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Katy is a Deputy Headteacher and the founder of a Leadership and Coaching Institute, which she now co-directs.

Katy is an Associate Fellow at the Oxford Character Project and a Research Associate at the Oxford University Wellbeing Research Centre. She is the co-founder of Global Social Leaders, a leadership programme which has participants in 105 countries, all passionate about creating and sustaining positive change in the world.

Title of Thesis

How could school leaders improve the flourishing and wellbeing of teaching staff?

Books
  • Granville-Chapman, K. and Bidston, E (2020) Leader: Know, love and inspire your people. Carmarthen: Crownhouse Publishing
Book Chapters
  •  Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ In White, M. & McCallum, F. (Ed.s) Wellbeing and Resilience Education: Covid-19 And Its Impact on Education Systems. Routledge
Publications
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘Purpose and Leadership in Education and Beyond’. The Education Exchange. Available from: https://theeducation.exchange/purpose-and-leadership-in-education-and-beyond/
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘The Three Secrets of COVID-era Leadership’. Times Education Supplement. Available from: https://www.tes.com/news/three-secrets-covid-era-school-leadership
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2016) ‘Assessing the Impact of a Teacher Leadership Programme in a Teaching Schools Alliance. Journal of Teacher Action Research
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2014) ‘The Afghan conflict: causes and consequences.’ Geography Review 28(1): 22-27
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2013) What are the psychological factors that affect students’ academic resilience and can teachers influence these? Unpublished thesis
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘Unlocking Leadership Potential’, The Magazine of the Boarding School’s Association, 33: 42-45
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2009) ‘Learning to Lead’, Leader, The Education Leader Magazine 41: 22-25
Presentations
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2019) ‘How could leaders improve the flourishing of their teams?’ ‘Stowe Ed Conference’, Forthcoming: 7 Jan 2019
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2018) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education: 21 Jun 2018
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2017) ‘How can school leaders improve teacher flourishing?’ ‘Doing Education Differently Conference’, University of Oxford, Department of Education, 11 Mar 17
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2016) ‘Developing school leaders who enable teachers to flourish’ The Telegraph Festival of Education 23 Jun 16
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Developing leadership in pupils and teachers’ High School Affiliated to Renmin University of China, Beijing. 20 Oct 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Resilience for leaders.’ Global Social Leaders World Summit. 16 Aug 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Emotional Intelligence for Leaders.’ Global Leaders in Education. 12 Aug 15
  • Coates, S.; Fraser, H.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J.; and Nasim, A. (2015) ‘Breaking through the glass ceiling – how can schools empower our girls to become leaders?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education. 19 Jun 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. ‘Developing Leadership in Schools’ (2015). G20 Schools Conference. International conference for head teachers. 11 Apr 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2018) ‘Introduction’, Wellington Leadership Institute: Festival of Leadership. Mar 2012-15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘How the Young Learn to Lead’, Raffles Institution (Singapore) -Purdue University (USA) Education Forum on Gifted & Talented Youth 2012. Singapore. 15 Mar 12
  • Draper, D.; Dyer, R.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Schools’. Presentation for a meeting about pupil leadership and character development at 10 Downing Street. 16 Nov 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Young People’. Presentation for a meeting about leadership and character at 10 Downing Street. 7 Mar 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K. & Seldon, A. (2012) ‘Introduction’, Leading Your School in the 21st Century. 7 Feb 12

Prior to starting his DPhil, Eddy worked as a primary school teacher in Bristol, where he also completed his MSc in Educational Research.

He is particularly interested in the culture of high stakes, standardised testing, and how this might perpetuate existing inequalities in schools. His research focuses specifically on the interaction between knowledge, policy and pedagogy in the context of Literacy education.

 

Amanda is completing a part-time DPhil, alongside working in Initial Teacher Education at Leeds Trinity University.

Her research is focused on understanding tensions, contradictions and conflicts that teachers in disadvantaged schools may experience when they engage in research activity.  Her research focus is influenced by her own experiences of working as a research-active teacher in disadvantaged schools, and recent work in teacher education to support experienced and beginning teachers in developing their own research activities.

One of the aims of Amanda’s research is to construct a framework to support teachers in pursuing research activity and critical scholarship work which articulates with wider social movements to address issues of poverty and disadvantage in schools.

Title of Thesis

Teachers’ perspectives on tensions between policy, practice and research in disadvantaged schools

Publications 

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2017) A ‘usable past’ of teacher education in England: history in JET’s anniversary issue. Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy, 43 (5), pp.616-627.

Nuttall, A. (2016) The ‘curriculum challenge’: Moving towards the ‘Storyline’ approach in a case study urban primary school.  Improving Schools, 19 (2), pp. 154-166.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Learning {Re}imagined: A review.  Primary First, 15, pp. 17-18.

Nuttall, A. and Doherty, J. (2014) Disaffected boys and the achievement gap: the ‘wallpaper effect’ and what is hidden by a focus on school results.  The Urban Review, 46 (5), pp.800-815.

Conference Papers and Presentations

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2018) “No child is pre-ordained to fail” Teachers questioning policy assumptions.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Newcastle, 11-13 September.

Nuttall, A. and Tobbell, C. (2017) Trainee teachers’ perspectives on practitioner enquiry.  Paper presented at the 8th TEAN Conference: Thinking Deeply about Education, Birmingham, 11-12 May.

Nuttall, A. (2017) Assessment at primary level: quality, comparability and improving secondary readiness.  A perspective from ITE.  Speech at the Westminster Education Forum Keynote Seminar: Next steps for reforming primary education: effective teaching practices, assessment and accountably, London, 18 January.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Deficit narratives and lived realities: whose poverty is it?  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the Australian Association for Research in Education, Melbourne, 27 November – 1 December.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Disenfranchised boys’ reflections on their urban schooling experience: “What a Waste!”.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Philpott, C., Beckett, L. and Wrigley, T. (2016) Collaborative practitioner inquiry: making a difference to urban schools.  Innovation session (school visits and symposium) presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Finn, B. and Beckett, L. (2015) Teachers’ constructions of poverty effects: Their research evidence.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Belfast, 15-17 September.

Nuttall, A. (2014) Teachers’ voice on disengaged boys: the role of one teacher-researcher in an English primary school. Paper presented at the Joint Australian Association for Research in Education and the New Zealand Association for Research in Education Conference, Brisbane, 30 November – 4 December.

Andrew Marotta is a D.Phil candidate in the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. He holds an A.A. in Social Sciences from Broward Community College, and a B.A. in Individualized Studies from the Gallatin School of Individualized Studies, New York University and an M.A. and Ed.M. in Counseling Psychology and School Counseling from Teachers College, Columbia University.

Andrew’s research interests include social and emotional learning, peer mentorship, existential therapy / philosophy, curriculum design for school counselors, and applied ethics in computer science. Andrew’s thesis examines how literature and philosophy can be used to nurture social and emotional learning through group counseling among high school students. He has also worked as a school counselor, teaching artist, and curriculum designer.

Presently, Andrew is designing joint humanities and applied ethics workshops for computer and data science college majors, using social and emotional learning concepts as the pedagogical foundation.

Abigail’s research explores the role of education in students’ personal development and how this can be supported by policy, curricula, initial teacher education and teacher professional development. In particular she focuses on history education, citizenship education and peace education as vehicles for dialogue. These opportunities for students to engage with social questions are vital for building cohesive societies. This flows from the recognition that traditional forums for developing public understanding, such as post-conflict truth commissions, need to be complemented by intergenerational and educational perspectives.

Abigail has taught History, Politics, Debating as well as Relationships and Sex Education to secondary school students in South Africa, England and the USA.

She holds postgraduate degrees in Post-Conflict and Transitional Justice (University of Cape Town), in Education, Globalisation and International Development (University of Cambridge) and in African Studies (University of Oxford). She is a Rhodes Scholar, Mandela-Magdalene Scholar and Mandela-Rhodes Scholar.

Title of thesis

GCSE History, Policy Reform and Student Development: How students and teachers navigate the thematic study “Empires, Migration and the People”

Conference papers

Teaching Migration, Belonging, and Empire in Secondary Schools: evaluation of a teacher professional development program, (2019) History Educators International Research Network Conference, Lead author: Dr Jason Todd, University of Vienna, Austria.

“The Problems and Prospects of Teaching South Africa’s Recent History: Teachers’ Perspectives”, (2018) Sustainability, peace and education – Exploring promise and practice: BAICE 20th Anniversary Symposium, University of Bristol, England.

“New Generations, Old Wounds: Learning History at Home and School in Northern Ireland”, (2018) European Social Science and History Conference,
Queens University Belfast, Northern Ireland.

“The Methodological Challenges of Investigating the Role of History Teaching in Peacebuilding”, (2017), Present Past: Time, Memory, and the Negotiation of Historical Justice Conference, Columbia University, United States of America.

“Teaching South Africa’s Truth and Reconciliation Commission”, (2017) European Conference on African Studies, Universität Basel, Switzerland.

Research Assistant Publications

Review of the evidence on feedback in primary and secondary schools, (forthcoming, 2021) for the Education Endowment Foundation, Lead author: Prof Velda Elliott.

Teaching Migration, Belonging, and Empire in Secondary Schools, (2019), for Runnymede Trust and the European Research Council, Lead authors: Kimberly McIntosh, Dr Jason Todd and Prof Nandini Das.

Gender and the Politics of Reconciliation (2016), for The Institute for Justice and Reconciliation, Lead author: Dr Helen Scanlon

SOLE AUTHOR PUBLICATIONS

‘Transitions, Truth-Telling and Teaching History’, Cambridge Open-Review Educational Research e-Journal, Vol. 4, 2017.

Alice Tawell is an ESRC funded DPhil Student, co-supervised across the Department of Education and Centre for Criminology at the University of Oxford.

Supervisors: Professor Harry Daniels and Dr Rachel Condry.

Alice’s research focuses broadly on the enactment of school exclusion policy in England.

Prior to starting her doctoral studies, Alice gained a BSc in Sociology from the University of Bath and an MSc in Education (Research Training) from the University of Oxford.

As part of her undergraduate degree, Alice undertook a placement year working with Professor Kathy Sylva in the Families, Effective Learning and Literacy Research Group at the Department of Education, University of Oxford. After completing her degree, Alice returned to the department and has worked as a Research Officer on a number of different research projects since 2014. Most recently Alice has worked as part of the Excluded Lives Research Team on two projects exploring exclusion from school from a multidisciplinary perspective. In 2017 she was awarded a Seed-corn Small Grant Award to co-lead a pilot project exploring student collaborative networks with Hau Ming Tse. Alice also co-convenes the Qualitative Methods Hub in the department.

Outside of the department, Alice has sat on the Advisory Board for the Children Missing Education research project (2016-2017) at the National Children’s Bureau (NCB) and has been a member of the NCB Partnership for Well Being and Mental Health in Schools since 2016. She also sits on the Transparency on Exclusions Steering Group.

In 2017 Alice received funding from the Grand Union Doctoral Training Partnership placement scheme to conduct a Knowledge Exchange Internship with the Early Years Analysis and Research Unit at the Department for Education, and in 2018 Alice was elected the Co-President of the Grand Union ESRC Scholar’s Association, representing ESRC students from the University of Oxford, Brunel and The Open University.

Ashmita graduated from Boston University in 2008 with a BSc. in Biomedical Engineering, after which she worked in Research & Development for 6 years.

It is here that she decided to make the leap from formulation chemistry to STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Math) Education after having worked on programs involving increasing diversity in STEM in schools.

She received her Master’s from Boston University in 2015 in Education Policy. Her research interests include: STEM education policy; Assessment; Further Education; Higher Education; Science education pedagogy

Originally from Indonesia, Tracey has spent the last decade studying in the UK and working about multicultural education in Indonesia.

She is fully funded by the Indonesia Endowment Fund for Education (LPDP). Her doctoral research explores the ways Indonesian schools teach and accommodate the national vision of multicultural Indonesia, “Bhinneka Tunggal Ika” (Unity-in-Diversity). By using a two-tier case study research approach (case studies of six schools and of two provinces), it presents nuanced and critical account of the ways head teachers, teachers, students and parents from six state and private schools in Jakarta and Bali with different mixes of pupil ethnicity and religiosity understand and accommodate the vision of diversity into educational practices. Despite the highly contextual focus, the research offers a critical view into the complex role of schools in today’s era of globalisation in providing quality education for all and at the same time creating citizens who are inclusive and respectful towards others.

Tracey completed her MSc in Comparative and International Education at the University of Oxford in 2011 and her honours BA in Mathematics and Education Studies at the University of Cambridge in 2010. Upon completing her study in the UK, she returned to Indonesia to work in an educational foundation Sultan Iskandar Muda in Medan, Indonesia as a member of the Board of Directors in the Foundation – a position which she is still holding until today. She is responsible for overlooking the development and implementation of multicultural education and teacher development programme.

During her tenure, she has worked alongside the head teachers and teachers across all educational levels (from pre-school until high school) and produced books on the praxis of multicultural education in the school setting.

Title of Thesis

Accommodating a vision of diversity in different school contexts: “Unity-in-Diversity” in Indonesia

Publications
Journal Article
  • Harjatanaya, T.Y. & Hoon, C.Y. (2018) Politics of multicultural education in post-Suharto Indonesia: a study of the Chinese minority. Compare: A Journal of Comparative and International Education
Edited Book
  • Harjatanaya, T.Y. (2015) (2nd Edition) Merawat Keberagaman: Praksis Pendidikan Multikultural Perguruan Sultan Iskandar Muda (Fostering Diversity: Praxis of Multicultural Education in Sultan Iskandar Muda). Medan: YPSIM.
Book Chapter
  • Harjatanaya, T.Y. (2018). Akses dan Kesamaan dalam Pendidikan Vokasi (Access and Equality in Vocational Education). In Ferary, D. (2018) Sistem Pendidikan Vokasi di Inggris (Vocational Education System in England) (ed.). London: Kantor Atase Pendidikan dan Kebudayaan, Kedutaan Besar Indonesia (Indonesian Embassy) London, p. 121-138.

Katy is a Deputy Headteacher and the founder of a Leadership and Coaching Institute, which she now co-directs.

Katy is an Associate Fellow at the Oxford Character Project and a Research Associate at the Oxford University Wellbeing Research Centre. She is the co-founder of Global Social Leaders, a leadership programme which has participants in 105 countries, all passionate about creating and sustaining positive change in the world.

Title of Thesis

How could school leaders improve the flourishing and wellbeing of teaching staff?

Books
  • Granville-Chapman, K. and Bidston, E (2020) Leader: Know, love and inspire your people. Carmarthen: Crownhouse Publishing
Book Chapters
  •  Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ In White, M. & McCallum, F. (Ed.s) Wellbeing and Resilience Education: Covid-19 And Its Impact on Education Systems. Routledge
Publications
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘Purpose and Leadership in Education and Beyond’. The Education Exchange. Available from: https://theeducation.exchange/purpose-and-leadership-in-education-and-beyond/
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘The Three Secrets of COVID-era Leadership’. Times Education Supplement. Available from: https://www.tes.com/news/three-secrets-covid-era-school-leadership
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2016) ‘Assessing the Impact of a Teacher Leadership Programme in a Teaching Schools Alliance. Journal of Teacher Action Research
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2014) ‘The Afghan conflict: causes and consequences.’ Geography Review 28(1): 22-27
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2013) What are the psychological factors that affect students’ academic resilience and can teachers influence these? Unpublished thesis
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘Unlocking Leadership Potential’, The Magazine of the Boarding School’s Association, 33: 42-45
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2009) ‘Learning to Lead’, Leader, The Education Leader Magazine 41: 22-25
Presentations
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2019) ‘How could leaders improve the flourishing of their teams?’ ‘Stowe Ed Conference’, Forthcoming: 7 Jan 2019
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2018) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education: 21 Jun 2018
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2017) ‘How can school leaders improve teacher flourishing?’ ‘Doing Education Differently Conference’, University of Oxford, Department of Education, 11 Mar 17
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2016) ‘Developing school leaders who enable teachers to flourish’ The Telegraph Festival of Education 23 Jun 16
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Developing leadership in pupils and teachers’ High School Affiliated to Renmin University of China, Beijing. 20 Oct 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Resilience for leaders.’ Global Social Leaders World Summit. 16 Aug 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Emotional Intelligence for Leaders.’ Global Leaders in Education. 12 Aug 15
  • Coates, S.; Fraser, H.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J.; and Nasim, A. (2015) ‘Breaking through the glass ceiling – how can schools empower our girls to become leaders?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education. 19 Jun 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. ‘Developing Leadership in Schools’ (2015). G20 Schools Conference. International conference for head teachers. 11 Apr 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2018) ‘Introduction’, Wellington Leadership Institute: Festival of Leadership. Mar 2012-15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘How the Young Learn to Lead’, Raffles Institution (Singapore) -Purdue University (USA) Education Forum on Gifted & Talented Youth 2012. Singapore. 15 Mar 12
  • Draper, D.; Dyer, R.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Schools’. Presentation for a meeting about pupil leadership and character development at 10 Downing Street. 16 Nov 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Young People’. Presentation for a meeting about leadership and character at 10 Downing Street. 7 Mar 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K. & Seldon, A. (2012) ‘Introduction’, Leading Your School in the 21st Century. 7 Feb 12

Prior to starting his DPhil, Eddy worked as a primary school teacher in Bristol, where he also completed his MSc in Educational Research.

He is particularly interested in the culture of high stakes, standardised testing, and how this might perpetuate existing inequalities in schools. His research focuses specifically on the interaction between knowledge, policy and pedagogy in the context of Literacy education.

 

Amanda is completing a part-time DPhil, alongside working in Initial Teacher Education at Leeds Trinity University.

Her research is focused on understanding tensions, contradictions and conflicts that teachers in disadvantaged schools may experience when they engage in research activity.  Her research focus is influenced by her own experiences of working as a research-active teacher in disadvantaged schools, and recent work in teacher education to support experienced and beginning teachers in developing their own research activities.

One of the aims of Amanda’s research is to construct a framework to support teachers in pursuing research activity and critical scholarship work which articulates with wider social movements to address issues of poverty and disadvantage in schools.

Title of Thesis

Teachers’ perspectives on tensions between policy, practice and research in disadvantaged schools

Publications 

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2017) A ‘usable past’ of teacher education in England: history in JET’s anniversary issue. Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy, 43 (5), pp.616-627.

Nuttall, A. (2016) The ‘curriculum challenge’: Moving towards the ‘Storyline’ approach in a case study urban primary school.  Improving Schools, 19 (2), pp. 154-166.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Learning {Re}imagined: A review.  Primary First, 15, pp. 17-18.

Nuttall, A. and Doherty, J. (2014) Disaffected boys and the achievement gap: the ‘wallpaper effect’ and what is hidden by a focus on school results.  The Urban Review, 46 (5), pp.800-815.

Conference Papers and Presentations

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2018) “No child is pre-ordained to fail” Teachers questioning policy assumptions.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Newcastle, 11-13 September.

Nuttall, A. and Tobbell, C. (2017) Trainee teachers’ perspectives on practitioner enquiry.  Paper presented at the 8th TEAN Conference: Thinking Deeply about Education, Birmingham, 11-12 May.

Nuttall, A. (2017) Assessment at primary level: quality, comparability and improving secondary readiness.  A perspective from ITE.  Speech at the Westminster Education Forum Keynote Seminar: Next steps for reforming primary education: effective teaching practices, assessment and accountably, London, 18 January.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Deficit narratives and lived realities: whose poverty is it?  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the Australian Association for Research in Education, Melbourne, 27 November – 1 December.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Disenfranchised boys’ reflections on their urban schooling experience: “What a Waste!”.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Philpott, C., Beckett, L. and Wrigley, T. (2016) Collaborative practitioner inquiry: making a difference to urban schools.  Innovation session (school visits and symposium) presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Finn, B. and Beckett, L. (2015) Teachers’ constructions of poverty effects: Their research evidence.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Belfast, 15-17 September.

Nuttall, A. (2014) Teachers’ voice on disengaged boys: the role of one teacher-researcher in an English primary school. Paper presented at the Joint Australian Association for Research in Education and the New Zealand Association for Research in Education Conference, Brisbane, 30 November – 4 December.

Andrew Marotta is a D.Phil candidate in the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. He holds an A.A. in Social Sciences from Broward Community College, and a B.A. in Individualized Studies from the Gallatin School of Individualized Studies, New York University and an M.A. and Ed.M. in Counseling Psychology and School Counseling from Teachers College, Columbia University.

Andrew’s research interests include social and emotional learning, peer mentorship, existential therapy / philosophy, curriculum design for school counselors, and applied ethics in computer science. Andrew’s thesis examines how literature and philosophy can be used to nurture social and emotional learning through group counseling among high school students. He has also worked as a school counselor, teaching artist, and curriculum designer.

Presently, Andrew is designing joint humanities and applied ethics workshops for computer and data science college majors, using social and emotional learning concepts as the pedagogical foundation.

Abigail’s research explores the role of education in students’ personal development and how this can be supported by policy, curricula, initial teacher education and teacher professional development. In particular she focuses on history education, citizenship education and peace education as vehicles for dialogue. These opportunities for students to engage with social questions are vital for building cohesive societies. This flows from the recognition that traditional forums for developing public understanding, such as post-conflict truth commissions, need to be complemented by intergenerational and educational perspectives.

Abigail has taught History, Politics, Debating as well as Relationships and Sex Education to secondary school students in South Africa, England and the USA.

She holds postgraduate degrees in Post-Conflict and Transitional Justice (University of Cape Town), in Education, Globalisation and International Development (University of Cambridge) and in African Studies (University of Oxford). She is a Rhodes Scholar, Mandela-Magdalene Scholar and Mandela-Rhodes Scholar.

Title of thesis

GCSE History, Policy Reform and Student Development: How students and teachers navigate the thematic study “Empires, Migration and the People”

Conference papers

Teaching Migration, Belonging, and Empire in Secondary Schools: evaluation of a teacher professional development program, (2019) History Educators International Research Network Conference, Lead author: Dr Jason Todd, University of Vienna, Austria.

“The Problems and Prospects of Teaching South Africa’s Recent History: Teachers’ Perspectives”, (2018) Sustainability, peace and education – Exploring promise and practice: BAICE 20th Anniversary Symposium, University of Bristol, England.

“New Generations, Old Wounds: Learning History at Home and School in Northern Ireland”, (2018) European Social Science and History Conference,
Queens University Belfast, Northern Ireland.

“The Methodological Challenges of Investigating the Role of History Teaching in Peacebuilding”, (2017), Present Past: Time, Memory, and the Negotiation of Historical Justice Conference, Columbia University, United States of America.

“Teaching South Africa’s Truth and Reconciliation Commission”, (2017) European Conference on African Studies, Universität Basel, Switzerland.

Research Assistant Publications

Review of the evidence on feedback in primary and secondary schools, (forthcoming, 2021) for the Education Endowment Foundation, Lead author: Prof Velda Elliott.

Teaching Migration, Belonging, and Empire in Secondary Schools, (2019), for Runnymede Trust and the European Research Council, Lead authors: Kimberly McIntosh, Dr Jason Todd and Prof Nandini Das.

Gender and the Politics of Reconciliation (2016), for The Institute for Justice and Reconciliation, Lead author: Dr Helen Scanlon

SOLE AUTHOR PUBLICATIONS

‘Transitions, Truth-Telling and Teaching History’, Cambridge Open-Review Educational Research e-Journal, Vol. 4, 2017.

Alice Tawell is an ESRC funded DPhil Student, co-supervised across the Department of Education and Centre for Criminology at the University of Oxford.

Supervisors: Professor Harry Daniels and Dr Rachel Condry.

Alice’s research focuses broadly on the enactment of school exclusion policy in England.

Prior to starting her doctoral studies, Alice gained a BSc in Sociology from the University of Bath and an MSc in Education (Research Training) from the University of Oxford.

As part of her undergraduate degree, Alice undertook a placement year working with Professor Kathy Sylva in the Families, Effective Learning and Literacy Research Group at the Department of Education, University of Oxford. After completing her degree, Alice returned to the department and has worked as a Research Officer on a number of different research projects since 2014. Most recently Alice has worked as part of the Excluded Lives Research Team on two projects exploring exclusion from school from a multidisciplinary perspective. In 2017 she was awarded a Seed-corn Small Grant Award to co-lead a pilot project exploring student collaborative networks with Hau Ming Tse. Alice also co-convenes the Qualitative Methods Hub in the department.

Outside of the department, Alice has sat on the Advisory Board for the Children Missing Education research project (2016-2017) at the National Children’s Bureau (NCB) and has been a member of the NCB Partnership for Well Being and Mental Health in Schools since 2016. She also sits on the Transparency on Exclusions Steering Group.

In 2017 Alice received funding from the Grand Union Doctoral Training Partnership placement scheme to conduct a Knowledge Exchange Internship with the Early Years Analysis and Research Unit at the Department for Education, and in 2018 Alice was elected the Co-President of the Grand Union ESRC Scholar’s Association, representing ESRC students from the University of Oxford, Brunel and The Open University.

Ashmita graduated from Boston University in 2008 with a BSc. in Biomedical Engineering, after which she worked in Research & Development for 6 years.

It is here that she decided to make the leap from formulation chemistry to STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Math) Education after having worked on programs involving increasing diversity in STEM in schools.

She received her Master’s from Boston University in 2015 in Education Policy. Her research interests include: STEM education policy; Assessment; Further Education; Higher Education; Science education pedagogy

Originally from Indonesia, Tracey has spent the last decade studying in the UK and working about multicultural education in Indonesia.

She is fully funded by the Indonesia Endowment Fund for Education (LPDP). Her doctoral research explores the ways Indonesian schools teach and accommodate the national vision of multicultural Indonesia, “Bhinneka Tunggal Ika” (Unity-in-Diversity). By using a two-tier case study research approach (case studies of six schools and of two provinces), it presents nuanced and critical account of the ways head teachers, teachers, students and parents from six state and private schools in Jakarta and Bali with different mixes of pupil ethnicity and religiosity understand and accommodate the vision of diversity into educational practices. Despite the highly contextual focus, the research offers a critical view into the complex role of schools in today’s era of globalisation in providing quality education for all and at the same time creating citizens who are inclusive and respectful towards others.

Tracey completed her MSc in Comparative and International Education at the University of Oxford in 2011 and her honours BA in Mathematics and Education Studies at the University of Cambridge in 2010. Upon completing her study in the UK, she returned to Indonesia to work in an educational foundation Sultan Iskandar Muda in Medan, Indonesia as a member of the Board of Directors in the Foundation – a position which she is still holding until today. She is responsible for overlooking the development and implementation of multicultural education and teacher development programme.

During her tenure, she has worked alongside the head teachers and teachers across all educational levels (from pre-school until high school) and produced books on the praxis of multicultural education in the school setting.

Title of Thesis

Accommodating a vision of diversity in different school contexts: “Unity-in-Diversity” in Indonesia

Publications
Journal Article
  • Harjatanaya, T.Y. & Hoon, C.Y. (2018) Politics of multicultural education in post-Suharto Indonesia: a study of the Chinese minority. Compare: A Journal of Comparative and International Education
Edited Book
  • Harjatanaya, T.Y. (2015) (2nd Edition) Merawat Keberagaman: Praksis Pendidikan Multikultural Perguruan Sultan Iskandar Muda (Fostering Diversity: Praxis of Multicultural Education in Sultan Iskandar Muda). Medan: YPSIM.
Book Chapter
  • Harjatanaya, T.Y. (2018). Akses dan Kesamaan dalam Pendidikan Vokasi (Access and Equality in Vocational Education). In Ferary, D. (2018) Sistem Pendidikan Vokasi di Inggris (Vocational Education System in England) (ed.). London: Kantor Atase Pendidikan dan Kebudayaan, Kedutaan Besar Indonesia (Indonesian Embassy) London, p. 121-138.

Katy is a Deputy Headteacher and the founder of a Leadership and Coaching Institute, which she now co-directs.

Katy is an Associate Fellow at the Oxford Character Project and a Research Associate at the Oxford University Wellbeing Research Centre. She is the co-founder of Global Social Leaders, a leadership programme which has participants in 105 countries, all passionate about creating and sustaining positive change in the world.

Title of Thesis

How could school leaders improve the flourishing and wellbeing of teaching staff?

Books
  • Granville-Chapman, K. and Bidston, E (2020) Leader: Know, love and inspire your people. Carmarthen: Crownhouse Publishing
Book Chapters
  •  Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ In White, M. & McCallum, F. (Ed.s) Wellbeing and Resilience Education: Covid-19 And Its Impact on Education Systems. Routledge
Publications
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘Purpose and Leadership in Education and Beyond’. The Education Exchange. Available from: https://theeducation.exchange/purpose-and-leadership-in-education-and-beyond/
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘The Three Secrets of COVID-era Leadership’. Times Education Supplement. Available from: https://www.tes.com/news/three-secrets-covid-era-school-leadership
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2016) ‘Assessing the Impact of a Teacher Leadership Programme in a Teaching Schools Alliance. Journal of Teacher Action Research
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2014) ‘The Afghan conflict: causes and consequences.’ Geography Review 28(1): 22-27
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2013) What are the psychological factors that affect students’ academic resilience and can teachers influence these? Unpublished thesis
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘Unlocking Leadership Potential’, The Magazine of the Boarding School’s Association, 33: 42-45
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2009) ‘Learning to Lead’, Leader, The Education Leader Magazine 41: 22-25
Presentations
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2019) ‘How could leaders improve the flourishing of their teams?’ ‘Stowe Ed Conference’, Forthcoming: 7 Jan 2019
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2018) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education: 21 Jun 2018
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2017) ‘How can school leaders improve teacher flourishing?’ ‘Doing Education Differently Conference’, University of Oxford, Department of Education, 11 Mar 17
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2016) ‘Developing school leaders who enable teachers to flourish’ The Telegraph Festival of Education 23 Jun 16
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Developing leadership in pupils and teachers’ High School Affiliated to Renmin University of China, Beijing. 20 Oct 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Resilience for leaders.’ Global Social Leaders World Summit. 16 Aug 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Emotional Intelligence for Leaders.’ Global Leaders in Education. 12 Aug 15
  • Coates, S.; Fraser, H.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J.; and Nasim, A. (2015) ‘Breaking through the glass ceiling – how can schools empower our girls to become leaders?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education. 19 Jun 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. ‘Developing Leadership in Schools’ (2015). G20 Schools Conference. International conference for head teachers. 11 Apr 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2018) ‘Introduction’, Wellington Leadership Institute: Festival of Leadership. Mar 2012-15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘How the Young Learn to Lead’, Raffles Institution (Singapore) -Purdue University (USA) Education Forum on Gifted & Talented Youth 2012. Singapore. 15 Mar 12
  • Draper, D.; Dyer, R.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Schools’. Presentation for a meeting about pupil leadership and character development at 10 Downing Street. 16 Nov 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Young People’. Presentation for a meeting about leadership and character at 10 Downing Street. 7 Mar 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K. & Seldon, A. (2012) ‘Introduction’, Leading Your School in the 21st Century. 7 Feb 12

Prior to starting his DPhil, Eddy worked as a primary school teacher in Bristol, where he also completed his MSc in Educational Research.

He is particularly interested in the culture of high stakes, standardised testing, and how this might perpetuate existing inequalities in schools. His research focuses specifically on the interaction between knowledge, policy and pedagogy in the context of Literacy education.

 

Amanda is completing a part-time DPhil, alongside working in Initial Teacher Education at Leeds Trinity University.

Her research is focused on understanding tensions, contradictions and conflicts that teachers in disadvantaged schools may experience when they engage in research activity.  Her research focus is influenced by her own experiences of working as a research-active teacher in disadvantaged schools, and recent work in teacher education to support experienced and beginning teachers in developing their own research activities.

One of the aims of Amanda’s research is to construct a framework to support teachers in pursuing research activity and critical scholarship work which articulates with wider social movements to address issues of poverty and disadvantage in schools.

Title of Thesis

Teachers’ perspectives on tensions between policy, practice and research in disadvantaged schools

Publications 

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2017) A ‘usable past’ of teacher education in England: history in JET’s anniversary issue. Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy, 43 (5), pp.616-627.

Nuttall, A. (2016) The ‘curriculum challenge’: Moving towards the ‘Storyline’ approach in a case study urban primary school.  Improving Schools, 19 (2), pp. 154-166.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Learning {Re}imagined: A review.  Primary First, 15, pp. 17-18.

Nuttall, A. and Doherty, J. (2014) Disaffected boys and the achievement gap: the ‘wallpaper effect’ and what is hidden by a focus on school results.  The Urban Review, 46 (5), pp.800-815.

Conference Papers and Presentations

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2018) “No child is pre-ordained to fail” Teachers questioning policy assumptions.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Newcastle, 11-13 September.

Nuttall, A. and Tobbell, C. (2017) Trainee teachers’ perspectives on practitioner enquiry.  Paper presented at the 8th TEAN Conference: Thinking Deeply about Education, Birmingham, 11-12 May.

Nuttall, A. (2017) Assessment at primary level: quality, comparability and improving secondary readiness.  A perspective from ITE.  Speech at the Westminster Education Forum Keynote Seminar: Next steps for reforming primary education: effective teaching practices, assessment and accountably, London, 18 January.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Deficit narratives and lived realities: whose poverty is it?  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the Australian Association for Research in Education, Melbourne, 27 November – 1 December.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Disenfranchised boys’ reflections on their urban schooling experience: “What a Waste!”.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Philpott, C., Beckett, L. and Wrigley, T. (2016) Collaborative practitioner inquiry: making a difference to urban schools.  Innovation session (school visits and symposium) presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Finn, B. and Beckett, L. (2015) Teachers’ constructions of poverty effects: Their research evidence.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Belfast, 15-17 September.

Nuttall, A. (2014) Teachers’ voice on disengaged boys: the role of one teacher-researcher in an English primary school. Paper presented at the Joint Australian Association for Research in Education and the New Zealand Association for Research in Education Conference, Brisbane, 30 November – 4 December.

Andrew Marotta is a D.Phil candidate in the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. He holds an A.A. in Social Sciences from Broward Community College, and a B.A. in Individualized Studies from the Gallatin School of Individualized Studies, New York University and an M.A. and Ed.M. in Counseling Psychology and School Counseling from Teachers College, Columbia University.

Andrew’s research interests include social and emotional learning, peer mentorship, existential therapy / philosophy, curriculum design for school counselors, and applied ethics in computer science. Andrew’s thesis examines how literature and philosophy can be used to nurture social and emotional learning through group counseling among high school students. He has also worked as a school counselor, teaching artist, and curriculum designer.

Presently, Andrew is designing joint humanities and applied ethics workshops for computer and data science college majors, using social and emotional learning concepts as the pedagogical foundation.

Abigail’s research explores the role of education in students’ personal development and how this can be supported by policy, curricula, initial teacher education and teacher professional development. In particular she focuses on history education, citizenship education and peace education as vehicles for dialogue. These opportunities for students to engage with social questions are vital for building cohesive societies. This flows from the recognition that traditional forums for developing public understanding, such as post-conflict truth commissions, need to be complemented by intergenerational and educational perspectives.

Abigail has taught History, Politics, Debating as well as Relationships and Sex Education to secondary school students in South Africa, England and the USA.

She holds postgraduate degrees in Post-Conflict and Transitional Justice (University of Cape Town), in Education, Globalisation and International Development (University of Cambridge) and in African Studies (University of Oxford). She is a Rhodes Scholar, Mandela-Magdalene Scholar and Mandela-Rhodes Scholar.

Title of thesis

GCSE History, Policy Reform and Student Development: How students and teachers navigate the thematic study “Empires, Migration and the People”

Conference papers

Teaching Migration, Belonging, and Empire in Secondary Schools: evaluation of a teacher professional development program, (2019) History Educators International Research Network Conference, Lead author: Dr Jason Todd, University of Vienna, Austria.

“The Problems and Prospects of Teaching South Africa’s Recent History: Teachers’ Perspectives”, (2018) Sustainability, peace and education – Exploring promise and practice: BAICE 20th Anniversary Symposium, University of Bristol, England.

“New Generations, Old Wounds: Learning History at Home and School in Northern Ireland”, (2018) European Social Science and History Conference,
Queens University Belfast, Northern Ireland.

“The Methodological Challenges of Investigating the Role of History Teaching in Peacebuilding”, (2017), Present Past: Time, Memory, and the Negotiation of Historical Justice Conference, Columbia University, United States of America.

“Teaching South Africa’s Truth and Reconciliation Commission”, (2017) European Conference on African Studies, Universität Basel, Switzerland.

Research Assistant Publications

Review of the evidence on feedback in primary and secondary schools, (forthcoming, 2021) for the Education Endowment Foundation, Lead author: Prof Velda Elliott.

Teaching Migration, Belonging, and Empire in Secondary Schools, (2019), for Runnymede Trust and the European Research Council, Lead authors: Kimberly McIntosh, Dr Jason Todd and Prof Nandini Das.

Gender and the Politics of Reconciliation (2016), for The Institute for Justice and Reconciliation, Lead author: Dr Helen Scanlon

SOLE AUTHOR PUBLICATIONS

‘Transitions, Truth-Telling and Teaching History’, Cambridge Open-Review Educational Research e-Journal, Vol. 4, 2017.

Alice Tawell is an ESRC funded DPhil Student, co-supervised across the Department of Education and Centre for Criminology at the University of Oxford.

Supervisors: Professor Harry Daniels and Dr Rachel Condry.

Alice’s research focuses broadly on the enactment of school exclusion policy in England.

Prior to starting her doctoral studies, Alice gained a BSc in Sociology from the University of Bath and an MSc in Education (Research Training) from the University of Oxford.

As part of her undergraduate degree, Alice undertook a placement year working with Professor Kathy Sylva in the Families, Effective Learning and Literacy Research Group at the Department of Education, University of Oxford. After completing her degree, Alice returned to the department and has worked as a Research Officer on a number of different research projects since 2014. Most recently Alice has worked as part of the Excluded Lives Research Team on two projects exploring exclusion from school from a multidisciplinary perspective. In 2017 she was awarded a Seed-corn Small Grant Award to co-lead a pilot project exploring student collaborative networks with Hau Ming Tse. Alice also co-convenes the Qualitative Methods Hub in the department.

Outside of the department, Alice has sat on the Advisory Board for the Children Missing Education research project (2016-2017) at the National Children’s Bureau (NCB) and has been a member of the NCB Partnership for Well Being and Mental Health in Schools since 2016. She also sits on the Transparency on Exclusions Steering Group.

In 2017 Alice received funding from the Grand Union Doctoral Training Partnership placement scheme to conduct a Knowledge Exchange Internship with the Early Years Analysis and Research Unit at the Department for Education, and in 2018 Alice was elected the Co-President of the Grand Union ESRC Scholar’s Association, representing ESRC students from the University of Oxford, Brunel and The Open University.

Ashmita graduated from Boston University in 2008 with a BSc. in Biomedical Engineering, after which she worked in Research & Development for 6 years.

It is here that she decided to make the leap from formulation chemistry to STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Math) Education after having worked on programs involving increasing diversity in STEM in schools.

She received her Master’s from Boston University in 2015 in Education Policy. Her research interests include: STEM education policy; Assessment; Further Education; Higher Education; Science education pedagogy

Originally from Indonesia, Tracey has spent the last decade studying in the UK and working about multicultural education in Indonesia.

She is fully funded by the Indonesia Endowment Fund for Education (LPDP). Her doctoral research explores the ways Indonesian schools teach and accommodate the national vision of multicultural Indonesia, “Bhinneka Tunggal Ika” (Unity-in-Diversity). By using a two-tier case study research approach (case studies of six schools and of two provinces), it presents nuanced and critical account of the ways head teachers, teachers, students and parents from six state and private schools in Jakarta and Bali with different mixes of pupil ethnicity and religiosity understand and accommodate the vision of diversity into educational practices. Despite the highly contextual focus, the research offers a critical view into the complex role of schools in today’s era of globalisation in providing quality education for all and at the same time creating citizens who are inclusive and respectful towards others.

Tracey completed her MSc in Comparative and International Education at the University of Oxford in 2011 and her honours BA in Mathematics and Education Studies at the University of Cambridge in 2010. Upon completing her study in the UK, she returned to Indonesia to work in an educational foundation Sultan Iskandar Muda in Medan, Indonesia as a member of the Board of Directors in the Foundation – a position which she is still holding until today. She is responsible for overlooking the development and implementation of multicultural education and teacher development programme.

During her tenure, she has worked alongside the head teachers and teachers across all educational levels (from pre-school until high school) and produced books on the praxis of multicultural education in the school setting.

Title of Thesis

Accommodating a vision of diversity in different school contexts: “Unity-in-Diversity” in Indonesia

Publications
Journal Article
  • Harjatanaya, T.Y. & Hoon, C.Y. (2018) Politics of multicultural education in post-Suharto Indonesia: a study of the Chinese minority. Compare: A Journal of Comparative and International Education
Edited Book
  • Harjatanaya, T.Y. (2015) (2nd Edition) Merawat Keberagaman: Praksis Pendidikan Multikultural Perguruan Sultan Iskandar Muda (Fostering Diversity: Praxis of Multicultural Education in Sultan Iskandar Muda). Medan: YPSIM.
Book Chapter
  • Harjatanaya, T.Y. (2018). Akses dan Kesamaan dalam Pendidikan Vokasi (Access and Equality in Vocational Education). In Ferary, D. (2018) Sistem Pendidikan Vokasi di Inggris (Vocational Education System in England) (ed.). London: Kantor Atase Pendidikan dan Kebudayaan, Kedutaan Besar Indonesia (Indonesian Embassy) London, p. 121-138.

Katy is a Deputy Headteacher and the founder of a Leadership and Coaching Institute, which she now co-directs.

Katy is an Associate Fellow at the Oxford Character Project and a Research Associate at the Oxford University Wellbeing Research Centre. She is the co-founder of Global Social Leaders, a leadership programme which has participants in 105 countries, all passionate about creating and sustaining positive change in the world.

Title of Thesis

How could school leaders improve the flourishing and wellbeing of teaching staff?

Books
  • Granville-Chapman, K. and Bidston, E (2020) Leader: Know, love and inspire your people. Carmarthen: Crownhouse Publishing
Book Chapters
  •  Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ In White, M. & McCallum, F. (Ed.s) Wellbeing and Resilience Education: Covid-19 And Its Impact on Education Systems. Routledge
Publications
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘Purpose and Leadership in Education and Beyond’. The Education Exchange. Available from: https://theeducation.exchange/purpose-and-leadership-in-education-and-beyond/
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘The Three Secrets of COVID-era Leadership’. Times Education Supplement. Available from: https://www.tes.com/news/three-secrets-covid-era-school-leadership
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2016) ‘Assessing the Impact of a Teacher Leadership Programme in a Teaching Schools Alliance. Journal of Teacher Action Research
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2014) ‘The Afghan conflict: causes and consequences.’ Geography Review 28(1): 22-27
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2013) What are the psychological factors that affect students’ academic resilience and can teachers influence these? Unpublished thesis
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘Unlocking Leadership Potential’, The Magazine of the Boarding School’s Association, 33: 42-45
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2009) ‘Learning to Lead’, Leader, The Education Leader Magazine 41: 22-25
Presentations
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2019) ‘How could leaders improve the flourishing of their teams?’ ‘Stowe Ed Conference’, Forthcoming: 7 Jan 2019
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2018) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education: 21 Jun 2018
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2017) ‘How can school leaders improve teacher flourishing?’ ‘Doing Education Differently Conference’, University of Oxford, Department of Education, 11 Mar 17
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2016) ‘Developing school leaders who enable teachers to flourish’ The Telegraph Festival of Education 23 Jun 16
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Developing leadership in pupils and teachers’ High School Affiliated to Renmin University of China, Beijing. 20 Oct 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Resilience for leaders.’ Global Social Leaders World Summit. 16 Aug 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Emotional Intelligence for Leaders.’ Global Leaders in Education. 12 Aug 15
  • Coates, S.; Fraser, H.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J.; and Nasim, A. (2015) ‘Breaking through the glass ceiling – how can schools empower our girls to become leaders?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education. 19 Jun 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. ‘Developing Leadership in Schools’ (2015). G20 Schools Conference. International conference for head teachers. 11 Apr 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2018) ‘Introduction’, Wellington Leadership Institute: Festival of Leadership. Mar 2012-15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘How the Young Learn to Lead’, Raffles Institution (Singapore) -Purdue University (USA) Education Forum on Gifted & Talented Youth 2012. Singapore. 15 Mar 12
  • Draper, D.; Dyer, R.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Schools’. Presentation for a meeting about pupil leadership and character development at 10 Downing Street. 16 Nov 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Young People’. Presentation for a meeting about leadership and character at 10 Downing Street. 7 Mar 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K. & Seldon, A. (2012) ‘Introduction’, Leading Your School in the 21st Century. 7 Feb 12

Prior to starting his DPhil, Eddy worked as a primary school teacher in Bristol, where he also completed his MSc in Educational Research.

He is particularly interested in the culture of high stakes, standardised testing, and how this might perpetuate existing inequalities in schools. His research focuses specifically on the interaction between knowledge, policy and pedagogy in the context of Literacy education.

 

Amanda is completing a part-time DPhil, alongside working in Initial Teacher Education at Leeds Trinity University.

Her research is focused on understanding tensions, contradictions and conflicts that teachers in disadvantaged schools may experience when they engage in research activity.  Her research focus is influenced by her own experiences of working as a research-active teacher in disadvantaged schools, and recent work in teacher education to support experienced and beginning teachers in developing their own research activities.

One of the aims of Amanda’s research is to construct a framework to support teachers in pursuing research activity and critical scholarship work which articulates with wider social movements to address issues of poverty and disadvantage in schools.

Title of Thesis

Teachers’ perspectives on tensions between policy, practice and research in disadvantaged schools

Publications 

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2017) A ‘usable past’ of teacher education in England: history in JET’s anniversary issue. Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy, 43 (5), pp.616-627.

Nuttall, A. (2016) The ‘curriculum challenge’: Moving towards the ‘Storyline’ approach in a case study urban primary school.  Improving Schools, 19 (2), pp. 154-166.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Learning {Re}imagined: A review.  Primary First, 15, pp. 17-18.

Nuttall, A. and Doherty, J. (2014) Disaffected boys and the achievement gap: the ‘wallpaper effect’ and what is hidden by a focus on school results.  The Urban Review, 46 (5), pp.800-815.

Conference Papers and Presentations

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2018) “No child is pre-ordained to fail” Teachers questioning policy assumptions.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Newcastle, 11-13 September.

Nuttall, A. and Tobbell, C. (2017) Trainee teachers’ perspectives on practitioner enquiry.  Paper presented at the 8th TEAN Conference: Thinking Deeply about Education, Birmingham, 11-12 May.

Nuttall, A. (2017) Assessment at primary level: quality, comparability and improving secondary readiness.  A perspective from ITE.  Speech at the Westminster Education Forum Keynote Seminar: Next steps for reforming primary education: effective teaching practices, assessment and accountably, London, 18 January.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Deficit narratives and lived realities: whose poverty is it?  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the Australian Association for Research in Education, Melbourne, 27 November – 1 December.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Disenfranchised boys’ reflections on their urban schooling experience: “What a Waste!”.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Philpott, C., Beckett, L. and Wrigley, T. (2016) Collaborative practitioner inquiry: making a difference to urban schools.  Innovation session (school visits and symposium) presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Finn, B. and Beckett, L. (2015) Teachers’ constructions of poverty effects: Their research evidence.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Belfast, 15-17 September.

Nuttall, A. (2014) Teachers’ voice on disengaged boys: the role of one teacher-researcher in an English primary school. Paper presented at the Joint Australian Association for Research in Education and the New Zealand Association for Research in Education Conference, Brisbane, 30 November – 4 December.

Andrew Marotta is a D.Phil candidate in the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. He holds an A.A. in Social Sciences from Broward Community College, and a B.A. in Individualized Studies from the Gallatin School of Individualized Studies, New York University and an M.A. and Ed.M. in Counseling Psychology and School Counseling from Teachers College, Columbia University.

Andrew’s research interests include social and emotional learning, peer mentorship, existential therapy / philosophy, curriculum design for school counselors, and applied ethics in computer science. Andrew’s thesis examines how literature and philosophy can be used to nurture social and emotional learning through group counseling among high school students. He has also worked as a school counselor, teaching artist, and curriculum designer.

Presently, Andrew is designing joint humanities and applied ethics workshops for computer and data science college majors, using social and emotional learning concepts as the pedagogical foundation.

Abigail’s research explores the role of education in students’ personal development and how this can be supported by policy, curricula, initial teacher education and teacher professional development. In particular she focuses on history education, citizenship education and peace education as vehicles for dialogue. These opportunities for students to engage with social questions are vital for building cohesive societies. This flows from the recognition that traditional forums for developing public understanding, such as post-conflict truth commissions, need to be complemented by intergenerational and educational perspectives.

Abigail has taught History, Politics, Debating as well as Relationships and Sex Education to secondary school students in South Africa, England and the USA.

She holds postgraduate degrees in Post-Conflict and Transitional Justice (University of Cape Town), in Education, Globalisation and International Development (University of Cambridge) and in African Studies (University of Oxford). She is a Rhodes Scholar, Mandela-Magdalene Scholar and Mandela-Rhodes Scholar.

Title of thesis

GCSE History, Policy Reform and Student Development: How students and teachers navigate the thematic study “Empires, Migration and the People”

Conference papers

Teaching Migration, Belonging, and Empire in Secondary Schools: evaluation of a teacher professional development program, (2019) History Educators International Research Network Conference, Lead author: Dr Jason Todd, University of Vienna, Austria.

“The Problems and Prospects of Teaching South Africa’s Recent History: Teachers’ Perspectives”, (2018) Sustainability, peace and education – Exploring promise and practice: BAICE 20th Anniversary Symposium, University of Bristol, England.

“New Generations, Old Wounds: Learning History at Home and School in Northern Ireland”, (2018) European Social Science and History Conference,
Queens University Belfast, Northern Ireland.

“The Methodological Challenges of Investigating the Role of History Teaching in Peacebuilding”, (2017), Present Past: Time, Memory, and the Negotiation of Historical Justice Conference, Columbia University, United States of America.

“Teaching South Africa’s Truth and Reconciliation Commission”, (2017) European Conference on African Studies, Universität Basel, Switzerland.

Research Assistant Publications

Review of the evidence on feedback in primary and secondary schools, (forthcoming, 2021) for the Education Endowment Foundation, Lead author: Prof Velda Elliott.

Teaching Migration, Belonging, and Empire in Secondary Schools, (2019), for Runnymede Trust and the European Research Council, Lead authors: Kimberly McIntosh, Dr Jason Todd and Prof Nandini Das.

Gender and the Politics of Reconciliation (2016), for The Institute for Justice and Reconciliation, Lead author: Dr Helen Scanlon

SOLE AUTHOR PUBLICATIONS

‘Transitions, Truth-Telling and Teaching History’, Cambridge Open-Review Educational Research e-Journal, Vol. 4, 2017.

Alice Tawell is an ESRC funded DPhil Student, co-supervised across the Department of Education and Centre for Criminology at the University of Oxford.

Supervisors: Professor Harry Daniels and Dr Rachel Condry.

Alice’s research focuses broadly on the enactment of school exclusion policy in England.

Prior to starting her doctoral studies, Alice gained a BSc in Sociology from the University of Bath and an MSc in Education (Research Training) from the University of Oxford.

As part of her undergraduate degree, Alice undertook a placement year working with Professor Kathy Sylva in the Families, Effective Learning and Literacy Research Group at the Department of Education, University of Oxford. After completing her degree, Alice returned to the department and has worked as a Research Officer on a number of different research projects since 2014. Most recently Alice has worked as part of the Excluded Lives Research Team on two projects exploring exclusion from school from a multidisciplinary perspective. In 2017 she was awarded a Seed-corn Small Grant Award to co-lead a pilot project exploring student collaborative networks with Hau Ming Tse. Alice also co-convenes the Qualitative Methods Hub in the department.

Outside of the department, Alice has sat on the Advisory Board for the Children Missing Education research project (2016-2017) at the National Children’s Bureau (NCB) and has been a member of the NCB Partnership for Well Being and Mental Health in Schools since 2016. She also sits on the Transparency on Exclusions Steering Group.

In 2017 Alice received funding from the Grand Union Doctoral Training Partnership placement scheme to conduct a Knowledge Exchange Internship with the Early Years Analysis and Research Unit at the Department for Education, and in 2018 Alice was elected the Co-President of the Grand Union ESRC Scholar’s Association, representing ESRC students from the University of Oxford, Brunel and The Open University.

Ashmita graduated from Boston University in 2008 with a BSc. in Biomedical Engineering, after which she worked in Research & Development for 6 years.

It is here that she decided to make the leap from formulation chemistry to STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Math) Education after having worked on programs involving increasing diversity in STEM in schools.

She received her Master’s from Boston University in 2015 in Education Policy. Her research interests include: STEM education policy; Assessment; Further Education; Higher Education; Science education pedagogy

Originally from Indonesia, Tracey has spent the last decade studying in the UK and working about multicultural education in Indonesia.

She is fully funded by the Indonesia Endowment Fund for Education (LPDP). Her doctoral research explores the ways Indonesian schools teach and accommodate the national vision of multicultural Indonesia, “Bhinneka Tunggal Ika” (Unity-in-Diversity). By using a two-tier case study research approach (case studies of six schools and of two provinces), it presents nuanced and critical account of the ways head teachers, teachers, students and parents from six state and private schools in Jakarta and Bali with different mixes of pupil ethnicity and religiosity understand and accommodate the vision of diversity into educational practices. Despite the highly contextual focus, the research offers a critical view into the complex role of schools in today’s era of globalisation in providing quality education for all and at the same time creating citizens who are inclusive and respectful towards others.

Tracey completed her MSc in Comparative and International Education at the University of Oxford in 2011 and her honours BA in Mathematics and Education Studies at the University of Cambridge in 2010. Upon completing her study in the UK, she returned to Indonesia to work in an educational foundation Sultan Iskandar Muda in Medan, Indonesia as a member of the Board of Directors in the Foundation – a position which she is still holding until today. She is responsible for overlooking the development and implementation of multicultural education and teacher development programme.

During her tenure, she has worked alongside the head teachers and teachers across all educational levels (from pre-school until high school) and produced books on the praxis of multicultural education in the school setting.

Title of Thesis

Accommodating a vision of diversity in different school contexts: “Unity-in-Diversity” in Indonesia

Publications
Journal Article
  • Harjatanaya, T.Y. & Hoon, C.Y. (2018) Politics of multicultural education in post-Suharto Indonesia: a study of the Chinese minority. Compare: A Journal of Comparative and International Education
Edited Book
  • Harjatanaya, T.Y. (2015) (2nd Edition) Merawat Keberagaman: Praksis Pendidikan Multikultural Perguruan Sultan Iskandar Muda (Fostering Diversity: Praxis of Multicultural Education in Sultan Iskandar Muda). Medan: YPSIM.
Book Chapter
  • Harjatanaya, T.Y. (2018). Akses dan Kesamaan dalam Pendidikan Vokasi (Access and Equality in Vocational Education). In Ferary, D. (2018) Sistem Pendidikan Vokasi di Inggris (Vocational Education System in England) (ed.). London: Kantor Atase Pendidikan dan Kebudayaan, Kedutaan Besar Indonesia (Indonesian Embassy) London, p. 121-138.

Katy is a Deputy Headteacher and the founder of a Leadership and Coaching Institute, which she now co-directs.

Katy is an Associate Fellow at the Oxford Character Project and a Research Associate at the Oxford University Wellbeing Research Centre. She is the co-founder of Global Social Leaders, a leadership programme which has participants in 105 countries, all passionate about creating and sustaining positive change in the world.

Title of Thesis

How could school leaders improve the flourishing and wellbeing of teaching staff?

Books
  • Granville-Chapman, K. and Bidston, E (2020) Leader: Know, love and inspire your people. Carmarthen: Crownhouse Publishing
Book Chapters
  •  Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ In White, M. & McCallum, F. (Ed.s) Wellbeing and Resilience Education: Covid-19 And Its Impact on Education Systems. Routledge
Publications
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘Purpose and Leadership in Education and Beyond’. The Education Exchange. Available from: https://theeducation.exchange/purpose-and-leadership-in-education-and-beyond/
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘The Three Secrets of COVID-era Leadership’. Times Education Supplement. Available from: https://www.tes.com/news/three-secrets-covid-era-school-leadership
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2016) ‘Assessing the Impact of a Teacher Leadership Programme in a Teaching Schools Alliance. Journal of Teacher Action Research
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2014) ‘The Afghan conflict: causes and consequences.’ Geography Review 28(1): 22-27
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2013) What are the psychological factors that affect students’ academic resilience and can teachers influence these? Unpublished thesis
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘Unlocking Leadership Potential’, The Magazine of the Boarding School’s Association, 33: 42-45
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2009) ‘Learning to Lead’, Leader, The Education Leader Magazine 41: 22-25
Presentations
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2019) ‘How could leaders improve the flourishing of their teams?’ ‘Stowe Ed Conference’, Forthcoming: 7 Jan 2019
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2018) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education: 21 Jun 2018
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2017) ‘How can school leaders improve teacher flourishing?’ ‘Doing Education Differently Conference’, University of Oxford, Department of Education, 11 Mar 17
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2016) ‘Developing school leaders who enable teachers to flourish’ The Telegraph Festival of Education 23 Jun 16
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Developing leadership in pupils and teachers’ High School Affiliated to Renmin University of China, Beijing. 20 Oct 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Resilience for leaders.’ Global Social Leaders World Summit. 16 Aug 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Emotional Intelligence for Leaders.’ Global Leaders in Education. 12 Aug 15
  • Coates, S.; Fraser, H.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J.; and Nasim, A. (2015) ‘Breaking through the glass ceiling – how can schools empower our girls to become leaders?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education. 19 Jun 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. ‘Developing Leadership in Schools’ (2015). G20 Schools Conference. International conference for head teachers. 11 Apr 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2018) ‘Introduction’, Wellington Leadership Institute: Festival of Leadership. Mar 2012-15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘How the Young Learn to Lead’, Raffles Institution (Singapore) -Purdue University (USA) Education Forum on Gifted & Talented Youth 2012. Singapore. 15 Mar 12
  • Draper, D.; Dyer, R.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Schools’. Presentation for a meeting about pupil leadership and character development at 10 Downing Street. 16 Nov 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Young People’. Presentation for a meeting about leadership and character at 10 Downing Street. 7 Mar 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K. & Seldon, A. (2012) ‘Introduction’, Leading Your School in the 21st Century. 7 Feb 12

Prior to starting his DPhil, Eddy worked as a primary school teacher in Bristol, where he also completed his MSc in Educational Research.

He is particularly interested in the culture of high stakes, standardised testing, and how this might perpetuate existing inequalities in schools. His research focuses specifically on the interaction between knowledge, policy and pedagogy in the context of Literacy education.

 

Amanda is completing a part-time DPhil, alongside working in Initial Teacher Education at Leeds Trinity University.

Her research is focused on understanding tensions, contradictions and conflicts that teachers in disadvantaged schools may experience when they engage in research activity.  Her research focus is influenced by her own experiences of working as a research-active teacher in disadvantaged schools, and recent work in teacher education to support experienced and beginning teachers in developing their own research activities.

One of the aims of Amanda’s research is to construct a framework to support teachers in pursuing research activity and critical scholarship work which articulates with wider social movements to address issues of poverty and disadvantage in schools.

Title of Thesis

Teachers’ perspectives on tensions between policy, practice and research in disadvantaged schools

Publications 

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2017) A ‘usable past’ of teacher education in England: history in JET’s anniversary issue. Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy, 43 (5), pp.616-627.

Nuttall, A. (2016) The ‘curriculum challenge’: Moving towards the ‘Storyline’ approach in a case study urban primary school.  Improving Schools, 19 (2), pp. 154-166.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Learning {Re}imagined: A review.  Primary First, 15, pp. 17-18.

Nuttall, A. and Doherty, J. (2014) Disaffected boys and the achievement gap: the ‘wallpaper effect’ and what is hidden by a focus on school results.  The Urban Review, 46 (5), pp.800-815.

Conference Papers and Presentations

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2018) “No child is pre-ordained to fail” Teachers questioning policy assumptions.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Newcastle, 11-13 September.

Nuttall, A. and Tobbell, C. (2017) Trainee teachers’ perspectives on practitioner enquiry.  Paper presented at the 8th TEAN Conference: Thinking Deeply about Education, Birmingham, 11-12 May.

Nuttall, A. (2017) Assessment at primary level: quality, comparability and improving secondary readiness.  A perspective from ITE.  Speech at the Westminster Education Forum Keynote Seminar: Next steps for reforming primary education: effective teaching practices, assessment and accountably, London, 18 January.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Deficit narratives and lived realities: whose poverty is it?  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the Australian Association for Research in Education, Melbourne, 27 November – 1 December.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Disenfranchised boys’ reflections on their urban schooling experience: “What a Waste!”.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Philpott, C., Beckett, L. and Wrigley, T. (2016) Collaborative practitioner inquiry: making a difference to urban schools.  Innovation session (school visits and symposium) presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Finn, B. and Beckett, L. (2015) Teachers’ constructions of poverty effects: Their research evidence.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Belfast, 15-17 September.

Nuttall, A. (2014) Teachers’ voice on disengaged boys: the role of one teacher-researcher in an English primary school. Paper presented at the Joint Australian Association for Research in Education and the New Zealand Association for Research in Education Conference, Brisbane, 30 November – 4 December.

Andrew Marotta is a D.Phil candidate in the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. He holds an A.A. in Social Sciences from Broward Community College, and a B.A. in Individualized Studies from the Gallatin School of Individualized Studies, New York University and an M.A. and Ed.M. in Counseling Psychology and School Counseling from Teachers College, Columbia University.

Andrew’s research interests include social and emotional learning, peer mentorship, existential therapy / philosophy, curriculum design for school counselors, and applied ethics in computer science. Andrew’s thesis examines how literature and philosophy can be used to nurture social and emotional learning through group counseling among high school students. He has also worked as a school counselor, teaching artist, and curriculum designer.

Presently, Andrew is designing joint humanities and applied ethics workshops for computer and data science college majors, using social and emotional learning concepts as the pedagogical foundation.

Abigail’s research explores the role of education in students’ personal development and how this can be supported by policy, curricula, initial teacher education and teacher professional development. In particular she focuses on history education, citizenship education and peace education as vehicles for dialogue. These opportunities for students to engage with social questions are vital for building cohesive societies. This flows from the recognition that traditional forums for developing public understanding, such as post-conflict truth commissions, need to be complemented by intergenerational and educational perspectives.

Abigail has taught History, Politics, Debating as well as Relationships and Sex Education to secondary school students in South Africa, England and the USA.

She holds postgraduate degrees in Post-Conflict and Transitional Justice (University of Cape Town), in Education, Globalisation and International Development (University of Cambridge) and in African Studies (University of Oxford). She is a Rhodes Scholar, Mandela-Magdalene Scholar and Mandela-Rhodes Scholar.

Title of thesis

GCSE History, Policy Reform and Student Development: How students and teachers navigate the thematic study “Empires, Migration and the People”

Conference papers

Teaching Migration, Belonging, and Empire in Secondary Schools: evaluation of a teacher professional development program, (2019) History Educators International Research Network Conference, Lead author: Dr Jason Todd, University of Vienna, Austria.

“The Problems and Prospects of Teaching South Africa’s Recent History: Teachers’ Perspectives”, (2018) Sustainability, peace and education – Exploring promise and practice: BAICE 20th Anniversary Symposium, University of Bristol, England.

“New Generations, Old Wounds: Learning History at Home and School in Northern Ireland”, (2018) European Social Science and History Conference,
Queens University Belfast, Northern Ireland.

“The Methodological Challenges of Investigating the Role of History Teaching in Peacebuilding”, (2017), Present Past: Time, Memory, and the Negotiation of Historical Justice Conference, Columbia University, United States of America.

“Teaching South Africa’s Truth and Reconciliation Commission”, (2017) European Conference on African Studies, Universität Basel, Switzerland.

Research Assistant Publications

Review of the evidence on feedback in primary and secondary schools, (forthcoming, 2021) for the Education Endowment Foundation, Lead author: Prof Velda Elliott.

Teaching Migration, Belonging, and Empire in Secondary Schools, (2019), for Runnymede Trust and the European Research Council, Lead authors: Kimberly McIntosh, Dr Jason Todd and Prof Nandini Das.

Gender and the Politics of Reconciliation (2016), for The Institute for Justice and Reconciliation, Lead author: Dr Helen Scanlon

SOLE AUTHOR PUBLICATIONS

‘Transitions, Truth-Telling and Teaching History’, Cambridge Open-Review Educational Research e-Journal, Vol. 4, 2017.

Alice Tawell is an ESRC funded DPhil Student, co-supervised across the Department of Education and Centre for Criminology at the University of Oxford.

Supervisors: Professor Harry Daniels and Dr Rachel Condry.

Alice’s research focuses broadly on the enactment of school exclusion policy in England.

Prior to starting her doctoral studies, Alice gained a BSc in Sociology from the University of Bath and an MSc in Education (Research Training) from the University of Oxford.

As part of her undergraduate degree, Alice undertook a placement year working with Professor Kathy Sylva in the Families, Effective Learning and Literacy Research Group at the Department of Education, University of Oxford. After completing her degree, Alice returned to the department and has worked as a Research Officer on a number of different research projects since 2014. Most recently Alice has worked as part of the Excluded Lives Research Team on two projects exploring exclusion from school from a multidisciplinary perspective. In 2017 she was awarded a Seed-corn Small Grant Award to co-lead a pilot project exploring student collaborative networks with Hau Ming Tse. Alice also co-convenes the Qualitative Methods Hub in the department.

Outside of the department, Alice has sat on the Advisory Board for the Children Missing Education research project (2016-2017) at the National Children’s Bureau (NCB) and has been a member of the NCB Partnership for Well Being and Mental Health in Schools since 2016. She also sits on the Transparency on Exclusions Steering Group.

In 2017 Alice received funding from the Grand Union Doctoral Training Partnership placement scheme to conduct a Knowledge Exchange Internship with the Early Years Analysis and Research Unit at the Department for Education, and in 2018 Alice was elected the Co-President of the Grand Union ESRC Scholar’s Association, representing ESRC students from the University of Oxford, Brunel and The Open University.

Ashmita graduated from Boston University in 2008 with a BSc. in Biomedical Engineering, after which she worked in Research & Development for 6 years.

It is here that she decided to make the leap from formulation chemistry to STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Math) Education after having worked on programs involving increasing diversity in STEM in schools.

She received her Master’s from Boston University in 2015 in Education Policy. Her research interests include: STEM education policy; Assessment; Further Education; Higher Education; Science education pedagogy

Originally from Indonesia, Tracey has spent the last decade studying in the UK and working about multicultural education in Indonesia.

She is fully funded by the Indonesia Endowment Fund for Education (LPDP). Her doctoral research explores the ways Indonesian schools teach and accommodate the national vision of multicultural Indonesia, “Bhinneka Tunggal Ika” (Unity-in-Diversity). By using a two-tier case study research approach (case studies of six schools and of two provinces), it presents nuanced and critical account of the ways head teachers, teachers, students and parents from six state and private schools in Jakarta and Bali with different mixes of pupil ethnicity and religiosity understand and accommodate the vision of diversity into educational practices. Despite the highly contextual focus, the research offers a critical view into the complex role of schools in today’s era of globalisation in providing quality education for all and at the same time creating citizens who are inclusive and respectful towards others.

Tracey completed her MSc in Comparative and International Education at the University of Oxford in 2011 and her honours BA in Mathematics and Education Studies at the University of Cambridge in 2010. Upon completing her study in the UK, she returned to Indonesia to work in an educational foundation Sultan Iskandar Muda in Medan, Indonesia as a member of the Board of Directors in the Foundation – a position which she is still holding until today. She is responsible for overlooking the development and implementation of multicultural education and teacher development programme.

During her tenure, she has worked alongside the head teachers and teachers across all educational levels (from pre-school until high school) and produced books on the praxis of multicultural education in the school setting.

Title of Thesis

Accommodating a vision of diversity in different school contexts: “Unity-in-Diversity” in Indonesia

Publications
Journal Article
  • Harjatanaya, T.Y. & Hoon, C.Y. (2018) Politics of multicultural education in post-Suharto Indonesia: a study of the Chinese minority. Compare: A Journal of Comparative and International Education
Edited Book
  • Harjatanaya, T.Y. (2015) (2nd Edition) Merawat Keberagaman: Praksis Pendidikan Multikultural Perguruan Sultan Iskandar Muda (Fostering Diversity: Praxis of Multicultural Education in Sultan Iskandar Muda). Medan: YPSIM.
Book Chapter
  • Harjatanaya, T.Y. (2018). Akses dan Kesamaan dalam Pendidikan Vokasi (Access and Equality in Vocational Education). In Ferary, D. (2018) Sistem Pendidikan Vokasi di Inggris (Vocational Education System in England) (ed.). London: Kantor Atase Pendidikan dan Kebudayaan, Kedutaan Besar Indonesia (Indonesian Embassy) London, p. 121-138.

Katy is a Deputy Headteacher and the founder of a Leadership and Coaching Institute, which she now co-directs.

Katy is an Associate Fellow at the Oxford Character Project and a Research Associate at the Oxford University Wellbeing Research Centre. She is the co-founder of Global Social Leaders, a leadership programme which has participants in 105 countries, all passionate about creating and sustaining positive change in the world.

Title of Thesis

How could school leaders improve the flourishing and wellbeing of teaching staff?

Books
  • Granville-Chapman, K. and Bidston, E (2020) Leader: Know, love and inspire your people. Carmarthen: Crownhouse Publishing
Book Chapters
  •  Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ In White, M. & McCallum, F. (Ed.s) Wellbeing and Resilience Education: Covid-19 And Its Impact on Education Systems. Routledge
Publications
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘Purpose and Leadership in Education and Beyond’. The Education Exchange. Available from: https://theeducation.exchange/purpose-and-leadership-in-education-and-beyond/
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘The Three Secrets of COVID-era Leadership’. Times Education Supplement. Available from: https://www.tes.com/news/three-secrets-covid-era-school-leadership
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2016) ‘Assessing the Impact of a Teacher Leadership Programme in a Teaching Schools Alliance. Journal of Teacher Action Research
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2014) ‘The Afghan conflict: causes and consequences.’ Geography Review 28(1): 22-27
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2013) What are the psychological factors that affect students’ academic resilience and can teachers influence these? Unpublished thesis
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘Unlocking Leadership Potential’, The Magazine of the Boarding School’s Association, 33: 42-45
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2009) ‘Learning to Lead’, Leader, The Education Leader Magazine 41: 22-25
Presentations
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2019) ‘How could leaders improve the flourishing of their teams?’ ‘Stowe Ed Conference’, Forthcoming: 7 Jan 2019
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2018) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education: 21 Jun 2018
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2017) ‘How can school leaders improve teacher flourishing?’ ‘Doing Education Differently Conference’, University of Oxford, Department of Education, 11 Mar 17
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2016) ‘Developing school leaders who enable teachers to flourish’ The Telegraph Festival of Education 23 Jun 16
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Developing leadership in pupils and teachers’ High School Affiliated to Renmin University of China, Beijing. 20 Oct 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Resilience for leaders.’ Global Social Leaders World Summit. 16 Aug 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Emotional Intelligence for Leaders.’ Global Leaders in Education. 12 Aug 15
  • Coates, S.; Fraser, H.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J.; and Nasim, A. (2015) ‘Breaking through the glass ceiling – how can schools empower our girls to become leaders?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education. 19 Jun 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. ‘Developing Leadership in Schools’ (2015). G20 Schools Conference. International conference for head teachers. 11 Apr 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2018) ‘Introduction’, Wellington Leadership Institute: Festival of Leadership. Mar 2012-15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘How the Young Learn to Lead’, Raffles Institution (Singapore) -Purdue University (USA) Education Forum on Gifted & Talented Youth 2012. Singapore. 15 Mar 12
  • Draper, D.; Dyer, R.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Schools’. Presentation for a meeting about pupil leadership and character development at 10 Downing Street. 16 Nov 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Young People’. Presentation for a meeting about leadership and character at 10 Downing Street. 7 Mar 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K. & Seldon, A. (2012) ‘Introduction’, Leading Your School in the 21st Century. 7 Feb 12

Prior to starting his DPhil, Eddy worked as a primary school teacher in Bristol, where he also completed his MSc in Educational Research.

He is particularly interested in the culture of high stakes, standardised testing, and how this might perpetuate existing inequalities in schools. His research focuses specifically on the interaction between knowledge, policy and pedagogy in the context of Literacy education.

 

Amanda is completing a part-time DPhil, alongside working in Initial Teacher Education at Leeds Trinity University.

Her research is focused on understanding tensions, contradictions and conflicts that teachers in disadvantaged schools may experience when they engage in research activity.  Her research focus is influenced by her own experiences of working as a research-active teacher in disadvantaged schools, and recent work in teacher education to support experienced and beginning teachers in developing their own research activities.

One of the aims of Amanda’s research is to construct a framework to support teachers in pursuing research activity and critical scholarship work which articulates with wider social movements to address issues of poverty and disadvantage in schools.

Title of Thesis

Teachers’ perspectives on tensions between policy, practice and research in disadvantaged schools

Publications 

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2017) A ‘usable past’ of teacher education in England: history in JET’s anniversary issue. Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy, 43 (5), pp.616-627.

Nuttall, A. (2016) The ‘curriculum challenge’: Moving towards the ‘Storyline’ approach in a case study urban primary school.  Improving Schools, 19 (2), pp. 154-166.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Learning {Re}imagined: A review.  Primary First, 15, pp. 17-18.

Nuttall, A. and Doherty, J. (2014) Disaffected boys and the achievement gap: the ‘wallpaper effect’ and what is hidden by a focus on school results.  The Urban Review, 46 (5), pp.800-815.

Conference Papers and Presentations

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2018) “No child is pre-ordained to fail” Teachers questioning policy assumptions.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Newcastle, 11-13 September.

Nuttall, A. and Tobbell, C. (2017) Trainee teachers’ perspectives on practitioner enquiry.  Paper presented at the 8th TEAN Conference: Thinking Deeply about Education, Birmingham, 11-12 May.

Nuttall, A. (2017) Assessment at primary level: quality, comparability and improving secondary readiness.  A perspective from ITE.  Speech at the Westminster Education Forum Keynote Seminar: Next steps for reforming primary education: effective teaching practices, assessment and accountably, London, 18 January.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Deficit narratives and lived realities: whose poverty is it?  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the Australian Association for Research in Education, Melbourne, 27 November – 1 December.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Disenfranchised boys’ reflections on their urban schooling experience: “What a Waste!”.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Philpott, C., Beckett, L. and Wrigley, T. (2016) Collaborative practitioner inquiry: making a difference to urban schools.  Innovation session (school visits and symposium) presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Finn, B. and Beckett, L. (2015) Teachers’ constructions of poverty effects: Their research evidence.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Belfast, 15-17 September.

Nuttall, A. (2014) Teachers’ voice on disengaged boys: the role of one teacher-researcher in an English primary school. Paper presented at the Joint Australian Association for Research in Education and the New Zealand Association for Research in Education Conference, Brisbane, 30 November – 4 December.

Andrew Marotta is a D.Phil candidate in the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. He holds an A.A. in Social Sciences from Broward Community College, and a B.A. in Individualized Studies from the Gallatin School of Individualized Studies, New York University and an M.A. and Ed.M. in Counseling Psychology and School Counseling from Teachers College, Columbia University.

Andrew’s research interests include social and emotional learning, peer mentorship, existential therapy / philosophy, curriculum design for school counselors, and applied ethics in computer science. Andrew’s thesis examines how literature and philosophy can be used to nurture social and emotional learning through group counseling among high school students. He has also worked as a school counselor, teaching artist, and curriculum designer.

Presently, Andrew is designing joint humanities and applied ethics workshops for computer and data science college majors, using social and emotional learning concepts as the pedagogical foundation.

Abigail’s research explores the role of education in students’ personal development and how this can be supported by policy, curricula, initial teacher education and teacher professional development. In particular she focuses on history education, citizenship education and peace education as vehicles for dialogue. These opportunities for students to engage with social questions are vital for building cohesive societies. This flows from the recognition that traditional forums for developing public understanding, such as post-conflict truth commissions, need to be complemented by intergenerational and educational perspectives.

Abigail has taught History, Politics, Debating as well as Relationships and Sex Education to secondary school students in South Africa, England and the USA.

She holds postgraduate degrees in Post-Conflict and Transitional Justice (University of Cape Town), in Education, Globalisation and International Development (University of Cambridge) and in African Studies (University of Oxford). She is a Rhodes Scholar, Mandela-Magdalene Scholar and Mandela-Rhodes Scholar.

Title of thesis

GCSE History, Policy Reform and Student Development: How students and teachers navigate the thematic study “Empires, Migration and the People”

Conference papers

Teaching Migration, Belonging, and Empire in Secondary Schools: evaluation of a teacher professional development program, (2019) History Educators International Research Network Conference, Lead author: Dr Jason Todd, University of Vienna, Austria.

“The Problems and Prospects of Teaching South Africa’s Recent History: Teachers’ Perspectives”, (2018) Sustainability, peace and education – Exploring promise and practice: BAICE 20th Anniversary Symposium, University of Bristol, England.

“New Generations, Old Wounds: Learning History at Home and School in Northern Ireland”, (2018) European Social Science and History Conference,
Queens University Belfast, Northern Ireland.

“The Methodological Challenges of Investigating the Role of History Teaching in Peacebuilding”, (2017), Present Past: Time, Memory, and the Negotiation of Historical Justice Conference, Columbia University, United States of America.

“Teaching South Africa’s Truth and Reconciliation Commission”, (2017) European Conference on African Studies, Universität Basel, Switzerland.

Research Assistant Publications

Review of the evidence on feedback in primary and secondary schools, (forthcoming, 2021) for the Education Endowment Foundation, Lead author: Prof Velda Elliott.

Teaching Migration, Belonging, and Empire in Secondary Schools, (2019), for Runnymede Trust and the European Research Council, Lead authors: Kimberly McIntosh, Dr Jason Todd and Prof Nandini Das.

Gender and the Politics of Reconciliation (2016), for The Institute for Justice and Reconciliation, Lead author: Dr Helen Scanlon

SOLE AUTHOR PUBLICATIONS

‘Transitions, Truth-Telling and Teaching History’, Cambridge Open-Review Educational Research e-Journal, Vol. 4, 2017.

Alice Tawell is an ESRC funded DPhil Student, co-supervised across the Department of Education and Centre for Criminology at the University of Oxford.

Supervisors: Professor Harry Daniels and Dr Rachel Condry.

Alice’s research focuses broadly on the enactment of school exclusion policy in England.

Prior to starting her doctoral studies, Alice gained a BSc in Sociology from the University of Bath and an MSc in Education (Research Training) from the University of Oxford.

As part of her undergraduate degree, Alice undertook a placement year working with Professor Kathy Sylva in the Families, Effective Learning and Literacy Research Group at the Department of Education, University of Oxford. After completing her degree, Alice returned to the department and has worked as a Research Officer on a number of different research projects since 2014. Most recently Alice has worked as part of the Excluded Lives Research Team on two projects exploring exclusion from school from a multidisciplinary perspective. In 2017 she was awarded a Seed-corn Small Grant Award to co-lead a pilot project exploring student collaborative networks with Hau Ming Tse. Alice also co-convenes the Qualitative Methods Hub in the department.

Outside of the department, Alice has sat on the Advisory Board for the Children Missing Education research project (2016-2017) at the National Children’s Bureau (NCB) and has been a member of the NCB Partnership for Well Being and Mental Health in Schools since 2016. She also sits on the Transparency on Exclusions Steering Group.

In 2017 Alice received funding from the Grand Union Doctoral Training Partnership placement scheme to conduct a Knowledge Exchange Internship with the Early Years Analysis and Research Unit at the Department for Education, and in 2018 Alice was elected the Co-President of the Grand Union ESRC Scholar’s Association, representing ESRC students from the University of Oxford, Brunel and The Open University.

Ashmita graduated from Boston University in 2008 with a BSc. in Biomedical Engineering, after which she worked in Research & Development for 6 years.

It is here that she decided to make the leap from formulation chemistry to STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Math) Education after having worked on programs involving increasing diversity in STEM in schools.

She received her Master’s from Boston University in 2015 in Education Policy. Her research interests include: STEM education policy; Assessment; Further Education; Higher Education; Science education pedagogy

Originally from Indonesia, Tracey has spent the last decade studying in the UK and working about multicultural education in Indonesia.

She is fully funded by the Indonesia Endowment Fund for Education (LPDP). Her doctoral research explores the ways Indonesian schools teach and accommodate the national vision of multicultural Indonesia, “Bhinneka Tunggal Ika” (Unity-in-Diversity). By using a two-tier case study research approach (case studies of six schools and of two provinces), it presents nuanced and critical account of the ways head teachers, teachers, students and parents from six state and private schools in Jakarta and Bali with different mixes of pupil ethnicity and religiosity understand and accommodate the vision of diversity into educational practices. Despite the highly contextual focus, the research offers a critical view into the complex role of schools in today’s era of globalisation in providing quality education for all and at the same time creating citizens who are inclusive and respectful towards others.

Tracey completed her MSc in Comparative and International Education at the University of Oxford in 2011 and her honours BA in Mathematics and Education Studies at the University of Cambridge in 2010. Upon completing her study in the UK, she returned to Indonesia to work in an educational foundation Sultan Iskandar Muda in Medan, Indonesia as a member of the Board of Directors in the Foundation – a position which she is still holding until today. She is responsible for overlooking the development and implementation of multicultural education and teacher development programme.

During her tenure, she has worked alongside the head teachers and teachers across all educational levels (from pre-school until high school) and produced books on the praxis of multicultural education in the school setting.

Title of Thesis

Accommodating a vision of diversity in different school contexts: “Unity-in-Diversity” in Indonesia

Publications
Journal Article
  • Harjatanaya, T.Y. & Hoon, C.Y. (2018) Politics of multicultural education in post-Suharto Indonesia: a study of the Chinese minority. Compare: A Journal of Comparative and International Education
Edited Book
  • Harjatanaya, T.Y. (2015) (2nd Edition) Merawat Keberagaman: Praksis Pendidikan Multikultural Perguruan Sultan Iskandar Muda (Fostering Diversity: Praxis of Multicultural Education in Sultan Iskandar Muda). Medan: YPSIM.
Book Chapter
  • Harjatanaya, T.Y. (2018). Akses dan Kesamaan dalam Pendidikan Vokasi (Access and Equality in Vocational Education). In Ferary, D. (2018) Sistem Pendidikan Vokasi di Inggris (Vocational Education System in England) (ed.). London: Kantor Atase Pendidikan dan Kebudayaan, Kedutaan Besar Indonesia (Indonesian Embassy) London, p. 121-138.

Katy is a Deputy Headteacher and the founder of a Leadership and Coaching Institute, which she now co-directs.

Katy is an Associate Fellow at the Oxford Character Project and a Research Associate at the Oxford University Wellbeing Research Centre. She is the co-founder of Global Social Leaders, a leadership programme which has participants in 105 countries, all passionate about creating and sustaining positive change in the world.

Title of Thesis

How could school leaders improve the flourishing and wellbeing of teaching staff?

Books
  • Granville-Chapman, K. and Bidston, E (2020) Leader: Know, love and inspire your people. Carmarthen: Crownhouse Publishing
Book Chapters
  •  Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ In White, M. & McCallum, F. (Ed.s) Wellbeing and Resilience Education: Covid-19 And Its Impact on Education Systems. Routledge
Publications
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘Purpose and Leadership in Education and Beyond’. The Education Exchange. Available from: https://theeducation.exchange/purpose-and-leadership-in-education-and-beyond/
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘The Three Secrets of COVID-era Leadership’. Times Education Supplement. Available from: https://www.tes.com/news/three-secrets-covid-era-school-leadership
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2016) ‘Assessing the Impact of a Teacher Leadership Programme in a Teaching Schools Alliance. Journal of Teacher Action Research
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2014) ‘The Afghan conflict: causes and consequences.’ Geography Review 28(1): 22-27
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2013) What are the psychological factors that affect students’ academic resilience and can teachers influence these? Unpublished thesis
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘Unlocking Leadership Potential’, The Magazine of the Boarding School’s Association, 33: 42-45
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2009) ‘Learning to Lead’, Leader, The Education Leader Magazine 41: 22-25
Presentations
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2019) ‘How could leaders improve the flourishing of their teams?’ ‘Stowe Ed Conference’, Forthcoming: 7 Jan 2019
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2018) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education: 21 Jun 2018
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2017) ‘How can school leaders improve teacher flourishing?’ ‘Doing Education Differently Conference’, University of Oxford, Department of Education, 11 Mar 17
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2016) ‘Developing school leaders who enable teachers to flourish’ The Telegraph Festival of Education 23 Jun 16
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Developing leadership in pupils and teachers’ High School Affiliated to Renmin University of China, Beijing. 20 Oct 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Resilience for leaders.’ Global Social Leaders World Summit. 16 Aug 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Emotional Intelligence for Leaders.’ Global Leaders in Education. 12 Aug 15
  • Coates, S.; Fraser, H.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J.; and Nasim, A. (2015) ‘Breaking through the glass ceiling – how can schools empower our girls to become leaders?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education. 19 Jun 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. ‘Developing Leadership in Schools’ (2015). G20 Schools Conference. International conference for head teachers. 11 Apr 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2018) ‘Introduction’, Wellington Leadership Institute: Festival of Leadership. Mar 2012-15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘How the Young Learn to Lead’, Raffles Institution (Singapore) -Purdue University (USA) Education Forum on Gifted & Talented Youth 2012. Singapore. 15 Mar 12
  • Draper, D.; Dyer, R.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Schools’. Presentation for a meeting about pupil leadership and character development at 10 Downing Street. 16 Nov 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Young People’. Presentation for a meeting about leadership and character at 10 Downing Street. 7 Mar 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K. & Seldon, A. (2012) ‘Introduction’, Leading Your School in the 21st Century. 7 Feb 12

Prior to starting his DPhil, Eddy worked as a primary school teacher in Bristol, where he also completed his MSc in Educational Research.

He is particularly interested in the culture of high stakes, standardised testing, and how this might perpetuate existing inequalities in schools. His research focuses specifically on the interaction between knowledge, policy and pedagogy in the context of Literacy education.

 

Amanda is completing a part-time DPhil, alongside working in Initial Teacher Education at Leeds Trinity University.

Her research is focused on understanding tensions, contradictions and conflicts that teachers in disadvantaged schools may experience when they engage in research activity.  Her research focus is influenced by her own experiences of working as a research-active teacher in disadvantaged schools, and recent work in teacher education to support experienced and beginning teachers in developing their own research activities.

One of the aims of Amanda’s research is to construct a framework to support teachers in pursuing research activity and critical scholarship work which articulates with wider social movements to address issues of poverty and disadvantage in schools.

Title of Thesis

Teachers’ perspectives on tensions between policy, practice and research in disadvantaged schools

Publications 

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2017) A ‘usable past’ of teacher education in England: history in JET’s anniversary issue. Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy, 43 (5), pp.616-627.

Nuttall, A. (2016) The ‘curriculum challenge’: Moving towards the ‘Storyline’ approach in a case study urban primary school.  Improving Schools, 19 (2), pp. 154-166.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Learning {Re}imagined: A review.  Primary First, 15, pp. 17-18.

Nuttall, A. and Doherty, J. (2014) Disaffected boys and the achievement gap: the ‘wallpaper effect’ and what is hidden by a focus on school results.  The Urban Review, 46 (5), pp.800-815.

Conference Papers and Presentations

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2018) “No child is pre-ordained to fail” Teachers questioning policy assumptions.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Newcastle, 11-13 September.

Nuttall, A. and Tobbell, C. (2017) Trainee teachers’ perspectives on practitioner enquiry.  Paper presented at the 8th TEAN Conference: Thinking Deeply about Education, Birmingham, 11-12 May.

Nuttall, A. (2017) Assessment at primary level: quality, comparability and improving secondary readiness.  A perspective from ITE.  Speech at the Westminster Education Forum Keynote Seminar: Next steps for reforming primary education: effective teaching practices, assessment and accountably, London, 18 January.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Deficit narratives and lived realities: whose poverty is it?  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the Australian Association for Research in Education, Melbourne, 27 November – 1 December.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Disenfranchised boys’ reflections on their urban schooling experience: “What a Waste!”.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Philpott, C., Beckett, L. and Wrigley, T. (2016) Collaborative practitioner inquiry: making a difference to urban schools.  Innovation session (school visits and symposium) presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Finn, B. and Beckett, L. (2015) Teachers’ constructions of poverty effects: Their research evidence.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Belfast, 15-17 September.

Nuttall, A. (2014) Teachers’ voice on disengaged boys: the role of one teacher-researcher in an English primary school. Paper presented at the Joint Australian Association for Research in Education and the New Zealand Association for Research in Education Conference, Brisbane, 30 November – 4 December.

Andrew Marotta is a D.Phil candidate in the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. He holds an A.A. in Social Sciences from Broward Community College, and a B.A. in Individualized Studies from the Gallatin School of Individualized Studies, New York University and an M.A. and Ed.M. in Counseling Psychology and School Counseling from Teachers College, Columbia University.

Andrew’s research interests include social and emotional learning, peer mentorship, existential therapy / philosophy, curriculum design for school counselors, and applied ethics in computer science. Andrew’s thesis examines how literature and philosophy can be used to nurture social and emotional learning through group counseling among high school students. He has also worked as a school counselor, teaching artist, and curriculum designer.

Presently, Andrew is designing joint humanities and applied ethics workshops for computer and data science college majors, using social and emotional learning concepts as the pedagogical foundation.

Abigail’s research explores the role of education in students’ personal development and how this can be supported by policy, curricula, initial teacher education and teacher professional development. In particular she focuses on history education, citizenship education and peace education as vehicles for dialogue. These opportunities for students to engage with social questions are vital for building cohesive societies. This flows from the recognition that traditional forums for developing public understanding, such as post-conflict truth commissions, need to be complemented by intergenerational and educational perspectives.

Abigail has taught History, Politics, Debating as well as Relationships and Sex Education to secondary school students in South Africa, England and the USA.

She holds postgraduate degrees in Post-Conflict and Transitional Justice (University of Cape Town), in Education, Globalisation and International Development (University of Cambridge) and in African Studies (University of Oxford). She is a Rhodes Scholar, Mandela-Magdalene Scholar and Mandela-Rhodes Scholar.

Title of thesis

GCSE History, Policy Reform and Student Development: How students and teachers navigate the thematic study “Empires, Migration and the People”

Conference papers

Teaching Migration, Belonging, and Empire in Secondary Schools: evaluation of a teacher professional development program, (2019) History Educators International Research Network Conference, Lead author: Dr Jason Todd, University of Vienna, Austria.

“The Problems and Prospects of Teaching South Africa’s Recent History: Teachers’ Perspectives”, (2018) Sustainability, peace and education – Exploring promise and practice: BAICE 20th Anniversary Symposium, University of Bristol, England.

“New Generations, Old Wounds: Learning History at Home and School in Northern Ireland”, (2018) European Social Science and History Conference,
Queens University Belfast, Northern Ireland.

“The Methodological Challenges of Investigating the Role of History Teaching in Peacebuilding”, (2017), Present Past: Time, Memory, and the Negotiation of Historical Justice Conference, Columbia University, United States of America.

“Teaching South Africa’s Truth and Reconciliation Commission”, (2017) European Conference on African Studies, Universität Basel, Switzerland.

Research Assistant Publications

Review of the evidence on feedback in primary and secondary schools, (forthcoming, 2021) for the Education Endowment Foundation, Lead author: Prof Velda Elliott.

Teaching Migration, Belonging, and Empire in Secondary Schools, (2019), for Runnymede Trust and the European Research Council, Lead authors: Kimberly McIntosh, Dr Jason Todd and Prof Nandini Das.

