Department of Education

Viewing archives for Student

Katy is a Deputy Headteacher and the founder of a Leadership and Coaching Institute, which she now co-directs.

Katy is an Associate Fellow at the Oxford Character Project and a Research Associate at the Oxford University Wellbeing Research Centre. She is the co-founder of Global Social Leaders, a leadership programme which has participants in 105 countries, all passionate about creating and sustaining positive change in the world.

Title of Thesis

How could school leaders improve the flourishing and wellbeing of teaching staff?

Books
  • Granville-Chapman, K. and Bidston, E (2020) Leader: Know, love and inspire your people. Carmarthen: Crownhouse Publishing
Book Chapters
  •  Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ In White, M. & McCallum, F. (Ed.s) Wellbeing and Resilience Education: Covid-19 And Its Impact on Education Systems. Routledge
Publications
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘Purpose and Leadership in Education and Beyond’. The Education Exchange. Available from: https://theeducation.exchange/purpose-and-leadership-in-education-and-beyond/
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘The Three Secrets of COVID-era Leadership’. Times Education Supplement. Available from: https://www.tes.com/news/three-secrets-covid-era-school-leadership
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2016) ‘Assessing the Impact of a Teacher Leadership Programme in a Teaching Schools Alliance. Journal of Teacher Action Research
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2014) ‘The Afghan conflict: causes and consequences.’ Geography Review 28(1): 22-27
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2013) What are the psychological factors that affect students’ academic resilience and can teachers influence these? Unpublished thesis
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘Unlocking Leadership Potential’, The Magazine of the Boarding School’s Association, 33: 42-45
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2009) ‘Learning to Lead’, Leader, The Education Leader Magazine 41: 22-25
Presentations
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2019) ‘How could leaders improve the flourishing of their teams?’ ‘Stowe Ed Conference’, Forthcoming: 7 Jan 2019
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2018) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education: 21 Jun 2018
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2017) ‘How can school leaders improve teacher flourishing?’ ‘Doing Education Differently Conference’, University of Oxford, Department of Education, 11 Mar 17
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2016) ‘Developing school leaders who enable teachers to flourish’ The Telegraph Festival of Education 23 Jun 16
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Developing leadership in pupils and teachers’ High School Affiliated to Renmin University of China, Beijing. 20 Oct 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Resilience for leaders.’ Global Social Leaders World Summit. 16 Aug 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Emotional Intelligence for Leaders.’ Global Leaders in Education. 12 Aug 15
  • Coates, S.; Fraser, H.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J.; and Nasim, A. (2015) ‘Breaking through the glass ceiling – how can schools empower our girls to become leaders?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education. 19 Jun 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. ‘Developing Leadership in Schools’ (2015). G20 Schools Conference. International conference for head teachers. 11 Apr 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2018) ‘Introduction’, Wellington Leadership Institute: Festival of Leadership. Mar 2012-15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘How the Young Learn to Lead’, Raffles Institution (Singapore) -Purdue University (USA) Education Forum on Gifted & Talented Youth 2012. Singapore. 15 Mar 12
  • Draper, D.; Dyer, R.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Schools’. Presentation for a meeting about pupil leadership and character development at 10 Downing Street. 16 Nov 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Young People’. Presentation for a meeting about leadership and character at 10 Downing Street. 7 Mar 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K. & Seldon, A. (2012) ‘Introduction’, Leading Your School in the 21st Century. 7 Feb 12

Kamal Armanious is particularly interested in the topic of education governance to explore what is possible in developing an improved governance system for technical and vocational education and training (TVET).

There have always been various calls from different international organisations such UNESCO, ILO, World Bank, OECD etc. to develop a transformed and transformative approach to TVET. This is attractive for certain theoretical as well as practical reasons; however, one set of limitations in achieving this vision lies in the arena of governance. Mr Armanious examines an imagined better model of governance that can be developed from the principles of a new approach and wider theoretical resources with consideration to national realities where there may be very serious obstacles in the way of realising this new governance approach and hence the overall planned transformation.

Title of Thesis

Education and Training Policies in Egypt: Good Governance and Stakeholders Participation

 

Amanda is completing a part-time DPhil, alongside working in Initial Teacher Education at Leeds Trinity University.

Her research is focused on understanding tensions, contradictions and conflicts that teachers in disadvantaged schools may experience when they engage in research activity.  Her research focus is influenced by her own experiences of working as a research-active teacher in disadvantaged schools, and recent work in teacher education to support experienced and beginning teachers in developing their own research activities.

One of the aims of Amanda’s research is to construct a framework to support teachers in pursuing research activity and critical scholarship work which articulates with wider social movements to address issues of poverty and disadvantage in schools.

Title of Thesis

Teachers’ perspectives on tensions between policy, practice and research in disadvantaged schools

Publications 

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2017) A ‘usable past’ of teacher education in England: history in JET’s anniversary issue. Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy, 43 (5), pp.616-627.

Nuttall, A. (2016) The ‘curriculum challenge’: Moving towards the ‘Storyline’ approach in a case study urban primary school.  Improving Schools, 19 (2), pp. 154-166.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Learning {Re}imagined: A review.  Primary First, 15, pp. 17-18.

Nuttall, A. and Doherty, J. (2014) Disaffected boys and the achievement gap: the ‘wallpaper effect’ and what is hidden by a focus on school results.  The Urban Review, 46 (5), pp.800-815.

Conference Papers and Presentations

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2018) “No child is pre-ordained to fail” Teachers questioning policy assumptions.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Newcastle, 11-13 September.

Nuttall, A. and Tobbell, C. (2017) Trainee teachers’ perspectives on practitioner enquiry.  Paper presented at the 8th TEAN Conference: Thinking Deeply about Education, Birmingham, 11-12 May.

Nuttall, A. (2017) Assessment at primary level: quality, comparability and improving secondary readiness.  A perspective from ITE.  Speech at the Westminster Education Forum Keynote Seminar: Next steps for reforming primary education: effective teaching practices, assessment and accountably, London, 18 January.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Deficit narratives and lived realities: whose poverty is it?  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the Australian Association for Research in Education, Melbourne, 27 November – 1 December.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Disenfranchised boys’ reflections on their urban schooling experience: “What a Waste!”.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Philpott, C., Beckett, L. and Wrigley, T. (2016) Collaborative practitioner inquiry: making a difference to urban schools.  Innovation session (school visits and symposium) presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Finn, B. and Beckett, L. (2015) Teachers’ constructions of poverty effects: Their research evidence.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Belfast, 15-17 September.

Nuttall, A. (2014) Teachers’ voice on disengaged boys: the role of one teacher-researcher in an English primary school. Paper presented at the Joint Australian Association for Research in Education and the New Zealand Association for Research in Education Conference, Brisbane, 30 November – 4 December.

Abigail’s research explores the role of education in students’ personal development and how this can be supported by policy, curricula, initial teacher education and teacher professional development. In particular she focuses on history education, citizenship education and peace education as vehicles for dialogue. These opportunities for students to engage with social questions are vital for building cohesive societies. This flows from the recognition that traditional forums for developing public understanding, such as post-conflict truth commissions, need to be complemented by intergenerational and educational perspectives.

Abigail has taught History, Politics, Debating as well as Relationships and Sex Education to secondary school students in South Africa, England and the USA.

She holds postgraduate degrees in Post-Conflict and Transitional Justice (University of Cape Town), in Education, Globalisation and International Development (University of Cambridge) and in African Studies (University of Oxford). She is a Rhodes Scholar, Mandela-Magdalene Scholar and Mandela-Rhodes Scholar.

Title of thesis

GCSE History, Policy Reform and Student Development: How students and teachers navigate the thematic study “Empires, Migration and the People”

Conference papers

Teaching Migration, Belonging, and Empire in Secondary Schools: evaluation of a teacher professional development program, (2019) History Educators International Research Network Conference, Lead author: Dr Jason Todd, University of Vienna, Austria.

“The Problems and Prospects of Teaching South Africa’s Recent History: Teachers’ Perspectives”, (2018) Sustainability, peace and education – Exploring promise and practice: BAICE 20th Anniversary Symposium, University of Bristol, England.

“New Generations, Old Wounds: Learning History at Home and School in Northern Ireland”, (2018) European Social Science and History Conference,
Queens University Belfast, Northern Ireland.

“The Methodological Challenges of Investigating the Role of History Teaching in Peacebuilding”, (2017), Present Past: Time, Memory, and the Negotiation of Historical Justice Conference, Columbia University, United States of America.

“Teaching South Africa’s Truth and Reconciliation Commission”, (2017) European Conference on African Studies, Universität Basel, Switzerland.

Research Assistant Publications

Review of the evidence on feedback in primary and secondary schools, (forthcoming, 2021) for the Education Endowment Foundation, Lead author: Prof Velda Elliott.

Teaching Migration, Belonging, and Empire in Secondary Schools, (2019), for Runnymede Trust and the European Research Council, Lead authors: Kimberly McIntosh, Dr Jason Todd and Prof Nandini Das.

Gender and the Politics of Reconciliation (2016), for The Institute for Justice and Reconciliation, Lead author: Dr Helen Scanlon

SOLE AUTHOR PUBLICATIONS

‘Transitions, Truth-Telling and Teaching History’, Cambridge Open-Review Educational Research e-Journal, Vol. 4, 2017.

Paul Riser is a DPhil Student in the department. His research focuses broadly on students’ (especially the marginalised) identities work in upper-secondary English Language Arts classrooms.

Prior to starting his doctoral studies, Paul earned a BSc in English Language Arts (Secondary Education) with a minor in Theology and a BA in Spanish and International Studies with a minor in Psychology from Texas Lutheran University. His MA in English Literature and Language is from St. Mary’s University.

As part of his postgraduate schoolwork, Paul undertook a placement in two graduate certificate programs, earning both his School Counselor certification and School Principal certification for all grade levels in the state of Texas, USA. In addition to English Language Arts and Reading (4th-12th grades), he is also qualified to teach Health (all levels), Journalism (7-12), Speech (7-12), Social Studies (7-12), and English as a Second Language (all levels) in Texas. Further, Paul holds a teaching certification in California, USA, the United Kingdom and Wales, the Kingdom of Denmark, and the Netherlands.

As a public school English teacher for 8 years, Paul was awarded many distinctions including, but not limited to: El maestro de impacto, two Harvard Book Awards, Teacher of the Year, and Texas Parent-Teacher Association Life Member.

His research to inform his doctoral thesis work will be completed in the United States of America. Furthermore, his research interests revolve around the nexus points of gender, ethnicity, sexuality, economic status, and religion as they relate to the agency students have in the classroom.

Paul is the 2019-2020 Student Liaison Coordinator for the Department of Education, Oxford. In this role, he is charged with leading/convening weekly workshops on a variety of research training topics, co-organizing networking and career advice opportunities for graduate students, and liaising with Cambridge University personnel to organize the annual Oxbridge Exchange. Furthermore, Paul supports the Higher Degrees Office as appropriate and meets regularly with directors and other stakeholders to discuss issues of common student concern in order to develop student identity and community throughout the Department.

Paul serves as the representative student voice on the Social Sciences Division Equality & Diversity Steering Group for the University of Oxford.

Paul is also a part-time Research Assistant working with professionals and other academics within the Department of Education on funded and individual projects as needed.

Supervisors: Associate Professors Jenni Ingram and Velda Elliott & Departmental Lecturer Jason Todd.

Thesis Title: ‘Using Positioning Theory to Understand Marginalised Students’ Identities Work and Their Learning Experiences in English Language Arts Classrooms’

Open-Access Publication:
Ingram, Jenni, & Riser, P.A. (2019). Experiences of problem solving in whole class interactions. Avances De Investigación En Educación Matemática, Avances de Investigación en Educación Matemática, Number 16; October 2019.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.35763/aiem.v0i16.279

Tessa is currently completing a part-time DPhil, alongside work as a senior leader in a London secondary school.

Her research explores how teachers on school-based ITE routes (TeachFirst and School Direct salaried) approach learning from experience. The research takes an action research approach: working with participant beginning teachers and mentors to critically examine and reflect on the processes of learning to teach, using their conversations as stimulus data.

Prior to joining the Department of Education Tessa completed an MSc in Educational Research (University of Bristol).

Yoon Young has been involved in a variety of academic and professional projects related to teacher education.

She is currently a member of the Teacher Education and Professional Learning (TEPL) research group at Oxford. Her doctoral research focuses on teacher education policy and practice in England. The study examines the relationship between individuals’ own objectives, the stated programme goals, and the national teachers’ standards in the operation of the Oxford Internship Scheme (OIS). It also explores the perceptions of stakeholders regarding ideal goals that could drive a re-conceptualised teacher education programme.

Prior to her doctorate, Yoon Young used to be a social studies teacher and subsequently worked as a consultant for the OECD’s Initial Teacher Preparation (ITP) Study. She holds a B.A. in Social Studies and Geography Education from the Ewha Womans University, and an M.A. in Educational Leadership from the University of Jyväskylä, where she was a grantee of the Korean Government Scholarship for Study Overseas.

Katy is a Deputy Headteacher and the founder of a Leadership and Coaching Institute, which she now co-directs.

Katy is an Associate Fellow at the Oxford Character Project and a Research Associate at the Oxford University Wellbeing Research Centre. She is the co-founder of Global Social Leaders, a leadership programme which has participants in 105 countries, all passionate about creating and sustaining positive change in the world.

Title of Thesis

How could school leaders improve the flourishing and wellbeing of teaching staff?

Books
  • Granville-Chapman, K. and Bidston, E (2020) Leader: Know, love and inspire your people. Carmarthen: Crownhouse Publishing
Book Chapters
  •  Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ In White, M. & McCallum, F. (Ed.s) Wellbeing and Resilience Education: Covid-19 And Its Impact on Education Systems. Routledge
Publications
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘Purpose and Leadership in Education and Beyond’. The Education Exchange. Available from: https://theeducation.exchange/purpose-and-leadership-in-education-and-beyond/
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘The Three Secrets of COVID-era Leadership’. Times Education Supplement. Available from: https://www.tes.com/news/three-secrets-covid-era-school-leadership
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2016) ‘Assessing the Impact of a Teacher Leadership Programme in a Teaching Schools Alliance. Journal of Teacher Action Research
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2014) ‘The Afghan conflict: causes and consequences.’ Geography Review 28(1): 22-27
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2013) What are the psychological factors that affect students’ academic resilience and can teachers influence these? Unpublished thesis
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘Unlocking Leadership Potential’, The Magazine of the Boarding School’s Association, 33: 42-45
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2009) ‘Learning to Lead’, Leader, The Education Leader Magazine 41: 22-25
Presentations
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2019) ‘How could leaders improve the flourishing of their teams?’ ‘Stowe Ed Conference’, Forthcoming: 7 Jan 2019
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2018) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education: 21 Jun 2018
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2017) ‘How can school leaders improve teacher flourishing?’ ‘Doing Education Differently Conference’, University of Oxford, Department of Education, 11 Mar 17
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2016) ‘Developing school leaders who enable teachers to flourish’ The Telegraph Festival of Education 23 Jun 16
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Developing leadership in pupils and teachers’ High School Affiliated to Renmin University of China, Beijing. 20 Oct 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Resilience for leaders.’ Global Social Leaders World Summit. 16 Aug 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Emotional Intelligence for Leaders.’ Global Leaders in Education. 12 Aug 15
  • Coates, S.; Fraser, H.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J.; and Nasim, A. (2015) ‘Breaking through the glass ceiling – how can schools empower our girls to become leaders?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education. 19 Jun 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. ‘Developing Leadership in Schools’ (2015). G20 Schools Conference. International conference for head teachers. 11 Apr 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2018) ‘Introduction’, Wellington Leadership Institute: Festival of Leadership. Mar 2012-15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘How the Young Learn to Lead’, Raffles Institution (Singapore) -Purdue University (USA) Education Forum on Gifted & Talented Youth 2012. Singapore. 15 Mar 12
  • Draper, D.; Dyer, R.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Schools’. Presentation for a meeting about pupil leadership and character development at 10 Downing Street. 16 Nov 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Young People’. Presentation for a meeting about leadership and character at 10 Downing Street. 7 Mar 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K. & Seldon, A. (2012) ‘Introduction’, Leading Your School in the 21st Century. 7 Feb 12

Kamal Armanious is particularly interested in the topic of education governance to explore what is possible in developing an improved governance system for technical and vocational education and training (TVET).

There have always been various calls from different international organisations such UNESCO, ILO, World Bank, OECD etc. to develop a transformed and transformative approach to TVET. This is attractive for certain theoretical as well as practical reasons; however, one set of limitations in achieving this vision lies in the arena of governance. Mr Armanious examines an imagined better model of governance that can be developed from the principles of a new approach and wider theoretical resources with consideration to national realities where there may be very serious obstacles in the way of realising this new governance approach and hence the overall planned transformation.

Title of Thesis

Education and Training Policies in Egypt: Good Governance and Stakeholders Participation

 

Amanda is completing a part-time DPhil, alongside working in Initial Teacher Education at Leeds Trinity University.

Her research is focused on understanding tensions, contradictions and conflicts that teachers in disadvantaged schools may experience when they engage in research activity.  Her research focus is influenced by her own experiences of working as a research-active teacher in disadvantaged schools, and recent work in teacher education to support experienced and beginning teachers in developing their own research activities.

One of the aims of Amanda’s research is to construct a framework to support teachers in pursuing research activity and critical scholarship work which articulates with wider social movements to address issues of poverty and disadvantage in schools.

Title of Thesis

Teachers’ perspectives on tensions between policy, practice and research in disadvantaged schools

Publications 

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2017) A ‘usable past’ of teacher education in England: history in JET’s anniversary issue. Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy, 43 (5), pp.616-627.

Nuttall, A. (2016) The ‘curriculum challenge’: Moving towards the ‘Storyline’ approach in a case study urban primary school.  Improving Schools, 19 (2), pp. 154-166.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Learning {Re}imagined: A review.  Primary First, 15, pp. 17-18.

Nuttall, A. and Doherty, J. (2014) Disaffected boys and the achievement gap: the ‘wallpaper effect’ and what is hidden by a focus on school results.  The Urban Review, 46 (5), pp.800-815.

Conference Papers and Presentations

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2018) “No child is pre-ordained to fail” Teachers questioning policy assumptions.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Newcastle, 11-13 September.

Nuttall, A. and Tobbell, C. (2017) Trainee teachers’ perspectives on practitioner enquiry.  Paper presented at the 8th TEAN Conference: Thinking Deeply about Education, Birmingham, 11-12 May.

Nuttall, A. (2017) Assessment at primary level: quality, comparability and improving secondary readiness.  A perspective from ITE.  Speech at the Westminster Education Forum Keynote Seminar: Next steps for reforming primary education: effective teaching practices, assessment and accountably, London, 18 January.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Deficit narratives and lived realities: whose poverty is it?  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the Australian Association for Research in Education, Melbourne, 27 November – 1 December.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Disenfranchised boys’ reflections on their urban schooling experience: “What a Waste!”.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Philpott, C., Beckett, L. and Wrigley, T. (2016) Collaborative practitioner inquiry: making a difference to urban schools.  Innovation session (school visits and symposium) presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Finn, B. and Beckett, L. (2015) Teachers’ constructions of poverty effects: Their research evidence.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Belfast, 15-17 September.

Nuttall, A. (2014) Teachers’ voice on disengaged boys: the role of one teacher-researcher in an English primary school. Paper presented at the Joint Australian Association for Research in Education and the New Zealand Association for Research in Education Conference, Brisbane, 30 November – 4 December.

Abigail’s research explores the role of education in students’ personal development and how this can be supported by policy, curricula, initial teacher education and teacher professional development. In particular she focuses on history education, citizenship education and peace education as vehicles for dialogue. These opportunities for students to engage with social questions are vital for building cohesive societies. This flows from the recognition that traditional forums for developing public understanding, such as post-conflict truth commissions, need to be complemented by intergenerational and educational perspectives.

Abigail has taught History, Politics, Debating as well as Relationships and Sex Education to secondary school students in South Africa, England and the USA.

She holds postgraduate degrees in Post-Conflict and Transitional Justice (University of Cape Town), in Education, Globalisation and International Development (University of Cambridge) and in African Studies (University of Oxford). She is a Rhodes Scholar, Mandela-Magdalene Scholar and Mandela-Rhodes Scholar.

Title of thesis

GCSE History, Policy Reform and Student Development: How students and teachers navigate the thematic study “Empires, Migration and the People”

Conference papers

Teaching Migration, Belonging, and Empire in Secondary Schools: evaluation of a teacher professional development program, (2019) History Educators International Research Network Conference, Lead author: Dr Jason Todd, University of Vienna, Austria.

“The Problems and Prospects of Teaching South Africa’s Recent History: Teachers’ Perspectives”, (2018) Sustainability, peace and education – Exploring promise and practice: BAICE 20th Anniversary Symposium, University of Bristol, England.

“New Generations, Old Wounds: Learning History at Home and School in Northern Ireland”, (2018) European Social Science and History Conference,
Queens University Belfast, Northern Ireland.

“The Methodological Challenges of Investigating the Role of History Teaching in Peacebuilding”, (2017), Present Past: Time, Memory, and the Negotiation of Historical Justice Conference, Columbia University, United States of America.

“Teaching South Africa’s Truth and Reconciliation Commission”, (2017) European Conference on African Studies, Universität Basel, Switzerland.

Research Assistant Publications

Review of the evidence on feedback in primary and secondary schools, (forthcoming, 2021) for the Education Endowment Foundation, Lead author: Prof Velda Elliott.

Teaching Migration, Belonging, and Empire in Secondary Schools, (2019), for Runnymede Trust and the European Research Council, Lead authors: Kimberly McIntosh, Dr Jason Todd and Prof Nandini Das.

Gender and the Politics of Reconciliation (2016), for The Institute for Justice and Reconciliation, Lead author: Dr Helen Scanlon

SOLE AUTHOR PUBLICATIONS

‘Transitions, Truth-Telling and Teaching History’, Cambridge Open-Review Educational Research e-Journal, Vol. 4, 2017.

Paul Riser is a DPhil Student in the department. His research focuses broadly on students’ (especially the marginalised) identities work in upper-secondary English Language Arts classrooms.

Prior to starting his doctoral studies, Paul earned a BSc in English Language Arts (Secondary Education) with a minor in Theology and a BA in Spanish and International Studies with a minor in Psychology from Texas Lutheran University. His MA in English Literature and Language is from St. Mary’s University.

As part of his postgraduate schoolwork, Paul undertook a placement in two graduate certificate programs, earning both his School Counselor certification and School Principal certification for all grade levels in the state of Texas, USA. In addition to English Language Arts and Reading (4th-12th grades), he is also qualified to teach Health (all levels), Journalism (7-12), Speech (7-12), Social Studies (7-12), and English as a Second Language (all levels) in Texas. Further, Paul holds a teaching certification in California, USA, the United Kingdom and Wales, the Kingdom of Denmark, and the Netherlands.

As a public school English teacher for 8 years, Paul was awarded many distinctions including, but not limited to: El maestro de impacto, two Harvard Book Awards, Teacher of the Year, and Texas Parent-Teacher Association Life Member.

His research to inform his doctoral thesis work will be completed in the United States of America. Furthermore, his research interests revolve around the nexus points of gender, ethnicity, sexuality, economic status, and religion as they relate to the agency students have in the classroom.

Paul is the 2019-2020 Student Liaison Coordinator for the Department of Education, Oxford. In this role, he is charged with leading/convening weekly workshops on a variety of research training topics, co-organizing networking and career advice opportunities for graduate students, and liaising with Cambridge University personnel to organize the annual Oxbridge Exchange. Furthermore, Paul supports the Higher Degrees Office as appropriate and meets regularly with directors and other stakeholders to discuss issues of common student concern in order to develop student identity and community throughout the Department.

Paul serves as the representative student voice on the Social Sciences Division Equality & Diversity Steering Group for the University of Oxford.

Paul is also a part-time Research Assistant working with professionals and other academics within the Department of Education on funded and individual projects as needed.

Supervisors: Associate Professors Jenni Ingram and Velda Elliott & Departmental Lecturer Jason Todd.

Thesis Title: ‘Using Positioning Theory to Understand Marginalised Students’ Identities Work and Their Learning Experiences in English Language Arts Classrooms’

Open-Access Publication:
Ingram, Jenni, & Riser, P.A. (2019). Experiences of problem solving in whole class interactions. Avances De Investigación En Educación Matemática, Avances de Investigación en Educación Matemática, Number 16; October 2019.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.35763/aiem.v0i16.279

Tessa is currently completing a part-time DPhil, alongside work as a senior leader in a London secondary school.

Her research explores how teachers on school-based ITE routes (TeachFirst and School Direct salaried) approach learning from experience. The research takes an action research approach: working with participant beginning teachers and mentors to critically examine and reflect on the processes of learning to teach, using their conversations as stimulus data.

Prior to joining the Department of Education Tessa completed an MSc in Educational Research (University of Bristol).

Yoon Young has been involved in a variety of academic and professional projects related to teacher education.

She is currently a member of the Teacher Education and Professional Learning (TEPL) research group at Oxford. Her doctoral research focuses on teacher education policy and practice in England. The study examines the relationship between individuals’ own objectives, the stated programme goals, and the national teachers’ standards in the operation of the Oxford Internship Scheme (OIS). It also explores the perceptions of stakeholders regarding ideal goals that could drive a re-conceptualised teacher education programme.

Prior to her doctorate, Yoon Young used to be a social studies teacher and subsequently worked as a consultant for the OECD’s Initial Teacher Preparation (ITP) Study. She holds a B.A. in Social Studies and Geography Education from the Ewha Womans University, and an M.A. in Educational Leadership from the University of Jyväskylä, where she was a grantee of the Korean Government Scholarship for Study Overseas.

Katy is a Deputy Headteacher and the founder of a Leadership and Coaching Institute, which she now co-directs.

Katy is an Associate Fellow at the Oxford Character Project and a Research Associate at the Oxford University Wellbeing Research Centre. She is the co-founder of Global Social Leaders, a leadership programme which has participants in 105 countries, all passionate about creating and sustaining positive change in the world.

Title of Thesis

How could school leaders improve the flourishing and wellbeing of teaching staff?

Books
  • Granville-Chapman, K. and Bidston, E (2020) Leader: Know, love and inspire your people. Carmarthen: Crownhouse Publishing
Book Chapters
  •  Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ In White, M. & McCallum, F. (Ed.s) Wellbeing and Resilience Education: Covid-19 And Its Impact on Education Systems. Routledge
Publications
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘Purpose and Leadership in Education and Beyond’. The Education Exchange. Available from: https://theeducation.exchange/purpose-and-leadership-in-education-and-beyond/
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘The Three Secrets of COVID-era Leadership’. Times Education Supplement. Available from: https://www.tes.com/news/three-secrets-covid-era-school-leadership
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2016) ‘Assessing the Impact of a Teacher Leadership Programme in a Teaching Schools Alliance. Journal of Teacher Action Research
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2014) ‘The Afghan conflict: causes and consequences.’ Geography Review 28(1): 22-27
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2013) What are the psychological factors that affect students’ academic resilience and can teachers influence these? Unpublished thesis
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘Unlocking Leadership Potential’, The Magazine of the Boarding School’s Association, 33: 42-45
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2009) ‘Learning to Lead’, Leader, The Education Leader Magazine 41: 22-25
Presentations
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2019) ‘How could leaders improve the flourishing of their teams?’ ‘Stowe Ed Conference’, Forthcoming: 7 Jan 2019
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2018) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education: 21 Jun 2018
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2017) ‘How can school leaders improve teacher flourishing?’ ‘Doing Education Differently Conference’, University of Oxford, Department of Education, 11 Mar 17
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2016) ‘Developing school leaders who enable teachers to flourish’ The Telegraph Festival of Education 23 Jun 16
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Developing leadership in pupils and teachers’ High School Affiliated to Renmin University of China, Beijing. 20 Oct 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Resilience for leaders.’ Global Social Leaders World Summit. 16 Aug 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Emotional Intelligence for Leaders.’ Global Leaders in Education. 12 Aug 15
  • Coates, S.; Fraser, H.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J.; and Nasim, A. (2015) ‘Breaking through the glass ceiling – how can schools empower our girls to become leaders?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education. 19 Jun 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. ‘Developing Leadership in Schools’ (2015). G20 Schools Conference. International conference for head teachers. 11 Apr 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2018) ‘Introduction’, Wellington Leadership Institute: Festival of Leadership. Mar 2012-15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘How the Young Learn to Lead’, Raffles Institution (Singapore) -Purdue University (USA) Education Forum on Gifted & Talented Youth 2012. Singapore. 15 Mar 12
  • Draper, D.; Dyer, R.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Schools’. Presentation for a meeting about pupil leadership and character development at 10 Downing Street. 16 Nov 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Young People’. Presentation for a meeting about leadership and character at 10 Downing Street. 7 Mar 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K. & Seldon, A. (2012) ‘Introduction’, Leading Your School in the 21st Century. 7 Feb 12

Kamal Armanious is particularly interested in the topic of education governance to explore what is possible in developing an improved governance system for technical and vocational education and training (TVET).

There have always been various calls from different international organisations such UNESCO, ILO, World Bank, OECD etc. to develop a transformed and transformative approach to TVET. This is attractive for certain theoretical as well as practical reasons; however, one set of limitations in achieving this vision lies in the arena of governance. Mr Armanious examines an imagined better model of governance that can be developed from the principles of a new approach and wider theoretical resources with consideration to national realities where there may be very serious obstacles in the way of realising this new governance approach and hence the overall planned transformation.

Title of Thesis

Education and Training Policies in Egypt: Good Governance and Stakeholders Participation

 

Amanda is completing a part-time DPhil, alongside working in Initial Teacher Education at Leeds Trinity University.

Her research is focused on understanding tensions, contradictions and conflicts that teachers in disadvantaged schools may experience when they engage in research activity.  Her research focus is influenced by her own experiences of working as a research-active teacher in disadvantaged schools, and recent work in teacher education to support experienced and beginning teachers in developing their own research activities.

One of the aims of Amanda’s research is to construct a framework to support teachers in pursuing research activity and critical scholarship work which articulates with wider social movements to address issues of poverty and disadvantage in schools.

Title of Thesis

Teachers’ perspectives on tensions between policy, practice and research in disadvantaged schools

Publications 

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2017) A ‘usable past’ of teacher education in England: history in JET’s anniversary issue. Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy, 43 (5), pp.616-627.

Nuttall, A. (2016) The ‘curriculum challenge’: Moving towards the ‘Storyline’ approach in a case study urban primary school.  Improving Schools, 19 (2), pp. 154-166.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Learning {Re}imagined: A review.  Primary First, 15, pp. 17-18.

Nuttall, A. and Doherty, J. (2014) Disaffected boys and the achievement gap: the ‘wallpaper effect’ and what is hidden by a focus on school results.  The Urban Review, 46 (5), pp.800-815.

Conference Papers and Presentations

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2018) “No child is pre-ordained to fail” Teachers questioning policy assumptions.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Newcastle, 11-13 September.

Nuttall, A. and Tobbell, C. (2017) Trainee teachers’ perspectives on practitioner enquiry.  Paper presented at the 8th TEAN Conference: Thinking Deeply about Education, Birmingham, 11-12 May.

Nuttall, A. (2017) Assessment at primary level: quality, comparability and improving secondary readiness.  A perspective from ITE.  Speech at the Westminster Education Forum Keynote Seminar: Next steps for reforming primary education: effective teaching practices, assessment and accountably, London, 18 January.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Deficit narratives and lived realities: whose poverty is it?  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the Australian Association for Research in Education, Melbourne, 27 November – 1 December.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Disenfranchised boys’ reflections on their urban schooling experience: “What a Waste!”.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Philpott, C., Beckett, L. and Wrigley, T. (2016) Collaborative practitioner inquiry: making a difference to urban schools.  Innovation session (school visits and symposium) presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Finn, B. and Beckett, L. (2015) Teachers’ constructions of poverty effects: Their research evidence.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Belfast, 15-17 September.

Nuttall, A. (2014) Teachers’ voice on disengaged boys: the role of one teacher-researcher in an English primary school. Paper presented at the Joint Australian Association for Research in Education and the New Zealand Association for Research in Education Conference, Brisbane, 30 November – 4 December.

Abigail’s research explores the role of education in students’ personal development and how this can be supported by policy, curricula, initial teacher education and teacher professional development. In particular she focuses on history education, citizenship education and peace education as vehicles for dialogue. These opportunities for students to engage with social questions are vital for building cohesive societies. This flows from the recognition that traditional forums for developing public understanding, such as post-conflict truth commissions, need to be complemented by intergenerational and educational perspectives.

Abigail has taught History, Politics, Debating as well as Relationships and Sex Education to secondary school students in South Africa, England and the USA.

She holds postgraduate degrees in Post-Conflict and Transitional Justice (University of Cape Town), in Education, Globalisation and International Development (University of Cambridge) and in African Studies (University of Oxford). She is a Rhodes Scholar, Mandela-Magdalene Scholar and Mandela-Rhodes Scholar.

Title of thesis

GCSE History, Policy Reform and Student Development: How students and teachers navigate the thematic study “Empires, Migration and the People”

Conference papers

Teaching Migration, Belonging, and Empire in Secondary Schools: evaluation of a teacher professional development program, (2019) History Educators International Research Network Conference, Lead author: Dr Jason Todd, University of Vienna, Austria.

“The Problems and Prospects of Teaching South Africa’s Recent History: Teachers’ Perspectives”, (2018) Sustainability, peace and education – Exploring promise and practice: BAICE 20th Anniversary Symposium, University of Bristol, England.

“New Generations, Old Wounds: Learning History at Home and School in Northern Ireland”, (2018) European Social Science and History Conference,
Queens University Belfast, Northern Ireland.

“The Methodological Challenges of Investigating the Role of History Teaching in Peacebuilding”, (2017), Present Past: Time, Memory, and the Negotiation of Historical Justice Conference, Columbia University, United States of America.

“Teaching South Africa’s Truth and Reconciliation Commission”, (2017) European Conference on African Studies, Universität Basel, Switzerland.

Research Assistant Publications

Review of the evidence on feedback in primary and secondary schools, (forthcoming, 2021) for the Education Endowment Foundation, Lead author: Prof Velda Elliott.

Teaching Migration, Belonging, and Empire in Secondary Schools, (2019), for Runnymede Trust and the European Research Council, Lead authors: Kimberly McIntosh, Dr Jason Todd and Prof Nandini Das.

Gender and the Politics of Reconciliation (2016), for The Institute for Justice and Reconciliation, Lead author: Dr Helen Scanlon

SOLE AUTHOR PUBLICATIONS

‘Transitions, Truth-Telling and Teaching History’, Cambridge Open-Review Educational Research e-Journal, Vol. 4, 2017.

Paul Riser is a DPhil Student in the department. His research focuses broadly on students’ (especially the marginalised) identities work in upper-secondary English Language Arts classrooms.

Prior to starting his doctoral studies, Paul earned a BSc in English Language Arts (Secondary Education) with a minor in Theology and a BA in Spanish and International Studies with a minor in Psychology from Texas Lutheran University. His MA in English Literature and Language is from St. Mary’s University.

As part of his postgraduate schoolwork, Paul undertook a placement in two graduate certificate programs, earning both his School Counselor certification and School Principal certification for all grade levels in the state of Texas, USA. In addition to English Language Arts and Reading (4th-12th grades), he is also qualified to teach Health (all levels), Journalism (7-12), Speech (7-12), Social Studies (7-12), and English as a Second Language (all levels) in Texas. Further, Paul holds a teaching certification in California, USA, the United Kingdom and Wales, the Kingdom of Denmark, and the Netherlands.

As a public school English teacher for 8 years, Paul was awarded many distinctions including, but not limited to: El maestro de impacto, two Harvard Book Awards, Teacher of the Year, and Texas Parent-Teacher Association Life Member.

His research to inform his doctoral thesis work will be completed in the United States of America. Furthermore, his research interests revolve around the nexus points of gender, ethnicity, sexuality, economic status, and religion as they relate to the agency students have in the classroom.

Paul is the 2019-2020 Student Liaison Coordinator for the Department of Education, Oxford. In this role, he is charged with leading/convening weekly workshops on a variety of research training topics, co-organizing networking and career advice opportunities for graduate students, and liaising with Cambridge University personnel to organize the annual Oxbridge Exchange. Furthermore, Paul supports the Higher Degrees Office as appropriate and meets regularly with directors and other stakeholders to discuss issues of common student concern in order to develop student identity and community throughout the Department.

Paul serves as the representative student voice on the Social Sciences Division Equality & Diversity Steering Group for the University of Oxford.

Paul is also a part-time Research Assistant working with professionals and other academics within the Department of Education on funded and individual projects as needed.

Supervisors: Associate Professors Jenni Ingram and Velda Elliott & Departmental Lecturer Jason Todd.

Thesis Title: ‘Using Positioning Theory to Understand Marginalised Students’ Identities Work and Their Learning Experiences in English Language Arts Classrooms’

Open-Access Publication:
Ingram, Jenni, & Riser, P.A. (2019). Experiences of problem solving in whole class interactions. Avances De Investigación En Educación Matemática, Avances de Investigación en Educación Matemática, Number 16; October 2019.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.35763/aiem.v0i16.279

Tessa is currently completing a part-time DPhil, alongside work as a senior leader in a London secondary school.

Her research explores how teachers on school-based ITE routes (TeachFirst and School Direct salaried) approach learning from experience. The research takes an action research approach: working with participant beginning teachers and mentors to critically examine and reflect on the processes of learning to teach, using their conversations as stimulus data.

Prior to joining the Department of Education Tessa completed an MSc in Educational Research (University of Bristol).

Yoon Young has been involved in a variety of academic and professional projects related to teacher education.

She is currently a member of the Teacher Education and Professional Learning (TEPL) research group at Oxford. Her doctoral research focuses on teacher education policy and practice in England. The study examines the relationship between individuals’ own objectives, the stated programme goals, and the national teachers’ standards in the operation of the Oxford Internship Scheme (OIS). It also explores the perceptions of stakeholders regarding ideal goals that could drive a re-conceptualised teacher education programme.

Prior to her doctorate, Yoon Young used to be a social studies teacher and subsequently worked as a consultant for the OECD’s Initial Teacher Preparation (ITP) Study. She holds a B.A. in Social Studies and Geography Education from the Ewha Womans University, and an M.A. in Educational Leadership from the University of Jyväskylä, where she was a grantee of the Korean Government Scholarship for Study Overseas.

Katy is a Deputy Headteacher and the founder of a Leadership and Coaching Institute, which she now co-directs.

Katy is an Associate Fellow at the Oxford Character Project and a Research Associate at the Oxford University Wellbeing Research Centre. She is the co-founder of Global Social Leaders, a leadership programme which has participants in 105 countries, all passionate about creating and sustaining positive change in the world.

Title of Thesis

How could school leaders improve the flourishing and wellbeing of teaching staff?

Books
  • Granville-Chapman, K. and Bidston, E (2020) Leader: Know, love and inspire your people. Carmarthen: Crownhouse Publishing
Book Chapters
  •  Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ In White, M. & McCallum, F. (Ed.s) Wellbeing and Resilience Education: Covid-19 And Its Impact on Education Systems. Routledge
Publications
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘Purpose and Leadership in Education and Beyond’. The Education Exchange. Available from: https://theeducation.exchange/purpose-and-leadership-in-education-and-beyond/
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘The Three Secrets of COVID-era Leadership’. Times Education Supplement. Available from: https://www.tes.com/news/three-secrets-covid-era-school-leadership
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2016) ‘Assessing the Impact of a Teacher Leadership Programme in a Teaching Schools Alliance. Journal of Teacher Action Research
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2014) ‘The Afghan conflict: causes and consequences.’ Geography Review 28(1): 22-27
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2013) What are the psychological factors that affect students’ academic resilience and can teachers influence these? Unpublished thesis
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘Unlocking Leadership Potential’, The Magazine of the Boarding School’s Association, 33: 42-45
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2009) ‘Learning to Lead’, Leader, The Education Leader Magazine 41: 22-25
Presentations
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2019) ‘How could leaders improve the flourishing of their teams?’ ‘Stowe Ed Conference’, Forthcoming: 7 Jan 2019
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2018) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education: 21 Jun 2018
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2017) ‘How can school leaders improve teacher flourishing?’ ‘Doing Education Differently Conference’, University of Oxford, Department of Education, 11 Mar 17
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2016) ‘Developing school leaders who enable teachers to flourish’ The Telegraph Festival of Education 23 Jun 16
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Developing leadership in pupils and teachers’ High School Affiliated to Renmin University of China, Beijing. 20 Oct 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Resilience for leaders.’ Global Social Leaders World Summit. 16 Aug 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Emotional Intelligence for Leaders.’ Global Leaders in Education. 12 Aug 15
  • Coates, S.; Fraser, H.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J.; and Nasim, A. (2015) ‘Breaking through the glass ceiling – how can schools empower our girls to become leaders?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education. 19 Jun 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. ‘Developing Leadership in Schools’ (2015). G20 Schools Conference. International conference for head teachers. 11 Apr 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2018) ‘Introduction’, Wellington Leadership Institute: Festival of Leadership. Mar 2012-15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘How the Young Learn to Lead’, Raffles Institution (Singapore) -Purdue University (USA) Education Forum on Gifted & Talented Youth 2012. Singapore. 15 Mar 12
  • Draper, D.; Dyer, R.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Schools’. Presentation for a meeting about pupil leadership and character development at 10 Downing Street. 16 Nov 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Young People’. Presentation for a meeting about leadership and character at 10 Downing Street. 7 Mar 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K. & Seldon, A. (2012) ‘Introduction’, Leading Your School in the 21st Century. 7 Feb 12

Kamal Armanious is particularly interested in the topic of education governance to explore what is possible in developing an improved governance system for technical and vocational education and training (TVET).

There have always been various calls from different international organisations such UNESCO, ILO, World Bank, OECD etc. to develop a transformed and transformative approach to TVET. This is attractive for certain theoretical as well as practical reasons; however, one set of limitations in achieving this vision lies in the arena of governance. Mr Armanious examines an imagined better model of governance that can be developed from the principles of a new approach and wider theoretical resources with consideration to national realities where there may be very serious obstacles in the way of realising this new governance approach and hence the overall planned transformation.

Title of Thesis

Education and Training Policies in Egypt: Good Governance and Stakeholders Participation

 

Amanda is completing a part-time DPhil, alongside working in Initial Teacher Education at Leeds Trinity University.

Her research is focused on understanding tensions, contradictions and conflicts that teachers in disadvantaged schools may experience when they engage in research activity.  Her research focus is influenced by her own experiences of working as a research-active teacher in disadvantaged schools, and recent work in teacher education to support experienced and beginning teachers in developing their own research activities.

One of the aims of Amanda’s research is to construct a framework to support teachers in pursuing research activity and critical scholarship work which articulates with wider social movements to address issues of poverty and disadvantage in schools.

Title of Thesis

Teachers’ perspectives on tensions between policy, practice and research in disadvantaged schools

Publications 

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2017) A ‘usable past’ of teacher education in England: history in JET’s anniversary issue. Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy, 43 (5), pp.616-627.

Nuttall, A. (2016) The ‘curriculum challenge’: Moving towards the ‘Storyline’ approach in a case study urban primary school.  Improving Schools, 19 (2), pp. 154-166.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Learning {Re}imagined: A review.  Primary First, 15, pp. 17-18.

Nuttall, A. and Doherty, J. (2014) Disaffected boys and the achievement gap: the ‘wallpaper effect’ and what is hidden by a focus on school results.  The Urban Review, 46 (5), pp.800-815.

Conference Papers and Presentations

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2018) “No child is pre-ordained to fail” Teachers questioning policy assumptions.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Newcastle, 11-13 September.

Nuttall, A. and Tobbell, C. (2017) Trainee teachers’ perspectives on practitioner enquiry.  Paper presented at the 8th TEAN Conference: Thinking Deeply about Education, Birmingham, 11-12 May.

Nuttall, A. (2017) Assessment at primary level: quality, comparability and improving secondary readiness.  A perspective from ITE.  Speech at the Westminster Education Forum Keynote Seminar: Next steps for reforming primary education: effective teaching practices, assessment and accountably, London, 18 January.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Deficit narratives and lived realities: whose poverty is it?  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the Australian Association for Research in Education, Melbourne, 27 November – 1 December.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Disenfranchised boys’ reflections on their urban schooling experience: “What a Waste!”.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Philpott, C., Beckett, L. and Wrigley, T. (2016) Collaborative practitioner inquiry: making a difference to urban schools.  Innovation session (school visits and symposium) presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Finn, B. and Beckett, L. (2015) Teachers’ constructions of poverty effects: Their research evidence.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Belfast, 15-17 September.

Nuttall, A. (2014) Teachers’ voice on disengaged boys: the role of one teacher-researcher in an English primary school. Paper presented at the Joint Australian Association for Research in Education and the New Zealand Association for Research in Education Conference, Brisbane, 30 November – 4 December.

Abigail’s research explores the role of education in students’ personal development and how this can be supported by policy, curricula, initial teacher education and teacher professional development. In particular she focuses on history education, citizenship education and peace education as vehicles for dialogue. These opportunities for students to engage with social questions are vital for building cohesive societies. This flows from the recognition that traditional forums for developing public understanding, such as post-conflict truth commissions, need to be complemented by intergenerational and educational perspectives.

Abigail has taught History, Politics, Debating as well as Relationships and Sex Education to secondary school students in South Africa, England and the USA.

She holds postgraduate degrees in Post-Conflict and Transitional Justice (University of Cape Town), in Education, Globalisation and International Development (University of Cambridge) and in African Studies (University of Oxford). She is a Rhodes Scholar, Mandela-Magdalene Scholar and Mandela-Rhodes Scholar.

Title of thesis

GCSE History, Policy Reform and Student Development: How students and teachers navigate the thematic study “Empires, Migration and the People”

Conference papers

Teaching Migration, Belonging, and Empire in Secondary Schools: evaluation of a teacher professional development program, (2019) History Educators International Research Network Conference, Lead author: Dr Jason Todd, University of Vienna, Austria.

“The Problems and Prospects of Teaching South Africa’s Recent History: Teachers’ Perspectives”, (2018) Sustainability, peace and education – Exploring promise and practice: BAICE 20th Anniversary Symposium, University of Bristol, England.

“New Generations, Old Wounds: Learning History at Home and School in Northern Ireland”, (2018) European Social Science and History Conference,
Queens University Belfast, Northern Ireland.

“The Methodological Challenges of Investigating the Role of History Teaching in Peacebuilding”, (2017), Present Past: Time, Memory, and the Negotiation of Historical Justice Conference, Columbia University, United States of America.

“Teaching South Africa’s Truth and Reconciliation Commission”, (2017) European Conference on African Studies, Universität Basel, Switzerland.

Research Assistant Publications

Review of the evidence on feedback in primary and secondary schools, (forthcoming, 2021) for the Education Endowment Foundation, Lead author: Prof Velda Elliott.

Teaching Migration, Belonging, and Empire in Secondary Schools, (2019), for Runnymede Trust and the European Research Council, Lead authors: Kimberly McIntosh, Dr Jason Todd and Prof Nandini Das.

Gender and the Politics of Reconciliation (2016), for The Institute for Justice and Reconciliation, Lead author: Dr Helen Scanlon

SOLE AUTHOR PUBLICATIONS

‘Transitions, Truth-Telling and Teaching History’, Cambridge Open-Review Educational Research e-Journal, Vol. 4, 2017.

Paul Riser is a DPhil Student in the department. His research focuses broadly on students’ (especially the marginalised) identities work in upper-secondary English Language Arts classrooms.

Prior to starting his doctoral studies, Paul earned a BSc in English Language Arts (Secondary Education) with a minor in Theology and a BA in Spanish and International Studies with a minor in Psychology from Texas Lutheran University. His MA in English Literature and Language is from St. Mary’s University.

As part of his postgraduate schoolwork, Paul undertook a placement in two graduate certificate programs, earning both his School Counselor certification and School Principal certification for all grade levels in the state of Texas, USA. In addition to English Language Arts and Reading (4th-12th grades), he is also qualified to teach Health (all levels), Journalism (7-12), Speech (7-12), Social Studies (7-12), and English as a Second Language (all levels) in Texas. Further, Paul holds a teaching certification in California, USA, the United Kingdom and Wales, the Kingdom of Denmark, and the Netherlands.

As a public school English teacher for 8 years, Paul was awarded many distinctions including, but not limited to: El maestro de impacto, two Harvard Book Awards, Teacher of the Year, and Texas Parent-Teacher Association Life Member.

His research to inform his doctoral thesis work will be completed in the United States of America. Furthermore, his research interests revolve around the nexus points of gender, ethnicity, sexuality, economic status, and religion as they relate to the agency students have in the classroom.

Paul is the 2019-2020 Student Liaison Coordinator for the Department of Education, Oxford. In this role, he is charged with leading/convening weekly workshops on a variety of research training topics, co-organizing networking and career advice opportunities for graduate students, and liaising with Cambridge University personnel to organize the annual Oxbridge Exchange. Furthermore, Paul supports the Higher Degrees Office as appropriate and meets regularly with directors and other stakeholders to discuss issues of common student concern in order to develop student identity and community throughout the Department.

Paul serves as the representative student voice on the Social Sciences Division Equality & Diversity Steering Group for the University of Oxford.

Paul is also a part-time Research Assistant working with professionals and other academics within the Department of Education on funded and individual projects as needed.

Supervisors: Associate Professors Jenni Ingram and Velda Elliott & Departmental Lecturer Jason Todd.

Thesis Title: ‘Using Positioning Theory to Understand Marginalised Students’ Identities Work and Their Learning Experiences in English Language Arts Classrooms’

Open-Access Publication:
Ingram, Jenni, & Riser, P.A. (2019). Experiences of problem solving in whole class interactions. Avances De Investigación En Educación Matemática, Avances de Investigación en Educación Matemática, Number 16; October 2019.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.35763/aiem.v0i16.279

Tessa is currently completing a part-time DPhil, alongside work as a senior leader in a London secondary school.

Her research explores how teachers on school-based ITE routes (TeachFirst and School Direct salaried) approach learning from experience. The research takes an action research approach: working with participant beginning teachers and mentors to critically examine and reflect on the processes of learning to teach, using their conversations as stimulus data.

Prior to joining the Department of Education Tessa completed an MSc in Educational Research (University of Bristol).

Yoon Young has been involved in a variety of academic and professional projects related to teacher education.

She is currently a member of the Teacher Education and Professional Learning (TEPL) research group at Oxford. Her doctoral research focuses on teacher education policy and practice in England. The study examines the relationship between individuals’ own objectives, the stated programme goals, and the national teachers’ standards in the operation of the Oxford Internship Scheme (OIS). It also explores the perceptions of stakeholders regarding ideal goals that could drive a re-conceptualised teacher education programme.

Prior to her doctorate, Yoon Young used to be a social studies teacher and subsequently worked as a consultant for the OECD’s Initial Teacher Preparation (ITP) Study. She holds a B.A. in Social Studies and Geography Education from the Ewha Womans University, and an M.A. in Educational Leadership from the University of Jyväskylä, where she was a grantee of the Korean Government Scholarship for Study Overseas.

Katy is a Deputy Headteacher and the founder of a Leadership and Coaching Institute, which she now co-directs.

Katy is an Associate Fellow at the Oxford Character Project and a Research Associate at the Oxford University Wellbeing Research Centre. She is the co-founder of Global Social Leaders, a leadership programme which has participants in 105 countries, all passionate about creating and sustaining positive change in the world.

Title of Thesis

How could school leaders improve the flourishing and wellbeing of teaching staff?

Books
  • Granville-Chapman, K. and Bidston, E (2020) Leader: Know, love and inspire your people. Carmarthen: Crownhouse Publishing
Book Chapters
  •  Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ In White, M. & McCallum, F. (Ed.s) Wellbeing and Resilience Education: Covid-19 And Its Impact on Education Systems. Routledge
Publications
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘Purpose and Leadership in Education and Beyond’. The Education Exchange. Available from: https://theeducation.exchange/purpose-and-leadership-in-education-and-beyond/
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘The Three Secrets of COVID-era Leadership’. Times Education Supplement. Available from: https://www.tes.com/news/three-secrets-covid-era-school-leadership
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2016) ‘Assessing the Impact of a Teacher Leadership Programme in a Teaching Schools Alliance. Journal of Teacher Action Research
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2014) ‘The Afghan conflict: causes and consequences.’ Geography Review 28(1): 22-27
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2013) What are the psychological factors that affect students’ academic resilience and can teachers influence these? Unpublished thesis
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘Unlocking Leadership Potential’, The Magazine of the Boarding School’s Association, 33: 42-45
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2009) ‘Learning to Lead’, Leader, The Education Leader Magazine 41: 22-25
Presentations
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2019) ‘How could leaders improve the flourishing of their teams?’ ‘Stowe Ed Conference’, Forthcoming: 7 Jan 2019
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2018) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education: 21 Jun 2018
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2017) ‘How can school leaders improve teacher flourishing?’ ‘Doing Education Differently Conference’, University of Oxford, Department of Education, 11 Mar 17
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2016) ‘Developing school leaders who enable teachers to flourish’ The Telegraph Festival of Education 23 Jun 16
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Developing leadership in pupils and teachers’ High School Affiliated to Renmin University of China, Beijing. 20 Oct 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Resilience for leaders.’ Global Social Leaders World Summit. 16 Aug 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Emotional Intelligence for Leaders.’ Global Leaders in Education. 12 Aug 15
  • Coates, S.; Fraser, H.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J.; and Nasim, A. (2015) ‘Breaking through the glass ceiling – how can schools empower our girls to become leaders?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education. 19 Jun 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. ‘Developing Leadership in Schools’ (2015). G20 Schools Conference. International conference for head teachers. 11 Apr 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2018) ‘Introduction’, Wellington Leadership Institute: Festival of Leadership. Mar 2012-15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘How the Young Learn to Lead’, Raffles Institution (Singapore) -Purdue University (USA) Education Forum on Gifted & Talented Youth 2012. Singapore. 15 Mar 12
  • Draper, D.; Dyer, R.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Schools’. Presentation for a meeting about pupil leadership and character development at 10 Downing Street. 16 Nov 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Young People’. Presentation for a meeting about leadership and character at 10 Downing Street. 7 Mar 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K. & Seldon, A. (2012) ‘Introduction’, Leading Your School in the 21st Century. 7 Feb 12

Kamal Armanious is particularly interested in the topic of education governance to explore what is possible in developing an improved governance system for technical and vocational education and training (TVET).

There have always been various calls from different international organisations such UNESCO, ILO, World Bank, OECD etc. to develop a transformed and transformative approach to TVET. This is attractive for certain theoretical as well as practical reasons; however, one set of limitations in achieving this vision lies in the arena of governance. Mr Armanious examines an imagined better model of governance that can be developed from the principles of a new approach and wider theoretical resources with consideration to national realities where there may be very serious obstacles in the way of realising this new governance approach and hence the overall planned transformation.

Title of Thesis

Education and Training Policies in Egypt: Good Governance and Stakeholders Participation

 

Amanda is completing a part-time DPhil, alongside working in Initial Teacher Education at Leeds Trinity University.

Her research is focused on understanding tensions, contradictions and conflicts that teachers in disadvantaged schools may experience when they engage in research activity.  Her research focus is influenced by her own experiences of working as a research-active teacher in disadvantaged schools, and recent work in teacher education to support experienced and beginning teachers in developing their own research activities.

One of the aims of Amanda’s research is to construct a framework to support teachers in pursuing research activity and critical scholarship work which articulates with wider social movements to address issues of poverty and disadvantage in schools.

Title of Thesis

Teachers’ perspectives on tensions between policy, practice and research in disadvantaged schools

Publications 

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2017) A ‘usable past’ of teacher education in England: history in JET’s anniversary issue. Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy, 43 (5), pp.616-627.

Nuttall, A. (2016) The ‘curriculum challenge’: Moving towards the ‘Storyline’ approach in a case study urban primary school.  Improving Schools, 19 (2), pp. 154-166.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Learning {Re}imagined: A review.  Primary First, 15, pp. 17-18.

Nuttall, A. and Doherty, J. (2014) Disaffected boys and the achievement gap: the ‘wallpaper effect’ and what is hidden by a focus on school results.  The Urban Review, 46 (5), pp.800-815.

Conference Papers and Presentations

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2018) “No child is pre-ordained to fail” Teachers questioning policy assumptions.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Newcastle, 11-13 September.

Nuttall, A. and Tobbell, C. (2017) Trainee teachers’ perspectives on practitioner enquiry.  Paper presented at the 8th TEAN Conference: Thinking Deeply about Education, Birmingham, 11-12 May.

Nuttall, A. (2017) Assessment at primary level: quality, comparability and improving secondary readiness.  A perspective from ITE.  Speech at the Westminster Education Forum Keynote Seminar: Next steps for reforming primary education: effective teaching practices, assessment and accountably, London, 18 January.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Deficit narratives and lived realities: whose poverty is it?  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the Australian Association for Research in Education, Melbourne, 27 November – 1 December.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Disenfranchised boys’ reflections on their urban schooling experience: “What a Waste!”.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Philpott, C., Beckett, L. and Wrigley, T. (2016) Collaborative practitioner inquiry: making a difference to urban schools.  Innovation session (school visits and symposium) presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Finn, B. and Beckett, L. (2015) Teachers’ constructions of poverty effects: Their research evidence.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Belfast, 15-17 September.

Nuttall, A. (2014) Teachers’ voice on disengaged boys: the role of one teacher-researcher in an English primary school. Paper presented at the Joint Australian Association for Research in Education and the New Zealand Association for Research in Education Conference, Brisbane, 30 November – 4 December.

Abigail’s research explores the role of education in students’ personal development and how this can be supported by policy, curricula, initial teacher education and teacher professional development. In particular she focuses on history education, citizenship education and peace education as vehicles for dialogue. These opportunities for students to engage with social questions are vital for building cohesive societies. This flows from the recognition that traditional forums for developing public understanding, such as post-conflict truth commissions, need to be complemented by intergenerational and educational perspectives.

Abigail has taught History, Politics, Debating as well as Relationships and Sex Education to secondary school students in South Africa, England and the USA.

She holds postgraduate degrees in Post-Conflict and Transitional Justice (University of Cape Town), in Education, Globalisation and International Development (University of Cambridge) and in African Studies (University of Oxford). She is a Rhodes Scholar, Mandela-Magdalene Scholar and Mandela-Rhodes Scholar.

Title of thesis

GCSE History, Policy Reform and Student Development: How students and teachers navigate the thematic study “Empires, Migration and the People”

Conference papers

Teaching Migration, Belonging, and Empire in Secondary Schools: evaluation of a teacher professional development program, (2019) History Educators International Research Network Conference, Lead author: Dr Jason Todd, University of Vienna, Austria.

“The Problems and Prospects of Teaching South Africa’s Recent History: Teachers’ Perspectives”, (2018) Sustainability, peace and education – Exploring promise and practice: BAICE 20th Anniversary Symposium, University of Bristol, England.

“New Generations, Old Wounds: Learning History at Home and School in Northern Ireland”, (2018) European Social Science and History Conference,
Queens University Belfast, Northern Ireland.

“The Methodological Challenges of Investigating the Role of History Teaching in Peacebuilding”, (2017), Present Past: Time, Memory, and the Negotiation of Historical Justice Conference, Columbia University, United States of America.

“Teaching South Africa’s Truth and Reconciliation Commission”, (2017) European Conference on African Studies, Universität Basel, Switzerland.

Research Assistant Publications

Review of the evidence on feedback in primary and secondary schools, (forthcoming, 2021) for the Education Endowment Foundation, Lead author: Prof Velda Elliott.

Teaching Migration, Belonging, and Empire in Secondary Schools, (2019), for Runnymede Trust and the European Research Council, Lead authors: Kimberly McIntosh, Dr Jason Todd and Prof Nandini Das.

Gender and the Politics of Reconciliation (2016), for The Institute for Justice and Reconciliation, Lead author: Dr Helen Scanlon

SOLE AUTHOR PUBLICATIONS

‘Transitions, Truth-Telling and Teaching History’, Cambridge Open-Review Educational Research e-Journal, Vol. 4, 2017.

Paul Riser is a DPhil Student in the department. His research focuses broadly on students’ (especially the marginalised) identities work in upper-secondary English Language Arts classrooms.

Prior to starting his doctoral studies, Paul earned a BSc in English Language Arts (Secondary Education) with a minor in Theology and a BA in Spanish and International Studies with a minor in Psychology from Texas Lutheran University. His MA in English Literature and Language is from St. Mary’s University.

As part of his postgraduate schoolwork, Paul undertook a placement in two graduate certificate programs, earning both his School Counselor certification and School Principal certification for all grade levels in the state of Texas, USA. In addition to English Language Arts and Reading (4th-12th grades), he is also qualified to teach Health (all levels), Journalism (7-12), Speech (7-12), Social Studies (7-12), and English as a Second Language (all levels) in Texas. Further, Paul holds a teaching certification in California, USA, the United Kingdom and Wales, the Kingdom of Denmark, and the Netherlands.

As a public school English teacher for 8 years, Paul was awarded many distinctions including, but not limited to: El maestro de impacto, two Harvard Book Awards, Teacher of the Year, and Texas Parent-Teacher Association Life Member.

His research to inform his doctoral thesis work will be completed in the United States of America. Furthermore, his research interests revolve around the nexus points of gender, ethnicity, sexuality, economic status, and religion as they relate to the agency students have in the classroom.

Paul is the 2019-2020 Student Liaison Coordinator for the Department of Education, Oxford. In this role, he is charged with leading/convening weekly workshops on a variety of research training topics, co-organizing networking and career advice opportunities for graduate students, and liaising with Cambridge University personnel to organize the annual Oxbridge Exchange. Furthermore, Paul supports the Higher Degrees Office as appropriate and meets regularly with directors and other stakeholders to discuss issues of common student concern in order to develop student identity and community throughout the Department.

Paul serves as the representative student voice on the Social Sciences Division Equality & Diversity Steering Group for the University of Oxford.

Paul is also a part-time Research Assistant working with professionals and other academics within the Department of Education on funded and individual projects as needed.

Supervisors: Associate Professors Jenni Ingram and Velda Elliott & Departmental Lecturer Jason Todd.

Thesis Title: ‘Using Positioning Theory to Understand Marginalised Students’ Identities Work and Their Learning Experiences in English Language Arts Classrooms’

Open-Access Publication:
Ingram, Jenni, & Riser, P.A. (2019). Experiences of problem solving in whole class interactions. Avances De Investigación En Educación Matemática, Avances de Investigación en Educación Matemática, Number 16; October 2019.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.35763/aiem.v0i16.279

Tessa is currently completing a part-time DPhil, alongside work as a senior leader in a London secondary school.

Her research explores how teachers on school-based ITE routes (TeachFirst and School Direct salaried) approach learning from experience. The research takes an action research approach: working with participant beginning teachers and mentors to critically examine and reflect on the processes of learning to teach, using their conversations as stimulus data.

Prior to joining the Department of Education Tessa completed an MSc in Educational Research (University of Bristol).

Yoon Young has been involved in a variety of academic and professional projects related to teacher education.

She is currently a member of the Teacher Education and Professional Learning (TEPL) research group at Oxford. Her doctoral research focuses on teacher education policy and practice in England. The study examines the relationship between individuals’ own objectives, the stated programme goals, and the national teachers’ standards in the operation of the Oxford Internship Scheme (OIS). It also explores the perceptions of stakeholders regarding ideal goals that could drive a re-conceptualised teacher education programme.

Prior to her doctorate, Yoon Young used to be a social studies teacher and subsequently worked as a consultant for the OECD’s Initial Teacher Preparation (ITP) Study. She holds a B.A. in Social Studies and Geography Education from the Ewha Womans University, and an M.A. in Educational Leadership from the University of Jyväskylä, where she was a grantee of the Korean Government Scholarship for Study Overseas.

Katy is a Deputy Headteacher and the founder of a Leadership and Coaching Institute, which she now co-directs.

Katy is an Associate Fellow at the Oxford Character Project and a Research Associate at the Oxford University Wellbeing Research Centre. She is the co-founder of Global Social Leaders, a leadership programme which has participants in 105 countries, all passionate about creating and sustaining positive change in the world.

Title of Thesis

How could school leaders improve the flourishing and wellbeing of teaching staff?

Books
  • Granville-Chapman, K. and Bidston, E (2020) Leader: Know, love and inspire your people. Carmarthen: Crownhouse Publishing
Book Chapters
  •  Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ In White, M. & McCallum, F. (Ed.s) Wellbeing and Resilience Education: Covid-19 And Its Impact on Education Systems. Routledge
Publications
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘Purpose and Leadership in Education and Beyond’. The Education Exchange. Available from: https://theeducation.exchange/purpose-and-leadership-in-education-and-beyond/
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘The Three Secrets of COVID-era Leadership’. Times Education Supplement. Available from: https://www.tes.com/news/three-secrets-covid-era-school-leadership
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2016) ‘Assessing the Impact of a Teacher Leadership Programme in a Teaching Schools Alliance. Journal of Teacher Action Research
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2014) ‘The Afghan conflict: causes and consequences.’ Geography Review 28(1): 22-27
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2013) What are the psychological factors that affect students’ academic resilience and can teachers influence these? Unpublished thesis
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘Unlocking Leadership Potential’, The Magazine of the Boarding School’s Association, 33: 42-45
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2009) ‘Learning to Lead’, Leader, The Education Leader Magazine 41: 22-25
Presentations
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2019) ‘How could leaders improve the flourishing of their teams?’ ‘Stowe Ed Conference’, Forthcoming: 7 Jan 2019
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2018) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education: 21 Jun 2018
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2017) ‘How can school leaders improve teacher flourishing?’ ‘Doing Education Differently Conference’, University of Oxford, Department of Education, 11 Mar 17
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2016) ‘Developing school leaders who enable teachers to flourish’ The Telegraph Festival of Education 23 Jun 16
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Developing leadership in pupils and teachers’ High School Affiliated to Renmin University of China, Beijing. 20 Oct 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Resilience for leaders.’ Global Social Leaders World Summit. 16 Aug 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Emotional Intelligence for Leaders.’ Global Leaders in Education. 12 Aug 15
  • Coates, S.; Fraser, H.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J.; and Nasim, A. (2015) ‘Breaking through the glass ceiling – how can schools empower our girls to become leaders?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education. 19 Jun 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. ‘Developing Leadership in Schools’ (2015). G20 Schools Conference. International conference for head teachers. 11 Apr 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2018) ‘Introduction’, Wellington Leadership Institute: Festival of Leadership. Mar 2012-15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘How the Young Learn to Lead’, Raffles Institution (Singapore) -Purdue University (USA) Education Forum on Gifted & Talented Youth 2012. Singapore. 15 Mar 12
  • Draper, D.; Dyer, R.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Schools’. Presentation for a meeting about pupil leadership and character development at 10 Downing Street. 16 Nov 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Young People’. Presentation for a meeting about leadership and character at 10 Downing Street. 7 Mar 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K. & Seldon, A. (2012) ‘Introduction’, Leading Your School in the 21st Century. 7 Feb 12

Kamal Armanious is particularly interested in the topic of education governance to explore what is possible in developing an improved governance system for technical and vocational education and training (TVET).

There have always been various calls from different international organisations such UNESCO, ILO, World Bank, OECD etc. to develop a transformed and transformative approach to TVET. This is attractive for certain theoretical as well as practical reasons; however, one set of limitations in achieving this vision lies in the arena of governance. Mr Armanious examines an imagined better model of governance that can be developed from the principles of a new approach and wider theoretical resources with consideration to national realities where there may be very serious obstacles in the way of realising this new governance approach and hence the overall planned transformation.

Title of Thesis

Education and Training Policies in Egypt: Good Governance and Stakeholders Participation

 

Amanda is completing a part-time DPhil, alongside working in Initial Teacher Education at Leeds Trinity University.

Her research is focused on understanding tensions, contradictions and conflicts that teachers in disadvantaged schools may experience when they engage in research activity.  Her research focus is influenced by her own experiences of working as a research-active teacher in disadvantaged schools, and recent work in teacher education to support experienced and beginning teachers in developing their own research activities.

One of the aims of Amanda’s research is to construct a framework to support teachers in pursuing research activity and critical scholarship work which articulates with wider social movements to address issues of poverty and disadvantage in schools.

Title of Thesis

Teachers’ perspectives on tensions between policy, practice and research in disadvantaged schools

Publications 

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2017) A ‘usable past’ of teacher education in England: history in JET’s anniversary issue. Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy, 43 (5), pp.616-627.

Nuttall, A. (2016) The ‘curriculum challenge’: Moving towards the ‘Storyline’ approach in a case study urban primary school.  Improving Schools, 19 (2), pp. 154-166.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Learning {Re}imagined: A review.  Primary First, 15, pp. 17-18.

Nuttall, A. and Doherty, J. (2014) Disaffected boys and the achievement gap: the ‘wallpaper effect’ and what is hidden by a focus on school results.  The Urban Review, 46 (5), pp.800-815.

Conference Papers and Presentations

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2018) “No child is pre-ordained to fail” Teachers questioning policy assumptions.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Newcastle, 11-13 September.

Nuttall, A. and Tobbell, C. (2017) Trainee teachers’ perspectives on practitioner enquiry.  Paper presented at the 8th TEAN Conference: Thinking Deeply about Education, Birmingham, 11-12 May.

Nuttall, A. (2017) Assessment at primary level: quality, comparability and improving secondary readiness.  A perspective from ITE.  Speech at the Westminster Education Forum Keynote Seminar: Next steps for reforming primary education: effective teaching practices, assessment and accountably, London, 18 January.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Deficit narratives and lived realities: whose poverty is it?  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the Australian Association for Research in Education, Melbourne, 27 November – 1 December.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Disenfranchised boys’ reflections on their urban schooling experience: “What a Waste!”.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Philpott, C., Beckett, L. and Wrigley, T. (2016) Collaborative practitioner inquiry: making a difference to urban schools.  Innovation session (school visits and symposium) presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Finn, B. and Beckett, L. (2015) Teachers’ constructions of poverty effects: Their research evidence.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Belfast, 15-17 September.

Nuttall, A. (2014) Teachers’ voice on disengaged boys: the role of one teacher-researcher in an English primary school. Paper presented at the Joint Australian Association for Research in Education and the New Zealand Association for Research in Education Conference, Brisbane, 30 November – 4 December.

Abigail’s research explores the role of education in students’ personal development and how this can be supported by policy, curricula, initial teacher education and teacher professional development. In particular she focuses on history education, citizenship education and peace education as vehicles for dialogue. These opportunities for students to engage with social questions are vital for building cohesive societies. This flows from the recognition that traditional forums for developing public understanding, such as post-conflict truth commissions, need to be complemented by intergenerational and educational perspectives.

Abigail has taught History, Politics, Debating as well as Relationships and Sex Education to secondary school students in South Africa, England and the USA.

She holds postgraduate degrees in Post-Conflict and Transitional Justice (University of Cape Town), in Education, Globalisation and International Development (University of Cambridge) and in African Studies (University of Oxford). She is a Rhodes Scholar, Mandela-Magdalene Scholar and Mandela-Rhodes Scholar.

Title of thesis

GCSE History, Policy Reform and Student Development: How students and teachers navigate the thematic study “Empires, Migration and the People”

Conference papers

Teaching Migration, Belonging, and Empire in Secondary Schools: evaluation of a teacher professional development program, (2019) History Educators International Research Network Conference, Lead author: Dr Jason Todd, University of Vienna, Austria.

“The Problems and Prospects of Teaching South Africa’s Recent History: Teachers’ Perspectives”, (2018) Sustainability, peace and education – Exploring promise and practice: BAICE 20th Anniversary Symposium, University of Bristol, England.

“New Generations, Old Wounds: Learning History at Home and School in Northern Ireland”, (2018) European Social Science and History Conference,
Queens University Belfast, Northern Ireland.

“The Methodological Challenges of Investigating the Role of History Teaching in Peacebuilding”, (2017), Present Past: Time, Memory, and the Negotiation of Historical Justice Conference, Columbia University, United States of America.

“Teaching South Africa’s Truth and Reconciliation Commission”, (2017) European Conference on African Studies, Universität Basel, Switzerland.

Research Assistant Publications

Review of the evidence on feedback in primary and secondary schools, (forthcoming, 2021) for the Education Endowment Foundation, Lead author: Prof Velda Elliott.

Teaching Migration, Belonging, and Empire in Secondary Schools, (2019), for Runnymede Trust and the European Research Council, Lead authors: Kimberly McIntosh, Dr Jason Todd and Prof Nandini Das.

Gender and the Politics of Reconciliation (2016), for The Institute for Justice and Reconciliation, Lead author: Dr Helen Scanlon

SOLE AUTHOR PUBLICATIONS

‘Transitions, Truth-Telling and Teaching History’, Cambridge Open-Review Educational Research e-Journal, Vol. 4, 2017.

Paul Riser is a DPhil Student in the department. His research focuses broadly on students’ (especially the marginalised) identities work in upper-secondary English Language Arts classrooms.

Prior to starting his doctoral studies, Paul earned a BSc in English Language Arts (Secondary Education) with a minor in Theology and a BA in Spanish and International Studies with a minor in Psychology from Texas Lutheran University. His MA in English Literature and Language is from St. Mary’s University.

As part of his postgraduate schoolwork, Paul undertook a placement in two graduate certificate programs, earning both his School Counselor certification and School Principal certification for all grade levels in the state of Texas, USA. In addition to English Language Arts and Reading (4th-12th grades), he is also qualified to teach Health (all levels), Journalism (7-12), Speech (7-12), Social Studies (7-12), and English as a Second Language (all levels) in Texas. Further, Paul holds a teaching certification in California, USA, the United Kingdom and Wales, the Kingdom of Denmark, and the Netherlands.

As a public school English teacher for 8 years, Paul was awarded many distinctions including, but not limited to: El maestro de impacto, two Harvard Book Awards, Teacher of the Year, and Texas Parent-Teacher Association Life Member.

His research to inform his doctoral thesis work will be completed in the United States of America. Furthermore, his research interests revolve around the nexus points of gender, ethnicity, sexuality, economic status, and religion as they relate to the agency students have in the classroom.

Paul is the 2019-2020 Student Liaison Coordinator for the Department of Education, Oxford. In this role, he is charged with leading/convening weekly workshops on a variety of research training topics, co-organizing networking and career advice opportunities for graduate students, and liaising with Cambridge University personnel to organize the annual Oxbridge Exchange. Furthermore, Paul supports the Higher Degrees Office as appropriate and meets regularly with directors and other stakeholders to discuss issues of common student concern in order to develop student identity and community throughout the Department.

Paul serves as the representative student voice on the Social Sciences Division Equality & Diversity Steering Group for the University of Oxford.

Paul is also a part-time Research Assistant working with professionals and other academics within the Department of Education on funded and individual projects as needed.

Supervisors: Associate Professors Jenni Ingram and Velda Elliott & Departmental Lecturer Jason Todd.

Thesis Title: ‘Using Positioning Theory to Understand Marginalised Students’ Identities Work and Their Learning Experiences in English Language Arts Classrooms’

Open-Access Publication:
Ingram, Jenni, & Riser, P.A. (2019). Experiences of problem solving in whole class interactions. Avances De Investigación En Educación Matemática, Avances de Investigación en Educación Matemática, Number 16; October 2019.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.35763/aiem.v0i16.279

Tessa is currently completing a part-time DPhil, alongside work as a senior leader in a London secondary school.

Her research explores how teachers on school-based ITE routes (TeachFirst and School Direct salaried) approach learning from experience. The research takes an action research approach: working with participant beginning teachers and mentors to critically examine and reflect on the processes of learning to teach, using their conversations as stimulus data.

Prior to joining the Department of Education Tessa completed an MSc in Educational Research (University of Bristol).

Yoon Young has been involved in a variety of academic and professional projects related to teacher education.

She is currently a member of the Teacher Education and Professional Learning (TEPL) research group at Oxford. Her doctoral research focuses on teacher education policy and practice in England. The study examines the relationship between individuals’ own objectives, the stated programme goals, and the national teachers’ standards in the operation of the Oxford Internship Scheme (OIS). It also explores the perceptions of stakeholders regarding ideal goals that could drive a re-conceptualised teacher education programme.

Prior to her doctorate, Yoon Young used to be a social studies teacher and subsequently worked as a consultant for the OECD’s Initial Teacher Preparation (ITP) Study. She holds a B.A. in Social Studies and Geography Education from the Ewha Womans University, and an M.A. in Educational Leadership from the University of Jyväskylä, where she was a grantee of the Korean Government Scholarship for Study Overseas.

Katy is a Deputy Headteacher and the founder of a Leadership and Coaching Institute, which she now co-directs.

Katy is an Associate Fellow at the Oxford Character Project and a Research Associate at the Oxford University Wellbeing Research Centre. She is the co-founder of Global Social Leaders, a leadership programme which has participants in 105 countries, all passionate about creating and sustaining positive change in the world.

Title of Thesis

How could school leaders improve the flourishing and wellbeing of teaching staff?

Books
  • Granville-Chapman, K. and Bidston, E (2020) Leader: Know, love and inspire your people. Carmarthen: Crownhouse Publishing
Book Chapters
  •  Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ In White, M. & McCallum, F. (Ed.s) Wellbeing and Resilience Education: Covid-19 And Its Impact on Education Systems. Routledge
Publications
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘Purpose and Leadership in Education and Beyond’. The Education Exchange. Available from: https://theeducation.exchange/purpose-and-leadership-in-education-and-beyond/
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘The Three Secrets of COVID-era Leadership’. Times Education Supplement. Available from: https://www.tes.com/news/three-secrets-covid-era-school-leadership
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2016) ‘Assessing the Impact of a Teacher Leadership Programme in a Teaching Schools Alliance. Journal of Teacher Action Research
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2014) ‘The Afghan conflict: causes and consequences.’ Geography Review 28(1): 22-27
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2013) What are the psychological factors that affect students’ academic resilience and can teachers influence these? Unpublished thesis
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘Unlocking Leadership Potential’, The Magazine of the Boarding School’s Association, 33: 42-45
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2009) ‘Learning to Lead’, Leader, The Education Leader Magazine 41: 22-25
Presentations
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2019) ‘How could leaders improve the flourishing of their teams?’ ‘Stowe Ed Conference’, Forthcoming: 7 Jan 2019
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2018) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education: 21 Jun 2018
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2017) ‘How can school leaders improve teacher flourishing?’ ‘Doing Education Differently Conference’, University of Oxford, Department of Education, 11 Mar 17
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2016) ‘Developing school leaders who enable teachers to flourish’ The Telegraph Festival of Education 23 Jun 16
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Developing leadership in pupils and teachers’ High School Affiliated to Renmin University of China, Beijing. 20 Oct 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Resilience for leaders.’ Global Social Leaders World Summit. 16 Aug 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Emotional Intelligence for Leaders.’ Global Leaders in Education. 12 Aug 15
  • Coates, S.; Fraser, H.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J.; and Nasim, A. (2015) ‘Breaking through the glass ceiling – how can schools empower our girls to become leaders?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education. 19 Jun 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. ‘Developing Leadership in Schools’ (2015). G20 Schools Conference. International conference for head teachers. 11 Apr 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2018) ‘Introduction’, Wellington Leadership Institute: Festival of Leadership. Mar 2012-15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘How the Young Learn to Lead’, Raffles Institution (Singapore) -Purdue University (USA) Education Forum on Gifted & Talented Youth 2012. Singapore. 15 Mar 12
  • Draper, D.; Dyer, R.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Schools’. Presentation for a meeting about pupil leadership and character development at 10 Downing Street. 16 Nov 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Young People’. Presentation for a meeting about leadership and character at 10 Downing Street. 7 Mar 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K. & Seldon, A. (2012) ‘Introduction’, Leading Your School in the 21st Century. 7 Feb 12

Kamal Armanious is particularly interested in the topic of education governance to explore what is possible in developing an improved governance system for technical and vocational education and training (TVET).

There have always been various calls from different international organisations such UNESCO, ILO, World Bank, OECD etc. to develop a transformed and transformative approach to TVET. This is attractive for certain theoretical as well as practical reasons; however, one set of limitations in achieving this vision lies in the arena of governance. Mr Armanious examines an imagined better model of governance that can be developed from the principles of a new approach and wider theoretical resources with consideration to national realities where there may be very serious obstacles in the way of realising this new governance approach and hence the overall planned transformation.

Title of Thesis

Education and Training Policies in Egypt: Good Governance and Stakeholders Participation

 

Amanda is completing a part-time DPhil, alongside working in Initial Teacher Education at Leeds Trinity University.

Her research is focused on understanding tensions, contradictions and conflicts that teachers in disadvantaged schools may experience when they engage in research activity.  Her research focus is influenced by her own experiences of working as a research-active teacher in disadvantaged schools, and recent work in teacher education to support experienced and beginning teachers in developing their own research activities.

One of the aims of Amanda’s research is to construct a framework to support teachers in pursuing research activity and critical scholarship work which articulates with wider social movements to address issues of poverty and disadvantage in schools.

Title of Thesis

Teachers’ perspectives on tensions between policy, practice and research in disadvantaged schools

Publications 

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2017) A ‘usable past’ of teacher education in England: history in JET’s anniversary issue. Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy, 43 (5), pp.616-627.

Nuttall, A. (2016) The ‘curriculum challenge’: Moving towards the ‘Storyline’ approach in a case study urban primary school.  Improving Schools, 19 (2), pp. 154-166.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Learning {Re}imagined: A review.  Primary First, 15, pp. 17-18.

Nuttall, A. and Doherty, J. (2014) Disaffected boys and the achievement gap: the ‘wallpaper effect’ and what is hidden by a focus on school results.  The Urban Review, 46 (5), pp.800-815.

Conference Papers and Presentations

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2018) “No child is pre-ordained to fail” Teachers questioning policy assumptions.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Newcastle, 11-13 September.

Nuttall, A. and Tobbell, C. (2017) Trainee teachers’ perspectives on practitioner enquiry.  Paper presented at the 8th TEAN Conference: Thinking Deeply about Education, Birmingham, 11-12 May.

Nuttall, A. (2017) Assessment at primary level: quality, comparability and improving secondary readiness.  A perspective from ITE.  Speech at the Westminster Education Forum Keynote Seminar: Next steps for reforming primary education: effective teaching practices, assessment and accountably, London, 18 January.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Deficit narratives and lived realities: whose poverty is it?  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the Australian Association for Research in Education, Melbourne, 27 November – 1 December.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Disenfranchised boys’ reflections on their urban schooling experience: “What a Waste!”.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Philpott, C., Beckett, L. and Wrigley, T. (2016) Collaborative practitioner inquiry: making a difference to urban schools.  Innovation session (school visits and symposium) presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Finn, B. and Beckett, L. (2015) Teachers’ constructions of poverty effects: Their research evidence.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Belfast, 15-17 September.

Nuttall, A. (2014) Teachers’ voice on disengaged boys: the role of one teacher-researcher in an English primary school. Paper presented at the Joint Australian Association for Research in Education and the New Zealand Association for Research in Education Conference, Brisbane, 30 November – 4 December.

Abigail’s research explores the role of education in students’ personal development and how this can be supported by policy, curricula, initial teacher education and teacher professional development. In particular she focuses on history education, citizenship education and peace education as vehicles for dialogue. These opportunities for students to engage with social questions are vital for building cohesive societies. This flows from the recognition that traditional forums for developing public understanding, such as post-conflict truth commissions, need to be complemented by intergenerational and educational perspectives.

Abigail has taught History, Politics, Debating as well as Relationships and Sex Education to secondary school students in South Africa, England and the USA.

She holds postgraduate degrees in Post-Conflict and Transitional Justice (University of Cape Town), in Education, Globalisation and International Development (University of Cambridge) and in African Studies (University of Oxford). She is a Rhodes Scholar, Mandela-Magdalene Scholar and Mandela-Rhodes Scholar.

Title of thesis

GCSE History, Policy Reform and Student Development: How students and teachers navigate the thematic study “Empires, Migration and the People”

Conference papers

Teaching Migration, Belonging, and Empire in Secondary Schools: evaluation of a teacher professional development program, (2019) History Educators International Research Network Conference, Lead author: Dr Jason Todd, University of Vienna, Austria.

“The Problems and Prospects of Teaching South Africa’s Recent History: Teachers’ Perspectives”, (2018) Sustainability, peace and education – Exploring promise and practice: BAICE 20th Anniversary Symposium, University of Bristol, England.

“New Generations, Old Wounds: Learning History at Home and School in Northern Ireland”, (2018) European Social Science and History Conference,
Queens University Belfast, Northern Ireland.

“The Methodological Challenges of Investigating the Role of History Teaching in Peacebuilding”, (2017), Present Past: Time, Memory, and the Negotiation of Historical Justice Conference, Columbia University, United States of America.

“Teaching South Africa’s Truth and Reconciliation Commission”, (2017) European Conference on African Studies, Universität Basel, Switzerland.

Research Assistant Publications

Review of the evidence on feedback in primary and secondary schools, (forthcoming, 2021) for the Education Endowment Foundation, Lead author: Prof Velda Elliott.

Teaching Migration, Belonging, and Empire in Secondary Schools, (2019), for Runnymede Trust and the European Research Council, Lead authors: Kimberly McIntosh, Dr Jason Todd and Prof Nandini Das.

Gender and the Politics of Reconciliation (2016), for The Institute for Justice and Reconciliation, Lead author: Dr Helen Scanlon

SOLE AUTHOR PUBLICATIONS

‘Transitions, Truth-Telling and Teaching History’, Cambridge Open-Review Educational Research e-Journal, Vol. 4, 2017.

Paul Riser is a DPhil Student in the department. His research focuses broadly on students’ (especially the marginalised) identities work in upper-secondary English Language Arts classrooms.

Prior to starting his doctoral studies, Paul earned a BSc in English Language Arts (Secondary Education) with a minor in Theology and a BA in Spanish and International Studies with a minor in Psychology from Texas Lutheran University. His MA in English Literature and Language is from St. Mary’s University.

As part of his postgraduate schoolwork, Paul undertook a placement in two graduate certificate programs, earning both his School Counselor certification and School Principal certification for all grade levels in the state of Texas, USA. In addition to English Language Arts and Reading (4th-12th grades), he is also qualified to teach Health (all levels), Journalism (7-12), Speech (7-12), Social Studies (7-12), and English as a Second Language (all levels) in Texas. Further, Paul holds a teaching certification in California, USA, the United Kingdom and Wales, the Kingdom of Denmark, and the Netherlands.

As a public school English teacher for 8 years, Paul was awarded many distinctions including, but not limited to: El maestro de impacto, two Harvard Book Awards, Teacher of the Year, and Texas Parent-Teacher Association Life Member.

His research to inform his doctoral thesis work will be completed in the United States of America. Furthermore, his research interests revolve around the nexus points of gender, ethnicity, sexuality, economic status, and religion as they relate to the agency students have in the classroom.

Paul is the 2019-2020 Student Liaison Coordinator for the Department of Education, Oxford. In this role, he is charged with leading/convening weekly workshops on a variety of research training topics, co-organizing networking and career advice opportunities for graduate students, and liaising with Cambridge University personnel to organize the annual Oxbridge Exchange. Furthermore, Paul supports the Higher Degrees Office as appropriate and meets regularly with directors and other stakeholders to discuss issues of common student concern in order to develop student identity and community throughout the Department.

Paul serves as the representative student voice on the Social Sciences Division Equality & Diversity Steering Group for the University of Oxford.

Paul is also a part-time Research Assistant working with professionals and other academics within the Department of Education on funded and individual projects as needed.

Supervisors: Associate Professors Jenni Ingram and Velda Elliott & Departmental Lecturer Jason Todd.

Thesis Title: ‘Using Positioning Theory to Understand Marginalised Students’ Identities Work and Their Learning Experiences in English Language Arts Classrooms’

Open-Access Publication:
Ingram, Jenni, & Riser, P.A. (2019). Experiences of problem solving in whole class interactions. Avances De Investigación En Educación Matemática, Avances de Investigación en Educación Matemática, Number 16; October 2019.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.35763/aiem.v0i16.279

Tessa is currently completing a part-time DPhil, alongside work as a senior leader in a London secondary school.

Her research explores how teachers on school-based ITE routes (TeachFirst and School Direct salaried) approach learning from experience. The research takes an action research approach: working with participant beginning teachers and mentors to critically examine and reflect on the processes of learning to teach, using their conversations as stimulus data.

Prior to joining the Department of Education Tessa completed an MSc in Educational Research (University of Bristol).

Yoon Young has been involved in a variety of academic and professional projects related to teacher education.

She is currently a member of the Teacher Education and Professional Learning (TEPL) research group at Oxford. Her doctoral research focuses on teacher education policy and practice in England. The study examines the relationship between individuals’ own objectives, the stated programme goals, and the national teachers’ standards in the operation of the Oxford Internship Scheme (OIS). It also explores the perceptions of stakeholders regarding ideal goals that could drive a re-conceptualised teacher education programme.

Prior to her doctorate, Yoon Young used to be a social studies teacher and subsequently worked as a consultant for the OECD’s Initial Teacher Preparation (ITP) Study. She holds a B.A. in Social Studies and Geography Education from the Ewha Womans University, and an M.A. in Educational Leadership from the University of Jyväskylä, where she was a grantee of the Korean Government Scholarship for Study Overseas.

Katy is a Deputy Headteacher and the founder of a Leadership and Coaching Institute, which she now co-directs.

Katy is an Associate Fellow at the Oxford Character Project and a Research Associate at the Oxford University Wellbeing Research Centre. She is the co-founder of Global Social Leaders, a leadership programme which has participants in 105 countries, all passionate about creating and sustaining positive change in the world.

Title of Thesis

How could school leaders improve the flourishing and wellbeing of teaching staff?

Books
  • Granville-Chapman, K. and Bidston, E (2020) Leader: Know, love and inspire your people. Carmarthen: Crownhouse Publishing
Book Chapters
  •  Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ In White, M. & McCallum, F. (Ed.s) Wellbeing and Resilience Education: Covid-19 And Its Impact on Education Systems. Routledge
Publications
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘Purpose and Leadership in Education and Beyond’. The Education Exchange. Available from: https://theeducation.exchange/purpose-and-leadership-in-education-and-beyond/
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘The Three Secrets of COVID-era Leadership’. Times Education Supplement. Available from: https://www.tes.com/news/three-secrets-covid-era-school-leadership
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2016) ‘Assessing the Impact of a Teacher Leadership Programme in a Teaching Schools Alliance. Journal of Teacher Action Research
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2014) ‘The Afghan conflict: causes and consequences.’ Geography Review 28(1): 22-27
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2013) What are the psychological factors that affect students’ academic resilience and can teachers influence these? Unpublished thesis
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘Unlocking Leadership Potential’, The Magazine of the Boarding School’s Association, 33: 42-45
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2009) ‘Learning to Lead’, Leader, The Education Leader Magazine 41: 22-25
Presentations
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2019) ‘How could leaders improve the flourishing of their teams?’ ‘Stowe Ed Conference’, Forthcoming: 7 Jan 2019
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2018) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education: 21 Jun 2018
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2017) ‘How can school leaders improve teacher flourishing?’ ‘Doing Education Differently Conference’, University of Oxford, Department of Education, 11 Mar 17
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2016) ‘Developing school leaders who enable teachers to flourish’ The Telegraph Festival of Education 23 Jun 16
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Developing leadership in pupils and teachers’ High School Affiliated to Renmin University of China, Beijing. 20 Oct 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Resilience for leaders.’ Global Social Leaders World Summit. 16 Aug 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Emotional Intelligence for Leaders.’ Global Leaders in Education. 12 Aug 15
  • Coates, S.; Fraser, H.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J.; and Nasim, A. (2015) ‘Breaking through the glass ceiling – how can schools empower our girls to become leaders?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education. 19 Jun 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. ‘Developing Leadership in Schools’ (2015). G20 Schools Conference. International conference for head teachers. 11 Apr 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2018) ‘Introduction’, Wellington Leadership Institute: Festival of Leadership. Mar 2012-15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘How the Young Learn to Lead’, Raffles Institution (Singapore) -Purdue University (USA) Education Forum on Gifted & Talented Youth 2012. Singapore. 15 Mar 12
  • Draper, D.; Dyer, R.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Schools’. Presentation for a meeting about pupil leadership and character development at 10 Downing Street. 16 Nov 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Young People’. Presentation for a meeting about leadership and character at 10 Downing Street. 7 Mar 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K. & Seldon, A. (2012) ‘Introduction’, Leading Your School in the 21st Century. 7 Feb 12

Kamal Armanious is particularly interested in the topic of education governance to explore what is possible in developing an improved governance system for technical and vocational education and training (TVET).

There have always been various calls from different international organisations such UNESCO, ILO, World Bank, OECD etc. to develop a transformed and transformative approach to TVET. This is attractive for certain theoretical as well as practical reasons; however, one set of limitations in achieving this vision lies in the arena of governance. Mr Armanious examines an imagined better model of governance that can be developed from the principles of a new approach and wider theoretical resources with consideration to national realities where there may be very serious obstacles in the way of realising this new governance approach and hence the overall planned transformation.

Title of Thesis

Education and Training Policies in Egypt: Good Governance and Stakeholders Participation

 

Amanda is completing a part-time DPhil, alongside working in Initial Teacher Education at Leeds Trinity University.

Her research is focused on understanding tensions, contradictions and conflicts that teachers in disadvantaged schools may experience when they engage in research activity.  Her research focus is influenced by her own experiences of working as a research-active teacher in disadvantaged schools, and recent work in teacher education to support experienced and beginning teachers in developing their own research activities.

One of the aims of Amanda’s research is to construct a framework to support teachers in pursuing research activity and critical scholarship work which articulates with wider social movements to address issues of poverty and disadvantage in schools.

Title of Thesis

Teachers’ perspectives on tensions between policy, practice and research in disadvantaged schools

Publications 

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2017) A ‘usable past’ of teacher education in England: history in JET’s anniversary issue. Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy, 43 (5), pp.616-627.

Nuttall, A. (2016) The ‘curriculum challenge’: Moving towards the ‘Storyline’ approach in a case study urban primary school.  Improving Schools, 19 (2), pp. 154-166.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Learning {Re}imagined: A review.  Primary First, 15, pp. 17-18.

Nuttall, A. and Doherty, J. (2014) Disaffected boys and the achievement gap: the ‘wallpaper effect’ and what is hidden by a focus on school results.  The Urban Review, 46 (5), pp.800-815.

Conference Papers and Presentations

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2018) “No child is pre-ordained to fail” Teachers questioning policy assumptions.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Newcastle, 11-13 September.

Nuttall, A. and Tobbell, C. (2017) Trainee teachers’ perspectives on practitioner enquiry.  Paper presented at the 8th TEAN Conference: Thinking Deeply about Education, Birmingham, 11-12 May.

Nuttall, A. (2017) Assessment at primary level: quality, comparability and improving secondary readiness.  A perspective from ITE.  Speech at the Westminster Education Forum Keynote Seminar: Next steps for reforming primary education: effective teaching practices, assessment and accountably, London, 18 January.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Deficit narratives and lived realities: whose poverty is it?  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the Australian Association for Research in Education, Melbourne, 27 November – 1 December.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Disenfranchised boys’ reflections on their urban schooling experience: “What a Waste!”.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Philpott, C., Beckett, L. and Wrigley, T. (2016) Collaborative practitioner inquiry: making a difference to urban schools.  Innovation session (school visits and symposium) presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Finn, B. and Beckett, L. (2015) Teachers’ constructions of poverty effects: Their research evidence.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Belfast, 15-17 September.

Nuttall, A. (2014) Teachers’ voice on disengaged boys: the role of one teacher-researcher in an English primary school. Paper presented at the Joint Australian Association for Research in Education and the New Zealand Association for Research in Education Conference, Brisbane, 30 November – 4 December.

Abigail’s research explores the role of education in students’ personal development and how this can be supported by policy, curricula, initial teacher education and teacher professional development. In particular she focuses on history education, citizenship education and peace education as vehicles for dialogue. These opportunities for students to engage with social questions are vital for building cohesive societies. This flows from the recognition that traditional forums for developing public understanding, such as post-conflict truth commissions, need to be complemented by intergenerational and educational perspectives.

Abigail has taught History, Politics, Debating as well as Relationships and Sex Education to secondary school students in South Africa, England and the USA.

She holds postgraduate degrees in Post-Conflict and Transitional Justice (University of Cape Town), in Education, Globalisation and International Development (University of Cambridge) and in African Studies (University of Oxford). She is a Rhodes Scholar, Mandela-Magdalene Scholar and Mandela-Rhodes Scholar.

Title of thesis

GCSE History, Policy Reform and Student Development: How students and teachers navigate the thematic study “Empires, Migration and the People”

Conference papers

Teaching Migration, Belonging, and Empire in Secondary Schools: evaluation of a teacher professional development program, (2019) History Educators International Research Network Conference, Lead author: Dr Jason Todd, University of Vienna, Austria.

“The Problems and Prospects of Teaching South Africa’s Recent History: Teachers’ Perspectives”, (2018) Sustainability, peace and education – Exploring promise and practice: BAICE 20th Anniversary Symposium, University of Bristol, England.

“New Generations, Old Wounds: Learning History at Home and School in Northern Ireland”, (2018) European Social Science and History Conference,
Queens University Belfast, Northern Ireland.

“The Methodological Challenges of Investigating the Role of History Teaching in Peacebuilding”, (2017), Present Past: Time, Memory, and the Negotiation of Historical Justice Conference, Columbia University, United States of America.

“Teaching South Africa’s Truth and Reconciliation Commission”, (2017) European Conference on African Studies, Universität Basel, Switzerland.

Research Assistant Publications

Review of the evidence on feedback in primary and secondary schools, (forthcoming, 2021) for the Education Endowment Foundation, Lead author: Prof Velda Elliott.

Teaching Migration, Belonging, and Empire in Secondary Schools, (2019), for Runnymede Trust and the European Research Council, Lead authors: Kimberly McIntosh, Dr Jason Todd and Prof Nandini Das.

Gender and the Politics of Reconciliation (2016), for The Institute for Justice and Reconciliation, Lead author: Dr Helen Scanlon

SOLE AUTHOR PUBLICATIONS

‘Transitions, Truth-Telling and Teaching History’, Cambridge Open-Review Educational Research e-Journal, Vol. 4, 2017.

Paul Riser is a DPhil Student in the department. His research focuses broadly on students’ (especially the marginalised) identities work in upper-secondary English Language Arts classrooms.

Prior to starting his doctoral studies, Paul earned a BSc in English Language Arts (Secondary Education) with a minor in Theology and a BA in Spanish and International Studies with a minor in Psychology from Texas Lutheran University. His MA in English Literature and Language is from St. Mary’s University.

As part of his postgraduate schoolwork, Paul undertook a placement in two graduate certificate programs, earning both his School Counselor certification and School Principal certification for all grade levels in the state of Texas, USA. In addition to English Language Arts and Reading (4th-12th grades), he is also qualified to teach Health (all levels), Journalism (7-12), Speech (7-12), Social Studies (7-12), and English as a Second Language (all levels) in Texas. Further, Paul holds a teaching certification in California, USA, the United Kingdom and Wales, the Kingdom of Denmark, and the Netherlands.

As a public school English teacher for 8 years, Paul was awarded many distinctions including, but not limited to: El maestro de impacto, two Harvard Book Awards, Teacher of the Year, and Texas Parent-Teacher Association Life Member.

His research to inform his doctoral thesis work will be completed in the United States of America. Furthermore, his research interests revolve around the nexus points of gender, ethnicity, sexuality, economic status, and religion as they relate to the agency students have in the classroom.

Paul is the 2019-2020 Student Liaison Coordinator for the Department of Education, Oxford. In this role, he is charged with leading/convening weekly workshops on a variety of research training topics, co-organizing networking and career advice opportunities for graduate students, and liaising with Cambridge University personnel to organize the annual Oxbridge Exchange. Furthermore, Paul supports the Higher Degrees Office as appropriate and meets regularly with directors and other stakeholders to discuss issues of common student concern in order to develop student identity and community throughout the Department.

Paul serves as the representative student voice on the Social Sciences Division Equality & Diversity Steering Group for the University of Oxford.

Paul is also a part-time Research Assistant working with professionals and other academics within the Department of Education on funded and individual projects as needed.

Supervisors: Associate Professors Jenni Ingram and Velda Elliott & Departmental Lecturer Jason Todd.

Thesis Title: ‘Using Positioning Theory to Understand Marginalised Students’ Identities Work and Their Learning Experiences in English Language Arts Classrooms’

Open-Access Publication:
Ingram, Jenni, & Riser, P.A. (2019). Experiences of problem solving in whole class interactions. Avances De Investigación En Educación Matemática, Avances de Investigación en Educación Matemática, Number 16; October 2019.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.35763/aiem.v0i16.279

Tessa is currently completing a part-time DPhil, alongside work as a senior leader in a London secondary school.

Her research explores how teachers on school-based ITE routes (TeachFirst and School Direct salaried) approach learning from experience. The research takes an action research approach: working with participant beginning teachers and mentors to critically examine and reflect on the processes of learning to teach, using their conversations as stimulus data.

Prior to joining the Department of Education Tessa completed an MSc in Educational Research (University of Bristol).

Yoon Young has been involved in a variety of academic and professional projects related to teacher education.

She is currently a member of the Teacher Education and Professional Learning (TEPL) research group at Oxford. Her doctoral research focuses on teacher education policy and practice in England. The study examines the relationship between individuals’ own objectives, the stated programme goals, and the national teachers’ standards in the operation of the Oxford Internship Scheme (OIS). It also explores the perceptions of stakeholders regarding ideal goals that could drive a re-conceptualised teacher education programme.

Prior to her doctorate, Yoon Young used to be a social studies teacher and subsequently worked as a consultant for the OECD’s Initial Teacher Preparation (ITP) Study. She holds a B.A. in Social Studies and Geography Education from the Ewha Womans University, and an M.A. in Educational Leadership from the University of Jyväskylä, where she was a grantee of the Korean Government Scholarship for Study Overseas.

Katy is a Deputy Headteacher and the founder of a Leadership and Coaching Institute, which she now co-directs.

Katy is an Associate Fellow at the Oxford Character Project and a Research Associate at the Oxford University Wellbeing Research Centre. She is the co-founder of Global Social Leaders, a leadership programme which has participants in 105 countries, all passionate about creating and sustaining positive change in the world.

Title of Thesis

How could school leaders improve the flourishing and wellbeing of teaching staff?

Books
  • Granville-Chapman, K. and Bidston, E (2020) Leader: Know, love and inspire your people. Carmarthen: Crownhouse Publishing
Book Chapters
  •  Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ In White, M. & McCallum, F. (Ed.s) Wellbeing and Resilience Education: Covid-19 And Its Impact on Education Systems. Routledge
Publications
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘Purpose and Leadership in Education and Beyond’. The Education Exchange. Available from: https://theeducation.exchange/purpose-and-leadership-in-education-and-beyond/
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘The Three Secrets of COVID-era Leadership’. Times Education Supplement. Available from: https://www.tes.com/news/three-secrets-covid-era-school-leadership
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2016) ‘Assessing the Impact of a Teacher Leadership Programme in a Teaching Schools Alliance. Journal of Teacher Action Research
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2014) ‘The Afghan conflict: causes and consequences.’ Geography Review 28(1): 22-27
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2013) What are the psychological factors that affect students’ academic resilience and can teachers influence these? Unpublished thesis
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘Unlocking Leadership Potential’, The Magazine of the Boarding School’s Association, 33: 42-45
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2009) ‘Learning to Lead’, Leader, The Education Leader Magazine 41: 22-25
Presentations
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2019) ‘How could leaders improve the flourishing of their teams?’ ‘Stowe Ed Conference’, Forthcoming: 7 Jan 2019
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2018) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education: 21 Jun 2018
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2017) ‘How can school leaders improve teacher flourishing?’ ‘Doing Education Differently Conference’, University of Oxford, Department of Education, 11 Mar 17
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2016) ‘Developing school leaders who enable teachers to flourish’ The Telegraph Festival of Education 23 Jun 16
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Developing leadership in pupils and teachers’ High School Affiliated to Renmin University of China, Beijing. 20 Oct 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Resilience for leaders.’ Global Social Leaders World Summit. 16 Aug 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Emotional Intelligence for Leaders.’ Global Leaders in Education. 12 Aug 15
  • Coates, S.; Fraser, H.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J.; and Nasim, A. (2015) ‘Breaking through the glass ceiling – how can schools empower our girls to become leaders?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education. 19 Jun 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. ‘Developing Leadership in Schools’ (2015). G20 Schools Conference. International conference for head teachers. 11 Apr 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2018) ‘Introduction’, Wellington Leadership Institute: Festival of Leadership. Mar 2012-15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘How the Young Learn to Lead’, Raffles Institution (Singapore) -Purdue University (USA) Education Forum on Gifted & Talented Youth 2012. Singapore. 15 Mar 12
  • Draper, D.; Dyer, R.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Schools’. Presentation for a meeting about pupil leadership and character development at 10 Downing Street. 16 Nov 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Young People’. Presentation for a meeting about leadership and character at 10 Downing Street. 7 Mar 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K. & Seldon, A. (2012) ‘Introduction’, Leading Your School in the 21st Century. 7 Feb 12

Kamal Armanious is particularly interested in the topic of education governance to explore what is possible in developing an improved governance system for technical and vocational education and training (TVET).

There have always been various calls from different international organisations such UNESCO, ILO, World Bank, OECD etc. to develop a transformed and transformative approach to TVET. This is attractive for certain theoretical as well as practical reasons; however, one set of limitations in achieving this vision lies in the arena of governance. Mr Armanious examines an imagined better model of governance that can be developed from the principles of a new approach and wider theoretical resources with consideration to national realities where there may be very serious obstacles in the way of realising this new governance approach and hence the overall planned transformation.

Title of Thesis

Education and Training Policies in Egypt: Good Governance and Stakeholders Participation

 

Amanda is completing a part-time DPhil, alongside working in Initial Teacher Education at Leeds Trinity University.

Her research is focused on understanding tensions, contradictions and conflicts that teachers in disadvantaged schools may experience when they engage in research activity.  Her research focus is influenced by her own experiences of working as a research-active teacher in disadvantaged schools, and recent work in teacher education to support experienced and beginning teachers in developing their own research activities.

One of the aims of Amanda’s research is to construct a framework to support teachers in pursuing research activity and critical scholarship work which articulates with wider social movements to address issues of poverty and disadvantage in schools.

Title of Thesis

Teachers’ perspectives on tensions between policy, practice and research in disadvantaged schools

Publications 

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2017) A ‘usable past’ of teacher education in England: history in JET’s anniversary issue. Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy, 43 (5), pp.616-627.

Nuttall, A. (2016) The ‘curriculum challenge’: Moving towards the ‘Storyline’ approach in a case study urban primary school.  Improving Schools, 19 (2), pp. 154-166.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Learning {Re}imagined: A review.  Primary First, 15, pp. 17-18.

Nuttall, A. and Doherty, J. (2014) Disaffected boys and the achievement gap: the ‘wallpaper effect’ and what is hidden by a focus on school results.  The Urban Review, 46 (5), pp.800-815.

Conference Papers and Presentations

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2018) “No child is pre-ordained to fail” Teachers questioning policy assumptions.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Newcastle, 11-13 September.

Nuttall, A. and Tobbell, C. (2017) Trainee teachers’ perspectives on practitioner enquiry.  Paper presented at the 8th TEAN Conference: Thinking Deeply about Education, Birmingham, 11-12 May.

Nuttall, A. (2017) Assessment at primary level: quality, comparability and improving secondary readiness.  A perspective from ITE.  Speech at the Westminster Education Forum Keynote Seminar: Next steps for reforming primary education: effective teaching practices, assessment and accountably, London, 18 January.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Deficit narratives and lived realities: whose poverty is it?  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the Australian Association for Research in Education, Melbourne, 27 November – 1 December.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Disenfranchised boys’ reflections on their urban schooling experience: “What a Waste!”.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Philpott, C., Beckett, L. and Wrigley, T. (2016) Collaborative practitioner inquiry: making a difference to urban schools.  Innovation session (school visits and symposium) presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Finn, B. and Beckett, L. (2015) Teachers’ constructions of poverty effects: Their research evidence.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Belfast, 15-17 September.

Nuttall, A. (2014) Teachers’ voice on disengaged boys: the role of one teacher-researcher in an English primary school. Paper presented at the Joint Australian Association for Research in Education and the New Zealand Association for Research in Education Conference, Brisbane, 30 November – 4 December.

Abigail’s research explores the role of education in students’ personal development and how this can be supported by policy, curricula, initial teacher education and teacher professional development. In particular she focuses on history education, citizenship education and peace education as vehicles for dialogue. These opportunities for students to engage with social questions are vital for building cohesive societies. This flows from the recognition that traditional forums for developing public understanding, such as post-conflict truth commissions, need to be complemented by intergenerational and educational perspectives.

Abigail has taught History, Politics, Debating as well as Relationships and Sex Education to secondary school students in South Africa, England and the USA.

She holds postgraduate degrees in Post-Conflict and Transitional Justice (University of Cape Town), in Education, Globalisation and International Development (University of Cambridge) and in African Studies (University of Oxford). She is a Rhodes Scholar, Mandela-Magdalene Scholar and Mandela-Rhodes Scholar.

Title of thesis

GCSE History, Policy Reform and Student Development: How students and teachers navigate the thematic study “Empires, Migration and the People”

Conference papers

Teaching Migration, Belonging, and Empire in Secondary Schools: evaluation of a teacher professional development program, (2019) History Educators International Research Network Conference, Lead author: Dr Jason Todd, University of Vienna, Austria.

“The Problems and Prospects of Teaching South Africa’s Recent History: Teachers’ Perspectives”, (2018) Sustainability, peace and education – Exploring promise and practice: BAICE 20th Anniversary Symposium, University of Bristol, England.

“New Generations, Old Wounds: Learning History at Home and School in Northern Ireland”, (2018) European Social Science and History Conference,
Queens University Belfast, Northern Ireland.

“The Methodological Challenges of Investigating the Role of History Teaching in Peacebuilding”, (2017), Present Past: Time, Memory, and the Negotiation of Historical Justice Conference, Columbia University, United States of America.

“Teaching South Africa’s Truth and Reconciliation Commission”, (2017) European Conference on African Studies, Universität Basel, Switzerland.

Research Assistant Publications

Review of the evidence on feedback in primary and secondary schools, (forthcoming, 2021) for the Education Endowment Foundation, Lead author: Prof Velda Elliott.

Teaching Migration, Belonging, and Empire in Secondary Schools, (2019), for Runnymede Trust and the European Research Council, Lead authors: Kimberly McIntosh, Dr Jason Todd and Prof Nandini Das.

Gender and the Politics of Reconciliation (2016), for The Institute for Justice and Reconciliation, Lead author: Dr Helen Scanlon

SOLE AUTHOR PUBLICATIONS

‘Transitions, Truth-Telling and Teaching History’, Cambridge Open-Review Educational Research e-Journal, Vol. 4, 2017.

Paul Riser is a DPhil Student in the department. His research focuses broadly on students’ (especially the marginalised) identities work in upper-secondary English Language Arts classrooms.

Prior to starting his doctoral studies, Paul earned a BSc in English Language Arts (Secondary Education) with a minor in Theology and a BA in Spanish and International Studies with a minor in Psychology from Texas Lutheran University. His MA in English Literature and Language is from St. Mary’s University.

As part of his postgraduate schoolwork, Paul undertook a placement in two graduate certificate programs, earning both his School Counselor certification and School Principal certification for all grade levels in the state of Texas, USA. In addition to English Language Arts and Reading (4th-12th grades), he is also qualified to teach Health (all levels), Journalism (7-12), Speech (7-12), Social Studies (7-12), and English as a Second Language (all levels) in Texas. Further, Paul holds a teaching certification in California, USA, the United Kingdom and Wales, the Kingdom of Denmark, and the Netherlands.

As a public school English teacher for 8 years, Paul was awarded many distinctions including, but not limited to: El maestro de impacto, two Harvard Book Awards, Teacher of the Year, and Texas Parent-Teacher Association Life Member.

His research to inform his doctoral thesis work will be completed in the United States of America. Furthermore, his research interests revolve around the nexus points of gender, ethnicity, sexuality, economic status, and religion as they relate to the agency students have in the classroom.

Paul is the 2019-2020 Student Liaison Coordinator for the Department of Education, Oxford. In this role, he is charged with leading/convening weekly workshops on a variety of research training topics, co-organizing networking and career advice opportunities for graduate students, and liaising with Cambridge University personnel to organize the annual Oxbridge Exchange. Furthermore, Paul supports the Higher Degrees Office as appropriate and meets regularly with directors and other stakeholders to discuss issues of common student concern in order to develop student identity and community throughout the Department.

Paul serves as the representative student voice on the Social Sciences Division Equality & Diversity Steering Group for the University of Oxford.

Paul is also a part-time Research Assistant working with professionals and other academics within the Department of Education on funded and individual projects as needed.

Supervisors: Associate Professors Jenni Ingram and Velda Elliott & Departmental Lecturer Jason Todd.

Thesis Title: ‘Using Positioning Theory to Understand Marginalised Students’ Identities Work and Their Learning Experiences in English Language Arts Classrooms’

Open-Access Publication:
Ingram, Jenni, & Riser, P.A. (2019). Experiences of problem solving in whole class interactions. Avances De Investigación En Educación Matemática, Avances de Investigación en Educación Matemática, Number 16; October 2019.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.35763/aiem.v0i16.279

Tessa is currently completing a part-time DPhil, alongside work as a senior leader in a London secondary school.

Her research explores how teachers on school-based ITE routes (TeachFirst and School Direct salaried) approach learning from experience. The research takes an action research approach: working with participant beginning teachers and mentors to critically examine and reflect on the processes of learning to teach, using their conversations as stimulus data.

Prior to joining the Department of Education Tessa completed an MSc in Educational Research (University of Bristol).

Yoon Young has been involved in a variety of academic and professional projects related to teacher education.

She is currently a member of the Teacher Education and Professional Learning (TEPL) research group at Oxford. Her doctoral research focuses on teacher education policy and practice in England. The study examines the relationship between individuals’ own objectives, the stated programme goals, and the national teachers’ standards in the operation of the Oxford Internship Scheme (OIS). It also explores the perceptions of stakeholders regarding ideal goals that could drive a re-conceptualised teacher education programme.

Prior to her doctorate, Yoon Young used to be a social studies teacher and subsequently worked as a consultant for the OECD’s Initial Teacher Preparation (ITP) Study. She holds a B.A. in Social Studies and Geography Education from the Ewha Womans University, and an M.A. in Educational Leadership from the University of Jyväskylä, where she was a grantee of the Korean Government Scholarship for Study Overseas.

Katy is a Deputy Headteacher and the founder of a Leadership and Coaching Institute, which she now co-directs.

Katy is an Associate Fellow at the Oxford Character Project and a Research Associate at the Oxford University Wellbeing Research Centre. She is the co-founder of Global Social Leaders, a leadership programme which has participants in 105 countries, all passionate about creating and sustaining positive change in the world.

Title of Thesis

How could school leaders improve the flourishing and wellbeing of teaching staff?

Books
  • Granville-Chapman, K. and Bidston, E (2020) Leader: Know, love and inspire your people. Carmarthen: Crownhouse Publishing
Book Chapters
  •  Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ In White, M. & McCallum, F. (Ed.s) Wellbeing and Resilience Education: Covid-19 And Its Impact on Education Systems. Routledge
Publications
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘Purpose and Leadership in Education and Beyond’. The Education Exchange. Available from: https://theeducation.exchange/purpose-and-leadership-in-education-and-beyond/
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘The Three Secrets of COVID-era Leadership’. Times Education Supplement. Available from: https://www.tes.com/news/three-secrets-covid-era-school-leadership
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2016) ‘Assessing the Impact of a Teacher Leadership Programme in a Teaching Schools Alliance. Journal of Teacher Action Research
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2014) ‘The Afghan conflict: causes and consequences.’ Geography Review 28(1): 22-27
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2013) What are the psychological factors that affect students’ academic resilience and can teachers influence these? Unpublished thesis
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘Unlocking Leadership Potential’, The Magazine of the Boarding School’s Association, 33: 42-45
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2009) ‘Learning to Lead’, Leader, The Education Leader Magazine 41: 22-25
Presentations
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2019) ‘How could leaders improve the flourishing of their teams?’ ‘Stowe Ed Conference’, Forthcoming: 7 Jan 2019
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2018) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education: 21 Jun 2018
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2017) ‘How can school leaders improve teacher flourishing?’ ‘Doing Education Differently Conference’, University of Oxford, Department of Education, 11 Mar 17
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2016) ‘Developing school leaders who enable teachers to flourish’ The Telegraph Festival of Education 23 Jun 16
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Developing leadership in pupils and teachers’ High School Affiliated to Renmin University of China, Beijing. 20 Oct 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Resilience for leaders.’ Global Social Leaders World Summit. 16 Aug 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Emotional Intelligence for Leaders.’ Global Leaders in Education. 12 Aug 15
  • Coates, S.; Fraser, H.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J.; and Nasim, A. (2015) ‘Breaking through the glass ceiling – how can schools empower our girls to become leaders?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education. 19 Jun 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. ‘Developing Leadership in Schools’ (2015). G20 Schools Conference. International conference for head teachers. 11 Apr 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2018) ‘Introduction’, Wellington Leadership Institute: Festival of Leadership. Mar 2012-15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘How the Young Learn to Lead’, Raffles Institution (Singapore) -Purdue University (USA) Education Forum on Gifted & Talented Youth 2012. Singapore. 15 Mar 12
  • Draper, D.; Dyer, R.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Schools’. Presentation for a meeting about pupil leadership and character development at 10 Downing Street. 16 Nov 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Young People’. Presentation for a meeting about leadership and character at 10 Downing Street. 7 Mar 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K. & Seldon, A. (2012) ‘Introduction’, Leading Your School in the 21st Century. 7 Feb 12

Kamal Armanious is particularly interested in the topic of education governance to explore what is possible in developing an improved governance system for technical and vocational education and training (TVET).

There have always been various calls from different international organisations such UNESCO, ILO, World Bank, OECD etc. to develop a transformed and transformative approach to TVET. This is attractive for certain theoretical as well as practical reasons; however, one set of limitations in achieving this vision lies in the arena of governance. Mr Armanious examines an imagined better model of governance that can be developed from the principles of a new approach and wider theoretical resources with consideration to national realities where there may be very serious obstacles in the way of realising this new governance approach and hence the overall planned transformation.

Title of Thesis

Education and Training Policies in Egypt: Good Governance and Stakeholders Participation

 

Amanda is completing a part-time DPhil, alongside working in Initial Teacher Education at Leeds Trinity University.

Her research is focused on understanding tensions, contradictions and conflicts that teachers in disadvantaged schools may experience when they engage in research activity.  Her research focus is influenced by her own experiences of working as a research-active teacher in disadvantaged schools, and recent work in teacher education to support experienced and beginning teachers in developing their own research activities.

One of the aims of Amanda’s research is to construct a framework to support teachers in pursuing research activity and critical scholarship work which articulates with wider social movements to address issues of poverty and disadvantage in schools.

Title of Thesis

Teachers’ perspectives on tensions between policy, practice and research in disadvantaged schools

Publications 

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2017) A ‘usable past’ of teacher education in England: history in JET’s anniversary issue. Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy, 43 (5), pp.616-627.

Nuttall, A. (2016) The ‘curriculum challenge’: Moving towards the ‘Storyline’ approach in a case study urban primary school.  Improving Schools, 19 (2), pp. 154-166.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Learning {Re}imagined: A review.  Primary First, 15, pp. 17-18.

Nuttall, A. and Doherty, J. (2014) Disaffected boys and the achievement gap: the ‘wallpaper effect’ and what is hidden by a focus on school results.  The Urban Review, 46 (5), pp.800-815.

Conference Papers and Presentations

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2018) “No child is pre-ordained to fail” Teachers questioning policy assumptions.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Newcastle, 11-13 September.

Nuttall, A. and Tobbell, C. (2017) Trainee teachers’ perspectives on practitioner enquiry.  Paper presented at the 8th TEAN Conference: Thinking Deeply about Education, Birmingham, 11-12 May.

Nuttall, A. (2017) Assessment at primary level: quality, comparability and improving secondary readiness.  A perspective from ITE.  Speech at the Westminster Education Forum Keynote Seminar: Next steps for reforming primary education: effective teaching practices, assessment and accountably, London, 18 January.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Deficit narratives and lived realities: whose poverty is it?  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the Australian Association for Research in Education, Melbourne, 27 November – 1 December.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Disenfranchised boys’ reflections on their urban schooling experience: “What a Waste!”.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Philpott, C., Beckett, L. and Wrigley, T. (2016) Collaborative practitioner inquiry: making a difference to urban schools.  Innovation session (school visits and symposium) presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Finn, B. and Beckett, L. (2015) Teachers’ constructions of poverty effects: Their research evidence.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Belfast, 15-17 September.

Nuttall, A. (2014) Teachers’ voice on disengaged boys: the role of one teacher-researcher in an English primary school. Paper presented at the Joint Australian Association for Research in Education and the New Zealand Association for Research in Education Conference, Brisbane, 30 November – 4 December.

Abigail’s research explores the role of education in students’ personal development and how this can be supported by policy, curricula, initial teacher education and teacher professional development. In particular she focuses on history education, citizenship education and peace education as vehicles for dialogue. These opportunities for students to engage with social questions are vital for building cohesive societies. This flows from the recognition that traditional forums for developing public understanding, such as post-conflict truth commissions, need to be complemented by intergenerational and educational perspectives.

Abigail has taught History, Politics, Debating as well as Relationships and Sex Education to secondary school students in South Africa, England and the USA.

She holds postgraduate degrees in Post-Conflict and Transitional Justice (University of Cape Town), in Education, Globalisation and International Development (University of Cambridge) and in African Studies (University of Oxford). She is a Rhodes Scholar, Mandela-Magdalene Scholar and Mandela-Rhodes Scholar.

Title of thesis

GCSE History, Policy Reform and Student Development: How students and teachers navigate the thematic study “Empires, Migration and the People”

Conference papers

Teaching Migration, Belonging, and Empire in Secondary Schools: evaluation of a teacher professional development program, (2019) History Educators International Research Network Conference, Lead author: Dr Jason Todd, University of Vienna, Austria.

“The Problems and Prospects of Teaching South Africa’s Recent History: Teachers’ Perspectives”, (2018) Sustainability, peace and education – Exploring promise and practice: BAICE 20th Anniversary Symposium, University of Bristol, England.

“New Generations, Old Wounds: Learning History at Home and School in Northern Ireland”, (2018) European Social Science and History Conference,
Queens University Belfast, Northern Ireland.

“The Methodological Challenges of Investigating the Role of History Teaching in Peacebuilding”, (2017), Present Past: Time, Memory, and the Negotiation of Historical Justice Conference, Columbia University, United States of America.

“Teaching South Africa’s Truth and Reconciliation Commission”, (2017) European Conference on African Studies, Universität Basel, Switzerland.

Research Assistant Publications

Review of the evidence on feedback in primary and secondary schools, (forthcoming, 2021) for the Education Endowment Foundation, Lead author: Prof Velda Elliott.

Teaching Migration, Belonging, and Empire in Secondary Schools, (2019), for Runnymede Trust and the European Research Council, Lead authors: Kimberly McIntosh, Dr Jason Todd and Prof Nandini Das.

Gender and the Politics of Reconciliation (2016), for The Institute for Justice and Reconciliation, Lead author: Dr Helen Scanlon

SOLE AUTHOR PUBLICATIONS

‘Transitions, Truth-Telling and Teaching History’, Cambridge Open-Review Educational Research e-Journal, Vol. 4, 2017.

Paul Riser is a DPhil Student in the department. His research focuses broadly on students’ (especially the marginalised) identities work in upper-secondary English Language Arts classrooms.

Prior to starting his doctoral studies, Paul earned a BSc in English Language Arts (Secondary Education) with a minor in Theology and a BA in Spanish and International Studies with a minor in Psychology from Texas Lutheran University. His MA in English Literature and Language is from St. Mary’s University.

As part of his postgraduate schoolwork, Paul undertook a placement in two graduate certificate programs, earning both his School Counselor certification and School Principal certification for all grade levels in the state of Texas, USA. In addition to English Language Arts and Reading (4th-12th grades), he is also qualified to teach Health (all levels), Journalism (7-12), Speech (7-12), Social Studies (7-12), and English as a Second Language (all levels) in Texas. Further, Paul holds a teaching certification in California, USA, the United Kingdom and Wales, the Kingdom of Denmark, and the Netherlands.

As a public school English teacher for 8 years, Paul was awarded many distinctions including, but not limited to: El maestro de impacto, two Harvard Book Awards, Teacher of the Year, and Texas Parent-Teacher Association Life Member.

His research to inform his doctoral thesis work will be completed in the United States of America. Furthermore, his research interests revolve around the nexus points of gender, ethnicity, sexuality, economic status, and religion as they relate to the agency students have in the classroom.

Paul is the 2019-2020 Student Liaison Coordinator for the Department of Education, Oxford. In this role, he is charged with leading/convening weekly workshops on a variety of research training topics, co-organizing networking and career advice opportunities for graduate students, and liaising with Cambridge University personnel to organize the annual Oxbridge Exchange. Furthermore, Paul supports the Higher Degrees Office as appropriate and meets regularly with directors and other stakeholders to discuss issues of common student concern in order to develop student identity and community throughout the Department.

Paul serves as the representative student voice on the Social Sciences Division Equality & Diversity Steering Group for the University of Oxford.

Paul is also a part-time Research Assistant working with professionals and other academics within the Department of Education on funded and individual projects as needed.

Supervisors: Associate Professors Jenni Ingram and Velda Elliott & Departmental Lecturer Jason Todd.

Thesis Title: ‘Using Positioning Theory to Understand Marginalised Students’ Identities Work and Their Learning Experiences in English Language Arts Classrooms’

Open-Access Publication:
Ingram, Jenni, & Riser, P.A. (2019). Experiences of problem solving in whole class interactions. Avances De Investigación En Educación Matemática, Avances de Investigación en Educación Matemática, Number 16; October 2019.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.35763/aiem.v0i16.279

Tessa is currently completing a part-time DPhil, alongside work as a senior leader in a London secondary school.

Her research explores how teachers on school-based ITE routes (TeachFirst and School Direct salaried) approach learning from experience. The research takes an action research approach: working with participant beginning teachers and mentors to critically examine and reflect on the processes of learning to teach, using their conversations as stimulus data.

Prior to joining the Department of Education Tessa completed an MSc in Educational Research (University of Bristol).

Yoon Young has been involved in a variety of academic and professional projects related to teacher education.

She is currently a member of the Teacher Education and Professional Learning (TEPL) research group at Oxford. Her doctoral research focuses on teacher education policy and practice in England. The study examines the relationship between individuals’ own objectives, the stated programme goals, and the national teachers’ standards in the operation of the Oxford Internship Scheme (OIS). It also explores the perceptions of stakeholders regarding ideal goals that could drive a re-conceptualised teacher education programme.

Prior to her doctorate, Yoon Young used to be a social studies teacher and subsequently worked as a consultant for the OECD’s Initial Teacher Preparation (ITP) Study. She holds a B.A. in Social Studies and Geography Education from the Ewha Womans University, and an M.A. in Educational Leadership from the University of Jyväskylä, where she was a grantee of the Korean Government Scholarship for Study Overseas.

Katy is a Deputy Headteacher and the founder of a Leadership and Coaching Institute, which she now co-directs.

Katy is an Associate Fellow at the Oxford Character Project and a Research Associate at the Oxford University Wellbeing Research Centre. She is the co-founder of Global Social Leaders, a leadership programme which has participants in 105 countries, all passionate about creating and sustaining positive change in the world.

Title of Thesis

How could school leaders improve the flourishing and wellbeing of teaching staff?

Books
  • Granville-Chapman, K. and Bidston, E (2020) Leader: Know, love and inspire your people. Carmarthen: Crownhouse Publishing
Book Chapters
  •  Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ In White, M. & McCallum, F. (Ed.s) Wellbeing and Resilience Education: Covid-19 And Its Impact on Education Systems. Routledge
Publications
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘Purpose and Leadership in Education and Beyond’. The Education Exchange. Available from: https://theeducation.exchange/purpose-and-leadership-in-education-and-beyond/
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘The Three Secrets of COVID-era Leadership’. Times Education Supplement. Available from: https://www.tes.com/news/three-secrets-covid-era-school-leadership
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2016) ‘Assessing the Impact of a Teacher Leadership Programme in a Teaching Schools Alliance. Journal of Teacher Action Research
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2014) ‘The Afghan conflict: causes and consequences.’ Geography Review 28(1): 22-27
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2013) What are the psychological factors that affect students’ academic resilience and can teachers influence these? Unpublished thesis
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘Unlocking Leadership Potential’, The Magazine of the Boarding School’s Association, 33: 42-45
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2009) ‘Learning to Lead’, Leader, The Education Leader Magazine 41: 22-25
Presentations
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2019) ‘How could leaders improve the flourishing of their teams?’ ‘Stowe Ed Conference’, Forthcoming: 7 Jan 2019
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2018) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education: 21 Jun 2018
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2017) ‘How can school leaders improve teacher flourishing?’ ‘Doing Education Differently Conference’, University of Oxford, Department of Education, 11 Mar 17
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2016) ‘Developing school leaders who enable teachers to flourish’ The Telegraph Festival of Education 23 Jun 16
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Developing leadership in pupils and teachers’ High School Affiliated to Renmin University of China, Beijing. 20 Oct 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Resilience for leaders.’ Global Social Leaders World Summit. 16 Aug 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Emotional Intelligence for Leaders.’ Global Leaders in Education. 12 Aug 15
  • Coates, S.; Fraser, H.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J.; and Nasim, A. (2015) ‘Breaking through the glass ceiling – how can schools empower our girls to become leaders?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education. 19 Jun 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. ‘Developing Leadership in Schools’ (2015). G20 Schools Conference. International conference for head teachers. 11 Apr 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2018) ‘Introduction’, Wellington Leadership Institute: Festival of Leadership. Mar 2012-15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘How the Young Learn to Lead’, Raffles Institution (Singapore) -Purdue University (USA) Education Forum on Gifted & Talented Youth 2012. Singapore. 15 Mar 12
  • Draper, D.; Dyer, R.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Schools’. Presentation for a meeting about pupil leadership and character development at 10 Downing Street. 16 Nov 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Young People’. Presentation for a meeting about leadership and character at 10 Downing Street. 7 Mar 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K. & Seldon, A. (2012) ‘Introduction’, Leading Your School in the 21st Century. 7 Feb 12

Kamal Armanious is particularly interested in the topic of education governance to explore what is possible in developing an improved governance system for technical and vocational education and training (TVET).

There have always been various calls from different international organisations such UNESCO, ILO, World Bank, OECD etc. to develop a transformed and transformative approach to TVET. This is attractive for certain theoretical as well as practical reasons; however, one set of limitations in achieving this vision lies in the arena of governance. Mr Armanious examines an imagined better model of governance that can be developed from the principles of a new approach and wider theoretical resources with consideration to national realities where there may be very serious obstacles in the way of realising this new governance approach and hence the overall planned transformation.

Title of Thesis

Education and Training Policies in Egypt: Good Governance and Stakeholders Participation

 

Amanda is completing a part-time DPhil, alongside working in Initial Teacher Education at Leeds Trinity University.

Her research is focused on understanding tensions, contradictions and conflicts that teachers in disadvantaged schools may experience when they engage in research activity.  Her research focus is influenced by her own experiences of working as a research-active teacher in disadvantaged schools, and recent work in teacher education to support experienced and beginning teachers in developing their own research activities.

One of the aims of Amanda’s research is to construct a framework to support teachers in pursuing research activity and critical scholarship work which articulates with wider social movements to address issues of poverty and disadvantage in schools.

Title of Thesis

Teachers’ perspectives on tensions between policy, practice and research in disadvantaged schools

Publications 

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2017) A ‘usable past’ of teacher education in England: history in JET’s anniversary issue. Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy, 43 (5), pp.616-627.

Nuttall, A. (2016) The ‘curriculum challenge’: Moving towards the ‘Storyline’ approach in a case study urban primary school.  Improving Schools, 19 (2), pp. 154-166.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Learning {Re}imagined: A review.  Primary First, 15, pp. 17-18.

Nuttall, A. and Doherty, J. (2014) Disaffected boys and the achievement gap: the ‘wallpaper effect’ and what is hidden by a focus on school results.  The Urban Review, 46 (5), pp.800-815.

Conference Papers and Presentations

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2018) “No child is pre-ordained to fail” Teachers questioning policy assumptions.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Newcastle, 11-13 September.

Nuttall, A. and Tobbell, C. (2017) Trainee teachers’ perspectives on practitioner enquiry.  Paper presented at the 8th TEAN Conference: Thinking Deeply about Education, Birmingham, 11-12 May.

Nuttall, A. (2017) Assessment at primary level: quality, comparability and improving secondary readiness.  A perspective from ITE.  Speech at the Westminster Education Forum Keynote Seminar: Next steps for reforming primary education: effective teaching practices, assessment and accountably, London, 18 January.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Deficit narratives and lived realities: whose poverty is it?  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the Australian Association for Research in Education, Melbourne, 27 November – 1 December.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Disenfranchised boys’ reflections on their urban schooling experience: “What a Waste!”.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Philpott, C., Beckett, L. and Wrigley, T. (2016) Collaborative practitioner inquiry: making a difference to urban schools.  Innovation session (school visits and symposium) presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Finn, B. and Beckett, L. (2015) Teachers’ constructions of poverty effects: Their research evidence.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Belfast, 15-17 September.

Nuttall, A. (2014) Teachers’ voice on disengaged boys: the role of one teacher-researcher in an English primary school. Paper presented at the Joint Australian Association for Research in Education and the New Zealand Association for Research in Education Conference, Brisbane, 30 November – 4 December.

Abigail’s research explores the role of education in students’ personal development and how this can be supported by policy, curricula, initial teacher education and teacher professional development. In particular she focuses on history education, citizenship education and peace education as vehicles for dialogue. These opportunities for students to engage with social questions are vital for building cohesive societies. This flows from the recognition that traditional forums for developing public understanding, such as post-conflict truth commissions, need to be complemented by intergenerational and educational perspectives.

Abigail has taught History, Politics, Debating as well as Relationships and Sex Education to secondary school students in South Africa, England and the USA.

She holds postgraduate degrees in Post-Conflict and Transitional Justice (University of Cape Town), in Education, Globalisation and International Development (University of Cambridge) and in African Studies (University of Oxford). She is a Rhodes Scholar, Mandela-Magdalene Scholar and Mandela-Rhodes Scholar.

Title of thesis

GCSE History, Policy Reform and Student Development: How students and teachers navigate the thematic study “Empires, Migration and the People”

Conference papers

Teaching Migration, Belonging, and Empire in Secondary Schools: evaluation of a teacher professional development program, (2019) History Educators International Research Network Conference, Lead author: Dr Jason Todd, University of Vienna, Austria.

“The Problems and Prospects of Teaching South Africa’s Recent History: Teachers’ Perspectives”, (2018) Sustainability, peace and education – Exploring promise and practice: BAICE 20th Anniversary Symposium, University of Bristol, England.

“New Generations, Old Wounds: Learning History at Home and School in Northern Ireland”, (2018) European Social Science and History Conference,
Queens University Belfast, Northern Ireland.

“The Methodological Challenges of Investigating the Role of History Teaching in Peacebuilding”, (2017), Present Past: Time, Memory, and the Negotiation of Historical Justice Conference, Columbia University, United States of America.

“Teaching South Africa’s Truth and Reconciliation Commission”, (2017) European Conference on African Studies, Universität Basel, Switzerland.

Research Assistant Publications

Review of the evidence on feedback in primary and secondary schools, (forthcoming, 2021) for the Education Endowment Foundation, Lead author: Prof Velda Elliott.

Teaching Migration, Belonging, and Empire in Secondary Schools, (2019), for Runnymede Trust and the European Research Council, Lead authors: Kimberly McIntosh, Dr Jason Todd and Prof Nandini Das.

Gender and the Politics of Reconciliation (2016), for The Institute for Justice and Reconciliation, Lead author: Dr Helen Scanlon

SOLE AUTHOR PUBLICATIONS

‘Transitions, Truth-Telling and Teaching History’, Cambridge Open-Review Educational Research e-Journal, Vol. 4, 2017.

Paul Riser is a DPhil Student in the department. His research focuses broadly on students’ (especially the marginalised) identities work in upper-secondary English Language Arts classrooms.

Prior to starting his doctoral studies, Paul earned a BSc in English Language Arts (Secondary Education) with a minor in Theology and a BA in Spanish and International Studies with a minor in Psychology from Texas Lutheran University. His MA in English Literature and Language is from St. Mary’s University.

As part of his postgraduate schoolwork, Paul undertook a placement in two graduate certificate programs, earning both his School Counselor certification and School Principal certification for all grade levels in the state of Texas, USA. In addition to English Language Arts and Reading (4th-12th grades), he is also qualified to teach Health (all levels), Journalism (7-12), Speech (7-12), Social Studies (7-12), and English as a Second Language (all levels) in Texas. Further, Paul holds a teaching certification in California, USA, the United Kingdom and Wales, the Kingdom of Denmark, and the Netherlands.

As a public school English teacher for 8 years, Paul was awarded many distinctions including, but not limited to: El maestro de impacto, two Harvard Book Awards, Teacher of the Year, and Texas Parent-Teacher Association Life Member.

His research to inform his doctoral thesis work will be completed in the United States of America. Furthermore, his research interests revolve around the nexus points of gender, ethnicity, sexuality, economic status, and religion as they relate to the agency students have in the classroom.

Paul is the 2019-2020 Student Liaison Coordinator for the Department of Education, Oxford. In this role, he is charged with leading/convening weekly workshops on a variety of research training topics, co-organizing networking and career advice opportunities for graduate students, and liaising with Cambridge University personnel to organize the annual Oxbridge Exchange. Furthermore, Paul supports the Higher Degrees Office as appropriate and meets regularly with directors and other stakeholders to discuss issues of common student concern in order to develop student identity and community throughout the Department.

Paul serves as the representative student voice on the Social Sciences Division Equality & Diversity Steering Group for the University of Oxford.

Paul is also a part-time Research Assistant working with professionals and other academics within the Department of Education on funded and individual projects as needed.

Supervisors: Associate Professors Jenni Ingram and Velda Elliott & Departmental Lecturer Jason Todd.

Thesis Title: ‘Using Positioning Theory to Understand Marginalised Students’ Identities Work and Their Learning Experiences in English Language Arts Classrooms’

Open-Access Publication:
Ingram, Jenni, & Riser, P.A. (2019). Experiences of problem solving in whole class interactions. Avances De Investigación En Educación Matemática, Avances de Investigación en Educación Matemática, Number 16; October 2019.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.35763/aiem.v0i16.279

Tessa is currently completing a part-time DPhil, alongside work as a senior leader in a London secondary school.

Her research explores how teachers on school-based ITE routes (TeachFirst and School Direct salaried) approach learning from experience. The research takes an action research approach: working with participant beginning teachers and mentors to critically examine and reflect on the processes of learning to teach, using their conversations as stimulus data.

Prior to joining the Department of Education Tessa completed an MSc in Educational Research (University of Bristol).

Yoon Young has been involved in a variety of academic and professional projects related to teacher education.

She is currently a member of the Teacher Education and Professional Learning (TEPL) research group at Oxford. Her doctoral research focuses on teacher education policy and practice in England. The study examines the relationship between individuals’ own objectives, the stated programme goals, and the national teachers’ standards in the operation of the Oxford Internship Scheme (OIS). It also explores the perceptions of stakeholders regarding ideal goals that could drive a re-conceptualised teacher education programme.

Prior to her doctorate, Yoon Young used to be a social studies teacher and subsequently worked as a consultant for the OECD’s Initial Teacher Preparation (ITP) Study. She holds a B.A. in Social Studies and Geography Education from the Ewha Womans University, and an M.A. in Educational Leadership from the University of Jyväskylä, where she was a grantee of the Korean Government Scholarship for Study Overseas.

Katy is a Deputy Headteacher and the founder of a Leadership and Coaching Institute, which she now co-directs.

Katy is an Associate Fellow at the Oxford Character Project and a Research Associate at the Oxford University Wellbeing Research Centre. She is the co-founder of Global Social Leaders, a leadership programme which has participants in 105 countries, all passionate about creating and sustaining positive change in the world.

Title of Thesis

How could school leaders improve the flourishing and wellbeing of teaching staff?

Books
  • Granville-Chapman, K. and Bidston, E (2020) Leader: Know, love and inspire your people. Carmarthen: Crownhouse Publishing
Book Chapters
  •  Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ In White, M. & McCallum, F. (Ed.s) Wellbeing and Resilience Education: Covid-19 And Its Impact on Education Systems. Routledge
Publications
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘Purpose and Leadership in Education and Beyond’. The Education Exchange. Available from: https://theeducation.exchange/purpose-and-leadership-in-education-and-beyond/
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘The Three Secrets of COVID-era Leadership’. Times Education Supplement. Available from: https://www.tes.com/news/three-secrets-covid-era-school-leadership
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2016) ‘Assessing the Impact of a Teacher Leadership Programme in a Teaching Schools Alliance. Journal of Teacher Action Research
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2014) ‘The Afghan conflict: causes and consequences.’ Geography Review 28(1): 22-27
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2013) What are the psychological factors that affect students’ academic resilience and can teachers influence these? Unpublished thesis
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘Unlocking Leadership Potential’, The Magazine of the Boarding School’s Association, 33: 42-45
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2009) ‘Learning to Lead’, Leader, The Education Leader Magazine 41: 22-25
Presentations
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2019) ‘How could leaders improve the flourishing of their teams?’ ‘Stowe Ed Conference’, Forthcoming: 7 Jan 2019
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2018) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education: 21 Jun 2018
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2017) ‘How can school leaders improve teacher flourishing?’ ‘Doing Education Differently Conference’, University of Oxford, Department of Education, 11 Mar 17
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2016) ‘Developing school leaders who enable teachers to flourish’ The Telegraph Festival of Education 23 Jun 16
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Developing leadership in pupils and teachers’ High School Affiliated to Renmin University of China, Beijing. 20 Oct 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Resilience for leaders.’ Global Social Leaders World Summit. 16 Aug 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Emotional Intelligence for Leaders.’ Global Leaders in Education. 12 Aug 15
  • Coates, S.; Fraser, H.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J.; and Nasim, A. (2015) ‘Breaking through the glass ceiling – how can schools empower our girls to become leaders?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education. 19 Jun 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. ‘Developing Leadership in Schools’ (2015). G20 Schools Conference. International conference for head teachers. 11 Apr 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2018) ‘Introduction’, Wellington Leadership Institute: Festival of Leadership. Mar 2012-15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘How the Young Learn to Lead’, Raffles Institution (Singapore) -Purdue University (USA) Education Forum on Gifted & Talented Youth 2012. Singapore. 15 Mar 12
  • Draper, D.; Dyer, R.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Schools’. Presentation for a meeting about pupil leadership and character development at 10 Downing Street. 16 Nov 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Young People’. Presentation for a meeting about leadership and character at 10 Downing Street. 7 Mar 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K. & Seldon, A. (2012) ‘Introduction’, Leading Your School in the 21st Century. 7 Feb 12

Kamal Armanious is particularly interested in the topic of education governance to explore what is possible in developing an improved governance system for technical and vocational education and training (TVET).

There have always been various calls from different international organisations such UNESCO, ILO, World Bank, OECD etc. to develop a transformed and transformative approach to TVET. This is attractive for certain theoretical as well as practical reasons; however, one set of limitations in achieving this vision lies in the arena of governance. Mr Armanious examines an imagined better model of governance that can be developed from the principles of a new approach and wider theoretical resources with consideration to national realities where there may be very serious obstacles in the way of realising this new governance approach and hence the overall planned transformation.

Title of Thesis

Education and Training Policies in Egypt: Good Governance and Stakeholders Participation

 

Amanda is completing a part-time DPhil, alongside working in Initial Teacher Education at Leeds Trinity University.

Her research is focused on understanding tensions, contradictions and conflicts that teachers in disadvantaged schools may experience when they engage in research activity.  Her research focus is influenced by her own experiences of working as a research-active teacher in disadvantaged schools, and recent work in teacher education to support experienced and beginning teachers in developing their own research activities.

One of the aims of Amanda’s research is to construct a framework to support teachers in pursuing research activity and critical scholarship work which articulates with wider social movements to address issues of poverty and disadvantage in schools.

Title of Thesis

Teachers’ perspectives on tensions between policy, practice and research in disadvantaged schools

Publications 

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2017) A ‘usable past’ of teacher education in England: history in JET’s anniversary issue. Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy, 43 (5), pp.616-627.

Nuttall, A. (2016) The ‘curriculum challenge’: Moving towards the ‘Storyline’ approach in a case study urban primary school.  Improving Schools, 19 (2), pp. 154-166.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Learning {Re}imagined: A review.  Primary First, 15, pp. 17-18.

Nuttall, A. and Doherty, J. (2014) Disaffected boys and the achievement gap: the ‘wallpaper effect’ and what is hidden by a focus on school results.  The Urban Review, 46 (5), pp.800-815.

Conference Papers and Presentations

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2018) “No child is pre-ordained to fail” Teachers questioning policy assumptions.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Newcastle, 11-13 September.

Nuttall, A. and Tobbell, C. (2017) Trainee teachers’ perspectives on practitioner enquiry.  Paper presented at the 8th TEAN Conference: Thinking Deeply about Education, Birmingham, 11-12 May.

Nuttall, A. (2017) Assessment at primary level: quality, comparability and improving secondary readiness.  A perspective from ITE.  Speech at the Westminster Education Forum Keynote Seminar: Next steps for reforming primary education: effective teaching practices, assessment and accountably, London, 18 January.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Deficit narratives and lived realities: whose poverty is it?  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the Australian Association for Research in Education, Melbourne, 27 November – 1 December.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Disenfranchised boys’ reflections on their urban schooling experience: “What a Waste!”.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Philpott, C., Beckett, L. and Wrigley, T. (2016) Collaborative practitioner inquiry: making a difference to urban schools.  Innovation session (school visits and symposium) presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Finn, B. and Beckett, L. (2015) Teachers’ constructions of poverty effects: Their research evidence.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Belfast, 15-17 September.

Nuttall, A. (2014) Teachers’ voice on disengaged boys: the role of one teacher-researcher in an English primary school. Paper presented at the Joint Australian Association for Research in Education and the New Zealand Association for Research in Education Conference, Brisbane, 30 November – 4 December.

Abigail’s research explores the role of education in students’ personal development and how this can be supported by policy, curricula, initial teacher education and teacher professional development. In particular she focuses on history education, citizenship education and peace education as vehicles for dialogue. These opportunities for students to engage with social questions are vital for building cohesive societies. This flows from the recognition that traditional forums for developing public understanding, such as post-conflict truth commissions, need to be complemented by intergenerational and educational perspectives.

Abigail has taught History, Politics, Debating as well as Relationships and Sex Education to secondary school students in South Africa, England and the USA.

She holds postgraduate degrees in Post-Conflict and Transitional Justice (University of Cape Town), in Education, Globalisation and International Development (University of Cambridge) and in African Studies (University of Oxford). She is a Rhodes Scholar, Mandela-Magdalene Scholar and Mandela-Rhodes Scholar.

Title of thesis

GCSE History, Policy Reform and Student Development: How students and teachers navigate the thematic study “Empires, Migration and the People”

Conference papers

Teaching Migration, Belonging, and Empire in Secondary Schools: evaluation of a teacher professional development program, (2019) History Educators International Research Network Conference, Lead author: Dr Jason Todd, University of Vienna, Austria.

“The Problems and Prospects of Teaching South Africa’s Recent History: Teachers’ Perspectives”, (2018) Sustainability, peace and education – Exploring promise and practice: BAICE 20th Anniversary Symposium, University of Bristol, England.

“New Generations, Old Wounds: Learning History at Home and School in Northern Ireland”, (2018) European Social Science and History Conference,
Queens University Belfast, Northern Ireland.

“The Methodological Challenges of Investigating the Role of History Teaching in Peacebuilding”, (2017), Present Past: Time, Memory, and the Negotiation of Historical Justice Conference, Columbia University, United States of America.

“Teaching South Africa’s Truth and Reconciliation Commission”, (2017) European Conference on African Studies, Universität Basel, Switzerland.

Research Assistant Publications

Review of the evidence on feedback in primary and secondary schools, (forthcoming, 2021) for the Education Endowment Foundation, Lead author: Prof Velda Elliott.

Teaching Migration, Belonging, and Empire in Secondary Schools, (2019), for Runnymede Trust and the European Research Council, Lead authors: Kimberly McIntosh, Dr Jason Todd and Prof Nandini Das.

Gender and the Politics of Reconciliation (2016), for The Institute for Justice and Reconciliation, Lead author: Dr Helen Scanlon

SOLE AUTHOR PUBLICATIONS

‘Transitions, Truth-Telling and Teaching History’, Cambridge Open-Review Educational Research e-Journal, Vol. 4, 2017.

Paul Riser is a DPhil Student in the department. His research focuses broadly on students’ (especially the marginalised) identities work in upper-secondary English Language Arts classrooms.

Prior to starting his doctoral studies, Paul earned a BSc in English Language Arts (Secondary Education) with a minor in Theology and a BA in Spanish and International Studies with a minor in Psychology from Texas Lutheran University. His MA in English Literature and Language is from St. Mary’s University.

As part of his postgraduate schoolwork, Paul undertook a placement in two graduate certificate programs, earning both his School Counselor certification and School Principal certification for all grade levels in the state of Texas, USA. In addition to English Language Arts and Reading (4th-12th grades), he is also qualified to teach Health (all levels), Journalism (7-12), Speech (7-12), Social Studies (7-12), and English as a Second Language (all levels) in Texas. Further, Paul holds a teaching certification in California, USA, the United Kingdom and Wales, the Kingdom of Denmark, and the Netherlands.

As a public school English teacher for 8 years, Paul was awarded many distinctions including, but not limited to: El maestro de impacto, two Harvard Book Awards, Teacher of the Year, and Texas Parent-Teacher Association Life Member.

His research to inform his doctoral thesis work will be completed in the United States of America. Furthermore, his research interests revolve around the nexus points of gender, ethnicity, sexuality, economic status, and religion as they relate to the agency students have in the classroom.

Paul is the 2019-2020 Student Liaison Coordinator for the Department of Education, Oxford. In this role, he is charged with leading/convening weekly workshops on a variety of research training topics, co-organizing networking and career advice opportunities for graduate students, and liaising with Cambridge University personnel to organize the annual Oxbridge Exchange. Furthermore, Paul supports the Higher Degrees Office as appropriate and meets regularly with directors and other stakeholders to discuss issues of common student concern in order to develop student identity and community throughout the Department.

Paul serves as the representative student voice on the Social Sciences Division Equality & Diversity Steering Group for the University of Oxford.

Paul is also a part-time Research Assistant working with professionals and other academics within the Department of Education on funded and individual projects as needed.

Supervisors: Associate Professors Jenni Ingram and Velda Elliott & Departmental Lecturer Jason Todd.

Thesis Title: ‘Using Positioning Theory to Understand Marginalised Students’ Identities Work and Their Learning Experiences in English Language Arts Classrooms’

Open-Access Publication:
Ingram, Jenni, & Riser, P.A. (2019). Experiences of problem solving in whole class interactions. Avances De Investigación En Educación Matemática, Avances de Investigación en Educación Matemática, Number 16; October 2019.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.35763/aiem.v0i16.279

Tessa is currently completing a part-time DPhil, alongside work as a senior leader in a London secondary school.

Her research explores how teachers on school-based ITE routes (TeachFirst and School Direct salaried) approach learning from experience. The research takes an action research approach: working with participant beginning teachers and mentors to critically examine and reflect on the processes of learning to teach, using their conversations as stimulus data.

Prior to joining the Department of Education Tessa completed an MSc in Educational Research (University of Bristol).

Yoon Young has been involved in a variety of academic and professional projects related to teacher education.

She is currently a member of the Teacher Education and Professional Learning (TEPL) research group at Oxford. Her doctoral research focuses on teacher education policy and practice in England. The study examines the relationship between individuals’ own objectives, the stated programme goals, and the national teachers’ standards in the operation of the Oxford Internship Scheme (OIS). It also explores the perceptions of stakeholders regarding ideal goals that could drive a re-conceptualised teacher education programme.

Prior to her doctorate, Yoon Young used to be a social studies teacher and subsequently worked as a consultant for the OECD’s Initial Teacher Preparation (ITP) Study. She holds a B.A. in Social Studies and Geography Education from the Ewha Womans University, and an M.A. in Educational Leadership from the University of Jyväskylä, where she was a grantee of the Korean Government Scholarship for Study Overseas.

Katy is a Deputy Headteacher and the founder of a Leadership and Coaching Institute, which she now co-directs.

Katy is an Associate Fellow at the Oxford Character Project and a Research Associate at the Oxford University Wellbeing Research Centre. She is the co-founder of Global Social Leaders, a leadership programme which has participants in 105 countries, all passionate about creating and sustaining positive change in the world.

Title of Thesis

How could school leaders improve the flourishing and wellbeing of teaching staff?

Books
  • Granville-Chapman, K. and Bidston, E (2020) Leader: Know, love and inspire your people. Carmarthen: Crownhouse Publishing
Book Chapters
  •  Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ In White, M. & McCallum, F. (Ed.s) Wellbeing and Resilience Education: Covid-19 And Its Impact on Education Systems. Routledge
Publications
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘Purpose and Leadership in Education and Beyond’. The Education Exchange. Available from: https://theeducation.exchange/purpose-and-leadership-in-education-and-beyond/
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘The Three Secrets of COVID-era Leadership’. Times Education Supplement. Available from: https://www.tes.com/news/three-secrets-covid-era-school-leadership
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2016) ‘Assessing the Impact of a Teacher Leadership Programme in a Teaching Schools Alliance. Journal of Teacher Action Research
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2014) ‘The Afghan conflict: causes and consequences.’ Geography Review 28(1): 22-27
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2013) What are the psychological factors that affect students’ academic resilience and can teachers influence these? Unpublished thesis
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘Unlocking Leadership Potential’, The Magazine of the Boarding School’s Association, 33: 42-45
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2009) ‘Learning to Lead’, Leader, The Education Leader Magazine 41: 22-25
Presentations
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2019) ‘How could leaders improve the flourishing of their teams?’ ‘Stowe Ed Conference’, Forthcoming: 7 Jan 2019
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2018) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education: 21 Jun 2018
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2017) ‘How can school leaders improve teacher flourishing?’ ‘Doing Education Differently Conference’, University of Oxford, Department of Education, 11 Mar 17
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2016) ‘Developing school leaders who enable teachers to flourish’ The Telegraph Festival of Education 23 Jun 16
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Developing leadership in pupils and teachers’ High School Affiliated to Renmin University of China, Beijing. 20 Oct 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Resilience for leaders.’ Global Social Leaders World Summit. 16 Aug 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Emotional Intelligence for Leaders.’ Global Leaders in Education. 12 Aug 15
  • Coates, S.; Fraser, H.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J.; and Nasim, A. (2015) ‘Breaking through the glass ceiling – how can schools empower our girls to become leaders?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education. 19 Jun 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. ‘Developing Leadership in Schools’ (2015). G20 Schools Conference. International conference for head teachers. 11 Apr 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2018) ‘Introduction’, Wellington Leadership Institute: Festival of Leadership. Mar 2012-15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘How the Young Learn to Lead’, Raffles Institution (Singapore) -Purdue University (USA) Education Forum on Gifted & Talented Youth 2012. Singapore. 15 Mar 12
  • Draper, D.; Dyer, R.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Schools’. Presentation for a meeting about pupil leadership and character development at 10 Downing Street. 16 Nov 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Young People’. Presentation for a meeting about leadership and character at 10 Downing Street. 7 Mar 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K. & Seldon, A. (2012) ‘Introduction’, Leading Your School in the 21st Century. 7 Feb 12

Kamal Armanious is particularly interested in the topic of education governance to explore what is possible in developing an improved governance system for technical and vocational education and training (TVET).

There have always been various calls from different international organisations such UNESCO, ILO, World Bank, OECD etc. to develop a transformed and transformative approach to TVET. This is attractive for certain theoretical as well as practical reasons; however, one set of limitations in achieving this vision lies in the arena of governance. Mr Armanious examines an imagined better model of governance that can be developed from the principles of a new approach and wider theoretical resources with consideration to national realities where there may be very serious obstacles in the way of realising this new governance approach and hence the overall planned transformation.

Title of Thesis

Education and Training Policies in Egypt: Good Governance and Stakeholders Participation

 

Amanda is completing a part-time DPhil, alongside working in Initial Teacher Education at Leeds Trinity University.

Her research is focused on understanding tensions, contradictions and conflicts that teachers in disadvantaged schools may experience when they engage in research activity.  Her research focus is influenced by her own experiences of working as a research-active teacher in disadvantaged schools, and recent work in teacher education to support experienced and beginning teachers in developing their own research activities.

One of the aims of Amanda’s research is to construct a framework to support teachers in pursuing research activity and critical scholarship work which articulates with wider social movements to address issues of poverty and disadvantage in schools.

Title of Thesis

Teachers’ perspectives on tensions between policy, practice and research in disadvantaged schools

Publications 

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2017) A ‘usable past’ of teacher education in England: history in JET’s anniversary issue. Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy, 43 (5), pp.616-627.

Nuttall, A. (2016) The ‘curriculum challenge’: Moving towards the ‘Storyline’ approach in a case study urban primary school.  Improving Schools, 19 (2), pp. 154-166.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Learning {Re}imagined: A review.  Primary First, 15, pp. 17-18.

Nuttall, A. and Doherty, J. (2014) Disaffected boys and the achievement gap: the ‘wallpaper effect’ and what is hidden by a focus on school results.  The Urban Review, 46 (5), pp.800-815.

Conference Papers and Presentations

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2018) “No child is pre-ordained to fail” Teachers questioning policy assumptions.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Newcastle, 11-13 September.

Nuttall, A. and Tobbell, C. (2017) Trainee teachers’ perspectives on practitioner enquiry.  Paper presented at the 8th TEAN Conference: Thinking Deeply about Education, Birmingham, 11-12 May.

Nuttall, A. (2017) Assessment at primary level: quality, comparability and improving secondary readiness.  A perspective from ITE.  Speech at the Westminster Education Forum Keynote Seminar: Next steps for reforming primary education: effective teaching practices, assessment and accountably, London, 18 January.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Deficit narratives and lived realities: whose poverty is it?  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the Australian Association for Research in Education, Melbourne, 27 November – 1 December.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Disenfranchised boys’ reflections on their urban schooling experience: “What a Waste!”.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Philpott, C., Beckett, L. and Wrigley, T. (2016) Collaborative practitioner inquiry: making a difference to urban schools.  Innovation session (school visits and symposium) presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Finn, B. and Beckett, L. (2015) Teachers’ constructions of poverty effects: Their research evidence.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Belfast, 15-17 September.

Nuttall, A. (2014) Teachers’ voice on disengaged boys: the role of one teacher-researcher in an English primary school. Paper presented at the Joint Australian Association for Research in Education and the New Zealand Association for Research in Education Conference, Brisbane, 30 November – 4 December.

Abigail’s research explores the role of education in students’ personal development and how this can be supported by policy, curricula, initial teacher education and teacher professional development. In particular she focuses on history education, citizenship education and peace education as vehicles for dialogue. These opportunities for students to engage with social questions are vital for building cohesive societies. This flows from the recognition that traditional forums for developing public understanding, such as post-conflict truth commissions, need to be complemented by intergenerational and educational perspectives.

Abigail has taught History, Politics, Debating as well as Relationships and Sex Education to secondary school students in South Africa, England and the USA.

She holds postgraduate degrees in Post-Conflict and Transitional Justice (University of Cape Town), in Education, Globalisation and International Development (University of Cambridge) and in African Studies (University of Oxford). She is a Rhodes Scholar, Mandela-Magdalene Scholar and Mandela-Rhodes Scholar.

Title of thesis

GCSE History, Policy Reform and Student Development: How students and teachers navigate the thematic study “Empires, Migration and the People”

Conference papers

Teaching Migration, Belonging, and Empire in Secondary Schools: evaluation of a teacher professional development program, (2019) History Educators International Research Network Conference, Lead author: Dr Jason Todd, University of Vienna, Austria.

“The Problems and Prospects of Teaching South Africa’s Recent History: Teachers’ Perspectives”, (2018) Sustainability, peace and education – Exploring promise and practice: BAICE 20th Anniversary Symposium, University of Bristol, England.

“New Generations, Old Wounds: Learning History at Home and School in Northern Ireland”, (2018) European Social Science and History Conference,
Queens University Belfast, Northern Ireland.

“The Methodological Challenges of Investigating the Role of History Teaching in Peacebuilding”, (2017), Present Past: Time, Memory, and the Negotiation of Historical Justice Conference, Columbia University, United States of America.

“Teaching South Africa’s Truth and Reconciliation Commission”, (2017) European Conference on African Studies, Universität Basel, Switzerland.

Research Assistant Publications

Review of the evidence on feedback in primary and secondary schools, (forthcoming, 2021) for the Education Endowment Foundation, Lead author: Prof Velda Elliott.

Teaching Migration, Belonging, and Empire in Secondary Schools, (2019), for Runnymede Trust and the European Research Council, Lead authors: Kimberly McIntosh, Dr Jason Todd and Prof Nandini Das.

Gender and the Politics of Reconciliation (2016), for The Institute for Justice and Reconciliation, Lead author: Dr Helen Scanlon

SOLE AUTHOR PUBLICATIONS

‘Transitions, Truth-Telling and Teaching History’, Cambridge Open-Review Educational Research e-Journal, Vol. 4, 2017.

Paul Riser is a DPhil Student in the department. His research focuses broadly on students’ (especially the marginalised) identities work in upper-secondary English Language Arts classrooms.

Prior to starting his doctoral studies, Paul earned a BSc in English Language Arts (Secondary Education) with a minor in Theology and a BA in Spanish and International Studies with a minor in Psychology from Texas Lutheran University. His MA in English Literature and Language is from St. Mary’s University.

As part of his postgraduate schoolwork, Paul undertook a placement in two graduate certificate programs, earning both his School Counselor certification and School Principal certification for all grade levels in the state of Texas, USA. In addition to English Language Arts and Reading (4th-12th grades), he is also qualified to teach Health (all levels), Journalism (7-12), Speech (7-12), Social Studies (7-12), and English as a Second Language (all levels) in Texas. Further, Paul holds a teaching certification in California, USA, the United Kingdom and Wales, the Kingdom of Denmark, and the Netherlands.

As a public school English teacher for 8 years, Paul was awarded many distinctions including, but not limited to: El maestro de impacto, two Harvard Book Awards, Teacher of the Year, and Texas Parent-Teacher Association Life Member.

His research to inform his doctoral thesis work will be completed in the United States of America. Furthermore, his research interests revolve around the nexus points of gender, ethnicity, sexuality, economic status, and religion as they relate to the agency students have in the classroom.

Paul is the 2019-2020 Student Liaison Coordinator for the Department of Education, Oxford. In this role, he is charged with leading/convening weekly workshops on a variety of research training topics, co-organizing networking and career advice opportunities for graduate students, and liaising with Cambridge University personnel to organize the annual Oxbridge Exchange. Furthermore, Paul supports the Higher Degrees Office as appropriate and meets regularly with directors and other stakeholders to discuss issues of common student concern in order to develop student identity and community throughout the Department.

Paul serves as the representative student voice on the Social Sciences Division Equality & Diversity Steering Group for the University of Oxford.

Paul is also a part-time Research Assistant working with professionals and other academics within the Department of Education on funded and individual projects as needed.

Supervisors: Associate Professors Jenni Ingram and Velda Elliott & Departmental Lecturer Jason Todd.

Thesis Title: ‘Using Positioning Theory to Understand Marginalised Students’ Identities Work and Their Learning Experiences in English Language Arts Classrooms’

Open-Access Publication:
Ingram, Jenni, & Riser, P.A. (2019). Experiences of problem solving in whole class interactions. Avances De Investigación En Educación Matemática, Avances de Investigación en Educación Matemática, Number 16; October 2019.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.35763/aiem.v0i16.279

Tessa is currently completing a part-time DPhil, alongside work as a senior leader in a London secondary school.

Her research explores how teachers on school-based ITE routes (TeachFirst and School Direct salaried) approach learning from experience. The research takes an action research approach: working with participant beginning teachers and mentors to critically examine and reflect on the processes of learning to teach, using their conversations as stimulus data.

Prior to joining the Department of Education Tessa completed an MSc in Educational Research (University of Bristol).

Yoon Young has been involved in a variety of academic and professional projects related to teacher education.

She is currently a member of the Teacher Education and Professional Learning (TEPL) research group at Oxford. Her doctoral research focuses on teacher education policy and practice in England. The study examines the relationship between individuals’ own objectives, the stated programme goals, and the national teachers’ standards in the operation of the Oxford Internship Scheme (OIS). It also explores the perceptions of stakeholders regarding ideal goals that could drive a re-conceptualised teacher education programme.

Prior to her doctorate, Yoon Young used to be a social studies teacher and subsequently worked as a consultant for the OECD’s Initial Teacher Preparation (ITP) Study. She holds a B.A. in Social Studies and Geography Education from the Ewha Womans University, and an M.A. in Educational Leadership from the University of Jyväskylä, where she was a grantee of the Korean Government Scholarship for Study Overseas.

Katy is a Deputy Headteacher and the founder of a Leadership and Coaching Institute, which she now co-directs.

Katy is an Associate Fellow at the Oxford Character Project and a Research Associate at the Oxford University Wellbeing Research Centre. She is the co-founder of Global Social Leaders, a leadership programme which has participants in 105 countries, all passionate about creating and sustaining positive change in the world.

Title of Thesis

How could school leaders improve the flourishing and wellbeing of teaching staff?

Books
  • Granville-Chapman, K. and Bidston, E (2020) Leader: Know, love and inspire your people. Carmarthen: Crownhouse Publishing
Book Chapters
  •  Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ In White, M. & McCallum, F. (Ed.s) Wellbeing and Resilience Education: Covid-19 And Its Impact on Education Systems. Routledge
Publications
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘Purpose and Leadership in Education and Beyond’. The Education Exchange. Available from: https://theeducation.exchange/purpose-and-leadership-in-education-and-beyond/
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘The Three Secrets of COVID-era Leadership’. Times Education Supplement. Available from: https://www.tes.com/news/three-secrets-covid-era-school-leadership
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2016) ‘Assessing the Impact of a Teacher Leadership Programme in a Teaching Schools Alliance. Journal of Teacher Action Research
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2014) ‘The Afghan conflict: causes and consequences.’ Geography Review 28(1): 22-27
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2013) What are the psychological factors that affect students’ academic resilience and can teachers influence these? Unpublished thesis
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘Unlocking Leadership Potential’, The Magazine of the Boarding School’s Association, 33: 42-45
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2009) ‘Learning to Lead’, Leader, The Education Leader Magazine 41: 22-25
Presentations
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2019) ‘How could leaders improve the flourishing of their teams?’ ‘Stowe Ed Conference’, Forthcoming: 7 Jan 2019
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2018) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education: 21 Jun 2018
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2017) ‘How can school leaders improve teacher flourishing?’ ‘Doing Education Differently Conference’, University of Oxford, Department of Education, 11 Mar 17
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2016) ‘Developing school leaders who enable teachers to flourish’ The Telegraph Festival of Education 23 Jun 16
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Developing leadership in pupils and teachers’ High School Affiliated to Renmin University of China, Beijing. 20 Oct 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Resilience for leaders.’ Global Social Leaders World Summit. 16 Aug 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Emotional Intelligence for Leaders.’ Global Leaders in Education. 12 Aug 15
  • Coates, S.; Fraser, H.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J.; and Nasim, A. (2015) ‘Breaking through the glass ceiling – how can schools empower our girls to become leaders?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education. 19 Jun 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. ‘Developing Leadership in Schools’ (2015). G20 Schools Conference. International conference for head teachers. 11 Apr 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2018) ‘Introduction’, Wellington Leadership Institute: Festival of Leadership. Mar 2012-15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘How the Young Learn to Lead’, Raffles Institution (Singapore) -Purdue University (USA) Education Forum on Gifted & Talented Youth 2012. Singapore. 15 Mar 12
  • Draper, D.; Dyer, R.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Schools’. Presentation for a meeting about pupil leadership and character development at 10 Downing Street. 16 Nov 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Young People’. Presentation for a meeting about leadership and character at 10 Downing Street. 7 Mar 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K. & Seldon, A. (2012) ‘Introduction’, Leading Your School in the 21st Century. 7 Feb 12

Kamal Armanious is particularly interested in the topic of education governance to explore what is possible in developing an improved governance system for technical and vocational education and training (TVET).

There have always been various calls from different international organisations such UNESCO, ILO, World Bank, OECD etc. to develop a transformed and transformative approach to TVET. This is attractive for certain theoretical as well as practical reasons; however, one set of limitations in achieving this vision lies in the arena of governance. Mr Armanious examines an imagined better model of governance that can be developed from the principles of a new approach and wider theoretical resources with consideration to national realities where there may be very serious obstacles in the way of realising this new governance approach and hence the overall planned transformation.

Title of Thesis

Education and Training Policies in Egypt: Good Governance and Stakeholders Participation

 

Amanda is completing a part-time DPhil, alongside working in Initial Teacher Education at Leeds Trinity University.

Her research is focused on understanding tensions, contradictions and conflicts that teachers in disadvantaged schools may experience when they engage in research activity.  Her research focus is influenced by her own experiences of working as a research-active teacher in disadvantaged schools, and recent work in teacher education to support experienced and beginning teachers in developing their own research activities.

One of the aims of Amanda’s research is to construct a framework to support teachers in pursuing research activity and critical scholarship work which articulates with wider social movements to address issues of poverty and disadvantage in schools.

Title of Thesis

Teachers’ perspectives on tensions between policy, practice and research in disadvantaged schools

Publications 

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2017) A ‘usable past’ of teacher education in England: history in JET’s anniversary issue. Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy, 43 (5), pp.616-627.

Nuttall, A. (2016) The ‘curriculum challenge’: Moving towards the ‘Storyline’ approach in a case study urban primary school.  Improving Schools, 19 (2), pp. 154-166.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Learning {Re}imagined: A review.  Primary First, 15, pp. 17-18.

Nuttall, A. and Doherty, J. (2014) Disaffected boys and the achievement gap: the ‘wallpaper effect’ and what is hidden by a focus on school results.  The Urban Review, 46 (5), pp.800-815.

Conference Papers and Presentations

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2018) “No child is pre-ordained to fail” Teachers questioning policy assumptions.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Newcastle, 11-13 September.

Nuttall, A. and Tobbell, C. (2017) Trainee teachers’ perspectives on practitioner enquiry.  Paper presented at the 8th TEAN Conference: Thinking Deeply about Education, Birmingham, 11-12 May.

Nuttall, A. (2017) Assessment at primary level: quality, comparability and improving secondary readiness.  A perspective from ITE.  Speech at the Westminster Education Forum Keynote Seminar: Next steps for reforming primary education: effective teaching practices, assessment and accountably, London, 18 January.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Deficit narratives and lived realities: whose poverty is it?  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the Australian Association for Research in Education, Melbourne, 27 November – 1 December.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Disenfranchised boys’ reflections on their urban schooling experience: “What a Waste!”.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Philpott, C., Beckett, L. and Wrigley, T. (2016) Collaborative practitioner inquiry: making a difference to urban schools.  Innovation session (school visits and symposium) presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Finn, B. and Beckett, L. (2015) Teachers’ constructions of poverty effects: Their research evidence.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Belfast, 15-17 September.

Nuttall, A. (2014) Teachers’ voice on disengaged boys: the role of one teacher-researcher in an English primary school. Paper presented at the Joint Australian Association for Research in Education and the New Zealand Association for Research in Education Conference, Brisbane, 30 November – 4 December.

Abigail’s research explores the role of education in students’ personal development and how this can be supported by policy, curricula, initial teacher education and teacher professional development. In particular she focuses on history education, citizenship education and peace education as vehicles for dialogue. These opportunities for students to engage with social questions are vital for building cohesive societies. This flows from the recognition that traditional forums for developing public understanding, such as post-conflict truth commissions, need to be complemented by intergenerational and educational perspectives.

Abigail has taught History, Politics, Debating as well as Relationships and Sex Education to secondary school students in South Africa, England and the USA.

She holds postgraduate degrees in Post-Conflict and Transitional Justice (University of Cape Town), in Education, Globalisation and International Development (University of Cambridge) and in African Studies (University of Oxford). She is a Rhodes Scholar, Mandela-Magdalene Scholar and Mandela-Rhodes Scholar.

Title of thesis

GCSE History, Policy Reform and Student Development: How students and teachers navigate the thematic study “Empires, Migration and the People”

Conference papers

Teaching Migration, Belonging, and Empire in Secondary Schools: evaluation of a teacher professional development program, (2019) History Educators International Research Network Conference, Lead author: Dr Jason Todd, University of Vienna, Austria.

“The Problems and Prospects of Teaching South Africa’s Recent History: Teachers’ Perspectives”, (2018) Sustainability, peace and education – Exploring promise and practice: BAICE 20th Anniversary Symposium, University of Bristol, England.

“New Generations, Old Wounds: Learning History at Home and School in Northern Ireland”, (2018) European Social Science and History Conference,
Queens University Belfast, Northern Ireland.

“The Methodological Challenges of Investigating the Role of History Teaching in Peacebuilding”, (2017), Present Past: Time, Memory, and the Negotiation of Historical Justice Conference, Columbia University, United States of America.

“Teaching South Africa’s Truth and Reconciliation Commission”, (2017) European Conference on African Studies, Universität Basel, Switzerland.

Research Assistant Publications

Review of the evidence on feedback in primary and secondary schools, (forthcoming, 2021) for the Education Endowment Foundation, Lead author: Prof Velda Elliott.

Teaching Migration, Belonging, and Empire in Secondary Schools, (2019), for Runnymede Trust and the European Research Council, Lead authors: Kimberly McIntosh, Dr Jason Todd and Prof Nandini Das.

Gender and the Politics of Reconciliation (2016), for The Institute for Justice and Reconciliation, Lead author: Dr Helen Scanlon

SOLE AUTHOR PUBLICATIONS

‘Transitions, Truth-Telling and Teaching History’, Cambridge Open-Review Educational Research e-Journal, Vol. 4, 2017.

Paul Riser is a DPhil Student in the department. His research focuses broadly on students’ (especially the marginalised) identities work in upper-secondary English Language Arts classrooms.

Prior to starting his doctoral studies, Paul earned a BSc in English Language Arts (Secondary Education) with a minor in Theology and a BA in Spanish and International Studies with a minor in Psychology from Texas Lutheran University. His MA in English Literature and Language is from St. Mary’s University.