Gender and the Politics of Reconciliation (2016), for The Institute for Justice and Reconciliation, Lead author: Dr Helen Scanlon

SOLE AUTHOR PUBLICATIONS

‘Transitions, Truth-Telling and Teaching History’, Cambridge Open-Review Educational Research e-Journal, Vol. 4, 2017.

Alice Tawell is an ESRC funded DPhil Student, co-supervised across the Department of Education and Centre for Criminology at the University of Oxford.

Supervisors: Professor Harry Daniels and Dr Rachel Condry.

Alice’s research focuses broadly on the enactment of school exclusion policy in England.

Prior to starting her doctoral studies, Alice gained a BSc in Sociology from the University of Bath and an MSc in Education (Research Training) from the University of Oxford.

As part of her undergraduate degree, Alice undertook a placement year working with Professor Kathy Sylva in the Families, Effective Learning and Literacy Research Group at the Department of Education, University of Oxford. After completing her degree, Alice returned to the department and has worked as a Research Officer on a number of different research projects since 2014. Most recently Alice has worked as part of the Excluded Lives Research Team on two projects exploring exclusion from school from a multidisciplinary perspective. In 2017 she was awarded a Seed-corn Small Grant Award to co-lead a pilot project exploring student collaborative networks with Hau Ming Tse. Alice also co-convenes the Qualitative Methods Hub in the department.

Outside of the department, Alice has sat on the Advisory Board for the Children Missing Education research project (2016-2017) at the National Children’s Bureau (NCB) and has been a member of the NCB Partnership for Well Being and Mental Health in Schools since 2016. She also sits on the Transparency on Exclusions Steering Group.

In 2017 Alice received funding from the Grand Union Doctoral Training Partnership placement scheme to conduct a Knowledge Exchange Internship with the Early Years Analysis and Research Unit at the Department for Education, and in 2018 Alice was elected the Co-President of the Grand Union ESRC Scholar’s Association, representing ESRC students from the University of Oxford, Brunel and The Open University.

Ashmita graduated from Boston University in 2008 with a BSc. in Biomedical Engineering, after which she worked in Research & Development for 6 years.

It is here that she decided to make the leap from formulation chemistry to STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Math) Education after having worked on programs involving increasing diversity in STEM in schools.

She received her Master’s from Boston University in 2015 in Education Policy. Her research interests include: STEM education policy; Assessment; Further Education; Higher Education; Science education pedagogy

Originally from Indonesia, Tracey has spent the last decade studying in the UK and working about multicultural education in Indonesia.

She is fully funded by the Indonesia Endowment Fund for Education (LPDP). Her doctoral research explores the ways Indonesian schools teach and accommodate the national vision of multicultural Indonesia, “Bhinneka Tunggal Ika” (Unity-in-Diversity). By using a two-tier case study research approach (case studies of six schools and of two provinces), it presents nuanced and critical account of the ways head teachers, teachers, students and parents from six state and private schools in Jakarta and Bali with different mixes of pupil ethnicity and religiosity understand and accommodate the vision of diversity into educational practices. Despite the highly contextual focus, the research offers a critical view into the complex role of schools in today’s era of globalisation in providing quality education for all and at the same time creating citizens who are inclusive and respectful towards others.

Tracey completed her MSc in Comparative and International Education at the University of Oxford in 2011 and her honours BA in Mathematics and Education Studies at the University of Cambridge in 2010. Upon completing her study in the UK, she returned to Indonesia to work in an educational foundation Sultan Iskandar Muda in Medan, Indonesia as a member of the Board of Directors in the Foundation – a position which she is still holding until today. She is responsible for overlooking the development and implementation of multicultural education and teacher development programme.

During her tenure, she has worked alongside the head teachers and teachers across all educational levels (from pre-school until high school) and produced books on the praxis of multicultural education in the school setting.

Title of Thesis

Accommodating a vision of diversity in different school contexts: “Unity-in-Diversity” in Indonesia

Publications
Journal Article
  • Harjatanaya, T.Y. & Hoon, C.Y. (2018) Politics of multicultural education in post-Suharto Indonesia: a study of the Chinese minority. Compare: A Journal of Comparative and International Education
Edited Book
  • Harjatanaya, T.Y. (2015) (2nd Edition) Merawat Keberagaman: Praksis Pendidikan Multikultural Perguruan Sultan Iskandar Muda (Fostering Diversity: Praxis of Multicultural Education in Sultan Iskandar Muda). Medan: YPSIM.
Book Chapter
  • Harjatanaya, T.Y. (2018). Akses dan Kesamaan dalam Pendidikan Vokasi (Access and Equality in Vocational Education). In Ferary, D. (2018) Sistem Pendidikan Vokasi di Inggris (Vocational Education System in England) (ed.). London: Kantor Atase Pendidikan dan Kebudayaan, Kedutaan Besar Indonesia (Indonesian Embassy) London, p. 121-138.

Katy is a Deputy Headteacher and the founder of a Leadership and Coaching Institute, which she now co-directs.

Katy is an Associate Fellow at the Oxford Character Project and a Research Associate at the Oxford University Wellbeing Research Centre. She is the co-founder of Global Social Leaders, a leadership programme which has participants in 105 countries, all passionate about creating and sustaining positive change in the world.

Title of Thesis

How could school leaders improve the flourishing and wellbeing of teaching staff?

Books
  • Granville-Chapman, K. and Bidston, E (2020) Leader: Know, love and inspire your people. Carmarthen: Crownhouse Publishing
Book Chapters
  •  Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ In White, M. & McCallum, F. (Ed.s) Wellbeing and Resilience Education: Covid-19 And Its Impact on Education Systems. Routledge
Publications
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘Purpose and Leadership in Education and Beyond’. The Education Exchange. Available from: https://theeducation.exchange/purpose-and-leadership-in-education-and-beyond/
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘The Three Secrets of COVID-era Leadership’. Times Education Supplement. Available from: https://www.tes.com/news/three-secrets-covid-era-school-leadership
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2016) ‘Assessing the Impact of a Teacher Leadership Programme in a Teaching Schools Alliance. Journal of Teacher Action Research
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2014) ‘The Afghan conflict: causes and consequences.’ Geography Review 28(1): 22-27
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2013) What are the psychological factors that affect students’ academic resilience and can teachers influence these? Unpublished thesis
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘Unlocking Leadership Potential’, The Magazine of the Boarding School’s Association, 33: 42-45
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2009) ‘Learning to Lead’, Leader, The Education Leader Magazine 41: 22-25
Presentations
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2019) ‘How could leaders improve the flourishing of their teams?’ ‘Stowe Ed Conference’, Forthcoming: 7 Jan 2019
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2018) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education: 21 Jun 2018
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2017) ‘How can school leaders improve teacher flourishing?’ ‘Doing Education Differently Conference’, University of Oxford, Department of Education, 11 Mar 17
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2016) ‘Developing school leaders who enable teachers to flourish’ The Telegraph Festival of Education 23 Jun 16
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Developing leadership in pupils and teachers’ High School Affiliated to Renmin University of China, Beijing. 20 Oct 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Resilience for leaders.’ Global Social Leaders World Summit. 16 Aug 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Emotional Intelligence for Leaders.’ Global Leaders in Education. 12 Aug 15
  • Coates, S.; Fraser, H.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J.; and Nasim, A. (2015) ‘Breaking through the glass ceiling – how can schools empower our girls to become leaders?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education. 19 Jun 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. ‘Developing Leadership in Schools’ (2015). G20 Schools Conference. International conference for head teachers. 11 Apr 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2018) ‘Introduction’, Wellington Leadership Institute: Festival of Leadership. Mar 2012-15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘How the Young Learn to Lead’, Raffles Institution (Singapore) -Purdue University (USA) Education Forum on Gifted & Talented Youth 2012. Singapore. 15 Mar 12
  • Draper, D.; Dyer, R.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Schools’. Presentation for a meeting about pupil leadership and character development at 10 Downing Street. 16 Nov 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Young People’. Presentation for a meeting about leadership and character at 10 Downing Street. 7 Mar 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K. & Seldon, A. (2012) ‘Introduction’, Leading Your School in the 21st Century. 7 Feb 12

Prior to starting his DPhil, Eddy worked as a primary school teacher in Bristol, where he also completed his MSc in Educational Research.

He is particularly interested in the culture of high stakes, standardised testing, and how this might perpetuate existing inequalities in schools. His research focuses specifically on the interaction between knowledge, policy and pedagogy in the context of Literacy education.

 

Amanda is completing a part-time DPhil, alongside working in Initial Teacher Education at Leeds Trinity University.

Her research is focused on understanding tensions, contradictions and conflicts that teachers in disadvantaged schools may experience when they engage in research activity.  Her research focus is influenced by her own experiences of working as a research-active teacher in disadvantaged schools, and recent work in teacher education to support experienced and beginning teachers in developing their own research activities.

One of the aims of Amanda’s research is to construct a framework to support teachers in pursuing research activity and critical scholarship work which articulates with wider social movements to address issues of poverty and disadvantage in schools.

Title of Thesis

Teachers’ perspectives on tensions between policy, practice and research in disadvantaged schools

Publications 

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2017) A ‘usable past’ of teacher education in England: history in JET’s anniversary issue. Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy, 43 (5), pp.616-627.

Nuttall, A. (2016) The ‘curriculum challenge’: Moving towards the ‘Storyline’ approach in a case study urban primary school.  Improving Schools, 19 (2), pp. 154-166.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Learning {Re}imagined: A review.  Primary First, 15, pp. 17-18.

Nuttall, A. and Doherty, J. (2014) Disaffected boys and the achievement gap: the ‘wallpaper effect’ and what is hidden by a focus on school results.  The Urban Review, 46 (5), pp.800-815.

Conference Papers and Presentations

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2018) “No child is pre-ordained to fail” Teachers questioning policy assumptions.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Newcastle, 11-13 September.

Nuttall, A. and Tobbell, C. (2017) Trainee teachers’ perspectives on practitioner enquiry.  Paper presented at the 8th TEAN Conference: Thinking Deeply about Education, Birmingham, 11-12 May.

Nuttall, A. (2017) Assessment at primary level: quality, comparability and improving secondary readiness.  A perspective from ITE.  Speech at the Westminster Education Forum Keynote Seminar: Next steps for reforming primary education: effective teaching practices, assessment and accountably, London, 18 January.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Deficit narratives and lived realities: whose poverty is it?  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the Australian Association for Research in Education, Melbourne, 27 November – 1 December.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Disenfranchised boys’ reflections on their urban schooling experience: “What a Waste!”.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Philpott, C., Beckett, L. and Wrigley, T. (2016) Collaborative practitioner inquiry: making a difference to urban schools.  Innovation session (school visits and symposium) presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Finn, B. and Beckett, L. (2015) Teachers’ constructions of poverty effects: Their research evidence.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Belfast, 15-17 September.

Nuttall, A. (2014) Teachers’ voice on disengaged boys: the role of one teacher-researcher in an English primary school. Paper presented at the Joint Australian Association for Research in Education and the New Zealand Association for Research in Education Conference, Brisbane, 30 November – 4 December.

Andrew Marotta is a D.Phil candidate in the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. He holds an A.A. in Social Sciences from Broward Community College, and a B.A. in Individualized Studies from the Gallatin School of Individualized Studies, New York University and an M.A. and Ed.M. in Counseling Psychology and School Counseling from Teachers College, Columbia University.

Andrew’s research interests include social and emotional learning, peer mentorship, existential therapy / philosophy, curriculum design for school counselors, and applied ethics in computer science. Andrew’s thesis examines how literature and philosophy can be used to nurture social and emotional learning through group counseling among high school students. He has also worked as a school counselor, teaching artist, and curriculum designer.

Presently, Andrew is designing joint humanities and applied ethics workshops for computer and data science college majors, using social and emotional learning concepts as the pedagogical foundation.

Abigail’s research explores the role of education in students’ personal development and how this can be supported by policy, curricula, initial teacher education and teacher professional development. In particular she focuses on history education, citizenship education and peace education as vehicles for dialogue. These opportunities for students to engage with social questions are vital for building cohesive societies. This flows from the recognition that traditional forums for developing public understanding, such as post-conflict truth commissions, need to be complemented by intergenerational and educational perspectives.

Abigail has taught History, Politics, Debating as well as Relationships and Sex Education to secondary school students in South Africa, England and the USA.

She holds postgraduate degrees in Post-Conflict and Transitional Justice (University of Cape Town), in Education, Globalisation and International Development (University of Cambridge) and in African Studies (University of Oxford). She is a Rhodes Scholar, Mandela-Magdalene Scholar and Mandela-Rhodes Scholar.

Title of thesis

GCSE History, Policy Reform and Student Development: How students and teachers navigate the thematic study “Empires, Migration and the People”

Conference papers

Teaching Migration, Belonging, and Empire in Secondary Schools: evaluation of a teacher professional development program, (2019) History Educators International Research Network Conference, Lead author: Dr Jason Todd, University of Vienna, Austria.

“The Problems and Prospects of Teaching South Africa’s Recent History: Teachers’ Perspectives”, (2018) Sustainability, peace and education – Exploring promise and practice: BAICE 20th Anniversary Symposium, University of Bristol, England.

“New Generations, Old Wounds: Learning History at Home and School in Northern Ireland”, (2018) European Social Science and History Conference,
Queens University Belfast, Northern Ireland.

“The Methodological Challenges of Investigating the Role of History Teaching in Peacebuilding”, (2017), Present Past: Time, Memory, and the Negotiation of Historical Justice Conference, Columbia University, United States of America.

“Teaching South Africa’s Truth and Reconciliation Commission”, (2017) European Conference on African Studies, Universität Basel, Switzerland.

Research Assistant Publications

Review of the evidence on feedback in primary and secondary schools, (forthcoming, 2021) for the Education Endowment Foundation, Lead author: Prof Velda Elliott.

Teaching Migration, Belonging, and Empire in Secondary Schools, (2019), for Runnymede Trust and the European Research Council, Lead authors: Kimberly McIntosh, Dr Jason Todd and Prof Nandini Das.

Gender and the Politics of Reconciliation (2016), for The Institute for Justice and Reconciliation, Lead author: Dr Helen Scanlon

SOLE AUTHOR PUBLICATIONS

‘Transitions, Truth-Telling and Teaching History’, Cambridge Open-Review Educational Research e-Journal, Vol. 4, 2017.

Alice Tawell is an ESRC funded DPhil Student, co-supervised across the Department of Education and Centre for Criminology at the University of Oxford.

Supervisors: Professor Harry Daniels and Dr Rachel Condry.

Alice’s research focuses broadly on the enactment of school exclusion policy in England.

Prior to starting her doctoral studies, Alice gained a BSc in Sociology from the University of Bath and an MSc in Education (Research Training) from the University of Oxford.

As part of her undergraduate degree, Alice undertook a placement year working with Professor Kathy Sylva in the Families, Effective Learning and Literacy Research Group at the Department of Education, University of Oxford. After completing her degree, Alice returned to the department and has worked as a Research Officer on a number of different research projects since 2014. Most recently Alice has worked as part of the Excluded Lives Research Team on two projects exploring exclusion from school from a multidisciplinary perspective. In 2017 she was awarded a Seed-corn Small Grant Award to co-lead a pilot project exploring student collaborative networks with Hau Ming Tse. Alice also co-convenes the Qualitative Methods Hub in the department.

Outside of the department, Alice has sat on the Advisory Board for the Children Missing Education research project (2016-2017) at the National Children’s Bureau (NCB) and has been a member of the NCB Partnership for Well Being and Mental Health in Schools since 2016. She also sits on the Transparency on Exclusions Steering Group.

In 2017 Alice received funding from the Grand Union Doctoral Training Partnership placement scheme to conduct a Knowledge Exchange Internship with the Early Years Analysis and Research Unit at the Department for Education, and in 2018 Alice was elected the Co-President of the Grand Union ESRC Scholar’s Association, representing ESRC students from the University of Oxford, Brunel and The Open University.

Ashmita graduated from Boston University in 2008 with a BSc. in Biomedical Engineering, after which she worked in Research & Development for 6 years.

It is here that she decided to make the leap from formulation chemistry to STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Math) Education after having worked on programs involving increasing diversity in STEM in schools.

She received her Master’s from Boston University in 2015 in Education Policy. Her research interests include: STEM education policy; Assessment; Further Education; Higher Education; Science education pedagogy

Originally from Indonesia, Tracey has spent the last decade studying in the UK and working about multicultural education in Indonesia.

She is fully funded by the Indonesia Endowment Fund for Education (LPDP). Her doctoral research explores the ways Indonesian schools teach and accommodate the national vision of multicultural Indonesia, “Bhinneka Tunggal Ika” (Unity-in-Diversity). By using a two-tier case study research approach (case studies of six schools and of two provinces), it presents nuanced and critical account of the ways head teachers, teachers, students and parents from six state and private schools in Jakarta and Bali with different mixes of pupil ethnicity and religiosity understand and accommodate the vision of diversity into educational practices. Despite the highly contextual focus, the research offers a critical view into the complex role of schools in today’s era of globalisation in providing quality education for all and at the same time creating citizens who are inclusive and respectful towards others.

Tracey completed her MSc in Comparative and International Education at the University of Oxford in 2011 and her honours BA in Mathematics and Education Studies at the University of Cambridge in 2010. Upon completing her study in the UK, she returned to Indonesia to work in an educational foundation Sultan Iskandar Muda in Medan, Indonesia as a member of the Board of Directors in the Foundation – a position which she is still holding until today. She is responsible for overlooking the development and implementation of multicultural education and teacher development programme.

During her tenure, she has worked alongside the head teachers and teachers across all educational levels (from pre-school until high school) and produced books on the praxis of multicultural education in the school setting.

Title of Thesis

Accommodating a vision of diversity in different school contexts: “Unity-in-Diversity” in Indonesia

Publications
Journal Article
  • Harjatanaya, T.Y. & Hoon, C.Y. (2018) Politics of multicultural education in post-Suharto Indonesia: a study of the Chinese minority. Compare: A Journal of Comparative and International Education
Edited Book
  • Harjatanaya, T.Y. (2015) (2nd Edition) Merawat Keberagaman: Praksis Pendidikan Multikultural Perguruan Sultan Iskandar Muda (Fostering Diversity: Praxis of Multicultural Education in Sultan Iskandar Muda). Medan: YPSIM.
Book Chapter
  • Harjatanaya, T.Y. (2018). Akses dan Kesamaan dalam Pendidikan Vokasi (Access and Equality in Vocational Education). In Ferary, D. (2018) Sistem Pendidikan Vokasi di Inggris (Vocational Education System in England) (ed.). London: Kantor Atase Pendidikan dan Kebudayaan, Kedutaan Besar Indonesia (Indonesian Embassy) London, p. 121-138.

Katy is a Deputy Headteacher and the founder of a Leadership and Coaching Institute, which she now co-directs.

Katy is an Associate Fellow at the Oxford Character Project and a Research Associate at the Oxford University Wellbeing Research Centre. She is the co-founder of Global Social Leaders, a leadership programme which has participants in 105 countries, all passionate about creating and sustaining positive change in the world.

Title of Thesis

How could school leaders improve the flourishing and wellbeing of teaching staff?

Books
  • Granville-Chapman, K. and Bidston, E (2020) Leader: Know, love and inspire your people. Carmarthen: Crownhouse Publishing
Book Chapters
  •  Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ In White, M. & McCallum, F. (Ed.s) Wellbeing and Resilience Education: Covid-19 And Its Impact on Education Systems. Routledge
Publications
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘Purpose and Leadership in Education and Beyond’. The Education Exchange. Available from: https://theeducation.exchange/purpose-and-leadership-in-education-and-beyond/
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘The Three Secrets of COVID-era Leadership’. Times Education Supplement. Available from: https://www.tes.com/news/three-secrets-covid-era-school-leadership
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2016) ‘Assessing the Impact of a Teacher Leadership Programme in a Teaching Schools Alliance. Journal of Teacher Action Research
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2014) ‘The Afghan conflict: causes and consequences.’ Geography Review 28(1): 22-27
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2013) What are the psychological factors that affect students’ academic resilience and can teachers influence these? Unpublished thesis
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘Unlocking Leadership Potential’, The Magazine of the Boarding School’s Association, 33: 42-45
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2009) ‘Learning to Lead’, Leader, The Education Leader Magazine 41: 22-25
Presentations
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2019) ‘How could leaders improve the flourishing of their teams?’ ‘Stowe Ed Conference’, Forthcoming: 7 Jan 2019
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2018) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education: 21 Jun 2018
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2017) ‘How can school leaders improve teacher flourishing?’ ‘Doing Education Differently Conference’, University of Oxford, Department of Education, 11 Mar 17
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2016) ‘Developing school leaders who enable teachers to flourish’ The Telegraph Festival of Education 23 Jun 16
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Developing leadership in pupils and teachers’ High School Affiliated to Renmin University of China, Beijing. 20 Oct 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Resilience for leaders.’ Global Social Leaders World Summit. 16 Aug 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Emotional Intelligence for Leaders.’ Global Leaders in Education. 12 Aug 15
  • Coates, S.; Fraser, H.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J.; and Nasim, A. (2015) ‘Breaking through the glass ceiling – how can schools empower our girls to become leaders?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education. 19 Jun 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. ‘Developing Leadership in Schools’ (2015). G20 Schools Conference. International conference for head teachers. 11 Apr 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2018) ‘Introduction’, Wellington Leadership Institute: Festival of Leadership. Mar 2012-15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘How the Young Learn to Lead’, Raffles Institution (Singapore) -Purdue University (USA) Education Forum on Gifted & Talented Youth 2012. Singapore. 15 Mar 12
  • Draper, D.; Dyer, R.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Schools’. Presentation for a meeting about pupil leadership and character development at 10 Downing Street. 16 Nov 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Young People’. Presentation for a meeting about leadership and character at 10 Downing Street. 7 Mar 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K. & Seldon, A. (2012) ‘Introduction’, Leading Your School in the 21st Century. 7 Feb 12

Prior to starting his DPhil, Eddy worked as a primary school teacher in Bristol, where he also completed his MSc in Educational Research.

He is particularly interested in the culture of high stakes, standardised testing, and how this might perpetuate existing inequalities in schools. His research focuses specifically on the interaction between knowledge, policy and pedagogy in the context of Literacy education.

 

Amanda is completing a part-time DPhil, alongside working in Initial Teacher Education at Leeds Trinity University.

Her research is focused on understanding tensions, contradictions and conflicts that teachers in disadvantaged schools may experience when they engage in research activity.  Her research focus is influenced by her own experiences of working as a research-active teacher in disadvantaged schools, and recent work in teacher education to support experienced and beginning teachers in developing their own research activities.

One of the aims of Amanda’s research is to construct a framework to support teachers in pursuing research activity and critical scholarship work which articulates with wider social movements to address issues of poverty and disadvantage in schools.

Title of Thesis

Teachers’ perspectives on tensions between policy, practice and research in disadvantaged schools

Publications 

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2017) A ‘usable past’ of teacher education in England: history in JET’s anniversary issue. Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy, 43 (5), pp.616-627.

Nuttall, A. (2016) The ‘curriculum challenge’: Moving towards the ‘Storyline’ approach in a case study urban primary school.  Improving Schools, 19 (2), pp. 154-166.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Learning {Re}imagined: A review.  Primary First, 15, pp. 17-18.

Nuttall, A. and Doherty, J. (2014) Disaffected boys and the achievement gap: the ‘wallpaper effect’ and what is hidden by a focus on school results.  The Urban Review, 46 (5), pp.800-815.

Conference Papers and Presentations

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2018) “No child is pre-ordained to fail” Teachers questioning policy assumptions.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Newcastle, 11-13 September.

Nuttall, A. and Tobbell, C. (2017) Trainee teachers’ perspectives on practitioner enquiry.  Paper presented at the 8th TEAN Conference: Thinking Deeply about Education, Birmingham, 11-12 May.

Nuttall, A. (2017) Assessment at primary level: quality, comparability and improving secondary readiness.  A perspective from ITE.  Speech at the Westminster Education Forum Keynote Seminar: Next steps for reforming primary education: effective teaching practices, assessment and accountably, London, 18 January.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Deficit narratives and lived realities: whose poverty is it?  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the Australian Association for Research in Education, Melbourne, 27 November – 1 December.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Disenfranchised boys’ reflections on their urban schooling experience: “What a Waste!”.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Philpott, C., Beckett, L. and Wrigley, T. (2016) Collaborative practitioner inquiry: making a difference to urban schools.  Innovation session (school visits and symposium) presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Finn, B. and Beckett, L. (2015) Teachers’ constructions of poverty effects: Their research evidence.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Belfast, 15-17 September.

Nuttall, A. (2014) Teachers’ voice on disengaged boys: the role of one teacher-researcher in an English primary school. Paper presented at the Joint Australian Association for Research in Education and the New Zealand Association for Research in Education Conference, Brisbane, 30 November – 4 December.

Andrew Marotta is a D.Phil candidate in the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. He holds an A.A. in Social Sciences from Broward Community College, and a B.A. in Individualized Studies from the Gallatin School of Individualized Studies, New York University and an M.A. and Ed.M. in Counseling Psychology and School Counseling from Teachers College, Columbia University.

Andrew’s research interests include social and emotional learning, peer mentorship, existential therapy / philosophy, curriculum design for school counselors, and applied ethics in computer science. Andrew’s thesis examines how literature and philosophy can be used to nurture social and emotional learning through group counseling among high school students. He has also worked as a school counselor, teaching artist, and curriculum designer.

Presently, Andrew is designing joint humanities and applied ethics workshops for computer and data science college majors, using social and emotional learning concepts as the pedagogical foundation.

Abigail’s research explores the role of education in students’ personal development and how this can be supported by policy, curricula, initial teacher education and teacher professional development. In particular she focuses on history education, citizenship education and peace education as vehicles for dialogue. These opportunities for students to engage with social questions are vital for building cohesive societies. This flows from the recognition that traditional forums for developing public understanding, such as post-conflict truth commissions, need to be complemented by intergenerational and educational perspectives.

Abigail has taught History, Politics, Debating as well as Relationships and Sex Education to secondary school students in South Africa, England and the USA.

She holds postgraduate degrees in Post-Conflict and Transitional Justice (University of Cape Town), in Education, Globalisation and International Development (University of Cambridge) and in African Studies (University of Oxford). She is a Rhodes Scholar, Mandela-Magdalene Scholar and Mandela-Rhodes Scholar.

Title of thesis

GCSE History, Policy Reform and Student Development: How students and teachers navigate the thematic study “Empires, Migration and the People”

Conference papers

Teaching Migration, Belonging, and Empire in Secondary Schools: evaluation of a teacher professional development program, (2019) History Educators International Research Network Conference, Lead author: Dr Jason Todd, University of Vienna, Austria.

“The Problems and Prospects of Teaching South Africa’s Recent History: Teachers’ Perspectives”, (2018) Sustainability, peace and education – Exploring promise and practice: BAICE 20th Anniversary Symposium, University of Bristol, England.

“New Generations, Old Wounds: Learning History at Home and School in Northern Ireland”, (2018) European Social Science and History Conference,
Queens University Belfast, Northern Ireland.

“The Methodological Challenges of Investigating the Role of History Teaching in Peacebuilding”, (2017), Present Past: Time, Memory, and the Negotiation of Historical Justice Conference, Columbia University, United States of America.

“Teaching South Africa’s Truth and Reconciliation Commission”, (2017) European Conference on African Studies, Universität Basel, Switzerland.

Research Assistant Publications

Review of the evidence on feedback in primary and secondary schools, (forthcoming, 2021) for the Education Endowment Foundation, Lead author: Prof Velda Elliott.

Teaching Migration, Belonging, and Empire in Secondary Schools, (2019), for Runnymede Trust and the European Research Council, Lead authors: Kimberly McIntosh, Dr Jason Todd and Prof Nandini Das.

Gender and the Politics of Reconciliation (2016), for The Institute for Justice and Reconciliation, Lead author: Dr Helen Scanlon

SOLE AUTHOR PUBLICATIONS

‘Transitions, Truth-Telling and Teaching History’, Cambridge Open-Review Educational Research e-Journal, Vol. 4, 2017.

Alice Tawell is an ESRC funded DPhil Student, co-supervised across the Department of Education and Centre for Criminology at the University of Oxford.

Supervisors: Professor Harry Daniels and Dr Rachel Condry.

Alice’s research focuses broadly on the enactment of school exclusion policy in England.

Prior to starting her doctoral studies, Alice gained a BSc in Sociology from the University of Bath and an MSc in Education (Research Training) from the University of Oxford.

As part of her undergraduate degree, Alice undertook a placement year working with Professor Kathy Sylva in the Families, Effective Learning and Literacy Research Group at the Department of Education, University of Oxford. After completing her degree, Alice returned to the department and has worked as a Research Officer on a number of different research projects since 2014. Most recently Alice has worked as part of the Excluded Lives Research Team on two projects exploring exclusion from school from a multidisciplinary perspective. In 2017 she was awarded a Seed-corn Small Grant Award to co-lead a pilot project exploring student collaborative networks with Hau Ming Tse. Alice also co-convenes the Qualitative Methods Hub in the department.

Outside of the department, Alice has sat on the Advisory Board for the Children Missing Education research project (2016-2017) at the National Children’s Bureau (NCB) and has been a member of the NCB Partnership for Well Being and Mental Health in Schools since 2016. She also sits on the Transparency on Exclusions Steering Group.

In 2017 Alice received funding from the Grand Union Doctoral Training Partnership placement scheme to conduct a Knowledge Exchange Internship with the Early Years Analysis and Research Unit at the Department for Education, and in 2018 Alice was elected the Co-President of the Grand Union ESRC Scholar’s Association, representing ESRC students from the University of Oxford, Brunel and The Open University.

Ashmita graduated from Boston University in 2008 with a BSc. in Biomedical Engineering, after which she worked in Research & Development for 6 years.

It is here that she decided to make the leap from formulation chemistry to STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Math) Education after having worked on programs involving increasing diversity in STEM in schools.

She received her Master’s from Boston University in 2015 in Education Policy. Her research interests include: STEM education policy; Assessment; Further Education; Higher Education; Science education pedagogy

Originally from Indonesia, Tracey has spent the last decade studying in the UK and working about multicultural education in Indonesia.

She is fully funded by the Indonesia Endowment Fund for Education (LPDP). Her doctoral research explores the ways Indonesian schools teach and accommodate the national vision of multicultural Indonesia, “Bhinneka Tunggal Ika” (Unity-in-Diversity). By using a two-tier case study research approach (case studies of six schools and of two provinces), it presents nuanced and critical account of the ways head teachers, teachers, students and parents from six state and private schools in Jakarta and Bali with different mixes of pupil ethnicity and religiosity understand and accommodate the vision of diversity into educational practices. Despite the highly contextual focus, the research offers a critical view into the complex role of schools in today’s era of globalisation in providing quality education for all and at the same time creating citizens who are inclusive and respectful towards others.

Tracey completed her MSc in Comparative and International Education at the University of Oxford in 2011 and her honours BA in Mathematics and Education Studies at the University of Cambridge in 2010. Upon completing her study in the UK, she returned to Indonesia to work in an educational foundation Sultan Iskandar Muda in Medan, Indonesia as a member of the Board of Directors in the Foundation – a position which she is still holding until today. She is responsible for overlooking the development and implementation of multicultural education and teacher development programme.

During her tenure, she has worked alongside the head teachers and teachers across all educational levels (from pre-school until high school) and produced books on the praxis of multicultural education in the school setting.

Title of Thesis

Accommodating a vision of diversity in different school contexts: “Unity-in-Diversity” in Indonesia

Publications
Journal Article
  • Harjatanaya, T.Y. & Hoon, C.Y. (2018) Politics of multicultural education in post-Suharto Indonesia: a study of the Chinese minority. Compare: A Journal of Comparative and International Education
Edited Book
  • Harjatanaya, T.Y. (2015) (2nd Edition) Merawat Keberagaman: Praksis Pendidikan Multikultural Perguruan Sultan Iskandar Muda (Fostering Diversity: Praxis of Multicultural Education in Sultan Iskandar Muda). Medan: YPSIM.
Book Chapter
  • Harjatanaya, T.Y. (2018). Akses dan Kesamaan dalam Pendidikan Vokasi (Access and Equality in Vocational Education). In Ferary, D. (2018) Sistem Pendidikan Vokasi di Inggris (Vocational Education System in England) (ed.). London: Kantor Atase Pendidikan dan Kebudayaan, Kedutaan Besar Indonesia (Indonesian Embassy) London, p. 121-138.

Katy is a Deputy Headteacher and the founder of a Leadership and Coaching Institute, which she now co-directs.

Katy is an Associate Fellow at the Oxford Character Project and a Research Associate at the Oxford University Wellbeing Research Centre. She is the co-founder of Global Social Leaders, a leadership programme which has participants in 105 countries, all passionate about creating and sustaining positive change in the world.

Title of Thesis

How could school leaders improve the flourishing and wellbeing of teaching staff?

Books
  • Granville-Chapman, K. and Bidston, E (2020) Leader: Know, love and inspire your people. Carmarthen: Crownhouse Publishing
Book Chapters
  •  Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ In White, M. & McCallum, F. (Ed.s) Wellbeing and Resilience Education: Covid-19 And Its Impact on Education Systems. Routledge
Publications
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘Purpose and Leadership in Education and Beyond’. The Education Exchange. Available from: https://theeducation.exchange/purpose-and-leadership-in-education-and-beyond/
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘The Three Secrets of COVID-era Leadership’. Times Education Supplement. Available from: https://www.tes.com/news/three-secrets-covid-era-school-leadership
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2016) ‘Assessing the Impact of a Teacher Leadership Programme in a Teaching Schools Alliance. Journal of Teacher Action Research
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2014) ‘The Afghan conflict: causes and consequences.’ Geography Review 28(1): 22-27
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2013) What are the psychological factors that affect students’ academic resilience and can teachers influence these? Unpublished thesis
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘Unlocking Leadership Potential’, The Magazine of the Boarding School’s Association, 33: 42-45
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2009) ‘Learning to Lead’, Leader, The Education Leader Magazine 41: 22-25
Presentations
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2019) ‘How could leaders improve the flourishing of their teams?’ ‘Stowe Ed Conference’, Forthcoming: 7 Jan 2019
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2018) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education: 21 Jun 2018
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2017) ‘How can school leaders improve teacher flourishing?’ ‘Doing Education Differently Conference’, University of Oxford, Department of Education, 11 Mar 17
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2016) ‘Developing school leaders who enable teachers to flourish’ The Telegraph Festival of Education 23 Jun 16
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Developing leadership in pupils and teachers’ High School Affiliated to Renmin University of China, Beijing. 20 Oct 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Resilience for leaders.’ Global Social Leaders World Summit. 16 Aug 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Emotional Intelligence for Leaders.’ Global Leaders in Education. 12 Aug 15
  • Coates, S.; Fraser, H.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J.; and Nasim, A. (2015) ‘Breaking through the glass ceiling – how can schools empower our girls to become leaders?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education. 19 Jun 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. ‘Developing Leadership in Schools’ (2015). G20 Schools Conference. International conference for head teachers. 11 Apr 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2018) ‘Introduction’, Wellington Leadership Institute: Festival of Leadership. Mar 2012-15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘How the Young Learn to Lead’, Raffles Institution (Singapore) -Purdue University (USA) Education Forum on Gifted & Talented Youth 2012. Singapore. 15 Mar 12
  • Draper, D.; Dyer, R.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Schools’. Presentation for a meeting about pupil leadership and character development at 10 Downing Street. 16 Nov 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Young People’. Presentation for a meeting about leadership and character at 10 Downing Street. 7 Mar 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K. & Seldon, A. (2012) ‘Introduction’, Leading Your School in the 21st Century. 7 Feb 12

Prior to starting his DPhil, Eddy worked as a primary school teacher in Bristol, where he also completed his MSc in Educational Research.

He is particularly interested in the culture of high stakes, standardised testing, and how this might perpetuate existing inequalities in schools. His research focuses specifically on the interaction between knowledge, policy and pedagogy in the context of Literacy education.

 

Amanda is completing a part-time DPhil, alongside working in Initial Teacher Education at Leeds Trinity University.

Her research is focused on understanding tensions, contradictions and conflicts that teachers in disadvantaged schools may experience when they engage in research activity.  Her research focus is influenced by her own experiences of working as a research-active teacher in disadvantaged schools, and recent work in teacher education to support experienced and beginning teachers in developing their own research activities.

One of the aims of Amanda’s research is to construct a framework to support teachers in pursuing research activity and critical scholarship work which articulates with wider social movements to address issues of poverty and disadvantage in schools.

Title of Thesis

Teachers’ perspectives on tensions between policy, practice and research in disadvantaged schools

Publications 

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2017) A ‘usable past’ of teacher education in England: history in JET’s anniversary issue. Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy, 43 (5), pp.616-627.

Nuttall, A. (2016) The ‘curriculum challenge’: Moving towards the ‘Storyline’ approach in a case study urban primary school.  Improving Schools, 19 (2), pp. 154-166.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Learning {Re}imagined: A review.  Primary First, 15, pp. 17-18.

Nuttall, A. and Doherty, J. (2014) Disaffected boys and the achievement gap: the ‘wallpaper effect’ and what is hidden by a focus on school results.  The Urban Review, 46 (5), pp.800-815.

Conference Papers and Presentations

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2018) “No child is pre-ordained to fail” Teachers questioning policy assumptions.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Newcastle, 11-13 September.

Nuttall, A. and Tobbell, C. (2017) Trainee teachers’ perspectives on practitioner enquiry.  Paper presented at the 8th TEAN Conference: Thinking Deeply about Education, Birmingham, 11-12 May.

Nuttall, A. (2017) Assessment at primary level: quality, comparability and improving secondary readiness.  A perspective from ITE.  Speech at the Westminster Education Forum Keynote Seminar: Next steps for reforming primary education: effective teaching practices, assessment and accountably, London, 18 January.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Deficit narratives and lived realities: whose poverty is it?  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the Australian Association for Research in Education, Melbourne, 27 November – 1 December.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Disenfranchised boys’ reflections on their urban schooling experience: “What a Waste!”.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Philpott, C., Beckett, L. and Wrigley, T. (2016) Collaborative practitioner inquiry: making a difference to urban schools.  Innovation session (school visits and symposium) presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Finn, B. and Beckett, L. (2015) Teachers’ constructions of poverty effects: Their research evidence.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Belfast, 15-17 September.

Nuttall, A. (2014) Teachers’ voice on disengaged boys: the role of one teacher-researcher in an English primary school. Paper presented at the Joint Australian Association for Research in Education and the New Zealand Association for Research in Education Conference, Brisbane, 30 November – 4 December.

Andrew Marotta is a D.Phil candidate in the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. He holds an A.A. in Social Sciences from Broward Community College, and a B.A. in Individualized Studies from the Gallatin School of Individualized Studies, New York University and an M.A. and Ed.M. in Counseling Psychology and School Counseling from Teachers College, Columbia University.

Andrew’s research interests include social and emotional learning, peer mentorship, existential therapy / philosophy, curriculum design for school counselors, and applied ethics in computer science. Andrew’s thesis examines how literature and philosophy can be used to nurture social and emotional learning through group counseling among high school students. He has also worked as a school counselor, teaching artist, and curriculum designer.

Presently, Andrew is designing joint humanities and applied ethics workshops for computer and data science college majors, using social and emotional learning concepts as the pedagogical foundation.

Abigail’s research explores the role of education in students’ personal development and how this can be supported by policy, curricula, initial teacher education and teacher professional development. In particular she focuses on history education, citizenship education and peace education as vehicles for dialogue. These opportunities for students to engage with social questions are vital for building cohesive societies. This flows from the recognition that traditional forums for developing public understanding, such as post-conflict truth commissions, need to be complemented by intergenerational and educational perspectives.

Abigail has taught History, Politics, Debating as well as Relationships and Sex Education to secondary school students in South Africa, England and the USA.

She holds postgraduate degrees in Post-Conflict and Transitional Justice (University of Cape Town), in Education, Globalisation and International Development (University of Cambridge) and in African Studies (University of Oxford). She is a Rhodes Scholar, Mandela-Magdalene Scholar and Mandela-Rhodes Scholar.

Title of thesis

GCSE History, Policy Reform and Student Development: How students and teachers navigate the thematic study “Empires, Migration and the People”

Conference papers

Teaching Migration, Belonging, and Empire in Secondary Schools: evaluation of a teacher professional development program, (2019) History Educators International Research Network Conference, Lead author: Dr Jason Todd, University of Vienna, Austria.

“The Problems and Prospects of Teaching South Africa’s Recent History: Teachers’ Perspectives”, (2018) Sustainability, peace and education – Exploring promise and practice: BAICE 20th Anniversary Symposium, University of Bristol, England.

“New Generations, Old Wounds: Learning History at Home and School in Northern Ireland”, (2018) European Social Science and History Conference,
Queens University Belfast, Northern Ireland.

“The Methodological Challenges of Investigating the Role of History Teaching in Peacebuilding”, (2017), Present Past: Time, Memory, and the Negotiation of Historical Justice Conference, Columbia University, United States of America.

“Teaching South Africa’s Truth and Reconciliation Commission”, (2017) European Conference on African Studies, Universität Basel, Switzerland.

Research Assistant Publications

Review of the evidence on feedback in primary and secondary schools, (forthcoming, 2021) for the Education Endowment Foundation, Lead author: Prof Velda Elliott.

Teaching Migration, Belonging, and Empire in Secondary Schools, (2019), for Runnymede Trust and the European Research Council, Lead authors: Kimberly McIntosh, Dr Jason Todd and Prof Nandini Das.

Gender and the Politics of Reconciliation (2016), for The Institute for Justice and Reconciliation, Lead author: Dr Helen Scanlon

SOLE AUTHOR PUBLICATIONS

‘Transitions, Truth-Telling and Teaching History’, Cambridge Open-Review Educational Research e-Journal, Vol. 4, 2017.

Alice Tawell is an ESRC funded DPhil Student, co-supervised across the Department of Education and Centre for Criminology at the University of Oxford.

Supervisors: Professor Harry Daniels and Dr Rachel Condry.

Alice’s research focuses broadly on the enactment of school exclusion policy in England.

Prior to starting her doctoral studies, Alice gained a BSc in Sociology from the University of Bath and an MSc in Education (Research Training) from the University of Oxford.

As part of her undergraduate degree, Alice undertook a placement year working with Professor Kathy Sylva in the Families, Effective Learning and Literacy Research Group at the Department of Education, University of Oxford. After completing her degree, Alice returned to the department and has worked as a Research Officer on a number of different research projects since 2014. Most recently Alice has worked as part of the Excluded Lives Research Team on two projects exploring exclusion from school from a multidisciplinary perspective. In 2017 she was awarded a Seed-corn Small Grant Award to co-lead a pilot project exploring student collaborative networks with Hau Ming Tse. Alice also co-convenes the Qualitative Methods Hub in the department.

Outside of the department, Alice has sat on the Advisory Board for the Children Missing Education research project (2016-2017) at the National Children’s Bureau (NCB) and has been a member of the NCB Partnership for Well Being and Mental Health in Schools since 2016. She also sits on the Transparency on Exclusions Steering Group.

In 2017 Alice received funding from the Grand Union Doctoral Training Partnership placement scheme to conduct a Knowledge Exchange Internship with the Early Years Analysis and Research Unit at the Department for Education, and in 2018 Alice was elected the Co-President of the Grand Union ESRC Scholar’s Association, representing ESRC students from the University of Oxford, Brunel and The Open University.

Ashmita graduated from Boston University in 2008 with a BSc. in Biomedical Engineering, after which she worked in Research & Development for 6 years.

It is here that she decided to make the leap from formulation chemistry to STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Math) Education after having worked on programs involving increasing diversity in STEM in schools.

She received her Master’s from Boston University in 2015 in Education Policy. Her research interests include: STEM education policy; Assessment; Further Education; Higher Education; Science education pedagogy

Originally from Indonesia, Tracey has spent the last decade studying in the UK and working about multicultural education in Indonesia.

She is fully funded by the Indonesia Endowment Fund for Education (LPDP). Her doctoral research explores the ways Indonesian schools teach and accommodate the national vision of multicultural Indonesia, “Bhinneka Tunggal Ika” (Unity-in-Diversity). By using a two-tier case study research approach (case studies of six schools and of two provinces), it presents nuanced and critical account of the ways head teachers, teachers, students and parents from six state and private schools in Jakarta and Bali with different mixes of pupil ethnicity and religiosity understand and accommodate the vision of diversity into educational practices. Despite the highly contextual focus, the research offers a critical view into the complex role of schools in today’s era of globalisation in providing quality education for all and at the same time creating citizens who are inclusive and respectful towards others.

Tracey completed her MSc in Comparative and International Education at the University of Oxford in 2011 and her honours BA in Mathematics and Education Studies at the University of Cambridge in 2010. Upon completing her study in the UK, she returned to Indonesia to work in an educational foundation Sultan Iskandar Muda in Medan, Indonesia as a member of the Board of Directors in the Foundation – a position which she is still holding until today. She is responsible for overlooking the development and implementation of multicultural education and teacher development programme.

During her tenure, she has worked alongside the head teachers and teachers across all educational levels (from pre-school until high school) and produced books on the praxis of multicultural education in the school setting.

Title of Thesis

Accommodating a vision of diversity in different school contexts: “Unity-in-Diversity” in Indonesia

Publications
Journal Article
  • Harjatanaya, T.Y. & Hoon, C.Y. (2018) Politics of multicultural education in post-Suharto Indonesia: a study of the Chinese minority. Compare: A Journal of Comparative and International Education
Edited Book
  • Harjatanaya, T.Y. (2015) (2nd Edition) Merawat Keberagaman: Praksis Pendidikan Multikultural Perguruan Sultan Iskandar Muda (Fostering Diversity: Praxis of Multicultural Education in Sultan Iskandar Muda). Medan: YPSIM.
Book Chapter
  • Harjatanaya, T.Y. (2018). Akses dan Kesamaan dalam Pendidikan Vokasi (Access and Equality in Vocational Education). In Ferary, D. (2018) Sistem Pendidikan Vokasi di Inggris (Vocational Education System in England) (ed.). London: Kantor Atase Pendidikan dan Kebudayaan, Kedutaan Besar Indonesia (Indonesian Embassy) London, p. 121-138.

Katy is a Deputy Headteacher and the founder of a Leadership and Coaching Institute, which she now co-directs.

Katy is an Associate Fellow at the Oxford Character Project and a Research Associate at the Oxford University Wellbeing Research Centre. She is the co-founder of Global Social Leaders, a leadership programme which has participants in 105 countries, all passionate about creating and sustaining positive change in the world.

Title of Thesis

How could school leaders improve the flourishing and wellbeing of teaching staff?

Books
  • Granville-Chapman, K. and Bidston, E (2020) Leader: Know, love and inspire your people. Carmarthen: Crownhouse Publishing
Book Chapters
  •  Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ In White, M. & McCallum, F. (Ed.s) Wellbeing and Resilience Education: Covid-19 And Its Impact on Education Systems. Routledge
Publications
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘Purpose and Leadership in Education and Beyond’. The Education Exchange. Available from: https://theeducation.exchange/purpose-and-leadership-in-education-and-beyond/
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘The Three Secrets of COVID-era Leadership’. Times Education Supplement. Available from: https://www.tes.com/news/three-secrets-covid-era-school-leadership
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2016) ‘Assessing the Impact of a Teacher Leadership Programme in a Teaching Schools Alliance. Journal of Teacher Action Research
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2014) ‘The Afghan conflict: causes and consequences.’ Geography Review 28(1): 22-27
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2013) What are the psychological factors that affect students’ academic resilience and can teachers influence these? Unpublished thesis
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘Unlocking Leadership Potential’, The Magazine of the Boarding School’s Association, 33: 42-45
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2009) ‘Learning to Lead’, Leader, The Education Leader Magazine 41: 22-25
Presentations
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2019) ‘How could leaders improve the flourishing of their teams?’ ‘Stowe Ed Conference’, Forthcoming: 7 Jan 2019
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2018) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education: 21 Jun 2018
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2017) ‘How can school leaders improve teacher flourishing?’ ‘Doing Education Differently Conference’, University of Oxford, Department of Education, 11 Mar 17
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2016) ‘Developing school leaders who enable teachers to flourish’ The Telegraph Festival of Education 23 Jun 16
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Developing leadership in pupils and teachers’ High School Affiliated to Renmin University of China, Beijing. 20 Oct 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Resilience for leaders.’ Global Social Leaders World Summit. 16 Aug 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Emotional Intelligence for Leaders.’ Global Leaders in Education. 12 Aug 15
  • Coates, S.; Fraser, H.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J.; and Nasim, A. (2015) ‘Breaking through the glass ceiling – how can schools empower our girls to become leaders?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education. 19 Jun 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. ‘Developing Leadership in Schools’ (2015). G20 Schools Conference. International conference for head teachers. 11 Apr 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2018) ‘Introduction’, Wellington Leadership Institute: Festival of Leadership. Mar 2012-15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘How the Young Learn to Lead’, Raffles Institution (Singapore) -Purdue University (USA) Education Forum on Gifted & Talented Youth 2012. Singapore. 15 Mar 12
  • Draper, D.; Dyer, R.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Schools’. Presentation for a meeting about pupil leadership and character development at 10 Downing Street. 16 Nov 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Young People’. Presentation for a meeting about leadership and character at 10 Downing Street. 7 Mar 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K. & Seldon, A. (2012) ‘Introduction’, Leading Your School in the 21st Century. 7 Feb 12

Prior to starting his DPhil, Eddy worked as a primary school teacher in Bristol, where he also completed his MSc in Educational Research.

He is particularly interested in the culture of high stakes, standardised testing, and how this might perpetuate existing inequalities in schools. His research focuses specifically on the interaction between knowledge, policy and pedagogy in the context of Literacy education.

 

Amanda is completing a part-time DPhil, alongside working in Initial Teacher Education at Leeds Trinity University.

Her research is focused on understanding tensions, contradictions and conflicts that teachers in disadvantaged schools may experience when they engage in research activity.  Her research focus is influenced by her own experiences of working as a research-active teacher in disadvantaged schools, and recent work in teacher education to support experienced and beginning teachers in developing their own research activities.

One of the aims of Amanda’s research is to construct a framework to support teachers in pursuing research activity and critical scholarship work which articulates with wider social movements to address issues of poverty and disadvantage in schools.

Title of Thesis

Teachers’ perspectives on tensions between policy, practice and research in disadvantaged schools

Publications 

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2017) A ‘usable past’ of teacher education in England: history in JET’s anniversary issue. Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy, 43 (5), pp.616-627.

Nuttall, A. (2016) The ‘curriculum challenge’: Moving towards the ‘Storyline’ approach in a case study urban primary school.  Improving Schools, 19 (2), pp. 154-166.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Learning {Re}imagined: A review.  Primary First, 15, pp. 17-18.

Nuttall, A. and Doherty, J. (2014) Disaffected boys and the achievement gap: the ‘wallpaper effect’ and what is hidden by a focus on school results.  The Urban Review, 46 (5), pp.800-815.

Conference Papers and Presentations

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2018) “No child is pre-ordained to fail” Teachers questioning policy assumptions.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Newcastle, 11-13 September.

Nuttall, A. and Tobbell, C. (2017) Trainee teachers’ perspectives on practitioner enquiry.  Paper presented at the 8th TEAN Conference: Thinking Deeply about Education, Birmingham, 11-12 May.

Nuttall, A. (2017) Assessment at primary level: quality, comparability and improving secondary readiness.  A perspective from ITE.  Speech at the Westminster Education Forum Keynote Seminar: Next steps for reforming primary education: effective teaching practices, assessment and accountably, London, 18 January.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Deficit narratives and lived realities: whose poverty is it?  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the Australian Association for Research in Education, Melbourne, 27 November – 1 December.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Disenfranchised boys’ reflections on their urban schooling experience: “What a Waste!”.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Philpott, C., Beckett, L. and Wrigley, T. (2016) Collaborative practitioner inquiry: making a difference to urban schools.  Innovation session (school visits and symposium) presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Finn, B. and Beckett, L. (2015) Teachers’ constructions of poverty effects: Their research evidence.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Belfast, 15-17 September.

Nuttall, A. (2014) Teachers’ voice on disengaged boys: the role of one teacher-researcher in an English primary school. Paper presented at the Joint Australian Association for Research in Education and the New Zealand Association for Research in Education Conference, Brisbane, 30 November – 4 December.

Andrew Marotta is a D.Phil candidate in the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. He holds an A.A. in Social Sciences from Broward Community College, and a B.A. in Individualized Studies from the Gallatin School of Individualized Studies, New York University and an M.A. and Ed.M. in Counseling Psychology and School Counseling from Teachers College, Columbia University.

Andrew’s research interests include social and emotional learning, peer mentorship, existential therapy / philosophy, curriculum design for school counselors, and applied ethics in computer science. Andrew’s thesis examines how literature and philosophy can be used to nurture social and emotional learning through group counseling among high school students. He has also worked as a school counselor, teaching artist, and curriculum designer.

Presently, Andrew is designing joint humanities and applied ethics workshops for computer and data science college majors, using social and emotional learning concepts as the pedagogical foundation.

Abigail’s research explores the role of education in students’ personal development and how this can be supported by policy, curricula, initial teacher education and teacher professional development. In particular she focuses on history education, citizenship education and peace education as vehicles for dialogue. These opportunities for students to engage with social questions are vital for building cohesive societies. This flows from the recognition that traditional forums for developing public understanding, such as post-conflict truth commissions, need to be complemented by intergenerational and educational perspectives.

Abigail has taught History, Politics, Debating as well as Relationships and Sex Education to secondary school students in South Africa, England and the USA.

She holds postgraduate degrees in Post-Conflict and Transitional Justice (University of Cape Town), in Education, Globalisation and International Development (University of Cambridge) and in African Studies (University of Oxford). She is a Rhodes Scholar, Mandela-Magdalene Scholar and Mandela-Rhodes Scholar.

Title of thesis

GCSE History, Policy Reform and Student Development: How students and teachers navigate the thematic study “Empires, Migration and the People”

Conference papers

Teaching Migration, Belonging, and Empire in Secondary Schools: evaluation of a teacher professional development program, (2019) History Educators International Research Network Conference, Lead author: Dr Jason Todd, University of Vienna, Austria.

“The Problems and Prospects of Teaching South Africa’s Recent History: Teachers’ Perspectives”, (2018) Sustainability, peace and education – Exploring promise and practice: BAICE 20th Anniversary Symposium, University of Bristol, England.

“New Generations, Old Wounds: Learning History at Home and School in Northern Ireland”, (2018) European Social Science and History Conference,
Queens University Belfast, Northern Ireland.

“The Methodological Challenges of Investigating the Role of History Teaching in Peacebuilding”, (2017), Present Past: Time, Memory, and the Negotiation of Historical Justice Conference, Columbia University, United States of America.

“Teaching South Africa’s Truth and Reconciliation Commission”, (2017) European Conference on African Studies, Universität Basel, Switzerland.

Research Assistant Publications

Review of the evidence on feedback in primary and secondary schools, (forthcoming, 2021) for the Education Endowment Foundation, Lead author: Prof Velda Elliott.

Teaching Migration, Belonging, and Empire in Secondary Schools, (2019), for Runnymede Trust and the European Research Council, Lead authors: Kimberly McIntosh, Dr Jason Todd and Prof Nandini Das.

Gender and the Politics of Reconciliation (2016), for The Institute for Justice and Reconciliation, Lead author: Dr Helen Scanlon

SOLE AUTHOR PUBLICATIONS

‘Transitions, Truth-Telling and Teaching History’, Cambridge Open-Review Educational Research e-Journal, Vol. 4, 2017.

Alice Tawell is an ESRC funded DPhil Student, co-supervised across the Department of Education and Centre for Criminology at the University of Oxford.

Supervisors: Professor Harry Daniels and Dr Rachel Condry.

Alice’s research focuses broadly on the enactment of school exclusion policy in England.

Prior to starting her doctoral studies, Alice gained a BSc in Sociology from the University of Bath and an MSc in Education (Research Training) from the University of Oxford.

As part of her undergraduate degree, Alice undertook a placement year working with Professor Kathy Sylva in the Families, Effective Learning and Literacy Research Group at the Department of Education, University of Oxford. After completing her degree, Alice returned to the department and has worked as a Research Officer on a number of different research projects since 2014. Most recently Alice has worked as part of the Excluded Lives Research Team on two projects exploring exclusion from school from a multidisciplinary perspective. In 2017 she was awarded a Seed-corn Small Grant Award to co-lead a pilot project exploring student collaborative networks with Hau Ming Tse. Alice also co-convenes the Qualitative Methods Hub in the department.

Outside of the department, Alice has sat on the Advisory Board for the Children Missing Education research project (2016-2017) at the National Children’s Bureau (NCB) and has been a member of the NCB Partnership for Well Being and Mental Health in Schools since 2016. She also sits on the Transparency on Exclusions Steering Group.

In 2017 Alice received funding from the Grand Union Doctoral Training Partnership placement scheme to conduct a Knowledge Exchange Internship with the Early Years Analysis and Research Unit at the Department for Education, and in 2018 Alice was elected the Co-President of the Grand Union ESRC Scholar’s Association, representing ESRC students from the University of Oxford, Brunel and The Open University.

Ashmita graduated from Boston University in 2008 with a BSc. in Biomedical Engineering, after which she worked in Research & Development for 6 years.

It is here that she decided to make the leap from formulation chemistry to STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Math) Education after having worked on programs involving increasing diversity in STEM in schools.

She received her Master’s from Boston University in 2015 in Education Policy. Her research interests include: STEM education policy; Assessment; Further Education; Higher Education; Science education pedagogy

Originally from Indonesia, Tracey has spent the last decade studying in the UK and working about multicultural education in Indonesia.

She is fully funded by the Indonesia Endowment Fund for Education (LPDP). Her doctoral research explores the ways Indonesian schools teach and accommodate the national vision of multicultural Indonesia, “Bhinneka Tunggal Ika” (Unity-in-Diversity). By using a two-tier case study research approach (case studies of six schools and of two provinces), it presents nuanced and critical account of the ways head teachers, teachers, students and parents from six state and private schools in Jakarta and Bali with different mixes of pupil ethnicity and religiosity understand and accommodate the vision of diversity into educational practices. Despite the highly contextual focus, the research offers a critical view into the complex role of schools in today’s era of globalisation in providing quality education for all and at the same time creating citizens who are inclusive and respectful towards others.

Tracey completed her MSc in Comparative and International Education at the University of Oxford in 2011 and her honours BA in Mathematics and Education Studies at the University of Cambridge in 2010. Upon completing her study in the UK, she returned to Indonesia to work in an educational foundation Sultan Iskandar Muda in Medan, Indonesia as a member of the Board of Directors in the Foundation – a position which she is still holding until today. She is responsible for overlooking the development and implementation of multicultural education and teacher development programme.

During her tenure, she has worked alongside the head teachers and teachers across all educational levels (from pre-school until high school) and produced books on the praxis of multicultural education in the school setting.

Title of Thesis

Accommodating a vision of diversity in different school contexts: “Unity-in-Diversity” in Indonesia

Publications
Journal Article
  • Harjatanaya, T.Y. & Hoon, C.Y. (2018) Politics of multicultural education in post-Suharto Indonesia: a study of the Chinese minority. Compare: A Journal of Comparative and International Education
Edited Book
  • Harjatanaya, T.Y. (2015) (2nd Edition) Merawat Keberagaman: Praksis Pendidikan Multikultural Perguruan Sultan Iskandar Muda (Fostering Diversity: Praxis of Multicultural Education in Sultan Iskandar Muda). Medan: YPSIM.
Book Chapter
  • Harjatanaya, T.Y. (2018). Akses dan Kesamaan dalam Pendidikan Vokasi (Access and Equality in Vocational Education). In Ferary, D. (2018) Sistem Pendidikan Vokasi di Inggris (Vocational Education System in England) (ed.). London: Kantor Atase Pendidikan dan Kebudayaan, Kedutaan Besar Indonesia (Indonesian Embassy) London, p. 121-138.

Katy is a Deputy Headteacher and the founder of a Leadership and Coaching Institute, which she now co-directs.

Katy is an Associate Fellow at the Oxford Character Project and a Research Associate at the Oxford University Wellbeing Research Centre. She is the co-founder of Global Social Leaders, a leadership programme which has participants in 105 countries, all passionate about creating and sustaining positive change in the world.

Title of Thesis

How could school leaders improve the flourishing and wellbeing of teaching staff?

Books
  • Granville-Chapman, K. and Bidston, E (2020) Leader: Know, love and inspire your people. Carmarthen: Crownhouse Publishing
Book Chapters
  •  Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ In White, M. & McCallum, F. (Ed.s) Wellbeing and Resilience Education: Covid-19 And Its Impact on Education Systems. Routledge
Publications
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘Purpose and Leadership in Education and Beyond’. The Education Exchange. Available from: https://theeducation.exchange/purpose-and-leadership-in-education-and-beyond/
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘The Three Secrets of COVID-era Leadership’. Times Education Supplement. Available from: https://www.tes.com/news/three-secrets-covid-era-school-leadership
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2016) ‘Assessing the Impact of a Teacher Leadership Programme in a Teaching Schools Alliance. Journal of Teacher Action Research
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2014) ‘The Afghan conflict: causes and consequences.’ Geography Review 28(1): 22-27
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2013) What are the psychological factors that affect students’ academic resilience and can teachers influence these? Unpublished thesis
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘Unlocking Leadership Potential’, The Magazine of the Boarding School’s Association, 33: 42-45
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2009) ‘Learning to Lead’, Leader, The Education Leader Magazine 41: 22-25
Presentations
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2019) ‘How could leaders improve the flourishing of their teams?’ ‘Stowe Ed Conference’, Forthcoming: 7 Jan 2019
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2018) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education: 21 Jun 2018
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2017) ‘How can school leaders improve teacher flourishing?’ ‘Doing Education Differently Conference’, University of Oxford, Department of Education, 11 Mar 17
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2016) ‘Developing school leaders who enable teachers to flourish’ The Telegraph Festival of Education 23 Jun 16
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Developing leadership in pupils and teachers’ High School Affiliated to Renmin University of China, Beijing. 20 Oct 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Resilience for leaders.’ Global Social Leaders World Summit. 16 Aug 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Emotional Intelligence for Leaders.’ Global Leaders in Education. 12 Aug 15
  • Coates, S.; Fraser, H.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J.; and Nasim, A. (2015) ‘Breaking through the glass ceiling – how can schools empower our girls to become leaders?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education. 19 Jun 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. ‘Developing Leadership in Schools’ (2015). G20 Schools Conference. International conference for head teachers. 11 Apr 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2018) ‘Introduction’, Wellington Leadership Institute: Festival of Leadership. Mar 2012-15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘How the Young Learn to Lead’, Raffles Institution (Singapore) -Purdue University (USA) Education Forum on Gifted & Talented Youth 2012. Singapore. 15 Mar 12
  • Draper, D.; Dyer, R.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Schools’. Presentation for a meeting about pupil leadership and character development at 10 Downing Street. 16 Nov 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Young People’. Presentation for a meeting about leadership and character at 10 Downing Street. 7 Mar 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K. & Seldon, A. (2012) ‘Introduction’, Leading Your School in the 21st Century. 7 Feb 12

Prior to starting his DPhil, Eddy worked as a primary school teacher in Bristol, where he also completed his MSc in Educational Research.

He is particularly interested in the culture of high stakes, standardised testing, and how this might perpetuate existing inequalities in schools. His research focuses specifically on the interaction between knowledge, policy and pedagogy in the context of Literacy education.

 

Amanda is completing a part-time DPhil, alongside working in Initial Teacher Education at Leeds Trinity University.

Her research is focused on understanding tensions, contradictions and conflicts that teachers in disadvantaged schools may experience when they engage in research activity.  Her research focus is influenced by her own experiences of working as a research-active teacher in disadvantaged schools, and recent work in teacher education to support experienced and beginning teachers in developing their own research activities.

One of the aims of Amanda’s research is to construct a framework to support teachers in pursuing research activity and critical scholarship work which articulates with wider social movements to address issues of poverty and disadvantage in schools.

Title of Thesis

Teachers’ perspectives on tensions between policy, practice and research in disadvantaged schools

Publications 

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2017) A ‘usable past’ of teacher education in England: history in JET’s anniversary issue. Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy, 43 (5), pp.616-627.

Nuttall, A. (2016) The ‘curriculum challenge’: Moving towards the ‘Storyline’ approach in a case study urban primary school.  Improving Schools, 19 (2), pp. 154-166.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Learning {Re}imagined: A review.  Primary First, 15, pp. 17-18.

Nuttall, A. and Doherty, J. (2014) Disaffected boys and the achievement gap: the ‘wallpaper effect’ and what is hidden by a focus on school results.  The Urban Review, 46 (5), pp.800-815.

Conference Papers and Presentations

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2018) “No child is pre-ordained to fail” Teachers questioning policy assumptions.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Newcastle, 11-13 September.

Nuttall, A. and Tobbell, C. (2017) Trainee teachers’ perspectives on practitioner enquiry.  Paper presented at the 8th TEAN Conference: Thinking Deeply about Education, Birmingham, 11-12 May.

Nuttall, A. (2017) Assessment at primary level: quality, comparability and improving secondary readiness.  A perspective from ITE.  Speech at the Westminster Education Forum Keynote Seminar: Next steps for reforming primary education: effective teaching practices, assessment and accountably, London, 18 January.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Deficit narratives and lived realities: whose poverty is it?  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the Australian Association for Research in Education, Melbourne, 27 November – 1 December.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Disenfranchised boys’ reflections on their urban schooling experience: “What a Waste!”.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Philpott, C., Beckett, L. and Wrigley, T. (2016) Collaborative practitioner inquiry: making a difference to urban schools.  Innovation session (school visits and symposium) presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Finn, B. and Beckett, L. (2015) Teachers’ constructions of poverty effects: Their research evidence.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Belfast, 15-17 September.

Nuttall, A. (2014) Teachers’ voice on disengaged boys: the role of one teacher-researcher in an English primary school. Paper presented at the Joint Australian Association for Research in Education and the New Zealand Association for Research in Education Conference, Brisbane, 30 November – 4 December.

Andrew Marotta is a D.Phil candidate in the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. He holds an A.A. in Social Sciences from Broward Community College, and a B.A. in Individualized Studies from the Gallatin School of Individualized Studies, New York University and an M.A. and Ed.M. in Counseling Psychology and School Counseling from Teachers College, Columbia University.

Andrew’s research interests include social and emotional learning, peer mentorship, existential therapy / philosophy, curriculum design for school counselors, and applied ethics in computer science. Andrew’s thesis examines how literature and philosophy can be used to nurture social and emotional learning through group counseling among high school students. He has also worked as a school counselor, teaching artist, and curriculum designer.

Presently, Andrew is designing joint humanities and applied ethics workshops for computer and data science college majors, using social and emotional learning concepts as the pedagogical foundation.

Abigail’s research explores the role of education in students’ personal development and how this can be supported by policy, curricula, initial teacher education and teacher professional development. In particular she focuses on history education, citizenship education and peace education as vehicles for dialogue. These opportunities for students to engage with social questions are vital for building cohesive societies. This flows from the recognition that traditional forums for developing public understanding, such as post-conflict truth commissions, need to be complemented by intergenerational and educational perspectives.

Abigail has taught History, Politics, Debating as well as Relationships and Sex Education to secondary school students in South Africa, England and the USA.

She holds postgraduate degrees in Post-Conflict and Transitional Justice (University of Cape Town), in Education, Globalisation and International Development (University of Cambridge) and in African Studies (University of Oxford). She is a Rhodes Scholar, Mandela-Magdalene Scholar and Mandela-Rhodes Scholar.

Title of thesis

GCSE History, Policy Reform and Student Development: How students and teachers navigate the thematic study “Empires, Migration and the People”

Conference papers

Teaching Migration, Belonging, and Empire in Secondary Schools: evaluation of a teacher professional development program, (2019) History Educators International Research Network Conference, Lead author: Dr Jason Todd, University of Vienna, Austria.

“The Problems and Prospects of Teaching South Africa’s Recent History: Teachers’ Perspectives”, (2018) Sustainability, peace and education – Exploring promise and practice: BAICE 20th Anniversary Symposium, University of Bristol, England.

“New Generations, Old Wounds: Learning History at Home and School in Northern Ireland”, (2018) European Social Science and History Conference,
Queens University Belfast, Northern Ireland.

“The Methodological Challenges of Investigating the Role of History Teaching in Peacebuilding”, (2017), Present Past: Time, Memory, and the Negotiation of Historical Justice Conference, Columbia University, United States of America.

“Teaching South Africa’s Truth and Reconciliation Commission”, (2017) European Conference on African Studies, Universität Basel, Switzerland.

Research Assistant Publications

Review of the evidence on feedback in primary and secondary schools, (forthcoming, 2021) for the Education Endowment Foundation, Lead author: Prof Velda Elliott.

Teaching Migration, Belonging, and Empire in Secondary Schools, (2019), for Runnymede Trust and the European Research Council, Lead authors: Kimberly McIntosh, Dr Jason Todd and Prof Nandini Das.

Gender and the Politics of Reconciliation (2016), for The Institute for Justice and Reconciliation, Lead author: Dr Helen Scanlon

SOLE AUTHOR PUBLICATIONS

‘Transitions, Truth-Telling and Teaching History’, Cambridge Open-Review Educational Research e-Journal, Vol. 4, 2017.

Alice Tawell is an ESRC funded DPhil Student, co-supervised across the Department of Education and Centre for Criminology at the University of Oxford.

Supervisors: Professor Harry Daniels and Dr Rachel Condry.

Alice’s research focuses broadly on the enactment of school exclusion policy in England.

Prior to starting her doctoral studies, Alice gained a BSc in Sociology from the University of Bath and an MSc in Education (Research Training) from the University of Oxford.

As part of her undergraduate degree, Alice undertook a placement year working with Professor Kathy Sylva in the Families, Effective Learning and Literacy Research Group at the Department of Education, University of Oxford. After completing her degree, Alice returned to the department and has worked as a Research Officer on a number of different research projects since 2014. Most recently Alice has worked as part of the Excluded Lives Research Team on two projects exploring exclusion from school from a multidisciplinary perspective. In 2017 she was awarded a Seed-corn Small Grant Award to co-lead a pilot project exploring student collaborative networks with Hau Ming Tse. Alice also co-convenes the Qualitative Methods Hub in the department.

Outside of the department, Alice has sat on the Advisory Board for the Children Missing Education research project (2016-2017) at the National Children’s Bureau (NCB) and has been a member of the NCB Partnership for Well Being and Mental Health in Schools since 2016. She also sits on the Transparency on Exclusions Steering Group.

In 2017 Alice received funding from the Grand Union Doctoral Training Partnership placement scheme to conduct a Knowledge Exchange Internship with the Early Years Analysis and Research Unit at the Department for Education, and in 2018 Alice was elected the Co-President of the Grand Union ESRC Scholar’s Association, representing ESRC students from the University of Oxford, Brunel and The Open University.

Ashmita graduated from Boston University in 2008 with a BSc. in Biomedical Engineering, after which she worked in Research & Development for 6 years.

It is here that she decided to make the leap from formulation chemistry to STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Math) Education after having worked on programs involving increasing diversity in STEM in schools.

She received her Master’s from Boston University in 2015 in Education Policy. Her research interests include: STEM education policy; Assessment; Further Education; Higher Education; Science education pedagogy

Originally from Indonesia, Tracey has spent the last decade studying in the UK and working about multicultural education in Indonesia.

She is fully funded by the Indonesia Endowment Fund for Education (LPDP). Her doctoral research explores the ways Indonesian schools teach and accommodate the national vision of multicultural Indonesia, “Bhinneka Tunggal Ika” (Unity-in-Diversity). By using a two-tier case study research approach (case studies of six schools and of two provinces), it presents nuanced and critical account of the ways head teachers, teachers, students and parents from six state and private schools in Jakarta and Bali with different mixes of pupil ethnicity and religiosity understand and accommodate the vision of diversity into educational practices. Despite the highly contextual focus, the research offers a critical view into the complex role of schools in today’s era of globalisation in providing quality education for all and at the same time creating citizens who are inclusive and respectful towards others.

Tracey completed her MSc in Comparative and International Education at the University of Oxford in 2011 and her honours BA in Mathematics and Education Studies at the University of Cambridge in 2010. Upon completing her study in the UK, she returned to Indonesia to work in an educational foundation Sultan Iskandar Muda in Medan, Indonesia as a member of the Board of Directors in the Foundation – a position which she is still holding until today. She is responsible for overlooking the development and implementation of multicultural education and teacher development programme.

During her tenure, she has worked alongside the head teachers and teachers across all educational levels (from pre-school until high school) and produced books on the praxis of multicultural education in the school setting.

Title of Thesis

Accommodating a vision of diversity in different school contexts: “Unity-in-Diversity” in Indonesia

Publications
Journal Article
  • Harjatanaya, T.Y. & Hoon, C.Y. (2018) Politics of multicultural education in post-Suharto Indonesia: a study of the Chinese minority. Compare: A Journal of Comparative and International Education
Edited Book
  • Harjatanaya, T.Y. (2015) (2nd Edition) Merawat Keberagaman: Praksis Pendidikan Multikultural Perguruan Sultan Iskandar Muda (Fostering Diversity: Praxis of Multicultural Education in Sultan Iskandar Muda). Medan: YPSIM.
Book Chapter
  • Harjatanaya, T.Y. (2018). Akses dan Kesamaan dalam Pendidikan Vokasi (Access and Equality in Vocational Education). In Ferary, D. (2018) Sistem Pendidikan Vokasi di Inggris (Vocational Education System in England) (ed.). London: Kantor Atase Pendidikan dan Kebudayaan, Kedutaan Besar Indonesia (Indonesian Embassy) London, p. 121-138.

Katy is a Deputy Headteacher and the founder of a Leadership and Coaching Institute, which she now co-directs.

Katy is an Associate Fellow at the Oxford Character Project and a Research Associate at the Oxford University Wellbeing Research Centre. She is the co-founder of Global Social Leaders, a leadership programme which has participants in 105 countries, all passionate about creating and sustaining positive change in the world.

Title of Thesis

How could school leaders improve the flourishing and wellbeing of teaching staff?

Books
  • Granville-Chapman, K. and Bidston, E (2020) Leader: Know, love and inspire your people. Carmarthen: Crownhouse Publishing
Book Chapters
  •  Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ In White, M. & McCallum, F. (Ed.s) Wellbeing and Resilience Education: Covid-19 And Its Impact on Education Systems. Routledge
Publications
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘Purpose and Leadership in Education and Beyond’. The Education Exchange. Available from: https://theeducation.exchange/purpose-and-leadership-in-education-and-beyond/
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘The Three Secrets of COVID-era Leadership’. Times Education Supplement. Available from: https://www.tes.com/news/three-secrets-covid-era-school-leadership
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2016) ‘Assessing the Impact of a Teacher Leadership Programme in a Teaching Schools Alliance. Journal of Teacher Action Research
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2014) ‘The Afghan conflict: causes and consequences.’ Geography Review 28(1): 22-27
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2013) What are the psychological factors that affect students’ academic resilience and can teachers influence these? Unpublished thesis
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘Unlocking Leadership Potential’, The Magazine of the Boarding School’s Association, 33: 42-45
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2009) ‘Learning to Lead’, Leader, The Education Leader Magazine 41: 22-25
Presentations
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2019) ‘How could leaders improve the flourishing of their teams?’ ‘Stowe Ed Conference’, Forthcoming: 7 Jan 2019
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2018) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education: 21 Jun 2018
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2017) ‘How can school leaders improve teacher flourishing?’ ‘Doing Education Differently Conference’, University of Oxford, Department of Education, 11 Mar 17
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2016) ‘Developing school leaders who enable teachers to flourish’ The Telegraph Festival of Education 23 Jun 16
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Developing leadership in pupils and teachers’ High School Affiliated to Renmin University of China, Beijing. 20 Oct 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Resilience for leaders.’ Global Social Leaders World Summit. 16 Aug 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Emotional Intelligence for Leaders.’ Global Leaders in Education. 12 Aug 15
  • Coates, S.; Fraser, H.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J.; and Nasim, A. (2015) ‘Breaking through the glass ceiling – how can schools empower our girls to become leaders?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education. 19 Jun 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. ‘Developing Leadership in Schools’ (2015). G20 Schools Conference. International conference for head teachers. 11 Apr 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2018) ‘Introduction’, Wellington Leadership Institute: Festival of Leadership. Mar 2012-15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘How the Young Learn to Lead’, Raffles Institution (Singapore) -Purdue University (USA) Education Forum on Gifted & Talented Youth 2012. Singapore. 15 Mar 12
  • Draper, D.; Dyer, R.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Schools’. Presentation for a meeting about pupil leadership and character development at 10 Downing Street. 16 Nov 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Young People’. Presentation for a meeting about leadership and character at 10 Downing Street. 7 Mar 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K. & Seldon, A. (2012) ‘Introduction’, Leading Your School in the 21st Century. 7 Feb 12

Prior to starting his DPhil, Eddy worked as a primary school teacher in Bristol, where he also completed his MSc in Educational Research.

He is particularly interested in the culture of high stakes, standardised testing, and how this might perpetuate existing inequalities in schools. His research focuses specifically on the interaction between knowledge, policy and pedagogy in the context of Literacy education.

 

Amanda is completing a part-time DPhil, alongside working in Initial Teacher Education at Leeds Trinity University.

Her research is focused on understanding tensions, contradictions and conflicts that teachers in disadvantaged schools may experience when they engage in research activity.  Her research focus is influenced by her own experiences of working as a research-active teacher in disadvantaged schools, and recent work in teacher education to support experienced and beginning teachers in developing their own research activities.

One of the aims of Amanda’s research is to construct a framework to support teachers in pursuing research activity and critical scholarship work which articulates with wider social movements to address issues of poverty and disadvantage in schools.

Title of Thesis

Teachers’ perspectives on tensions between policy, practice and research in disadvantaged schools

Publications 

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2017) A ‘usable past’ of teacher education in England: history in JET’s anniversary issue. Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy, 43 (5), pp.616-627.

Nuttall, A. (2016) The ‘curriculum challenge’: Moving towards the ‘Storyline’ approach in a case study urban primary school.  Improving Schools, 19 (2), pp. 154-166.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Learning {Re}imagined: A review.  Primary First, 15, pp. 17-18.

Nuttall, A. and Doherty, J. (2014) Disaffected boys and the achievement gap: the ‘wallpaper effect’ and what is hidden by a focus on school results.  The Urban Review, 46 (5), pp.800-815.

Conference Papers and Presentations

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2018) “No child is pre-ordained to fail” Teachers questioning policy assumptions.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Newcastle, 11-13 September.

Nuttall, A. and Tobbell, C. (2017) Trainee teachers’ perspectives on practitioner enquiry.  Paper presented at the 8th TEAN Conference: Thinking Deeply about Education, Birmingham, 11-12 May.

Nuttall, A. (2017) Assessment at primary level: quality, comparability and improving secondary readiness.  A perspective from ITE.  Speech at the Westminster Education Forum Keynote Seminar: Next steps for reforming primary education: effective teaching practices, assessment and accountably, London, 18 January.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Deficit narratives and lived realities: whose poverty is it?  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the Australian Association for Research in Education, Melbourne, 27 November – 1 December.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Disenfranchised boys’ reflections on their urban schooling experience: “What a Waste!”.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Philpott, C., Beckett, L. and Wrigley, T. (2016) Collaborative practitioner inquiry: making a difference to urban schools.  Innovation session (school visits and symposium) presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Finn, B. and Beckett, L. (2015) Teachers’ constructions of poverty effects: Their research evidence.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Belfast, 15-17 September.

Nuttall, A. (2014) Teachers’ voice on disengaged boys: the role of one teacher-researcher in an English primary school. Paper presented at the Joint Australian Association for Research in Education and the New Zealand Association for Research in Education Conference, Brisbane, 30 November – 4 December.

Andrew Marotta is a D.Phil candidate in the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. He holds an A.A. in Social Sciences from Broward Community College, and a B.A. in Individualized Studies from the Gallatin School of Individualized Studies, New York University and an M.A. and Ed.M. in Counseling Psychology and School Counseling from Teachers College, Columbia University.

Andrew’s research interests include social and emotional learning, peer mentorship, existential therapy / philosophy, curriculum design for school counselors, and applied ethics in computer science. Andrew’s thesis examines how literature and philosophy can be used to nurture social and emotional learning through group counseling among high school students. He has also worked as a school counselor, teaching artist, and curriculum designer.

Presently, Andrew is designing joint humanities and applied ethics workshops for computer and data science college majors, using social and emotional learning concepts as the pedagogical foundation.

Abigail’s research explores the role of education in students’ personal development and how this can be supported by policy, curricula, initial teacher education and teacher professional development. In particular she focuses on history education, citizenship education and peace education as vehicles for dialogue. These opportunities for students to engage with social questions are vital for building cohesive societies. This flows from the recognition that traditional forums for developing public understanding, such as post-conflict truth commissions, need to be complemented by intergenerational and educational perspectives.

Abigail has taught History, Politics, Debating as well as Relationships and Sex Education to secondary school students in South Africa, England and the USA.

She holds postgraduate degrees in Post-Conflict and Transitional Justice (University of Cape Town), in Education, Globalisation and International Development (University of Cambridge) and in African Studies (University of Oxford). She is a Rhodes Scholar, Mandela-Magdalene Scholar and Mandela-Rhodes Scholar.

Title of thesis

GCSE History, Policy Reform and Student Development: How students and teachers navigate the thematic study “Empires, Migration and the People”

Conference papers

Teaching Migration, Belonging, and Empire in Secondary Schools: evaluation of a teacher professional development program, (2019) History Educators International Research Network Conference, Lead author: Dr Jason Todd, University of Vienna, Austria.

“The Problems and Prospects of Teaching South Africa’s Recent History: Teachers’ Perspectives”, (2018) Sustainability, peace and education – Exploring promise and practice: BAICE 20th Anniversary Symposium, University of Bristol, England.

“New Generations, Old Wounds: Learning History at Home and School in Northern Ireland”, (2018) European Social Science and History Conference,
Queens University Belfast, Northern Ireland.

“The Methodological Challenges of Investigating the Role of History Teaching in Peacebuilding”, (2017), Present Past: Time, Memory, and the Negotiation of Historical Justice Conference, Columbia University, United States of America.

“Teaching South Africa’s Truth and Reconciliation Commission”, (2017) European Conference on African Studies, Universität Basel, Switzerland.

Research Assistant Publications

Review of the evidence on feedback in primary and secondary schools, (forthcoming, 2021) for the Education Endowment Foundation, Lead author: Prof Velda Elliott.

Teaching Migration, Belonging, and Empire in Secondary Schools, (2019), for Runnymede Trust and the European Research Council, Lead authors: Kimberly McIntosh, Dr Jason Todd and Prof Nandini Das.

Gender and the Politics of Reconciliation (2016), for The Institute for Justice and Reconciliation, Lead author: Dr Helen Scanlon

SOLE AUTHOR PUBLICATIONS

‘Transitions, Truth-Telling and Teaching History’, Cambridge Open-Review Educational Research e-Journal, Vol. 4, 2017.

Alice Tawell is an ESRC funded DPhil Student, co-supervised across the Department of Education and Centre for Criminology at the University of Oxford.

Supervisors: Professor Harry Daniels and Dr Rachel Condry.

Alice’s research focuses broadly on the enactment of school exclusion policy in England.

Prior to starting her doctoral studies, Alice gained a BSc in Sociology from the University of Bath and an MSc in Education (Research Training) from the University of Oxford.

As part of her undergraduate degree, Alice undertook a placement year working with Professor Kathy Sylva in the Families, Effective Learning and Literacy Research Group at the Department of Education, University of Oxford. After completing her degree, Alice returned to the department and has worked as a Research Officer on a number of different research projects since 2014. Most recently Alice has worked as part of the Excluded Lives Research Team on two projects exploring exclusion from school from a multidisciplinary perspective. In 2017 she was awarded a Seed-corn Small Grant Award to co-lead a pilot project exploring student collaborative networks with Hau Ming Tse. Alice also co-convenes the Qualitative Methods Hub in the department.

Outside of the department, Alice has sat on the Advisory Board for the Children Missing Education research project (2016-2017) at the National Children’s Bureau (NCB) and has been a member of the NCB Partnership for Well Being and Mental Health in Schools since 2016. She also sits on the Transparency on Exclusions Steering Group.

In 2017 Alice received funding from the Grand Union Doctoral Training Partnership placement scheme to conduct a Knowledge Exchange Internship with the Early Years Analysis and Research Unit at the Department for Education, and in 2018 Alice was elected the Co-President of the Grand Union ESRC Scholar’s Association, representing ESRC students from the University of Oxford, Brunel and The Open University.

Ashmita graduated from Boston University in 2008 with a BSc. in Biomedical Engineering, after which she worked in Research & Development for 6 years.

It is here that she decided to make the leap from formulation chemistry to STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Math) Education after having worked on programs involving increasing diversity in STEM in schools.

She received her Master’s from Boston University in 2015 in Education Policy. Her research interests include: STEM education policy; Assessment; Further Education; Higher Education; Science education pedagogy

Originally from Indonesia, Tracey has spent the last decade studying in the UK and working about multicultural education in Indonesia.

She is fully funded by the Indonesia Endowment Fund for Education (LPDP). Her doctoral research explores the ways Indonesian schools teach and accommodate the national vision of multicultural Indonesia, “Bhinneka Tunggal Ika” (Unity-in-Diversity). By using a two-tier case study research approach (case studies of six schools and of two provinces), it presents nuanced and critical account of the ways head teachers, teachers, students and parents from six state and private schools in Jakarta and Bali with different mixes of pupil ethnicity and religiosity understand and accommodate the vision of diversity into educational practices. Despite the highly contextual focus, the research offers a critical view into the complex role of schools in today’s era of globalisation in providing quality education for all and at the same time creating citizens who are inclusive and respectful towards others.

Tracey completed her MSc in Comparative and International Education at the University of Oxford in 2011 and her honours BA in Mathematics and Education Studies at the University of Cambridge in 2010. Upon completing her study in the UK, she returned to Indonesia to work in an educational foundation Sultan Iskandar Muda in Medan, Indonesia as a member of the Board of Directors in the Foundation – a position which she is still holding until today. She is responsible for overlooking the development and implementation of multicultural education and teacher development programme.

During her tenure, she has worked alongside the head teachers and teachers across all educational levels (from pre-school until high school) and produced books on the praxis of multicultural education in the school setting.

Title of Thesis

Accommodating a vision of diversity in different school contexts: “Unity-in-Diversity” in Indonesia

Publications
Journal Article
  • Harjatanaya, T.Y. & Hoon, C.Y. (2018) Politics of multicultural education in post-Suharto Indonesia: a study of the Chinese minority. Compare: A Journal of Comparative and International Education
Edited Book
  • Harjatanaya, T.Y. (2015) (2nd Edition) Merawat Keberagaman: Praksis Pendidikan Multikultural Perguruan Sultan Iskandar Muda (Fostering Diversity: Praxis of Multicultural Education in Sultan Iskandar Muda). Medan: YPSIM.
Book Chapter
  • Harjatanaya, T.Y. (2018). Akses dan Kesamaan dalam Pendidikan Vokasi (Access and Equality in Vocational Education). In Ferary, D. (2018) Sistem Pendidikan Vokasi di Inggris (Vocational Education System in England) (ed.). London: Kantor Atase Pendidikan dan Kebudayaan, Kedutaan Besar Indonesia (Indonesian Embassy) London, p. 121-138.

Katy is a Deputy Headteacher and the founder of a Leadership and Coaching Institute, which she now co-directs.

Katy is an Associate Fellow at the Oxford Character Project and a Research Associate at the Oxford University Wellbeing Research Centre. She is the co-founder of Global Social Leaders, a leadership programme which has participants in 105 countries, all passionate about creating and sustaining positive change in the world.

Title of Thesis

How could school leaders improve the flourishing and wellbeing of teaching staff?

Books
  • Granville-Chapman, K. and Bidston, E (2020) Leader: Know, love and inspire your people. Carmarthen: Crownhouse Publishing
Book Chapters
  •  Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ In White, M. & McCallum, F. (Ed.s) Wellbeing and Resilience Education: Covid-19 And Its Impact on Education Systems. Routledge
Publications
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘Purpose and Leadership in Education and Beyond’. The Education Exchange. Available from: https://theeducation.exchange/purpose-and-leadership-in-education-and-beyond/
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘The Three Secrets of COVID-era Leadership’. Times Education Supplement. Available from: https://www.tes.com/news/three-secrets-covid-era-school-leadership
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2016) ‘Assessing the Impact of a Teacher Leadership Programme in a Teaching Schools Alliance. Journal of Teacher Action Research
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2014) ‘The Afghan conflict: causes and consequences.’ Geography Review 28(1): 22-27
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2013) What are the psychological factors that affect students’ academic resilience and can teachers influence these? Unpublished thesis
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘Unlocking Leadership Potential’, The Magazine of the Boarding School’s Association, 33: 42-45
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2009) ‘Learning to Lead’, Leader, The Education Leader Magazine 41: 22-25
Presentations
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2019) ‘How could leaders improve the flourishing of their teams?’ ‘Stowe Ed Conference’, Forthcoming: 7 Jan 2019
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2018) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education: 21 Jun 2018
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2017) ‘How can school leaders improve teacher flourishing?’ ‘Doing Education Differently Conference’, University of Oxford, Department of Education, 11 Mar 17
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2016) ‘Developing school leaders who enable teachers to flourish’ The Telegraph Festival of Education 23 Jun 16
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Developing leadership in pupils and teachers’ High School Affiliated to Renmin University of China, Beijing. 20 Oct 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Resilience for leaders.’ Global Social Leaders World Summit. 16 Aug 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Emotional Intelligence for Leaders.’ Global Leaders in Education. 12 Aug 15
  • Coates, S.; Fraser, H.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J.; and Nasim, A. (2015) ‘Breaking through the glass ceiling – how can schools empower our girls to become leaders?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education. 19 Jun 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. ‘Developing Leadership in Schools’ (2015). G20 Schools Conference. International conference for head teachers. 11 Apr 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2018) ‘Introduction’, Wellington Leadership Institute: Festival of Leadership. Mar 2012-15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘How the Young Learn to Lead’, Raffles Institution (Singapore) -Purdue University (USA) Education Forum on Gifted & Talented Youth 2012. Singapore. 15 Mar 12
  • Draper, D.; Dyer, R.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Schools’. Presentation for a meeting about pupil leadership and character development at 10 Downing Street. 16 Nov 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Young People’. Presentation for a meeting about leadership and character at 10 Downing Street. 7 Mar 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K. & Seldon, A. (2012) ‘Introduction’, Leading Your School in the 21st Century. 7 Feb 12

Prior to starting his DPhil, Eddy worked as a primary school teacher in Bristol, where he also completed his MSc in Educational Research.

He is particularly interested in the culture of high stakes, standardised testing, and how this might perpetuate existing inequalities in schools. His research focuses specifically on the interaction between knowledge, policy and pedagogy in the context of Literacy education.

 

Amanda is completing a part-time DPhil, alongside working in Initial Teacher Education at Leeds Trinity University.

Her research is focused on understanding tensions, contradictions and conflicts that teachers in disadvantaged schools may experience when they engage in research activity.  Her research focus is influenced by her own experiences of working as a research-active teacher in disadvantaged schools, and recent work in teacher education to support experienced and beginning teachers in developing their own research activities.

One of the aims of Amanda’s research is to construct a framework to support teachers in pursuing research activity and critical scholarship work which articulates with wider social movements to address issues of poverty and disadvantage in schools.

Title of Thesis

Teachers’ perspectives on tensions between policy, practice and research in disadvantaged schools

Publications 

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2017) A ‘usable past’ of teacher education in England: history in JET’s anniversary issue. Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy, 43 (5), pp.616-627.

Nuttall, A. (2016) The ‘curriculum challenge’: Moving towards the ‘Storyline’ approach in a case study urban primary school.  Improving Schools, 19 (2), pp. 154-166.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Learning {Re}imagined: A review.  Primary First, 15, pp. 17-18.