As part of his postgraduate schoolwork, Paul undertook a placement in two graduate certificate programs, earning both his School Counselor certification and School Principal certification for all grade levels in the state of Texas, USA. In addition to English Language Arts and Reading (4th-12th grades), he is also qualified to teach Health (all levels), Journalism (7-12), Speech (7-12), Social Studies (7-12), and English as a Second Language (all levels) in Texas. Further, Paul holds a teaching certification in California, USA, the United Kingdom and Wales, the Kingdom of Denmark, and the Netherlands.

As a public school English teacher for 8 years, Paul was awarded many distinctions including, but not limited to: El maestro de impacto, two Harvard Book Awards, Teacher of the Year, and Texas Parent-Teacher Association Life Member.

His research to inform his doctoral thesis work will be completed in the United States of America. Furthermore, his research interests revolve around the nexus points of gender, ethnicity, sexuality, economic status, and religion as they relate to the agency students have in the classroom.

Paul is the 2019-2020 Student Liaison Coordinator for the Department of Education, Oxford. In this role, he is charged with leading/convening weekly workshops on a variety of research training topics, co-organizing networking and career advice opportunities for graduate students, and liaising with Cambridge University personnel to organize the annual Oxbridge Exchange. Furthermore, Paul supports the Higher Degrees Office as appropriate and meets regularly with directors and other stakeholders to discuss issues of common student concern in order to develop student identity and community throughout the Department.

Paul serves as the representative student voice on the Social Sciences Division Equality & Diversity Steering Group for the University of Oxford.

Paul is also a part-time Research Assistant working with professionals and other academics within the Department of Education on funded and individual projects as needed.

Supervisors: Associate Professors Jenni Ingram and Velda Elliott & Departmental Lecturer Jason Todd.

Thesis Title: ‘Using Positioning Theory to Understand Marginalised Students’ Identities Work and Their Learning Experiences in English Language Arts Classrooms’

Open-Access Publication:
Ingram, Jenni, & Riser, P.A. (2019). Experiences of problem solving in whole class interactions. Avances De Investigación En Educación Matemática, Avances de Investigación en Educación Matemática, Number 16; October 2019.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.35763/aiem.v0i16.279

Tessa is currently completing a part-time DPhil, alongside work as a senior leader in a London secondary school.

Her research explores how teachers on school-based ITE routes (TeachFirst and School Direct salaried) approach learning from experience. The research takes an action research approach: working with participant beginning teachers and mentors to critically examine and reflect on the processes of learning to teach, using their conversations as stimulus data.

Prior to joining the Department of Education Tessa completed an MSc in Educational Research (University of Bristol).

Yoon Young has been involved in a variety of academic and professional projects related to teacher education.

She is currently a member of the Teacher Education and Professional Learning (TEPL) research group at Oxford. Her doctoral research focuses on teacher education policy and practice in England. The study examines the relationship between individuals’ own objectives, the stated programme goals, and the national teachers’ standards in the operation of the Oxford Internship Scheme (OIS). It also explores the perceptions of stakeholders regarding ideal goals that could drive a re-conceptualised teacher education programme.

Prior to her doctorate, Yoon Young used to be a social studies teacher and subsequently worked as a consultant for the OECD’s Initial Teacher Preparation (ITP) Study. She holds a B.A. in Social Studies and Geography Education from the Ewha Womans University, and an M.A. in Educational Leadership from the University of Jyväskylä, where she was a grantee of the Korean Government Scholarship for Study Overseas.

Katy is a Deputy Headteacher and the founder of a Leadership and Coaching Institute, which she now co-directs.

Katy is an Associate Fellow at the Oxford Character Project and a Research Associate at the Oxford University Wellbeing Research Centre. She is the co-founder of Global Social Leaders, a leadership programme which has participants in 105 countries, all passionate about creating and sustaining positive change in the world.

Title of Thesis

How could school leaders improve the flourishing and wellbeing of teaching staff?

Books
  • Granville-Chapman, K. and Bidston, E (2020) Leader: Know, love and inspire your people. Carmarthen: Crownhouse Publishing
Book Chapters
  •  Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ In White, M. & McCallum, F. (Ed.s) Wellbeing and Resilience Education: Covid-19 And Its Impact on Education Systems. Routledge
Publications
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘Purpose and Leadership in Education and Beyond’. The Education Exchange. Available from: https://theeducation.exchange/purpose-and-leadership-in-education-and-beyond/
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘The Three Secrets of COVID-era Leadership’. Times Education Supplement. Available from: https://www.tes.com/news/three-secrets-covid-era-school-leadership
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2016) ‘Assessing the Impact of a Teacher Leadership Programme in a Teaching Schools Alliance. Journal of Teacher Action Research
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2014) ‘The Afghan conflict: causes and consequences.’ Geography Review 28(1): 22-27
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2013) What are the psychological factors that affect students’ academic resilience and can teachers influence these? Unpublished thesis
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘Unlocking Leadership Potential’, The Magazine of the Boarding School’s Association, 33: 42-45
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2009) ‘Learning to Lead’, Leader, The Education Leader Magazine 41: 22-25
Presentations
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2019) ‘How could leaders improve the flourishing of their teams?’ ‘Stowe Ed Conference’, Forthcoming: 7 Jan 2019
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2018) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education: 21 Jun 2018
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2017) ‘How can school leaders improve teacher flourishing?’ ‘Doing Education Differently Conference’, University of Oxford, Department of Education, 11 Mar 17
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2016) ‘Developing school leaders who enable teachers to flourish’ The Telegraph Festival of Education 23 Jun 16
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Developing leadership in pupils and teachers’ High School Affiliated to Renmin University of China, Beijing. 20 Oct 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Resilience for leaders.’ Global Social Leaders World Summit. 16 Aug 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Emotional Intelligence for Leaders.’ Global Leaders in Education. 12 Aug 15
  • Coates, S.; Fraser, H.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J.; and Nasim, A. (2015) ‘Breaking through the glass ceiling – how can schools empower our girls to become leaders?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education. 19 Jun 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. ‘Developing Leadership in Schools’ (2015). G20 Schools Conference. International conference for head teachers. 11 Apr 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2018) ‘Introduction’, Wellington Leadership Institute: Festival of Leadership. Mar 2012-15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘How the Young Learn to Lead’, Raffles Institution (Singapore) -Purdue University (USA) Education Forum on Gifted & Talented Youth 2012. Singapore. 15 Mar 12
  • Draper, D.; Dyer, R.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Schools’. Presentation for a meeting about pupil leadership and character development at 10 Downing Street. 16 Nov 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Young People’. Presentation for a meeting about leadership and character at 10 Downing Street. 7 Mar 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K. & Seldon, A. (2012) ‘Introduction’, Leading Your School in the 21st Century. 7 Feb 12

Kamal Armanious is particularly interested in the topic of education governance to explore what is possible in developing an improved governance system for technical and vocational education and training (TVET).

There have always been various calls from different international organisations such UNESCO, ILO, World Bank, OECD etc. to develop a transformed and transformative approach to TVET. This is attractive for certain theoretical as well as practical reasons; however, one set of limitations in achieving this vision lies in the arena of governance. Mr Armanious examines an imagined better model of governance that can be developed from the principles of a new approach and wider theoretical resources with consideration to national realities where there may be very serious obstacles in the way of realising this new governance approach and hence the overall planned transformation.

Title of Thesis

Education and Training Policies in Egypt: Good Governance and Stakeholders Participation

 

Amanda is completing a part-time DPhil, alongside working in Initial Teacher Education at Leeds Trinity University.

Her research is focused on understanding tensions, contradictions and conflicts that teachers in disadvantaged schools may experience when they engage in research activity.  Her research focus is influenced by her own experiences of working as a research-active teacher in disadvantaged schools, and recent work in teacher education to support experienced and beginning teachers in developing their own research activities.

One of the aims of Amanda’s research is to construct a framework to support teachers in pursuing research activity and critical scholarship work which articulates with wider social movements to address issues of poverty and disadvantage in schools.

Title of Thesis

Teachers’ perspectives on tensions between policy, practice and research in disadvantaged schools

Publications 

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2017) A ‘usable past’ of teacher education in England: history in JET’s anniversary issue. Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy, 43 (5), pp.616-627.

Nuttall, A. (2016) The ‘curriculum challenge’: Moving towards the ‘Storyline’ approach in a case study urban primary school.  Improving Schools, 19 (2), pp. 154-166.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Learning {Re}imagined: A review.  Primary First, 15, pp. 17-18.

Nuttall, A. and Doherty, J. (2014) Disaffected boys and the achievement gap: the ‘wallpaper effect’ and what is hidden by a focus on school results.  The Urban Review, 46 (5), pp.800-815.

Conference Papers and Presentations

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2018) “No child is pre-ordained to fail” Teachers questioning policy assumptions.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Newcastle, 11-13 September.

Nuttall, A. and Tobbell, C. (2017) Trainee teachers’ perspectives on practitioner enquiry.  Paper presented at the 8th TEAN Conference: Thinking Deeply about Education, Birmingham, 11-12 May.

Nuttall, A. (2017) Assessment at primary level: quality, comparability and improving secondary readiness.  A perspective from ITE.  Speech at the Westminster Education Forum Keynote Seminar: Next steps for reforming primary education: effective teaching practices, assessment and accountably, London, 18 January.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Deficit narratives and lived realities: whose poverty is it?  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the Australian Association for Research in Education, Melbourne, 27 November – 1 December.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Disenfranchised boys’ reflections on their urban schooling experience: “What a Waste!”.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Philpott, C., Beckett, L. and Wrigley, T. (2016) Collaborative practitioner inquiry: making a difference to urban schools.  Innovation session (school visits and symposium) presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Finn, B. and Beckett, L. (2015) Teachers’ constructions of poverty effects: Their research evidence.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Belfast, 15-17 September.

Nuttall, A. (2014) Teachers’ voice on disengaged boys: the role of one teacher-researcher in an English primary school. Paper presented at the Joint Australian Association for Research in Education and the New Zealand Association for Research in Education Conference, Brisbane, 30 November – 4 December.

Abigail’s research explores the role of education in students’ personal development and how this can be supported by policy, curricula, initial teacher education and teacher professional development. In particular she focuses on history education, citizenship education and peace education as vehicles for dialogue. These opportunities for students to engage with social questions are vital for building cohesive societies. This flows from the recognition that traditional forums for developing public understanding, such as post-conflict truth commissions, need to be complemented by intergenerational and educational perspectives.

Abigail has taught History, Politics, Debating as well as Relationships and Sex Education to secondary school students in South Africa, England and the USA.

She holds postgraduate degrees in Post-Conflict and Transitional Justice (University of Cape Town), in Education, Globalisation and International Development (University of Cambridge) and in African Studies (University of Oxford). She is a Rhodes Scholar, Mandela-Magdalene Scholar and Mandela-Rhodes Scholar.

Title of thesis

GCSE History, Policy Reform and Student Development: How students and teachers navigate the thematic study “Empires, Migration and the People”

Conference papers

Teaching Migration, Belonging, and Empire in Secondary Schools: evaluation of a teacher professional development program, (2019) History Educators International Research Network Conference, Lead author: Dr Jason Todd, University of Vienna, Austria.

“The Problems and Prospects of Teaching South Africa’s Recent History: Teachers’ Perspectives”, (2018) Sustainability, peace and education – Exploring promise and practice: BAICE 20th Anniversary Symposium, University of Bristol, England.

“New Generations, Old Wounds: Learning History at Home and School in Northern Ireland”, (2018) European Social Science and History Conference,
Queens University Belfast, Northern Ireland.

“The Methodological Challenges of Investigating the Role of History Teaching in Peacebuilding”, (2017), Present Past: Time, Memory, and the Negotiation of Historical Justice Conference, Columbia University, United States of America.

“Teaching South Africa’s Truth and Reconciliation Commission”, (2017) European Conference on African Studies, Universität Basel, Switzerland.

Research Assistant Publications

Review of the evidence on feedback in primary and secondary schools, (forthcoming, 2021) for the Education Endowment Foundation, Lead author: Prof Velda Elliott.

Teaching Migration, Belonging, and Empire in Secondary Schools, (2019), for Runnymede Trust and the European Research Council, Lead authors: Kimberly McIntosh, Dr Jason Todd and Prof Nandini Das.

Gender and the Politics of Reconciliation (2016), for The Institute for Justice and Reconciliation, Lead author: Dr Helen Scanlon

SOLE AUTHOR PUBLICATIONS

‘Transitions, Truth-Telling and Teaching History’, Cambridge Open-Review Educational Research e-Journal, Vol. 4, 2017.

Paul Riser is a DPhil Student in the department. His research focuses broadly on students’ (especially the marginalised) identities work in upper-secondary English Language Arts classrooms.

Prior to starting his doctoral studies, Paul earned a BSc in English Language Arts (Secondary Education) with a minor in Theology and a BA in Spanish and International Studies with a minor in Psychology from Texas Lutheran University. His MA in English Literature and Language is from St. Mary’s University.

As part of his postgraduate schoolwork, Paul undertook a placement in two graduate certificate programs, earning both his School Counselor certification and School Principal certification for all grade levels in the state of Texas, USA. In addition to English Language Arts and Reading (4th-12th grades), he is also qualified to teach Health (all levels), Journalism (7-12), Speech (7-12), Social Studies (7-12), and English as a Second Language (all levels) in Texas. Further, Paul holds a teaching certification in California, USA, the United Kingdom and Wales, the Kingdom of Denmark, and the Netherlands.

As a public school English teacher for 8 years, Paul was awarded many distinctions including, but not limited to: El maestro de impacto, two Harvard Book Awards, Teacher of the Year, and Texas Parent-Teacher Association Life Member.

His research to inform his doctoral thesis work will be completed in the United States of America. Furthermore, his research interests revolve around the nexus points of gender, ethnicity, sexuality, economic status, and religion as they relate to the agency students have in the classroom.

Paul is the 2019-2020 Student Liaison Coordinator for the Department of Education, Oxford. In this role, he is charged with leading/convening weekly workshops on a variety of research training topics, co-organizing networking and career advice opportunities for graduate students, and liaising with Cambridge University personnel to organize the annual Oxbridge Exchange. Furthermore, Paul supports the Higher Degrees Office as appropriate and meets regularly with directors and other stakeholders to discuss issues of common student concern in order to develop student identity and community throughout the Department.

Paul serves as the representative student voice on the Social Sciences Division Equality & Diversity Steering Group for the University of Oxford.

Paul is also a part-time Research Assistant working with professionals and other academics within the Department of Education on funded and individual projects as needed.

Supervisors: Associate Professors Jenni Ingram and Velda Elliott & Departmental Lecturer Jason Todd.

Thesis Title: ‘Using Positioning Theory to Understand Marginalised Students’ Identities Work and Their Learning Experiences in English Language Arts Classrooms’

Open-Access Publication:
Ingram, Jenni, & Riser, P.A. (2019). Experiences of problem solving in whole class interactions. Avances De Investigación En Educación Matemática, Avances de Investigación en Educación Matemática, Number 16; October 2019.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.35763/aiem.v0i16.279

Tessa is currently completing a part-time DPhil, alongside work as a senior leader in a London secondary school.

Her research explores how teachers on school-based ITE routes (TeachFirst and School Direct salaried) approach learning from experience. The research takes an action research approach: working with participant beginning teachers and mentors to critically examine and reflect on the processes of learning to teach, using their conversations as stimulus data.

Prior to joining the Department of Education Tessa completed an MSc in Educational Research (University of Bristol).

Yoon Young has been involved in a variety of academic and professional projects related to teacher education.

She is currently a member of the Teacher Education and Professional Learning (TEPL) research group at Oxford. Her doctoral research focuses on teacher education policy and practice in England. The study examines the relationship between individuals’ own objectives, the stated programme goals, and the national teachers’ standards in the operation of the Oxford Internship Scheme (OIS). It also explores the perceptions of stakeholders regarding ideal goals that could drive a re-conceptualised teacher education programme.

Prior to her doctorate, Yoon Young used to be a social studies teacher and subsequently worked as a consultant for the OECD’s Initial Teacher Preparation (ITP) Study. She holds a B.A. in Social Studies and Geography Education from the Ewha Womans University, and an M.A. in Educational Leadership from the University of Jyväskylä, where she was a grantee of the Korean Government Scholarship for Study Overseas.

Katy is a Deputy Headteacher and the founder of a Leadership and Coaching Institute, which she now co-directs.

Katy is an Associate Fellow at the Oxford Character Project and a Research Associate at the Oxford University Wellbeing Research Centre. She is the co-founder of Global Social Leaders, a leadership programme which has participants in 105 countries, all passionate about creating and sustaining positive change in the world.

Title of Thesis

How could school leaders improve the flourishing and wellbeing of teaching staff?

Books
  • Granville-Chapman, K. and Bidston, E (2020) Leader: Know, love and inspire your people. Carmarthen: Crownhouse Publishing
Book Chapters
  •  Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ In White, M. & McCallum, F. (Ed.s) Wellbeing and Resilience Education: Covid-19 And Its Impact on Education Systems. Routledge
Publications
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘Purpose and Leadership in Education and Beyond’. The Education Exchange. Available from: https://theeducation.exchange/purpose-and-leadership-in-education-and-beyond/
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘The Three Secrets of COVID-era Leadership’. Times Education Supplement. Available from: https://www.tes.com/news/three-secrets-covid-era-school-leadership
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2016) ‘Assessing the Impact of a Teacher Leadership Programme in a Teaching Schools Alliance. Journal of Teacher Action Research
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2014) ‘The Afghan conflict: causes and consequences.’ Geography Review 28(1): 22-27
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2013) What are the psychological factors that affect students’ academic resilience and can teachers influence these? Unpublished thesis
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘Unlocking Leadership Potential’, The Magazine of the Boarding School’s Association, 33: 42-45
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2009) ‘Learning to Lead’, Leader, The Education Leader Magazine 41: 22-25
Presentations
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2019) ‘How could leaders improve the flourishing of their teams?’ ‘Stowe Ed Conference’, Forthcoming: 7 Jan 2019
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2018) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education: 21 Jun 2018
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2017) ‘How can school leaders improve teacher flourishing?’ ‘Doing Education Differently Conference’, University of Oxford, Department of Education, 11 Mar 17
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2016) ‘Developing school leaders who enable teachers to flourish’ The Telegraph Festival of Education 23 Jun 16
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Developing leadership in pupils and teachers’ High School Affiliated to Renmin University of China, Beijing. 20 Oct 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Resilience for leaders.’ Global Social Leaders World Summit. 16 Aug 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Emotional Intelligence for Leaders.’ Global Leaders in Education. 12 Aug 15
  • Coates, S.; Fraser, H.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J.; and Nasim, A. (2015) ‘Breaking through the glass ceiling – how can schools empower our girls to become leaders?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education. 19 Jun 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. ‘Developing Leadership in Schools’ (2015). G20 Schools Conference. International conference for head teachers. 11 Apr 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2018) ‘Introduction’, Wellington Leadership Institute: Festival of Leadership. Mar 2012-15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘How the Young Learn to Lead’, Raffles Institution (Singapore) -Purdue University (USA) Education Forum on Gifted & Talented Youth 2012. Singapore. 15 Mar 12
  • Draper, D.; Dyer, R.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Schools’. Presentation for a meeting about pupil leadership and character development at 10 Downing Street. 16 Nov 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Young People’. Presentation for a meeting about leadership and character at 10 Downing Street. 7 Mar 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K. & Seldon, A. (2012) ‘Introduction’, Leading Your School in the 21st Century. 7 Feb 12

Kamal Armanious is particularly interested in the topic of education governance to explore what is possible in developing an improved governance system for technical and vocational education and training (TVET).

There have always been various calls from different international organisations such UNESCO, ILO, World Bank, OECD etc. to develop a transformed and transformative approach to TVET. This is attractive for certain theoretical as well as practical reasons; however, one set of limitations in achieving this vision lies in the arena of governance. Mr Armanious examines an imagined better model of governance that can be developed from the principles of a new approach and wider theoretical resources with consideration to national realities where there may be very serious obstacles in the way of realising this new governance approach and hence the overall planned transformation.

Title of Thesis

Education and Training Policies in Egypt: Good Governance and Stakeholders Participation

 

Amanda is completing a part-time DPhil, alongside working in Initial Teacher Education at Leeds Trinity University.

Her research is focused on understanding tensions, contradictions and conflicts that teachers in disadvantaged schools may experience when they engage in research activity.  Her research focus is influenced by her own experiences of working as a research-active teacher in disadvantaged schools, and recent work in teacher education to support experienced and beginning teachers in developing their own research activities.

One of the aims of Amanda’s research is to construct a framework to support teachers in pursuing research activity and critical scholarship work which articulates with wider social movements to address issues of poverty and disadvantage in schools.

Title of Thesis

Teachers’ perspectives on tensions between policy, practice and research in disadvantaged schools

Publications 

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2017) A ‘usable past’ of teacher education in England: history in JET’s anniversary issue. Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy, 43 (5), pp.616-627.

Nuttall, A. (2016) The ‘curriculum challenge’: Moving towards the ‘Storyline’ approach in a case study urban primary school.  Improving Schools, 19 (2), pp. 154-166.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Learning {Re}imagined: A review.  Primary First, 15, pp. 17-18.

Nuttall, A. and Doherty, J. (2014) Disaffected boys and the achievement gap: the ‘wallpaper effect’ and what is hidden by a focus on school results.  The Urban Review, 46 (5), pp.800-815.

Conference Papers and Presentations

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2018) “No child is pre-ordained to fail” Teachers questioning policy assumptions.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Newcastle, 11-13 September.

Nuttall, A. and Tobbell, C. (2017) Trainee teachers’ perspectives on practitioner enquiry.  Paper presented at the 8th TEAN Conference: Thinking Deeply about Education, Birmingham, 11-12 May.

Nuttall, A. (2017) Assessment at primary level: quality, comparability and improving secondary readiness.  A perspective from ITE.  Speech at the Westminster Education Forum Keynote Seminar: Next steps for reforming primary education: effective teaching practices, assessment and accountably, London, 18 January.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Deficit narratives and lived realities: whose poverty is it?  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the Australian Association for Research in Education, Melbourne, 27 November – 1 December.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Disenfranchised boys’ reflections on their urban schooling experience: “What a Waste!”.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Philpott, C., Beckett, L. and Wrigley, T. (2016) Collaborative practitioner inquiry: making a difference to urban schools.  Innovation session (school visits and symposium) presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Finn, B. and Beckett, L. (2015) Teachers’ constructions of poverty effects: Their research evidence.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Belfast, 15-17 September.

Nuttall, A. (2014) Teachers’ voice on disengaged boys: the role of one teacher-researcher in an English primary school. Paper presented at the Joint Australian Association for Research in Education and the New Zealand Association for Research in Education Conference, Brisbane, 30 November – 4 December.

Abigail’s research explores the role of education in students’ personal development and how this can be supported by policy, curricula, initial teacher education and teacher professional development. In particular she focuses on history education, citizenship education and peace education as vehicles for dialogue. These opportunities for students to engage with social questions are vital for building cohesive societies. This flows from the recognition that traditional forums for developing public understanding, such as post-conflict truth commissions, need to be complemented by intergenerational and educational perspectives.

Abigail has taught History, Politics, Debating as well as Relationships and Sex Education to secondary school students in South Africa, England and the USA.

She holds postgraduate degrees in Post-Conflict and Transitional Justice (University of Cape Town), in Education, Globalisation and International Development (University of Cambridge) and in African Studies (University of Oxford). She is a Rhodes Scholar, Mandela-Magdalene Scholar and Mandela-Rhodes Scholar.

Title of thesis

GCSE History, Policy Reform and Student Development: How students and teachers navigate the thematic study “Empires, Migration and the People”

Conference papers

Teaching Migration, Belonging, and Empire in Secondary Schools: evaluation of a teacher professional development program, (2019) History Educators International Research Network Conference, Lead author: Dr Jason Todd, University of Vienna, Austria.

“The Problems and Prospects of Teaching South Africa’s Recent History: Teachers’ Perspectives”, (2018) Sustainability, peace and education – Exploring promise and practice: BAICE 20th Anniversary Symposium, University of Bristol, England.

“New Generations, Old Wounds: Learning History at Home and School in Northern Ireland”, (2018) European Social Science and History Conference,
Queens University Belfast, Northern Ireland.

“The Methodological Challenges of Investigating the Role of History Teaching in Peacebuilding”, (2017), Present Past: Time, Memory, and the Negotiation of Historical Justice Conference, Columbia University, United States of America.

“Teaching South Africa’s Truth and Reconciliation Commission”, (2017) European Conference on African Studies, Universität Basel, Switzerland.

Research Assistant Publications

Review of the evidence on feedback in primary and secondary schools, (forthcoming, 2021) for the Education Endowment Foundation, Lead author: Prof Velda Elliott.

Teaching Migration, Belonging, and Empire in Secondary Schools, (2019), for Runnymede Trust and the European Research Council, Lead authors: Kimberly McIntosh, Dr Jason Todd and Prof Nandini Das.

Gender and the Politics of Reconciliation (2016), for The Institute for Justice and Reconciliation, Lead author: Dr Helen Scanlon

SOLE AUTHOR PUBLICATIONS

‘Transitions, Truth-Telling and Teaching History’, Cambridge Open-Review Educational Research e-Journal, Vol. 4, 2017.

Paul Riser is a DPhil Student in the department. His research focuses broadly on students’ (especially the marginalised) identities work in upper-secondary English Language Arts classrooms.

Prior to starting his doctoral studies, Paul earned a BSc in English Language Arts (Secondary Education) with a minor in Theology and a BA in Spanish and International Studies with a minor in Psychology from Texas Lutheran University. His MA in English Literature and Language is from St. Mary’s University.

As part of his postgraduate schoolwork, Paul undertook a placement in two graduate certificate programs, earning both his School Counselor certification and School Principal certification for all grade levels in the state of Texas, USA. In addition to English Language Arts and Reading (4th-12th grades), he is also qualified to teach Health (all levels), Journalism (7-12), Speech (7-12), Social Studies (7-12), and English as a Second Language (all levels) in Texas. Further, Paul holds a teaching certification in California, USA, the United Kingdom and Wales, the Kingdom of Denmark, and the Netherlands.

As a public school English teacher for 8 years, Paul was awarded many distinctions including, but not limited to: El maestro de impacto, two Harvard Book Awards, Teacher of the Year, and Texas Parent-Teacher Association Life Member.

His research to inform his doctoral thesis work will be completed in the United States of America. Furthermore, his research interests revolve around the nexus points of gender, ethnicity, sexuality, economic status, and religion as they relate to the agency students have in the classroom.

Paul is the 2019-2020 Student Liaison Coordinator for the Department of Education, Oxford. In this role, he is charged with leading/convening weekly workshops on a variety of research training topics, co-organizing networking and career advice opportunities for graduate students, and liaising with Cambridge University personnel to organize the annual Oxbridge Exchange. Furthermore, Paul supports the Higher Degrees Office as appropriate and meets regularly with directors and other stakeholders to discuss issues of common student concern in order to develop student identity and community throughout the Department.

Paul serves as the representative student voice on the Social Sciences Division Equality & Diversity Steering Group for the University of Oxford.

Paul is also a part-time Research Assistant working with professionals and other academics within the Department of Education on funded and individual projects as needed.

Supervisors: Associate Professors Jenni Ingram and Velda Elliott & Departmental Lecturer Jason Todd.

Thesis Title: ‘Using Positioning Theory to Understand Marginalised Students’ Identities Work and Their Learning Experiences in English Language Arts Classrooms’

Open-Access Publication:
Ingram, Jenni, & Riser, P.A. (2019). Experiences of problem solving in whole class interactions. Avances De Investigación En Educación Matemática, Avances de Investigación en Educación Matemática, Number 16; October 2019.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.35763/aiem.v0i16.279

Tessa is currently completing a part-time DPhil, alongside work as a senior leader in a London secondary school.

Her research explores how teachers on school-based ITE routes (TeachFirst and School Direct salaried) approach learning from experience. The research takes an action research approach: working with participant beginning teachers and mentors to critically examine and reflect on the processes of learning to teach, using their conversations as stimulus data.

Prior to joining the Department of Education Tessa completed an MSc in Educational Research (University of Bristol).

Yoon Young has been involved in a variety of academic and professional projects related to teacher education.

She is currently a member of the Teacher Education and Professional Learning (TEPL) research group at Oxford. Her doctoral research focuses on teacher education policy and practice in England. The study examines the relationship between individuals’ own objectives, the stated programme goals, and the national teachers’ standards in the operation of the Oxford Internship Scheme (OIS). It also explores the perceptions of stakeholders regarding ideal goals that could drive a re-conceptualised teacher education programme.

Prior to her doctorate, Yoon Young used to be a social studies teacher and subsequently worked as a consultant for the OECD’s Initial Teacher Preparation (ITP) Study. She holds a B.A. in Social Studies and Geography Education from the Ewha Womans University, and an M.A. in Educational Leadership from the University of Jyväskylä, where she was a grantee of the Korean Government Scholarship for Study Overseas.

Katy is a Deputy Headteacher and the founder of a Leadership and Coaching Institute, which she now co-directs.

Katy is an Associate Fellow at the Oxford Character Project and a Research Associate at the Oxford University Wellbeing Research Centre. She is the co-founder of Global Social Leaders, a leadership programme which has participants in 105 countries, all passionate about creating and sustaining positive change in the world.

Title of Thesis

How could school leaders improve the flourishing and wellbeing of teaching staff?

Books
  • Granville-Chapman, K. and Bidston, E (2020) Leader: Know, love and inspire your people. Carmarthen: Crownhouse Publishing
Book Chapters
  •  Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ In White, M. & McCallum, F. (Ed.s) Wellbeing and Resilience Education: Covid-19 And Its Impact on Education Systems. Routledge
Publications
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘Purpose and Leadership in Education and Beyond’. The Education Exchange. Available from: https://theeducation.exchange/purpose-and-leadership-in-education-and-beyond/
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘The Three Secrets of COVID-era Leadership’. Times Education Supplement. Available from: https://www.tes.com/news/three-secrets-covid-era-school-leadership
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2016) ‘Assessing the Impact of a Teacher Leadership Programme in a Teaching Schools Alliance. Journal of Teacher Action Research
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2014) ‘The Afghan conflict: causes and consequences.’ Geography Review 28(1): 22-27
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2013) What are the psychological factors that affect students’ academic resilience and can teachers influence these? Unpublished thesis
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘Unlocking Leadership Potential’, The Magazine of the Boarding School’s Association, 33: 42-45
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2009) ‘Learning to Lead’, Leader, The Education Leader Magazine 41: 22-25
Presentations
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2019) ‘How could leaders improve the flourishing of their teams?’ ‘Stowe Ed Conference’, Forthcoming: 7 Jan 2019
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2018) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education: 21 Jun 2018
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2017) ‘How can school leaders improve teacher flourishing?’ ‘Doing Education Differently Conference’, University of Oxford, Department of Education, 11 Mar 17
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2016) ‘Developing school leaders who enable teachers to flourish’ The Telegraph Festival of Education 23 Jun 16
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Developing leadership in pupils and teachers’ High School Affiliated to Renmin University of China, Beijing. 20 Oct 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Resilience for leaders.’ Global Social Leaders World Summit. 16 Aug 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Emotional Intelligence for Leaders.’ Global Leaders in Education. 12 Aug 15
  • Coates, S.; Fraser, H.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J.; and Nasim, A. (2015) ‘Breaking through the glass ceiling – how can schools empower our girls to become leaders?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education. 19 Jun 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. ‘Developing Leadership in Schools’ (2015). G20 Schools Conference. International conference for head teachers. 11 Apr 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2018) ‘Introduction’, Wellington Leadership Institute: Festival of Leadership. Mar 2012-15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘How the Young Learn to Lead’, Raffles Institution (Singapore) -Purdue University (USA) Education Forum on Gifted & Talented Youth 2012. Singapore. 15 Mar 12
  • Draper, D.; Dyer, R.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Schools’. Presentation for a meeting about pupil leadership and character development at 10 Downing Street. 16 Nov 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Young People’. Presentation for a meeting about leadership and character at 10 Downing Street. 7 Mar 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K. & Seldon, A. (2012) ‘Introduction’, Leading Your School in the 21st Century. 7 Feb 12

Kamal Armanious is particularly interested in the topic of education governance to explore what is possible in developing an improved governance system for technical and vocational education and training (TVET).

There have always been various calls from different international organisations such UNESCO, ILO, World Bank, OECD etc. to develop a transformed and transformative approach to TVET. This is attractive for certain theoretical as well as practical reasons; however, one set of limitations in achieving this vision lies in the arena of governance. Mr Armanious examines an imagined better model of governance that can be developed from the principles of a new approach and wider theoretical resources with consideration to national realities where there may be very serious obstacles in the way of realising this new governance approach and hence the overall planned transformation.

Title of Thesis

Education and Training Policies in Egypt: Good Governance and Stakeholders Participation

 

Amanda is completing a part-time DPhil, alongside working in Initial Teacher Education at Leeds Trinity University.

Her research is focused on understanding tensions, contradictions and conflicts that teachers in disadvantaged schools may experience when they engage in research activity.  Her research focus is influenced by her own experiences of working as a research-active teacher in disadvantaged schools, and recent work in teacher education to support experienced and beginning teachers in developing their own research activities.

One of the aims of Amanda’s research is to construct a framework to support teachers in pursuing research activity and critical scholarship work which articulates with wider social movements to address issues of poverty and disadvantage in schools.

Title of Thesis

Teachers’ perspectives on tensions between policy, practice and research in disadvantaged schools

Publications 

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2017) A ‘usable past’ of teacher education in England: history in JET’s anniversary issue. Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy, 43 (5), pp.616-627.

Nuttall, A. (2016) The ‘curriculum challenge’: Moving towards the ‘Storyline’ approach in a case study urban primary school.  Improving Schools, 19 (2), pp. 154-166.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Learning {Re}imagined: A review.  Primary First, 15, pp. 17-18.

Nuttall, A. and Doherty, J. (2014) Disaffected boys and the achievement gap: the ‘wallpaper effect’ and what is hidden by a focus on school results.  The Urban Review, 46 (5), pp.800-815.

Conference Papers and Presentations

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2018) “No child is pre-ordained to fail” Teachers questioning policy assumptions.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Newcastle, 11-13 September.

Nuttall, A. and Tobbell, C. (2017) Trainee teachers’ perspectives on practitioner enquiry.  Paper presented at the 8th TEAN Conference: Thinking Deeply about Education, Birmingham, 11-12 May.

Nuttall, A. (2017) Assessment at primary level: quality, comparability and improving secondary readiness.  A perspective from ITE.  Speech at the Westminster Education Forum Keynote Seminar: Next steps for reforming primary education: effective teaching practices, assessment and accountably, London, 18 January.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Deficit narratives and lived realities: whose poverty is it?  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the Australian Association for Research in Education, Melbourne, 27 November – 1 December.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Disenfranchised boys’ reflections on their urban schooling experience: “What a Waste!”.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Philpott, C., Beckett, L. and Wrigley, T. (2016) Collaborative practitioner inquiry: making a difference to urban schools.  Innovation session (school visits and symposium) presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Finn, B. and Beckett, L. (2015) Teachers’ constructions of poverty effects: Their research evidence.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Belfast, 15-17 September.

Nuttall, A. (2014) Teachers’ voice on disengaged boys: the role of one teacher-researcher in an English primary school. Paper presented at the Joint Australian Association for Research in Education and the New Zealand Association for Research in Education Conference, Brisbane, 30 November – 4 December.

Abigail’s research explores the role of education in students’ personal development and how this can be supported by policy, curricula, initial teacher education and teacher professional development. In particular she focuses on history education, citizenship education and peace education as vehicles for dialogue. These opportunities for students to engage with social questions are vital for building cohesive societies. This flows from the recognition that traditional forums for developing public understanding, such as post-conflict truth commissions, need to be complemented by intergenerational and educational perspectives.

Abigail has taught History, Politics, Debating as well as Relationships and Sex Education to secondary school students in South Africa, England and the USA.

She holds postgraduate degrees in Post-Conflict and Transitional Justice (University of Cape Town), in Education, Globalisation and International Development (University of Cambridge) and in African Studies (University of Oxford). She is a Rhodes Scholar, Mandela-Magdalene Scholar and Mandela-Rhodes Scholar.

Title of thesis

GCSE History, Policy Reform and Student Development: How students and teachers navigate the thematic study “Empires, Migration and the People”

Conference papers

Teaching Migration, Belonging, and Empire in Secondary Schools: evaluation of a teacher professional development program, (2019) History Educators International Research Network Conference, Lead author: Dr Jason Todd, University of Vienna, Austria.

“The Problems and Prospects of Teaching South Africa’s Recent History: Teachers’ Perspectives”, (2018) Sustainability, peace and education – Exploring promise and practice: BAICE 20th Anniversary Symposium, University of Bristol, England.

“New Generations, Old Wounds: Learning History at Home and School in Northern Ireland”, (2018) European Social Science and History Conference,
Queens University Belfast, Northern Ireland.

“The Methodological Challenges of Investigating the Role of History Teaching in Peacebuilding”, (2017), Present Past: Time, Memory, and the Negotiation of Historical Justice Conference, Columbia University, United States of America.

“Teaching South Africa’s Truth and Reconciliation Commission”, (2017) European Conference on African Studies, Universität Basel, Switzerland.

Research Assistant Publications

Review of the evidence on feedback in primary and secondary schools, (forthcoming, 2021) for the Education Endowment Foundation, Lead author: Prof Velda Elliott.

Teaching Migration, Belonging, and Empire in Secondary Schools, (2019), for Runnymede Trust and the European Research Council, Lead authors: Kimberly McIntosh, Dr Jason Todd and Prof Nandini Das.

Gender and the Politics of Reconciliation (2016), for The Institute for Justice and Reconciliation, Lead author: Dr Helen Scanlon

SOLE AUTHOR PUBLICATIONS

‘Transitions, Truth-Telling and Teaching History’, Cambridge Open-Review Educational Research e-Journal, Vol. 4, 2017.

Paul Riser is a DPhil Student in the department. His research focuses broadly on students’ (especially the marginalised) identities work in upper-secondary English Language Arts classrooms.

Prior to starting his doctoral studies, Paul earned a BSc in English Language Arts (Secondary Education) with a minor in Theology and a BA in Spanish and International Studies with a minor in Psychology from Texas Lutheran University. His MA in English Literature and Language is from St. Mary’s University.

As part of his postgraduate schoolwork, Paul undertook a placement in two graduate certificate programs, earning both his School Counselor certification and School Principal certification for all grade levels in the state of Texas, USA. In addition to English Language Arts and Reading (4th-12th grades), he is also qualified to teach Health (all levels), Journalism (7-12), Speech (7-12), Social Studies (7-12), and English as a Second Language (all levels) in Texas. Further, Paul holds a teaching certification in California, USA, the United Kingdom and Wales, the Kingdom of Denmark, and the Netherlands.

As a public school English teacher for 8 years, Paul was awarded many distinctions including, but not limited to: El maestro de impacto, two Harvard Book Awards, Teacher of the Year, and Texas Parent-Teacher Association Life Member.

His research to inform his doctoral thesis work will be completed in the United States of America. Furthermore, his research interests revolve around the nexus points of gender, ethnicity, sexuality, economic status, and religion as they relate to the agency students have in the classroom.

Paul is the 2019-2020 Student Liaison Coordinator for the Department of Education, Oxford. In this role, he is charged with leading/convening weekly workshops on a variety of research training topics, co-organizing networking and career advice opportunities for graduate students, and liaising with Cambridge University personnel to organize the annual Oxbridge Exchange. Furthermore, Paul supports the Higher Degrees Office as appropriate and meets regularly with directors and other stakeholders to discuss issues of common student concern in order to develop student identity and community throughout the Department.

Paul serves as the representative student voice on the Social Sciences Division Equality & Diversity Steering Group for the University of Oxford.

Paul is also a part-time Research Assistant working with professionals and other academics within the Department of Education on funded and individual projects as needed.

Supervisors: Associate Professors Jenni Ingram and Velda Elliott & Departmental Lecturer Jason Todd.

Thesis Title: ‘Using Positioning Theory to Understand Marginalised Students’ Identities Work and Their Learning Experiences in English Language Arts Classrooms’

Open-Access Publication:
Ingram, Jenni, & Riser, P.A. (2019). Experiences of problem solving in whole class interactions. Avances De Investigación En Educación Matemática, Avances de Investigación en Educación Matemática, Number 16; October 2019.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.35763/aiem.v0i16.279

Tessa is currently completing a part-time DPhil, alongside work as a senior leader in a London secondary school.

Her research explores how teachers on school-based ITE routes (TeachFirst and School Direct salaried) approach learning from experience. The research takes an action research approach: working with participant beginning teachers and mentors to critically examine and reflect on the processes of learning to teach, using their conversations as stimulus data.

Prior to joining the Department of Education Tessa completed an MSc in Educational Research (University of Bristol).

Yoon Young has been involved in a variety of academic and professional projects related to teacher education.

She is currently a member of the Teacher Education and Professional Learning (TEPL) research group at Oxford. Her doctoral research focuses on teacher education policy and practice in England. The study examines the relationship between individuals’ own objectives, the stated programme goals, and the national teachers’ standards in the operation of the Oxford Internship Scheme (OIS). It also explores the perceptions of stakeholders regarding ideal goals that could drive a re-conceptualised teacher education programme.

Prior to her doctorate, Yoon Young used to be a social studies teacher and subsequently worked as a consultant for the OECD’s Initial Teacher Preparation (ITP) Study. She holds a B.A. in Social Studies and Geography Education from the Ewha Womans University, and an M.A. in Educational Leadership from the University of Jyväskylä, where she was a grantee of the Korean Government Scholarship for Study Overseas.

Katy is a Deputy Headteacher and the founder of a Leadership and Coaching Institute, which she now co-directs.

Katy is an Associate Fellow at the Oxford Character Project and a Research Associate at the Oxford University Wellbeing Research Centre. She is the co-founder of Global Social Leaders, a leadership programme which has participants in 105 countries, all passionate about creating and sustaining positive change in the world.

Title of Thesis

How could school leaders improve the flourishing and wellbeing of teaching staff?

Books
  • Granville-Chapman, K. and Bidston, E (2020) Leader: Know, love and inspire your people. Carmarthen: Crownhouse Publishing
Book Chapters
  •  Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ In White, M. & McCallum, F. (Ed.s) Wellbeing and Resilience Education: Covid-19 And Its Impact on Education Systems. Routledge
Publications
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘Purpose and Leadership in Education and Beyond’. The Education Exchange. Available from: https://theeducation.exchange/purpose-and-leadership-in-education-and-beyond/
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘The Three Secrets of COVID-era Leadership’. Times Education Supplement. Available from: https://www.tes.com/news/three-secrets-covid-era-school-leadership
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2016) ‘Assessing the Impact of a Teacher Leadership Programme in a Teaching Schools Alliance. Journal of Teacher Action Research
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2014) ‘The Afghan conflict: causes and consequences.’ Geography Review 28(1): 22-27
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2013) What are the psychological factors that affect students’ academic resilience and can teachers influence these? Unpublished thesis
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘Unlocking Leadership Potential’, The Magazine of the Boarding School’s Association, 33: 42-45
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2009) ‘Learning to Lead’, Leader, The Education Leader Magazine 41: 22-25
Presentations
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2019) ‘How could leaders improve the flourishing of their teams?’ ‘Stowe Ed Conference’, Forthcoming: 7 Jan 2019
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2018) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education: 21 Jun 2018
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2017) ‘How can school leaders improve teacher flourishing?’ ‘Doing Education Differently Conference’, University of Oxford, Department of Education, 11 Mar 17
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2016) ‘Developing school leaders who enable teachers to flourish’ The Telegraph Festival of Education 23 Jun 16
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Developing leadership in pupils and teachers’ High School Affiliated to Renmin University of China, Beijing. 20 Oct 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Resilience for leaders.’ Global Social Leaders World Summit. 16 Aug 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Emotional Intelligence for Leaders.’ Global Leaders in Education. 12 Aug 15
  • Coates, S.; Fraser, H.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J.; and Nasim, A. (2015) ‘Breaking through the glass ceiling – how can schools empower our girls to become leaders?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education. 19 Jun 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. ‘Developing Leadership in Schools’ (2015). G20 Schools Conference. International conference for head teachers. 11 Apr 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2018) ‘Introduction’, Wellington Leadership Institute: Festival of Leadership. Mar 2012-15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘How the Young Learn to Lead’, Raffles Institution (Singapore) -Purdue University (USA) Education Forum on Gifted & Talented Youth 2012. Singapore. 15 Mar 12
  • Draper, D.; Dyer, R.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Schools’. Presentation for a meeting about pupil leadership and character development at 10 Downing Street. 16 Nov 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Young People’. Presentation for a meeting about leadership and character at 10 Downing Street. 7 Mar 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K. & Seldon, A. (2012) ‘Introduction’, Leading Your School in the 21st Century. 7 Feb 12

Kamal Armanious is particularly interested in the topic of education governance to explore what is possible in developing an improved governance system for technical and vocational education and training (TVET).

There have always been various calls from different international organisations such UNESCO, ILO, World Bank, OECD etc. to develop a transformed and transformative approach to TVET. This is attractive for certain theoretical as well as practical reasons; however, one set of limitations in achieving this vision lies in the arena of governance. Mr Armanious examines an imagined better model of governance that can be developed from the principles of a new approach and wider theoretical resources with consideration to national realities where there may be very serious obstacles in the way of realising this new governance approach and hence the overall planned transformation.

Title of Thesis

Education and Training Policies in Egypt: Good Governance and Stakeholders Participation

 

Amanda is completing a part-time DPhil, alongside working in Initial Teacher Education at Leeds Trinity University.

Her research is focused on understanding tensions, contradictions and conflicts that teachers in disadvantaged schools may experience when they engage in research activity.  Her research focus is influenced by her own experiences of working as a research-active teacher in disadvantaged schools, and recent work in teacher education to support experienced and beginning teachers in developing their own research activities.

One of the aims of Amanda’s research is to construct a framework to support teachers in pursuing research activity and critical scholarship work which articulates with wider social movements to address issues of poverty and disadvantage in schools.

Title of Thesis

Teachers’ perspectives on tensions between policy, practice and research in disadvantaged schools

Publications 

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2017) A ‘usable past’ of teacher education in England: history in JET’s anniversary issue. Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy, 43 (5), pp.616-627.

Nuttall, A. (2016) The ‘curriculum challenge’: Moving towards the ‘Storyline’ approach in a case study urban primary school.  Improving Schools, 19 (2), pp. 154-166.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Learning {Re}imagined: A review.  Primary First, 15, pp. 17-18.

Nuttall, A. and Doherty, J. (2014) Disaffected boys and the achievement gap: the ‘wallpaper effect’ and what is hidden by a focus on school results.  The Urban Review, 46 (5), pp.800-815.

Conference Papers and Presentations

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2018) “No child is pre-ordained to fail” Teachers questioning policy assumptions.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Newcastle, 11-13 September.

Nuttall, A. and Tobbell, C. (2017) Trainee teachers’ perspectives on practitioner enquiry.  Paper presented at the 8th TEAN Conference: Thinking Deeply about Education, Birmingham, 11-12 May.

Nuttall, A. (2017) Assessment at primary level: quality, comparability and improving secondary readiness.  A perspective from ITE.  Speech at the Westminster Education Forum Keynote Seminar: Next steps for reforming primary education: effective teaching practices, assessment and accountably, London, 18 January.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Deficit narratives and lived realities: whose poverty is it?  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the Australian Association for Research in Education, Melbourne, 27 November – 1 December.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Disenfranchised boys’ reflections on their urban schooling experience: “What a Waste!”.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Philpott, C., Beckett, L. and Wrigley, T. (2016) Collaborative practitioner inquiry: making a difference to urban schools.  Innovation session (school visits and symposium) presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Finn, B. and Beckett, L. (2015) Teachers’ constructions of poverty effects: Their research evidence.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Belfast, 15-17 September.

Nuttall, A. (2014) Teachers’ voice on disengaged boys: the role of one teacher-researcher in an English primary school. Paper presented at the Joint Australian Association for Research in Education and the New Zealand Association for Research in Education Conference, Brisbane, 30 November – 4 December.

Abigail’s research explores the role of education in students’ personal development and how this can be supported by policy, curricula, initial teacher education and teacher professional development. In particular she focuses on history education, citizenship education and peace education as vehicles for dialogue. These opportunities for students to engage with social questions are vital for building cohesive societies. This flows from the recognition that traditional forums for developing public understanding, such as post-conflict truth commissions, need to be complemented by intergenerational and educational perspectives.

Abigail has taught History, Politics, Debating as well as Relationships and Sex Education to secondary school students in South Africa, England and the USA.

She holds postgraduate degrees in Post-Conflict and Transitional Justice (University of Cape Town), in Education, Globalisation and International Development (University of Cambridge) and in African Studies (University of Oxford). She is a Rhodes Scholar, Mandela-Magdalene Scholar and Mandela-Rhodes Scholar.

Title of thesis

GCSE History, Policy Reform and Student Development: How students and teachers navigate the thematic study “Empires, Migration and the People”

Conference papers

Teaching Migration, Belonging, and Empire in Secondary Schools: evaluation of a teacher professional development program, (2019) History Educators International Research Network Conference, Lead author: Dr Jason Todd, University of Vienna, Austria.

“The Problems and Prospects of Teaching South Africa’s Recent History: Teachers’ Perspectives”, (2018) Sustainability, peace and education – Exploring promise and practice: BAICE 20th Anniversary Symposium, University of Bristol, England.

“New Generations, Old Wounds: Learning History at Home and School in Northern Ireland”, (2018) European Social Science and History Conference,
Queens University Belfast, Northern Ireland.

“The Methodological Challenges of Investigating the Role of History Teaching in Peacebuilding”, (2017), Present Past: Time, Memory, and the Negotiation of Historical Justice Conference, Columbia University, United States of America.

“Teaching South Africa’s Truth and Reconciliation Commission”, (2017) European Conference on African Studies, Universität Basel, Switzerland.

Research Assistant Publications

Review of the evidence on feedback in primary and secondary schools, (forthcoming, 2021) for the Education Endowment Foundation, Lead author: Prof Velda Elliott.

Teaching Migration, Belonging, and Empire in Secondary Schools, (2019), for Runnymede Trust and the European Research Council, Lead authors: Kimberly McIntosh, Dr Jason Todd and Prof Nandini Das.

Gender and the Politics of Reconciliation (2016), for The Institute for Justice and Reconciliation, Lead author: Dr Helen Scanlon

SOLE AUTHOR PUBLICATIONS

‘Transitions, Truth-Telling and Teaching History’, Cambridge Open-Review Educational Research e-Journal, Vol. 4, 2017.

Paul Riser is a DPhil Student in the department. His research focuses broadly on students’ (especially the marginalised) identities work in upper-secondary English Language Arts classrooms.

Prior to starting his doctoral studies, Paul earned a BSc in English Language Arts (Secondary Education) with a minor in Theology and a BA in Spanish and International Studies with a minor in Psychology from Texas Lutheran University. His MA in English Literature and Language is from St. Mary’s University.

As part of his postgraduate schoolwork, Paul undertook a placement in two graduate certificate programs, earning both his School Counselor certification and School Principal certification for all grade levels in the state of Texas, USA. In addition to English Language Arts and Reading (4th-12th grades), he is also qualified to teach Health (all levels), Journalism (7-12), Speech (7-12), Social Studies (7-12), and English as a Second Language (all levels) in Texas. Further, Paul holds a teaching certification in California, USA, the United Kingdom and Wales, the Kingdom of Denmark, and the Netherlands.

As a public school English teacher for 8 years, Paul was awarded many distinctions including, but not limited to: El maestro de impacto, two Harvard Book Awards, Teacher of the Year, and Texas Parent-Teacher Association Life Member.

His research to inform his doctoral thesis work will be completed in the United States of America. Furthermore, his research interests revolve around the nexus points of gender, ethnicity, sexuality, economic status, and religion as they relate to the agency students have in the classroom.

Paul is the 2019-2020 Student Liaison Coordinator for the Department of Education, Oxford. In this role, he is charged with leading/convening weekly workshops on a variety of research training topics, co-organizing networking and career advice opportunities for graduate students, and liaising with Cambridge University personnel to organize the annual Oxbridge Exchange. Furthermore, Paul supports the Higher Degrees Office as appropriate and meets regularly with directors and other stakeholders to discuss issues of common student concern in order to develop student identity and community throughout the Department.

Paul serves as the representative student voice on the Social Sciences Division Equality & Diversity Steering Group for the University of Oxford.

Paul is also a part-time Research Assistant working with professionals and other academics within the Department of Education on funded and individual projects as needed.

Supervisors: Associate Professors Jenni Ingram and Velda Elliott & Departmental Lecturer Jason Todd.

Thesis Title: ‘Using Positioning Theory to Understand Marginalised Students’ Identities Work and Their Learning Experiences in English Language Arts Classrooms’

Open-Access Publication:
Ingram, Jenni, & Riser, P.A. (2019). Experiences of problem solving in whole class interactions. Avances De Investigación En Educación Matemática, Avances de Investigación en Educación Matemática, Number 16; October 2019.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.35763/aiem.v0i16.279

Tessa is currently completing a part-time DPhil, alongside work as a senior leader in a London secondary school.

Her research explores how teachers on school-based ITE routes (TeachFirst and School Direct salaried) approach learning from experience. The research takes an action research approach: working with participant beginning teachers and mentors to critically examine and reflect on the processes of learning to teach, using their conversations as stimulus data.

Prior to joining the Department of Education Tessa completed an MSc in Educational Research (University of Bristol).

Yoon Young has been involved in a variety of academic and professional projects related to teacher education.

She is currently a member of the Teacher Education and Professional Learning (TEPL) research group at Oxford. Her doctoral research focuses on teacher education policy and practice in England. The study examines the relationship between individuals’ own objectives, the stated programme goals, and the national teachers’ standards in the operation of the Oxford Internship Scheme (OIS). It also explores the perceptions of stakeholders regarding ideal goals that could drive a re-conceptualised teacher education programme.

Prior to her doctorate, Yoon Young used to be a social studies teacher and subsequently worked as a consultant for the OECD’s Initial Teacher Preparation (ITP) Study. She holds a B.A. in Social Studies and Geography Education from the Ewha Womans University, and an M.A. in Educational Leadership from the University of Jyväskylä, where she was a grantee of the Korean Government Scholarship for Study Overseas.

Katy is a Deputy Headteacher and the founder of a Leadership and Coaching Institute, which she now co-directs.

Katy is an Associate Fellow at the Oxford Character Project and a Research Associate at the Oxford University Wellbeing Research Centre. She is the co-founder of Global Social Leaders, a leadership programme which has participants in 105 countries, all passionate about creating and sustaining positive change in the world.

Title of Thesis

How could school leaders improve the flourishing and wellbeing of teaching staff?

Books
  • Granville-Chapman, K. and Bidston, E (2020) Leader: Know, love and inspire your people. Carmarthen: Crownhouse Publishing
Book Chapters
  •  Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ In White, M. & McCallum, F. (Ed.s) Wellbeing and Resilience Education: Covid-19 And Its Impact on Education Systems. Routledge
Publications
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘Purpose and Leadership in Education and Beyond’. The Education Exchange. Available from: https://theeducation.exchange/purpose-and-leadership-in-education-and-beyond/
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘The Three Secrets of COVID-era Leadership’. Times Education Supplement. Available from: https://www.tes.com/news/three-secrets-covid-era-school-leadership
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2016) ‘Assessing the Impact of a Teacher Leadership Programme in a Teaching Schools Alliance. Journal of Teacher Action Research
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2014) ‘The Afghan conflict: causes and consequences.’ Geography Review 28(1): 22-27
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2013) What are the psychological factors that affect students’ academic resilience and can teachers influence these? Unpublished thesis
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘Unlocking Leadership Potential’, The Magazine of the Boarding School’s Association, 33: 42-45
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2009) ‘Learning to Lead’, Leader, The Education Leader Magazine 41: 22-25
Presentations
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2019) ‘How could leaders improve the flourishing of their teams?’ ‘Stowe Ed Conference’, Forthcoming: 7 Jan 2019
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2018) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education: 21 Jun 2018
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2017) ‘How can school leaders improve teacher flourishing?’ ‘Doing Education Differently Conference’, University of Oxford, Department of Education, 11 Mar 17
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2016) ‘Developing school leaders who enable teachers to flourish’ The Telegraph Festival of Education 23 Jun 16
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Developing leadership in pupils and teachers’ High School Affiliated to Renmin University of China, Beijing. 20 Oct 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Resilience for leaders.’ Global Social Leaders World Summit. 16 Aug 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Emotional Intelligence for Leaders.’ Global Leaders in Education. 12 Aug 15
  • Coates, S.; Fraser, H.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J.; and Nasim, A. (2015) ‘Breaking through the glass ceiling – how can schools empower our girls to become leaders?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education. 19 Jun 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. ‘Developing Leadership in Schools’ (2015). G20 Schools Conference. International conference for head teachers. 11 Apr 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2018) ‘Introduction’, Wellington Leadership Institute: Festival of Leadership. Mar 2012-15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘How the Young Learn to Lead’, Raffles Institution (Singapore) -Purdue University (USA) Education Forum on Gifted & Talented Youth 2012. Singapore. 15 Mar 12
  • Draper, D.; Dyer, R.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Schools’. Presentation for a meeting about pupil leadership and character development at 10 Downing Street. 16 Nov 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Young People’. Presentation for a meeting about leadership and character at 10 Downing Street. 7 Mar 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K. & Seldon, A. (2012) ‘Introduction’, Leading Your School in the 21st Century. 7 Feb 12

Kamal Armanious is particularly interested in the topic of education governance to explore what is possible in developing an improved governance system for technical and vocational education and training (TVET).

There have always been various calls from different international organisations such UNESCO, ILO, World Bank, OECD etc. to develop a transformed and transformative approach to TVET. This is attractive for certain theoretical as well as practical reasons; however, one set of limitations in achieving this vision lies in the arena of governance. Mr Armanious examines an imagined better model of governance that can be developed from the principles of a new approach and wider theoretical resources with consideration to national realities where there may be very serious obstacles in the way of realising this new governance approach and hence the overall planned transformation.

Title of Thesis

Education and Training Policies in Egypt: Good Governance and Stakeholders Participation

 

Amanda is completing a part-time DPhil, alongside working in Initial Teacher Education at Leeds Trinity University.

Her research is focused on understanding tensions, contradictions and conflicts that teachers in disadvantaged schools may experience when they engage in research activity.  Her research focus is influenced by her own experiences of working as a research-active teacher in disadvantaged schools, and recent work in teacher education to support experienced and beginning teachers in developing their own research activities.

One of the aims of Amanda’s research is to construct a framework to support teachers in pursuing research activity and critical scholarship work which articulates with wider social movements to address issues of poverty and disadvantage in schools.

Title of Thesis

Teachers’ perspectives on tensions between policy, practice and research in disadvantaged schools

Publications 

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2017) A ‘usable past’ of teacher education in England: history in JET’s anniversary issue. Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy, 43 (5), pp.616-627.

Nuttall, A. (2016) The ‘curriculum challenge’: Moving towards the ‘Storyline’ approach in a case study urban primary school.  Improving Schools, 19 (2), pp. 154-166.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Learning {Re}imagined: A review.  Primary First, 15, pp. 17-18.

Nuttall, A. and Doherty, J. (2014) Disaffected boys and the achievement gap: the ‘wallpaper effect’ and what is hidden by a focus on school results.  The Urban Review, 46 (5), pp.800-815.

Conference Papers and Presentations

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2018) “No child is pre-ordained to fail” Teachers questioning policy assumptions.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Newcastle, 11-13 September.

Nuttall, A. and Tobbell, C. (2017) Trainee teachers’ perspectives on practitioner enquiry.  Paper presented at the 8th TEAN Conference: Thinking Deeply about Education, Birmingham, 11-12 May.

Nuttall, A. (2017) Assessment at primary level: quality, comparability and improving secondary readiness.  A perspective from ITE.  Speech at the Westminster Education Forum Keynote Seminar: Next steps for reforming primary education: effective teaching practices, assessment and accountably, London, 18 January.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Deficit narratives and lived realities: whose poverty is it?  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the Australian Association for Research in Education, Melbourne, 27 November – 1 December.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Disenfranchised boys’ reflections on their urban schooling experience: “What a Waste!”.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Philpott, C., Beckett, L. and Wrigley, T. (2016) Collaborative practitioner inquiry: making a difference to urban schools.  Innovation session (school visits and symposium) presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Finn, B. and Beckett, L. (2015) Teachers’ constructions of poverty effects: Their research evidence.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Belfast, 15-17 September.

Nuttall, A. (2014) Teachers’ voice on disengaged boys: the role of one teacher-researcher in an English primary school. Paper presented at the Joint Australian Association for Research in Education and the New Zealand Association for Research in Education Conference, Brisbane, 30 November – 4 December.

Abigail’s research explores the role of education in students’ personal development and how this can be supported by policy, curricula, initial teacher education and teacher professional development. In particular she focuses on history education, citizenship education and peace education as vehicles for dialogue. These opportunities for students to engage with social questions are vital for building cohesive societies. This flows from the recognition that traditional forums for developing public understanding, such as post-conflict truth commissions, need to be complemented by intergenerational and educational perspectives.

Abigail has taught History, Politics, Debating as well as Relationships and Sex Education to secondary school students in South Africa, England and the USA.

She holds postgraduate degrees in Post-Conflict and Transitional Justice (University of Cape Town), in Education, Globalisation and International Development (University of Cambridge) and in African Studies (University of Oxford). She is a Rhodes Scholar, Mandela-Magdalene Scholar and Mandela-Rhodes Scholar.

Title of thesis

GCSE History, Policy Reform and Student Development: How students and teachers navigate the thematic study “Empires, Migration and the People”

Conference papers

Teaching Migration, Belonging, and Empire in Secondary Schools: evaluation of a teacher professional development program, (2019) History Educators International Research Network Conference, Lead author: Dr Jason Todd, University of Vienna, Austria.

“The Problems and Prospects of Teaching South Africa’s Recent History: Teachers’ Perspectives”, (2018) Sustainability, peace and education – Exploring promise and practice: BAICE 20th Anniversary Symposium, University of Bristol, England.

“New Generations, Old Wounds: Learning History at Home and School in Northern Ireland”, (2018) European Social Science and History Conference,
Queens University Belfast, Northern Ireland.

“The Methodological Challenges of Investigating the Role of History Teaching in Peacebuilding”, (2017), Present Past: Time, Memory, and the Negotiation of Historical Justice Conference, Columbia University, United States of America.

“Teaching South Africa’s Truth and Reconciliation Commission”, (2017) European Conference on African Studies, Universität Basel, Switzerland.

Research Assistant Publications

Review of the evidence on feedback in primary and secondary schools, (forthcoming, 2021) for the Education Endowment Foundation, Lead author: Prof Velda Elliott.

Teaching Migration, Belonging, and Empire in Secondary Schools, (2019), for Runnymede Trust and the European Research Council, Lead authors: Kimberly McIntosh, Dr Jason Todd and Prof Nandini Das.

Gender and the Politics of Reconciliation (2016), for The Institute for Justice and Reconciliation, Lead author: Dr Helen Scanlon

SOLE AUTHOR PUBLICATIONS

‘Transitions, Truth-Telling and Teaching History’, Cambridge Open-Review Educational Research e-Journal, Vol. 4, 2017.

Paul Riser is a DPhil Student in the department. His research focuses broadly on students’ (especially the marginalised) identities work in upper-secondary English Language Arts classrooms.

Prior to starting his doctoral studies, Paul earned a BSc in English Language Arts (Secondary Education) with a minor in Theology and a BA in Spanish and International Studies with a minor in Psychology from Texas Lutheran University. His MA in English Literature and Language is from St. Mary’s University.

As part of his postgraduate schoolwork, Paul undertook a placement in two graduate certificate programs, earning both his School Counselor certification and School Principal certification for all grade levels in the state of Texas, USA. In addition to English Language Arts and Reading (4th-12th grades), he is also qualified to teach Health (all levels), Journalism (7-12), Speech (7-12), Social Studies (7-12), and English as a Second Language (all levels) in Texas. Further, Paul holds a teaching certification in California, USA, the United Kingdom and Wales, the Kingdom of Denmark, and the Netherlands.

As a public school English teacher for 8 years, Paul was awarded many distinctions including, but not limited to: El maestro de impacto, two Harvard Book Awards, Teacher of the Year, and Texas Parent-Teacher Association Life Member.

His research to inform his doctoral thesis work will be completed in the United States of America. Furthermore, his research interests revolve around the nexus points of gender, ethnicity, sexuality, economic status, and religion as they relate to the agency students have in the classroom.

Paul is the 2019-2020 Student Liaison Coordinator for the Department of Education, Oxford. In this role, he is charged with leading/convening weekly workshops on a variety of research training topics, co-organizing networking and career advice opportunities for graduate students, and liaising with Cambridge University personnel to organize the annual Oxbridge Exchange. Furthermore, Paul supports the Higher Degrees Office as appropriate and meets regularly with directors and other stakeholders to discuss issues of common student concern in order to develop student identity and community throughout the Department.

Paul serves as the representative student voice on the Social Sciences Division Equality & Diversity Steering Group for the University of Oxford.

Paul is also a part-time Research Assistant working with professionals and other academics within the Department of Education on funded and individual projects as needed.

Supervisors: Associate Professors Jenni Ingram and Velda Elliott & Departmental Lecturer Jason Todd.

Thesis Title: ‘Using Positioning Theory to Understand Marginalised Students’ Identities Work and Their Learning Experiences in English Language Arts Classrooms’

Open-Access Publication:
Ingram, Jenni, & Riser, P.A. (2019). Experiences of problem solving in whole class interactions. Avances De Investigación En Educación Matemática, Avances de Investigación en Educación Matemática, Number 16; October 2019.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.35763/aiem.v0i16.279

Tessa is currently completing a part-time DPhil, alongside work as a senior leader in a London secondary school.

Her research explores how teachers on school-based ITE routes (TeachFirst and School Direct salaried) approach learning from experience. The research takes an action research approach: working with participant beginning teachers and mentors to critically examine and reflect on the processes of learning to teach, using their conversations as stimulus data.

Prior to joining the Department of Education Tessa completed an MSc in Educational Research (University of Bristol).

Yoon Young has been involved in a variety of academic and professional projects related to teacher education.

She is currently a member of the Teacher Education and Professional Learning (TEPL) research group at Oxford. Her doctoral research focuses on teacher education policy and practice in England. The study examines the relationship between individuals’ own objectives, the stated programme goals, and the national teachers’ standards in the operation of the Oxford Internship Scheme (OIS). It also explores the perceptions of stakeholders regarding ideal goals that could drive a re-conceptualised teacher education programme.

Prior to her doctorate, Yoon Young used to be a social studies teacher and subsequently worked as a consultant for the OECD’s Initial Teacher Preparation (ITP) Study. She holds a B.A. in Social Studies and Geography Education from the Ewha Womans University, and an M.A. in Educational Leadership from the University of Jyväskylä, where she was a grantee of the Korean Government Scholarship for Study Overseas.

Katy is a Deputy Headteacher and the founder of a Leadership and Coaching Institute, which she now co-directs.

Katy is an Associate Fellow at the Oxford Character Project and a Research Associate at the Oxford University Wellbeing Research Centre. She is the co-founder of Global Social Leaders, a leadership programme which has participants in 105 countries, all passionate about creating and sustaining positive change in the world.

Title of Thesis

How could school leaders improve the flourishing and wellbeing of teaching staff?

Books
  • Granville-Chapman, K. and Bidston, E (2020) Leader: Know, love and inspire your people. Carmarthen: Crownhouse Publishing
Book Chapters
  •  Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ In White, M. & McCallum, F. (Ed.s) Wellbeing and Resilience Education: Covid-19 And Its Impact on Education Systems. Routledge
Publications
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘Purpose and Leadership in Education and Beyond’. The Education Exchange. Available from: https://theeducation.exchange/purpose-and-leadership-in-education-and-beyond/
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘The Three Secrets of COVID-era Leadership’. Times Education Supplement. Available from: https://www.tes.com/news/three-secrets-covid-era-school-leadership
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2016) ‘Assessing the Impact of a Teacher Leadership Programme in a Teaching Schools Alliance. Journal of Teacher Action Research
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2014) ‘The Afghan conflict: causes and consequences.’ Geography Review 28(1): 22-27
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2013) What are the psychological factors that affect students’ academic resilience and can teachers influence these? Unpublished thesis
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘Unlocking Leadership Potential’, The Magazine of the Boarding School’s Association, 33: 42-45
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2009) ‘Learning to Lead’, Leader, The Education Leader Magazine 41: 22-25
Presentations
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2019) ‘How could leaders improve the flourishing of their teams?’ ‘Stowe Ed Conference’, Forthcoming: 7 Jan 2019
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2018) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education: 21 Jun 2018
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2017) ‘How can school leaders improve teacher flourishing?’ ‘Doing Education Differently Conference’, University of Oxford, Department of Education, 11 Mar 17
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2016) ‘Developing school leaders who enable teachers to flourish’ The Telegraph Festival of Education 23 Jun 16
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Developing leadership in pupils and teachers’ High School Affiliated to Renmin University of China, Beijing. 20 Oct 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Resilience for leaders.’ Global Social Leaders World Summit. 16 Aug 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Emotional Intelligence for Leaders.’ Global Leaders in Education. 12 Aug 15
  • Coates, S.; Fraser, H.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J.; and Nasim, A. (2015) ‘Breaking through the glass ceiling – how can schools empower our girls to become leaders?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education. 19 Jun 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. ‘Developing Leadership in Schools’ (2015). G20 Schools Conference. International conference for head teachers. 11 Apr 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2018) ‘Introduction’, Wellington Leadership Institute: Festival of Leadership. Mar 2012-15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘How the Young Learn to Lead’, Raffles Institution (Singapore) -Purdue University (USA) Education Forum on Gifted & Talented Youth 2012. Singapore. 15 Mar 12
  • Draper, D.; Dyer, R.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Schools’. Presentation for a meeting about pupil leadership and character development at 10 Downing Street. 16 Nov 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Young People’. Presentation for a meeting about leadership and character at 10 Downing Street. 7 Mar 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K. & Seldon, A. (2012) ‘Introduction’, Leading Your School in the 21st Century. 7 Feb 12

Kamal Armanious is particularly interested in the topic of education governance to explore what is possible in developing an improved governance system for technical and vocational education and training (TVET).

There have always been various calls from different international organisations such UNESCO, ILO, World Bank, OECD etc. to develop a transformed and transformative approach to TVET. This is attractive for certain theoretical as well as practical reasons; however, one set of limitations in achieving this vision lies in the arena of governance. Mr Armanious examines an imagined better model of governance that can be developed from the principles of a new approach and wider theoretical resources with consideration to national realities where there may be very serious obstacles in the way of realising this new governance approach and hence the overall planned transformation.

Title of Thesis

Education and Training Policies in Egypt: Good Governance and Stakeholders Participation

 

Amanda is completing a part-time DPhil, alongside working in Initial Teacher Education at Leeds Trinity University.

Her research is focused on understanding tensions, contradictions and conflicts that teachers in disadvantaged schools may experience when they engage in research activity.  Her research focus is influenced by her own experiences of working as a research-active teacher in disadvantaged schools, and recent work in teacher education to support experienced and beginning teachers in developing their own research activities.

One of the aims of Amanda’s research is to construct a framework to support teachers in pursuing research activity and critical scholarship work which articulates with wider social movements to address issues of poverty and disadvantage in schools.

Title of Thesis

Teachers’ perspectives on tensions between policy, practice and research in disadvantaged schools

Publications 

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2017) A ‘usable past’ of teacher education in England: history in JET’s anniversary issue. Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy, 43 (5), pp.616-627.

Nuttall, A. (2016) The ‘curriculum challenge’: Moving towards the ‘Storyline’ approach in a case study urban primary school.  Improving Schools, 19 (2), pp. 154-166.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Learning {Re}imagined: A review.  Primary First, 15, pp. 17-18.

Nuttall, A. and Doherty, J. (2014) Disaffected boys and the achievement gap: the ‘wallpaper effect’ and what is hidden by a focus on school results.  The Urban Review, 46 (5), pp.800-815.

Conference Papers and Presentations

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2018) “No child is pre-ordained to fail” Teachers questioning policy assumptions.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Newcastle, 11-13 September.

Nuttall, A. and Tobbell, C. (2017) Trainee teachers’ perspectives on practitioner enquiry.  Paper presented at the 8th TEAN Conference: Thinking Deeply about Education, Birmingham, 11-12 May.

Nuttall, A. (2017) Assessment at primary level: quality, comparability and improving secondary readiness.  A perspective from ITE.  Speech at the Westminster Education Forum Keynote Seminar: Next steps for reforming primary education: effective teaching practices, assessment and accountably, London, 18 January.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Deficit narratives and lived realities: whose poverty is it?  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the Australian Association for Research in Education, Melbourne, 27 November – 1 December.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Disenfranchised boys’ reflections on their urban schooling experience: “What a Waste!”.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Philpott, C., Beckett, L. and Wrigley, T. (2016) Collaborative practitioner inquiry: making a difference to urban schools.  Innovation session (school visits and symposium) presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Finn, B. and Beckett, L. (2015) Teachers’ constructions of poverty effects: Their research evidence.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Belfast, 15-17 September.

Nuttall, A. (2014) Teachers’ voice on disengaged boys: the role of one teacher-researcher in an English primary school. Paper presented at the Joint Australian Association for Research in Education and the New Zealand Association for Research in Education Conference, Brisbane, 30 November – 4 December.

Abigail’s research explores the role of education in students’ personal development and how this can be supported by policy, curricula, initial teacher education and teacher professional development. In particular she focuses on history education, citizenship education and peace education as vehicles for dialogue. These opportunities for students to engage with social questions are vital for building cohesive societies. This flows from the recognition that traditional forums for developing public understanding, such as post-conflict truth commissions, need to be complemented by intergenerational and educational perspectives.

Abigail has taught History, Politics, Debating as well as Relationships and Sex Education to secondary school students in South Africa, England and the USA.

She holds postgraduate degrees in Post-Conflict and Transitional Justice (University of Cape Town), in Education, Globalisation and International Development (University of Cambridge) and in African Studies (University of Oxford). She is a Rhodes Scholar, Mandela-Magdalene Scholar and Mandela-Rhodes Scholar.

Title of thesis

GCSE History, Policy Reform and Student Development: How students and teachers navigate the thematic study “Empires, Migration and the People”

Conference papers

Teaching Migration, Belonging, and Empire in Secondary Schools: evaluation of a teacher professional development program, (2019) History Educators International Research Network Conference, Lead author: Dr Jason Todd, University of Vienna, Austria.

“The Problems and Prospects of Teaching South Africa’s Recent History: Teachers’ Perspectives”, (2018) Sustainability, peace and education – Exploring promise and practice: BAICE 20th Anniversary Symposium, University of Bristol, England.

“New Generations, Old Wounds: Learning History at Home and School in Northern Ireland”, (2018) European Social Science and History Conference,
Queens University Belfast, Northern Ireland.

“The Methodological Challenges of Investigating the Role of History Teaching in Peacebuilding”, (2017), Present Past: Time, Memory, and the Negotiation of Historical Justice Conference, Columbia University, United States of America.

“Teaching South Africa’s Truth and Reconciliation Commission”, (2017) European Conference on African Studies, Universität Basel, Switzerland.

Research Assistant Publications

Review of the evidence on feedback in primary and secondary schools, (forthcoming, 2021) for the Education Endowment Foundation, Lead author: Prof Velda Elliott.

Teaching Migration, Belonging, and Empire in Secondary Schools, (2019), for Runnymede Trust and the European Research Council, Lead authors: Kimberly McIntosh, Dr Jason Todd and Prof Nandini Das.

Gender and the Politics of Reconciliation (2016), for The Institute for Justice and Reconciliation, Lead author: Dr Helen Scanlon

SOLE AUTHOR PUBLICATIONS

‘Transitions, Truth-Telling and Teaching History’, Cambridge Open-Review Educational Research e-Journal, Vol. 4, 2017.

Paul Riser is a DPhil Student in the department. His research focuses broadly on students’ (especially the marginalised) identities work in upper-secondary English Language Arts classrooms.

Prior to starting his doctoral studies, Paul earned a BSc in English Language Arts (Secondary Education) with a minor in Theology and a BA in Spanish and International Studies with a minor in Psychology from Texas Lutheran University. His MA in English Literature and Language is from St. Mary’s University.

As part of his postgraduate schoolwork, Paul undertook a placement in two graduate certificate programs, earning both his School Counselor certification and School Principal certification for all grade levels in the state of Texas, USA. In addition to English Language Arts and Reading (4th-12th grades), he is also qualified to teach Health (all levels), Journalism (7-12), Speech (7-12), Social Studies (7-12), and English as a Second Language (all levels) in Texas. Further, Paul holds a teaching certification in California, USA, the United Kingdom and Wales, the Kingdom of Denmark, and the Netherlands.

As a public school English teacher for 8 years, Paul was awarded many distinctions including, but not limited to: El maestro de impacto, two Harvard Book Awards, Teacher of the Year, and Texas Parent-Teacher Association Life Member.

His research to inform his doctoral thesis work will be completed in the United States of America. Furthermore, his research interests revolve around the nexus points of gender, ethnicity, sexuality, economic status, and religion as they relate to the agency students have in the classroom.

Paul is the 2019-2020 Student Liaison Coordinator for the Department of Education, Oxford. In this role, he is charged with leading/convening weekly workshops on a variety of research training topics, co-organizing networking and career advice opportunities for graduate students, and liaising with Cambridge University personnel to organize the annual Oxbridge Exchange. Furthermore, Paul supports the Higher Degrees Office as appropriate and meets regularly with directors and other stakeholders to discuss issues of common student concern in order to develop student identity and community throughout the Department.

Paul serves as the representative student voice on the Social Sciences Division Equality & Diversity Steering Group for the University of Oxford.

Paul is also a part-time Research Assistant working with professionals and other academics within the Department of Education on funded and individual projects as needed.

Supervisors: Associate Professors Jenni Ingram and Velda Elliott & Departmental Lecturer Jason Todd.

Thesis Title: ‘Using Positioning Theory to Understand Marginalised Students’ Identities Work and Their Learning Experiences in English Language Arts Classrooms’

Open-Access Publication:
Ingram, Jenni, & Riser, P.A. (2019). Experiences of problem solving in whole class interactions. Avances De Investigación En Educación Matemática, Avances de Investigación en Educación Matemática, Number 16; October 2019.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.35763/aiem.v0i16.279

Tessa is currently completing a part-time DPhil, alongside work as a senior leader in a London secondary school.

Her research explores how teachers on school-based ITE routes (TeachFirst and School Direct salaried) approach learning from experience. The research takes an action research approach: working with participant beginning teachers and mentors to critically examine and reflect on the processes of learning to teach, using their conversations as stimulus data.

Prior to joining the Department of Education Tessa completed an MSc in Educational Research (University of Bristol).

Yoon Young has been involved in a variety of academic and professional projects related to teacher education.

She is currently a member of the Teacher Education and Professional Learning (TEPL) research group at Oxford. Her doctoral research focuses on teacher education policy and practice in England. The study examines the relationship between individuals’ own objectives, the stated programme goals, and the national teachers’ standards in the operation of the Oxford Internship Scheme (OIS). It also explores the perceptions of stakeholders regarding ideal goals that could drive a re-conceptualised teacher education programme.

Prior to her doctorate, Yoon Young used to be a social studies teacher and subsequently worked as a consultant for the OECD’s Initial Teacher Preparation (ITP) Study. She holds a B.A. in Social Studies and Geography Education from the Ewha Womans University, and an M.A. in Educational Leadership from the University of Jyväskylä, where she was a grantee of the Korean Government Scholarship for Study Overseas.

Katy is a Deputy Headteacher and the founder of a Leadership and Coaching Institute, which she now co-directs.

Katy is an Associate Fellow at the Oxford Character Project and a Research Associate at the Oxford University Wellbeing Research Centre. She is the co-founder of Global Social Leaders, a leadership programme which has participants in 105 countries, all passionate about creating and sustaining positive change in the world.

Title of Thesis

How could school leaders improve the flourishing and wellbeing of teaching staff?

Books
  • Granville-Chapman, K. and Bidston, E (2020) Leader: Know, love and inspire your people. Carmarthen: Crownhouse Publishing
Book Chapters
  •  Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ In White, M. & McCallum, F. (Ed.s) Wellbeing and Resilience Education: Covid-19 And Its Impact on Education Systems. Routledge
Publications
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘Purpose and Leadership in Education and Beyond’. The Education Exchange. Available from: https://theeducation.exchange/purpose-and-leadership-in-education-and-beyond/
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘The Three Secrets of COVID-era Leadership’. Times Education Supplement. Available from: https://www.tes.com/news/three-secrets-covid-era-school-leadership
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2016) ‘Assessing the Impact of a Teacher Leadership Programme in a Teaching Schools Alliance. Journal of Teacher Action Research
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2014) ‘The Afghan conflict: causes and consequences.’ Geography Review 28(1): 22-27
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2013) What are the psychological factors that affect students’ academic resilience and can teachers influence these? Unpublished thesis
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘Unlocking Leadership Potential’, The Magazine of the Boarding School’s Association, 33: 42-45
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2009) ‘Learning to Lead’, Leader, The Education Leader Magazine 41: 22-25
Presentations
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2019) ‘How could leaders improve the flourishing of their teams?’ ‘Stowe Ed Conference’, Forthcoming: 7 Jan 2019
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2018) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education: 21 Jun 2018
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2017) ‘How can school leaders improve teacher flourishing?’ ‘Doing Education Differently Conference’, University of Oxford, Department of Education, 11 Mar 17
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2016) ‘Developing school leaders who enable teachers to flourish’ The Telegraph Festival of Education 23 Jun 16
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Developing leadership in pupils and teachers’ High School Affiliated to Renmin University of China, Beijing. 20 Oct 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Resilience for leaders.’ Global Social Leaders World Summit. 16 Aug 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Emotional Intelligence for Leaders.’ Global Leaders in Education. 12 Aug 15
  • Coates, S.; Fraser, H.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J.; and Nasim, A. (2015) ‘Breaking through the glass ceiling – how can schools empower our girls to become leaders?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education. 19 Jun 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. ‘Developing Leadership in Schools’ (2015). G20 Schools Conference. International conference for head teachers. 11 Apr 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2018) ‘Introduction’, Wellington Leadership Institute: Festival of Leadership. Mar 2012-15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘How the Young Learn to Lead’, Raffles Institution (Singapore) -Purdue University (USA) Education Forum on Gifted & Talented Youth 2012. Singapore. 15 Mar 12
  • Draper, D.; Dyer, R.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Schools’. Presentation for a meeting about pupil leadership and character development at 10 Downing Street. 16 Nov 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Young People’. Presentation for a meeting about leadership and character at 10 Downing Street. 7 Mar 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K. & Seldon, A. (2012) ‘Introduction’, Leading Your School in the 21st Century. 7 Feb 12

Kamal Armanious is particularly interested in the topic of education governance to explore what is possible in developing an improved governance system for technical and vocational education and training (TVET).

There have always been various calls from different international organisations such UNESCO, ILO, World Bank, OECD etc. to develop a transformed and transformative approach to TVET. This is attractive for certain theoretical as well as practical reasons; however, one set of limitations in achieving this vision lies in the arena of governance. Mr Armanious examines an imagined better model of governance that can be developed from the principles of a new approach and wider theoretical resources with consideration to national realities where there may be very serious obstacles in the way of realising this new governance approach and hence the overall planned transformation.

Title of Thesis

Education and Training Policies in Egypt: Good Governance and Stakeholders Participation

 

Amanda is completing a part-time DPhil, alongside working in Initial Teacher Education at Leeds Trinity University.

Her research is focused on understanding tensions, contradictions and conflicts that teachers in disadvantaged schools may experience when they engage in research activity.  Her research focus is influenced by her own experiences of working as a research-active teacher in disadvantaged schools, and recent work in teacher education to support experienced and beginning teachers in developing their own research activities.

One of the aims of Amanda’s research is to construct a framework to support teachers in pursuing research activity and critical scholarship work which articulates with wider social movements to address issues of poverty and disadvantage in schools.

Title of Thesis

Teachers’ perspectives on tensions between policy, practice and research in disadvantaged schools

Publications 

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2017) A ‘usable past’ of teacher education in England: history in JET’s anniversary issue. Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy, 43 (5), pp.616-627.

Nuttall, A. (2016) The ‘curriculum challenge’: Moving towards the ‘Storyline’ approach in a case study urban primary school.  Improving Schools, 19 (2), pp. 154-166.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Learning {Re}imagined: A review.  Primary First, 15, pp. 17-18.

Nuttall, A. and Doherty, J. (2014) Disaffected boys and the achievement gap: the ‘wallpaper effect’ and what is hidden by a focus on school results.  The Urban Review, 46 (5), pp.800-815.

Conference Papers and Presentations

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2018) “No child is pre-ordained to fail” Teachers questioning policy assumptions.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Newcastle, 11-13 September.

Nuttall, A. and Tobbell, C. (2017) Trainee teachers’ perspectives on practitioner enquiry.  Paper presented at the 8th TEAN Conference: Thinking Deeply about Education, Birmingham, 11-12 May.

Nuttall, A. (2017) Assessment at primary level: quality, comparability and improving secondary readiness.  A perspective from ITE.  Speech at the Westminster Education Forum Keynote Seminar: Next steps for reforming primary education: effective teaching practices, assessment and accountably, London, 18 January.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Deficit narratives and lived realities: whose poverty is it?  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the Australian Association for Research in Education, Melbourne, 27 November – 1 December.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Disenfranchised boys’ reflections on their urban schooling experience: “What a Waste!”.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Philpott, C., Beckett, L. and Wrigley, T. (2016) Collaborative practitioner inquiry: making a difference to urban schools.  Innovation session (school visits and symposium) presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Finn, B. and Beckett, L. (2015) Teachers’ constructions of poverty effects: Their research evidence.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Belfast, 15-17 September.

Nuttall, A. (2014) Teachers’ voice on disengaged boys: the role of one teacher-researcher in an English primary school. Paper presented at the Joint Australian Association for Research in Education and the New Zealand Association for Research in Education Conference, Brisbane, 30 November – 4 December.

Abigail’s research explores the role of education in students’ personal development and how this can be supported by policy, curricula, initial teacher education and teacher professional development. In particular she focuses on history education, citizenship education and peace education as vehicles for dialogue. These opportunities for students to engage with social questions are vital for building cohesive societies. This flows from the recognition that traditional forums for developing public understanding, such as post-conflict truth commissions, need to be complemented by intergenerational and educational perspectives.

Abigail has taught History, Politics, Debating as well as Relationships and Sex Education to secondary school students in South Africa, England and the USA.

She holds postgraduate degrees in Post-Conflict and Transitional Justice (University of Cape Town), in Education, Globalisation and International Development (University of Cambridge) and in African Studies (University of Oxford). She is a Rhodes Scholar, Mandela-Magdalene Scholar and Mandela-Rhodes Scholar.

Title of thesis

GCSE History, Policy Reform and Student Development: How students and teachers navigate the thematic study “Empires, Migration and the People”

Conference papers

Teaching Migration, Belonging, and Empire in Secondary Schools: evaluation of a teacher professional development program, (2019) History Educators International Research Network Conference, Lead author: Dr Jason Todd, University of Vienna, Austria.