Nuttall, A. and Doherty, J. (2014) Disaffected boys and the achievement gap: the ‘wallpaper effect’ and what is hidden by a focus on school results.  The Urban Review, 46 (5), pp.800-815.

Conference Papers and Presentations

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2018) “No child is pre-ordained to fail” Teachers questioning policy assumptions.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Newcastle, 11-13 September.

Nuttall, A. and Tobbell, C. (2017) Trainee teachers’ perspectives on practitioner enquiry.  Paper presented at the 8th TEAN Conference: Thinking Deeply about Education, Birmingham, 11-12 May.

Nuttall, A. (2017) Assessment at primary level: quality, comparability and improving secondary readiness.  A perspective from ITE.  Speech at the Westminster Education Forum Keynote Seminar: Next steps for reforming primary education: effective teaching practices, assessment and accountably, London, 18 January.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Deficit narratives and lived realities: whose poverty is it?  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the Australian Association for Research in Education, Melbourne, 27 November – 1 December.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Disenfranchised boys’ reflections on their urban schooling experience: “What a Waste!”.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Philpott, C., Beckett, L. and Wrigley, T. (2016) Collaborative practitioner inquiry: making a difference to urban schools.  Innovation session (school visits and symposium) presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Finn, B. and Beckett, L. (2015) Teachers’ constructions of poverty effects: Their research evidence.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Belfast, 15-17 September.

Nuttall, A. (2014) Teachers’ voice on disengaged boys: the role of one teacher-researcher in an English primary school. Paper presented at the Joint Australian Association for Research in Education and the New Zealand Association for Research in Education Conference, Brisbane, 30 November – 4 December.

Andrew Marotta is a D.Phil candidate in the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. He holds an A.A. in Social Sciences from Broward Community College, and a B.A. in Individualized Studies from the Gallatin School of Individualized Studies, New York University and an M.A. and Ed.M. in Counseling Psychology and School Counseling from Teachers College, Columbia University.

Andrew’s research interests include social and emotional learning, peer mentorship, existential therapy / philosophy, curriculum design for school counselors, and applied ethics in computer science. Andrew’s thesis examines how literature and philosophy can be used to nurture social and emotional learning through group counseling among high school students. He has also worked as a school counselor, teaching artist, and curriculum designer.

Presently, Andrew is designing joint humanities and applied ethics workshops for computer and data science college majors, using social and emotional learning concepts as the pedagogical foundation.

Abigail’s research explores the role of education in students’ personal development and how this can be supported by policy, curricula, initial teacher education and teacher professional development. In particular she focuses on history education, citizenship education and peace education as vehicles for dialogue. These opportunities for students to engage with social questions are vital for building cohesive societies. This flows from the recognition that traditional forums for developing public understanding, such as post-conflict truth commissions, need to be complemented by intergenerational and educational perspectives.

Abigail has taught History, Politics, Debating as well as Relationships and Sex Education to secondary school students in South Africa, England and the USA.

She holds postgraduate degrees in Post-Conflict and Transitional Justice (University of Cape Town), in Education, Globalisation and International Development (University of Cambridge) and in African Studies (University of Oxford). She is a Rhodes Scholar, Mandela-Magdalene Scholar and Mandela-Rhodes Scholar.

Title of thesis

GCSE History, Policy Reform and Student Development: How students and teachers navigate the thematic study “Empires, Migration and the People”

Conference papers

Teaching Migration, Belonging, and Empire in Secondary Schools: evaluation of a teacher professional development program, (2019) History Educators International Research Network Conference, Lead author: Dr Jason Todd, University of Vienna, Austria.

“The Problems and Prospects of Teaching South Africa’s Recent History: Teachers’ Perspectives”, (2018) Sustainability, peace and education – Exploring promise and practice: BAICE 20th Anniversary Symposium, University of Bristol, England.

“New Generations, Old Wounds: Learning History at Home and School in Northern Ireland”, (2018) European Social Science and History Conference,
Queens University Belfast, Northern Ireland.

“The Methodological Challenges of Investigating the Role of History Teaching in Peacebuilding”, (2017), Present Past: Time, Memory, and the Negotiation of Historical Justice Conference, Columbia University, United States of America.

“Teaching South Africa’s Truth and Reconciliation Commission”, (2017) European Conference on African Studies, Universität Basel, Switzerland.

Research Assistant Publications

Review of the evidence on feedback in primary and secondary schools, (forthcoming, 2021) for the Education Endowment Foundation, Lead author: Prof Velda Elliott.

Teaching Migration, Belonging, and Empire in Secondary Schools, (2019), for Runnymede Trust and the European Research Council, Lead authors: Kimberly McIntosh, Dr Jason Todd and Prof Nandini Das.

Gender and the Politics of Reconciliation (2016), for The Institute for Justice and Reconciliation, Lead author: Dr Helen Scanlon

SOLE AUTHOR PUBLICATIONS

‘Transitions, Truth-Telling and Teaching History’, Cambridge Open-Review Educational Research e-Journal, Vol. 4, 2017.

Alice Tawell is an ESRC funded DPhil Student, co-supervised across the Department of Education and Centre for Criminology at the University of Oxford.

Supervisors: Professor Harry Daniels and Dr Rachel Condry.

Alice’s research focuses broadly on the enactment of school exclusion policy in England.

Prior to starting her doctoral studies, Alice gained a BSc in Sociology from the University of Bath and an MSc in Education (Research Training) from the University of Oxford.

As part of her undergraduate degree, Alice undertook a placement year working with Professor Kathy Sylva in the Families, Effective Learning and Literacy Research Group at the Department of Education, University of Oxford. After completing her degree, Alice returned to the department and has worked as a Research Officer on a number of different research projects since 2014. Most recently Alice has worked as part of the Excluded Lives Research Team on two projects exploring exclusion from school from a multidisciplinary perspective. In 2017 she was awarded a Seed-corn Small Grant Award to co-lead a pilot project exploring student collaborative networks with Hau Ming Tse. Alice also co-convenes the Qualitative Methods Hub in the department.

Outside of the department, Alice has sat on the Advisory Board for the Children Missing Education research project (2016-2017) at the National Children’s Bureau (NCB) and has been a member of the NCB Partnership for Well Being and Mental Health in Schools since 2016. She also sits on the Transparency on Exclusions Steering Group.

In 2017 Alice received funding from the Grand Union Doctoral Training Partnership placement scheme to conduct a Knowledge Exchange Internship with the Early Years Analysis and Research Unit at the Department for Education, and in 2018 Alice was elected the Co-President of the Grand Union ESRC Scholar’s Association, representing ESRC students from the University of Oxford, Brunel and The Open University.

Ashmita graduated from Boston University in 2008 with a BSc. in Biomedical Engineering, after which she worked in Research & Development for 6 years.

It is here that she decided to make the leap from formulation chemistry to STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Math) Education after having worked on programs involving increasing diversity in STEM in schools.

She received her Master’s from Boston University in 2015 in Education Policy. Her research interests include: STEM education policy; Assessment; Further Education; Higher Education; Science education pedagogy

Originally from Indonesia, Tracey has spent the last decade studying in the UK and working about multicultural education in Indonesia.

She is fully funded by the Indonesia Endowment Fund for Education (LPDP). Her doctoral research explores the ways Indonesian schools teach and accommodate the national vision of multicultural Indonesia, “Bhinneka Tunggal Ika” (Unity-in-Diversity). By using a two-tier case study research approach (case studies of six schools and of two provinces), it presents nuanced and critical account of the ways head teachers, teachers, students and parents from six state and private schools in Jakarta and Bali with different mixes of pupil ethnicity and religiosity understand and accommodate the vision of diversity into educational practices. Despite the highly contextual focus, the research offers a critical view into the complex role of schools in today’s era of globalisation in providing quality education for all and at the same time creating citizens who are inclusive and respectful towards others.

Tracey completed her MSc in Comparative and International Education at the University of Oxford in 2011 and her honours BA in Mathematics and Education Studies at the University of Cambridge in 2010. Upon completing her study in the UK, she returned to Indonesia to work in an educational foundation Sultan Iskandar Muda in Medan, Indonesia as a member of the Board of Directors in the Foundation – a position which she is still holding until today. She is responsible for overlooking the development and implementation of multicultural education and teacher development programme.

During her tenure, she has worked alongside the head teachers and teachers across all educational levels (from pre-school until high school) and produced books on the praxis of multicultural education in the school setting.

Title of Thesis

Accommodating a vision of diversity in different school contexts: “Unity-in-Diversity” in Indonesia

Publications
Journal Article
  • Harjatanaya, T.Y. & Hoon, C.Y. (2018) Politics of multicultural education in post-Suharto Indonesia: a study of the Chinese minority. Compare: A Journal of Comparative and International Education
Edited Book
  • Harjatanaya, T.Y. (2015) (2nd Edition) Merawat Keberagaman: Praksis Pendidikan Multikultural Perguruan Sultan Iskandar Muda (Fostering Diversity: Praxis of Multicultural Education in Sultan Iskandar Muda). Medan: YPSIM.
Book Chapter
  • Harjatanaya, T.Y. (2018). Akses dan Kesamaan dalam Pendidikan Vokasi (Access and Equality in Vocational Education). In Ferary, D. (2018) Sistem Pendidikan Vokasi di Inggris (Vocational Education System in England) (ed.). London: Kantor Atase Pendidikan dan Kebudayaan, Kedutaan Besar Indonesia (Indonesian Embassy) London, p. 121-138.

Katy is a Deputy Headteacher and the founder of a Leadership and Coaching Institute, which she now co-directs.

Katy is an Associate Fellow at the Oxford Character Project and a Research Associate at the Oxford University Wellbeing Research Centre. She is the co-founder of Global Social Leaders, a leadership programme which has participants in 105 countries, all passionate about creating and sustaining positive change in the world.

Title of Thesis

How could school leaders improve the flourishing and wellbeing of teaching staff?

Books
  • Granville-Chapman, K. and Bidston, E (2020) Leader: Know, love and inspire your people. Carmarthen: Crownhouse Publishing
Book Chapters
  •  Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ In White, M. & McCallum, F. (Ed.s) Wellbeing and Resilience Education: Covid-19 And Its Impact on Education Systems. Routledge
Publications
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘Purpose and Leadership in Education and Beyond’. The Education Exchange. Available from: https://theeducation.exchange/purpose-and-leadership-in-education-and-beyond/
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘The Three Secrets of COVID-era Leadership’. Times Education Supplement. Available from: https://www.tes.com/news/three-secrets-covid-era-school-leadership
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2016) ‘Assessing the Impact of a Teacher Leadership Programme in a Teaching Schools Alliance. Journal of Teacher Action Research
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2014) ‘The Afghan conflict: causes and consequences.’ Geography Review 28(1): 22-27
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2013) What are the psychological factors that affect students’ academic resilience and can teachers influence these? Unpublished thesis
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘Unlocking Leadership Potential’, The Magazine of the Boarding School’s Association, 33: 42-45
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2009) ‘Learning to Lead’, Leader, The Education Leader Magazine 41: 22-25
Presentations
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2019) ‘How could leaders improve the flourishing of their teams?’ ‘Stowe Ed Conference’, Forthcoming: 7 Jan 2019
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2018) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education: 21 Jun 2018
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2017) ‘How can school leaders improve teacher flourishing?’ ‘Doing Education Differently Conference’, University of Oxford, Department of Education, 11 Mar 17
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2016) ‘Developing school leaders who enable teachers to flourish’ The Telegraph Festival of Education 23 Jun 16
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Developing leadership in pupils and teachers’ High School Affiliated to Renmin University of China, Beijing. 20 Oct 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Resilience for leaders.’ Global Social Leaders World Summit. 16 Aug 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Emotional Intelligence for Leaders.’ Global Leaders in Education. 12 Aug 15
  • Coates, S.; Fraser, H.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J.; and Nasim, A. (2015) ‘Breaking through the glass ceiling – how can schools empower our girls to become leaders?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education. 19 Jun 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. ‘Developing Leadership in Schools’ (2015). G20 Schools Conference. International conference for head teachers. 11 Apr 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2018) ‘Introduction’, Wellington Leadership Institute: Festival of Leadership. Mar 2012-15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘How the Young Learn to Lead’, Raffles Institution (Singapore) -Purdue University (USA) Education Forum on Gifted & Talented Youth 2012. Singapore. 15 Mar 12
  • Draper, D.; Dyer, R.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Schools’. Presentation for a meeting about pupil leadership and character development at 10 Downing Street. 16 Nov 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Young People’. Presentation for a meeting about leadership and character at 10 Downing Street. 7 Mar 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K. & Seldon, A. (2012) ‘Introduction’, Leading Your School in the 21st Century. 7 Feb 12

Prior to starting his DPhil, Eddy worked as a primary school teacher in Bristol, where he also completed his MSc in Educational Research.

He is particularly interested in the culture of high stakes, standardised testing, and how this might perpetuate existing inequalities in schools. His research focuses specifically on the interaction between knowledge, policy and pedagogy in the context of Literacy education.

 

Amanda is completing a part-time DPhil, alongside working in Initial Teacher Education at Leeds Trinity University.

Her research is focused on understanding tensions, contradictions and conflicts that teachers in disadvantaged schools may experience when they engage in research activity.  Her research focus is influenced by her own experiences of working as a research-active teacher in disadvantaged schools, and recent work in teacher education to support experienced and beginning teachers in developing their own research activities.

One of the aims of Amanda’s research is to construct a framework to support teachers in pursuing research activity and critical scholarship work which articulates with wider social movements to address issues of poverty and disadvantage in schools.

Title of Thesis

Teachers’ perspectives on tensions between policy, practice and research in disadvantaged schools

Publications 

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2017) A ‘usable past’ of teacher education in England: history in JET’s anniversary issue. Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy, 43 (5), pp.616-627.

Nuttall, A. (2016) The ‘curriculum challenge’: Moving towards the ‘Storyline’ approach in a case study urban primary school.  Improving Schools, 19 (2), pp. 154-166.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Learning {Re}imagined: A review.  Primary First, 15, pp. 17-18.

Nuttall, A. and Doherty, J. (2014) Disaffected boys and the achievement gap: the ‘wallpaper effect’ and what is hidden by a focus on school results.  The Urban Review, 46 (5), pp.800-815.

Conference Papers and Presentations

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2018) “No child is pre-ordained to fail” Teachers questioning policy assumptions.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Newcastle, 11-13 September.

Nuttall, A. and Tobbell, C. (2017) Trainee teachers’ perspectives on practitioner enquiry.  Paper presented at the 8th TEAN Conference: Thinking Deeply about Education, Birmingham, 11-12 May.

Nuttall, A. (2017) Assessment at primary level: quality, comparability and improving secondary readiness.  A perspective from ITE.  Speech at the Westminster Education Forum Keynote Seminar: Next steps for reforming primary education: effective teaching practices, assessment and accountably, London, 18 January.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Deficit narratives and lived realities: whose poverty is it?  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the Australian Association for Research in Education, Melbourne, 27 November – 1 December.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Disenfranchised boys’ reflections on their urban schooling experience: “What a Waste!”.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Philpott, C., Beckett, L. and Wrigley, T. (2016) Collaborative practitioner inquiry: making a difference to urban schools.  Innovation session (school visits and symposium) presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Finn, B. and Beckett, L. (2015) Teachers’ constructions of poverty effects: Their research evidence.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Belfast, 15-17 September.

Nuttall, A. (2014) Teachers’ voice on disengaged boys: the role of one teacher-researcher in an English primary school. Paper presented at the Joint Australian Association for Research in Education and the New Zealand Association for Research in Education Conference, Brisbane, 30 November – 4 December.

Andrew Marotta is a D.Phil candidate in the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. He holds an A.A. in Social Sciences from Broward Community College, and a B.A. in Individualized Studies from the Gallatin School of Individualized Studies, New York University and an M.A. and Ed.M. in Counseling Psychology and School Counseling from Teachers College, Columbia University.

Andrew’s research interests include social and emotional learning, peer mentorship, existential therapy / philosophy, curriculum design for school counselors, and applied ethics in computer science. Andrew’s thesis examines how literature and philosophy can be used to nurture social and emotional learning through group counseling among high school students. He has also worked as a school counselor, teaching artist, and curriculum designer.

Presently, Andrew is designing joint humanities and applied ethics workshops for computer and data science college majors, using social and emotional learning concepts as the pedagogical foundation.

Abigail’s research explores the role of education in students’ personal development and how this can be supported by policy, curricula, initial teacher education and teacher professional development. In particular she focuses on history education, citizenship education and peace education as vehicles for dialogue. These opportunities for students to engage with social questions are vital for building cohesive societies. This flows from the recognition that traditional forums for developing public understanding, such as post-conflict truth commissions, need to be complemented by intergenerational and educational perspectives.

Abigail has taught History, Politics, Debating as well as Relationships and Sex Education to secondary school students in South Africa, England and the USA.

She holds postgraduate degrees in Post-Conflict and Transitional Justice (University of Cape Town), in Education, Globalisation and International Development (University of Cambridge) and in African Studies (University of Oxford). She is a Rhodes Scholar, Mandela-Magdalene Scholar and Mandela-Rhodes Scholar.

Title of thesis

GCSE History, Policy Reform and Student Development: How students and teachers navigate the thematic study “Empires, Migration and the People”

Conference papers

Teaching Migration, Belonging, and Empire in Secondary Schools: evaluation of a teacher professional development program, (2019) History Educators International Research Network Conference, Lead author: Dr Jason Todd, University of Vienna, Austria.

“The Problems and Prospects of Teaching South Africa’s Recent History: Teachers’ Perspectives”, (2018) Sustainability, peace and education – Exploring promise and practice: BAICE 20th Anniversary Symposium, University of Bristol, England.

“New Generations, Old Wounds: Learning History at Home and School in Northern Ireland”, (2018) European Social Science and History Conference,
Queens University Belfast, Northern Ireland.

“The Methodological Challenges of Investigating the Role of History Teaching in Peacebuilding”, (2017), Present Past: Time, Memory, and the Negotiation of Historical Justice Conference, Columbia University, United States of America.

“Teaching South Africa’s Truth and Reconciliation Commission”, (2017) European Conference on African Studies, Universität Basel, Switzerland.

Research Assistant Publications

Review of the evidence on feedback in primary and secondary schools, (forthcoming, 2021) for the Education Endowment Foundation, Lead author: Prof Velda Elliott.

Teaching Migration, Belonging, and Empire in Secondary Schools, (2019), for Runnymede Trust and the European Research Council, Lead authors: Kimberly McIntosh, Dr Jason Todd and Prof Nandini Das.

Gender and the Politics of Reconciliation (2016), for The Institute for Justice and Reconciliation, Lead author: Dr Helen Scanlon

SOLE AUTHOR PUBLICATIONS

‘Transitions, Truth-Telling and Teaching History’, Cambridge Open-Review Educational Research e-Journal, Vol. 4, 2017.

Alice Tawell is an ESRC funded DPhil Student, co-supervised across the Department of Education and Centre for Criminology at the University of Oxford.

Supervisors: Professor Harry Daniels and Dr Rachel Condry.

Alice’s research focuses broadly on the enactment of school exclusion policy in England.

Prior to starting her doctoral studies, Alice gained a BSc in Sociology from the University of Bath and an MSc in Education (Research Training) from the University of Oxford.

As part of her undergraduate degree, Alice undertook a placement year working with Professor Kathy Sylva in the Families, Effective Learning and Literacy Research Group at the Department of Education, University of Oxford. After completing her degree, Alice returned to the department and has worked as a Research Officer on a number of different research projects since 2014. Most recently Alice has worked as part of the Excluded Lives Research Team on two projects exploring exclusion from school from a multidisciplinary perspective. In 2017 she was awarded a Seed-corn Small Grant Award to co-lead a pilot project exploring student collaborative networks with Hau Ming Tse. Alice also co-convenes the Qualitative Methods Hub in the department.

Outside of the department, Alice has sat on the Advisory Board for the Children Missing Education research project (2016-2017) at the National Children’s Bureau (NCB) and has been a member of the NCB Partnership for Well Being and Mental Health in Schools since 2016. She also sits on the Transparency on Exclusions Steering Group.

In 2017 Alice received funding from the Grand Union Doctoral Training Partnership placement scheme to conduct a Knowledge Exchange Internship with the Early Years Analysis and Research Unit at the Department for Education, and in 2018 Alice was elected the Co-President of the Grand Union ESRC Scholar’s Association, representing ESRC students from the University of Oxford, Brunel and The Open University.

Ashmita graduated from Boston University in 2008 with a BSc. in Biomedical Engineering, after which she worked in Research & Development for 6 years.

It is here that she decided to make the leap from formulation chemistry to STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Math) Education after having worked on programs involving increasing diversity in STEM in schools.

She received her Master’s from Boston University in 2015 in Education Policy. Her research interests include: STEM education policy; Assessment; Further Education; Higher Education; Science education pedagogy

Originally from Indonesia, Tracey has spent the last decade studying in the UK and working about multicultural education in Indonesia.

She is fully funded by the Indonesia Endowment Fund for Education (LPDP). Her doctoral research explores the ways Indonesian schools teach and accommodate the national vision of multicultural Indonesia, “Bhinneka Tunggal Ika” (Unity-in-Diversity). By using a two-tier case study research approach (case studies of six schools and of two provinces), it presents nuanced and critical account of the ways head teachers, teachers, students and parents from six state and private schools in Jakarta and Bali with different mixes of pupil ethnicity and religiosity understand and accommodate the vision of diversity into educational practices. Despite the highly contextual focus, the research offers a critical view into the complex role of schools in today’s era of globalisation in providing quality education for all and at the same time creating citizens who are inclusive and respectful towards others.

Tracey completed her MSc in Comparative and International Education at the University of Oxford in 2011 and her honours BA in Mathematics and Education Studies at the University of Cambridge in 2010. Upon completing her study in the UK, she returned to Indonesia to work in an educational foundation Sultan Iskandar Muda in Medan, Indonesia as a member of the Board of Directors in the Foundation – a position which she is still holding until today. She is responsible for overlooking the development and implementation of multicultural education and teacher development programme.

During her tenure, she has worked alongside the head teachers and teachers across all educational levels (from pre-school until high school) and produced books on the praxis of multicultural education in the school setting.

Title of Thesis

Accommodating a vision of diversity in different school contexts: “Unity-in-Diversity” in Indonesia

Publications
Journal Article
  • Harjatanaya, T.Y. & Hoon, C.Y. (2018) Politics of multicultural education in post-Suharto Indonesia: a study of the Chinese minority. Compare: A Journal of Comparative and International Education
Edited Book
  • Harjatanaya, T.Y. (2015) (2nd Edition) Merawat Keberagaman: Praksis Pendidikan Multikultural Perguruan Sultan Iskandar Muda (Fostering Diversity: Praxis of Multicultural Education in Sultan Iskandar Muda). Medan: YPSIM.
Book Chapter
  • Harjatanaya, T.Y. (2018). Akses dan Kesamaan dalam Pendidikan Vokasi (Access and Equality in Vocational Education). In Ferary, D. (2018) Sistem Pendidikan Vokasi di Inggris (Vocational Education System in England) (ed.). London: Kantor Atase Pendidikan dan Kebudayaan, Kedutaan Besar Indonesia (Indonesian Embassy) London, p. 121-138.

Katy is a Deputy Headteacher and the founder of a Leadership and Coaching Institute, which she now co-directs.

Katy is an Associate Fellow at the Oxford Character Project and a Research Associate at the Oxford University Wellbeing Research Centre. She is the co-founder of Global Social Leaders, a leadership programme which has participants in 105 countries, all passionate about creating and sustaining positive change in the world.

Title of Thesis

How could school leaders improve the flourishing and wellbeing of teaching staff?

Books
  • Granville-Chapman, K. and Bidston, E (2020) Leader: Know, love and inspire your people. Carmarthen: Crownhouse Publishing
Book Chapters
  •  Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ In White, M. & McCallum, F. (Ed.s) Wellbeing and Resilience Education: Covid-19 And Its Impact on Education Systems. Routledge
Publications
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘Purpose and Leadership in Education and Beyond’. The Education Exchange. Available from: https://theeducation.exchange/purpose-and-leadership-in-education-and-beyond/
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘The Three Secrets of COVID-era Leadership’. Times Education Supplement. Available from: https://www.tes.com/news/three-secrets-covid-era-school-leadership
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2016) ‘Assessing the Impact of a Teacher Leadership Programme in a Teaching Schools Alliance. Journal of Teacher Action Research
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2014) ‘The Afghan conflict: causes and consequences.’ Geography Review 28(1): 22-27
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2013) What are the psychological factors that affect students’ academic resilience and can teachers influence these? Unpublished thesis
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘Unlocking Leadership Potential’, The Magazine of the Boarding School’s Association, 33: 42-45
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2009) ‘Learning to Lead’, Leader, The Education Leader Magazine 41: 22-25
Presentations
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2019) ‘How could leaders improve the flourishing of their teams?’ ‘Stowe Ed Conference’, Forthcoming: 7 Jan 2019
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2018) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education: 21 Jun 2018
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2017) ‘How can school leaders improve teacher flourishing?’ ‘Doing Education Differently Conference’, University of Oxford, Department of Education, 11 Mar 17
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2016) ‘Developing school leaders who enable teachers to flourish’ The Telegraph Festival of Education 23 Jun 16
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Developing leadership in pupils and teachers’ High School Affiliated to Renmin University of China, Beijing. 20 Oct 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Resilience for leaders.’ Global Social Leaders World Summit. 16 Aug 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Emotional Intelligence for Leaders.’ Global Leaders in Education. 12 Aug 15
  • Coates, S.; Fraser, H.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J.; and Nasim, A. (2015) ‘Breaking through the glass ceiling – how can schools empower our girls to become leaders?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education. 19 Jun 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. ‘Developing Leadership in Schools’ (2015). G20 Schools Conference. International conference for head teachers. 11 Apr 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2018) ‘Introduction’, Wellington Leadership Institute: Festival of Leadership. Mar 2012-15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘How the Young Learn to Lead’, Raffles Institution (Singapore) -Purdue University (USA) Education Forum on Gifted & Talented Youth 2012. Singapore. 15 Mar 12
  • Draper, D.; Dyer, R.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Schools’. Presentation for a meeting about pupil leadership and character development at 10 Downing Street. 16 Nov 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Young People’. Presentation for a meeting about leadership and character at 10 Downing Street. 7 Mar 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K. & Seldon, A. (2012) ‘Introduction’, Leading Your School in the 21st Century. 7 Feb 12

Prior to starting his DPhil, Eddy worked as a primary school teacher in Bristol, where he also completed his MSc in Educational Research.

He is particularly interested in the culture of high stakes, standardised testing, and how this might perpetuate existing inequalities in schools. His research focuses specifically on the interaction between knowledge, policy and pedagogy in the context of Literacy education.

 

Amanda is completing a part-time DPhil, alongside working in Initial Teacher Education at Leeds Trinity University.

Her research is focused on understanding tensions, contradictions and conflicts that teachers in disadvantaged schools may experience when they engage in research activity.  Her research focus is influenced by her own experiences of working as a research-active teacher in disadvantaged schools, and recent work in teacher education to support experienced and beginning teachers in developing their own research activities.

One of the aims of Amanda’s research is to construct a framework to support teachers in pursuing research activity and critical scholarship work which articulates with wider social movements to address issues of poverty and disadvantage in schools.

Title of Thesis

Teachers’ perspectives on tensions between policy, practice and research in disadvantaged schools

Publications 

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2017) A ‘usable past’ of teacher education in England: history in JET’s anniversary issue. Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy, 43 (5), pp.616-627.

Nuttall, A. (2016) The ‘curriculum challenge’: Moving towards the ‘Storyline’ approach in a case study urban primary school.  Improving Schools, 19 (2), pp. 154-166.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Learning {Re}imagined: A review.  Primary First, 15, pp. 17-18.

Nuttall, A. and Doherty, J. (2014) Disaffected boys and the achievement gap: the ‘wallpaper effect’ and what is hidden by a focus on school results.  The Urban Review, 46 (5), pp.800-815.

Conference Papers and Presentations

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2018) “No child is pre-ordained to fail” Teachers questioning policy assumptions.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Newcastle, 11-13 September.

Nuttall, A. and Tobbell, C. (2017) Trainee teachers’ perspectives on practitioner enquiry.  Paper presented at the 8th TEAN Conference: Thinking Deeply about Education, Birmingham, 11-12 May.

Nuttall, A. (2017) Assessment at primary level: quality, comparability and improving secondary readiness.  A perspective from ITE.  Speech at the Westminster Education Forum Keynote Seminar: Next steps for reforming primary education: effective teaching practices, assessment and accountably, London, 18 January.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Deficit narratives and lived realities: whose poverty is it?  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the Australian Association for Research in Education, Melbourne, 27 November – 1 December.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Disenfranchised boys’ reflections on their urban schooling experience: “What a Waste!”.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Philpott, C., Beckett, L. and Wrigley, T. (2016) Collaborative practitioner inquiry: making a difference to urban schools.  Innovation session (school visits and symposium) presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Finn, B. and Beckett, L. (2015) Teachers’ constructions of poverty effects: Their research evidence.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Belfast, 15-17 September.

Nuttall, A. (2014) Teachers’ voice on disengaged boys: the role of one teacher-researcher in an English primary school. Paper presented at the Joint Australian Association for Research in Education and the New Zealand Association for Research in Education Conference, Brisbane, 30 November – 4 December.

Andrew Marotta is a D.Phil candidate in the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. He holds an A.A. in Social Sciences from Broward Community College, and a B.A. in Individualized Studies from the Gallatin School of Individualized Studies, New York University and an M.A. and Ed.M. in Counseling Psychology and School Counseling from Teachers College, Columbia University.

Andrew’s research interests include social and emotional learning, peer mentorship, existential therapy / philosophy, curriculum design for school counselors, and applied ethics in computer science. Andrew’s thesis examines how literature and philosophy can be used to nurture social and emotional learning through group counseling among high school students. He has also worked as a school counselor, teaching artist, and curriculum designer.

Presently, Andrew is designing joint humanities and applied ethics workshops for computer and data science college majors, using social and emotional learning concepts as the pedagogical foundation.

Abigail’s research explores the role of education in students’ personal development and how this can be supported by policy, curricula, initial teacher education and teacher professional development. In particular she focuses on history education, citizenship education and peace education as vehicles for dialogue. These opportunities for students to engage with social questions are vital for building cohesive societies. This flows from the recognition that traditional forums for developing public understanding, such as post-conflict truth commissions, need to be complemented by intergenerational and educational perspectives.

Abigail has taught History, Politics, Debating as well as Relationships and Sex Education to secondary school students in South Africa, England and the USA.

She holds postgraduate degrees in Post-Conflict and Transitional Justice (University of Cape Town), in Education, Globalisation and International Development (University of Cambridge) and in African Studies (University of Oxford). She is a Rhodes Scholar, Mandela-Magdalene Scholar and Mandela-Rhodes Scholar.

Title of thesis

GCSE History, Policy Reform and Student Development: How students and teachers navigate the thematic study “Empires, Migration and the People”

Conference papers

Teaching Migration, Belonging, and Empire in Secondary Schools: evaluation of a teacher professional development program, (2019) History Educators International Research Network Conference, Lead author: Dr Jason Todd, University of Vienna, Austria.

“The Problems and Prospects of Teaching South Africa’s Recent History: Teachers’ Perspectives”, (2018) Sustainability, peace and education – Exploring promise and practice: BAICE 20th Anniversary Symposium, University of Bristol, England.

“New Generations, Old Wounds: Learning History at Home and School in Northern Ireland”, (2018) European Social Science and History Conference,
Queens University Belfast, Northern Ireland.

“The Methodological Challenges of Investigating the Role of History Teaching in Peacebuilding”, (2017), Present Past: Time, Memory, and the Negotiation of Historical Justice Conference, Columbia University, United States of America.

“Teaching South Africa’s Truth and Reconciliation Commission”, (2017) European Conference on African Studies, Universität Basel, Switzerland.

Research Assistant Publications

Review of the evidence on feedback in primary and secondary schools, (forthcoming, 2021) for the Education Endowment Foundation, Lead author: Prof Velda Elliott.

Teaching Migration, Belonging, and Empire in Secondary Schools, (2019), for Runnymede Trust and the European Research Council, Lead authors: Kimberly McIntosh, Dr Jason Todd and Prof Nandini Das.

Gender and the Politics of Reconciliation (2016), for The Institute for Justice and Reconciliation, Lead author: Dr Helen Scanlon

SOLE AUTHOR PUBLICATIONS

‘Transitions, Truth-Telling and Teaching History’, Cambridge Open-Review Educational Research e-Journal, Vol. 4, 2017.

Alice Tawell is an ESRC funded DPhil Student, co-supervised across the Department of Education and Centre for Criminology at the University of Oxford.

Supervisors: Professor Harry Daniels and Dr Rachel Condry.

Alice’s research focuses broadly on the enactment of school exclusion policy in England.

Prior to starting her doctoral studies, Alice gained a BSc in Sociology from the University of Bath and an MSc in Education (Research Training) from the University of Oxford.

As part of her undergraduate degree, Alice undertook a placement year working with Professor Kathy Sylva in the Families, Effective Learning and Literacy Research Group at the Department of Education, University of Oxford. After completing her degree, Alice returned to the department and has worked as a Research Officer on a number of different research projects since 2014. Most recently Alice has worked as part of the Excluded Lives Research Team on two projects exploring exclusion from school from a multidisciplinary perspective. In 2017 she was awarded a Seed-corn Small Grant Award to co-lead a pilot project exploring student collaborative networks with Hau Ming Tse. Alice also co-convenes the Qualitative Methods Hub in the department.

Outside of the department, Alice has sat on the Advisory Board for the Children Missing Education research project (2016-2017) at the National Children’s Bureau (NCB) and has been a member of the NCB Partnership for Well Being and Mental Health in Schools since 2016. She also sits on the Transparency on Exclusions Steering Group.

In 2017 Alice received funding from the Grand Union Doctoral Training Partnership placement scheme to conduct a Knowledge Exchange Internship with the Early Years Analysis and Research Unit at the Department for Education, and in 2018 Alice was elected the Co-President of the Grand Union ESRC Scholar’s Association, representing ESRC students from the University of Oxford, Brunel and The Open University.

Ashmita graduated from Boston University in 2008 with a BSc. in Biomedical Engineering, after which she worked in Research & Development for 6 years.

It is here that she decided to make the leap from formulation chemistry to STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Math) Education after having worked on programs involving increasing diversity in STEM in schools.

She received her Master’s from Boston University in 2015 in Education Policy. Her research interests include: STEM education policy; Assessment; Further Education; Higher Education; Science education pedagogy

Originally from Indonesia, Tracey has spent the last decade studying in the UK and working about multicultural education in Indonesia.

She is fully funded by the Indonesia Endowment Fund for Education (LPDP). Her doctoral research explores the ways Indonesian schools teach and accommodate the national vision of multicultural Indonesia, “Bhinneka Tunggal Ika” (Unity-in-Diversity). By using a two-tier case study research approach (case studies of six schools and of two provinces), it presents nuanced and critical account of the ways head teachers, teachers, students and parents from six state and private schools in Jakarta and Bali with different mixes of pupil ethnicity and religiosity understand and accommodate the vision of diversity into educational practices. Despite the highly contextual focus, the research offers a critical view into the complex role of schools in today’s era of globalisation in providing quality education for all and at the same time creating citizens who are inclusive and respectful towards others.

Tracey completed her MSc in Comparative and International Education at the University of Oxford in 2011 and her honours BA in Mathematics and Education Studies at the University of Cambridge in 2010. Upon completing her study in the UK, she returned to Indonesia to work in an educational foundation Sultan Iskandar Muda in Medan, Indonesia as a member of the Board of Directors in the Foundation – a position which she is still holding until today. She is responsible for overlooking the development and implementation of multicultural education and teacher development programme.

During her tenure, she has worked alongside the head teachers and teachers across all educational levels (from pre-school until high school) and produced books on the praxis of multicultural education in the school setting.

Title of Thesis

Accommodating a vision of diversity in different school contexts: “Unity-in-Diversity” in Indonesia

Publications
Journal Article
  • Harjatanaya, T.Y. & Hoon, C.Y. (2018) Politics of multicultural education in post-Suharto Indonesia: a study of the Chinese minority. Compare: A Journal of Comparative and International Education
Edited Book
  • Harjatanaya, T.Y. (2015) (2nd Edition) Merawat Keberagaman: Praksis Pendidikan Multikultural Perguruan Sultan Iskandar Muda (Fostering Diversity: Praxis of Multicultural Education in Sultan Iskandar Muda). Medan: YPSIM.
Book Chapter
  • Harjatanaya, T.Y. (2018). Akses dan Kesamaan dalam Pendidikan Vokasi (Access and Equality in Vocational Education). In Ferary, D. (2018) Sistem Pendidikan Vokasi di Inggris (Vocational Education System in England) (ed.). London: Kantor Atase Pendidikan dan Kebudayaan, Kedutaan Besar Indonesia (Indonesian Embassy) London, p. 121-138.

Katy is a Deputy Headteacher and the founder of a Leadership and Coaching Institute, which she now co-directs.

Katy is an Associate Fellow at the Oxford Character Project and a Research Associate at the Oxford University Wellbeing Research Centre. She is the co-founder of Global Social Leaders, a leadership programme which has participants in 105 countries, all passionate about creating and sustaining positive change in the world.

Title of Thesis

How could school leaders improve the flourishing and wellbeing of teaching staff?

Books
  • Granville-Chapman, K. and Bidston, E (2020) Leader: Know, love and inspire your people. Carmarthen: Crownhouse Publishing
Book Chapters
  •  Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ In White, M. & McCallum, F. (Ed.s) Wellbeing and Resilience Education: Covid-19 And Its Impact on Education Systems. Routledge
Publications
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘Purpose and Leadership in Education and Beyond’. The Education Exchange. Available from: https://theeducation.exchange/purpose-and-leadership-in-education-and-beyond/
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘The Three Secrets of COVID-era Leadership’. Times Education Supplement. Available from: https://www.tes.com/news/three-secrets-covid-era-school-leadership
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2016) ‘Assessing the Impact of a Teacher Leadership Programme in a Teaching Schools Alliance. Journal of Teacher Action Research
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2014) ‘The Afghan conflict: causes and consequences.’ Geography Review 28(1): 22-27
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2013) What are the psychological factors that affect students’ academic resilience and can teachers influence these? Unpublished thesis
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘Unlocking Leadership Potential’, The Magazine of the Boarding School’s Association, 33: 42-45
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2009) ‘Learning to Lead’, Leader, The Education Leader Magazine 41: 22-25
Presentations
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2019) ‘How could leaders improve the flourishing of their teams?’ ‘Stowe Ed Conference’, Forthcoming: 7 Jan 2019
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2018) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education: 21 Jun 2018
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2017) ‘How can school leaders improve teacher flourishing?’ ‘Doing Education Differently Conference’, University of Oxford, Department of Education, 11 Mar 17
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2016) ‘Developing school leaders who enable teachers to flourish’ The Telegraph Festival of Education 23 Jun 16
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Developing leadership in pupils and teachers’ High School Affiliated to Renmin University of China, Beijing. 20 Oct 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Resilience for leaders.’ Global Social Leaders World Summit. 16 Aug 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Emotional Intelligence for Leaders.’ Global Leaders in Education. 12 Aug 15
  • Coates, S.; Fraser, H.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J.; and Nasim, A. (2015) ‘Breaking through the glass ceiling – how can schools empower our girls to become leaders?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education. 19 Jun 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. ‘Developing Leadership in Schools’ (2015). G20 Schools Conference. International conference for head teachers. 11 Apr 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2018) ‘Introduction’, Wellington Leadership Institute: Festival of Leadership. Mar 2012-15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘How the Young Learn to Lead’, Raffles Institution (Singapore) -Purdue University (USA) Education Forum on Gifted & Talented Youth 2012. Singapore. 15 Mar 12
  • Draper, D.; Dyer, R.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Schools’. Presentation for a meeting about pupil leadership and character development at 10 Downing Street. 16 Nov 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Young People’. Presentation for a meeting about leadership and character at 10 Downing Street. 7 Mar 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K. & Seldon, A. (2012) ‘Introduction’, Leading Your School in the 21st Century. 7 Feb 12

Prior to starting his DPhil, Eddy worked as a primary school teacher in Bristol, where he also completed his MSc in Educational Research.

He is particularly interested in the culture of high stakes, standardised testing, and how this might perpetuate existing inequalities in schools. His research focuses specifically on the interaction between knowledge, policy and pedagogy in the context of Literacy education.

 

Amanda is completing a part-time DPhil, alongside working in Initial Teacher Education at Leeds Trinity University.

Her research is focused on understanding tensions, contradictions and conflicts that teachers in disadvantaged schools may experience when they engage in research activity.  Her research focus is influenced by her own experiences of working as a research-active teacher in disadvantaged schools, and recent work in teacher education to support experienced and beginning teachers in developing their own research activities.

One of the aims of Amanda’s research is to construct a framework to support teachers in pursuing research activity and critical scholarship work which articulates with wider social movements to address issues of poverty and disadvantage in schools.

Title of Thesis

Teachers’ perspectives on tensions between policy, practice and research in disadvantaged schools

Publications 

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2017) A ‘usable past’ of teacher education in England: history in JET’s anniversary issue. Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy, 43 (5), pp.616-627.

Nuttall, A. (2016) The ‘curriculum challenge’: Moving towards the ‘Storyline’ approach in a case study urban primary school.  Improving Schools, 19 (2), pp. 154-166.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Learning {Re}imagined: A review.  Primary First, 15, pp. 17-18.

Nuttall, A. and Doherty, J. (2014) Disaffected boys and the achievement gap: the ‘wallpaper effect’ and what is hidden by a focus on school results.  The Urban Review, 46 (5), pp.800-815.

Conference Papers and Presentations

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2018) “No child is pre-ordained to fail” Teachers questioning policy assumptions.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Newcastle, 11-13 September.

Nuttall, A. and Tobbell, C. (2017) Trainee teachers’ perspectives on practitioner enquiry.  Paper presented at the 8th TEAN Conference: Thinking Deeply about Education, Birmingham, 11-12 May.

Nuttall, A. (2017) Assessment at primary level: quality, comparability and improving secondary readiness.  A perspective from ITE.  Speech at the Westminster Education Forum Keynote Seminar: Next steps for reforming primary education: effective teaching practices, assessment and accountably, London, 18 January.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Deficit narratives and lived realities: whose poverty is it?  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the Australian Association for Research in Education, Melbourne, 27 November – 1 December.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Disenfranchised boys’ reflections on their urban schooling experience: “What a Waste!”.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Philpott, C., Beckett, L. and Wrigley, T. (2016) Collaborative practitioner inquiry: making a difference to urban schools.  Innovation session (school visits and symposium) presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Finn, B. and Beckett, L. (2015) Teachers’ constructions of poverty effects: Their research evidence.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Belfast, 15-17 September.

Nuttall, A. (2014) Teachers’ voice on disengaged boys: the role of one teacher-researcher in an English primary school. Paper presented at the Joint Australian Association for Research in Education and the New Zealand Association for Research in Education Conference, Brisbane, 30 November – 4 December.

Andrew Marotta is a D.Phil candidate in the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. He holds an A.A. in Social Sciences from Broward Community College, and a B.A. in Individualized Studies from the Gallatin School of Individualized Studies, New York University and an M.A. and Ed.M. in Counseling Psychology and School Counseling from Teachers College, Columbia University.

Andrew’s research interests include social and emotional learning, peer mentorship, existential therapy / philosophy, curriculum design for school counselors, and applied ethics in computer science. Andrew’s thesis examines how literature and philosophy can be used to nurture social and emotional learning through group counseling among high school students. He has also worked as a school counselor, teaching artist, and curriculum designer.

Presently, Andrew is designing joint humanities and applied ethics workshops for computer and data science college majors, using social and emotional learning concepts as the pedagogical foundation.

Abigail’s research explores the role of education in students’ personal development and how this can be supported by policy, curricula, initial teacher education and teacher professional development. In particular she focuses on history education, citizenship education and peace education as vehicles for dialogue. These opportunities for students to engage with social questions are vital for building cohesive societies. This flows from the recognition that traditional forums for developing public understanding, such as post-conflict truth commissions, need to be complemented by intergenerational and educational perspectives.

Abigail has taught History, Politics, Debating as well as Relationships and Sex Education to secondary school students in South Africa, England and the USA.

She holds postgraduate degrees in Post-Conflict and Transitional Justice (University of Cape Town), in Education, Globalisation and International Development (University of Cambridge) and in African Studies (University of Oxford). She is a Rhodes Scholar, Mandela-Magdalene Scholar and Mandela-Rhodes Scholar.

Title of thesis

GCSE History, Policy Reform and Student Development: How students and teachers navigate the thematic study “Empires, Migration and the People”

Conference papers

Teaching Migration, Belonging, and Empire in Secondary Schools: evaluation of a teacher professional development program, (2019) History Educators International Research Network Conference, Lead author: Dr Jason Todd, University of Vienna, Austria.

“The Problems and Prospects of Teaching South Africa’s Recent History: Teachers’ Perspectives”, (2018) Sustainability, peace and education – Exploring promise and practice: BAICE 20th Anniversary Symposium, University of Bristol, England.

“New Generations, Old Wounds: Learning History at Home and School in Northern Ireland”, (2018) European Social Science and History Conference,
Queens University Belfast, Northern Ireland.

“The Methodological Challenges of Investigating the Role of History Teaching in Peacebuilding”, (2017), Present Past: Time, Memory, and the Negotiation of Historical Justice Conference, Columbia University, United States of America.

“Teaching South Africa’s Truth and Reconciliation Commission”, (2017) European Conference on African Studies, Universität Basel, Switzerland.

Research Assistant Publications

Review of the evidence on feedback in primary and secondary schools, (forthcoming, 2021) for the Education Endowment Foundation, Lead author: Prof Velda Elliott.

Teaching Migration, Belonging, and Empire in Secondary Schools, (2019), for Runnymede Trust and the European Research Council, Lead authors: Kimberly McIntosh, Dr Jason Todd and Prof Nandini Das.

Gender and the Politics of Reconciliation (2016), for The Institute for Justice and Reconciliation, Lead author: Dr Helen Scanlon

SOLE AUTHOR PUBLICATIONS

‘Transitions, Truth-Telling and Teaching History’, Cambridge Open-Review Educational Research e-Journal, Vol. 4, 2017.

Alice Tawell is an ESRC funded DPhil Student, co-supervised across the Department of Education and Centre for Criminology at the University of Oxford.

Supervisors: Professor Harry Daniels and Dr Rachel Condry.

Alice’s research focuses broadly on the enactment of school exclusion policy in England.

Prior to starting her doctoral studies, Alice gained a BSc in Sociology from the University of Bath and an MSc in Education (Research Training) from the University of Oxford.

As part of her undergraduate degree, Alice undertook a placement year working with Professor Kathy Sylva in the Families, Effective Learning and Literacy Research Group at the Department of Education, University of Oxford. After completing her degree, Alice returned to the department and has worked as a Research Officer on a number of different research projects since 2014. Most recently Alice has worked as part of the Excluded Lives Research Team on two projects exploring exclusion from school from a multidisciplinary perspective. In 2017 she was awarded a Seed-corn Small Grant Award to co-lead a pilot project exploring student collaborative networks with Hau Ming Tse. Alice also co-convenes the Qualitative Methods Hub in the department.

Outside of the department, Alice has sat on the Advisory Board for the Children Missing Education research project (2016-2017) at the National Children’s Bureau (NCB) and has been a member of the NCB Partnership for Well Being and Mental Health in Schools since 2016. She also sits on the Transparency on Exclusions Steering Group.

In 2017 Alice received funding from the Grand Union Doctoral Training Partnership placement scheme to conduct a Knowledge Exchange Internship with the Early Years Analysis and Research Unit at the Department for Education, and in 2018 Alice was elected the Co-President of the Grand Union ESRC Scholar’s Association, representing ESRC students from the University of Oxford, Brunel and The Open University.

Ashmita graduated from Boston University in 2008 with a BSc. in Biomedical Engineering, after which she worked in Research & Development for 6 years.

It is here that she decided to make the leap from formulation chemistry to STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Math) Education after having worked on programs involving increasing diversity in STEM in schools.

She received her Master’s from Boston University in 2015 in Education Policy. Her research interests include: STEM education policy; Assessment; Further Education; Higher Education; Science education pedagogy

Originally from Indonesia, Tracey has spent the last decade studying in the UK and working about multicultural education in Indonesia.

She is fully funded by the Indonesia Endowment Fund for Education (LPDP). Her doctoral research explores the ways Indonesian schools teach and accommodate the national vision of multicultural Indonesia, “Bhinneka Tunggal Ika” (Unity-in-Diversity). By using a two-tier case study research approach (case studies of six schools and of two provinces), it presents nuanced and critical account of the ways head teachers, teachers, students and parents from six state and private schools in Jakarta and Bali with different mixes of pupil ethnicity and religiosity understand and accommodate the vision of diversity into educational practices. Despite the highly contextual focus, the research offers a critical view into the complex role of schools in today’s era of globalisation in providing quality education for all and at the same time creating citizens who are inclusive and respectful towards others.

Tracey completed her MSc in Comparative and International Education at the University of Oxford in 2011 and her honours BA in Mathematics and Education Studies at the University of Cambridge in 2010. Upon completing her study in the UK, she returned to Indonesia to work in an educational foundation Sultan Iskandar Muda in Medan, Indonesia as a member of the Board of Directors in the Foundation – a position which she is still holding until today. She is responsible for overlooking the development and implementation of multicultural education and teacher development programme.

During her tenure, she has worked alongside the head teachers and teachers across all educational levels (from pre-school until high school) and produced books on the praxis of multicultural education in the school setting.

Title of Thesis

Accommodating a vision of diversity in different school contexts: “Unity-in-Diversity” in Indonesia

Publications
Journal Article
  • Harjatanaya, T.Y. & Hoon, C.Y. (2018) Politics of multicultural education in post-Suharto Indonesia: a study of the Chinese minority. Compare: A Journal of Comparative and International Education
Edited Book
  • Harjatanaya, T.Y. (2015) (2nd Edition) Merawat Keberagaman: Praksis Pendidikan Multikultural Perguruan Sultan Iskandar Muda (Fostering Diversity: Praxis of Multicultural Education in Sultan Iskandar Muda). Medan: YPSIM.
Book Chapter
  • Harjatanaya, T.Y. (2018). Akses dan Kesamaan dalam Pendidikan Vokasi (Access and Equality in Vocational Education). In Ferary, D. (2018) Sistem Pendidikan Vokasi di Inggris (Vocational Education System in England) (ed.). London: Kantor Atase Pendidikan dan Kebudayaan, Kedutaan Besar Indonesia (Indonesian Embassy) London, p. 121-138.

Katy is a Deputy Headteacher and the founder of a Leadership and Coaching Institute, which she now co-directs.

Katy is an Associate Fellow at the Oxford Character Project and a Research Associate at the Oxford University Wellbeing Research Centre. She is the co-founder of Global Social Leaders, a leadership programme which has participants in 105 countries, all passionate about creating and sustaining positive change in the world.

Title of Thesis

How could school leaders improve the flourishing and wellbeing of teaching staff?

Books
  • Granville-Chapman, K. and Bidston, E (2020) Leader: Know, love and inspire your people. Carmarthen: Crownhouse Publishing
Book Chapters
  •  Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ In White, M. & McCallum, F. (Ed.s) Wellbeing and Resilience Education: Covid-19 And Its Impact on Education Systems. Routledge
Publications
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘Purpose and Leadership in Education and Beyond’. The Education Exchange. Available from: https://theeducation.exchange/purpose-and-leadership-in-education-and-beyond/
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘The Three Secrets of COVID-era Leadership’. Times Education Supplement. Available from: https://www.tes.com/news/three-secrets-covid-era-school-leadership
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2016) ‘Assessing the Impact of a Teacher Leadership Programme in a Teaching Schools Alliance. Journal of Teacher Action Research
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2014) ‘The Afghan conflict: causes and consequences.’ Geography Review 28(1): 22-27
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2013) What are the psychological factors that affect students’ academic resilience and can teachers influence these? Unpublished thesis
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘Unlocking Leadership Potential’, The Magazine of the Boarding School’s Association, 33: 42-45
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2009) ‘Learning to Lead’, Leader, The Education Leader Magazine 41: 22-25
Presentations
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2019) ‘How could leaders improve the flourishing of their teams?’ ‘Stowe Ed Conference’, Forthcoming: 7 Jan 2019
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2018) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education: 21 Jun 2018
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2017) ‘How can school leaders improve teacher flourishing?’ ‘Doing Education Differently Conference’, University of Oxford, Department of Education, 11 Mar 17
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2016) ‘Developing school leaders who enable teachers to flourish’ The Telegraph Festival of Education 23 Jun 16
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Developing leadership in pupils and teachers’ High School Affiliated to Renmin University of China, Beijing. 20 Oct 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Resilience for leaders.’ Global Social Leaders World Summit. 16 Aug 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Emotional Intelligence for Leaders.’ Global Leaders in Education. 12 Aug 15
  • Coates, S.; Fraser, H.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J.; and Nasim, A. (2015) ‘Breaking through the glass ceiling – how can schools empower our girls to become leaders?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education. 19 Jun 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. ‘Developing Leadership in Schools’ (2015). G20 Schools Conference. International conference for head teachers. 11 Apr 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2018) ‘Introduction’, Wellington Leadership Institute: Festival of Leadership. Mar 2012-15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘How the Young Learn to Lead’, Raffles Institution (Singapore) -Purdue University (USA) Education Forum on Gifted & Talented Youth 2012. Singapore. 15 Mar 12
  • Draper, D.; Dyer, R.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Schools’. Presentation for a meeting about pupil leadership and character development at 10 Downing Street. 16 Nov 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Young People’. Presentation for a meeting about leadership and character at 10 Downing Street. 7 Mar 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K. & Seldon, A. (2012) ‘Introduction’, Leading Your School in the 21st Century. 7 Feb 12

Prior to starting his DPhil, Eddy worked as a primary school teacher in Bristol, where he also completed his MSc in Educational Research.

He is particularly interested in the culture of high stakes, standardised testing, and how this might perpetuate existing inequalities in schools. His research focuses specifically on the interaction between knowledge, policy and pedagogy in the context of Literacy education.

 

Amanda is completing a part-time DPhil, alongside working in Initial Teacher Education at Leeds Trinity University.

Her research is focused on understanding tensions, contradictions and conflicts that teachers in disadvantaged schools may experience when they engage in research activity.  Her research focus is influenced by her own experiences of working as a research-active teacher in disadvantaged schools, and recent work in teacher education to support experienced and beginning teachers in developing their own research activities.

One of the aims of Amanda’s research is to construct a framework to support teachers in pursuing research activity and critical scholarship work which articulates with wider social movements to address issues of poverty and disadvantage in schools.

Title of Thesis

Teachers’ perspectives on tensions between policy, practice and research in disadvantaged schools

Publications 

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2017) A ‘usable past’ of teacher education in England: history in JET’s anniversary issue. Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy, 43 (5), pp.616-627.

Nuttall, A. (2016) The ‘curriculum challenge’: Moving towards the ‘Storyline’ approach in a case study urban primary school.  Improving Schools, 19 (2), pp. 154-166.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Learning {Re}imagined: A review.  Primary First, 15, pp. 17-18.

Nuttall, A. and Doherty, J. (2014) Disaffected boys and the achievement gap: the ‘wallpaper effect’ and what is hidden by a focus on school results.  The Urban Review, 46 (5), pp.800-815.

Conference Papers and Presentations

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2018) “No child is pre-ordained to fail” Teachers questioning policy assumptions.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Newcastle, 11-13 September.

Nuttall, A. and Tobbell, C. (2017) Trainee teachers’ perspectives on practitioner enquiry.  Paper presented at the 8th TEAN Conference: Thinking Deeply about Education, Birmingham, 11-12 May.

Nuttall, A. (2017) Assessment at primary level: quality, comparability and improving secondary readiness.  A perspective from ITE.  Speech at the Westminster Education Forum Keynote Seminar: Next steps for reforming primary education: effective teaching practices, assessment and accountably, London, 18 January.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Deficit narratives and lived realities: whose poverty is it?  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the Australian Association for Research in Education, Melbourne, 27 November – 1 December.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Disenfranchised boys’ reflections on their urban schooling experience: “What a Waste!”.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Philpott, C., Beckett, L. and Wrigley, T. (2016) Collaborative practitioner inquiry: making a difference to urban schools.  Innovation session (school visits and symposium) presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Finn, B. and Beckett, L. (2015) Teachers’ constructions of poverty effects: Their research evidence.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Belfast, 15-17 September.

Nuttall, A. (2014) Teachers’ voice on disengaged boys: the role of one teacher-researcher in an English primary school. Paper presented at the Joint Australian Association for Research in Education and the New Zealand Association for Research in Education Conference, Brisbane, 30 November – 4 December.

Andrew Marotta is a D.Phil candidate in the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. He holds an A.A. in Social Sciences from Broward Community College, and a B.A. in Individualized Studies from the Gallatin School of Individualized Studies, New York University and an M.A. and Ed.M. in Counseling Psychology and School Counseling from Teachers College, Columbia University.

Andrew’s research interests include social and emotional learning, peer mentorship, existential therapy / philosophy, curriculum design for school counselors, and applied ethics in computer science. Andrew’s thesis examines how literature and philosophy can be used to nurture social and emotional learning through group counseling among high school students. He has also worked as a school counselor, teaching artist, and curriculum designer.

Presently, Andrew is designing joint humanities and applied ethics workshops for computer and data science college majors, using social and emotional learning concepts as the pedagogical foundation.

Abigail’s research explores the role of education in students’ personal development and how this can be supported by policy, curricula, initial teacher education and teacher professional development. In particular she focuses on history education, citizenship education and peace education as vehicles for dialogue. These opportunities for students to engage with social questions are vital for building cohesive societies. This flows from the recognition that traditional forums for developing public understanding, such as post-conflict truth commissions, need to be complemented by intergenerational and educational perspectives.

Abigail has taught History, Politics, Debating as well as Relationships and Sex Education to secondary school students in South Africa, England and the USA.

She holds postgraduate degrees in Post-Conflict and Transitional Justice (University of Cape Town), in Education, Globalisation and International Development (University of Cambridge) and in African Studies (University of Oxford). She is a Rhodes Scholar, Mandela-Magdalene Scholar and Mandela-Rhodes Scholar.

Title of thesis

GCSE History, Policy Reform and Student Development: How students and teachers navigate the thematic study “Empires, Migration and the People”

Conference papers

Teaching Migration, Belonging, and Empire in Secondary Schools: evaluation of a teacher professional development program, (2019) History Educators International Research Network Conference, Lead author: Dr Jason Todd, University of Vienna, Austria.

“The Problems and Prospects of Teaching South Africa’s Recent History: Teachers’ Perspectives”, (2018) Sustainability, peace and education – Exploring promise and practice: BAICE 20th Anniversary Symposium, University of Bristol, England.

“New Generations, Old Wounds: Learning History at Home and School in Northern Ireland”, (2018) European Social Science and History Conference,
Queens University Belfast, Northern Ireland.

“The Methodological Challenges of Investigating the Role of History Teaching in Peacebuilding”, (2017), Present Past: Time, Memory, and the Negotiation of Historical Justice Conference, Columbia University, United States of America.

“Teaching South Africa’s Truth and Reconciliation Commission”, (2017) European Conference on African Studies, Universität Basel, Switzerland.

Research Assistant Publications

Review of the evidence on feedback in primary and secondary schools, (forthcoming, 2021) for the Education Endowment Foundation, Lead author: Prof Velda Elliott.

Teaching Migration, Belonging, and Empire in Secondary Schools, (2019), for Runnymede Trust and the European Research Council, Lead authors: Kimberly McIntosh, Dr Jason Todd and Prof Nandini Das.

Gender and the Politics of Reconciliation (2016), for The Institute for Justice and Reconciliation, Lead author: Dr Helen Scanlon

SOLE AUTHOR PUBLICATIONS

‘Transitions, Truth-Telling and Teaching History’, Cambridge Open-Review Educational Research e-Journal, Vol. 4, 2017.

Alice Tawell is an ESRC funded DPhil Student, co-supervised across the Department of Education and Centre for Criminology at the University of Oxford.

Supervisors: Professor Harry Daniels and Dr Rachel Condry.

Alice’s research focuses broadly on the enactment of school exclusion policy in England.

Prior to starting her doctoral studies, Alice gained a BSc in Sociology from the University of Bath and an MSc in Education (Research Training) from the University of Oxford.

As part of her undergraduate degree, Alice undertook a placement year working with Professor Kathy Sylva in the Families, Effective Learning and Literacy Research Group at the Department of Education, University of Oxford. After completing her degree, Alice returned to the department and has worked as a Research Officer on a number of different research projects since 2014. Most recently Alice has worked as part of the Excluded Lives Research Team on two projects exploring exclusion from school from a multidisciplinary perspective. In 2017 she was awarded a Seed-corn Small Grant Award to co-lead a pilot project exploring student collaborative networks with Hau Ming Tse. Alice also co-convenes the Qualitative Methods Hub in the department.

Outside of the department, Alice has sat on the Advisory Board for the Children Missing Education research project (2016-2017) at the National Children’s Bureau (NCB) and has been a member of the NCB Partnership for Well Being and Mental Health in Schools since 2016. She also sits on the Transparency on Exclusions Steering Group.

In 2017 Alice received funding from the Grand Union Doctoral Training Partnership placement scheme to conduct a Knowledge Exchange Internship with the Early Years Analysis and Research Unit at the Department for Education, and in 2018 Alice was elected the Co-President of the Grand Union ESRC Scholar’s Association, representing ESRC students from the University of Oxford, Brunel and The Open University.

Ashmita graduated from Boston University in 2008 with a BSc. in Biomedical Engineering, after which she worked in Research & Development for 6 years.

It is here that she decided to make the leap from formulation chemistry to STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Math) Education after having worked on programs involving increasing diversity in STEM in schools.

She received her Master’s from Boston University in 2015 in Education Policy. Her research interests include: STEM education policy; Assessment; Further Education; Higher Education; Science education pedagogy

Originally from Indonesia, Tracey has spent the last decade studying in the UK and working about multicultural education in Indonesia.

She is fully funded by the Indonesia Endowment Fund for Education (LPDP). Her doctoral research explores the ways Indonesian schools teach and accommodate the national vision of multicultural Indonesia, “Bhinneka Tunggal Ika” (Unity-in-Diversity). By using a two-tier case study research approach (case studies of six schools and of two provinces), it presents nuanced and critical account of the ways head teachers, teachers, students and parents from six state and private schools in Jakarta and Bali with different mixes of pupil ethnicity and religiosity understand and accommodate the vision of diversity into educational practices. Despite the highly contextual focus, the research offers a critical view into the complex role of schools in today’s era of globalisation in providing quality education for all and at the same time creating citizens who are inclusive and respectful towards others.

Tracey completed her MSc in Comparative and International Education at the University of Oxford in 2011 and her honours BA in Mathematics and Education Studies at the University of Cambridge in 2010. Upon completing her study in the UK, she returned to Indonesia to work in an educational foundation Sultan Iskandar Muda in Medan, Indonesia as a member of the Board of Directors in the Foundation – a position which she is still holding until today. She is responsible for overlooking the development and implementation of multicultural education and teacher development programme.

During her tenure, she has worked alongside the head teachers and teachers across all educational levels (from pre-school until high school) and produced books on the praxis of multicultural education in the school setting.

Title of Thesis

Accommodating a vision of diversity in different school contexts: “Unity-in-Diversity” in Indonesia

Publications
Journal Article
  • Harjatanaya, T.Y. & Hoon, C.Y. (2018) Politics of multicultural education in post-Suharto Indonesia: a study of the Chinese minority. Compare: A Journal of Comparative and International Education
Edited Book
  • Harjatanaya, T.Y. (2015) (2nd Edition) Merawat Keberagaman: Praksis Pendidikan Multikultural Perguruan Sultan Iskandar Muda (Fostering Diversity: Praxis of Multicultural Education in Sultan Iskandar Muda). Medan: YPSIM.
Book Chapter
  • Harjatanaya, T.Y. (2018). Akses dan Kesamaan dalam Pendidikan Vokasi (Access and Equality in Vocational Education). In Ferary, D. (2018) Sistem Pendidikan Vokasi di Inggris (Vocational Education System in England) (ed.). London: Kantor Atase Pendidikan dan Kebudayaan, Kedutaan Besar Indonesia (Indonesian Embassy) London, p. 121-138.

Katy is a Deputy Headteacher and the founder of a Leadership and Coaching Institute, which she now co-directs.

Katy is an Associate Fellow at the Oxford Character Project and a Research Associate at the Oxford University Wellbeing Research Centre. She is the co-founder of Global Social Leaders, a leadership programme which has participants in 105 countries, all passionate about creating and sustaining positive change in the world.

Title of Thesis

How could school leaders improve the flourishing and wellbeing of teaching staff?

Books
  • Granville-Chapman, K. and Bidston, E (2020) Leader: Know, love and inspire your people. Carmarthen: Crownhouse Publishing
Book Chapters
  •  Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ In White, M. & McCallum, F. (Ed.s) Wellbeing and Resilience Education: Covid-19 And Its Impact on Education Systems. Routledge
Publications
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘Purpose and Leadership in Education and Beyond’. The Education Exchange. Available from: https://theeducation.exchange/purpose-and-leadership-in-education-and-beyond/
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘The Three Secrets of COVID-era Leadership’. Times Education Supplement. Available from: https://www.tes.com/news/three-secrets-covid-era-school-leadership
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2016) ‘Assessing the Impact of a Teacher Leadership Programme in a Teaching Schools Alliance. Journal of Teacher Action Research
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2014) ‘The Afghan conflict: causes and consequences.’ Geography Review 28(1): 22-27
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2013) What are the psychological factors that affect students’ academic resilience and can teachers influence these? Unpublished thesis
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘Unlocking Leadership Potential’, The Magazine of the Boarding School’s Association, 33: 42-45
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2009) ‘Learning to Lead’, Leader, The Education Leader Magazine 41: 22-25
Presentations
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2019) ‘How could leaders improve the flourishing of their teams?’ ‘Stowe Ed Conference’, Forthcoming: 7 Jan 2019
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2018) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education: 21 Jun 2018
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2017) ‘How can school leaders improve teacher flourishing?’ ‘Doing Education Differently Conference’, University of Oxford, Department of Education, 11 Mar 17
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2016) ‘Developing school leaders who enable teachers to flourish’ The Telegraph Festival of Education 23 Jun 16
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Developing leadership in pupils and teachers’ High School Affiliated to Renmin University of China, Beijing. 20 Oct 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Resilience for leaders.’ Global Social Leaders World Summit. 16 Aug 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Emotional Intelligence for Leaders.’ Global Leaders in Education. 12 Aug 15
  • Coates, S.; Fraser, H.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J.; and Nasim, A. (2015) ‘Breaking through the glass ceiling – how can schools empower our girls to become leaders?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education. 19 Jun 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. ‘Developing Leadership in Schools’ (2015). G20 Schools Conference. International conference for head teachers. 11 Apr 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2018) ‘Introduction’, Wellington Leadership Institute: Festival of Leadership. Mar 2012-15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘How the Young Learn to Lead’, Raffles Institution (Singapore) -Purdue University (USA) Education Forum on Gifted & Talented Youth 2012. Singapore. 15 Mar 12
  • Draper, D.; Dyer, R.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Schools’. Presentation for a meeting about pupil leadership and character development at 10 Downing Street. 16 Nov 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Young People’. Presentation for a meeting about leadership and character at 10 Downing Street. 7 Mar 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K. & Seldon, A. (2012) ‘Introduction’, Leading Your School in the 21st Century. 7 Feb 12

Prior to starting his DPhil, Eddy worked as a primary school teacher in Bristol, where he also completed his MSc in Educational Research.

He is particularly interested in the culture of high stakes, standardised testing, and how this might perpetuate existing inequalities in schools. His research focuses specifically on the interaction between knowledge, policy and pedagogy in the context of Literacy education.

 

Amanda is completing a part-time DPhil, alongside working in Initial Teacher Education at Leeds Trinity University.

Her research is focused on understanding tensions, contradictions and conflicts that teachers in disadvantaged schools may experience when they engage in research activity.  Her research focus is influenced by her own experiences of working as a research-active teacher in disadvantaged schools, and recent work in teacher education to support experienced and beginning teachers in developing their own research activities.

One of the aims of Amanda’s research is to construct a framework to support teachers in pursuing research activity and critical scholarship work which articulates with wider social movements to address issues of poverty and disadvantage in schools.

Title of Thesis

Teachers’ perspectives on tensions between policy, practice and research in disadvantaged schools

Publications 

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2017) A ‘usable past’ of teacher education in England: history in JET’s anniversary issue. Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy, 43 (5), pp.616-627.

Nuttall, A. (2016) The ‘curriculum challenge’: Moving towards the ‘Storyline’ approach in a case study urban primary school.  Improving Schools, 19 (2), pp. 154-166.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Learning {Re}imagined: A review.  Primary First, 15, pp. 17-18.

Nuttall, A. and Doherty, J. (2014) Disaffected boys and the achievement gap: the ‘wallpaper effect’ and what is hidden by a focus on school results.  The Urban Review, 46 (5), pp.800-815.

Conference Papers and Presentations

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2018) “No child is pre-ordained to fail” Teachers questioning policy assumptions.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Newcastle, 11-13 September.

Nuttall, A. and Tobbell, C. (2017) Trainee teachers’ perspectives on practitioner enquiry.  Paper presented at the 8th TEAN Conference: Thinking Deeply about Education, Birmingham, 11-12 May.

Nuttall, A. (2017) Assessment at primary level: quality, comparability and improving secondary readiness.  A perspective from ITE.  Speech at the Westminster Education Forum Keynote Seminar: Next steps for reforming primary education: effective teaching practices, assessment and accountably, London, 18 January.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Deficit narratives and lived realities: whose poverty is it?  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the Australian Association for Research in Education, Melbourne, 27 November – 1 December.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Disenfranchised boys’ reflections on their urban schooling experience: “What a Waste!”.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Philpott, C., Beckett, L. and Wrigley, T. (2016) Collaborative practitioner inquiry: making a difference to urban schools.  Innovation session (school visits and symposium) presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Finn, B. and Beckett, L. (2015) Teachers’ constructions of poverty effects: Their research evidence.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Belfast, 15-17 September.

Nuttall, A. (2014) Teachers’ voice on disengaged boys: the role of one teacher-researcher in an English primary school. Paper presented at the Joint Australian Association for Research in Education and the New Zealand Association for Research in Education Conference, Brisbane, 30 November – 4 December.

Andrew Marotta is a D.Phil candidate in the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. He holds an A.A. in Social Sciences from Broward Community College, and a B.A. in Individualized Studies from the Gallatin School of Individualized Studies, New York University and an M.A. and Ed.M. in Counseling Psychology and School Counseling from Teachers College, Columbia University.

Andrew’s research interests include social and emotional learning, peer mentorship, existential therapy / philosophy, curriculum design for school counselors, and applied ethics in computer science. Andrew’s thesis examines how literature and philosophy can be used to nurture social and emotional learning through group counseling among high school students. He has also worked as a school counselor, teaching artist, and curriculum designer.

Presently, Andrew is designing joint humanities and applied ethics workshops for computer and data science college majors, using social and emotional learning concepts as the pedagogical foundation.

Abigail’s research explores the role of education in students’ personal development and how this can be supported by policy, curricula, initial teacher education and teacher professional development. In particular she focuses on history education, citizenship education and peace education as vehicles for dialogue. These opportunities for students to engage with social questions are vital for building cohesive societies. This flows from the recognition that traditional forums for developing public understanding, such as post-conflict truth commissions, need to be complemented by intergenerational and educational perspectives.

Abigail has taught History, Politics, Debating as well as Relationships and Sex Education to secondary school students in South Africa, England and the USA.

She holds postgraduate degrees in Post-Conflict and Transitional Justice (University of Cape Town), in Education, Globalisation and International Development (University of Cambridge) and in African Studies (University of Oxford). She is a Rhodes Scholar, Mandela-Magdalene Scholar and Mandela-Rhodes Scholar.

Title of thesis

GCSE History, Policy Reform and Student Development: How students and teachers navigate the thematic study “Empires, Migration and the People”

Conference papers

Teaching Migration, Belonging, and Empire in Secondary Schools: evaluation of a teacher professional development program, (2019) History Educators International Research Network Conference, Lead author: Dr Jason Todd, University of Vienna, Austria.

“The Problems and Prospects of Teaching South Africa’s Recent History: Teachers’ Perspectives”, (2018) Sustainability, peace and education – Exploring promise and practice: BAICE 20th Anniversary Symposium, University of Bristol, England.

“New Generations, Old Wounds: Learning History at Home and School in Northern Ireland”, (2018) European Social Science and History Conference,
Queens University Belfast, Northern Ireland.

“The Methodological Challenges of Investigating the Role of History Teaching in Peacebuilding”, (2017), Present Past: Time, Memory, and the Negotiation of Historical Justice Conference, Columbia University, United States of America.

“Teaching South Africa’s Truth and Reconciliation Commission”, (2017) European Conference on African Studies, Universität Basel, Switzerland.

Research Assistant Publications

Review of the evidence on feedback in primary and secondary schools, (forthcoming, 2021) for the Education Endowment Foundation, Lead author: Prof Velda Elliott.

Teaching Migration, Belonging, and Empire in Secondary Schools, (2019), for Runnymede Trust and the European Research Council, Lead authors: Kimberly McIntosh, Dr Jason Todd and Prof Nandini Das.

Gender and the Politics of Reconciliation (2016), for The Institute for Justice and Reconciliation, Lead author: Dr Helen Scanlon

SOLE AUTHOR PUBLICATIONS

‘Transitions, Truth-Telling and Teaching History’, Cambridge Open-Review Educational Research e-Journal, Vol. 4, 2017.

Alice Tawell is an ESRC funded DPhil Student, co-supervised across the Department of Education and Centre for Criminology at the University of Oxford.

Supervisors: Professor Harry Daniels and Dr Rachel Condry.

Alice’s research focuses broadly on the enactment of school exclusion policy in England.

Prior to starting her doctoral studies, Alice gained a BSc in Sociology from the University of Bath and an MSc in Education (Research Training) from the University of Oxford.

As part of her undergraduate degree, Alice undertook a placement year working with Professor Kathy Sylva in the Families, Effective Learning and Literacy Research Group at the Department of Education, University of Oxford. After completing her degree, Alice returned to the department and has worked as a Research Officer on a number of different research projects since 2014. Most recently Alice has worked as part of the Excluded Lives Research Team on two projects exploring exclusion from school from a multidisciplinary perspective. In 2017 she was awarded a Seed-corn Small Grant Award to co-lead a pilot project exploring student collaborative networks with Hau Ming Tse. Alice also co-convenes the Qualitative Methods Hub in the department.

Outside of the department, Alice has sat on the Advisory Board for the Children Missing Education research project (2016-2017) at the National Children’s Bureau (NCB) and has been a member of the NCB Partnership for Well Being and Mental Health in Schools since 2016. She also sits on the Transparency on Exclusions Steering Group.

In 2017 Alice received funding from the Grand Union Doctoral Training Partnership placement scheme to conduct a Knowledge Exchange Internship with the Early Years Analysis and Research Unit at the Department for Education, and in 2018 Alice was elected the Co-President of the Grand Union ESRC Scholar’s Association, representing ESRC students from the University of Oxford, Brunel and The Open University.

Ashmita graduated from Boston University in 2008 with a BSc. in Biomedical Engineering, after which she worked in Research & Development for 6 years.

It is here that she decided to make the leap from formulation chemistry to STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Math) Education after having worked on programs involving increasing diversity in STEM in schools.

She received her Master’s from Boston University in 2015 in Education Policy. Her research interests include: STEM education policy; Assessment; Further Education; Higher Education; Science education pedagogy

Originally from Indonesia, Tracey has spent the last decade studying in the UK and working about multicultural education in Indonesia.

She is fully funded by the Indonesia Endowment Fund for Education (LPDP). Her doctoral research explores the ways Indonesian schools teach and accommodate the national vision of multicultural Indonesia, “Bhinneka Tunggal Ika” (Unity-in-Diversity). By using a two-tier case study research approach (case studies of six schools and of two provinces), it presents nuanced and critical account of the ways head teachers, teachers, students and parents from six state and private schools in Jakarta and Bali with different mixes of pupil ethnicity and religiosity understand and accommodate the vision of diversity into educational practices. Despite the highly contextual focus, the research offers a critical view into the complex role of schools in today’s era of globalisation in providing quality education for all and at the same time creating citizens who are inclusive and respectful towards others.

Tracey completed her MSc in Comparative and International Education at the University of Oxford in 2011 and her honours BA in Mathematics and Education Studies at the University of Cambridge in 2010. Upon completing her study in the UK, she returned to Indonesia to work in an educational foundation Sultan Iskandar Muda in Medan, Indonesia as a member of the Board of Directors in the Foundation – a position which she is still holding until today. She is responsible for overlooking the development and implementation of multicultural education and teacher development programme.

During her tenure, she has worked alongside the head teachers and teachers across all educational levels (from pre-school until high school) and produced books on the praxis of multicultural education in the school setting.

Title of Thesis

Accommodating a vision of diversity in different school contexts: “Unity-in-Diversity” in Indonesia

Publications
Journal Article
  • Harjatanaya, T.Y. & Hoon, C.Y. (2018) Politics of multicultural education in post-Suharto Indonesia: a study of the Chinese minority. Compare: A Journal of Comparative and International Education
Edited Book
  • Harjatanaya, T.Y. (2015) (2nd Edition) Merawat Keberagaman: Praksis Pendidikan Multikultural Perguruan Sultan Iskandar Muda (Fostering Diversity: Praxis of Multicultural Education in Sultan Iskandar Muda). Medan: YPSIM.
Book Chapter
  • Harjatanaya, T.Y. (2018). Akses dan Kesamaan dalam Pendidikan Vokasi (Access and Equality in Vocational Education). In Ferary, D. (2018) Sistem Pendidikan Vokasi di Inggris (Vocational Education System in England) (ed.). London: Kantor Atase Pendidikan dan Kebudayaan, Kedutaan Besar Indonesia (Indonesian Embassy) London, p. 121-138.

Katy is a Deputy Headteacher and the founder of a Leadership and Coaching Institute, which she now co-directs.

Katy is an Associate Fellow at the Oxford Character Project and a Research Associate at the Oxford University Wellbeing Research Centre. She is the co-founder of Global Social Leaders, a leadership programme which has participants in 105 countries, all passionate about creating and sustaining positive change in the world.

Title of Thesis

How could school leaders improve the flourishing and wellbeing of teaching staff?

Books
  • Granville-Chapman, K. and Bidston, E (2020) Leader: Know, love and inspire your people. Carmarthen: Crownhouse Publishing
Book Chapters
  •  Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ In White, M. & McCallum, F. (Ed.s) Wellbeing and Resilience Education: Covid-19 And Its Impact on Education Systems. Routledge
Publications
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘Purpose and Leadership in Education and Beyond’. The Education Exchange. Available from: https://theeducation.exchange/purpose-and-leadership-in-education-and-beyond/
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘The Three Secrets of COVID-era Leadership’. Times Education Supplement. Available from: https://www.tes.com/news/three-secrets-covid-era-school-leadership
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2016) ‘Assessing the Impact of a Teacher Leadership Programme in a Teaching Schools Alliance. Journal of Teacher Action Research
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2014) ‘The Afghan conflict: causes and consequences.’ Geography Review 28(1): 22-27
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2013) What are the psychological factors that affect students’ academic resilience and can teachers influence these? Unpublished thesis
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘Unlocking Leadership Potential’, The Magazine of the Boarding School’s Association, 33: 42-45
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2009) ‘Learning to Lead’, Leader, The Education Leader Magazine 41: 22-25
Presentations
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2019) ‘How could leaders improve the flourishing of their teams?’ ‘Stowe Ed Conference’, Forthcoming: 7 Jan 2019
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2018) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education: 21 Jun 2018
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2017) ‘How can school leaders improve teacher flourishing?’ ‘Doing Education Differently Conference’, University of Oxford, Department of Education, 11 Mar 17
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2016) ‘Developing school leaders who enable teachers to flourish’ The Telegraph Festival of Education 23 Jun 16
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Developing leadership in pupils and teachers’ High School Affiliated to Renmin University of China, Beijing. 20 Oct 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Resilience for leaders.’ Global Social Leaders World Summit. 16 Aug 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Emotional Intelligence for Leaders.’ Global Leaders in Education. 12 Aug 15
  • Coates, S.; Fraser, H.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J.; and Nasim, A. (2015) ‘Breaking through the glass ceiling – how can schools empower our girls to become leaders?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education. 19 Jun 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. ‘Developing Leadership in Schools’ (2015). G20 Schools Conference. International conference for head teachers. 11 Apr 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2018) ‘Introduction’, Wellington Leadership Institute: Festival of Leadership. Mar 2012-15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘How the Young Learn to Lead’, Raffles Institution (Singapore) -Purdue University (USA) Education Forum on Gifted & Talented Youth 2012. Singapore. 15 Mar 12
  • Draper, D.; Dyer, R.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Schools’. Presentation for a meeting about pupil leadership and character development at 10 Downing Street. 16 Nov 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Young People’. Presentation for a meeting about leadership and character at 10 Downing Street. 7 Mar 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K. & Seldon, A. (2012) ‘Introduction’, Leading Your School in the 21st Century. 7 Feb 12

Prior to starting his DPhil, Eddy worked as a primary school teacher in Bristol, where he also completed his MSc in Educational Research.

He is particularly interested in the culture of high stakes, standardised testing, and how this might perpetuate existing inequalities in schools. His research focuses specifically on the interaction between knowledge, policy and pedagogy in the context of Literacy education.

 

Amanda is completing a part-time DPhil, alongside working in Initial Teacher Education at Leeds Trinity University.

Her research is focused on understanding tensions, contradictions and conflicts that teachers in disadvantaged schools may experience when they engage in research activity.  Her research focus is influenced by her own experiences of working as a research-active teacher in disadvantaged schools, and recent work in teacher education to support experienced and beginning teachers in developing their own research activities.

One of the aims of Amanda’s research is to construct a framework to support teachers in pursuing research activity and critical scholarship work which articulates with wider social movements to address issues of poverty and disadvantage in schools.

Title of Thesis

Teachers’ perspectives on tensions between policy, practice and research in disadvantaged schools

Publications 

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2017) A ‘usable past’ of teacher education in England: history in JET’s anniversary issue. Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy, 43 (5), pp.616-627.

Nuttall, A. (2016) The ‘curriculum challenge’: Moving towards the ‘Storyline’ approach in a case study urban primary school.  Improving Schools, 19 (2), pp. 154-166.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Learning {Re}imagined: A review.  Primary First, 15, pp. 17-18.

Nuttall, A. and Doherty, J. (2014) Disaffected boys and the achievement gap: the ‘wallpaper effect’ and what is hidden by a focus on school results.  The Urban Review, 46 (5), pp.800-815.

Conference Papers and Presentations

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2018) “No child is pre-ordained to fail” Teachers questioning policy assumptions.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Newcastle, 11-13 September.

Nuttall, A. and Tobbell, C. (2017) Trainee teachers’ perspectives on practitioner enquiry.  Paper presented at the 8th TEAN Conference: Thinking Deeply about Education, Birmingham, 11-12 May.

Nuttall, A. (2017) Assessment at primary level: quality, comparability and improving secondary readiness.  A perspective from ITE.  Speech at the Westminster Education Forum Keynote Seminar: Next steps for reforming primary education: effective teaching practices, assessment and accountably, London, 18 January.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Deficit narratives and lived realities: whose poverty is it?  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the Australian Association for Research in Education, Melbourne, 27 November – 1 December.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Disenfranchised boys’ reflections on their urban schooling experience: “What a Waste!”.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Philpott, C., Beckett, L. and Wrigley, T. (2016) Collaborative practitioner inquiry: making a difference to urban schools.  Innovation session (school visits and symposium) presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Finn, B. and Beckett, L. (2015) Teachers’ constructions of poverty effects: Their research evidence.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Belfast, 15-17 September.

Nuttall, A. (2014) Teachers’ voice on disengaged boys: the role of one teacher-researcher in an English primary school. Paper presented at the Joint Australian Association for Research in Education and the New Zealand Association for Research in Education Conference, Brisbane, 30 November – 4 December.

Andrew Marotta is a D.Phil candidate in the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. He holds an A.A. in Social Sciences from Broward Community College, and a B.A. in Individualized Studies from the Gallatin School of Individualized Studies, New York University and an M.A. and Ed.M. in Counseling Psychology and School Counseling from Teachers College, Columbia University.

Andrew’s research interests include social and emotional learning, peer mentorship, existential therapy / philosophy, curriculum design for school counselors, and applied ethics in computer science. Andrew’s thesis examines how literature and philosophy can be used to nurture social and emotional learning through group counseling among high school students. He has also worked as a school counselor, teaching artist, and curriculum designer.

Presently, Andrew is designing joint humanities and applied ethics workshops for computer and data science college majors, using social and emotional learning concepts as the pedagogical foundation.

Abigail’s research explores the role of education in students’ personal development and how this can be supported by policy, curricula, initial teacher education and teacher professional development. In particular she focuses on history education, citizenship education and peace education as vehicles for dialogue. These opportunities for students to engage with social questions are vital for building cohesive societies. This flows from the recognition that traditional forums for developing public understanding, such as post-conflict truth commissions, need to be complemented by intergenerational and educational perspectives.

Abigail has taught History, Politics, Debating as well as Relationships and Sex Education to secondary school students in South Africa, England and the USA.

She holds postgraduate degrees in Post-Conflict and Transitional Justice (University of Cape Town), in Education, Globalisation and International Development (University of Cambridge) and in African Studies (University of Oxford). She is a Rhodes Scholar, Mandela-Magdalene Scholar and Mandela-Rhodes Scholar.

Title of thesis

GCSE History, Policy Reform and Student Development: How students and teachers navigate the thematic study “Empires, Migration and the People”

Conference papers

Teaching Migration, Belonging, and Empire in Secondary Schools: evaluation of a teacher professional development program, (2019) History Educators International Research Network Conference, Lead author: Dr Jason Todd, University of Vienna, Austria.

“The Problems and Prospects of Teaching South Africa’s Recent History: Teachers’ Perspectives”, (2018) Sustainability, peace and education – Exploring promise and practice: BAICE 20th Anniversary Symposium, University of Bristol, England.

“New Generations, Old Wounds: Learning History at Home and School in Northern Ireland”, (2018) European Social Science and History Conference,
Queens University Belfast, Northern Ireland.

“The Methodological Challenges of Investigating the Role of History Teaching in Peacebuilding”, (2017), Present Past: Time, Memory, and the Negotiation of Historical Justice Conference, Columbia University, United States of America.

“Teaching South Africa’s Truth and Reconciliation Commission”, (2017) European Conference on African Studies, Universität Basel, Switzerland.

Research Assistant Publications

Review of the evidence on feedback in primary and secondary schools, (forthcoming, 2021) for the Education Endowment Foundation, Lead author: Prof Velda Elliott.

Teaching Migration, Belonging, and Empire in Secondary Schools, (2019), for Runnymede Trust and the European Research Council, Lead authors: Kimberly McIntosh, Dr Jason Todd and Prof Nandini Das.

Gender and the Politics of Reconciliation (2016), for The Institute for Justice and Reconciliation, Lead author: Dr Helen Scanlon

SOLE AUTHOR PUBLICATIONS

‘Transitions, Truth-Telling and Teaching History’, Cambridge Open-Review Educational Research e-Journal, Vol. 4, 2017.

Alice Tawell is an ESRC funded DPhil Student, co-supervised across the Department of Education and Centre for Criminology at the University of Oxford.

Supervisors: Professor Harry Daniels and Dr Rachel Condry.

Alice’s research focuses broadly on the enactment of school exclusion policy in England.

Prior to starting her doctoral studies, Alice gained a BSc in Sociology from the University of Bath and an MSc in Education (Research Training) from the University of Oxford.

As part of her undergraduate degree, Alice undertook a placement year working with Professor Kathy Sylva in the Families, Effective Learning and Literacy Research Group at the Department of Education, University of Oxford. After completing her degree, Alice returned to the department and has worked as a Research Officer on a number of different research projects since 2014. Most recently Alice has worked as part of the Excluded Lives Research Team on two projects exploring exclusion from school from a multidisciplinary perspective. In 2017 she was awarded a Seed-corn Small Grant Award to co-lead a pilot project exploring student collaborative networks with Hau Ming Tse. Alice also co-convenes the Qualitative Methods Hub in the department.

Outside of the department, Alice has sat on the Advisory Board for the Children Missing Education research project (2016-2017) at the National Children’s Bureau (NCB) and has been a member of the NCB Partnership for Well Being and Mental Health in Schools since 2016. She also sits on the Transparency on Exclusions Steering Group.

In 2017 Alice received funding from the Grand Union Doctoral Training Partnership placement scheme to conduct a Knowledge Exchange Internship with the Early Years Analysis and Research Unit at the Department for Education, and in 2018 Alice was elected the Co-President of the Grand Union ESRC Scholar’s Association, representing ESRC students from the University of Oxford, Brunel and The Open University.

Ashmita graduated from Boston University in 2008 with a BSc. in Biomedical Engineering, after which she worked in Research & Development for 6 years.

It is here that she decided to make the leap from formulation chemistry to STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Math) Education after having worked on programs involving increasing diversity in STEM in schools.

She received her Master’s from Boston University in 2015 in Education Policy. Her research interests include: STEM education policy; Assessment; Further Education; Higher Education; Science education pedagogy

Originally from Indonesia, Tracey has spent the last decade studying in the UK and working about multicultural education in Indonesia.

She is fully funded by the Indonesia Endowment Fund for Education (LPDP). Her doctoral research explores the ways Indonesian schools teach and accommodate the national vision of multicultural Indonesia, “Bhinneka Tunggal Ika” (Unity-in-Diversity). By using a two-tier case study research approach (case studies of six schools and of two provinces), it presents nuanced and critical account of the ways head teachers, teachers, students and parents from six state and private schools in Jakarta and Bali with different mixes of pupil ethnicity and religiosity understand and accommodate the vision of diversity into educational practices. Despite the highly contextual focus, the research offers a critical view into the complex role of schools in today’s era of globalisation in providing quality education for all and at the same time creating citizens who are inclusive and respectful towards others.

Tracey completed her MSc in Comparative and International Education at the University of Oxford in 2011 and her honours BA in Mathematics and Education Studies at the University of Cambridge in 2010. Upon completing her study in the UK, she returned to Indonesia to work in an educational foundation Sultan Iskandar Muda in Medan, Indonesia as a member of the Board of Directors in the Foundation – a position which she is still holding until today. She is responsible for overlooking the development and implementation of multicultural education and teacher development programme.

During her tenure, she has worked alongside the head teachers and teachers across all educational levels (from pre-school until high school) and produced books on the praxis of multicultural education in the school setting.

Title of Thesis

Accommodating a vision of diversity in different school contexts: “Unity-in-Diversity” in Indonesia

Publications
Journal Article
  • Harjatanaya, T.Y. & Hoon, C.Y. (2018) Politics of multicultural education in post-Suharto Indonesia: a study of the Chinese minority. Compare: A Journal of Comparative and International Education
Edited Book
  • Harjatanaya, T.Y. (2015) (2nd Edition) Merawat Keberagaman: Praksis Pendidikan Multikultural Perguruan Sultan Iskandar Muda (Fostering Diversity: Praxis of Multicultural Education in Sultan Iskandar Muda). Medan: YPSIM.
Book Chapter
  • Harjatanaya, T.Y. (2018). Akses dan Kesamaan dalam Pendidikan Vokasi (Access and Equality in Vocational Education). In Ferary, D. (2018) Sistem Pendidikan Vokasi di Inggris (Vocational Education System in England) (ed.). London: Kantor Atase Pendidikan dan Kebudayaan, Kedutaan Besar Indonesia (Indonesian Embassy) London, p. 121-138.

Katy is a Deputy Headteacher and the founder of a Leadership and Coaching Institute, which she now co-directs.

Katy is an Associate Fellow at the Oxford Character Project and a Research Associate at the Oxford University Wellbeing Research Centre. She is the co-founder of Global Social Leaders, a leadership programme which has participants in 105 countries, all passionate about creating and sustaining positive change in the world.

Title of Thesis

How could school leaders improve the flourishing and wellbeing of teaching staff?

Books
  • Granville-Chapman, K. and Bidston, E (2020) Leader: Know, love and inspire your people. Carmarthen: Crownhouse Publishing
Book Chapters
  •  Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ In White, M. & McCallum, F. (Ed.s) Wellbeing and Resilience Education: Covid-19 And Its Impact on Education Systems. Routledge
Publications
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘Purpose and Leadership in Education and Beyond’. The Education Exchange. Available from: https://theeducation.exchange/purpose-and-leadership-in-education-and-beyond/
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘The Three Secrets of COVID-era Leadership’. Times Education Supplement. Available from: https://www.tes.com/news/three-secrets-covid-era-school-leadership
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2016) ‘Assessing the Impact of a Teacher Leadership Programme in a Teaching Schools Alliance. Journal of Teacher Action Research
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2014) ‘The Afghan conflict: causes and consequences.’ Geography Review 28(1): 22-27
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2013) What are the psychological factors that affect students’ academic resilience and can teachers influence these? Unpublished thesis
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘Unlocking Leadership Potential’, The Magazine of the Boarding School’s Association, 33: 42-45
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2009) ‘Learning to Lead’, Leader, The Education Leader Magazine 41: 22-25
Presentations
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2019) ‘How could leaders improve the flourishing of their teams?’ ‘Stowe Ed Conference’, Forthcoming: 7 Jan 2019
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2018) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education: 21 Jun 2018
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2017) ‘How can school leaders improve teacher flourishing?’ ‘Doing Education Differently Conference’, University of Oxford, Department of Education, 11 Mar 17
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2016) ‘Developing school leaders who enable teachers to flourish’ The Telegraph Festival of Education 23 Jun 16
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Developing leadership in pupils and teachers’ High School Affiliated to Renmin University of China, Beijing. 20 Oct 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Resilience for leaders.’ Global Social Leaders World Summit. 16 Aug 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Emotional Intelligence for Leaders.’ Global Leaders in Education. 12 Aug 15
  • Coates, S.; Fraser, H.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J.; and Nasim, A. (2015) ‘Breaking through the glass ceiling – how can schools empower our girls to become leaders?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education. 19 Jun 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. ‘Developing Leadership in Schools’ (2015). G20 Schools Conference. International conference for head teachers. 11 Apr 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2018) ‘Introduction’, Wellington Leadership Institute: Festival of Leadership. Mar 2012-15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘How the Young Learn to Lead’, Raffles Institution (Singapore) -Purdue University (USA) Education Forum on Gifted & Talented Youth 2012. Singapore. 15 Mar 12
  • Draper, D.; Dyer, R.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Schools’. Presentation for a meeting about pupil leadership and character development at 10 Downing Street. 16 Nov 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Young People’. Presentation for a meeting about leadership and character at 10 Downing Street. 7 Mar 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K. & Seldon, A. (2012) ‘Introduction’, Leading Your School in the 21st Century. 7 Feb 12

Prior to starting his DPhil, Eddy worked as a primary school teacher in Bristol, where he also completed his MSc in Educational Research.

He is particularly interested in the culture of high stakes, standardised testing, and how this might perpetuate existing inequalities in schools. His research focuses specifically on the interaction between knowledge, policy and pedagogy in the context of Literacy education.

 

Amanda is completing a part-time DPhil, alongside working in Initial Teacher Education at Leeds Trinity University.

Her research is focused on understanding tensions, contradictions and conflicts that teachers in disadvantaged schools may experience when they engage in research activity.  Her research focus is influenced by her own experiences of working as a research-active teacher in disadvantaged schools, and recent work in teacher education to support experienced and beginning teachers in developing their own research activities.

One of the aims of Amanda’s research is to construct a framework to support teachers in pursuing research activity and critical scholarship work which articulates with wider social movements to address issues of poverty and disadvantage in schools.

Title of Thesis

Teachers’ perspectives on tensions between policy, practice and research in disadvantaged schools

Publications 

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2017) A ‘usable past’ of teacher education in England: history in JET’s anniversary issue. Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy, 43 (5), pp.616-627.

Nuttall, A. (2016) The ‘curriculum challenge’: Moving towards the ‘Storyline’ approach in a case study urban primary school.  Improving Schools, 19 (2), pp. 154-166.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Learning {Re}imagined: A review.  Primary First, 15, pp. 17-18.

Nuttall, A. and Doherty, J. (2014) Disaffected boys and the achievement gap: the ‘wallpaper effect’ and what is hidden by a focus on school results.  The Urban Review, 46 (5), pp.800-815.

Conference Papers and Presentations

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2018) “No child is pre-ordained to fail” Teachers questioning policy assumptions.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Newcastle, 11-13 September.

Nuttall, A. and Tobbell, C. (2017) Trainee teachers’ perspectives on practitioner enquiry.  Paper presented at the 8th TEAN Conference: Thinking Deeply about Education, Birmingham, 11-12 May.

Nuttall, A. (2017) Assessment at primary level: quality, comparability and improving secondary readiness.  A perspective from ITE.  Speech at the Westminster Education Forum Keynote Seminar: Next steps for reforming primary education: effective teaching practices, assessment and accountably, London, 18 January.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Deficit narratives and lived realities: whose poverty is it?  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the Australian Association for Research in Education, Melbourne, 27 November – 1 December.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Disenfranchised boys’ reflections on their urban schooling experience: “What a Waste!”.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Philpott, C., Beckett, L. and Wrigley, T. (2016) Collaborative practitioner inquiry: making a difference to urban schools.  Innovation session (school visits and symposium) presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Finn, B. and Beckett, L. (2015) Teachers’ constructions of poverty effects: Their research evidence.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Belfast, 15-17 September.

Nuttall, A. (2014) Teachers’ voice on disengaged boys: the role of one teacher-researcher in an English primary school. Paper presented at the Joint Australian Association for Research in Education and the New Zealand Association for Research in Education Conference, Brisbane, 30 November – 4 December.

Andrew Marotta is a D.Phil candidate in the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. He holds an A.A. in Social Sciences from Broward Community College, and a B.A. in Individualized Studies from the Gallatin School of Individualized Studies, New York University and an M.A. and Ed.M. in Counseling Psychology and School Counseling from Teachers College, Columbia University.

Andrew’s research interests include social and emotional learning, peer mentorship, existential therapy / philosophy, curriculum design for school counselors, and applied ethics in computer science. Andrew’s thesis examines how literature and philosophy can be used to nurture social and emotional learning through group counseling among high school students. He has also worked as a school counselor, teaching artist, and curriculum designer.

Presently, Andrew is designing joint humanities and applied ethics workshops for computer and data science college majors, using social and emotional learning concepts as the pedagogical foundation.

Abigail’s research explores the role of education in students’ personal development and how this can be supported by policy, curricula, initial teacher education and teacher professional development. In particular she focuses on history education, citizenship education and peace education as vehicles for dialogue. These opportunities for students to engage with social questions are vital for building cohesive societies. This flows from the recognition that traditional forums for developing public understanding, such as post-conflict truth commissions, need to be complemented by intergenerational and educational perspectives.

Abigail has taught History, Politics, Debating as well as Relationships and Sex Education to secondary school students in South Africa, England and the USA.

She holds postgraduate degrees in Post-Conflict and Transitional Justice (University of Cape Town), in Education, Globalisation and International Development (University of Cambridge) and in African Studies (University of Oxford). She is a Rhodes Scholar, Mandela-Magdalene Scholar and Mandela-Rhodes Scholar.

Title of thesis

GCSE History, Policy Reform and Student Development: How students and teachers navigate the thematic study “Empires, Migration and the People”

Conference papers

Teaching Migration, Belonging, and Empire in Secondary Schools: evaluation of a teacher professional development program, (2019) History Educators International Research Network Conference, Lead author: Dr Jason Todd, University of Vienna, Austria.

“The Problems and Prospects of Teaching South Africa’s Recent History: Teachers’ Perspectives”, (2018) Sustainability, peace and education – Exploring promise and practice: BAICE 20th Anniversary Symposium, University of Bristol, England.

“New Generations, Old Wounds: Learning History at Home and School in Northern Ireland”, (2018) European Social Science and History Conference,
Queens University Belfast, Northern Ireland.

“The Methodological Challenges of Investigating the Role of History Teaching in Peacebuilding”, (2017), Present Past: Time, Memory, and the Negotiation of Historical Justice Conference, Columbia University, United States of America.

“Teaching South Africa’s Truth and Reconciliation Commission”, (2017) European Conference on African Studies, Universität Basel, Switzerland.

Research Assistant Publications

Review of the evidence on feedback in primary and secondary schools, (forthcoming, 2021) for the Education Endowment Foundation, Lead author: Prof Velda Elliott.

Teaching Migration, Belonging, and Empire in Secondary Schools, (2019), for Runnymede Trust and the European Research Council, Lead authors: Kimberly McIntosh, Dr Jason Todd and Prof Nandini Das.

Gender and the Politics of Reconciliation (2016), for The Institute for Justice and Reconciliation, Lead author: Dr Helen Scanlon

SOLE AUTHOR PUBLICATIONS

‘Transitions, Truth-Telling and Teaching History’, Cambridge Open-Review Educational Research e-Journal, Vol. 4, 2017.

Alice Tawell is an ESRC funded DPhil Student, co-supervised across the Department of Education and Centre for Criminology at the University of Oxford.

Supervisors: Professor Harry Daniels and Dr Rachel Condry.

Alice’s research focuses broadly on the enactment of school exclusion policy in England.

Prior to starting her doctoral studies, Alice gained a BSc in Sociology from the University of Bath and an MSc in Education (Research Training) from the University of Oxford.

As part of her undergraduate degree, Alice undertook a placement year working with Professor Kathy Sylva in the Families, Effective Learning and Literacy Research Group at the Department of Education, University of Oxford. After completing her degree, Alice returned to the department and has worked as a Research Officer on a number of different research projects since 2014. Most recently Alice has worked as part of the Excluded Lives Research Team on two projects exploring exclusion from school from a multidisciplinary perspective. In 2017 she was awarded a Seed-corn Small Grant Award to co-lead a pilot project exploring student collaborative networks with Hau Ming Tse. Alice also co-convenes the Qualitative Methods Hub in the department.

Outside of the department, Alice has sat on the Advisory Board for the Children Missing Education research project (2016-2017) at the National Children’s Bureau (NCB) and has been a member of the NCB Partnership for Well Being and Mental Health in Schools since 2016. She also sits on the Transparency on Exclusions Steering Group.

In 2017 Alice received funding from the Grand Union Doctoral Training Partnership placement scheme to conduct a Knowledge Exchange Internship with the Early Years Analysis and Research Unit at the Department for Education, and in 2018 Alice was elected the Co-President of the Grand Union ESRC Scholar’s Association, representing ESRC students from the University of Oxford, Brunel and The Open University.

Ashmita graduated from Boston University in 2008 with a BSc. in Biomedical Engineering, after which she worked in Research & Development for 6 years.

It is here that she decided to make the leap from formulation chemistry to STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Math) Education after having worked on programs involving increasing diversity in STEM in schools.

She received her Master’s from Boston University in 2015 in Education Policy. Her research interests include: STEM education policy; Assessment; Further Education; Higher Education; Science education pedagogy

Originally from Indonesia, Tracey has spent the last decade studying in the UK and working about multicultural education in Indonesia.

She is fully funded by the Indonesia Endowment Fund for Education (LPDP). Her doctoral research explores the ways Indonesian schools teach and accommodate the national vision of multicultural Indonesia, “Bhinneka Tunggal Ika” (Unity-in-Diversity). By using a two-tier case study research approach (case studies of six schools and of two provinces), it presents nuanced and critical account of the ways head teachers, teachers, students and parents from six state and private schools in Jakarta and Bali with different mixes of pupil ethnicity and religiosity understand and accommodate the vision of diversity into educational practices. Despite the highly contextual focus, the research offers a critical view into the complex role of schools in today’s era of globalisation in providing quality education for all and at the same time creating citizens who are inclusive and respectful towards others.

Tracey completed her MSc in Comparative and International Education at the University of Oxford in 2011 and her honours BA in Mathematics and Education Studies at the University of Cambridge in 2010. Upon completing her study in the UK, she returned to Indonesia to work in an educational foundation Sultan Iskandar Muda in Medan, Indonesia as a member of the Board of Directors in the Foundation – a position which she is still holding until today. She is responsible for overlooking the development and implementation of multicultural education and teacher development programme.

During her tenure, she has worked alongside the head teachers and teachers across all educational levels (from pre-school until high school) and produced books on the praxis of multicultural education in the school setting.

Title of Thesis

Accommodating a vision of diversity in different school contexts: “Unity-in-Diversity” in Indonesia

Publications
Journal Article
  • Harjatanaya, T.Y. & Hoon, C.Y. (2018) Politics of multicultural education in post-Suharto Indonesia: a study of the Chinese minority. Compare: A Journal of Comparative and International Education
Edited Book
  • Harjatanaya, T.Y. (2015) (2nd Edition) Merawat Keberagaman: Praksis Pendidikan Multikultural Perguruan Sultan Iskandar Muda (Fostering Diversity: Praxis of Multicultural Education in Sultan Iskandar Muda). Medan: YPSIM.
Book Chapter
  • Harjatanaya, T.Y. (2018). Akses dan Kesamaan dalam Pendidikan Vokasi (Access and Equality in Vocational Education). In Ferary, D. (2018) Sistem Pendidikan Vokasi di Inggris (Vocational Education System in England) (ed.). London: Kantor Atase Pendidikan dan Kebudayaan, Kedutaan Besar Indonesia (Indonesian Embassy) London, p. 121-138.

Katy is a Deputy Headteacher and the founder of a Leadership and Coaching Institute, which she now co-directs.

Katy is an Associate Fellow at the Oxford Character Project and a Research Associate at the Oxford University Wellbeing Research Centre. She is the co-founder of Global Social Leaders, a leadership programme which has participants in 105 countries, all passionate about creating and sustaining positive change in the world.

Title of Thesis

How could school leaders improve the flourishing and wellbeing of teaching staff?

Books
  • Granville-Chapman, K. and Bidston, E (2020) Leader: Know, love and inspire your people. Carmarthen: Crownhouse Publishing
Book Chapters
  •  Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ In White, M. & McCallum, F. (Ed.s) Wellbeing and Resilience Education: Covid-19 And Its Impact on Education Systems. Routledge
Publications
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘Purpose and Leadership in Education and Beyond’. The Education Exchange. Available from: https://theeducation.exchange/purpose-and-leadership-in-education-and-beyond/
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘The Three Secrets of COVID-era Leadership’. Times Education Supplement. Available from: https://www.tes.com/news/three-secrets-covid-era-school-leadership
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2016) ‘Assessing the Impact of a Teacher Leadership Programme in a Teaching Schools Alliance. Journal of Teacher Action Research
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2014) ‘The Afghan conflict: causes and consequences.’ Geography Review 28(1): 22-27
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2013) What are the psychological factors that affect students’ academic resilience and can teachers influence these? Unpublished thesis
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘Unlocking Leadership Potential’, The Magazine of the Boarding School’s Association, 33: 42-45
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2009) ‘Learning to Lead’, Leader, The Education Leader Magazine 41: 22-25
Presentations
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2019) ‘How could leaders improve the flourishing of their teams?’ ‘Stowe Ed Conference’, Forthcoming: 7 Jan 2019
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2018) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education: 21 Jun 2018
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2017) ‘How can school leaders improve teacher flourishing?’ ‘Doing Education Differently Conference’, University of Oxford, Department of Education, 11 Mar 17
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2016) ‘Developing school leaders who enable teachers to flourish’ The Telegraph Festival of Education 23 Jun 16
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Developing leadership in pupils and teachers’ High School Affiliated to Renmin University of China, Beijing. 20 Oct 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Resilience for leaders.’ Global Social Leaders World Summit. 16 Aug 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Emotional Intelligence for Leaders.’ Global Leaders in Education. 12 Aug 15
  • Coates, S.; Fraser, H.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J.; and Nasim, A. (2015) ‘Breaking through the glass ceiling – how can schools empower our girls to become leaders?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education. 19 Jun 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. ‘Developing Leadership in Schools’ (2015). G20 Schools Conference. International conference for head teachers. 11 Apr 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2018) ‘Introduction’, Wellington Leadership Institute: Festival of Leadership. Mar 2012-15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘How the Young Learn to Lead’, Raffles Institution (Singapore) -Purdue University (USA) Education Forum on Gifted & Talented Youth 2012. Singapore. 15 Mar 12
  • Draper, D.; Dyer, R.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Schools’. Presentation for a meeting about pupil leadership and character development at 10 Downing Street. 16 Nov 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Young People’. Presentation for a meeting about leadership and character at 10 Downing Street. 7 Mar 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K. & Seldon, A. (2012) ‘Introduction’, Leading Your School in the 21st Century. 7 Feb 12

Prior to starting his DPhil, Eddy worked as a primary school teacher in Bristol, where he also completed his MSc in Educational Research.

He is particularly interested in the culture of high stakes, standardised testing, and how this might perpetuate existing inequalities in schools. His research focuses specifically on the interaction between knowledge, policy and pedagogy in the context of Literacy education.

 

Amanda is completing a part-time DPhil, alongside working in Initial Teacher Education at Leeds Trinity University.

Her research is focused on understanding tensions, contradictions and conflicts that teachers in disadvantaged schools may experience when they engage in research activity.  Her research focus is influenced by her own experiences of working as a research-active teacher in disadvantaged schools, and recent work in teacher education to support experienced and beginning teachers in developing their own research activities.

One of the aims of Amanda’s research is to construct a framework to support teachers in pursuing research activity and critical scholarship work which articulates with wider social movements to address issues of poverty and disadvantage in schools.

Title of Thesis

Teachers’ perspectives on tensions between policy, practice and research in disadvantaged schools

Publications 

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2017) A ‘usable past’ of teacher education in England: history in JET’s anniversary issue. Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy, 43 (5), pp.616-627.

Nuttall, A. (2016) The ‘curriculum challenge’: Moving towards the ‘Storyline’ approach in a case study urban primary school.  Improving Schools, 19 (2), pp. 154-166.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Learning {Re}imagined: A review.  Primary First, 15, pp. 17-18.

Nuttall, A. and Doherty, J. (2014) Disaffected boys and the achievement gap: the ‘wallpaper effect’ and what is hidden by a focus on school results.  The Urban Review, 46 (5), pp.800-815.

Conference Papers and Presentations

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2018) “No child is pre-ordained to fail” Teachers questioning policy assumptions.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Newcastle, 11-13 September.

Nuttall, A. and Tobbell, C. (2017) Trainee teachers’ perspectives on practitioner enquiry.  Paper presented at the 8th TEAN Conference: Thinking Deeply about Education, Birmingham, 11-12 May.

Nuttall, A. (2017) Assessment at primary level: quality, comparability and improving secondary readiness.  A perspective from ITE.  Speech at the Westminster Education Forum Keynote Seminar: Next steps for reforming primary education: effective teaching practices, assessment and accountably, London, 18 January.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Deficit narratives and lived realities: whose poverty is it?  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the Australian Association for Research in Education, Melbourne, 27 November – 1 December.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Disenfranchised boys’ reflections on their urban schooling experience: “What a Waste!”.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Philpott, C., Beckett, L. and Wrigley, T. (2016) Collaborative practitioner inquiry: making a difference to urban schools.  Innovation session (school visits and symposium) presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Finn, B. and Beckett, L. (2015) Teachers’ constructions of poverty effects: Their research evidence.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Belfast, 15-17 September.

Nuttall, A. (2014) Teachers’ voice on disengaged boys: the role of one teacher-researcher in an English primary school. Paper presented at the Joint Australian Association for Research in Education and the New Zealand Association for Research in Education Conference, Brisbane, 30 November – 4 December.

Andrew Marotta is a D.Phil candidate in the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. He holds an A.A. in Social Sciences from Broward Community College, and a B.A. in Individualized Studies from the Gallatin School of Individualized Studies, New York University and an M.A. and Ed.M. in Counseling Psychology and School Counseling from Teachers College, Columbia University.

Andrew’s research interests include social and emotional learning, peer mentorship, existential therapy / philosophy, curriculum design for school counselors, and applied ethics in computer science. Andrew’s thesis examines how literature and philosophy can be used to nurture social and emotional learning through group counseling among high school students. He has also worked as a school counselor, teaching artist, and curriculum designer.

Presently, Andrew is designing joint humanities and applied ethics workshops for computer and data science college majors, using social and emotional learning concepts as the pedagogical foundation.

Abigail’s research explores the role of education in students’ personal development and how this can be supported by policy, curricula, initial teacher education and teacher professional development. In particular she focuses on history education, citizenship education and peace education as vehicles for dialogue. These opportunities for students to engage with social questions are vital for building cohesive societies. This flows from the recognition that traditional forums for developing public understanding, such as post-conflict truth commissions, need to be complemented by intergenerational and educational perspectives.

Abigail has taught History, Politics, Debating as well as Relationships and Sex Education to secondary school students in South Africa, England and the USA.

She holds postgraduate degrees in Post-Conflict and Transitional Justice (University of Cape Town), in Education, Globalisation and International Development (University of Cambridge) and in African Studies (University of Oxford). She is a Rhodes Scholar, Mandela-Magdalene Scholar and Mandela-Rhodes Scholar.

Title of thesis

GCSE History, Policy Reform and Student Development: How students and teachers navigate the thematic study “Empires, Migration and the People”

Conference papers

Teaching Migration, Belonging, and Empire in Secondary Schools: evaluation of a teacher professional development program, (2019) History Educators International Research Network Conference, Lead author: Dr Jason Todd, University of Vienna, Austria.

“The Problems and Prospects of Teaching South Africa’s Recent History: Teachers’ Perspectives”, (2018) Sustainability, peace and education – Exploring promise and practice: BAICE 20th Anniversary Symposium, University of Bristol, England.

“New Generations, Old Wounds: Learning History at Home and School in Northern Ireland”, (2018) European Social Science and History Conference,
Queens University Belfast, Northern Ireland.

“The Methodological Challenges of Investigating the Role of History Teaching in Peacebuilding”, (2017), Present Past: Time, Memory, and the Negotiation of Historical Justice Conference, Columbia University, United States of America.

“Teaching South Africa’s Truth and Reconciliation Commission”, (2017) European Conference on African Studies, Universität Basel, Switzerland.

Research Assistant Publications

Review of the evidence on feedback in primary and secondary schools, (forthcoming, 2021) for the Education Endowment Foundation, Lead author: Prof Velda Elliott.

Teaching Migration, Belonging, and Empire in Secondary Schools, (2019), for Runnymede Trust and the European Research Council, Lead authors: Kimberly McIntosh, Dr Jason Todd and Prof Nandini Das.

Gender and the Politics of Reconciliation (2016), for The Institute for Justice and Reconciliation, Lead author: Dr Helen Scanlon

SOLE AUTHOR PUBLICATIONS

‘Transitions, Truth-Telling and Teaching History’, Cambridge Open-Review Educational Research e-Journal, Vol. 4, 2017.

Alice Tawell is an ESRC funded DPhil Student, co-supervised across the Department of Education and Centre for Criminology at the University of Oxford.

Supervisors: Professor Harry Daniels and Dr Rachel Condry.

Alice’s research focuses broadly on the enactment of school exclusion policy in England.

Prior to starting her doctoral studies, Alice gained a BSc in Sociology from the University of Bath and an MSc in Education (Research Training) from the University of Oxford.

As part of her undergraduate degree, Alice undertook a placement year working with Professor Kathy Sylva in the Families, Effective Learning and Literacy Research Group at the Department of Education, University of Oxford. After completing her degree, Alice returned to the department and has worked as a Research Officer on a number of different research projects since 2014. Most recently Alice has worked as part of the Excluded Lives Research Team on two projects exploring exclusion from school from a multidisciplinary perspective. In 2017 she was awarded a Seed-corn Small Grant Award to co-lead a pilot project exploring student collaborative networks with Hau Ming Tse. Alice also co-convenes the Qualitative Methods Hub in the department.

Outside of the department, Alice has sat on the Advisory Board for the Children Missing Education research project (2016-2017) at the National Children’s Bureau (NCB) and has been a member of the NCB Partnership for Well Being and Mental Health in Schools since 2016. She also sits on the Transparency on Exclusions Steering Group.

In 2017 Alice received funding from the Grand Union Doctoral Training Partnership placement scheme to conduct a Knowledge Exchange Internship with the Early Years Analysis and Research Unit at the Department for Education, and in 2018 Alice was elected the Co-President of the Grand Union ESRC Scholar’s Association, representing ESRC students from the University of Oxford, Brunel and The Open University.

Ashmita graduated from Boston University in 2008 with a BSc. in Biomedical Engineering, after which she worked in Research & Development for 6 years.

It is here that she decided to make the leap from formulation chemistry to STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Math) Education after having worked on programs involving increasing diversity in STEM in schools.

She received her Master’s from Boston University in 2015 in Education Policy. Her research interests include: STEM education policy; Assessment; Further Education; Higher Education; Science education pedagogy

Originally from Indonesia, Tracey has spent the last decade studying in the UK and working about multicultural education in Indonesia.

She is fully funded by the Indonesia Endowment Fund for Education (LPDP). Her doctoral research explores the ways Indonesian schools teach and accommodate the national vision of multicultural Indonesia, “Bhinneka Tunggal Ika” (Unity-in-Diversity). By using a two-tier case study research approach (case studies of six schools and of two provinces), it presents nuanced and critical account of the ways head teachers, teachers, students and parents from six state and private schools in Jakarta and Bali with different mixes of pupil ethnicity and religiosity understand and accommodate the vision of diversity into educational practices. Despite the highly contextual focus, the research offers a critical view into the complex role of schools in today’s era of globalisation in providing quality education for all and at the same time creating citizens who are inclusive and respectful towards others.

Tracey completed her MSc in Comparative and International Education at the University of Oxford in 2011 and her honours BA in Mathematics and Education Studies at the University of Cambridge in 2010. Upon completing her study in the UK, she returned to Indonesia to work in an educational foundation Sultan Iskandar Muda in Medan, Indonesia as a member of the Board of Directors in the Foundation – a position which she is still holding until today. She is responsible for overlooking the development and implementation of multicultural education and teacher development programme.

During her tenure, she has worked alongside the head teachers and teachers across all educational levels (from pre-school until high school) and produced books on the praxis of multicultural education in the school setting.

Title of Thesis

Accommodating a vision of diversity in different school contexts: “Unity-in-Diversity” in Indonesia

Publications
Journal Article
  • Harjatanaya, T.Y. & Hoon, C.Y. (2018) Politics of multicultural education in post-Suharto Indonesia: a study of the Chinese minority. Compare: A Journal of Comparative and International Education
Edited Book
  • Harjatanaya, T.Y. (2015) (2nd Edition) Merawat Keberagaman: Praksis Pendidikan Multikultural Perguruan Sultan Iskandar Muda (Fostering Diversity: Praxis of Multicultural Education in Sultan Iskandar Muda). Medan: YPSIM.
Book Chapter
  • Harjatanaya, T.Y. (2018). Akses dan Kesamaan dalam Pendidikan Vokasi (Access and Equality in Vocational Education). In Ferary, D. (2018) Sistem Pendidikan Vokasi di Inggris (Vocational Education System in England) (ed.). London: Kantor Atase Pendidikan dan Kebudayaan, Kedutaan Besar Indonesia (Indonesian Embassy) London, p. 121-138.

Katy is a Deputy Headteacher and the founder of a Leadership and Coaching Institute, which she now co-directs.

Katy is an Associate Fellow at the Oxford Character Project and a Research Associate at the Oxford University Wellbeing Research Centre. She is the co-founder of Global Social Leaders, a leadership programme which has participants in 105 countries, all passionate about creating and sustaining positive change in the world.

Title of Thesis

How could school leaders improve the flourishing and wellbeing of teaching staff?

Books
  • Granville-Chapman, K. and Bidston, E (2020) Leader: Know, love and inspire your people. Carmarthen: Crownhouse Publishing
Book Chapters
  •  Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ In White, M. & McCallum, F. (Ed.s) Wellbeing and Resilience Education: Covid-19 And Its Impact on Education Systems. Routledge
Publications
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘Purpose and Leadership in Education and Beyond’. The Education Exchange. Available from: https://theeducation.exchange/purpose-and-leadership-in-education-and-beyond/
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘The Three Secrets of COVID-era Leadership’. Times Education Supplement. Available from: https://www.tes.com/news/three-secrets-covid-era-school-leadership
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2016) ‘Assessing the Impact of a Teacher Leadership Programme in a Teaching Schools Alliance. Journal of Teacher Action Research
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2014) ‘The Afghan conflict: causes and consequences.’ Geography Review 28(1): 22-27
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2013) What are the psychological factors that affect students’ academic resilience and can teachers influence these? Unpublished thesis
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘Unlocking Leadership Potential’, The Magazine of the Boarding School’s Association, 33: 42-45
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2009) ‘Learning to Lead’, Leader, The Education Leader Magazine 41: 22-25
Presentations
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2019) ‘How could leaders improve the flourishing of their teams?’ ‘Stowe Ed Conference’, Forthcoming: 7 Jan 2019
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2018) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education: 21 Jun 2018
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2017) ‘How can school leaders improve teacher flourishing?’ ‘Doing Education Differently Conference’, University of Oxford, Department of Education, 11 Mar 17
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2016) ‘Developing school leaders who enable teachers to flourish’ The Telegraph Festival of Education 23 Jun 16
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Developing leadership in pupils and teachers’ High School Affiliated to Renmin University of China, Beijing. 20 Oct 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Resilience for leaders.’ Global Social Leaders World Summit. 16 Aug 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Emotional Intelligence for Leaders.’ Global Leaders in Education. 12 Aug 15
  • Coates, S.; Fraser, H.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J.; and Nasim, A. (2015) ‘Breaking through the glass ceiling – how can schools empower our girls to become leaders?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education. 19 Jun 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. ‘Developing Leadership in Schools’ (2015). G20 Schools Conference. International conference for head teachers. 11 Apr 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2018) ‘Introduction’, Wellington Leadership Institute: Festival of Leadership. Mar 2012-15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘How the Young Learn to Lead’, Raffles Institution (Singapore) -Purdue University (USA) Education Forum on Gifted & Talented Youth 2012. Singapore. 15 Mar 12
  • Draper, D.; Dyer, R.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Schools’. Presentation for a meeting about pupil leadership and character development at 10 Downing Street. 16 Nov 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Young People’. Presentation for a meeting about leadership and character at 10 Downing Street. 7 Mar 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K. & Seldon, A. (2012) ‘Introduction’, Leading Your School in the 21st Century. 7 Feb 12

Prior to starting his DPhil, Eddy worked as a primary school teacher in Bristol, where he also completed his MSc in Educational Research.

He is particularly interested in the culture of high stakes, standardised testing, and how this might perpetuate existing inequalities in schools. His research focuses specifically on the interaction between knowledge, policy and pedagogy in the context of Literacy education.

 

Amanda is completing a part-time DPhil, alongside working in Initial Teacher Education at Leeds Trinity University.

Her research is focused on understanding tensions, contradictions and conflicts that teachers in disadvantaged schools may experience when they engage in research activity.  Her research focus is influenced by her own experiences of working as a research-active teacher in disadvantaged schools, and recent work in teacher education to support experienced and beginning teachers in developing their own research activities.

One of the aims of Amanda’s research is to construct a framework to support teachers in pursuing research activity and critical scholarship work which articulates with wider social movements to address issues of poverty and disadvantage in schools.

Title of Thesis

Teachers’ perspectives on tensions between policy, practice and research in disadvantaged schools

Publications 

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2017) A ‘usable past’ of teacher education in England: history in JET’s anniversary issue. Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy, 43 (5), pp.616-627.

Nuttall, A. (2016) The ‘curriculum challenge’: Moving towards the ‘Storyline’ approach in a case study urban primary school.  Improving Schools, 19 (2), pp. 154-166.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Learning {Re}imagined: A review.  Primary First, 15, pp. 17-18.

Nuttall, A. and Doherty, J. (2014) Disaffected boys and the achievement gap: the ‘wallpaper effect’ and what is hidden by a focus on school results.  The Urban Review, 46 (5), pp.800-815.

Conference Papers and Presentations

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2018) “No child is pre-ordained to fail” Teachers questioning policy assumptions.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Newcastle, 11-13 September.

Nuttall, A. and Tobbell, C. (2017) Trainee teachers’ perspectives on practitioner enquiry.  Paper presented at the 8th TEAN Conference: Thinking Deeply about Education, Birmingham, 11-12 May.

Nuttall, A. (2017) Assessment at primary level: quality, comparability and improving secondary readiness.  A perspective from ITE.  Speech at the Westminster Education Forum Keynote Seminar: Next steps for reforming primary education: effective teaching practices, assessment and accountably, London, 18 January.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Deficit narratives and lived realities: whose poverty is it?  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the Australian Association for Research in Education, Melbourne, 27 November – 1 December.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Disenfranchised boys’ reflections on their urban schooling experience: “What a Waste!”.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Philpott, C., Beckett, L. and Wrigley, T. (2016) Collaborative practitioner inquiry: making a difference to urban schools.  Innovation session (school visits and symposium) presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Finn, B. and Beckett, L. (2015) Teachers’ constructions of poverty effects: Their research evidence.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Belfast, 15-17 September.

Nuttall, A. (2014) Teachers’ voice on disengaged boys: the role of one teacher-researcher in an English primary school. Paper presented at the Joint Australian Association for Research in Education and the New Zealand Association for Research in Education Conference, Brisbane, 30 November – 4 December.

Andrew Marotta is a D.Phil candidate in the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. He holds an A.A. in Social Sciences from Broward Community College, and a B.A. in Individualized Studies from the Gallatin School of Individualized Studies, New York University and an M.A. and Ed.M. in Counseling Psychology and School Counseling from Teachers College, Columbia University.

Andrew’s research interests include social and emotional learning, peer mentorship, existential therapy / philosophy, curriculum design for school counselors, and applied ethics in computer science. Andrew’s thesis examines how literature and philosophy can be used to nurture social and emotional learning through group counseling among high school students. He has also worked as a school counselor, teaching artist, and curriculum designer.

Presently, Andrew is designing joint humanities and applied ethics workshops for computer and data science college majors, using social and emotional learning concepts as the pedagogical foundation.

Abigail’s research explores the role of education in students’ personal development and how this can be supported by policy, curricula, initial teacher education and teacher professional development. In particular she focuses on history education, citizenship education and peace education as vehicles for dialogue. These opportunities for students to engage with social questions are vital for building cohesive societies. This flows from the recognition that traditional forums for developing public understanding, such as post-conflict truth commissions, need to be complemented by intergenerational and educational perspectives.

Abigail has taught History, Politics, Debating as well as Relationships and Sex Education to secondary school students in South Africa, England and the USA.

She holds postgraduate degrees in Post-Conflict and Transitional Justice (University of Cape Town), in Education, Globalisation and International Development (University of Cambridge) and in African Studies (University of Oxford). She is a Rhodes Scholar, Mandela-Magdalene Scholar and Mandela-Rhodes Scholar.

Title of thesis

GCSE History, Policy Reform and Student Development: How students and teachers navigate the thematic study “Empires, Migration and the People”

Conference papers

Teaching Migration, Belonging, and Empire in Secondary Schools: evaluation of a teacher professional development program, (2019) History Educators International Research Network Conference, Lead author: Dr Jason Todd, University of Vienna, Austria.

“The Problems and Prospects of Teaching South Africa’s Recent History: Teachers’ Perspectives”, (2018) Sustainability, peace and education – Exploring promise and practice: BAICE 20th Anniversary Symposium, University of Bristol, England.

“New Generations, Old Wounds: Learning History at Home and School in Northern Ireland”, (2018) European Social Science and History Conference,
Queens University Belfast, Northern Ireland.

“The Methodological Challenges of Investigating the Role of History Teaching in Peacebuilding”, (2017), Present Past: Time, Memory, and the Negotiation of Historical Justice Conference, Columbia University, United States of America.

“Teaching South Africa’s Truth and Reconciliation Commission”, (2017) European Conference on African Studies, Universität Basel, Switzerland.

Research Assistant Publications

Review of the evidence on feedback in primary and secondary schools, (forthcoming, 2021) for the Education Endowment Foundation, Lead author: Prof Velda Elliott.

Teaching Migration, Belonging, and Empire in Secondary Schools, (2019), for Runnymede Trust and the European Research Council, Lead authors: Kimberly McIntosh, Dr Jason Todd and Prof Nandini Das.

Gender and the Politics of Reconciliation (2016), for The Institute for Justice and Reconciliation, Lead author: Dr Helen Scanlon

SOLE AUTHOR PUBLICATIONS

‘Transitions, Truth-Telling and Teaching History’, Cambridge Open-Review Educational Research e-Journal, Vol. 4, 2017.

Alice Tawell is an ESRC funded DPhil Student, co-supervised across the Department of Education and Centre for Criminology at the University of Oxford.

Supervisors: Professor Harry Daniels and Dr Rachel Condry.

Alice’s research focuses broadly on the enactment of school exclusion policy in England.

Prior to starting her doctoral studies, Alice gained a BSc in Sociology from the University of Bath and an MSc in Education (Research Training) from the University of Oxford.

As part of her undergraduate degree, Alice undertook a placement year working with Professor Kathy Sylva in the Families, Effective Learning and Literacy Research Group at the Department of Education, University of Oxford. After completing her degree, Alice returned to the department and has worked as a Research Officer on a number of different research projects since 2014. Most recently Alice has worked as part of the Excluded Lives Research Team on two projects exploring exclusion from school from a multidisciplinary perspective. In 2017 she was awarded a Seed-corn Small Grant Award to co-lead a pilot project exploring student collaborative networks with Hau Ming Tse. Alice also co-convenes the Qualitative Methods Hub in the department.

Outside of the department, Alice has sat on the Advisory Board for the Children Missing Education research project (2016-2017) at the National Children’s Bureau (NCB) and has been a member of the NCB Partnership for Well Being and Mental Health in Schools since 2016. She also sits on the Transparency on Exclusions Steering Group.

In 2017 Alice received funding from the Grand Union Doctoral Training Partnership placement scheme to conduct a Knowledge Exchange Internship with the Early Years Analysis and Research Unit at the Department for Education, and in 2018 Alice was elected the Co-President of the Grand Union ESRC Scholar’s Association, representing ESRC students from the University of Oxford, Brunel and The Open University.

Ashmita graduated from Boston University in 2008 with a BSc. in Biomedical Engineering, after which she worked in Research & Development for 6 years.

It is here that she decided to make the leap from formulation chemistry to STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Math) Education after having worked on programs involving increasing diversity in STEM in schools.

She received her Master’s from Boston University in 2015 in Education Policy. Her research interests include: STEM education policy; Assessment; Further Education; Higher Education; Science education pedagogy

Originally from Indonesia, Tracey has spent the last decade studying in the UK and working about multicultural education in Indonesia.

She is fully funded by the Indonesia Endowment Fund for Education (LPDP). Her doctoral research explores the ways Indonesian schools teach and accommodate the national vision of multicultural Indonesia, “Bhinneka Tunggal Ika” (Unity-in-Diversity). By using a two-tier case study research approach (case studies of six schools and of two provinces), it presents nuanced and critical account of the ways head teachers, teachers, students and parents from six state and private schools in Jakarta and Bali with different mixes of pupil ethnicity and religiosity understand and accommodate the vision of diversity into educational practices. Despite the highly contextual focus, the research offers a critical view into the complex role of schools in today’s era of globalisation in providing quality education for all and at the same time creating citizens who are inclusive and respectful towards others.

Tracey completed her MSc in Comparative and International Education at the University of Oxford in 2011 and her honours BA in Mathematics and Education Studies at the University of Cambridge in 2010. Upon completing her study in the UK, she returned to Indonesia to work in an educational foundation Sultan Iskandar Muda in Medan, Indonesia as a member of the Board of Directors in the Foundation – a position which she is still holding until today. She is responsible for overlooking the development and implementation of multicultural education and teacher development programme.

During her tenure, she has worked alongside the head teachers and teachers across all educational levels (from pre-school until high school) and produced books on the praxis of multicultural education in the school setting.

Title of Thesis

Accommodating a vision of diversity in different school contexts: “Unity-in-Diversity” in Indonesia

Publications
Journal Article
  • Harjatanaya, T.Y. & Hoon, C.Y. (2018) Politics of multicultural education in post-Suharto Indonesia: a study of the Chinese minority. Compare: A Journal of Comparative and International Education
Edited Book
  • Harjatanaya, T.Y. (2015) (2nd Edition) Merawat Keberagaman: Praksis Pendidikan Multikultural Perguruan Sultan Iskandar Muda (Fostering Diversity: Praxis of Multicultural Education in Sultan Iskandar Muda). Medan: YPSIM.
Book Chapter
  • Harjatanaya, T.Y. (2018). Akses dan Kesamaan dalam Pendidikan Vokasi (Access and Equality in Vocational Education). In Ferary, D. (2018) Sistem Pendidikan Vokasi di Inggris (Vocational Education System in England) (ed.). London: Kantor Atase Pendidikan dan Kebudayaan, Kedutaan Besar Indonesia (Indonesian Embassy) London, p. 121-138.

Katy is a Deputy Headteacher and the founder of a Leadership and Coaching Institute, which she now co-directs.

Katy is an Associate Fellow at the Oxford Character Project and a Research Associate at the Oxford University Wellbeing Research Centre. She is the co-founder of Global Social Leaders, a leadership programme which has participants in 105 countries, all passionate about creating and sustaining positive change in the world.

Title of Thesis

How could school leaders improve the flourishing and wellbeing of teaching staff?

Books
  • Granville-Chapman, K. and Bidston, E (2020) Leader: Know, love and inspire your people. Carmarthen: Crownhouse Publishing
Book Chapters
  •  Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ In White, M. & McCallum, F. (Ed.s) Wellbeing and Resilience Education: Covid-19 And Its Impact on Education Systems. Routledge
Publications
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘Purpose and Leadership in Education and Beyond’. The Education Exchange. Available from: https://theeducation.exchange/purpose-and-leadership-in-education-and-beyond/
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘The Three Secrets of COVID-era Leadership’. Times Education Supplement. Available from: https://www.tes.com/news/three-secrets-covid-era-school-leadership
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2016) ‘Assessing the Impact of a Teacher Leadership Programme in a Teaching Schools Alliance. Journal of Teacher Action Research
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2014) ‘The Afghan conflict: causes and consequences.’ Geography Review 28(1): 22-27
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2013) What are the psychological factors that affect students’ academic resilience and can teachers influence these? Unpublished thesis
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘Unlocking Leadership Potential’, The Magazine of the Boarding School’s Association, 33: 42-45
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2009) ‘Learning to Lead’, Leader, The Education Leader Magazine 41: 22-25
Presentations
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2019) ‘How could leaders improve the flourishing of their teams?’ ‘Stowe Ed Conference’, Forthcoming: 7 Jan 2019
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2018) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education: 21 Jun 2018
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2017) ‘How can school leaders improve teacher flourishing?’ ‘Doing Education Differently Conference’, University of Oxford, Department of Education, 11 Mar 17
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2016) ‘Developing school leaders who enable teachers to flourish’ The Telegraph Festival of Education 23 Jun 16
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Developing leadership in pupils and teachers’ High School Affiliated to Renmin University of China, Beijing. 20 Oct 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Resilience for leaders.’ Global Social Leaders World Summit. 16 Aug 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Emotional Intelligence for Leaders.’ Global Leaders in Education. 12 Aug 15
  • Coates, S.; Fraser, H.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J.; and Nasim, A. (2015) ‘Breaking through the glass ceiling – how can schools empower our girls to become leaders?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education. 19 Jun 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. ‘Developing Leadership in Schools’ (2015). G20 Schools Conference. International conference for head teachers. 11 Apr 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2018) ‘Introduction’, Wellington Leadership Institute: Festival of Leadership. Mar 2012-15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘How the Young Learn to Lead’, Raffles Institution (Singapore) -Purdue University (USA) Education Forum on Gifted & Talented Youth 2012. Singapore. 15 Mar 12
  • Draper, D.; Dyer, R.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Schools’. Presentation for a meeting about pupil leadership and character development at 10 Downing Street. 16 Nov 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Young People’. Presentation for a meeting about leadership and character at 10 Downing Street. 7 Mar 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K. & Seldon, A. (2012) ‘Introduction’, Leading Your School in the 21st Century. 7 Feb 12

Prior to starting his DPhil, Eddy worked as a primary school teacher in Bristol, where he also completed his MSc in Educational Research.

He is particularly interested in the culture of high stakes, standardised testing, and how this might perpetuate existing inequalities in schools. His research focuses specifically on the interaction between knowledge, policy and pedagogy in the context of Literacy education.

 

Amanda is completing a part-time DPhil, alongside working in Initial Teacher Education at Leeds Trinity University.

Her research is focused on understanding tensions, contradictions and conflicts that teachers in disadvantaged schools may experience when they engage in research activity.  Her research focus is influenced by her own experiences of working as a research-active teacher in disadvantaged schools, and recent work in teacher education to support experienced and beginning teachers in developing their own research activities.

One of the aims of Amanda’s research is to construct a framework to support teachers in pursuing research activity and critical scholarship work which articulates with wider social movements to address issues of poverty and disadvantage in schools.

Title of Thesis

Teachers’ perspectives on tensions between policy, practice and research in disadvantaged schools

Publications 

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2017) A ‘usable past’ of teacher education in England: history in JET’s anniversary issue. Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy, 43 (5), pp.616-627.

Nuttall, A. (2016) The ‘curriculum challenge’: Moving towards the ‘Storyline’ approach in a case study urban primary school.  Improving Schools, 19 (2), pp. 154-166.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Learning {Re}imagined: A review.  Primary First, 15, pp. 17-18.

Nuttall, A. and Doherty, J. (2014) Disaffected boys and the achievement gap: the ‘wallpaper effect’ and what is hidden by a focus on school results.  The Urban Review, 46 (5), pp.800-815.

Conference Papers and Presentations

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2018) “No child is pre-ordained to fail” Teachers questioning policy assumptions.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Newcastle, 11-13 September.

Nuttall, A. and Tobbell, C. (2017) Trainee teachers’ perspectives on practitioner enquiry.  Paper presented at the 8th TEAN Conference: Thinking Deeply about Education, Birmingham, 11-12 May.

Nuttall, A. (2017) Assessment at primary level: quality, comparability and improving secondary readiness.  A perspective from ITE.  Speech at the Westminster Education Forum Keynote Seminar: Next steps for reforming primary education: effective teaching practices, assessment and accountably, London, 18 January.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Deficit narratives and lived realities: whose poverty is it?  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the Australian Association for Research in Education, Melbourne, 27 November – 1 December.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Disenfranchised boys’ reflections on their urban schooling experience: “What a Waste!”.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Philpott, C., Beckett, L. and Wrigley, T. (2016) Collaborative practitioner inquiry: making a difference to urban schools.  Innovation session (school visits and symposium) presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Finn, B. and Beckett, L. (2015) Teachers’ constructions of poverty effects: Their research evidence.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Belfast, 15-17 September.

Nuttall, A. (2014) Teachers’ voice on disengaged boys: the role of one teacher-researcher in an English primary school. Paper presented at the Joint Australian Association for Research in Education and the New Zealand Association for Research in Education Conference, Brisbane, 30 November – 4 December.

Andrew Marotta is a D.Phil candidate in the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. He holds an A.A. in Social Sciences from Broward Community College, and a B.A. in Individualized Studies from the Gallatin School of Individualized Studies, New York University and an M.A. and Ed.M. in Counseling Psychology and School Counseling from Teachers College, Columbia University.

Andrew’s research interests include social and emotional learning, peer mentorship, existential therapy / philosophy, curriculum design for school counselors, and applied ethics in computer science. Andrew’s thesis examines how literature and philosophy can be used to nurture social and emotional learning through group counseling among high school students. He has also worked as a school counselor, teaching artist, and curriculum designer.

Presently, Andrew is designing joint humanities and applied ethics workshops for computer and data science college majors, using social and emotional learning concepts as the pedagogical foundation.

Abigail’s research explores the role of education in students’ personal development and how this can be supported by policy, curricula, initial teacher education and teacher professional development. In particular she focuses on history education, citizenship education and peace education as vehicles for dialogue. These opportunities for students to engage with social questions are vital for building cohesive societies. This flows from the recognition that traditional forums for developing public understanding, such as post-conflict truth commissions, need to be complemented by intergenerational and educational perspectives.

Abigail has taught History, Politics, Debating as well as Relationships and Sex Education to secondary school students in South Africa, England and the USA.

She holds postgraduate degrees in Post-Conflict and Transitional Justice (University of Cape Town), in Education, Globalisation and International Development (University of Cambridge) and in African Studies (University of Oxford). She is a Rhodes Scholar, Mandela-Magdalene Scholar and Mandela-Rhodes Scholar.

Title of thesis

GCSE History, Policy Reform and Student Development: How students and teachers navigate the thematic study “Empires, Migration and the People”

Conference papers

Teaching Migration, Belonging, and Empire in Secondary Schools: evaluation of a teacher professional development program, (2019) History Educators International Research Network Conference, Lead author: Dr Jason Todd, University of Vienna, Austria.

“The Problems and Prospects of Teaching South Africa’s Recent History: Teachers’ Perspectives”, (2018) Sustainability, peace and education – Exploring promise and practice: BAICE 20th Anniversary Symposium, University of Bristol, England.

“New Generations, Old Wounds: Learning History at Home and School in Northern Ireland”, (2018) European Social Science and History Conference,
Queens University Belfast, Northern Ireland.

“The Methodological Challenges of Investigating the Role of History Teaching in Peacebuilding”, (2017), Present Past: Time, Memory, and the Negotiation of Historical Justice Conference, Columbia University, United States of America.

“Teaching South Africa’s Truth and Reconciliation Commission”, (2017) European Conference on African Studies, Universität Basel, Switzerland.

Research Assistant Publications

Review of the evidence on feedback in primary and secondary schools, (forthcoming, 2021) for the Education Endowment Foundation, Lead author: Prof Velda Elliott.

Teaching Migration, Belonging, and Empire in Secondary Schools, (2019), for Runnymede Trust and the European Research Council, Lead authors: Kimberly McIntosh, Dr Jason Todd and Prof Nandini Das.

Gender and the Politics of Reconciliation (2016), for The Institute for Justice and Reconciliation, Lead author: Dr Helen Scanlon

SOLE AUTHOR PUBLICATIONS

‘Transitions, Truth-Telling and Teaching History’, Cambridge Open-Review Educational Research e-Journal, Vol. 4, 2017.

Alice Tawell is an ESRC funded DPhil Student, co-supervised across the Department of Education and Centre for Criminology at the University of Oxford.

Supervisors: Professor Harry Daniels and Dr Rachel Condry.

Alice’s research focuses broadly on the enactment of school exclusion policy in England.

Prior to starting her doctoral studies, Alice gained a BSc in Sociology from the University of Bath and an MSc in Education (Research Training) from the University of Oxford.

As part of her undergraduate degree, Alice undertook a placement year working with Professor Kathy Sylva in the Families, Effective Learning and Literacy Research Group at the Department of Education, University of Oxford. After completing her degree, Alice returned to the department and has worked as a Research Officer on a number of different research projects since 2014. Most recently Alice has worked as part of the Excluded Lives Research Team on two projects exploring exclusion from school from a multidisciplinary perspective. In 2017 she was awarded a Seed-corn Small Grant Award to co-lead a pilot project exploring student collaborative networks with Hau Ming Tse. Alice also co-convenes the Qualitative Methods Hub in the department.

Outside of the department, Alice has sat on the Advisory Board for the Children Missing Education research project (2016-2017) at the National Children’s Bureau (NCB) and has been a member of the NCB Partnership for Well Being and Mental Health in Schools since 2016. She also sits on the Transparency on Exclusions Steering Group.

In 2017 Alice received funding from the Grand Union Doctoral Training Partnership placement scheme to conduct a Knowledge Exchange Internship with the Early Years Analysis and Research Unit at the Department for Education, and in 2018 Alice was elected the Co-President of the Grand Union ESRC Scholar’s Association, representing ESRC students from the University of Oxford, Brunel and The Open University.

Ashmita graduated from Boston University in 2008 with a BSc. in Biomedical Engineering, after which she worked in Research & Development for 6 years.

It is here that she decided to make the leap from formulation chemistry to STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Math) Education after having worked on programs involving increasing diversity in STEM in schools.

She received her Master’s from Boston University in 2015 in Education Policy. Her research interests include: STEM education policy; Assessment; Further Education; Higher Education; Science education pedagogy

Originally from Indonesia, Tracey has spent the last decade studying in the UK and working about multicultural education in Indonesia.

She is fully funded by the Indonesia Endowment Fund for Education (LPDP). Her doctoral research explores the ways Indonesian schools teach and accommodate the national vision of multicultural Indonesia, “Bhinneka Tunggal Ika” (Unity-in-Diversity). By using a two-tier case study research approach (case studies of six schools and of two provinces), it presents nuanced and critical account of the ways head teachers, teachers, students and parents from six state and private schools in Jakarta and Bali with different mixes of pupil ethnicity and religiosity understand and accommodate the vision of diversity into educational practices. Despite the highly contextual focus, the research offers a critical view into the complex role of schools in today’s era of globalisation in providing quality education for all and at the same time creating citizens who are inclusive and respectful towards others.

Tracey completed her MSc in Comparative and International Education at the University of Oxford in 2011 and her honours BA in Mathematics and Education Studies at the University of Cambridge in 2010. Upon completing her study in the UK, she returned to Indonesia to work in an educational foundation Sultan Iskandar Muda in Medan, Indonesia as a member of the Board of Directors in the Foundation – a position which she is still holding until today. She is responsible for overlooking the development and implementation of multicultural education and teacher development programme.

During her tenure, she has worked alongside the head teachers and teachers across all educational levels (from pre-school until high school) and produced books on the praxis of multicultural education in the school setting.

Title of Thesis

Accommodating a vision of diversity in different school contexts: “Unity-in-Diversity” in Indonesia

Publications
Journal Article
  • Harjatanaya, T.Y. & Hoon, C.Y. (2018) Politics of multicultural education in post-Suharto Indonesia: a study of the Chinese minority. Compare: A Journal of Comparative and International Education
Edited Book
  • Harjatanaya, T.Y. (2015) (2nd Edition) Merawat Keberagaman: Praksis Pendidikan Multikultural Perguruan Sultan Iskandar Muda (Fostering Diversity: Praxis of Multicultural Education in Sultan Iskandar Muda). Medan: YPSIM.
Book Chapter
  • Harjatanaya, T.Y. (2018). Akses dan Kesamaan dalam Pendidikan Vokasi (Access and Equality in Vocational Education). In Ferary, D. (2018) Sistem Pendidikan Vokasi di Inggris (Vocational Education System in England) (ed.). London: Kantor Atase Pendidikan dan Kebudayaan, Kedutaan Besar Indonesia (Indonesian Embassy) London, p. 121-138.

Katy is a Deputy Headteacher and the founder of a Leadership and Coaching Institute, which she now co-directs.

Katy is an Associate Fellow at the Oxford Character Project and a Research Associate at the Oxford University Wellbeing Research Centre. She is the co-founder of Global Social Leaders, a leadership programme which has participants in 105 countries, all passionate about creating and sustaining positive change in the world.

Title of Thesis

How could school leaders improve the flourishing and wellbeing of teaching staff?

Books
  • Granville-Chapman, K. and Bidston, E (2020) Leader: Know, love and inspire your people. Carmarthen: Crownhouse Publishing
Book Chapters
  •  Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ In White, M. & McCallum, F. (Ed.s) Wellbeing and Resilience Education: Covid-19 And Its Impact on Education Systems. Routledge
Publications
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘Purpose and Leadership in Education and Beyond’. The Education Exchange. Available from: https://theeducation.exchange/purpose-and-leadership-in-education-and-beyond/
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘The Three Secrets of COVID-era Leadership’. Times Education Supplement. Available from: https://www.tes.com/news/three-secrets-covid-era-school-leadership
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2016) ‘Assessing the Impact of a Teacher Leadership Programme in a Teaching Schools Alliance. Journal of Teacher Action Research
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2014) ‘The Afghan conflict: causes and consequences.’ Geography Review 28(1): 22-27
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2013) What are the psychological factors that affect students’ academic resilience and can teachers influence these? Unpublished thesis
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘Unlocking Leadership Potential’, The Magazine of the Boarding School’s Association, 33: 42-45
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2009) ‘Learning to Lead’, Leader, The Education Leader Magazine 41: 22-25
Presentations
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2019) ‘How could leaders improve the flourishing of their teams?’ ‘Stowe Ed Conference’, Forthcoming: 7 Jan 2019
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2018) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education: 21 Jun 2018
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2017) ‘How can school leaders improve teacher flourishing?’ ‘Doing Education Differently Conference’, University of Oxford, Department of Education, 11 Mar 17
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2016) ‘Developing school leaders who enable teachers to flourish’ The Telegraph Festival of Education 23 Jun 16
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Developing leadership in pupils and teachers’ High School Affiliated to Renmin University of China, Beijing. 20 Oct 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Resilience for leaders.’ Global Social Leaders World Summit. 16 Aug 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Emotional Intelligence for Leaders.’ Global Leaders in Education. 12 Aug 15
  • Coates, S.; Fraser, H.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J.; and Nasim, A. (2015) ‘Breaking through the glass ceiling – how can schools empower our girls to become leaders?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education. 19 Jun 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. ‘Developing Leadership in Schools’ (2015). G20 Schools Conference. International conference for head teachers. 11 Apr 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2018) ‘Introduction’, Wellington Leadership Institute: Festival of Leadership. Mar 2012-15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘How the Young Learn to Lead’, Raffles Institution (Singapore) -Purdue University (USA) Education Forum on Gifted & Talented Youth 2012. Singapore. 15 Mar 12
  • Draper, D.; Dyer, R.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Schools’. Presentation for a meeting about pupil leadership and character development at 10 Downing Street. 16 Nov 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Young People’. Presentation for a meeting about leadership and character at 10 Downing Street. 7 Mar 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K. & Seldon, A. (2012) ‘Introduction’, Leading Your School in the 21st Century. 7 Feb 12

Prior to starting his DPhil, Eddy worked as a primary school teacher in Bristol, where he also completed his MSc in Educational Research.

He is particularly interested in the culture of high stakes, standardised testing, and how this might perpetuate existing inequalities in schools. His research focuses specifically on the interaction between knowledge, policy and pedagogy in the context of Literacy education.

 

Amanda is completing a part-time DPhil, alongside working in Initial Teacher Education at Leeds Trinity University.

Her research is focused on understanding tensions, contradictions and conflicts that teachers in disadvantaged schools may experience when they engage in research activity.  Her research focus is influenced by her own experiences of working as a research-active teacher in disadvantaged schools, and recent work in teacher education to support experienced and beginning teachers in developing their own research activities.

One of the aims of Amanda’s research is to construct a framework to support teachers in pursuing research activity and critical scholarship work which articulates with wider social movements to address issues of poverty and disadvantage in schools.

Title of Thesis

Teachers’ perspectives on tensions between policy, practice and research in disadvantaged schools

Publications 

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2017) A ‘usable past’ of teacher education in England: history in JET’s anniversary issue. Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy, 43 (5), pp.616-627.

Nuttall, A. (2016) The ‘curriculum challenge’: Moving towards the ‘Storyline’ approach in a case study urban primary school.  Improving Schools, 19 (2), pp. 154-166.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Learning {Re}imagined: A review.  Primary First, 15, pp. 17-18.

Nuttall, A. and Doherty, J. (2014) Disaffected boys and the achievement gap: the ‘wallpaper effect’ and what is hidden by a focus on school results.  The Urban Review, 46 (5), pp.800-815.

Conference Papers and Presentations

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2018) “No child is pre-ordained to fail” Teachers questioning policy assumptions.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Newcastle, 11-13 September.

Nuttall, A. and Tobbell, C. (2017) Trainee teachers’ perspectives on practitioner enquiry.  Paper presented at the 8th TEAN Conference: Thinking Deeply about Education, Birmingham, 11-12 May.

Nuttall, A. (2017) Assessment at primary level: quality, comparability and improving secondary readiness.  A perspective from ITE.  Speech at the Westminster Education Forum Keynote Seminar: Next steps for reforming primary education: effective teaching practices, assessment and accountably, London, 18 January.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Deficit narratives and lived realities: whose poverty is it?  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the Australian Association for Research in Education, Melbourne, 27 November – 1 December.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Disenfranchised boys’ reflections on their urban schooling experience: “What a Waste!”.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Philpott, C., Beckett, L. and Wrigley, T. (2016) Collaborative practitioner inquiry: making a difference to urban schools.  Innovation session (school visits and symposium) presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Finn, B. and Beckett, L. (2015) Teachers’ constructions of poverty effects: Their research evidence.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Belfast, 15-17 September.

Nuttall, A. (2014) Teachers’ voice on disengaged boys: the role of one teacher-researcher in an English primary school. Paper presented at the Joint Australian Association for Research in Education and the New Zealand Association for Research in Education Conference, Brisbane, 30 November – 4 December.

Andrew Marotta is a D.Phil candidate in the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. He holds an A.A. in Social Sciences from Broward Community College, and a B.A. in Individualized Studies from the Gallatin School of Individualized Studies, New York University and an M.A. and Ed.M. in Counseling Psychology and School Counseling from Teachers College, Columbia University.

Andrew’s research interests include social and emotional learning, peer mentorship, existential therapy / philosophy, curriculum design for school counselors, and applied ethics in computer science. Andrew’s thesis examines how literature and philosophy can be used to nurture social and emotional learning through group counseling among high school students. He has also worked as a school counselor, teaching artist, and curriculum designer.

Presently, Andrew is designing joint humanities and applied ethics workshops for computer and data science college majors, using social and emotional learning concepts as the pedagogical foundation.

Abigail’s research explores the role of education in students’ personal development and how this can be supported by policy, curricula, initial teacher education and teacher professional development. In particular she focuses on history education, citizenship education and peace education as vehicles for dialogue. These opportunities for students to engage with social questions are vital for building cohesive societies. This flows from the recognition that traditional forums for developing public understanding, such as post-conflict truth commissions, need to be complemented by intergenerational and educational perspectives.

Abigail has taught History, Politics, Debating as well as Relationships and Sex Education to secondary school students in South Africa, England and the USA.

She holds postgraduate degrees in Post-Conflict and Transitional Justice (University of Cape Town), in Education, Globalisation and International Development (University of Cambridge) and in African Studies (University of Oxford). She is a Rhodes Scholar, Mandela-Magdalene Scholar and Mandela-Rhodes Scholar.

Title of thesis

GCSE History, Policy Reform and Student Development: How students and teachers navigate the thematic study “Empires, Migration and the People”

Conference papers

Teaching Migration, Belonging, and Empire in Secondary Schools: evaluation of a teacher professional development program, (2019) History Educators International Research Network Conference, Lead author: Dr Jason Todd, University of Vienna, Austria.

“The Problems and Prospects of Teaching South Africa’s Recent History: Teachers’ Perspectives”, (2018) Sustainability, peace and education – Exploring promise and practice: BAICE 20th Anniversary Symposium, University of Bristol, England.

“New Generations, Old Wounds: Learning History at Home and School in Northern Ireland”, (2018) European Social Science and History Conference,
Queens University Belfast, Northern Ireland.

“The Methodological Challenges of Investigating the Role of History Teaching in Peacebuilding”, (2017), Present Past: Time, Memory, and the Negotiation of Historical Justice Conference, Columbia University, United States of America.

“Teaching South Africa’s Truth and Reconciliation Commission”, (2017) European Conference on African Studies, Universität Basel, Switzerland.

Research Assistant Publications

Review of the evidence on feedback in primary and secondary schools, (forthcoming, 2021) for the Education Endowment Foundation, Lead author: Prof Velda Elliott.

Teaching Migration, Belonging, and Empire in Secondary Schools, (2019), for Runnymede Trust and the European Research Council, Lead authors: Kimberly McIntosh, Dr Jason Todd and Prof Nandini Das.

Gender and the Politics of Reconciliation (2016), for The Institute for Justice and Reconciliation, Lead author: Dr Helen Scanlon

SOLE AUTHOR PUBLICATIONS

‘Transitions, Truth-Telling and Teaching History’, Cambridge Open-Review Educational Research e-Journal, Vol. 4, 2017.

Alice Tawell is an ESRC funded DPhil Student, co-supervised across the Department of Education and Centre for Criminology at the University of Oxford.

Supervisors: Professor Harry Daniels and Dr Rachel Condry.

Alice’s research focuses broadly on the enactment of school exclusion policy in England.

Prior to starting her doctoral studies, Alice gained a BSc in Sociology from the University of Bath and an MSc in Education (Research Training) from the University of Oxford.

As part of her undergraduate degree, Alice undertook a placement year working with Professor Kathy Sylva in the Families, Effective Learning and Literacy Research Group at the Department of Education, University of Oxford. After completing her degree, Alice returned to the department and has worked as a Research Officer on a number of different research projects since 2014. Most recently Alice has worked as part of the Excluded Lives Research Team on two projects exploring exclusion from school from a multidisciplinary perspective. In 2017 she was awarded a Seed-corn Small Grant Award to co-lead a pilot project exploring student collaborative networks with Hau Ming Tse. Alice also co-convenes the Qualitative Methods Hub in the department.

Outside of the department, Alice has sat on the Advisory Board for the Children Missing Education research project (2016-2017) at the National Children’s Bureau (NCB) and has been a member of the NCB Partnership for Well Being and Mental Health in Schools since 2016. She also sits on the Transparency on Exclusions Steering Group.

In 2017 Alice received funding from the Grand Union Doctoral Training Partnership placement scheme to conduct a Knowledge Exchange Internship with the Early Years Analysis and Research Unit at the Department for Education, and in 2018 Alice was elected the Co-President of the Grand Union ESRC Scholar’s Association, representing ESRC students from the University of Oxford, Brunel and The Open University.

Ashmita graduated from Boston University in 2008 with a BSc. in Biomedical Engineering, after which she worked in Research & Development for 6 years.

It is here that she decided to make the leap from formulation chemistry to STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Math) Education after having worked on programs involving increasing diversity in STEM in schools.

She received her Master’s from Boston University in 2015 in Education Policy. Her research interests include: STEM education policy; Assessment; Further Education; Higher Education; Science education pedagogy

Originally from Indonesia, Tracey has spent the last decade studying in the UK and working about multicultural education in Indonesia.

She is fully funded by the Indonesia Endowment Fund for Education (LPDP). Her doctoral research explores the ways Indonesian schools teach and accommodate the national vision of multicultural Indonesia, “Bhinneka Tunggal Ika” (Unity-in-Diversity). By using a two-tier case study research approach (case studies of six schools and of two provinces), it presents nuanced and critical account of the ways head teachers, teachers, students and parents from six state and private schools in Jakarta and Bali with different mixes of pupil ethnicity and religiosity understand and accommodate the vision of diversity into educational practices. Despite the highly contextual focus, the research offers a critical view into the complex role of schools in today’s era of globalisation in providing quality education for all and at the same time creating citizens who are inclusive and respectful towards others.

Tracey completed her MSc in Comparative and International Education at the University of Oxford in 2011 and her honours BA in Mathematics and Education Studies at the University of Cambridge in 2010. Upon completing her study in the UK, she returned to Indonesia to work in an educational foundation Sultan Iskandar Muda in Medan, Indonesia as a member of the Board of Directors in the Foundation – a position which she is still holding until today. She is responsible for overlooking the development and implementation of multicultural education and teacher development programme.

During her tenure, she has worked alongside the head teachers and teachers across all educational levels (from pre-school until high school) and produced books on the praxis of multicultural education in the school setting.

Title of Thesis

Accommodating a vision of diversity in different school contexts: “Unity-in-Diversity” in Indonesia

Publications
Journal Article
  • Harjatanaya, T.Y. & Hoon, C.Y. (2018) Politics of multicultural education in post-Suharto Indonesia: a study of the Chinese minority. Compare: A Journal of Comparative and International Education
Edited Book
  • Harjatanaya, T.Y. (2015) (2nd Edition) Merawat Keberagaman: Praksis Pendidikan Multikultural Perguruan Sultan Iskandar Muda (Fostering Diversity: Praxis of Multicultural Education in Sultan Iskandar Muda). Medan: YPSIM.
Book Chapter
  • Harjatanaya, T.Y. (2018). Akses dan Kesamaan dalam Pendidikan Vokasi (Access and Equality in Vocational Education). In Ferary, D. (2018) Sistem Pendidikan Vokasi di Inggris (Vocational Education System in England) (ed.). London: Kantor Atase Pendidikan dan Kebudayaan, Kedutaan Besar Indonesia (Indonesian Embassy) London, p. 121-138.

Katy is a Deputy Headteacher and the founder of a Leadership and Coaching Institute, which she now co-directs.

Katy is an Associate Fellow at the Oxford Character Project and a Research Associate at the Oxford University Wellbeing Research Centre. She is the co-founder of Global Social Leaders, a leadership programme which has participants in 105 countries, all passionate about creating and sustaining positive change in the world.

Title of Thesis

How could school leaders improve the flourishing and wellbeing of teaching staff?

Books
  • Granville-Chapman, K. and Bidston, E (2020) Leader: Know, love and inspire your people. Carmarthen: Crownhouse Publishing
Book Chapters
  •  Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ In White, M. & McCallum, F. (Ed.s) Wellbeing and Resilience Education: Covid-19 And Its Impact on Education Systems. Routledge
Publications
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘Purpose and Leadership in Education and Beyond’. The Education Exchange. Available from: https://theeducation.exchange/purpose-and-leadership-in-education-and-beyond/
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘The Three Secrets of COVID-era Leadership’. Times Education Supplement. Available from: https://www.tes.com/news/three-secrets-covid-era-school-leadership
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2016) ‘Assessing the Impact of a Teacher Leadership Programme in a Teaching Schools Alliance. Journal of Teacher Action Research
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2014) ‘The Afghan conflict: causes and consequences.’ Geography Review 28(1): 22-27
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2013) What are the psychological factors that affect students’ academic resilience and can teachers influence these? Unpublished thesis
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘Unlocking Leadership Potential’, The Magazine of the Boarding School’s Association, 33: 42-45
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2009) ‘Learning to Lead’, Leader, The Education Leader Magazine 41: 22-25
Presentations
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2019) ‘How could leaders improve the flourishing of their teams?’ ‘Stowe Ed Conference’, Forthcoming: 7 Jan 2019
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2018) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education: 21 Jun 2018
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2017) ‘How can school leaders improve teacher flourishing?’ ‘Doing Education Differently Conference’, University of Oxford, Department of Education, 11 Mar 17
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2016) ‘Developing school leaders who enable teachers to flourish’ The Telegraph Festival of Education 23 Jun 16
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Developing leadership in pupils and teachers’ High School Affiliated to Renmin University of China, Beijing. 20 Oct 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Resilience for leaders.’ Global Social Leaders World Summit. 16 Aug 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Emotional Intelligence for Leaders.’ Global Leaders in Education. 12 Aug 15
  • Coates, S.; Fraser, H.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J.; and Nasim, A. (2015) ‘Breaking through the glass ceiling – how can schools empower our girls to become leaders?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education. 19 Jun 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. ‘Developing Leadership in Schools’ (2015). G20 Schools Conference. International conference for head teachers. 11 Apr 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2018) ‘Introduction’, Wellington Leadership Institute: Festival of Leadership. Mar 2012-15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘How the Young Learn to Lead’, Raffles Institution (Singapore) -Purdue University (USA) Education Forum on Gifted & Talented Youth 2012. Singapore. 15 Mar 12
  • Draper, D.; Dyer, R.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Schools’. Presentation for a meeting about pupil leadership and character development at 10 Downing Street. 16 Nov 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Young People’. Presentation for a meeting about leadership and character at 10 Downing Street. 7 Mar 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K. & Seldon, A. (2012) ‘Introduction’, Leading Your School in the 21st Century. 7 Feb 12

Prior to starting his DPhil, Eddy worked as a primary school teacher in Bristol, where he also completed his MSc in Educational Research.

He is particularly interested in the culture of high stakes, standardised testing, and how this might perpetuate existing inequalities in schools. His research focuses specifically on the interaction between knowledge, policy and pedagogy in the context of Literacy education.

 

Amanda is completing a part-time DPhil, alongside working in Initial Teacher Education at Leeds Trinity University.

Her research is focused on understanding tensions, contradictions and conflicts that teachers in disadvantaged schools may experience when they engage in research activity.  Her research focus is influenced by her own experiences of working as a research-active teacher in disadvantaged schools, and recent work in teacher education to support experienced and beginning teachers in developing their own research activities.

One of the aims of Amanda’s research is to construct a framework to support teachers in pursuing research activity and critical scholarship work which articulates with wider social movements to address issues of poverty and disadvantage in schools.

Title of Thesis

Teachers’ perspectives on tensions between policy, practice and research in disadvantaged schools

Publications 

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2017) A ‘usable past’ of teacher education in England: history in JET’s anniversary issue. Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy, 43 (5), pp.616-627.

Nuttall, A. (2016) The ‘curriculum challenge’: Moving towards the ‘Storyline’ approach in a case study urban primary school.  Improving Schools, 19 (2), pp. 154-166.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Learning {Re}imagined: A review.  Primary First, 15, pp. 17-18.

Nuttall, A. and Doherty, J. (2014) Disaffected boys and the achievement gap: the ‘wallpaper effect’ and what is hidden by a focus on school results.  The Urban Review, 46 (5), pp.800-815.

Conference Papers and Presentations

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2018) “No child is pre-ordained to fail” Teachers questioning policy assumptions.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Newcastle, 11-13 September.

Nuttall, A. and Tobbell, C. (2017) Trainee teachers’ perspectives on practitioner enquiry.  Paper presented at the 8th TEAN Conference: Thinking Deeply about Education, Birmingham, 11-12 May.

Nuttall, A. (2017) Assessment at primary level: quality, comparability and improving secondary readiness.  A perspective from ITE.  Speech at the Westminster Education Forum Keynote Seminar: Next steps for reforming primary education: effective teaching practices, assessment and accountably, London, 18 January.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Deficit narratives and lived realities: whose poverty is it?  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the Australian Association for Research in Education, Melbourne, 27 November – 1 December.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Disenfranchised boys’ reflections on their urban schooling experience: “What a Waste!”.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Philpott, C., Beckett, L. and Wrigley, T. (2016) Collaborative practitioner inquiry: making a difference to urban schools.  Innovation session (school visits and symposium) presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Finn, B. and Beckett, L. (2015) Teachers’ constructions of poverty effects: Their research evidence.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Belfast, 15-17 September.

Nuttall, A. (2014) Teachers’ voice on disengaged boys: the role of one teacher-researcher in an English primary school. Paper presented at the Joint Australian Association for Research in Education and the New Zealand Association for Research in Education Conference, Brisbane, 30 November – 4 December.

Andrew Marotta is a D.Phil candidate in the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. He holds an A.A. in Social Sciences from Broward Community College, and a B.A. in Individualized Studies from the Gallatin School of Individualized Studies, New York University and an M.A. and Ed.M. in Counseling Psychology and School Counseling from Teachers College, Columbia University.

Andrew’s research interests include social and emotional learning, peer mentorship, existential therapy / philosophy, curriculum design for school counselors, and applied ethics in computer science. Andrew’s thesis examines how literature and philosophy can be used to nurture social and emotional learning through group counseling among high school students. He has also worked as a school counselor, teaching artist, and curriculum designer.

Presently, Andrew is designing joint humanities and applied ethics workshops for computer and data science college majors, using social and emotional learning concepts as the pedagogical foundation.

Abigail’s research explores the role of education in students’ personal development and how this can be supported by policy, curricula, initial teacher education and teacher professional development. In particular she focuses on history education, citizenship education and peace education as vehicles for dialogue. These opportunities for students to engage with social questions are vital for building cohesive societies. This flows from the recognition that traditional forums for developing public understanding, such as post-conflict truth commissions, need to be complemented by intergenerational and educational perspectives.

Abigail has taught History, Politics, Debating as well as Relationships and Sex Education to secondary school students in South Africa, England and the USA.

She holds postgraduate degrees in Post-Conflict and Transitional Justice (University of Cape Town), in Education, Globalisation and International Development (University of Cambridge) and in African Studies (University of Oxford). She is a Rhodes Scholar, Mandela-Magdalene Scholar and Mandela-Rhodes Scholar.

Title of thesis

GCSE History, Policy Reform and Student Development: How students and teachers navigate the thematic study “Empires, Migration and the People”

Conference papers

Teaching Migration, Belonging, and Empire in Secondary Schools: evaluation of a teacher professional development program, (2019) History Educators International Research Network Conference, Lead author: Dr Jason Todd, University of Vienna, Austria.

“The Problems and Prospects of Teaching South Africa’s Recent History: Teachers’ Perspectives”, (2018) Sustainability, peace and education – Exploring promise and practice: BAICE 20th Anniversary Symposium, University of Bristol, England.

“New Generations, Old Wounds: Learning History at Home and School in Northern Ireland”, (2018) European Social Science and History Conference,
Queens University Belfast, Northern Ireland.

“The Methodological Challenges of Investigating the Role of History Teaching in Peacebuilding”, (2017), Present Past: Time, Memory, and the Negotiation of Historical Justice Conference, Columbia University, United States of America.

“Teaching South Africa’s Truth and Reconciliation Commission”, (2017) European Conference on African Studies, Universität Basel, Switzerland.

Research Assistant Publications

Review of the evidence on feedback in primary and secondary schools, (forthcoming, 2021) for the Education Endowment Foundation, Lead author: Prof Velda Elliott.

Teaching Migration, Belonging, and Empire in Secondary Schools, (2019), for Runnymede Trust and the European Research Council, Lead authors: Kimberly McIntosh, Dr Jason Todd and Prof Nandini Das.

Gender and the Politics of Reconciliation (2016), for The Institute for Justice and Reconciliation, Lead author: Dr Helen Scanlon

SOLE AUTHOR PUBLICATIONS

‘Transitions, Truth-Telling and Teaching History’, Cambridge Open-Review Educational Research e-Journal, Vol. 4, 2017.

Alice Tawell is an ESRC funded DPhil Student, co-supervised across the Department of Education and Centre for Criminology at the University of Oxford.

Supervisors: Professor Harry Daniels and Dr Rachel Condry.

Alice’s research focuses broadly on the enactment of school exclusion policy in England.

Prior to starting her doctoral studies, Alice gained a BSc in Sociology from the University of Bath and an MSc in Education (Research Training) from the University of Oxford.

As part of her undergraduate degree, Alice undertook a placement year working with Professor Kathy Sylva in the Families, Effective Learning and Literacy Research Group at the Department of Education, University of Oxford. After completing her degree, Alice returned to the department and has worked as a Research Officer on a number of different research projects since 2014. Most recently Alice has worked as part of the Excluded Lives Research Team on two projects exploring exclusion from school from a multidisciplinary perspective. In 2017 she was awarded a Seed-corn Small Grant Award to co-lead a pilot project exploring student collaborative networks with Hau Ming Tse. Alice also co-convenes the Qualitative Methods Hub in the department.

Outside of the department, Alice has sat on the Advisory Board for the Children Missing Education research project (2016-2017) at the National Children’s Bureau (NCB) and has been a member of the NCB Partnership for Well Being and Mental Health in Schools since 2016. She also sits on the Transparency on Exclusions Steering Group.

In 2017 Alice received funding from the Grand Union Doctoral Training Partnership placement scheme to conduct a Knowledge Exchange Internship with the Early Years Analysis and Research Unit at the Department for Education, and in 2018 Alice was elected the Co-President of the Grand Union ESRC Scholar’s Association, representing ESRC students from the University of Oxford, Brunel and The Open University.

Ashmita graduated from Boston University in 2008 with a BSc. in Biomedical Engineering, after which she worked in Research & Development for 6 years.

It is here that she decided to make the leap from formulation chemistry to STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Math) Education after having worked on programs involving increasing diversity in STEM in schools.

She received her Master’s from Boston University in 2015 in Education Policy. Her research interests include: STEM education policy; Assessment; Further Education; Higher Education; Science education pedagogy

Originally from Indonesia, Tracey has spent the last decade studying in the UK and working about multicultural education in Indonesia.

She is fully funded by the Indonesia Endowment Fund for Education (LPDP). Her doctoral research explores the ways Indonesian schools teach and accommodate the national vision of multicultural Indonesia, “Bhinneka Tunggal Ika” (Unity-in-Diversity). By using a two-tier case study research approach (case studies of six schools and of two provinces), it presents nuanced and critical account of the ways head teachers, teachers, students and parents from six state and private schools in Jakarta and Bali with different mixes of pupil ethnicity and religiosity understand and accommodate the vision of diversity into educational practices. Despite the highly contextual focus, the research offers a critical view into the complex role of schools in today’s era of globalisation in providing quality education for all and at the same time creating citizens who are inclusive and respectful towards others.

Tracey completed her MSc in Comparative and International Education at the University of Oxford in 2011 and her honours BA in Mathematics and Education Studies at the University of Cambridge in 2010. Upon completing her study in the UK, she returned to Indonesia to work in an educational foundation Sultan Iskandar Muda in Medan, Indonesia as a member of the Board of Directors in the Foundation – a position which she is still holding until today. She is responsible for overlooking the development and implementation of multicultural education and teacher development programme.

During her tenure, she has worked alongside the head teachers and teachers across all educational levels (from pre-school until high school) and produced books on the praxis of multicultural education in the school setting.

Title of Thesis

Accommodating a vision of diversity in different school contexts: “Unity-in-Diversity” in Indonesia

Publications
Journal Article
  • Harjatanaya, T.Y. & Hoon, C.Y. (2018) Politics of multicultural education in post-Suharto Indonesia: a study of the Chinese minority. Compare: A Journal of Comparative and International Education
Edited Book
  • Harjatanaya, T.Y. (2015) (2nd Edition) Merawat Keberagaman: Praksis Pendidikan Multikultural Perguruan Sultan Iskandar Muda (Fostering Diversity: Praxis of Multicultural Education in Sultan Iskandar Muda). Medan: YPSIM.
Book Chapter
  • Harjatanaya, T.Y. (2018). Akses dan Kesamaan dalam Pendidikan Vokasi (Access and Equality in Vocational Education). In Ferary, D. (2018) Sistem Pendidikan Vokasi di Inggris (Vocational Education System in England) (ed.). London: Kantor Atase Pendidikan dan Kebudayaan, Kedutaan Besar Indonesia (Indonesian Embassy) London, p. 121-138.

Katy is a Deputy Headteacher and the founder of a Leadership and Coaching Institute, which she now co-directs.

Katy is an Associate Fellow at the Oxford Character Project and a Research Associate at the Oxford University Wellbeing Research Centre. She is the co-founder of Global Social Leaders, a leadership programme which has participants in 105 countries, all passionate about creating and sustaining positive change in the world.

Title of Thesis

How could school leaders improve the flourishing and wellbeing of teaching staff?

Books
  • Granville-Chapman, K. and Bidston, E (2020) Leader: Know, love and inspire your people. Carmarthen: Crownhouse Publishing
Book Chapters
  •  Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ In White, M. & McCallum, F. (Ed.s) Wellbeing and Resilience Education: Covid-19 And Its Impact on Education Systems. Routledge
Publications
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘Purpose and Leadership in Education and Beyond’. The Education Exchange. Available from: https://theeducation.exchange/purpose-and-leadership-in-education-and-beyond/
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘The Three Secrets of COVID-era Leadership’. Times Education Supplement. Available from: https://www.tes.com/news/three-secrets-covid-era-school-leadership
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2016) ‘Assessing the Impact of a Teacher Leadership Programme in a Teaching Schools Alliance. Journal of Teacher Action Research
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2014) ‘The Afghan conflict: causes and consequences.’ Geography Review 28(1): 22-27
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2013) What are the psychological factors that affect students’ academic resilience and can teachers influence these? Unpublished thesis
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘Unlocking Leadership Potential’, The Magazine of the Boarding School’s Association, 33: 42-45
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2009) ‘Learning to Lead’, Leader, The Education Leader Magazine 41: 22-25
Presentations
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2019) ‘How could leaders improve the flourishing of their teams?’ ‘Stowe Ed Conference’, Forthcoming: 7 Jan 2019
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2018) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education: 21 Jun 2018
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2017) ‘How can school leaders improve teacher flourishing?’ ‘Doing Education Differently Conference’, University of Oxford, Department of Education, 11 Mar 17
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2016) ‘Developing school leaders who enable teachers to flourish’ The Telegraph Festival of Education 23 Jun 16
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Developing leadership in pupils and teachers’ High School Affiliated to Renmin University of China, Beijing. 20 Oct 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Resilience for leaders.’ Global Social Leaders World Summit. 16 Aug 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Emotional Intelligence for Leaders.’ Global Leaders in Education. 12 Aug 15
  • Coates, S.; Fraser, H.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J.; and Nasim, A. (2015) ‘Breaking through the glass ceiling – how can schools empower our girls to become leaders?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education. 19 Jun 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. ‘Developing Leadership in Schools’ (2015). G20 Schools Conference. International conference for head teachers. 11 Apr 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2018) ‘Introduction’, Wellington Leadership Institute: Festival of Leadership. Mar 2012-15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘How the Young Learn to Lead’, Raffles Institution (Singapore) -Purdue University (USA) Education Forum on Gifted & Talented Youth 2012. Singapore. 15 Mar 12
  • Draper, D.; Dyer, R.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Schools’. Presentation for a meeting about pupil leadership and character development at 10 Downing Street. 16 Nov 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Young People’. Presentation for a meeting about leadership and character at 10 Downing Street. 7 Mar 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K. & Seldon, A. (2012) ‘Introduction’, Leading Your School in the 21st Century. 7 Feb 12

Prior to starting his DPhil, Eddy worked as a primary school teacher in Bristol, where he also completed his MSc in Educational Research.

He is particularly interested in the culture of high stakes, standardised testing, and how this might perpetuate existing inequalities in schools. His research focuses specifically on the interaction between knowledge, policy and pedagogy in the context of Literacy education.

 

Amanda is completing a part-time DPhil, alongside working in Initial Teacher Education at Leeds Trinity University.

Her research is focused on understanding tensions, contradictions and conflicts that teachers in disadvantaged schools may experience when they engage in research activity.  Her research focus is influenced by her own experiences of working as a research-active teacher in disadvantaged schools, and recent work in teacher education to support experienced and beginning teachers in developing their own research activities.

One of the aims of Amanda’s research is to construct a framework to support teachers in pursuing research activity and critical scholarship work which articulates with wider social movements to address issues of poverty and disadvantage in schools.

Title of Thesis

Teachers’ perspectives on tensions between policy, practice and research in disadvantaged schools

Publications 

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2017) A ‘usable past’ of teacher education in England: history in JET’s anniversary issue. Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy, 43 (5), pp.616-627.

Nuttall, A. (2016) The ‘curriculum challenge’: Moving towards the ‘Storyline’ approach in a case study urban primary school.  Improving Schools, 19 (2), pp. 154-166.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Learning {Re}imagined: A review.  Primary First, 15, pp. 17-18.

Nuttall, A. and Doherty, J. (2014) Disaffected boys and the achievement gap: the ‘wallpaper effect’ and what is hidden by a focus on school results.  The Urban Review, 46 (5), pp.800-815.

Conference Papers and Presentations

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2018) “No child is pre-ordained to fail” Teachers questioning policy assumptions.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Newcastle, 11-13 September.

Nuttall, A. and Tobbell, C. (2017) Trainee teachers’ perspectives on practitioner enquiry.  Paper presented at the 8th TEAN Conference: Thinking Deeply about Education, Birmingham, 11-12 May.

Nuttall, A. (2017) Assessment at primary level: quality, comparability and improving secondary readiness.  A perspective from ITE.  Speech at the Westminster Education Forum Keynote Seminar: Next steps for reforming primary education: effective teaching practices, assessment and accountably, London, 18 January.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Deficit narratives and lived realities: whose poverty is it?  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the Australian Association for Research in Education, Melbourne, 27 November – 1 December.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Disenfranchised boys’ reflections on their urban schooling experience: “What a Waste!”.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Philpott, C., Beckett, L. and Wrigley, T. (2016) Collaborative practitioner inquiry: making a difference to urban schools.  Innovation session (school visits and symposium) presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Finn, B. and Beckett, L. (2015) Teachers’ constructions of poverty effects: Their research evidence.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Belfast, 15-17 September.

Nuttall, A. (2014) Teachers’ voice on disengaged boys: the role of one teacher-researcher in an English primary school. Paper presented at the Joint Australian Association for Research in Education and the New Zealand Association for Research in Education Conference, Brisbane, 30 November – 4 December.

Andrew Marotta is a D.Phil candidate in the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. He holds an A.A. in Social Sciences from Broward Community College, and a B.A. in Individualized Studies from the Gallatin School of Individualized Studies, New York University and an M.A. and Ed.M. in Counseling Psychology and School Counseling from Teachers College, Columbia University.

Andrew’s research interests include social and emotional learning, peer mentorship, existential therapy / philosophy, curriculum design for school counselors, and applied ethics in computer science. Andrew’s thesis examines how literature and philosophy can be used to nurture social and emotional learning through group counseling among high school students. He has also worked as a school counselor, teaching artist, and curriculum designer.

Presently, Andrew is designing joint humanities and applied ethics workshops for computer and data science college majors, using social and emotional learning concepts as the pedagogical foundation.

Abigail’s research explores the role of education in students’ personal development and how this can be supported by policy, curricula, initial teacher education and teacher professional development. In particular she focuses on history education, citizenship education and peace education as vehicles for dialogue. These opportunities for students to engage with social questions are vital for building cohesive societies. This flows from the recognition that traditional forums for developing public understanding, such as post-conflict truth commissions, need to be complemented by intergenerational and educational perspectives.

Abigail has taught History, Politics, Debating as well as Relationships and Sex Education to secondary school students in South Africa, England and the USA.

She holds postgraduate degrees in Post-Conflict and Transitional Justice (University of Cape Town), in Education, Globalisation and International Development (University of Cambridge) and in African Studies (University of Oxford). She is a Rhodes Scholar, Mandela-Magdalene Scholar and Mandela-Rhodes Scholar.

Title of thesis

GCSE History, Policy Reform and Student Development: How students and teachers navigate the thematic study “Empires, Migration and the People”

Conference papers

Teaching Migration, Belonging, and Empire in Secondary Schools: evaluation of a teacher professional development program, (2019) History Educators International Research Network Conference, Lead author: Dr Jason Todd, University of Vienna, Austria.

“The Problems and Prospects of Teaching South Africa’s Recent History: Teachers’ Perspectives”, (2018) Sustainability, peace and education – Exploring promise and practice: BAICE 20th Anniversary Symposium, University of Bristol, England.

“New Generations, Old Wounds: Learning History at Home and School in Northern Ireland”, (2018) European Social Science and History Conference,
Queens University Belfast, Northern Ireland.

“The Methodological Challenges of Investigating the Role of History Teaching in Peacebuilding”, (2017), Present Past: Time, Memory, and the Negotiation of Historical Justice Conference, Columbia University, United States of America.

“Teaching South Africa’s Truth and Reconciliation Commission”, (2017) European Conference on African Studies, Universität Basel, Switzerland.

Research Assistant Publications

Review of the evidence on feedback in primary and secondary schools, (forthcoming, 2021) for the Education Endowment Foundation, Lead author: Prof Velda Elliott.

Teaching Migration, Belonging, and Empire in Secondary Schools, (2019), for Runnymede Trust and the European Research Council, Lead authors: Kimberly McIntosh, Dr Jason Todd and Prof Nandini Das.