“The Problems and Prospects of Teaching South Africa’s Recent History: Teachers’ Perspectives”, (2018) Sustainability, peace and education – Exploring promise and practice: BAICE 20th Anniversary Symposium, University of Bristol, England.

“New Generations, Old Wounds: Learning History at Home and School in Northern Ireland”, (2018) European Social Science and History Conference,
Queens University Belfast, Northern Ireland.

“The Methodological Challenges of Investigating the Role of History Teaching in Peacebuilding”, (2017), Present Past: Time, Memory, and the Negotiation of Historical Justice Conference, Columbia University, United States of America.

“Teaching South Africa’s Truth and Reconciliation Commission”, (2017) European Conference on African Studies, Universität Basel, Switzerland.

Research Assistant Publications

Review of the evidence on feedback in primary and secondary schools, (forthcoming, 2021) for the Education Endowment Foundation, Lead author: Prof Velda Elliott.

Teaching Migration, Belonging, and Empire in Secondary Schools, (2019), for Runnymede Trust and the European Research Council, Lead authors: Kimberly McIntosh, Dr Jason Todd and Prof Nandini Das.

Gender and the Politics of Reconciliation (2016), for The Institute for Justice and Reconciliation, Lead author: Dr Helen Scanlon

SOLE AUTHOR PUBLICATIONS

‘Transitions, Truth-Telling and Teaching History’, Cambridge Open-Review Educational Research e-Journal, Vol. 4, 2017.

Paul Riser is a DPhil Student in the department. His research focuses broadly on students’ (especially the marginalised) identities work in upper-secondary English Language Arts classrooms.

Prior to starting his doctoral studies, Paul earned a BSc in English Language Arts (Secondary Education) with a minor in Theology and a BA in Spanish and International Studies with a minor in Psychology from Texas Lutheran University. His MA in English Literature and Language is from St. Mary’s University.

As part of his postgraduate schoolwork, Paul undertook a placement in two graduate certificate programs, earning both his School Counselor certification and School Principal certification for all grade levels in the state of Texas, USA. In addition to English Language Arts and Reading (4th-12th grades), he is also qualified to teach Health (all levels), Journalism (7-12), Speech (7-12), Social Studies (7-12), and English as a Second Language (all levels) in Texas. Further, Paul holds a teaching certification in California, USA, the United Kingdom and Wales, the Kingdom of Denmark, and the Netherlands.

As a public school English teacher for 8 years, Paul was awarded many distinctions including, but not limited to: El maestro de impacto, two Harvard Book Awards, Teacher of the Year, and Texas Parent-Teacher Association Life Member.

His research to inform his doctoral thesis work will be completed in the United States of America. Furthermore, his research interests revolve around the nexus points of gender, ethnicity, sexuality, economic status, and religion as they relate to the agency students have in the classroom.

Paul is the 2019-2020 Student Liaison Coordinator for the Department of Education, Oxford. In this role, he is charged with leading/convening weekly workshops on a variety of research training topics, co-organizing networking and career advice opportunities for graduate students, and liaising with Cambridge University personnel to organize the annual Oxbridge Exchange. Furthermore, Paul supports the Higher Degrees Office as appropriate and meets regularly with directors and other stakeholders to discuss issues of common student concern in order to develop student identity and community throughout the Department.

Paul serves as the representative student voice on the Social Sciences Division Equality & Diversity Steering Group for the University of Oxford.

Paul is also a part-time Research Assistant working with professionals and other academics within the Department of Education on funded and individual projects as needed.

Supervisors: Associate Professors Jenni Ingram and Velda Elliott & Departmental Lecturer Jason Todd.

Thesis Title: ‘Using Positioning Theory to Understand Marginalised Students’ Identities Work and Their Learning Experiences in English Language Arts Classrooms’

Open-Access Publication:
Ingram, Jenni, & Riser, P.A. (2019). Experiences of problem solving in whole class interactions. Avances De Investigación En Educación Matemática, Avances de Investigación en Educación Matemática, Number 16; October 2019.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.35763/aiem.v0i16.279

Tessa is currently completing a part-time DPhil, alongside work as a senior leader in a London secondary school.

Her research explores how teachers on school-based ITE routes (TeachFirst and School Direct salaried) approach learning from experience. The research takes an action research approach: working with participant beginning teachers and mentors to critically examine and reflect on the processes of learning to teach, using their conversations as stimulus data.

Prior to joining the Department of Education Tessa completed an MSc in Educational Research (University of Bristol).

Yoon Young has been involved in a variety of academic and professional projects related to teacher education.

She is currently a member of the Teacher Education and Professional Learning (TEPL) research group at Oxford. Her doctoral research focuses on teacher education policy and practice in England. The study examines the relationship between individuals’ own objectives, the stated programme goals, and the national teachers’ standards in the operation of the Oxford Internship Scheme (OIS). It also explores the perceptions of stakeholders regarding ideal goals that could drive a re-conceptualised teacher education programme.

Prior to her doctorate, Yoon Young used to be a social studies teacher and subsequently worked as a consultant for the OECD’s Initial Teacher Preparation (ITP) Study. She holds a B.A. in Social Studies and Geography Education from the Ewha Womans University, and an M.A. in Educational Leadership from the University of Jyväskylä, where she was a grantee of the Korean Government Scholarship for Study Overseas.

Katy is a Deputy Headteacher and the founder of a Leadership and Coaching Institute, which she now co-directs.

Katy is an Associate Fellow at the Oxford Character Project and a Research Associate at the Oxford University Wellbeing Research Centre. She is the co-founder of Global Social Leaders, a leadership programme which has participants in 105 countries, all passionate about creating and sustaining positive change in the world.

Title of Thesis

How could school leaders improve the flourishing and wellbeing of teaching staff?

Books
  • Granville-Chapman, K. and Bidston, E (2020) Leader: Know, love and inspire your people. Carmarthen: Crownhouse Publishing
Book Chapters
  •  Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ In White, M. & McCallum, F. (Ed.s) Wellbeing and Resilience Education: Covid-19 And Its Impact on Education Systems. Routledge
Publications
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘Purpose and Leadership in Education and Beyond’. The Education Exchange. Available from: https://theeducation.exchange/purpose-and-leadership-in-education-and-beyond/
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘The Three Secrets of COVID-era Leadership’. Times Education Supplement. Available from: https://www.tes.com/news/three-secrets-covid-era-school-leadership
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2016) ‘Assessing the Impact of a Teacher Leadership Programme in a Teaching Schools Alliance. Journal of Teacher Action Research
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2014) ‘The Afghan conflict: causes and consequences.’ Geography Review 28(1): 22-27
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2013) What are the psychological factors that affect students’ academic resilience and can teachers influence these? Unpublished thesis
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘Unlocking Leadership Potential’, The Magazine of the Boarding School’s Association, 33: 42-45
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2009) ‘Learning to Lead’, Leader, The Education Leader Magazine 41: 22-25
Presentations
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2019) ‘How could leaders improve the flourishing of their teams?’ ‘Stowe Ed Conference’, Forthcoming: 7 Jan 2019
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2018) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education: 21 Jun 2018
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2017) ‘How can school leaders improve teacher flourishing?’ ‘Doing Education Differently Conference’, University of Oxford, Department of Education, 11 Mar 17
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2016) ‘Developing school leaders who enable teachers to flourish’ The Telegraph Festival of Education 23 Jun 16
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Developing leadership in pupils and teachers’ High School Affiliated to Renmin University of China, Beijing. 20 Oct 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Resilience for leaders.’ Global Social Leaders World Summit. 16 Aug 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Emotional Intelligence for Leaders.’ Global Leaders in Education. 12 Aug 15
  • Coates, S.; Fraser, H.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J.; and Nasim, A. (2015) ‘Breaking through the glass ceiling – how can schools empower our girls to become leaders?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education. 19 Jun 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. ‘Developing Leadership in Schools’ (2015). G20 Schools Conference. International conference for head teachers. 11 Apr 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2018) ‘Introduction’, Wellington Leadership Institute: Festival of Leadership. Mar 2012-15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘How the Young Learn to Lead’, Raffles Institution (Singapore) -Purdue University (USA) Education Forum on Gifted & Talented Youth 2012. Singapore. 15 Mar 12
  • Draper, D.; Dyer, R.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Schools’. Presentation for a meeting about pupil leadership and character development at 10 Downing Street. 16 Nov 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Young People’. Presentation for a meeting about leadership and character at 10 Downing Street. 7 Mar 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K. & Seldon, A. (2012) ‘Introduction’, Leading Your School in the 21st Century. 7 Feb 12

Kamal Armanious is particularly interested in the topic of education governance to explore what is possible in developing an improved governance system for technical and vocational education and training (TVET).

There have always been various calls from different international organisations such UNESCO, ILO, World Bank, OECD etc. to develop a transformed and transformative approach to TVET. This is attractive for certain theoretical as well as practical reasons; however, one set of limitations in achieving this vision lies in the arena of governance. Mr Armanious examines an imagined better model of governance that can be developed from the principles of a new approach and wider theoretical resources with consideration to national realities where there may be very serious obstacles in the way of realising this new governance approach and hence the overall planned transformation.

Title of Thesis

Education and Training Policies in Egypt: Good Governance and Stakeholders Participation

 

Amanda is completing a part-time DPhil, alongside working in Initial Teacher Education at Leeds Trinity University.

Her research is focused on understanding tensions, contradictions and conflicts that teachers in disadvantaged schools may experience when they engage in research activity.  Her research focus is influenced by her own experiences of working as a research-active teacher in disadvantaged schools, and recent work in teacher education to support experienced and beginning teachers in developing their own research activities.

One of the aims of Amanda’s research is to construct a framework to support teachers in pursuing research activity and critical scholarship work which articulates with wider social movements to address issues of poverty and disadvantage in schools.

Title of Thesis

Teachers’ perspectives on tensions between policy, practice and research in disadvantaged schools

Publications 

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2017) A ‘usable past’ of teacher education in England: history in JET’s anniversary issue. Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy, 43 (5), pp.616-627.

Nuttall, A. (2016) The ‘curriculum challenge’: Moving towards the ‘Storyline’ approach in a case study urban primary school.  Improving Schools, 19 (2), pp. 154-166.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Learning {Re}imagined: A review.  Primary First, 15, pp. 17-18.

Nuttall, A. and Doherty, J. (2014) Disaffected boys and the achievement gap: the ‘wallpaper effect’ and what is hidden by a focus on school results.  The Urban Review, 46 (5), pp.800-815.

Conference Papers and Presentations

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2018) “No child is pre-ordained to fail” Teachers questioning policy assumptions.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Newcastle, 11-13 September.

Nuttall, A. and Tobbell, C. (2017) Trainee teachers’ perspectives on practitioner enquiry.  Paper presented at the 8th TEAN Conference: Thinking Deeply about Education, Birmingham, 11-12 May.

Nuttall, A. (2017) Assessment at primary level: quality, comparability and improving secondary readiness.  A perspective from ITE.  Speech at the Westminster Education Forum Keynote Seminar: Next steps for reforming primary education: effective teaching practices, assessment and accountably, London, 18 January.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Deficit narratives and lived realities: whose poverty is it?  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the Australian Association for Research in Education, Melbourne, 27 November – 1 December.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Disenfranchised boys’ reflections on their urban schooling experience: “What a Waste!”.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Philpott, C., Beckett, L. and Wrigley, T. (2016) Collaborative practitioner inquiry: making a difference to urban schools.  Innovation session (school visits and symposium) presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Finn, B. and Beckett, L. (2015) Teachers’ constructions of poverty effects: Their research evidence.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Belfast, 15-17 September.

Nuttall, A. (2014) Teachers’ voice on disengaged boys: the role of one teacher-researcher in an English primary school. Paper presented at the Joint Australian Association for Research in Education and the New Zealand Association for Research in Education Conference, Brisbane, 30 November – 4 December.

Abigail’s research explores the role of education in students’ personal development and how this can be supported by policy, curricula, initial teacher education and teacher professional development. In particular she focuses on history education, citizenship education and peace education as vehicles for dialogue. These opportunities for students to engage with social questions are vital for building cohesive societies. This flows from the recognition that traditional forums for developing public understanding, such as post-conflict truth commissions, need to be complemented by intergenerational and educational perspectives.

Abigail has taught History, Politics, Debating as well as Relationships and Sex Education to secondary school students in South Africa, England and the USA.

She holds postgraduate degrees in Post-Conflict and Transitional Justice (University of Cape Town), in Education, Globalisation and International Development (University of Cambridge) and in African Studies (University of Oxford). She is a Rhodes Scholar, Mandela-Magdalene Scholar and Mandela-Rhodes Scholar.

Title of thesis

GCSE History, Policy Reform and Student Development: How students and teachers navigate the thematic study “Empires, Migration and the People”

Conference papers

Teaching Migration, Belonging, and Empire in Secondary Schools: evaluation of a teacher professional development program, (2019) History Educators International Research Network Conference, Lead author: Dr Jason Todd, University of Vienna, Austria.

“The Problems and Prospects of Teaching South Africa’s Recent History: Teachers’ Perspectives”, (2018) Sustainability, peace and education – Exploring promise and practice: BAICE 20th Anniversary Symposium, University of Bristol, England.

“New Generations, Old Wounds: Learning History at Home and School in Northern Ireland”, (2018) European Social Science and History Conference,
Queens University Belfast, Northern Ireland.

“The Methodological Challenges of Investigating the Role of History Teaching in Peacebuilding”, (2017), Present Past: Time, Memory, and the Negotiation of Historical Justice Conference, Columbia University, United States of America.

“Teaching South Africa’s Truth and Reconciliation Commission”, (2017) European Conference on African Studies, Universität Basel, Switzerland.

Research Assistant Publications

Review of the evidence on feedback in primary and secondary schools, (forthcoming, 2021) for the Education Endowment Foundation, Lead author: Prof Velda Elliott.

Teaching Migration, Belonging, and Empire in Secondary Schools, (2019), for Runnymede Trust and the European Research Council, Lead authors: Kimberly McIntosh, Dr Jason Todd and Prof Nandini Das.

Gender and the Politics of Reconciliation (2016), for The Institute for Justice and Reconciliation, Lead author: Dr Helen Scanlon

SOLE AUTHOR PUBLICATIONS

‘Transitions, Truth-Telling and Teaching History’, Cambridge Open-Review Educational Research e-Journal, Vol. 4, 2017.

Paul Riser is a DPhil Student in the department. His research focuses broadly on students’ (especially the marginalised) identities work in upper-secondary English Language Arts classrooms.

Prior to starting his doctoral studies, Paul earned a BSc in English Language Arts (Secondary Education) with a minor in Theology and a BA in Spanish and International Studies with a minor in Psychology from Texas Lutheran University. His MA in English Literature and Language is from St. Mary’s University.

As part of his postgraduate schoolwork, Paul undertook a placement in two graduate certificate programs, earning both his School Counselor certification and School Principal certification for all grade levels in the state of Texas, USA. In addition to English Language Arts and Reading (4th-12th grades), he is also qualified to teach Health (all levels), Journalism (7-12), Speech (7-12), Social Studies (7-12), and English as a Second Language (all levels) in Texas. Further, Paul holds a teaching certification in California, USA, the United Kingdom and Wales, the Kingdom of Denmark, and the Netherlands.

As a public school English teacher for 8 years, Paul was awarded many distinctions including, but not limited to: El maestro de impacto, two Harvard Book Awards, Teacher of the Year, and Texas Parent-Teacher Association Life Member.

His research to inform his doctoral thesis work will be completed in the United States of America. Furthermore, his research interests revolve around the nexus points of gender, ethnicity, sexuality, economic status, and religion as they relate to the agency students have in the classroom.

Paul is the 2019-2020 Student Liaison Coordinator for the Department of Education, Oxford. In this role, he is charged with leading/convening weekly workshops on a variety of research training topics, co-organizing networking and career advice opportunities for graduate students, and liaising with Cambridge University personnel to organize the annual Oxbridge Exchange. Furthermore, Paul supports the Higher Degrees Office as appropriate and meets regularly with directors and other stakeholders to discuss issues of common student concern in order to develop student identity and community throughout the Department.

Paul serves as the representative student voice on the Social Sciences Division Equality & Diversity Steering Group for the University of Oxford.

Paul is also a part-time Research Assistant working with professionals and other academics within the Department of Education on funded and individual projects as needed.

Supervisors: Associate Professors Jenni Ingram and Velda Elliott & Departmental Lecturer Jason Todd.

Thesis Title: ‘Using Positioning Theory to Understand Marginalised Students’ Identities Work and Their Learning Experiences in English Language Arts Classrooms’

Open-Access Publication:
Ingram, Jenni, & Riser, P.A. (2019). Experiences of problem solving in whole class interactions. Avances De Investigación En Educación Matemática, Avances de Investigación en Educación Matemática, Number 16; October 2019.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.35763/aiem.v0i16.279

Tessa is currently completing a part-time DPhil, alongside work as a senior leader in a London secondary school.

Her research explores how teachers on school-based ITE routes (TeachFirst and School Direct salaried) approach learning from experience. The research takes an action research approach: working with participant beginning teachers and mentors to critically examine and reflect on the processes of learning to teach, using their conversations as stimulus data.

Prior to joining the Department of Education Tessa completed an MSc in Educational Research (University of Bristol).

Yoon Young has been involved in a variety of academic and professional projects related to teacher education.

She is currently a member of the Teacher Education and Professional Learning (TEPL) research group at Oxford. Her doctoral research focuses on teacher education policy and practice in England. The study examines the relationship between individuals’ own objectives, the stated programme goals, and the national teachers’ standards in the operation of the Oxford Internship Scheme (OIS). It also explores the perceptions of stakeholders regarding ideal goals that could drive a re-conceptualised teacher education programme.

Prior to her doctorate, Yoon Young used to be a social studies teacher and subsequently worked as a consultant for the OECD’s Initial Teacher Preparation (ITP) Study. She holds a B.A. in Social Studies and Geography Education from the Ewha Womans University, and an M.A. in Educational Leadership from the University of Jyväskylä, where she was a grantee of the Korean Government Scholarship for Study Overseas.

Katy is a Deputy Headteacher and the founder of a Leadership and Coaching Institute, which she now co-directs.

Katy is an Associate Fellow at the Oxford Character Project and a Research Associate at the Oxford University Wellbeing Research Centre. She is the co-founder of Global Social Leaders, a leadership programme which has participants in 105 countries, all passionate about creating and sustaining positive change in the world.

Title of Thesis

How could school leaders improve the flourishing and wellbeing of teaching staff?

Books
  • Granville-Chapman, K. and Bidston, E (2020) Leader: Know, love and inspire your people. Carmarthen: Crownhouse Publishing
Book Chapters
  •  Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ In White, M. & McCallum, F. (Ed.s) Wellbeing and Resilience Education: Covid-19 And Its Impact on Education Systems. Routledge
Publications
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘Purpose and Leadership in Education and Beyond’. The Education Exchange. Available from: https://theeducation.exchange/purpose-and-leadership-in-education-and-beyond/
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘The Three Secrets of COVID-era Leadership’. Times Education Supplement. Available from: https://www.tes.com/news/three-secrets-covid-era-school-leadership
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2016) ‘Assessing the Impact of a Teacher Leadership Programme in a Teaching Schools Alliance. Journal of Teacher Action Research
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2014) ‘The Afghan conflict: causes and consequences.’ Geography Review 28(1): 22-27
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2013) What are the psychological factors that affect students’ academic resilience and can teachers influence these? Unpublished thesis
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘Unlocking Leadership Potential’, The Magazine of the Boarding School’s Association, 33: 42-45
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2009) ‘Learning to Lead’, Leader, The Education Leader Magazine 41: 22-25
Presentations
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2019) ‘How could leaders improve the flourishing of their teams?’ ‘Stowe Ed Conference’, Forthcoming: 7 Jan 2019
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2018) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education: 21 Jun 2018
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2017) ‘How can school leaders improve teacher flourishing?’ ‘Doing Education Differently Conference’, University of Oxford, Department of Education, 11 Mar 17
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2016) ‘Developing school leaders who enable teachers to flourish’ The Telegraph Festival of Education 23 Jun 16
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Developing leadership in pupils and teachers’ High School Affiliated to Renmin University of China, Beijing. 20 Oct 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Resilience for leaders.’ Global Social Leaders World Summit. 16 Aug 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Emotional Intelligence for Leaders.’ Global Leaders in Education. 12 Aug 15
  • Coates, S.; Fraser, H.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J.; and Nasim, A. (2015) ‘Breaking through the glass ceiling – how can schools empower our girls to become leaders?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education. 19 Jun 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. ‘Developing Leadership in Schools’ (2015). G20 Schools Conference. International conference for head teachers. 11 Apr 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2018) ‘Introduction’, Wellington Leadership Institute: Festival of Leadership. Mar 2012-15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘How the Young Learn to Lead’, Raffles Institution (Singapore) -Purdue University (USA) Education Forum on Gifted & Talented Youth 2012. Singapore. 15 Mar 12
  • Draper, D.; Dyer, R.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Schools’. Presentation for a meeting about pupil leadership and character development at 10 Downing Street. 16 Nov 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Young People’. Presentation for a meeting about leadership and character at 10 Downing Street. 7 Mar 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K. & Seldon, A. (2012) ‘Introduction’, Leading Your School in the 21st Century. 7 Feb 12

Kamal Armanious is particularly interested in the topic of education governance to explore what is possible in developing an improved governance system for technical and vocational education and training (TVET).

There have always been various calls from different international organisations such UNESCO, ILO, World Bank, OECD etc. to develop a transformed and transformative approach to TVET. This is attractive for certain theoretical as well as practical reasons; however, one set of limitations in achieving this vision lies in the arena of governance. Mr Armanious examines an imagined better model of governance that can be developed from the principles of a new approach and wider theoretical resources with consideration to national realities where there may be very serious obstacles in the way of realising this new governance approach and hence the overall planned transformation.

Title of Thesis

Education and Training Policies in Egypt: Good Governance and Stakeholders Participation

 

Amanda is completing a part-time DPhil, alongside working in Initial Teacher Education at Leeds Trinity University.

Her research is focused on understanding tensions, contradictions and conflicts that teachers in disadvantaged schools may experience when they engage in research activity.  Her research focus is influenced by her own experiences of working as a research-active teacher in disadvantaged schools, and recent work in teacher education to support experienced and beginning teachers in developing their own research activities.

One of the aims of Amanda’s research is to construct a framework to support teachers in pursuing research activity and critical scholarship work which articulates with wider social movements to address issues of poverty and disadvantage in schools.

Title of Thesis

Teachers’ perspectives on tensions between policy, practice and research in disadvantaged schools

Publications 

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2017) A ‘usable past’ of teacher education in England: history in JET’s anniversary issue. Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy, 43 (5), pp.616-627.

Nuttall, A. (2016) The ‘curriculum challenge’: Moving towards the ‘Storyline’ approach in a case study urban primary school.  Improving Schools, 19 (2), pp. 154-166.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Learning {Re}imagined: A review.  Primary First, 15, pp. 17-18.

Nuttall, A. and Doherty, J. (2014) Disaffected boys and the achievement gap: the ‘wallpaper effect’ and what is hidden by a focus on school results.  The Urban Review, 46 (5), pp.800-815.

Conference Papers and Presentations

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2018) “No child is pre-ordained to fail” Teachers questioning policy assumptions.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Newcastle, 11-13 September.

Nuttall, A. and Tobbell, C. (2017) Trainee teachers’ perspectives on practitioner enquiry.  Paper presented at the 8th TEAN Conference: Thinking Deeply about Education, Birmingham, 11-12 May.

Nuttall, A. (2017) Assessment at primary level: quality, comparability and improving secondary readiness.  A perspective from ITE.  Speech at the Westminster Education Forum Keynote Seminar: Next steps for reforming primary education: effective teaching practices, assessment and accountably, London, 18 January.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Deficit narratives and lived realities: whose poverty is it?  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the Australian Association for Research in Education, Melbourne, 27 November – 1 December.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Disenfranchised boys’ reflections on their urban schooling experience: “What a Waste!”.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Philpott, C., Beckett, L. and Wrigley, T. (2016) Collaborative practitioner inquiry: making a difference to urban schools.  Innovation session (school visits and symposium) presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Finn, B. and Beckett, L. (2015) Teachers’ constructions of poverty effects: Their research evidence.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Belfast, 15-17 September.

Nuttall, A. (2014) Teachers’ voice on disengaged boys: the role of one teacher-researcher in an English primary school. Paper presented at the Joint Australian Association for Research in Education and the New Zealand Association for Research in Education Conference, Brisbane, 30 November – 4 December.

Abigail’s research explores the role of education in students’ personal development and how this can be supported by policy, curricula, initial teacher education and teacher professional development. In particular she focuses on history education, citizenship education and peace education as vehicles for dialogue. These opportunities for students to engage with social questions are vital for building cohesive societies. This flows from the recognition that traditional forums for developing public understanding, such as post-conflict truth commissions, need to be complemented by intergenerational and educational perspectives.

Abigail has taught History, Politics, Debating as well as Relationships and Sex Education to secondary school students in South Africa, England and the USA.

She holds postgraduate degrees in Post-Conflict and Transitional Justice (University of Cape Town), in Education, Globalisation and International Development (University of Cambridge) and in African Studies (University of Oxford). She is a Rhodes Scholar, Mandela-Magdalene Scholar and Mandela-Rhodes Scholar.

Title of thesis

GCSE History, Policy Reform and Student Development: How students and teachers navigate the thematic study “Empires, Migration and the People”

Conference papers

Teaching Migration, Belonging, and Empire in Secondary Schools: evaluation of a teacher professional development program, (2019) History Educators International Research Network Conference, Lead author: Dr Jason Todd, University of Vienna, Austria.

“The Problems and Prospects of Teaching South Africa’s Recent History: Teachers’ Perspectives”, (2018) Sustainability, peace and education – Exploring promise and practice: BAICE 20th Anniversary Symposium, University of Bristol, England.

“New Generations, Old Wounds: Learning History at Home and School in Northern Ireland”, (2018) European Social Science and History Conference,
Queens University Belfast, Northern Ireland.

“The Methodological Challenges of Investigating the Role of History Teaching in Peacebuilding”, (2017), Present Past: Time, Memory, and the Negotiation of Historical Justice Conference, Columbia University, United States of America.

“Teaching South Africa’s Truth and Reconciliation Commission”, (2017) European Conference on African Studies, Universität Basel, Switzerland.

Research Assistant Publications

Review of the evidence on feedback in primary and secondary schools, (forthcoming, 2021) for the Education Endowment Foundation, Lead author: Prof Velda Elliott.

Teaching Migration, Belonging, and Empire in Secondary Schools, (2019), for Runnymede Trust and the European Research Council, Lead authors: Kimberly McIntosh, Dr Jason Todd and Prof Nandini Das.

Gender and the Politics of Reconciliation (2016), for The Institute for Justice and Reconciliation, Lead author: Dr Helen Scanlon

SOLE AUTHOR PUBLICATIONS

‘Transitions, Truth-Telling and Teaching History’, Cambridge Open-Review Educational Research e-Journal, Vol. 4, 2017.

Paul Riser is a DPhil Student in the department. His research focuses broadly on students’ (especially the marginalised) identities work in upper-secondary English Language Arts classrooms.

Prior to starting his doctoral studies, Paul earned a BSc in English Language Arts (Secondary Education) with a minor in Theology and a BA in Spanish and International Studies with a minor in Psychology from Texas Lutheran University. His MA in English Literature and Language is from St. Mary’s University.

As part of his postgraduate schoolwork, Paul undertook a placement in two graduate certificate programs, earning both his School Counselor certification and School Principal certification for all grade levels in the state of Texas, USA. In addition to English Language Arts and Reading (4th-12th grades), he is also qualified to teach Health (all levels), Journalism (7-12), Speech (7-12), Social Studies (7-12), and English as a Second Language (all levels) in Texas. Further, Paul holds a teaching certification in California, USA, the United Kingdom and Wales, the Kingdom of Denmark, and the Netherlands.

As a public school English teacher for 8 years, Paul was awarded many distinctions including, but not limited to: El maestro de impacto, two Harvard Book Awards, Teacher of the Year, and Texas Parent-Teacher Association Life Member.

His research to inform his doctoral thesis work will be completed in the United States of America. Furthermore, his research interests revolve around the nexus points of gender, ethnicity, sexuality, economic status, and religion as they relate to the agency students have in the classroom.

Paul is the 2019-2020 Student Liaison Coordinator for the Department of Education, Oxford. In this role, he is charged with leading/convening weekly workshops on a variety of research training topics, co-organizing networking and career advice opportunities for graduate students, and liaising with Cambridge University personnel to organize the annual Oxbridge Exchange. Furthermore, Paul supports the Higher Degrees Office as appropriate and meets regularly with directors and other stakeholders to discuss issues of common student concern in order to develop student identity and community throughout the Department.

Paul serves as the representative student voice on the Social Sciences Division Equality & Diversity Steering Group for the University of Oxford.

Paul is also a part-time Research Assistant working with professionals and other academics within the Department of Education on funded and individual projects as needed.

Supervisors: Associate Professors Jenni Ingram and Velda Elliott & Departmental Lecturer Jason Todd.

Thesis Title: ‘Using Positioning Theory to Understand Marginalised Students’ Identities Work and Their Learning Experiences in English Language Arts Classrooms’

Open-Access Publication:
Ingram, Jenni, & Riser, P.A. (2019). Experiences of problem solving in whole class interactions. Avances De Investigación En Educación Matemática, Avances de Investigación en Educación Matemática, Number 16; October 2019.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.35763/aiem.v0i16.279

Tessa is currently completing a part-time DPhil, alongside work as a senior leader in a London secondary school.

Her research explores how teachers on school-based ITE routes (TeachFirst and School Direct salaried) approach learning from experience. The research takes an action research approach: working with participant beginning teachers and mentors to critically examine and reflect on the processes of learning to teach, using their conversations as stimulus data.

Prior to joining the Department of Education Tessa completed an MSc in Educational Research (University of Bristol).

Yoon Young has been involved in a variety of academic and professional projects related to teacher education.

She is currently a member of the Teacher Education and Professional Learning (TEPL) research group at Oxford. Her doctoral research focuses on teacher education policy and practice in England. The study examines the relationship between individuals’ own objectives, the stated programme goals, and the national teachers’ standards in the operation of the Oxford Internship Scheme (OIS). It also explores the perceptions of stakeholders regarding ideal goals that could drive a re-conceptualised teacher education programme.

Prior to her doctorate, Yoon Young used to be a social studies teacher and subsequently worked as a consultant for the OECD’s Initial Teacher Preparation (ITP) Study. She holds a B.A. in Social Studies and Geography Education from the Ewha Womans University, and an M.A. in Educational Leadership from the University of Jyväskylä, where she was a grantee of the Korean Government Scholarship for Study Overseas.

Katy is a Deputy Headteacher and the founder of a Leadership and Coaching Institute, which she now co-directs.

Katy is an Associate Fellow at the Oxford Character Project and a Research Associate at the Oxford University Wellbeing Research Centre. She is the co-founder of Global Social Leaders, a leadership programme which has participants in 105 countries, all passionate about creating and sustaining positive change in the world.

Title of Thesis

How could school leaders improve the flourishing and wellbeing of teaching staff?

Books
  • Granville-Chapman, K. and Bidston, E (2020) Leader: Know, love and inspire your people. Carmarthen: Crownhouse Publishing
Book Chapters
  •  Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ In White, M. & McCallum, F. (Ed.s) Wellbeing and Resilience Education: Covid-19 And Its Impact on Education Systems. Routledge
Publications
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘Purpose and Leadership in Education and Beyond’. The Education Exchange. Available from: https://theeducation.exchange/purpose-and-leadership-in-education-and-beyond/
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘The Three Secrets of COVID-era Leadership’. Times Education Supplement. Available from: https://www.tes.com/news/three-secrets-covid-era-school-leadership
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2016) ‘Assessing the Impact of a Teacher Leadership Programme in a Teaching Schools Alliance. Journal of Teacher Action Research
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2014) ‘The Afghan conflict: causes and consequences.’ Geography Review 28(1): 22-27
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2013) What are the psychological factors that affect students’ academic resilience and can teachers influence these? Unpublished thesis
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘Unlocking Leadership Potential’, The Magazine of the Boarding School’s Association, 33: 42-45
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2009) ‘Learning to Lead’, Leader, The Education Leader Magazine 41: 22-25
Presentations
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2019) ‘How could leaders improve the flourishing of their teams?’ ‘Stowe Ed Conference’, Forthcoming: 7 Jan 2019
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2018) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education: 21 Jun 2018
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2017) ‘How can school leaders improve teacher flourishing?’ ‘Doing Education Differently Conference’, University of Oxford, Department of Education, 11 Mar 17
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2016) ‘Developing school leaders who enable teachers to flourish’ The Telegraph Festival of Education 23 Jun 16
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Developing leadership in pupils and teachers’ High School Affiliated to Renmin University of China, Beijing. 20 Oct 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Resilience for leaders.’ Global Social Leaders World Summit. 16 Aug 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Emotional Intelligence for Leaders.’ Global Leaders in Education. 12 Aug 15
  • Coates, S.; Fraser, H.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J.; and Nasim, A. (2015) ‘Breaking through the glass ceiling – how can schools empower our girls to become leaders?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education. 19 Jun 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. ‘Developing Leadership in Schools’ (2015). G20 Schools Conference. International conference for head teachers. 11 Apr 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2018) ‘Introduction’, Wellington Leadership Institute: Festival of Leadership. Mar 2012-15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘How the Young Learn to Lead’, Raffles Institution (Singapore) -Purdue University (USA) Education Forum on Gifted & Talented Youth 2012. Singapore. 15 Mar 12
  • Draper, D.; Dyer, R.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Schools’. Presentation for a meeting about pupil leadership and character development at 10 Downing Street. 16 Nov 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Young People’. Presentation for a meeting about leadership and character at 10 Downing Street. 7 Mar 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K. & Seldon, A. (2012) ‘Introduction’, Leading Your School in the 21st Century. 7 Feb 12

Kamal Armanious is particularly interested in the topic of education governance to explore what is possible in developing an improved governance system for technical and vocational education and training (TVET).

There have always been various calls from different international organisations such UNESCO, ILO, World Bank, OECD etc. to develop a transformed and transformative approach to TVET. This is attractive for certain theoretical as well as practical reasons; however, one set of limitations in achieving this vision lies in the arena of governance. Mr Armanious examines an imagined better model of governance that can be developed from the principles of a new approach and wider theoretical resources with consideration to national realities where there may be very serious obstacles in the way of realising this new governance approach and hence the overall planned transformation.

Title of Thesis

Education and Training Policies in Egypt: Good Governance and Stakeholders Participation

 

Amanda is completing a part-time DPhil, alongside working in Initial Teacher Education at Leeds Trinity University.

Her research is focused on understanding tensions, contradictions and conflicts that teachers in disadvantaged schools may experience when they engage in research activity.  Her research focus is influenced by her own experiences of working as a research-active teacher in disadvantaged schools, and recent work in teacher education to support experienced and beginning teachers in developing their own research activities.

One of the aims of Amanda’s research is to construct a framework to support teachers in pursuing research activity and critical scholarship work which articulates with wider social movements to address issues of poverty and disadvantage in schools.

Title of Thesis

Teachers’ perspectives on tensions between policy, practice and research in disadvantaged schools

Publications 

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2017) A ‘usable past’ of teacher education in England: history in JET’s anniversary issue. Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy, 43 (5), pp.616-627.

Nuttall, A. (2016) The ‘curriculum challenge’: Moving towards the ‘Storyline’ approach in a case study urban primary school.  Improving Schools, 19 (2), pp. 154-166.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Learning {Re}imagined: A review.  Primary First, 15, pp. 17-18.

Nuttall, A. and Doherty, J. (2014) Disaffected boys and the achievement gap: the ‘wallpaper effect’ and what is hidden by a focus on school results.  The Urban Review, 46 (5), pp.800-815.

Conference Papers and Presentations

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2018) “No child is pre-ordained to fail” Teachers questioning policy assumptions.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Newcastle, 11-13 September.

Nuttall, A. and Tobbell, C. (2017) Trainee teachers’ perspectives on practitioner enquiry.  Paper presented at the 8th TEAN Conference: Thinking Deeply about Education, Birmingham, 11-12 May.

Nuttall, A. (2017) Assessment at primary level: quality, comparability and improving secondary readiness.  A perspective from ITE.  Speech at the Westminster Education Forum Keynote Seminar: Next steps for reforming primary education: effective teaching practices, assessment and accountably, London, 18 January.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Deficit narratives and lived realities: whose poverty is it?  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the Australian Association for Research in Education, Melbourne, 27 November – 1 December.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Disenfranchised boys’ reflections on their urban schooling experience: “What a Waste!”.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Philpott, C., Beckett, L. and Wrigley, T. (2016) Collaborative practitioner inquiry: making a difference to urban schools.  Innovation session (school visits and symposium) presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Finn, B. and Beckett, L. (2015) Teachers’ constructions of poverty effects: Their research evidence.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Belfast, 15-17 September.

Nuttall, A. (2014) Teachers’ voice on disengaged boys: the role of one teacher-researcher in an English primary school. Paper presented at the Joint Australian Association for Research in Education and the New Zealand Association for Research in Education Conference, Brisbane, 30 November – 4 December.

Abigail’s research explores the role of education in students’ personal development and how this can be supported by policy, curricula, initial teacher education and teacher professional development. In particular she focuses on history education, citizenship education and peace education as vehicles for dialogue. These opportunities for students to engage with social questions are vital for building cohesive societies. This flows from the recognition that traditional forums for developing public understanding, such as post-conflict truth commissions, need to be complemented by intergenerational and educational perspectives.

Abigail has taught History, Politics, Debating as well as Relationships and Sex Education to secondary school students in South Africa, England and the USA.

She holds postgraduate degrees in Post-Conflict and Transitional Justice (University of Cape Town), in Education, Globalisation and International Development (University of Cambridge) and in African Studies (University of Oxford). She is a Rhodes Scholar, Mandela-Magdalene Scholar and Mandela-Rhodes Scholar.

Title of thesis

GCSE History, Policy Reform and Student Development: How students and teachers navigate the thematic study “Empires, Migration and the People”

Conference papers

Teaching Migration, Belonging, and Empire in Secondary Schools: evaluation of a teacher professional development program, (2019) History Educators International Research Network Conference, Lead author: Dr Jason Todd, University of Vienna, Austria.

“The Problems and Prospects of Teaching South Africa’s Recent History: Teachers’ Perspectives”, (2018) Sustainability, peace and education – Exploring promise and practice: BAICE 20th Anniversary Symposium, University of Bristol, England.

“New Generations, Old Wounds: Learning History at Home and School in Northern Ireland”, (2018) European Social Science and History Conference,
Queens University Belfast, Northern Ireland.

“The Methodological Challenges of Investigating the Role of History Teaching in Peacebuilding”, (2017), Present Past: Time, Memory, and the Negotiation of Historical Justice Conference, Columbia University, United States of America.

“Teaching South Africa’s Truth and Reconciliation Commission”, (2017) European Conference on African Studies, Universität Basel, Switzerland.

Research Assistant Publications

Review of the evidence on feedback in primary and secondary schools, (forthcoming, 2021) for the Education Endowment Foundation, Lead author: Prof Velda Elliott.

Teaching Migration, Belonging, and Empire in Secondary Schools, (2019), for Runnymede Trust and the European Research Council, Lead authors: Kimberly McIntosh, Dr Jason Todd and Prof Nandini Das.

Gender and the Politics of Reconciliation (2016), for The Institute for Justice and Reconciliation, Lead author: Dr Helen Scanlon

SOLE AUTHOR PUBLICATIONS

‘Transitions, Truth-Telling and Teaching History’, Cambridge Open-Review Educational Research e-Journal, Vol. 4, 2017.

Paul Riser is a DPhil Student in the department. His research focuses broadly on students’ (especially the marginalised) identities work in upper-secondary English Language Arts classrooms.

Prior to starting his doctoral studies, Paul earned a BSc in English Language Arts (Secondary Education) with a minor in Theology and a BA in Spanish and International Studies with a minor in Psychology from Texas Lutheran University. His MA in English Literature and Language is from St. Mary’s University.

As part of his postgraduate schoolwork, Paul undertook a placement in two graduate certificate programs, earning both his School Counselor certification and School Principal certification for all grade levels in the state of Texas, USA. In addition to English Language Arts and Reading (4th-12th grades), he is also qualified to teach Health (all levels), Journalism (7-12), Speech (7-12), Social Studies (7-12), and English as a Second Language (all levels) in Texas. Further, Paul holds a teaching certification in California, USA, the United Kingdom and Wales, the Kingdom of Denmark, and the Netherlands.

As a public school English teacher for 8 years, Paul was awarded many distinctions including, but not limited to: El maestro de impacto, two Harvard Book Awards, Teacher of the Year, and Texas Parent-Teacher Association Life Member.

His research to inform his doctoral thesis work will be completed in the United States of America. Furthermore, his research interests revolve around the nexus points of gender, ethnicity, sexuality, economic status, and religion as they relate to the agency students have in the classroom.

Paul is the 2019-2020 Student Liaison Coordinator for the Department of Education, Oxford. In this role, he is charged with leading/convening weekly workshops on a variety of research training topics, co-organizing networking and career advice opportunities for graduate students, and liaising with Cambridge University personnel to organize the annual Oxbridge Exchange. Furthermore, Paul supports the Higher Degrees Office as appropriate and meets regularly with directors and other stakeholders to discuss issues of common student concern in order to develop student identity and community throughout the Department.

Paul serves as the representative student voice on the Social Sciences Division Equality & Diversity Steering Group for the University of Oxford.

Paul is also a part-time Research Assistant working with professionals and other academics within the Department of Education on funded and individual projects as needed.

Supervisors: Associate Professors Jenni Ingram and Velda Elliott & Departmental Lecturer Jason Todd.

Thesis Title: ‘Using Positioning Theory to Understand Marginalised Students’ Identities Work and Their Learning Experiences in English Language Arts Classrooms’

Open-Access Publication:
Ingram, Jenni, & Riser, P.A. (2019). Experiences of problem solving in whole class interactions. Avances De Investigación En Educación Matemática, Avances de Investigación en Educación Matemática, Number 16; October 2019.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.35763/aiem.v0i16.279

Tessa is currently completing a part-time DPhil, alongside work as a senior leader in a London secondary school.

Her research explores how teachers on school-based ITE routes (TeachFirst and School Direct salaried) approach learning from experience. The research takes an action research approach: working with participant beginning teachers and mentors to critically examine and reflect on the processes of learning to teach, using their conversations as stimulus data.

Prior to joining the Department of Education Tessa completed an MSc in Educational Research (University of Bristol).

Yoon Young has been involved in a variety of academic and professional projects related to teacher education.

She is currently a member of the Teacher Education and Professional Learning (TEPL) research group at Oxford. Her doctoral research focuses on teacher education policy and practice in England. The study examines the relationship between individuals’ own objectives, the stated programme goals, and the national teachers’ standards in the operation of the Oxford Internship Scheme (OIS). It also explores the perceptions of stakeholders regarding ideal goals that could drive a re-conceptualised teacher education programme.

Prior to her doctorate, Yoon Young used to be a social studies teacher and subsequently worked as a consultant for the OECD’s Initial Teacher Preparation (ITP) Study. She holds a B.A. in Social Studies and Geography Education from the Ewha Womans University, and an M.A. in Educational Leadership from the University of Jyväskylä, where she was a grantee of the Korean Government Scholarship for Study Overseas.

Katy is a Deputy Headteacher and the founder of a Leadership and Coaching Institute, which she now co-directs.

Katy is an Associate Fellow at the Oxford Character Project and a Research Associate at the Oxford University Wellbeing Research Centre. She is the co-founder of Global Social Leaders, a leadership programme which has participants in 105 countries, all passionate about creating and sustaining positive change in the world.

Title of Thesis

How could school leaders improve the flourishing and wellbeing of teaching staff?

Books
  • Granville-Chapman, K. and Bidston, E (2020) Leader: Know, love and inspire your people. Carmarthen: Crownhouse Publishing
Book Chapters
  •  Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ In White, M. & McCallum, F. (Ed.s) Wellbeing and Resilience Education: Covid-19 And Its Impact on Education Systems. Routledge
Publications
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘Purpose and Leadership in Education and Beyond’. The Education Exchange. Available from: https://theeducation.exchange/purpose-and-leadership-in-education-and-beyond/
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘The Three Secrets of COVID-era Leadership’. Times Education Supplement. Available from: https://www.tes.com/news/three-secrets-covid-era-school-leadership
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2016) ‘Assessing the Impact of a Teacher Leadership Programme in a Teaching Schools Alliance. Journal of Teacher Action Research
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2014) ‘The Afghan conflict: causes and consequences.’ Geography Review 28(1): 22-27
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2013) What are the psychological factors that affect students’ academic resilience and can teachers influence these? Unpublished thesis
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘Unlocking Leadership Potential’, The Magazine of the Boarding School’s Association, 33: 42-45
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2009) ‘Learning to Lead’, Leader, The Education Leader Magazine 41: 22-25
Presentations
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2019) ‘How could leaders improve the flourishing of their teams?’ ‘Stowe Ed Conference’, Forthcoming: 7 Jan 2019
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2018) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education: 21 Jun 2018
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2017) ‘How can school leaders improve teacher flourishing?’ ‘Doing Education Differently Conference’, University of Oxford, Department of Education, 11 Mar 17
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2016) ‘Developing school leaders who enable teachers to flourish’ The Telegraph Festival of Education 23 Jun 16
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Developing leadership in pupils and teachers’ High School Affiliated to Renmin University of China, Beijing. 20 Oct 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Resilience for leaders.’ Global Social Leaders World Summit. 16 Aug 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Emotional Intelligence for Leaders.’ Global Leaders in Education. 12 Aug 15
  • Coates, S.; Fraser, H.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J.; and Nasim, A. (2015) ‘Breaking through the glass ceiling – how can schools empower our girls to become leaders?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education. 19 Jun 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. ‘Developing Leadership in Schools’ (2015). G20 Schools Conference. International conference for head teachers. 11 Apr 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2018) ‘Introduction’, Wellington Leadership Institute: Festival of Leadership. Mar 2012-15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘How the Young Learn to Lead’, Raffles Institution (Singapore) -Purdue University (USA) Education Forum on Gifted & Talented Youth 2012. Singapore. 15 Mar 12
  • Draper, D.; Dyer, R.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Schools’. Presentation for a meeting about pupil leadership and character development at 10 Downing Street. 16 Nov 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Young People’. Presentation for a meeting about leadership and character at 10 Downing Street. 7 Mar 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K. & Seldon, A. (2012) ‘Introduction’, Leading Your School in the 21st Century. 7 Feb 12

Kamal Armanious is particularly interested in the topic of education governance to explore what is possible in developing an improved governance system for technical and vocational education and training (TVET).

There have always been various calls from different international organisations such UNESCO, ILO, World Bank, OECD etc. to develop a transformed and transformative approach to TVET. This is attractive for certain theoretical as well as practical reasons; however, one set of limitations in achieving this vision lies in the arena of governance. Mr Armanious examines an imagined better model of governance that can be developed from the principles of a new approach and wider theoretical resources with consideration to national realities where there may be very serious obstacles in the way of realising this new governance approach and hence the overall planned transformation.

Title of Thesis

Education and Training Policies in Egypt: Good Governance and Stakeholders Participation

 

Amanda is completing a part-time DPhil, alongside working in Initial Teacher Education at Leeds Trinity University.

Her research is focused on understanding tensions, contradictions and conflicts that teachers in disadvantaged schools may experience when they engage in research activity.  Her research focus is influenced by her own experiences of working as a research-active teacher in disadvantaged schools, and recent work in teacher education to support experienced and beginning teachers in developing their own research activities.

One of the aims of Amanda’s research is to construct a framework to support teachers in pursuing research activity and critical scholarship work which articulates with wider social movements to address issues of poverty and disadvantage in schools.

Title of Thesis

Teachers’ perspectives on tensions between policy, practice and research in disadvantaged schools

Publications 

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2017) A ‘usable past’ of teacher education in England: history in JET’s anniversary issue. Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy, 43 (5), pp.616-627.

Nuttall, A. (2016) The ‘curriculum challenge’: Moving towards the ‘Storyline’ approach in a case study urban primary school.  Improving Schools, 19 (2), pp. 154-166.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Learning {Re}imagined: A review.  Primary First, 15, pp. 17-18.

Nuttall, A. and Doherty, J. (2014) Disaffected boys and the achievement gap: the ‘wallpaper effect’ and what is hidden by a focus on school results.  The Urban Review, 46 (5), pp.800-815.

Conference Papers and Presentations

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2018) “No child is pre-ordained to fail” Teachers questioning policy assumptions.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Newcastle, 11-13 September.

Nuttall, A. and Tobbell, C. (2017) Trainee teachers’ perspectives on practitioner enquiry.  Paper presented at the 8th TEAN Conference: Thinking Deeply about Education, Birmingham, 11-12 May.

Nuttall, A. (2017) Assessment at primary level: quality, comparability and improving secondary readiness.  A perspective from ITE.  Speech at the Westminster Education Forum Keynote Seminar: Next steps for reforming primary education: effective teaching practices, assessment and accountably, London, 18 January.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Deficit narratives and lived realities: whose poverty is it?  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the Australian Association for Research in Education, Melbourne, 27 November – 1 December.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Disenfranchised boys’ reflections on their urban schooling experience: “What a Waste!”.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Philpott, C., Beckett, L. and Wrigley, T. (2016) Collaborative practitioner inquiry: making a difference to urban schools.  Innovation session (school visits and symposium) presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Finn, B. and Beckett, L. (2015) Teachers’ constructions of poverty effects: Their research evidence.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Belfast, 15-17 September.

Nuttall, A. (2014) Teachers’ voice on disengaged boys: the role of one teacher-researcher in an English primary school. Paper presented at the Joint Australian Association for Research in Education and the New Zealand Association for Research in Education Conference, Brisbane, 30 November – 4 December.

Abigail’s research explores the role of education in students’ personal development and how this can be supported by policy, curricula, initial teacher education and teacher professional development. In particular she focuses on history education, citizenship education and peace education as vehicles for dialogue. These opportunities for students to engage with social questions are vital for building cohesive societies. This flows from the recognition that traditional forums for developing public understanding, such as post-conflict truth commissions, need to be complemented by intergenerational and educational perspectives.

Abigail has taught History, Politics, Debating as well as Relationships and Sex Education to secondary school students in South Africa, England and the USA.

She holds postgraduate degrees in Post-Conflict and Transitional Justice (University of Cape Town), in Education, Globalisation and International Development (University of Cambridge) and in African Studies (University of Oxford). She is a Rhodes Scholar, Mandela-Magdalene Scholar and Mandela-Rhodes Scholar.

Title of thesis

GCSE History, Policy Reform and Student Development: How students and teachers navigate the thematic study “Empires, Migration and the People”

Conference papers

Teaching Migration, Belonging, and Empire in Secondary Schools: evaluation of a teacher professional development program, (2019) History Educators International Research Network Conference, Lead author: Dr Jason Todd, University of Vienna, Austria.

“The Problems and Prospects of Teaching South Africa’s Recent History: Teachers’ Perspectives”, (2018) Sustainability, peace and education – Exploring promise and practice: BAICE 20th Anniversary Symposium, University of Bristol, England.

“New Generations, Old Wounds: Learning History at Home and School in Northern Ireland”, (2018) European Social Science and History Conference,
Queens University Belfast, Northern Ireland.

“The Methodological Challenges of Investigating the Role of History Teaching in Peacebuilding”, (2017), Present Past: Time, Memory, and the Negotiation of Historical Justice Conference, Columbia University, United States of America.

“Teaching South Africa’s Truth and Reconciliation Commission”, (2017) European Conference on African Studies, Universität Basel, Switzerland.

Research Assistant Publications

Review of the evidence on feedback in primary and secondary schools, (forthcoming, 2021) for the Education Endowment Foundation, Lead author: Prof Velda Elliott.

Teaching Migration, Belonging, and Empire in Secondary Schools, (2019), for Runnymede Trust and the European Research Council, Lead authors: Kimberly McIntosh, Dr Jason Todd and Prof Nandini Das.

Gender and the Politics of Reconciliation (2016), for The Institute for Justice and Reconciliation, Lead author: Dr Helen Scanlon

SOLE AUTHOR PUBLICATIONS

‘Transitions, Truth-Telling and Teaching History’, Cambridge Open-Review Educational Research e-Journal, Vol. 4, 2017.

Paul Riser is a DPhil Student in the department. His research focuses broadly on students’ (especially the marginalised) identities work in upper-secondary English Language Arts classrooms.

Prior to starting his doctoral studies, Paul earned a BSc in English Language Arts (Secondary Education) with a minor in Theology and a BA in Spanish and International Studies with a minor in Psychology from Texas Lutheran University. His MA in English Literature and Language is from St. Mary’s University.

As part of his postgraduate schoolwork, Paul undertook a placement in two graduate certificate programs, earning both his School Counselor certification and School Principal certification for all grade levels in the state of Texas, USA. In addition to English Language Arts and Reading (4th-12th grades), he is also qualified to teach Health (all levels), Journalism (7-12), Speech (7-12), Social Studies (7-12), and English as a Second Language (all levels) in Texas. Further, Paul holds a teaching certification in California, USA, the United Kingdom and Wales, the Kingdom of Denmark, and the Netherlands.

As a public school English teacher for 8 years, Paul was awarded many distinctions including, but not limited to: El maestro de impacto, two Harvard Book Awards, Teacher of the Year, and Texas Parent-Teacher Association Life Member.

His research to inform his doctoral thesis work will be completed in the United States of America. Furthermore, his research interests revolve around the nexus points of gender, ethnicity, sexuality, economic status, and religion as they relate to the agency students have in the classroom.

Paul is the 2019-2020 Student Liaison Coordinator for the Department of Education, Oxford. In this role, he is charged with leading/convening weekly workshops on a variety of research training topics, co-organizing networking and career advice opportunities for graduate students, and liaising with Cambridge University personnel to organize the annual Oxbridge Exchange. Furthermore, Paul supports the Higher Degrees Office as appropriate and meets regularly with directors and other stakeholders to discuss issues of common student concern in order to develop student identity and community throughout the Department.

Paul serves as the representative student voice on the Social Sciences Division Equality & Diversity Steering Group for the University of Oxford.

Paul is also a part-time Research Assistant working with professionals and other academics within the Department of Education on funded and individual projects as needed.

Supervisors: Associate Professors Jenni Ingram and Velda Elliott & Departmental Lecturer Jason Todd.

Thesis Title: ‘Using Positioning Theory to Understand Marginalised Students’ Identities Work and Their Learning Experiences in English Language Arts Classrooms’

Open-Access Publication:
Ingram, Jenni, & Riser, P.A. (2019). Experiences of problem solving in whole class interactions. Avances De Investigación En Educación Matemática, Avances de Investigación en Educación Matemática, Number 16; October 2019.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.35763/aiem.v0i16.279

Tessa is currently completing a part-time DPhil, alongside work as a senior leader in a London secondary school.

Her research explores how teachers on school-based ITE routes (TeachFirst and School Direct salaried) approach learning from experience. The research takes an action research approach: working with participant beginning teachers and mentors to critically examine and reflect on the processes of learning to teach, using their conversations as stimulus data.

Prior to joining the Department of Education Tessa completed an MSc in Educational Research (University of Bristol).

Yoon Young has been involved in a variety of academic and professional projects related to teacher education.

She is currently a member of the Teacher Education and Professional Learning (TEPL) research group at Oxford. Her doctoral research focuses on teacher education policy and practice in England. The study examines the relationship between individuals’ own objectives, the stated programme goals, and the national teachers’ standards in the operation of the Oxford Internship Scheme (OIS). It also explores the perceptions of stakeholders regarding ideal goals that could drive a re-conceptualised teacher education programme.

Prior to her doctorate, Yoon Young used to be a social studies teacher and subsequently worked as a consultant for the OECD’s Initial Teacher Preparation (ITP) Study. She holds a B.A. in Social Studies and Geography Education from the Ewha Womans University, and an M.A. in Educational Leadership from the University of Jyväskylä, where she was a grantee of the Korean Government Scholarship for Study Overseas.

Katy is a Deputy Headteacher and the founder of a Leadership and Coaching Institute, which she now co-directs.

Katy is an Associate Fellow at the Oxford Character Project and a Research Associate at the Oxford University Wellbeing Research Centre. She is the co-founder of Global Social Leaders, a leadership programme which has participants in 105 countries, all passionate about creating and sustaining positive change in the world.

Title of Thesis

How could school leaders improve the flourishing and wellbeing of teaching staff?

Books
  • Granville-Chapman, K. and Bidston, E (2020) Leader: Know, love and inspire your people. Carmarthen: Crownhouse Publishing
Book Chapters
  •  Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ In White, M. & McCallum, F. (Ed.s) Wellbeing and Resilience Education: Covid-19 And Its Impact on Education Systems. Routledge
Publications
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘Purpose and Leadership in Education and Beyond’. The Education Exchange. Available from: https://theeducation.exchange/purpose-and-leadership-in-education-and-beyond/
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘The Three Secrets of COVID-era Leadership’. Times Education Supplement. Available from: https://www.tes.com/news/three-secrets-covid-era-school-leadership
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2016) ‘Assessing the Impact of a Teacher Leadership Programme in a Teaching Schools Alliance. Journal of Teacher Action Research
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2014) ‘The Afghan conflict: causes and consequences.’ Geography Review 28(1): 22-27
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2013) What are the psychological factors that affect students’ academic resilience and can teachers influence these? Unpublished thesis
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘Unlocking Leadership Potential’, The Magazine of the Boarding School’s Association, 33: 42-45
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2009) ‘Learning to Lead’, Leader, The Education Leader Magazine 41: 22-25
Presentations
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2019) ‘How could leaders improve the flourishing of their teams?’ ‘Stowe Ed Conference’, Forthcoming: 7 Jan 2019
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2018) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education: 21 Jun 2018
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2017) ‘How can school leaders improve teacher flourishing?’ ‘Doing Education Differently Conference’, University of Oxford, Department of Education, 11 Mar 17
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2016) ‘Developing school leaders who enable teachers to flourish’ The Telegraph Festival of Education 23 Jun 16
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Developing leadership in pupils and teachers’ High School Affiliated to Renmin University of China, Beijing. 20 Oct 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Resilience for leaders.’ Global Social Leaders World Summit. 16 Aug 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Emotional Intelligence for Leaders.’ Global Leaders in Education. 12 Aug 15
  • Coates, S.; Fraser, H.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J.; and Nasim, A. (2015) ‘Breaking through the glass ceiling – how can schools empower our girls to become leaders?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education. 19 Jun 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. ‘Developing Leadership in Schools’ (2015). G20 Schools Conference. International conference for head teachers. 11 Apr 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2018) ‘Introduction’, Wellington Leadership Institute: Festival of Leadership. Mar 2012-15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘How the Young Learn to Lead’, Raffles Institution (Singapore) -Purdue University (USA) Education Forum on Gifted & Talented Youth 2012. Singapore. 15 Mar 12
  • Draper, D.; Dyer, R.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Schools’. Presentation for a meeting about pupil leadership and character development at 10 Downing Street. 16 Nov 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Young People’. Presentation for a meeting about leadership and character at 10 Downing Street. 7 Mar 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K. & Seldon, A. (2012) ‘Introduction’, Leading Your School in the 21st Century. 7 Feb 12

Kamal Armanious is particularly interested in the topic of education governance to explore what is possible in developing an improved governance system for technical and vocational education and training (TVET).

There have always been various calls from different international organisations such UNESCO, ILO, World Bank, OECD etc. to develop a transformed and transformative approach to TVET. This is attractive for certain theoretical as well as practical reasons; however, one set of limitations in achieving this vision lies in the arena of governance. Mr Armanious examines an imagined better model of governance that can be developed from the principles of a new approach and wider theoretical resources with consideration to national realities where there may be very serious obstacles in the way of realising this new governance approach and hence the overall planned transformation.

Title of Thesis

Education and Training Policies in Egypt: Good Governance and Stakeholders Participation

 

Amanda is completing a part-time DPhil, alongside working in Initial Teacher Education at Leeds Trinity University.

Her research is focused on understanding tensions, contradictions and conflicts that teachers in disadvantaged schools may experience when they engage in research activity.  Her research focus is influenced by her own experiences of working as a research-active teacher in disadvantaged schools, and recent work in teacher education to support experienced and beginning teachers in developing their own research activities.

One of the aims of Amanda’s research is to construct a framework to support teachers in pursuing research activity and critical scholarship work which articulates with wider social movements to address issues of poverty and disadvantage in schools.

Title of Thesis

Teachers’ perspectives on tensions between policy, practice and research in disadvantaged schools

Publications 

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2017) A ‘usable past’ of teacher education in England: history in JET’s anniversary issue. Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy, 43 (5), pp.616-627.

Nuttall, A. (2016) The ‘curriculum challenge’: Moving towards the ‘Storyline’ approach in a case study urban primary school.  Improving Schools, 19 (2), pp. 154-166.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Learning {Re}imagined: A review.  Primary First, 15, pp. 17-18.

Nuttall, A. and Doherty, J. (2014) Disaffected boys and the achievement gap: the ‘wallpaper effect’ and what is hidden by a focus on school results.  The Urban Review, 46 (5), pp.800-815.

Conference Papers and Presentations

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2018) “No child is pre-ordained to fail” Teachers questioning policy assumptions.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Newcastle, 11-13 September.

Nuttall, A. and Tobbell, C. (2017) Trainee teachers’ perspectives on practitioner enquiry.  Paper presented at the 8th TEAN Conference: Thinking Deeply about Education, Birmingham, 11-12 May.

Nuttall, A. (2017) Assessment at primary level: quality, comparability and improving secondary readiness.  A perspective from ITE.  Speech at the Westminster Education Forum Keynote Seminar: Next steps for reforming primary education: effective teaching practices, assessment and accountably, London, 18 January.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Deficit narratives and lived realities: whose poverty is it?  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the Australian Association for Research in Education, Melbourne, 27 November – 1 December.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Disenfranchised boys’ reflections on their urban schooling experience: “What a Waste!”.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Philpott, C., Beckett, L. and Wrigley, T. (2016) Collaborative practitioner inquiry: making a difference to urban schools.  Innovation session (school visits and symposium) presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Finn, B. and Beckett, L. (2015) Teachers’ constructions of poverty effects: Their research evidence.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Belfast, 15-17 September.

Nuttall, A. (2014) Teachers’ voice on disengaged boys: the role of one teacher-researcher in an English primary school. Paper presented at the Joint Australian Association for Research in Education and the New Zealand Association for Research in Education Conference, Brisbane, 30 November – 4 December.

Abigail’s research explores the role of education in students’ personal development and how this can be supported by policy, curricula, initial teacher education and teacher professional development. In particular she focuses on history education, citizenship education and peace education as vehicles for dialogue. These opportunities for students to engage with social questions are vital for building cohesive societies. This flows from the recognition that traditional forums for developing public understanding, such as post-conflict truth commissions, need to be complemented by intergenerational and educational perspectives.

Abigail has taught History, Politics, Debating as well as Relationships and Sex Education to secondary school students in South Africa, England and the USA.

She holds postgraduate degrees in Post-Conflict and Transitional Justice (University of Cape Town), in Education, Globalisation and International Development (University of Cambridge) and in African Studies (University of Oxford). She is a Rhodes Scholar, Mandela-Magdalene Scholar and Mandela-Rhodes Scholar.

Title of thesis

GCSE History, Policy Reform and Student Development: How students and teachers navigate the thematic study “Empires, Migration and the People”

Conference papers

Teaching Migration, Belonging, and Empire in Secondary Schools: evaluation of a teacher professional development program, (2019) History Educators International Research Network Conference, Lead author: Dr Jason Todd, University of Vienna, Austria.

“The Problems and Prospects of Teaching South Africa’s Recent History: Teachers’ Perspectives”, (2018) Sustainability, peace and education – Exploring promise and practice: BAICE 20th Anniversary Symposium, University of Bristol, England.

“New Generations, Old Wounds: Learning History at Home and School in Northern Ireland”, (2018) European Social Science and History Conference,
Queens University Belfast, Northern Ireland.

“The Methodological Challenges of Investigating the Role of History Teaching in Peacebuilding”, (2017), Present Past: Time, Memory, and the Negotiation of Historical Justice Conference, Columbia University, United States of America.

“Teaching South Africa’s Truth and Reconciliation Commission”, (2017) European Conference on African Studies, Universität Basel, Switzerland.

Research Assistant Publications

Review of the evidence on feedback in primary and secondary schools, (forthcoming, 2021) for the Education Endowment Foundation, Lead author: Prof Velda Elliott.

Teaching Migration, Belonging, and Empire in Secondary Schools, (2019), for Runnymede Trust and the European Research Council, Lead authors: Kimberly McIntosh, Dr Jason Todd and Prof Nandini Das.

Gender and the Politics of Reconciliation (2016), for The Institute for Justice and Reconciliation, Lead author: Dr Helen Scanlon

SOLE AUTHOR PUBLICATIONS

‘Transitions, Truth-Telling and Teaching History’, Cambridge Open-Review Educational Research e-Journal, Vol. 4, 2017.

Paul Riser is a DPhil Student in the department. His research focuses broadly on students’ (especially the marginalised) identities work in upper-secondary English Language Arts classrooms.

Prior to starting his doctoral studies, Paul earned a BSc in English Language Arts (Secondary Education) with a minor in Theology and a BA in Spanish and International Studies with a minor in Psychology from Texas Lutheran University. His MA in English Literature and Language is from St. Mary’s University.

As part of his postgraduate schoolwork, Paul undertook a placement in two graduate certificate programs, earning both his School Counselor certification and School Principal certification for all grade levels in the state of Texas, USA. In addition to English Language Arts and Reading (4th-12th grades), he is also qualified to teach Health (all levels), Journalism (7-12), Speech (7-12), Social Studies (7-12), and English as a Second Language (all levels) in Texas. Further, Paul holds a teaching certification in California, USA, the United Kingdom and Wales, the Kingdom of Denmark, and the Netherlands.

As a public school English teacher for 8 years, Paul was awarded many distinctions including, but not limited to: El maestro de impacto, two Harvard Book Awards, Teacher of the Year, and Texas Parent-Teacher Association Life Member.

His research to inform his doctoral thesis work will be completed in the United States of America. Furthermore, his research interests revolve around the nexus points of gender, ethnicity, sexuality, economic status, and religion as they relate to the agency students have in the classroom.

Paul is the 2019-2020 Student Liaison Coordinator for the Department of Education, Oxford. In this role, he is charged with leading/convening weekly workshops on a variety of research training topics, co-organizing networking and career advice opportunities for graduate students, and liaising with Cambridge University personnel to organize the annual Oxbridge Exchange. Furthermore, Paul supports the Higher Degrees Office as appropriate and meets regularly with directors and other stakeholders to discuss issues of common student concern in order to develop student identity and community throughout the Department.

Paul serves as the representative student voice on the Social Sciences Division Equality & Diversity Steering Group for the University of Oxford.

Paul is also a part-time Research Assistant working with professionals and other academics within the Department of Education on funded and individual projects as needed.

Supervisors: Associate Professors Jenni Ingram and Velda Elliott & Departmental Lecturer Jason Todd.

Thesis Title: ‘Using Positioning Theory to Understand Marginalised Students’ Identities Work and Their Learning Experiences in English Language Arts Classrooms’

Open-Access Publication:
Ingram, Jenni, & Riser, P.A. (2019). Experiences of problem solving in whole class interactions. Avances De Investigación En Educación Matemática, Avances de Investigación en Educación Matemática, Number 16; October 2019.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.35763/aiem.v0i16.279

Tessa is currently completing a part-time DPhil, alongside work as a senior leader in a London secondary school.

Her research explores how teachers on school-based ITE routes (TeachFirst and School Direct salaried) approach learning from experience. The research takes an action research approach: working with participant beginning teachers and mentors to critically examine and reflect on the processes of learning to teach, using their conversations as stimulus data.

Prior to joining the Department of Education Tessa completed an MSc in Educational Research (University of Bristol).

Yoon Young has been involved in a variety of academic and professional projects related to teacher education.

She is currently a member of the Teacher Education and Professional Learning (TEPL) research group at Oxford. Her doctoral research focuses on teacher education policy and practice in England. The study examines the relationship between individuals’ own objectives, the stated programme goals, and the national teachers’ standards in the operation of the Oxford Internship Scheme (OIS). It also explores the perceptions of stakeholders regarding ideal goals that could drive a re-conceptualised teacher education programme.

Prior to her doctorate, Yoon Young used to be a social studies teacher and subsequently worked as a consultant for the OECD’s Initial Teacher Preparation (ITP) Study. She holds a B.A. in Social Studies and Geography Education from the Ewha Womans University, and an M.A. in Educational Leadership from the University of Jyväskylä, where she was a grantee of the Korean Government Scholarship for Study Overseas.

Katy is a Deputy Headteacher and the founder of a Leadership and Coaching Institute, which she now co-directs.

Katy is an Associate Fellow at the Oxford Character Project and a Research Associate at the Oxford University Wellbeing Research Centre. She is the co-founder of Global Social Leaders, a leadership programme which has participants in 105 countries, all passionate about creating and sustaining positive change in the world.

Title of Thesis

How could school leaders improve the flourishing and wellbeing of teaching staff?

Books
  • Granville-Chapman, K. and Bidston, E (2020) Leader: Know, love and inspire your people. Carmarthen: Crownhouse Publishing
Book Chapters
  •  Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ In White, M. & McCallum, F. (Ed.s) Wellbeing and Resilience Education: Covid-19 And Its Impact on Education Systems. Routledge
Publications
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘Purpose and Leadership in Education and Beyond’. The Education Exchange. Available from: https://theeducation.exchange/purpose-and-leadership-in-education-and-beyond/
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘The Three Secrets of COVID-era Leadership’. Times Education Supplement. Available from: https://www.tes.com/news/three-secrets-covid-era-school-leadership
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2016) ‘Assessing the Impact of a Teacher Leadership Programme in a Teaching Schools Alliance. Journal of Teacher Action Research
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2014) ‘The Afghan conflict: causes and consequences.’ Geography Review 28(1): 22-27
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2013) What are the psychological factors that affect students’ academic resilience and can teachers influence these? Unpublished thesis
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘Unlocking Leadership Potential’, The Magazine of the Boarding School’s Association, 33: 42-45
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2009) ‘Learning to Lead’, Leader, The Education Leader Magazine 41: 22-25
Presentations
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2019) ‘How could leaders improve the flourishing of their teams?’ ‘Stowe Ed Conference’, Forthcoming: 7 Jan 2019
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2018) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education: 21 Jun 2018
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2017) ‘How can school leaders improve teacher flourishing?’ ‘Doing Education Differently Conference’, University of Oxford, Department of Education, 11 Mar 17
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2016) ‘Developing school leaders who enable teachers to flourish’ The Telegraph Festival of Education 23 Jun 16
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Developing leadership in pupils and teachers’ High School Affiliated to Renmin University of China, Beijing. 20 Oct 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Resilience for leaders.’ Global Social Leaders World Summit. 16 Aug 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Emotional Intelligence for Leaders.’ Global Leaders in Education. 12 Aug 15
  • Coates, S.; Fraser, H.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J.; and Nasim, A. (2015) ‘Breaking through the glass ceiling – how can schools empower our girls to become leaders?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education. 19 Jun 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. ‘Developing Leadership in Schools’ (2015). G20 Schools Conference. International conference for head teachers. 11 Apr 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2018) ‘Introduction’, Wellington Leadership Institute: Festival of Leadership. Mar 2012-15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘How the Young Learn to Lead’, Raffles Institution (Singapore) -Purdue University (USA) Education Forum on Gifted & Talented Youth 2012. Singapore. 15 Mar 12
  • Draper, D.; Dyer, R.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Schools’. Presentation for a meeting about pupil leadership and character development at 10 Downing Street. 16 Nov 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Young People’. Presentation for a meeting about leadership and character at 10 Downing Street. 7 Mar 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K. & Seldon, A. (2012) ‘Introduction’, Leading Your School in the 21st Century. 7 Feb 12

Kamal Armanious is particularly interested in the topic of education governance to explore what is possible in developing an improved governance system for technical and vocational education and training (TVET).

There have always been various calls from different international organisations such UNESCO, ILO, World Bank, OECD etc. to develop a transformed and transformative approach to TVET. This is attractive for certain theoretical as well as practical reasons; however, one set of limitations in achieving this vision lies in the arena of governance. Mr Armanious examines an imagined better model of governance that can be developed from the principles of a new approach and wider theoretical resources with consideration to national realities where there may be very serious obstacles in the way of realising this new governance approach and hence the overall planned transformation.

Title of Thesis

Education and Training Policies in Egypt: Good Governance and Stakeholders Participation

 

Amanda is completing a part-time DPhil, alongside working in Initial Teacher Education at Leeds Trinity University.

Her research is focused on understanding tensions, contradictions and conflicts that teachers in disadvantaged schools may experience when they engage in research activity.  Her research focus is influenced by her own experiences of working as a research-active teacher in disadvantaged schools, and recent work in teacher education to support experienced and beginning teachers in developing their own research activities.

One of the aims of Amanda’s research is to construct a framework to support teachers in pursuing research activity and critical scholarship work which articulates with wider social movements to address issues of poverty and disadvantage in schools.

Title of Thesis

Teachers’ perspectives on tensions between policy, practice and research in disadvantaged schools

Publications 

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2017) A ‘usable past’ of teacher education in England: history in JET’s anniversary issue. Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy, 43 (5), pp.616-627.

Nuttall, A. (2016) The ‘curriculum challenge’: Moving towards the ‘Storyline’ approach in a case study urban primary school.  Improving Schools, 19 (2), pp. 154-166.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Learning {Re}imagined: A review.  Primary First, 15, pp. 17-18.

Nuttall, A. and Doherty, J. (2014) Disaffected boys and the achievement gap: the ‘wallpaper effect’ and what is hidden by a focus on school results.  The Urban Review, 46 (5), pp.800-815.

Conference Papers and Presentations

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2018) “No child is pre-ordained to fail” Teachers questioning policy assumptions.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Newcastle, 11-13 September.

Nuttall, A. and Tobbell, C. (2017) Trainee teachers’ perspectives on practitioner enquiry.  Paper presented at the 8th TEAN Conference: Thinking Deeply about Education, Birmingham, 11-12 May.

Nuttall, A. (2017) Assessment at primary level: quality, comparability and improving secondary readiness.  A perspective from ITE.  Speech at the Westminster Education Forum Keynote Seminar: Next steps for reforming primary education: effective teaching practices, assessment and accountably, London, 18 January.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Deficit narratives and lived realities: whose poverty is it?  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the Australian Association for Research in Education, Melbourne, 27 November – 1 December.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Disenfranchised boys’ reflections on their urban schooling experience: “What a Waste!”.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Philpott, C., Beckett, L. and Wrigley, T. (2016) Collaborative practitioner inquiry: making a difference to urban schools.  Innovation session (school visits and symposium) presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Finn, B. and Beckett, L. (2015) Teachers’ constructions of poverty effects: Their research evidence.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Belfast, 15-17 September.

Nuttall, A. (2014) Teachers’ voice on disengaged boys: the role of one teacher-researcher in an English primary school. Paper presented at the Joint Australian Association for Research in Education and the New Zealand Association for Research in Education Conference, Brisbane, 30 November – 4 December.

Abigail’s research explores the role of education in students’ personal development and how this can be supported by policy, curricula, initial teacher education and teacher professional development. In particular she focuses on history education, citizenship education and peace education as vehicles for dialogue. These opportunities for students to engage with social questions are vital for building cohesive societies. This flows from the recognition that traditional forums for developing public understanding, such as post-conflict truth commissions, need to be complemented by intergenerational and educational perspectives.

Abigail has taught History, Politics, Debating as well as Relationships and Sex Education to secondary school students in South Africa, England and the USA.

She holds postgraduate degrees in Post-Conflict and Transitional Justice (University of Cape Town), in Education, Globalisation and International Development (University of Cambridge) and in African Studies (University of Oxford). She is a Rhodes Scholar, Mandela-Magdalene Scholar and Mandela-Rhodes Scholar.

Title of thesis

GCSE History, Policy Reform and Student Development: How students and teachers navigate the thematic study “Empires, Migration and the People”

Conference papers

Teaching Migration, Belonging, and Empire in Secondary Schools: evaluation of a teacher professional development program, (2019) History Educators International Research Network Conference, Lead author: Dr Jason Todd, University of Vienna, Austria.

“The Problems and Prospects of Teaching South Africa’s Recent History: Teachers’ Perspectives”, (2018) Sustainability, peace and education – Exploring promise and practice: BAICE 20th Anniversary Symposium, University of Bristol, England.

“New Generations, Old Wounds: Learning History at Home and School in Northern Ireland”, (2018) European Social Science and History Conference,
Queens University Belfast, Northern Ireland.

“The Methodological Challenges of Investigating the Role of History Teaching in Peacebuilding”, (2017), Present Past: Time, Memory, and the Negotiation of Historical Justice Conference, Columbia University, United States of America.

“Teaching South Africa’s Truth and Reconciliation Commission”, (2017) European Conference on African Studies, Universität Basel, Switzerland.

Research Assistant Publications

Review of the evidence on feedback in primary and secondary schools, (forthcoming, 2021) for the Education Endowment Foundation, Lead author: Prof Velda Elliott.

Teaching Migration, Belonging, and Empire in Secondary Schools, (2019), for Runnymede Trust and the European Research Council, Lead authors: Kimberly McIntosh, Dr Jason Todd and Prof Nandini Das.

Gender and the Politics of Reconciliation (2016), for The Institute for Justice and Reconciliation, Lead author: Dr Helen Scanlon

SOLE AUTHOR PUBLICATIONS

‘Transitions, Truth-Telling and Teaching History’, Cambridge Open-Review Educational Research e-Journal, Vol. 4, 2017.

Paul Riser is a DPhil Student in the department. His research focuses broadly on students’ (especially the marginalised) identities work in upper-secondary English Language Arts classrooms.

Prior to starting his doctoral studies, Paul earned a BSc in English Language Arts (Secondary Education) with a minor in Theology and a BA in Spanish and International Studies with a minor in Psychology from Texas Lutheran University. His MA in English Literature and Language is from St. Mary’s University.

As part of his postgraduate schoolwork, Paul undertook a placement in two graduate certificate programs, earning both his School Counselor certification and School Principal certification for all grade levels in the state of Texas, USA. In addition to English Language Arts and Reading (4th-12th grades), he is also qualified to teach Health (all levels), Journalism (7-12), Speech (7-12), Social Studies (7-12), and English as a Second Language (all levels) in Texas. Further, Paul holds a teaching certification in California, USA, the United Kingdom and Wales, the Kingdom of Denmark, and the Netherlands.

As a public school English teacher for 8 years, Paul was awarded many distinctions including, but not limited to: El maestro de impacto, two Harvard Book Awards, Teacher of the Year, and Texas Parent-Teacher Association Life Member.

His research to inform his doctoral thesis work will be completed in the United States of America. Furthermore, his research interests revolve around the nexus points of gender, ethnicity, sexuality, economic status, and religion as they relate to the agency students have in the classroom.

Paul is the 2019-2020 Student Liaison Coordinator for the Department of Education, Oxford. In this role, he is charged with leading/convening weekly workshops on a variety of research training topics, co-organizing networking and career advice opportunities for graduate students, and liaising with Cambridge University personnel to organize the annual Oxbridge Exchange. Furthermore, Paul supports the Higher Degrees Office as appropriate and meets regularly with directors and other stakeholders to discuss issues of common student concern in order to develop student identity and community throughout the Department.

Paul serves as the representative student voice on the Social Sciences Division Equality & Diversity Steering Group for the University of Oxford.

Paul is also a part-time Research Assistant working with professionals and other academics within the Department of Education on funded and individual projects as needed.

Supervisors: Associate Professors Jenni Ingram and Velda Elliott & Departmental Lecturer Jason Todd.

Thesis Title: ‘Using Positioning Theory to Understand Marginalised Students’ Identities Work and Their Learning Experiences in English Language Arts Classrooms’

Open-Access Publication:
Ingram, Jenni, & Riser, P.A. (2019). Experiences of problem solving in whole class interactions. Avances De Investigación En Educación Matemática, Avances de Investigación en Educación Matemática, Number 16; October 2019.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.35763/aiem.v0i16.279

Tessa is currently completing a part-time DPhil, alongside work as a senior leader in a London secondary school.

Her research explores how teachers on school-based ITE routes (TeachFirst and School Direct salaried) approach learning from experience. The research takes an action research approach: working with participant beginning teachers and mentors to critically examine and reflect on the processes of learning to teach, using their conversations as stimulus data.

Prior to joining the Department of Education Tessa completed an MSc in Educational Research (University of Bristol).

Yoon Young has been involved in a variety of academic and professional projects related to teacher education.

She is currently a member of the Teacher Education and Professional Learning (TEPL) research group at Oxford. Her doctoral research focuses on teacher education policy and practice in England. The study examines the relationship between individuals’ own objectives, the stated programme goals, and the national teachers’ standards in the operation of the Oxford Internship Scheme (OIS). It also explores the perceptions of stakeholders regarding ideal goals that could drive a re-conceptualised teacher education programme.

Prior to her doctorate, Yoon Young used to be a social studies teacher and subsequently worked as a consultant for the OECD’s Initial Teacher Preparation (ITP) Study. She holds a B.A. in Social Studies and Geography Education from the Ewha Womans University, and an M.A. in Educational Leadership from the University of Jyväskylä, where she was a grantee of the Korean Government Scholarship for Study Overseas.

Katy is a Deputy Headteacher and the founder of a Leadership and Coaching Institute, which she now co-directs.

Katy is an Associate Fellow at the Oxford Character Project and a Research Associate at the Oxford University Wellbeing Research Centre. She is the co-founder of Global Social Leaders, a leadership programme which has participants in 105 countries, all passionate about creating and sustaining positive change in the world.

Title of Thesis

How could school leaders improve the flourishing and wellbeing of teaching staff?

Books
  • Granville-Chapman, K. and Bidston, E (2020) Leader: Know, love and inspire your people. Carmarthen: Crownhouse Publishing
Book Chapters
  •  Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ In White, M. & McCallum, F. (Ed.s) Wellbeing and Resilience Education: Covid-19 And Its Impact on Education Systems. Routledge
Publications
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘Purpose and Leadership in Education and Beyond’. The Education Exchange. Available from: https://theeducation.exchange/purpose-and-leadership-in-education-and-beyond/
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘The Three Secrets of COVID-era Leadership’. Times Education Supplement. Available from: https://www.tes.com/news/three-secrets-covid-era-school-leadership
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2016) ‘Assessing the Impact of a Teacher Leadership Programme in a Teaching Schools Alliance. Journal of Teacher Action Research
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2014) ‘The Afghan conflict: causes and consequences.’ Geography Review 28(1): 22-27
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2013) What are the psychological factors that affect students’ academic resilience and can teachers influence these? Unpublished thesis
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘Unlocking Leadership Potential’, The Magazine of the Boarding School’s Association, 33: 42-45
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2009) ‘Learning to Lead’, Leader, The Education Leader Magazine 41: 22-25
Presentations
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2019) ‘How could leaders improve the flourishing of their teams?’ ‘Stowe Ed Conference’, Forthcoming: 7 Jan 2019
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2018) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education: 21 Jun 2018
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2017) ‘How can school leaders improve teacher flourishing?’ ‘Doing Education Differently Conference’, University of Oxford, Department of Education, 11 Mar 17
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2016) ‘Developing school leaders who enable teachers to flourish’ The Telegraph Festival of Education 23 Jun 16
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Developing leadership in pupils and teachers’ High School Affiliated to Renmin University of China, Beijing. 20 Oct 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Resilience for leaders.’ Global Social Leaders World Summit. 16 Aug 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Emotional Intelligence for Leaders.’ Global Leaders in Education. 12 Aug 15
  • Coates, S.; Fraser, H.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J.; and Nasim, A. (2015) ‘Breaking through the glass ceiling – how can schools empower our girls to become leaders?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education. 19 Jun 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. ‘Developing Leadership in Schools’ (2015). G20 Schools Conference. International conference for head teachers. 11 Apr 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2018) ‘Introduction’, Wellington Leadership Institute: Festival of Leadership. Mar 2012-15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘How the Young Learn to Lead’, Raffles Institution (Singapore) -Purdue University (USA) Education Forum on Gifted & Talented Youth 2012. Singapore. 15 Mar 12
  • Draper, D.; Dyer, R.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Schools’. Presentation for a meeting about pupil leadership and character development at 10 Downing Street. 16 Nov 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Young People’. Presentation for a meeting about leadership and character at 10 Downing Street. 7 Mar 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K. & Seldon, A. (2012) ‘Introduction’, Leading Your School in the 21st Century. 7 Feb 12

Kamal Armanious is particularly interested in the topic of education governance to explore what is possible in developing an improved governance system for technical and vocational education and training (TVET).

There have always been various calls from different international organisations such UNESCO, ILO, World Bank, OECD etc. to develop a transformed and transformative approach to TVET. This is attractive for certain theoretical as well as practical reasons; however, one set of limitations in achieving this vision lies in the arena of governance. Mr Armanious examines an imagined better model of governance that can be developed from the principles of a new approach and wider theoretical resources with consideration to national realities where there may be very serious obstacles in the way of realising this new governance approach and hence the overall planned transformation.

Title of Thesis

Education and Training Policies in Egypt: Good Governance and Stakeholders Participation

 

Amanda is completing a part-time DPhil, alongside working in Initial Teacher Education at Leeds Trinity University.

Her research is focused on understanding tensions, contradictions and conflicts that teachers in disadvantaged schools may experience when they engage in research activity.  Her research focus is influenced by her own experiences of working as a research-active teacher in disadvantaged schools, and recent work in teacher education to support experienced and beginning teachers in developing their own research activities.

One of the aims of Amanda’s research is to construct a framework to support teachers in pursuing research activity and critical scholarship work which articulates with wider social movements to address issues of poverty and disadvantage in schools.

Title of Thesis

Teachers’ perspectives on tensions between policy, practice and research in disadvantaged schools

Publications 

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2017) A ‘usable past’ of teacher education in England: history in JET’s anniversary issue. Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy, 43 (5), pp.616-627.

Nuttall, A. (2016) The ‘curriculum challenge’: Moving towards the ‘Storyline’ approach in a case study urban primary school.  Improving Schools, 19 (2), pp. 154-166.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Learning {Re}imagined: A review.  Primary First, 15, pp. 17-18.

Nuttall, A. and Doherty, J. (2014) Disaffected boys and the achievement gap: the ‘wallpaper effect’ and what is hidden by a focus on school results.  The Urban Review, 46 (5), pp.800-815.

Conference Papers and Presentations

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2018) “No child is pre-ordained to fail” Teachers questioning policy assumptions.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Newcastle, 11-13 September.

Nuttall, A. and Tobbell, C. (2017) Trainee teachers’ perspectives on practitioner enquiry.  Paper presented at the 8th TEAN Conference: Thinking Deeply about Education, Birmingham, 11-12 May.

Nuttall, A. (2017) Assessment at primary level: quality, comparability and improving secondary readiness.  A perspective from ITE.  Speech at the Westminster Education Forum Keynote Seminar: Next steps for reforming primary education: effective teaching practices, assessment and accountably, London, 18 January.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Deficit narratives and lived realities: whose poverty is it?  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the Australian Association for Research in Education, Melbourne, 27 November – 1 December.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Disenfranchised boys’ reflections on their urban schooling experience: “What a Waste!”.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Philpott, C., Beckett, L. and Wrigley, T. (2016) Collaborative practitioner inquiry: making a difference to urban schools.  Innovation session (school visits and symposium) presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Finn, B. and Beckett, L. (2015) Teachers’ constructions of poverty effects: Their research evidence.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Belfast, 15-17 September.