Gender and the Politics of Reconciliation (2016), for The Institute for Justice and Reconciliation, Lead author: Dr Helen Scanlon

SOLE AUTHOR PUBLICATIONS

‘Transitions, Truth-Telling and Teaching History’, Cambridge Open-Review Educational Research e-Journal, Vol. 4, 2017.

Alice Tawell is an ESRC funded DPhil Student, co-supervised across the Department of Education and Centre for Criminology at the University of Oxford.

Supervisors: Professor Harry Daniels and Dr Rachel Condry.

Alice’s research focuses broadly on the enactment of school exclusion policy in England.

Prior to starting her doctoral studies, Alice gained a BSc in Sociology from the University of Bath and an MSc in Education (Research Training) from the University of Oxford.

As part of her undergraduate degree, Alice undertook a placement year working with Professor Kathy Sylva in the Families, Effective Learning and Literacy Research Group at the Department of Education, University of Oxford. After completing her degree, Alice returned to the department and has worked as a Research Officer on a number of different research projects since 2014. Most recently Alice has worked as part of the Excluded Lives Research Team on two projects exploring exclusion from school from a multidisciplinary perspective. In 2017 she was awarded a Seed-corn Small Grant Award to co-lead a pilot project exploring student collaborative networks with Hau Ming Tse. Alice also co-convenes the Qualitative Methods Hub in the department.

Outside of the department, Alice has sat on the Advisory Board for the Children Missing Education research project (2016-2017) at the National Children’s Bureau (NCB) and has been a member of the NCB Partnership for Well Being and Mental Health in Schools since 2016. She also sits on the Transparency on Exclusions Steering Group.

In 2017 Alice received funding from the Grand Union Doctoral Training Partnership placement scheme to conduct a Knowledge Exchange Internship with the Early Years Analysis and Research Unit at the Department for Education, and in 2018 Alice was elected the Co-President of the Grand Union ESRC Scholar’s Association, representing ESRC students from the University of Oxford, Brunel and The Open University.

Ashmita graduated from Boston University in 2008 with a BSc. in Biomedical Engineering, after which she worked in Research & Development for 6 years.

It is here that she decided to make the leap from formulation chemistry to STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Math) Education after having worked on programs involving increasing diversity in STEM in schools.

She received her Master’s from Boston University in 2015 in Education Policy. Her research interests include: STEM education policy; Assessment; Further Education; Higher Education; Science education pedagogy

Originally from Indonesia, Tracey has spent the last decade studying in the UK and working about multicultural education in Indonesia.

She is fully funded by the Indonesia Endowment Fund for Education (LPDP). Her doctoral research explores the ways Indonesian schools teach and accommodate the national vision of multicultural Indonesia, “Bhinneka Tunggal Ika” (Unity-in-Diversity). By using a two-tier case study research approach (case studies of six schools and of two provinces), it presents nuanced and critical account of the ways head teachers, teachers, students and parents from six state and private schools in Jakarta and Bali with different mixes of pupil ethnicity and religiosity understand and accommodate the vision of diversity into educational practices. Despite the highly contextual focus, the research offers a critical view into the complex role of schools in today’s era of globalisation in providing quality education for all and at the same time creating citizens who are inclusive and respectful towards others.

Tracey completed her MSc in Comparative and International Education at the University of Oxford in 2011 and her honours BA in Mathematics and Education Studies at the University of Cambridge in 2010. Upon completing her study in the UK, she returned to Indonesia to work in an educational foundation Sultan Iskandar Muda in Medan, Indonesia as a member of the Board of Directors in the Foundation – a position which she is still holding until today. She is responsible for overlooking the development and implementation of multicultural education and teacher development programme.

During her tenure, she has worked alongside the head teachers and teachers across all educational levels (from pre-school until high school) and produced books on the praxis of multicultural education in the school setting.

Title of Thesis

Accommodating a vision of diversity in different school contexts: “Unity-in-Diversity” in Indonesia

Publications
Journal Article
  • Harjatanaya, T.Y. & Hoon, C.Y. (2018) Politics of multicultural education in post-Suharto Indonesia: a study of the Chinese minority. Compare: A Journal of Comparative and International Education
Edited Book
  • Harjatanaya, T.Y. (2015) (2nd Edition) Merawat Keberagaman: Praksis Pendidikan Multikultural Perguruan Sultan Iskandar Muda (Fostering Diversity: Praxis of Multicultural Education in Sultan Iskandar Muda). Medan: YPSIM.
Book Chapter
  • Harjatanaya, T.Y. (2018). Akses dan Kesamaan dalam Pendidikan Vokasi (Access and Equality in Vocational Education). In Ferary, D. (2018) Sistem Pendidikan Vokasi di Inggris (Vocational Education System in England) (ed.). London: Kantor Atase Pendidikan dan Kebudayaan, Kedutaan Besar Indonesia (Indonesian Embassy) London, p. 121-138.

Katy is a Deputy Headteacher and the founder of a Leadership and Coaching Institute, which she now co-directs.

Katy is an Associate Fellow at the Oxford Character Project and a Research Associate at the Oxford University Wellbeing Research Centre. She is the co-founder of Global Social Leaders, a leadership programme which has participants in 105 countries, all passionate about creating and sustaining positive change in the world.

Title of Thesis

How could school leaders improve the flourishing and wellbeing of teaching staff?

Books
  • Granville-Chapman, K. and Bidston, E (2020) Leader: Know, love and inspire your people. Carmarthen: Crownhouse Publishing
Book Chapters
  •  Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ In White, M. & McCallum, F. (Ed.s) Wellbeing and Resilience Education: Covid-19 And Its Impact on Education Systems. Routledge
Publications
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘Purpose and Leadership in Education and Beyond’. The Education Exchange. Available from: https://theeducation.exchange/purpose-and-leadership-in-education-and-beyond/
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘The Three Secrets of COVID-era Leadership’. Times Education Supplement. Available from: https://www.tes.com/news/three-secrets-covid-era-school-leadership
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2016) ‘Assessing the Impact of a Teacher Leadership Programme in a Teaching Schools Alliance. Journal of Teacher Action Research
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2014) ‘The Afghan conflict: causes and consequences.’ Geography Review 28(1): 22-27
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2013) What are the psychological factors that affect students’ academic resilience and can teachers influence these? Unpublished thesis
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘Unlocking Leadership Potential’, The Magazine of the Boarding School’s Association, 33: 42-45
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2009) ‘Learning to Lead’, Leader, The Education Leader Magazine 41: 22-25
Presentations
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2019) ‘How could leaders improve the flourishing of their teams?’ ‘Stowe Ed Conference’, Forthcoming: 7 Jan 2019
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2018) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education: 21 Jun 2018
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2017) ‘How can school leaders improve teacher flourishing?’ ‘Doing Education Differently Conference’, University of Oxford, Department of Education, 11 Mar 17
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2016) ‘Developing school leaders who enable teachers to flourish’ The Telegraph Festival of Education 23 Jun 16
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Developing leadership in pupils and teachers’ High School Affiliated to Renmin University of China, Beijing. 20 Oct 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Resilience for leaders.’ Global Social Leaders World Summit. 16 Aug 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Emotional Intelligence for Leaders.’ Global Leaders in Education. 12 Aug 15
  • Coates, S.; Fraser, H.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J.; and Nasim, A. (2015) ‘Breaking through the glass ceiling – how can schools empower our girls to become leaders?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education. 19 Jun 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. ‘Developing Leadership in Schools’ (2015). G20 Schools Conference. International conference for head teachers. 11 Apr 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2018) ‘Introduction’, Wellington Leadership Institute: Festival of Leadership. Mar 2012-15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘How the Young Learn to Lead’, Raffles Institution (Singapore) -Purdue University (USA) Education Forum on Gifted & Talented Youth 2012. Singapore. 15 Mar 12
  • Draper, D.; Dyer, R.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Schools’. Presentation for a meeting about pupil leadership and character development at 10 Downing Street. 16 Nov 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Young People’. Presentation for a meeting about leadership and character at 10 Downing Street. 7 Mar 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K. & Seldon, A. (2012) ‘Introduction’, Leading Your School in the 21st Century. 7 Feb 12

Prior to starting his DPhil, Eddy worked as a primary school teacher in Bristol, where he also completed his MSc in Educational Research.

He is particularly interested in the culture of high stakes, standardised testing, and how this might perpetuate existing inequalities in schools. His research focuses specifically on the interaction between knowledge, policy and pedagogy in the context of Literacy education.

 

Amanda is completing a part-time DPhil, alongside working in Initial Teacher Education at Leeds Trinity University.

Her research is focused on understanding tensions, contradictions and conflicts that teachers in disadvantaged schools may experience when they engage in research activity.  Her research focus is influenced by her own experiences of working as a research-active teacher in disadvantaged schools, and recent work in teacher education to support experienced and beginning teachers in developing their own research activities.

One of the aims of Amanda’s research is to construct a framework to support teachers in pursuing research activity and critical scholarship work which articulates with wider social movements to address issues of poverty and disadvantage in schools.

Title of Thesis

Teachers’ perspectives on tensions between policy, practice and research in disadvantaged schools

Publications 

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2017) A ‘usable past’ of teacher education in England: history in JET’s anniversary issue. Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy, 43 (5), pp.616-627.

Nuttall, A. (2016) The ‘curriculum challenge’: Moving towards the ‘Storyline’ approach in a case study urban primary school.  Improving Schools, 19 (2), pp. 154-166.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Learning {Re}imagined: A review.  Primary First, 15, pp. 17-18.

Nuttall, A. and Doherty, J. (2014) Disaffected boys and the achievement gap: the ‘wallpaper effect’ and what is hidden by a focus on school results.  The Urban Review, 46 (5), pp.800-815.

Conference Papers and Presentations

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2018) “No child is pre-ordained to fail” Teachers questioning policy assumptions.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Newcastle, 11-13 September.

Nuttall, A. and Tobbell, C. (2017) Trainee teachers’ perspectives on practitioner enquiry.  Paper presented at the 8th TEAN Conference: Thinking Deeply about Education, Birmingham, 11-12 May.

Nuttall, A. (2017) Assessment at primary level: quality, comparability and improving secondary readiness.  A perspective from ITE.  Speech at the Westminster Education Forum Keynote Seminar: Next steps for reforming primary education: effective teaching practices, assessment and accountably, London, 18 January.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Deficit narratives and lived realities: whose poverty is it?  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the Australian Association for Research in Education, Melbourne, 27 November – 1 December.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Disenfranchised boys’ reflections on their urban schooling experience: “What a Waste!”.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Philpott, C., Beckett, L. and Wrigley, T. (2016) Collaborative practitioner inquiry: making a difference to urban schools.  Innovation session (school visits and symposium) presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Finn, B. and Beckett, L. (2015) Teachers’ constructions of poverty effects: Their research evidence.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Belfast, 15-17 September.

Nuttall, A. (2014) Teachers’ voice on disengaged boys: the role of one teacher-researcher in an English primary school. Paper presented at the Joint Australian Association for Research in Education and the New Zealand Association for Research in Education Conference, Brisbane, 30 November – 4 December.

Andrew Marotta is a D.Phil candidate in the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. He holds an A.A. in Social Sciences from Broward Community College, and a B.A. in Individualized Studies from the Gallatin School of Individualized Studies, New York University and an M.A. and Ed.M. in Counseling Psychology and School Counseling from Teachers College, Columbia University.

Andrew’s research interests include social and emotional learning, peer mentorship, existential therapy / philosophy, curriculum design for school counselors, and applied ethics in computer science. Andrew’s thesis examines how literature and philosophy can be used to nurture social and emotional learning through group counseling among high school students. He has also worked as a school counselor, teaching artist, and curriculum designer.

Presently, Andrew is designing joint humanities and applied ethics workshops for computer and data science college majors, using social and emotional learning concepts as the pedagogical foundation.

Abigail’s research explores the role of education in students’ personal development and how this can be supported by policy, curricula, initial teacher education and teacher professional development. In particular she focuses on history education, citizenship education and peace education as vehicles for dialogue. These opportunities for students to engage with social questions are vital for building cohesive societies. This flows from the recognition that traditional forums for developing public understanding, such as post-conflict truth commissions, need to be complemented by intergenerational and educational perspectives.

Abigail has taught History, Politics, Debating as well as Relationships and Sex Education to secondary school students in South Africa, England and the USA.

She holds postgraduate degrees in Post-Conflict and Transitional Justice (University of Cape Town), in Education, Globalisation and International Development (University of Cambridge) and in African Studies (University of Oxford). She is a Rhodes Scholar, Mandela-Magdalene Scholar and Mandela-Rhodes Scholar.

Title of thesis

GCSE History, Policy Reform and Student Development: How students and teachers navigate the thematic study “Empires, Migration and the People”

Conference papers

Teaching Migration, Belonging, and Empire in Secondary Schools: evaluation of a teacher professional development program, (2019) History Educators International Research Network Conference, Lead author: Dr Jason Todd, University of Vienna, Austria.

“The Problems and Prospects of Teaching South Africa’s Recent History: Teachers’ Perspectives”, (2018) Sustainability, peace and education – Exploring promise and practice: BAICE 20th Anniversary Symposium, University of Bristol, England.

“New Generations, Old Wounds: Learning History at Home and School in Northern Ireland”, (2018) European Social Science and History Conference,
Queens University Belfast, Northern Ireland.

“The Methodological Challenges of Investigating the Role of History Teaching in Peacebuilding”, (2017), Present Past: Time, Memory, and the Negotiation of Historical Justice Conference, Columbia University, United States of America.

“Teaching South Africa’s Truth and Reconciliation Commission”, (2017) European Conference on African Studies, Universität Basel, Switzerland.

Research Assistant Publications

Review of the evidence on feedback in primary and secondary schools, (forthcoming, 2021) for the Education Endowment Foundation, Lead author: Prof Velda Elliott.

Teaching Migration, Belonging, and Empire in Secondary Schools, (2019), for Runnymede Trust and the European Research Council, Lead authors: Kimberly McIntosh, Dr Jason Todd and Prof Nandini Das.

Gender and the Politics of Reconciliation (2016), for The Institute for Justice and Reconciliation, Lead author: Dr Helen Scanlon

SOLE AUTHOR PUBLICATIONS

‘Transitions, Truth-Telling and Teaching History’, Cambridge Open-Review Educational Research e-Journal, Vol. 4, 2017.

Alice Tawell is an ESRC funded DPhil Student, co-supervised across the Department of Education and Centre for Criminology at the University of Oxford.

Supervisors: Professor Harry Daniels and Dr Rachel Condry.

Alice’s research focuses broadly on the enactment of school exclusion policy in England.

Prior to starting her doctoral studies, Alice gained a BSc in Sociology from the University of Bath and an MSc in Education (Research Training) from the University of Oxford.

As part of her undergraduate degree, Alice undertook a placement year working with Professor Kathy Sylva in the Families, Effective Learning and Literacy Research Group at the Department of Education, University of Oxford. After completing her degree, Alice returned to the department and has worked as a Research Officer on a number of different research projects since 2014. Most recently Alice has worked as part of the Excluded Lives Research Team on two projects exploring exclusion from school from a multidisciplinary perspective. In 2017 she was awarded a Seed-corn Small Grant Award to co-lead a pilot project exploring student collaborative networks with Hau Ming Tse. Alice also co-convenes the Qualitative Methods Hub in the department.

Outside of the department, Alice has sat on the Advisory Board for the Children Missing Education research project (2016-2017) at the National Children’s Bureau (NCB) and has been a member of the NCB Partnership for Well Being and Mental Health in Schools since 2016. She also sits on the Transparency on Exclusions Steering Group.

In 2017 Alice received funding from the Grand Union Doctoral Training Partnership placement scheme to conduct a Knowledge Exchange Internship with the Early Years Analysis and Research Unit at the Department for Education, and in 2018 Alice was elected the Co-President of the Grand Union ESRC Scholar’s Association, representing ESRC students from the University of Oxford, Brunel and The Open University.

Ashmita graduated from Boston University in 2008 with a BSc. in Biomedical Engineering, after which she worked in Research & Development for 6 years.

It is here that she decided to make the leap from formulation chemistry to STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Math) Education after having worked on programs involving increasing diversity in STEM in schools.

She received her Master’s from Boston University in 2015 in Education Policy. Her research interests include: STEM education policy; Assessment; Further Education; Higher Education; Science education pedagogy

Originally from Indonesia, Tracey has spent the last decade studying in the UK and working about multicultural education in Indonesia.

She is fully funded by the Indonesia Endowment Fund for Education (LPDP). Her doctoral research explores the ways Indonesian schools teach and accommodate the national vision of multicultural Indonesia, “Bhinneka Tunggal Ika” (Unity-in-Diversity). By using a two-tier case study research approach (case studies of six schools and of two provinces), it presents nuanced and critical account of the ways head teachers, teachers, students and parents from six state and private schools in Jakarta and Bali with different mixes of pupil ethnicity and religiosity understand and accommodate the vision of diversity into educational practices. Despite the highly contextual focus, the research offers a critical view into the complex role of schools in today’s era of globalisation in providing quality education for all and at the same time creating citizens who are inclusive and respectful towards others.

Tracey completed her MSc in Comparative and International Education at the University of Oxford in 2011 and her honours BA in Mathematics and Education Studies at the University of Cambridge in 2010. Upon completing her study in the UK, she returned to Indonesia to work in an educational foundation Sultan Iskandar Muda in Medan, Indonesia as a member of the Board of Directors in the Foundation – a position which she is still holding until today. She is responsible for overlooking the development and implementation of multicultural education and teacher development programme.

During her tenure, she has worked alongside the head teachers and teachers across all educational levels (from pre-school until high school) and produced books on the praxis of multicultural education in the school setting.

Title of Thesis

Accommodating a vision of diversity in different school contexts: “Unity-in-Diversity” in Indonesia

Publications
Journal Article
  • Harjatanaya, T.Y. & Hoon, C.Y. (2018) Politics of multicultural education in post-Suharto Indonesia: a study of the Chinese minority. Compare: A Journal of Comparative and International Education
Edited Book
  • Harjatanaya, T.Y. (2015) (2nd Edition) Merawat Keberagaman: Praksis Pendidikan Multikultural Perguruan Sultan Iskandar Muda (Fostering Diversity: Praxis of Multicultural Education in Sultan Iskandar Muda). Medan: YPSIM.
Book Chapter
  • Harjatanaya, T.Y. (2018). Akses dan Kesamaan dalam Pendidikan Vokasi (Access and Equality in Vocational Education). In Ferary, D. (2018) Sistem Pendidikan Vokasi di Inggris (Vocational Education System in England) (ed.). London: Kantor Atase Pendidikan dan Kebudayaan, Kedutaan Besar Indonesia (Indonesian Embassy) London, p. 121-138.

Katy is a Deputy Headteacher and the founder of a Leadership and Coaching Institute, which she now co-directs.

Katy is an Associate Fellow at the Oxford Character Project and a Research Associate at the Oxford University Wellbeing Research Centre. She is the co-founder of Global Social Leaders, a leadership programme which has participants in 105 countries, all passionate about creating and sustaining positive change in the world.

Title of Thesis

How could school leaders improve the flourishing and wellbeing of teaching staff?

Books
  • Granville-Chapman, K. and Bidston, E (2020) Leader: Know, love and inspire your people. Carmarthen: Crownhouse Publishing
Book Chapters
  •  Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ In White, M. & McCallum, F. (Ed.s) Wellbeing and Resilience Education: Covid-19 And Its Impact on Education Systems. Routledge
Publications
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘Purpose and Leadership in Education and Beyond’. The Education Exchange. Available from: https://theeducation.exchange/purpose-and-leadership-in-education-and-beyond/
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘The Three Secrets of COVID-era Leadership’. Times Education Supplement. Available from: https://www.tes.com/news/three-secrets-covid-era-school-leadership
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2016) ‘Assessing the Impact of a Teacher Leadership Programme in a Teaching Schools Alliance. Journal of Teacher Action Research
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2014) ‘The Afghan conflict: causes and consequences.’ Geography Review 28(1): 22-27
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2013) What are the psychological factors that affect students’ academic resilience and can teachers influence these? Unpublished thesis
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘Unlocking Leadership Potential’, The Magazine of the Boarding School’s Association, 33: 42-45
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2009) ‘Learning to Lead’, Leader, The Education Leader Magazine 41: 22-25
Presentations
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2019) ‘How could leaders improve the flourishing of their teams?’ ‘Stowe Ed Conference’, Forthcoming: 7 Jan 2019
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2018) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education: 21 Jun 2018
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2017) ‘How can school leaders improve teacher flourishing?’ ‘Doing Education Differently Conference’, University of Oxford, Department of Education, 11 Mar 17
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2016) ‘Developing school leaders who enable teachers to flourish’ The Telegraph Festival of Education 23 Jun 16
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Developing leadership in pupils and teachers’ High School Affiliated to Renmin University of China, Beijing. 20 Oct 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Resilience for leaders.’ Global Social Leaders World Summit. 16 Aug 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Emotional Intelligence for Leaders.’ Global Leaders in Education. 12 Aug 15
  • Coates, S.; Fraser, H.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J.; and Nasim, A. (2015) ‘Breaking through the glass ceiling – how can schools empower our girls to become leaders?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education. 19 Jun 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. ‘Developing Leadership in Schools’ (2015). G20 Schools Conference. International conference for head teachers. 11 Apr 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2018) ‘Introduction’, Wellington Leadership Institute: Festival of Leadership. Mar 2012-15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘How the Young Learn to Lead’, Raffles Institution (Singapore) -Purdue University (USA) Education Forum on Gifted & Talented Youth 2012. Singapore. 15 Mar 12
  • Draper, D.; Dyer, R.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Schools’. Presentation for a meeting about pupil leadership and character development at 10 Downing Street. 16 Nov 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Young People’. Presentation for a meeting about leadership and character at 10 Downing Street. 7 Mar 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K. & Seldon, A. (2012) ‘Introduction’, Leading Your School in the 21st Century. 7 Feb 12

Prior to starting his DPhil, Eddy worked as a primary school teacher in Bristol, where he also completed his MSc in Educational Research.

He is particularly interested in the culture of high stakes, standardised testing, and how this might perpetuate existing inequalities in schools. His research focuses specifically on the interaction between knowledge, policy and pedagogy in the context of Literacy education.

 

Amanda is completing a part-time DPhil, alongside working in Initial Teacher Education at Leeds Trinity University.

Her research is focused on understanding tensions, contradictions and conflicts that teachers in disadvantaged schools may experience when they engage in research activity.  Her research focus is influenced by her own experiences of working as a research-active teacher in disadvantaged schools, and recent work in teacher education to support experienced and beginning teachers in developing their own research activities.

One of the aims of Amanda’s research is to construct a framework to support teachers in pursuing research activity and critical scholarship work which articulates with wider social movements to address issues of poverty and disadvantage in schools.

Title of Thesis

Teachers’ perspectives on tensions between policy, practice and research in disadvantaged schools

Publications 

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2017) A ‘usable past’ of teacher education in England: history in JET’s anniversary issue. Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy, 43 (5), pp.616-627.

Nuttall, A. (2016) The ‘curriculum challenge’: Moving towards the ‘Storyline’ approach in a case study urban primary school.  Improving Schools, 19 (2), pp. 154-166.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Learning {Re}imagined: A review.  Primary First, 15, pp. 17-18.

Nuttall, A. and Doherty, J. (2014) Disaffected boys and the achievement gap: the ‘wallpaper effect’ and what is hidden by a focus on school results.  The Urban Review, 46 (5), pp.800-815.

Conference Papers and Presentations

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2018) “No child is pre-ordained to fail” Teachers questioning policy assumptions.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Newcastle, 11-13 September.

Nuttall, A. and Tobbell, C. (2017) Trainee teachers’ perspectives on practitioner enquiry.  Paper presented at the 8th TEAN Conference: Thinking Deeply about Education, Birmingham, 11-12 May.

Nuttall, A. (2017) Assessment at primary level: quality, comparability and improving secondary readiness.  A perspective from ITE.  Speech at the Westminster Education Forum Keynote Seminar: Next steps for reforming primary education: effective teaching practices, assessment and accountably, London, 18 January.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Deficit narratives and lived realities: whose poverty is it?  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the Australian Association for Research in Education, Melbourne, 27 November – 1 December.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Disenfranchised boys’ reflections on their urban schooling experience: “What a Waste!”.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Philpott, C., Beckett, L. and Wrigley, T. (2016) Collaborative practitioner inquiry: making a difference to urban schools.  Innovation session (school visits and symposium) presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Finn, B. and Beckett, L. (2015) Teachers’ constructions of poverty effects: Their research evidence.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Belfast, 15-17 September.

Nuttall, A. (2014) Teachers’ voice on disengaged boys: the role of one teacher-researcher in an English primary school. Paper presented at the Joint Australian Association for Research in Education and the New Zealand Association for Research in Education Conference, Brisbane, 30 November – 4 December.

Andrew Marotta is a D.Phil candidate in the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. He holds an A.A. in Social Sciences from Broward Community College, and a B.A. in Individualized Studies from the Gallatin School of Individualized Studies, New York University and an M.A. and Ed.M. in Counseling Psychology and School Counseling from Teachers College, Columbia University.

Andrew’s research interests include social and emotional learning, peer mentorship, existential therapy / philosophy, curriculum design for school counselors, and applied ethics in computer science. Andrew’s thesis examines how literature and philosophy can be used to nurture social and emotional learning through group counseling among high school students. He has also worked as a school counselor, teaching artist, and curriculum designer.

Presently, Andrew is designing joint humanities and applied ethics workshops for computer and data science college majors, using social and emotional learning concepts as the pedagogical foundation.

Abigail’s research explores the role of education in students’ personal development and how this can be supported by policy, curricula, initial teacher education and teacher professional development. In particular she focuses on history education, citizenship education and peace education as vehicles for dialogue. These opportunities for students to engage with social questions are vital for building cohesive societies. This flows from the recognition that traditional forums for developing public understanding, such as post-conflict truth commissions, need to be complemented by intergenerational and educational perspectives.

Abigail has taught History, Politics, Debating as well as Relationships and Sex Education to secondary school students in South Africa, England and the USA.

She holds postgraduate degrees in Post-Conflict and Transitional Justice (University of Cape Town), in Education, Globalisation and International Development (University of Cambridge) and in African Studies (University of Oxford). She is a Rhodes Scholar, Mandela-Magdalene Scholar and Mandela-Rhodes Scholar.

Title of thesis

GCSE History, Policy Reform and Student Development: How students and teachers navigate the thematic study “Empires, Migration and the People”

Conference papers

Teaching Migration, Belonging, and Empire in Secondary Schools: evaluation of a teacher professional development program, (2019) History Educators International Research Network Conference, Lead author: Dr Jason Todd, University of Vienna, Austria.

“The Problems and Prospects of Teaching South Africa’s Recent History: Teachers’ Perspectives”, (2018) Sustainability, peace and education – Exploring promise and practice: BAICE 20th Anniversary Symposium, University of Bristol, England.

“New Generations, Old Wounds: Learning History at Home and School in Northern Ireland”, (2018) European Social Science and History Conference,
Queens University Belfast, Northern Ireland.

“The Methodological Challenges of Investigating the Role of History Teaching in Peacebuilding”, (2017), Present Past: Time, Memory, and the Negotiation of Historical Justice Conference, Columbia University, United States of America.

“Teaching South Africa’s Truth and Reconciliation Commission”, (2017) European Conference on African Studies, Universität Basel, Switzerland.

Research Assistant Publications

Review of the evidence on feedback in primary and secondary schools, (forthcoming, 2021) for the Education Endowment Foundation, Lead author: Prof Velda Elliott.

Teaching Migration, Belonging, and Empire in Secondary Schools, (2019), for Runnymede Trust and the European Research Council, Lead authors: Kimberly McIntosh, Dr Jason Todd and Prof Nandini Das.

Gender and the Politics of Reconciliation (2016), for The Institute for Justice and Reconciliation, Lead author: Dr Helen Scanlon

SOLE AUTHOR PUBLICATIONS

‘Transitions, Truth-Telling and Teaching History’, Cambridge Open-Review Educational Research e-Journal, Vol. 4, 2017.

Alice Tawell is an ESRC funded DPhil Student, co-supervised across the Department of Education and Centre for Criminology at the University of Oxford.

Supervisors: Professor Harry Daniels and Dr Rachel Condry.

Alice’s research focuses broadly on the enactment of school exclusion policy in England.

Prior to starting her doctoral studies, Alice gained a BSc in Sociology from the University of Bath and an MSc in Education (Research Training) from the University of Oxford.

As part of her undergraduate degree, Alice undertook a placement year working with Professor Kathy Sylva in the Families, Effective Learning and Literacy Research Group at the Department of Education, University of Oxford. After completing her degree, Alice returned to the department and has worked as a Research Officer on a number of different research projects since 2014. Most recently Alice has worked as part of the Excluded Lives Research Team on two projects exploring exclusion from school from a multidisciplinary perspective. In 2017 she was awarded a Seed-corn Small Grant Award to co-lead a pilot project exploring student collaborative networks with Hau Ming Tse. Alice also co-convenes the Qualitative Methods Hub in the department.

Outside of the department, Alice has sat on the Advisory Board for the Children Missing Education research project (2016-2017) at the National Children’s Bureau (NCB) and has been a member of the NCB Partnership for Well Being and Mental Health in Schools since 2016. She also sits on the Transparency on Exclusions Steering Group.

In 2017 Alice received funding from the Grand Union Doctoral Training Partnership placement scheme to conduct a Knowledge Exchange Internship with the Early Years Analysis and Research Unit at the Department for Education, and in 2018 Alice was elected the Co-President of the Grand Union ESRC Scholar’s Association, representing ESRC students from the University of Oxford, Brunel and The Open University.

Ashmita graduated from Boston University in 2008 with a BSc. in Biomedical Engineering, after which she worked in Research & Development for 6 years.

It is here that she decided to make the leap from formulation chemistry to STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Math) Education after having worked on programs involving increasing diversity in STEM in schools.

She received her Master’s from Boston University in 2015 in Education Policy. Her research interests include: STEM education policy; Assessment; Further Education; Higher Education; Science education pedagogy

Originally from Indonesia, Tracey has spent the last decade studying in the UK and working about multicultural education in Indonesia.

She is fully funded by the Indonesia Endowment Fund for Education (LPDP). Her doctoral research explores the ways Indonesian schools teach and accommodate the national vision of multicultural Indonesia, “Bhinneka Tunggal Ika” (Unity-in-Diversity). By using a two-tier case study research approach (case studies of six schools and of two provinces), it presents nuanced and critical account of the ways head teachers, teachers, students and parents from six state and private schools in Jakarta and Bali with different mixes of pupil ethnicity and religiosity understand and accommodate the vision of diversity into educational practices. Despite the highly contextual focus, the research offers a critical view into the complex role of schools in today’s era of globalisation in providing quality education for all and at the same time creating citizens who are inclusive and respectful towards others.

Tracey completed her MSc in Comparative and International Education at the University of Oxford in 2011 and her honours BA in Mathematics and Education Studies at the University of Cambridge in 2010. Upon completing her study in the UK, she returned to Indonesia to work in an educational foundation Sultan Iskandar Muda in Medan, Indonesia as a member of the Board of Directors in the Foundation – a position which she is still holding until today. She is responsible for overlooking the development and implementation of multicultural education and teacher development programme.

During her tenure, she has worked alongside the head teachers and teachers across all educational levels (from pre-school until high school) and produced books on the praxis of multicultural education in the school setting.

Title of Thesis

Accommodating a vision of diversity in different school contexts: “Unity-in-Diversity” in Indonesia

Publications
Journal Article
  • Harjatanaya, T.Y. & Hoon, C.Y. (2018) Politics of multicultural education in post-Suharto Indonesia: a study of the Chinese minority. Compare: A Journal of Comparative and International Education
Edited Book
  • Harjatanaya, T.Y. (2015) (2nd Edition) Merawat Keberagaman: Praksis Pendidikan Multikultural Perguruan Sultan Iskandar Muda (Fostering Diversity: Praxis of Multicultural Education in Sultan Iskandar Muda). Medan: YPSIM.
Book Chapter
  • Harjatanaya, T.Y. (2018). Akses dan Kesamaan dalam Pendidikan Vokasi (Access and Equality in Vocational Education). In Ferary, D. (2018) Sistem Pendidikan Vokasi di Inggris (Vocational Education System in England) (ed.). London: Kantor Atase Pendidikan dan Kebudayaan, Kedutaan Besar Indonesia (Indonesian Embassy) London, p. 121-138.

Katy is a Deputy Headteacher and the founder of a Leadership and Coaching Institute, which she now co-directs.

Katy is an Associate Fellow at the Oxford Character Project and a Research Associate at the Oxford University Wellbeing Research Centre. She is the co-founder of Global Social Leaders, a leadership programme which has participants in 105 countries, all passionate about creating and sustaining positive change in the world.

Title of Thesis

How could school leaders improve the flourishing and wellbeing of teaching staff?

Books
  • Granville-Chapman, K. and Bidston, E (2020) Leader: Know, love and inspire your people. Carmarthen: Crownhouse Publishing
Book Chapters
  •  Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ In White, M. & McCallum, F. (Ed.s) Wellbeing and Resilience Education: Covid-19 And Its Impact on Education Systems. Routledge
Publications
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘Purpose and Leadership in Education and Beyond’. The Education Exchange. Available from: https://theeducation.exchange/purpose-and-leadership-in-education-and-beyond/
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘The Three Secrets of COVID-era Leadership’. Times Education Supplement. Available from: https://www.tes.com/news/three-secrets-covid-era-school-leadership
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2016) ‘Assessing the Impact of a Teacher Leadership Programme in a Teaching Schools Alliance. Journal of Teacher Action Research
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2014) ‘The Afghan conflict: causes and consequences.’ Geography Review 28(1): 22-27
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2013) What are the psychological factors that affect students’ academic resilience and can teachers influence these? Unpublished thesis
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘Unlocking Leadership Potential’, The Magazine of the Boarding School’s Association, 33: 42-45
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2009) ‘Learning to Lead’, Leader, The Education Leader Magazine 41: 22-25
Presentations
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2019) ‘How could leaders improve the flourishing of their teams?’ ‘Stowe Ed Conference’, Forthcoming: 7 Jan 2019
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2018) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education: 21 Jun 2018
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2017) ‘How can school leaders improve teacher flourishing?’ ‘Doing Education Differently Conference’, University of Oxford, Department of Education, 11 Mar 17
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2016) ‘Developing school leaders who enable teachers to flourish’ The Telegraph Festival of Education 23 Jun 16
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Developing leadership in pupils and teachers’ High School Affiliated to Renmin University of China, Beijing. 20 Oct 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Resilience for leaders.’ Global Social Leaders World Summit. 16 Aug 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Emotional Intelligence for Leaders.’ Global Leaders in Education. 12 Aug 15
  • Coates, S.; Fraser, H.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J.; and Nasim, A. (2015) ‘Breaking through the glass ceiling – how can schools empower our girls to become leaders?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education. 19 Jun 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. ‘Developing Leadership in Schools’ (2015). G20 Schools Conference. International conference for head teachers. 11 Apr 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2018) ‘Introduction’, Wellington Leadership Institute: Festival of Leadership. Mar 2012-15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘How the Young Learn to Lead’, Raffles Institution (Singapore) -Purdue University (USA) Education Forum on Gifted & Talented Youth 2012. Singapore. 15 Mar 12
  • Draper, D.; Dyer, R.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Schools’. Presentation for a meeting about pupil leadership and character development at 10 Downing Street. 16 Nov 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Young People’. Presentation for a meeting about leadership and character at 10 Downing Street. 7 Mar 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K. & Seldon, A. (2012) ‘Introduction’, Leading Your School in the 21st Century. 7 Feb 12

Prior to starting his DPhil, Eddy worked as a primary school teacher in Bristol, where he also completed his MSc in Educational Research.

He is particularly interested in the culture of high stakes, standardised testing, and how this might perpetuate existing inequalities in schools. His research focuses specifically on the interaction between knowledge, policy and pedagogy in the context of Literacy education.

 

Amanda is completing a part-time DPhil, alongside working in Initial Teacher Education at Leeds Trinity University.

Her research is focused on understanding tensions, contradictions and conflicts that teachers in disadvantaged schools may experience when they engage in research activity.  Her research focus is influenced by her own experiences of working as a research-active teacher in disadvantaged schools, and recent work in teacher education to support experienced and beginning teachers in developing their own research activities.

One of the aims of Amanda’s research is to construct a framework to support teachers in pursuing research activity and critical scholarship work which articulates with wider social movements to address issues of poverty and disadvantage in schools.

Title of Thesis

Teachers’ perspectives on tensions between policy, practice and research in disadvantaged schools

Publications 

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2017) A ‘usable past’ of teacher education in England: history in JET’s anniversary issue. Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy, 43 (5), pp.616-627.

Nuttall, A. (2016) The ‘curriculum challenge’: Moving towards the ‘Storyline’ approach in a case study urban primary school.  Improving Schools, 19 (2), pp. 154-166.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Learning {Re}imagined: A review.  Primary First, 15, pp. 17-18.

Nuttall, A. and Doherty, J. (2014) Disaffected boys and the achievement gap: the ‘wallpaper effect’ and what is hidden by a focus on school results.  The Urban Review, 46 (5), pp.800-815.

Conference Papers and Presentations

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2018) “No child is pre-ordained to fail” Teachers questioning policy assumptions.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Newcastle, 11-13 September.

Nuttall, A. and Tobbell, C. (2017) Trainee teachers’ perspectives on practitioner enquiry.  Paper presented at the 8th TEAN Conference: Thinking Deeply about Education, Birmingham, 11-12 May.

Nuttall, A. (2017) Assessment at primary level: quality, comparability and improving secondary readiness.  A perspective from ITE.  Speech at the Westminster Education Forum Keynote Seminar: Next steps for reforming primary education: effective teaching practices, assessment and accountably, London, 18 January.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Deficit narratives and lived realities: whose poverty is it?  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the Australian Association for Research in Education, Melbourne, 27 November – 1 December.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Disenfranchised boys’ reflections on their urban schooling experience: “What a Waste!”.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Philpott, C., Beckett, L. and Wrigley, T. (2016) Collaborative practitioner inquiry: making a difference to urban schools.  Innovation session (school visits and symposium) presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Finn, B. and Beckett, L. (2015) Teachers’ constructions of poverty effects: Their research evidence.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Belfast, 15-17 September.

Nuttall, A. (2014) Teachers’ voice on disengaged boys: the role of one teacher-researcher in an English primary school. Paper presented at the Joint Australian Association for Research in Education and the New Zealand Association for Research in Education Conference, Brisbane, 30 November – 4 December.

Andrew Marotta is a D.Phil candidate in the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. He holds an A.A. in Social Sciences from Broward Community College, and a B.A. in Individualized Studies from the Gallatin School of Individualized Studies, New York University and an M.A. and Ed.M. in Counseling Psychology and School Counseling from Teachers College, Columbia University.

Andrew’s research interests include social and emotional learning, peer mentorship, existential therapy / philosophy, curriculum design for school counselors, and applied ethics in computer science. Andrew’s thesis examines how literature and philosophy can be used to nurture social and emotional learning through group counseling among high school students. He has also worked as a school counselor, teaching artist, and curriculum designer.

Presently, Andrew is designing joint humanities and applied ethics workshops for computer and data science college majors, using social and emotional learning concepts as the pedagogical foundation.

Abigail’s research explores the role of education in students’ personal development and how this can be supported by policy, curricula, initial teacher education and teacher professional development. In particular she focuses on history education, citizenship education and peace education as vehicles for dialogue. These opportunities for students to engage with social questions are vital for building cohesive societies. This flows from the recognition that traditional forums for developing public understanding, such as post-conflict truth commissions, need to be complemented by intergenerational and educational perspectives.

Abigail has taught History, Politics, Debating as well as Relationships and Sex Education to secondary school students in South Africa, England and the USA.

She holds postgraduate degrees in Post-Conflict and Transitional Justice (University of Cape Town), in Education, Globalisation and International Development (University of Cambridge) and in African Studies (University of Oxford). She is a Rhodes Scholar, Mandela-Magdalene Scholar and Mandela-Rhodes Scholar.

Title of thesis

GCSE History, Policy Reform and Student Development: How students and teachers navigate the thematic study “Empires, Migration and the People”

Conference papers

Teaching Migration, Belonging, and Empire in Secondary Schools: evaluation of a teacher professional development program, (2019) History Educators International Research Network Conference, Lead author: Dr Jason Todd, University of Vienna, Austria.

“The Problems and Prospects of Teaching South Africa’s Recent History: Teachers’ Perspectives”, (2018) Sustainability, peace and education – Exploring promise and practice: BAICE 20th Anniversary Symposium, University of Bristol, England.

“New Generations, Old Wounds: Learning History at Home and School in Northern Ireland”, (2018) European Social Science and History Conference,
Queens University Belfast, Northern Ireland.

“The Methodological Challenges of Investigating the Role of History Teaching in Peacebuilding”, (2017), Present Past: Time, Memory, and the Negotiation of Historical Justice Conference, Columbia University, United States of America.

“Teaching South Africa’s Truth and Reconciliation Commission”, (2017) European Conference on African Studies, Universität Basel, Switzerland.

Research Assistant Publications

Review of the evidence on feedback in primary and secondary schools, (forthcoming, 2021) for the Education Endowment Foundation, Lead author: Prof Velda Elliott.

Teaching Migration, Belonging, and Empire in Secondary Schools, (2019), for Runnymede Trust and the European Research Council, Lead authors: Kimberly McIntosh, Dr Jason Todd and Prof Nandini Das.

Gender and the Politics of Reconciliation (2016), for The Institute for Justice and Reconciliation, Lead author: Dr Helen Scanlon

SOLE AUTHOR PUBLICATIONS

‘Transitions, Truth-Telling and Teaching History’, Cambridge Open-Review Educational Research e-Journal, Vol. 4, 2017.

Alice Tawell is an ESRC funded DPhil Student, co-supervised across the Department of Education and Centre for Criminology at the University of Oxford.

Supervisors: Professor Harry Daniels and Dr Rachel Condry.

Alice’s research focuses broadly on the enactment of school exclusion policy in England.

Prior to starting her doctoral studies, Alice gained a BSc in Sociology from the University of Bath and an MSc in Education (Research Training) from the University of Oxford.

As part of her undergraduate degree, Alice undertook a placement year working with Professor Kathy Sylva in the Families, Effective Learning and Literacy Research Group at the Department of Education, University of Oxford. After completing her degree, Alice returned to the department and has worked as a Research Officer on a number of different research projects since 2014. Most recently Alice has worked as part of the Excluded Lives Research Team on two projects exploring exclusion from school from a multidisciplinary perspective. In 2017 she was awarded a Seed-corn Small Grant Award to co-lead a pilot project exploring student collaborative networks with Hau Ming Tse. Alice also co-convenes the Qualitative Methods Hub in the department.

Outside of the department, Alice has sat on the Advisory Board for the Children Missing Education research project (2016-2017) at the National Children’s Bureau (NCB) and has been a member of the NCB Partnership for Well Being and Mental Health in Schools since 2016. She also sits on the Transparency on Exclusions Steering Group.

In 2017 Alice received funding from the Grand Union Doctoral Training Partnership placement scheme to conduct a Knowledge Exchange Internship with the Early Years Analysis and Research Unit at the Department for Education, and in 2018 Alice was elected the Co-President of the Grand Union ESRC Scholar’s Association, representing ESRC students from the University of Oxford, Brunel and The Open University.

Ashmita graduated from Boston University in 2008 with a BSc. in Biomedical Engineering, after which she worked in Research & Development for 6 years.

It is here that she decided to make the leap from formulation chemistry to STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Math) Education after having worked on programs involving increasing diversity in STEM in schools.

She received her Master’s from Boston University in 2015 in Education Policy. Her research interests include: STEM education policy; Assessment; Further Education; Higher Education; Science education pedagogy

Originally from Indonesia, Tracey has spent the last decade studying in the UK and working about multicultural education in Indonesia.

She is fully funded by the Indonesia Endowment Fund for Education (LPDP). Her doctoral research explores the ways Indonesian schools teach and accommodate the national vision of multicultural Indonesia, “Bhinneka Tunggal Ika” (Unity-in-Diversity). By using a two-tier case study research approach (case studies of six schools and of two provinces), it presents nuanced and critical account of the ways head teachers, teachers, students and parents from six state and private schools in Jakarta and Bali with different mixes of pupil ethnicity and religiosity understand and accommodate the vision of diversity into educational practices. Despite the highly contextual focus, the research offers a critical view into the complex role of schools in today’s era of globalisation in providing quality education for all and at the same time creating citizens who are inclusive and respectful towards others.

Tracey completed her MSc in Comparative and International Education at the University of Oxford in 2011 and her honours BA in Mathematics and Education Studies at the University of Cambridge in 2010. Upon completing her study in the UK, she returned to Indonesia to work in an educational foundation Sultan Iskandar Muda in Medan, Indonesia as a member of the Board of Directors in the Foundation – a position which she is still holding until today. She is responsible for overlooking the development and implementation of multicultural education and teacher development programme.

During her tenure, she has worked alongside the head teachers and teachers across all educational levels (from pre-school until high school) and produced books on the praxis of multicultural education in the school setting.

Title of Thesis

Accommodating a vision of diversity in different school contexts: “Unity-in-Diversity” in Indonesia

Publications
Journal Article
  • Harjatanaya, T.Y. & Hoon, C.Y. (2018) Politics of multicultural education in post-Suharto Indonesia: a study of the Chinese minority. Compare: A Journal of Comparative and International Education
Edited Book
  • Harjatanaya, T.Y. (2015) (2nd Edition) Merawat Keberagaman: Praksis Pendidikan Multikultural Perguruan Sultan Iskandar Muda (Fostering Diversity: Praxis of Multicultural Education in Sultan Iskandar Muda). Medan: YPSIM.
Book Chapter
  • Harjatanaya, T.Y. (2018). Akses dan Kesamaan dalam Pendidikan Vokasi (Access and Equality in Vocational Education). In Ferary, D. (2018) Sistem Pendidikan Vokasi di Inggris (Vocational Education System in England) (ed.). London: Kantor Atase Pendidikan dan Kebudayaan, Kedutaan Besar Indonesia (Indonesian Embassy) London, p. 121-138.

Katy is a Deputy Headteacher and the founder of a Leadership and Coaching Institute, which she now co-directs.

Katy is an Associate Fellow at the Oxford Character Project and a Research Associate at the Oxford University Wellbeing Research Centre. She is the co-founder of Global Social Leaders, a leadership programme which has participants in 105 countries, all passionate about creating and sustaining positive change in the world.

Title of Thesis

How could school leaders improve the flourishing and wellbeing of teaching staff?

Books
  • Granville-Chapman, K. and Bidston, E (2020) Leader: Know, love and inspire your people. Carmarthen: Crownhouse Publishing
Book Chapters
  •  Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ In White, M. & McCallum, F. (Ed.s) Wellbeing and Resilience Education: Covid-19 And Its Impact on Education Systems. Routledge
Publications
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘Purpose and Leadership in Education and Beyond’. The Education Exchange. Available from: https://theeducation.exchange/purpose-and-leadership-in-education-and-beyond/
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘The Three Secrets of COVID-era Leadership’. Times Education Supplement. Available from: https://www.tes.com/news/three-secrets-covid-era-school-leadership
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2016) ‘Assessing the Impact of a Teacher Leadership Programme in a Teaching Schools Alliance. Journal of Teacher Action Research
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2014) ‘The Afghan conflict: causes and consequences.’ Geography Review 28(1): 22-27
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2013) What are the psychological factors that affect students’ academic resilience and can teachers influence these? Unpublished thesis
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘Unlocking Leadership Potential’, The Magazine of the Boarding School’s Association, 33: 42-45
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2009) ‘Learning to Lead’, Leader, The Education Leader Magazine 41: 22-25
Presentations
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2019) ‘How could leaders improve the flourishing of their teams?’ ‘Stowe Ed Conference’, Forthcoming: 7 Jan 2019
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2018) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education: 21 Jun 2018
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2017) ‘How can school leaders improve teacher flourishing?’ ‘Doing Education Differently Conference’, University of Oxford, Department of Education, 11 Mar 17
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2016) ‘Developing school leaders who enable teachers to flourish’ The Telegraph Festival of Education 23 Jun 16
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Developing leadership in pupils and teachers’ High School Affiliated to Renmin University of China, Beijing. 20 Oct 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Resilience for leaders.’ Global Social Leaders World Summit. 16 Aug 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Emotional Intelligence for Leaders.’ Global Leaders in Education. 12 Aug 15
  • Coates, S.; Fraser, H.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J.; and Nasim, A. (2015) ‘Breaking through the glass ceiling – how can schools empower our girls to become leaders?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education. 19 Jun 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. ‘Developing Leadership in Schools’ (2015). G20 Schools Conference. International conference for head teachers. 11 Apr 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2018) ‘Introduction’, Wellington Leadership Institute: Festival of Leadership. Mar 2012-15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘How the Young Learn to Lead’, Raffles Institution (Singapore) -Purdue University (USA) Education Forum on Gifted & Talented Youth 2012. Singapore. 15 Mar 12
  • Draper, D.; Dyer, R.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Schools’. Presentation for a meeting about pupil leadership and character development at 10 Downing Street. 16 Nov 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Young People’. Presentation for a meeting about leadership and character at 10 Downing Street. 7 Mar 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K. & Seldon, A. (2012) ‘Introduction’, Leading Your School in the 21st Century. 7 Feb 12

Prior to starting his DPhil, Eddy worked as a primary school teacher in Bristol, where he also completed his MSc in Educational Research.

He is particularly interested in the culture of high stakes, standardised testing, and how this might perpetuate existing inequalities in schools. His research focuses specifically on the interaction between knowledge, policy and pedagogy in the context of Literacy education.

 

Amanda is completing a part-time DPhil, alongside working in Initial Teacher Education at Leeds Trinity University.

Her research is focused on understanding tensions, contradictions and conflicts that teachers in disadvantaged schools may experience when they engage in research activity.  Her research focus is influenced by her own experiences of working as a research-active teacher in disadvantaged schools, and recent work in teacher education to support experienced and beginning teachers in developing their own research activities.

One of the aims of Amanda’s research is to construct a framework to support teachers in pursuing research activity and critical scholarship work which articulates with wider social movements to address issues of poverty and disadvantage in schools.

Title of Thesis

Teachers’ perspectives on tensions between policy, practice and research in disadvantaged schools

Publications 

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2017) A ‘usable past’ of teacher education in England: history in JET’s anniversary issue. Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy, 43 (5), pp.616-627.

Nuttall, A. (2016) The ‘curriculum challenge’: Moving towards the ‘Storyline’ approach in a case study urban primary school.  Improving Schools, 19 (2), pp. 154-166.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Learning {Re}imagined: A review.  Primary First, 15, pp. 17-18.

Nuttall, A. and Doherty, J. (2014) Disaffected boys and the achievement gap: the ‘wallpaper effect’ and what is hidden by a focus on school results.  The Urban Review, 46 (5), pp.800-815.

Conference Papers and Presentations

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2018) “No child is pre-ordained to fail” Teachers questioning policy assumptions.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Newcastle, 11-13 September.

Nuttall, A. and Tobbell, C. (2017) Trainee teachers’ perspectives on practitioner enquiry.  Paper presented at the 8th TEAN Conference: Thinking Deeply about Education, Birmingham, 11-12 May.

Nuttall, A. (2017) Assessment at primary level: quality, comparability and improving secondary readiness.  A perspective from ITE.  Speech at the Westminster Education Forum Keynote Seminar: Next steps for reforming primary education: effective teaching practices, assessment and accountably, London, 18 January.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Deficit narratives and lived realities: whose poverty is it?  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the Australian Association for Research in Education, Melbourne, 27 November – 1 December.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Disenfranchised boys’ reflections on their urban schooling experience: “What a Waste!”.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Philpott, C., Beckett, L. and Wrigley, T. (2016) Collaborative practitioner inquiry: making a difference to urban schools.  Innovation session (school visits and symposium) presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Finn, B. and Beckett, L. (2015) Teachers’ constructions of poverty effects: Their research evidence.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Belfast, 15-17 September.

Nuttall, A. (2014) Teachers’ voice on disengaged boys: the role of one teacher-researcher in an English primary school. Paper presented at the Joint Australian Association for Research in Education and the New Zealand Association for Research in Education Conference, Brisbane, 30 November – 4 December.

Andrew Marotta is a D.Phil candidate in the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. He holds an A.A. in Social Sciences from Broward Community College, and a B.A. in Individualized Studies from the Gallatin School of Individualized Studies, New York University and an M.A. and Ed.M. in Counseling Psychology and School Counseling from Teachers College, Columbia University.

Andrew’s research interests include social and emotional learning, peer mentorship, existential therapy / philosophy, curriculum design for school counselors, and applied ethics in computer science. Andrew’s thesis examines how literature and philosophy can be used to nurture social and emotional learning through group counseling among high school students. He has also worked as a school counselor, teaching artist, and curriculum designer.

Presently, Andrew is designing joint humanities and applied ethics workshops for computer and data science college majors, using social and emotional learning concepts as the pedagogical foundation.

Abigail’s research explores the role of education in students’ personal development and how this can be supported by policy, curricula, initial teacher education and teacher professional development. In particular she focuses on history education, citizenship education and peace education as vehicles for dialogue. These opportunities for students to engage with social questions are vital for building cohesive societies. This flows from the recognition that traditional forums for developing public understanding, such as post-conflict truth commissions, need to be complemented by intergenerational and educational perspectives.

Abigail has taught History, Politics, Debating as well as Relationships and Sex Education to secondary school students in South Africa, England and the USA.

She holds postgraduate degrees in Post-Conflict and Transitional Justice (University of Cape Town), in Education, Globalisation and International Development (University of Cambridge) and in African Studies (University of Oxford). She is a Rhodes Scholar, Mandela-Magdalene Scholar and Mandela-Rhodes Scholar.

Title of thesis

GCSE History, Policy Reform and Student Development: How students and teachers navigate the thematic study “Empires, Migration and the People”

Conference papers

Teaching Migration, Belonging, and Empire in Secondary Schools: evaluation of a teacher professional development program, (2019) History Educators International Research Network Conference, Lead author: Dr Jason Todd, University of Vienna, Austria.

“The Problems and Prospects of Teaching South Africa’s Recent History: Teachers’ Perspectives”, (2018) Sustainability, peace and education – Exploring promise and practice: BAICE 20th Anniversary Symposium, University of Bristol, England.

“New Generations, Old Wounds: Learning History at Home and School in Northern Ireland”, (2018) European Social Science and History Conference,
Queens University Belfast, Northern Ireland.

“The Methodological Challenges of Investigating the Role of History Teaching in Peacebuilding”, (2017), Present Past: Time, Memory, and the Negotiation of Historical Justice Conference, Columbia University, United States of America.

“Teaching South Africa’s Truth and Reconciliation Commission”, (2017) European Conference on African Studies, Universität Basel, Switzerland.

Research Assistant Publications

Review of the evidence on feedback in primary and secondary schools, (forthcoming, 2021) for the Education Endowment Foundation, Lead author: Prof Velda Elliott.

Teaching Migration, Belonging, and Empire in Secondary Schools, (2019), for Runnymede Trust and the European Research Council, Lead authors: Kimberly McIntosh, Dr Jason Todd and Prof Nandini Das.

Gender and the Politics of Reconciliation (2016), for The Institute for Justice and Reconciliation, Lead author: Dr Helen Scanlon

SOLE AUTHOR PUBLICATIONS

‘Transitions, Truth-Telling and Teaching History’, Cambridge Open-Review Educational Research e-Journal, Vol. 4, 2017.

Alice Tawell is an ESRC funded DPhil Student, co-supervised across the Department of Education and Centre for Criminology at the University of Oxford.

Supervisors: Professor Harry Daniels and Dr Rachel Condry.

Alice’s research focuses broadly on the enactment of school exclusion policy in England.

Prior to starting her doctoral studies, Alice gained a BSc in Sociology from the University of Bath and an MSc in Education (Research Training) from the University of Oxford.

As part of her undergraduate degree, Alice undertook a placement year working with Professor Kathy Sylva in the Families, Effective Learning and Literacy Research Group at the Department of Education, University of Oxford. After completing her degree, Alice returned to the department and has worked as a Research Officer on a number of different research projects since 2014. Most recently Alice has worked as part of the Excluded Lives Research Team on two projects exploring exclusion from school from a multidisciplinary perspective. In 2017 she was awarded a Seed-corn Small Grant Award to co-lead a pilot project exploring student collaborative networks with Hau Ming Tse. Alice also co-convenes the Qualitative Methods Hub in the department.

Outside of the department, Alice has sat on the Advisory Board for the Children Missing Education research project (2016-2017) at the National Children’s Bureau (NCB) and has been a member of the NCB Partnership for Well Being and Mental Health in Schools since 2016. She also sits on the Transparency on Exclusions Steering Group.

In 2017 Alice received funding from the Grand Union Doctoral Training Partnership placement scheme to conduct a Knowledge Exchange Internship with the Early Years Analysis and Research Unit at the Department for Education, and in 2018 Alice was elected the Co-President of the Grand Union ESRC Scholar’s Association, representing ESRC students from the University of Oxford, Brunel and The Open University.

Ashmita graduated from Boston University in 2008 with a BSc. in Biomedical Engineering, after which she worked in Research & Development for 6 years.

It is here that she decided to make the leap from formulation chemistry to STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Math) Education after having worked on programs involving increasing diversity in STEM in schools.

She received her Master’s from Boston University in 2015 in Education Policy. Her research interests include: STEM education policy; Assessment; Further Education; Higher Education; Science education pedagogy

Originally from Indonesia, Tracey has spent the last decade studying in the UK and working about multicultural education in Indonesia.

She is fully funded by the Indonesia Endowment Fund for Education (LPDP). Her doctoral research explores the ways Indonesian schools teach and accommodate the national vision of multicultural Indonesia, “Bhinneka Tunggal Ika” (Unity-in-Diversity). By using a two-tier case study research approach (case studies of six schools and of two provinces), it presents nuanced and critical account of the ways head teachers, teachers, students and parents from six state and private schools in Jakarta and Bali with different mixes of pupil ethnicity and religiosity understand and accommodate the vision of diversity into educational practices. Despite the highly contextual focus, the research offers a critical view into the complex role of schools in today’s era of globalisation in providing quality education for all and at the same time creating citizens who are inclusive and respectful towards others.

Tracey completed her MSc in Comparative and International Education at the University of Oxford in 2011 and her honours BA in Mathematics and Education Studies at the University of Cambridge in 2010. Upon completing her study in the UK, she returned to Indonesia to work in an educational foundation Sultan Iskandar Muda in Medan, Indonesia as a member of the Board of Directors in the Foundation – a position which she is still holding until today. She is responsible for overlooking the development and implementation of multicultural education and teacher development programme.

During her tenure, she has worked alongside the head teachers and teachers across all educational levels (from pre-school until high school) and produced books on the praxis of multicultural education in the school setting.

Title of Thesis

Accommodating a vision of diversity in different school contexts: “Unity-in-Diversity” in Indonesia

Publications
Journal Article
  • Harjatanaya, T.Y. & Hoon, C.Y. (2018) Politics of multicultural education in post-Suharto Indonesia: a study of the Chinese minority. Compare: A Journal of Comparative and International Education
Edited Book
  • Harjatanaya, T.Y. (2015) (2nd Edition) Merawat Keberagaman: Praksis Pendidikan Multikultural Perguruan Sultan Iskandar Muda (Fostering Diversity: Praxis of Multicultural Education in Sultan Iskandar Muda). Medan: YPSIM.
Book Chapter
  • Harjatanaya, T.Y. (2018). Akses dan Kesamaan dalam Pendidikan Vokasi (Access and Equality in Vocational Education). In Ferary, D. (2018) Sistem Pendidikan Vokasi di Inggris (Vocational Education System in England) (ed.). London: Kantor Atase Pendidikan dan Kebudayaan, Kedutaan Besar Indonesia (Indonesian Embassy) London, p. 121-138.

Katy is a Deputy Headteacher and the founder of a Leadership and Coaching Institute, which she now co-directs.

Katy is an Associate Fellow at the Oxford Character Project and a Research Associate at the Oxford University Wellbeing Research Centre. She is the co-founder of Global Social Leaders, a leadership programme which has participants in 105 countries, all passionate about creating and sustaining positive change in the world.

Title of Thesis

How could school leaders improve the flourishing and wellbeing of teaching staff?

Books
  • Granville-Chapman, K. and Bidston, E (2020) Leader: Know, love and inspire your people. Carmarthen: Crownhouse Publishing
Book Chapters
  •  Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ In White, M. & McCallum, F. (Ed.s) Wellbeing and Resilience Education: Covid-19 And Its Impact on Education Systems. Routledge
Publications
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘Purpose and Leadership in Education and Beyond’. The Education Exchange. Available from: https://theeducation.exchange/purpose-and-leadership-in-education-and-beyond/
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘The Three Secrets of COVID-era Leadership’. Times Education Supplement. Available from: https://www.tes.com/news/three-secrets-covid-era-school-leadership
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2016) ‘Assessing the Impact of a Teacher Leadership Programme in a Teaching Schools Alliance. Journal of Teacher Action Research
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2014) ‘The Afghan conflict: causes and consequences.’ Geography Review 28(1): 22-27
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2013) What are the psychological factors that affect students’ academic resilience and can teachers influence these? Unpublished thesis
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘Unlocking Leadership Potential’, The Magazine of the Boarding School’s Association, 33: 42-45
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2009) ‘Learning to Lead’, Leader, The Education Leader Magazine 41: 22-25
Presentations
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2019) ‘How could leaders improve the flourishing of their teams?’ ‘Stowe Ed Conference’, Forthcoming: 7 Jan 2019
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2018) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education: 21 Jun 2018
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2017) ‘How can school leaders improve teacher flourishing?’ ‘Doing Education Differently Conference’, University of Oxford, Department of Education, 11 Mar 17
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2016) ‘Developing school leaders who enable teachers to flourish’ The Telegraph Festival of Education 23 Jun 16
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Developing leadership in pupils and teachers’ High School Affiliated to Renmin University of China, Beijing. 20 Oct 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Resilience for leaders.’ Global Social Leaders World Summit. 16 Aug 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Emotional Intelligence for Leaders.’ Global Leaders in Education. 12 Aug 15
  • Coates, S.; Fraser, H.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J.; and Nasim, A. (2015) ‘Breaking through the glass ceiling – how can schools empower our girls to become leaders?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education. 19 Jun 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. ‘Developing Leadership in Schools’ (2015). G20 Schools Conference. International conference for head teachers. 11 Apr 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2018) ‘Introduction’, Wellington Leadership Institute: Festival of Leadership. Mar 2012-15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘How the Young Learn to Lead’, Raffles Institution (Singapore) -Purdue University (USA) Education Forum on Gifted & Talented Youth 2012. Singapore. 15 Mar 12
  • Draper, D.; Dyer, R.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Schools’. Presentation for a meeting about pupil leadership and character development at 10 Downing Street. 16 Nov 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Young People’. Presentation for a meeting about leadership and character at 10 Downing Street. 7 Mar 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K. & Seldon, A. (2012) ‘Introduction’, Leading Your School in the 21st Century. 7 Feb 12

Prior to starting his DPhil, Eddy worked as a primary school teacher in Bristol, where he also completed his MSc in Educational Research.

He is particularly interested in the culture of high stakes, standardised testing, and how this might perpetuate existing inequalities in schools. His research focuses specifically on the interaction between knowledge, policy and pedagogy in the context of Literacy education.

 

Amanda is completing a part-time DPhil, alongside working in Initial Teacher Education at Leeds Trinity University.

Her research is focused on understanding tensions, contradictions and conflicts that teachers in disadvantaged schools may experience when they engage in research activity.  Her research focus is influenced by her own experiences of working as a research-active teacher in disadvantaged schools, and recent work in teacher education to support experienced and beginning teachers in developing their own research activities.

One of the aims of Amanda’s research is to construct a framework to support teachers in pursuing research activity and critical scholarship work which articulates with wider social movements to address issues of poverty and disadvantage in schools.

Title of Thesis

Teachers’ perspectives on tensions between policy, practice and research in disadvantaged schools

Publications 

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2017) A ‘usable past’ of teacher education in England: history in JET’s anniversary issue. Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy, 43 (5), pp.616-627.

Nuttall, A. (2016) The ‘curriculum challenge’: Moving towards the ‘Storyline’ approach in a case study urban primary school.  Improving Schools, 19 (2), pp. 154-166.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Learning {Re}imagined: A review.  Primary First, 15, pp. 17-18.

Nuttall, A. and Doherty, J. (2014) Disaffected boys and the achievement gap: the ‘wallpaper effect’ and what is hidden by a focus on school results.  The Urban Review, 46 (5), pp.800-815.

Conference Papers and Presentations

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2018) “No child is pre-ordained to fail” Teachers questioning policy assumptions.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Newcastle, 11-13 September.

Nuttall, A. and Tobbell, C. (2017) Trainee teachers’ perspectives on practitioner enquiry.  Paper presented at the 8th TEAN Conference: Thinking Deeply about Education, Birmingham, 11-12 May.

Nuttall, A. (2017) Assessment at primary level: quality, comparability and improving secondary readiness.  A perspective from ITE.  Speech at the Westminster Education Forum Keynote Seminar: Next steps for reforming primary education: effective teaching practices, assessment and accountably, London, 18 January.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Deficit narratives and lived realities: whose poverty is it?  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the Australian Association for Research in Education, Melbourne, 27 November – 1 December.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Disenfranchised boys’ reflections on their urban schooling experience: “What a Waste!”.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Philpott, C., Beckett, L. and Wrigley, T. (2016) Collaborative practitioner inquiry: making a difference to urban schools.  Innovation session (school visits and symposium) presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Finn, B. and Beckett, L. (2015) Teachers’ constructions of poverty effects: Their research evidence.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Belfast, 15-17 September.

Nuttall, A. (2014) Teachers’ voice on disengaged boys: the role of one teacher-researcher in an English primary school. Paper presented at the Joint Australian Association for Research in Education and the New Zealand Association for Research in Education Conference, Brisbane, 30 November – 4 December.

Andrew Marotta is a D.Phil candidate in the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. He holds an A.A. in Social Sciences from Broward Community College, and a B.A. in Individualized Studies from the Gallatin School of Individualized Studies, New York University and an M.A. and Ed.M. in Counseling Psychology and School Counseling from Teachers College, Columbia University.

Andrew’s research interests include social and emotional learning, peer mentorship, existential therapy / philosophy, curriculum design for school counselors, and applied ethics in computer science. Andrew’s thesis examines how literature and philosophy can be used to nurture social and emotional learning through group counseling among high school students. He has also worked as a school counselor, teaching artist, and curriculum designer.

Presently, Andrew is designing joint humanities and applied ethics workshops for computer and data science college majors, using social and emotional learning concepts as the pedagogical foundation.

Abigail’s research explores the role of education in students’ personal development and how this can be supported by policy, curricula, initial teacher education and teacher professional development. In particular she focuses on history education, citizenship education and peace education as vehicles for dialogue. These opportunities for students to engage with social questions are vital for building cohesive societies. This flows from the recognition that traditional forums for developing public understanding, such as post-conflict truth commissions, need to be complemented by intergenerational and educational perspectives.

Abigail has taught History, Politics, Debating as well as Relationships and Sex Education to secondary school students in South Africa, England and the USA.

She holds postgraduate degrees in Post-Conflict and Transitional Justice (University of Cape Town), in Education, Globalisation and International Development (University of Cambridge) and in African Studies (University of Oxford). She is a Rhodes Scholar, Mandela-Magdalene Scholar and Mandela-Rhodes Scholar.

Title of thesis

GCSE History, Policy Reform and Student Development: How students and teachers navigate the thematic study “Empires, Migration and the People”

Conference papers

Teaching Migration, Belonging, and Empire in Secondary Schools: evaluation of a teacher professional development program, (2019) History Educators International Research Network Conference, Lead author: Dr Jason Todd, University of Vienna, Austria.

“The Problems and Prospects of Teaching South Africa’s Recent History: Teachers’ Perspectives”, (2018) Sustainability, peace and education – Exploring promise and practice: BAICE 20th Anniversary Symposium, University of Bristol, England.

“New Generations, Old Wounds: Learning History at Home and School in Northern Ireland”, (2018) European Social Science and History Conference,
Queens University Belfast, Northern Ireland.

“The Methodological Challenges of Investigating the Role of History Teaching in Peacebuilding”, (2017), Present Past: Time, Memory, and the Negotiation of Historical Justice Conference, Columbia University, United States of America.

“Teaching South Africa’s Truth and Reconciliation Commission”, (2017) European Conference on African Studies, Universität Basel, Switzerland.

Research Assistant Publications

Review of the evidence on feedback in primary and secondary schools, (forthcoming, 2021) for the Education Endowment Foundation, Lead author: Prof Velda Elliott.

Teaching Migration, Belonging, and Empire in Secondary Schools, (2019), for Runnymede Trust and the European Research Council, Lead authors: Kimberly McIntosh, Dr Jason Todd and Prof Nandini Das.

Gender and the Politics of Reconciliation (2016), for The Institute for Justice and Reconciliation, Lead author: Dr Helen Scanlon

SOLE AUTHOR PUBLICATIONS

‘Transitions, Truth-Telling and Teaching History’, Cambridge Open-Review Educational Research e-Journal, Vol. 4, 2017.

Alice Tawell is an ESRC funded DPhil Student, co-supervised across the Department of Education and Centre for Criminology at the University of Oxford.

Supervisors: Professor Harry Daniels and Dr Rachel Condry.

Alice’s research focuses broadly on the enactment of school exclusion policy in England.

Prior to starting her doctoral studies, Alice gained a BSc in Sociology from the University of Bath and an MSc in Education (Research Training) from the University of Oxford.

As part of her undergraduate degree, Alice undertook a placement year working with Professor Kathy Sylva in the Families, Effective Learning and Literacy Research Group at the Department of Education, University of Oxford. After completing her degree, Alice returned to the department and has worked as a Research Officer on a number of different research projects since 2014. Most recently Alice has worked as part of the Excluded Lives Research Team on two projects exploring exclusion from school from a multidisciplinary perspective. In 2017 she was awarded a Seed-corn Small Grant Award to co-lead a pilot project exploring student collaborative networks with Hau Ming Tse. Alice also co-convenes the Qualitative Methods Hub in the department.

Outside of the department, Alice has sat on the Advisory Board for the Children Missing Education research project (2016-2017) at the National Children’s Bureau (NCB) and has been a member of the NCB Partnership for Well Being and Mental Health in Schools since 2016. She also sits on the Transparency on Exclusions Steering Group.

In 2017 Alice received funding from the Grand Union Doctoral Training Partnership placement scheme to conduct a Knowledge Exchange Internship with the Early Years Analysis and Research Unit at the Department for Education, and in 2018 Alice was elected the Co-President of the Grand Union ESRC Scholar’s Association, representing ESRC students from the University of Oxford, Brunel and The Open University.

Ashmita graduated from Boston University in 2008 with a BSc. in Biomedical Engineering, after which she worked in Research & Development for 6 years.

It is here that she decided to make the leap from formulation chemistry to STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Math) Education after having worked on programs involving increasing diversity in STEM in schools.

She received her Master’s from Boston University in 2015 in Education Policy. Her research interests include: STEM education policy; Assessment; Further Education; Higher Education; Science education pedagogy

Originally from Indonesia, Tracey has spent the last decade studying in the UK and working about multicultural education in Indonesia.

She is fully funded by the Indonesia Endowment Fund for Education (LPDP). Her doctoral research explores the ways Indonesian schools teach and accommodate the national vision of multicultural Indonesia, “Bhinneka Tunggal Ika” (Unity-in-Diversity). By using a two-tier case study research approach (case studies of six schools and of two provinces), it presents nuanced and critical account of the ways head teachers, teachers, students and parents from six state and private schools in Jakarta and Bali with different mixes of pupil ethnicity and religiosity understand and accommodate the vision of diversity into educational practices. Despite the highly contextual focus, the research offers a critical view into the complex role of schools in today’s era of globalisation in providing quality education for all and at the same time creating citizens who are inclusive and respectful towards others.

Tracey completed her MSc in Comparative and International Education at the University of Oxford in 2011 and her honours BA in Mathematics and Education Studies at the University of Cambridge in 2010. Upon completing her study in the UK, she returned to Indonesia to work in an educational foundation Sultan Iskandar Muda in Medan, Indonesia as a member of the Board of Directors in the Foundation – a position which she is still holding until today. She is responsible for overlooking the development and implementation of multicultural education and teacher development programme.

During her tenure, she has worked alongside the head teachers and teachers across all educational levels (from pre-school until high school) and produced books on the praxis of multicultural education in the school setting.

Title of Thesis

Accommodating a vision of diversity in different school contexts: “Unity-in-Diversity” in Indonesia

Publications
Journal Article
  • Harjatanaya, T.Y. & Hoon, C.Y. (2018) Politics of multicultural education in post-Suharto Indonesia: a study of the Chinese minority. Compare: A Journal of Comparative and International Education
Edited Book
  • Harjatanaya, T.Y. (2015) (2nd Edition) Merawat Keberagaman: Praksis Pendidikan Multikultural Perguruan Sultan Iskandar Muda (Fostering Diversity: Praxis of Multicultural Education in Sultan Iskandar Muda). Medan: YPSIM.
Book Chapter
  • Harjatanaya, T.Y. (2018). Akses dan Kesamaan dalam Pendidikan Vokasi (Access and Equality in Vocational Education). In Ferary, D. (2018) Sistem Pendidikan Vokasi di Inggris (Vocational Education System in England) (ed.). London: Kantor Atase Pendidikan dan Kebudayaan, Kedutaan Besar Indonesia (Indonesian Embassy) London, p. 121-138.

Katy is a Deputy Headteacher and the founder of a Leadership and Coaching Institute, which she now co-directs.

Katy is an Associate Fellow at the Oxford Character Project and a Research Associate at the Oxford University Wellbeing Research Centre. She is the co-founder of Global Social Leaders, a leadership programme which has participants in 105 countries, all passionate about creating and sustaining positive change in the world.

Title of Thesis

How could school leaders improve the flourishing and wellbeing of teaching staff?

Books
  • Granville-Chapman, K. and Bidston, E (2020) Leader: Know, love and inspire your people. Carmarthen: Crownhouse Publishing
Book Chapters
  •  Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ In White, M. & McCallum, F. (Ed.s) Wellbeing and Resilience Education: Covid-19 And Its Impact on Education Systems. Routledge
Publications
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘Purpose and Leadership in Education and Beyond’. The Education Exchange. Available from: https://theeducation.exchange/purpose-and-leadership-in-education-and-beyond/
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘The Three Secrets of COVID-era Leadership’. Times Education Supplement. Available from: https://www.tes.com/news/three-secrets-covid-era-school-leadership
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2016) ‘Assessing the Impact of a Teacher Leadership Programme in a Teaching Schools Alliance. Journal of Teacher Action Research
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2014) ‘The Afghan conflict: causes and consequences.’ Geography Review 28(1): 22-27
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2013) What are the psychological factors that affect students’ academic resilience and can teachers influence these? Unpublished thesis
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘Unlocking Leadership Potential’, The Magazine of the Boarding School’s Association, 33: 42-45
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2009) ‘Learning to Lead’, Leader, The Education Leader Magazine 41: 22-25
Presentations
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2019) ‘How could leaders improve the flourishing of their teams?’ ‘Stowe Ed Conference’, Forthcoming: 7 Jan 2019
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2018) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education: 21 Jun 2018
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2017) ‘How can school leaders improve teacher flourishing?’ ‘Doing Education Differently Conference’, University of Oxford, Department of Education, 11 Mar 17
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2016) ‘Developing school leaders who enable teachers to flourish’ The Telegraph Festival of Education 23 Jun 16
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Developing leadership in pupils and teachers’ High School Affiliated to Renmin University of China, Beijing. 20 Oct 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Resilience for leaders.’ Global Social Leaders World Summit. 16 Aug 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Emotional Intelligence for Leaders.’ Global Leaders in Education. 12 Aug 15
  • Coates, S.; Fraser, H.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J.; and Nasim, A. (2015) ‘Breaking through the glass ceiling – how can schools empower our girls to become leaders?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education. 19 Jun 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. ‘Developing Leadership in Schools’ (2015). G20 Schools Conference. International conference for head teachers. 11 Apr 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2018) ‘Introduction’, Wellington Leadership Institute: Festival of Leadership. Mar 2012-15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘How the Young Learn to Lead’, Raffles Institution (Singapore) -Purdue University (USA) Education Forum on Gifted & Talented Youth 2012. Singapore. 15 Mar 12
  • Draper, D.; Dyer, R.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Schools’. Presentation for a meeting about pupil leadership and character development at 10 Downing Street. 16 Nov 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Young People’. Presentation for a meeting about leadership and character at 10 Downing Street. 7 Mar 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K. & Seldon, A. (2012) ‘Introduction’, Leading Your School in the 21st Century. 7 Feb 12

Prior to starting his DPhil, Eddy worked as a primary school teacher in Bristol, where he also completed his MSc in Educational Research.

He is particularly interested in the culture of high stakes, standardised testing, and how this might perpetuate existing inequalities in schools. His research focuses specifically on the interaction between knowledge, policy and pedagogy in the context of Literacy education.

 

Amanda is completing a part-time DPhil, alongside working in Initial Teacher Education at Leeds Trinity University.

Her research is focused on understanding tensions, contradictions and conflicts that teachers in disadvantaged schools may experience when they engage in research activity.  Her research focus is influenced by her own experiences of working as a research-active teacher in disadvantaged schools, and recent work in teacher education to support experienced and beginning teachers in developing their own research activities.

One of the aims of Amanda’s research is to construct a framework to support teachers in pursuing research activity and critical scholarship work which articulates with wider social movements to address issues of poverty and disadvantage in schools.

Title of Thesis

Teachers’ perspectives on tensions between policy, practice and research in disadvantaged schools

Publications 

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2017) A ‘usable past’ of teacher education in England: history in JET’s anniversary issue. Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy, 43 (5), pp.616-627.

Nuttall, A. (2016) The ‘curriculum challenge’: Moving towards the ‘Storyline’ approach in a case study urban primary school.  Improving Schools, 19 (2), pp. 154-166.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Learning {Re}imagined: A review.  Primary First, 15, pp. 17-18.

Nuttall, A. and Doherty, J. (2014) Disaffected boys and the achievement gap: the ‘wallpaper effect’ and what is hidden by a focus on school results.  The Urban Review, 46 (5), pp.800-815.

Conference Papers and Presentations

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2018) “No child is pre-ordained to fail” Teachers questioning policy assumptions.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Newcastle, 11-13 September.

Nuttall, A. and Tobbell, C. (2017) Trainee teachers’ perspectives on practitioner enquiry.  Paper presented at the 8th TEAN Conference: Thinking Deeply about Education, Birmingham, 11-12 May.

Nuttall, A. (2017) Assessment at primary level: quality, comparability and improving secondary readiness.  A perspective from ITE.  Speech at the Westminster Education Forum Keynote Seminar: Next steps for reforming primary education: effective teaching practices, assessment and accountably, London, 18 January.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Deficit narratives and lived realities: whose poverty is it?  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the Australian Association for Research in Education, Melbourne, 27 November – 1 December.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Disenfranchised boys’ reflections on their urban schooling experience: “What a Waste!”.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Philpott, C., Beckett, L. and Wrigley, T. (2016) Collaborative practitioner inquiry: making a difference to urban schools.  Innovation session (school visits and symposium) presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Finn, B. and Beckett, L. (2015) Teachers’ constructions of poverty effects: Their research evidence.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Belfast, 15-17 September.

Nuttall, A. (2014) Teachers’ voice on disengaged boys: the role of one teacher-researcher in an English primary school. Paper presented at the Joint Australian Association for Research in Education and the New Zealand Association for Research in Education Conference, Brisbane, 30 November – 4 December.

Andrew Marotta is a D.Phil candidate in the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. He holds an A.A. in Social Sciences from Broward Community College, and a B.A. in Individualized Studies from the Gallatin School of Individualized Studies, New York University and an M.A. and Ed.M. in Counseling Psychology and School Counseling from Teachers College, Columbia University.

Andrew’s research interests include social and emotional learning, peer mentorship, existential therapy / philosophy, curriculum design for school counselors, and applied ethics in computer science. Andrew’s thesis examines how literature and philosophy can be used to nurture social and emotional learning through group counseling among high school students. He has also worked as a school counselor, teaching artist, and curriculum designer.

Presently, Andrew is designing joint humanities and applied ethics workshops for computer and data science college majors, using social and emotional learning concepts as the pedagogical foundation.

Abigail’s research explores the role of education in students’ personal development and how this can be supported by policy, curricula, initial teacher education and teacher professional development. In particular she focuses on history education, citizenship education and peace education as vehicles for dialogue. These opportunities for students to engage with social questions are vital for building cohesive societies. This flows from the recognition that traditional forums for developing public understanding, such as post-conflict truth commissions, need to be complemented by intergenerational and educational perspectives.

Abigail has taught History, Politics, Debating as well as Relationships and Sex Education to secondary school students in South Africa, England and the USA.

She holds postgraduate degrees in Post-Conflict and Transitional Justice (University of Cape Town), in Education, Globalisation and International Development (University of Cambridge) and in African Studies (University of Oxford). She is a Rhodes Scholar, Mandela-Magdalene Scholar and Mandela-Rhodes Scholar.

Title of thesis

GCSE History, Policy Reform and Student Development: How students and teachers navigate the thematic study “Empires, Migration and the People”

Conference papers

Teaching Migration, Belonging, and Empire in Secondary Schools: evaluation of a teacher professional development program, (2019) History Educators International Research Network Conference, Lead author: Dr Jason Todd, University of Vienna, Austria.

“The Problems and Prospects of Teaching South Africa’s Recent History: Teachers’ Perspectives”, (2018) Sustainability, peace and education – Exploring promise and practice: BAICE 20th Anniversary Symposium, University of Bristol, England.

“New Generations, Old Wounds: Learning History at Home and School in Northern Ireland”, (2018) European Social Science and History Conference,
Queens University Belfast, Northern Ireland.

“The Methodological Challenges of Investigating the Role of History Teaching in Peacebuilding”, (2017), Present Past: Time, Memory, and the Negotiation of Historical Justice Conference, Columbia University, United States of America.

“Teaching South Africa’s Truth and Reconciliation Commission”, (2017) European Conference on African Studies, Universität Basel, Switzerland.

Research Assistant Publications

Review of the evidence on feedback in primary and secondary schools, (forthcoming, 2021) for the Education Endowment Foundation, Lead author: Prof Velda Elliott.

Teaching Migration, Belonging, and Empire in Secondary Schools, (2019), for Runnymede Trust and the European Research Council, Lead authors: Kimberly McIntosh, Dr Jason Todd and Prof Nandini Das.

Gender and the Politics of Reconciliation (2016), for The Institute for Justice and Reconciliation, Lead author: Dr Helen Scanlon

SOLE AUTHOR PUBLICATIONS

‘Transitions, Truth-Telling and Teaching History’, Cambridge Open-Review Educational Research e-Journal, Vol. 4, 2017.

Alice Tawell is an ESRC funded DPhil Student, co-supervised across the Department of Education and Centre for Criminology at the University of Oxford.

Supervisors: Professor Harry Daniels and Dr Rachel Condry.

Alice’s research focuses broadly on the enactment of school exclusion policy in England.

Prior to starting her doctoral studies, Alice gained a BSc in Sociology from the University of Bath and an MSc in Education (Research Training) from the University of Oxford.

As part of her undergraduate degree, Alice undertook a placement year working with Professor Kathy Sylva in the Families, Effective Learning and Literacy Research Group at the Department of Education, University of Oxford. After completing her degree, Alice returned to the department and has worked as a Research Officer on a number of different research projects since 2014. Most recently Alice has worked as part of the Excluded Lives Research Team on two projects exploring exclusion from school from a multidisciplinary perspective. In 2017 she was awarded a Seed-corn Small Grant Award to co-lead a pilot project exploring student collaborative networks with Hau Ming Tse. Alice also co-convenes the Qualitative Methods Hub in the department.

Outside of the department, Alice has sat on the Advisory Board for the Children Missing Education research project (2016-2017) at the National Children’s Bureau (NCB) and has been a member of the NCB Partnership for Well Being and Mental Health in Schools since 2016. She also sits on the Transparency on Exclusions Steering Group.

In 2017 Alice received funding from the Grand Union Doctoral Training Partnership placement scheme to conduct a Knowledge Exchange Internship with the Early Years Analysis and Research Unit at the Department for Education, and in 2018 Alice was elected the Co-President of the Grand Union ESRC Scholar’s Association, representing ESRC students from the University of Oxford, Brunel and The Open University.

Ashmita graduated from Boston University in 2008 with a BSc. in Biomedical Engineering, after which she worked in Research & Development for 6 years.

It is here that she decided to make the leap from formulation chemistry to STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Math) Education after having worked on programs involving increasing diversity in STEM in schools.

She received her Master’s from Boston University in 2015 in Education Policy. Her research interests include: STEM education policy; Assessment; Further Education; Higher Education; Science education pedagogy

Originally from Indonesia, Tracey has spent the last decade studying in the UK and working about multicultural education in Indonesia.

She is fully funded by the Indonesia Endowment Fund for Education (LPDP). Her doctoral research explores the ways Indonesian schools teach and accommodate the national vision of multicultural Indonesia, “Bhinneka Tunggal Ika” (Unity-in-Diversity). By using a two-tier case study research approach (case studies of six schools and of two provinces), it presents nuanced and critical account of the ways head teachers, teachers, students and parents from six state and private schools in Jakarta and Bali with different mixes of pupil ethnicity and religiosity understand and accommodate the vision of diversity into educational practices. Despite the highly contextual focus, the research offers a critical view into the complex role of schools in today’s era of globalisation in providing quality education for all and at the same time creating citizens who are inclusive and respectful towards others.

Tracey completed her MSc in Comparative and International Education at the University of Oxford in 2011 and her honours BA in Mathematics and Education Studies at the University of Cambridge in 2010. Upon completing her study in the UK, she returned to Indonesia to work in an educational foundation Sultan Iskandar Muda in Medan, Indonesia as a member of the Board of Directors in the Foundation – a position which she is still holding until today. She is responsible for overlooking the development and implementation of multicultural education and teacher development programme.

During her tenure, she has worked alongside the head teachers and teachers across all educational levels (from pre-school until high school) and produced books on the praxis of multicultural education in the school setting.

Title of Thesis

Accommodating a vision of diversity in different school contexts: “Unity-in-Diversity” in Indonesia

Publications
Journal Article
  • Harjatanaya, T.Y. & Hoon, C.Y. (2018) Politics of multicultural education in post-Suharto Indonesia: a study of the Chinese minority. Compare: A Journal of Comparative and International Education
Edited Book
  • Harjatanaya, T.Y. (2015) (2nd Edition) Merawat Keberagaman: Praksis Pendidikan Multikultural Perguruan Sultan Iskandar Muda (Fostering Diversity: Praxis of Multicultural Education in Sultan Iskandar Muda). Medan: YPSIM.
Book Chapter
  • Harjatanaya, T.Y. (2018). Akses dan Kesamaan dalam Pendidikan Vokasi (Access and Equality in Vocational Education). In Ferary, D. (2018) Sistem Pendidikan Vokasi di Inggris (Vocational Education System in England) (ed.). London: Kantor Atase Pendidikan dan Kebudayaan, Kedutaan Besar Indonesia (Indonesian Embassy) London, p. 121-138.

Katy is a Deputy Headteacher and the founder of a Leadership and Coaching Institute, which she now co-directs.

Katy is an Associate Fellow at the Oxford Character Project and a Research Associate at the Oxford University Wellbeing Research Centre. She is the co-founder of Global Social Leaders, a leadership programme which has participants in 105 countries, all passionate about creating and sustaining positive change in the world.

Title of Thesis

How could school leaders improve the flourishing and wellbeing of teaching staff?

Books
  • Granville-Chapman, K. and Bidston, E (2020) Leader: Know, love and inspire your people. Carmarthen: Crownhouse Publishing
Book Chapters
  •  Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ In White, M. & McCallum, F. (Ed.s) Wellbeing and Resilience Education: Covid-19 And Its Impact on Education Systems. Routledge
Publications
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘Purpose and Leadership in Education and Beyond’. The Education Exchange. Available from: https://theeducation.exchange/purpose-and-leadership-in-education-and-beyond/
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘The Three Secrets of COVID-era Leadership’. Times Education Supplement. Available from: https://www.tes.com/news/three-secrets-covid-era-school-leadership
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2016) ‘Assessing the Impact of a Teacher Leadership Programme in a Teaching Schools Alliance. Journal of Teacher Action Research
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2014) ‘The Afghan conflict: causes and consequences.’ Geography Review 28(1): 22-27
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2013) What are the psychological factors that affect students’ academic resilience and can teachers influence these? Unpublished thesis
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘Unlocking Leadership Potential’, The Magazine of the Boarding School’s Association, 33: 42-45
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2009) ‘Learning to Lead’, Leader, The Education Leader Magazine 41: 22-25
Presentations
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2019) ‘How could leaders improve the flourishing of their teams?’ ‘Stowe Ed Conference’, Forthcoming: 7 Jan 2019
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2018) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education: 21 Jun 2018
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2017) ‘How can school leaders improve teacher flourishing?’ ‘Doing Education Differently Conference’, University of Oxford, Department of Education, 11 Mar 17
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2016) ‘Developing school leaders who enable teachers to flourish’ The Telegraph Festival of Education 23 Jun 16
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Developing leadership in pupils and teachers’ High School Affiliated to Renmin University of China, Beijing. 20 Oct 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Resilience for leaders.’ Global Social Leaders World Summit. 16 Aug 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Emotional Intelligence for Leaders.’ Global Leaders in Education. 12 Aug 15
  • Coates, S.; Fraser, H.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J.; and Nasim, A. (2015) ‘Breaking through the glass ceiling – how can schools empower our girls to become leaders?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education. 19 Jun 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. ‘Developing Leadership in Schools’ (2015). G20 Schools Conference. International conference for head teachers. 11 Apr 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2018) ‘Introduction’, Wellington Leadership Institute: Festival of Leadership. Mar 2012-15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘How the Young Learn to Lead’, Raffles Institution (Singapore) -Purdue University (USA) Education Forum on Gifted & Talented Youth 2012. Singapore. 15 Mar 12
  • Draper, D.; Dyer, R.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Schools’. Presentation for a meeting about pupil leadership and character development at 10 Downing Street. 16 Nov 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Young People’. Presentation for a meeting about leadership and character at 10 Downing Street. 7 Mar 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K. & Seldon, A. (2012) ‘Introduction’, Leading Your School in the 21st Century. 7 Feb 12

Prior to starting his DPhil, Eddy worked as a primary school teacher in Bristol, where he also completed his MSc in Educational Research.

He is particularly interested in the culture of high stakes, standardised testing, and how this might perpetuate existing inequalities in schools. His research focuses specifically on the interaction between knowledge, policy and pedagogy in the context of Literacy education.

 

Amanda is completing a part-time DPhil, alongside working in Initial Teacher Education at Leeds Trinity University.

Her research is focused on understanding tensions, contradictions and conflicts that teachers in disadvantaged schools may experience when they engage in research activity.  Her research focus is influenced by her own experiences of working as a research-active teacher in disadvantaged schools, and recent work in teacher education to support experienced and beginning teachers in developing their own research activities.

One of the aims of Amanda’s research is to construct a framework to support teachers in pursuing research activity and critical scholarship work which articulates with wider social movements to address issues of poverty and disadvantage in schools.

Title of Thesis

Teachers’ perspectives on tensions between policy, practice and research in disadvantaged schools

Publications 

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2017) A ‘usable past’ of teacher education in England: history in JET’s anniversary issue. Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy, 43 (5), pp.616-627.

Nuttall, A. (2016) The ‘curriculum challenge’: Moving towards the ‘Storyline’ approach in a case study urban primary school.  Improving Schools, 19 (2), pp. 154-166.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Learning {Re}imagined: A review.  Primary First, 15, pp. 17-18.

Nuttall, A. and Doherty, J. (2014) Disaffected boys and the achievement gap: the ‘wallpaper effect’ and what is hidden by a focus on school results.  The Urban Review, 46 (5), pp.800-815.

Conference Papers and Presentations

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2018) “No child is pre-ordained to fail” Teachers questioning policy assumptions.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Newcastle, 11-13 September.

Nuttall, A. and Tobbell, C. (2017) Trainee teachers’ perspectives on practitioner enquiry.  Paper presented at the 8th TEAN Conference: Thinking Deeply about Education, Birmingham, 11-12 May.

Nuttall, A. (2017) Assessment at primary level: quality, comparability and improving secondary readiness.  A perspective from ITE.  Speech at the Westminster Education Forum Keynote Seminar: Next steps for reforming primary education: effective teaching practices, assessment and accountably, London, 18 January.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Deficit narratives and lived realities: whose poverty is it?  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the Australian Association for Research in Education, Melbourne, 27 November – 1 December.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Disenfranchised boys’ reflections on their urban schooling experience: “What a Waste!”.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Philpott, C., Beckett, L. and Wrigley, T. (2016) Collaborative practitioner inquiry: making a difference to urban schools.  Innovation session (school visits and symposium) presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Finn, B. and Beckett, L. (2015) Teachers’ constructions of poverty effects: Their research evidence.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Belfast, 15-17 September.

Nuttall, A. (2014) Teachers’ voice on disengaged boys: the role of one teacher-researcher in an English primary school. Paper presented at the Joint Australian Association for Research in Education and the New Zealand Association for Research in Education Conference, Brisbane, 30 November – 4 December.

Andrew Marotta is a D.Phil candidate in the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. He holds an A.A. in Social Sciences from Broward Community College, and a B.A. in Individualized Studies from the Gallatin School of Individualized Studies, New York University and an M.A. and Ed.M. in Counseling Psychology and School Counseling from Teachers College, Columbia University.

Andrew’s research interests include social and emotional learning, peer mentorship, existential therapy / philosophy, curriculum design for school counselors, and applied ethics in computer science. Andrew’s thesis examines how literature and philosophy can be used to nurture social and emotional learning through group counseling among high school students. He has also worked as a school counselor, teaching artist, and curriculum designer.

Presently, Andrew is designing joint humanities and applied ethics workshops for computer and data science college majors, using social and emotional learning concepts as the pedagogical foundation.

Abigail’s research explores the role of education in students’ personal development and how this can be supported by policy, curricula, initial teacher education and teacher professional development. In particular she focuses on history education, citizenship education and peace education as vehicles for dialogue. These opportunities for students to engage with social questions are vital for building cohesive societies. This flows from the recognition that traditional forums for developing public understanding, such as post-conflict truth commissions, need to be complemented by intergenerational and educational perspectives.

Abigail has taught History, Politics, Debating as well as Relationships and Sex Education to secondary school students in South Africa, England and the USA.

She holds postgraduate degrees in Post-Conflict and Transitional Justice (University of Cape Town), in Education, Globalisation and International Development (University of Cambridge) and in African Studies (University of Oxford). She is a Rhodes Scholar, Mandela-Magdalene Scholar and Mandela-Rhodes Scholar.

Title of thesis

GCSE History, Policy Reform and Student Development: How students and teachers navigate the thematic study “Empires, Migration and the People”

Conference papers

Teaching Migration, Belonging, and Empire in Secondary Schools: evaluation of a teacher professional development program, (2019) History Educators International Research Network Conference, Lead author: Dr Jason Todd, University of Vienna, Austria.

“The Problems and Prospects of Teaching South Africa’s Recent History: Teachers’ Perspectives”, (2018) Sustainability, peace and education – Exploring promise and practice: BAICE 20th Anniversary Symposium, University of Bristol, England.

“New Generations, Old Wounds: Learning History at Home and School in Northern Ireland”, (2018) European Social Science and History Conference,
Queens University Belfast, Northern Ireland.

“The Methodological Challenges of Investigating the Role of History Teaching in Peacebuilding”, (2017), Present Past: Time, Memory, and the Negotiation of Historical Justice Conference, Columbia University, United States of America.

“Teaching South Africa’s Truth and Reconciliation Commission”, (2017) European Conference on African Studies, Universität Basel, Switzerland.

Research Assistant Publications

Review of the evidence on feedback in primary and secondary schools, (forthcoming, 2021) for the Education Endowment Foundation, Lead author: Prof Velda Elliott.

Teaching Migration, Belonging, and Empire in Secondary Schools, (2019), for Runnymede Trust and the European Research Council, Lead authors: Kimberly McIntosh, Dr Jason Todd and Prof Nandini Das.

Gender and the Politics of Reconciliation (2016), for The Institute for Justice and Reconciliation, Lead author: Dr Helen Scanlon

SOLE AUTHOR PUBLICATIONS

‘Transitions, Truth-Telling and Teaching History’, Cambridge Open-Review Educational Research e-Journal, Vol. 4, 2017.

Alice Tawell is an ESRC funded DPhil Student, co-supervised across the Department of Education and Centre for Criminology at the University of Oxford.

Supervisors: Professor Harry Daniels and Dr Rachel Condry.

Alice’s research focuses broadly on the enactment of school exclusion policy in England.

Prior to starting her doctoral studies, Alice gained a BSc in Sociology from the University of Bath and an MSc in Education (Research Training) from the University of Oxford.

As part of her undergraduate degree, Alice undertook a placement year working with Professor Kathy Sylva in the Families, Effective Learning and Literacy Research Group at the Department of Education, University of Oxford. After completing her degree, Alice returned to the department and has worked as a Research Officer on a number of different research projects since 2014. Most recently Alice has worked as part of the Excluded Lives Research Team on two projects exploring exclusion from school from a multidisciplinary perspective. In 2017 she was awarded a Seed-corn Small Grant Award to co-lead a pilot project exploring student collaborative networks with Hau Ming Tse. Alice also co-convenes the Qualitative Methods Hub in the department.

Outside of the department, Alice has sat on the Advisory Board for the Children Missing Education research project (2016-2017) at the National Children’s Bureau (NCB) and has been a member of the NCB Partnership for Well Being and Mental Health in Schools since 2016. She also sits on the Transparency on Exclusions Steering Group.

In 2017 Alice received funding from the Grand Union Doctoral Training Partnership placement scheme to conduct a Knowledge Exchange Internship with the Early Years Analysis and Research Unit at the Department for Education, and in 2018 Alice was elected the Co-President of the Grand Union ESRC Scholar’s Association, representing ESRC students from the University of Oxford, Brunel and The Open University.

Ashmita graduated from Boston University in 2008 with a BSc. in Biomedical Engineering, after which she worked in Research & Development for 6 years.

It is here that she decided to make the leap from formulation chemistry to STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Math) Education after having worked on programs involving increasing diversity in STEM in schools.

She received her Master’s from Boston University in 2015 in Education Policy. Her research interests include: STEM education policy; Assessment; Further Education; Higher Education; Science education pedagogy

Originally from Indonesia, Tracey has spent the last decade studying in the UK and working about multicultural education in Indonesia.

She is fully funded by the Indonesia Endowment Fund for Education (LPDP). Her doctoral research explores the ways Indonesian schools teach and accommodate the national vision of multicultural Indonesia, “Bhinneka Tunggal Ika” (Unity-in-Diversity). By using a two-tier case study research approach (case studies of six schools and of two provinces), it presents nuanced and critical account of the ways head teachers, teachers, students and parents from six state and private schools in Jakarta and Bali with different mixes of pupil ethnicity and religiosity understand and accommodate the vision of diversity into educational practices. Despite the highly contextual focus, the research offers a critical view into the complex role of schools in today’s era of globalisation in providing quality education for all and at the same time creating citizens who are inclusive and respectful towards others.

Tracey completed her MSc in Comparative and International Education at the University of Oxford in 2011 and her honours BA in Mathematics and Education Studies at the University of Cambridge in 2010. Upon completing her study in the UK, she returned to Indonesia to work in an educational foundation Sultan Iskandar Muda in Medan, Indonesia as a member of the Board of Directors in the Foundation – a position which she is still holding until today. She is responsible for overlooking the development and implementation of multicultural education and teacher development programme.

During her tenure, she has worked alongside the head teachers and teachers across all educational levels (from pre-school until high school) and produced books on the praxis of multicultural education in the school setting.

Title of Thesis

Accommodating a vision of diversity in different school contexts: “Unity-in-Diversity” in Indonesia

Publications
Journal Article
  • Harjatanaya, T.Y. & Hoon, C.Y. (2018) Politics of multicultural education in post-Suharto Indonesia: a study of the Chinese minority. Compare: A Journal of Comparative and International Education
Edited Book
  • Harjatanaya, T.Y. (2015) (2nd Edition) Merawat Keberagaman: Praksis Pendidikan Multikultural Perguruan Sultan Iskandar Muda (Fostering Diversity: Praxis of Multicultural Education in Sultan Iskandar Muda). Medan: YPSIM.
Book Chapter
  • Harjatanaya, T.Y. (2018). Akses dan Kesamaan dalam Pendidikan Vokasi (Access and Equality in Vocational Education). In Ferary, D. (2018) Sistem Pendidikan Vokasi di Inggris (Vocational Education System in England) (ed.). London: Kantor Atase Pendidikan dan Kebudayaan, Kedutaan Besar Indonesia (Indonesian Embassy) London, p. 121-138.

Katy is a Deputy Headteacher and the founder of a Leadership and Coaching Institute, which she now co-directs.

Katy is an Associate Fellow at the Oxford Character Project and a Research Associate at the Oxford University Wellbeing Research Centre. She is the co-founder of Global Social Leaders, a leadership programme which has participants in 105 countries, all passionate about creating and sustaining positive change in the world.

Title of Thesis

How could school leaders improve the flourishing and wellbeing of teaching staff?

Books
  • Granville-Chapman, K. and Bidston, E (2020) Leader: Know, love and inspire your people. Carmarthen: Crownhouse Publishing
Book Chapters
  •  Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ In White, M. & McCallum, F. (Ed.s) Wellbeing and Resilience Education: Covid-19 And Its Impact on Education Systems. Routledge
Publications
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘Purpose and Leadership in Education and Beyond’. The Education Exchange. Available from: https://theeducation.exchange/purpose-and-leadership-in-education-and-beyond/
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘The Three Secrets of COVID-era Leadership’. Times Education Supplement. Available from: https://www.tes.com/news/three-secrets-covid-era-school-leadership
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2016) ‘Assessing the Impact of a Teacher Leadership Programme in a Teaching Schools Alliance. Journal of Teacher Action Research
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2014) ‘The Afghan conflict: causes and consequences.’ Geography Review 28(1): 22-27
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2013) What are the psychological factors that affect students’ academic resilience and can teachers influence these? Unpublished thesis
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘Unlocking Leadership Potential’, The Magazine of the Boarding School’s Association, 33: 42-45
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2009) ‘Learning to Lead’, Leader, The Education Leader Magazine 41: 22-25
Presentations
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2019) ‘How could leaders improve the flourishing of their teams?’ ‘Stowe Ed Conference’, Forthcoming: 7 Jan 2019
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2018) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education: 21 Jun 2018
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2017) ‘How can school leaders improve teacher flourishing?’ ‘Doing Education Differently Conference’, University of Oxford, Department of Education, 11 Mar 17
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2016) ‘Developing school leaders who enable teachers to flourish’ The Telegraph Festival of Education 23 Jun 16
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Developing leadership in pupils and teachers’ High School Affiliated to Renmin University of China, Beijing. 20 Oct 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Resilience for leaders.’ Global Social Leaders World Summit. 16 Aug 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Emotional Intelligence for Leaders.’ Global Leaders in Education. 12 Aug 15
  • Coates, S.; Fraser, H.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J.; and Nasim, A. (2015) ‘Breaking through the glass ceiling – how can schools empower our girls to become leaders?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education. 19 Jun 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. ‘Developing Leadership in Schools’ (2015). G20 Schools Conference. International conference for head teachers. 11 Apr 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2018) ‘Introduction’, Wellington Leadership Institute: Festival of Leadership. Mar 2012-15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘How the Young Learn to Lead’, Raffles Institution (Singapore) -Purdue University (USA) Education Forum on Gifted & Talented Youth 2012. Singapore. 15 Mar 12
  • Draper, D.; Dyer, R.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Schools’. Presentation for a meeting about pupil leadership and character development at 10 Downing Street. 16 Nov 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Young People’. Presentation for a meeting about leadership and character at 10 Downing Street. 7 Mar 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K. & Seldon, A. (2012) ‘Introduction’, Leading Your School in the 21st Century. 7 Feb 12

Prior to starting his DPhil, Eddy worked as a primary school teacher in Bristol, where he also completed his MSc in Educational Research.

He is particularly interested in the culture of high stakes, standardised testing, and how this might perpetuate existing inequalities in schools. His research focuses specifically on the interaction between knowledge, policy and pedagogy in the context of Literacy education.

 

Amanda is completing a part-time DPhil, alongside working in Initial Teacher Education at Leeds Trinity University.

Her research is focused on understanding tensions, contradictions and conflicts that teachers in disadvantaged schools may experience when they engage in research activity.  Her research focus is influenced by her own experiences of working as a research-active teacher in disadvantaged schools, and recent work in teacher education to support experienced and beginning teachers in developing their own research activities.

One of the aims of Amanda’s research is to construct a framework to support teachers in pursuing research activity and critical scholarship work which articulates with wider social movements to address issues of poverty and disadvantage in schools.

Title of Thesis

Teachers’ perspectives on tensions between policy, practice and research in disadvantaged schools

Publications 

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2017) A ‘usable past’ of teacher education in England: history in JET’s anniversary issue. Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy, 43 (5), pp.616-627.

Nuttall, A. (2016) The ‘curriculum challenge’: Moving towards the ‘Storyline’ approach in a case study urban primary school.  Improving Schools, 19 (2), pp. 154-166.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Learning {Re}imagined: A review.  Primary First, 15, pp. 17-18.

Nuttall, A. and Doherty, J. (2014) Disaffected boys and the achievement gap: the ‘wallpaper effect’ and what is hidden by a focus on school results.  The Urban Review, 46 (5), pp.800-815.

Conference Papers and Presentations

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2018) “No child is pre-ordained to fail” Teachers questioning policy assumptions.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Newcastle, 11-13 September.

Nuttall, A. and Tobbell, C. (2017) Trainee teachers’ perspectives on practitioner enquiry.  Paper presented at the 8th TEAN Conference: Thinking Deeply about Education, Birmingham, 11-12 May.

Nuttall, A. (2017) Assessment at primary level: quality, comparability and improving secondary readiness.  A perspective from ITE.  Speech at the Westminster Education Forum Keynote Seminar: Next steps for reforming primary education: effective teaching practices, assessment and accountably, London, 18 January.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Deficit narratives and lived realities: whose poverty is it?  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the Australian Association for Research in Education, Melbourne, 27 November – 1 December.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Disenfranchised boys’ reflections on their urban schooling experience: “What a Waste!”.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Philpott, C., Beckett, L. and Wrigley, T. (2016) Collaborative practitioner inquiry: making a difference to urban schools.  Innovation session (school visits and symposium) presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Finn, B. and Beckett, L. (2015) Teachers’ constructions of poverty effects: Their research evidence.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Belfast, 15-17 September.

Nuttall, A. (2014) Teachers’ voice on disengaged boys: the role of one teacher-researcher in an English primary school. Paper presented at the Joint Australian Association for Research in Education and the New Zealand Association for Research in Education Conference, Brisbane, 30 November – 4 December.

Andrew Marotta is a D.Phil candidate in the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. He holds an A.A. in Social Sciences from Broward Community College, and a B.A. in Individualized Studies from the Gallatin School of Individualized Studies, New York University and an M.A. and Ed.M. in Counseling Psychology and School Counseling from Teachers College, Columbia University.

Andrew’s research interests include social and emotional learning, peer mentorship, existential therapy / philosophy, curriculum design for school counselors, and applied ethics in computer science. Andrew’s thesis examines how literature and philosophy can be used to nurture social and emotional learning through group counseling among high school students. He has also worked as a school counselor, teaching artist, and curriculum designer.

Presently, Andrew is designing joint humanities and applied ethics workshops for computer and data science college majors, using social and emotional learning concepts as the pedagogical foundation.

Abigail’s research explores the role of education in students’ personal development and how this can be supported by policy, curricula, initial teacher education and teacher professional development. In particular she focuses on history education, citizenship education and peace education as vehicles for dialogue. These opportunities for students to engage with social questions are vital for building cohesive societies. This flows from the recognition that traditional forums for developing public understanding, such as post-conflict truth commissions, need to be complemented by intergenerational and educational perspectives.

Abigail has taught History, Politics, Debating as well as Relationships and Sex Education to secondary school students in South Africa, England and the USA.

She holds postgraduate degrees in Post-Conflict and Transitional Justice (University of Cape Town), in Education, Globalisation and International Development (University of Cambridge) and in African Studies (University of Oxford). She is a Rhodes Scholar, Mandela-Magdalene Scholar and Mandela-Rhodes Scholar.

Title of thesis

GCSE History, Policy Reform and Student Development: How students and teachers navigate the thematic study “Empires, Migration and the People”

Conference papers

Teaching Migration, Belonging, and Empire in Secondary Schools: evaluation of a teacher professional development program, (2019) History Educators International Research Network Conference, Lead author: Dr Jason Todd, University of Vienna, Austria.

“The Problems and Prospects of Teaching South Africa’s Recent History: Teachers’ Perspectives”, (2018) Sustainability, peace and education – Exploring promise and practice: BAICE 20th Anniversary Symposium, University of Bristol, England.

“New Generations, Old Wounds: Learning History at Home and School in Northern Ireland”, (2018) European Social Science and History Conference,
Queens University Belfast, Northern Ireland.

“The Methodological Challenges of Investigating the Role of History Teaching in Peacebuilding”, (2017), Present Past: Time, Memory, and the Negotiation of Historical Justice Conference, Columbia University, United States of America.

“Teaching South Africa’s Truth and Reconciliation Commission”, (2017) European Conference on African Studies, Universität Basel, Switzerland.

Research Assistant Publications

Review of the evidence on feedback in primary and secondary schools, (forthcoming, 2021) for the Education Endowment Foundation, Lead author: Prof Velda Elliott.

Teaching Migration, Belonging, and Empire in Secondary Schools, (2019), for Runnymede Trust and the European Research Council, Lead authors: Kimberly McIntosh, Dr Jason Todd and Prof Nandini Das.

Gender and the Politics of Reconciliation (2016), for The Institute for Justice and Reconciliation, Lead author: Dr Helen Scanlon

SOLE AUTHOR PUBLICATIONS

‘Transitions, Truth-Telling and Teaching History’, Cambridge Open-Review Educational Research e-Journal, Vol. 4, 2017.

Alice Tawell is an ESRC funded DPhil Student, co-supervised across the Department of Education and Centre for Criminology at the University of Oxford.

Supervisors: Professor Harry Daniels and Dr Rachel Condry.

Alice’s research focuses broadly on the enactment of school exclusion policy in England.

Prior to starting her doctoral studies, Alice gained a BSc in Sociology from the University of Bath and an MSc in Education (Research Training) from the University of Oxford.

As part of her undergraduate degree, Alice undertook a placement year working with Professor Kathy Sylva in the Families, Effective Learning and Literacy Research Group at the Department of Education, University of Oxford. After completing her degree, Alice returned to the department and has worked as a Research Officer on a number of different research projects since 2014. Most recently Alice has worked as part of the Excluded Lives Research Team on two projects exploring exclusion from school from a multidisciplinary perspective. In 2017 she was awarded a Seed-corn Small Grant Award to co-lead a pilot project exploring student collaborative networks with Hau Ming Tse. Alice also co-convenes the Qualitative Methods Hub in the department.

Outside of the department, Alice has sat on the Advisory Board for the Children Missing Education research project (2016-2017) at the National Children’s Bureau (NCB) and has been a member of the NCB Partnership for Well Being and Mental Health in Schools since 2016. She also sits on the Transparency on Exclusions Steering Group.

In 2017 Alice received funding from the Grand Union Doctoral Training Partnership placement scheme to conduct a Knowledge Exchange Internship with the Early Years Analysis and Research Unit at the Department for Education, and in 2018 Alice was elected the Co-President of the Grand Union ESRC Scholar’s Association, representing ESRC students from the University of Oxford, Brunel and The Open University.

Ashmita graduated from Boston University in 2008 with a BSc. in Biomedical Engineering, after which she worked in Research & Development for 6 years.

It is here that she decided to make the leap from formulation chemistry to STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Math) Education after having worked on programs involving increasing diversity in STEM in schools.

She received her Master’s from Boston University in 2015 in Education Policy. Her research interests include: STEM education policy; Assessment; Further Education; Higher Education; Science education pedagogy

Originally from Indonesia, Tracey has spent the last decade studying in the UK and working about multicultural education in Indonesia.

She is fully funded by the Indonesia Endowment Fund for Education (LPDP). Her doctoral research explores the ways Indonesian schools teach and accommodate the national vision of multicultural Indonesia, “Bhinneka Tunggal Ika” (Unity-in-Diversity). By using a two-tier case study research approach (case studies of six schools and of two provinces), it presents nuanced and critical account of the ways head teachers, teachers, students and parents from six state and private schools in Jakarta and Bali with different mixes of pupil ethnicity and religiosity understand and accommodate the vision of diversity into educational practices. Despite the highly contextual focus, the research offers a critical view into the complex role of schools in today’s era of globalisation in providing quality education for all and at the same time creating citizens who are inclusive and respectful towards others.

Tracey completed her MSc in Comparative and International Education at the University of Oxford in 2011 and her honours BA in Mathematics and Education Studies at the University of Cambridge in 2010. Upon completing her study in the UK, she returned to Indonesia to work in an educational foundation Sultan Iskandar Muda in Medan, Indonesia as a member of the Board of Directors in the Foundation – a position which she is still holding until today. She is responsible for overlooking the development and implementation of multicultural education and teacher development programme.

During her tenure, she has worked alongside the head teachers and teachers across all educational levels (from pre-school until high school) and produced books on the praxis of multicultural education in the school setting.

Title of Thesis

Accommodating a vision of diversity in different school contexts: “Unity-in-Diversity” in Indonesia

Publications
Journal Article
  • Harjatanaya, T.Y. & Hoon, C.Y. (2018) Politics of multicultural education in post-Suharto Indonesia: a study of the Chinese minority. Compare: A Journal of Comparative and International Education
Edited Book
  • Harjatanaya, T.Y. (2015) (2nd Edition) Merawat Keberagaman: Praksis Pendidikan Multikultural Perguruan Sultan Iskandar Muda (Fostering Diversity: Praxis of Multicultural Education in Sultan Iskandar Muda). Medan: YPSIM.
Book Chapter
  • Harjatanaya, T.Y. (2018). Akses dan Kesamaan dalam Pendidikan Vokasi (Access and Equality in Vocational Education). In Ferary, D. (2018) Sistem Pendidikan Vokasi di Inggris (Vocational Education System in England) (ed.). London: Kantor Atase Pendidikan dan Kebudayaan, Kedutaan Besar Indonesia (Indonesian Embassy) London, p. 121-138.

Katy is a Deputy Headteacher and the founder of a Leadership and Coaching Institute, which she now co-directs.

Katy is an Associate Fellow at the Oxford Character Project and a Research Associate at the Oxford University Wellbeing Research Centre. She is the co-founder of Global Social Leaders, a leadership programme which has participants in 105 countries, all passionate about creating and sustaining positive change in the world.

Title of Thesis

How could school leaders improve the flourishing and wellbeing of teaching staff?

Books
  • Granville-Chapman, K. and Bidston, E (2020) Leader: Know, love and inspire your people. Carmarthen: Crownhouse Publishing
Book Chapters
  •  Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ In White, M. & McCallum, F. (Ed.s) Wellbeing and Resilience Education: Covid-19 And Its Impact on Education Systems. Routledge
Publications
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘Purpose and Leadership in Education and Beyond’. The Education Exchange. Available from: https://theeducation.exchange/purpose-and-leadership-in-education-and-beyond/
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘The Three Secrets of COVID-era Leadership’. Times Education Supplement. Available from: https://www.tes.com/news/three-secrets-covid-era-school-leadership
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2016) ‘Assessing the Impact of a Teacher Leadership Programme in a Teaching Schools Alliance. Journal of Teacher Action Research
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2014) ‘The Afghan conflict: causes and consequences.’ Geography Review 28(1): 22-27
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2013) What are the psychological factors that affect students’ academic resilience and can teachers influence these? Unpublished thesis
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘Unlocking Leadership Potential’, The Magazine of the Boarding School’s Association, 33: 42-45
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2009) ‘Learning to Lead’, Leader, The Education Leader Magazine 41: 22-25
Presentations
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2019) ‘How could leaders improve the flourishing of their teams?’ ‘Stowe Ed Conference’, Forthcoming: 7 Jan 2019
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2018) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education: 21 Jun 2018
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2017) ‘How can school leaders improve teacher flourishing?’ ‘Doing Education Differently Conference’, University of Oxford, Department of Education, 11 Mar 17
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2016) ‘Developing school leaders who enable teachers to flourish’ The Telegraph Festival of Education 23 Jun 16
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Developing leadership in pupils and teachers’ High School Affiliated to Renmin University of China, Beijing. 20 Oct 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Resilience for leaders.’ Global Social Leaders World Summit. 16 Aug 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Emotional Intelligence for Leaders.’ Global Leaders in Education. 12 Aug 15
  • Coates, S.; Fraser, H.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J.; and Nasim, A. (2015) ‘Breaking through the glass ceiling – how can schools empower our girls to become leaders?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education. 19 Jun 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. ‘Developing Leadership in Schools’ (2015). G20 Schools Conference. International conference for head teachers. 11 Apr 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2018) ‘Introduction’, Wellington Leadership Institute: Festival of Leadership. Mar 2012-15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘How the Young Learn to Lead’, Raffles Institution (Singapore) -Purdue University (USA) Education Forum on Gifted & Talented Youth 2012. Singapore. 15 Mar 12
  • Draper, D.; Dyer, R.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Schools’. Presentation for a meeting about pupil leadership and character development at 10 Downing Street. 16 Nov 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Young People’. Presentation for a meeting about leadership and character at 10 Downing Street. 7 Mar 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K. & Seldon, A. (2012) ‘Introduction’, Leading Your School in the 21st Century. 7 Feb 12

Prior to starting his DPhil, Eddy worked as a primary school teacher in Bristol, where he also completed his MSc in Educational Research.

He is particularly interested in the culture of high stakes, standardised testing, and how this might perpetuate existing inequalities in schools. His research focuses specifically on the interaction between knowledge, policy and pedagogy in the context of Literacy education.

 

Amanda is completing a part-time DPhil, alongside working in Initial Teacher Education at Leeds Trinity University.

Her research is focused on understanding tensions, contradictions and conflicts that teachers in disadvantaged schools may experience when they engage in research activity.  Her research focus is influenced by her own experiences of working as a research-active teacher in disadvantaged schools, and recent work in teacher education to support experienced and beginning teachers in developing their own research activities.

One of the aims of Amanda’s research is to construct a framework to support teachers in pursuing research activity and critical scholarship work which articulates with wider social movements to address issues of poverty and disadvantage in schools.

Title of Thesis

Teachers’ perspectives on tensions between policy, practice and research in disadvantaged schools

Publications 

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2017) A ‘usable past’ of teacher education in England: history in JET’s anniversary issue. Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy, 43 (5), pp.616-627.

Nuttall, A. (2016) The ‘curriculum challenge’: Moving towards the ‘Storyline’ approach in a case study urban primary school.  Improving Schools, 19 (2), pp. 154-166.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Learning {Re}imagined: A review.  Primary First, 15, pp. 17-18.

Nuttall, A. and Doherty, J. (2014) Disaffected boys and the achievement gap: the ‘wallpaper effect’ and what is hidden by a focus on school results.  The Urban Review, 46 (5), pp.800-815.

Conference Papers and Presentations

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2018) “No child is pre-ordained to fail” Teachers questioning policy assumptions.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Newcastle, 11-13 September.

Nuttall, A. and Tobbell, C. (2017) Trainee teachers’ perspectives on practitioner enquiry.  Paper presented at the 8th TEAN Conference: Thinking Deeply about Education, Birmingham, 11-12 May.

Nuttall, A. (2017) Assessment at primary level: quality, comparability and improving secondary readiness.  A perspective from ITE.  Speech at the Westminster Education Forum Keynote Seminar: Next steps for reforming primary education: effective teaching practices, assessment and accountably, London, 18 January.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Deficit narratives and lived realities: whose poverty is it?  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the Australian Association for Research in Education, Melbourne, 27 November – 1 December.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Disenfranchised boys’ reflections on their urban schooling experience: “What a Waste!”.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Philpott, C., Beckett, L. and Wrigley, T. (2016) Collaborative practitioner inquiry: making a difference to urban schools.  Innovation session (school visits and symposium) presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Finn, B. and Beckett, L. (2015) Teachers’ constructions of poverty effects: Their research evidence.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Belfast, 15-17 September.

Nuttall, A. (2014) Teachers’ voice on disengaged boys: the role of one teacher-researcher in an English primary school. Paper presented at the Joint Australian Association for Research in Education and the New Zealand Association for Research in Education Conference, Brisbane, 30 November – 4 December.

Andrew Marotta is a D.Phil candidate in the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. He holds an A.A. in Social Sciences from Broward Community College, and a B.A. in Individualized Studies from the Gallatin School of Individualized Studies, New York University and an M.A. and Ed.M. in Counseling Psychology and School Counseling from Teachers College, Columbia University.

Andrew’s research interests include social and emotional learning, peer mentorship, existential therapy / philosophy, curriculum design for school counselors, and applied ethics in computer science. Andrew’s thesis examines how literature and philosophy can be used to nurture social and emotional learning through group counseling among high school students. He has also worked as a school counselor, teaching artist, and curriculum designer.

Presently, Andrew is designing joint humanities and applied ethics workshops for computer and data science college majors, using social and emotional learning concepts as the pedagogical foundation.

Abigail’s research explores the role of education in students’ personal development and how this can be supported by policy, curricula, initial teacher education and teacher professional development. In particular she focuses on history education, citizenship education and peace education as vehicles for dialogue. These opportunities for students to engage with social questions are vital for building cohesive societies. This flows from the recognition that traditional forums for developing public understanding, such as post-conflict truth commissions, need to be complemented by intergenerational and educational perspectives.

Abigail has taught History, Politics, Debating as well as Relationships and Sex Education to secondary school students in South Africa, England and the USA.

She holds postgraduate degrees in Post-Conflict and Transitional Justice (University of Cape Town), in Education, Globalisation and International Development (University of Cambridge) and in African Studies (University of Oxford). She is a Rhodes Scholar, Mandela-Magdalene Scholar and Mandela-Rhodes Scholar.

Title of thesis

GCSE History, Policy Reform and Student Development: How students and teachers navigate the thematic study “Empires, Migration and the People”

Conference papers

Teaching Migration, Belonging, and Empire in Secondary Schools: evaluation of a teacher professional development program, (2019) History Educators International Research Network Conference, Lead author: Dr Jason Todd, University of Vienna, Austria.

“The Problems and Prospects of Teaching South Africa’s Recent History: Teachers’ Perspectives”, (2018) Sustainability, peace and education – Exploring promise and practice: BAICE 20th Anniversary Symposium, University of Bristol, England.

“New Generations, Old Wounds: Learning History at Home and School in Northern Ireland”, (2018) European Social Science and History Conference,
Queens University Belfast, Northern Ireland.

“The Methodological Challenges of Investigating the Role of History Teaching in Peacebuilding”, (2017), Present Past: Time, Memory, and the Negotiation of Historical Justice Conference, Columbia University, United States of America.

“Teaching South Africa’s Truth and Reconciliation Commission”, (2017) European Conference on African Studies, Universität Basel, Switzerland.

Research Assistant Publications

Review of the evidence on feedback in primary and secondary schools, (forthcoming, 2021) for the Education Endowment Foundation, Lead author: Prof Velda Elliott.

Teaching Migration, Belonging, and Empire in Secondary Schools, (2019), for Runnymede Trust and the European Research Council, Lead authors: Kimberly McIntosh, Dr Jason Todd and Prof Nandini Das.

Gender and the Politics of Reconciliation (2016), for The Institute for Justice and Reconciliation, Lead author: Dr Helen Scanlon

SOLE AUTHOR PUBLICATIONS

‘Transitions, Truth-Telling and Teaching History’, Cambridge Open-Review Educational Research e-Journal, Vol. 4, 2017.

Alice Tawell is an ESRC funded DPhil Student, co-supervised across the Department of Education and Centre for Criminology at the University of Oxford.

Supervisors: Professor Harry Daniels and Dr Rachel Condry.

Alice’s research focuses broadly on the enactment of school exclusion policy in England.

Prior to starting her doctoral studies, Alice gained a BSc in Sociology from the University of Bath and an MSc in Education (Research Training) from the University of Oxford.

As part of her undergraduate degree, Alice undertook a placement year working with Professor Kathy Sylva in the Families, Effective Learning and Literacy Research Group at the Department of Education, University of Oxford. After completing her degree, Alice returned to the department and has worked as a Research Officer on a number of different research projects since 2014. Most recently Alice has worked as part of the Excluded Lives Research Team on two projects exploring exclusion from school from a multidisciplinary perspective. In 2017 she was awarded a Seed-corn Small Grant Award to co-lead a pilot project exploring student collaborative networks with Hau Ming Tse. Alice also co-convenes the Qualitative Methods Hub in the department.

Outside of the department, Alice has sat on the Advisory Board for the Children Missing Education research project (2016-2017) at the National Children’s Bureau (NCB) and has been a member of the NCB Partnership for Well Being and Mental Health in Schools since 2016. She also sits on the Transparency on Exclusions Steering Group.

In 2017 Alice received funding from the Grand Union Doctoral Training Partnership placement scheme to conduct a Knowledge Exchange Internship with the Early Years Analysis and Research Unit at the Department for Education, and in 2018 Alice was elected the Co-President of the Grand Union ESRC Scholar’s Association, representing ESRC students from the University of Oxford, Brunel and The Open University.

Ashmita graduated from Boston University in 2008 with a BSc. in Biomedical Engineering, after which she worked in Research & Development for 6 years.

It is here that she decided to make the leap from formulation chemistry to STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Math) Education after having worked on programs involving increasing diversity in STEM in schools.

She received her Master’s from Boston University in 2015 in Education Policy. Her research interests include: STEM education policy; Assessment; Further Education; Higher Education; Science education pedagogy

Originally from Indonesia, Tracey has spent the last decade studying in the UK and working about multicultural education in Indonesia.

She is fully funded by the Indonesia Endowment Fund for Education (LPDP). Her doctoral research explores the ways Indonesian schools teach and accommodate the national vision of multicultural Indonesia, “Bhinneka Tunggal Ika” (Unity-in-Diversity). By using a two-tier case study research approach (case studies of six schools and of two provinces), it presents nuanced and critical account of the ways head teachers, teachers, students and parents from six state and private schools in Jakarta and Bali with different mixes of pupil ethnicity and religiosity understand and accommodate the vision of diversity into educational practices. Despite the highly contextual focus, the research offers a critical view into the complex role of schools in today’s era of globalisation in providing quality education for all and at the same time creating citizens who are inclusive and respectful towards others.

Tracey completed her MSc in Comparative and International Education at the University of Oxford in 2011 and her honours BA in Mathematics and Education Studies at the University of Cambridge in 2010. Upon completing her study in the UK, she returned to Indonesia to work in an educational foundation Sultan Iskandar Muda in Medan, Indonesia as a member of the Board of Directors in the Foundation – a position which she is still holding until today. She is responsible for overlooking the development and implementation of multicultural education and teacher development programme.

During her tenure, she has worked alongside the head teachers and teachers across all educational levels (from pre-school until high school) and produced books on the praxis of multicultural education in the school setting.

Title of Thesis

Accommodating a vision of diversity in different school contexts: “Unity-in-Diversity” in Indonesia

Publications
Journal Article
  • Harjatanaya, T.Y. & Hoon, C.Y. (2018) Politics of multicultural education in post-Suharto Indonesia: a study of the Chinese minority. Compare: A Journal of Comparative and International Education
Edited Book
  • Harjatanaya, T.Y. (2015) (2nd Edition) Merawat Keberagaman: Praksis Pendidikan Multikultural Perguruan Sultan Iskandar Muda (Fostering Diversity: Praxis of Multicultural Education in Sultan Iskandar Muda). Medan: YPSIM.
Book Chapter
  • Harjatanaya, T.Y. (2018). Akses dan Kesamaan dalam Pendidikan Vokasi (Access and Equality in Vocational Education). In Ferary, D. (2018) Sistem Pendidikan Vokasi di Inggris (Vocational Education System in England) (ed.). London: Kantor Atase Pendidikan dan Kebudayaan, Kedutaan Besar Indonesia (Indonesian Embassy) London, p. 121-138.

Katy is a Deputy Headteacher and the founder of a Leadership and Coaching Institute, which she now co-directs.

Katy is an Associate Fellow at the Oxford Character Project and a Research Associate at the Oxford University Wellbeing Research Centre. She is the co-founder of Global Social Leaders, a leadership programme which has participants in 105 countries, all passionate about creating and sustaining positive change in the world.

Title of Thesis

How could school leaders improve the flourishing and wellbeing of teaching staff?

Books
  • Granville-Chapman, K. and Bidston, E (2020) Leader: Know, love and inspire your people. Carmarthen: Crownhouse Publishing
Book Chapters
  •  Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ In White, M. & McCallum, F. (Ed.s) Wellbeing and Resilience Education: Covid-19 And Its Impact on Education Systems. Routledge
Publications
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘Purpose and Leadership in Education and Beyond’. The Education Exchange. Available from: https://theeducation.exchange/purpose-and-leadership-in-education-and-beyond/
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘The Three Secrets of COVID-era Leadership’. Times Education Supplement. Available from: https://www.tes.com/news/three-secrets-covid-era-school-leadership
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2016) ‘Assessing the Impact of a Teacher Leadership Programme in a Teaching Schools Alliance. Journal of Teacher Action Research
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2014) ‘The Afghan conflict: causes and consequences.’ Geography Review 28(1): 22-27
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2013) What are the psychological factors that affect students’ academic resilience and can teachers influence these? Unpublished thesis
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘Unlocking Leadership Potential’, The Magazine of the Boarding School’s Association, 33: 42-45
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2009) ‘Learning to Lead’, Leader, The Education Leader Magazine 41: 22-25
Presentations
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2019) ‘How could leaders improve the flourishing of their teams?’ ‘Stowe Ed Conference’, Forthcoming: 7 Jan 2019
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2018) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education: 21 Jun 2018
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2017) ‘How can school leaders improve teacher flourishing?’ ‘Doing Education Differently Conference’, University of Oxford, Department of Education, 11 Mar 17
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2016) ‘Developing school leaders who enable teachers to flourish’ The Telegraph Festival of Education 23 Jun 16
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Developing leadership in pupils and teachers’ High School Affiliated to Renmin University of China, Beijing. 20 Oct 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Resilience for leaders.’ Global Social Leaders World Summit. 16 Aug 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Emotional Intelligence for Leaders.’ Global Leaders in Education. 12 Aug 15
  • Coates, S.; Fraser, H.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J.; and Nasim, A. (2015) ‘Breaking through the glass ceiling – how can schools empower our girls to become leaders?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education. 19 Jun 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. ‘Developing Leadership in Schools’ (2015). G20 Schools Conference. International conference for head teachers. 11 Apr 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2018) ‘Introduction’, Wellington Leadership Institute: Festival of Leadership. Mar 2012-15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘How the Young Learn to Lead’, Raffles Institution (Singapore) -Purdue University (USA) Education Forum on Gifted & Talented Youth 2012. Singapore. 15 Mar 12
  • Draper, D.; Dyer, R.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Schools’. Presentation for a meeting about pupil leadership and character development at 10 Downing Street. 16 Nov 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Young People’. Presentation for a meeting about leadership and character at 10 Downing Street. 7 Mar 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K. & Seldon, A. (2012) ‘Introduction’, Leading Your School in the 21st Century. 7 Feb 12

Prior to starting his DPhil, Eddy worked as a primary school teacher in Bristol, where he also completed his MSc in Educational Research.

He is particularly interested in the culture of high stakes, standardised testing, and how this might perpetuate existing inequalities in schools. His research focuses specifically on the interaction between knowledge, policy and pedagogy in the context of Literacy education.

 

Amanda is completing a part-time DPhil, alongside working in Initial Teacher Education at Leeds Trinity University.

Her research is focused on understanding tensions, contradictions and conflicts that teachers in disadvantaged schools may experience when they engage in research activity.  Her research focus is influenced by her own experiences of working as a research-active teacher in disadvantaged schools, and recent work in teacher education to support experienced and beginning teachers in developing their own research activities.

One of the aims of Amanda’s research is to construct a framework to support teachers in pursuing research activity and critical scholarship work which articulates with wider social movements to address issues of poverty and disadvantage in schools.

Title of Thesis

Teachers’ perspectives on tensions between policy, practice and research in disadvantaged schools

Publications 

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2017) A ‘usable past’ of teacher education in England: history in JET’s anniversary issue. Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy, 43 (5), pp.616-627.

Nuttall, A. (2016) The ‘curriculum challenge’: Moving towards the ‘Storyline’ approach in a case study urban primary school.  Improving Schools, 19 (2), pp. 154-166.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Learning {Re}imagined: A review.  Primary First, 15, pp. 17-18.

Nuttall, A. and Doherty, J. (2014) Disaffected boys and the achievement gap: the ‘wallpaper effect’ and what is hidden by a focus on school results.  The Urban Review, 46 (5), pp.800-815.

Conference Papers and Presentations

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2018) “No child is pre-ordained to fail” Teachers questioning policy assumptions.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Newcastle, 11-13 September.

Nuttall, A. and Tobbell, C. (2017) Trainee teachers’ perspectives on practitioner enquiry.  Paper presented at the 8th TEAN Conference: Thinking Deeply about Education, Birmingham, 11-12 May.

Nuttall, A. (2017) Assessment at primary level: quality, comparability and improving secondary readiness.  A perspective from ITE.  Speech at the Westminster Education Forum Keynote Seminar: Next steps for reforming primary education: effective teaching practices, assessment and accountably, London, 18 January.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Deficit narratives and lived realities: whose poverty is it?  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the Australian Association for Research in Education, Melbourne, 27 November – 1 December.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Disenfranchised boys’ reflections on their urban schooling experience: “What a Waste!”.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Philpott, C., Beckett, L. and Wrigley, T. (2016) Collaborative practitioner inquiry: making a difference to urban schools.  Innovation session (school visits and symposium) presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Finn, B. and Beckett, L. (2015) Teachers’ constructions of poverty effects: Their research evidence.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Belfast, 15-17 September.

Nuttall, A. (2014) Teachers’ voice on disengaged boys: the role of one teacher-researcher in an English primary school. Paper presented at the Joint Australian Association for Research in Education and the New Zealand Association for Research in Education Conference, Brisbane, 30 November – 4 December.

Andrew Marotta is a D.Phil candidate in the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. He holds an A.A. in Social Sciences from Broward Community College, and a B.A. in Individualized Studies from the Gallatin School of Individualized Studies, New York University and an M.A. and Ed.M. in Counseling Psychology and School Counseling from Teachers College, Columbia University.

Andrew’s research interests include social and emotional learning, peer mentorship, existential therapy / philosophy, curriculum design for school counselors, and applied ethics in computer science. Andrew’s thesis examines how literature and philosophy can be used to nurture social and emotional learning through group counseling among high school students. He has also worked as a school counselor, teaching artist, and curriculum designer.

Presently, Andrew is designing joint humanities and applied ethics workshops for computer and data science college majors, using social and emotional learning concepts as the pedagogical foundation.

Abigail’s research explores the role of education in students’ personal development and how this can be supported by policy, curricula, initial teacher education and teacher professional development. In particular she focuses on history education, citizenship education and peace education as vehicles for dialogue. These opportunities for students to engage with social questions are vital for building cohesive societies. This flows from the recognition that traditional forums for developing public understanding, such as post-conflict truth commissions, need to be complemented by intergenerational and educational perspectives.

Abigail has taught History, Politics, Debating as well as Relationships and Sex Education to secondary school students in South Africa, England and the USA.

She holds postgraduate degrees in Post-Conflict and Transitional Justice (University of Cape Town), in Education, Globalisation and International Development (University of Cambridge) and in African Studies (University of Oxford). She is a Rhodes Scholar, Mandela-Magdalene Scholar and Mandela-Rhodes Scholar.

Title of thesis

GCSE History, Policy Reform and Student Development: How students and teachers navigate the thematic study “Empires, Migration and the People”

Conference papers

Teaching Migration, Belonging, and Empire in Secondary Schools: evaluation of a teacher professional development program, (2019) History Educators International Research Network Conference, Lead author: Dr Jason Todd, University of Vienna, Austria.

“The Problems and Prospects of Teaching South Africa’s Recent History: Teachers’ Perspectives”, (2018) Sustainability, peace and education – Exploring promise and practice: BAICE 20th Anniversary Symposium, University of Bristol, England.

“New Generations, Old Wounds: Learning History at Home and School in Northern Ireland”, (2018) European Social Science and History Conference,
Queens University Belfast, Northern Ireland.

“The Methodological Challenges of Investigating the Role of History Teaching in Peacebuilding”, (2017), Present Past: Time, Memory, and the Negotiation of Historical Justice Conference, Columbia University, United States of America.

“Teaching South Africa’s Truth and Reconciliation Commission”, (2017) European Conference on African Studies, Universität Basel, Switzerland.

Research Assistant Publications

Review of the evidence on feedback in primary and secondary schools, (forthcoming, 2021) for the Education Endowment Foundation, Lead author: Prof Velda Elliott.

Teaching Migration, Belonging, and Empire in Secondary Schools, (2019), for Runnymede Trust and the European Research Council, Lead authors: Kimberly McIntosh, Dr Jason Todd and Prof Nandini Das.

Gender and the Politics of Reconciliation (2016), for The Institute for Justice and Reconciliation, Lead author: Dr Helen Scanlon

SOLE AUTHOR PUBLICATIONS

‘Transitions, Truth-Telling and Teaching History’, Cambridge Open-Review Educational Research e-Journal, Vol. 4, 2017.

Alice Tawell is an ESRC funded DPhil Student, co-supervised across the Department of Education and Centre for Criminology at the University of Oxford.

Supervisors: Professor Harry Daniels and Dr Rachel Condry.

Alice’s research focuses broadly on the enactment of school exclusion policy in England.

Prior to starting her doctoral studies, Alice gained a BSc in Sociology from the University of Bath and an MSc in Education (Research Training) from the University of Oxford.

As part of her undergraduate degree, Alice undertook a placement year working with Professor Kathy Sylva in the Families, Effective Learning and Literacy Research Group at the Department of Education, University of Oxford. After completing her degree, Alice returned to the department and has worked as a Research Officer on a number of different research projects since 2014. Most recently Alice has worked as part of the Excluded Lives Research Team on two projects exploring exclusion from school from a multidisciplinary perspective. In 2017 she was awarded a Seed-corn Small Grant Award to co-lead a pilot project exploring student collaborative networks with Hau Ming Tse. Alice also co-convenes the Qualitative Methods Hub in the department.

Outside of the department, Alice has sat on the Advisory Board for the Children Missing Education research project (2016-2017) at the National Children’s Bureau (NCB) and has been a member of the NCB Partnership for Well Being and Mental Health in Schools since 2016. She also sits on the Transparency on Exclusions Steering Group.

In 2017 Alice received funding from the Grand Union Doctoral Training Partnership placement scheme to conduct a Knowledge Exchange Internship with the Early Years Analysis and Research Unit at the Department for Education, and in 2018 Alice was elected the Co-President of the Grand Union ESRC Scholar’s Association, representing ESRC students from the University of Oxford, Brunel and The Open University.

Ashmita graduated from Boston University in 2008 with a BSc. in Biomedical Engineering, after which she worked in Research & Development for 6 years.

It is here that she decided to make the leap from formulation chemistry to STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Math) Education after having worked on programs involving increasing diversity in STEM in schools.

She received her Master’s from Boston University in 2015 in Education Policy. Her research interests include: STEM education policy; Assessment; Further Education; Higher Education; Science education pedagogy

Originally from Indonesia, Tracey has spent the last decade studying in the UK and working about multicultural education in Indonesia.

She is fully funded by the Indonesia Endowment Fund for Education (LPDP). Her doctoral research explores the ways Indonesian schools teach and accommodate the national vision of multicultural Indonesia, “Bhinneka Tunggal Ika” (Unity-in-Diversity). By using a two-tier case study research approach (case studies of six schools and of two provinces), it presents nuanced and critical account of the ways head teachers, teachers, students and parents from six state and private schools in Jakarta and Bali with different mixes of pupil ethnicity and religiosity understand and accommodate the vision of diversity into educational practices. Despite the highly contextual focus, the research offers a critical view into the complex role of schools in today’s era of globalisation in providing quality education for all and at the same time creating citizens who are inclusive and respectful towards others.

Tracey completed her MSc in Comparative and International Education at the University of Oxford in 2011 and her honours BA in Mathematics and Education Studies at the University of Cambridge in 2010. Upon completing her study in the UK, she returned to Indonesia to work in an educational foundation Sultan Iskandar Muda in Medan, Indonesia as a member of the Board of Directors in the Foundation – a position which she is still holding until today. She is responsible for overlooking the development and implementation of multicultural education and teacher development programme.

During her tenure, she has worked alongside the head teachers and teachers across all educational levels (from pre-school until high school) and produced books on the praxis of multicultural education in the school setting.

Title of Thesis

Accommodating a vision of diversity in different school contexts: “Unity-in-Diversity” in Indonesia

Publications
Journal Article
  • Harjatanaya, T.Y. & Hoon, C.Y. (2018) Politics of multicultural education in post-Suharto Indonesia: a study of the Chinese minority. Compare: A Journal of Comparative and International Education
Edited Book
  • Harjatanaya, T.Y. (2015) (2nd Edition) Merawat Keberagaman: Praksis Pendidikan Multikultural Perguruan Sultan Iskandar Muda (Fostering Diversity: Praxis of Multicultural Education in Sultan Iskandar Muda). Medan: YPSIM.
Book Chapter
  • Harjatanaya, T.Y. (2018). Akses dan Kesamaan dalam Pendidikan Vokasi (Access and Equality in Vocational Education). In Ferary, D. (2018) Sistem Pendidikan Vokasi di Inggris (Vocational Education System in England) (ed.). London: Kantor Atase Pendidikan dan Kebudayaan, Kedutaan Besar Indonesia (Indonesian Embassy) London, p. 121-138.

Katy is a Deputy Headteacher and the founder of a Leadership and Coaching Institute, which she now co-directs.

Katy is an Associate Fellow at the Oxford Character Project and a Research Associate at the Oxford University Wellbeing Research Centre. She is the co-founder of Global Social Leaders, a leadership programme which has participants in 105 countries, all passionate about creating and sustaining positive change in the world.

Title of Thesis

How could school leaders improve the flourishing and wellbeing of teaching staff?

Books
  • Granville-Chapman, K. and Bidston, E (2020) Leader: Know, love and inspire your people. Carmarthen: Crownhouse Publishing
Book Chapters
  •  Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ In White, M. & McCallum, F. (Ed.s) Wellbeing and Resilience Education: Covid-19 And Its Impact on Education Systems. Routledge
Publications
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘Purpose and Leadership in Education and Beyond’. The Education Exchange. Available from: https://theeducation.exchange/purpose-and-leadership-in-education-and-beyond/
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘The Three Secrets of COVID-era Leadership’. Times Education Supplement. Available from: https://www.tes.com/news/three-secrets-covid-era-school-leadership
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2016) ‘Assessing the Impact of a Teacher Leadership Programme in a Teaching Schools Alliance. Journal of Teacher Action Research
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2014) ‘The Afghan conflict: causes and consequences.’ Geography Review 28(1): 22-27
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2013) What are the psychological factors that affect students’ academic resilience and can teachers influence these? Unpublished thesis
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘Unlocking Leadership Potential’, The Magazine of the Boarding School’s Association, 33: 42-45
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2009) ‘Learning to Lead’, Leader, The Education Leader Magazine 41: 22-25
Presentations
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2019) ‘How could leaders improve the flourishing of their teams?’ ‘Stowe Ed Conference’, Forthcoming: 7 Jan 2019
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2018) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education: 21 Jun 2018
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2017) ‘How can school leaders improve teacher flourishing?’ ‘Doing Education Differently Conference’, University of Oxford, Department of Education, 11 Mar 17
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2016) ‘Developing school leaders who enable teachers to flourish’ The Telegraph Festival of Education 23 Jun 16
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Developing leadership in pupils and teachers’ High School Affiliated to Renmin University of China, Beijing. 20 Oct 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Resilience for leaders.’ Global Social Leaders World Summit. 16 Aug 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Emotional Intelligence for Leaders.’ Global Leaders in Education. 12 Aug 15
  • Coates, S.; Fraser, H.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J.; and Nasim, A. (2015) ‘Breaking through the glass ceiling – how can schools empower our girls to become leaders?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education. 19 Jun 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. ‘Developing Leadership in Schools’ (2015). G20 Schools Conference. International conference for head teachers. 11 Apr 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2018) ‘Introduction’, Wellington Leadership Institute: Festival of Leadership. Mar 2012-15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘How the Young Learn to Lead’, Raffles Institution (Singapore) -Purdue University (USA) Education Forum on Gifted & Talented Youth 2012. Singapore. 15 Mar 12
  • Draper, D.; Dyer, R.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Schools’. Presentation for a meeting about pupil leadership and character development at 10 Downing Street. 16 Nov 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Young People’. Presentation for a meeting about leadership and character at 10 Downing Street. 7 Mar 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K. & Seldon, A. (2012) ‘Introduction’, Leading Your School in the 21st Century. 7 Feb 12

Prior to starting his DPhil, Eddy worked as a primary school teacher in Bristol, where he also completed his MSc in Educational Research.

He is particularly interested in the culture of high stakes, standardised testing, and how this might perpetuate existing inequalities in schools. His research focuses specifically on the interaction between knowledge, policy and pedagogy in the context of Literacy education.

 

Amanda is completing a part-time DPhil, alongside working in Initial Teacher Education at Leeds Trinity University.

Her research is focused on understanding tensions, contradictions and conflicts that teachers in disadvantaged schools may experience when they engage in research activity.  Her research focus is influenced by her own experiences of working as a research-active teacher in disadvantaged schools, and recent work in teacher education to support experienced and beginning teachers in developing their own research activities.

One of the aims of Amanda’s research is to construct a framework to support teachers in pursuing research activity and critical scholarship work which articulates with wider social movements to address issues of poverty and disadvantage in schools.

Title of Thesis

Teachers’ perspectives on tensions between policy, practice and research in disadvantaged schools

Publications 

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2017) A ‘usable past’ of teacher education in England: history in JET’s anniversary issue. Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy, 43 (5), pp.616-627.

Nuttall, A. (2016) The ‘curriculum challenge’: Moving towards the ‘Storyline’ approach in a case study urban primary school.  Improving Schools, 19 (2), pp. 154-166.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Learning {Re}imagined: A review.  Primary First, 15, pp. 17-18.

Nuttall, A. and Doherty, J. (2014) Disaffected boys and the achievement gap: the ‘wallpaper effect’ and what is hidden by a focus on school results.  The Urban Review, 46 (5), pp.800-815.

Conference Papers and Presentations

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2018) “No child is pre-ordained to fail” Teachers questioning policy assumptions.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Newcastle, 11-13 September.

Nuttall, A. and Tobbell, C. (2017) Trainee teachers’ perspectives on practitioner enquiry.  Paper presented at the 8th TEAN Conference: Thinking Deeply about Education, Birmingham, 11-12 May.

Nuttall, A. (2017) Assessment at primary level: quality, comparability and improving secondary readiness.  A perspective from ITE.  Speech at the Westminster Education Forum Keynote Seminar: Next steps for reforming primary education: effective teaching practices, assessment and accountably, London, 18 January.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Deficit narratives and lived realities: whose poverty is it?  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the Australian Association for Research in Education, Melbourne, 27 November – 1 December.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Disenfranchised boys’ reflections on their urban schooling experience: “What a Waste!”.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Philpott, C., Beckett, L. and Wrigley, T. (2016) Collaborative practitioner inquiry: making a difference to urban schools.  Innovation session (school visits and symposium) presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Finn, B. and Beckett, L. (2015) Teachers’ constructions of poverty effects: Their research evidence.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Belfast, 15-17 September.

Nuttall, A. (2014) Teachers’ voice on disengaged boys: the role of one teacher-researcher in an English primary school. Paper presented at the Joint Australian Association for Research in Education and the New Zealand Association for Research in Education Conference, Brisbane, 30 November – 4 December.

Andrew Marotta is a D.Phil candidate in the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. He holds an A.A. in Social Sciences from Broward Community College, and a B.A. in Individualized Studies from the Gallatin School of Individualized Studies, New York University and an M.A. and Ed.M. in Counseling Psychology and School Counseling from Teachers College, Columbia University.

Andrew’s research interests include social and emotional learning, peer mentorship, existential therapy / philosophy, curriculum design for school counselors, and applied ethics in computer science. Andrew’s thesis examines how literature and philosophy can be used to nurture social and emotional learning through group counseling among high school students. He has also worked as a school counselor, teaching artist, and curriculum designer.

Presently, Andrew is designing joint humanities and applied ethics workshops for computer and data science college majors, using social and emotional learning concepts as the pedagogical foundation.

Abigail’s research explores the role of education in students’ personal development and how this can be supported by policy, curricula, initial teacher education and teacher professional development. In particular she focuses on history education, citizenship education and peace education as vehicles for dialogue. These opportunities for students to engage with social questions are vital for building cohesive societies. This flows from the recognition that traditional forums for developing public understanding, such as post-conflict truth commissions, need to be complemented by intergenerational and educational perspectives.

Abigail has taught History, Politics, Debating as well as Relationships and Sex Education to secondary school students in South Africa, England and the USA.

She holds postgraduate degrees in Post-Conflict and Transitional Justice (University of Cape Town), in Education, Globalisation and International Development (University of Cambridge) and in African Studies (University of Oxford). She is a Rhodes Scholar, Mandela-Magdalene Scholar and Mandela-Rhodes Scholar.

Title of thesis

GCSE History, Policy Reform and Student Development: How students and teachers navigate the thematic study “Empires, Migration and the People”

Conference papers

Teaching Migration, Belonging, and Empire in Secondary Schools: evaluation of a teacher professional development program, (2019) History Educators International Research Network Conference, Lead author: Dr Jason Todd, University of Vienna, Austria.

“The Problems and Prospects of Teaching South Africa’s Recent History: Teachers’ Perspectives”, (2018) Sustainability, peace and education – Exploring promise and practice: BAICE 20th Anniversary Symposium, University of Bristol, England.

“New Generations, Old Wounds: Learning History at Home and School in Northern Ireland”, (2018) European Social Science and History Conference,
Queens University Belfast, Northern Ireland.

“The Methodological Challenges of Investigating the Role of History Teaching in Peacebuilding”, (2017), Present Past: Time, Memory, and the Negotiation of Historical Justice Conference, Columbia University, United States of America.

“Teaching South Africa’s Truth and Reconciliation Commission”, (2017) European Conference on African Studies, Universität Basel, Switzerland.

Research Assistant Publications

Review of the evidence on feedback in primary and secondary schools, (forthcoming, 2021) for the Education Endowment Foundation, Lead author: Prof Velda Elliott.

Teaching Migration, Belonging, and Empire in Secondary Schools, (2019), for Runnymede Trust and the European Research Council, Lead authors: Kimberly McIntosh, Dr Jason Todd and Prof Nandini Das.

Gender and the Politics of Reconciliation (2016), for The Institute for Justice and Reconciliation, Lead author: Dr Helen Scanlon

SOLE AUTHOR PUBLICATIONS

‘Transitions, Truth-Telling and Teaching History’, Cambridge Open-Review Educational Research e-Journal, Vol. 4, 2017.

Alice Tawell is an ESRC funded DPhil Student, co-supervised across the Department of Education and Centre for Criminology at the University of Oxford.

Supervisors: Professor Harry Daniels and Dr Rachel Condry.

Alice’s research focuses broadly on the enactment of school exclusion policy in England.

Prior to starting her doctoral studies, Alice gained a BSc in Sociology from the University of Bath and an MSc in Education (Research Training) from the University of Oxford.

As part of her undergraduate degree, Alice undertook a placement year working with Professor Kathy Sylva in the Families, Effective Learning and Literacy Research Group at the Department of Education, University of Oxford. After completing her degree, Alice returned to the department and has worked as a Research Officer on a number of different research projects since 2014. Most recently Alice has worked as part of the Excluded Lives Research Team on two projects exploring exclusion from school from a multidisciplinary perspective. In 2017 she was awarded a Seed-corn Small Grant Award to co-lead a pilot project exploring student collaborative networks with Hau Ming Tse. Alice also co-convenes the Qualitative Methods Hub in the department.

Outside of the department, Alice has sat on the Advisory Board for the Children Missing Education research project (2016-2017) at the National Children’s Bureau (NCB) and has been a member of the NCB Partnership for Well Being and Mental Health in Schools since 2016. She also sits on the Transparency on Exclusions Steering Group.

In 2017 Alice received funding from the Grand Union Doctoral Training Partnership placement scheme to conduct a Knowledge Exchange Internship with the Early Years Analysis and Research Unit at the Department for Education, and in 2018 Alice was elected the Co-President of the Grand Union ESRC Scholar’s Association, representing ESRC students from the University of Oxford, Brunel and The Open University.

Ashmita graduated from Boston University in 2008 with a BSc. in Biomedical Engineering, after which she worked in Research & Development for 6 years.

It is here that she decided to make the leap from formulation chemistry to STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Math) Education after having worked on programs involving increasing diversity in STEM in schools.

She received her Master’s from Boston University in 2015 in Education Policy. Her research interests include: STEM education policy; Assessment; Further Education; Higher Education; Science education pedagogy

Originally from Indonesia, Tracey has spent the last decade studying in the UK and working about multicultural education in Indonesia.

She is fully funded by the Indonesia Endowment Fund for Education (LPDP). Her doctoral research explores the ways Indonesian schools teach and accommodate the national vision of multicultural Indonesia, “Bhinneka Tunggal Ika” (Unity-in-Diversity). By using a two-tier case study research approach (case studies of six schools and of two provinces), it presents nuanced and critical account of the ways head teachers, teachers, students and parents from six state and private schools in Jakarta and Bali with different mixes of pupil ethnicity and religiosity understand and accommodate the vision of diversity into educational practices. Despite the highly contextual focus, the research offers a critical view into the complex role of schools in today’s era of globalisation in providing quality education for all and at the same time creating citizens who are inclusive and respectful towards others.

Tracey completed her MSc in Comparative and International Education at the University of Oxford in 2011 and her honours BA in Mathematics and Education Studies at the University of Cambridge in 2010. Upon completing her study in the UK, she returned to Indonesia to work in an educational foundation Sultan Iskandar Muda in Medan, Indonesia as a member of the Board of Directors in the Foundation – a position which she is still holding until today. She is responsible for overlooking the development and implementation of multicultural education and teacher development programme.

During her tenure, she has worked alongside the head teachers and teachers across all educational levels (from pre-school until high school) and produced books on the praxis of multicultural education in the school setting.

Title of Thesis

Accommodating a vision of diversity in different school contexts: “Unity-in-Diversity” in Indonesia

Publications
Journal Article
  • Harjatanaya, T.Y. & Hoon, C.Y. (2018) Politics of multicultural education in post-Suharto Indonesia: a study of the Chinese minority. Compare: A Journal of Comparative and International Education
Edited Book
  • Harjatanaya, T.Y. (2015) (2nd Edition) Merawat Keberagaman: Praksis Pendidikan Multikultural Perguruan Sultan Iskandar Muda (Fostering Diversity: Praxis of Multicultural Education in Sultan Iskandar Muda). Medan: YPSIM.
Book Chapter
  • Harjatanaya, T.Y. (2018). Akses dan Kesamaan dalam Pendidikan Vokasi (Access and Equality in Vocational Education). In Ferary, D. (2018) Sistem Pendidikan Vokasi di Inggris (Vocational Education System in England) (ed.). London: Kantor Atase Pendidikan dan Kebudayaan, Kedutaan Besar Indonesia (Indonesian Embassy) London, p. 121-138.

Katy is a Deputy Headteacher and the founder of a Leadership and Coaching Institute, which she now co-directs.

Katy is an Associate Fellow at the Oxford Character Project and a Research Associate at the Oxford University Wellbeing Research Centre. She is the co-founder of Global Social Leaders, a leadership programme which has participants in 105 countries, all passionate about creating and sustaining positive change in the world.

Title of Thesis

How could school leaders improve the flourishing and wellbeing of teaching staff?

Books
  • Granville-Chapman, K. and Bidston, E (2020) Leader: Know, love and inspire your people. Carmarthen: Crownhouse Publishing
Book Chapters
  •  Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ In White, M. & McCallum, F. (Ed.s) Wellbeing and Resilience Education: Covid-19 And Its Impact on Education Systems. Routledge
Publications
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘Purpose and Leadership in Education and Beyond’. The Education Exchange. Available from: https://theeducation.exchange/purpose-and-leadership-in-education-and-beyond/
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘The Three Secrets of COVID-era Leadership’. Times Education Supplement. Available from: https://www.tes.com/news/three-secrets-covid-era-school-leadership
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2016) ‘Assessing the Impact of a Teacher Leadership Programme in a Teaching Schools Alliance. Journal of Teacher Action Research
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2014) ‘The Afghan conflict: causes and consequences.’ Geography Review 28(1): 22-27
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2013) What are the psychological factors that affect students’ academic resilience and can teachers influence these? Unpublished thesis
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘Unlocking Leadership Potential’, The Magazine of the Boarding School’s Association, 33: 42-45
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2009) ‘Learning to Lead’, Leader, The Education Leader Magazine 41: 22-25
Presentations
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2019) ‘How could leaders improve the flourishing of their teams?’ ‘Stowe Ed Conference’, Forthcoming: 7 Jan 2019
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2018) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education: 21 Jun 2018
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2017) ‘How can school leaders improve teacher flourishing?’ ‘Doing Education Differently Conference’, University of Oxford, Department of Education, 11 Mar 17
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2016) ‘Developing school leaders who enable teachers to flourish’ The Telegraph Festival of Education 23 Jun 16
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Developing leadership in pupils and teachers’ High School Affiliated to Renmin University of China, Beijing. 20 Oct 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Resilience for leaders.’ Global Social Leaders World Summit. 16 Aug 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Emotional Intelligence for Leaders.’ Global Leaders in Education. 12 Aug 15
  • Coates, S.; Fraser, H.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J.; and Nasim, A. (2015) ‘Breaking through the glass ceiling – how can schools empower our girls to become leaders?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education. 19 Jun 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. ‘Developing Leadership in Schools’ (2015). G20 Schools Conference. International conference for head teachers. 11 Apr 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2018) ‘Introduction’, Wellington Leadership Institute: Festival of Leadership. Mar 2012-15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘How the Young Learn to Lead’, Raffles Institution (Singapore) -Purdue University (USA) Education Forum on Gifted & Talented Youth 2012. Singapore. 15 Mar 12
  • Draper, D.; Dyer, R.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Schools’. Presentation for a meeting about pupil leadership and character development at 10 Downing Street. 16 Nov 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Young People’. Presentation for a meeting about leadership and character at 10 Downing Street. 7 Mar 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K. & Seldon, A. (2012) ‘Introduction’, Leading Your School in the 21st Century. 7 Feb 12

Prior to starting his DPhil, Eddy worked as a primary school teacher in Bristol, where he also completed his MSc in Educational Research.

He is particularly interested in the culture of high stakes, standardised testing, and how this might perpetuate existing inequalities in schools. His research focuses specifically on the interaction between knowledge, policy and pedagogy in the context of Literacy education.

 

Amanda is completing a part-time DPhil, alongside working in Initial Teacher Education at Leeds Trinity University.

Her research is focused on understanding tensions, contradictions and conflicts that teachers in disadvantaged schools may experience when they engage in research activity.  Her research focus is influenced by her own experiences of working as a research-active teacher in disadvantaged schools, and recent work in teacher education to support experienced and beginning teachers in developing their own research activities.

One of the aims of Amanda’s research is to construct a framework to support teachers in pursuing research activity and critical scholarship work which articulates with wider social movements to address issues of poverty and disadvantage in schools.

Title of Thesis

Teachers’ perspectives on tensions between policy, practice and research in disadvantaged schools

Publications 

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2017) A ‘usable past’ of teacher education in England: history in JET’s anniversary issue. Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy, 43 (5), pp.616-627.

Nuttall, A. (2016) The ‘curriculum challenge’: Moving towards the ‘Storyline’ approach in a case study urban primary school.  Improving Schools, 19 (2), pp. 154-166.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Learning {Re}imagined: A review.  Primary First, 15, pp. 17-18.

Nuttall, A. and Doherty, J. (2014) Disaffected boys and the achievement gap: the ‘wallpaper effect’ and what is hidden by a focus on school results.  The Urban Review, 46 (5), pp.800-815.

Conference Papers and Presentations

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2018) “No child is pre-ordained to fail” Teachers questioning policy assumptions.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Newcastle, 11-13 September.

Nuttall, A. and Tobbell, C. (2017) Trainee teachers’ perspectives on practitioner enquiry.  Paper presented at the 8th TEAN Conference: Thinking Deeply about Education, Birmingham, 11-12 May.

Nuttall, A. (2017) Assessment at primary level: quality, comparability and improving secondary readiness.  A perspective from ITE.  Speech at the Westminster Education Forum Keynote Seminar: Next steps for reforming primary education: effective teaching practices, assessment and accountably, London, 18 January.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Deficit narratives and lived realities: whose poverty is it?  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the Australian Association for Research in Education, Melbourne, 27 November – 1 December.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Disenfranchised boys’ reflections on their urban schooling experience: “What a Waste!”.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Philpott, C., Beckett, L. and Wrigley, T. (2016) Collaborative practitioner inquiry: making a difference to urban schools.  Innovation session (school visits and symposium) presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Finn, B. and Beckett, L. (2015) Teachers’ constructions of poverty effects: Their research evidence.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Belfast, 15-17 September.

Nuttall, A. (2014) Teachers’ voice on disengaged boys: the role of one teacher-researcher in an English primary school. Paper presented at the Joint Australian Association for Research in Education and the New Zealand Association for Research in Education Conference, Brisbane, 30 November – 4 December.

Andrew Marotta is a D.Phil candidate in the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. He holds an A.A. in Social Sciences from Broward Community College, and a B.A. in Individualized Studies from the Gallatin School of Individualized Studies, New York University and an M.A. and Ed.M. in Counseling Psychology and School Counseling from Teachers College, Columbia University.

Andrew’s research interests include social and emotional learning, peer mentorship, existential therapy / philosophy, curriculum design for school counselors, and applied ethics in computer science. Andrew’s thesis examines how literature and philosophy can be used to nurture social and emotional learning through group counseling among high school students. He has also worked as a school counselor, teaching artist, and curriculum designer.

Presently, Andrew is designing joint humanities and applied ethics workshops for computer and data science college majors, using social and emotional learning concepts as the pedagogical foundation.

Abigail’s research explores the role of education in students’ personal development and how this can be supported by policy, curricula, initial teacher education and teacher professional development. In particular she focuses on history education, citizenship education and peace education as vehicles for dialogue. These opportunities for students to engage with social questions are vital for building cohesive societies. This flows from the recognition that traditional forums for developing public understanding, such as post-conflict truth commissions, need to be complemented by intergenerational and educational perspectives.

Abigail has taught History, Politics, Debating as well as Relationships and Sex Education to secondary school students in South Africa, England and the USA.

She holds postgraduate degrees in Post-Conflict and Transitional Justice (University of Cape Town), in Education, Globalisation and International Development (University of Cambridge) and in African Studies (University of Oxford). She is a Rhodes Scholar, Mandela-Magdalene Scholar and Mandela-Rhodes Scholar.

Title of thesis

GCSE History, Policy Reform and Student Development: How students and teachers navigate the thematic study “Empires, Migration and the People”

Conference papers

Teaching Migration, Belonging, and Empire in Secondary Schools: evaluation of a teacher professional development program, (2019) History Educators International Research Network Conference, Lead author: Dr Jason Todd, University of Vienna, Austria.

“The Problems and Prospects of Teaching South Africa’s Recent History: Teachers’ Perspectives”, (2018) Sustainability, peace and education – Exploring promise and practice: BAICE 20th Anniversary Symposium, University of Bristol, England.

“New Generations, Old Wounds: Learning History at Home and School in Northern Ireland”, (2018) European Social Science and History Conference,
Queens University Belfast, Northern Ireland.

“The Methodological Challenges of Investigating the Role of History Teaching in Peacebuilding”, (2017), Present Past: Time, Memory, and the Negotiation of Historical Justice Conference, Columbia University, United States of America.

“Teaching South Africa’s Truth and Reconciliation Commission”, (2017) European Conference on African Studies, Universität Basel, Switzerland.

Research Assistant Publications

Review of the evidence on feedback in primary and secondary schools, (forthcoming, 2021) for the Education Endowment Foundation, Lead author: Prof Velda Elliott.

Teaching Migration, Belonging, and Empire in Secondary Schools, (2019), for Runnymede Trust and the European Research Council, Lead authors: Kimberly McIntosh, Dr Jason Todd and Prof Nandini Das.

Gender and the Politics of Reconciliation (2016), for The Institute for Justice and Reconciliation, Lead author: Dr Helen Scanlon

SOLE AUTHOR PUBLICATIONS

‘Transitions, Truth-Telling and Teaching History’, Cambridge Open-Review Educational Research e-Journal, Vol. 4, 2017.

Alice Tawell is an ESRC funded DPhil Student, co-supervised across the Department of Education and Centre for Criminology at the University of Oxford.

Supervisors: Professor Harry Daniels and Dr Rachel Condry.

Alice’s research focuses broadly on the enactment of school exclusion policy in England.

Prior to starting her doctoral studies, Alice gained a BSc in Sociology from the University of Bath and an MSc in Education (Research Training) from the University of Oxford.

As part of her undergraduate degree, Alice undertook a placement year working with Professor Kathy Sylva in the Families, Effective Learning and Literacy Research Group at the Department of Education, University of Oxford. After completing her degree, Alice returned to the department and has worked as a Research Officer on a number of different research projects since 2014. Most recently Alice has worked as part of the Excluded Lives Research Team on two projects exploring exclusion from school from a multidisciplinary perspective. In 2017 she was awarded a Seed-corn Small Grant Award to co-lead a pilot project exploring student collaborative networks with Hau Ming Tse. Alice also co-convenes the Qualitative Methods Hub in the department.

Outside of the department, Alice has sat on the Advisory Board for the Children Missing Education research project (2016-2017) at the National Children’s Bureau (NCB) and has been a member of the NCB Partnership for Well Being and Mental Health in Schools since 2016. She also sits on the Transparency on Exclusions Steering Group.

In 2017 Alice received funding from the Grand Union Doctoral Training Partnership placement scheme to conduct a Knowledge Exchange Internship with the Early Years Analysis and Research Unit at the Department for Education, and in 2018 Alice was elected the Co-President of the Grand Union ESRC Scholar’s Association, representing ESRC students from the University of Oxford, Brunel and The Open University.

Ashmita graduated from Boston University in 2008 with a BSc. in Biomedical Engineering, after which she worked in Research & Development for 6 years.

It is here that she decided to make the leap from formulation chemistry to STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Math) Education after having worked on programs involving increasing diversity in STEM in schools.

She received her Master’s from Boston University in 2015 in Education Policy. Her research interests include: STEM education policy; Assessment; Further Education; Higher Education; Science education pedagogy

Originally from Indonesia, Tracey has spent the last decade studying in the UK and working about multicultural education in Indonesia.

She is fully funded by the Indonesia Endowment Fund for Education (LPDP). Her doctoral research explores the ways Indonesian schools teach and accommodate the national vision of multicultural Indonesia, “Bhinneka Tunggal Ika” (Unity-in-Diversity). By using a two-tier case study research approach (case studies of six schools and of two provinces), it presents nuanced and critical account of the ways head teachers, teachers, students and parents from six state and private schools in Jakarta and Bali with different mixes of pupil ethnicity and religiosity understand and accommodate the vision of diversity into educational practices. Despite the highly contextual focus, the research offers a critical view into the complex role of schools in today’s era of globalisation in providing quality education for all and at the same time creating citizens who are inclusive and respectful towards others.

Tracey completed her MSc in Comparative and International Education at the University of Oxford in 2011 and her honours BA in Mathematics and Education Studies at the University of Cambridge in 2010. Upon completing her study in the UK, she returned to Indonesia to work in an educational foundation Sultan Iskandar Muda in Medan, Indonesia as a member of the Board of Directors in the Foundation – a position which she is still holding until today. She is responsible for overlooking the development and implementation of multicultural education and teacher development programme.

During her tenure, she has worked alongside the head teachers and teachers across all educational levels (from pre-school until high school) and produced books on the praxis of multicultural education in the school setting.

Title of Thesis

Accommodating a vision of diversity in different school contexts: “Unity-in-Diversity” in Indonesia

Publications
Journal Article
  • Harjatanaya, T.Y. & Hoon, C.Y. (2018) Politics of multicultural education in post-Suharto Indonesia: a study of the Chinese minority. Compare: A Journal of Comparative and International Education
Edited Book
  • Harjatanaya, T.Y. (2015) (2nd Edition) Merawat Keberagaman: Praksis Pendidikan Multikultural Perguruan Sultan Iskandar Muda (Fostering Diversity: Praxis of Multicultural Education in Sultan Iskandar Muda). Medan: YPSIM.
Book Chapter
  • Harjatanaya, T.Y. (2018). Akses dan Kesamaan dalam Pendidikan Vokasi (Access and Equality in Vocational Education). In Ferary, D. (2018) Sistem Pendidikan Vokasi di Inggris (Vocational Education System in England) (ed.). London: Kantor Atase Pendidikan dan Kebudayaan, Kedutaan Besar Indonesia (Indonesian Embassy) London, p. 121-138.

Katy is a Deputy Headteacher and the founder of a Leadership and Coaching Institute, which she now co-directs.

Katy is an Associate Fellow at the Oxford Character Project and a Research Associate at the Oxford University Wellbeing Research Centre. She is the co-founder of Global Social Leaders, a leadership programme which has participants in 105 countries, all passionate about creating and sustaining positive change in the world.

Title of Thesis

How could school leaders improve the flourishing and wellbeing of teaching staff?

Books
  • Granville-Chapman, K. and Bidston, E (2020) Leader: Know, love and inspire your people. Carmarthen: Crownhouse Publishing
Book Chapters
  •  Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ In White, M. & McCallum, F. (Ed.s) Wellbeing and Resilience Education: Covid-19 And Its Impact on Education Systems. Routledge
Publications
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘Purpose and Leadership in Education and Beyond’. The Education Exchange. Available from: https://theeducation.exchange/purpose-and-leadership-in-education-and-beyond/
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘The Three Secrets of COVID-era Leadership’. Times Education Supplement. Available from: https://www.tes.com/news/three-secrets-covid-era-school-leadership
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2016) ‘Assessing the Impact of a Teacher Leadership Programme in a Teaching Schools Alliance. Journal of Teacher Action Research
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2014) ‘The Afghan conflict: causes and consequences.’ Geography Review 28(1): 22-27
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2013) What are the psychological factors that affect students’ academic resilience and can teachers influence these? Unpublished thesis
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘Unlocking Leadership Potential’, The Magazine of the Boarding School’s Association, 33: 42-45
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2009) ‘Learning to Lead’, Leader, The Education Leader Magazine 41: 22-25
Presentations
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2019) ‘How could leaders improve the flourishing of their teams?’ ‘Stowe Ed Conference’, Forthcoming: 7 Jan 2019
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2018) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education: 21 Jun 2018
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2017) ‘How can school leaders improve teacher flourishing?’ ‘Doing Education Differently Conference’, University of Oxford, Department of Education, 11 Mar 17
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2016) ‘Developing school leaders who enable teachers to flourish’ The Telegraph Festival of Education 23 Jun 16
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Developing leadership in pupils and teachers’ High School Affiliated to Renmin University of China, Beijing. 20 Oct 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Resilience for leaders.’ Global Social Leaders World Summit. 16 Aug 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Emotional Intelligence for Leaders.’ Global Leaders in Education. 12 Aug 15
  • Coates, S.; Fraser, H.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J.; and Nasim, A. (2015) ‘Breaking through the glass ceiling – how can schools empower our girls to become leaders?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education. 19 Jun 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. ‘Developing Leadership in Schools’ (2015). G20 Schools Conference. International conference for head teachers. 11 Apr 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2018) ‘Introduction’, Wellington Leadership Institute: Festival of Leadership. Mar 2012-15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘How the Young Learn to Lead’, Raffles Institution (Singapore) -Purdue University (USA) Education Forum on Gifted & Talented Youth 2012. Singapore. 15 Mar 12
  • Draper, D.; Dyer, R.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Schools’. Presentation for a meeting about pupil leadership and character development at 10 Downing Street. 16 Nov 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Young People’. Presentation for a meeting about leadership and character at 10 Downing Street. 7 Mar 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K. & Seldon, A. (2012) ‘Introduction’, Leading Your School in the 21st Century. 7 Feb 12

Prior to starting his DPhil, Eddy worked as a primary school teacher in Bristol, where he also completed his MSc in Educational Research.

He is particularly interested in the culture of high stakes, standardised testing, and how this might perpetuate existing inequalities in schools. His research focuses specifically on the interaction between knowledge, policy and pedagogy in the context of Literacy education.

 

Amanda is completing a part-time DPhil, alongside working in Initial Teacher Education at Leeds Trinity University.

Her research is focused on understanding tensions, contradictions and conflicts that teachers in disadvantaged schools may experience when they engage in research activity.  Her research focus is influenced by her own experiences of working as a research-active teacher in disadvantaged schools, and recent work in teacher education to support experienced and beginning teachers in developing their own research activities.

One of the aims of Amanda’s research is to construct a framework to support teachers in pursuing research activity and critical scholarship work which articulates with wider social movements to address issues of poverty and disadvantage in schools.

Title of Thesis

Teachers’ perspectives on tensions between policy, practice and research in disadvantaged schools

Publications 

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2017) A ‘usable past’ of teacher education in England: history in JET’s anniversary issue. Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy, 43 (5), pp.616-627.

Nuttall, A. (2016) The ‘curriculum challenge’: Moving towards the ‘Storyline’ approach in a case study urban primary school.  Improving Schools, 19 (2), pp. 154-166.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Learning {Re}imagined: A review.  Primary First, 15, pp. 17-18.

Nuttall, A. and Doherty, J. (2014) Disaffected boys and the achievement gap: the ‘wallpaper effect’ and what is hidden by a focus on school results.  The Urban Review, 46 (5), pp.800-815.

Conference Papers and Presentations

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2018) “No child is pre-ordained to fail” Teachers questioning policy assumptions.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Newcastle, 11-13 September.

Nuttall, A. and Tobbell, C. (2017) Trainee teachers’ perspectives on practitioner enquiry.  Paper presented at the 8th TEAN Conference: Thinking Deeply about Education, Birmingham, 11-12 May.

Nuttall, A. (2017) Assessment at primary level: quality, comparability and improving secondary readiness.  A perspective from ITE.  Speech at the Westminster Education Forum Keynote Seminar: Next steps for reforming primary education: effective teaching practices, assessment and accountably, London, 18 January.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Deficit narratives and lived realities: whose poverty is it?  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the Australian Association for Research in Education, Melbourne, 27 November – 1 December.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Disenfranchised boys’ reflections on their urban schooling experience: “What a Waste!”.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Philpott, C., Beckett, L. and Wrigley, T. (2016) Collaborative practitioner inquiry: making a difference to urban schools.  Innovation session (school visits and symposium) presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Finn, B. and Beckett, L. (2015) Teachers’ constructions of poverty effects: Their research evidence.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Belfast, 15-17 September.

Nuttall, A. (2014) Teachers’ voice on disengaged boys: the role of one teacher-researcher in an English primary school. Paper presented at the Joint Australian Association for Research in Education and the New Zealand Association for Research in Education Conference, Brisbane, 30 November – 4 December.

Andrew Marotta is a D.Phil candidate in the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. He holds an A.A. in Social Sciences from Broward Community College, and a B.A. in Individualized Studies from the Gallatin School of Individualized Studies, New York University and an M.A. and Ed.M. in Counseling Psychology and School Counseling from Teachers College, Columbia University.

Andrew’s research interests include social and emotional learning, peer mentorship, existential therapy / philosophy, curriculum design for school counselors, and applied ethics in computer science. Andrew’s thesis examines how literature and philosophy can be used to nurture social and emotional learning through group counseling among high school students. He has also worked as a school counselor, teaching artist, and curriculum designer.

Presently, Andrew is designing joint humanities and applied ethics workshops for computer and data science college majors, using social and emotional learning concepts as the pedagogical foundation.

Abigail’s research explores the role of education in students’ personal development and how this can be supported by policy, curricula, initial teacher education and teacher professional development. In particular she focuses on history education, citizenship education and peace education as vehicles for dialogue. These opportunities for students to engage with social questions are vital for building cohesive societies. This flows from the recognition that traditional forums for developing public understanding, such as post-conflict truth commissions, need to be complemented by intergenerational and educational perspectives.

Abigail has taught History, Politics, Debating as well as Relationships and Sex Education to secondary school students in South Africa, England and the USA.

She holds postgraduate degrees in Post-Conflict and Transitional Justice (University of Cape Town), in Education, Globalisation and International Development (University of Cambridge) and in African Studies (University of Oxford). She is a Rhodes Scholar, Mandela-Magdalene Scholar and Mandela-Rhodes Scholar.

Title of thesis

GCSE History, Policy Reform and Student Development: How students and teachers navigate the thematic study “Empires, Migration and the People”

Conference papers

Teaching Migration, Belonging, and Empire in Secondary Schools: evaluation of a teacher professional development program, (2019) History Educators International Research Network Conference, Lead author: Dr Jason Todd, University of Vienna, Austria.

“The Problems and Prospects of Teaching South Africa’s Recent History: Teachers’ Perspectives”, (2018) Sustainability, peace and education – Exploring promise and practice: BAICE 20th Anniversary Symposium, University of Bristol, England.

“New Generations, Old Wounds: Learning History at Home and School in Northern Ireland”, (2018) European Social Science and History Conference,
Queens University Belfast, Northern Ireland.

“The Methodological Challenges of Investigating the Role of History Teaching in Peacebuilding”, (2017), Present Past: Time, Memory, and the Negotiation of Historical Justice Conference, Columbia University, United States of America.

“Teaching South Africa’s Truth and Reconciliation Commission”, (2017) European Conference on African Studies, Universität Basel, Switzerland.

Research Assistant Publications

Review of the evidence on feedback in primary and secondary schools, (forthcoming, 2021) for the Education Endowment Foundation, Lead author: Prof Velda Elliott.

Teaching Migration, Belonging, and Empire in Secondary Schools, (2019), for Runnymede Trust and the European Research Council, Lead authors: Kimberly McIntosh, Dr Jason Todd and Prof Nandini Das.

Gender and the Politics of Reconciliation (2016), for The Institute for Justice and Reconciliation, Lead author: Dr Helen Scanlon

SOLE AUTHOR PUBLICATIONS

‘Transitions, Truth-Telling and Teaching History’, Cambridge Open-Review Educational Research e-Journal, Vol. 4, 2017.

Alice Tawell is an ESRC funded DPhil Student, co-supervised across the Department of Education and Centre for Criminology at the University of Oxford.

Supervisors: Professor Harry Daniels and Dr Rachel Condry.

Alice’s research focuses broadly on the enactment of school exclusion policy in England.

Prior to starting her doctoral studies, Alice gained a BSc in Sociology from the University of Bath and an MSc in Education (Research Training) from the University of Oxford.

As part of her undergraduate degree, Alice undertook a placement year working with Professor Kathy Sylva in the Families, Effective Learning and Literacy Research Group at the Department of Education, University of Oxford. After completing her degree, Alice returned to the department and has worked as a Research Officer on a number of different research projects since 2014. Most recently Alice has worked as part of the Excluded Lives Research Team on two projects exploring exclusion from school from a multidisciplinary perspective. In 2017 she was awarded a Seed-corn Small Grant Award to co-lead a pilot project exploring student collaborative networks with Hau Ming Tse. Alice also co-convenes the Qualitative Methods Hub in the department.

Outside of the department, Alice has sat on the Advisory Board for the Children Missing Education research project (2016-2017) at the National Children’s Bureau (NCB) and has been a member of the NCB Partnership for Well Being and Mental Health in Schools since 2016. She also sits on the Transparency on Exclusions Steering Group.

In 2017 Alice received funding from the Grand Union Doctoral Training Partnership placement scheme to conduct a Knowledge Exchange Internship with the Early Years Analysis and Research Unit at the Department for Education, and in 2018 Alice was elected the Co-President of the Grand Union ESRC Scholar’s Association, representing ESRC students from the University of Oxford, Brunel and The Open University.

Ashmita graduated from Boston University in 2008 with a BSc. in Biomedical Engineering, after which she worked in Research & Development for 6 years.

It is here that she decided to make the leap from formulation chemistry to STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Math) Education after having worked on programs involving increasing diversity in STEM in schools.

She received her Master’s from Boston University in 2015 in Education Policy. Her research interests include: STEM education policy; Assessment; Further Education; Higher Education; Science education pedagogy

Originally from Indonesia, Tracey has spent the last decade studying in the UK and working about multicultural education in Indonesia.

She is fully funded by the Indonesia Endowment Fund for Education (LPDP). Her doctoral research explores the ways Indonesian schools teach and accommodate the national vision of multicultural Indonesia, “Bhinneka Tunggal Ika” (Unity-in-Diversity). By using a two-tier case study research approach (case studies of six schools and of two provinces), it presents nuanced and critical account of the ways head teachers, teachers, students and parents from six state and private schools in Jakarta and Bali with different mixes of pupil ethnicity and religiosity understand and accommodate the vision of diversity into educational practices. Despite the highly contextual focus, the research offers a critical view into the complex role of schools in today’s era of globalisation in providing quality education for all and at the same time creating citizens who are inclusive and respectful towards others.

Tracey completed her MSc in Comparative and International Education at the University of Oxford in 2011 and her honours BA in Mathematics and Education Studies at the University of Cambridge in 2010. Upon completing her study in the UK, she returned to Indonesia to work in an educational foundation Sultan Iskandar Muda in Medan, Indonesia as a member of the Board of Directors in the Foundation – a position which she is still holding until today. She is responsible for overlooking the development and implementation of multicultural education and teacher development programme.

During her tenure, she has worked alongside the head teachers and teachers across all educational levels (from pre-school until high school) and produced books on the praxis of multicultural education in the school setting.

Title of Thesis

Accommodating a vision of diversity in different school contexts: “Unity-in-Diversity” in Indonesia

Publications
Journal Article
  • Harjatanaya, T.Y. & Hoon, C.Y. (2018) Politics of multicultural education in post-Suharto Indonesia: a study of the Chinese minority. Compare: A Journal of Comparative and International Education
Edited Book
  • Harjatanaya, T.Y. (2015) (2nd Edition) Merawat Keberagaman: Praksis Pendidikan Multikultural Perguruan Sultan Iskandar Muda (Fostering Diversity: Praxis of Multicultural Education in Sultan Iskandar Muda). Medan: YPSIM.
Book Chapter
  • Harjatanaya, T.Y. (2018). Akses dan Kesamaan dalam Pendidikan Vokasi (Access and Equality in Vocational Education). In Ferary, D. (2018) Sistem Pendidikan Vokasi di Inggris (Vocational Education System in England) (ed.). London: Kantor Atase Pendidikan dan Kebudayaan, Kedutaan Besar Indonesia (Indonesian Embassy) London, p. 121-138.