Nuttall, A. (2014) Teachers’ voice on disengaged boys: the role of one teacher-researcher in an English primary school. Paper presented at the Joint Australian Association for Research in Education and the New Zealand Association for Research in Education Conference, Brisbane, 30 November – 4 December.

Abigail’s research explores the role of education in students’ personal development and how this can be supported by policy, curricula, initial teacher education and teacher professional development. In particular she focuses on history education, citizenship education and peace education as vehicles for dialogue. These opportunities for students to engage with social questions are vital for building cohesive societies. This flows from the recognition that traditional forums for developing public understanding, such as post-conflict truth commissions, need to be complemented by intergenerational and educational perspectives.

Abigail has taught History, Politics, Debating as well as Relationships and Sex Education to secondary school students in South Africa, England and the USA.

She holds postgraduate degrees in Post-Conflict and Transitional Justice (University of Cape Town), in Education, Globalisation and International Development (University of Cambridge) and in African Studies (University of Oxford). She is a Rhodes Scholar, Mandela-Magdalene Scholar and Mandela-Rhodes Scholar.

Title of thesis

GCSE History, Policy Reform and Student Development: How students and teachers navigate the thematic study “Empires, Migration and the People”

Conference papers

Teaching Migration, Belonging, and Empire in Secondary Schools: evaluation of a teacher professional development program, (2019) History Educators International Research Network Conference, Lead author: Dr Jason Todd, University of Vienna, Austria.

“The Problems and Prospects of Teaching South Africa’s Recent History: Teachers’ Perspectives”, (2018) Sustainability, peace and education – Exploring promise and practice: BAICE 20th Anniversary Symposium, University of Bristol, England.

“New Generations, Old Wounds: Learning History at Home and School in Northern Ireland”, (2018) European Social Science and History Conference,
Queens University Belfast, Northern Ireland.

“The Methodological Challenges of Investigating the Role of History Teaching in Peacebuilding”, (2017), Present Past: Time, Memory, and the Negotiation of Historical Justice Conference, Columbia University, United States of America.

“Teaching South Africa’s Truth and Reconciliation Commission”, (2017) European Conference on African Studies, Universität Basel, Switzerland.

Research Assistant Publications

Review of the evidence on feedback in primary and secondary schools, (forthcoming, 2021) for the Education Endowment Foundation, Lead author: Prof Velda Elliott.

Teaching Migration, Belonging, and Empire in Secondary Schools, (2019), for Runnymede Trust and the European Research Council, Lead authors: Kimberly McIntosh, Dr Jason Todd and Prof Nandini Das.

Gender and the Politics of Reconciliation (2016), for The Institute for Justice and Reconciliation, Lead author: Dr Helen Scanlon

SOLE AUTHOR PUBLICATIONS

‘Transitions, Truth-Telling and Teaching History’, Cambridge Open-Review Educational Research e-Journal, Vol. 4, 2017.

Paul Riser is a DPhil Student in the department. His research focuses broadly on students’ (especially the marginalised) identities work in upper-secondary English Language Arts classrooms.

Prior to starting his doctoral studies, Paul earned a BSc in English Language Arts (Secondary Education) with a minor in Theology and a BA in Spanish and International Studies with a minor in Psychology from Texas Lutheran University. His MA in English Literature and Language is from St. Mary’s University.

As part of his postgraduate schoolwork, Paul undertook a placement in two graduate certificate programs, earning both his School Counselor certification and School Principal certification for all grade levels in the state of Texas, USA. In addition to English Language Arts and Reading (4th-12th grades), he is also qualified to teach Health (all levels), Journalism (7-12), Speech (7-12), Social Studies (7-12), and English as a Second Language (all levels) in Texas. Further, Paul holds a teaching certification in California, USA, the United Kingdom and Wales, the Kingdom of Denmark, and the Netherlands.

As a public school English teacher for 8 years, Paul was awarded many distinctions including, but not limited to: El maestro de impacto, two Harvard Book Awards, Teacher of the Year, and Texas Parent-Teacher Association Life Member.

His research to inform his doctoral thesis work will be completed in the United States of America. Furthermore, his research interests revolve around the nexus points of gender, ethnicity, sexuality, economic status, and religion as they relate to the agency students have in the classroom.

Paul is the 2019-2020 Student Liaison Coordinator for the Department of Education, Oxford. In this role, he is charged with leading/convening weekly workshops on a variety of research training topics, co-organizing networking and career advice opportunities for graduate students, and liaising with Cambridge University personnel to organize the annual Oxbridge Exchange. Furthermore, Paul supports the Higher Degrees Office as appropriate and meets regularly with directors and other stakeholders to discuss issues of common student concern in order to develop student identity and community throughout the Department.

Paul serves as the representative student voice on the Social Sciences Division Equality & Diversity Steering Group for the University of Oxford.

Paul is also a part-time Research Assistant working with professionals and other academics within the Department of Education on funded and individual projects as needed.

Supervisors: Associate Professors Jenni Ingram and Velda Elliott & Departmental Lecturer Jason Todd.

Thesis Title: ‘Using Positioning Theory to Understand Marginalised Students’ Identities Work and Their Learning Experiences in English Language Arts Classrooms’

Open-Access Publication:
Ingram, Jenni, & Riser, P.A. (2019). Experiences of problem solving in whole class interactions. Avances De Investigación En Educación Matemática, Avances de Investigación en Educación Matemática, Number 16; October 2019.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.35763/aiem.v0i16.279

Tessa is currently completing a part-time DPhil, alongside work as a senior leader in a London secondary school.

Her research explores how teachers on school-based ITE routes (TeachFirst and School Direct salaried) approach learning from experience. The research takes an action research approach: working with participant beginning teachers and mentors to critically examine and reflect on the processes of learning to teach, using their conversations as stimulus data.

Prior to joining the Department of Education Tessa completed an MSc in Educational Research (University of Bristol).

Yoon Young has been involved in a variety of academic and professional projects related to teacher education.

She is currently a member of the Teacher Education and Professional Learning (TEPL) research group at Oxford. Her doctoral research focuses on teacher education policy and practice in England. The study examines the relationship between individuals’ own objectives, the stated programme goals, and the national teachers’ standards in the operation of the Oxford Internship Scheme (OIS). It also explores the perceptions of stakeholders regarding ideal goals that could drive a re-conceptualised teacher education programme.

Prior to her doctorate, Yoon Young used to be a social studies teacher and subsequently worked as a consultant for the OECD’s Initial Teacher Preparation (ITP) Study. She holds a B.A. in Social Studies and Geography Education from the Ewha Womans University, and an M.A. in Educational Leadership from the University of Jyväskylä, where she was a grantee of the Korean Government Scholarship for Study Overseas.

Katy is a Deputy Headteacher and the founder of a Leadership and Coaching Institute, which she now co-directs.

Katy is an Associate Fellow at the Oxford Character Project and a Research Associate at the Oxford University Wellbeing Research Centre. She is the co-founder of Global Social Leaders, a leadership programme which has participants in 105 countries, all passionate about creating and sustaining positive change in the world.

Title of Thesis

How could school leaders improve the flourishing and wellbeing of teaching staff?

Books
  • Granville-Chapman, K. and Bidston, E (2020) Leader: Know, love and inspire your people. Carmarthen: Crownhouse Publishing
Book Chapters
  •  Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ In White, M. & McCallum, F. (Ed.s) Wellbeing and Resilience Education: Covid-19 And Its Impact on Education Systems. Routledge
Publications
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘Purpose and Leadership in Education and Beyond’. The Education Exchange. Available from: https://theeducation.exchange/purpose-and-leadership-in-education-and-beyond/
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘The Three Secrets of COVID-era Leadership’. Times Education Supplement. Available from: https://www.tes.com/news/three-secrets-covid-era-school-leadership
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2016) ‘Assessing the Impact of a Teacher Leadership Programme in a Teaching Schools Alliance. Journal of Teacher Action Research
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2014) ‘The Afghan conflict: causes and consequences.’ Geography Review 28(1): 22-27
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2013) What are the psychological factors that affect students’ academic resilience and can teachers influence these? Unpublished thesis
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘Unlocking Leadership Potential’, The Magazine of the Boarding School’s Association, 33: 42-45
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2009) ‘Learning to Lead’, Leader, The Education Leader Magazine 41: 22-25
Presentations
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2019) ‘How could leaders improve the flourishing of their teams?’ ‘Stowe Ed Conference’, Forthcoming: 7 Jan 2019
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2018) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education: 21 Jun 2018
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2017) ‘How can school leaders improve teacher flourishing?’ ‘Doing Education Differently Conference’, University of Oxford, Department of Education, 11 Mar 17
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2016) ‘Developing school leaders who enable teachers to flourish’ The Telegraph Festival of Education 23 Jun 16
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Developing leadership in pupils and teachers’ High School Affiliated to Renmin University of China, Beijing. 20 Oct 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Resilience for leaders.’ Global Social Leaders World Summit. 16 Aug 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Emotional Intelligence for Leaders.’ Global Leaders in Education. 12 Aug 15
  • Coates, S.; Fraser, H.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J.; and Nasim, A. (2015) ‘Breaking through the glass ceiling – how can schools empower our girls to become leaders?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education. 19 Jun 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. ‘Developing Leadership in Schools’ (2015). G20 Schools Conference. International conference for head teachers. 11 Apr 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2018) ‘Introduction’, Wellington Leadership Institute: Festival of Leadership. Mar 2012-15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘How the Young Learn to Lead’, Raffles Institution (Singapore) -Purdue University (USA) Education Forum on Gifted & Talented Youth 2012. Singapore. 15 Mar 12
  • Draper, D.; Dyer, R.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Schools’. Presentation for a meeting about pupil leadership and character development at 10 Downing Street. 16 Nov 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Young People’. Presentation for a meeting about leadership and character at 10 Downing Street. 7 Mar 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K. & Seldon, A. (2012) ‘Introduction’, Leading Your School in the 21st Century. 7 Feb 12

Kamal Armanious is particularly interested in the topic of education governance to explore what is possible in developing an improved governance system for technical and vocational education and training (TVET).

There have always been various calls from different international organisations such UNESCO, ILO, World Bank, OECD etc. to develop a transformed and transformative approach to TVET. This is attractive for certain theoretical as well as practical reasons; however, one set of limitations in achieving this vision lies in the arena of governance. Mr Armanious examines an imagined better model of governance that can be developed from the principles of a new approach and wider theoretical resources with consideration to national realities where there may be very serious obstacles in the way of realising this new governance approach and hence the overall planned transformation.

Title of Thesis

Education and Training Policies in Egypt: Good Governance and Stakeholders Participation

 

Amanda is completing a part-time DPhil, alongside working in Initial Teacher Education at Leeds Trinity University.

Her research is focused on understanding tensions, contradictions and conflicts that teachers in disadvantaged schools may experience when they engage in research activity.  Her research focus is influenced by her own experiences of working as a research-active teacher in disadvantaged schools, and recent work in teacher education to support experienced and beginning teachers in developing their own research activities.

One of the aims of Amanda’s research is to construct a framework to support teachers in pursuing research activity and critical scholarship work which articulates with wider social movements to address issues of poverty and disadvantage in schools.

Title of Thesis

Teachers’ perspectives on tensions between policy, practice and research in disadvantaged schools

Publications 

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2017) A ‘usable past’ of teacher education in England: history in JET’s anniversary issue. Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy, 43 (5), pp.616-627.

Nuttall, A. (2016) The ‘curriculum challenge’: Moving towards the ‘Storyline’ approach in a case study urban primary school.  Improving Schools, 19 (2), pp. 154-166.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Learning {Re}imagined: A review.  Primary First, 15, pp. 17-18.

Nuttall, A. and Doherty, J. (2014) Disaffected boys and the achievement gap: the ‘wallpaper effect’ and what is hidden by a focus on school results.  The Urban Review, 46 (5), pp.800-815.

Conference Papers and Presentations

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2018) “No child is pre-ordained to fail” Teachers questioning policy assumptions.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Newcastle, 11-13 September.

Nuttall, A. and Tobbell, C. (2017) Trainee teachers’ perspectives on practitioner enquiry.  Paper presented at the 8th TEAN Conference: Thinking Deeply about Education, Birmingham, 11-12 May.

Nuttall, A. (2017) Assessment at primary level: quality, comparability and improving secondary readiness.  A perspective from ITE.  Speech at the Westminster Education Forum Keynote Seminar: Next steps for reforming primary education: effective teaching practices, assessment and accountably, London, 18 January.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Deficit narratives and lived realities: whose poverty is it?  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the Australian Association for Research in Education, Melbourne, 27 November – 1 December.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Disenfranchised boys’ reflections on their urban schooling experience: “What a Waste!”.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Philpott, C., Beckett, L. and Wrigley, T. (2016) Collaborative practitioner inquiry: making a difference to urban schools.  Innovation session (school visits and symposium) presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Finn, B. and Beckett, L. (2015) Teachers’ constructions of poverty effects: Their research evidence.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Belfast, 15-17 September.

Nuttall, A. (2014) Teachers’ voice on disengaged boys: the role of one teacher-researcher in an English primary school. Paper presented at the Joint Australian Association for Research in Education and the New Zealand Association for Research in Education Conference, Brisbane, 30 November – 4 December.

Abigail’s research explores the role of education in students’ personal development and how this can be supported by policy, curricula, initial teacher education and teacher professional development. In particular she focuses on history education, citizenship education and peace education as vehicles for dialogue. These opportunities for students to engage with social questions are vital for building cohesive societies. This flows from the recognition that traditional forums for developing public understanding, such as post-conflict truth commissions, need to be complemented by intergenerational and educational perspectives.

Abigail has taught History, Politics, Debating as well as Relationships and Sex Education to secondary school students in South Africa, England and the USA.

She holds postgraduate degrees in Post-Conflict and Transitional Justice (University of Cape Town), in Education, Globalisation and International Development (University of Cambridge) and in African Studies (University of Oxford). She is a Rhodes Scholar, Mandela-Magdalene Scholar and Mandela-Rhodes Scholar.

Title of thesis

GCSE History, Policy Reform and Student Development: How students and teachers navigate the thematic study “Empires, Migration and the People”

Conference papers

Teaching Migration, Belonging, and Empire in Secondary Schools: evaluation of a teacher professional development program, (2019) History Educators International Research Network Conference, Lead author: Dr Jason Todd, University of Vienna, Austria.

“The Problems and Prospects of Teaching South Africa’s Recent History: Teachers’ Perspectives”, (2018) Sustainability, peace and education – Exploring promise and practice: BAICE 20th Anniversary Symposium, University of Bristol, England.

“New Generations, Old Wounds: Learning History at Home and School in Northern Ireland”, (2018) European Social Science and History Conference,
Queens University Belfast, Northern Ireland.

“The Methodological Challenges of Investigating the Role of History Teaching in Peacebuilding”, (2017), Present Past: Time, Memory, and the Negotiation of Historical Justice Conference, Columbia University, United States of America.

“Teaching South Africa’s Truth and Reconciliation Commission”, (2017) European Conference on African Studies, Universität Basel, Switzerland.

Research Assistant Publications

Review of the evidence on feedback in primary and secondary schools, (forthcoming, 2021) for the Education Endowment Foundation, Lead author: Prof Velda Elliott.

Teaching Migration, Belonging, and Empire in Secondary Schools, (2019), for Runnymede Trust and the European Research Council, Lead authors: Kimberly McIntosh, Dr Jason Todd and Prof Nandini Das.

Gender and the Politics of Reconciliation (2016), for The Institute for Justice and Reconciliation, Lead author: Dr Helen Scanlon

SOLE AUTHOR PUBLICATIONS

‘Transitions, Truth-Telling and Teaching History’, Cambridge Open-Review Educational Research e-Journal, Vol. 4, 2017.

Paul Riser is a DPhil Student in the department. His research focuses broadly on students’ (especially the marginalised) identities work in upper-secondary English Language Arts classrooms.

Prior to starting his doctoral studies, Paul earned a BSc in English Language Arts (Secondary Education) with a minor in Theology and a BA in Spanish and International Studies with a minor in Psychology from Texas Lutheran University. His MA in English Literature and Language is from St. Mary’s University.

As part of his postgraduate schoolwork, Paul undertook a placement in two graduate certificate programs, earning both his School Counselor certification and School Principal certification for all grade levels in the state of Texas, USA. In addition to English Language Arts and Reading (4th-12th grades), he is also qualified to teach Health (all levels), Journalism (7-12), Speech (7-12), Social Studies (7-12), and English as a Second Language (all levels) in Texas. Further, Paul holds a teaching certification in California, USA, the United Kingdom and Wales, the Kingdom of Denmark, and the Netherlands.

As a public school English teacher for 8 years, Paul was awarded many distinctions including, but not limited to: El maestro de impacto, two Harvard Book Awards, Teacher of the Year, and Texas Parent-Teacher Association Life Member.

His research to inform his doctoral thesis work will be completed in the United States of America. Furthermore, his research interests revolve around the nexus points of gender, ethnicity, sexuality, economic status, and religion as they relate to the agency students have in the classroom.

Paul is the 2019-2020 Student Liaison Coordinator for the Department of Education, Oxford. In this role, he is charged with leading/convening weekly workshops on a variety of research training topics, co-organizing networking and career advice opportunities for graduate students, and liaising with Cambridge University personnel to organize the annual Oxbridge Exchange. Furthermore, Paul supports the Higher Degrees Office as appropriate and meets regularly with directors and other stakeholders to discuss issues of common student concern in order to develop student identity and community throughout the Department.

Paul serves as the representative student voice on the Social Sciences Division Equality & Diversity Steering Group for the University of Oxford.

Paul is also a part-time Research Assistant working with professionals and other academics within the Department of Education on funded and individual projects as needed.

Supervisors: Associate Professors Jenni Ingram and Velda Elliott & Departmental Lecturer Jason Todd.

Thesis Title: ‘Using Positioning Theory to Understand Marginalised Students’ Identities Work and Their Learning Experiences in English Language Arts Classrooms’

Open-Access Publication:
Ingram, Jenni, & Riser, P.A. (2019). Experiences of problem solving in whole class interactions. Avances De Investigación En Educación Matemática, Avances de Investigación en Educación Matemática, Number 16; October 2019.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.35763/aiem.v0i16.279

Tessa is currently completing a part-time DPhil, alongside work as a senior leader in a London secondary school.

Her research explores how teachers on school-based ITE routes (TeachFirst and School Direct salaried) approach learning from experience. The research takes an action research approach: working with participant beginning teachers and mentors to critically examine and reflect on the processes of learning to teach, using their conversations as stimulus data.

Prior to joining the Department of Education Tessa completed an MSc in Educational Research (University of Bristol).

Yoon Young has been involved in a variety of academic and professional projects related to teacher education.

She is currently a member of the Teacher Education and Professional Learning (TEPL) research group at Oxford. Her doctoral research focuses on teacher education policy and practice in England. The study examines the relationship between individuals’ own objectives, the stated programme goals, and the national teachers’ standards in the operation of the Oxford Internship Scheme (OIS). It also explores the perceptions of stakeholders regarding ideal goals that could drive a re-conceptualised teacher education programme.

Prior to her doctorate, Yoon Young used to be a social studies teacher and subsequently worked as a consultant for the OECD’s Initial Teacher Preparation (ITP) Study. She holds a B.A. in Social Studies and Geography Education from the Ewha Womans University, and an M.A. in Educational Leadership from the University of Jyväskylä, where she was a grantee of the Korean Government Scholarship for Study Overseas.

Katy is a Deputy Headteacher and the founder of a Leadership and Coaching Institute, which she now co-directs.

Katy is an Associate Fellow at the Oxford Character Project and a Research Associate at the Oxford University Wellbeing Research Centre. She is the co-founder of Global Social Leaders, a leadership programme which has participants in 105 countries, all passionate about creating and sustaining positive change in the world.

Title of Thesis

How could school leaders improve the flourishing and wellbeing of teaching staff?

Books
  • Granville-Chapman, K. and Bidston, E (2020) Leader: Know, love and inspire your people. Carmarthen: Crownhouse Publishing
Book Chapters
  •  Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ In White, M. & McCallum, F. (Ed.s) Wellbeing and Resilience Education: Covid-19 And Its Impact on Education Systems. Routledge
Publications
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘Purpose and Leadership in Education and Beyond’. The Education Exchange. Available from: https://theeducation.exchange/purpose-and-leadership-in-education-and-beyond/
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘The Three Secrets of COVID-era Leadership’. Times Education Supplement. Available from: https://www.tes.com/news/three-secrets-covid-era-school-leadership
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2016) ‘Assessing the Impact of a Teacher Leadership Programme in a Teaching Schools Alliance. Journal of Teacher Action Research
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2014) ‘The Afghan conflict: causes and consequences.’ Geography Review 28(1): 22-27
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2013) What are the psychological factors that affect students’ academic resilience and can teachers influence these? Unpublished thesis
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘Unlocking Leadership Potential’, The Magazine of the Boarding School’s Association, 33: 42-45
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2009) ‘Learning to Lead’, Leader, The Education Leader Magazine 41: 22-25
Presentations
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2019) ‘How could leaders improve the flourishing of their teams?’ ‘Stowe Ed Conference’, Forthcoming: 7 Jan 2019
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2018) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education: 21 Jun 2018
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2017) ‘How can school leaders improve teacher flourishing?’ ‘Doing Education Differently Conference’, University of Oxford, Department of Education, 11 Mar 17
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2016) ‘Developing school leaders who enable teachers to flourish’ The Telegraph Festival of Education 23 Jun 16
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Developing leadership in pupils and teachers’ High School Affiliated to Renmin University of China, Beijing. 20 Oct 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Resilience for leaders.’ Global Social Leaders World Summit. 16 Aug 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Emotional Intelligence for Leaders.’ Global Leaders in Education. 12 Aug 15
  • Coates, S.; Fraser, H.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J.; and Nasim, A. (2015) ‘Breaking through the glass ceiling – how can schools empower our girls to become leaders?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education. 19 Jun 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. ‘Developing Leadership in Schools’ (2015). G20 Schools Conference. International conference for head teachers. 11 Apr 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2018) ‘Introduction’, Wellington Leadership Institute: Festival of Leadership. Mar 2012-15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘How the Young Learn to Lead’, Raffles Institution (Singapore) -Purdue University (USA) Education Forum on Gifted & Talented Youth 2012. Singapore. 15 Mar 12
  • Draper, D.; Dyer, R.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Schools’. Presentation for a meeting about pupil leadership and character development at 10 Downing Street. 16 Nov 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Young People’. Presentation for a meeting about leadership and character at 10 Downing Street. 7 Mar 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K. & Seldon, A. (2012) ‘Introduction’, Leading Your School in the 21st Century. 7 Feb 12

Kamal Armanious is particularly interested in the topic of education governance to explore what is possible in developing an improved governance system for technical and vocational education and training (TVET).

There have always been various calls from different international organisations such UNESCO, ILO, World Bank, OECD etc. to develop a transformed and transformative approach to TVET. This is attractive for certain theoretical as well as practical reasons; however, one set of limitations in achieving this vision lies in the arena of governance. Mr Armanious examines an imagined better model of governance that can be developed from the principles of a new approach and wider theoretical resources with consideration to national realities where there may be very serious obstacles in the way of realising this new governance approach and hence the overall planned transformation.

Title of Thesis

Education and Training Policies in Egypt: Good Governance and Stakeholders Participation

 

Amanda is completing a part-time DPhil, alongside working in Initial Teacher Education at Leeds Trinity University.

Her research is focused on understanding tensions, contradictions and conflicts that teachers in disadvantaged schools may experience when they engage in research activity.  Her research focus is influenced by her own experiences of working as a research-active teacher in disadvantaged schools, and recent work in teacher education to support experienced and beginning teachers in developing their own research activities.

One of the aims of Amanda’s research is to construct a framework to support teachers in pursuing research activity and critical scholarship work which articulates with wider social movements to address issues of poverty and disadvantage in schools.

Title of Thesis

Teachers’ perspectives on tensions between policy, practice and research in disadvantaged schools

Publications 

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2017) A ‘usable past’ of teacher education in England: history in JET’s anniversary issue. Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy, 43 (5), pp.616-627.

Nuttall, A. (2016) The ‘curriculum challenge’: Moving towards the ‘Storyline’ approach in a case study urban primary school.  Improving Schools, 19 (2), pp. 154-166.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Learning {Re}imagined: A review.  Primary First, 15, pp. 17-18.

Nuttall, A. and Doherty, J. (2014) Disaffected boys and the achievement gap: the ‘wallpaper effect’ and what is hidden by a focus on school results.  The Urban Review, 46 (5), pp.800-815.

Conference Papers and Presentations

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2018) “No child is pre-ordained to fail” Teachers questioning policy assumptions.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Newcastle, 11-13 September.

Nuttall, A. and Tobbell, C. (2017) Trainee teachers’ perspectives on practitioner enquiry.  Paper presented at the 8th TEAN Conference: Thinking Deeply about Education, Birmingham, 11-12 May.

Nuttall, A. (2017) Assessment at primary level: quality, comparability and improving secondary readiness.  A perspective from ITE.  Speech at the Westminster Education Forum Keynote Seminar: Next steps for reforming primary education: effective teaching practices, assessment and accountably, London, 18 January.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Deficit narratives and lived realities: whose poverty is it?  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the Australian Association for Research in Education, Melbourne, 27 November – 1 December.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Disenfranchised boys’ reflections on their urban schooling experience: “What a Waste!”.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Philpott, C., Beckett, L. and Wrigley, T. (2016) Collaborative practitioner inquiry: making a difference to urban schools.  Innovation session (school visits and symposium) presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Finn, B. and Beckett, L. (2015) Teachers’ constructions of poverty effects: Their research evidence.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Belfast, 15-17 September.

Nuttall, A. (2014) Teachers’ voice on disengaged boys: the role of one teacher-researcher in an English primary school. Paper presented at the Joint Australian Association for Research in Education and the New Zealand Association for Research in Education Conference, Brisbane, 30 November – 4 December.

Abigail’s research explores the role of education in students’ personal development and how this can be supported by policy, curricula, initial teacher education and teacher professional development. In particular she focuses on history education, citizenship education and peace education as vehicles for dialogue. These opportunities for students to engage with social questions are vital for building cohesive societies. This flows from the recognition that traditional forums for developing public understanding, such as post-conflict truth commissions, need to be complemented by intergenerational and educational perspectives.

Abigail has taught History, Politics, Debating as well as Relationships and Sex Education to secondary school students in South Africa, England and the USA.

She holds postgraduate degrees in Post-Conflict and Transitional Justice (University of Cape Town), in Education, Globalisation and International Development (University of Cambridge) and in African Studies (University of Oxford). She is a Rhodes Scholar, Mandela-Magdalene Scholar and Mandela-Rhodes Scholar.

Title of thesis

GCSE History, Policy Reform and Student Development: How students and teachers navigate the thematic study “Empires, Migration and the People”

Conference papers

Teaching Migration, Belonging, and Empire in Secondary Schools: evaluation of a teacher professional development program, (2019) History Educators International Research Network Conference, Lead author: Dr Jason Todd, University of Vienna, Austria.

“The Problems and Prospects of Teaching South Africa’s Recent History: Teachers’ Perspectives”, (2018) Sustainability, peace and education – Exploring promise and practice: BAICE 20th Anniversary Symposium, University of Bristol, England.

“New Generations, Old Wounds: Learning History at Home and School in Northern Ireland”, (2018) European Social Science and History Conference,
Queens University Belfast, Northern Ireland.

“The Methodological Challenges of Investigating the Role of History Teaching in Peacebuilding”, (2017), Present Past: Time, Memory, and the Negotiation of Historical Justice Conference, Columbia University, United States of America.

“Teaching South Africa’s Truth and Reconciliation Commission”, (2017) European Conference on African Studies, Universität Basel, Switzerland.

Research Assistant Publications

Review of the evidence on feedback in primary and secondary schools, (forthcoming, 2021) for the Education Endowment Foundation, Lead author: Prof Velda Elliott.

Teaching Migration, Belonging, and Empire in Secondary Schools, (2019), for Runnymede Trust and the European Research Council, Lead authors: Kimberly McIntosh, Dr Jason Todd and Prof Nandini Das.

Gender and the Politics of Reconciliation (2016), for The Institute for Justice and Reconciliation, Lead author: Dr Helen Scanlon

SOLE AUTHOR PUBLICATIONS

‘Transitions, Truth-Telling and Teaching History’, Cambridge Open-Review Educational Research e-Journal, Vol. 4, 2017.

Paul Riser is a DPhil Student in the department. His research focuses broadly on students’ (especially the marginalised) identities work in upper-secondary English Language Arts classrooms.

Prior to starting his doctoral studies, Paul earned a BSc in English Language Arts (Secondary Education) with a minor in Theology and a BA in Spanish and International Studies with a minor in Psychology from Texas Lutheran University. His MA in English Literature and Language is from St. Mary’s University.

As part of his postgraduate schoolwork, Paul undertook a placement in two graduate certificate programs, earning both his School Counselor certification and School Principal certification for all grade levels in the state of Texas, USA. In addition to English Language Arts and Reading (4th-12th grades), he is also qualified to teach Health (all levels), Journalism (7-12), Speech (7-12), Social Studies (7-12), and English as a Second Language (all levels) in Texas. Further, Paul holds a teaching certification in California, USA, the United Kingdom and Wales, the Kingdom of Denmark, and the Netherlands.

As a public school English teacher for 8 years, Paul was awarded many distinctions including, but not limited to: El maestro de impacto, two Harvard Book Awards, Teacher of the Year, and Texas Parent-Teacher Association Life Member.

His research to inform his doctoral thesis work will be completed in the United States of America. Furthermore, his research interests revolve around the nexus points of gender, ethnicity, sexuality, economic status, and religion as they relate to the agency students have in the classroom.

Paul is the 2019-2020 Student Liaison Coordinator for the Department of Education, Oxford. In this role, he is charged with leading/convening weekly workshops on a variety of research training topics, co-organizing networking and career advice opportunities for graduate students, and liaising with Cambridge University personnel to organize the annual Oxbridge Exchange. Furthermore, Paul supports the Higher Degrees Office as appropriate and meets regularly with directors and other stakeholders to discuss issues of common student concern in order to develop student identity and community throughout the Department.

Paul serves as the representative student voice on the Social Sciences Division Equality & Diversity Steering Group for the University of Oxford.

Paul is also a part-time Research Assistant working with professionals and other academics within the Department of Education on funded and individual projects as needed.

Supervisors: Associate Professors Jenni Ingram and Velda Elliott & Departmental Lecturer Jason Todd.

Thesis Title: ‘Using Positioning Theory to Understand Marginalised Students’ Identities Work and Their Learning Experiences in English Language Arts Classrooms’

Open-Access Publication:
Ingram, Jenni, & Riser, P.A. (2019). Experiences of problem solving in whole class interactions. Avances De Investigación En Educación Matemática, Avances de Investigación en Educación Matemática, Number 16; October 2019.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.35763/aiem.v0i16.279

Tessa is currently completing a part-time DPhil, alongside work as a senior leader in a London secondary school.

Her research explores how teachers on school-based ITE routes (TeachFirst and School Direct salaried) approach learning from experience. The research takes an action research approach: working with participant beginning teachers and mentors to critically examine and reflect on the processes of learning to teach, using their conversations as stimulus data.

Prior to joining the Department of Education Tessa completed an MSc in Educational Research (University of Bristol).

Yoon Young has been involved in a variety of academic and professional projects related to teacher education.

She is currently a member of the Teacher Education and Professional Learning (TEPL) research group at Oxford. Her doctoral research focuses on teacher education policy and practice in England. The study examines the relationship between individuals’ own objectives, the stated programme goals, and the national teachers’ standards in the operation of the Oxford Internship Scheme (OIS). It also explores the perceptions of stakeholders regarding ideal goals that could drive a re-conceptualised teacher education programme.

Prior to her doctorate, Yoon Young used to be a social studies teacher and subsequently worked as a consultant for the OECD’s Initial Teacher Preparation (ITP) Study. She holds a B.A. in Social Studies and Geography Education from the Ewha Womans University, and an M.A. in Educational Leadership from the University of Jyväskylä, where she was a grantee of the Korean Government Scholarship for Study Overseas.

Katy is a Deputy Headteacher and the founder of a Leadership and Coaching Institute, which she now co-directs.

Katy is an Associate Fellow at the Oxford Character Project and a Research Associate at the Oxford University Wellbeing Research Centre. She is the co-founder of Global Social Leaders, a leadership programme which has participants in 105 countries, all passionate about creating and sustaining positive change in the world.

Title of Thesis

How could school leaders improve the flourishing and wellbeing of teaching staff?

Books
  • Granville-Chapman, K. and Bidston, E (2020) Leader: Know, love and inspire your people. Carmarthen: Crownhouse Publishing
Book Chapters
  •  Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ In White, M. & McCallum, F. (Ed.s) Wellbeing and Resilience Education: Covid-19 And Its Impact on Education Systems. Routledge
Publications
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘Purpose and Leadership in Education and Beyond’. The Education Exchange. Available from: https://theeducation.exchange/purpose-and-leadership-in-education-and-beyond/
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘The Three Secrets of COVID-era Leadership’. Times Education Supplement. Available from: https://www.tes.com/news/three-secrets-covid-era-school-leadership
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2016) ‘Assessing the Impact of a Teacher Leadership Programme in a Teaching Schools Alliance. Journal of Teacher Action Research
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2014) ‘The Afghan conflict: causes and consequences.’ Geography Review 28(1): 22-27
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2013) What are the psychological factors that affect students’ academic resilience and can teachers influence these? Unpublished thesis
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘Unlocking Leadership Potential’, The Magazine of the Boarding School’s Association, 33: 42-45
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2009) ‘Learning to Lead’, Leader, The Education Leader Magazine 41: 22-25
Presentations
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2019) ‘How could leaders improve the flourishing of their teams?’ ‘Stowe Ed Conference’, Forthcoming: 7 Jan 2019
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2018) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education: 21 Jun 2018
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2017) ‘How can school leaders improve teacher flourishing?’ ‘Doing Education Differently Conference’, University of Oxford, Department of Education, 11 Mar 17
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2016) ‘Developing school leaders who enable teachers to flourish’ The Telegraph Festival of Education 23 Jun 16
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Developing leadership in pupils and teachers’ High School Affiliated to Renmin University of China, Beijing. 20 Oct 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Resilience for leaders.’ Global Social Leaders World Summit. 16 Aug 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Emotional Intelligence for Leaders.’ Global Leaders in Education. 12 Aug 15
  • Coates, S.; Fraser, H.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J.; and Nasim, A. (2015) ‘Breaking through the glass ceiling – how can schools empower our girls to become leaders?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education. 19 Jun 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. ‘Developing Leadership in Schools’ (2015). G20 Schools Conference. International conference for head teachers. 11 Apr 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2018) ‘Introduction’, Wellington Leadership Institute: Festival of Leadership. Mar 2012-15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘How the Young Learn to Lead’, Raffles Institution (Singapore) -Purdue University (USA) Education Forum on Gifted & Talented Youth 2012. Singapore. 15 Mar 12
  • Draper, D.; Dyer, R.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Schools’. Presentation for a meeting about pupil leadership and character development at 10 Downing Street. 16 Nov 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Young People’. Presentation for a meeting about leadership and character at 10 Downing Street. 7 Mar 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K. & Seldon, A. (2012) ‘Introduction’, Leading Your School in the 21st Century. 7 Feb 12

Kamal Armanious is particularly interested in the topic of education governance to explore what is possible in developing an improved governance system for technical and vocational education and training (TVET).

There have always been various calls from different international organisations such UNESCO, ILO, World Bank, OECD etc. to develop a transformed and transformative approach to TVET. This is attractive for certain theoretical as well as practical reasons; however, one set of limitations in achieving this vision lies in the arena of governance. Mr Armanious examines an imagined better model of governance that can be developed from the principles of a new approach and wider theoretical resources with consideration to national realities where there may be very serious obstacles in the way of realising this new governance approach and hence the overall planned transformation.

Title of Thesis

Education and Training Policies in Egypt: Good Governance and Stakeholders Participation

 

Amanda is completing a part-time DPhil, alongside working in Initial Teacher Education at Leeds Trinity University.

Her research is focused on understanding tensions, contradictions and conflicts that teachers in disadvantaged schools may experience when they engage in research activity.  Her research focus is influenced by her own experiences of working as a research-active teacher in disadvantaged schools, and recent work in teacher education to support experienced and beginning teachers in developing their own research activities.

One of the aims of Amanda’s research is to construct a framework to support teachers in pursuing research activity and critical scholarship work which articulates with wider social movements to address issues of poverty and disadvantage in schools.

Title of Thesis

Teachers’ perspectives on tensions between policy, practice and research in disadvantaged schools

Publications 

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2017) A ‘usable past’ of teacher education in England: history in JET’s anniversary issue. Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy, 43 (5), pp.616-627.

Nuttall, A. (2016) The ‘curriculum challenge’: Moving towards the ‘Storyline’ approach in a case study urban primary school.  Improving Schools, 19 (2), pp. 154-166.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Learning {Re}imagined: A review.  Primary First, 15, pp. 17-18.

Nuttall, A. and Doherty, J. (2014) Disaffected boys and the achievement gap: the ‘wallpaper effect’ and what is hidden by a focus on school results.  The Urban Review, 46 (5), pp.800-815.

Conference Papers and Presentations

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2018) “No child is pre-ordained to fail” Teachers questioning policy assumptions.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Newcastle, 11-13 September.

Nuttall, A. and Tobbell, C. (2017) Trainee teachers’ perspectives on practitioner enquiry.  Paper presented at the 8th TEAN Conference: Thinking Deeply about Education, Birmingham, 11-12 May.

Nuttall, A. (2017) Assessment at primary level: quality, comparability and improving secondary readiness.  A perspective from ITE.  Speech at the Westminster Education Forum Keynote Seminar: Next steps for reforming primary education: effective teaching practices, assessment and accountably, London, 18 January.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Deficit narratives and lived realities: whose poverty is it?  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the Australian Association for Research in Education, Melbourne, 27 November – 1 December.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Disenfranchised boys’ reflections on their urban schooling experience: “What a Waste!”.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Philpott, C., Beckett, L. and Wrigley, T. (2016) Collaborative practitioner inquiry: making a difference to urban schools.  Innovation session (school visits and symposium) presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Finn, B. and Beckett, L. (2015) Teachers’ constructions of poverty effects: Their research evidence.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Belfast, 15-17 September.

Nuttall, A. (2014) Teachers’ voice on disengaged boys: the role of one teacher-researcher in an English primary school. Paper presented at the Joint Australian Association for Research in Education and the New Zealand Association for Research in Education Conference, Brisbane, 30 November – 4 December.

Abigail’s research explores the role of education in students’ personal development and how this can be supported by policy, curricula, initial teacher education and teacher professional development. In particular she focuses on history education, citizenship education and peace education as vehicles for dialogue. These opportunities for students to engage with social questions are vital for building cohesive societies. This flows from the recognition that traditional forums for developing public understanding, such as post-conflict truth commissions, need to be complemented by intergenerational and educational perspectives.

Abigail has taught History, Politics, Debating as well as Relationships and Sex Education to secondary school students in South Africa, England and the USA.

She holds postgraduate degrees in Post-Conflict and Transitional Justice (University of Cape Town), in Education, Globalisation and International Development (University of Cambridge) and in African Studies (University of Oxford). She is a Rhodes Scholar, Mandela-Magdalene Scholar and Mandela-Rhodes Scholar.

Title of thesis

GCSE History, Policy Reform and Student Development: How students and teachers navigate the thematic study “Empires, Migration and the People”

Conference papers

Teaching Migration, Belonging, and Empire in Secondary Schools: evaluation of a teacher professional development program, (2019) History Educators International Research Network Conference, Lead author: Dr Jason Todd, University of Vienna, Austria.

“The Problems and Prospects of Teaching South Africa’s Recent History: Teachers’ Perspectives”, (2018) Sustainability, peace and education – Exploring promise and practice: BAICE 20th Anniversary Symposium, University of Bristol, England.

“New Generations, Old Wounds: Learning History at Home and School in Northern Ireland”, (2018) European Social Science and History Conference,
Queens University Belfast, Northern Ireland.

“The Methodological Challenges of Investigating the Role of History Teaching in Peacebuilding”, (2017), Present Past: Time, Memory, and the Negotiation of Historical Justice Conference, Columbia University, United States of America.

“Teaching South Africa’s Truth and Reconciliation Commission”, (2017) European Conference on African Studies, Universität Basel, Switzerland.

Research Assistant Publications

Review of the evidence on feedback in primary and secondary schools, (forthcoming, 2021) for the Education Endowment Foundation, Lead author: Prof Velda Elliott.

Teaching Migration, Belonging, and Empire in Secondary Schools, (2019), for Runnymede Trust and the European Research Council, Lead authors: Kimberly McIntosh, Dr Jason Todd and Prof Nandini Das.

Gender and the Politics of Reconciliation (2016), for The Institute for Justice and Reconciliation, Lead author: Dr Helen Scanlon

SOLE AUTHOR PUBLICATIONS

‘Transitions, Truth-Telling and Teaching History’, Cambridge Open-Review Educational Research e-Journal, Vol. 4, 2017.

Paul Riser is a DPhil Student in the department. His research focuses broadly on students’ (especially the marginalised) identities work in upper-secondary English Language Arts classrooms.

Prior to starting his doctoral studies, Paul earned a BSc in English Language Arts (Secondary Education) with a minor in Theology and a BA in Spanish and International Studies with a minor in Psychology from Texas Lutheran University. His MA in English Literature and Language is from St. Mary’s University.

As part of his postgraduate schoolwork, Paul undertook a placement in two graduate certificate programs, earning both his School Counselor certification and School Principal certification for all grade levels in the state of Texas, USA. In addition to English Language Arts and Reading (4th-12th grades), he is also qualified to teach Health (all levels), Journalism (7-12), Speech (7-12), Social Studies (7-12), and English as a Second Language (all levels) in Texas. Further, Paul holds a teaching certification in California, USA, the United Kingdom and Wales, the Kingdom of Denmark, and the Netherlands.

As a public school English teacher for 8 years, Paul was awarded many distinctions including, but not limited to: El maestro de impacto, two Harvard Book Awards, Teacher of the Year, and Texas Parent-Teacher Association Life Member.

His research to inform his doctoral thesis work will be completed in the United States of America. Furthermore, his research interests revolve around the nexus points of gender, ethnicity, sexuality, economic status, and religion as they relate to the agency students have in the classroom.

Paul is the 2019-2020 Student Liaison Coordinator for the Department of Education, Oxford. In this role, he is charged with leading/convening weekly workshops on a variety of research training topics, co-organizing networking and career advice opportunities for graduate students, and liaising with Cambridge University personnel to organize the annual Oxbridge Exchange. Furthermore, Paul supports the Higher Degrees Office as appropriate and meets regularly with directors and other stakeholders to discuss issues of common student concern in order to develop student identity and community throughout the Department.

Paul serves as the representative student voice on the Social Sciences Division Equality & Diversity Steering Group for the University of Oxford.

Paul is also a part-time Research Assistant working with professionals and other academics within the Department of Education on funded and individual projects as needed.

Supervisors: Associate Professors Jenni Ingram and Velda Elliott & Departmental Lecturer Jason Todd.

Thesis Title: ‘Using Positioning Theory to Understand Marginalised Students’ Identities Work and Their Learning Experiences in English Language Arts Classrooms’

Open-Access Publication:
Ingram, Jenni, & Riser, P.A. (2019). Experiences of problem solving in whole class interactions. Avances De Investigación En Educación Matemática, Avances de Investigación en Educación Matemática, Number 16; October 2019.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.35763/aiem.v0i16.279

Tessa is currently completing a part-time DPhil, alongside work as a senior leader in a London secondary school.

Her research explores how teachers on school-based ITE routes (TeachFirst and School Direct salaried) approach learning from experience. The research takes an action research approach: working with participant beginning teachers and mentors to critically examine and reflect on the processes of learning to teach, using their conversations as stimulus data.

Prior to joining the Department of Education Tessa completed an MSc in Educational Research (University of Bristol).

Yoon Young has been involved in a variety of academic and professional projects related to teacher education.

She is currently a member of the Teacher Education and Professional Learning (TEPL) research group at Oxford. Her doctoral research focuses on teacher education policy and practice in England. The study examines the relationship between individuals’ own objectives, the stated programme goals, and the national teachers’ standards in the operation of the Oxford Internship Scheme (OIS). It also explores the perceptions of stakeholders regarding ideal goals that could drive a re-conceptualised teacher education programme.

Prior to her doctorate, Yoon Young used to be a social studies teacher and subsequently worked as a consultant for the OECD’s Initial Teacher Preparation (ITP) Study. She holds a B.A. in Social Studies and Geography Education from the Ewha Womans University, and an M.A. in Educational Leadership from the University of Jyväskylä, where she was a grantee of the Korean Government Scholarship for Study Overseas.

Katy is a Deputy Headteacher and the founder of a Leadership and Coaching Institute, which she now co-directs.

Katy is an Associate Fellow at the Oxford Character Project and a Research Associate at the Oxford University Wellbeing Research Centre. She is the co-founder of Global Social Leaders, a leadership programme which has participants in 105 countries, all passionate about creating and sustaining positive change in the world.

Title of Thesis

How could school leaders improve the flourishing and wellbeing of teaching staff?

Books
  • Granville-Chapman, K. and Bidston, E (2020) Leader: Know, love and inspire your people. Carmarthen: Crownhouse Publishing
Book Chapters
  •  Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ In White, M. & McCallum, F. (Ed.s) Wellbeing and Resilience Education: Covid-19 And Its Impact on Education Systems. Routledge
Publications
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘Purpose and Leadership in Education and Beyond’. The Education Exchange. Available from: https://theeducation.exchange/purpose-and-leadership-in-education-and-beyond/
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘The Three Secrets of COVID-era Leadership’. Times Education Supplement. Available from: https://www.tes.com/news/three-secrets-covid-era-school-leadership
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2016) ‘Assessing the Impact of a Teacher Leadership Programme in a Teaching Schools Alliance. Journal of Teacher Action Research
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2014) ‘The Afghan conflict: causes and consequences.’ Geography Review 28(1): 22-27
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2013) What are the psychological factors that affect students’ academic resilience and can teachers influence these? Unpublished thesis
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘Unlocking Leadership Potential’, The Magazine of the Boarding School’s Association, 33: 42-45
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2009) ‘Learning to Lead’, Leader, The Education Leader Magazine 41: 22-25
Presentations
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2019) ‘How could leaders improve the flourishing of their teams?’ ‘Stowe Ed Conference’, Forthcoming: 7 Jan 2019
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2018) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education: 21 Jun 2018
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2017) ‘How can school leaders improve teacher flourishing?’ ‘Doing Education Differently Conference’, University of Oxford, Department of Education, 11 Mar 17
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2016) ‘Developing school leaders who enable teachers to flourish’ The Telegraph Festival of Education 23 Jun 16
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Developing leadership in pupils and teachers’ High School Affiliated to Renmin University of China, Beijing. 20 Oct 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Resilience for leaders.’ Global Social Leaders World Summit. 16 Aug 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Emotional Intelligence for Leaders.’ Global Leaders in Education. 12 Aug 15
  • Coates, S.; Fraser, H.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J.; and Nasim, A. (2015) ‘Breaking through the glass ceiling – how can schools empower our girls to become leaders?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education. 19 Jun 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. ‘Developing Leadership in Schools’ (2015). G20 Schools Conference. International conference for head teachers. 11 Apr 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2018) ‘Introduction’, Wellington Leadership Institute: Festival of Leadership. Mar 2012-15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘How the Young Learn to Lead’, Raffles Institution (Singapore) -Purdue University (USA) Education Forum on Gifted & Talented Youth 2012. Singapore. 15 Mar 12
  • Draper, D.; Dyer, R.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Schools’. Presentation for a meeting about pupil leadership and character development at 10 Downing Street. 16 Nov 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Young People’. Presentation for a meeting about leadership and character at 10 Downing Street. 7 Mar 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K. & Seldon, A. (2012) ‘Introduction’, Leading Your School in the 21st Century. 7 Feb 12

Kamal Armanious is particularly interested in the topic of education governance to explore what is possible in developing an improved governance system for technical and vocational education and training (TVET).

There have always been various calls from different international organisations such UNESCO, ILO, World Bank, OECD etc. to develop a transformed and transformative approach to TVET. This is attractive for certain theoretical as well as practical reasons; however, one set of limitations in achieving this vision lies in the arena of governance. Mr Armanious examines an imagined better model of governance that can be developed from the principles of a new approach and wider theoretical resources with consideration to national realities where there may be very serious obstacles in the way of realising this new governance approach and hence the overall planned transformation.

Title of Thesis

Education and Training Policies in Egypt: Good Governance and Stakeholders Participation

 

Amanda is completing a part-time DPhil, alongside working in Initial Teacher Education at Leeds Trinity University.

Her research is focused on understanding tensions, contradictions and conflicts that teachers in disadvantaged schools may experience when they engage in research activity.  Her research focus is influenced by her own experiences of working as a research-active teacher in disadvantaged schools, and recent work in teacher education to support experienced and beginning teachers in developing their own research activities.

One of the aims of Amanda’s research is to construct a framework to support teachers in pursuing research activity and critical scholarship work which articulates with wider social movements to address issues of poverty and disadvantage in schools.

Title of Thesis

Teachers’ perspectives on tensions between policy, practice and research in disadvantaged schools

Publications 

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2017) A ‘usable past’ of teacher education in England: history in JET’s anniversary issue. Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy, 43 (5), pp.616-627.

Nuttall, A. (2016) The ‘curriculum challenge’: Moving towards the ‘Storyline’ approach in a case study urban primary school.  Improving Schools, 19 (2), pp. 154-166.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Learning {Re}imagined: A review.  Primary First, 15, pp. 17-18.

Nuttall, A. and Doherty, J. (2014) Disaffected boys and the achievement gap: the ‘wallpaper effect’ and what is hidden by a focus on school results.  The Urban Review, 46 (5), pp.800-815.

Conference Papers and Presentations

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2018) “No child is pre-ordained to fail” Teachers questioning policy assumptions.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Newcastle, 11-13 September.

Nuttall, A. and Tobbell, C. (2017) Trainee teachers’ perspectives on practitioner enquiry.  Paper presented at the 8th TEAN Conference: Thinking Deeply about Education, Birmingham, 11-12 May.

Nuttall, A. (2017) Assessment at primary level: quality, comparability and improving secondary readiness.  A perspective from ITE.  Speech at the Westminster Education Forum Keynote Seminar: Next steps for reforming primary education: effective teaching practices, assessment and accountably, London, 18 January.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Deficit narratives and lived realities: whose poverty is it?  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the Australian Association for Research in Education, Melbourne, 27 November – 1 December.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Disenfranchised boys’ reflections on their urban schooling experience: “What a Waste!”.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Philpott, C., Beckett, L. and Wrigley, T. (2016) Collaborative practitioner inquiry: making a difference to urban schools.  Innovation session (school visits and symposium) presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Finn, B. and Beckett, L. (2015) Teachers’ constructions of poverty effects: Their research evidence.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Belfast, 15-17 September.

Nuttall, A. (2014) Teachers’ voice on disengaged boys: the role of one teacher-researcher in an English primary school. Paper presented at the Joint Australian Association for Research in Education and the New Zealand Association for Research in Education Conference, Brisbane, 30 November – 4 December.

Abigail’s research explores the role of education in students’ personal development and how this can be supported by policy, curricula, initial teacher education and teacher professional development. In particular she focuses on history education, citizenship education and peace education as vehicles for dialogue. These opportunities for students to engage with social questions are vital for building cohesive societies. This flows from the recognition that traditional forums for developing public understanding, such as post-conflict truth commissions, need to be complemented by intergenerational and educational perspectives.

Abigail has taught History, Politics, Debating as well as Relationships and Sex Education to secondary school students in South Africa, England and the USA.

She holds postgraduate degrees in Post-Conflict and Transitional Justice (University of Cape Town), in Education, Globalisation and International Development (University of Cambridge) and in African Studies (University of Oxford). She is a Rhodes Scholar, Mandela-Magdalene Scholar and Mandela-Rhodes Scholar.

Title of thesis

GCSE History, Policy Reform and Student Development: How students and teachers navigate the thematic study “Empires, Migration and the People”

Conference papers

Teaching Migration, Belonging, and Empire in Secondary Schools: evaluation of a teacher professional development program, (2019) History Educators International Research Network Conference, Lead author: Dr Jason Todd, University of Vienna, Austria.

“The Problems and Prospects of Teaching South Africa’s Recent History: Teachers’ Perspectives”, (2018) Sustainability, peace and education – Exploring promise and practice: BAICE 20th Anniversary Symposium, University of Bristol, England.

“New Generations, Old Wounds: Learning History at Home and School in Northern Ireland”, (2018) European Social Science and History Conference,
Queens University Belfast, Northern Ireland.

“The Methodological Challenges of Investigating the Role of History Teaching in Peacebuilding”, (2017), Present Past: Time, Memory, and the Negotiation of Historical Justice Conference, Columbia University, United States of America.

“Teaching South Africa’s Truth and Reconciliation Commission”, (2017) European Conference on African Studies, Universität Basel, Switzerland.

Research Assistant Publications

Review of the evidence on feedback in primary and secondary schools, (forthcoming, 2021) for the Education Endowment Foundation, Lead author: Prof Velda Elliott.

Teaching Migration, Belonging, and Empire in Secondary Schools, (2019), for Runnymede Trust and the European Research Council, Lead authors: Kimberly McIntosh, Dr Jason Todd and Prof Nandini Das.

Gender and the Politics of Reconciliation (2016), for The Institute for Justice and Reconciliation, Lead author: Dr Helen Scanlon

SOLE AUTHOR PUBLICATIONS

‘Transitions, Truth-Telling and Teaching History’, Cambridge Open-Review Educational Research e-Journal, Vol. 4, 2017.

Paul Riser is a DPhil Student in the department. His research focuses broadly on students’ (especially the marginalised) identities work in upper-secondary English Language Arts classrooms.

Prior to starting his doctoral studies, Paul earned a BSc in English Language Arts (Secondary Education) with a minor in Theology and a BA in Spanish and International Studies with a minor in Psychology from Texas Lutheran University. His MA in English Literature and Language is from St. Mary’s University.

As part of his postgraduate schoolwork, Paul undertook a placement in two graduate certificate programs, earning both his School Counselor certification and School Principal certification for all grade levels in the state of Texas, USA. In addition to English Language Arts and Reading (4th-12th grades), he is also qualified to teach Health (all levels), Journalism (7-12), Speech (7-12), Social Studies (7-12), and English as a Second Language (all levels) in Texas. Further, Paul holds a teaching certification in California, USA, the United Kingdom and Wales, the Kingdom of Denmark, and the Netherlands.

As a public school English teacher for 8 years, Paul was awarded many distinctions including, but not limited to: El maestro de impacto, two Harvard Book Awards, Teacher of the Year, and Texas Parent-Teacher Association Life Member.

His research to inform his doctoral thesis work will be completed in the United States of America. Furthermore, his research interests revolve around the nexus points of gender, ethnicity, sexuality, economic status, and religion as they relate to the agency students have in the classroom.

Paul is the 2019-2020 Student Liaison Coordinator for the Department of Education, Oxford. In this role, he is charged with leading/convening weekly workshops on a variety of research training topics, co-organizing networking and career advice opportunities for graduate students, and liaising with Cambridge University personnel to organize the annual Oxbridge Exchange. Furthermore, Paul supports the Higher Degrees Office as appropriate and meets regularly with directors and other stakeholders to discuss issues of common student concern in order to develop student identity and community throughout the Department.

Paul serves as the representative student voice on the Social Sciences Division Equality & Diversity Steering Group for the University of Oxford.

Paul is also a part-time Research Assistant working with professionals and other academics within the Department of Education on funded and individual projects as needed.

Supervisors: Associate Professors Jenni Ingram and Velda Elliott & Departmental Lecturer Jason Todd.

Thesis Title: ‘Using Positioning Theory to Understand Marginalised Students’ Identities Work and Their Learning Experiences in English Language Arts Classrooms’

Open-Access Publication:
Ingram, Jenni, & Riser, P.A. (2019). Experiences of problem solving in whole class interactions. Avances De Investigación En Educación Matemática, Avances de Investigación en Educación Matemática, Number 16; October 2019.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.35763/aiem.v0i16.279

Tessa is currently completing a part-time DPhil, alongside work as a senior leader in a London secondary school.

Her research explores how teachers on school-based ITE routes (TeachFirst and School Direct salaried) approach learning from experience. The research takes an action research approach: working with participant beginning teachers and mentors to critically examine and reflect on the processes of learning to teach, using their conversations as stimulus data.

Prior to joining the Department of Education Tessa completed an MSc in Educational Research (University of Bristol).

Yoon Young has been involved in a variety of academic and professional projects related to teacher education.

She is currently a member of the Teacher Education and Professional Learning (TEPL) research group at Oxford. Her doctoral research focuses on teacher education policy and practice in England. The study examines the relationship between individuals’ own objectives, the stated programme goals, and the national teachers’ standards in the operation of the Oxford Internship Scheme (OIS). It also explores the perceptions of stakeholders regarding ideal goals that could drive a re-conceptualised teacher education programme.

Prior to her doctorate, Yoon Young used to be a social studies teacher and subsequently worked as a consultant for the OECD’s Initial Teacher Preparation (ITP) Study. She holds a B.A. in Social Studies and Geography Education from the Ewha Womans University, and an M.A. in Educational Leadership from the University of Jyväskylä, where she was a grantee of the Korean Government Scholarship for Study Overseas.

Katy is a Deputy Headteacher and the founder of a Leadership and Coaching Institute, which she now co-directs.

Katy is an Associate Fellow at the Oxford Character Project and a Research Associate at the Oxford University Wellbeing Research Centre. She is the co-founder of Global Social Leaders, a leadership programme which has participants in 105 countries, all passionate about creating and sustaining positive change in the world.

Title of Thesis

How could school leaders improve the flourishing and wellbeing of teaching staff?

Books
  • Granville-Chapman, K. and Bidston, E (2020) Leader: Know, love and inspire your people. Carmarthen: Crownhouse Publishing
Book Chapters
  •  Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ In White, M. & McCallum, F. (Ed.s) Wellbeing and Resilience Education: Covid-19 And Its Impact on Education Systems. Routledge
Publications
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘Purpose and Leadership in Education and Beyond’. The Education Exchange. Available from: https://theeducation.exchange/purpose-and-leadership-in-education-and-beyond/
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘The Three Secrets of COVID-era Leadership’. Times Education Supplement. Available from: https://www.tes.com/news/three-secrets-covid-era-school-leadership
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2016) ‘Assessing the Impact of a Teacher Leadership Programme in a Teaching Schools Alliance. Journal of Teacher Action Research
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2014) ‘The Afghan conflict: causes and consequences.’ Geography Review 28(1): 22-27
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2013) What are the psychological factors that affect students’ academic resilience and can teachers influence these? Unpublished thesis
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘Unlocking Leadership Potential’, The Magazine of the Boarding School’s Association, 33: 42-45
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2009) ‘Learning to Lead’, Leader, The Education Leader Magazine 41: 22-25
Presentations
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2019) ‘How could leaders improve the flourishing of their teams?’ ‘Stowe Ed Conference’, Forthcoming: 7 Jan 2019
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2018) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education: 21 Jun 2018
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2017) ‘How can school leaders improve teacher flourishing?’ ‘Doing Education Differently Conference’, University of Oxford, Department of Education, 11 Mar 17
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2016) ‘Developing school leaders who enable teachers to flourish’ The Telegraph Festival of Education 23 Jun 16
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Developing leadership in pupils and teachers’ High School Affiliated to Renmin University of China, Beijing. 20 Oct 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Resilience for leaders.’ Global Social Leaders World Summit. 16 Aug 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Emotional Intelligence for Leaders.’ Global Leaders in Education. 12 Aug 15
  • Coates, S.; Fraser, H.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J.; and Nasim, A. (2015) ‘Breaking through the glass ceiling – how can schools empower our girls to become leaders?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education. 19 Jun 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. ‘Developing Leadership in Schools’ (2015). G20 Schools Conference. International conference for head teachers. 11 Apr 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2018) ‘Introduction’, Wellington Leadership Institute: Festival of Leadership. Mar 2012-15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘How the Young Learn to Lead’, Raffles Institution (Singapore) -Purdue University (USA) Education Forum on Gifted & Talented Youth 2012. Singapore. 15 Mar 12
  • Draper, D.; Dyer, R.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Schools’. Presentation for a meeting about pupil leadership and character development at 10 Downing Street. 16 Nov 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Young People’. Presentation for a meeting about leadership and character at 10 Downing Street. 7 Mar 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K. & Seldon, A. (2012) ‘Introduction’, Leading Your School in the 21st Century. 7 Feb 12

Kamal Armanious is particularly interested in the topic of education governance to explore what is possible in developing an improved governance system for technical and vocational education and training (TVET).

There have always been various calls from different international organisations such UNESCO, ILO, World Bank, OECD etc. to develop a transformed and transformative approach to TVET. This is attractive for certain theoretical as well as practical reasons; however, one set of limitations in achieving this vision lies in the arena of governance. Mr Armanious examines an imagined better model of governance that can be developed from the principles of a new approach and wider theoretical resources with consideration to national realities where there may be very serious obstacles in the way of realising this new governance approach and hence the overall planned transformation.

Title of Thesis

Education and Training Policies in Egypt: Good Governance and Stakeholders Participation

 

Amanda is completing a part-time DPhil, alongside working in Initial Teacher Education at Leeds Trinity University.

Her research is focused on understanding tensions, contradictions and conflicts that teachers in disadvantaged schools may experience when they engage in research activity.  Her research focus is influenced by her own experiences of working as a research-active teacher in disadvantaged schools, and recent work in teacher education to support experienced and beginning teachers in developing their own research activities.

One of the aims of Amanda’s research is to construct a framework to support teachers in pursuing research activity and critical scholarship work which articulates with wider social movements to address issues of poverty and disadvantage in schools.

Title of Thesis

Teachers’ perspectives on tensions between policy, practice and research in disadvantaged schools

Publications 

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2017) A ‘usable past’ of teacher education in England: history in JET’s anniversary issue. Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy, 43 (5), pp.616-627.

Nuttall, A. (2016) The ‘curriculum challenge’: Moving towards the ‘Storyline’ approach in a case study urban primary school.  Improving Schools, 19 (2), pp. 154-166.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Learning {Re}imagined: A review.  Primary First, 15, pp. 17-18.

Nuttall, A. and Doherty, J. (2014) Disaffected boys and the achievement gap: the ‘wallpaper effect’ and what is hidden by a focus on school results.  The Urban Review, 46 (5), pp.800-815.

Conference Papers and Presentations

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2018) “No child is pre-ordained to fail” Teachers questioning policy assumptions.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Newcastle, 11-13 September.

Nuttall, A. and Tobbell, C. (2017) Trainee teachers’ perspectives on practitioner enquiry.  Paper presented at the 8th TEAN Conference: Thinking Deeply about Education, Birmingham, 11-12 May.

Nuttall, A. (2017) Assessment at primary level: quality, comparability and improving secondary readiness.  A perspective from ITE.  Speech at the Westminster Education Forum Keynote Seminar: Next steps for reforming primary education: effective teaching practices, assessment and accountably, London, 18 January.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Deficit narratives and lived realities: whose poverty is it?  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the Australian Association for Research in Education, Melbourne, 27 November – 1 December.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Disenfranchised boys’ reflections on their urban schooling experience: “What a Waste!”.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Philpott, C., Beckett, L. and Wrigley, T. (2016) Collaborative practitioner inquiry: making a difference to urban schools.  Innovation session (school visits and symposium) presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Finn, B. and Beckett, L. (2015) Teachers’ constructions of poverty effects: Their research evidence.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Belfast, 15-17 September.

Nuttall, A. (2014) Teachers’ voice on disengaged boys: the role of one teacher-researcher in an English primary school. Paper presented at the Joint Australian Association for Research in Education and the New Zealand Association for Research in Education Conference, Brisbane, 30 November – 4 December.

Abigail’s research explores the role of education in students’ personal development and how this can be supported by policy, curricula, initial teacher education and teacher professional development. In particular she focuses on history education, citizenship education and peace education as vehicles for dialogue. These opportunities for students to engage with social questions are vital for building cohesive societies. This flows from the recognition that traditional forums for developing public understanding, such as post-conflict truth commissions, need to be complemented by intergenerational and educational perspectives.

Abigail has taught History, Politics, Debating as well as Relationships and Sex Education to secondary school students in South Africa, England and the USA.

She holds postgraduate degrees in Post-Conflict and Transitional Justice (University of Cape Town), in Education, Globalisation and International Development (University of Cambridge) and in African Studies (University of Oxford). She is a Rhodes Scholar, Mandela-Magdalene Scholar and Mandela-Rhodes Scholar.

Title of thesis

GCSE History, Policy Reform and Student Development: How students and teachers navigate the thematic study “Empires, Migration and the People”

Conference papers

Teaching Migration, Belonging, and Empire in Secondary Schools: evaluation of a teacher professional development program, (2019) History Educators International Research Network Conference, Lead author: Dr Jason Todd, University of Vienna, Austria.

“The Problems and Prospects of Teaching South Africa’s Recent History: Teachers’ Perspectives”, (2018) Sustainability, peace and education – Exploring promise and practice: BAICE 20th Anniversary Symposium, University of Bristol, England.

“New Generations, Old Wounds: Learning History at Home and School in Northern Ireland”, (2018) European Social Science and History Conference,
Queens University Belfast, Northern Ireland.

“The Methodological Challenges of Investigating the Role of History Teaching in Peacebuilding”, (2017), Present Past: Time, Memory, and the Negotiation of Historical Justice Conference, Columbia University, United States of America.

“Teaching South Africa’s Truth and Reconciliation Commission”, (2017) European Conference on African Studies, Universität Basel, Switzerland.

Research Assistant Publications

Review of the evidence on feedback in primary and secondary schools, (forthcoming, 2021) for the Education Endowment Foundation, Lead author: Prof Velda Elliott.

Teaching Migration, Belonging, and Empire in Secondary Schools, (2019), for Runnymede Trust and the European Research Council, Lead authors: Kimberly McIntosh, Dr Jason Todd and Prof Nandini Das.

Gender and the Politics of Reconciliation (2016), for The Institute for Justice and Reconciliation, Lead author: Dr Helen Scanlon

SOLE AUTHOR PUBLICATIONS

‘Transitions, Truth-Telling and Teaching History’, Cambridge Open-Review Educational Research e-Journal, Vol. 4, 2017.

Paul Riser is a DPhil Student in the department. His research focuses broadly on students’ (especially the marginalised) identities work in upper-secondary English Language Arts classrooms.

Prior to starting his doctoral studies, Paul earned a BSc in English Language Arts (Secondary Education) with a minor in Theology and a BA in Spanish and International Studies with a minor in Psychology from Texas Lutheran University. His MA in English Literature and Language is from St. Mary’s University.

As part of his postgraduate schoolwork, Paul undertook a placement in two graduate certificate programs, earning both his School Counselor certification and School Principal certification for all grade levels in the state of Texas, USA. In addition to English Language Arts and Reading (4th-12th grades), he is also qualified to teach Health (all levels), Journalism (7-12), Speech (7-12), Social Studies (7-12), and English as a Second Language (all levels) in Texas. Further, Paul holds a teaching certification in California, USA, the United Kingdom and Wales, the Kingdom of Denmark, and the Netherlands.

As a public school English teacher for 8 years, Paul was awarded many distinctions including, but not limited to: El maestro de impacto, two Harvard Book Awards, Teacher of the Year, and Texas Parent-Teacher Association Life Member.

His research to inform his doctoral thesis work will be completed in the United States of America. Furthermore, his research interests revolve around the nexus points of gender, ethnicity, sexuality, economic status, and religion as they relate to the agency students have in the classroom.

Paul is the 2019-2020 Student Liaison Coordinator for the Department of Education, Oxford. In this role, he is charged with leading/convening weekly workshops on a variety of research training topics, co-organizing networking and career advice opportunities for graduate students, and liaising with Cambridge University personnel to organize the annual Oxbridge Exchange. Furthermore, Paul supports the Higher Degrees Office as appropriate and meets regularly with directors and other stakeholders to discuss issues of common student concern in order to develop student identity and community throughout the Department.

Paul serves as the representative student voice on the Social Sciences Division Equality & Diversity Steering Group for the University of Oxford.

Paul is also a part-time Research Assistant working with professionals and other academics within the Department of Education on funded and individual projects as needed.

Supervisors: Associate Professors Jenni Ingram and Velda Elliott & Departmental Lecturer Jason Todd.

Thesis Title: ‘Using Positioning Theory to Understand Marginalised Students’ Identities Work and Their Learning Experiences in English Language Arts Classrooms’

Open-Access Publication:
Ingram, Jenni, & Riser, P.A. (2019). Experiences of problem solving in whole class interactions. Avances De Investigación En Educación Matemática, Avances de Investigación en Educación Matemática, Number 16; October 2019.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.35763/aiem.v0i16.279

Tessa is currently completing a part-time DPhil, alongside work as a senior leader in a London secondary school.

Her research explores how teachers on school-based ITE routes (TeachFirst and School Direct salaried) approach learning from experience. The research takes an action research approach: working with participant beginning teachers and mentors to critically examine and reflect on the processes of learning to teach, using their conversations as stimulus data.

Prior to joining the Department of Education Tessa completed an MSc in Educational Research (University of Bristol).

Yoon Young has been involved in a variety of academic and professional projects related to teacher education.

She is currently a member of the Teacher Education and Professional Learning (TEPL) research group at Oxford. Her doctoral research focuses on teacher education policy and practice in England. The study examines the relationship between individuals’ own objectives, the stated programme goals, and the national teachers’ standards in the operation of the Oxford Internship Scheme (OIS). It also explores the perceptions of stakeholders regarding ideal goals that could drive a re-conceptualised teacher education programme.

Prior to her doctorate, Yoon Young used to be a social studies teacher and subsequently worked as a consultant for the OECD’s Initial Teacher Preparation (ITP) Study. She holds a B.A. in Social Studies and Geography Education from the Ewha Womans University, and an M.A. in Educational Leadership from the University of Jyväskylä, where she was a grantee of the Korean Government Scholarship for Study Overseas.

Katy is a Deputy Headteacher and the founder of a Leadership and Coaching Institute, which she now co-directs.

Katy is an Associate Fellow at the Oxford Character Project and a Research Associate at the Oxford University Wellbeing Research Centre. She is the co-founder of Global Social Leaders, a leadership programme which has participants in 105 countries, all passionate about creating and sustaining positive change in the world.

Title of Thesis

How could school leaders improve the flourishing and wellbeing of teaching staff?

Books
  • Granville-Chapman, K. and Bidston, E (2020) Leader: Know, love and inspire your people. Carmarthen: Crownhouse Publishing
Book Chapters
  •  Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ In White, M. & McCallum, F. (Ed.s) Wellbeing and Resilience Education: Covid-19 And Its Impact on Education Systems. Routledge
Publications
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘Purpose and Leadership in Education and Beyond’. The Education Exchange. Available from: https://theeducation.exchange/purpose-and-leadership-in-education-and-beyond/
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘The Three Secrets of COVID-era Leadership’. Times Education Supplement. Available from: https://www.tes.com/news/three-secrets-covid-era-school-leadership
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2016) ‘Assessing the Impact of a Teacher Leadership Programme in a Teaching Schools Alliance. Journal of Teacher Action Research
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2014) ‘The Afghan conflict: causes and consequences.’ Geography Review 28(1): 22-27
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2013) What are the psychological factors that affect students’ academic resilience and can teachers influence these? Unpublished thesis
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘Unlocking Leadership Potential’, The Magazine of the Boarding School’s Association, 33: 42-45
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2009) ‘Learning to Lead’, Leader, The Education Leader Magazine 41: 22-25
Presentations
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2019) ‘How could leaders improve the flourishing of their teams?’ ‘Stowe Ed Conference’, Forthcoming: 7 Jan 2019
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2018) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education: 21 Jun 2018
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2017) ‘How can school leaders improve teacher flourishing?’ ‘Doing Education Differently Conference’, University of Oxford, Department of Education, 11 Mar 17
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2016) ‘Developing school leaders who enable teachers to flourish’ The Telegraph Festival of Education 23 Jun 16
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Developing leadership in pupils and teachers’ High School Affiliated to Renmin University of China, Beijing. 20 Oct 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Resilience for leaders.’ Global Social Leaders World Summit. 16 Aug 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Emotional Intelligence for Leaders.’ Global Leaders in Education. 12 Aug 15
  • Coates, S.; Fraser, H.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J.; and Nasim, A. (2015) ‘Breaking through the glass ceiling – how can schools empower our girls to become leaders?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education. 19 Jun 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. ‘Developing Leadership in Schools’ (2015). G20 Schools Conference. International conference for head teachers. 11 Apr 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2018) ‘Introduction’, Wellington Leadership Institute: Festival of Leadership. Mar 2012-15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘How the Young Learn to Lead’, Raffles Institution (Singapore) -Purdue University (USA) Education Forum on Gifted & Talented Youth 2012. Singapore. 15 Mar 12
  • Draper, D.; Dyer, R.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Schools’. Presentation for a meeting about pupil leadership and character development at 10 Downing Street. 16 Nov 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Young People’. Presentation for a meeting about leadership and character at 10 Downing Street. 7 Mar 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K. & Seldon, A. (2012) ‘Introduction’, Leading Your School in the 21st Century. 7 Feb 12

Kamal Armanious is particularly interested in the topic of education governance to explore what is possible in developing an improved governance system for technical and vocational education and training (TVET).

There have always been various calls from different international organisations such UNESCO, ILO, World Bank, OECD etc. to develop a transformed and transformative approach to TVET. This is attractive for certain theoretical as well as practical reasons; however, one set of limitations in achieving this vision lies in the arena of governance. Mr Armanious examines an imagined better model of governance that can be developed from the principles of a new approach and wider theoretical resources with consideration to national realities where there may be very serious obstacles in the way of realising this new governance approach and hence the overall planned transformation.

Title of Thesis

Education and Training Policies in Egypt: Good Governance and Stakeholders Participation

 

Amanda is completing a part-time DPhil, alongside working in Initial Teacher Education at Leeds Trinity University.

Her research is focused on understanding tensions, contradictions and conflicts that teachers in disadvantaged schools may experience when they engage in research activity.  Her research focus is influenced by her own experiences of working as a research-active teacher in disadvantaged schools, and recent work in teacher education to support experienced and beginning teachers in developing their own research activities.

One of the aims of Amanda’s research is to construct a framework to support teachers in pursuing research activity and critical scholarship work which articulates with wider social movements to address issues of poverty and disadvantage in schools.

Title of Thesis

Teachers’ perspectives on tensions between policy, practice and research in disadvantaged schools

Publications 

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2017) A ‘usable past’ of teacher education in England: history in JET’s anniversary issue. Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy, 43 (5), pp.616-627.

Nuttall, A. (2016) The ‘curriculum challenge’: Moving towards the ‘Storyline’ approach in a case study urban primary school.  Improving Schools, 19 (2), pp. 154-166.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Learning {Re}imagined: A review.  Primary First, 15, pp. 17-18.

Nuttall, A. and Doherty, J. (2014) Disaffected boys and the achievement gap: the ‘wallpaper effect’ and what is hidden by a focus on school results.  The Urban Review, 46 (5), pp.800-815.

Conference Papers and Presentations

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2018) “No child is pre-ordained to fail” Teachers questioning policy assumptions.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Newcastle, 11-13 September.

Nuttall, A. and Tobbell, C. (2017) Trainee teachers’ perspectives on practitioner enquiry.  Paper presented at the 8th TEAN Conference: Thinking Deeply about Education, Birmingham, 11-12 May.

Nuttall, A. (2017) Assessment at primary level: quality, comparability and improving secondary readiness.  A perspective from ITE.  Speech at the Westminster Education Forum Keynote Seminar: Next steps for reforming primary education: effective teaching practices, assessment and accountably, London, 18 January.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Deficit narratives and lived realities: whose poverty is it?  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the Australian Association for Research in Education, Melbourne, 27 November – 1 December.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Disenfranchised boys’ reflections on their urban schooling experience: “What a Waste!”.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Philpott, C., Beckett, L. and Wrigley, T. (2016) Collaborative practitioner inquiry: making a difference to urban schools.  Innovation session (school visits and symposium) presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Finn, B. and Beckett, L. (2015) Teachers’ constructions of poverty effects: Their research evidence.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Belfast, 15-17 September.

Nuttall, A. (2014) Teachers’ voice on disengaged boys: the role of one teacher-researcher in an English primary school. Paper presented at the Joint Australian Association for Research in Education and the New Zealand Association for Research in Education Conference, Brisbane, 30 November – 4 December.

Abigail’s research explores the role of education in students’ personal development and how this can be supported by policy, curricula, initial teacher education and teacher professional development. In particular she focuses on history education, citizenship education and peace education as vehicles for dialogue. These opportunities for students to engage with social questions are vital for building cohesive societies. This flows from the recognition that traditional forums for developing public understanding, such as post-conflict truth commissions, need to be complemented by intergenerational and educational perspectives.

Abigail has taught History, Politics, Debating as well as Relationships and Sex Education to secondary school students in South Africa, England and the USA.

She holds postgraduate degrees in Post-Conflict and Transitional Justice (University of Cape Town), in Education, Globalisation and International Development (University of Cambridge) and in African Studies (University of Oxford). She is a Rhodes Scholar, Mandela-Magdalene Scholar and Mandela-Rhodes Scholar.

Title of thesis

GCSE History, Policy Reform and Student Development: How students and teachers navigate the thematic study “Empires, Migration and the People”

Conference papers

Teaching Migration, Belonging, and Empire in Secondary Schools: evaluation of a teacher professional development program, (2019) History Educators International Research Network Conference, Lead author: Dr Jason Todd, University of Vienna, Austria.

“The Problems and Prospects of Teaching South Africa’s Recent History: Teachers’ Perspectives”, (2018) Sustainability, peace and education – Exploring promise and practice: BAICE 20th Anniversary Symposium, University of Bristol, England.

“New Generations, Old Wounds: Learning History at Home and School in Northern Ireland”, (2018) European Social Science and History Conference,
Queens University Belfast, Northern Ireland.

“The Methodological Challenges of Investigating the Role of History Teaching in Peacebuilding”, (2017), Present Past: Time, Memory, and the Negotiation of Historical Justice Conference, Columbia University, United States of America.

“Teaching South Africa’s Truth and Reconciliation Commission”, (2017) European Conference on African Studies, Universität Basel, Switzerland.

Research Assistant Publications

Review of the evidence on feedback in primary and secondary schools, (forthcoming, 2021) for the Education Endowment Foundation, Lead author: Prof Velda Elliott.

Teaching Migration, Belonging, and Empire in Secondary Schools, (2019), for Runnymede Trust and the European Research Council, Lead authors: Kimberly McIntosh, Dr Jason Todd and Prof Nandini Das.

Gender and the Politics of Reconciliation (2016), for The Institute for Justice and Reconciliation, Lead author: Dr Helen Scanlon

SOLE AUTHOR PUBLICATIONS

‘Transitions, Truth-Telling and Teaching History’, Cambridge Open-Review Educational Research e-Journal, Vol. 4, 2017.

Paul Riser is a DPhil Student in the department. His research focuses broadly on students’ (especially the marginalised) identities work in upper-secondary English Language Arts classrooms.

Prior to starting his doctoral studies, Paul earned a BSc in English Language Arts (Secondary Education) with a minor in Theology and a BA in Spanish and International Studies with a minor in Psychology from Texas Lutheran University. His MA in English Literature and Language is from St. Mary’s University.

As part of his postgraduate schoolwork, Paul undertook a placement in two graduate certificate programs, earning both his School Counselor certification and School Principal certification for all grade levels in the state of Texas, USA. In addition to English Language Arts and Reading (4th-12th grades), he is also qualified to teach Health (all levels), Journalism (7-12), Speech (7-12), Social Studies (7-12), and English as a Second Language (all levels) in Texas. Further, Paul holds a teaching certification in California, USA, the United Kingdom and Wales, the Kingdom of Denmark, and the Netherlands.

As a public school English teacher for 8 years, Paul was awarded many distinctions including, but not limited to: El maestro de impacto, two Harvard Book Awards, Teacher of the Year, and Texas Parent-Teacher Association Life Member.

His research to inform his doctoral thesis work will be completed in the United States of America. Furthermore, his research interests revolve around the nexus points of gender, ethnicity, sexuality, economic status, and religion as they relate to the agency students have in the classroom.

Paul is the 2019-2020 Student Liaison Coordinator for the Department of Education, Oxford. In this role, he is charged with leading/convening weekly workshops on a variety of research training topics, co-organizing networking and career advice opportunities for graduate students, and liaising with Cambridge University personnel to organize the annual Oxbridge Exchange. Furthermore, Paul supports the Higher Degrees Office as appropriate and meets regularly with directors and other stakeholders to discuss issues of common student concern in order to develop student identity and community throughout the Department.

Paul serves as the representative student voice on the Social Sciences Division Equality & Diversity Steering Group for the University of Oxford.

Paul is also a part-time Research Assistant working with professionals and other academics within the Department of Education on funded and individual projects as needed.

Supervisors: Associate Professors Jenni Ingram and Velda Elliott & Departmental Lecturer Jason Todd.

Thesis Title: ‘Using Positioning Theory to Understand Marginalised Students’ Identities Work and Their Learning Experiences in English Language Arts Classrooms’

Open-Access Publication:
Ingram, Jenni, & Riser, P.A. (2019). Experiences of problem solving in whole class interactions. Avances De Investigación En Educación Matemática, Avances de Investigación en Educación Matemática, Number 16; October 2019.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.35763/aiem.v0i16.279

Tessa is currently completing a part-time DPhil, alongside work as a senior leader in a London secondary school.

Her research explores how teachers on school-based ITE routes (TeachFirst and School Direct salaried) approach learning from experience. The research takes an action research approach: working with participant beginning teachers and mentors to critically examine and reflect on the processes of learning to teach, using their conversations as stimulus data.

Prior to joining the Department of Education Tessa completed an MSc in Educational Research (University of Bristol).

Yoon Young has been involved in a variety of academic and professional projects related to teacher education.

She is currently a member of the Teacher Education and Professional Learning (TEPL) research group at Oxford. Her doctoral research focuses on teacher education policy and practice in England. The study examines the relationship between individuals’ own objectives, the stated programme goals, and the national teachers’ standards in the operation of the Oxford Internship Scheme (OIS). It also explores the perceptions of stakeholders regarding ideal goals that could drive a re-conceptualised teacher education programme.

Prior to her doctorate, Yoon Young used to be a social studies teacher and subsequently worked as a consultant for the OECD’s Initial Teacher Preparation (ITP) Study. She holds a B.A. in Social Studies and Geography Education from the Ewha Womans University, and an M.A. in Educational Leadership from the University of Jyväskylä, where she was a grantee of the Korean Government Scholarship for Study Overseas.

Katy is a Deputy Headteacher and the founder of a Leadership and Coaching Institute, which she now co-directs.

Katy is an Associate Fellow at the Oxford Character Project and a Research Associate at the Oxford University Wellbeing Research Centre. She is the co-founder of Global Social Leaders, a leadership programme which has participants in 105 countries, all passionate about creating and sustaining positive change in the world.

Title of Thesis

How could school leaders improve the flourishing and wellbeing of teaching staff?

Books
  • Granville-Chapman, K. and Bidston, E (2020) Leader: Know, love and inspire your people. Carmarthen: Crownhouse Publishing
Book Chapters
  •  Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ In White, M. & McCallum, F. (Ed.s) Wellbeing and Resilience Education: Covid-19 And Its Impact on Education Systems. Routledge
Publications
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘Purpose and Leadership in Education and Beyond’. The Education Exchange. Available from: https://theeducation.exchange/purpose-and-leadership-in-education-and-beyond/
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘The Three Secrets of COVID-era Leadership’. Times Education Supplement. Available from: https://www.tes.com/news/three-secrets-covid-era-school-leadership
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2016) ‘Assessing the Impact of a Teacher Leadership Programme in a Teaching Schools Alliance. Journal of Teacher Action Research
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2014) ‘The Afghan conflict: causes and consequences.’ Geography Review 28(1): 22-27
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2013) What are the psychological factors that affect students’ academic resilience and can teachers influence these? Unpublished thesis
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘Unlocking Leadership Potential’, The Magazine of the Boarding School’s Association, 33: 42-45
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2009) ‘Learning to Lead’, Leader, The Education Leader Magazine 41: 22-25
Presentations
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2019) ‘How could leaders improve the flourishing of their teams?’ ‘Stowe Ed Conference’, Forthcoming: 7 Jan 2019
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2018) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education: 21 Jun 2018
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2017) ‘How can school leaders improve teacher flourishing?’ ‘Doing Education Differently Conference’, University of Oxford, Department of Education, 11 Mar 17
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2016) ‘Developing school leaders who enable teachers to flourish’ The Telegraph Festival of Education 23 Jun 16
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Developing leadership in pupils and teachers’ High School Affiliated to Renmin University of China, Beijing. 20 Oct 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Resilience for leaders.’ Global Social Leaders World Summit. 16 Aug 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Emotional Intelligence for Leaders.’ Global Leaders in Education. 12 Aug 15
  • Coates, S.; Fraser, H.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J.; and Nasim, A. (2015) ‘Breaking through the glass ceiling – how can schools empower our girls to become leaders?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education. 19 Jun 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. ‘Developing Leadership in Schools’ (2015). G20 Schools Conference. International conference for head teachers. 11 Apr 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2018) ‘Introduction’, Wellington Leadership Institute: Festival of Leadership. Mar 2012-15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘How the Young Learn to Lead’, Raffles Institution (Singapore) -Purdue University (USA) Education Forum on Gifted & Talented Youth 2012. Singapore. 15 Mar 12
  • Draper, D.; Dyer, R.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Schools’. Presentation for a meeting about pupil leadership and character development at 10 Downing Street. 16 Nov 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Young People’. Presentation for a meeting about leadership and character at 10 Downing Street. 7 Mar 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K. & Seldon, A. (2012) ‘Introduction’, Leading Your School in the 21st Century. 7 Feb 12

Kamal Armanious is particularly interested in the topic of education governance to explore what is possible in developing an improved governance system for technical and vocational education and training (TVET).

There have always been various calls from different international organisations such UNESCO, ILO, World Bank, OECD etc. to develop a transformed and transformative approach to TVET. This is attractive for certain theoretical as well as practical reasons; however, one set of limitations in achieving this vision lies in the arena of governance. Mr Armanious examines an imagined better model of governance that can be developed from the principles of a new approach and wider theoretical resources with consideration to national realities where there may be very serious obstacles in the way of realising this new governance approach and hence the overall planned transformation.

Title of Thesis

Education and Training Policies in Egypt: Good Governance and Stakeholders Participation

 

Amanda is completing a part-time DPhil, alongside working in Initial Teacher Education at Leeds Trinity University.

Her research is focused on understanding tensions, contradictions and conflicts that teachers in disadvantaged schools may experience when they engage in research activity.  Her research focus is influenced by her own experiences of working as a research-active teacher in disadvantaged schools, and recent work in teacher education to support experienced and beginning teachers in developing their own research activities.