Katy is a Deputy Headteacher and the founder of a Leadership and Coaching Institute, which she now co-directs.

Katy is an Associate Fellow at the Oxford Character Project and a Research Associate at the Oxford University Wellbeing Research Centre. She is the co-founder of Global Social Leaders, a leadership programme which has participants in 105 countries, all passionate about creating and sustaining positive change in the world.

Title of Thesis

How could school leaders improve the flourishing and wellbeing of teaching staff?

Books
  • Granville-Chapman, K. and Bidston, E (2020) Leader: Know, love and inspire your people. Carmarthen: Crownhouse Publishing
Book Chapters
  •  Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ In White, M. & McCallum, F. (Ed.s) Wellbeing and Resilience Education: Covid-19 And Its Impact on Education Systems. Routledge
Publications
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘Purpose and Leadership in Education and Beyond’. The Education Exchange. Available from: https://theeducation.exchange/purpose-and-leadership-in-education-and-beyond/
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘The Three Secrets of COVID-era Leadership’. Times Education Supplement. Available from: https://www.tes.com/news/three-secrets-covid-era-school-leadership
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2016) ‘Assessing the Impact of a Teacher Leadership Programme in a Teaching Schools Alliance. Journal of Teacher Action Research
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2014) ‘The Afghan conflict: causes and consequences.’ Geography Review 28(1): 22-27
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2013) What are the psychological factors that affect students’ academic resilience and can teachers influence these? Unpublished thesis
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘Unlocking Leadership Potential’, The Magazine of the Boarding School’s Association, 33: 42-45
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2009) ‘Learning to Lead’, Leader, The Education Leader Magazine 41: 22-25
Presentations
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2019) ‘How could leaders improve the flourishing of their teams?’ ‘Stowe Ed Conference’, Forthcoming: 7 Jan 2019
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2018) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education: 21 Jun 2018
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2017) ‘How can school leaders improve teacher flourishing?’ ‘Doing Education Differently Conference’, University of Oxford, Department of Education, 11 Mar 17
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2016) ‘Developing school leaders who enable teachers to flourish’ The Telegraph Festival of Education 23 Jun 16
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Developing leadership in pupils and teachers’ High School Affiliated to Renmin University of China, Beijing. 20 Oct 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Resilience for leaders.’ Global Social Leaders World Summit. 16 Aug 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Emotional Intelligence for Leaders.’ Global Leaders in Education. 12 Aug 15
  • Coates, S.; Fraser, H.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J.; and Nasim, A. (2015) ‘Breaking through the glass ceiling – how can schools empower our girls to become leaders?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education. 19 Jun 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. ‘Developing Leadership in Schools’ (2015). G20 Schools Conference. International conference for head teachers. 11 Apr 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2018) ‘Introduction’, Wellington Leadership Institute: Festival of Leadership. Mar 2012-15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘How the Young Learn to Lead’, Raffles Institution (Singapore) -Purdue University (USA) Education Forum on Gifted & Talented Youth 2012. Singapore. 15 Mar 12
  • Draper, D.; Dyer, R.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Schools’. Presentation for a meeting about pupil leadership and character development at 10 Downing Street. 16 Nov 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Young People’. Presentation for a meeting about leadership and character at 10 Downing Street. 7 Mar 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K. & Seldon, A. (2012) ‘Introduction’, Leading Your School in the 21st Century. 7 Feb 12

Prior to starting his DPhil, Eddy worked as a primary school teacher in Bristol, where he also completed his MSc in Educational Research.

He is particularly interested in the culture of high stakes, standardised testing, and how this might perpetuate existing inequalities in schools. His research focuses specifically on the interaction between knowledge, policy and pedagogy in the context of Literacy education.

 

Amanda is completing a part-time DPhil, alongside working in Initial Teacher Education at Leeds Trinity University.

Her research is focused on understanding tensions, contradictions and conflicts that teachers in disadvantaged schools may experience when they engage in research activity.  Her research focus is influenced by her own experiences of working as a research-active teacher in disadvantaged schools, and recent work in teacher education to support experienced and beginning teachers in developing their own research activities.

One of the aims of Amanda’s research is to construct a framework to support teachers in pursuing research activity and critical scholarship work which articulates with wider social movements to address issues of poverty and disadvantage in schools.

Title of Thesis

Teachers’ perspectives on tensions between policy, practice and research in disadvantaged schools

Publications 

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2017) A ‘usable past’ of teacher education in England: history in JET’s anniversary issue. Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy, 43 (5), pp.616-627.

Nuttall, A. (2016) The ‘curriculum challenge’: Moving towards the ‘Storyline’ approach in a case study urban primary school.  Improving Schools, 19 (2), pp. 154-166.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Learning {Re}imagined: A review.  Primary First, 15, pp. 17-18.

Nuttall, A. and Doherty, J. (2014) Disaffected boys and the achievement gap: the ‘wallpaper effect’ and what is hidden by a focus on school results.  The Urban Review, 46 (5), pp.800-815.

Conference Papers and Presentations

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2018) “No child is pre-ordained to fail” Teachers questioning policy assumptions.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Newcastle, 11-13 September.

Nuttall, A. and Tobbell, C. (2017) Trainee teachers’ perspectives on practitioner enquiry.  Paper presented at the 8th TEAN Conference: Thinking Deeply about Education, Birmingham, 11-12 May.

Nuttall, A. (2017) Assessment at primary level: quality, comparability and improving secondary readiness.  A perspective from ITE.  Speech at the Westminster Education Forum Keynote Seminar: Next steps for reforming primary education: effective teaching practices, assessment and accountably, London, 18 January.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Deficit narratives and lived realities: whose poverty is it?  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the Australian Association for Research in Education, Melbourne, 27 November – 1 December.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Disenfranchised boys’ reflections on their urban schooling experience: “What a Waste!”.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Philpott, C., Beckett, L. and Wrigley, T. (2016) Collaborative practitioner inquiry: making a difference to urban schools.  Innovation session (school visits and symposium) presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Finn, B. and Beckett, L. (2015) Teachers’ constructions of poverty effects: Their research evidence.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Belfast, 15-17 September.

Nuttall, A. (2014) Teachers’ voice on disengaged boys: the role of one teacher-researcher in an English primary school. Paper presented at the Joint Australian Association for Research in Education and the New Zealand Association for Research in Education Conference, Brisbane, 30 November – 4 December.

Andrew Marotta is a D.Phil candidate in the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. He holds an A.A. in Social Sciences from Broward Community College, and a B.A. in Individualized Studies from the Gallatin School of Individualized Studies, New York University and an M.A. and Ed.M. in Counseling Psychology and School Counseling from Teachers College, Columbia University.

Andrew’s research interests include social and emotional learning, peer mentorship, existential therapy / philosophy, curriculum design for school counselors, and applied ethics in computer science. Andrew’s thesis examines how literature and philosophy can be used to nurture social and emotional learning through group counseling among high school students. He has also worked as a school counselor, teaching artist, and curriculum designer.

Presently, Andrew is designing joint humanities and applied ethics workshops for computer and data science college majors, using social and emotional learning concepts as the pedagogical foundation.

Abigail’s research explores the role of education in students’ personal development and how this can be supported by policy, curricula, initial teacher education and teacher professional development. In particular she focuses on history education, citizenship education and peace education as vehicles for dialogue. These opportunities for students to engage with social questions are vital for building cohesive societies. This flows from the recognition that traditional forums for developing public understanding, such as post-conflict truth commissions, need to be complemented by intergenerational and educational perspectives.

Abigail has taught History, Politics, Debating as well as Relationships and Sex Education to secondary school students in South Africa, England and the USA.

She holds postgraduate degrees in Post-Conflict and Transitional Justice (University of Cape Town), in Education, Globalisation and International Development (University of Cambridge) and in African Studies (University of Oxford). She is a Rhodes Scholar, Mandela-Magdalene Scholar and Mandela-Rhodes Scholar.

Title of thesis

GCSE History, Policy Reform and Student Development: How students and teachers navigate the thematic study “Empires, Migration and the People”

Conference papers

Teaching Migration, Belonging, and Empire in Secondary Schools: evaluation of a teacher professional development program, (2019) History Educators International Research Network Conference, Lead author: Dr Jason Todd, University of Vienna, Austria.

“The Problems and Prospects of Teaching South Africa’s Recent History: Teachers’ Perspectives”, (2018) Sustainability, peace and education – Exploring promise and practice: BAICE 20th Anniversary Symposium, University of Bristol, England.

“New Generations, Old Wounds: Learning History at Home and School in Northern Ireland”, (2018) European Social Science and History Conference,
Queens University Belfast, Northern Ireland.

“The Methodological Challenges of Investigating the Role of History Teaching in Peacebuilding”, (2017), Present Past: Time, Memory, and the Negotiation of Historical Justice Conference, Columbia University, United States of America.

“Teaching South Africa’s Truth and Reconciliation Commission”, (2017) European Conference on African Studies, Universität Basel, Switzerland.

Research Assistant Publications

Review of the evidence on feedback in primary and secondary schools, (forthcoming, 2021) for the Education Endowment Foundation, Lead author: Prof Velda Elliott.

Teaching Migration, Belonging, and Empire in Secondary Schools, (2019), for Runnymede Trust and the European Research Council, Lead authors: Kimberly McIntosh, Dr Jason Todd and Prof Nandini Das.

Gender and the Politics of Reconciliation (2016), for The Institute for Justice and Reconciliation, Lead author: Dr Helen Scanlon

SOLE AUTHOR PUBLICATIONS

‘Transitions, Truth-Telling and Teaching History’, Cambridge Open-Review Educational Research e-Journal, Vol. 4, 2017.

Alice Tawell is an ESRC funded DPhil Student, co-supervised across the Department of Education and Centre for Criminology at the University of Oxford.

Supervisors: Professor Harry Daniels and Dr Rachel Condry.

Alice’s research focuses broadly on the enactment of school exclusion policy in England.

Prior to starting her doctoral studies, Alice gained a BSc in Sociology from the University of Bath and an MSc in Education (Research Training) from the University of Oxford.

As part of her undergraduate degree, Alice undertook a placement year working with Professor Kathy Sylva in the Families, Effective Learning and Literacy Research Group at the Department of Education, University of Oxford. After completing her degree, Alice returned to the department and has worked as a Research Officer on a number of different research projects since 2014. Most recently Alice has worked as part of the Excluded Lives Research Team on two projects exploring exclusion from school from a multidisciplinary perspective. In 2017 she was awarded a Seed-corn Small Grant Award to co-lead a pilot project exploring student collaborative networks with Hau Ming Tse. Alice also co-convenes the Qualitative Methods Hub in the department.

Outside of the department, Alice has sat on the Advisory Board for the Children Missing Education research project (2016-2017) at the National Children’s Bureau (NCB) and has been a member of the NCB Partnership for Well Being and Mental Health in Schools since 2016. She also sits on the Transparency on Exclusions Steering Group.

In 2017 Alice received funding from the Grand Union Doctoral Training Partnership placement scheme to conduct a Knowledge Exchange Internship with the Early Years Analysis and Research Unit at the Department for Education, and in 2018 Alice was elected the Co-President of the Grand Union ESRC Scholar’s Association, representing ESRC students from the University of Oxford, Brunel and The Open University.

Ashmita graduated from Boston University in 2008 with a BSc. in Biomedical Engineering, after which she worked in Research & Development for 6 years.

It is here that she decided to make the leap from formulation chemistry to STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Math) Education after having worked on programs involving increasing diversity in STEM in schools.

She received her Master’s from Boston University in 2015 in Education Policy. Her research interests include: STEM education policy; Assessment; Further Education; Higher Education; Science education pedagogy

Originally from Indonesia, Tracey has spent the last decade studying in the UK and working about multicultural education in Indonesia.

She is fully funded by the Indonesia Endowment Fund for Education (LPDP). Her doctoral research explores the ways Indonesian schools teach and accommodate the national vision of multicultural Indonesia, “Bhinneka Tunggal Ika” (Unity-in-Diversity). By using a two-tier case study research approach (case studies of six schools and of two provinces), it presents nuanced and critical account of the ways head teachers, teachers, students and parents from six state and private schools in Jakarta and Bali with different mixes of pupil ethnicity and religiosity understand and accommodate the vision of diversity into educational practices. Despite the highly contextual focus, the research offers a critical view into the complex role of schools in today’s era of globalisation in providing quality education for all and at the same time creating citizens who are inclusive and respectful towards others.

Tracey completed her MSc in Comparative and International Education at the University of Oxford in 2011 and her honours BA in Mathematics and Education Studies at the University of Cambridge in 2010. Upon completing her study in the UK, she returned to Indonesia to work in an educational foundation Sultan Iskandar Muda in Medan, Indonesia as a member of the Board of Directors in the Foundation – a position which she is still holding until today. She is responsible for overlooking the development and implementation of multicultural education and teacher development programme.

During her tenure, she has worked alongside the head teachers and teachers across all educational levels (from pre-school until high school) and produced books on the praxis of multicultural education in the school setting.

Title of Thesis

Accommodating a vision of diversity in different school contexts: “Unity-in-Diversity” in Indonesia

Publications
Journal Article
  • Harjatanaya, T.Y. & Hoon, C.Y. (2018) Politics of multicultural education in post-Suharto Indonesia: a study of the Chinese minority. Compare: A Journal of Comparative and International Education
Edited Book
  • Harjatanaya, T.Y. (2015) (2nd Edition) Merawat Keberagaman: Praksis Pendidikan Multikultural Perguruan Sultan Iskandar Muda (Fostering Diversity: Praxis of Multicultural Education in Sultan Iskandar Muda). Medan: YPSIM.
Book Chapter
  • Harjatanaya, T.Y. (2018). Akses dan Kesamaan dalam Pendidikan Vokasi (Access and Equality in Vocational Education). In Ferary, D. (2018) Sistem Pendidikan Vokasi di Inggris (Vocational Education System in England) (ed.). London: Kantor Atase Pendidikan dan Kebudayaan, Kedutaan Besar Indonesia (Indonesian Embassy) London, p. 121-138.

Katy is a Deputy Headteacher and the founder of a Leadership and Coaching Institute, which she now co-directs.

Katy is an Associate Fellow at the Oxford Character Project and a Research Associate at the Oxford University Wellbeing Research Centre. She is the co-founder of Global Social Leaders, a leadership programme which has participants in 105 countries, all passionate about creating and sustaining positive change in the world.

Title of Thesis

How could school leaders improve the flourishing and wellbeing of teaching staff?

Books
  • Granville-Chapman, K. and Bidston, E (2020) Leader: Know, love and inspire your people. Carmarthen: Crownhouse Publishing
Book Chapters
  •  Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ In White, M. & McCallum, F. (Ed.s) Wellbeing and Resilience Education: Covid-19 And Its Impact on Education Systems. Routledge
Publications
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘Purpose and Leadership in Education and Beyond’. The Education Exchange. Available from: https://theeducation.exchange/purpose-and-leadership-in-education-and-beyond/
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘The Three Secrets of COVID-era Leadership’. Times Education Supplement. Available from: https://www.tes.com/news/three-secrets-covid-era-school-leadership
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2016) ‘Assessing the Impact of a Teacher Leadership Programme in a Teaching Schools Alliance. Journal of Teacher Action Research
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2014) ‘The Afghan conflict: causes and consequences.’ Geography Review 28(1): 22-27
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2013) What are the psychological factors that affect students’ academic resilience and can teachers influence these? Unpublished thesis
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘Unlocking Leadership Potential’, The Magazine of the Boarding School’s Association, 33: 42-45
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2009) ‘Learning to Lead’, Leader, The Education Leader Magazine 41: 22-25
Presentations
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2019) ‘How could leaders improve the flourishing of their teams?’ ‘Stowe Ed Conference’, Forthcoming: 7 Jan 2019
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2018) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education: 21 Jun 2018
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2017) ‘How can school leaders improve teacher flourishing?’ ‘Doing Education Differently Conference’, University of Oxford, Department of Education, 11 Mar 17
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2016) ‘Developing school leaders who enable teachers to flourish’ The Telegraph Festival of Education 23 Jun 16
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Developing leadership in pupils and teachers’ High School Affiliated to Renmin University of China, Beijing. 20 Oct 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Resilience for leaders.’ Global Social Leaders World Summit. 16 Aug 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Emotional Intelligence for Leaders.’ Global Leaders in Education. 12 Aug 15
  • Coates, S.; Fraser, H.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J.; and Nasim, A. (2015) ‘Breaking through the glass ceiling – how can schools empower our girls to become leaders?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education. 19 Jun 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. ‘Developing Leadership in Schools’ (2015). G20 Schools Conference. International conference for head teachers. 11 Apr 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2018) ‘Introduction’, Wellington Leadership Institute: Festival of Leadership. Mar 2012-15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘How the Young Learn to Lead’, Raffles Institution (Singapore) -Purdue University (USA) Education Forum on Gifted & Talented Youth 2012. Singapore. 15 Mar 12
  • Draper, D.; Dyer, R.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Schools’. Presentation for a meeting about pupil leadership and character development at 10 Downing Street. 16 Nov 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Young People’. Presentation for a meeting about leadership and character at 10 Downing Street. 7 Mar 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K. & Seldon, A. (2012) ‘Introduction’, Leading Your School in the 21st Century. 7 Feb 12

Prior to starting his DPhil, Eddy worked as a primary school teacher in Bristol, where he also completed his MSc in Educational Research.

He is particularly interested in the culture of high stakes, standardised testing, and how this might perpetuate existing inequalities in schools. His research focuses specifically on the interaction between knowledge, policy and pedagogy in the context of Literacy education.

 

Amanda is completing a part-time DPhil, alongside working in Initial Teacher Education at Leeds Trinity University.

Her research is focused on understanding tensions, contradictions and conflicts that teachers in disadvantaged schools may experience when they engage in research activity.  Her research focus is influenced by her own experiences of working as a research-active teacher in disadvantaged schools, and recent work in teacher education to support experienced and beginning teachers in developing their own research activities.

One of the aims of Amanda’s research is to construct a framework to support teachers in pursuing research activity and critical scholarship work which articulates with wider social movements to address issues of poverty and disadvantage in schools.

Title of Thesis

Teachers’ perspectives on tensions between policy, practice and research in disadvantaged schools

Publications 

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2017) A ‘usable past’ of teacher education in England: history in JET’s anniversary issue. Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy, 43 (5), pp.616-627.

Nuttall, A. (2016) The ‘curriculum challenge’: Moving towards the ‘Storyline’ approach in a case study urban primary school.  Improving Schools, 19 (2), pp. 154-166.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Learning {Re}imagined: A review.  Primary First, 15, pp. 17-18.

Nuttall, A. and Doherty, J. (2014) Disaffected boys and the achievement gap: the ‘wallpaper effect’ and what is hidden by a focus on school results.  The Urban Review, 46 (5), pp.800-815.

Conference Papers and Presentations

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2018) “No child is pre-ordained to fail” Teachers questioning policy assumptions.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Newcastle, 11-13 September.

Nuttall, A. and Tobbell, C. (2017) Trainee teachers’ perspectives on practitioner enquiry.  Paper presented at the 8th TEAN Conference: Thinking Deeply about Education, Birmingham, 11-12 May.

Nuttall, A. (2017) Assessment at primary level: quality, comparability and improving secondary readiness.  A perspective from ITE.  Speech at the Westminster Education Forum Keynote Seminar: Next steps for reforming primary education: effective teaching practices, assessment and accountably, London, 18 January.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Deficit narratives and lived realities: whose poverty is it?  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the Australian Association for Research in Education, Melbourne, 27 November – 1 December.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Disenfranchised boys’ reflections on their urban schooling experience: “What a Waste!”.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Philpott, C., Beckett, L. and Wrigley, T. (2016) Collaborative practitioner inquiry: making a difference to urban schools.  Innovation session (school visits and symposium) presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Finn, B. and Beckett, L. (2015) Teachers’ constructions of poverty effects: Their research evidence.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Belfast, 15-17 September.

Nuttall, A. (2014) Teachers’ voice on disengaged boys: the role of one teacher-researcher in an English primary school. Paper presented at the Joint Australian Association for Research in Education and the New Zealand Association for Research in Education Conference, Brisbane, 30 November – 4 December.

Andrew Marotta is a D.Phil candidate in the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. He holds an A.A. in Social Sciences from Broward Community College, and a B.A. in Individualized Studies from the Gallatin School of Individualized Studies, New York University and an M.A. and Ed.M. in Counseling Psychology and School Counseling from Teachers College, Columbia University.

Andrew’s research interests include social and emotional learning, peer mentorship, existential therapy / philosophy, curriculum design for school counselors, and applied ethics in computer science. Andrew’s thesis examines how literature and philosophy can be used to nurture social and emotional learning through group counseling among high school students. He has also worked as a school counselor, teaching artist, and curriculum designer.

Presently, Andrew is designing joint humanities and applied ethics workshops for computer and data science college majors, using social and emotional learning concepts as the pedagogical foundation.

Abigail’s research explores the role of education in students’ personal development and how this can be supported by policy, curricula, initial teacher education and teacher professional development. In particular she focuses on history education, citizenship education and peace education as vehicles for dialogue. These opportunities for students to engage with social questions are vital for building cohesive societies. This flows from the recognition that traditional forums for developing public understanding, such as post-conflict truth commissions, need to be complemented by intergenerational and educational perspectives.

Abigail has taught History, Politics, Debating as well as Relationships and Sex Education to secondary school students in South Africa, England and the USA.

She holds postgraduate degrees in Post-Conflict and Transitional Justice (University of Cape Town), in Education, Globalisation and International Development (University of Cambridge) and in African Studies (University of Oxford). She is a Rhodes Scholar, Mandela-Magdalene Scholar and Mandela-Rhodes Scholar.

Title of thesis

GCSE History, Policy Reform and Student Development: How students and teachers navigate the thematic study “Empires, Migration and the People”

Conference papers

Teaching Migration, Belonging, and Empire in Secondary Schools: evaluation of a teacher professional development program, (2019) History Educators International Research Network Conference, Lead author: Dr Jason Todd, University of Vienna, Austria.

“The Problems and Prospects of Teaching South Africa’s Recent History: Teachers’ Perspectives”, (2018) Sustainability, peace and education – Exploring promise and practice: BAICE 20th Anniversary Symposium, University of Bristol, England.

“New Generations, Old Wounds: Learning History at Home and School in Northern Ireland”, (2018) European Social Science and History Conference,
Queens University Belfast, Northern Ireland.

“The Methodological Challenges of Investigating the Role of History Teaching in Peacebuilding”, (2017), Present Past: Time, Memory, and the Negotiation of Historical Justice Conference, Columbia University, United States of America.

“Teaching South Africa’s Truth and Reconciliation Commission”, (2017) European Conference on African Studies, Universität Basel, Switzerland.

Research Assistant Publications

Review of the evidence on feedback in primary and secondary schools, (forthcoming, 2021) for the Education Endowment Foundation, Lead author: Prof Velda Elliott.

Teaching Migration, Belonging, and Empire in Secondary Schools, (2019), for Runnymede Trust and the European Research Council, Lead authors: Kimberly McIntosh, Dr Jason Todd and Prof Nandini Das.

Gender and the Politics of Reconciliation (2016), for The Institute for Justice and Reconciliation, Lead author: Dr Helen Scanlon

SOLE AUTHOR PUBLICATIONS

‘Transitions, Truth-Telling and Teaching History’, Cambridge Open-Review Educational Research e-Journal, Vol. 4, 2017.

Alice Tawell is an ESRC funded DPhil Student, co-supervised across the Department of Education and Centre for Criminology at the University of Oxford.

Supervisors: Professor Harry Daniels and Dr Rachel Condry.

Alice’s research focuses broadly on the enactment of school exclusion policy in England.

Prior to starting her doctoral studies, Alice gained a BSc in Sociology from the University of Bath and an MSc in Education (Research Training) from the University of Oxford.

As part of her undergraduate degree, Alice undertook a placement year working with Professor Kathy Sylva in the Families, Effective Learning and Literacy Research Group at the Department of Education, University of Oxford. After completing her degree, Alice returned to the department and has worked as a Research Officer on a number of different research projects since 2014. Most recently Alice has worked as part of the Excluded Lives Research Team on two projects exploring exclusion from school from a multidisciplinary perspective. In 2017 she was awarded a Seed-corn Small Grant Award to co-lead a pilot project exploring student collaborative networks with Hau Ming Tse. Alice also co-convenes the Qualitative Methods Hub in the department.

Outside of the department, Alice has sat on the Advisory Board for the Children Missing Education research project (2016-2017) at the National Children’s Bureau (NCB) and has been a member of the NCB Partnership for Well Being and Mental Health in Schools since 2016. She also sits on the Transparency on Exclusions Steering Group.

In 2017 Alice received funding from the Grand Union Doctoral Training Partnership placement scheme to conduct a Knowledge Exchange Internship with the Early Years Analysis and Research Unit at the Department for Education, and in 2018 Alice was elected the Co-President of the Grand Union ESRC Scholar’s Association, representing ESRC students from the University of Oxford, Brunel and The Open University.

Ashmita graduated from Boston University in 2008 with a BSc. in Biomedical Engineering, after which she worked in Research & Development for 6 years.

It is here that she decided to make the leap from formulation chemistry to STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Math) Education after having worked on programs involving increasing diversity in STEM in schools.

She received her Master’s from Boston University in 2015 in Education Policy. Her research interests include: STEM education policy; Assessment; Further Education; Higher Education; Science education pedagogy

Originally from Indonesia, Tracey has spent the last decade studying in the UK and working about multicultural education in Indonesia.

She is fully funded by the Indonesia Endowment Fund for Education (LPDP). Her doctoral research explores the ways Indonesian schools teach and accommodate the national vision of multicultural Indonesia, “Bhinneka Tunggal Ika” (Unity-in-Diversity). By using a two-tier case study research approach (case studies of six schools and of two provinces), it presents nuanced and critical account of the ways head teachers, teachers, students and parents from six state and private schools in Jakarta and Bali with different mixes of pupil ethnicity and religiosity understand and accommodate the vision of diversity into educational practices. Despite the highly contextual focus, the research offers a critical view into the complex role of schools in today’s era of globalisation in providing quality education for all and at the same time creating citizens who are inclusive and respectful towards others.

Tracey completed her MSc in Comparative and International Education at the University of Oxford in 2011 and her honours BA in Mathematics and Education Studies at the University of Cambridge in 2010. Upon completing her study in the UK, she returned to Indonesia to work in an educational foundation Sultan Iskandar Muda in Medan, Indonesia as a member of the Board of Directors in the Foundation – a position which she is still holding until today. She is responsible for overlooking the development and implementation of multicultural education and teacher development programme.

During her tenure, she has worked alongside the head teachers and teachers across all educational levels (from pre-school until high school) and produced books on the praxis of multicultural education in the school setting.

Title of Thesis

Accommodating a vision of diversity in different school contexts: “Unity-in-Diversity” in Indonesia

Publications
Journal Article
  • Harjatanaya, T.Y. & Hoon, C.Y. (2018) Politics of multicultural education in post-Suharto Indonesia: a study of the Chinese minority. Compare: A Journal of Comparative and International Education
Edited Book
  • Harjatanaya, T.Y. (2015) (2nd Edition) Merawat Keberagaman: Praksis Pendidikan Multikultural Perguruan Sultan Iskandar Muda (Fostering Diversity: Praxis of Multicultural Education in Sultan Iskandar Muda). Medan: YPSIM.
Book Chapter
  • Harjatanaya, T.Y. (2018). Akses dan Kesamaan dalam Pendidikan Vokasi (Access and Equality in Vocational Education). In Ferary, D. (2018) Sistem Pendidikan Vokasi di Inggris (Vocational Education System in England) (ed.). London: Kantor Atase Pendidikan dan Kebudayaan, Kedutaan Besar Indonesia (Indonesian Embassy) London, p. 121-138.

Katy is a Deputy Headteacher and the founder of a Leadership and Coaching Institute, which she now co-directs.

Katy is an Associate Fellow at the Oxford Character Project and a Research Associate at the Oxford University Wellbeing Research Centre. She is the co-founder of Global Social Leaders, a leadership programme which has participants in 105 countries, all passionate about creating and sustaining positive change in the world.

Title of Thesis

How could school leaders improve the flourishing and wellbeing of teaching staff?

Books
  • Granville-Chapman, K. and Bidston, E (2020) Leader: Know, love and inspire your people. Carmarthen: Crownhouse Publishing
Book Chapters
  •  Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ In White, M. & McCallum, F. (Ed.s) Wellbeing and Resilience Education: Covid-19 And Its Impact on Education Systems. Routledge
Publications
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘Purpose and Leadership in Education and Beyond’. The Education Exchange. Available from: https://theeducation.exchange/purpose-and-leadership-in-education-and-beyond/
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘The Three Secrets of COVID-era Leadership’. Times Education Supplement. Available from: https://www.tes.com/news/three-secrets-covid-era-school-leadership
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2016) ‘Assessing the Impact of a Teacher Leadership Programme in a Teaching Schools Alliance. Journal of Teacher Action Research
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2014) ‘The Afghan conflict: causes and consequences.’ Geography Review 28(1): 22-27
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2013) What are the psychological factors that affect students’ academic resilience and can teachers influence these? Unpublished thesis
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘Unlocking Leadership Potential’, The Magazine of the Boarding School’s Association, 33: 42-45
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2009) ‘Learning to Lead’, Leader, The Education Leader Magazine 41: 22-25
Presentations
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2019) ‘How could leaders improve the flourishing of their teams?’ ‘Stowe Ed Conference’, Forthcoming: 7 Jan 2019
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2018) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education: 21 Jun 2018
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2017) ‘How can school leaders improve teacher flourishing?’ ‘Doing Education Differently Conference’, University of Oxford, Department of Education, 11 Mar 17
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2016) ‘Developing school leaders who enable teachers to flourish’ The Telegraph Festival of Education 23 Jun 16
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Developing leadership in pupils and teachers’ High School Affiliated to Renmin University of China, Beijing. 20 Oct 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Resilience for leaders.’ Global Social Leaders World Summit. 16 Aug 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Emotional Intelligence for Leaders.’ Global Leaders in Education. 12 Aug 15
  • Coates, S.; Fraser, H.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J.; and Nasim, A. (2015) ‘Breaking through the glass ceiling – how can schools empower our girls to become leaders?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education. 19 Jun 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. ‘Developing Leadership in Schools’ (2015). G20 Schools Conference. International conference for head teachers. 11 Apr 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2018) ‘Introduction’, Wellington Leadership Institute: Festival of Leadership. Mar 2012-15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘How the Young Learn to Lead’, Raffles Institution (Singapore) -Purdue University (USA) Education Forum on Gifted & Talented Youth 2012. Singapore. 15 Mar 12
  • Draper, D.; Dyer, R.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Schools’. Presentation for a meeting about pupil leadership and character development at 10 Downing Street. 16 Nov 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Young People’. Presentation for a meeting about leadership and character at 10 Downing Street. 7 Mar 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K. & Seldon, A. (2012) ‘Introduction’, Leading Your School in the 21st Century. 7 Feb 12

Prior to starting his DPhil, Eddy worked as a primary school teacher in Bristol, where he also completed his MSc in Educational Research.

He is particularly interested in the culture of high stakes, standardised testing, and how this might perpetuate existing inequalities in schools. His research focuses specifically on the interaction between knowledge, policy and pedagogy in the context of Literacy education.

 

Amanda is completing a part-time DPhil, alongside working in Initial Teacher Education at Leeds Trinity University.

Her research is focused on understanding tensions, contradictions and conflicts that teachers in disadvantaged schools may experience when they engage in research activity.  Her research focus is influenced by her own experiences of working as a research-active teacher in disadvantaged schools, and recent work in teacher education to support experienced and beginning teachers in developing their own research activities.

One of the aims of Amanda’s research is to construct a framework to support teachers in pursuing research activity and critical scholarship work which articulates with wider social movements to address issues of poverty and disadvantage in schools.

Title of Thesis

Teachers’ perspectives on tensions between policy, practice and research in disadvantaged schools

Publications 

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2017) A ‘usable past’ of teacher education in England: history in JET’s anniversary issue. Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy, 43 (5), pp.616-627.

Nuttall, A. (2016) The ‘curriculum challenge’: Moving towards the ‘Storyline’ approach in a case study urban primary school.  Improving Schools, 19 (2), pp. 154-166.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Learning {Re}imagined: A review.  Primary First, 15, pp. 17-18.

Nuttall, A. and Doherty, J. (2014) Disaffected boys and the achievement gap: the ‘wallpaper effect’ and what is hidden by a focus on school results.  The Urban Review, 46 (5), pp.800-815.

Conference Papers and Presentations

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2018) “No child is pre-ordained to fail” Teachers questioning policy assumptions.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Newcastle, 11-13 September.

Nuttall, A. and Tobbell, C. (2017) Trainee teachers’ perspectives on practitioner enquiry.  Paper presented at the 8th TEAN Conference: Thinking Deeply about Education, Birmingham, 11-12 May.

Nuttall, A. (2017) Assessment at primary level: quality, comparability and improving secondary readiness.  A perspective from ITE.  Speech at the Westminster Education Forum Keynote Seminar: Next steps for reforming primary education: effective teaching practices, assessment and accountably, London, 18 January.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Deficit narratives and lived realities: whose poverty is it?  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the Australian Association for Research in Education, Melbourne, 27 November – 1 December.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Disenfranchised boys’ reflections on their urban schooling experience: “What a Waste!”.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Philpott, C., Beckett, L. and Wrigley, T. (2016) Collaborative practitioner inquiry: making a difference to urban schools.  Innovation session (school visits and symposium) presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Finn, B. and Beckett, L. (2015) Teachers’ constructions of poverty effects: Their research evidence.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Belfast, 15-17 September.

Nuttall, A. (2014) Teachers’ voice on disengaged boys: the role of one teacher-researcher in an English primary school. Paper presented at the Joint Australian Association for Research in Education and the New Zealand Association for Research in Education Conference, Brisbane, 30 November – 4 December.

Andrew Marotta is a D.Phil candidate in the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. He holds an A.A. in Social Sciences from Broward Community College, and a B.A. in Individualized Studies from the Gallatin School of Individualized Studies, New York University and an M.A. and Ed.M. in Counseling Psychology and School Counseling from Teachers College, Columbia University.

Andrew’s research interests include social and emotional learning, peer mentorship, existential therapy / philosophy, curriculum design for school counselors, and applied ethics in computer science. Andrew’s thesis examines how literature and philosophy can be used to nurture social and emotional learning through group counseling among high school students. He has also worked as a school counselor, teaching artist, and curriculum designer.

Presently, Andrew is designing joint humanities and applied ethics workshops for computer and data science college majors, using social and emotional learning concepts as the pedagogical foundation.

Abigail’s research explores the role of education in students’ personal development and how this can be supported by policy, curricula, initial teacher education and teacher professional development. In particular she focuses on history education, citizenship education and peace education as vehicles for dialogue. These opportunities for students to engage with social questions are vital for building cohesive societies. This flows from the recognition that traditional forums for developing public understanding, such as post-conflict truth commissions, need to be complemented by intergenerational and educational perspectives.

Abigail has taught History, Politics, Debating as well as Relationships and Sex Education to secondary school students in South Africa, England and the USA.

She holds postgraduate degrees in Post-Conflict and Transitional Justice (University of Cape Town), in Education, Globalisation and International Development (University of Cambridge) and in African Studies (University of Oxford). She is a Rhodes Scholar, Mandela-Magdalene Scholar and Mandela-Rhodes Scholar.

Title of thesis

GCSE History, Policy Reform and Student Development: How students and teachers navigate the thematic study “Empires, Migration and the People”

Conference papers

Teaching Migration, Belonging, and Empire in Secondary Schools: evaluation of a teacher professional development program, (2019) History Educators International Research Network Conference, Lead author: Dr Jason Todd, University of Vienna, Austria.

“The Problems and Prospects of Teaching South Africa’s Recent History: Teachers’ Perspectives”, (2018) Sustainability, peace and education – Exploring promise and practice: BAICE 20th Anniversary Symposium, University of Bristol, England.

“New Generations, Old Wounds: Learning History at Home and School in Northern Ireland”, (2018) European Social Science and History Conference,
Queens University Belfast, Northern Ireland.

“The Methodological Challenges of Investigating the Role of History Teaching in Peacebuilding”, (2017), Present Past: Time, Memory, and the Negotiation of Historical Justice Conference, Columbia University, United States of America.

“Teaching South Africa’s Truth and Reconciliation Commission”, (2017) European Conference on African Studies, Universität Basel, Switzerland.

Research Assistant Publications

Review of the evidence on feedback in primary and secondary schools, (forthcoming, 2021) for the Education Endowment Foundation, Lead author: Prof Velda Elliott.

Teaching Migration, Belonging, and Empire in Secondary Schools, (2019), for Runnymede Trust and the European Research Council, Lead authors: Kimberly McIntosh, Dr Jason Todd and Prof Nandini Das.

Gender and the Politics of Reconciliation (2016), for The Institute for Justice and Reconciliation, Lead author: Dr Helen Scanlon

SOLE AUTHOR PUBLICATIONS

‘Transitions, Truth-Telling and Teaching History’, Cambridge Open-Review Educational Research e-Journal, Vol. 4, 2017.

Alice Tawell is an ESRC funded DPhil Student, co-supervised across the Department of Education and Centre for Criminology at the University of Oxford.

Supervisors: Professor Harry Daniels and Dr Rachel Condry.

Alice’s research focuses broadly on the enactment of school exclusion policy in England.

Prior to starting her doctoral studies, Alice gained a BSc in Sociology from the University of Bath and an MSc in Education (Research Training) from the University of Oxford.

As part of her undergraduate degree, Alice undertook a placement year working with Professor Kathy Sylva in the Families, Effective Learning and Literacy Research Group at the Department of Education, University of Oxford. After completing her degree, Alice returned to the department and has worked as a Research Officer on a number of different research projects since 2014. Most recently Alice has worked as part of the Excluded Lives Research Team on two projects exploring exclusion from school from a multidisciplinary perspective. In 2017 she was awarded a Seed-corn Small Grant Award to co-lead a pilot project exploring student collaborative networks with Hau Ming Tse. Alice also co-convenes the Qualitative Methods Hub in the department.

Outside of the department, Alice has sat on the Advisory Board for the Children Missing Education research project (2016-2017) at the National Children’s Bureau (NCB) and has been a member of the NCB Partnership for Well Being and Mental Health in Schools since 2016. She also sits on the Transparency on Exclusions Steering Group.

In 2017 Alice received funding from the Grand Union Doctoral Training Partnership placement scheme to conduct a Knowledge Exchange Internship with the Early Years Analysis and Research Unit at the Department for Education, and in 2018 Alice was elected the Co-President of the Grand Union ESRC Scholar’s Association, representing ESRC students from the University of Oxford, Brunel and The Open University.

Ashmita graduated from Boston University in 2008 with a BSc. in Biomedical Engineering, after which she worked in Research & Development for 6 years.

It is here that she decided to make the leap from formulation chemistry to STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Math) Education after having worked on programs involving increasing diversity in STEM in schools.

She received her Master’s from Boston University in 2015 in Education Policy. Her research interests include: STEM education policy; Assessment; Further Education; Higher Education; Science education pedagogy

Originally from Indonesia, Tracey has spent the last decade studying in the UK and working about multicultural education in Indonesia.

She is fully funded by the Indonesia Endowment Fund for Education (LPDP). Her doctoral research explores the ways Indonesian schools teach and accommodate the national vision of multicultural Indonesia, “Bhinneka Tunggal Ika” (Unity-in-Diversity). By using a two-tier case study research approach (case studies of six schools and of two provinces), it presents nuanced and critical account of the ways head teachers, teachers, students and parents from six state and private schools in Jakarta and Bali with different mixes of pupil ethnicity and religiosity understand and accommodate the vision of diversity into educational practices. Despite the highly contextual focus, the research offers a critical view into the complex role of schools in today’s era of globalisation in providing quality education for all and at the same time creating citizens who are inclusive and respectful towards others.

Tracey completed her MSc in Comparative and International Education at the University of Oxford in 2011 and her honours BA in Mathematics and Education Studies at the University of Cambridge in 2010. Upon completing her study in the UK, she returned to Indonesia to work in an educational foundation Sultan Iskandar Muda in Medan, Indonesia as a member of the Board of Directors in the Foundation – a position which she is still holding until today. She is responsible for overlooking the development and implementation of multicultural education and teacher development programme.

During her tenure, she has worked alongside the head teachers and teachers across all educational levels (from pre-school until high school) and produced books on the praxis of multicultural education in the school setting.

Title of Thesis

Accommodating a vision of diversity in different school contexts: “Unity-in-Diversity” in Indonesia

Publications
Journal Article
  • Harjatanaya, T.Y. & Hoon, C.Y. (2018) Politics of multicultural education in post-Suharto Indonesia: a study of the Chinese minority. Compare: A Journal of Comparative and International Education
Edited Book
  • Harjatanaya, T.Y. (2015) (2nd Edition) Merawat Keberagaman: Praksis Pendidikan Multikultural Perguruan Sultan Iskandar Muda (Fostering Diversity: Praxis of Multicultural Education in Sultan Iskandar Muda). Medan: YPSIM.
Book Chapter
  • Harjatanaya, T.Y. (2018). Akses dan Kesamaan dalam Pendidikan Vokasi (Access and Equality in Vocational Education). In Ferary, D. (2018) Sistem Pendidikan Vokasi di Inggris (Vocational Education System in England) (ed.). London: Kantor Atase Pendidikan dan Kebudayaan, Kedutaan Besar Indonesia (Indonesian Embassy) London, p. 121-138.

Katy is a Deputy Headteacher and the founder of a Leadership and Coaching Institute, which she now co-directs.

Katy is an Associate Fellow at the Oxford Character Project and a Research Associate at the Oxford University Wellbeing Research Centre. She is the co-founder of Global Social Leaders, a leadership programme which has participants in 105 countries, all passionate about creating and sustaining positive change in the world.

Title of Thesis

How could school leaders improve the flourishing and wellbeing of teaching staff?

Books
  • Granville-Chapman, K. and Bidston, E (2020) Leader: Know, love and inspire your people. Carmarthen: Crownhouse Publishing
Book Chapters
  •  Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ In White, M. & McCallum, F. (Ed.s) Wellbeing and Resilience Education: Covid-19 And Its Impact on Education Systems. Routledge
Publications
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘Purpose and Leadership in Education and Beyond’. The Education Exchange. Available from: https://theeducation.exchange/purpose-and-leadership-in-education-and-beyond/
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘The Three Secrets of COVID-era Leadership’. Times Education Supplement. Available from: https://www.tes.com/news/three-secrets-covid-era-school-leadership
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2016) ‘Assessing the Impact of a Teacher Leadership Programme in a Teaching Schools Alliance. Journal of Teacher Action Research
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2014) ‘The Afghan conflict: causes and consequences.’ Geography Review 28(1): 22-27
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2013) What are the psychological factors that affect students’ academic resilience and can teachers influence these? Unpublished thesis
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘Unlocking Leadership Potential’, The Magazine of the Boarding School’s Association, 33: 42-45
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2009) ‘Learning to Lead’, Leader, The Education Leader Magazine 41: 22-25
Presentations
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2019) ‘How could leaders improve the flourishing of their teams?’ ‘Stowe Ed Conference’, Forthcoming: 7 Jan 2019
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2018) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education: 21 Jun 2018
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2017) ‘How can school leaders improve teacher flourishing?’ ‘Doing Education Differently Conference’, University of Oxford, Department of Education, 11 Mar 17
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2016) ‘Developing school leaders who enable teachers to flourish’ The Telegraph Festival of Education 23 Jun 16
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Developing leadership in pupils and teachers’ High School Affiliated to Renmin University of China, Beijing. 20 Oct 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Resilience for leaders.’ Global Social Leaders World Summit. 16 Aug 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Emotional Intelligence for Leaders.’ Global Leaders in Education. 12 Aug 15
  • Coates, S.; Fraser, H.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J.; and Nasim, A. (2015) ‘Breaking through the glass ceiling – how can schools empower our girls to become leaders?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education. 19 Jun 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. ‘Developing Leadership in Schools’ (2015). G20 Schools Conference. International conference for head teachers. 11 Apr 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2018) ‘Introduction’, Wellington Leadership Institute: Festival of Leadership. Mar 2012-15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘How the Young Learn to Lead’, Raffles Institution (Singapore) -Purdue University (USA) Education Forum on Gifted & Talented Youth 2012. Singapore. 15 Mar 12
  • Draper, D.; Dyer, R.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Schools’. Presentation for a meeting about pupil leadership and character development at 10 Downing Street. 16 Nov 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Young People’. Presentation for a meeting about leadership and character at 10 Downing Street. 7 Mar 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K. & Seldon, A. (2012) ‘Introduction’, Leading Your School in the 21st Century. 7 Feb 12

Prior to starting his DPhil, Eddy worked as a primary school teacher in Bristol, where he also completed his MSc in Educational Research.

He is particularly interested in the culture of high stakes, standardised testing, and how this might perpetuate existing inequalities in schools. His research focuses specifically on the interaction between knowledge, policy and pedagogy in the context of Literacy education.

 

Amanda is completing a part-time DPhil, alongside working in Initial Teacher Education at Leeds Trinity University.

Her research is focused on understanding tensions, contradictions and conflicts that teachers in disadvantaged schools may experience when they engage in research activity.  Her research focus is influenced by her own experiences of working as a research-active teacher in disadvantaged schools, and recent work in teacher education to support experienced and beginning teachers in developing their own research activities.

One of the aims of Amanda’s research is to construct a framework to support teachers in pursuing research activity and critical scholarship work which articulates with wider social movements to address issues of poverty and disadvantage in schools.

Title of Thesis

Teachers’ perspectives on tensions between policy, practice and research in disadvantaged schools

Publications 

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2017) A ‘usable past’ of teacher education in England: history in JET’s anniversary issue. Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy, 43 (5), pp.616-627.

Nuttall, A. (2016) The ‘curriculum challenge’: Moving towards the ‘Storyline’ approach in a case study urban primary school.  Improving Schools, 19 (2), pp. 154-166.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Learning {Re}imagined: A review.  Primary First, 15, pp. 17-18.

Nuttall, A. and Doherty, J. (2014) Disaffected boys and the achievement gap: the ‘wallpaper effect’ and what is hidden by a focus on school results.  The Urban Review, 46 (5), pp.800-815.

Conference Papers and Presentations

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2018) “No child is pre-ordained to fail” Teachers questioning policy assumptions.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Newcastle, 11-13 September.

Nuttall, A. and Tobbell, C. (2017) Trainee teachers’ perspectives on practitioner enquiry.  Paper presented at the 8th TEAN Conference: Thinking Deeply about Education, Birmingham, 11-12 May.

Nuttall, A. (2017) Assessment at primary level: quality, comparability and improving secondary readiness.  A perspective from ITE.  Speech at the Westminster Education Forum Keynote Seminar: Next steps for reforming primary education: effective teaching practices, assessment and accountably, London, 18 January.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Deficit narratives and lived realities: whose poverty is it?  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the Australian Association for Research in Education, Melbourne, 27 November – 1 December.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Disenfranchised boys’ reflections on their urban schooling experience: “What a Waste!”.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Philpott, C., Beckett, L. and Wrigley, T. (2016) Collaborative practitioner inquiry: making a difference to urban schools.  Innovation session (school visits and symposium) presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Finn, B. and Beckett, L. (2015) Teachers’ constructions of poverty effects: Their research evidence.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Belfast, 15-17 September.

Nuttall, A. (2014) Teachers’ voice on disengaged boys: the role of one teacher-researcher in an English primary school. Paper presented at the Joint Australian Association for Research in Education and the New Zealand Association for Research in Education Conference, Brisbane, 30 November – 4 December.

Andrew Marotta is a D.Phil candidate in the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. He holds an A.A. in Social Sciences from Broward Community College, and a B.A. in Individualized Studies from the Gallatin School of Individualized Studies, New York University and an M.A. and Ed.M. in Counseling Psychology and School Counseling from Teachers College, Columbia University.

Andrew’s research interests include social and emotional learning, peer mentorship, existential therapy / philosophy, curriculum design for school counselors, and applied ethics in computer science. Andrew’s thesis examines how literature and philosophy can be used to nurture social and emotional learning through group counseling among high school students. He has also worked as a school counselor, teaching artist, and curriculum designer.

Presently, Andrew is designing joint humanities and applied ethics workshops for computer and data science college majors, using social and emotional learning concepts as the pedagogical foundation.

Abigail’s research explores the role of education in students’ personal development and how this can be supported by policy, curricula, initial teacher education and teacher professional development. In particular she focuses on history education, citizenship education and peace education as vehicles for dialogue. These opportunities for students to engage with social questions are vital for building cohesive societies. This flows from the recognition that traditional forums for developing public understanding, such as post-conflict truth commissions, need to be complemented by intergenerational and educational perspectives.

Abigail has taught History, Politics, Debating as well as Relationships and Sex Education to secondary school students in South Africa, England and the USA.

She holds postgraduate degrees in Post-Conflict and Transitional Justice (University of Cape Town), in Education, Globalisation and International Development (University of Cambridge) and in African Studies (University of Oxford). She is a Rhodes Scholar, Mandela-Magdalene Scholar and Mandela-Rhodes Scholar.

Title of thesis

GCSE History, Policy Reform and Student Development: How students and teachers navigate the thematic study “Empires, Migration and the People”

Conference papers

Teaching Migration, Belonging, and Empire in Secondary Schools: evaluation of a teacher professional development program, (2019) History Educators International Research Network Conference, Lead author: Dr Jason Todd, University of Vienna, Austria.

“The Problems and Prospects of Teaching South Africa’s Recent History: Teachers’ Perspectives”, (2018) Sustainability, peace and education – Exploring promise and practice: BAICE 20th Anniversary Symposium, University of Bristol, England.

“New Generations, Old Wounds: Learning History at Home and School in Northern Ireland”, (2018) European Social Science and History Conference,
Queens University Belfast, Northern Ireland.

“The Methodological Challenges of Investigating the Role of History Teaching in Peacebuilding”, (2017), Present Past: Time, Memory, and the Negotiation of Historical Justice Conference, Columbia University, United States of America.

“Teaching South Africa’s Truth and Reconciliation Commission”, (2017) European Conference on African Studies, Universität Basel, Switzerland.

Research Assistant Publications

Review of the evidence on feedback in primary and secondary schools, (forthcoming, 2021) for the Education Endowment Foundation, Lead author: Prof Velda Elliott.

Teaching Migration, Belonging, and Empire in Secondary Schools, (2019), for Runnymede Trust and the European Research Council, Lead authors: Kimberly McIntosh, Dr Jason Todd and Prof Nandini Das.

Gender and the Politics of Reconciliation (2016), for The Institute for Justice and Reconciliation, Lead author: Dr Helen Scanlon

SOLE AUTHOR PUBLICATIONS

‘Transitions, Truth-Telling and Teaching History’, Cambridge Open-Review Educational Research e-Journal, Vol. 4, 2017.

Alice Tawell is an ESRC funded DPhil Student, co-supervised across the Department of Education and Centre for Criminology at the University of Oxford.

Supervisors: Professor Harry Daniels and Dr Rachel Condry.

Alice’s research focuses broadly on the enactment of school exclusion policy in England.

Prior to starting her doctoral studies, Alice gained a BSc in Sociology from the University of Bath and an MSc in Education (Research Training) from the University of Oxford.

As part of her undergraduate degree, Alice undertook a placement year working with Professor Kathy Sylva in the Families, Effective Learning and Literacy Research Group at the Department of Education, University of Oxford. After completing her degree, Alice returned to the department and has worked as a Research Officer on a number of different research projects since 2014. Most recently Alice has worked as part of the Excluded Lives Research Team on two projects exploring exclusion from school from a multidisciplinary perspective. In 2017 she was awarded a Seed-corn Small Grant Award to co-lead a pilot project exploring student collaborative networks with Hau Ming Tse. Alice also co-convenes the Qualitative Methods Hub in the department.

Outside of the department, Alice has sat on the Advisory Board for the Children Missing Education research project (2016-2017) at the National Children’s Bureau (NCB) and has been a member of the NCB Partnership for Well Being and Mental Health in Schools since 2016. She also sits on the Transparency on Exclusions Steering Group.

In 2017 Alice received funding from the Grand Union Doctoral Training Partnership placement scheme to conduct a Knowledge Exchange Internship with the Early Years Analysis and Research Unit at the Department for Education, and in 2018 Alice was elected the Co-President of the Grand Union ESRC Scholar’s Association, representing ESRC students from the University of Oxford, Brunel and The Open University.

Ashmita graduated from Boston University in 2008 with a BSc. in Biomedical Engineering, after which she worked in Research & Development for 6 years.

It is here that she decided to make the leap from formulation chemistry to STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Math) Education after having worked on programs involving increasing diversity in STEM in schools.

She received her Master’s from Boston University in 2015 in Education Policy. Her research interests include: STEM education policy; Assessment; Further Education; Higher Education; Science education pedagogy

Originally from Indonesia, Tracey has spent the last decade studying in the UK and working about multicultural education in Indonesia.

She is fully funded by the Indonesia Endowment Fund for Education (LPDP). Her doctoral research explores the ways Indonesian schools teach and accommodate the national vision of multicultural Indonesia, “Bhinneka Tunggal Ika” (Unity-in-Diversity). By using a two-tier case study research approach (case studies of six schools and of two provinces), it presents nuanced and critical account of the ways head teachers, teachers, students and parents from six state and private schools in Jakarta and Bali with different mixes of pupil ethnicity and religiosity understand and accommodate the vision of diversity into educational practices. Despite the highly contextual focus, the research offers a critical view into the complex role of schools in today’s era of globalisation in providing quality education for all and at the same time creating citizens who are inclusive and respectful towards others.

Tracey completed her MSc in Comparative and International Education at the University of Oxford in 2011 and her honours BA in Mathematics and Education Studies at the University of Cambridge in 2010. Upon completing her study in the UK, she returned to Indonesia to work in an educational foundation Sultan Iskandar Muda in Medan, Indonesia as a member of the Board of Directors in the Foundation – a position which she is still holding until today. She is responsible for overlooking the development and implementation of multicultural education and teacher development programme.

During her tenure, she has worked alongside the head teachers and teachers across all educational levels (from pre-school until high school) and produced books on the praxis of multicultural education in the school setting.

Title of Thesis

Accommodating a vision of diversity in different school contexts: “Unity-in-Diversity” in Indonesia

Publications
Journal Article
  • Harjatanaya, T.Y. & Hoon, C.Y. (2018) Politics of multicultural education in post-Suharto Indonesia: a study of the Chinese minority. Compare: A Journal of Comparative and International Education
Edited Book
  • Harjatanaya, T.Y. (2015) (2nd Edition) Merawat Keberagaman: Praksis Pendidikan Multikultural Perguruan Sultan Iskandar Muda (Fostering Diversity: Praxis of Multicultural Education in Sultan Iskandar Muda). Medan: YPSIM.
Book Chapter
  • Harjatanaya, T.Y. (2018). Akses dan Kesamaan dalam Pendidikan Vokasi (Access and Equality in Vocational Education). In Ferary, D. (2018) Sistem Pendidikan Vokasi di Inggris (Vocational Education System in England) (ed.). London: Kantor Atase Pendidikan dan Kebudayaan, Kedutaan Besar Indonesia (Indonesian Embassy) London, p. 121-138.

Katy is a Deputy Headteacher and the founder of a Leadership and Coaching Institute, which she now co-directs.

Katy is an Associate Fellow at the Oxford Character Project and a Research Associate at the Oxford University Wellbeing Research Centre. She is the co-founder of Global Social Leaders, a leadership programme which has participants in 105 countries, all passionate about creating and sustaining positive change in the world.

Title of Thesis

How could school leaders improve the flourishing and wellbeing of teaching staff?

Books
  • Granville-Chapman, K. and Bidston, E (2020) Leader: Know, love and inspire your people. Carmarthen: Crownhouse Publishing
Book Chapters
  •  Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ In White, M. & McCallum, F. (Ed.s) Wellbeing and Resilience Education: Covid-19 And Its Impact on Education Systems. Routledge
Publications
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘Purpose and Leadership in Education and Beyond’. The Education Exchange. Available from: https://theeducation.exchange/purpose-and-leadership-in-education-and-beyond/
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘The Three Secrets of COVID-era Leadership’. Times Education Supplement. Available from: https://www.tes.com/news/three-secrets-covid-era-school-leadership
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2016) ‘Assessing the Impact of a Teacher Leadership Programme in a Teaching Schools Alliance. Journal of Teacher Action Research
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2014) ‘The Afghan conflict: causes and consequences.’ Geography Review 28(1): 22-27
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2013) What are the psychological factors that affect students’ academic resilience and can teachers influence these? Unpublished thesis
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘Unlocking Leadership Potential’, The Magazine of the Boarding School’s Association, 33: 42-45
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2009) ‘Learning to Lead’, Leader, The Education Leader Magazine 41: 22-25
Presentations
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2019) ‘How could leaders improve the flourishing of their teams?’ ‘Stowe Ed Conference’, Forthcoming: 7 Jan 2019
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2018) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education: 21 Jun 2018
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2017) ‘How can school leaders improve teacher flourishing?’ ‘Doing Education Differently Conference’, University of Oxford, Department of Education, 11 Mar 17
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2016) ‘Developing school leaders who enable teachers to flourish’ The Telegraph Festival of Education 23 Jun 16
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Developing leadership in pupils and teachers’ High School Affiliated to Renmin University of China, Beijing. 20 Oct 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Resilience for leaders.’ Global Social Leaders World Summit. 16 Aug 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Emotional Intelligence for Leaders.’ Global Leaders in Education. 12 Aug 15
  • Coates, S.; Fraser, H.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J.; and Nasim, A. (2015) ‘Breaking through the glass ceiling – how can schools empower our girls to become leaders?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education. 19 Jun 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. ‘Developing Leadership in Schools’ (2015). G20 Schools Conference. International conference for head teachers. 11 Apr 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2018) ‘Introduction’, Wellington Leadership Institute: Festival of Leadership. Mar 2012-15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘How the Young Learn to Lead’, Raffles Institution (Singapore) -Purdue University (USA) Education Forum on Gifted & Talented Youth 2012. Singapore. 15 Mar 12
  • Draper, D.; Dyer, R.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Schools’. Presentation for a meeting about pupil leadership and character development at 10 Downing Street. 16 Nov 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Young People’. Presentation for a meeting about leadership and character at 10 Downing Street. 7 Mar 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K. & Seldon, A. (2012) ‘Introduction’, Leading Your School in the 21st Century. 7 Feb 12

Prior to starting his DPhil, Eddy worked as a primary school teacher in Bristol, where he also completed his MSc in Educational Research.

He is particularly interested in the culture of high stakes, standardised testing, and how this might perpetuate existing inequalities in schools. His research focuses specifically on the interaction between knowledge, policy and pedagogy in the context of Literacy education.

 

Amanda is completing a part-time DPhil, alongside working in Initial Teacher Education at Leeds Trinity University.

Her research is focused on understanding tensions, contradictions and conflicts that teachers in disadvantaged schools may experience when they engage in research activity.  Her research focus is influenced by her own experiences of working as a research-active teacher in disadvantaged schools, and recent work in teacher education to support experienced and beginning teachers in developing their own research activities.

One of the aims of Amanda’s research is to construct a framework to support teachers in pursuing research activity and critical scholarship work which articulates with wider social movements to address issues of poverty and disadvantage in schools.

Title of Thesis

Teachers’ perspectives on tensions between policy, practice and research in disadvantaged schools

Publications 

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2017) A ‘usable past’ of teacher education in England: history in JET’s anniversary issue. Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy, 43 (5), pp.616-627.

Nuttall, A. (2016) The ‘curriculum challenge’: Moving towards the ‘Storyline’ approach in a case study urban primary school.  Improving Schools, 19 (2), pp. 154-166.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Learning {Re}imagined: A review.  Primary First, 15, pp. 17-18.

Nuttall, A. and Doherty, J. (2014) Disaffected boys and the achievement gap: the ‘wallpaper effect’ and what is hidden by a focus on school results.  The Urban Review, 46 (5), pp.800-815.

Conference Papers and Presentations

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2018) “No child is pre-ordained to fail” Teachers questioning policy assumptions.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Newcastle, 11-13 September.

Nuttall, A. and Tobbell, C. (2017) Trainee teachers’ perspectives on practitioner enquiry.  Paper presented at the 8th TEAN Conference: Thinking Deeply about Education, Birmingham, 11-12 May.

Nuttall, A. (2017) Assessment at primary level: quality, comparability and improving secondary readiness.  A perspective from ITE.  Speech at the Westminster Education Forum Keynote Seminar: Next steps for reforming primary education: effective teaching practices, assessment and accountably, London, 18 January.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Deficit narratives and lived realities: whose poverty is it?  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the Australian Association for Research in Education, Melbourne, 27 November – 1 December.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Disenfranchised boys’ reflections on their urban schooling experience: “What a Waste!”.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Philpott, C., Beckett, L. and Wrigley, T. (2016) Collaborative practitioner inquiry: making a difference to urban schools.  Innovation session (school visits and symposium) presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Finn, B. and Beckett, L. (2015) Teachers’ constructions of poverty effects: Their research evidence.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Belfast, 15-17 September.

Nuttall, A. (2014) Teachers’ voice on disengaged boys: the role of one teacher-researcher in an English primary school. Paper presented at the Joint Australian Association for Research in Education and the New Zealand Association for Research in Education Conference, Brisbane, 30 November – 4 December.

Andrew Marotta is a D.Phil candidate in the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. He holds an A.A. in Social Sciences from Broward Community College, and a B.A. in Individualized Studies from the Gallatin School of Individualized Studies, New York University and an M.A. and Ed.M. in Counseling Psychology and School Counseling from Teachers College, Columbia University.

Andrew’s research interests include social and emotional learning, peer mentorship, existential therapy / philosophy, curriculum design for school counselors, and applied ethics in computer science. Andrew’s thesis examines how literature and philosophy can be used to nurture social and emotional learning through group counseling among high school students. He has also worked as a school counselor, teaching artist, and curriculum designer.

Presently, Andrew is designing joint humanities and applied ethics workshops for computer and data science college majors, using social and emotional learning concepts as the pedagogical foundation.

Abigail’s research explores the role of education in students’ personal development and how this can be supported by policy, curricula, initial teacher education and teacher professional development. In particular she focuses on history education, citizenship education and peace education as vehicles for dialogue. These opportunities for students to engage with social questions are vital for building cohesive societies. This flows from the recognition that traditional forums for developing public understanding, such as post-conflict truth commissions, need to be complemented by intergenerational and educational perspectives.

Abigail has taught History, Politics, Debating as well as Relationships and Sex Education to secondary school students in South Africa, England and the USA.

She holds postgraduate degrees in Post-Conflict and Transitional Justice (University of Cape Town), in Education, Globalisation and International Development (University of Cambridge) and in African Studies (University of Oxford). She is a Rhodes Scholar, Mandela-Magdalene Scholar and Mandela-Rhodes Scholar.

Title of thesis

GCSE History, Policy Reform and Student Development: How students and teachers navigate the thematic study “Empires, Migration and the People”

Conference papers

Teaching Migration, Belonging, and Empire in Secondary Schools: evaluation of a teacher professional development program, (2019) History Educators International Research Network Conference, Lead author: Dr Jason Todd, University of Vienna, Austria.

“The Problems and Prospects of Teaching South Africa’s Recent History: Teachers’ Perspectives”, (2018) Sustainability, peace and education – Exploring promise and practice: BAICE 20th Anniversary Symposium, University of Bristol, England.

“New Generations, Old Wounds: Learning History at Home and School in Northern Ireland”, (2018) European Social Science and History Conference,
Queens University Belfast, Northern Ireland.

“The Methodological Challenges of Investigating the Role of History Teaching in Peacebuilding”, (2017), Present Past: Time, Memory, and the Negotiation of Historical Justice Conference, Columbia University, United States of America.

“Teaching South Africa’s Truth and Reconciliation Commission”, (2017) European Conference on African Studies, Universität Basel, Switzerland.

Research Assistant Publications

Review of the evidence on feedback in primary and secondary schools, (forthcoming, 2021) for the Education Endowment Foundation, Lead author: Prof Velda Elliott.

Teaching Migration, Belonging, and Empire in Secondary Schools, (2019), for Runnymede Trust and the European Research Council, Lead authors: Kimberly McIntosh, Dr Jason Todd and Prof Nandini Das.

Gender and the Politics of Reconciliation (2016), for The Institute for Justice and Reconciliation, Lead author: Dr Helen Scanlon

SOLE AUTHOR PUBLICATIONS

‘Transitions, Truth-Telling and Teaching History’, Cambridge Open-Review Educational Research e-Journal, Vol. 4, 2017.

Alice Tawell is an ESRC funded DPhil Student, co-supervised across the Department of Education and Centre for Criminology at the University of Oxford.

Supervisors: Professor Harry Daniels and Dr Rachel Condry.

Alice’s research focuses broadly on the enactment of school exclusion policy in England.

Prior to starting her doctoral studies, Alice gained a BSc in Sociology from the University of Bath and an MSc in Education (Research Training) from the University of Oxford.

As part of her undergraduate degree, Alice undertook a placement year working with Professor Kathy Sylva in the Families, Effective Learning and Literacy Research Group at the Department of Education, University of Oxford. After completing her degree, Alice returned to the department and has worked as a Research Officer on a number of different research projects since 2014. Most recently Alice has worked as part of the Excluded Lives Research Team on two projects exploring exclusion from school from a multidisciplinary perspective. In 2017 she was awarded a Seed-corn Small Grant Award to co-lead a pilot project exploring student collaborative networks with Hau Ming Tse. Alice also co-convenes the Qualitative Methods Hub in the department.

Outside of the department, Alice has sat on the Advisory Board for the Children Missing Education research project (2016-2017) at the National Children’s Bureau (NCB) and has been a member of the NCB Partnership for Well Being and Mental Health in Schools since 2016. She also sits on the Transparency on Exclusions Steering Group.

In 2017 Alice received funding from the Grand Union Doctoral Training Partnership placement scheme to conduct a Knowledge Exchange Internship with the Early Years Analysis and Research Unit at the Department for Education, and in 2018 Alice was elected the Co-President of the Grand Union ESRC Scholar’s Association, representing ESRC students from the University of Oxford, Brunel and The Open University.

Ashmita graduated from Boston University in 2008 with a BSc. in Biomedical Engineering, after which she worked in Research & Development for 6 years.

It is here that she decided to make the leap from formulation chemistry to STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Math) Education after having worked on programs involving increasing diversity in STEM in schools.

She received her Master’s from Boston University in 2015 in Education Policy. Her research interests include: STEM education policy; Assessment; Further Education; Higher Education; Science education pedagogy

Originally from Indonesia, Tracey has spent the last decade studying in the UK and working about multicultural education in Indonesia.

She is fully funded by the Indonesia Endowment Fund for Education (LPDP). Her doctoral research explores the ways Indonesian schools teach and accommodate the national vision of multicultural Indonesia, “Bhinneka Tunggal Ika” (Unity-in-Diversity). By using a two-tier case study research approach (case studies of six schools and of two provinces), it presents nuanced and critical account of the ways head teachers, teachers, students and parents from six state and private schools in Jakarta and Bali with different mixes of pupil ethnicity and religiosity understand and accommodate the vision of diversity into educational practices. Despite the highly contextual focus, the research offers a critical view into the complex role of schools in today’s era of globalisation in providing quality education for all and at the same time creating citizens who are inclusive and respectful towards others.

Tracey completed her MSc in Comparative and International Education at the University of Oxford in 2011 and her honours BA in Mathematics and Education Studies at the University of Cambridge in 2010. Upon completing her study in the UK, she returned to Indonesia to work in an educational foundation Sultan Iskandar Muda in Medan, Indonesia as a member of the Board of Directors in the Foundation – a position which she is still holding until today. She is responsible for overlooking the development and implementation of multicultural education and teacher development programme.

During her tenure, she has worked alongside the head teachers and teachers across all educational levels (from pre-school until high school) and produced books on the praxis of multicultural education in the school setting.

Title of Thesis

Accommodating a vision of diversity in different school contexts: “Unity-in-Diversity” in Indonesia

Publications
Journal Article
  • Harjatanaya, T.Y. & Hoon, C.Y. (2018) Politics of multicultural education in post-Suharto Indonesia: a study of the Chinese minority. Compare: A Journal of Comparative and International Education
Edited Book
  • Harjatanaya, T.Y. (2015) (2nd Edition) Merawat Keberagaman: Praksis Pendidikan Multikultural Perguruan Sultan Iskandar Muda (Fostering Diversity: Praxis of Multicultural Education in Sultan Iskandar Muda). Medan: YPSIM.
Book Chapter
  • Harjatanaya, T.Y. (2018). Akses dan Kesamaan dalam Pendidikan Vokasi (Access and Equality in Vocational Education). In Ferary, D. (2018) Sistem Pendidikan Vokasi di Inggris (Vocational Education System in England) (ed.). London: Kantor Atase Pendidikan dan Kebudayaan, Kedutaan Besar Indonesia (Indonesian Embassy) London, p. 121-138.

Katy is a Deputy Headteacher and the founder of a Leadership and Coaching Institute, which she now co-directs.

Katy is an Associate Fellow at the Oxford Character Project and a Research Associate at the Oxford University Wellbeing Research Centre. She is the co-founder of Global Social Leaders, a leadership programme which has participants in 105 countries, all passionate about creating and sustaining positive change in the world.

Title of Thesis

How could school leaders improve the flourishing and wellbeing of teaching staff?

Books
  • Granville-Chapman, K. and Bidston, E (2020) Leader: Know, love and inspire your people. Carmarthen: Crownhouse Publishing
Book Chapters
  •  Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ In White, M. & McCallum, F. (Ed.s) Wellbeing and Resilience Education: Covid-19 And Its Impact on Education Systems. Routledge
Publications
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘Purpose and Leadership in Education and Beyond’. The Education Exchange. Available from: https://theeducation.exchange/purpose-and-leadership-in-education-and-beyond/
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘The Three Secrets of COVID-era Leadership’. Times Education Supplement. Available from: https://www.tes.com/news/three-secrets-covid-era-school-leadership
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2016) ‘Assessing the Impact of a Teacher Leadership Programme in a Teaching Schools Alliance. Journal of Teacher Action Research
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2014) ‘The Afghan conflict: causes and consequences.’ Geography Review 28(1): 22-27
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2013) What are the psychological factors that affect students’ academic resilience and can teachers influence these? Unpublished thesis
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘Unlocking Leadership Potential’, The Magazine of the Boarding School’s Association, 33: 42-45
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2009) ‘Learning to Lead’, Leader, The Education Leader Magazine 41: 22-25
Presentations
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2019) ‘How could leaders improve the flourishing of their teams?’ ‘Stowe Ed Conference’, Forthcoming: 7 Jan 2019
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2018) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education: 21 Jun 2018
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2017) ‘How can school leaders improve teacher flourishing?’ ‘Doing Education Differently Conference’, University of Oxford, Department of Education, 11 Mar 17
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2016) ‘Developing school leaders who enable teachers to flourish’ The Telegraph Festival of Education 23 Jun 16
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Developing leadership in pupils and teachers’ High School Affiliated to Renmin University of China, Beijing. 20 Oct 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Resilience for leaders.’ Global Social Leaders World Summit. 16 Aug 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Emotional Intelligence for Leaders.’ Global Leaders in Education. 12 Aug 15
  • Coates, S.; Fraser, H.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J.; and Nasim, A. (2015) ‘Breaking through the glass ceiling – how can schools empower our girls to become leaders?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education. 19 Jun 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. ‘Developing Leadership in Schools’ (2015). G20 Schools Conference. International conference for head teachers. 11 Apr 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2018) ‘Introduction’, Wellington Leadership Institute: Festival of Leadership. Mar 2012-15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘How the Young Learn to Lead’, Raffles Institution (Singapore) -Purdue University (USA) Education Forum on Gifted & Talented Youth 2012. Singapore. 15 Mar 12
  • Draper, D.; Dyer, R.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Schools’. Presentation for a meeting about pupil leadership and character development at 10 Downing Street. 16 Nov 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Young People’. Presentation for a meeting about leadership and character at 10 Downing Street. 7 Mar 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K. & Seldon, A. (2012) ‘Introduction’, Leading Your School in the 21st Century. 7 Feb 12

Prior to starting his DPhil, Eddy worked as a primary school teacher in Bristol, where he also completed his MSc in Educational Research.

He is particularly interested in the culture of high stakes, standardised testing, and how this might perpetuate existing inequalities in schools. His research focuses specifically on the interaction between knowledge, policy and pedagogy in the context of Literacy education.

 

Amanda is completing a part-time DPhil, alongside working in Initial Teacher Education at Leeds Trinity University.

Her research is focused on understanding tensions, contradictions and conflicts that teachers in disadvantaged schools may experience when they engage in research activity.  Her research focus is influenced by her own experiences of working as a research-active teacher in disadvantaged schools, and recent work in teacher education to support experienced and beginning teachers in developing their own research activities.

One of the aims of Amanda’s research is to construct a framework to support teachers in pursuing research activity and critical scholarship work which articulates with wider social movements to address issues of poverty and disadvantage in schools.

Title of Thesis

Teachers’ perspectives on tensions between policy, practice and research in disadvantaged schools

Publications 

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2017) A ‘usable past’ of teacher education in England: history in JET’s anniversary issue. Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy, 43 (5), pp.616-627.

Nuttall, A. (2016) The ‘curriculum challenge’: Moving towards the ‘Storyline’ approach in a case study urban primary school.  Improving Schools, 19 (2), pp. 154-166.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Learning {Re}imagined: A review.  Primary First, 15, pp. 17-18.

Nuttall, A. and Doherty, J. (2014) Disaffected boys and the achievement gap: the ‘wallpaper effect’ and what is hidden by a focus on school results.  The Urban Review, 46 (5), pp.800-815.

Conference Papers and Presentations

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2018) “No child is pre-ordained to fail” Teachers questioning policy assumptions.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Newcastle, 11-13 September.

Nuttall, A. and Tobbell, C. (2017) Trainee teachers’ perspectives on practitioner enquiry.  Paper presented at the 8th TEAN Conference: Thinking Deeply about Education, Birmingham, 11-12 May.

Nuttall, A. (2017) Assessment at primary level: quality, comparability and improving secondary readiness.  A perspective from ITE.  Speech at the Westminster Education Forum Keynote Seminar: Next steps for reforming primary education: effective teaching practices, assessment and accountably, London, 18 January.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Deficit narratives and lived realities: whose poverty is it?  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the Australian Association for Research in Education, Melbourne, 27 November – 1 December.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Disenfranchised boys’ reflections on their urban schooling experience: “What a Waste!”.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Philpott, C., Beckett, L. and Wrigley, T. (2016) Collaborative practitioner inquiry: making a difference to urban schools.  Innovation session (school visits and symposium) presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Finn, B. and Beckett, L. (2015) Teachers’ constructions of poverty effects: Their research evidence.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Belfast, 15-17 September.

Nuttall, A. (2014) Teachers’ voice on disengaged boys: the role of one teacher-researcher in an English primary school. Paper presented at the Joint Australian Association for Research in Education and the New Zealand Association for Research in Education Conference, Brisbane, 30 November – 4 December.

Andrew Marotta is a D.Phil candidate in the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. He holds an A.A. in Social Sciences from Broward Community College, and a B.A. in Individualized Studies from the Gallatin School of Individualized Studies, New York University and an M.A. and Ed.M. in Counseling Psychology and School Counseling from Teachers College, Columbia University.

Andrew’s research interests include social and emotional learning, peer mentorship, existential therapy / philosophy, curriculum design for school counselors, and applied ethics in computer science. Andrew’s thesis examines how literature and philosophy can be used to nurture social and emotional learning through group counseling among high school students. He has also worked as a school counselor, teaching artist, and curriculum designer.

Presently, Andrew is designing joint humanities and applied ethics workshops for computer and data science college majors, using social and emotional learning concepts as the pedagogical foundation.

Abigail’s research explores the role of education in students’ personal development and how this can be supported by policy, curricula, initial teacher education and teacher professional development. In particular she focuses on history education, citizenship education and peace education as vehicles for dialogue. These opportunities for students to engage with social questions are vital for building cohesive societies. This flows from the recognition that traditional forums for developing public understanding, such as post-conflict truth commissions, need to be complemented by intergenerational and educational perspectives.

Abigail has taught History, Politics, Debating as well as Relationships and Sex Education to secondary school students in South Africa, England and the USA.

She holds postgraduate degrees in Post-Conflict and Transitional Justice (University of Cape Town), in Education, Globalisation and International Development (University of Cambridge) and in African Studies (University of Oxford). She is a Rhodes Scholar, Mandela-Magdalene Scholar and Mandela-Rhodes Scholar.

Title of thesis

GCSE History, Policy Reform and Student Development: How students and teachers navigate the thematic study “Empires, Migration and the People”

Conference papers

Teaching Migration, Belonging, and Empire in Secondary Schools: evaluation of a teacher professional development program, (2019) History Educators International Research Network Conference, Lead author: Dr Jason Todd, University of Vienna, Austria.

“The Problems and Prospects of Teaching South Africa’s Recent History: Teachers’ Perspectives”, (2018) Sustainability, peace and education – Exploring promise and practice: BAICE 20th Anniversary Symposium, University of Bristol, England.

“New Generations, Old Wounds: Learning History at Home and School in Northern Ireland”, (2018) European Social Science and History Conference,
Queens University Belfast, Northern Ireland.

“The Methodological Challenges of Investigating the Role of History Teaching in Peacebuilding”, (2017), Present Past: Time, Memory, and the Negotiation of Historical Justice Conference, Columbia University, United States of America.

“Teaching South Africa’s Truth and Reconciliation Commission”, (2017) European Conference on African Studies, Universität Basel, Switzerland.

Research Assistant Publications

Review of the evidence on feedback in primary and secondary schools, (forthcoming, 2021) for the Education Endowment Foundation, Lead author: Prof Velda Elliott.

Teaching Migration, Belonging, and Empire in Secondary Schools, (2019), for Runnymede Trust and the European Research Council, Lead authors: Kimberly McIntosh, Dr Jason Todd and Prof Nandini Das.

Gender and the Politics of Reconciliation (2016), for The Institute for Justice and Reconciliation, Lead author: Dr Helen Scanlon

SOLE AUTHOR PUBLICATIONS

‘Transitions, Truth-Telling and Teaching History’, Cambridge Open-Review Educational Research e-Journal, Vol. 4, 2017.

Alice Tawell is an ESRC funded DPhil Student, co-supervised across the Department of Education and Centre for Criminology at the University of Oxford.

Supervisors: Professor Harry Daniels and Dr Rachel Condry.

Alice’s research focuses broadly on the enactment of school exclusion policy in England.

Prior to starting her doctoral studies, Alice gained a BSc in Sociology from the University of Bath and an MSc in Education (Research Training) from the University of Oxford.

As part of her undergraduate degree, Alice undertook a placement year working with Professor Kathy Sylva in the Families, Effective Learning and Literacy Research Group at the Department of Education, University of Oxford. After completing her degree, Alice returned to the department and has worked as a Research Officer on a number of different research projects since 2014. Most recently Alice has worked as part of the Excluded Lives Research Team on two projects exploring exclusion from school from a multidisciplinary perspective. In 2017 she was awarded a Seed-corn Small Grant Award to co-lead a pilot project exploring student collaborative networks with Hau Ming Tse. Alice also co-convenes the Qualitative Methods Hub in the department.

Outside of the department, Alice has sat on the Advisory Board for the Children Missing Education research project (2016-2017) at the National Children’s Bureau (NCB) and has been a member of the NCB Partnership for Well Being and Mental Health in Schools since 2016. She also sits on the Transparency on Exclusions Steering Group.

In 2017 Alice received funding from the Grand Union Doctoral Training Partnership placement scheme to conduct a Knowledge Exchange Internship with the Early Years Analysis and Research Unit at the Department for Education, and in 2018 Alice was elected the Co-President of the Grand Union ESRC Scholar’s Association, representing ESRC students from the University of Oxford, Brunel and The Open University.

Ashmita graduated from Boston University in 2008 with a BSc. in Biomedical Engineering, after which she worked in Research & Development for 6 years.

It is here that she decided to make the leap from formulation chemistry to STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Math) Education after having worked on programs involving increasing diversity in STEM in schools.

She received her Master’s from Boston University in 2015 in Education Policy. Her research interests include: STEM education policy; Assessment; Further Education; Higher Education; Science education pedagogy

Originally from Indonesia, Tracey has spent the last decade studying in the UK and working about multicultural education in Indonesia.

She is fully funded by the Indonesia Endowment Fund for Education (LPDP). Her doctoral research explores the ways Indonesian schools teach and accommodate the national vision of multicultural Indonesia, “Bhinneka Tunggal Ika” (Unity-in-Diversity). By using a two-tier case study research approach (case studies of six schools and of two provinces), it presents nuanced and critical account of the ways head teachers, teachers, students and parents from six state and private schools in Jakarta and Bali with different mixes of pupil ethnicity and religiosity understand and accommodate the vision of diversity into educational practices. Despite the highly contextual focus, the research offers a critical view into the complex role of schools in today’s era of globalisation in providing quality education for all and at the same time creating citizens who are inclusive and respectful towards others.

Tracey completed her MSc in Comparative and International Education at the University of Oxford in 2011 and her honours BA in Mathematics and Education Studies at the University of Cambridge in 2010. Upon completing her study in the UK, she returned to Indonesia to work in an educational foundation Sultan Iskandar Muda in Medan, Indonesia as a member of the Board of Directors in the Foundation – a position which she is still holding until today. She is responsible for overlooking the development and implementation of multicultural education and teacher development programme.

During her tenure, she has worked alongside the head teachers and teachers across all educational levels (from pre-school until high school) and produced books on the praxis of multicultural education in the school setting.

Title of Thesis

Accommodating a vision of diversity in different school contexts: “Unity-in-Diversity” in Indonesia

Publications
Journal Article
  • Harjatanaya, T.Y. & Hoon, C.Y. (2018) Politics of multicultural education in post-Suharto Indonesia: a study of the Chinese minority. Compare: A Journal of Comparative and International Education
Edited Book
  • Harjatanaya, T.Y. (2015) (2nd Edition) Merawat Keberagaman: Praksis Pendidikan Multikultural Perguruan Sultan Iskandar Muda (Fostering Diversity: Praxis of Multicultural Education in Sultan Iskandar Muda). Medan: YPSIM.
Book Chapter
  • Harjatanaya, T.Y. (2018). Akses dan Kesamaan dalam Pendidikan Vokasi (Access and Equality in Vocational Education). In Ferary, D. (2018) Sistem Pendidikan Vokasi di Inggris (Vocational Education System in England) (ed.). London: Kantor Atase Pendidikan dan Kebudayaan, Kedutaan Besar Indonesia (Indonesian Embassy) London, p. 121-138.

Katy is a Deputy Headteacher and the founder of a Leadership and Coaching Institute, which she now co-directs.

Katy is an Associate Fellow at the Oxford Character Project and a Research Associate at the Oxford University Wellbeing Research Centre. She is the co-founder of Global Social Leaders, a leadership programme which has participants in 105 countries, all passionate about creating and sustaining positive change in the world.

Title of Thesis

How could school leaders improve the flourishing and wellbeing of teaching staff?

Books
  • Granville-Chapman, K. and Bidston, E (2020) Leader: Know, love and inspire your people. Carmarthen: Crownhouse Publishing
Book Chapters
  •  Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ In White, M. & McCallum, F. (Ed.s) Wellbeing and Resilience Education: Covid-19 And Its Impact on Education Systems. Routledge
Publications
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘Purpose and Leadership in Education and Beyond’. The Education Exchange. Available from: https://theeducation.exchange/purpose-and-leadership-in-education-and-beyond/
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘The Three Secrets of COVID-era Leadership’. Times Education Supplement. Available from: https://www.tes.com/news/three-secrets-covid-era-school-leadership
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2016) ‘Assessing the Impact of a Teacher Leadership Programme in a Teaching Schools Alliance. Journal of Teacher Action Research
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2014) ‘The Afghan conflict: causes and consequences.’ Geography Review 28(1): 22-27
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2013) What are the psychological factors that affect students’ academic resilience and can teachers influence these? Unpublished thesis
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘Unlocking Leadership Potential’, The Magazine of the Boarding School’s Association, 33: 42-45
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2009) ‘Learning to Lead’, Leader, The Education Leader Magazine 41: 22-25
Presentations
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2019) ‘How could leaders improve the flourishing of their teams?’ ‘Stowe Ed Conference’, Forthcoming: 7 Jan 2019
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2018) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education: 21 Jun 2018
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2017) ‘How can school leaders improve teacher flourishing?’ ‘Doing Education Differently Conference’, University of Oxford, Department of Education, 11 Mar 17
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2016) ‘Developing school leaders who enable teachers to flourish’ The Telegraph Festival of Education 23 Jun 16
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Developing leadership in pupils and teachers’ High School Affiliated to Renmin University of China, Beijing. 20 Oct 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Resilience for leaders.’ Global Social Leaders World Summit. 16 Aug 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Emotional Intelligence for Leaders.’ Global Leaders in Education. 12 Aug 15
  • Coates, S.; Fraser, H.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J.; and Nasim, A. (2015) ‘Breaking through the glass ceiling – how can schools empower our girls to become leaders?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education. 19 Jun 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. ‘Developing Leadership in Schools’ (2015). G20 Schools Conference. International conference for head teachers. 11 Apr 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2018) ‘Introduction’, Wellington Leadership Institute: Festival of Leadership. Mar 2012-15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘How the Young Learn to Lead’, Raffles Institution (Singapore) -Purdue University (USA) Education Forum on Gifted & Talented Youth 2012. Singapore. 15 Mar 12
  • Draper, D.; Dyer, R.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Schools’. Presentation for a meeting about pupil leadership and character development at 10 Downing Street. 16 Nov 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Young People’. Presentation for a meeting about leadership and character at 10 Downing Street. 7 Mar 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K. & Seldon, A. (2012) ‘Introduction’, Leading Your School in the 21st Century. 7 Feb 12

Prior to starting his DPhil, Eddy worked as a primary school teacher in Bristol, where he also completed his MSc in Educational Research.

He is particularly interested in the culture of high stakes, standardised testing, and how this might perpetuate existing inequalities in schools. His research focuses specifically on the interaction between knowledge, policy and pedagogy in the context of Literacy education.

 

Amanda is completing a part-time DPhil, alongside working in Initial Teacher Education at Leeds Trinity University.

Her research is focused on understanding tensions, contradictions and conflicts that teachers in disadvantaged schools may experience when they engage in research activity.  Her research focus is influenced by her own experiences of working as a research-active teacher in disadvantaged schools, and recent work in teacher education to support experienced and beginning teachers in developing their own research activities.

One of the aims of Amanda’s research is to construct a framework to support teachers in pursuing research activity and critical scholarship work which articulates with wider social movements to address issues of poverty and disadvantage in schools.

Title of Thesis

Teachers’ perspectives on tensions between policy, practice and research in disadvantaged schools

Publications 

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2017) A ‘usable past’ of teacher education in England: history in JET’s anniversary issue. Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy, 43 (5), pp.616-627.

Nuttall, A. (2016) The ‘curriculum challenge’: Moving towards the ‘Storyline’ approach in a case study urban primary school.  Improving Schools, 19 (2), pp. 154-166.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Learning {Re}imagined: A review.  Primary First, 15, pp. 17-18.

Nuttall, A. and Doherty, J. (2014) Disaffected boys and the achievement gap: the ‘wallpaper effect’ and what is hidden by a focus on school results.  The Urban Review, 46 (5), pp.800-815.

Conference Papers and Presentations

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2018) “No child is pre-ordained to fail” Teachers questioning policy assumptions.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Newcastle, 11-13 September.

Nuttall, A. and Tobbell, C. (2017) Trainee teachers’ perspectives on practitioner enquiry.  Paper presented at the 8th TEAN Conference: Thinking Deeply about Education, Birmingham, 11-12 May.

Nuttall, A. (2017) Assessment at primary level: quality, comparability and improving secondary readiness.  A perspective from ITE.  Speech at the Westminster Education Forum Keynote Seminar: Next steps for reforming primary education: effective teaching practices, assessment and accountably, London, 18 January.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Deficit narratives and lived realities: whose poverty is it?  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the Australian Association for Research in Education, Melbourne, 27 November – 1 December.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Disenfranchised boys’ reflections on their urban schooling experience: “What a Waste!”.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Philpott, C., Beckett, L. and Wrigley, T. (2016) Collaborative practitioner inquiry: making a difference to urban schools.  Innovation session (school visits and symposium) presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Finn, B. and Beckett, L. (2015) Teachers’ constructions of poverty effects: Their research evidence.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Belfast, 15-17 September.

Nuttall, A. (2014) Teachers’ voice on disengaged boys: the role of one teacher-researcher in an English primary school. Paper presented at the Joint Australian Association for Research in Education and the New Zealand Association for Research in Education Conference, Brisbane, 30 November – 4 December.

Andrew Marotta is a D.Phil candidate in the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. He holds an A.A. in Social Sciences from Broward Community College, and a B.A. in Individualized Studies from the Gallatin School of Individualized Studies, New York University and an M.A. and Ed.M. in Counseling Psychology and School Counseling from Teachers College, Columbia University.

Andrew’s research interests include social and emotional learning, peer mentorship, existential therapy / philosophy, curriculum design for school counselors, and applied ethics in computer science. Andrew’s thesis examines how literature and philosophy can be used to nurture social and emotional learning through group counseling among high school students. He has also worked as a school counselor, teaching artist, and curriculum designer.

Presently, Andrew is designing joint humanities and applied ethics workshops for computer and data science college majors, using social and emotional learning concepts as the pedagogical foundation.

Abigail’s research explores the role of education in students’ personal development and how this can be supported by policy, curricula, initial teacher education and teacher professional development. In particular she focuses on history education, citizenship education and peace education as vehicles for dialogue. These opportunities for students to engage with social questions are vital for building cohesive societies. This flows from the recognition that traditional forums for developing public understanding, such as post-conflict truth commissions, need to be complemented by intergenerational and educational perspectives.

Abigail has taught History, Politics, Debating as well as Relationships and Sex Education to secondary school students in South Africa, England and the USA.

She holds postgraduate degrees in Post-Conflict and Transitional Justice (University of Cape Town), in Education, Globalisation and International Development (University of Cambridge) and in African Studies (University of Oxford). She is a Rhodes Scholar, Mandela-Magdalene Scholar and Mandela-Rhodes Scholar.

Title of thesis

GCSE History, Policy Reform and Student Development: How students and teachers navigate the thematic study “Empires, Migration and the People”

Conference papers

Teaching Migration, Belonging, and Empire in Secondary Schools: evaluation of a teacher professional development program, (2019) History Educators International Research Network Conference, Lead author: Dr Jason Todd, University of Vienna, Austria.

“The Problems and Prospects of Teaching South Africa’s Recent History: Teachers’ Perspectives”, (2018) Sustainability, peace and education – Exploring promise and practice: BAICE 20th Anniversary Symposium, University of Bristol, England.

“New Generations, Old Wounds: Learning History at Home and School in Northern Ireland”, (2018) European Social Science and History Conference,
Queens University Belfast, Northern Ireland.

“The Methodological Challenges of Investigating the Role of History Teaching in Peacebuilding”, (2017), Present Past: Time, Memory, and the Negotiation of Historical Justice Conference, Columbia University, United States of America.

“Teaching South Africa’s Truth and Reconciliation Commission”, (2017) European Conference on African Studies, Universität Basel, Switzerland.

Research Assistant Publications

Review of the evidence on feedback in primary and secondary schools, (forthcoming, 2021) for the Education Endowment Foundation, Lead author: Prof Velda Elliott.

Teaching Migration, Belonging, and Empire in Secondary Schools, (2019), for Runnymede Trust and the European Research Council, Lead authors: Kimberly McIntosh, Dr Jason Todd and Prof Nandini Das.