One of the aims of Amanda’s research is to construct a framework to support teachers in pursuing research activity and critical scholarship work which articulates with wider social movements to address issues of poverty and disadvantage in schools.

Title of Thesis

Teachers’ perspectives on tensions between policy, practice and research in disadvantaged schools

Publications 

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2017) A ‘usable past’ of teacher education in England: history in JET’s anniversary issue. Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy, 43 (5), pp.616-627.

Nuttall, A. (2016) The ‘curriculum challenge’: Moving towards the ‘Storyline’ approach in a case study urban primary school.  Improving Schools, 19 (2), pp. 154-166.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Learning {Re}imagined: A review.  Primary First, 15, pp. 17-18.

Nuttall, A. and Doherty, J. (2014) Disaffected boys and the achievement gap: the ‘wallpaper effect’ and what is hidden by a focus on school results.  The Urban Review, 46 (5), pp.800-815.

Conference Papers and Presentations

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2018) “No child is pre-ordained to fail” Teachers questioning policy assumptions.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Newcastle, 11-13 September.

Nuttall, A. and Tobbell, C. (2017) Trainee teachers’ perspectives on practitioner enquiry.  Paper presented at the 8th TEAN Conference: Thinking Deeply about Education, Birmingham, 11-12 May.

Nuttall, A. (2017) Assessment at primary level: quality, comparability and improving secondary readiness.  A perspective from ITE.  Speech at the Westminster Education Forum Keynote Seminar: Next steps for reforming primary education: effective teaching practices, assessment and accountably, London, 18 January.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Deficit narratives and lived realities: whose poverty is it?  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the Australian Association for Research in Education, Melbourne, 27 November – 1 December.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Disenfranchised boys’ reflections on their urban schooling experience: “What a Waste!”.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Philpott, C., Beckett, L. and Wrigley, T. (2016) Collaborative practitioner inquiry: making a difference to urban schools.  Innovation session (school visits and symposium) presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Finn, B. and Beckett, L. (2015) Teachers’ constructions of poverty effects: Their research evidence.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Belfast, 15-17 September.

Nuttall, A. (2014) Teachers’ voice on disengaged boys: the role of one teacher-researcher in an English primary school. Paper presented at the Joint Australian Association for Research in Education and the New Zealand Association for Research in Education Conference, Brisbane, 30 November – 4 December.

Abigail’s research explores the role of education in students’ personal development and how this can be supported by policy, curricula, initial teacher education and teacher professional development. In particular she focuses on history education, citizenship education and peace education as vehicles for dialogue. These opportunities for students to engage with social questions are vital for building cohesive societies. This flows from the recognition that traditional forums for developing public understanding, such as post-conflict truth commissions, need to be complemented by intergenerational and educational perspectives.

Abigail has taught History, Politics, Debating as well as Relationships and Sex Education to secondary school students in South Africa, England and the USA.

She holds postgraduate degrees in Post-Conflict and Transitional Justice (University of Cape Town), in Education, Globalisation and International Development (University of Cambridge) and in African Studies (University of Oxford). She is a Rhodes Scholar, Mandela-Magdalene Scholar and Mandela-Rhodes Scholar.

Title of thesis

GCSE History, Policy Reform and Student Development: How students and teachers navigate the thematic study “Empires, Migration and the People”

Conference papers

Teaching Migration, Belonging, and Empire in Secondary Schools: evaluation of a teacher professional development program, (2019) History Educators International Research Network Conference, Lead author: Dr Jason Todd, University of Vienna, Austria.

“The Problems and Prospects of Teaching South Africa’s Recent History: Teachers’ Perspectives”, (2018) Sustainability, peace and education – Exploring promise and practice: BAICE 20th Anniversary Symposium, University of Bristol, England.

“New Generations, Old Wounds: Learning History at Home and School in Northern Ireland”, (2018) European Social Science and History Conference,
Queens University Belfast, Northern Ireland.

“The Methodological Challenges of Investigating the Role of History Teaching in Peacebuilding”, (2017), Present Past: Time, Memory, and the Negotiation of Historical Justice Conference, Columbia University, United States of America.

“Teaching South Africa’s Truth and Reconciliation Commission”, (2017) European Conference on African Studies, Universität Basel, Switzerland.

Research Assistant Publications

Review of the evidence on feedback in primary and secondary schools, (forthcoming, 2021) for the Education Endowment Foundation, Lead author: Prof Velda Elliott.

Teaching Migration, Belonging, and Empire in Secondary Schools, (2019), for Runnymede Trust and the European Research Council, Lead authors: Kimberly McIntosh, Dr Jason Todd and Prof Nandini Das.

Gender and the Politics of Reconciliation (2016), for The Institute for Justice and Reconciliation, Lead author: Dr Helen Scanlon

SOLE AUTHOR PUBLICATIONS

‘Transitions, Truth-Telling and Teaching History’, Cambridge Open-Review Educational Research e-Journal, Vol. 4, 2017.

Paul Riser is a DPhil Student in the department. His research focuses broadly on students’ (especially the marginalised) identities work in upper-secondary English Language Arts classrooms.

Prior to starting his doctoral studies, Paul earned a BSc in English Language Arts (Secondary Education) with a minor in Theology and a BA in Spanish and International Studies with a minor in Psychology from Texas Lutheran University. His MA in English Literature and Language is from St. Mary’s University.

As part of his postgraduate schoolwork, Paul undertook a placement in two graduate certificate programs, earning both his School Counselor certification and School Principal certification for all grade levels in the state of Texas, USA. In addition to English Language Arts and Reading (4th-12th grades), he is also qualified to teach Health (all levels), Journalism (7-12), Speech (7-12), Social Studies (7-12), and English as a Second Language (all levels) in Texas. Further, Paul holds a teaching certification in California, USA, the United Kingdom and Wales, the Kingdom of Denmark, and the Netherlands.

As a public school English teacher for 8 years, Paul was awarded many distinctions including, but not limited to: El maestro de impacto, two Harvard Book Awards, Teacher of the Year, and Texas Parent-Teacher Association Life Member.

His research to inform his doctoral thesis work will be completed in the United States of America. Furthermore, his research interests revolve around the nexus points of gender, ethnicity, sexuality, economic status, and religion as they relate to the agency students have in the classroom.

Paul is the 2019-2020 Student Liaison Coordinator for the Department of Education, Oxford. In this role, he is charged with leading/convening weekly workshops on a variety of research training topics, co-organizing networking and career advice opportunities for graduate students, and liaising with Cambridge University personnel to organize the annual Oxbridge Exchange. Furthermore, Paul supports the Higher Degrees Office as appropriate and meets regularly with directors and other stakeholders to discuss issues of common student concern in order to develop student identity and community throughout the Department.

Paul serves as the representative student voice on the Social Sciences Division Equality & Diversity Steering Group for the University of Oxford.

Paul is also a part-time Research Assistant working with professionals and other academics within the Department of Education on funded and individual projects as needed.

Supervisors: Associate Professors Jenni Ingram and Velda Elliott & Departmental Lecturer Jason Todd.

Thesis Title: ‘Using Positioning Theory to Understand Marginalised Students’ Identities Work and Their Learning Experiences in English Language Arts Classrooms’

Open-Access Publication:
Ingram, Jenni, & Riser, P.A. (2019). Experiences of problem solving in whole class interactions. Avances De Investigación En Educación Matemática, Avances de Investigación en Educación Matemática, Number 16; October 2019.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.35763/aiem.v0i16.279

Tessa is currently completing a part-time DPhil, alongside work as a senior leader in a London secondary school.

Her research explores how teachers on school-based ITE routes (TeachFirst and School Direct salaried) approach learning from experience. The research takes an action research approach: working with participant beginning teachers and mentors to critically examine and reflect on the processes of learning to teach, using their conversations as stimulus data.

Prior to joining the Department of Education Tessa completed an MSc in Educational Research (University of Bristol).

Yoon Young has been involved in a variety of academic and professional projects related to teacher education.

She is currently a member of the Teacher Education and Professional Learning (TEPL) research group at Oxford. Her doctoral research focuses on teacher education policy and practice in England. The study examines the relationship between individuals’ own objectives, the stated programme goals, and the national teachers’ standards in the operation of the Oxford Internship Scheme (OIS). It also explores the perceptions of stakeholders regarding ideal goals that could drive a re-conceptualised teacher education programme.

Prior to her doctorate, Yoon Young used to be a social studies teacher and subsequently worked as a consultant for the OECD’s Initial Teacher Preparation (ITP) Study. She holds a B.A. in Social Studies and Geography Education from the Ewha Womans University, and an M.A. in Educational Leadership from the University of Jyväskylä, where she was a grantee of the Korean Government Scholarship for Study Overseas.

Katy is a Deputy Headteacher and the founder of a Leadership and Coaching Institute, which she now co-directs.

Katy is an Associate Fellow at the Oxford Character Project and a Research Associate at the Oxford University Wellbeing Research Centre. She is the co-founder of Global Social Leaders, a leadership programme which has participants in 105 countries, all passionate about creating and sustaining positive change in the world.

Title of Thesis

How could school leaders improve the flourishing and wellbeing of teaching staff?

Books
  • Granville-Chapman, K. and Bidston, E (2020) Leader: Know, love and inspire your people. Carmarthen: Crownhouse Publishing
Book Chapters
  •  Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ In White, M. & McCallum, F. (Ed.s) Wellbeing and Resilience Education: Covid-19 And Its Impact on Education Systems. Routledge
Publications
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘Purpose and Leadership in Education and Beyond’. The Education Exchange. Available from: https://theeducation.exchange/purpose-and-leadership-in-education-and-beyond/
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘The Three Secrets of COVID-era Leadership’. Times Education Supplement. Available from: https://www.tes.com/news/three-secrets-covid-era-school-leadership
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2016) ‘Assessing the Impact of a Teacher Leadership Programme in a Teaching Schools Alliance. Journal of Teacher Action Research
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2014) ‘The Afghan conflict: causes and consequences.’ Geography Review 28(1): 22-27
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2013) What are the psychological factors that affect students’ academic resilience and can teachers influence these? Unpublished thesis
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘Unlocking Leadership Potential’, The Magazine of the Boarding School’s Association, 33: 42-45
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2009) ‘Learning to Lead’, Leader, The Education Leader Magazine 41: 22-25
Presentations
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2019) ‘How could leaders improve the flourishing of their teams?’ ‘Stowe Ed Conference’, Forthcoming: 7 Jan 2019
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2018) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education: 21 Jun 2018
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2017) ‘How can school leaders improve teacher flourishing?’ ‘Doing Education Differently Conference’, University of Oxford, Department of Education, 11 Mar 17
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2016) ‘Developing school leaders who enable teachers to flourish’ The Telegraph Festival of Education 23 Jun 16
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Developing leadership in pupils and teachers’ High School Affiliated to Renmin University of China, Beijing. 20 Oct 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Resilience for leaders.’ Global Social Leaders World Summit. 16 Aug 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Emotional Intelligence for Leaders.’ Global Leaders in Education. 12 Aug 15
  • Coates, S.; Fraser, H.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J.; and Nasim, A. (2015) ‘Breaking through the glass ceiling – how can schools empower our girls to become leaders?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education. 19 Jun 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. ‘Developing Leadership in Schools’ (2015). G20 Schools Conference. International conference for head teachers. 11 Apr 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2018) ‘Introduction’, Wellington Leadership Institute: Festival of Leadership. Mar 2012-15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘How the Young Learn to Lead’, Raffles Institution (Singapore) -Purdue University (USA) Education Forum on Gifted & Talented Youth 2012. Singapore. 15 Mar 12
  • Draper, D.; Dyer, R.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Schools’. Presentation for a meeting about pupil leadership and character development at 10 Downing Street. 16 Nov 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Young People’. Presentation for a meeting about leadership and character at 10 Downing Street. 7 Mar 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K. & Seldon, A. (2012) ‘Introduction’, Leading Your School in the 21st Century. 7 Feb 12

Kamal Armanious is particularly interested in the topic of education governance to explore what is possible in developing an improved governance system for technical and vocational education and training (TVET).

There have always been various calls from different international organisations such UNESCO, ILO, World Bank, OECD etc. to develop a transformed and transformative approach to TVET. This is attractive for certain theoretical as well as practical reasons; however, one set of limitations in achieving this vision lies in the arena of governance. Mr Armanious examines an imagined better model of governance that can be developed from the principles of a new approach and wider theoretical resources with consideration to national realities where there may be very serious obstacles in the way of realising this new governance approach and hence the overall planned transformation.

Title of Thesis

Education and Training Policies in Egypt: Good Governance and Stakeholders Participation

 

Amanda is completing a part-time DPhil, alongside working in Initial Teacher Education at Leeds Trinity University.

Her research is focused on understanding tensions, contradictions and conflicts that teachers in disadvantaged schools may experience when they engage in research activity.  Her research focus is influenced by her own experiences of working as a research-active teacher in disadvantaged schools, and recent work in teacher education to support experienced and beginning teachers in developing their own research activities.

One of the aims of Amanda’s research is to construct a framework to support teachers in pursuing research activity and critical scholarship work which articulates with wider social movements to address issues of poverty and disadvantage in schools.

Title of Thesis

Teachers’ perspectives on tensions between policy, practice and research in disadvantaged schools

Publications 

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2017) A ‘usable past’ of teacher education in England: history in JET’s anniversary issue. Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy, 43 (5), pp.616-627.

Nuttall, A. (2016) The ‘curriculum challenge’: Moving towards the ‘Storyline’ approach in a case study urban primary school.  Improving Schools, 19 (2), pp. 154-166.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Learning {Re}imagined: A review.  Primary First, 15, pp. 17-18.

Nuttall, A. and Doherty, J. (2014) Disaffected boys and the achievement gap: the ‘wallpaper effect’ and what is hidden by a focus on school results.  The Urban Review, 46 (5), pp.800-815.

Conference Papers and Presentations

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2018) “No child is pre-ordained to fail” Teachers questioning policy assumptions.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Newcastle, 11-13 September.

Nuttall, A. and Tobbell, C. (2017) Trainee teachers’ perspectives on practitioner enquiry.  Paper presented at the 8th TEAN Conference: Thinking Deeply about Education, Birmingham, 11-12 May.

Nuttall, A. (2017) Assessment at primary level: quality, comparability and improving secondary readiness.  A perspective from ITE.  Speech at the Westminster Education Forum Keynote Seminar: Next steps for reforming primary education: effective teaching practices, assessment and accountably, London, 18 January.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Deficit narratives and lived realities: whose poverty is it?  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the Australian Association for Research in Education, Melbourne, 27 November – 1 December.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Disenfranchised boys’ reflections on their urban schooling experience: “What a Waste!”.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Philpott, C., Beckett, L. and Wrigley, T. (2016) Collaborative practitioner inquiry: making a difference to urban schools.  Innovation session (school visits and symposium) presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Finn, B. and Beckett, L. (2015) Teachers’ constructions of poverty effects: Their research evidence.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Belfast, 15-17 September.

Nuttall, A. (2014) Teachers’ voice on disengaged boys: the role of one teacher-researcher in an English primary school. Paper presented at the Joint Australian Association for Research in Education and the New Zealand Association for Research in Education Conference, Brisbane, 30 November – 4 December.

Abigail’s research explores the role of education in students’ personal development and how this can be supported by policy, curricula, initial teacher education and teacher professional development. In particular she focuses on history education, citizenship education and peace education as vehicles for dialogue. These opportunities for students to engage with social questions are vital for building cohesive societies. This flows from the recognition that traditional forums for developing public understanding, such as post-conflict truth commissions, need to be complemented by intergenerational and educational perspectives.

Abigail has taught History, Politics, Debating as well as Relationships and Sex Education to secondary school students in South Africa, England and the USA.

She holds postgraduate degrees in Post-Conflict and Transitional Justice (University of Cape Town), in Education, Globalisation and International Development (University of Cambridge) and in African Studies (University of Oxford). She is a Rhodes Scholar, Mandela-Magdalene Scholar and Mandela-Rhodes Scholar.

Title of thesis

GCSE History, Policy Reform and Student Development: How students and teachers navigate the thematic study “Empires, Migration and the People”

Conference papers

Teaching Migration, Belonging, and Empire in Secondary Schools: evaluation of a teacher professional development program, (2019) History Educators International Research Network Conference, Lead author: Dr Jason Todd, University of Vienna, Austria.

“The Problems and Prospects of Teaching South Africa’s Recent History: Teachers’ Perspectives”, (2018) Sustainability, peace and education – Exploring promise and practice: BAICE 20th Anniversary Symposium, University of Bristol, England.

“New Generations, Old Wounds: Learning History at Home and School in Northern Ireland”, (2018) European Social Science and History Conference,
Queens University Belfast, Northern Ireland.

“The Methodological Challenges of Investigating the Role of History Teaching in Peacebuilding”, (2017), Present Past: Time, Memory, and the Negotiation of Historical Justice Conference, Columbia University, United States of America.

“Teaching South Africa’s Truth and Reconciliation Commission”, (2017) European Conference on African Studies, Universität Basel, Switzerland.

Research Assistant Publications

Review of the evidence on feedback in primary and secondary schools, (forthcoming, 2021) for the Education Endowment Foundation, Lead author: Prof Velda Elliott.

Teaching Migration, Belonging, and Empire in Secondary Schools, (2019), for Runnymede Trust and the European Research Council, Lead authors: Kimberly McIntosh, Dr Jason Todd and Prof Nandini Das.

Gender and the Politics of Reconciliation (2016), for The Institute for Justice and Reconciliation, Lead author: Dr Helen Scanlon

SOLE AUTHOR PUBLICATIONS

‘Transitions, Truth-Telling and Teaching History’, Cambridge Open-Review Educational Research e-Journal, Vol. 4, 2017.

Paul Riser is a DPhil Student in the department. His research focuses broadly on students’ (especially the marginalised) identities work in upper-secondary English Language Arts classrooms.

Prior to starting his doctoral studies, Paul earned a BSc in English Language Arts (Secondary Education) with a minor in Theology and a BA in Spanish and International Studies with a minor in Psychology from Texas Lutheran University. His MA in English Literature and Language is from St. Mary’s University.

As part of his postgraduate schoolwork, Paul undertook a placement in two graduate certificate programs, earning both his School Counselor certification and School Principal certification for all grade levels in the state of Texas, USA. In addition to English Language Arts and Reading (4th-12th grades), he is also qualified to teach Health (all levels), Journalism (7-12), Speech (7-12), Social Studies (7-12), and English as a Second Language (all levels) in Texas. Further, Paul holds a teaching certification in California, USA, the United Kingdom and Wales, the Kingdom of Denmark, and the Netherlands.

As a public school English teacher for 8 years, Paul was awarded many distinctions including, but not limited to: El maestro de impacto, two Harvard Book Awards, Teacher of the Year, and Texas Parent-Teacher Association Life Member.

His research to inform his doctoral thesis work will be completed in the United States of America. Furthermore, his research interests revolve around the nexus points of gender, ethnicity, sexuality, economic status, and religion as they relate to the agency students have in the classroom.

Paul is the 2019-2020 Student Liaison Coordinator for the Department of Education, Oxford. In this role, he is charged with leading/convening weekly workshops on a variety of research training topics, co-organizing networking and career advice opportunities for graduate students, and liaising with Cambridge University personnel to organize the annual Oxbridge Exchange. Furthermore, Paul supports the Higher Degrees Office as appropriate and meets regularly with directors and other stakeholders to discuss issues of common student concern in order to develop student identity and community throughout the Department.

Paul serves as the representative student voice on the Social Sciences Division Equality & Diversity Steering Group for the University of Oxford.

Paul is also a part-time Research Assistant working with professionals and other academics within the Department of Education on funded and individual projects as needed.

Supervisors: Associate Professors Jenni Ingram and Velda Elliott & Departmental Lecturer Jason Todd.

Thesis Title: ‘Using Positioning Theory to Understand Marginalised Students’ Identities Work and Their Learning Experiences in English Language Arts Classrooms’

Open-Access Publication:
Ingram, Jenni, & Riser, P.A. (2019). Experiences of problem solving in whole class interactions. Avances De Investigación En Educación Matemática, Avances de Investigación en Educación Matemática, Number 16; October 2019.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.35763/aiem.v0i16.279

Tessa is currently completing a part-time DPhil, alongside work as a senior leader in a London secondary school.

Her research explores how teachers on school-based ITE routes (TeachFirst and School Direct salaried) approach learning from experience. The research takes an action research approach: working with participant beginning teachers and mentors to critically examine and reflect on the processes of learning to teach, using their conversations as stimulus data.

Prior to joining the Department of Education Tessa completed an MSc in Educational Research (University of Bristol).

Yoon Young has been involved in a variety of academic and professional projects related to teacher education.

She is currently a member of the Teacher Education and Professional Learning (TEPL) research group at Oxford. Her doctoral research focuses on teacher education policy and practice in England. The study examines the relationship between individuals’ own objectives, the stated programme goals, and the national teachers’ standards in the operation of the Oxford Internship Scheme (OIS). It also explores the perceptions of stakeholders regarding ideal goals that could drive a re-conceptualised teacher education programme.

Prior to her doctorate, Yoon Young used to be a social studies teacher and subsequently worked as a consultant for the OECD’s Initial Teacher Preparation (ITP) Study. She holds a B.A. in Social Studies and Geography Education from the Ewha Womans University, and an M.A. in Educational Leadership from the University of Jyväskylä, where she was a grantee of the Korean Government Scholarship for Study Overseas.

Katy is a Deputy Headteacher and the founder of a Leadership and Coaching Institute, which she now co-directs.

Katy is an Associate Fellow at the Oxford Character Project and a Research Associate at the Oxford University Wellbeing Research Centre. She is the co-founder of Global Social Leaders, a leadership programme which has participants in 105 countries, all passionate about creating and sustaining positive change in the world.

Title of Thesis

How could school leaders improve the flourishing and wellbeing of teaching staff?

Books
  • Granville-Chapman, K. and Bidston, E (2020) Leader: Know, love and inspire your people. Carmarthen: Crownhouse Publishing
Book Chapters
  •  Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ In White, M. & McCallum, F. (Ed.s) Wellbeing and Resilience Education: Covid-19 And Its Impact on Education Systems. Routledge
Publications
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘Purpose and Leadership in Education and Beyond’. The Education Exchange. Available from: https://theeducation.exchange/purpose-and-leadership-in-education-and-beyond/
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘The Three Secrets of COVID-era Leadership’. Times Education Supplement. Available from: https://www.tes.com/news/three-secrets-covid-era-school-leadership
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2016) ‘Assessing the Impact of a Teacher Leadership Programme in a Teaching Schools Alliance. Journal of Teacher Action Research
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2014) ‘The Afghan conflict: causes and consequences.’ Geography Review 28(1): 22-27
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2013) What are the psychological factors that affect students’ academic resilience and can teachers influence these? Unpublished thesis
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘Unlocking Leadership Potential’, The Magazine of the Boarding School’s Association, 33: 42-45
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2009) ‘Learning to Lead’, Leader, The Education Leader Magazine 41: 22-25
Presentations
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2019) ‘How could leaders improve the flourishing of their teams?’ ‘Stowe Ed Conference’, Forthcoming: 7 Jan 2019
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2018) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education: 21 Jun 2018
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2017) ‘How can school leaders improve teacher flourishing?’ ‘Doing Education Differently Conference’, University of Oxford, Department of Education, 11 Mar 17
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2016) ‘Developing school leaders who enable teachers to flourish’ The Telegraph Festival of Education 23 Jun 16
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Developing leadership in pupils and teachers’ High School Affiliated to Renmin University of China, Beijing. 20 Oct 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Resilience for leaders.’ Global Social Leaders World Summit. 16 Aug 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Emotional Intelligence for Leaders.’ Global Leaders in Education. 12 Aug 15
  • Coates, S.; Fraser, H.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J.; and Nasim, A. (2015) ‘Breaking through the glass ceiling – how can schools empower our girls to become leaders?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education. 19 Jun 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. ‘Developing Leadership in Schools’ (2015). G20 Schools Conference. International conference for head teachers. 11 Apr 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2018) ‘Introduction’, Wellington Leadership Institute: Festival of Leadership. Mar 2012-15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘How the Young Learn to Lead’, Raffles Institution (Singapore) -Purdue University (USA) Education Forum on Gifted & Talented Youth 2012. Singapore. 15 Mar 12
  • Draper, D.; Dyer, R.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Schools’. Presentation for a meeting about pupil leadership and character development at 10 Downing Street. 16 Nov 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Young People’. Presentation for a meeting about leadership and character at 10 Downing Street. 7 Mar 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K. & Seldon, A. (2012) ‘Introduction’, Leading Your School in the 21st Century. 7 Feb 12

Kamal Armanious is particularly interested in the topic of education governance to explore what is possible in developing an improved governance system for technical and vocational education and training (TVET).

There have always been various calls from different international organisations such UNESCO, ILO, World Bank, OECD etc. to develop a transformed and transformative approach to TVET. This is attractive for certain theoretical as well as practical reasons; however, one set of limitations in achieving this vision lies in the arena of governance. Mr Armanious examines an imagined better model of governance that can be developed from the principles of a new approach and wider theoretical resources with consideration to national realities where there may be very serious obstacles in the way of realising this new governance approach and hence the overall planned transformation.

Title of Thesis

Education and Training Policies in Egypt: Good Governance and Stakeholders Participation

 

Amanda is completing a part-time DPhil, alongside working in Initial Teacher Education at Leeds Trinity University.

Her research is focused on understanding tensions, contradictions and conflicts that teachers in disadvantaged schools may experience when they engage in research activity.  Her research focus is influenced by her own experiences of working as a research-active teacher in disadvantaged schools, and recent work in teacher education to support experienced and beginning teachers in developing their own research activities.

One of the aims of Amanda’s research is to construct a framework to support teachers in pursuing research activity and critical scholarship work which articulates with wider social movements to address issues of poverty and disadvantage in schools.

Title of Thesis

Teachers’ perspectives on tensions between policy, practice and research in disadvantaged schools

Publications 

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2017) A ‘usable past’ of teacher education in England: history in JET’s anniversary issue. Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy, 43 (5), pp.616-627.

Nuttall, A. (2016) The ‘curriculum challenge’: Moving towards the ‘Storyline’ approach in a case study urban primary school.  Improving Schools, 19 (2), pp. 154-166.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Learning {Re}imagined: A review.  Primary First, 15, pp. 17-18.

Nuttall, A. and Doherty, J. (2014) Disaffected boys and the achievement gap: the ‘wallpaper effect’ and what is hidden by a focus on school results.  The Urban Review, 46 (5), pp.800-815.

Conference Papers and Presentations

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2018) “No child is pre-ordained to fail” Teachers questioning policy assumptions.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Newcastle, 11-13 September.

Nuttall, A. and Tobbell, C. (2017) Trainee teachers’ perspectives on practitioner enquiry.  Paper presented at the 8th TEAN Conference: Thinking Deeply about Education, Birmingham, 11-12 May.

Nuttall, A. (2017) Assessment at primary level: quality, comparability and improving secondary readiness.  A perspective from ITE.  Speech at the Westminster Education Forum Keynote Seminar: Next steps for reforming primary education: effective teaching practices, assessment and accountably, London, 18 January.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Deficit narratives and lived realities: whose poverty is it?  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the Australian Association for Research in Education, Melbourne, 27 November – 1 December.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Disenfranchised boys’ reflections on their urban schooling experience: “What a Waste!”.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Philpott, C., Beckett, L. and Wrigley, T. (2016) Collaborative practitioner inquiry: making a difference to urban schools.  Innovation session (school visits and symposium) presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Finn, B. and Beckett, L. (2015) Teachers’ constructions of poverty effects: Their research evidence.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Belfast, 15-17 September.

Nuttall, A. (2014) Teachers’ voice on disengaged boys: the role of one teacher-researcher in an English primary school. Paper presented at the Joint Australian Association for Research in Education and the New Zealand Association for Research in Education Conference, Brisbane, 30 November – 4 December.

Abigail’s research explores the role of education in students’ personal development and how this can be supported by policy, curricula, initial teacher education and teacher professional development. In particular she focuses on history education, citizenship education and peace education as vehicles for dialogue. These opportunities for students to engage with social questions are vital for building cohesive societies. This flows from the recognition that traditional forums for developing public understanding, such as post-conflict truth commissions, need to be complemented by intergenerational and educational perspectives.

Abigail has taught History, Politics, Debating as well as Relationships and Sex Education to secondary school students in South Africa, England and the USA.

She holds postgraduate degrees in Post-Conflict and Transitional Justice (University of Cape Town), in Education, Globalisation and International Development (University of Cambridge) and in African Studies (University of Oxford). She is a Rhodes Scholar, Mandela-Magdalene Scholar and Mandela-Rhodes Scholar.

Title of thesis

GCSE History, Policy Reform and Student Development: How students and teachers navigate the thematic study “Empires, Migration and the People”

Conference papers

Teaching Migration, Belonging, and Empire in Secondary Schools: evaluation of a teacher professional development program, (2019) History Educators International Research Network Conference, Lead author: Dr Jason Todd, University of Vienna, Austria.

“The Problems and Prospects of Teaching South Africa’s Recent History: Teachers’ Perspectives”, (2018) Sustainability, peace and education – Exploring promise and practice: BAICE 20th Anniversary Symposium, University of Bristol, England.

“New Generations, Old Wounds: Learning History at Home and School in Northern Ireland”, (2018) European Social Science and History Conference,
Queens University Belfast, Northern Ireland.

“The Methodological Challenges of Investigating the Role of History Teaching in Peacebuilding”, (2017), Present Past: Time, Memory, and the Negotiation of Historical Justice Conference, Columbia University, United States of America.

“Teaching South Africa’s Truth and Reconciliation Commission”, (2017) European Conference on African Studies, Universität Basel, Switzerland.

Research Assistant Publications

Review of the evidence on feedback in primary and secondary schools, (forthcoming, 2021) for the Education Endowment Foundation, Lead author: Prof Velda Elliott.

Teaching Migration, Belonging, and Empire in Secondary Schools, (2019), for Runnymede Trust and the European Research Council, Lead authors: Kimberly McIntosh, Dr Jason Todd and Prof Nandini Das.

Gender and the Politics of Reconciliation (2016), for The Institute for Justice and Reconciliation, Lead author: Dr Helen Scanlon

SOLE AUTHOR PUBLICATIONS

‘Transitions, Truth-Telling and Teaching History’, Cambridge Open-Review Educational Research e-Journal, Vol. 4, 2017.

Paul Riser is a DPhil Student in the department. His research focuses broadly on students’ (especially the marginalised) identities work in upper-secondary English Language Arts classrooms.

Prior to starting his doctoral studies, Paul earned a BSc in English Language Arts (Secondary Education) with a minor in Theology and a BA in Spanish and International Studies with a minor in Psychology from Texas Lutheran University. His MA in English Literature and Language is from St. Mary’s University.

As part of his postgraduate schoolwork, Paul undertook a placement in two graduate certificate programs, earning both his School Counselor certification and School Principal certification for all grade levels in the state of Texas, USA. In addition to English Language Arts and Reading (4th-12th grades), he is also qualified to teach Health (all levels), Journalism (7-12), Speech (7-12), Social Studies (7-12), and English as a Second Language (all levels) in Texas. Further, Paul holds a teaching certification in California, USA, the United Kingdom and Wales, the Kingdom of Denmark, and the Netherlands.

As a public school English teacher for 8 years, Paul was awarded many distinctions including, but not limited to: El maestro de impacto, two Harvard Book Awards, Teacher of the Year, and Texas Parent-Teacher Association Life Member.

His research to inform his doctoral thesis work will be completed in the United States of America. Furthermore, his research interests revolve around the nexus points of gender, ethnicity, sexuality, economic status, and religion as they relate to the agency students have in the classroom.

Paul is the 2019-2020 Student Liaison Coordinator for the Department of Education, Oxford. In this role, he is charged with leading/convening weekly workshops on a variety of research training topics, co-organizing networking and career advice opportunities for graduate students, and liaising with Cambridge University personnel to organize the annual Oxbridge Exchange. Furthermore, Paul supports the Higher Degrees Office as appropriate and meets regularly with directors and other stakeholders to discuss issues of common student concern in order to develop student identity and community throughout the Department.

Paul serves as the representative student voice on the Social Sciences Division Equality & Diversity Steering Group for the University of Oxford.

Paul is also a part-time Research Assistant working with professionals and other academics within the Department of Education on funded and individual projects as needed.

Supervisors: Associate Professors Jenni Ingram and Velda Elliott & Departmental Lecturer Jason Todd.

Thesis Title: ‘Using Positioning Theory to Understand Marginalised Students’ Identities Work and Their Learning Experiences in English Language Arts Classrooms’

Open-Access Publication:
Ingram, Jenni, & Riser, P.A. (2019). Experiences of problem solving in whole class interactions. Avances De Investigación En Educación Matemática, Avances de Investigación en Educación Matemática, Number 16; October 2019.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.35763/aiem.v0i16.279

Tessa is currently completing a part-time DPhil, alongside work as a senior leader in a London secondary school.

Her research explores how teachers on school-based ITE routes (TeachFirst and School Direct salaried) approach learning from experience. The research takes an action research approach: working with participant beginning teachers and mentors to critically examine and reflect on the processes of learning to teach, using their conversations as stimulus data.

Prior to joining the Department of Education Tessa completed an MSc in Educational Research (University of Bristol).

Yoon Young has been involved in a variety of academic and professional projects related to teacher education.

She is currently a member of the Teacher Education and Professional Learning (TEPL) research group at Oxford. Her doctoral research focuses on teacher education policy and practice in England. The study examines the relationship between individuals’ own objectives, the stated programme goals, and the national teachers’ standards in the operation of the Oxford Internship Scheme (OIS). It also explores the perceptions of stakeholders regarding ideal goals that could drive a re-conceptualised teacher education programme.

Prior to her doctorate, Yoon Young used to be a social studies teacher and subsequently worked as a consultant for the OECD’s Initial Teacher Preparation (ITP) Study. She holds a B.A. in Social Studies and Geography Education from the Ewha Womans University, and an M.A. in Educational Leadership from the University of Jyväskylä, where she was a grantee of the Korean Government Scholarship for Study Overseas.

Katy is a Deputy Headteacher and the founder of a Leadership and Coaching Institute, which she now co-directs.

Katy is an Associate Fellow at the Oxford Character Project and a Research Associate at the Oxford University Wellbeing Research Centre. She is the co-founder of Global Social Leaders, a leadership programme which has participants in 105 countries, all passionate about creating and sustaining positive change in the world.

Title of Thesis

How could school leaders improve the flourishing and wellbeing of teaching staff?

Books
  • Granville-Chapman, K. and Bidston, E (2020) Leader: Know, love and inspire your people. Carmarthen: Crownhouse Publishing
Book Chapters
  •  Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ In White, M. & McCallum, F. (Ed.s) Wellbeing and Resilience Education: Covid-19 And Its Impact on Education Systems. Routledge
Publications
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘Purpose and Leadership in Education and Beyond’. The Education Exchange. Available from: https://theeducation.exchange/purpose-and-leadership-in-education-and-beyond/
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘The Three Secrets of COVID-era Leadership’. Times Education Supplement. Available from: https://www.tes.com/news/three-secrets-covid-era-school-leadership
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2016) ‘Assessing the Impact of a Teacher Leadership Programme in a Teaching Schools Alliance. Journal of Teacher Action Research
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2014) ‘The Afghan conflict: causes and consequences.’ Geography Review 28(1): 22-27
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2013) What are the psychological factors that affect students’ academic resilience and can teachers influence these? Unpublished thesis
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘Unlocking Leadership Potential’, The Magazine of the Boarding School’s Association, 33: 42-45
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2009) ‘Learning to Lead’, Leader, The Education Leader Magazine 41: 22-25
Presentations
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2019) ‘How could leaders improve the flourishing of their teams?’ ‘Stowe Ed Conference’, Forthcoming: 7 Jan 2019
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2018) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education: 21 Jun 2018
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2017) ‘How can school leaders improve teacher flourishing?’ ‘Doing Education Differently Conference’, University of Oxford, Department of Education, 11 Mar 17
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2016) ‘Developing school leaders who enable teachers to flourish’ The Telegraph Festival of Education 23 Jun 16
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Developing leadership in pupils and teachers’ High School Affiliated to Renmin University of China, Beijing. 20 Oct 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Resilience for leaders.’ Global Social Leaders World Summit. 16 Aug 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Emotional Intelligence for Leaders.’ Global Leaders in Education. 12 Aug 15
  • Coates, S.; Fraser, H.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J.; and Nasim, A. (2015) ‘Breaking through the glass ceiling – how can schools empower our girls to become leaders?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education. 19 Jun 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. ‘Developing Leadership in Schools’ (2015). G20 Schools Conference. International conference for head teachers. 11 Apr 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2018) ‘Introduction’, Wellington Leadership Institute: Festival of Leadership. Mar 2012-15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘How the Young Learn to Lead’, Raffles Institution (Singapore) -Purdue University (USA) Education Forum on Gifted & Talented Youth 2012. Singapore. 15 Mar 12
  • Draper, D.; Dyer, R.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Schools’. Presentation for a meeting about pupil leadership and character development at 10 Downing Street. 16 Nov 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Young People’. Presentation for a meeting about leadership and character at 10 Downing Street. 7 Mar 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K. & Seldon, A. (2012) ‘Introduction’, Leading Your School in the 21st Century. 7 Feb 12

Kamal Armanious is particularly interested in the topic of education governance to explore what is possible in developing an improved governance system for technical and vocational education and training (TVET).

There have always been various calls from different international organisations such UNESCO, ILO, World Bank, OECD etc. to develop a transformed and transformative approach to TVET. This is attractive for certain theoretical as well as practical reasons; however, one set of limitations in achieving this vision lies in the arena of governance. Mr Armanious examines an imagined better model of governance that can be developed from the principles of a new approach and wider theoretical resources with consideration to national realities where there may be very serious obstacles in the way of realising this new governance approach and hence the overall planned transformation.

Title of Thesis

Education and Training Policies in Egypt: Good Governance and Stakeholders Participation

 

Amanda is completing a part-time DPhil, alongside working in Initial Teacher Education at Leeds Trinity University.

Her research is focused on understanding tensions, contradictions and conflicts that teachers in disadvantaged schools may experience when they engage in research activity.  Her research focus is influenced by her own experiences of working as a research-active teacher in disadvantaged schools, and recent work in teacher education to support experienced and beginning teachers in developing their own research activities.

One of the aims of Amanda’s research is to construct a framework to support teachers in pursuing research activity and critical scholarship work which articulates with wider social movements to address issues of poverty and disadvantage in schools.

Title of Thesis

Teachers’ perspectives on tensions between policy, practice and research in disadvantaged schools

Publications 

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2017) A ‘usable past’ of teacher education in England: history in JET’s anniversary issue. Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy, 43 (5), pp.616-627.

Nuttall, A. (2016) The ‘curriculum challenge’: Moving towards the ‘Storyline’ approach in a case study urban primary school.  Improving Schools, 19 (2), pp. 154-166.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Learning {Re}imagined: A review.  Primary First, 15, pp. 17-18.

Nuttall, A. and Doherty, J. (2014) Disaffected boys and the achievement gap: the ‘wallpaper effect’ and what is hidden by a focus on school results.  The Urban Review, 46 (5), pp.800-815.

Conference Papers and Presentations

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2018) “No child is pre-ordained to fail” Teachers questioning policy assumptions.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Newcastle, 11-13 September.

Nuttall, A. and Tobbell, C. (2017) Trainee teachers’ perspectives on practitioner enquiry.  Paper presented at the 8th TEAN Conference: Thinking Deeply about Education, Birmingham, 11-12 May.

Nuttall, A. (2017) Assessment at primary level: quality, comparability and improving secondary readiness.  A perspective from ITE.  Speech at the Westminster Education Forum Keynote Seminar: Next steps for reforming primary education: effective teaching practices, assessment and accountably, London, 18 January.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Deficit narratives and lived realities: whose poverty is it?  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the Australian Association for Research in Education, Melbourne, 27 November – 1 December.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Disenfranchised boys’ reflections on their urban schooling experience: “What a Waste!”.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Philpott, C., Beckett, L. and Wrigley, T. (2016) Collaborative practitioner inquiry: making a difference to urban schools.  Innovation session (school visits and symposium) presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Finn, B. and Beckett, L. (2015) Teachers’ constructions of poverty effects: Their research evidence.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Belfast, 15-17 September.

Nuttall, A. (2014) Teachers’ voice on disengaged boys: the role of one teacher-researcher in an English primary school. Paper presented at the Joint Australian Association for Research in Education and the New Zealand Association for Research in Education Conference, Brisbane, 30 November – 4 December.

Abigail’s research explores the role of education in students’ personal development and how this can be supported by policy, curricula, initial teacher education and teacher professional development. In particular she focuses on history education, citizenship education and peace education as vehicles for dialogue. These opportunities for students to engage with social questions are vital for building cohesive societies. This flows from the recognition that traditional forums for developing public understanding, such as post-conflict truth commissions, need to be complemented by intergenerational and educational perspectives.

Abigail has taught History, Politics, Debating as well as Relationships and Sex Education to secondary school students in South Africa, England and the USA.

She holds postgraduate degrees in Post-Conflict and Transitional Justice (University of Cape Town), in Education, Globalisation and International Development (University of Cambridge) and in African Studies (University of Oxford). She is a Rhodes Scholar, Mandela-Magdalene Scholar and Mandela-Rhodes Scholar.

Title of thesis

GCSE History, Policy Reform and Student Development: How students and teachers navigate the thematic study “Empires, Migration and the People”

Conference papers

Teaching Migration, Belonging, and Empire in Secondary Schools: evaluation of a teacher professional development program, (2019) History Educators International Research Network Conference, Lead author: Dr Jason Todd, University of Vienna, Austria.

“The Problems and Prospects of Teaching South Africa’s Recent History: Teachers’ Perspectives”, (2018) Sustainability, peace and education – Exploring promise and practice: BAICE 20th Anniversary Symposium, University of Bristol, England.

“New Generations, Old Wounds: Learning History at Home and School in Northern Ireland”, (2018) European Social Science and History Conference,
Queens University Belfast, Northern Ireland.

“The Methodological Challenges of Investigating the Role of History Teaching in Peacebuilding”, (2017), Present Past: Time, Memory, and the Negotiation of Historical Justice Conference, Columbia University, United States of America.

“Teaching South Africa’s Truth and Reconciliation Commission”, (2017) European Conference on African Studies, Universität Basel, Switzerland.

Research Assistant Publications

Review of the evidence on feedback in primary and secondary schools, (forthcoming, 2021) for the Education Endowment Foundation, Lead author: Prof Velda Elliott.

Teaching Migration, Belonging, and Empire in Secondary Schools, (2019), for Runnymede Trust and the European Research Council, Lead authors: Kimberly McIntosh, Dr Jason Todd and Prof Nandini Das.

Gender and the Politics of Reconciliation (2016), for The Institute for Justice and Reconciliation, Lead author: Dr Helen Scanlon

SOLE AUTHOR PUBLICATIONS

‘Transitions, Truth-Telling and Teaching History’, Cambridge Open-Review Educational Research e-Journal, Vol. 4, 2017.

Paul Riser is a DPhil Student in the department. His research focuses broadly on students’ (especially the marginalised) identities work in upper-secondary English Language Arts classrooms.

Prior to starting his doctoral studies, Paul earned a BSc in English Language Arts (Secondary Education) with a minor in Theology and a BA in Spanish and International Studies with a minor in Psychology from Texas Lutheran University. His MA in English Literature and Language is from St. Mary’s University.

As part of his postgraduate schoolwork, Paul undertook a placement in two graduate certificate programs, earning both his School Counselor certification and School Principal certification for all grade levels in the state of Texas, USA. In addition to English Language Arts and Reading (4th-12th grades), he is also qualified to teach Health (all levels), Journalism (7-12), Speech (7-12), Social Studies (7-12), and English as a Second Language (all levels) in Texas. Further, Paul holds a teaching certification in California, USA, the United Kingdom and Wales, the Kingdom of Denmark, and the Netherlands.

As a public school English teacher for 8 years, Paul was awarded many distinctions including, but not limited to: El maestro de impacto, two Harvard Book Awards, Teacher of the Year, and Texas Parent-Teacher Association Life Member.

His research to inform his doctoral thesis work will be completed in the United States of America. Furthermore, his research interests revolve around the nexus points of gender, ethnicity, sexuality, economic status, and religion as they relate to the agency students have in the classroom.

Paul is the 2019-2020 Student Liaison Coordinator for the Department of Education, Oxford. In this role, he is charged with leading/convening weekly workshops on a variety of research training topics, co-organizing networking and career advice opportunities for graduate students, and liaising with Cambridge University personnel to organize the annual Oxbridge Exchange. Furthermore, Paul supports the Higher Degrees Office as appropriate and meets regularly with directors and other stakeholders to discuss issues of common student concern in order to develop student identity and community throughout the Department.

Paul serves as the representative student voice on the Social Sciences Division Equality & Diversity Steering Group for the University of Oxford.

Paul is also a part-time Research Assistant working with professionals and other academics within the Department of Education on funded and individual projects as needed.

Supervisors: Associate Professors Jenni Ingram and Velda Elliott & Departmental Lecturer Jason Todd.

Thesis Title: ‘Using Positioning Theory to Understand Marginalised Students’ Identities Work and Their Learning Experiences in English Language Arts Classrooms’

Open-Access Publication:
Ingram, Jenni, & Riser, P.A. (2019). Experiences of problem solving in whole class interactions. Avances De Investigación En Educación Matemática, Avances de Investigación en Educación Matemática, Number 16; October 2019.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.35763/aiem.v0i16.279

Tessa is currently completing a part-time DPhil, alongside work as a senior leader in a London secondary school.

Her research explores how teachers on school-based ITE routes (TeachFirst and School Direct salaried) approach learning from experience. The research takes an action research approach: working with participant beginning teachers and mentors to critically examine and reflect on the processes of learning to teach, using their conversations as stimulus data.

Prior to joining the Department of Education Tessa completed an MSc in Educational Research (University of Bristol).

Yoon Young has been involved in a variety of academic and professional projects related to teacher education.

She is currently a member of the Teacher Education and Professional Learning (TEPL) research group at Oxford. Her doctoral research focuses on teacher education policy and practice in England. The study examines the relationship between individuals’ own objectives, the stated programme goals, and the national teachers’ standards in the operation of the Oxford Internship Scheme (OIS). It also explores the perceptions of stakeholders regarding ideal goals that could drive a re-conceptualised teacher education programme.

Prior to her doctorate, Yoon Young used to be a social studies teacher and subsequently worked as a consultant for the OECD’s Initial Teacher Preparation (ITP) Study. She holds a B.A. in Social Studies and Geography Education from the Ewha Womans University, and an M.A. in Educational Leadership from the University of Jyväskylä, where she was a grantee of the Korean Government Scholarship for Study Overseas.

Katy is a Deputy Headteacher and the founder of a Leadership and Coaching Institute, which she now co-directs.

Katy is an Associate Fellow at the Oxford Character Project and a Research Associate at the Oxford University Wellbeing Research Centre. She is the co-founder of Global Social Leaders, a leadership programme which has participants in 105 countries, all passionate about creating and sustaining positive change in the world.

Title of Thesis

How could school leaders improve the flourishing and wellbeing of teaching staff?

Books
  • Granville-Chapman, K. and Bidston, E (2020) Leader: Know, love and inspire your people. Carmarthen: Crownhouse Publishing
Book Chapters
  •  Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ In White, M. & McCallum, F. (Ed.s) Wellbeing and Resilience Education: Covid-19 And Its Impact on Education Systems. Routledge
Publications
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘Purpose and Leadership in Education and Beyond’. The Education Exchange. Available from: https://theeducation.exchange/purpose-and-leadership-in-education-and-beyond/
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘The Three Secrets of COVID-era Leadership’. Times Education Supplement. Available from: https://www.tes.com/news/three-secrets-covid-era-school-leadership
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2016) ‘Assessing the Impact of a Teacher Leadership Programme in a Teaching Schools Alliance. Journal of Teacher Action Research
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2014) ‘The Afghan conflict: causes and consequences.’ Geography Review 28(1): 22-27
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2013) What are the psychological factors that affect students’ academic resilience and can teachers influence these? Unpublished thesis
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘Unlocking Leadership Potential’, The Magazine of the Boarding School’s Association, 33: 42-45
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2009) ‘Learning to Lead’, Leader, The Education Leader Magazine 41: 22-25
Presentations
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2019) ‘How could leaders improve the flourishing of their teams?’ ‘Stowe Ed Conference’, Forthcoming: 7 Jan 2019
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2018) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education: 21 Jun 2018
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2017) ‘How can school leaders improve teacher flourishing?’ ‘Doing Education Differently Conference’, University of Oxford, Department of Education, 11 Mar 17
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2016) ‘Developing school leaders who enable teachers to flourish’ The Telegraph Festival of Education 23 Jun 16
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Developing leadership in pupils and teachers’ High School Affiliated to Renmin University of China, Beijing. 20 Oct 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Resilience for leaders.’ Global Social Leaders World Summit. 16 Aug 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Emotional Intelligence for Leaders.’ Global Leaders in Education. 12 Aug 15
  • Coates, S.; Fraser, H.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J.; and Nasim, A. (2015) ‘Breaking through the glass ceiling – how can schools empower our girls to become leaders?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education. 19 Jun 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. ‘Developing Leadership in Schools’ (2015). G20 Schools Conference. International conference for head teachers. 11 Apr 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2018) ‘Introduction’, Wellington Leadership Institute: Festival of Leadership. Mar 2012-15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘How the Young Learn to Lead’, Raffles Institution (Singapore) -Purdue University (USA) Education Forum on Gifted & Talented Youth 2012. Singapore. 15 Mar 12
  • Draper, D.; Dyer, R.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Schools’. Presentation for a meeting about pupil leadership and character development at 10 Downing Street. 16 Nov 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Young People’. Presentation for a meeting about leadership and character at 10 Downing Street. 7 Mar 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K. & Seldon, A. (2012) ‘Introduction’, Leading Your School in the 21st Century. 7 Feb 12

Kamal Armanious is particularly interested in the topic of education governance to explore what is possible in developing an improved governance system for technical and vocational education and training (TVET).

There have always been various calls from different international organisations such UNESCO, ILO, World Bank, OECD etc. to develop a transformed and transformative approach to TVET. This is attractive for certain theoretical as well as practical reasons; however, one set of limitations in achieving this vision lies in the arena of governance. Mr Armanious examines an imagined better model of governance that can be developed from the principles of a new approach and wider theoretical resources with consideration to national realities where there may be very serious obstacles in the way of realising this new governance approach and hence the overall planned transformation.

Title of Thesis

Education and Training Policies in Egypt: Good Governance and Stakeholders Participation

 

Amanda is completing a part-time DPhil, alongside working in Initial Teacher Education at Leeds Trinity University.

Her research is focused on understanding tensions, contradictions and conflicts that teachers in disadvantaged schools may experience when they engage in research activity.  Her research focus is influenced by her own experiences of working as a research-active teacher in disadvantaged schools, and recent work in teacher education to support experienced and beginning teachers in developing their own research activities.

One of the aims of Amanda’s research is to construct a framework to support teachers in pursuing research activity and critical scholarship work which articulates with wider social movements to address issues of poverty and disadvantage in schools.

Title of Thesis

Teachers’ perspectives on tensions between policy, practice and research in disadvantaged schools

Publications 

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2017) A ‘usable past’ of teacher education in England: history in JET’s anniversary issue. Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy, 43 (5), pp.616-627.

Nuttall, A. (2016) The ‘curriculum challenge’: Moving towards the ‘Storyline’ approach in a case study urban primary school.  Improving Schools, 19 (2), pp. 154-166.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Learning {Re}imagined: A review.  Primary First, 15, pp. 17-18.

Nuttall, A. and Doherty, J. (2014) Disaffected boys and the achievement gap: the ‘wallpaper effect’ and what is hidden by a focus on school results.  The Urban Review, 46 (5), pp.800-815.

Conference Papers and Presentations

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2018) “No child is pre-ordained to fail” Teachers questioning policy assumptions.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Newcastle, 11-13 September.

Nuttall, A. and Tobbell, C. (2017) Trainee teachers’ perspectives on practitioner enquiry.  Paper presented at the 8th TEAN Conference: Thinking Deeply about Education, Birmingham, 11-12 May.

Nuttall, A. (2017) Assessment at primary level: quality, comparability and improving secondary readiness.  A perspective from ITE.  Speech at the Westminster Education Forum Keynote Seminar: Next steps for reforming primary education: effective teaching practices, assessment and accountably, London, 18 January.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Deficit narratives and lived realities: whose poverty is it?  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the Australian Association for Research in Education, Melbourne, 27 November – 1 December.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Disenfranchised boys’ reflections on their urban schooling experience: “What a Waste!”.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Philpott, C., Beckett, L. and Wrigley, T. (2016) Collaborative practitioner inquiry: making a difference to urban schools.  Innovation session (school visits and symposium) presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Finn, B. and Beckett, L. (2015) Teachers’ constructions of poverty effects: Their research evidence.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Belfast, 15-17 September.

Nuttall, A. (2014) Teachers’ voice on disengaged boys: the role of one teacher-researcher in an English primary school. Paper presented at the Joint Australian Association for Research in Education and the New Zealand Association for Research in Education Conference, Brisbane, 30 November – 4 December.

Abigail’s research explores the role of education in students’ personal development and how this can be supported by policy, curricula, initial teacher education and teacher professional development. In particular she focuses on history education, citizenship education and peace education as vehicles for dialogue. These opportunities for students to engage with social questions are vital for building cohesive societies. This flows from the recognition that traditional forums for developing public understanding, such as post-conflict truth commissions, need to be complemented by intergenerational and educational perspectives.

Abigail has taught History, Politics, Debating as well as Relationships and Sex Education to secondary school students in South Africa, England and the USA.

She holds postgraduate degrees in Post-Conflict and Transitional Justice (University of Cape Town), in Education, Globalisation and International Development (University of Cambridge) and in African Studies (University of Oxford). She is a Rhodes Scholar, Mandela-Magdalene Scholar and Mandela-Rhodes Scholar.

Title of thesis

GCSE History, Policy Reform and Student Development: How students and teachers navigate the thematic study “Empires, Migration and the People”

Conference papers

Teaching Migration, Belonging, and Empire in Secondary Schools: evaluation of a teacher professional development program, (2019) History Educators International Research Network Conference, Lead author: Dr Jason Todd, University of Vienna, Austria.

“The Problems and Prospects of Teaching South Africa’s Recent History: Teachers’ Perspectives”, (2018) Sustainability, peace and education – Exploring promise and practice: BAICE 20th Anniversary Symposium, University of Bristol, England.

“New Generations, Old Wounds: Learning History at Home and School in Northern Ireland”, (2018) European Social Science and History Conference,
Queens University Belfast, Northern Ireland.

“The Methodological Challenges of Investigating the Role of History Teaching in Peacebuilding”, (2017), Present Past: Time, Memory, and the Negotiation of Historical Justice Conference, Columbia University, United States of America.

“Teaching South Africa’s Truth and Reconciliation Commission”, (2017) European Conference on African Studies, Universität Basel, Switzerland.

Research Assistant Publications

Review of the evidence on feedback in primary and secondary schools, (forthcoming, 2021) for the Education Endowment Foundation, Lead author: Prof Velda Elliott.

Teaching Migration, Belonging, and Empire in Secondary Schools, (2019), for Runnymede Trust and the European Research Council, Lead authors: Kimberly McIntosh, Dr Jason Todd and Prof Nandini Das.

Gender and the Politics of Reconciliation (2016), for The Institute for Justice and Reconciliation, Lead author: Dr Helen Scanlon

SOLE AUTHOR PUBLICATIONS

‘Transitions, Truth-Telling and Teaching History’, Cambridge Open-Review Educational Research e-Journal, Vol. 4, 2017.

Paul Riser is a DPhil Student in the department. His research focuses broadly on students’ (especially the marginalised) identities work in upper-secondary English Language Arts classrooms.

Prior to starting his doctoral studies, Paul earned a BSc in English Language Arts (Secondary Education) with a minor in Theology and a BA in Spanish and International Studies with a minor in Psychology from Texas Lutheran University. His MA in English Literature and Language is from St. Mary’s University.

As part of his postgraduate schoolwork, Paul undertook a placement in two graduate certificate programs, earning both his School Counselor certification and School Principal certification for all grade levels in the state of Texas, USA. In addition to English Language Arts and Reading (4th-12th grades), he is also qualified to teach Health (all levels), Journalism (7-12), Speech (7-12), Social Studies (7-12), and English as a Second Language (all levels) in Texas. Further, Paul holds a teaching certification in California, USA, the United Kingdom and Wales, the Kingdom of Denmark, and the Netherlands.

As a public school English teacher for 8 years, Paul was awarded many distinctions including, but not limited to: El maestro de impacto, two Harvard Book Awards, Teacher of the Year, and Texas Parent-Teacher Association Life Member.

His research to inform his doctoral thesis work will be completed in the United States of America. Furthermore, his research interests revolve around the nexus points of gender, ethnicity, sexuality, economic status, and religion as they relate to the agency students have in the classroom.

Paul is the 2019-2020 Student Liaison Coordinator for the Department of Education, Oxford. In this role, he is charged with leading/convening weekly workshops on a variety of research training topics, co-organizing networking and career advice opportunities for graduate students, and liaising with Cambridge University personnel to organize the annual Oxbridge Exchange. Furthermore, Paul supports the Higher Degrees Office as appropriate and meets regularly with directors and other stakeholders to discuss issues of common student concern in order to develop student identity and community throughout the Department.

Paul serves as the representative student voice on the Social Sciences Division Equality & Diversity Steering Group for the University of Oxford.

Paul is also a part-time Research Assistant working with professionals and other academics within the Department of Education on funded and individual projects as needed.

Supervisors: Associate Professors Jenni Ingram and Velda Elliott & Departmental Lecturer Jason Todd.

Thesis Title: ‘Using Positioning Theory to Understand Marginalised Students’ Identities Work and Their Learning Experiences in English Language Arts Classrooms’

Open-Access Publication:
Ingram, Jenni, & Riser, P.A. (2019). Experiences of problem solving in whole class interactions. Avances De Investigación En Educación Matemática, Avances de Investigación en Educación Matemática, Number 16; October 2019.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.35763/aiem.v0i16.279

Tessa is currently completing a part-time DPhil, alongside work as a senior leader in a London secondary school.

Her research explores how teachers on school-based ITE routes (TeachFirst and School Direct salaried) approach learning from experience. The research takes an action research approach: working with participant beginning teachers and mentors to critically examine and reflect on the processes of learning to teach, using their conversations as stimulus data.

Prior to joining the Department of Education Tessa completed an MSc in Educational Research (University of Bristol).

Yoon Young has been involved in a variety of academic and professional projects related to teacher education.

She is currently a member of the Teacher Education and Professional Learning (TEPL) research group at Oxford. Her doctoral research focuses on teacher education policy and practice in England. The study examines the relationship between individuals’ own objectives, the stated programme goals, and the national teachers’ standards in the operation of the Oxford Internship Scheme (OIS). It also explores the perceptions of stakeholders regarding ideal goals that could drive a re-conceptualised teacher education programme.

Prior to her doctorate, Yoon Young used to be a social studies teacher and subsequently worked as a consultant for the OECD’s Initial Teacher Preparation (ITP) Study. She holds a B.A. in Social Studies and Geography Education from the Ewha Womans University, and an M.A. in Educational Leadership from the University of Jyväskylä, where she was a grantee of the Korean Government Scholarship for Study Overseas.

Katy is a Deputy Headteacher and the founder of a Leadership and Coaching Institute, which she now co-directs.

Katy is an Associate Fellow at the Oxford Character Project and a Research Associate at the Oxford University Wellbeing Research Centre. She is the co-founder of Global Social Leaders, a leadership programme which has participants in 105 countries, all passionate about creating and sustaining positive change in the world.

Title of Thesis

How could school leaders improve the flourishing and wellbeing of teaching staff?

Books
  • Granville-Chapman, K. and Bidston, E (2020) Leader: Know, love and inspire your people. Carmarthen: Crownhouse Publishing
Book Chapters
  •  Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ In White, M. & McCallum, F. (Ed.s) Wellbeing and Resilience Education: Covid-19 And Its Impact on Education Systems. Routledge
Publications
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘Purpose and Leadership in Education and Beyond’. The Education Exchange. Available from: https://theeducation.exchange/purpose-and-leadership-in-education-and-beyond/
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘The Three Secrets of COVID-era Leadership’. Times Education Supplement. Available from: https://www.tes.com/news/three-secrets-covid-era-school-leadership
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2016) ‘Assessing the Impact of a Teacher Leadership Programme in a Teaching Schools Alliance. Journal of Teacher Action Research
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2014) ‘The Afghan conflict: causes and consequences.’ Geography Review 28(1): 22-27
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2013) What are the psychological factors that affect students’ academic resilience and can teachers influence these? Unpublished thesis
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘Unlocking Leadership Potential’, The Magazine of the Boarding School’s Association, 33: 42-45
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2009) ‘Learning to Lead’, Leader, The Education Leader Magazine 41: 22-25
Presentations
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2019) ‘How could leaders improve the flourishing of their teams?’ ‘Stowe Ed Conference’, Forthcoming: 7 Jan 2019
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2018) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education: 21 Jun 2018
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2017) ‘How can school leaders improve teacher flourishing?’ ‘Doing Education Differently Conference’, University of Oxford, Department of Education, 11 Mar 17
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2016) ‘Developing school leaders who enable teachers to flourish’ The Telegraph Festival of Education 23 Jun 16
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Developing leadership in pupils and teachers’ High School Affiliated to Renmin University of China, Beijing. 20 Oct 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Resilience for leaders.’ Global Social Leaders World Summit. 16 Aug 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Emotional Intelligence for Leaders.’ Global Leaders in Education. 12 Aug 15
  • Coates, S.; Fraser, H.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J.; and Nasim, A. (2015) ‘Breaking through the glass ceiling – how can schools empower our girls to become leaders?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education. 19 Jun 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. ‘Developing Leadership in Schools’ (2015). G20 Schools Conference. International conference for head teachers. 11 Apr 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2018) ‘Introduction’, Wellington Leadership Institute: Festival of Leadership. Mar 2012-15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘How the Young Learn to Lead’, Raffles Institution (Singapore) -Purdue University (USA) Education Forum on Gifted & Talented Youth 2012. Singapore. 15 Mar 12
  • Draper, D.; Dyer, R.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Schools’. Presentation for a meeting about pupil leadership and character development at 10 Downing Street. 16 Nov 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Young People’. Presentation for a meeting about leadership and character at 10 Downing Street. 7 Mar 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K. & Seldon, A. (2012) ‘Introduction’, Leading Your School in the 21st Century. 7 Feb 12

Kamal Armanious is particularly interested in the topic of education governance to explore what is possible in developing an improved governance system for technical and vocational education and training (TVET).

There have always been various calls from different international organisations such UNESCO, ILO, World Bank, OECD etc. to develop a transformed and transformative approach to TVET. This is attractive for certain theoretical as well as practical reasons; however, one set of limitations in achieving this vision lies in the arena of governance. Mr Armanious examines an imagined better model of governance that can be developed from the principles of a new approach and wider theoretical resources with consideration to national realities where there may be very serious obstacles in the way of realising this new governance approach and hence the overall planned transformation.

Title of Thesis

Education and Training Policies in Egypt: Good Governance and Stakeholders Participation

 

Amanda is completing a part-time DPhil, alongside working in Initial Teacher Education at Leeds Trinity University.

Her research is focused on understanding tensions, contradictions and conflicts that teachers in disadvantaged schools may experience when they engage in research activity.  Her research focus is influenced by her own experiences of working as a research-active teacher in disadvantaged schools, and recent work in teacher education to support experienced and beginning teachers in developing their own research activities.

One of the aims of Amanda’s research is to construct a framework to support teachers in pursuing research activity and critical scholarship work which articulates with wider social movements to address issues of poverty and disadvantage in schools.

Title of Thesis

Teachers’ perspectives on tensions between policy, practice and research in disadvantaged schools

Publications 

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2017) A ‘usable past’ of teacher education in England: history in JET’s anniversary issue. Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy, 43 (5), pp.616-627.

Nuttall, A. (2016) The ‘curriculum challenge’: Moving towards the ‘Storyline’ approach in a case study urban primary school.  Improving Schools, 19 (2), pp. 154-166.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Learning {Re}imagined: A review.  Primary First, 15, pp. 17-18.

Nuttall, A. and Doherty, J. (2014) Disaffected boys and the achievement gap: the ‘wallpaper effect’ and what is hidden by a focus on school results.  The Urban Review, 46 (5), pp.800-815.

Conference Papers and Presentations

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2018) “No child is pre-ordained to fail” Teachers questioning policy assumptions.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Newcastle, 11-13 September.

Nuttall, A. and Tobbell, C. (2017) Trainee teachers’ perspectives on practitioner enquiry.  Paper presented at the 8th TEAN Conference: Thinking Deeply about Education, Birmingham, 11-12 May.

Nuttall, A. (2017) Assessment at primary level: quality, comparability and improving secondary readiness.  A perspective from ITE.  Speech at the Westminster Education Forum Keynote Seminar: Next steps for reforming primary education: effective teaching practices, assessment and accountably, London, 18 January.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Deficit narratives and lived realities: whose poverty is it?  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the Australian Association for Research in Education, Melbourne, 27 November – 1 December.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Disenfranchised boys’ reflections on their urban schooling experience: “What a Waste!”.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Philpott, C., Beckett, L. and Wrigley, T. (2016) Collaborative practitioner inquiry: making a difference to urban schools.  Innovation session (school visits and symposium) presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Finn, B. and Beckett, L. (2015) Teachers’ constructions of poverty effects: Their research evidence.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Belfast, 15-17 September.

Nuttall, A. (2014) Teachers’ voice on disengaged boys: the role of one teacher-researcher in an English primary school. Paper presented at the Joint Australian Association for Research in Education and the New Zealand Association for Research in Education Conference, Brisbane, 30 November – 4 December.

Abigail’s research explores the role of education in students’ personal development and how this can be supported by policy, curricula, initial teacher education and teacher professional development. In particular she focuses on history education, citizenship education and peace education as vehicles for dialogue. These opportunities for students to engage with social questions are vital for building cohesive societies. This flows from the recognition that traditional forums for developing public understanding, such as post-conflict truth commissions, need to be complemented by intergenerational and educational perspectives.

Abigail has taught History, Politics, Debating as well as Relationships and Sex Education to secondary school students in South Africa, England and the USA.

She holds postgraduate degrees in Post-Conflict and Transitional Justice (University of Cape Town), in Education, Globalisation and International Development (University of Cambridge) and in African Studies (University of Oxford). She is a Rhodes Scholar, Mandela-Magdalene Scholar and Mandela-Rhodes Scholar.

Title of thesis

GCSE History, Policy Reform and Student Development: How students and teachers navigate the thematic study “Empires, Migration and the People”

Conference papers

Teaching Migration, Belonging, and Empire in Secondary Schools: evaluation of a teacher professional development program, (2019) History Educators International Research Network Conference, Lead author: Dr Jason Todd, University of Vienna, Austria.

“The Problems and Prospects of Teaching South Africa’s Recent History: Teachers’ Perspectives”, (2018) Sustainability, peace and education – Exploring promise and practice: BAICE 20th Anniversary Symposium, University of Bristol, England.

“New Generations, Old Wounds: Learning History at Home and School in Northern Ireland”, (2018) European Social Science and History Conference,
Queens University Belfast, Northern Ireland.

“The Methodological Challenges of Investigating the Role of History Teaching in Peacebuilding”, (2017), Present Past: Time, Memory, and the Negotiation of Historical Justice Conference, Columbia University, United States of America.

“Teaching South Africa’s Truth and Reconciliation Commission”, (2017) European Conference on African Studies, Universität Basel, Switzerland.

Research Assistant Publications

Review of the evidence on feedback in primary and secondary schools, (forthcoming, 2021) for the Education Endowment Foundation, Lead author: Prof Velda Elliott.

Teaching Migration, Belonging, and Empire in Secondary Schools, (2019), for Runnymede Trust and the European Research Council, Lead authors: Kimberly McIntosh, Dr Jason Todd and Prof Nandini Das.

Gender and the Politics of Reconciliation (2016), for The Institute for Justice and Reconciliation, Lead author: Dr Helen Scanlon

SOLE AUTHOR PUBLICATIONS

‘Transitions, Truth-Telling and Teaching History’, Cambridge Open-Review Educational Research e-Journal, Vol. 4, 2017.

Paul Riser is a DPhil Student in the department. His research focuses broadly on students’ (especially the marginalised) identities work in upper-secondary English Language Arts classrooms.

Prior to starting his doctoral studies, Paul earned a BSc in English Language Arts (Secondary Education) with a minor in Theology and a BA in Spanish and International Studies with a minor in Psychology from Texas Lutheran University. His MA in English Literature and Language is from St. Mary’s University.

As part of his postgraduate schoolwork, Paul undertook a placement in two graduate certificate programs, earning both his School Counselor certification and School Principal certification for all grade levels in the state of Texas, USA. In addition to English Language Arts and Reading (4th-12th grades), he is also qualified to teach Health (all levels), Journalism (7-12), Speech (7-12), Social Studies (7-12), and English as a Second Language (all levels) in Texas. Further, Paul holds a teaching certification in California, USA, the United Kingdom and Wales, the Kingdom of Denmark, and the Netherlands.

As a public school English teacher for 8 years, Paul was awarded many distinctions including, but not limited to: El maestro de impacto, two Harvard Book Awards, Teacher of the Year, and Texas Parent-Teacher Association Life Member.

His research to inform his doctoral thesis work will be completed in the United States of America. Furthermore, his research interests revolve around the nexus points of gender, ethnicity, sexuality, economic status, and religion as they relate to the agency students have in the classroom.

Paul is the 2019-2020 Student Liaison Coordinator for the Department of Education, Oxford. In this role, he is charged with leading/convening weekly workshops on a variety of research training topics, co-organizing networking and career advice opportunities for graduate students, and liaising with Cambridge University personnel to organize the annual Oxbridge Exchange. Furthermore, Paul supports the Higher Degrees Office as appropriate and meets regularly with directors and other stakeholders to discuss issues of common student concern in order to develop student identity and community throughout the Department.

Paul serves as the representative student voice on the Social Sciences Division Equality & Diversity Steering Group for the University of Oxford.

Paul is also a part-time Research Assistant working with professionals and other academics within the Department of Education on funded and individual projects as needed.

Supervisors: Associate Professors Jenni Ingram and Velda Elliott & Departmental Lecturer Jason Todd.

Thesis Title: ‘Using Positioning Theory to Understand Marginalised Students’ Identities Work and Their Learning Experiences in English Language Arts Classrooms’

Open-Access Publication:
Ingram, Jenni, & Riser, P.A. (2019). Experiences of problem solving in whole class interactions. Avances De Investigación En Educación Matemática, Avances de Investigación en Educación Matemática, Number 16; October 2019.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.35763/aiem.v0i16.279

Tessa is currently completing a part-time DPhil, alongside work as a senior leader in a London secondary school.

Her research explores how teachers on school-based ITE routes (TeachFirst and School Direct salaried) approach learning from experience. The research takes an action research approach: working with participant beginning teachers and mentors to critically examine and reflect on the processes of learning to teach, using their conversations as stimulus data.

Prior to joining the Department of Education Tessa completed an MSc in Educational Research (University of Bristol).

Yoon Young has been involved in a variety of academic and professional projects related to teacher education.

She is currently a member of the Teacher Education and Professional Learning (TEPL) research group at Oxford. Her doctoral research focuses on teacher education policy and practice in England. The study examines the relationship between individuals’ own objectives, the stated programme goals, and the national teachers’ standards in the operation of the Oxford Internship Scheme (OIS). It also explores the perceptions of stakeholders regarding ideal goals that could drive a re-conceptualised teacher education programme.

Prior to her doctorate, Yoon Young used to be a social studies teacher and subsequently worked as a consultant for the OECD’s Initial Teacher Preparation (ITP) Study. She holds a B.A. in Social Studies and Geography Education from the Ewha Womans University, and an M.A. in Educational Leadership from the University of Jyväskylä, where she was a grantee of the Korean Government Scholarship for Study Overseas.

Katy is a Deputy Headteacher and the founder of a Leadership and Coaching Institute, which she now co-directs.

Katy is an Associate Fellow at the Oxford Character Project and a Research Associate at the Oxford University Wellbeing Research Centre. She is the co-founder of Global Social Leaders, a leadership programme which has participants in 105 countries, all passionate about creating and sustaining positive change in the world.

Title of Thesis

How could school leaders improve the flourishing and wellbeing of teaching staff?

Books
  • Granville-Chapman, K. and Bidston, E (2020) Leader: Know, love and inspire your people. Carmarthen: Crownhouse Publishing
Book Chapters
  •  Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ In White, M. & McCallum, F. (Ed.s) Wellbeing and Resilience Education: Covid-19 And Its Impact on Education Systems. Routledge
Publications
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘Purpose and Leadership in Education and Beyond’. The Education Exchange. Available from: https://theeducation.exchange/purpose-and-leadership-in-education-and-beyond/
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘The Three Secrets of COVID-era Leadership’. Times Education Supplement. Available from: https://www.tes.com/news/three-secrets-covid-era-school-leadership
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2016) ‘Assessing the Impact of a Teacher Leadership Programme in a Teaching Schools Alliance. Journal of Teacher Action Research
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2014) ‘The Afghan conflict: causes and consequences.’ Geography Review 28(1): 22-27
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2013) What are the psychological factors that affect students’ academic resilience and can teachers influence these? Unpublished thesis
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘Unlocking Leadership Potential’, The Magazine of the Boarding School’s Association, 33: 42-45
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2009) ‘Learning to Lead’, Leader, The Education Leader Magazine 41: 22-25
Presentations
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2019) ‘How could leaders improve the flourishing of their teams?’ ‘Stowe Ed Conference’, Forthcoming: 7 Jan 2019
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2018) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education: 21 Jun 2018
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2017) ‘How can school leaders improve teacher flourishing?’ ‘Doing Education Differently Conference’, University of Oxford, Department of Education, 11 Mar 17
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2016) ‘Developing school leaders who enable teachers to flourish’ The Telegraph Festival of Education 23 Jun 16
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Developing leadership in pupils and teachers’ High School Affiliated to Renmin University of China, Beijing. 20 Oct 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Resilience for leaders.’ Global Social Leaders World Summit. 16 Aug 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Emotional Intelligence for Leaders.’ Global Leaders in Education. 12 Aug 15
  • Coates, S.; Fraser, H.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J.; and Nasim, A. (2015) ‘Breaking through the glass ceiling – how can schools empower our girls to become leaders?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education. 19 Jun 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. ‘Developing Leadership in Schools’ (2015). G20 Schools Conference. International conference for head teachers. 11 Apr 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2018) ‘Introduction’, Wellington Leadership Institute: Festival of Leadership. Mar 2012-15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘How the Young Learn to Lead’, Raffles Institution (Singapore) -Purdue University (USA) Education Forum on Gifted & Talented Youth 2012. Singapore. 15 Mar 12
  • Draper, D.; Dyer, R.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Schools’. Presentation for a meeting about pupil leadership and character development at 10 Downing Street. 16 Nov 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Young People’. Presentation for a meeting about leadership and character at 10 Downing Street. 7 Mar 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K. & Seldon, A. (2012) ‘Introduction’, Leading Your School in the 21st Century. 7 Feb 12

Kamal Armanious is particularly interested in the topic of education governance to explore what is possible in developing an improved governance system for technical and vocational education and training (TVET).

There have always been various calls from different international organisations such UNESCO, ILO, World Bank, OECD etc. to develop a transformed and transformative approach to TVET. This is attractive for certain theoretical as well as practical reasons; however, one set of limitations in achieving this vision lies in the arena of governance. Mr Armanious examines an imagined better model of governance that can be developed from the principles of a new approach and wider theoretical resources with consideration to national realities where there may be very serious obstacles in the way of realising this new governance approach and hence the overall planned transformation.

Title of Thesis

Education and Training Policies in Egypt: Good Governance and Stakeholders Participation

 

Amanda is completing a part-time DPhil, alongside working in Initial Teacher Education at Leeds Trinity University.

Her research is focused on understanding tensions, contradictions and conflicts that teachers in disadvantaged schools may experience when they engage in research activity.  Her research focus is influenced by her own experiences of working as a research-active teacher in disadvantaged schools, and recent work in teacher education to support experienced and beginning teachers in developing their own research activities.

One of the aims of Amanda’s research is to construct a framework to support teachers in pursuing research activity and critical scholarship work which articulates with wider social movements to address issues of poverty and disadvantage in schools.

Title of Thesis

Teachers’ perspectives on tensions between policy, practice and research in disadvantaged schools

Publications 

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2017) A ‘usable past’ of teacher education in England: history in JET’s anniversary issue. Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy, 43 (5), pp.616-627.

Nuttall, A. (2016) The ‘curriculum challenge’: Moving towards the ‘Storyline’ approach in a case study urban primary school.  Improving Schools, 19 (2), pp. 154-166.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Learning {Re}imagined: A review.  Primary First, 15, pp. 17-18.

Nuttall, A. and Doherty, J. (2014) Disaffected boys and the achievement gap: the ‘wallpaper effect’ and what is hidden by a focus on school results.  The Urban Review, 46 (5), pp.800-815.

Conference Papers and Presentations

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2018) “No child is pre-ordained to fail” Teachers questioning policy assumptions.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Newcastle, 11-13 September.

Nuttall, A. and Tobbell, C. (2017) Trainee teachers’ perspectives on practitioner enquiry.  Paper presented at the 8th TEAN Conference: Thinking Deeply about Education, Birmingham, 11-12 May.

Nuttall, A. (2017) Assessment at primary level: quality, comparability and improving secondary readiness.  A perspective from ITE.  Speech at the Westminster Education Forum Keynote Seminar: Next steps for reforming primary education: effective teaching practices, assessment and accountably, London, 18 January.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Deficit narratives and lived realities: whose poverty is it?  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the Australian Association for Research in Education, Melbourne, 27 November – 1 December.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Disenfranchised boys’ reflections on their urban schooling experience: “What a Waste!”.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Philpott, C., Beckett, L. and Wrigley, T. (2016) Collaborative practitioner inquiry: making a difference to urban schools.  Innovation session (school visits and symposium) presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Finn, B. and Beckett, L. (2015) Teachers’ constructions of poverty effects: Their research evidence.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Belfast, 15-17 September.

Nuttall, A. (2014) Teachers’ voice on disengaged boys: the role of one teacher-researcher in an English primary school. Paper presented at the Joint Australian Association for Research in Education and the New Zealand Association for Research in Education Conference, Brisbane, 30 November – 4 December.

Abigail’s research explores the role of education in students’ personal development and how this can be supported by policy, curricula, initial teacher education and teacher professional development. In particular she focuses on history education, citizenship education and peace education as vehicles for dialogue. These opportunities for students to engage with social questions are vital for building cohesive societies. This flows from the recognition that traditional forums for developing public understanding, such as post-conflict truth commissions, need to be complemented by intergenerational and educational perspectives.

Abigail has taught History, Politics, Debating as well as Relationships and Sex Education to secondary school students in South Africa, England and the USA.

She holds postgraduate degrees in Post-Conflict and Transitional Justice (University of Cape Town), in Education, Globalisation and International Development (University of Cambridge) and in African Studies (University of Oxford). She is a Rhodes Scholar, Mandela-Magdalene Scholar and Mandela-Rhodes Scholar.

Title of thesis

GCSE History, Policy Reform and Student Development: How students and teachers navigate the thematic study “Empires, Migration and the People”

Conference papers

Teaching Migration, Belonging, and Empire in Secondary Schools: evaluation of a teacher professional development program, (2019) History Educators International Research Network Conference, Lead author: Dr Jason Todd, University of Vienna, Austria.

“The Problems and Prospects of Teaching South Africa’s Recent History: Teachers’ Perspectives”, (2018) Sustainability, peace and education – Exploring promise and practice: BAICE 20th Anniversary Symposium, University of Bristol, England.

“New Generations, Old Wounds: Learning History at Home and School in Northern Ireland”, (2018) European Social Science and History Conference,
Queens University Belfast, Northern Ireland.

“The Methodological Challenges of Investigating the Role of History Teaching in Peacebuilding”, (2017), Present Past: Time, Memory, and the Negotiation of Historical Justice Conference, Columbia University, United States of America.

“Teaching South Africa’s Truth and Reconciliation Commission”, (2017) European Conference on African Studies, Universität Basel, Switzerland.

Research Assistant Publications

Review of the evidence on feedback in primary and secondary schools, (forthcoming, 2021) for the Education Endowment Foundation, Lead author: Prof Velda Elliott.

Teaching Migration, Belonging, and Empire in Secondary Schools, (2019), for Runnymede Trust and the European Research Council, Lead authors: Kimberly McIntosh, Dr Jason Todd and Prof Nandini Das.

Gender and the Politics of Reconciliation (2016), for The Institute for Justice and Reconciliation, Lead author: Dr Helen Scanlon

SOLE AUTHOR PUBLICATIONS

‘Transitions, Truth-Telling and Teaching History’, Cambridge Open-Review Educational Research e-Journal, Vol. 4, 2017.

Paul Riser is a DPhil Student in the department. His research focuses broadly on students’ (especially the marginalised) identities work in upper-secondary English Language Arts classrooms.

Prior to starting his doctoral studies, Paul earned a BSc in English Language Arts (Secondary Education) with a minor in Theology and a BA in Spanish and International Studies with a minor in Psychology from Texas Lutheran University. His MA in English Literature and Language is from St. Mary’s University.

As part of his postgraduate schoolwork, Paul undertook a placement in two graduate certificate programs, earning both his School Counselor certification and School Principal certification for all grade levels in the state of Texas, USA. In addition to English Language Arts and Reading (4th-12th grades), he is also qualified to teach Health (all levels), Journalism (7-12), Speech (7-12), Social Studies (7-12), and English as a Second Language (all levels) in Texas. Further, Paul holds a teaching certification in California, USA, the United Kingdom and Wales, the Kingdom of Denmark, and the Netherlands.

As a public school English teacher for 8 years, Paul was awarded many distinctions including, but not limited to: El maestro de impacto, two Harvard Book Awards, Teacher of the Year, and Texas Parent-Teacher Association Life Member.

His research to inform his doctoral thesis work will be completed in the United States of America. Furthermore, his research interests revolve around the nexus points of gender, ethnicity, sexuality, economic status, and religion as they relate to the agency students have in the classroom.

Paul is the 2019-2020 Student Liaison Coordinator for the Department of Education, Oxford. In this role, he is charged with leading/convening weekly workshops on a variety of research training topics, co-organizing networking and career advice opportunities for graduate students, and liaising with Cambridge University personnel to organize the annual Oxbridge Exchange. Furthermore, Paul supports the Higher Degrees Office as appropriate and meets regularly with directors and other stakeholders to discuss issues of common student concern in order to develop student identity and community throughout the Department.

Paul serves as the representative student voice on the Social Sciences Division Equality & Diversity Steering Group for the University of Oxford.

Paul is also a part-time Research Assistant working with professionals and other academics within the Department of Education on funded and individual projects as needed.

Supervisors: Associate Professors Jenni Ingram and Velda Elliott & Departmental Lecturer Jason Todd.

Thesis Title: ‘Using Positioning Theory to Understand Marginalised Students’ Identities Work and Their Learning Experiences in English Language Arts Classrooms’

Open-Access Publication:
Ingram, Jenni, & Riser, P.A. (2019). Experiences of problem solving in whole class interactions. Avances De Investigación En Educación Matemática, Avances de Investigación en Educación Matemática, Number 16; October 2019.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.35763/aiem.v0i16.279

Tessa is currently completing a part-time DPhil, alongside work as a senior leader in a London secondary school.

Her research explores how teachers on school-based ITE routes (TeachFirst and School Direct salaried) approach learning from experience. The research takes an action research approach: working with participant beginning teachers and mentors to critically examine and reflect on the processes of learning to teach, using their conversations as stimulus data.

Prior to joining the Department of Education Tessa completed an MSc in Educational Research (University of Bristol).

Yoon Young has been involved in a variety of academic and professional projects related to teacher education.

She is currently a member of the Teacher Education and Professional Learning (TEPL) research group at Oxford. Her doctoral research focuses on teacher education policy and practice in England. The study examines the relationship between individuals’ own objectives, the stated programme goals, and the national teachers’ standards in the operation of the Oxford Internship Scheme (OIS). It also explores the perceptions of stakeholders regarding ideal goals that could drive a re-conceptualised teacher education programme.

Prior to her doctorate, Yoon Young used to be a social studies teacher and subsequently worked as a consultant for the OECD’s Initial Teacher Preparation (ITP) Study. She holds a B.A. in Social Studies and Geography Education from the Ewha Womans University, and an M.A. in Educational Leadership from the University of Jyväskylä, where she was a grantee of the Korean Government Scholarship for Study Overseas.

Katy is a Deputy Headteacher and the founder of a Leadership and Coaching Institute, which she now co-directs.

Katy is an Associate Fellow at the Oxford Character Project and a Research Associate at the Oxford University Wellbeing Research Centre. She is the co-founder of Global Social Leaders, a leadership programme which has participants in 105 countries, all passionate about creating and sustaining positive change in the world.

Title of Thesis

How could school leaders improve the flourishing and wellbeing of teaching staff?

Books
  • Granville-Chapman, K. and Bidston, E (2020) Leader: Know, love and inspire your people. Carmarthen: Crownhouse Publishing
Book Chapters
  •  Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ In White, M. & McCallum, F. (Ed.s) Wellbeing and Resilience Education: Covid-19 And Its Impact on Education Systems. Routledge
Publications
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘Purpose and Leadership in Education and Beyond’. The Education Exchange. Available from: https://theeducation.exchange/purpose-and-leadership-in-education-and-beyond/
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘The Three Secrets of COVID-era Leadership’. Times Education Supplement. Available from: https://www.tes.com/news/three-secrets-covid-era-school-leadership
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2016) ‘Assessing the Impact of a Teacher Leadership Programme in a Teaching Schools Alliance. Journal of Teacher Action Research
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2014) ‘The Afghan conflict: causes and consequences.’ Geography Review 28(1): 22-27
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2013) What are the psychological factors that affect students’ academic resilience and can teachers influence these? Unpublished thesis
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘Unlocking Leadership Potential’, The Magazine of the Boarding School’s Association, 33: 42-45
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2009) ‘Learning to Lead’, Leader, The Education Leader Magazine 41: 22-25
Presentations
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2019) ‘How could leaders improve the flourishing of their teams?’ ‘Stowe Ed Conference’, Forthcoming: 7 Jan 2019
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2018) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education: 21 Jun 2018
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2017) ‘How can school leaders improve teacher flourishing?’ ‘Doing Education Differently Conference’, University of Oxford, Department of Education, 11 Mar 17
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2016) ‘Developing school leaders who enable teachers to flourish’ The Telegraph Festival of Education 23 Jun 16
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Developing leadership in pupils and teachers’ High School Affiliated to Renmin University of China, Beijing. 20 Oct 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Resilience for leaders.’ Global Social Leaders World Summit. 16 Aug 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Emotional Intelligence for Leaders.’ Global Leaders in Education. 12 Aug 15
  • Coates, S.; Fraser, H.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J.; and Nasim, A. (2015) ‘Breaking through the glass ceiling – how can schools empower our girls to become leaders?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education. 19 Jun 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. ‘Developing Leadership in Schools’ (2015). G20 Schools Conference. International conference for head teachers. 11 Apr 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2018) ‘Introduction’, Wellington Leadership Institute: Festival of Leadership. Mar 2012-15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘How the Young Learn to Lead’, Raffles Institution (Singapore) -Purdue University (USA) Education Forum on Gifted & Talented Youth 2012. Singapore. 15 Mar 12
  • Draper, D.; Dyer, R.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Schools’. Presentation for a meeting about pupil leadership and character development at 10 Downing Street. 16 Nov 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Young People’. Presentation for a meeting about leadership and character at 10 Downing Street. 7 Mar 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K. & Seldon, A. (2012) ‘Introduction’, Leading Your School in the 21st Century. 7 Feb 12

Kamal Armanious is particularly interested in the topic of education governance to explore what is possible in developing an improved governance system for technical and vocational education and training (TVET).

There have always been various calls from different international organisations such UNESCO, ILO, World Bank, OECD etc. to develop a transformed and transformative approach to TVET. This is attractive for certain theoretical as well as practical reasons; however, one set of limitations in achieving this vision lies in the arena of governance. Mr Armanious examines an imagined better model of governance that can be developed from the principles of a new approach and wider theoretical resources with consideration to national realities where there may be very serious obstacles in the way of realising this new governance approach and hence the overall planned transformation.

Title of Thesis

Education and Training Policies in Egypt: Good Governance and Stakeholders Participation

 

Amanda is completing a part-time DPhil, alongside working in Initial Teacher Education at Leeds Trinity University.

Her research is focused on understanding tensions, contradictions and conflicts that teachers in disadvantaged schools may experience when they engage in research activity.  Her research focus is influenced by her own experiences of working as a research-active teacher in disadvantaged schools, and recent work in teacher education to support experienced and beginning teachers in developing their own research activities.

One of the aims of Amanda’s research is to construct a framework to support teachers in pursuing research activity and critical scholarship work which articulates with wider social movements to address issues of poverty and disadvantage in schools.

Title of Thesis

Teachers’ perspectives on tensions between policy, practice and research in disadvantaged schools

Publications 

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2017) A ‘usable past’ of teacher education in England: history in JET’s anniversary issue. Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy, 43 (5), pp.616-627.

Nuttall, A. (2016) The ‘curriculum challenge’: Moving towards the ‘Storyline’ approach in a case study urban primary school.  Improving Schools, 19 (2), pp. 154-166.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Learning {Re}imagined: A review.  Primary First, 15, pp. 17-18.

Nuttall, A. and Doherty, J. (2014) Disaffected boys and the achievement gap: the ‘wallpaper effect’ and what is hidden by a focus on school results.  The Urban Review, 46 (5), pp.800-815.

Conference Papers and Presentations

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2018) “No child is pre-ordained to fail” Teachers questioning policy assumptions.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Newcastle, 11-13 September.

Nuttall, A. and Tobbell, C. (2017) Trainee teachers’ perspectives on practitioner enquiry.  Paper presented at the 8th TEAN Conference: Thinking Deeply about Education, Birmingham, 11-12 May.

Nuttall, A. (2017) Assessment at primary level: quality, comparability and improving secondary readiness.  A perspective from ITE.  Speech at the Westminster Education Forum Keynote Seminar: Next steps for reforming primary education: effective teaching practices, assessment and accountably, London, 18 January.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Deficit narratives and lived realities: whose poverty is it?  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the Australian Association for Research in Education, Melbourne, 27 November – 1 December.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Disenfranchised boys’ reflections on their urban schooling experience: “What a Waste!”.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Philpott, C., Beckett, L. and Wrigley, T. (2016) Collaborative practitioner inquiry: making a difference to urban schools.  Innovation session (school visits and symposium) presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Finn, B. and Beckett, L. (2015) Teachers’ constructions of poverty effects: Their research evidence.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Belfast, 15-17 September.

Nuttall, A. (2014) Teachers’ voice on disengaged boys: the role of one teacher-researcher in an English primary school. Paper presented at the Joint Australian Association for Research in Education and the New Zealand Association for Research in Education Conference, Brisbane, 30 November – 4 December.

Abigail’s research explores the role of education in students’ personal development and how this can be supported by policy, curricula, initial teacher education and teacher professional development. In particular she focuses on history education, citizenship education and peace education as vehicles for dialogue. These opportunities for students to engage with social questions are vital for building cohesive societies. This flows from the recognition that traditional forums for developing public understanding, such as post-conflict truth commissions, need to be complemented by intergenerational and educational perspectives.

Abigail has taught History, Politics, Debating as well as Relationships and Sex Education to secondary school students in South Africa, England and the USA.

She holds postgraduate degrees in Post-Conflict and Transitional Justice (University of Cape Town), in Education, Globalisation and International Development (University of Cambridge) and in African Studies (University of Oxford). She is a Rhodes Scholar, Mandela-Magdalene Scholar and Mandela-Rhodes Scholar.

Title of thesis

GCSE History, Policy Reform and Student Development: How students and teachers navigate the thematic study “Empires, Migration and the People”

Conference papers

Teaching Migration, Belonging, and Empire in Secondary Schools: evaluation of a teacher professional development program, (2019) History Educators International Research Network Conference, Lead author: Dr Jason Todd, University of Vienna, Austria.

“The Problems and Prospects of Teaching South Africa’s Recent History: Teachers’ Perspectives”, (2018) Sustainability, peace and education – Exploring promise and practice: BAICE 20th Anniversary Symposium, University of Bristol, England.

“New Generations, Old Wounds: Learning History at Home and School in Northern Ireland”, (2018) European Social Science and History Conference,
Queens University Belfast, Northern Ireland.

“The Methodological Challenges of Investigating the Role of History Teaching in Peacebuilding”, (2017), Present Past: Time, Memory, and the Negotiation of Historical Justice Conference, Columbia University, United States of America.

“Teaching South Africa’s Truth and Reconciliation Commission”, (2017) European Conference on African Studies, Universität Basel, Switzerland.

Research Assistant Publications

Review of the evidence on feedback in primary and secondary schools, (forthcoming, 2021) for the Education Endowment Foundation, Lead author: Prof Velda Elliott.

Teaching Migration, Belonging, and Empire in Secondary Schools, (2019), for Runnymede Trust and the European Research Council, Lead authors: Kimberly McIntosh, Dr Jason Todd and Prof Nandini Das.

Gender and the Politics of Reconciliation (2016), for The Institute for Justice and Reconciliation, Lead author: Dr Helen Scanlon

SOLE AUTHOR PUBLICATIONS

‘Transitions, Truth-Telling and Teaching History’, Cambridge Open-Review Educational Research e-Journal, Vol. 4, 2017.

Paul Riser is a DPhil Student in the department. His research focuses broadly on students’ (especially the marginalised) identities work in upper-secondary English Language Arts classrooms.

Prior to starting his doctoral studies, Paul earned a BSc in English Language Arts (Secondary Education) with a minor in Theology and a BA in Spanish and International Studies with a minor in Psychology from Texas Lutheran University. His MA in English Literature and Language is from St. Mary’s University.

As part of his postgraduate schoolwork, Paul undertook a placement in two graduate certificate programs, earning both his School Counselor certification and School Principal certification for all grade levels in the state of Texas, USA. In addition to English Language Arts and Reading (4th-12th grades), he is also qualified to teach Health (all levels), Journalism (7-12), Speech (7-12), Social Studies (7-12), and English as a Second Language (all levels) in Texas. Further, Paul holds a teaching certification in California, USA, the United Kingdom and Wales, the Kingdom of Denmark, and the Netherlands.

As a public school English teacher for 8 years, Paul was awarded many distinctions including, but not limited to: El maestro de impacto, two Harvard Book Awards, Teacher of the Year, and Texas Parent-Teacher Association Life Member.

His research to inform his doctoral thesis work will be completed in the United States of America. Furthermore, his research interests revolve around the nexus points of gender, ethnicity, sexuality, economic status, and religion as they relate to the agency students have in the classroom.

Paul is the 2019-2020 Student Liaison Coordinator for the Department of Education, Oxford. In this role, he is charged with leading/convening weekly workshops on a variety of research training topics, co-organizing networking and career advice opportunities for graduate students, and liaising with Cambridge University personnel to organize the annual Oxbridge Exchange. Furthermore, Paul supports the Higher Degrees Office as appropriate and meets regularly with directors and other stakeholders to discuss issues of common student concern in order to develop student identity and community throughout the Department.

Paul serves as the representative student voice on the Social Sciences Division Equality & Diversity Steering Group for the University of Oxford.

Paul is also a part-time Research Assistant working with professionals and other academics within the Department of Education on funded and individual projects as needed.

Supervisors: Associate Professors Jenni Ingram and Velda Elliott & Departmental Lecturer Jason Todd.

Thesis Title: ‘Using Positioning Theory to Understand Marginalised Students’ Identities Work and Their Learning Experiences in English Language Arts Classrooms’

Open-Access Publication:
Ingram, Jenni, & Riser, P.A. (2019). Experiences of problem solving in whole class interactions. Avances De Investigación En Educación Matemática, Avances de Investigación en Educación Matemática, Number 16; October 2019.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.35763/aiem.v0i16.279

Tessa is currently completing a part-time DPhil, alongside work as a senior leader in a London secondary school.

Her research explores how teachers on school-based ITE routes (TeachFirst and School Direct salaried) approach learning from experience. The research takes an action research approach: working with participant beginning teachers and mentors to critically examine and reflect on the processes of learning to teach, using their conversations as stimulus data.

Prior to joining the Department of Education Tessa completed an MSc in Educational Research (University of Bristol).

Yoon Young has been involved in a variety of academic and professional projects related to teacher education.

She is currently a member of the Teacher Education and Professional Learning (TEPL) research group at Oxford. Her doctoral research focuses on teacher education policy and practice in England. The study examines the relationship between individuals’ own objectives, the stated programme goals, and the national teachers’ standards in the operation of the Oxford Internship Scheme (OIS). It also explores the perceptions of stakeholders regarding ideal goals that could drive a re-conceptualised teacher education programme.

Prior to her doctorate, Yoon Young used to be a social studies teacher and subsequently worked as a consultant for the OECD’s Initial Teacher Preparation (ITP) Study. She holds a B.A. in Social Studies and Geography Education from the Ewha Womans University, and an M.A. in Educational Leadership from the University of Jyväskylä, where she was a grantee of the Korean Government Scholarship for Study Overseas.

Katy is a Deputy Headteacher and the founder of a Leadership and Coaching Institute, which she now co-directs.

Katy is an Associate Fellow at the Oxford Character Project and a Research Associate at the Oxford University Wellbeing Research Centre. She is the co-founder of Global Social Leaders, a leadership programme which has participants in 105 countries, all passionate about creating and sustaining positive change in the world.

Title of Thesis

How could school leaders improve the flourishing and wellbeing of teaching staff?

Books
  • Granville-Chapman, K. and Bidston, E (2020) Leader: Know, love and inspire your people. Carmarthen: Crownhouse Publishing
Book Chapters
  •  Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ In White, M. & McCallum, F. (Ed.s) Wellbeing and Resilience Education: Covid-19 And Its Impact on Education Systems. Routledge
Publications
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘Purpose and Leadership in Education and Beyond’. The Education Exchange. Available from: https://theeducation.exchange/purpose-and-leadership-in-education-and-beyond/
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘The Three Secrets of COVID-era Leadership’. Times Education Supplement. Available from: https://www.tes.com/news/three-secrets-covid-era-school-leadership
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2016) ‘Assessing the Impact of a Teacher Leadership Programme in a Teaching Schools Alliance. Journal of Teacher Action Research
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2014) ‘The Afghan conflict: causes and consequences.’ Geography Review 28(1): 22-27
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2013) What are the psychological factors that affect students’ academic resilience and can teachers influence these? Unpublished thesis
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘Unlocking Leadership Potential’, The Magazine of the Boarding School’s Association, 33: 42-45
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2009) ‘Learning to Lead’, Leader, The Education Leader Magazine 41: 22-25
Presentations
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2019) ‘How could leaders improve the flourishing of their teams?’ ‘Stowe Ed Conference’, Forthcoming: 7 Jan 2019
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2018) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education: 21 Jun 2018
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2017) ‘How can school leaders improve teacher flourishing?’ ‘Doing Education Differently Conference’, University of Oxford, Department of Education, 11 Mar 17
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2016) ‘Developing school leaders who enable teachers to flourish’ The Telegraph Festival of Education 23 Jun 16
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Developing leadership in pupils and teachers’ High School Affiliated to Renmin University of China, Beijing. 20 Oct 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Resilience for leaders.’ Global Social Leaders World Summit. 16 Aug 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Emotional Intelligence for Leaders.’ Global Leaders in Education. 12 Aug 15
  • Coates, S.; Fraser, H.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J.; and Nasim, A. (2015) ‘Breaking through the glass ceiling – how can schools empower our girls to become leaders?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education. 19 Jun 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. ‘Developing Leadership in Schools’ (2015). G20 Schools Conference. International conference for head teachers. 11 Apr 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2018) ‘Introduction’, Wellington Leadership Institute: Festival of Leadership. Mar 2012-15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘How the Young Learn to Lead’, Raffles Institution (Singapore) -Purdue University (USA) Education Forum on Gifted & Talented Youth 2012. Singapore. 15 Mar 12
  • Draper, D.; Dyer, R.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Schools’. Presentation for a meeting about pupil leadership and character development at 10 Downing Street. 16 Nov 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Young People’. Presentation for a meeting about leadership and character at 10 Downing Street. 7 Mar 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K. & Seldon, A. (2012) ‘Introduction’, Leading Your School in the 21st Century. 7 Feb 12

Kamal Armanious is particularly interested in the topic of education governance to explore what is possible in developing an improved governance system for technical and vocational education and training (TVET).

There have always been various calls from different international organisations such UNESCO, ILO, World Bank, OECD etc. to develop a transformed and transformative approach to TVET. This is attractive for certain theoretical as well as practical reasons; however, one set of limitations in achieving this vision lies in the arena of governance. Mr Armanious examines an imagined better model of governance that can be developed from the principles of a new approach and wider theoretical resources with consideration to national realities where there may be very serious obstacles in the way of realising this new governance approach and hence the overall planned transformation.

Title of Thesis

Education and Training Policies in Egypt: Good Governance and Stakeholders Participation

 

Amanda is completing a part-time DPhil, alongside working in Initial Teacher Education at Leeds Trinity University.

Her research is focused on understanding tensions, contradictions and conflicts that teachers in disadvantaged schools may experience when they engage in research activity.  Her research focus is influenced by her own experiences of working as a research-active teacher in disadvantaged schools, and recent work in teacher education to support experienced and beginning teachers in developing their own research activities.

One of the aims of Amanda’s research is to construct a framework to support teachers in pursuing research activity and critical scholarship work which articulates with wider social movements to address issues of poverty and disadvantage in schools.

Title of Thesis

Teachers’ perspectives on tensions between policy, practice and research in disadvantaged schools

Publications 

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2017) A ‘usable past’ of teacher education in England: history in JET’s anniversary issue. Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy, 43 (5), pp.616-627.

Nuttall, A. (2016) The ‘curriculum challenge’: Moving towards the ‘Storyline’ approach in a case study urban primary school.  Improving Schools, 19 (2), pp. 154-166.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Learning {Re}imagined: A review.  Primary First, 15, pp. 17-18.

Nuttall, A. and Doherty, J. (2014) Disaffected boys and the achievement gap: the ‘wallpaper effect’ and what is hidden by a focus on school results.  The Urban Review, 46 (5), pp.800-815.

Conference Papers and Presentations

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2018) “No child is pre-ordained to fail” Teachers questioning policy assumptions.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Newcastle, 11-13 September.

Nuttall, A. and Tobbell, C. (2017) Trainee teachers’ perspectives on practitioner enquiry.  Paper presented at the 8th TEAN Conference: Thinking Deeply about Education, Birmingham, 11-12 May.

Nuttall, A. (2017) Assessment at primary level: quality, comparability and improving secondary readiness.  A perspective from ITE.  Speech at the Westminster Education Forum Keynote Seminar: Next steps for reforming primary education: effective teaching practices, assessment and accountably, London, 18 January.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Deficit narratives and lived realities: whose poverty is it?  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the Australian Association for Research in Education, Melbourne, 27 November – 1 December.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Disenfranchised boys’ reflections on their urban schooling experience: “What a Waste!”.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Philpott, C., Beckett, L. and Wrigley, T. (2016) Collaborative practitioner inquiry: making a difference to urban schools.  Innovation session (school visits and symposium) presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Finn, B. and Beckett, L. (2015) Teachers’ constructions of poverty effects: Their research evidence.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Belfast, 15-17 September.

Nuttall, A. (2014) Teachers’ voice on disengaged boys: the role of one teacher-researcher in an English primary school. Paper presented at the Joint Australian Association for Research in Education and the New Zealand Association for Research in Education Conference, Brisbane, 30 November – 4 December.

Abigail’s research explores the role of education in students’ personal development and how this can be supported by policy, curricula, initial teacher education and teacher professional development. In particular she focuses on history education, citizenship education and peace education as vehicles for dialogue. These opportunities for students to engage with social questions are vital for building cohesive societies. This flows from the recognition that traditional forums for developing public understanding, such as post-conflict truth commissions, need to be complemented by intergenerational and educational perspectives.

Abigail has taught History, Politics, Debating as well as Relationships and Sex Education to secondary school students in South Africa, England and the USA.

She holds postgraduate degrees in Post-Conflict and Transitional Justice (University of Cape Town), in Education, Globalisation and International Development (University of Cambridge) and in African Studies (University of Oxford). She is a Rhodes Scholar, Mandela-Magdalene Scholar and Mandela-Rhodes Scholar.

Title of thesis

GCSE History, Policy Reform and Student Development: How students and teachers navigate the thematic study “Empires, Migration and the People”

Conference papers

Teaching Migration, Belonging, and Empire in Secondary Schools: evaluation of a teacher professional development program, (2019) History Educators International Research Network Conference, Lead author: Dr Jason Todd, University of Vienna, Austria.

“The Problems and Prospects of Teaching South Africa’s Recent History: Teachers’ Perspectives”, (2018) Sustainability, peace and education – Exploring promise and practice: BAICE 20th Anniversary Symposium, University of Bristol, England.

“New Generations, Old Wounds: Learning History at Home and School in Northern Ireland”, (2018) European Social Science and History Conference,
Queens University Belfast, Northern Ireland.

“The Methodological Challenges of Investigating the Role of History Teaching in Peacebuilding”, (2017), Present Past: Time, Memory, and the Negotiation of Historical Justice Conference, Columbia University, United States of America.

“Teaching South Africa’s Truth and Reconciliation Commission”, (2017) European Conference on African Studies, Universität Basel, Switzerland.

Research Assistant Publications

Review of the evidence on feedback in primary and secondary schools, (forthcoming, 2021) for the Education Endowment Foundation, Lead author: Prof Velda Elliott.

Teaching Migration, Belonging, and Empire in Secondary Schools, (2019), for Runnymede Trust and the European Research Council, Lead authors: Kimberly McIntosh, Dr Jason Todd and Prof Nandini Das.

Gender and the Politics of Reconciliation (2016), for The Institute for Justice and Reconciliation, Lead author: Dr Helen Scanlon

SOLE AUTHOR PUBLICATIONS

‘Transitions, Truth-Telling and Teaching History’, Cambridge Open-Review Educational Research e-Journal, Vol. 4, 2017.

Paul Riser is a DPhil Student in the department. His research focuses broadly on students’ (especially the marginalised) identities work in upper-secondary English Language Arts classrooms.

Prior to starting his doctoral studies, Paul earned a BSc in English Language Arts (Secondary Education) with a minor in Theology and a BA in Spanish and International Studies with a minor in Psychology from Texas Lutheran University. His MA in English Literature and Language is from St. Mary’s University.

As part of his postgraduate schoolwork, Paul undertook a placement in two graduate certificate programs, earning both his School Counselor certification and School Principal certification for all grade levels in the state of Texas, USA. In addition to English Language Arts and Reading (4th-12th grades), he is also qualified to teach Health (all levels), Journalism (7-12), Speech (7-12), Social Studies (7-12), and English as a Second Language (all levels) in Texas. Further, Paul holds a teaching certification in California, USA, the United Kingdom and Wales, the Kingdom of Denmark, and the Netherlands.

As a public school English teacher for 8 years, Paul was awarded many distinctions including, but not limited to: El maestro de impacto, two Harvard Book Awards, Teacher of the Year, and Texas Parent-Teacher Association Life Member.

His research to inform his doctoral thesis work will be completed in the United States of America. Furthermore, his research interests revolve around the nexus points of gender, ethnicity, sexuality, economic status, and religion as they relate to the agency students have in the classroom.

Paul is the 2019-2020 Student Liaison Coordinator for the Department of Education, Oxford. In this role, he is charged with leading/convening weekly workshops on a variety of research training topics, co-organizing networking and career advice opportunities for graduate students, and liaising with Cambridge University personnel to organize the annual Oxbridge Exchange. Furthermore, Paul supports the Higher Degrees Office as appropriate and meets regularly with directors and other stakeholders to discuss issues of common student concern in order to develop student identity and community throughout the Department.

Paul serves as the representative student voice on the Social Sciences Division Equality & Diversity Steering Group for the University of Oxford.

Paul is also a part-time Research Assistant working with professionals and other academics within the Department of Education on funded and individual projects as needed.

Supervisors: Associate Professors Jenni Ingram and Velda Elliott & Departmental Lecturer Jason Todd.

Thesis Title: ‘Using Positioning Theory to Understand Marginalised Students’ Identities Work and Their Learning Experiences in English Language Arts Classrooms’

Open-Access Publication:
Ingram, Jenni, & Riser, P.A. (2019). Experiences of problem solving in whole class interactions. Avances De Investigación En Educación Matemática, Avances de Investigación en Educación Matemática, Number 16; October 2019.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.35763/aiem.v0i16.279

Tessa is currently completing a part-time DPhil, alongside work as a senior leader in a London secondary school.

Her research explores how teachers on school-based ITE routes (TeachFirst and School Direct salaried) approach learning from experience. The research takes an action research approach: working with participant beginning teachers and mentors to critically examine and reflect on the processes of learning to teach, using their conversations as stimulus data.

Prior to joining the Department of Education Tessa completed an MSc in Educational Research (University of Bristol).

Yoon Young has been involved in a variety of academic and professional projects related to teacher education.

She is currently a member of the Teacher Education and Professional Learning (TEPL) research group at Oxford. Her doctoral research focuses on teacher education policy and practice in England. The study examines the relationship between individuals’ own objectives, the stated programme goals, and the national teachers’ standards in the operation of the Oxford Internship Scheme (OIS). It also explores the perceptions of stakeholders regarding ideal goals that could drive a re-conceptualised teacher education programme.

Prior to her doctorate, Yoon Young used to be a social studies teacher and subsequently worked as a consultant for the OECD’s Initial Teacher Preparation (ITP) Study. She holds a B.A. in Social Studies and Geography Education from the Ewha Womans University, and an M.A. in Educational Leadership from the University of Jyväskylä, where she was a grantee of the Korean Government Scholarship for Study Overseas.

Katy is a Deputy Headteacher and the founder of a Leadership and Coaching Institute, which she now co-directs.

Katy is an Associate Fellow at the Oxford Character Project and a Research Associate at the Oxford University Wellbeing Research Centre. She is the co-founder of Global Social Leaders, a leadership programme which has participants in 105 countries, all passionate about creating and sustaining positive change in the world.

Title of Thesis

How could school leaders improve the flourishing and wellbeing of teaching staff?

Books
  • Granville-Chapman, K. and Bidston, E (2020) Leader: Know, love and inspire your people. Carmarthen: Crownhouse Publishing
Book Chapters
  •  Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ In White, M. & McCallum, F. (Ed.s) Wellbeing and Resilience Education: Covid-19 And Its Impact on Education Systems. Routledge
Publications
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘Purpose and Leadership in Education and Beyond’. The Education Exchange. Available from: https://theeducation.exchange/purpose-and-leadership-in-education-and-beyond/
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘The Three Secrets of COVID-era Leadership’. Times Education Supplement. Available from: https://www.tes.com/news/three-secrets-covid-era-school-leadership
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2016) ‘Assessing the Impact of a Teacher Leadership Programme in a Teaching Schools Alliance. Journal of Teacher Action Research
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2014) ‘The Afghan conflict: causes and consequences.’ Geography Review 28(1): 22-27
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2013) What are the psychological factors that affect students’ academic resilience and can teachers influence these? Unpublished thesis
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘Unlocking Leadership Potential’, The Magazine of the Boarding School’s Association, 33: 42-45
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2009) ‘Learning to Lead’, Leader, The Education Leader Magazine 41: 22-25
Presentations
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2019) ‘How could leaders improve the flourishing of their teams?’ ‘Stowe Ed Conference’, Forthcoming: 7 Jan 2019
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2018) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education: 21 Jun 2018
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2017) ‘How can school leaders improve teacher flourishing?’ ‘Doing Education Differently Conference’, University of Oxford, Department of Education, 11 Mar 17
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2016) ‘Developing school leaders who enable teachers to flourish’ The Telegraph Festival of Education 23 Jun 16
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Developing leadership in pupils and teachers’ High School Affiliated to Renmin University of China, Beijing. 20 Oct 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Resilience for leaders.’ Global Social Leaders World Summit. 16 Aug 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Emotional Intelligence for Leaders.’ Global Leaders in Education. 12 Aug 15
  • Coates, S.; Fraser, H.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J.; and Nasim, A. (2015) ‘Breaking through the glass ceiling – how can schools empower our girls to become leaders?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education. 19 Jun 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. ‘Developing Leadership in Schools’ (2015). G20 Schools Conference. International conference for head teachers. 11 Apr 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2018) ‘Introduction’, Wellington Leadership Institute: Festival of Leadership. Mar 2012-15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘How the Young Learn to Lead’, Raffles Institution (Singapore) -Purdue University (USA) Education Forum on Gifted & Talented Youth 2012. Singapore. 15 Mar 12
  • Draper, D.; Dyer, R.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Schools’. Presentation for a meeting about pupil leadership and character development at 10 Downing Street. 16 Nov 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Young People’. Presentation for a meeting about leadership and character at 10 Downing Street. 7 Mar 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K. & Seldon, A. (2012) ‘Introduction’, Leading Your School in the 21st Century. 7 Feb 12

Kamal Armanious is particularly interested in the topic of education governance to explore what is possible in developing an improved governance system for technical and vocational education and training (TVET).

There have always been various calls from different international organisations such UNESCO, ILO, World Bank, OECD etc. to develop a transformed and transformative approach to TVET. This is attractive for certain theoretical as well as practical reasons; however, one set of limitations in achieving this vision lies in the arena of governance. Mr Armanious examines an imagined better model of governance that can be developed from the principles of a new approach and wider theoretical resources with consideration to national realities where there may be very serious obstacles in the way of realising this new governance approach and hence the overall planned transformation.

Title of Thesis

Education and Training Policies in Egypt: Good Governance and Stakeholders Participation

 

Amanda is completing a part-time DPhil, alongside working in Initial Teacher Education at Leeds Trinity University.

Her research is focused on understanding tensions, contradictions and conflicts that teachers in disadvantaged schools may experience when they engage in research activity.  Her research focus is influenced by her own experiences of working as a research-active teacher in disadvantaged schools, and recent work in teacher education to support experienced and beginning teachers in developing their own research activities.

One of the aims of Amanda’s research is to construct a framework to support teachers in pursuing research activity and critical scholarship work which articulates with wider social movements to address issues of poverty and disadvantage in schools.

Title of Thesis

Teachers’ perspectives on tensions between policy, practice and research in disadvantaged schools

Publications 

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2017) A ‘usable past’ of teacher education in England: history in JET’s anniversary issue. Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy, 43 (5), pp.616-627.

Nuttall, A. (2016) The ‘curriculum challenge’: Moving towards the ‘Storyline’ approach in a case study urban primary school.  Improving Schools, 19 (2), pp. 154-166.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Learning {Re}imagined: A review.  Primary First, 15, pp. 17-18.

Nuttall, A. and Doherty, J. (2014) Disaffected boys and the achievement gap: the ‘wallpaper effect’ and what is hidden by a focus on school results.  The Urban Review, 46 (5), pp.800-815.

Conference Papers and Presentations

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2018) “No child is pre-ordained to fail” Teachers questioning policy assumptions.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Newcastle, 11-13 September.

Nuttall, A. and Tobbell, C. (2017) Trainee teachers’ perspectives on practitioner enquiry.  Paper presented at the 8th TEAN Conference: Thinking Deeply about Education, Birmingham, 11-12 May.

Nuttall, A. (2017) Assessment at primary level: quality, comparability and improving secondary readiness.  A perspective from ITE.  Speech at the Westminster Education Forum Keynote Seminar: Next steps for reforming primary education: effective teaching practices, assessment and accountably, London, 18 January.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Deficit narratives and lived realities: whose poverty is it?  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the Australian Association for Research in Education, Melbourne, 27 November – 1 December.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Disenfranchised boys’ reflections on their urban schooling experience: “What a Waste!”.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Philpott, C., Beckett, L. and Wrigley, T. (2016) Collaborative practitioner inquiry: making a difference to urban schools.  Innovation session (school visits and symposium) presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Finn, B. and Beckett, L. (2015) Teachers’ constructions of poverty effects: Their research evidence.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Belfast, 15-17 September.

Nuttall, A. (2014) Teachers’ voice on disengaged boys: the role of one teacher-researcher in an English primary school. Paper presented at the Joint Australian Association for Research in Education and the New Zealand Association for Research in Education Conference, Brisbane, 30 November – 4 December.

Abigail’s research explores the role of education in students’ personal development and how this can be supported by policy, curricula, initial teacher education and teacher professional development. In particular she focuses on history education, citizenship education and peace education as vehicles for dialogue. These opportunities for students to engage with social questions are vital for building cohesive societies. This flows from the recognition that traditional forums for developing public understanding, such as post-conflict truth commissions, need to be complemented by intergenerational and educational perspectives.

Abigail has taught History, Politics, Debating as well as Relationships and Sex Education to secondary school students in South Africa, England and the USA.

She holds postgraduate degrees in Post-Conflict and Transitional Justice (University of Cape Town), in Education, Globalisation and International Development (University of Cambridge) and in African Studies (University of Oxford). She is a Rhodes Scholar, Mandela-Magdalene Scholar and Mandela-Rhodes Scholar.

Title of thesis

GCSE History, Policy Reform and Student Development: How students and teachers navigate the thematic study “Empires, Migration and the People”

Conference papers

Teaching Migration, Belonging, and Empire in Secondary Schools: evaluation of a teacher professional development program, (2019) History Educators International Research Network Conference, Lead author: Dr Jason Todd, University of Vienna, Austria.

“The Problems and Prospects of Teaching South Africa’s Recent History: Teachers’ Perspectives”, (2018) Sustainability, peace and education – Exploring promise and practice: BAICE 20th Anniversary Symposium, University of Bristol, England.

“New Generations, Old Wounds: Learning History at Home and School in Northern Ireland”, (2018) European Social Science and History Conference,
Queens University Belfast, Northern Ireland.

“The Methodological Challenges of Investigating the Role of History Teaching in Peacebuilding”, (2017), Present Past: Time, Memory, and the Negotiation of Historical Justice Conference, Columbia University, United States of America.

“Teaching South Africa’s Truth and Reconciliation Commission”, (2017) European Conference on African Studies, Universität Basel, Switzerland.

Research Assistant Publications

Review of the evidence on feedback in primary and secondary schools, (forthcoming, 2021) for the Education Endowment Foundation, Lead author: Prof Velda Elliott.

Teaching Migration, Belonging, and Empire in Secondary Schools, (2019), for Runnymede Trust and the European Research Council, Lead authors: Kimberly McIntosh, Dr Jason Todd and Prof Nandini Das.

Gender and the Politics of Reconciliation (2016), for The Institute for Justice and Reconciliation, Lead author: Dr Helen Scanlon

SOLE AUTHOR PUBLICATIONS

‘Transitions, Truth-Telling and Teaching History’, Cambridge Open-Review Educational Research e-Journal, Vol. 4, 2017.

Paul Riser is a DPhil Student in the department. His research focuses broadly on students’ (especially the marginalised) identities work in upper-secondary English Language Arts classrooms.

Prior to starting his doctoral studies, Paul earned a BSc in English Language Arts (Secondary Education) with a minor in Theology and a BA in Spanish and International Studies with a minor in Psychology from Texas Lutheran University. His MA in English Literature and Language is from St. Mary’s University.

As part of his postgraduate schoolwork, Paul undertook a placement in two graduate certificate programs, earning both his School Counselor certification and School Principal certification for all grade levels in the state of Texas, USA. In addition to English Language Arts and Reading (4th-12th grades), he is also qualified to teach Health (all levels), Journalism (7-12), Speech (7-12), Social Studies (7-12), and English as a Second Language (all levels) in Texas. Further, Paul holds a teaching certification in California, USA, the United Kingdom and Wales, the Kingdom of Denmark, and the Netherlands.

As a public school English teacher for 8 years, Paul was awarded many distinctions including, but not limited to: El maestro de impacto, two Harvard Book Awards, Teacher of the Year, and Texas Parent-Teacher Association Life Member.

His research to inform his doctoral thesis work will be completed in the United States of America. Furthermore, his research interests revolve around the nexus points of gender, ethnicity, sexuality, economic status, and religion as they relate to the agency students have in the classroom.

Paul is the 2019-2020 Student Liaison Coordinator for the Department of Education, Oxford. In this role, he is charged with leading/convening weekly workshops on a variety of research training topics, co-organizing networking and career advice opportunities for graduate students, and liaising with Cambridge University personnel to organize the annual Oxbridge Exchange. Furthermore, Paul supports the Higher Degrees Office as appropriate and meets regularly with directors and other stakeholders to discuss issues of common student concern in order to develop student identity and community throughout the Department.

Paul serves as the representative student voice on the Social Sciences Division Equality & Diversity Steering Group for the University of Oxford.

Paul is also a part-time Research Assistant working with professionals and other academics within the Department of Education on funded and individual projects as needed.

Supervisors: Associate Professors Jenni Ingram and Velda Elliott & Departmental Lecturer Jason Todd.

Thesis Title: ‘Using Positioning Theory to Understand Marginalised Students’ Identities Work and Their Learning Experiences in English Language Arts Classrooms’

Open-Access Publication:
Ingram, Jenni, & Riser, P.A. (2019). Experiences of problem solving in whole class interactions. Avances De Investigación En Educación Matemática, Avances de Investigación en Educación Matemática, Number 16; October 2019.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.35763/aiem.v0i16.279

Tessa is currently completing a part-time DPhil, alongside work as a senior leader in a London secondary school.

Her research explores how teachers on school-based ITE routes (TeachFirst and School Direct salaried) approach learning from experience. The research takes an action research approach: working with participant beginning teachers and mentors to critically examine and reflect on the processes of learning to teach, using their conversations as stimulus data.

Prior to joining the Department of Education Tessa completed an MSc in Educational Research (University of Bristol).

Yoon Young has been involved in a variety of academic and professional projects related to teacher education.

She is currently a member of the Teacher Education and Professional Learning (TEPL) research group at Oxford. Her doctoral research focuses on teacher education policy and practice in England. The study examines the relationship between individuals’ own objectives, the stated programme goals, and the national teachers’ standards in the operation of the Oxford Internship Scheme (OIS). It also explores the perceptions of stakeholders regarding ideal goals that could drive a re-conceptualised teacher education programme.

Prior to her doctorate, Yoon Young used to be a social studies teacher and subsequently worked as a consultant for the OECD’s Initial Teacher Preparation (ITP) Study. She holds a B.A. in Social Studies and Geography Education from the Ewha Womans University, and an M.A. in Educational Leadership from the University of Jyväskylä, where she was a grantee of the Korean Government Scholarship for Study Overseas.

Katy is a Deputy Headteacher and the founder of a Leadership and Coaching Institute, which she now co-directs.

Katy is an Associate Fellow at the Oxford Character Project and a Research Associate at the Oxford University Wellbeing Research Centre. She is the co-founder of Global Social Leaders, a leadership programme which has participants in 105 countries, all passionate about creating and sustaining positive change in the world.

Title of Thesis

How could school leaders improve the flourishing and wellbeing of teaching staff?

Books
  • Granville-Chapman, K. and Bidston, E (2020) Leader: Know, love and inspire your people. Carmarthen: Crownhouse Publishing
Book Chapters
  •  Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ In White, M. & McCallum, F. (Ed.s) Wellbeing and Resilience Education: Covid-19 And Its Impact on Education Systems. Routledge
Publications
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘Purpose and Leadership in Education and Beyond’. The Education Exchange. Available from: https://theeducation.exchange/purpose-and-leadership-in-education-and-beyond/
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘The Three Secrets of COVID-era Leadership’. Times Education Supplement. Available from: https://www.tes.com/news/three-secrets-covid-era-school-leadership
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2016) ‘Assessing the Impact of a Teacher Leadership Programme in a Teaching Schools Alliance. Journal of Teacher Action Research
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2014) ‘The Afghan conflict: causes and consequences.’ Geography Review 28(1): 22-27
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2013) What are the psychological factors that affect students’ academic resilience and can teachers influence these? Unpublished thesis
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘Unlocking Leadership Potential’, The Magazine of the Boarding School’s Association, 33: 42-45
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2009) ‘Learning to Lead’, Leader, The Education Leader Magazine 41: 22-25
Presentations
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2019) ‘How could leaders improve the flourishing of their teams?’ ‘Stowe Ed Conference’, Forthcoming: 7 Jan 2019
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2018) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education: 21 Jun 2018
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2017) ‘How can school leaders improve teacher flourishing?’ ‘Doing Education Differently Conference’, University of Oxford, Department of Education, 11 Mar 17
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2016) ‘Developing school leaders who enable teachers to flourish’ The Telegraph Festival of Education 23 Jun 16
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Developing leadership in pupils and teachers’ High School Affiliated to Renmin University of China, Beijing. 20 Oct 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Resilience for leaders.’ Global Social Leaders World Summit. 16 Aug 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Emotional Intelligence for Leaders.’ Global Leaders in Education. 12 Aug 15
  • Coates, S.; Fraser, H.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J.; and Nasim, A. (2015) ‘Breaking through the glass ceiling – how can schools empower our girls to become leaders?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education. 19 Jun 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. ‘Developing Leadership in Schools’ (2015). G20 Schools Conference. International conference for head teachers. 11 Apr 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2018) ‘Introduction’, Wellington Leadership Institute: Festival of Leadership. Mar 2012-15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘How the Young Learn to Lead’, Raffles Institution (Singapore) -Purdue University (USA) Education Forum on Gifted & Talented Youth 2012. Singapore. 15 Mar 12
  • Draper, D.; Dyer, R.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Schools’. Presentation for a meeting about pupil leadership and character development at 10 Downing Street. 16 Nov 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Young People’. Presentation for a meeting about leadership and character at 10 Downing Street. 7 Mar 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K. & Seldon, A. (2012) ‘Introduction’, Leading Your School in the 21st Century. 7 Feb 12

Kamal Armanious is particularly interested in the topic of education governance to explore what is possible in developing an improved governance system for technical and vocational education and training (TVET).

There have always been various calls from different international organisations such UNESCO, ILO, World Bank, OECD etc. to develop a transformed and transformative approach to TVET. This is attractive for certain theoretical as well as practical reasons; however, one set of limitations in achieving this vision lies in the arena of governance. Mr Armanious examines an imagined better model of governance that can be developed from the principles of a new approach and wider theoretical resources with consideration to national realities where there may be very serious obstacles in the way of realising this new governance approach and hence the overall planned transformation.

Title of Thesis

Education and Training Policies in Egypt: Good Governance and Stakeholders Participation

 

Amanda is completing a part-time DPhil, alongside working in Initial Teacher Education at Leeds Trinity University.

Her research is focused on understanding tensions, contradictions and conflicts that teachers in disadvantaged schools may experience when they engage in research activity.  Her research focus is influenced by her own experiences of working as a research-active teacher in disadvantaged schools, and recent work in teacher education to support experienced and beginning teachers in developing their own research activities.

One of the aims of Amanda’s research is to construct a framework to support teachers in pursuing research activity and critical scholarship work which articulates with wider social movements to address issues of poverty and disadvantage in schools.

Title of Thesis

Teachers’ perspectives on tensions between policy, practice and research in disadvantaged schools

Publications 

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2017) A ‘usable past’ of teacher education in England: history in JET’s anniversary issue. Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy, 43 (5), pp.616-627.

Nuttall, A. (2016) The ‘curriculum challenge’: Moving towards the ‘Storyline’ approach in a case study urban primary school.  Improving Schools, 19 (2), pp. 154-166.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Learning {Re}imagined: A review.  Primary First, 15, pp. 17-18.

Nuttall, A. and Doherty, J. (2014) Disaffected boys and the achievement gap: the ‘wallpaper effect’ and what is hidden by a focus on school results.  The Urban Review, 46 (5), pp.800-815.

Conference Papers and Presentations

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2018) “No child is pre-ordained to fail” Teachers questioning policy assumptions.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Newcastle, 11-13 September.

Nuttall, A. and Tobbell, C. (2017) Trainee teachers’ perspectives on practitioner enquiry.  Paper presented at the 8th TEAN Conference: Thinking Deeply about Education, Birmingham, 11-12 May.

Nuttall, A. (2017) Assessment at primary level: quality, comparability and improving secondary readiness.  A perspective from ITE.  Speech at the Westminster Education Forum Keynote Seminar: Next steps for reforming primary education: effective teaching practices, assessment and accountably, London, 18 January.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Deficit narratives and lived realities: whose poverty is it?  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the Australian Association for Research in Education, Melbourne, 27 November – 1 December.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Disenfranchised boys’ reflections on their urban schooling experience: “What a Waste!”.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Philpott, C., Beckett, L. and Wrigley, T. (2016) Collaborative practitioner inquiry: making a difference to urban schools.  Innovation session (school visits and symposium) presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Finn, B. and Beckett, L. (2015) Teachers’ constructions of poverty effects: Their research evidence.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Belfast, 15-17 September.

Nuttall, A. (2014) Teachers’ voice on disengaged boys: the role of one teacher-researcher in an English primary school. Paper presented at the Joint Australian Association for Research in Education and the New Zealand Association for Research in Education Conference, Brisbane, 30 November – 4 December.

Abigail’s research explores the role of education in students’ personal development and how this can be supported by policy, curricula, initial teacher education and teacher professional development. In particular she focuses on history education, citizenship education and peace education as vehicles for dialogue. These opportunities for students to engage with social questions are vital for building cohesive societies. This flows from the recognition that traditional forums for developing public understanding, such as post-conflict truth commissions, need to be complemented by intergenerational and educational perspectives.

Abigail has taught History, Politics, Debating as well as Relationships and Sex Education to secondary school students in South Africa, England and the USA.

She holds postgraduate degrees in Post-Conflict and Transitional Justice (University of Cape Town), in Education, Globalisation and International Development (University of Cambridge) and in African Studies (University of Oxford). She is a Rhodes Scholar, Mandela-Magdalene Scholar and Mandela-Rhodes Scholar.

Title of thesis

GCSE History, Policy Reform and Student Development: How students and teachers navigate the thematic study “Empires, Migration and the People”

Conference papers

Teaching Migration, Belonging, and Empire in Secondary Schools: evaluation of a teacher professional development program, (2019) History Educators International Research Network Conference, Lead author: Dr Jason Todd, University of Vienna, Austria.

“The Problems and Prospects of Teaching South Africa’s Recent History: Teachers’ Perspectives”, (2018) Sustainability, peace and education – Exploring promise and practice: BAICE 20th Anniversary Symposium, University of Bristol, England.

“New Generations, Old Wounds: Learning History at Home and School in Northern Ireland”, (2018) European Social Science and History Conference,
Queens University Belfast, Northern Ireland.

“The Methodological Challenges of Investigating the Role of History Teaching in Peacebuilding”, (2017), Present Past: Time, Memory, and the Negotiation of Historical Justice Conference, Columbia University, United States of America.

“Teaching South Africa’s Truth and Reconciliation Commission”, (2017) European Conference on African Studies, Universität Basel, Switzerland.

Research Assistant Publications

Review of the evidence on feedback in primary and secondary schools, (forthcoming, 2021) for the Education Endowment Foundation, Lead author: Prof Velda Elliott.

Teaching Migration, Belonging, and Empire in Secondary Schools, (2019), for Runnymede Trust and the European Research Council, Lead authors: Kimberly McIntosh, Dr Jason Todd and Prof Nandini Das.

Gender and the Politics of Reconciliation (2016), for The Institute for Justice and Reconciliation, Lead author: Dr Helen Scanlon

SOLE AUTHOR PUBLICATIONS

‘Transitions, Truth-Telling and Teaching History’, Cambridge Open-Review Educational Research e-Journal, Vol. 4, 2017.

Paul Riser is a DPhil Student in the department. His research focuses broadly on students’ (especially the marginalised) identities work in upper-secondary English Language Arts classrooms.

Prior to starting his doctoral studies, Paul earned a BSc in English Language Arts (Secondary Education) with a minor in Theology and a BA in Spanish and International Studies with a minor in Psychology from Texas Lutheran University. His MA in English Literature and Language is from St. Mary’s University.

As part of his postgraduate schoolwork, Paul undertook a placement in two graduate certificate programs, earning both his School Counselor certification and School Principal certification for all grade levels in the state of Texas, USA. In addition to English Language Arts and Reading (4th-12th grades), he is also qualified to teach Health (all levels), Journalism (7-12), Speech (7-12), Social Studies (7-12), and English as a Second Language (all levels) in Texas. Further, Paul holds a teaching certification in California, USA, the United Kingdom and Wales, the Kingdom of Denmark, and the Netherlands.

As a public school English teacher for 8 years, Paul was awarded many distinctions including, but not limited to: El maestro de impacto, two Harvard Book Awards, Teacher of the Year, and Texas Parent-Teacher Association Life Member.

His research to inform his doctoral thesis work will be completed in the United States of America. Furthermore, his research interests revolve around the nexus points of gender, ethnicity, sexuality, economic status, and religion as they relate to the agency students have in the classroom.

Paul is the 2019-2020 Student Liaison Coordinator for the Department of Education, Oxford. In this role, he is charged with leading/convening weekly workshops on a variety of research training topics, co-organizing networking and career advice opportunities for graduate students, and liaising with Cambridge University personnel to organize the annual Oxbridge Exchange. Furthermore, Paul supports the Higher Degrees Office as appropriate and meets regularly with directors and other stakeholders to discuss issues of common student concern in order to develop student identity and community throughout the Department.

Paul serves as the representative student voice on the Social Sciences Division Equality & Diversity Steering Group for the University of Oxford.

Paul is also a part-time Research Assistant working with professionals and other academics within the Department of Education on funded and individual projects as needed.

Supervisors: Associate Professors Jenni Ingram and Velda Elliott & Departmental Lecturer Jason Todd.

Thesis Title: ‘Using Positioning Theory to Understand Marginalised Students’ Identities Work and Their Learning Experiences in English Language Arts Classrooms’

Open-Access Publication:
Ingram, Jenni, & Riser, P.A. (2019). Experiences of problem solving in whole class interactions. Avances De Investigación En Educación Matemática, Avances de Investigación en Educación Matemática, Number 16; October 2019.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.35763/aiem.v0i16.279

Tessa is currently completing a part-time DPhil, alongside work as a senior leader in a London secondary school.

Her research explores how teachers on school-based ITE routes (TeachFirst and School Direct salaried) approach learning from experience. The research takes an action research approach: working with participant beginning teachers and mentors to critically examine and reflect on the processes of learning to teach, using their conversations as stimulus data.

Prior to joining the Department of Education Tessa completed an MSc in Educational Research (University of Bristol).

Yoon Young has been involved in a variety of academic and professional projects related to teacher education.

She is currently a member of the Teacher Education and Professional Learning (TEPL) research group at Oxford. Her doctoral research focuses on teacher education policy and practice in England. The study examines the relationship between individuals’ own objectives, the stated programme goals, and the national teachers’ standards in the operation of the Oxford Internship Scheme (OIS). It also explores the perceptions of stakeholders regarding ideal goals that could drive a re-conceptualised teacher education programme.

Prior to her doctorate, Yoon Young used to be a social studies teacher and subsequently worked as a consultant for the OECD’s Initial Teacher Preparation (ITP) Study. She holds a B.A. in Social Studies and Geography Education from the Ewha Womans University, and an M.A. in Educational Leadership from the University of Jyväskylä, where she was a grantee of the Korean Government Scholarship for Study Overseas.

Katy is a Deputy Headteacher and the founder of a Leadership and Coaching Institute, which she now co-directs.

Katy is an Associate Fellow at the Oxford Character Project and a Research Associate at the Oxford University Wellbeing Research Centre. She is the co-founder of Global Social Leaders, a leadership programme which has participants in 105 countries, all passionate about creating and sustaining positive change in the world.

Title of Thesis

How could school leaders improve the flourishing and wellbeing of teaching staff?

Books
  • Granville-Chapman, K. and Bidston, E (2020) Leader: Know, love and inspire your people. Carmarthen: Crownhouse Publishing
Book Chapters
  •  Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ In White, M. & McCallum, F. (Ed.s) Wellbeing and Resilience Education: Covid-19 And Its Impact on Education Systems. Routledge
Publications
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘Purpose and Leadership in Education and Beyond’. The Education Exchange. Available from: https://theeducation.exchange/purpose-and-leadership-in-education-and-beyond/
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘The Three Secrets of COVID-era Leadership’. Times Education Supplement. Available from: https://www.tes.com/news/three-secrets-covid-era-school-leadership
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2016) ‘Assessing the Impact of a Teacher Leadership Programme in a Teaching Schools Alliance. Journal of Teacher Action Research
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2014) ‘The Afghan conflict: causes and consequences.’ Geography Review 28(1): 22-27
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2013) What are the psychological factors that affect students’ academic resilience and can teachers influence these? Unpublished thesis
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘Unlocking Leadership Potential’, The Magazine of the Boarding School’s Association, 33: 42-45
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2009) ‘Learning to Lead’, Leader, The Education Leader Magazine 41: 22-25
Presentations
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2019) ‘How could leaders improve the flourishing of their teams?’ ‘Stowe Ed Conference’, Forthcoming: 7 Jan 2019
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2018) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education: 21 Jun 2018
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2017) ‘How can school leaders improve teacher flourishing?’ ‘Doing Education Differently Conference’, University of Oxford, Department of Education, 11 Mar 17
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2016) ‘Developing school leaders who enable teachers to flourish’ The Telegraph Festival of Education 23 Jun 16
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Developing leadership in pupils and teachers’ High School Affiliated to Renmin University of China, Beijing. 20 Oct 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Resilience for leaders.’ Global Social Leaders World Summit. 16 Aug 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Emotional Intelligence for Leaders.’ Global Leaders in Education. 12 Aug 15
  • Coates, S.; Fraser, H.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J.; and Nasim, A. (2015) ‘Breaking through the glass ceiling – how can schools empower our girls to become leaders?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education. 19 Jun 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. ‘Developing Leadership in Schools’ (2015). G20 Schools Conference. International conference for head teachers. 11 Apr 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2018) ‘Introduction’, Wellington Leadership Institute: Festival of Leadership. Mar 2012-15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘How the Young Learn to Lead’, Raffles Institution (Singapore) -Purdue University (USA) Education Forum on Gifted & Talented Youth 2012. Singapore. 15 Mar 12
  • Draper, D.; Dyer, R.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Schools’. Presentation for a meeting about pupil leadership and character development at 10 Downing Street. 16 Nov 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Young People’. Presentation for a meeting about leadership and character at 10 Downing Street. 7 Mar 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K. & Seldon, A. (2012) ‘Introduction’, Leading Your School in the 21st Century. 7 Feb 12

Kamal Armanious is particularly interested in the topic of education governance to explore what is possible in developing an improved governance system for technical and vocational education and training (TVET).

There have always been various calls from different international organisations such UNESCO, ILO, World Bank, OECD etc. to develop a transformed and transformative approach to TVET. This is attractive for certain theoretical as well as practical reasons; however, one set of limitations in achieving this vision lies in the arena of governance. Mr Armanious examines an imagined better model of governance that can be developed from the principles of a new approach and wider theoretical resources with consideration to national realities where there may be very serious obstacles in the way of realising this new governance approach and hence the overall planned transformation.

Title of Thesis

Education and Training Policies in Egypt: Good Governance and Stakeholders Participation

 

Amanda is completing a part-time DPhil, alongside working in Initial Teacher Education at Leeds Trinity University.

Her research is focused on understanding tensions, contradictions and conflicts that teachers in disadvantaged schools may experience when they engage in research activity.  Her research focus is influenced by her own experiences of working as a research-active teacher in disadvantaged schools, and recent work in teacher education to support experienced and beginning teachers in developing their own research activities.

One of the aims of Amanda’s research is to construct a framework to support teachers in pursuing research activity and critical scholarship work which articulates with wider social movements to address issues of poverty and disadvantage in schools.

Title of Thesis

Teachers’ perspectives on tensions between policy, practice and research in disadvantaged schools

Publications 

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2017) A ‘usable past’ of teacher education in England: history in JET’s anniversary issue. Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy, 43 (5), pp.616-627.

Nuttall, A. (2016) The ‘curriculum challenge’: Moving towards the ‘Storyline’ approach in a case study urban primary school.  Improving Schools, 19 (2), pp. 154-166.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Learning {Re}imagined: A review.  Primary First, 15, pp. 17-18.

Nuttall, A. and Doherty, J. (2014) Disaffected boys and the achievement gap: the ‘wallpaper effect’ and what is hidden by a focus on school results.  The Urban Review, 46 (5), pp.800-815.

Conference Papers and Presentations

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2018) “No child is pre-ordained to fail” Teachers questioning policy assumptions.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Newcastle, 11-13 September.

Nuttall, A. and Tobbell, C. (2017) Trainee teachers’ perspectives on practitioner enquiry.  Paper presented at the 8th TEAN Conference: Thinking Deeply about Education, Birmingham, 11-12 May.

Nuttall, A. (2017) Assessment at primary level: quality, comparability and improving secondary readiness.  A perspective from ITE.  Speech at the Westminster Education Forum Keynote Seminar: Next steps for reforming primary education: effective teaching practices, assessment and accountably, London, 18 January.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Deficit narratives and lived realities: whose poverty is it?  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the Australian Association for Research in Education, Melbourne, 27 November – 1 December.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Disenfranchised boys’ reflections on their urban schooling experience: “What a Waste!”.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Philpott, C., Beckett, L. and Wrigley, T. (2016) Collaborative practitioner inquiry: making a difference to urban schools.  Innovation session (school visits and symposium) presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Finn, B. and Beckett, L. (2015) Teachers’ constructions of poverty effects: Their research evidence.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Belfast, 15-17 September.

Nuttall, A. (2014) Teachers’ voice on disengaged boys: the role of one teacher-researcher in an English primary school. Paper presented at the Joint Australian Association for Research in Education and the New Zealand Association for Research in Education Conference, Brisbane, 30 November – 4 December.

Abigail’s research explores the role of education in students’ personal development and how this can be supported by policy, curricula, initial teacher education and teacher professional development. In particular she focuses on history education, citizenship education and peace education as vehicles for dialogue. These opportunities for students to engage with social questions are vital for building cohesive societies. This flows from the recognition that traditional forums for developing public understanding, such as post-conflict truth commissions, need to be complemented by intergenerational and educational perspectives.

Abigail has taught History, Politics, Debating as well as Relationships and Sex Education to secondary school students in South Africa, England and the USA.

She holds postgraduate degrees in Post-Conflict and Transitional Justice (University of Cape Town), in Education, Globalisation and International Development (University of Cambridge) and in African Studies (University of Oxford). She is a Rhodes Scholar, Mandela-Magdalene Scholar and Mandela-Rhodes Scholar.

Title of thesis

GCSE History, Policy Reform and Student Development: How students and teachers navigate the thematic study “Empires, Migration and the People”

Conference papers

Teaching Migration, Belonging, and Empire in Secondary Schools: evaluation of a teacher professional development program, (2019) History Educators International Research Network Conference, Lead author: Dr Jason Todd, University of Vienna, Austria.

“The Problems and Prospects of Teaching South Africa’s Recent History: Teachers’ Perspectives”, (2018) Sustainability, peace and education – Exploring promise and practice: BAICE 20th Anniversary Symposium, University of Bristol, England.

“New Generations, Old Wounds: Learning History at Home and School in Northern Ireland”, (2018) European Social Science and History Conference,
Queens University Belfast, Northern Ireland.

“The Methodological Challenges of Investigating the Role of History Teaching in Peacebuilding”, (2017), Present Past: Time, Memory, and the Negotiation of Historical Justice Conference, Columbia University, United States of America.

“Teaching South Africa’s Truth and Reconciliation Commission”, (2017) European Conference on African Studies, Universität Basel, Switzerland.

Research Assistant Publications

Review of the evidence on feedback in primary and secondary schools, (forthcoming, 2021) for the Education Endowment Foundation, Lead author: Prof Velda Elliott.

Teaching Migration, Belonging, and Empire in Secondary Schools, (2019), for Runnymede Trust and the European Research Council, Lead authors: Kimberly McIntosh, Dr Jason Todd and Prof Nandini Das.

Gender and the Politics of Reconciliation (2016), for The Institute for Justice and Reconciliation, Lead author: Dr Helen Scanlon

SOLE AUTHOR PUBLICATIONS

‘Transitions, Truth-Telling and Teaching History’, Cambridge Open-Review Educational Research e-Journal, Vol. 4, 2017.

Paul Riser is a DPhil Student in the department. His research focuses broadly on students’ (especially the marginalised) identities work in upper-secondary English Language Arts classrooms.

Prior to starting his doctoral studies, Paul earned a BSc in English Language Arts (Secondary Education) with a minor in Theology and a BA in Spanish and International Studies with a minor in Psychology from Texas Lutheran University. His MA in English Literature and Language is from St. Mary’s University.

As part of his postgraduate schoolwork, Paul undertook a placement in two graduate certificate programs, earning both his School Counselor certification and School Principal certification for all grade levels in the state of Texas, USA. In addition to English Language Arts and Reading (4th-12th grades), he is also qualified to teach Health (all levels), Journalism (7-12), Speech (7-12), Social Studies (7-12), and English as a Second Language (all levels) in Texas. Further, Paul holds a teaching certification in California, USA, the United Kingdom and Wales, the Kingdom of Denmark, and the Netherlands.

As a public school English teacher for 8 years, Paul was awarded many distinctions including, but not limited to: El maestro de impacto, two Harvard Book Awards, Teacher of the Year, and Texas Parent-Teacher Association Life Member.

His research to inform his doctoral thesis work will be completed in the United States of America. Furthermore, his research interests revolve around the nexus points of gender, ethnicity, sexuality, economic status, and religion as they relate to the agency students have in the classroom.

Paul is the 2019-2020 Student Liaison Coordinator for the Department of Education, Oxford. In this role, he is charged with leading/convening weekly workshops on a variety of research training topics, co-organizing networking and career advice opportunities for graduate students, and liaising with Cambridge University personnel to organize the annual Oxbridge Exchange. Furthermore, Paul supports the Higher Degrees Office as appropriate and meets regularly with directors and other stakeholders to discuss issues of common student concern in order to develop student identity and community throughout the Department.

Paul serves as the representative student voice on the Social Sciences Division Equality & Diversity Steering Group for the University of Oxford.

Paul is also a part-time Research Assistant working with professionals and other academics within the Department of Education on funded and individual projects as needed.

Supervisors: Associate Professors Jenni Ingram and Velda Elliott & Departmental Lecturer Jason Todd.

Thesis Title: ‘Using Positioning Theory to Understand Marginalised Students’ Identities Work and Their Learning Experiences in English Language Arts Classrooms’

Open-Access Publication:
Ingram, Jenni, & Riser, P.A. (2019). Experiences of problem solving in whole class interactions. Avances De Investigación En Educación Matemática, Avances de Investigación en Educación Matemática, Number 16; October 2019.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.35763/aiem.v0i16.279

Tessa is currently completing a part-time DPhil, alongside work as a senior leader in a London secondary school.

Her research explores how teachers on school-based ITE routes (TeachFirst and School Direct salaried) approach learning from experience. The research takes an action research approach: working with participant beginning teachers and mentors to critically examine and reflect on the processes of learning to teach, using their conversations as stimulus data.

Prior to joining the Department of Education Tessa completed an MSc in Educational Research (University of Bristol).

Yoon Young has been involved in a variety of academic and professional projects related to teacher education.

She is currently a member of the Teacher Education and Professional Learning (TEPL) research group at Oxford. Her doctoral research focuses on teacher education policy and practice in England. The study examines the relationship between individuals’ own objectives, the stated programme goals, and the national teachers’ standards in the operation of the Oxford Internship Scheme (OIS). It also explores the perceptions of stakeholders regarding ideal goals that could drive a re-conceptualised teacher education programme.

Prior to her doctorate, Yoon Young used to be a social studies teacher and subsequently worked as a consultant for the OECD’s Initial Teacher Preparation (ITP) Study. She holds a B.A. in Social Studies and Geography Education from the Ewha Womans University, and an M.A. in Educational Leadership from the University of Jyväskylä, where she was a grantee of the Korean Government Scholarship for Study Overseas.

Katy is a Deputy Headteacher and the founder of a Leadership and Coaching Institute, which she now co-directs.

Katy is an Associate Fellow at the Oxford Character Project and a Research Associate at the Oxford University Wellbeing Research Centre. She is the co-founder of Global Social Leaders, a leadership programme which has participants in 105 countries, all passionate about creating and sustaining positive change in the world.

Title of Thesis

How could school leaders improve the flourishing and wellbeing of teaching staff?

Books
  • Granville-Chapman, K. and Bidston, E (2020) Leader: Know, love and inspire your people. Carmarthen: Crownhouse Publishing
Book Chapters
  •  Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ In White, M. & McCallum, F. (Ed.s) Wellbeing and Resilience Education: Covid-19 And Its Impact on Education Systems. Routledge
Publications
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘Purpose and Leadership in Education and Beyond’. The Education Exchange. Available from: https://theeducation.exchange/purpose-and-leadership-in-education-and-beyond/
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘The Three Secrets of COVID-era Leadership’. Times Education Supplement. Available from: https://www.tes.com/news/three-secrets-covid-era-school-leadership
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2016) ‘Assessing the Impact of a Teacher Leadership Programme in a Teaching Schools Alliance. Journal of Teacher Action Research
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2014) ‘The Afghan conflict: causes and consequences.’ Geography Review 28(1): 22-27
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2013) What are the psychological factors that affect students’ academic resilience and can teachers influence these? Unpublished thesis
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘Unlocking Leadership Potential’, The Magazine of the Boarding School’s Association, 33: 42-45
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2009) ‘Learning to Lead’, Leader, The Education Leader Magazine 41: 22-25
Presentations
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2019) ‘How could leaders improve the flourishing of their teams?’ ‘Stowe Ed Conference’, Forthcoming: 7 Jan 2019
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2018) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education: 21 Jun 2018
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2017) ‘How can school leaders improve teacher flourishing?’ ‘Doing Education Differently Conference’, University of Oxford, Department of Education, 11 Mar 17
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2016) ‘Developing school leaders who enable teachers to flourish’ The Telegraph Festival of Education 23 Jun 16
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Developing leadership in pupils and teachers’ High School Affiliated to Renmin University of China, Beijing. 20 Oct 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Resilience for leaders.’ Global Social Leaders World Summit. 16 Aug 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Emotional Intelligence for Leaders.’ Global Leaders in Education. 12 Aug 15
  • Coates, S.; Fraser, H.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J.; and Nasim, A. (2015) ‘Breaking through the glass ceiling – how can schools empower our girls to become leaders?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education. 19 Jun 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. ‘Developing Leadership in Schools’ (2015). G20 Schools Conference. International conference for head teachers. 11 Apr 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2018) ‘Introduction’, Wellington Leadership Institute: Festival of Leadership. Mar 2012-15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘How the Young Learn to Lead’, Raffles Institution (Singapore) -Purdue University (USA) Education Forum on Gifted & Talented Youth 2012. Singapore. 15 Mar 12
  • Draper, D.; Dyer, R.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Schools’. Presentation for a meeting about pupil leadership and character development at 10 Downing Street. 16 Nov 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Young People’. Presentation for a meeting about leadership and character at 10 Downing Street. 7 Mar 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K. & Seldon, A. (2012) ‘Introduction’, Leading Your School in the 21st Century. 7 Feb 12

Kamal Armanious is particularly interested in the topic of education governance to explore what is possible in developing an improved governance system for technical and vocational education and training (TVET).

There have always been various calls from different international organisations such UNESCO, ILO, World Bank, OECD etc. to develop a transformed and transformative approach to TVET. This is attractive for certain theoretical as well as practical reasons; however, one set of limitations in achieving this vision lies in the arena of governance. Mr Armanious examines an imagined better model of governance that can be developed from the principles of a new approach and wider theoretical resources with consideration to national realities where there may be very serious obstacles in the way of realising this new governance approach and hence the overall planned transformation.

Title of Thesis

Education and Training Policies in Egypt: Good Governance and Stakeholders Participation

 

Amanda is completing a part-time DPhil, alongside working in Initial Teacher Education at Leeds Trinity University.

Her research is focused on understanding tensions, contradictions and conflicts that teachers in disadvantaged schools may experience when they engage in research activity.  Her research focus is influenced by her own experiences of working as a research-active teacher in disadvantaged schools, and recent work in teacher education to support experienced and beginning teachers in developing their own research activities.

One of the aims of Amanda’s research is to construct a framework to support teachers in pursuing research activity and critical scholarship work which articulates with wider social movements to address issues of poverty and disadvantage in schools.

Title of Thesis

Teachers’ perspectives on tensions between policy, practice and research in disadvantaged schools

Publications 

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2017) A ‘usable past’ of teacher education in England: history in JET’s anniversary issue. Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy, 43 (5), pp.616-627.

Nuttall, A. (2016) The ‘curriculum challenge’: Moving towards the ‘Storyline’ approach in a case study urban primary school.  Improving Schools, 19 (2), pp. 154-166.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Learning {Re}imagined: A review.  Primary First, 15, pp. 17-18.

Nuttall, A. and Doherty, J. (2014) Disaffected boys and the achievement gap: the ‘wallpaper effect’ and what is hidden by a focus on school results.  The Urban Review, 46 (5), pp.800-815.

Conference Papers and Presentations

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2018) “No child is pre-ordained to fail” Teachers questioning policy assumptions.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Newcastle, 11-13 September.

Nuttall, A. and Tobbell, C. (2017) Trainee teachers’ perspectives on practitioner enquiry.  Paper presented at the 8th TEAN Conference: Thinking Deeply about Education, Birmingham, 11-12 May.

Nuttall, A. (2017) Assessment at primary level: quality, comparability and improving secondary readiness.  A perspective from ITE.  Speech at the Westminster Education Forum Keynote Seminar: Next steps for reforming primary education: effective teaching practices, assessment and accountably, London, 18 January.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Deficit narratives and lived realities: whose poverty is it?  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the Australian Association for Research in Education, Melbourne, 27 November – 1 December.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Disenfranchised boys’ reflections on their urban schooling experience: “What a Waste!”.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Philpott, C., Beckett, L. and Wrigley, T. (2016) Collaborative practitioner inquiry: making a difference to urban schools.  Innovation session (school visits and symposium) presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Finn, B. and Beckett, L. (2015) Teachers’ constructions of poverty effects: Their research evidence.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Belfast, 15-17 September.

Nuttall, A. (2014) Teachers’ voice on disengaged boys: the role of one teacher-researcher in an English primary school. Paper presented at the Joint Australian Association for Research in Education and the New Zealand Association for Research in Education Conference, Brisbane, 30 November – 4 December.

Abigail’s research explores the role of education in students’ personal development and how this can be supported by policy, curricula, initial teacher education and teacher professional development. In particular she focuses on history education, citizenship education and peace education as vehicles for dialogue. These opportunities for students to engage with social questions are vital for building cohesive societies. This flows from the recognition that traditional forums for developing public understanding, such as post-conflict truth commissions, need to be complemented by intergenerational and educational perspectives.

Abigail has taught History, Politics, Debating as well as Relationships and Sex Education to secondary school students in South Africa, England and the USA.

She holds postgraduate degrees in Post-Conflict and Transitional Justice (University of Cape Town), in Education, Globalisation and International Development (University of Cambridge) and in African Studies (University of Oxford). She is a Rhodes Scholar, Mandela-Magdalene Scholar and Mandela-Rhodes Scholar.

Title of thesis

GCSE History, Policy Reform and Student Development: How students and teachers navigate the thematic study “Empires, Migration and the People”

Conference papers

Teaching Migration, Belonging, and Empire in Secondary Schools: evaluation of a teacher professional development program, (2019) History Educators International Research Network Conference, Lead author: Dr Jason Todd, University of Vienna, Austria.

“The Problems and Prospects of Teaching South Africa’s Recent History: Teachers’ Perspectives”, (2018) Sustainability, peace and education – Exploring promise and practice: BAICE 20th Anniversary Symposium, University of Bristol, England.

“New Generations, Old Wounds: Learning History at Home and School in Northern Ireland”, (2018) European Social Science and History Conference,
Queens University Belfast, Northern Ireland.

“The Methodological Challenges of Investigating the Role of History Teaching in Peacebuilding”, (2017), Present Past: Time, Memory, and the Negotiation of Historical Justice Conference, Columbia University, United States of America.

“Teaching South Africa’s Truth and Reconciliation Commission”, (2017) European Conference on African Studies, Universität Basel, Switzerland.

Research Assistant Publications

Review of the evidence on feedback in primary and secondary schools, (forthcoming, 2021) for the Education Endowment Foundation, Lead author: Prof Velda Elliott.

Teaching Migration, Belonging, and Empire in Secondary Schools, (2019), for Runnymede Trust and the European Research Council, Lead authors: Kimberly McIntosh, Dr Jason Todd and Prof Nandini Das.

Gender and the Politics of Reconciliation (2016), for The Institute for Justice and Reconciliation, Lead author: Dr Helen Scanlon

SOLE AUTHOR PUBLICATIONS

‘Transitions, Truth-Telling and Teaching History’, Cambridge Open-Review Educational Research e-Journal, Vol. 4, 2017.

Paul Riser is a DPhil Student in the department. His research focuses broadly on students’ (especially the marginalised) identities work in upper-secondary English Language Arts classrooms.

Prior to starting his doctoral studies, Paul earned a BSc in English Language Arts (Secondary Education) with a minor in Theology and a BA in Spanish and International Studies with a minor in Psychology from Texas Lutheran University. His MA in English Literature and Language is from St. Mary’s University.

As part of his postgraduate schoolwork, Paul undertook a placement in two graduate certificate programs, earning both his School Counselor certification and School Principal certification for all grade levels in the state of Texas, USA. In addition to English Language Arts and Reading (4th-12th grades), he is also qualified to teach Health (all levels), Journalism (7-12), Speech (7-12), Social Studies (7-12), and English as a Second Language (all levels) in Texas. Further, Paul holds a teaching certification in California, USA, the United Kingdom and Wales, the Kingdom of Denmark, and the Netherlands.

As a public school English teacher for 8 years, Paul was awarded many distinctions including, but not limited to: El maestro de impacto, two Harvard Book Awards, Teacher of the Year, and Texas Parent-Teacher Association Life Member.

His research to inform his doctoral thesis work will be completed in the United States of America. Furthermore, his research interests revolve around the nexus points of gender, ethnicity, sexuality, economic status, and religion as they relate to the agency students have in the classroom.

Paul is the 2019-2020 Student Liaison Coordinator for the Department of Education, Oxford. In this role, he is charged with leading/convening weekly workshops on a variety of research training topics, co-organizing networking and career advice opportunities for graduate students, and liaising with Cambridge University personnel to organize the annual Oxbridge Exchange. Furthermore, Paul supports the Higher Degrees Office as appropriate and meets regularly with directors and other stakeholders to discuss issues of common student concern in order to develop student identity and community throughout the Department.

Paul serves as the representative student voice on the Social Sciences Division Equality & Diversity Steering Group for the University of Oxford.

Paul is also a part-time Research Assistant working with professionals and other academics within the Department of Education on funded and individual projects as needed.

Supervisors: Associate Professors Jenni Ingram and Velda Elliott & Departmental Lecturer Jason Todd.

Thesis Title: ‘Using Positioning Theory to Understand Marginalised Students’ Identities Work and Their Learning Experiences in English Language Arts Classrooms’

Open-Access Publication:
Ingram, Jenni, & Riser, P.A. (2019). Experiences of problem solving in whole class interactions. Avances De Investigación En Educación Matemática, Avances de Investigación en Educación Matemática, Number 16; October 2019.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.35763/aiem.v0i16.279

Tessa is currently completing a part-time DPhil, alongside work as a senior leader in a London secondary school.

Her research explores how teachers on school-based ITE routes (TeachFirst and School Direct salaried) approach learning from experience. The research takes an action research approach: working with participant beginning teachers and mentors to critically examine and reflect on the processes of learning to teach, using their conversations as stimulus data.

Prior to joining the Department of Education Tessa completed an MSc in Educational Research (University of Bristol).

Yoon Young has been involved in a variety of academic and professional projects related to teacher education.

She is currently a member of the Teacher Education and Professional Learning (TEPL) research group at Oxford. Her doctoral research focuses on teacher education policy and practice in England. The study examines the relationship between individuals’ own objectives, the stated programme goals, and the national teachers’ standards in the operation of the Oxford Internship Scheme (OIS). It also explores the perceptions of stakeholders regarding ideal goals that could drive a re-conceptualised teacher education programme.

Prior to her doctorate, Yoon Young used to be a social studies teacher and subsequently worked as a consultant for the OECD’s Initial Teacher Preparation (ITP) Study. She holds a B.A. in Social Studies and Geography Education from the Ewha Womans University, and an M.A. in Educational Leadership from the University of Jyväskylä, where she was a grantee of the Korean Government Scholarship for Study Overseas.

Katy is a Deputy Headteacher and the founder of a Leadership and Coaching Institute, which she now co-directs.

Katy is an Associate Fellow at the Oxford Character Project and a Research Associate at the Oxford University Wellbeing Research Centre. She is the co-founder of Global Social Leaders, a leadership programme which has participants in 105 countries, all passionate about creating and sustaining positive change in the world.

Title of Thesis

How could school leaders improve the flourishing and wellbeing of teaching staff?

Books
  • Granville-Chapman, K. and Bidston, E (2020) Leader: Know, love and inspire your people. Carmarthen: Crownhouse Publishing
Book Chapters
  •  Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ In White, M. & McCallum, F. (Ed.s) Wellbeing and Resilience Education: Covid-19 And Its Impact on Education Systems. Routledge
Publications
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘Purpose and Leadership in Education and Beyond’. The Education Exchange. Available from: https://theeducation.exchange/purpose-and-leadership-in-education-and-beyond/
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘The Three Secrets of COVID-era Leadership’. Times Education Supplement. Available from: https://www.tes.com/news/three-secrets-covid-era-school-leadership
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2016) ‘Assessing the Impact of a Teacher Leadership Programme in a Teaching Schools Alliance. Journal of Teacher Action Research
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2014) ‘The Afghan conflict: causes and consequences.’ Geography Review 28(1): 22-27
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2013) What are the psychological factors that affect students’ academic resilience and can teachers influence these? Unpublished thesis
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘Unlocking Leadership Potential’, The Magazine of the Boarding School’s Association, 33: 42-45
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2009) ‘Learning to Lead’, Leader, The Education Leader Magazine 41: 22-25
Presentations
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2019) ‘How could leaders improve the flourishing of their teams?’ ‘Stowe Ed Conference’, Forthcoming: 7 Jan 2019
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2018) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education: 21 Jun 2018
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2017) ‘How can school leaders improve teacher flourishing?’ ‘Doing Education Differently Conference’, University of Oxford, Department of Education, 11 Mar 17
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2016) ‘Developing school leaders who enable teachers to flourish’ The Telegraph Festival of Education 23 Jun 16
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Developing leadership in pupils and teachers’ High School Affiliated to Renmin University of China, Beijing. 20 Oct 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Resilience for leaders.’ Global Social Leaders World Summit. 16 Aug 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Emotional Intelligence for Leaders.’ Global Leaders in Education. 12 Aug 15
  • Coates, S.; Fraser, H.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J.; and Nasim, A. (2015) ‘Breaking through the glass ceiling – how can schools empower our girls to become leaders?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education. 19 Jun 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. ‘Developing Leadership in Schools’ (2015). G20 Schools Conference. International conference for head teachers. 11 Apr 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2018) ‘Introduction’, Wellington Leadership Institute: Festival of Leadership. Mar 2012-15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘How the Young Learn to Lead’, Raffles Institution (Singapore) -Purdue University (USA) Education Forum on Gifted & Talented Youth 2012. Singapore. 15 Mar 12
  • Draper, D.; Dyer, R.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Schools’. Presentation for a meeting about pupil leadership and character development at 10 Downing Street. 16 Nov 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Young People’. Presentation for a meeting about leadership and character at 10 Downing Street. 7 Mar 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K. & Seldon, A. (2012) ‘Introduction’, Leading Your School in the 21st Century. 7 Feb 12

Kamal Armanious is particularly interested in the topic of education governance to explore what is possible in developing an improved governance system for technical and vocational education and training (TVET).

There have always been various calls from different international organisations such UNESCO, ILO, World Bank, OECD etc. to develop a transformed and transformative approach to TVET. This is attractive for certain theoretical as well as practical reasons; however, one set of limitations in achieving this vision lies in the arena of governance. Mr Armanious examines an imagined better model of governance that can be developed from the principles of a new approach and wider theoretical resources with consideration to national realities where there may be very serious obstacles in the way of realising this new governance approach and hence the overall planned transformation.

Title of Thesis

Education and Training Policies in Egypt: Good Governance and Stakeholders Participation

 

Amanda is completing a part-time DPhil, alongside working in Initial Teacher Education at Leeds Trinity University.

Her research is focused on understanding tensions, contradictions and conflicts that teachers in disadvantaged schools may experience when they engage in research activity.  Her research focus is influenced by her own experiences of working as a research-active teacher in disadvantaged schools, and recent work in teacher education to support experienced and beginning teachers in developing their own research activities.

One of the aims of Amanda’s research is to construct a framework to support teachers in pursuing research activity and critical scholarship work which articulates with wider social movements to address issues of poverty and disadvantage in schools.

Title of Thesis

Teachers’ perspectives on tensions between policy, practice and research in disadvantaged schools

Publications 

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2017) A ‘usable past’ of teacher education in England: history in JET’s anniversary issue. Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy, 43 (5), pp.616-627.

Nuttall, A. (2016) The ‘curriculum challenge’: Moving towards the ‘Storyline’ approach in a case study urban primary school.  Improving Schools, 19 (2), pp. 154-166.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Learning {Re}imagined: A review.  Primary First, 15, pp. 17-18.

Nuttall, A. and Doherty, J. (2014) Disaffected boys and the achievement gap: the ‘wallpaper effect’ and what is hidden by a focus on school results.  The Urban Review, 46 (5), pp.800-815.

Conference Papers and Presentations

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2018) “No child is pre-ordained to fail” Teachers questioning policy assumptions.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Newcastle, 11-13 September.

Nuttall, A. and Tobbell, C. (2017) Trainee teachers’ perspectives on practitioner enquiry.  Paper presented at the 8th TEAN Conference: Thinking Deeply about Education, Birmingham, 11-12 May.

Nuttall, A. (2017) Assessment at primary level: quality, comparability and improving secondary readiness.  A perspective from ITE.  Speech at the Westminster Education Forum Keynote Seminar: Next steps for reforming primary education: effective teaching practices, assessment and accountably, London, 18 January.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Deficit narratives and lived realities: whose poverty is it?  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the Australian Association for Research in Education, Melbourne, 27 November – 1 December.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Disenfranchised boys’ reflections on their urban schooling experience: “What a Waste!”.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Philpott, C., Beckett, L. and Wrigley, T. (2016) Collaborative practitioner inquiry: making a difference to urban schools.  Innovation session (school visits and symposium) presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Finn, B. and Beckett, L. (2015) Teachers’ constructions of poverty effects: Their research evidence.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Belfast, 15-17 September.

Nuttall, A. (2014) Teachers’ voice on disengaged boys: the role of one teacher-researcher in an English primary school. Paper presented at the Joint Australian Association for Research in Education and the New Zealand Association for Research in Education Conference, Brisbane, 30 November – 4 December.

Abigail’s research explores the role of education in students’ personal development and how this can be supported by policy, curricula, initial teacher education and teacher professional development. In particular she focuses on history education, citizenship education and peace education as vehicles for dialogue. These opportunities for students to engage with social questions are vital for building cohesive societies. This flows from the recognition that traditional forums for developing public understanding, such as post-conflict truth commissions, need to be complemented by intergenerational and educational perspectives.

Abigail has taught History, Politics, Debating as well as Relationships and Sex Education to secondary school students in South Africa, England and the USA.

She holds postgraduate degrees in Post-Conflict and Transitional Justice (University of Cape Town), in Education, Globalisation and International Development (University of Cambridge) and in African Studies (University of Oxford). She is a Rhodes Scholar, Mandela-Magdalene Scholar and Mandela-Rhodes Scholar.

Title of thesis

GCSE History, Policy Reform and Student Development: How students and teachers navigate the thematic study “Empires, Migration and the People”

Conference papers

Teaching Migration, Belonging, and Empire in Secondary Schools: evaluation of a teacher professional development program, (2019) History Educators International Research Network Conference, Lead author: Dr Jason Todd, University of Vienna, Austria.

“The Problems and Prospects of Teaching South Africa’s Recent History: Teachers’ Perspectives”, (2018) Sustainability, peace and education – Exploring promise and practice: BAICE 20th Anniversary Symposium, University of Bristol, England.

“New Generations, Old Wounds: Learning History at Home and School in Northern Ireland”, (2018) European Social Science and History Conference,
Queens University Belfast, Northern Ireland.

“The Methodological Challenges of Investigating the Role of History Teaching in Peacebuilding”, (2017), Present Past: Time, Memory, and the Negotiation of Historical Justice Conference, Columbia University, United States of America.

“Teaching South Africa’s Truth and Reconciliation Commission”, (2017) European Conference on African Studies, Universität Basel, Switzerland.

Research Assistant Publications

Review of the evidence on feedback in primary and secondary schools, (forthcoming, 2021) for the Education Endowment Foundation, Lead author: Prof Velda Elliott.

Teaching Migration, Belonging, and Empire in Secondary Schools, (2019), for Runnymede Trust and the European Research Council, Lead authors: Kimberly McIntosh, Dr Jason Todd and Prof Nandini Das.

Gender and the Politics of Reconciliation (2016), for The Institute for Justice and Reconciliation, Lead author: Dr Helen Scanlon

SOLE AUTHOR PUBLICATIONS

‘Transitions, Truth-Telling and Teaching History’, Cambridge Open-Review Educational Research e-Journal, Vol. 4, 2017.

Paul Riser is a DPhil Student in the department. His research focuses broadly on students’ (especially the marginalised) identities work in upper-secondary English Language Arts classrooms.

Prior to starting his doctoral studies, Paul earned a BSc in English Language Arts (Secondary Education) with a minor in Theology and a BA in Spanish and International Studies with a minor in Psychology from Texas Lutheran University. His MA in English Literature and Language is from St. Mary’s University.

As part of his postgraduate schoolwork, Paul undertook a placement in two graduate certificate programs, earning both his School Counselor certification and School Principal certification for all grade levels in the state of Texas, USA. In addition to English Language Arts and Reading (4th-12th grades), he is also qualified to teach Health (all levels), Journalism (7-12), Speech (7-12), Social Studies (7-12), and English as a Second Language (all levels) in Texas. Further, Paul holds a teaching certification in California, USA, the United Kingdom and Wales, the Kingdom of Denmark, and the Netherlands.

As a public school English teacher for 8 years, Paul was awarded many distinctions including, but not limited to: El maestro de impacto, two Harvard Book Awards, Teacher of the Year, and Texas Parent-Teacher Association Life Member.

His research to inform his doctoral thesis work will be completed in the United States of America. Furthermore, his research interests revolve around the nexus points of gender, ethnicity, sexuality, economic status, and religion as they relate to the agency students have in the classroom.

Paul is the 2019-2020 Student Liaison Coordinator for the Department of Education, Oxford. In this role, he is charged with leading/convening weekly workshops on a variety of research training topics, co-organizing networking and career advice opportunities for graduate students, and liaising with Cambridge University personnel to organize the annual Oxbridge Exchange. Furthermore, Paul supports the Higher Degrees Office as appropriate and meets regularly with directors and other stakeholders to discuss issues of common student concern in order to develop student identity and community throughout the Department.

Paul serves as the representative student voice on the Social Sciences Division Equality & Diversity Steering Group for the University of Oxford.

Paul is also a part-time Research Assistant working with professionals and other academics within the Department of Education on funded and individual projects as needed.

Supervisors: Associate Professors Jenni Ingram and Velda Elliott & Departmental Lecturer Jason Todd.

Thesis Title: ‘Using Positioning Theory to Understand Marginalised Students’ Identities Work and Their Learning Experiences in English Language Arts Classrooms’

Open-Access Publication:
Ingram, Jenni, & Riser, P.A. (2019). Experiences of problem solving in whole class interactions. Avances De Investigación En Educación Matemática, Avances de Investigación en Educación Matemática, Number 16; October 2019.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.35763/aiem.v0i16.279

Tessa is currently completing a part-time DPhil, alongside work as a senior leader in a London secondary school.

Her research explores how teachers on school-based ITE routes (TeachFirst and School Direct salaried) approach learning from experience. The research takes an action research approach: working with participant beginning teachers and mentors to critically examine and reflect on the processes of learning to teach, using their conversations as stimulus data.

Prior to joining the Department of Education Tessa completed an MSc in Educational Research (University of Bristol).

Yoon Young has been involved in a variety of academic and professional projects related to teacher education.

She is currently a member of the Teacher Education and Professional Learning (TEPL) research group at Oxford. Her doctoral research focuses on teacher education policy and practice in England. The study examines the relationship between individuals’ own objectives, the stated programme goals, and the national teachers’ standards in the operation of the Oxford Internship Scheme (OIS). It also explores the perceptions of stakeholders regarding ideal goals that could drive a re-conceptualised teacher education programme.

Prior to her doctorate, Yoon Young used to be a social studies teacher and subsequently worked as a consultant for the OECD’s Initial Teacher Preparation (ITP) Study. She holds a B.A. in Social Studies and Geography Education from the Ewha Womans University, and an M.A. in Educational Leadership from the University of Jyväskylä, where she was a grantee of the Korean Government Scholarship for Study Overseas.

Katy is a Deputy Headteacher and the founder of a Leadership and Coaching Institute, which she now co-directs.

Katy is an Associate Fellow at the Oxford Character Project and a Research Associate at the Oxford University Wellbeing Research Centre. She is the co-founder of Global Social Leaders, a leadership programme which has participants in 105 countries, all passionate about creating and sustaining positive change in the world.

Title of Thesis

How could school leaders improve the flourishing and wellbeing of teaching staff?