Gender and the Politics of Reconciliation (2016), for The Institute for Justice and Reconciliation, Lead author: Dr Helen Scanlon

SOLE AUTHOR PUBLICATIONS

‘Transitions, Truth-Telling and Teaching History’, Cambridge Open-Review Educational Research e-Journal, Vol. 4, 2017.

Alice Tawell is an ESRC funded DPhil Student, co-supervised across the Department of Education and Centre for Criminology at the University of Oxford.

Supervisors: Professor Harry Daniels and Dr Rachel Condry.

Alice’s research focuses broadly on the enactment of school exclusion policy in England.

Prior to starting her doctoral studies, Alice gained a BSc in Sociology from the University of Bath and an MSc in Education (Research Training) from the University of Oxford.

As part of her undergraduate degree, Alice undertook a placement year working with Professor Kathy Sylva in the Families, Effective Learning and Literacy Research Group at the Department of Education, University of Oxford. After completing her degree, Alice returned to the department and has worked as a Research Officer on a number of different research projects since 2014. Most recently Alice has worked as part of the Excluded Lives Research Team on two projects exploring exclusion from school from a multidisciplinary perspective. In 2017 she was awarded a Seed-corn Small Grant Award to co-lead a pilot project exploring student collaborative networks with Hau Ming Tse. Alice also co-convenes the Qualitative Methods Hub in the department.

Outside of the department, Alice has sat on the Advisory Board for the Children Missing Education research project (2016-2017) at the National Children’s Bureau (NCB) and has been a member of the NCB Partnership for Well Being and Mental Health in Schools since 2016. She also sits on the Transparency on Exclusions Steering Group.

In 2017 Alice received funding from the Grand Union Doctoral Training Partnership placement scheme to conduct a Knowledge Exchange Internship with the Early Years Analysis and Research Unit at the Department for Education, and in 2018 Alice was elected the Co-President of the Grand Union ESRC Scholar’s Association, representing ESRC students from the University of Oxford, Brunel and The Open University.

Ashmita graduated from Boston University in 2008 with a BSc. in Biomedical Engineering, after which she worked in Research & Development for 6 years.

It is here that she decided to make the leap from formulation chemistry to STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Math) Education after having worked on programs involving increasing diversity in STEM in schools.

She received her Master’s from Boston University in 2015 in Education Policy. Her research interests include: STEM education policy; Assessment; Further Education; Higher Education; Science education pedagogy

Originally from Indonesia, Tracey has spent the last decade studying in the UK and working about multicultural education in Indonesia.

She is fully funded by the Indonesia Endowment Fund for Education (LPDP). Her doctoral research explores the ways Indonesian schools teach and accommodate the national vision of multicultural Indonesia, “Bhinneka Tunggal Ika” (Unity-in-Diversity). By using a two-tier case study research approach (case studies of six schools and of two provinces), it presents nuanced and critical account of the ways head teachers, teachers, students and parents from six state and private schools in Jakarta and Bali with different mixes of pupil ethnicity and religiosity understand and accommodate the vision of diversity into educational practices. Despite the highly contextual focus, the research offers a critical view into the complex role of schools in today’s era of globalisation in providing quality education for all and at the same time creating citizens who are inclusive and respectful towards others.

Tracey completed her MSc in Comparative and International Education at the University of Oxford in 2011 and her honours BA in Mathematics and Education Studies at the University of Cambridge in 2010. Upon completing her study in the UK, she returned to Indonesia to work in an educational foundation Sultan Iskandar Muda in Medan, Indonesia as a member of the Board of Directors in the Foundation – a position which she is still holding until today. She is responsible for overlooking the development and implementation of multicultural education and teacher development programme.

During her tenure, she has worked alongside the head teachers and teachers across all educational levels (from pre-school until high school) and produced books on the praxis of multicultural education in the school setting.

Title of Thesis

Accommodating a vision of diversity in different school contexts: “Unity-in-Diversity” in Indonesia

Publications
Journal Article
  • Harjatanaya, T.Y. & Hoon, C.Y. (2018) Politics of multicultural education in post-Suharto Indonesia: a study of the Chinese minority. Compare: A Journal of Comparative and International Education
Edited Book
  • Harjatanaya, T.Y. (2015) (2nd Edition) Merawat Keberagaman: Praksis Pendidikan Multikultural Perguruan Sultan Iskandar Muda (Fostering Diversity: Praxis of Multicultural Education in Sultan Iskandar Muda). Medan: YPSIM.
Book Chapter
  • Harjatanaya, T.Y. (2018). Akses dan Kesamaan dalam Pendidikan Vokasi (Access and Equality in Vocational Education). In Ferary, D. (2018) Sistem Pendidikan Vokasi di Inggris (Vocational Education System in England) (ed.). London: Kantor Atase Pendidikan dan Kebudayaan, Kedutaan Besar Indonesia (Indonesian Embassy) London, p. 121-138.

Katy is a Deputy Headteacher and the founder of a Leadership and Coaching Institute, which she now co-directs.

Katy is an Associate Fellow at the Oxford Character Project and a Research Associate at the Oxford University Wellbeing Research Centre. She is the co-founder of Global Social Leaders, a leadership programme which has participants in 105 countries, all passionate about creating and sustaining positive change in the world.

Title of Thesis

How could school leaders improve the flourishing and wellbeing of teaching staff?

Books
  • Granville-Chapman, K. and Bidston, E (2020) Leader: Know, love and inspire your people. Carmarthen: Crownhouse Publishing
Book Chapters
  •  Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ In White, M. & McCallum, F. (Ed.s) Wellbeing and Resilience Education: Covid-19 And Its Impact on Education Systems. Routledge
Publications
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘Purpose and Leadership in Education and Beyond’. The Education Exchange. Available from: https://theeducation.exchange/purpose-and-leadership-in-education-and-beyond/
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘The Three Secrets of COVID-era Leadership’. Times Education Supplement. Available from: https://www.tes.com/news/three-secrets-covid-era-school-leadership
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2016) ‘Assessing the Impact of a Teacher Leadership Programme in a Teaching Schools Alliance. Journal of Teacher Action Research
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2014) ‘The Afghan conflict: causes and consequences.’ Geography Review 28(1): 22-27
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2013) What are the psychological factors that affect students’ academic resilience and can teachers influence these? Unpublished thesis
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘Unlocking Leadership Potential’, The Magazine of the Boarding School’s Association, 33: 42-45
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2009) ‘Learning to Lead’, Leader, The Education Leader Magazine 41: 22-25
Presentations
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2019) ‘How could leaders improve the flourishing of their teams?’ ‘Stowe Ed Conference’, Forthcoming: 7 Jan 2019
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2018) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education: 21 Jun 2018
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2017) ‘How can school leaders improve teacher flourishing?’ ‘Doing Education Differently Conference’, University of Oxford, Department of Education, 11 Mar 17
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2016) ‘Developing school leaders who enable teachers to flourish’ The Telegraph Festival of Education 23 Jun 16
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Developing leadership in pupils and teachers’ High School Affiliated to Renmin University of China, Beijing. 20 Oct 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Resilience for leaders.’ Global Social Leaders World Summit. 16 Aug 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Emotional Intelligence for Leaders.’ Global Leaders in Education. 12 Aug 15
  • Coates, S.; Fraser, H.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J.; and Nasim, A. (2015) ‘Breaking through the glass ceiling – how can schools empower our girls to become leaders?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education. 19 Jun 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. ‘Developing Leadership in Schools’ (2015). G20 Schools Conference. International conference for head teachers. 11 Apr 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2018) ‘Introduction’, Wellington Leadership Institute: Festival of Leadership. Mar 2012-15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘How the Young Learn to Lead’, Raffles Institution (Singapore) -Purdue University (USA) Education Forum on Gifted & Talented Youth 2012. Singapore. 15 Mar 12
  • Draper, D.; Dyer, R.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Schools’. Presentation for a meeting about pupil leadership and character development at 10 Downing Street. 16 Nov 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Young People’. Presentation for a meeting about leadership and character at 10 Downing Street. 7 Mar 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K. & Seldon, A. (2012) ‘Introduction’, Leading Your School in the 21st Century. 7 Feb 12

Prior to starting his DPhil, Eddy worked as a primary school teacher in Bristol, where he also completed his MSc in Educational Research.

He is particularly interested in the culture of high stakes, standardised testing, and how this might perpetuate existing inequalities in schools. His research focuses specifically on the interaction between knowledge, policy and pedagogy in the context of Literacy education.

 

Amanda is completing a part-time DPhil, alongside working in Initial Teacher Education at Leeds Trinity University.

Her research is focused on understanding tensions, contradictions and conflicts that teachers in disadvantaged schools may experience when they engage in research activity.  Her research focus is influenced by her own experiences of working as a research-active teacher in disadvantaged schools, and recent work in teacher education to support experienced and beginning teachers in developing their own research activities.

One of the aims of Amanda’s research is to construct a framework to support teachers in pursuing research activity and critical scholarship work which articulates with wider social movements to address issues of poverty and disadvantage in schools.

Title of Thesis

Teachers’ perspectives on tensions between policy, practice and research in disadvantaged schools

Publications 

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2017) A ‘usable past’ of teacher education in England: history in JET’s anniversary issue. Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy, 43 (5), pp.616-627.

Nuttall, A. (2016) The ‘curriculum challenge’: Moving towards the ‘Storyline’ approach in a case study urban primary school.  Improving Schools, 19 (2), pp. 154-166.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Learning {Re}imagined: A review.  Primary First, 15, pp. 17-18.

Nuttall, A. and Doherty, J. (2014) Disaffected boys and the achievement gap: the ‘wallpaper effect’ and what is hidden by a focus on school results.  The Urban Review, 46 (5), pp.800-815.

Conference Papers and Presentations

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2018) “No child is pre-ordained to fail” Teachers questioning policy assumptions.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Newcastle, 11-13 September.

Nuttall, A. and Tobbell, C. (2017) Trainee teachers’ perspectives on practitioner enquiry.  Paper presented at the 8th TEAN Conference: Thinking Deeply about Education, Birmingham, 11-12 May.

Nuttall, A. (2017) Assessment at primary level: quality, comparability and improving secondary readiness.  A perspective from ITE.  Speech at the Westminster Education Forum Keynote Seminar: Next steps for reforming primary education: effective teaching practices, assessment and accountably, London, 18 January.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Deficit narratives and lived realities: whose poverty is it?  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the Australian Association for Research in Education, Melbourne, 27 November – 1 December.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Disenfranchised boys’ reflections on their urban schooling experience: “What a Waste!”.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Philpott, C., Beckett, L. and Wrigley, T. (2016) Collaborative practitioner inquiry: making a difference to urban schools.  Innovation session (school visits and symposium) presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Finn, B. and Beckett, L. (2015) Teachers’ constructions of poverty effects: Their research evidence.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Belfast, 15-17 September.

Nuttall, A. (2014) Teachers’ voice on disengaged boys: the role of one teacher-researcher in an English primary school. Paper presented at the Joint Australian Association for Research in Education and the New Zealand Association for Research in Education Conference, Brisbane, 30 November – 4 December.

Andrew Marotta is a D.Phil candidate in the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. He holds an A.A. in Social Sciences from Broward Community College, and a B.A. in Individualized Studies from the Gallatin School of Individualized Studies, New York University and an M.A. and Ed.M. in Counseling Psychology and School Counseling from Teachers College, Columbia University.

Andrew’s research interests include social and emotional learning, peer mentorship, existential therapy / philosophy, curriculum design for school counselors, and applied ethics in computer science. Andrew’s thesis examines how literature and philosophy can be used to nurture social and emotional learning through group counseling among high school students. He has also worked as a school counselor, teaching artist, and curriculum designer.

Presently, Andrew is designing joint humanities and applied ethics workshops for computer and data science college majors, using social and emotional learning concepts as the pedagogical foundation.

Abigail’s research explores the role of education in students’ personal development and how this can be supported by policy, curricula, initial teacher education and teacher professional development. In particular she focuses on history education, citizenship education and peace education as vehicles for dialogue. These opportunities for students to engage with social questions are vital for building cohesive societies. This flows from the recognition that traditional forums for developing public understanding, such as post-conflict truth commissions, need to be complemented by intergenerational and educational perspectives.

Abigail has taught History, Politics, Debating as well as Relationships and Sex Education to secondary school students in South Africa, England and the USA.

She holds postgraduate degrees in Post-Conflict and Transitional Justice (University of Cape Town), in Education, Globalisation and International Development (University of Cambridge) and in African Studies (University of Oxford). She is a Rhodes Scholar, Mandela-Magdalene Scholar and Mandela-Rhodes Scholar.

Title of thesis

GCSE History, Policy Reform and Student Development: How students and teachers navigate the thematic study “Empires, Migration and the People”

Conference papers

Teaching Migration, Belonging, and Empire in Secondary Schools: evaluation of a teacher professional development program, (2019) History Educators International Research Network Conference, Lead author: Dr Jason Todd, University of Vienna, Austria.

“The Problems and Prospects of Teaching South Africa’s Recent History: Teachers’ Perspectives”, (2018) Sustainability, peace and education – Exploring promise and practice: BAICE 20th Anniversary Symposium, University of Bristol, England.

“New Generations, Old Wounds: Learning History at Home and School in Northern Ireland”, (2018) European Social Science and History Conference,
Queens University Belfast, Northern Ireland.

“The Methodological Challenges of Investigating the Role of History Teaching in Peacebuilding”, (2017), Present Past: Time, Memory, and the Negotiation of Historical Justice Conference, Columbia University, United States of America.

“Teaching South Africa’s Truth and Reconciliation Commission”, (2017) European Conference on African Studies, Universität Basel, Switzerland.

Research Assistant Publications

Review of the evidence on feedback in primary and secondary schools, (forthcoming, 2021) for the Education Endowment Foundation, Lead author: Prof Velda Elliott.

Teaching Migration, Belonging, and Empire in Secondary Schools, (2019), for Runnymede Trust and the European Research Council, Lead authors: Kimberly McIntosh, Dr Jason Todd and Prof Nandini Das.

Gender and the Politics of Reconciliation (2016), for The Institute for Justice and Reconciliation, Lead author: Dr Helen Scanlon

SOLE AUTHOR PUBLICATIONS

‘Transitions, Truth-Telling and Teaching History’, Cambridge Open-Review Educational Research e-Journal, Vol. 4, 2017.

Alice Tawell is an ESRC funded DPhil Student, co-supervised across the Department of Education and Centre for Criminology at the University of Oxford.

Supervisors: Professor Harry Daniels and Dr Rachel Condry.

Alice’s research focuses broadly on the enactment of school exclusion policy in England.

Prior to starting her doctoral studies, Alice gained a BSc in Sociology from the University of Bath and an MSc in Education (Research Training) from the University of Oxford.

As part of her undergraduate degree, Alice undertook a placement year working with Professor Kathy Sylva in the Families, Effective Learning and Literacy Research Group at the Department of Education, University of Oxford. After completing her degree, Alice returned to the department and has worked as a Research Officer on a number of different research projects since 2014. Most recently Alice has worked as part of the Excluded Lives Research Team on two projects exploring exclusion from school from a multidisciplinary perspective. In 2017 she was awarded a Seed-corn Small Grant Award to co-lead a pilot project exploring student collaborative networks with Hau Ming Tse. Alice also co-convenes the Qualitative Methods Hub in the department.

Outside of the department, Alice has sat on the Advisory Board for the Children Missing Education research project (2016-2017) at the National Children’s Bureau (NCB) and has been a member of the NCB Partnership for Well Being and Mental Health in Schools since 2016. She also sits on the Transparency on Exclusions Steering Group.

In 2017 Alice received funding from the Grand Union Doctoral Training Partnership placement scheme to conduct a Knowledge Exchange Internship with the Early Years Analysis and Research Unit at the Department for Education, and in 2018 Alice was elected the Co-President of the Grand Union ESRC Scholar’s Association, representing ESRC students from the University of Oxford, Brunel and The Open University.

Ashmita graduated from Boston University in 2008 with a BSc. in Biomedical Engineering, after which she worked in Research & Development for 6 years.

It is here that she decided to make the leap from formulation chemistry to STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Math) Education after having worked on programs involving increasing diversity in STEM in schools.

She received her Master’s from Boston University in 2015 in Education Policy. Her research interests include: STEM education policy; Assessment; Further Education; Higher Education; Science education pedagogy

Originally from Indonesia, Tracey has spent the last decade studying in the UK and working about multicultural education in Indonesia.

She is fully funded by the Indonesia Endowment Fund for Education (LPDP). Her doctoral research explores the ways Indonesian schools teach and accommodate the national vision of multicultural Indonesia, “Bhinneka Tunggal Ika” (Unity-in-Diversity). By using a two-tier case study research approach (case studies of six schools and of two provinces), it presents nuanced and critical account of the ways head teachers, teachers, students and parents from six state and private schools in Jakarta and Bali with different mixes of pupil ethnicity and religiosity understand and accommodate the vision of diversity into educational practices. Despite the highly contextual focus, the research offers a critical view into the complex role of schools in today’s era of globalisation in providing quality education for all and at the same time creating citizens who are inclusive and respectful towards others.

Tracey completed her MSc in Comparative and International Education at the University of Oxford in 2011 and her honours BA in Mathematics and Education Studies at the University of Cambridge in 2010. Upon completing her study in the UK, she returned to Indonesia to work in an educational foundation Sultan Iskandar Muda in Medan, Indonesia as a member of the Board of Directors in the Foundation – a position which she is still holding until today. She is responsible for overlooking the development and implementation of multicultural education and teacher development programme.

During her tenure, she has worked alongside the head teachers and teachers across all educational levels (from pre-school until high school) and produced books on the praxis of multicultural education in the school setting.

Title of Thesis

Accommodating a vision of diversity in different school contexts: “Unity-in-Diversity” in Indonesia

Publications
Journal Article
  • Harjatanaya, T.Y. & Hoon, C.Y. (2018) Politics of multicultural education in post-Suharto Indonesia: a study of the Chinese minority. Compare: A Journal of Comparative and International Education
Edited Book
  • Harjatanaya, T.Y. (2015) (2nd Edition) Merawat Keberagaman: Praksis Pendidikan Multikultural Perguruan Sultan Iskandar Muda (Fostering Diversity: Praxis of Multicultural Education in Sultan Iskandar Muda). Medan: YPSIM.
Book Chapter
  • Harjatanaya, T.Y. (2018). Akses dan Kesamaan dalam Pendidikan Vokasi (Access and Equality in Vocational Education). In Ferary, D. (2018) Sistem Pendidikan Vokasi di Inggris (Vocational Education System in England) (ed.). London: Kantor Atase Pendidikan dan Kebudayaan, Kedutaan Besar Indonesia (Indonesian Embassy) London, p. 121-138.

Katy is a Deputy Headteacher and the founder of a Leadership and Coaching Institute, which she now co-directs.

Katy is an Associate Fellow at the Oxford Character Project and a Research Associate at the Oxford University Wellbeing Research Centre. She is the co-founder of Global Social Leaders, a leadership programme which has participants in 105 countries, all passionate about creating and sustaining positive change in the world.

Title of Thesis

How could school leaders improve the flourishing and wellbeing of teaching staff?

Books
  • Granville-Chapman, K. and Bidston, E (2020) Leader: Know, love and inspire your people. Carmarthen: Crownhouse Publishing
Book Chapters
  •  Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ In White, M. & McCallum, F. (Ed.s) Wellbeing and Resilience Education: Covid-19 And Its Impact on Education Systems. Routledge
Publications
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘Purpose and Leadership in Education and Beyond’. The Education Exchange. Available from: https://theeducation.exchange/purpose-and-leadership-in-education-and-beyond/
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘The Three Secrets of COVID-era Leadership’. Times Education Supplement. Available from: https://www.tes.com/news/three-secrets-covid-era-school-leadership
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2016) ‘Assessing the Impact of a Teacher Leadership Programme in a Teaching Schools Alliance. Journal of Teacher Action Research
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2014) ‘The Afghan conflict: causes and consequences.’ Geography Review 28(1): 22-27
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2013) What are the psychological factors that affect students’ academic resilience and can teachers influence these? Unpublished thesis
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘Unlocking Leadership Potential’, The Magazine of the Boarding School’s Association, 33: 42-45
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2009) ‘Learning to Lead’, Leader, The Education Leader Magazine 41: 22-25
Presentations
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2019) ‘How could leaders improve the flourishing of their teams?’ ‘Stowe Ed Conference’, Forthcoming: 7 Jan 2019
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2018) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education: 21 Jun 2018
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2017) ‘How can school leaders improve teacher flourishing?’ ‘Doing Education Differently Conference’, University of Oxford, Department of Education, 11 Mar 17
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2016) ‘Developing school leaders who enable teachers to flourish’ The Telegraph Festival of Education 23 Jun 16
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Developing leadership in pupils and teachers’ High School Affiliated to Renmin University of China, Beijing. 20 Oct 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Resilience for leaders.’ Global Social Leaders World Summit. 16 Aug 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Emotional Intelligence for Leaders.’ Global Leaders in Education. 12 Aug 15
  • Coates, S.; Fraser, H.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J.; and Nasim, A. (2015) ‘Breaking through the glass ceiling – how can schools empower our girls to become leaders?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education. 19 Jun 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. ‘Developing Leadership in Schools’ (2015). G20 Schools Conference. International conference for head teachers. 11 Apr 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2018) ‘Introduction’, Wellington Leadership Institute: Festival of Leadership. Mar 2012-15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘How the Young Learn to Lead’, Raffles Institution (Singapore) -Purdue University (USA) Education Forum on Gifted & Talented Youth 2012. Singapore. 15 Mar 12
  • Draper, D.; Dyer, R.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Schools’. Presentation for a meeting about pupil leadership and character development at 10 Downing Street. 16 Nov 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Young People’. Presentation for a meeting about leadership and character at 10 Downing Street. 7 Mar 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K. & Seldon, A. (2012) ‘Introduction’, Leading Your School in the 21st Century. 7 Feb 12

Prior to starting his DPhil, Eddy worked as a primary school teacher in Bristol, where he also completed his MSc in Educational Research.

He is particularly interested in the culture of high stakes, standardised testing, and how this might perpetuate existing inequalities in schools. His research focuses specifically on the interaction between knowledge, policy and pedagogy in the context of Literacy education.

 

Amanda is completing a part-time DPhil, alongside working in Initial Teacher Education at Leeds Trinity University.

Her research is focused on understanding tensions, contradictions and conflicts that teachers in disadvantaged schools may experience when they engage in research activity.  Her research focus is influenced by her own experiences of working as a research-active teacher in disadvantaged schools, and recent work in teacher education to support experienced and beginning teachers in developing their own research activities.

One of the aims of Amanda’s research is to construct a framework to support teachers in pursuing research activity and critical scholarship work which articulates with wider social movements to address issues of poverty and disadvantage in schools.

Title of Thesis

Teachers’ perspectives on tensions between policy, practice and research in disadvantaged schools

Publications 

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2017) A ‘usable past’ of teacher education in England: history in JET’s anniversary issue. Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy, 43 (5), pp.616-627.

Nuttall, A. (2016) The ‘curriculum challenge’: Moving towards the ‘Storyline’ approach in a case study urban primary school.  Improving Schools, 19 (2), pp. 154-166.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Learning {Re}imagined: A review.  Primary First, 15, pp. 17-18.

Nuttall, A. and Doherty, J. (2014) Disaffected boys and the achievement gap: the ‘wallpaper effect’ and what is hidden by a focus on school results.  The Urban Review, 46 (5), pp.800-815.

Conference Papers and Presentations

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2018) “No child is pre-ordained to fail” Teachers questioning policy assumptions.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Newcastle, 11-13 September.

Nuttall, A. and Tobbell, C. (2017) Trainee teachers’ perspectives on practitioner enquiry.  Paper presented at the 8th TEAN Conference: Thinking Deeply about Education, Birmingham, 11-12 May.

Nuttall, A. (2017) Assessment at primary level: quality, comparability and improving secondary readiness.  A perspective from ITE.  Speech at the Westminster Education Forum Keynote Seminar: Next steps for reforming primary education: effective teaching practices, assessment and accountably, London, 18 January.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Deficit narratives and lived realities: whose poverty is it?  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the Australian Association for Research in Education, Melbourne, 27 November – 1 December.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Disenfranchised boys’ reflections on their urban schooling experience: “What a Waste!”.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Philpott, C., Beckett, L. and Wrigley, T. (2016) Collaborative practitioner inquiry: making a difference to urban schools.  Innovation session (school visits and symposium) presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Finn, B. and Beckett, L. (2015) Teachers’ constructions of poverty effects: Their research evidence.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Belfast, 15-17 September.

Nuttall, A. (2014) Teachers’ voice on disengaged boys: the role of one teacher-researcher in an English primary school. Paper presented at the Joint Australian Association for Research in Education and the New Zealand Association for Research in Education Conference, Brisbane, 30 November – 4 December.

Andrew Marotta is a D.Phil candidate in the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. He holds an A.A. in Social Sciences from Broward Community College, and a B.A. in Individualized Studies from the Gallatin School of Individualized Studies, New York University and an M.A. and Ed.M. in Counseling Psychology and School Counseling from Teachers College, Columbia University.

Andrew’s research interests include social and emotional learning, peer mentorship, existential therapy / philosophy, curriculum design for school counselors, and applied ethics in computer science. Andrew’s thesis examines how literature and philosophy can be used to nurture social and emotional learning through group counseling among high school students. He has also worked as a school counselor, teaching artist, and curriculum designer.

Presently, Andrew is designing joint humanities and applied ethics workshops for computer and data science college majors, using social and emotional learning concepts as the pedagogical foundation.

Abigail’s research explores the role of education in students’ personal development and how this can be supported by policy, curricula, initial teacher education and teacher professional development. In particular she focuses on history education, citizenship education and peace education as vehicles for dialogue. These opportunities for students to engage with social questions are vital for building cohesive societies. This flows from the recognition that traditional forums for developing public understanding, such as post-conflict truth commissions, need to be complemented by intergenerational and educational perspectives.

Abigail has taught History, Politics, Debating as well as Relationships and Sex Education to secondary school students in South Africa, England and the USA.

She holds postgraduate degrees in Post-Conflict and Transitional Justice (University of Cape Town), in Education, Globalisation and International Development (University of Cambridge) and in African Studies (University of Oxford). She is a Rhodes Scholar, Mandela-Magdalene Scholar and Mandela-Rhodes Scholar.

Title of thesis

GCSE History, Policy Reform and Student Development: How students and teachers navigate the thematic study “Empires, Migration and the People”

Conference papers

Teaching Migration, Belonging, and Empire in Secondary Schools: evaluation of a teacher professional development program, (2019) History Educators International Research Network Conference, Lead author: Dr Jason Todd, University of Vienna, Austria.

“The Problems and Prospects of Teaching South Africa’s Recent History: Teachers’ Perspectives”, (2018) Sustainability, peace and education – Exploring promise and practice: BAICE 20th Anniversary Symposium, University of Bristol, England.

“New Generations, Old Wounds: Learning History at Home and School in Northern Ireland”, (2018) European Social Science and History Conference,
Queens University Belfast, Northern Ireland.

“The Methodological Challenges of Investigating the Role of History Teaching in Peacebuilding”, (2017), Present Past: Time, Memory, and the Negotiation of Historical Justice Conference, Columbia University, United States of America.

“Teaching South Africa’s Truth and Reconciliation Commission”, (2017) European Conference on African Studies, Universität Basel, Switzerland.

Research Assistant Publications

Review of the evidence on feedback in primary and secondary schools, (forthcoming, 2021) for the Education Endowment Foundation, Lead author: Prof Velda Elliott.

Teaching Migration, Belonging, and Empire in Secondary Schools, (2019), for Runnymede Trust and the European Research Council, Lead authors: Kimberly McIntosh, Dr Jason Todd and Prof Nandini Das.

Gender and the Politics of Reconciliation (2016), for The Institute for Justice and Reconciliation, Lead author: Dr Helen Scanlon

SOLE AUTHOR PUBLICATIONS

‘Transitions, Truth-Telling and Teaching History’, Cambridge Open-Review Educational Research e-Journal, Vol. 4, 2017.

Alice Tawell is an ESRC funded DPhil Student, co-supervised across the Department of Education and Centre for Criminology at the University of Oxford.

Supervisors: Professor Harry Daniels and Dr Rachel Condry.

Alice’s research focuses broadly on the enactment of school exclusion policy in England.

Prior to starting her doctoral studies, Alice gained a BSc in Sociology from the University of Bath and an MSc in Education (Research Training) from the University of Oxford.

As part of her undergraduate degree, Alice undertook a placement year working with Professor Kathy Sylva in the Families, Effective Learning and Literacy Research Group at the Department of Education, University of Oxford. After completing her degree, Alice returned to the department and has worked as a Research Officer on a number of different research projects since 2014. Most recently Alice has worked as part of the Excluded Lives Research Team on two projects exploring exclusion from school from a multidisciplinary perspective. In 2017 she was awarded a Seed-corn Small Grant Award to co-lead a pilot project exploring student collaborative networks with Hau Ming Tse. Alice also co-convenes the Qualitative Methods Hub in the department.

Outside of the department, Alice has sat on the Advisory Board for the Children Missing Education research project (2016-2017) at the National Children’s Bureau (NCB) and has been a member of the NCB Partnership for Well Being and Mental Health in Schools since 2016. She also sits on the Transparency on Exclusions Steering Group.

In 2017 Alice received funding from the Grand Union Doctoral Training Partnership placement scheme to conduct a Knowledge Exchange Internship with the Early Years Analysis and Research Unit at the Department for Education, and in 2018 Alice was elected the Co-President of the Grand Union ESRC Scholar’s Association, representing ESRC students from the University of Oxford, Brunel and The Open University.

Ashmita graduated from Boston University in 2008 with a BSc. in Biomedical Engineering, after which she worked in Research & Development for 6 years.

It is here that she decided to make the leap from formulation chemistry to STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Math) Education after having worked on programs involving increasing diversity in STEM in schools.

She received her Master’s from Boston University in 2015 in Education Policy. Her research interests include: STEM education policy; Assessment; Further Education; Higher Education; Science education pedagogy

Originally from Indonesia, Tracey has spent the last decade studying in the UK and working about multicultural education in Indonesia.

She is fully funded by the Indonesia Endowment Fund for Education (LPDP). Her doctoral research explores the ways Indonesian schools teach and accommodate the national vision of multicultural Indonesia, “Bhinneka Tunggal Ika” (Unity-in-Diversity). By using a two-tier case study research approach (case studies of six schools and of two provinces), it presents nuanced and critical account of the ways head teachers, teachers, students and parents from six state and private schools in Jakarta and Bali with different mixes of pupil ethnicity and religiosity understand and accommodate the vision of diversity into educational practices. Despite the highly contextual focus, the research offers a critical view into the complex role of schools in today’s era of globalisation in providing quality education for all and at the same time creating citizens who are inclusive and respectful towards others.

Tracey completed her MSc in Comparative and International Education at the University of Oxford in 2011 and her honours BA in Mathematics and Education Studies at the University of Cambridge in 2010. Upon completing her study in the UK, she returned to Indonesia to work in an educational foundation Sultan Iskandar Muda in Medan, Indonesia as a member of the Board of Directors in the Foundation – a position which she is still holding until today. She is responsible for overlooking the development and implementation of multicultural education and teacher development programme.

During her tenure, she has worked alongside the head teachers and teachers across all educational levels (from pre-school until high school) and produced books on the praxis of multicultural education in the school setting.

Title of Thesis

Accommodating a vision of diversity in different school contexts: “Unity-in-Diversity” in Indonesia

Publications
Journal Article
  • Harjatanaya, T.Y. & Hoon, C.Y. (2018) Politics of multicultural education in post-Suharto Indonesia: a study of the Chinese minority. Compare: A Journal of Comparative and International Education
Edited Book
  • Harjatanaya, T.Y. (2015) (2nd Edition) Merawat Keberagaman: Praksis Pendidikan Multikultural Perguruan Sultan Iskandar Muda (Fostering Diversity: Praxis of Multicultural Education in Sultan Iskandar Muda). Medan: YPSIM.
Book Chapter
  • Harjatanaya, T.Y. (2018). Akses dan Kesamaan dalam Pendidikan Vokasi (Access and Equality in Vocational Education). In Ferary, D. (2018) Sistem Pendidikan Vokasi di Inggris (Vocational Education System in England) (ed.). London: Kantor Atase Pendidikan dan Kebudayaan, Kedutaan Besar Indonesia (Indonesian Embassy) London, p. 121-138.

Katy is a Deputy Headteacher and the founder of a Leadership and Coaching Institute, which she now co-directs.

Katy is an Associate Fellow at the Oxford Character Project and a Research Associate at the Oxford University Wellbeing Research Centre. She is the co-founder of Global Social Leaders, a leadership programme which has participants in 105 countries, all passionate about creating and sustaining positive change in the world.

Title of Thesis

How could school leaders improve the flourishing and wellbeing of teaching staff?

Books
  • Granville-Chapman, K. and Bidston, E (2020) Leader: Know, love and inspire your people. Carmarthen: Crownhouse Publishing
Book Chapters
  •  Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ In White, M. & McCallum, F. (Ed.s) Wellbeing and Resilience Education: Covid-19 And Its Impact on Education Systems. Routledge
Publications
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘Purpose and Leadership in Education and Beyond’. The Education Exchange. Available from: https://theeducation.exchange/purpose-and-leadership-in-education-and-beyond/
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘The Three Secrets of COVID-era Leadership’. Times Education Supplement. Available from: https://www.tes.com/news/three-secrets-covid-era-school-leadership
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2016) ‘Assessing the Impact of a Teacher Leadership Programme in a Teaching Schools Alliance. Journal of Teacher Action Research
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2014) ‘The Afghan conflict: causes and consequences.’ Geography Review 28(1): 22-27
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2013) What are the psychological factors that affect students’ academic resilience and can teachers influence these? Unpublished thesis
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘Unlocking Leadership Potential’, The Magazine of the Boarding School’s Association, 33: 42-45
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2009) ‘Learning to Lead’, Leader, The Education Leader Magazine 41: 22-25
Presentations
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2019) ‘How could leaders improve the flourishing of their teams?’ ‘Stowe Ed Conference’, Forthcoming: 7 Jan 2019
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2018) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education: 21 Jun 2018
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2017) ‘How can school leaders improve teacher flourishing?’ ‘Doing Education Differently Conference’, University of Oxford, Department of Education, 11 Mar 17
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2016) ‘Developing school leaders who enable teachers to flourish’ The Telegraph Festival of Education 23 Jun 16
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Developing leadership in pupils and teachers’ High School Affiliated to Renmin University of China, Beijing. 20 Oct 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Resilience for leaders.’ Global Social Leaders World Summit. 16 Aug 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Emotional Intelligence for Leaders.’ Global Leaders in Education. 12 Aug 15
  • Coates, S.; Fraser, H.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J.; and Nasim, A. (2015) ‘Breaking through the glass ceiling – how can schools empower our girls to become leaders?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education. 19 Jun 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. ‘Developing Leadership in Schools’ (2015). G20 Schools Conference. International conference for head teachers. 11 Apr 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2018) ‘Introduction’, Wellington Leadership Institute: Festival of Leadership. Mar 2012-15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘How the Young Learn to Lead’, Raffles Institution (Singapore) -Purdue University (USA) Education Forum on Gifted & Talented Youth 2012. Singapore. 15 Mar 12
  • Draper, D.; Dyer, R.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Schools’. Presentation for a meeting about pupil leadership and character development at 10 Downing Street. 16 Nov 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Young People’. Presentation for a meeting about leadership and character at 10 Downing Street. 7 Mar 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K. & Seldon, A. (2012) ‘Introduction’, Leading Your School in the 21st Century. 7 Feb 12

Prior to starting his DPhil, Eddy worked as a primary school teacher in Bristol, where he also completed his MSc in Educational Research.

He is particularly interested in the culture of high stakes, standardised testing, and how this might perpetuate existing inequalities in schools. His research focuses specifically on the interaction between knowledge, policy and pedagogy in the context of Literacy education.

 

Amanda is completing a part-time DPhil, alongside working in Initial Teacher Education at Leeds Trinity University.

Her research is focused on understanding tensions, contradictions and conflicts that teachers in disadvantaged schools may experience when they engage in research activity.  Her research focus is influenced by her own experiences of working as a research-active teacher in disadvantaged schools, and recent work in teacher education to support experienced and beginning teachers in developing their own research activities.

One of the aims of Amanda’s research is to construct a framework to support teachers in pursuing research activity and critical scholarship work which articulates with wider social movements to address issues of poverty and disadvantage in schools.

Title of Thesis

Teachers’ perspectives on tensions between policy, practice and research in disadvantaged schools

Publications 

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2017) A ‘usable past’ of teacher education in England: history in JET’s anniversary issue. Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy, 43 (5), pp.616-627.

Nuttall, A. (2016) The ‘curriculum challenge’: Moving towards the ‘Storyline’ approach in a case study urban primary school.  Improving Schools, 19 (2), pp. 154-166.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Learning {Re}imagined: A review.  Primary First, 15, pp. 17-18.

Nuttall, A. and Doherty, J. (2014) Disaffected boys and the achievement gap: the ‘wallpaper effect’ and what is hidden by a focus on school results.  The Urban Review, 46 (5), pp.800-815.

Conference Papers and Presentations

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2018) “No child is pre-ordained to fail” Teachers questioning policy assumptions.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Newcastle, 11-13 September.

Nuttall, A. and Tobbell, C. (2017) Trainee teachers’ perspectives on practitioner enquiry.  Paper presented at the 8th TEAN Conference: Thinking Deeply about Education, Birmingham, 11-12 May.

Nuttall, A. (2017) Assessment at primary level: quality, comparability and improving secondary readiness.  A perspective from ITE.  Speech at the Westminster Education Forum Keynote Seminar: Next steps for reforming primary education: effective teaching practices, assessment and accountably, London, 18 January.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Deficit narratives and lived realities: whose poverty is it?  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the Australian Association for Research in Education, Melbourne, 27 November – 1 December.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Disenfranchised boys’ reflections on their urban schooling experience: “What a Waste!”.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Philpott, C., Beckett, L. and Wrigley, T. (2016) Collaborative practitioner inquiry: making a difference to urban schools.  Innovation session (school visits and symposium) presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Finn, B. and Beckett, L. (2015) Teachers’ constructions of poverty effects: Their research evidence.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Belfast, 15-17 September.

Nuttall, A. (2014) Teachers’ voice on disengaged boys: the role of one teacher-researcher in an English primary school. Paper presented at the Joint Australian Association for Research in Education and the New Zealand Association for Research in Education Conference, Brisbane, 30 November – 4 December.

Andrew Marotta is a D.Phil candidate in the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. He holds an A.A. in Social Sciences from Broward Community College, and a B.A. in Individualized Studies from the Gallatin School of Individualized Studies, New York University and an M.A. and Ed.M. in Counseling Psychology and School Counseling from Teachers College, Columbia University.

Andrew’s research interests include social and emotional learning, peer mentorship, existential therapy / philosophy, curriculum design for school counselors, and applied ethics in computer science. Andrew’s thesis examines how literature and philosophy can be used to nurture social and emotional learning through group counseling among high school students. He has also worked as a school counselor, teaching artist, and curriculum designer.

Presently, Andrew is designing joint humanities and applied ethics workshops for computer and data science college majors, using social and emotional learning concepts as the pedagogical foundation.

Abigail’s research explores the role of education in students’ personal development and how this can be supported by policy, curricula, initial teacher education and teacher professional development. In particular she focuses on history education, citizenship education and peace education as vehicles for dialogue. These opportunities for students to engage with social questions are vital for building cohesive societies. This flows from the recognition that traditional forums for developing public understanding, such as post-conflict truth commissions, need to be complemented by intergenerational and educational perspectives.

Abigail has taught History, Politics, Debating as well as Relationships and Sex Education to secondary school students in South Africa, England and the USA.

She holds postgraduate degrees in Post-Conflict and Transitional Justice (University of Cape Town), in Education, Globalisation and International Development (University of Cambridge) and in African Studies (University of Oxford). She is a Rhodes Scholar, Mandela-Magdalene Scholar and Mandela-Rhodes Scholar.

Title of thesis

GCSE History, Policy Reform and Student Development: How students and teachers navigate the thematic study “Empires, Migration and the People”

Conference papers

Teaching Migration, Belonging, and Empire in Secondary Schools: evaluation of a teacher professional development program, (2019) History Educators International Research Network Conference, Lead author: Dr Jason Todd, University of Vienna, Austria.

“The Problems and Prospects of Teaching South Africa’s Recent History: Teachers’ Perspectives”, (2018) Sustainability, peace and education – Exploring promise and practice: BAICE 20th Anniversary Symposium, University of Bristol, England.

“New Generations, Old Wounds: Learning History at Home and School in Northern Ireland”, (2018) European Social Science and History Conference,
Queens University Belfast, Northern Ireland.

“The Methodological Challenges of Investigating the Role of History Teaching in Peacebuilding”, (2017), Present Past: Time, Memory, and the Negotiation of Historical Justice Conference, Columbia University, United States of America.

“Teaching South Africa’s Truth and Reconciliation Commission”, (2017) European Conference on African Studies, Universität Basel, Switzerland.

Research Assistant Publications

Review of the evidence on feedback in primary and secondary schools, (forthcoming, 2021) for the Education Endowment Foundation, Lead author: Prof Velda Elliott.

Teaching Migration, Belonging, and Empire in Secondary Schools, (2019), for Runnymede Trust and the European Research Council, Lead authors: Kimberly McIntosh, Dr Jason Todd and Prof Nandini Das.

Gender and the Politics of Reconciliation (2016), for The Institute for Justice and Reconciliation, Lead author: Dr Helen Scanlon

SOLE AUTHOR PUBLICATIONS

‘Transitions, Truth-Telling and Teaching History’, Cambridge Open-Review Educational Research e-Journal, Vol. 4, 2017.

Alice Tawell is an ESRC funded DPhil Student, co-supervised across the Department of Education and Centre for Criminology at the University of Oxford.

Supervisors: Professor Harry Daniels and Dr Rachel Condry.

Alice’s research focuses broadly on the enactment of school exclusion policy in England.

Prior to starting her doctoral studies, Alice gained a BSc in Sociology from the University of Bath and an MSc in Education (Research Training) from the University of Oxford.

As part of her undergraduate degree, Alice undertook a placement year working with Professor Kathy Sylva in the Families, Effective Learning and Literacy Research Group at the Department of Education, University of Oxford. After completing her degree, Alice returned to the department and has worked as a Research Officer on a number of different research projects since 2014. Most recently Alice has worked as part of the Excluded Lives Research Team on two projects exploring exclusion from school from a multidisciplinary perspective. In 2017 she was awarded a Seed-corn Small Grant Award to co-lead a pilot project exploring student collaborative networks with Hau Ming Tse. Alice also co-convenes the Qualitative Methods Hub in the department.

Outside of the department, Alice has sat on the Advisory Board for the Children Missing Education research project (2016-2017) at the National Children’s Bureau (NCB) and has been a member of the NCB Partnership for Well Being and Mental Health in Schools since 2016. She also sits on the Transparency on Exclusions Steering Group.

In 2017 Alice received funding from the Grand Union Doctoral Training Partnership placement scheme to conduct a Knowledge Exchange Internship with the Early Years Analysis and Research Unit at the Department for Education, and in 2018 Alice was elected the Co-President of the Grand Union ESRC Scholar’s Association, representing ESRC students from the University of Oxford, Brunel and The Open University.

Ashmita graduated from Boston University in 2008 with a BSc. in Biomedical Engineering, after which she worked in Research & Development for 6 years.

It is here that she decided to make the leap from formulation chemistry to STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Math) Education after having worked on programs involving increasing diversity in STEM in schools.

She received her Master’s from Boston University in 2015 in Education Policy. Her research interests include: STEM education policy; Assessment; Further Education; Higher Education; Science education pedagogy

Originally from Indonesia, Tracey has spent the last decade studying in the UK and working about multicultural education in Indonesia.

She is fully funded by the Indonesia Endowment Fund for Education (LPDP). Her doctoral research explores the ways Indonesian schools teach and accommodate the national vision of multicultural Indonesia, “Bhinneka Tunggal Ika” (Unity-in-Diversity). By using a two-tier case study research approach (case studies of six schools and of two provinces), it presents nuanced and critical account of the ways head teachers, teachers, students and parents from six state and private schools in Jakarta and Bali with different mixes of pupil ethnicity and religiosity understand and accommodate the vision of diversity into educational practices. Despite the highly contextual focus, the research offers a critical view into the complex role of schools in today’s era of globalisation in providing quality education for all and at the same time creating citizens who are inclusive and respectful towards others.

Tracey completed her MSc in Comparative and International Education at the University of Oxford in 2011 and her honours BA in Mathematics and Education Studies at the University of Cambridge in 2010. Upon completing her study in the UK, she returned to Indonesia to work in an educational foundation Sultan Iskandar Muda in Medan, Indonesia as a member of the Board of Directors in the Foundation – a position which she is still holding until today. She is responsible for overlooking the development and implementation of multicultural education and teacher development programme.

During her tenure, she has worked alongside the head teachers and teachers across all educational levels (from pre-school until high school) and produced books on the praxis of multicultural education in the school setting.

Title of Thesis

Accommodating a vision of diversity in different school contexts: “Unity-in-Diversity” in Indonesia

Publications
Journal Article
  • Harjatanaya, T.Y. & Hoon, C.Y. (2018) Politics of multicultural education in post-Suharto Indonesia: a study of the Chinese minority. Compare: A Journal of Comparative and International Education
Edited Book
  • Harjatanaya, T.Y. (2015) (2nd Edition) Merawat Keberagaman: Praksis Pendidikan Multikultural Perguruan Sultan Iskandar Muda (Fostering Diversity: Praxis of Multicultural Education in Sultan Iskandar Muda). Medan: YPSIM.
Book Chapter
  • Harjatanaya, T.Y. (2018). Akses dan Kesamaan dalam Pendidikan Vokasi (Access and Equality in Vocational Education). In Ferary, D. (2018) Sistem Pendidikan Vokasi di Inggris (Vocational Education System in England) (ed.). London: Kantor Atase Pendidikan dan Kebudayaan, Kedutaan Besar Indonesia (Indonesian Embassy) London, p. 121-138.

Katy is a Deputy Headteacher and the founder of a Leadership and Coaching Institute, which she now co-directs.

Katy is an Associate Fellow at the Oxford Character Project and a Research Associate at the Oxford University Wellbeing Research Centre. She is the co-founder of Global Social Leaders, a leadership programme which has participants in 105 countries, all passionate about creating and sustaining positive change in the world.

Title of Thesis

How could school leaders improve the flourishing and wellbeing of teaching staff?

Books
  • Granville-Chapman, K. and Bidston, E (2020) Leader: Know, love and inspire your people. Carmarthen: Crownhouse Publishing
Book Chapters
  •  Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ In White, M. & McCallum, F. (Ed.s) Wellbeing and Resilience Education: Covid-19 And Its Impact on Education Systems. Routledge
Publications
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘Purpose and Leadership in Education and Beyond’. The Education Exchange. Available from: https://theeducation.exchange/purpose-and-leadership-in-education-and-beyond/
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘The Three Secrets of COVID-era Leadership’. Times Education Supplement. Available from: https://www.tes.com/news/three-secrets-covid-era-school-leadership
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2016) ‘Assessing the Impact of a Teacher Leadership Programme in a Teaching Schools Alliance. Journal of Teacher Action Research
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2014) ‘The Afghan conflict: causes and consequences.’ Geography Review 28(1): 22-27
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2013) What are the psychological factors that affect students’ academic resilience and can teachers influence these? Unpublished thesis
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘Unlocking Leadership Potential’, The Magazine of the Boarding School’s Association, 33: 42-45
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2009) ‘Learning to Lead’, Leader, The Education Leader Magazine 41: 22-25
Presentations
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2019) ‘How could leaders improve the flourishing of their teams?’ ‘Stowe Ed Conference’, Forthcoming: 7 Jan 2019
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2018) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education: 21 Jun 2018
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2017) ‘How can school leaders improve teacher flourishing?’ ‘Doing Education Differently Conference’, University of Oxford, Department of Education, 11 Mar 17
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2016) ‘Developing school leaders who enable teachers to flourish’ The Telegraph Festival of Education 23 Jun 16
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Developing leadership in pupils and teachers’ High School Affiliated to Renmin University of China, Beijing. 20 Oct 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Resilience for leaders.’ Global Social Leaders World Summit. 16 Aug 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Emotional Intelligence for Leaders.’ Global Leaders in Education. 12 Aug 15
  • Coates, S.; Fraser, H.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J.; and Nasim, A. (2015) ‘Breaking through the glass ceiling – how can schools empower our girls to become leaders?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education. 19 Jun 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. ‘Developing Leadership in Schools’ (2015). G20 Schools Conference. International conference for head teachers. 11 Apr 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2018) ‘Introduction’, Wellington Leadership Institute: Festival of Leadership. Mar 2012-15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘How the Young Learn to Lead’, Raffles Institution (Singapore) -Purdue University (USA) Education Forum on Gifted & Talented Youth 2012. Singapore. 15 Mar 12
  • Draper, D.; Dyer, R.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Schools’. Presentation for a meeting about pupil leadership and character development at 10 Downing Street. 16 Nov 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Young People’. Presentation for a meeting about leadership and character at 10 Downing Street. 7 Mar 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K. & Seldon, A. (2012) ‘Introduction’, Leading Your School in the 21st Century. 7 Feb 12

Prior to starting his DPhil, Eddy worked as a primary school teacher in Bristol, where he also completed his MSc in Educational Research.

He is particularly interested in the culture of high stakes, standardised testing, and how this might perpetuate existing inequalities in schools. His research focuses specifically on the interaction between knowledge, policy and pedagogy in the context of Literacy education.

 

Amanda is completing a part-time DPhil, alongside working in Initial Teacher Education at Leeds Trinity University.

Her research is focused on understanding tensions, contradictions and conflicts that teachers in disadvantaged schools may experience when they engage in research activity.  Her research focus is influenced by her own experiences of working as a research-active teacher in disadvantaged schools, and recent work in teacher education to support experienced and beginning teachers in developing their own research activities.

One of the aims of Amanda’s research is to construct a framework to support teachers in pursuing research activity and critical scholarship work which articulates with wider social movements to address issues of poverty and disadvantage in schools.

Title of Thesis

Teachers’ perspectives on tensions between policy, practice and research in disadvantaged schools

Publications 

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2017) A ‘usable past’ of teacher education in England: history in JET’s anniversary issue. Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy, 43 (5), pp.616-627.

Nuttall, A. (2016) The ‘curriculum challenge’: Moving towards the ‘Storyline’ approach in a case study urban primary school.  Improving Schools, 19 (2), pp. 154-166.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Learning {Re}imagined: A review.  Primary First, 15, pp. 17-18.

Nuttall, A. and Doherty, J. (2014) Disaffected boys and the achievement gap: the ‘wallpaper effect’ and what is hidden by a focus on school results.  The Urban Review, 46 (5), pp.800-815.

Conference Papers and Presentations

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2018) “No child is pre-ordained to fail” Teachers questioning policy assumptions.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Newcastle, 11-13 September.

Nuttall, A. and Tobbell, C. (2017) Trainee teachers’ perspectives on practitioner enquiry.  Paper presented at the 8th TEAN Conference: Thinking Deeply about Education, Birmingham, 11-12 May.

Nuttall, A. (2017) Assessment at primary level: quality, comparability and improving secondary readiness.  A perspective from ITE.  Speech at the Westminster Education Forum Keynote Seminar: Next steps for reforming primary education: effective teaching practices, assessment and accountably, London, 18 January.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Deficit narratives and lived realities: whose poverty is it?  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the Australian Association for Research in Education, Melbourne, 27 November – 1 December.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Disenfranchised boys’ reflections on their urban schooling experience: “What a Waste!”.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Philpott, C., Beckett, L. and Wrigley, T. (2016) Collaborative practitioner inquiry: making a difference to urban schools.  Innovation session (school visits and symposium) presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Finn, B. and Beckett, L. (2015) Teachers’ constructions of poverty effects: Their research evidence.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Belfast, 15-17 September.

Nuttall, A. (2014) Teachers’ voice on disengaged boys: the role of one teacher-researcher in an English primary school. Paper presented at the Joint Australian Association for Research in Education and the New Zealand Association for Research in Education Conference, Brisbane, 30 November – 4 December.

Andrew Marotta is a D.Phil candidate in the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. He holds an A.A. in Social Sciences from Broward Community College, and a B.A. in Individualized Studies from the Gallatin School of Individualized Studies, New York University and an M.A. and Ed.M. in Counseling Psychology and School Counseling from Teachers College, Columbia University.

Andrew’s research interests include social and emotional learning, peer mentorship, existential therapy / philosophy, curriculum design for school counselors, and applied ethics in computer science. Andrew’s thesis examines how literature and philosophy can be used to nurture social and emotional learning through group counseling among high school students. He has also worked as a school counselor, teaching artist, and curriculum designer.

Presently, Andrew is designing joint humanities and applied ethics workshops for computer and data science college majors, using social and emotional learning concepts as the pedagogical foundation.

Abigail’s research explores the role of education in students’ personal development and how this can be supported by policy, curricula, initial teacher education and teacher professional development. In particular she focuses on history education, citizenship education and peace education as vehicles for dialogue. These opportunities for students to engage with social questions are vital for building cohesive societies. This flows from the recognition that traditional forums for developing public understanding, such as post-conflict truth commissions, need to be complemented by intergenerational and educational perspectives.

Abigail has taught History, Politics, Debating as well as Relationships and Sex Education to secondary school students in South Africa, England and the USA.

She holds postgraduate degrees in Post-Conflict and Transitional Justice (University of Cape Town), in Education, Globalisation and International Development (University of Cambridge) and in African Studies (University of Oxford). She is a Rhodes Scholar, Mandela-Magdalene Scholar and Mandela-Rhodes Scholar.

Title of thesis

GCSE History, Policy Reform and Student Development: How students and teachers navigate the thematic study “Empires, Migration and the People”

Conference papers

Teaching Migration, Belonging, and Empire in Secondary Schools: evaluation of a teacher professional development program, (2019) History Educators International Research Network Conference, Lead author: Dr Jason Todd, University of Vienna, Austria.

“The Problems and Prospects of Teaching South Africa’s Recent History: Teachers’ Perspectives”, (2018) Sustainability, peace and education – Exploring promise and practice: BAICE 20th Anniversary Symposium, University of Bristol, England.

“New Generations, Old Wounds: Learning History at Home and School in Northern Ireland”, (2018) European Social Science and History Conference,
Queens University Belfast, Northern Ireland.

“The Methodological Challenges of Investigating the Role of History Teaching in Peacebuilding”, (2017), Present Past: Time, Memory, and the Negotiation of Historical Justice Conference, Columbia University, United States of America.

“Teaching South Africa’s Truth and Reconciliation Commission”, (2017) European Conference on African Studies, Universität Basel, Switzerland.

Research Assistant Publications

Review of the evidence on feedback in primary and secondary schools, (forthcoming, 2021) for the Education Endowment Foundation, Lead author: Prof Velda Elliott.

Teaching Migration, Belonging, and Empire in Secondary Schools, (2019), for Runnymede Trust and the European Research Council, Lead authors: Kimberly McIntosh, Dr Jason Todd and Prof Nandini Das.

Gender and the Politics of Reconciliation (2016), for The Institute for Justice and Reconciliation, Lead author: Dr Helen Scanlon

SOLE AUTHOR PUBLICATIONS

‘Transitions, Truth-Telling and Teaching History’, Cambridge Open-Review Educational Research e-Journal, Vol. 4, 2017.

Alice Tawell is an ESRC funded DPhil Student, co-supervised across the Department of Education and Centre for Criminology at the University of Oxford.

Supervisors: Professor Harry Daniels and Dr Rachel Condry.

Alice’s research focuses broadly on the enactment of school exclusion policy in England.

Prior to starting her doctoral studies, Alice gained a BSc in Sociology from the University of Bath and an MSc in Education (Research Training) from the University of Oxford.

As part of her undergraduate degree, Alice undertook a placement year working with Professor Kathy Sylva in the Families, Effective Learning and Literacy Research Group at the Department of Education, University of Oxford. After completing her degree, Alice returned to the department and has worked as a Research Officer on a number of different research projects since 2014. Most recently Alice has worked as part of the Excluded Lives Research Team on two projects exploring exclusion from school from a multidisciplinary perspective. In 2017 she was awarded a Seed-corn Small Grant Award to co-lead a pilot project exploring student collaborative networks with Hau Ming Tse. Alice also co-convenes the Qualitative Methods Hub in the department.

Outside of the department, Alice has sat on the Advisory Board for the Children Missing Education research project (2016-2017) at the National Children’s Bureau (NCB) and has been a member of the NCB Partnership for Well Being and Mental Health in Schools since 2016. She also sits on the Transparency on Exclusions Steering Group.

In 2017 Alice received funding from the Grand Union Doctoral Training Partnership placement scheme to conduct a Knowledge Exchange Internship with the Early Years Analysis and Research Unit at the Department for Education, and in 2018 Alice was elected the Co-President of the Grand Union ESRC Scholar’s Association, representing ESRC students from the University of Oxford, Brunel and The Open University.

Ashmita graduated from Boston University in 2008 with a BSc. in Biomedical Engineering, after which she worked in Research & Development for 6 years.

It is here that she decided to make the leap from formulation chemistry to STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Math) Education after having worked on programs involving increasing diversity in STEM in schools.

She received her Master’s from Boston University in 2015 in Education Policy. Her research interests include: STEM education policy; Assessment; Further Education; Higher Education; Science education pedagogy

Originally from Indonesia, Tracey has spent the last decade studying in the UK and working about multicultural education in Indonesia.

She is fully funded by the Indonesia Endowment Fund for Education (LPDP). Her doctoral research explores the ways Indonesian schools teach and accommodate the national vision of multicultural Indonesia, “Bhinneka Tunggal Ika” (Unity-in-Diversity). By using a two-tier case study research approach (case studies of six schools and of two provinces), it presents nuanced and critical account of the ways head teachers, teachers, students and parents from six state and private schools in Jakarta and Bali with different mixes of pupil ethnicity and religiosity understand and accommodate the vision of diversity into educational practices. Despite the highly contextual focus, the research offers a critical view into the complex role of schools in today’s era of globalisation in providing quality education for all and at the same time creating citizens who are inclusive and respectful towards others.

Tracey completed her MSc in Comparative and International Education at the University of Oxford in 2011 and her honours BA in Mathematics and Education Studies at the University of Cambridge in 2010. Upon completing her study in the UK, she returned to Indonesia to work in an educational foundation Sultan Iskandar Muda in Medan, Indonesia as a member of the Board of Directors in the Foundation – a position which she is still holding until today. She is responsible for overlooking the development and implementation of multicultural education and teacher development programme.

During her tenure, she has worked alongside the head teachers and teachers across all educational levels (from pre-school until high school) and produced books on the praxis of multicultural education in the school setting.

Title of Thesis

Accommodating a vision of diversity in different school contexts: “Unity-in-Diversity” in Indonesia

Publications
Journal Article
  • Harjatanaya, T.Y. & Hoon, C.Y. (2018) Politics of multicultural education in post-Suharto Indonesia: a study of the Chinese minority. Compare: A Journal of Comparative and International Education
Edited Book
  • Harjatanaya, T.Y. (2015) (2nd Edition) Merawat Keberagaman: Praksis Pendidikan Multikultural Perguruan Sultan Iskandar Muda (Fostering Diversity: Praxis of Multicultural Education in Sultan Iskandar Muda). Medan: YPSIM.
Book Chapter
  • Harjatanaya, T.Y. (2018). Akses dan Kesamaan dalam Pendidikan Vokasi (Access and Equality in Vocational Education). In Ferary, D. (2018) Sistem Pendidikan Vokasi di Inggris (Vocational Education System in England) (ed.). London: Kantor Atase Pendidikan dan Kebudayaan, Kedutaan Besar Indonesia (Indonesian Embassy) London, p. 121-138.

Katy is a Deputy Headteacher and the founder of a Leadership and Coaching Institute, which she now co-directs.

Katy is an Associate Fellow at the Oxford Character Project and a Research Associate at the Oxford University Wellbeing Research Centre. She is the co-founder of Global Social Leaders, a leadership programme which has participants in 105 countries, all passionate about creating and sustaining positive change in the world.

Title of Thesis

How could school leaders improve the flourishing and wellbeing of teaching staff?

Books
  • Granville-Chapman, K. and Bidston, E (2020) Leader: Know, love and inspire your people. Carmarthen: Crownhouse Publishing
Book Chapters
  •  Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ In White, M. & McCallum, F. (Ed.s) Wellbeing and Resilience Education: Covid-19 And Its Impact on Education Systems. Routledge
Publications
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘Purpose and Leadership in Education and Beyond’. The Education Exchange. Available from: https://theeducation.exchange/purpose-and-leadership-in-education-and-beyond/
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘The Three Secrets of COVID-era Leadership’. Times Education Supplement. Available from: https://www.tes.com/news/three-secrets-covid-era-school-leadership
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2016) ‘Assessing the Impact of a Teacher Leadership Programme in a Teaching Schools Alliance. Journal of Teacher Action Research
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2014) ‘The Afghan conflict: causes and consequences.’ Geography Review 28(1): 22-27
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2013) What are the psychological factors that affect students’ academic resilience and can teachers influence these? Unpublished thesis
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘Unlocking Leadership Potential’, The Magazine of the Boarding School’s Association, 33: 42-45
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2009) ‘Learning to Lead’, Leader, The Education Leader Magazine 41: 22-25
Presentations
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2019) ‘How could leaders improve the flourishing of their teams?’ ‘Stowe Ed Conference’, Forthcoming: 7 Jan 2019
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2018) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education: 21 Jun 2018
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2017) ‘How can school leaders improve teacher flourishing?’ ‘Doing Education Differently Conference’, University of Oxford, Department of Education, 11 Mar 17
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2016) ‘Developing school leaders who enable teachers to flourish’ The Telegraph Festival of Education 23 Jun 16
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Developing leadership in pupils and teachers’ High School Affiliated to Renmin University of China, Beijing. 20 Oct 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Resilience for leaders.’ Global Social Leaders World Summit. 16 Aug 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Emotional Intelligence for Leaders.’ Global Leaders in Education. 12 Aug 15
  • Coates, S.; Fraser, H.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J.; and Nasim, A. (2015) ‘Breaking through the glass ceiling – how can schools empower our girls to become leaders?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education. 19 Jun 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. ‘Developing Leadership in Schools’ (2015). G20 Schools Conference. International conference for head teachers. 11 Apr 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2018) ‘Introduction’, Wellington Leadership Institute: Festival of Leadership. Mar 2012-15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘How the Young Learn to Lead’, Raffles Institution (Singapore) -Purdue University (USA) Education Forum on Gifted & Talented Youth 2012. Singapore. 15 Mar 12
  • Draper, D.; Dyer, R.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Schools’. Presentation for a meeting about pupil leadership and character development at 10 Downing Street. 16 Nov 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Young People’. Presentation for a meeting about leadership and character at 10 Downing Street. 7 Mar 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K. & Seldon, A. (2012) ‘Introduction’, Leading Your School in the 21st Century. 7 Feb 12

Prior to starting his DPhil, Eddy worked as a primary school teacher in Bristol, where he also completed his MSc in Educational Research.

He is particularly interested in the culture of high stakes, standardised testing, and how this might perpetuate existing inequalities in schools. His research focuses specifically on the interaction between knowledge, policy and pedagogy in the context of Literacy education.

 

Amanda is completing a part-time DPhil, alongside working in Initial Teacher Education at Leeds Trinity University.

Her research is focused on understanding tensions, contradictions and conflicts that teachers in disadvantaged schools may experience when they engage in research activity.  Her research focus is influenced by her own experiences of working as a research-active teacher in disadvantaged schools, and recent work in teacher education to support experienced and beginning teachers in developing their own research activities.

One of the aims of Amanda’s research is to construct a framework to support teachers in pursuing research activity and critical scholarship work which articulates with wider social movements to address issues of poverty and disadvantage in schools.

Title of Thesis

Teachers’ perspectives on tensions between policy, practice and research in disadvantaged schools

Publications 

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2017) A ‘usable past’ of teacher education in England: history in JET’s anniversary issue. Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy, 43 (5), pp.616-627.

Nuttall, A. (2016) The ‘curriculum challenge’: Moving towards the ‘Storyline’ approach in a case study urban primary school.  Improving Schools, 19 (2), pp. 154-166.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Learning {Re}imagined: A review.  Primary First, 15, pp. 17-18.

Nuttall, A. and Doherty, J. (2014) Disaffected boys and the achievement gap: the ‘wallpaper effect’ and what is hidden by a focus on school results.  The Urban Review, 46 (5), pp.800-815.

Conference Papers and Presentations

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2018) “No child is pre-ordained to fail” Teachers questioning policy assumptions.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Newcastle, 11-13 September.

Nuttall, A. and Tobbell, C. (2017) Trainee teachers’ perspectives on practitioner enquiry.  Paper presented at the 8th TEAN Conference: Thinking Deeply about Education, Birmingham, 11-12 May.

Nuttall, A. (2017) Assessment at primary level: quality, comparability and improving secondary readiness.  A perspective from ITE.  Speech at the Westminster Education Forum Keynote Seminar: Next steps for reforming primary education: effective teaching practices, assessment and accountably, London, 18 January.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Deficit narratives and lived realities: whose poverty is it?  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the Australian Association for Research in Education, Melbourne, 27 November – 1 December.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Disenfranchised boys’ reflections on their urban schooling experience: “What a Waste!”.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Philpott, C., Beckett, L. and Wrigley, T. (2016) Collaborative practitioner inquiry: making a difference to urban schools.  Innovation session (school visits and symposium) presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Finn, B. and Beckett, L. (2015) Teachers’ constructions of poverty effects: Their research evidence.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Belfast, 15-17 September.

Nuttall, A. (2014) Teachers’ voice on disengaged boys: the role of one teacher-researcher in an English primary school. Paper presented at the Joint Australian Association for Research in Education and the New Zealand Association for Research in Education Conference, Brisbane, 30 November – 4 December.

Andrew Marotta is a D.Phil candidate in the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. He holds an A.A. in Social Sciences from Broward Community College, and a B.A. in Individualized Studies from the Gallatin School of Individualized Studies, New York University and an M.A. and Ed.M. in Counseling Psychology and School Counseling from Teachers College, Columbia University.

Andrew’s research interests include social and emotional learning, peer mentorship, existential therapy / philosophy, curriculum design for school counselors, and applied ethics in computer science. Andrew’s thesis examines how literature and philosophy can be used to nurture social and emotional learning through group counseling among high school students. He has also worked as a school counselor, teaching artist, and curriculum designer.

Presently, Andrew is designing joint humanities and applied ethics workshops for computer and data science college majors, using social and emotional learning concepts as the pedagogical foundation.

Abigail’s research explores the role of education in students’ personal development and how this can be supported by policy, curricula, initial teacher education and teacher professional development. In particular she focuses on history education, citizenship education and peace education as vehicles for dialogue. These opportunities for students to engage with social questions are vital for building cohesive societies. This flows from the recognition that traditional forums for developing public understanding, such as post-conflict truth commissions, need to be complemented by intergenerational and educational perspectives.

Abigail has taught History, Politics, Debating as well as Relationships and Sex Education to secondary school students in South Africa, England and the USA.

She holds postgraduate degrees in Post-Conflict and Transitional Justice (University of Cape Town), in Education, Globalisation and International Development (University of Cambridge) and in African Studies (University of Oxford). She is a Rhodes Scholar, Mandela-Magdalene Scholar and Mandela-Rhodes Scholar.

Title of thesis

GCSE History, Policy Reform and Student Development: How students and teachers navigate the thematic study “Empires, Migration and the People”

Conference papers

Teaching Migration, Belonging, and Empire in Secondary Schools: evaluation of a teacher professional development program, (2019) History Educators International Research Network Conference, Lead author: Dr Jason Todd, University of Vienna, Austria.

“The Problems and Prospects of Teaching South Africa’s Recent History: Teachers’ Perspectives”, (2018) Sustainability, peace and education – Exploring promise and practice: BAICE 20th Anniversary Symposium, University of Bristol, England.

“New Generations, Old Wounds: Learning History at Home and School in Northern Ireland”, (2018) European Social Science and History Conference,
Queens University Belfast, Northern Ireland.

“The Methodological Challenges of Investigating the Role of History Teaching in Peacebuilding”, (2017), Present Past: Time, Memory, and the Negotiation of Historical Justice Conference, Columbia University, United States of America.

“Teaching South Africa’s Truth and Reconciliation Commission”, (2017) European Conference on African Studies, Universität Basel, Switzerland.

Research Assistant Publications

Review of the evidence on feedback in primary and secondary schools, (forthcoming, 2021) for the Education Endowment Foundation, Lead author: Prof Velda Elliott.

Teaching Migration, Belonging, and Empire in Secondary Schools, (2019), for Runnymede Trust and the European Research Council, Lead authors: Kimberly McIntosh, Dr Jason Todd and Prof Nandini Das.

Gender and the Politics of Reconciliation (2016), for The Institute for Justice and Reconciliation, Lead author: Dr Helen Scanlon

SOLE AUTHOR PUBLICATIONS

‘Transitions, Truth-Telling and Teaching History’, Cambridge Open-Review Educational Research e-Journal, Vol. 4, 2017.

Alice Tawell is an ESRC funded DPhil Student, co-supervised across the Department of Education and Centre for Criminology at the University of Oxford.

Supervisors: Professor Harry Daniels and Dr Rachel Condry.

Alice’s research focuses broadly on the enactment of school exclusion policy in England.

Prior to starting her doctoral studies, Alice gained a BSc in Sociology from the University of Bath and an MSc in Education (Research Training) from the University of Oxford.

As part of her undergraduate degree, Alice undertook a placement year working with Professor Kathy Sylva in the Families, Effective Learning and Literacy Research Group at the Department of Education, University of Oxford. After completing her degree, Alice returned to the department and has worked as a Research Officer on a number of different research projects since 2014. Most recently Alice has worked as part of the Excluded Lives Research Team on two projects exploring exclusion from school from a multidisciplinary perspective. In 2017 she was awarded a Seed-corn Small Grant Award to co-lead a pilot project exploring student collaborative networks with Hau Ming Tse. Alice also co-convenes the Qualitative Methods Hub in the department.

Outside of the department, Alice has sat on the Advisory Board for the Children Missing Education research project (2016-2017) at the National Children’s Bureau (NCB) and has been a member of the NCB Partnership for Well Being and Mental Health in Schools since 2016. She also sits on the Transparency on Exclusions Steering Group.

In 2017 Alice received funding from the Grand Union Doctoral Training Partnership placement scheme to conduct a Knowledge Exchange Internship with the Early Years Analysis and Research Unit at the Department for Education, and in 2018 Alice was elected the Co-President of the Grand Union ESRC Scholar’s Association, representing ESRC students from the University of Oxford, Brunel and The Open University.

Ashmita graduated from Boston University in 2008 with a BSc. in Biomedical Engineering, after which she worked in Research & Development for 6 years.

It is here that she decided to make the leap from formulation chemistry to STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Math) Education after having worked on programs involving increasing diversity in STEM in schools.

She received her Master’s from Boston University in 2015 in Education Policy. Her research interests include: STEM education policy; Assessment; Further Education; Higher Education; Science education pedagogy

Originally from Indonesia, Tracey has spent the last decade studying in the UK and working about multicultural education in Indonesia.

She is fully funded by the Indonesia Endowment Fund for Education (LPDP). Her doctoral research explores the ways Indonesian schools teach and accommodate the national vision of multicultural Indonesia, “Bhinneka Tunggal Ika” (Unity-in-Diversity). By using a two-tier case study research approach (case studies of six schools and of two provinces), it presents nuanced and critical account of the ways head teachers, teachers, students and parents from six state and private schools in Jakarta and Bali with different mixes of pupil ethnicity and religiosity understand and accommodate the vision of diversity into educational practices. Despite the highly contextual focus, the research offers a critical view into the complex role of schools in today’s era of globalisation in providing quality education for all and at the same time creating citizens who are inclusive and respectful towards others.

Tracey completed her MSc in Comparative and International Education at the University of Oxford in 2011 and her honours BA in Mathematics and Education Studies at the University of Cambridge in 2010. Upon completing her study in the UK, she returned to Indonesia to work in an educational foundation Sultan Iskandar Muda in Medan, Indonesia as a member of the Board of Directors in the Foundation – a position which she is still holding until today. She is responsible for overlooking the development and implementation of multicultural education and teacher development programme.

During her tenure, she has worked alongside the head teachers and teachers across all educational levels (from pre-school until high school) and produced books on the praxis of multicultural education in the school setting.

Title of Thesis

Accommodating a vision of diversity in different school contexts: “Unity-in-Diversity” in Indonesia

Publications
Journal Article
  • Harjatanaya, T.Y. & Hoon, C.Y. (2018) Politics of multicultural education in post-Suharto Indonesia: a study of the Chinese minority. Compare: A Journal of Comparative and International Education
Edited Book
  • Harjatanaya, T.Y. (2015) (2nd Edition) Merawat Keberagaman: Praksis Pendidikan Multikultural Perguruan Sultan Iskandar Muda (Fostering Diversity: Praxis of Multicultural Education in Sultan Iskandar Muda). Medan: YPSIM.
Book Chapter
  • Harjatanaya, T.Y. (2018). Akses dan Kesamaan dalam Pendidikan Vokasi (Access and Equality in Vocational Education). In Ferary, D. (2018) Sistem Pendidikan Vokasi di Inggris (Vocational Education System in England) (ed.). London: Kantor Atase Pendidikan dan Kebudayaan, Kedutaan Besar Indonesia (Indonesian Embassy) London, p. 121-138.

Katy is a Deputy Headteacher and the founder of a Leadership and Coaching Institute, which she now co-directs.

Katy is an Associate Fellow at the Oxford Character Project and a Research Associate at the Oxford University Wellbeing Research Centre. She is the co-founder of Global Social Leaders, a leadership programme which has participants in 105 countries, all passionate about creating and sustaining positive change in the world.

Title of Thesis

How could school leaders improve the flourishing and wellbeing of teaching staff?

Books
  • Granville-Chapman, K. and Bidston, E (2020) Leader: Know, love and inspire your people. Carmarthen: Crownhouse Publishing
Book Chapters
  •  Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ In White, M. & McCallum, F. (Ed.s) Wellbeing and Resilience Education: Covid-19 And Its Impact on Education Systems. Routledge
Publications
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘Purpose and Leadership in Education and Beyond’. The Education Exchange. Available from: https://theeducation.exchange/purpose-and-leadership-in-education-and-beyond/
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘The Three Secrets of COVID-era Leadership’. Times Education Supplement. Available from: https://www.tes.com/news/three-secrets-covid-era-school-leadership
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2016) ‘Assessing the Impact of a Teacher Leadership Programme in a Teaching Schools Alliance. Journal of Teacher Action Research
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2014) ‘The Afghan conflict: causes and consequences.’ Geography Review 28(1): 22-27
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2013) What are the psychological factors that affect students’ academic resilience and can teachers influence these? Unpublished thesis
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘Unlocking Leadership Potential’, The Magazine of the Boarding School’s Association, 33: 42-45
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2009) ‘Learning to Lead’, Leader, The Education Leader Magazine 41: 22-25
Presentations
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2019) ‘How could leaders improve the flourishing of their teams?’ ‘Stowe Ed Conference’, Forthcoming: 7 Jan 2019
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2018) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education: 21 Jun 2018
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2017) ‘How can school leaders improve teacher flourishing?’ ‘Doing Education Differently Conference’, University of Oxford, Department of Education, 11 Mar 17
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2016) ‘Developing school leaders who enable teachers to flourish’ The Telegraph Festival of Education 23 Jun 16
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Developing leadership in pupils and teachers’ High School Affiliated to Renmin University of China, Beijing. 20 Oct 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Resilience for leaders.’ Global Social Leaders World Summit. 16 Aug 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Emotional Intelligence for Leaders.’ Global Leaders in Education. 12 Aug 15
  • Coates, S.; Fraser, H.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J.; and Nasim, A. (2015) ‘Breaking through the glass ceiling – how can schools empower our girls to become leaders?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education. 19 Jun 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. ‘Developing Leadership in Schools’ (2015). G20 Schools Conference. International conference for head teachers. 11 Apr 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2018) ‘Introduction’, Wellington Leadership Institute: Festival of Leadership. Mar 2012-15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘How the Young Learn to Lead’, Raffles Institution (Singapore) -Purdue University (USA) Education Forum on Gifted & Talented Youth 2012. Singapore. 15 Mar 12
  • Draper, D.; Dyer, R.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Schools’. Presentation for a meeting about pupil leadership and character development at 10 Downing Street. 16 Nov 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Young People’. Presentation for a meeting about leadership and character at 10 Downing Street. 7 Mar 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K. & Seldon, A. (2012) ‘Introduction’, Leading Your School in the 21st Century. 7 Feb 12

Prior to starting his DPhil, Eddy worked as a primary school teacher in Bristol, where he also completed his MSc in Educational Research.

He is particularly interested in the culture of high stakes, standardised testing, and how this might perpetuate existing inequalities in schools. His research focuses specifically on the interaction between knowledge, policy and pedagogy in the context of Literacy education.

 

Amanda is completing a part-time DPhil, alongside working in Initial Teacher Education at Leeds Trinity University.

Her research is focused on understanding tensions, contradictions and conflicts that teachers in disadvantaged schools may experience when they engage in research activity.  Her research focus is influenced by her own experiences of working as a research-active teacher in disadvantaged schools, and recent work in teacher education to support experienced and beginning teachers in developing their own research activities.

One of the aims of Amanda’s research is to construct a framework to support teachers in pursuing research activity and critical scholarship work which articulates with wider social movements to address issues of poverty and disadvantage in schools.

Title of Thesis

Teachers’ perspectives on tensions between policy, practice and research in disadvantaged schools

Publications 

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2017) A ‘usable past’ of teacher education in England: history in JET’s anniversary issue. Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy, 43 (5), pp.616-627.

Nuttall, A. (2016) The ‘curriculum challenge’: Moving towards the ‘Storyline’ approach in a case study urban primary school.  Improving Schools, 19 (2), pp. 154-166.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Learning {Re}imagined: A review.  Primary First, 15, pp. 17-18.

Nuttall, A. and Doherty, J. (2014) Disaffected boys and the achievement gap: the ‘wallpaper effect’ and what is hidden by a focus on school results.  The Urban Review, 46 (5), pp.800-815.

Conference Papers and Presentations

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2018) “No child is pre-ordained to fail” Teachers questioning policy assumptions.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Newcastle, 11-13 September.

Nuttall, A. and Tobbell, C. (2017) Trainee teachers’ perspectives on practitioner enquiry.  Paper presented at the 8th TEAN Conference: Thinking Deeply about Education, Birmingham, 11-12 May.

Nuttall, A. (2017) Assessment at primary level: quality, comparability and improving secondary readiness.  A perspective from ITE.  Speech at the Westminster Education Forum Keynote Seminar: Next steps for reforming primary education: effective teaching practices, assessment and accountably, London, 18 January.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Deficit narratives and lived realities: whose poverty is it?  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the Australian Association for Research in Education, Melbourne, 27 November – 1 December.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Disenfranchised boys’ reflections on their urban schooling experience: “What a Waste!”.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Philpott, C., Beckett, L. and Wrigley, T. (2016) Collaborative practitioner inquiry: making a difference to urban schools.  Innovation session (school visits and symposium) presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Finn, B. and Beckett, L. (2015) Teachers’ constructions of poverty effects: Their research evidence.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Belfast, 15-17 September.

Nuttall, A. (2014) Teachers’ voice on disengaged boys: the role of one teacher-researcher in an English primary school. Paper presented at the Joint Australian Association for Research in Education and the New Zealand Association for Research in Education Conference, Brisbane, 30 November – 4 December.

Andrew Marotta is a D.Phil candidate in the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. He holds an A.A. in Social Sciences from Broward Community College, and a B.A. in Individualized Studies from the Gallatin School of Individualized Studies, New York University and an M.A. and Ed.M. in Counseling Psychology and School Counseling from Teachers College, Columbia University.

Andrew’s research interests include social and emotional learning, peer mentorship, existential therapy / philosophy, curriculum design for school counselors, and applied ethics in computer science. Andrew’s thesis examines how literature and philosophy can be used to nurture social and emotional learning through group counseling among high school students. He has also worked as a school counselor, teaching artist, and curriculum designer.

Presently, Andrew is designing joint humanities and applied ethics workshops for computer and data science college majors, using social and emotional learning concepts as the pedagogical foundation.

Abigail’s research explores the role of education in students’ personal development and how this can be supported by policy, curricula, initial teacher education and teacher professional development. In particular she focuses on history education, citizenship education and peace education as vehicles for dialogue. These opportunities for students to engage with social questions are vital for building cohesive societies. This flows from the recognition that traditional forums for developing public understanding, such as post-conflict truth commissions, need to be complemented by intergenerational and educational perspectives.

Abigail has taught History, Politics, Debating as well as Relationships and Sex Education to secondary school students in South Africa, England and the USA.

She holds postgraduate degrees in Post-Conflict and Transitional Justice (University of Cape Town), in Education, Globalisation and International Development (University of Cambridge) and in African Studies (University of Oxford). She is a Rhodes Scholar, Mandela-Magdalene Scholar and Mandela-Rhodes Scholar.

Title of thesis

GCSE History, Policy Reform and Student Development: How students and teachers navigate the thematic study “Empires, Migration and the People”

Conference papers

Teaching Migration, Belonging, and Empire in Secondary Schools: evaluation of a teacher professional development program, (2019) History Educators International Research Network Conference, Lead author: Dr Jason Todd, University of Vienna, Austria.

“The Problems and Prospects of Teaching South Africa’s Recent History: Teachers’ Perspectives”, (2018) Sustainability, peace and education – Exploring promise and practice: BAICE 20th Anniversary Symposium, University of Bristol, England.

“New Generations, Old Wounds: Learning History at Home and School in Northern Ireland”, (2018) European Social Science and History Conference,
Queens University Belfast, Northern Ireland.

“The Methodological Challenges of Investigating the Role of History Teaching in Peacebuilding”, (2017), Present Past: Time, Memory, and the Negotiation of Historical Justice Conference, Columbia University, United States of America.

“Teaching South Africa’s Truth and Reconciliation Commission”, (2017) European Conference on African Studies, Universität Basel, Switzerland.

Research Assistant Publications

Review of the evidence on feedback in primary and secondary schools, (forthcoming, 2021) for the Education Endowment Foundation, Lead author: Prof Velda Elliott.

Teaching Migration, Belonging, and Empire in Secondary Schools, (2019), for Runnymede Trust and the European Research Council, Lead authors: Kimberly McIntosh, Dr Jason Todd and Prof Nandini Das.

Gender and the Politics of Reconciliation (2016), for The Institute for Justice and Reconciliation, Lead author: Dr Helen Scanlon

SOLE AUTHOR PUBLICATIONS

‘Transitions, Truth-Telling and Teaching History’, Cambridge Open-Review Educational Research e-Journal, Vol. 4, 2017.

Alice Tawell is an ESRC funded DPhil Student, co-supervised across the Department of Education and Centre for Criminology at the University of Oxford.

Supervisors: Professor Harry Daniels and Dr Rachel Condry.

Alice’s research focuses broadly on the enactment of school exclusion policy in England.

Prior to starting her doctoral studies, Alice gained a BSc in Sociology from the University of Bath and an MSc in Education (Research Training) from the University of Oxford.

As part of her undergraduate degree, Alice undertook a placement year working with Professor Kathy Sylva in the Families, Effective Learning and Literacy Research Group at the Department of Education, University of Oxford. After completing her degree, Alice returned to the department and has worked as a Research Officer on a number of different research projects since 2014. Most recently Alice has worked as part of the Excluded Lives Research Team on two projects exploring exclusion from school from a multidisciplinary perspective. In 2017 she was awarded a Seed-corn Small Grant Award to co-lead a pilot project exploring student collaborative networks with Hau Ming Tse. Alice also co-convenes the Qualitative Methods Hub in the department.

Outside of the department, Alice has sat on the Advisory Board for the Children Missing Education research project (2016-2017) at the National Children’s Bureau (NCB) and has been a member of the NCB Partnership for Well Being and Mental Health in Schools since 2016. She also sits on the Transparency on Exclusions Steering Group.

In 2017 Alice received funding from the Grand Union Doctoral Training Partnership placement scheme to conduct a Knowledge Exchange Internship with the Early Years Analysis and Research Unit at the Department for Education, and in 2018 Alice was elected the Co-President of the Grand Union ESRC Scholar’s Association, representing ESRC students from the University of Oxford, Brunel and The Open University.

Ashmita graduated from Boston University in 2008 with a BSc. in Biomedical Engineering, after which she worked in Research & Development for 6 years.

It is here that she decided to make the leap from formulation chemistry to STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Math) Education after having worked on programs involving increasing diversity in STEM in schools.

She received her Master’s from Boston University in 2015 in Education Policy. Her research interests include: STEM education policy; Assessment; Further Education; Higher Education; Science education pedagogy

Originally from Indonesia, Tracey has spent the last decade studying in the UK and working about multicultural education in Indonesia.

She is fully funded by the Indonesia Endowment Fund for Education (LPDP). Her doctoral research explores the ways Indonesian schools teach and accommodate the national vision of multicultural Indonesia, “Bhinneka Tunggal Ika” (Unity-in-Diversity). By using a two-tier case study research approach (case studies of six schools and of two provinces), it presents nuanced and critical account of the ways head teachers, teachers, students and parents from six state and private schools in Jakarta and Bali with different mixes of pupil ethnicity and religiosity understand and accommodate the vision of diversity into educational practices. Despite the highly contextual focus, the research offers a critical view into the complex role of schools in today’s era of globalisation in providing quality education for all and at the same time creating citizens who are inclusive and respectful towards others.

Tracey completed her MSc in Comparative and International Education at the University of Oxford in 2011 and her honours BA in Mathematics and Education Studies at the University of Cambridge in 2010. Upon completing her study in the UK, she returned to Indonesia to work in an educational foundation Sultan Iskandar Muda in Medan, Indonesia as a member of the Board of Directors in the Foundation – a position which she is still holding until today. She is responsible for overlooking the development and implementation of multicultural education and teacher development programme.

During her tenure, she has worked alongside the head teachers and teachers across all educational levels (from pre-school until high school) and produced books on the praxis of multicultural education in the school setting.

Title of Thesis

Accommodating a vision of diversity in different school contexts: “Unity-in-Diversity” in Indonesia

Publications
Journal Article
  • Harjatanaya, T.Y. & Hoon, C.Y. (2018) Politics of multicultural education in post-Suharto Indonesia: a study of the Chinese minority. Compare: A Journal of Comparative and International Education
Edited Book
  • Harjatanaya, T.Y. (2015) (2nd Edition) Merawat Keberagaman: Praksis Pendidikan Multikultural Perguruan Sultan Iskandar Muda (Fostering Diversity: Praxis of Multicultural Education in Sultan Iskandar Muda). Medan: YPSIM.
Book Chapter
  • Harjatanaya, T.Y. (2018). Akses dan Kesamaan dalam Pendidikan Vokasi (Access and Equality in Vocational Education). In Ferary, D. (2018) Sistem Pendidikan Vokasi di Inggris (Vocational Education System in England) (ed.). London: Kantor Atase Pendidikan dan Kebudayaan, Kedutaan Besar Indonesia (Indonesian Embassy) London, p. 121-138.

Katy is a Deputy Headteacher and the founder of a Leadership and Coaching Institute, which she now co-directs.

Katy is an Associate Fellow at the Oxford Character Project and a Research Associate at the Oxford University Wellbeing Research Centre. She is the co-founder of Global Social Leaders, a leadership programme which has participants in 105 countries, all passionate about creating and sustaining positive change in the world.

Title of Thesis

How could school leaders improve the flourishing and wellbeing of teaching staff?

Books
  • Granville-Chapman, K. and Bidston, E (2020) Leader: Know, love and inspire your people. Carmarthen: Crownhouse Publishing
Book Chapters
  •  Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ In White, M. & McCallum, F. (Ed.s) Wellbeing and Resilience Education: Covid-19 And Its Impact on Education Systems. Routledge
Publications
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘Purpose and Leadership in Education and Beyond’. The Education Exchange. Available from: https://theeducation.exchange/purpose-and-leadership-in-education-and-beyond/
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘The Three Secrets of COVID-era Leadership’. Times Education Supplement. Available from: https://www.tes.com/news/three-secrets-covid-era-school-leadership
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2016) ‘Assessing the Impact of a Teacher Leadership Programme in a Teaching Schools Alliance. Journal of Teacher Action Research
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2014) ‘The Afghan conflict: causes and consequences.’ Geography Review 28(1): 22-27
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2013) What are the psychological factors that affect students’ academic resilience and can teachers influence these? Unpublished thesis
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘Unlocking Leadership Potential’, The Magazine of the Boarding School’s Association, 33: 42-45
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2009) ‘Learning to Lead’, Leader, The Education Leader Magazine 41: 22-25
Presentations
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2019) ‘How could leaders improve the flourishing of their teams?’ ‘Stowe Ed Conference’, Forthcoming: 7 Jan 2019
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2018) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education: 21 Jun 2018
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2017) ‘How can school leaders improve teacher flourishing?’ ‘Doing Education Differently Conference’, University of Oxford, Department of Education, 11 Mar 17
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2016) ‘Developing school leaders who enable teachers to flourish’ The Telegraph Festival of Education 23 Jun 16
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Developing leadership in pupils and teachers’ High School Affiliated to Renmin University of China, Beijing. 20 Oct 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Resilience for leaders.’ Global Social Leaders World Summit. 16 Aug 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Emotional Intelligence for Leaders.’ Global Leaders in Education. 12 Aug 15
  • Coates, S.; Fraser, H.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J.; and Nasim, A. (2015) ‘Breaking through the glass ceiling – how can schools empower our girls to become leaders?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education. 19 Jun 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. ‘Developing Leadership in Schools’ (2015). G20 Schools Conference. International conference for head teachers. 11 Apr 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2018) ‘Introduction’, Wellington Leadership Institute: Festival of Leadership. Mar 2012-15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘How the Young Learn to Lead’, Raffles Institution (Singapore) -Purdue University (USA) Education Forum on Gifted & Talented Youth 2012. Singapore. 15 Mar 12
  • Draper, D.; Dyer, R.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Schools’. Presentation for a meeting about pupil leadership and character development at 10 Downing Street. 16 Nov 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Young People’. Presentation for a meeting about leadership and character at 10 Downing Street. 7 Mar 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K. & Seldon, A. (2012) ‘Introduction’, Leading Your School in the 21st Century. 7 Feb 12

Prior to starting his DPhil, Eddy worked as a primary school teacher in Bristol, where he also completed his MSc in Educational Research.

He is particularly interested in the culture of high stakes, standardised testing, and how this might perpetuate existing inequalities in schools. His research focuses specifically on the interaction between knowledge, policy and pedagogy in the context of Literacy education.

 

Amanda is completing a part-time DPhil, alongside working in Initial Teacher Education at Leeds Trinity University.

Her research is focused on understanding tensions, contradictions and conflicts that teachers in disadvantaged schools may experience when they engage in research activity.  Her research focus is influenced by her own experiences of working as a research-active teacher in disadvantaged schools, and recent work in teacher education to support experienced and beginning teachers in developing their own research activities.

One of the aims of Amanda’s research is to construct a framework to support teachers in pursuing research activity and critical scholarship work which articulates with wider social movements to address issues of poverty and disadvantage in schools.

Title of Thesis

Teachers’ perspectives on tensions between policy, practice and research in disadvantaged schools

Publications 

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2017) A ‘usable past’ of teacher education in England: history in JET’s anniversary issue. Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy, 43 (5), pp.616-627.

Nuttall, A. (2016) The ‘curriculum challenge’: Moving towards the ‘Storyline