Books
  • Granville-Chapman, K. and Bidston, E (2020) Leader: Know, love and inspire your people. Carmarthen: Crownhouse Publishing
Book Chapters
  •  Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ In White, M. & McCallum, F. (Ed.s) Wellbeing and Resilience Education: Covid-19 And Its Impact on Education Systems. Routledge
Publications
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘Purpose and Leadership in Education and Beyond’. The Education Exchange. Available from: https://theeducation.exchange/purpose-and-leadership-in-education-and-beyond/
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘The Three Secrets of COVID-era Leadership’. Times Education Supplement. Available from: https://www.tes.com/news/three-secrets-covid-era-school-leadership
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2016) ‘Assessing the Impact of a Teacher Leadership Programme in a Teaching Schools Alliance. Journal of Teacher Action Research
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2014) ‘The Afghan conflict: causes and consequences.’ Geography Review 28(1): 22-27
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2013) What are the psychological factors that affect students’ academic resilience and can teachers influence these? Unpublished thesis
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘Unlocking Leadership Potential’, The Magazine of the Boarding School’s Association, 33: 42-45
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2009) ‘Learning to Lead’, Leader, The Education Leader Magazine 41: 22-25
Presentations
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2019) ‘How could leaders improve the flourishing of their teams?’ ‘Stowe Ed Conference’, Forthcoming: 7 Jan 2019
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2018) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education: 21 Jun 2018
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2017) ‘How can school leaders improve teacher flourishing?’ ‘Doing Education Differently Conference’, University of Oxford, Department of Education, 11 Mar 17
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2016) ‘Developing school leaders who enable teachers to flourish’ The Telegraph Festival of Education 23 Jun 16
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Developing leadership in pupils and teachers’ High School Affiliated to Renmin University of China, Beijing. 20 Oct 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Resilience for leaders.’ Global Social Leaders World Summit. 16 Aug 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Emotional Intelligence for Leaders.’ Global Leaders in Education. 12 Aug 15
  • Coates, S.; Fraser, H.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J.; and Nasim, A. (2015) ‘Breaking through the glass ceiling – how can schools empower our girls to become leaders?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education. 19 Jun 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. ‘Developing Leadership in Schools’ (2015). G20 Schools Conference. International conference for head teachers. 11 Apr 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2018) ‘Introduction’, Wellington Leadership Institute: Festival of Leadership. Mar 2012-15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘How the Young Learn to Lead’, Raffles Institution (Singapore) -Purdue University (USA) Education Forum on Gifted & Talented Youth 2012. Singapore. 15 Mar 12
  • Draper, D.; Dyer, R.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Schools’. Presentation for a meeting about pupil leadership and character development at 10 Downing Street. 16 Nov 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Young People’. Presentation for a meeting about leadership and character at 10 Downing Street. 7 Mar 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K. & Seldon, A. (2012) ‘Introduction’, Leading Your School in the 21st Century. 7 Feb 12

Kamal Armanious is particularly interested in the topic of education governance to explore what is possible in developing an improved governance system for technical and vocational education and training (TVET).

There have always been various calls from different international organisations such UNESCO, ILO, World Bank, OECD etc. to develop a transformed and transformative approach to TVET. This is attractive for certain theoretical as well as practical reasons; however, one set of limitations in achieving this vision lies in the arena of governance. Mr Armanious examines an imagined better model of governance that can be developed from the principles of a new approach and wider theoretical resources with consideration to national realities where there may be very serious obstacles in the way of realising this new governance approach and hence the overall planned transformation.

Title of Thesis

Education and Training Policies in Egypt: Good Governance and Stakeholders Participation

 

Amanda is completing a part-time DPhil, alongside working in Initial Teacher Education at Leeds Trinity University.

Her research is focused on understanding tensions, contradictions and conflicts that teachers in disadvantaged schools may experience when they engage in research activity.  Her research focus is influenced by her own experiences of working as a research-active teacher in disadvantaged schools, and recent work in teacher education to support experienced and beginning teachers in developing their own research activities.

One of the aims of Amanda’s research is to construct a framework to support teachers in pursuing research activity and critical scholarship work which articulates with wider social movements to address issues of poverty and disadvantage in schools.

Title of Thesis

Teachers’ perspectives on tensions between policy, practice and research in disadvantaged schools

Publications 

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2017) A ‘usable past’ of teacher education in England: history in JET’s anniversary issue. Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy, 43 (5), pp.616-627.

Nuttall, A. (2016) The ‘curriculum challenge’: Moving towards the ‘Storyline’ approach in a case study urban primary school.  Improving Schools, 19 (2), pp. 154-166.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Learning {Re}imagined: A review.  Primary First, 15, pp. 17-18.

Nuttall, A. and Doherty, J. (2014) Disaffected boys and the achievement gap: the ‘wallpaper effect’ and what is hidden by a focus on school results.  The Urban Review, 46 (5), pp.800-815.

Conference Papers and Presentations

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2018) “No child is pre-ordained to fail” Teachers questioning policy assumptions.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Newcastle, 11-13 September.

Nuttall, A. and Tobbell, C. (2017) Trainee teachers’ perspectives on practitioner enquiry.  Paper presented at the 8th TEAN Conference: Thinking Deeply about Education, Birmingham, 11-12 May.

Nuttall, A. (2017) Assessment at primary level: quality, comparability and improving secondary readiness.  A perspective from ITE.  Speech at the Westminster Education Forum Keynote Seminar: Next steps for reforming primary education: effective teaching practices, assessment and accountably, London, 18 January.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Deficit narratives and lived realities: whose poverty is it?  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the Australian Association for Research in Education, Melbourne, 27 November – 1 December.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Disenfranchised boys’ reflections on their urban schooling experience: “What a Waste!”.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Philpott, C., Beckett, L. and Wrigley, T. (2016) Collaborative practitioner inquiry: making a difference to urban schools.  Innovation session (school visits and symposium) presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Finn, B. and Beckett, L. (2015) Teachers’ constructions of poverty effects: Their research evidence.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Belfast, 15-17 September.

Nuttall, A. (2014) Teachers’ voice on disengaged boys: the role of one teacher-researcher in an English primary school. Paper presented at the Joint Australian Association for Research in Education and the New Zealand Association for Research in Education Conference, Brisbane, 30 November – 4 December.

Abigail’s research explores the role of education in students’ personal development and how this can be supported by policy, curricula, initial teacher education and teacher professional development. In particular she focuses on history education, citizenship education and peace education as vehicles for dialogue. These opportunities for students to engage with social questions are vital for building cohesive societies. This flows from the recognition that traditional forums for developing public understanding, such as post-conflict truth commissions, need to be complemented by intergenerational and educational perspectives.

Abigail has taught History, Politics, Debating as well as Relationships and Sex Education to secondary school students in South Africa, England and the USA.

She holds postgraduate degrees in Post-Conflict and Transitional Justice (University of Cape Town), in Education, Globalisation and International Development (University of Cambridge) and in African Studies (University of Oxford). She is a Rhodes Scholar, Mandela-Magdalene Scholar and Mandela-Rhodes Scholar.

Title of thesis

GCSE History, Policy Reform and Student Development: How students and teachers navigate the thematic study “Empires, Migration and the People”

Conference papers

Teaching Migration, Belonging, and Empire in Secondary Schools: evaluation of a teacher professional development program, (2019) History Educators International Research Network Conference, Lead author: Dr Jason Todd, University of Vienna, Austria.

“The Problems and Prospects of Teaching South Africa’s Recent History: Teachers’ Perspectives”, (2018) Sustainability, peace and education – Exploring promise and practice: BAICE 20th Anniversary Symposium, University of Bristol, England.

“New Generations, Old Wounds: Learning History at Home and School in Northern Ireland”, (2018) European Social Science and History Conference,
Queens University Belfast, Northern Ireland.

“The Methodological Challenges of Investigating the Role of History Teaching in Peacebuilding”, (2017), Present Past: Time, Memory, and the Negotiation of Historical Justice Conference, Columbia University, United States of America.

“Teaching South Africa’s Truth and Reconciliation Commission”, (2017) European Conference on African Studies, Universität Basel, Switzerland.

Research Assistant Publications

Review of the evidence on feedback in primary and secondary schools, (forthcoming, 2021) for the Education Endowment Foundation, Lead author: Prof Velda Elliott.

Teaching Migration, Belonging, and Empire in Secondary Schools, (2019), for Runnymede Trust and the European Research Council, Lead authors: Kimberly McIntosh, Dr Jason Todd and Prof Nandini Das.

Gender and the Politics of Reconciliation (2016), for The Institute for Justice and Reconciliation, Lead author: Dr Helen Scanlon

SOLE AUTHOR PUBLICATIONS

‘Transitions, Truth-Telling and Teaching History’, Cambridge Open-Review Educational Research e-Journal, Vol. 4, 2017.

Paul Riser is a DPhil Student in the department. His research focuses broadly on students’ (especially the marginalised) identities work in upper-secondary English Language Arts classrooms.

Prior to starting his doctoral studies, Paul earned a BSc in English Language Arts (Secondary Education) with a minor in Theology and a BA in Spanish and International Studies with a minor in Psychology from Texas Lutheran University. His MA in English Literature and Language is from St. Mary’s University.

As part of his postgraduate schoolwork, Paul undertook a placement in two graduate certificate programs, earning both his School Counselor certification and School Principal certification for all grade levels in the state of Texas, USA. In addition to English Language Arts and Reading (4th-12th grades), he is also qualified to teach Health (all levels), Journalism (7-12), Speech (7-12), Social Studies (7-12), and English as a Second Language (all levels) in Texas. Further, Paul holds a teaching certification in California, USA, the United Kingdom and Wales, the Kingdom of Denmark, and the Netherlands.

As a public school English teacher for 8 years, Paul was awarded many distinctions including, but not limited to: El maestro de impacto, two Harvard Book Awards, Teacher of the Year, and Texas Parent-Teacher Association Life Member.

His research to inform his doctoral thesis work will be completed in the United States of America. Furthermore, his research interests revolve around the nexus points of gender, ethnicity, sexuality, economic status, and religion as they relate to the agency students have in the classroom.

Paul is the 2019-2020 Student Liaison Coordinator for the Department of Education, Oxford. In this role, he is charged with leading/convening weekly workshops on a variety of research training topics, co-organizing networking and career advice opportunities for graduate students, and liaising with Cambridge University personnel to organize the annual Oxbridge Exchange. Furthermore, Paul supports the Higher Degrees Office as appropriate and meets regularly with directors and other stakeholders to discuss issues of common student concern in order to develop student identity and community throughout the Department.

Paul serves as the representative student voice on the Social Sciences Division Equality & Diversity Steering Group for the University of Oxford.

Paul is also a part-time Research Assistant working with professionals and other academics within the Department of Education on funded and individual projects as needed.

Supervisors: Associate Professors Jenni Ingram and Velda Elliott & Departmental Lecturer Jason Todd.

Thesis Title: ‘Using Positioning Theory to Understand Marginalised Students’ Identities Work and Their Learning Experiences in English Language Arts Classrooms’

Open-Access Publication:
Ingram, Jenni, & Riser, P.A. (2019). Experiences of problem solving in whole class interactions. Avances De Investigación En Educación Matemática, Avances de Investigación en Educación Matemática, Number 16; October 2019.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.35763/aiem.v0i16.279

Tessa is currently completing a part-time DPhil, alongside work as a senior leader in a London secondary school.

Her research explores how teachers on school-based ITE routes (TeachFirst and School Direct salaried) approach learning from experience. The research takes an action research approach: working with participant beginning teachers and mentors to critically examine and reflect on the processes of learning to teach, using their conversations as stimulus data.

Prior to joining the Department of Education Tessa completed an MSc in Educational Research (University of Bristol).

Yoon Young has been involved in a variety of academic and professional projects related to teacher education.

She is currently a member of the Teacher Education and Professional Learning (TEPL) research group at Oxford. Her doctoral research focuses on teacher education policy and practice in England. The study examines the relationship between individuals’ own objectives, the stated programme goals, and the national teachers’ standards in the operation of the Oxford Internship Scheme (OIS). It also explores the perceptions of stakeholders regarding ideal goals that could drive a re-conceptualised teacher education programme.

Prior to her doctorate, Yoon Young used to be a social studies teacher and subsequently worked as a consultant for the OECD’s Initial Teacher Preparation (ITP) Study. She holds a B.A. in Social Studies and Geography Education from the Ewha Womans University, and an M.A. in Educational Leadership from the University of Jyväskylä, where she was a grantee of the Korean Government Scholarship for Study Overseas.

Katy is a Deputy Headteacher and the founder of a Leadership and Coaching Institute, which she now co-directs.

Katy is an Associate Fellow at the Oxford Character Project and a Research Associate at the Oxford University Wellbeing Research Centre. She is the co-founder of Global Social Leaders, a leadership programme which has participants in 105 countries, all passionate about creating and sustaining positive change in the world.

Title of Thesis

How could school leaders improve the flourishing and wellbeing of teaching staff?

Books
  • Granville-Chapman, K. and Bidston, E (2020) Leader: Know, love and inspire your people. Carmarthen: Crownhouse Publishing
Book Chapters
  •  Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ In White, M. & McCallum, F. (Ed.s) Wellbeing and Resilience Education: Covid-19 And Its Impact on Education Systems. Routledge
Publications
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘Purpose and Leadership in Education and Beyond’. The Education Exchange. Available from: https://theeducation.exchange/purpose-and-leadership-in-education-and-beyond/
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘The Three Secrets of COVID-era Leadership’. Times Education Supplement. Available from: https://www.tes.com/news/three-secrets-covid-era-school-leadership
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2016) ‘Assessing the Impact of a Teacher Leadership Programme in a Teaching Schools Alliance. Journal of Teacher Action Research
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2014) ‘The Afghan conflict: causes and consequences.’ Geography Review 28(1): 22-27
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2013) What are the psychological factors that affect students’ academic resilience and can teachers influence these? Unpublished thesis
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘Unlocking Leadership Potential’, The Magazine of the Boarding School’s Association, 33: 42-45
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2009) ‘Learning to Lead’, Leader, The Education Leader Magazine 41: 22-25
Presentations
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2019) ‘How could leaders improve the flourishing of their teams?’ ‘Stowe Ed Conference’, Forthcoming: 7 Jan 2019
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2018) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education: 21 Jun 2018
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2017) ‘How can school leaders improve teacher flourishing?’ ‘Doing Education Differently Conference’, University of Oxford, Department of Education, 11 Mar 17
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2016) ‘Developing school leaders who enable teachers to flourish’ The Telegraph Festival of Education 23 Jun 16
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Developing leadership in pupils and teachers’ High School Affiliated to Renmin University of China, Beijing. 20 Oct 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Resilience for leaders.’ Global Social Leaders World Summit. 16 Aug 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Emotional Intelligence for Leaders.’ Global Leaders in Education. 12 Aug 15
  • Coates, S.; Fraser, H.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J.; and Nasim, A. (2015) ‘Breaking through the glass ceiling – how can schools empower our girls to become leaders?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education. 19 Jun 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. ‘Developing Leadership in Schools’ (2015). G20 Schools Conference. International conference for head teachers. 11 Apr 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2018) ‘Introduction’, Wellington Leadership Institute: Festival of Leadership. Mar 2012-15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘How the Young Learn to Lead’, Raffles Institution (Singapore) -Purdue University (USA) Education Forum on Gifted & Talented Youth 2012. Singapore. 15 Mar 12
  • Draper, D.; Dyer, R.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Schools’. Presentation for a meeting about pupil leadership and character development at 10 Downing Street. 16 Nov 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Young People’. Presentation for a meeting about leadership and character at 10 Downing Street. 7 Mar 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K. & Seldon, A. (2012) ‘Introduction’, Leading Your School in the 21st Century. 7 Feb 12

Kamal Armanious is particularly interested in the topic of education governance to explore what is possible in developing an improved governance system for technical and vocational education and training (TVET).

There have always been various calls from different international organisations such UNESCO, ILO, World Bank, OECD etc. to develop a transformed and transformative approach to TVET. This is attractive for certain theoretical as well as practical reasons; however, one set of limitations in achieving this vision lies in the arena of governance. Mr Armanious examines an imagined better model of governance that can be developed from the principles of a new approach and wider theoretical resources with consideration to national realities where there may be very serious obstacles in the way of realising this new governance approach and hence the overall planned transformation.

Title of Thesis

Education and Training Policies in Egypt: Good Governance and Stakeholders Participation

 

Amanda is completing a part-time DPhil, alongside working in Initial Teacher Education at Leeds Trinity University.

Her research is focused on understanding tensions, contradictions and conflicts that teachers in disadvantaged schools may experience when they engage in research activity.  Her research focus is influenced by her own experiences of working as a research-active teacher in disadvantaged schools, and recent work in teacher education to support experienced and beginning teachers in developing their own research activities.

One of the aims of Amanda’s research is to construct a framework to support teachers in pursuing research activity and critical scholarship work which articulates with wider social movements to address issues of poverty and disadvantage in schools.

Title of Thesis

Teachers’ perspectives on tensions between policy, practice and research in disadvantaged schools

Publications 

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2017) A ‘usable past’ of teacher education in England: history in JET’s anniversary issue. Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy, 43 (5), pp.616-627.

Nuttall, A. (2016) The ‘curriculum challenge’: Moving towards the ‘Storyline’ approach in a case study urban primary school.  Improving Schools, 19 (2), pp. 154-166.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Learning {Re}imagined: A review.  Primary First, 15, pp. 17-18.

Nuttall, A. and Doherty, J. (2014) Disaffected boys and the achievement gap: the ‘wallpaper effect’ and what is hidden by a focus on school results.  The Urban Review, 46 (5), pp.800-815.

Conference Papers and Presentations

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2018) “No child is pre-ordained to fail” Teachers questioning policy assumptions.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Newcastle, 11-13 September.

Nuttall, A. and Tobbell, C. (2017) Trainee teachers’ perspectives on practitioner enquiry.  Paper presented at the 8th TEAN Conference: Thinking Deeply about Education, Birmingham, 11-12 May.

Nuttall, A. (2017) Assessment at primary level: quality, comparability and improving secondary readiness.  A perspective from ITE.  Speech at the Westminster Education Forum Keynote Seminar: Next steps for reforming primary education: effective teaching practices, assessment and accountably, London, 18 January.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Deficit narratives and lived realities: whose poverty is it?  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the Australian Association for Research in Education, Melbourne, 27 November – 1 December.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Disenfranchised boys’ reflections on their urban schooling experience: “What a Waste!”.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Philpott, C., Beckett, L. and Wrigley, T. (2016) Collaborative practitioner inquiry: making a difference to urban schools.  Innovation session (school visits and symposium) presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Finn, B. and Beckett, L. (2015) Teachers’ constructions of poverty effects: Their research evidence.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Belfast, 15-17 September.

Nuttall, A. (2014) Teachers’ voice on disengaged boys: the role of one teacher-researcher in an English primary school. Paper presented at the Joint Australian Association for Research in Education and the New Zealand Association for Research in Education Conference, Brisbane, 30 November – 4 December.

Abigail’s research explores the role of education in students’ personal development and how this can be supported by policy, curricula, initial teacher education and teacher professional development. In particular she focuses on history education, citizenship education and peace education as vehicles for dialogue. These opportunities for students to engage with social questions are vital for building cohesive societies. This flows from the recognition that traditional forums for developing public understanding, such as post-conflict truth commissions, need to be complemented by intergenerational and educational perspectives.

Abigail has taught History, Politics, Debating as well as Relationships and Sex Education to secondary school students in South Africa, England and the USA.

She holds postgraduate degrees in Post-Conflict and Transitional Justice (University of Cape Town), in Education, Globalisation and International Development (University of Cambridge) and in African Studies (University of Oxford). She is a Rhodes Scholar, Mandela-Magdalene Scholar and Mandela-Rhodes Scholar.

Title of thesis

GCSE History, Policy Reform and Student Development: How students and teachers navigate the thematic study “Empires, Migration and the People”

Conference papers

Teaching Migration, Belonging, and Empire in Secondary Schools: evaluation of a teacher professional development program, (2019) History Educators International Research Network Conference, Lead author: Dr Jason Todd, University of Vienna, Austria.

“The Problems and Prospects of Teaching South Africa’s Recent History: Teachers’ Perspectives”, (2018) Sustainability, peace and education – Exploring promise and practice: BAICE 20th Anniversary Symposium, University of Bristol, England.

“New Generations, Old Wounds: Learning History at Home and School in Northern Ireland”, (2018) European Social Science and History Conference,
Queens University Belfast, Northern Ireland.

“The Methodological Challenges of Investigating the Role of History Teaching in Peacebuilding”, (2017), Present Past: Time, Memory, and the Negotiation of Historical Justice Conference, Columbia University, United States of America.

“Teaching South Africa’s Truth and Reconciliation Commission”, (2017) European Conference on African Studies, Universität Basel, Switzerland.

Research Assistant Publications

Review of the evidence on feedback in primary and secondary schools, (forthcoming, 2021) for the Education Endowment Foundation, Lead author: Prof Velda Elliott.

Teaching Migration, Belonging, and Empire in Secondary Schools, (2019), for Runnymede Trust and the European Research Council, Lead authors: Kimberly McIntosh, Dr Jason Todd and Prof Nandini Das.

Gender and the Politics of Reconciliation (2016), for The Institute for Justice and Reconciliation, Lead author: Dr Helen Scanlon

SOLE AUTHOR PUBLICATIONS

‘Transitions, Truth-Telling and Teaching History’, Cambridge Open-Review Educational Research e-Journal, Vol. 4, 2017.

Paul Riser is a DPhil Student in the department. His research focuses broadly on students’ (especially the marginalised) identities work in upper-secondary English Language Arts classrooms.

Prior to starting his doctoral studies, Paul earned a BSc in English Language Arts (Secondary Education) with a minor in Theology and a BA in Spanish and International Studies with a minor in Psychology from Texas Lutheran University. His MA in English Literature and Language is from St. Mary’s University.

As part of his postgraduate schoolwork, Paul undertook a placement in two graduate certificate programs, earning both his School Counselor certification and School Principal certification for all grade levels in the state of Texas, USA. In addition to English Language Arts and Reading (4th-12th grades), he is also qualified to teach Health (all levels), Journalism (7-12), Speech (7-12), Social Studies (7-12), and English as a Second Language (all levels) in Texas. Further, Paul holds a teaching certification in California, USA, the United Kingdom and Wales, the Kingdom of Denmark, and the Netherlands.

As a public school English teacher for 8 years, Paul was awarded many distinctions including, but not limited to: El maestro de impacto, two Harvard Book Awards, Teacher of the Year, and Texas Parent-Teacher Association Life Member.

His research to inform his doctoral thesis work will be completed in the United States of America. Furthermore, his research interests revolve around the nexus points of gender, ethnicity, sexuality, economic status, and religion as they relate to the agency students have in the classroom.

Paul is the 2019-2020 Student Liaison Coordinator for the Department of Education, Oxford. In this role, he is charged with leading/convening weekly workshops on a variety of research training topics, co-organizing networking and career advice opportunities for graduate students, and liaising with Cambridge University personnel to organize the annual Oxbridge Exchange. Furthermore, Paul supports the Higher Degrees Office as appropriate and meets regularly with directors and other stakeholders to discuss issues of common student concern in order to develop student identity and community throughout the Department.

Paul serves as the representative student voice on the Social Sciences Division Equality & Diversity Steering Group for the University of Oxford.

Paul is also a part-time Research Assistant working with professionals and other academics within the Department of Education on funded and individual projects as needed.

Supervisors: Associate Professors Jenni Ingram and Velda Elliott & Departmental Lecturer Jason Todd.

Thesis Title: ‘Using Positioning Theory to Understand Marginalised Students’ Identities Work and Their Learning Experiences in English Language Arts Classrooms’

Open-Access Publication:
Ingram, Jenni, & Riser, P.A. (2019). Experiences of problem solving in whole class interactions. Avances De Investigación En Educación Matemática, Avances de Investigación en Educación Matemática, Number 16; October 2019.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.35763/aiem.v0i16.279

Tessa is currently completing a part-time DPhil, alongside work as a senior leader in a London secondary school.

Her research explores how teachers on school-based ITE routes (TeachFirst and School Direct salaried) approach learning from experience. The research takes an action research approach: working with participant beginning teachers and mentors to critically examine and reflect on the processes of learning to teach, using their conversations as stimulus data.

Prior to joining the Department of Education Tessa completed an MSc in Educational Research (University of Bristol).

Yoon Young has been involved in a variety of academic and professional projects related to teacher education.

She is currently a member of the Teacher Education and Professional Learning (TEPL) research group at Oxford. Her doctoral research focuses on teacher education policy and practice in England. The study examines the relationship between individuals’ own objectives, the stated programme goals, and the national teachers’ standards in the operation of the Oxford Internship Scheme (OIS). It also explores the perceptions of stakeholders regarding ideal goals that could drive a re-conceptualised teacher education programme.

Prior to her doctorate, Yoon Young used to be a social studies teacher and subsequently worked as a consultant for the OECD’s Initial Teacher Preparation (ITP) Study. She holds a B.A. in Social Studies and Geography Education from the Ewha Womans University, and an M.A. in Educational Leadership from the University of Jyväskylä, where she was a grantee of the Korean Government Scholarship for Study Overseas.

Katy is a Deputy Headteacher and the founder of a Leadership and Coaching Institute, which she now co-directs.

Katy is an Associate Fellow at the Oxford Character Project and a Research Associate at the Oxford University Wellbeing Research Centre. She is the co-founder of Global Social Leaders, a leadership programme which has participants in 105 countries, all passionate about creating and sustaining positive change in the world.

Title of Thesis

How could school leaders improve the flourishing and wellbeing of teaching staff?

Books
  • Granville-Chapman, K. and Bidston, E (2020) Leader: Know, love and inspire your people. Carmarthen: Crownhouse Publishing
Book Chapters
  •  Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ In White, M. & McCallum, F. (Ed.s) Wellbeing and Resilience Education: Covid-19 And Its Impact on Education Systems. Routledge
Publications
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘Purpose and Leadership in Education and Beyond’. The Education Exchange. Available from: https://theeducation.exchange/purpose-and-leadership-in-education-and-beyond/
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘The Three Secrets of COVID-era Leadership’. Times Education Supplement. Available from: https://www.tes.com/news/three-secrets-covid-era-school-leadership
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2016) ‘Assessing the Impact of a Teacher Leadership Programme in a Teaching Schools Alliance. Journal of Teacher Action Research
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2014) ‘The Afghan conflict: causes and consequences.’ Geography Review 28(1): 22-27
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2013) What are the psychological factors that affect students’ academic resilience and can teachers influence these? Unpublished thesis
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘Unlocking Leadership Potential’, The Magazine of the Boarding School’s Association, 33: 42-45
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2009) ‘Learning to Lead’, Leader, The Education Leader Magazine 41: 22-25
Presentations
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2019) ‘How could leaders improve the flourishing of their teams?’ ‘Stowe Ed Conference’, Forthcoming: 7 Jan 2019
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2018) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education: 21 Jun 2018
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2017) ‘How can school leaders improve teacher flourishing?’ ‘Doing Education Differently Conference’, University of Oxford, Department of Education, 11 Mar 17
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2016) ‘Developing school leaders who enable teachers to flourish’ The Telegraph Festival of Education 23 Jun 16
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Developing leadership in pupils and teachers’ High School Affiliated to Renmin University of China, Beijing. 20 Oct 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Resilience for leaders.’ Global Social Leaders World Summit. 16 Aug 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Emotional Intelligence for Leaders.’ Global Leaders in Education. 12 Aug 15
  • Coates, S.; Fraser, H.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J.; and Nasim, A. (2015) ‘Breaking through the glass ceiling – how can schools empower our girls to become leaders?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education. 19 Jun 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. ‘Developing Leadership in Schools’ (2015). G20 Schools Conference. International conference for head teachers. 11 Apr 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2018) ‘Introduction’, Wellington Leadership Institute: Festival of Leadership. Mar 2012-15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘How the Young Learn to Lead’, Raffles Institution (Singapore) -Purdue University (USA) Education Forum on Gifted & Talented Youth 2012. Singapore. 15 Mar 12
  • Draper, D.; Dyer, R.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Schools’. Presentation for a meeting about pupil leadership and character development at 10 Downing Street. 16 Nov 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Young People’. Presentation for a meeting about leadership and character at 10 Downing Street. 7 Mar 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K. & Seldon, A. (2012) ‘Introduction’, Leading Your School in the 21st Century. 7 Feb 12

Kamal Armanious is particularly interested in the topic of education governance to explore what is possible in developing an improved governance system for technical and vocational education and training (TVET).

There have always been various calls from different international organisations such UNESCO, ILO, World Bank, OECD etc. to develop a transformed and transformative approach to TVET. This is attractive for certain theoretical as well as practical reasons; however, one set of limitations in achieving this vision lies in the arena of governance. Mr Armanious examines an imagined better model of governance that can be developed from the principles of a new approach and wider theoretical resources with consideration to national realities where there may be very serious obstacles in the way of realising this new governance approach and hence the overall planned transformation.

Title of Thesis

Education and Training Policies in Egypt: Good Governance and Stakeholders Participation

 

Amanda is completing a part-time DPhil, alongside working in Initial Teacher Education at Leeds Trinity University.

Her research is focused on understanding tensions, contradictions and conflicts that teachers in disadvantaged schools may experience when they engage in research activity.  Her research focus is influenced by her own experiences of working as a research-active teacher in disadvantaged schools, and recent work in teacher education to support experienced and beginning teachers in developing their own research activities.

One of the aims of Amanda’s research is to construct a framework to support teachers in pursuing research activity and critical scholarship work which articulates with wider social movements to address issues of poverty and disadvantage in schools.

Title of Thesis

Teachers’ perspectives on tensions between policy, practice and research in disadvantaged schools

Publications 

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2017) A ‘usable past’ of teacher education in England: history in JET’s anniversary issue. Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy, 43 (5), pp.616-627.

Nuttall, A. (2016) The ‘curriculum challenge’: Moving towards the ‘Storyline’ approach in a case study urban primary school.  Improving Schools, 19 (2), pp. 154-166.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Learning {Re}imagined: A review.  Primary First, 15, pp. 17-18.

Nuttall, A. and Doherty, J. (2014) Disaffected boys and the achievement gap: the ‘wallpaper effect’ and what is hidden by a focus on school results.  The Urban Review, 46 (5), pp.800-815.

Conference Papers and Presentations

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2018) “No child is pre-ordained to fail” Teachers questioning policy assumptions.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Newcastle, 11-13 September.

Nuttall, A. and Tobbell, C. (2017) Trainee teachers’ perspectives on practitioner enquiry.  Paper presented at the 8th TEAN Conference: Thinking Deeply about Education, Birmingham, 11-12 May.

Nuttall, A. (2017) Assessment at primary level: quality, comparability and improving secondary readiness.  A perspective from ITE.  Speech at the Westminster Education Forum Keynote Seminar: Next steps for reforming primary education: effective teaching practices, assessment and accountably, London, 18 January.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Deficit narratives and lived realities: whose poverty is it?  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the Australian Association for Research in Education, Melbourne, 27 November – 1 December.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Disenfranchised boys’ reflections on their urban schooling experience: “What a Waste!”.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Philpott, C., Beckett, L. and Wrigley, T. (2016) Collaborative practitioner inquiry: making a difference to urban schools.  Innovation session (school visits and symposium) presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Finn, B. and Beckett, L. (2015) Teachers’ constructions of poverty effects: Their research evidence.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Belfast, 15-17 September.

Nuttall, A. (2014) Teachers’ voice on disengaged boys: the role of one teacher-researcher in an English primary school. Paper presented at the Joint Australian Association for Research in Education and the New Zealand Association for Research in Education Conference, Brisbane, 30 November – 4 December.

Abigail’s research explores the role of education in students’ personal development and how this can be supported by policy, curricula, initial teacher education and teacher professional development. In particular she focuses on history education, citizenship education and peace education as vehicles for dialogue. These opportunities for students to engage with social questions are vital for building cohesive societies. This flows from the recognition that traditional forums for developing public understanding, such as post-conflict truth commissions, need to be complemented by intergenerational and educational perspectives.

Abigail has taught History, Politics, Debating as well as Relationships and Sex Education to secondary school students in South Africa, England and the USA.

She holds postgraduate degrees in Post-Conflict and Transitional Justice (University of Cape Town), in Education, Globalisation and International Development (University of Cambridge) and in African Studies (University of Oxford). She is a Rhodes Scholar, Mandela-Magdalene Scholar and Mandela-Rhodes Scholar.

Title of thesis

GCSE History, Policy Reform and Student Development: How students and teachers navigate the thematic study “Empires, Migration and the People”

Conference papers

Teaching Migration, Belonging, and Empire in Secondary Schools: evaluation of a teacher professional development program, (2019) History Educators International Research Network Conference, Lead author: Dr Jason Todd, University of Vienna, Austria.

“The Problems and Prospects of Teaching South Africa’s Recent History: Teachers’ Perspectives”, (2018) Sustainability, peace and education – Exploring promise and practice: BAICE 20th Anniversary Symposium, University of Bristol, England.

“New Generations, Old Wounds: Learning History at Home and School in Northern Ireland”, (2018) European Social Science and History Conference,
Queens University Belfast, Northern Ireland.

“The Methodological Challenges of Investigating the Role of History Teaching in Peacebuilding”, (2017), Present Past: Time, Memory, and the Negotiation of Historical Justice Conference, Columbia University, United States of America.

“Teaching South Africa’s Truth and Reconciliation Commission”, (2017) European Conference on African Studies, Universität Basel, Switzerland.

Research Assistant Publications

Review of the evidence on feedback in primary and secondary schools, (forthcoming, 2021) for the Education Endowment Foundation, Lead author: Prof Velda Elliott.

Teaching Migration, Belonging, and Empire in Secondary Schools, (2019), for Runnymede Trust and the European Research Council, Lead authors: Kimberly McIntosh, Dr Jason Todd and Prof Nandini Das.

Gender and the Politics of Reconciliation (2016), for The Institute for Justice and Reconciliation, Lead author: Dr Helen Scanlon

SOLE AUTHOR PUBLICATIONS

‘Transitions, Truth-Telling and Teaching History’, Cambridge Open-Review Educational Research e-Journal, Vol. 4, 2017.

Paul Riser is a DPhil Student in the department. His research focuses broadly on students’ (especially the marginalised) identities work in upper-secondary English Language Arts classrooms.

Prior to starting his doctoral studies, Paul earned a BSc in English Language Arts (Secondary Education) with a minor in Theology and a BA in Spanish and International Studies with a minor in Psychology from Texas Lutheran University. His MA in English Literature and Language is from St. Mary’s University.

As part of his postgraduate schoolwork, Paul undertook a placement in two graduate certificate programs, earning both his School Counselor certification and School Principal certification for all grade levels in the state of Texas, USA. In addition to English Language Arts and Reading (4th-12th grades), he is also qualified to teach Health (all levels), Journalism (7-12), Speech (7-12), Social Studies (7-12), and English as a Second Language (all levels) in Texas. Further, Paul holds a teaching certification in California, USA, the United Kingdom and Wales, the Kingdom of Denmark, and the Netherlands.

As a public school English teacher for 8 years, Paul was awarded many distinctions including, but not limited to: El maestro de impacto, two Harvard Book Awards, Teacher of the Year, and Texas Parent-Teacher Association Life Member.

His research to inform his doctoral thesis work will be completed in the United States of America. Furthermore, his research interests revolve around the nexus points of gender, ethnicity, sexuality, economic status, and religion as they relate to the agency students have in the classroom.

Paul is the 2019-2020 Student Liaison Coordinator for the Department of Education, Oxford. In this role, he is charged with leading/convening weekly workshops on a variety of research training topics, co-organizing networking and career advice opportunities for graduate students, and liaising with Cambridge University personnel to organize the annual Oxbridge Exchange. Furthermore, Paul supports the Higher Degrees Office as appropriate and meets regularly with directors and other stakeholders to discuss issues of common student concern in order to develop student identity and community throughout the Department.

Paul serves as the representative student voice on the Social Sciences Division Equality & Diversity Steering Group for the University of Oxford.

Paul is also a part-time Research Assistant working with professionals and other academics within the Department of Education on funded and individual projects as needed.

Supervisors: Associate Professors Jenni Ingram and Velda Elliott & Departmental Lecturer Jason Todd.

Thesis Title: ‘Using Positioning Theory to Understand Marginalised Students’ Identities Work and Their Learning Experiences in English Language Arts Classrooms’

Open-Access Publication:
Ingram, Jenni, & Riser, P.A. (2019). Experiences of problem solving in whole class interactions. Avances De Investigación En Educación Matemática, Avances de Investigación en Educación Matemática, Number 16; October 2019.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.35763/aiem.v0i16.279

Tessa is currently completing a part-time DPhil, alongside work as a senior leader in a London secondary school.

Her research explores how teachers on school-based ITE routes (TeachFirst and School Direct salaried) approach learning from experience. The research takes an action research approach: working with participant beginning teachers and mentors to critically examine and reflect on the processes of learning to teach, using their conversations as stimulus data.

Prior to joining the Department of Education Tessa completed an MSc in Educational Research (University of Bristol).

Yoon Young has been involved in a variety of academic and professional projects related to teacher education.

She is currently a member of the Teacher Education and Professional Learning (TEPL) research group at Oxford. Her doctoral research focuses on teacher education policy and practice in England. The study examines the relationship between individuals’ own objectives, the stated programme goals, and the national teachers’ standards in the operation of the Oxford Internship Scheme (OIS). It also explores the perceptions of stakeholders regarding ideal goals that could drive a re-conceptualised teacher education programme.

Prior to her doctorate, Yoon Young used to be a social studies teacher and subsequently worked as a consultant for the OECD’s Initial Teacher Preparation (ITP) Study. She holds a B.A. in Social Studies and Geography Education from the Ewha Womans University, and an M.A. in Educational Leadership from the University of Jyväskylä, where she was a grantee of the Korean Government Scholarship for Study Overseas.

Katy is a Deputy Headteacher and the founder of a Leadership and Coaching Institute, which she now co-directs.

Katy is an Associate Fellow at the Oxford Character Project and a Research Associate at the Oxford University Wellbeing Research Centre. She is the co-founder of Global Social Leaders, a leadership programme which has participants in 105 countries, all passionate about creating and sustaining positive change in the world.

Title of Thesis

How could school leaders improve the flourishing and wellbeing of teaching staff?

Books
  • Granville-Chapman, K. and Bidston, E (2020) Leader: Know, love and inspire your people. Carmarthen: Crownhouse Publishing
Book Chapters
  •  Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ In White, M. & McCallum, F. (Ed.s) Wellbeing and Resilience Education: Covid-19 And Its Impact on Education Systems. Routledge
Publications
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘Purpose and Leadership in Education and Beyond’. The Education Exchange. Available from: https://theeducation.exchange/purpose-and-leadership-in-education-and-beyond/
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘The Three Secrets of COVID-era Leadership’. Times Education Supplement. Available from: https://www.tes.com/news/three-secrets-covid-era-school-leadership
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2016) ‘Assessing the Impact of a Teacher Leadership Programme in a Teaching Schools Alliance. Journal of Teacher Action Research
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2014) ‘The Afghan conflict: causes and consequences.’ Geography Review 28(1): 22-27
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2013) What are the psychological factors that affect students’ academic resilience and can teachers influence these? Unpublished thesis
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘Unlocking Leadership Potential’, The Magazine of the Boarding School’s Association, 33: 42-45
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2009) ‘Learning to Lead’, Leader, The Education Leader Magazine 41: 22-25
Presentations
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2019) ‘How could leaders improve the flourishing of their teams?’ ‘Stowe Ed Conference’, Forthcoming: 7 Jan 2019
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2018) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education: 21 Jun 2018
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2017) ‘How can school leaders improve teacher flourishing?’ ‘Doing Education Differently Conference’, University of Oxford, Department of Education, 11 Mar 17
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2016) ‘Developing school leaders who enable teachers to flourish’ The Telegraph Festival of Education 23 Jun 16
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Developing leadership in pupils and teachers’ High School Affiliated to Renmin University of China, Beijing. 20 Oct 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Resilience for leaders.’ Global Social Leaders World Summit. 16 Aug 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Emotional Intelligence for Leaders.’ Global Leaders in Education. 12 Aug 15
  • Coates, S.; Fraser, H.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J.; and Nasim, A. (2015) ‘Breaking through the glass ceiling – how can schools empower our girls to become leaders?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education. 19 Jun 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. ‘Developing Leadership in Schools’ (2015). G20 Schools Conference. International conference for head teachers. 11 Apr 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2018) ‘Introduction’, Wellington Leadership Institute: Festival of Leadership. Mar 2012-15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘How the Young Learn to Lead’, Raffles Institution (Singapore) -Purdue University (USA) Education Forum on Gifted & Talented Youth 2012. Singapore. 15 Mar 12
  • Draper, D.; Dyer, R.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Schools’. Presentation for a meeting about pupil leadership and character development at 10 Downing Street. 16 Nov 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Young People’. Presentation for a meeting about leadership and character at 10 Downing Street. 7 Mar 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K. & Seldon, A. (2012) ‘Introduction’, Leading Your School in the 21st Century. 7 Feb 12

Kamal Armanious is particularly interested in the topic of education governance to explore what is possible in developing an improved governance system for technical and vocational education and training (TVET).

There have always been various calls from different international organisations such UNESCO, ILO, World Bank, OECD etc. to develop a transformed and transformative approach to TVET. This is attractive for certain theoretical as well as practical reasons; however, one set of limitations in achieving this vision lies in the arena of governance. Mr Armanious examines an imagined better model of governance that can be developed from the principles of a new approach and wider theoretical resources with consideration to national realities where there may be very serious obstacles in the way of realising this new governance approach and hence the overall planned transformation.

Title of Thesis

Education and Training Policies in Egypt: Good Governance and Stakeholders Participation

 

Amanda is completing a part-time DPhil, alongside working in Initial Teacher Education at Leeds Trinity University.

Her research is focused on understanding tensions, contradictions and conflicts that teachers in disadvantaged schools may experience when they engage in research activity.  Her research focus is influenced by her own experiences of working as a research-active teacher in disadvantaged schools, and recent work in teacher education to support experienced and beginning teachers in developing their own research activities.

One of the aims of Amanda’s research is to construct a framework to support teachers in pursuing research activity and critical scholarship work which articulates with wider social movements to address issues of poverty and disadvantage in schools.

Title of Thesis

Teachers’ perspectives on tensions between policy, practice and research in disadvantaged schools

Publications 

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2017) A ‘usable past’ of teacher education in England: history in JET’s anniversary issue. Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy, 43 (5), pp.616-627.

Nuttall, A. (2016) The ‘curriculum challenge’: Moving towards the ‘Storyline’ approach in a case study urban primary school.  Improving Schools, 19 (2), pp. 154-166.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Learning {Re}imagined: A review.  Primary First, 15, pp. 17-18.

Nuttall, A. and Doherty, J. (2014) Disaffected boys and the achievement gap: the ‘wallpaper effect’ and what is hidden by a focus on school results.  The Urban Review, 46 (5), pp.800-815.

Conference Papers and Presentations

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2018) “No child is pre-ordained to fail” Teachers questioning policy assumptions.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Newcastle, 11-13 September.

Nuttall, A. and Tobbell, C. (2017) Trainee teachers’ perspectives on practitioner enquiry.  Paper presented at the 8th TEAN Conference: Thinking Deeply about Education, Birmingham, 11-12 May.

Nuttall, A. (2017) Assessment at primary level: quality, comparability and improving secondary readiness.  A perspective from ITE.  Speech at the Westminster Education Forum Keynote Seminar: Next steps for reforming primary education: effective teaching practices, assessment and accountably, London, 18 January.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Deficit narratives and lived realities: whose poverty is it?  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the Australian Association for Research in Education, Melbourne, 27 November – 1 December.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Disenfranchised boys’ reflections on their urban schooling experience: “What a Waste!”.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Philpott, C., Beckett, L. and Wrigley, T. (2016) Collaborative practitioner inquiry: making a difference to urban schools.  Innovation session (school visits and symposium) presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Finn, B. and Beckett, L. (2015) Teachers’ constructions of poverty effects: Their research evidence.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Belfast, 15-17 September.

Nuttall, A. (2014) Teachers’ voice on disengaged boys: the role of one teacher-researcher in an English primary school. Paper presented at the Joint Australian Association for Research in Education and the New Zealand Association for Research in Education Conference, Brisbane, 30 November – 4 December.

Abigail’s research explores the role of education in students’ personal development and how this can be supported by policy, curricula, initial teacher education and teacher professional development. In particular she focuses on history education, citizenship education and peace education as vehicles for dialogue. These opportunities for students to engage with social questions are vital for building cohesive societies. This flows from the recognition that traditional forums for developing public understanding, such as post-conflict truth commissions, need to be complemented by intergenerational and educational perspectives.

Abigail has taught History, Politics, Debating as well as Relationships and Sex Education to secondary school students in South Africa, England and the USA.

She holds postgraduate degrees in Post-Conflict and Transitional Justice (University of Cape Town), in Education, Globalisation and International Development (University of Cambridge) and in African Studies (University of Oxford). She is a Rhodes Scholar, Mandela-Magdalene Scholar and Mandela-Rhodes Scholar.

Title of thesis

GCSE History, Policy Reform and Student Development: How students and teachers navigate the thematic study “Empires, Migration and the People”

Conference papers

Teaching Migration, Belonging, and Empire in Secondary Schools: evaluation of a teacher professional development program, (2019) History Educators International Research Network Conference, Lead author: Dr Jason Todd, University of Vienna, Austria.

“The Problems and Prospects of Teaching South Africa’s Recent History: Teachers’ Perspectives”, (2018) Sustainability, peace and education – Exploring promise and practice: BAICE 20th Anniversary Symposium, University of Bristol, England.

“New Generations, Old Wounds: Learning History at Home and School in Northern Ireland”, (2018) European Social Science and History Conference,
Queens University Belfast, Northern Ireland.

“The Methodological Challenges of Investigating the Role of History Teaching in Peacebuilding”, (2017), Present Past: Time, Memory, and the Negotiation of Historical Justice Conference, Columbia University, United States of America.

“Teaching South Africa’s Truth and Reconciliation Commission”, (2017) European Conference on African Studies, Universität Basel, Switzerland.

Research Assistant Publications

Review of the evidence on feedback in primary and secondary schools, (forthcoming, 2021) for the Education Endowment Foundation, Lead author: Prof Velda Elliott.

Teaching Migration, Belonging, and Empire in Secondary Schools, (2019), for Runnymede Trust and the European Research Council, Lead authors: Kimberly McIntosh, Dr Jason Todd and Prof Nandini Das.

Gender and the Politics of Reconciliation (2016), for The Institute for Justice and Reconciliation, Lead author: Dr Helen Scanlon

SOLE AUTHOR PUBLICATIONS

‘Transitions, Truth-Telling and Teaching History’, Cambridge Open-Review Educational Research e-Journal, Vol. 4, 2017.

Paul Riser is a DPhil Student in the department. His research focuses broadly on students’ (especially the marginalised) identities work in upper-secondary English Language Arts classrooms.

Prior to starting his doctoral studies, Paul earned a BSc in English Language Arts (Secondary Education) with a minor in Theology and a BA in Spanish and International Studies with a minor in Psychology from Texas Lutheran University. His MA in English Literature and Language is from St. Mary’s University.

As part of his postgraduate schoolwork, Paul undertook a placement in two graduate certificate programs, earning both his School Counselor certification and School Principal certification for all grade levels in the state of Texas, USA. In addition to English Language Arts and Reading (4th-12th grades), he is also qualified to teach Health (all levels), Journalism (7-12), Speech (7-12), Social Studies (7-12), and English as a Second Language (all levels) in Texas. Further, Paul holds a teaching certification in California, USA, the United Kingdom and Wales, the Kingdom of Denmark, and the Netherlands.

As a public school English teacher for 8 years, Paul was awarded many distinctions including, but not limited to: El maestro de impacto, two Harvard Book Awards, Teacher of the Year, and Texas Parent-Teacher Association Life Member.

His research to inform his doctoral thesis work will be completed in the United States of America. Furthermore, his research interests revolve around the nexus points of gender, ethnicity, sexuality, economic status, and religion as they relate to the agency students have in the classroom.

Paul is the 2019-2020 Student Liaison Coordinator for the Department of Education, Oxford. In this role, he is charged with leading/convening weekly workshops on a variety of research training topics, co-organizing networking and career advice opportunities for graduate students, and liaising with Cambridge University personnel to organize the annual Oxbridge Exchange. Furthermore, Paul supports the Higher Degrees Office as appropriate and meets regularly with directors and other stakeholders to discuss issues of common student concern in order to develop student identity and community throughout the Department.

Paul serves as the representative student voice on the Social Sciences Division Equality & Diversity Steering Group for the University of Oxford.

Paul is also a part-time Research Assistant working with professionals and other academics within the Department of Education on funded and individual projects as needed.

Supervisors: Associate Professors Jenni Ingram and Velda Elliott & Departmental Lecturer Jason Todd.

Thesis Title: ‘Using Positioning Theory to Understand Marginalised Students’ Identities Work and Their Learning Experiences in English Language Arts Classrooms’

Open-Access Publication:
Ingram, Jenni, & Riser, P.A. (2019). Experiences of problem solving in whole class interactions. Avances De Investigación En Educación Matemática, Avances de Investigación en Educación Matemática, Number 16; October 2019.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.35763/aiem.v0i16.279

Tessa is currently completing a part-time DPhil, alongside work as a senior leader in a London secondary school.

Her research explores how teachers on school-based ITE routes (TeachFirst and School Direct salaried) approach learning from experience. The research takes an action research approach: working with participant beginning teachers and mentors to critically examine and reflect on the processes of learning to teach, using their conversations as stimulus data.

Prior to joining the Department of Education Tessa completed an MSc in Educational Research (University of Bristol).

Yoon Young has been involved in a variety of academic and professional projects related to teacher education.

She is currently a member of the Teacher Education and Professional Learning (TEPL) research group at Oxford. Her doctoral research focuses on teacher education policy and practice in England. The study examines the relationship between individuals’ own objectives, the stated programme goals, and the national teachers’ standards in the operation of the Oxford Internship Scheme (OIS). It also explores the perceptions of stakeholders regarding ideal goals that could drive a re-conceptualised teacher education programme.

Prior to her doctorate, Yoon Young used to be a social studies teacher and subsequently worked as a consultant for the OECD’s Initial Teacher Preparation (ITP) Study. She holds a B.A. in Social Studies and Geography Education from the Ewha Womans University, and an M.A. in Educational Leadership from the University of Jyväskylä, where she was a grantee of the Korean Government Scholarship for Study Overseas.

Katy is a Deputy Headteacher and the founder of a Leadership and Coaching Institute, which she now co-directs.

Katy is an Associate Fellow at the Oxford Character Project and a Research Associate at the Oxford University Wellbeing Research Centre. She is the co-founder of Global Social Leaders, a leadership programme which has participants in 105 countries, all passionate about creating and sustaining positive change in the world.

Title of Thesis

How could school leaders improve the flourishing and wellbeing of teaching staff?

Books
  • Granville-Chapman, K. and Bidston, E (2020) Leader: Know, love and inspire your people. Carmarthen: Crownhouse Publishing
Book Chapters
  •  Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ In White, M. & McCallum, F. (Ed.s) Wellbeing and Resilience Education: Covid-19 And Its Impact on Education Systems. Routledge
Publications
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘Purpose and Leadership in Education and Beyond’. The Education Exchange. Available from: https://theeducation.exchange/purpose-and-leadership-in-education-and-beyond/
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘The Three Secrets of COVID-era Leadership’. Times Education Supplement. Available from: https://www.tes.com/news/three-secrets-covid-era-school-leadership
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2016) ‘Assessing the Impact of a Teacher Leadership Programme in a Teaching Schools Alliance. Journal of Teacher Action Research
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2014) ‘The Afghan conflict: causes and consequences.’ Geography Review 28(1): 22-27
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2013) What are the psychological factors that affect students’ academic resilience and can teachers influence these? Unpublished thesis
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘Unlocking Leadership Potential’, The Magazine of the Boarding School’s Association, 33: 42-45
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2009) ‘Learning to Lead’, Leader, The Education Leader Magazine 41: 22-25
Presentations
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2019) ‘How could leaders improve the flourishing of their teams?’ ‘Stowe Ed Conference’, Forthcoming: 7 Jan 2019
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2018) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education: 21 Jun 2018
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2017) ‘How can school leaders improve teacher flourishing?’ ‘Doing Education Differently Conference’, University of Oxford, Department of Education, 11 Mar 17
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2016) ‘Developing school leaders who enable teachers to flourish’ The Telegraph Festival of Education 23 Jun 16
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Developing leadership in pupils and teachers’ High School Affiliated to Renmin University of China, Beijing. 20 Oct 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Resilience for leaders.’ Global Social Leaders World Summit. 16 Aug 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Emotional Intelligence for Leaders.’ Global Leaders in Education. 12 Aug 15
  • Coates, S.; Fraser, H.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J.; and Nasim, A. (2015) ‘Breaking through the glass ceiling – how can schools empower our girls to become leaders?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education. 19 Jun 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. ‘Developing Leadership in Schools’ (2015). G20 Schools Conference. International conference for head teachers. 11 Apr 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2018) ‘Introduction’, Wellington Leadership Institute: Festival of Leadership. Mar 2012-15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘How the Young Learn to Lead’, Raffles Institution (Singapore) -Purdue University (USA) Education Forum on Gifted & Talented Youth 2012. Singapore. 15 Mar 12
  • Draper, D.; Dyer, R.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Schools’. Presentation for a meeting about pupil leadership and character development at 10 Downing Street. 16 Nov 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Young People’. Presentation for a meeting about leadership and character at 10 Downing Street. 7 Mar 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K. & Seldon, A. (2012) ‘Introduction’, Leading Your School in the 21st Century. 7 Feb 12

Kamal Armanious is particularly interested in the topic of education governance to explore what is possible in developing an improved governance system for technical and vocational education and training (TVET).

There have always been various calls from different international organisations such UNESCO, ILO, World Bank, OECD etc. to develop a transformed and transformative approach to TVET. This is attractive for certain theoretical as well as practical reasons; however, one set of limitations in achieving this vision lies in the arena of governance. Mr Armanious examines an imagined better model of governance that can be developed from the principles of a new approach and wider theoretical resources with consideration to national realities where there may be very serious obstacles in the way of realising this new governance approach and hence the overall planned transformation.

Title of Thesis

Education and Training Policies in Egypt: Good Governance and Stakeholders Participation

 

Amanda is completing a part-time DPhil, alongside working in Initial Teacher Education at Leeds Trinity University.

Her research is focused on understanding tensions, contradictions and conflicts that teachers in disadvantaged schools may experience when they engage in research activity.  Her research focus is influenced by her own experiences of working as a research-active teacher in disadvantaged schools, and recent work in teacher education to support experienced and beginning teachers in developing their own research activities.

One of the aims of Amanda’s research is to construct a framework to support teachers in pursuing research activity and critical scholarship work which articulates with wider social movements to address issues of poverty and disadvantage in schools.

Title of Thesis

Teachers’ perspectives on tensions between policy, practice and research in disadvantaged schools

Publications 

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2017) A ‘usable past’ of teacher education in England: history in JET’s anniversary issue. Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy, 43 (5), pp.616-627.

Nuttall, A. (2016) The ‘curriculum challenge’: Moving towards the ‘Storyline’ approach in a case study urban primary school.  Improving Schools, 19 (2), pp. 154-166.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Learning {Re}imagined: A review.  Primary First, 15, pp. 17-18.

Nuttall, A. and Doherty, J. (2014) Disaffected boys and the achievement gap: the ‘wallpaper effect’ and what is hidden by a focus on school results.  The Urban Review, 46 (5), pp.800-815.

Conference Papers and Presentations

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2018) “No child is pre-ordained to fail” Teachers questioning policy assumptions.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Newcastle, 11-13 September.

Nuttall, A. and Tobbell, C. (2017) Trainee teachers’ perspectives on practitioner enquiry.  Paper presented at the 8th TEAN Conference: Thinking Deeply about Education, Birmingham, 11-12 May.

Nuttall, A. (2017) Assessment at primary level: quality, comparability and improving secondary readiness.  A perspective from ITE.  Speech at the Westminster Education Forum Keynote Seminar: Next steps for reforming primary education: effective teaching practices, assessment and accountably, London, 18 January.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Deficit narratives and lived realities: whose poverty is it?  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the Australian Association for Research in Education, Melbourne, 27 November – 1 December.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Disenfranchised boys’ reflections on their urban schooling experience: “What a Waste!”.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Philpott, C., Beckett, L. and Wrigley, T. (2016) Collaborative practitioner inquiry: making a difference to urban schools.  Innovation session (school visits and symposium) presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Finn, B. and Beckett, L. (2015) Teachers’ constructions of poverty effects: Their research evidence.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Belfast, 15-17 September.

Nuttall, A. (2014) Teachers’ voice on disengaged boys: the role of one teacher-researcher in an English primary school. Paper presented at the Joint Australian Association for Research in Education and the New Zealand Association for Research in Education Conference, Brisbane, 30 November – 4 December.

Abigail’s research explores the role of education in students’ personal development and how this can be supported by policy, curricula, initial teacher education and teacher professional development. In particular she focuses on history education, citizenship education and peace education as vehicles for dialogue. These opportunities for students to engage with social questions are vital for building cohesive societies. This flows from the recognition that traditional forums for developing public understanding, such as post-conflict truth commissions, need to be complemented by intergenerational and educational perspectives.

Abigail has taught History, Politics, Debating as well as Relationships and Sex Education to secondary school students in South Africa, England and the USA.

She holds postgraduate degrees in Post-Conflict and Transitional Justice (University of Cape Town), in Education, Globalisation and International Development (University of Cambridge) and in African Studies (University of Oxford). She is a Rhodes Scholar, Mandela-Magdalene Scholar and Mandela-Rhodes Scholar.

Title of thesis

GCSE History, Policy Reform and Student Development: How students and teachers navigate the thematic study “Empires, Migration and the People”

Conference papers

Teaching Migration, Belonging, and Empire in Secondary Schools: evaluation of a teacher professional development program, (2019) History Educators International Research Network Conference, Lead author: Dr Jason Todd, University of Vienna, Austria.

“The Problems and Prospects of Teaching South Africa’s Recent History: Teachers’ Perspectives”, (2018) Sustainability, peace and education – Exploring promise and practice: BAICE 20th Anniversary Symposium, University of Bristol, England.

“New Generations, Old Wounds: Learning History at Home and School in Northern Ireland”, (2018) European Social Science and History Conference,
Queens University Belfast, Northern Ireland.

“The Methodological Challenges of Investigating the Role of History Teaching in Peacebuilding”, (2017), Present Past: Time, Memory, and the Negotiation of Historical Justice Conference, Columbia University, United States of America.

“Teaching South Africa’s Truth and Reconciliation Commission”, (2017) European Conference on African Studies, Universität Basel, Switzerland.

Research Assistant Publications

Review of the evidence on feedback in primary and secondary schools, (forthcoming, 2021) for the Education Endowment Foundation, Lead author: Prof Velda Elliott.

Teaching Migration, Belonging, and Empire in Secondary Schools, (2019), for Runnymede Trust and the European Research Council, Lead authors: Kimberly McIntosh, Dr Jason Todd and Prof Nandini Das.

Gender and the Politics of Reconciliation (2016), for The Institute for Justice and Reconciliation, Lead author: Dr Helen Scanlon

SOLE AUTHOR PUBLICATIONS

‘Transitions, Truth-Telling and Teaching History’, Cambridge Open-Review Educational Research e-Journal, Vol. 4, 2017.

Paul Riser is a DPhil Student in the department. His research focuses broadly on students’ (especially the marginalised) identities work in upper-secondary English Language Arts classrooms.

Prior to starting his doctoral studies, Paul earned a BSc in English Language Arts (Secondary Education) with a minor in Theology and a BA in Spanish and International Studies with a minor in Psychology from Texas Lutheran University. His MA in English Literature and Language is from St. Mary’s University.

As part of his postgraduate schoolwork, Paul undertook a placement in two graduate certificate programs, earning both his School Counselor certification and School Principal certification for all grade levels in the state of Texas, USA. In addition to English Language Arts and Reading (4th-12th grades), he is also qualified to teach Health (all levels), Journalism (7-12), Speech (7-12), Social Studies (7-12), and English as a Second Language (all levels) in Texas. Further, Paul holds a teaching certification in California, USA, the United Kingdom and Wales, the Kingdom of Denmark, and the Netherlands.

As a public school English teacher for 8 years, Paul was awarded many distinctions including, but not limited to: El maestro de impacto, two Harvard Book Awards, Teacher of the Year, and Texas Parent-Teacher Association Life Member.

His research to inform his doctoral thesis work will be completed in the United States of America. Furthermore, his research interests revolve around the nexus points of gender, ethnicity, sexuality, economic status, and religion as they relate to the agency students have in the classroom.

Paul is the 2019-2020 Student Liaison Coordinator for the Department of Education, Oxford. In this role, he is charged with leading/convening weekly workshops on a variety of research training topics, co-organizing networking and career advice opportunities for graduate students, and liaising with Cambridge University personnel to organize the annual Oxbridge Exchange. Furthermore, Paul supports the Higher Degrees Office as appropriate and meets regularly with directors and other stakeholders to discuss issues of common student concern in order to develop student identity and community throughout the Department.

Paul serves as the representative student voice on the Social Sciences Division Equality & Diversity Steering Group for the University of Oxford.

Paul is also a part-time Research Assistant working with professionals and other academics within the Department of Education on funded and individual projects as needed.

Supervisors: Associate Professors Jenni Ingram and Velda Elliott & Departmental Lecturer Jason Todd.

Thesis Title: ‘Using Positioning Theory to Understand Marginalised Students’ Identities Work and Their Learning Experiences in English Language Arts Classrooms’

Open-Access Publication:
Ingram, Jenni, & Riser, P.A. (2019). Experiences of problem solving in whole class interactions. Avances De Investigación En Educación Matemática, Avances de Investigación en Educación Matemática, Number 16; October 2019.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.35763/aiem.v0i16.279

Tessa is currently completing a part-time DPhil, alongside work as a senior leader in a London secondary school.

Her research explores how teachers on school-based ITE routes (TeachFirst and School Direct salaried) approach learning from experience. The research takes an action research approach: working with participant beginning teachers and mentors to critically examine and reflect on the processes of learning to teach, using their conversations as stimulus data.

Prior to joining the Department of Education Tessa completed an MSc in Educational Research (University of Bristol).

Yoon Young has been involved in a variety of academic and professional projects related to teacher education.

She is currently a member of the Teacher Education and Professional Learning (TEPL) research group at Oxford. Her doctoral research focuses on teacher education policy and practice in England. The study examines the relationship between individuals’ own objectives, the stated programme goals, and the national teachers’ standards in the operation of the Oxford Internship Scheme (OIS). It also explores the perceptions of stakeholders regarding ideal goals that could drive a re-conceptualised teacher education programme.

Prior to her doctorate, Yoon Young used to be a social studies teacher and subsequently worked as a consultant for the OECD’s Initial Teacher Preparation (ITP) Study. She holds a B.A. in Social Studies and Geography Education from the Ewha Womans University, and an M.A. in Educational Leadership from the University of Jyväskylä, where she was a grantee of the Korean Government Scholarship for Study Overseas.

Katy is a Deputy Headteacher and the founder of a Leadership and Coaching Institute, which she now co-directs.

Katy is an Associate Fellow at the Oxford Character Project and a Research Associate at the Oxford University Wellbeing Research Centre. She is the co-founder of Global Social Leaders, a leadership programme which has participants in 105 countries, all passionate about creating and sustaining positive change in the world.

Title of Thesis

How could school leaders improve the flourishing and wellbeing of teaching staff?

Books
  • Granville-Chapman, K. and Bidston, E (2020) Leader: Know, love and inspire your people. Carmarthen: Crownhouse Publishing
Book Chapters
  •  Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ In White, M. & McCallum, F. (Ed.s) Wellbeing and Resilience Education: Covid-19 And Its Impact on Education Systems. Routledge
Publications
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘Purpose and Leadership in Education and Beyond’. The Education Exchange. Available from: https://theeducation.exchange/purpose-and-leadership-in-education-and-beyond/
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘The Three Secrets of COVID-era Leadership’. Times Education Supplement. Available from: https://www.tes.com/news/three-secrets-covid-era-school-leadership
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2016) ‘Assessing the Impact of a Teacher Leadership Programme in a Teaching Schools Alliance. Journal of Teacher Action Research
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2014) ‘The Afghan conflict: causes and consequences.’ Geography Review 28(1): 22-27
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2013) What are the psychological factors that affect students’ academic resilience and can teachers influence these? Unpublished thesis
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘Unlocking Leadership Potential’, The Magazine of the Boarding School’s Association, 33: 42-45
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2009) ‘Learning to Lead’, Leader, The Education Leader Magazine 41: 22-25
Presentations
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2019) ‘How could leaders improve the flourishing of their teams?’ ‘Stowe Ed Conference’, Forthcoming: 7 Jan 2019
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2018) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education: 21 Jun 2018
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2017) ‘How can school leaders improve teacher flourishing?’ ‘Doing Education Differently Conference’, University of Oxford, Department of Education, 11 Mar 17
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2016) ‘Developing school leaders who enable teachers to flourish’ The Telegraph Festival of Education 23 Jun 16
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Developing leadership in pupils and teachers’ High School Affiliated to Renmin University of China, Beijing. 20 Oct 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Resilience for leaders.’ Global Social Leaders World Summit. 16 Aug 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Emotional Intelligence for Leaders.’ Global Leaders in Education. 12 Aug 15
  • Coates, S.; Fraser, H.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J.; and Nasim, A. (2015) ‘Breaking through the glass ceiling – how can schools empower our girls to become leaders?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education. 19 Jun 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. ‘Developing Leadership in Schools’ (2015). G20 Schools Conference. International conference for head teachers. 11 Apr 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2018) ‘Introduction’, Wellington Leadership Institute: Festival of Leadership. Mar 2012-15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘How the Young Learn to Lead’, Raffles Institution (Singapore) -Purdue University (USA) Education Forum on Gifted & Talented Youth 2012. Singapore. 15 Mar 12
  • Draper, D.; Dyer, R.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Schools’. Presentation for a meeting about pupil leadership and character development at 10 Downing Street. 16 Nov 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Young People’. Presentation for a meeting about leadership and character at 10 Downing Street. 7 Mar 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K. & Seldon, A. (2012) ‘Introduction’, Leading Your School in the 21st Century. 7 Feb 12

Kamal Armanious is particularly interested in the topic of education governance to explore what is possible in developing an improved governance system for technical and vocational education and training (TVET).

There have always been various calls from different international organisations such UNESCO, ILO, World Bank, OECD etc. to develop a transformed and transformative approach to TVET. This is attractive for certain theoretical as well as practical reasons; however, one set of limitations in achieving this vision lies in the arena of governance. Mr Armanious examines an imagined better model of governance that can be developed from the principles of a new approach and wider theoretical resources with consideration to national realities where there may be very serious obstacles in the way of realising this new governance approach and hence the overall planned transformation.

Title of Thesis

Education and Training Policies in Egypt: Good Governance and Stakeholders Participation

 

Amanda is completing a part-time DPhil, alongside working in Initial Teacher Education at Leeds Trinity University.

Her research is focused on understanding tensions, contradictions and conflicts that teachers in disadvantaged schools may experience when they engage in research activity.  Her research focus is influenced by her own experiences of working as a research-active teacher in disadvantaged schools, and recent work in teacher education to support experienced and beginning teachers in developing their own research activities.

One of the aims of Amanda’s research is to construct a framework to support teachers in pursuing research activity and critical scholarship work which articulates with wider social movements to address issues of poverty and disadvantage in schools.

Title of Thesis

Teachers’ perspectives on tensions between policy, practice and research in disadvantaged schools

Publications 

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2017) A ‘usable past’ of teacher education in England: history in JET’s anniversary issue. Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy, 43 (5), pp.616-627.

Nuttall, A. (2016) The ‘curriculum challenge’: Moving towards the ‘Storyline’ approach in a case study urban primary school.  Improving Schools, 19 (2), pp. 154-166.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Learning {Re}imagined: A review.  Primary First, 15, pp. 17-18.

Nuttall, A. and Doherty, J. (2014) Disaffected boys and the achievement gap: the ‘wallpaper effect’ and what is hidden by a focus on school results.  The Urban Review, 46 (5), pp.800-815.

Conference Papers and Presentations

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2018) “No child is pre-ordained to fail” Teachers questioning policy assumptions.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Newcastle, 11-13 September.

Nuttall, A. and Tobbell, C. (2017) Trainee teachers’ perspectives on practitioner enquiry.  Paper presented at the 8th TEAN Conference: Thinking Deeply about Education, Birmingham, 11-12 May.

Nuttall, A. (2017) Assessment at primary level: quality, comparability and improving secondary readiness.  A perspective from ITE.  Speech at the Westminster Education Forum Keynote Seminar: Next steps for reforming primary education: effective teaching practices, assessment and accountably, London, 18 January.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Deficit narratives and lived realities: whose poverty is it?  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the Australian Association for Research in Education, Melbourne, 27 November – 1 December.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Disenfranchised boys’ reflections on their urban schooling experience: “What a Waste!”.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Philpott, C., Beckett, L. and Wrigley, T. (2016) Collaborative practitioner inquiry: making a difference to urban schools.  Innovation session (school visits and symposium) presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Finn, B. and Beckett, L. (2015) Teachers’ constructions of poverty effects: Their research evidence.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Belfast, 15-17 September.

Nuttall, A. (2014) Teachers’ voice on disengaged boys: the role of one teacher-researcher in an English primary school. Paper presented at the Joint Australian Association for Research in Education and the New Zealand Association for Research in Education Conference, Brisbane, 30 November – 4 December.

Abigail’s research explores the role of education in students’ personal development and how this can be supported by policy, curricula, initial teacher education and teacher professional development. In particular she focuses on history education, citizenship education and peace education as vehicles for dialogue. These opportunities for students to engage with social questions are vital for building cohesive societies. This flows from the recognition that traditional forums for developing public understanding, such as post-conflict truth commissions, need to be complemented by intergenerational and educational perspectives.

Abigail has taught History, Politics, Debating as well as Relationships and Sex Education to secondary school students in South Africa, England and the USA.

She holds postgraduate degrees in Post-Conflict and Transitional Justice (University of Cape Town), in Education, Globalisation and International Development (University of Cambridge) and in African Studies (University of Oxford). She is a Rhodes Scholar, Mandela-Magdalene Scholar and Mandela-Rhodes Scholar.

Title of thesis

GCSE History, Policy Reform and Student Development: How students and teachers navigate the thematic study “Empires, Migration and the People”

Conference papers

Teaching Migration, Belonging, and Empire in Secondary Schools: evaluation of a teacher professional development program, (2019) History Educators International Research Network Conference, Lead author: Dr Jason Todd, University of Vienna, Austria.

“The Problems and Prospects of Teaching South Africa’s Recent History: Teachers’ Perspectives”, (2018) Sustainability, peace and education – Exploring promise and practice: BAICE 20th Anniversary Symposium, University of Bristol, England.

“New Generations, Old Wounds: Learning History at Home and School in Northern Ireland”, (2018) European Social Science and History Conference,
Queens University Belfast, Northern Ireland.

“The Methodological Challenges of Investigating the Role of History Teaching in Peacebuilding”, (2017), Present Past: Time, Memory, and the Negotiation of Historical Justice Conference, Columbia University, United States of America.

“Teaching South Africa’s Truth and Reconciliation Commission”, (2017) European Conference on African Studies, Universität Basel, Switzerland.

Research Assistant Publications

Review of the evidence on feedback in primary and secondary schools, (forthcoming, 2021) for the Education Endowment Foundation, Lead author: Prof Velda Elliott.

Teaching Migration, Belonging, and Empire in Secondary Schools, (2019), for Runnymede Trust and the European Research Council, Lead authors: Kimberly McIntosh, Dr Jason Todd and Prof Nandini Das.

Gender and the Politics of Reconciliation (2016), for The Institute for Justice and Reconciliation, Lead author: Dr Helen Scanlon

SOLE AUTHOR PUBLICATIONS

‘Transitions, Truth-Telling and Teaching History’, Cambridge Open-Review Educational Research e-Journal, Vol. 4, 2017.

Paul Riser is a DPhil Student in the department. His research focuses broadly on students’ (especially the marginalised) identities work in upper-secondary English Language Arts classrooms.

Prior to starting his doctoral studies, Paul earned a BSc in English Language Arts (Secondary Education) with a minor in Theology and a BA in Spanish and International Studies with a minor in Psychology from Texas Lutheran University. His MA in English Literature and Language is from St. Mary’s University.

As part of his postgraduate schoolwork, Paul undertook a placement in two graduate certificate programs, earning both his School Counselor certification and School Principal certification for all grade levels in the state of Texas, USA. In addition to English Language Arts and Reading (4th-12th grades), he is also qualified to teach Health (all levels), Journalism (7-12), Speech (7-12), Social Studies (7-12), and English as a Second Language (all levels) in Texas. Further, Paul holds a teaching certification in California, USA, the United Kingdom and Wales, the Kingdom of Denmark, and the Netherlands.

As a public school English teacher for 8 years, Paul was awarded many distinctions including, but not limited to: El maestro de impacto, two Harvard Book Awards, Teacher of the Year, and Texas Parent-Teacher Association Life Member.

His research to inform his doctoral thesis work will be completed in the United States of America. Furthermore, his research interests revolve around the nexus points of gender, ethnicity, sexuality, economic status, and religion as they relate to the agency students have in the classroom.

Paul is the 2019-2020 Student Liaison Coordinator for the Department of Education, Oxford. In this role, he is charged with leading/convening weekly workshops on a variety of research training topics, co-organizing networking and career advice opportunities for graduate students, and liaising with Cambridge University personnel to organize the annual Oxbridge Exchange. Furthermore, Paul supports the Higher Degrees Office as appropriate and meets regularly with directors and other stakeholders to discuss issues of common student concern in order to develop student identity and community throughout the Department.

Paul serves as the representative student voice on the Social Sciences Division Equality & Diversity Steering Group for the University of Oxford.

Paul is also a part-time Research Assistant working with professionals and other academics within the Department of Education on funded and individual projects as needed.

Supervisors: Associate Professors Jenni Ingram and Velda Elliott & Departmental Lecturer Jason Todd.

Thesis Title: ‘Using Positioning Theory to Understand Marginalised Students’ Identities Work and Their Learning Experiences in English Language Arts Classrooms’

Open-Access Publication:
Ingram, Jenni, & Riser, P.A. (2019). Experiences of problem solving in whole class interactions. Avances De Investigación En Educación Matemática, Avances de Investigación en Educación Matemática, Number 16; October 2019.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.35763/aiem.v0i16.279

Tessa is currently completing a part-time DPhil, alongside work as a senior leader in a London secondary school.

Her research explores how teachers on school-based ITE routes (TeachFirst and School Direct salaried) approach learning from experience. The research takes an action research approach: working with participant beginning teachers and mentors to critically examine and reflect on the processes of learning to teach, using their conversations as stimulus data.

Prior to joining the Department of Education Tessa completed an MSc in Educational Research (University of Bristol).

Yoon Young has been involved in a variety of academic and professional projects related to teacher education.

She is currently a member of the Teacher Education and Professional Learning (TEPL) research group at Oxford. Her doctoral research focuses on teacher education policy and practice in England. The study examines the relationship between individuals’ own objectives, the stated programme goals, and the national teachers’ standards in the operation of the Oxford Internship Scheme (OIS). It also explores the perceptions of stakeholders regarding ideal goals that could drive a re-conceptualised teacher education programme.

Prior to her doctorate, Yoon Young used to be a social studies teacher and subsequently worked as a consultant for the OECD’s Initial Teacher Preparation (ITP) Study. She holds a B.A. in Social Studies and Geography Education from the Ewha Womans University, and an M.A. in Educational Leadership from the University of Jyväskylä, where she was a grantee of the Korean Government Scholarship for Study Overseas.

Katy is a Deputy Headteacher and the founder of a Leadership and Coaching Institute, which she now co-directs.

Katy is an Associate Fellow at the Oxford Character Project and a Research Associate at the Oxford University Wellbeing Research Centre. She is the co-founder of Global Social Leaders, a leadership programme which has participants in 105 countries, all passionate about creating and sustaining positive change in the world.

Title of Thesis

How could school leaders improve the flourishing and wellbeing of teaching staff?

Books
  • Granville-Chapman, K. and Bidston, E (2020) Leader: Know, love and inspire your people. Carmarthen: Crownhouse Publishing
Book Chapters
  •  Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ In White, M. & McCallum, F. (Ed.s) Wellbeing and Resilience Education: Covid-19 And Its Impact on Education Systems. Routledge
Publications
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘Purpose and Leadership in Education and Beyond’. The Education Exchange. Available from: https://theeducation.exchange/purpose-and-leadership-in-education-and-beyond/
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘The Three Secrets of COVID-era Leadership’. Times Education Supplement. Available from: https://www.tes.com/news/three-secrets-covid-era-school-leadership
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2016) ‘Assessing the Impact of a Teacher Leadership Programme in a Teaching Schools Alliance. Journal of Teacher Action Research
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2014) ‘The Afghan conflict: causes and consequences.’ Geography Review 28(1): 22-27
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2013) What are the psychological factors that affect students’ academic resilience and can teachers influence these? Unpublished thesis
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘Unlocking Leadership Potential’, The Magazine of the Boarding School’s Association, 33: 42-45
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2009) ‘Learning to Lead’, Leader, The Education Leader Magazine 41: 22-25
Presentations
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2019) ‘How could leaders improve the flourishing of their teams?’ ‘Stowe Ed Conference’, Forthcoming: 7 Jan 2019
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2018) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education: 21 Jun 2018
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2017) ‘How can school leaders improve teacher flourishing?’ ‘Doing Education Differently Conference’, University of Oxford, Department of Education, 11 Mar 17
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2016) ‘Developing school leaders who enable teachers to flourish’ The Telegraph Festival of Education 23 Jun 16
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Developing leadership in pupils and teachers’ High School Affiliated to Renmin University of China, Beijing. 20 Oct 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Resilience for leaders.’ Global Social Leaders World Summit. 16 Aug 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Emotional Intelligence for Leaders.’ Global Leaders in Education. 12 Aug 15
  • Coates, S.; Fraser, H.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J.; and Nasim, A. (2015) ‘Breaking through the glass ceiling – how can schools empower our girls to become leaders?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education. 19 Jun 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. ‘Developing Leadership in Schools’ (2015). G20 Schools Conference. International conference for head teachers. 11 Apr 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2018) ‘Introduction’, Wellington Leadership Institute: Festival of Leadership. Mar 2012-15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘How the Young Learn to Lead’, Raffles Institution (Singapore) -Purdue University (USA) Education Forum on Gifted & Talented Youth 2012. Singapore. 15 Mar 12
  • Draper, D.; Dyer, R.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Schools’. Presentation for a meeting about pupil leadership and character development at 10 Downing Street. 16 Nov 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Young People’. Presentation for a meeting about leadership and character at 10 Downing Street. 7 Mar 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K. & Seldon, A. (2012) ‘Introduction’, Leading Your School in the 21st Century. 7 Feb 12

Kamal Armanious is particularly interested in the topic of education governance to explore what is possible in developing an improved governance system for technical and vocational education and training (TVET).

There have always been various calls from different international organisations such UNESCO, ILO, World Bank, OECD etc. to develop a transformed and transformative approach to TVET. This is attractive for certain theoretical as well as practical reasons; however, one set of limitations in achieving this vision lies in the arena of governance. Mr Armanious examines an imagined better model of governance that can be developed from the principles of a new approach and wider theoretical resources with consideration to national realities where there may be very serious obstacles in the way of realising this new governance approach and hence the overall planned transformation.

Title of Thesis

Education and Training Policies in Egypt: Good Governance and Stakeholders Participation

 

Amanda is completing a part-time DPhil, alongside working in Initial Teacher Education at Leeds Trinity University.

Her research is focused on understanding tensions, contradictions and conflicts that teachers in disadvantaged schools may experience when they engage in research activity.  Her research focus is influenced by her own experiences of working as a research-active teacher in disadvantaged schools, and recent work in teacher education to support experienced and beginning teachers in developing their own research activities.

One of the aims of Amanda’s research is to construct a framework to support teachers in pursuing research activity and critical scholarship work which articulates with wider social movements to address issues of poverty and disadvantage in schools.

Title of Thesis

Teachers’ perspectives on tensions between policy, practice and research in disadvantaged schools

Publications 

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2017) A ‘usable past’ of teacher education in England: history in JET’s anniversary issue. Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy, 43 (5), pp.616-627.

Nuttall, A. (2016) The ‘curriculum challenge’: Moving towards the ‘Storyline’ approach in a case study urban primary school.  Improving Schools, 19 (2), pp. 154-166.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Learning {Re}imagined: A review.  Primary First, 15, pp. 17-18.

Nuttall, A. and Doherty, J. (2014) Disaffected boys and the achievement gap: the ‘wallpaper effect’ and what is hidden by a focus on school results.  The Urban Review, 46 (5), pp.800-815.

Conference Papers and Presentations

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2018) “No child is pre-ordained to fail” Teachers questioning policy assumptions.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Newcastle, 11-13 September.

Nuttall, A. and Tobbell, C. (2017) Trainee teachers’ perspectives on practitioner enquiry.  Paper presented at the 8th TEAN Conference: Thinking Deeply about Education, Birmingham, 11-12 May.

Nuttall, A. (2017) Assessment at primary level: quality, comparability and improving secondary readiness.  A perspective from ITE.  Speech at the Westminster Education Forum Keynote Seminar: Next steps for reforming primary education: effective teaching practices, assessment and accountably, London, 18 January.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Deficit narratives and lived realities: whose poverty is it?  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the Australian Association for Research in Education, Melbourne, 27 November – 1 December.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Disenfranchised boys’ reflections on their urban schooling experience: “What a Waste!”.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Philpott, C., Beckett, L. and Wrigley, T. (2016) Collaborative practitioner inquiry: making a difference to urban schools.  Innovation session (school visits and symposium) presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Finn, B. and Beckett, L. (2015) Teachers’ constructions of poverty effects: Their research evidence.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Belfast, 15-17 September.

Nuttall, A. (2014) Teachers’ voice on disengaged boys: the role of one teacher-researcher in an English primary school. Paper presented at the Joint Australian Association for Research in Education and the New Zealand Association for Research in Education Conference, Brisbane, 30 November – 4 December.

Abigail’s research explores the role of education in students’ personal development and how this can be supported by policy, curricula, initial teacher education and teacher professional development. In particular she focuses on history education, citizenship education and peace education as vehicles for dialogue. These opportunities for students to engage with social questions are vital for building cohesive societies. This flows from the recognition that traditional forums for developing public understanding, such as post-conflict truth commissions, need to be complemented by intergenerational and educational perspectives.

Abigail has taught History, Politics, Debating as well as Relationships and Sex Education to secondary school students in South Africa, England and the USA.

She holds postgraduate degrees in Post-Conflict and Transitional Justice (University of Cape Town), in Education, Globalisation and International Development (University of Cambridge) and in African Studies (University of Oxford). She is a Rhodes Scholar, Mandela-Magdalene Scholar and Mandela-Rhodes Scholar.

Title of thesis

GCSE History, Policy Reform and Student Development: How students and teachers navigate the thematic study “Empires, Migration and the People”

Conference papers

Teaching Migration, Belonging, and Empire in Secondary Schools: evaluation of a teacher professional development program, (2019) History Educators International Research Network Conference, Lead author: Dr Jason Todd, University of Vienna, Austria.

“The Problems and Prospects of Teaching South Africa’s Recent History: Teachers’ Perspectives”, (2018) Sustainability, peace and education – Exploring promise and practice: BAICE 20th Anniversary Symposium, University of Bristol, England.

“New Generations, Old Wounds: Learning History at Home and School in Northern Ireland”, (2018) European Social Science and History Conference,
Queens University Belfast, Northern Ireland.

“The Methodological Challenges of Investigating the Role of History Teaching in Peacebuilding”, (2017), Present Past: Time, Memory, and the Negotiation of Historical Justice Conference, Columbia University, United States of America.

“Teaching South Africa’s Truth and Reconciliation Commission”, (2017) European Conference on African Studies, Universität Basel, Switzerland.

Research Assistant Publications

Review of the evidence on feedback in primary and secondary schools, (forthcoming, 2021) for the Education Endowment Foundation, Lead author: Prof Velda Elliott.

Teaching Migration, Belonging, and Empire in Secondary Schools, (2019), for Runnymede Trust and the European Research Council, Lead authors: Kimberly McIntosh, Dr Jason Todd and Prof Nandini Das.

Gender and the Politics of Reconciliation (2016), for The Institute for Justice and Reconciliation, Lead author: Dr Helen Scanlon

SOLE AUTHOR PUBLICATIONS

‘Transitions, Truth-Telling and Teaching History’, Cambridge Open-Review Educational Research e-Journal, Vol. 4, 2017.

Paul Riser is a DPhil Student in the department. His research focuses broadly on students’ (especially the marginalised) identities work in upper-secondary English Language Arts classrooms.

Prior to starting his doctoral studies, Paul earned a BSc in English Language Arts (Secondary Education) with a minor in Theology and a BA in Spanish and International Studies with a minor in Psychology from Texas Lutheran University. His MA in English Literature and Language is from St. Mary’s University.

As part of his postgraduate schoolwork, Paul undertook a placement in two graduate certificate programs, earning both his School Counselor certification and School Principal certification for all grade levels in the state of Texas, USA. In addition to English Language Arts and Reading (4th-12th grades), he is also qualified to teach Health (all levels), Journalism (7-12), Speech (7-12), Social Studies (7-12), and English as a Second Language (all levels) in Texas. Further, Paul holds a teaching certification in California, USA, the United Kingdom and Wales, the Kingdom of Denmark, and the Netherlands.

As a public school English teacher for 8 years, Paul was awarded many distinctions including, but not limited to: El maestro de impacto, two Harvard Book Awards, Teacher of the Year, and Texas Parent-Teacher Association Life Member.

His research to inform his doctoral thesis work will be completed in the United States of America. Furthermore, his research interests revolve around the nexus points of gender, ethnicity, sexuality, economic status, and religion as they relate to the agency students have in the classroom.

Paul is the 2019-2020 Student Liaison Coordinator for the Department of Education, Oxford. In this role, he is charged with leading/convening weekly workshops on a variety of research training topics, co-organizing networking and career advice opportunities for graduate students, and liaising with Cambridge University personnel to organize the annual Oxbridge Exchange. Furthermore, Paul supports the Higher Degrees Office as appropriate and meets regularly with directors and other stakeholders to discuss issues of common student concern in order to develop student identity and community throughout the Department.

Paul serves as the representative student voice on the Social Sciences Division Equality & Diversity Steering Group for the University of Oxford.

Paul is also a part-time Research Assistant working with professionals and other academics within the Department of Education on funded and individual projects as needed.

Supervisors: Associate Professors Jenni Ingram and Velda Elliott & Departmental Lecturer Jason Todd.

Thesis Title: ‘Using Positioning Theory to Understand Marginalised Students’ Identities Work and Their Learning Experiences in English Language Arts Classrooms’

Open-Access Publication:
Ingram, Jenni, & Riser, P.A. (2019). Experiences of problem solving in whole class interactions. Avances De Investigación En Educación Matemática, Avances de Investigación en Educación Matemática, Number 16; October 2019.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.35763/aiem.v0i16.279

Tessa is currently completing a part-time DPhil, alongside work as a senior leader in a London secondary school.

Her research explores how teachers on school-based ITE routes (TeachFirst and School Direct salaried) approach learning from experience. The research takes an action research approach: working with participant beginning teachers and mentors to critically examine and reflect on the processes of learning to teach, using their conversations as stimulus data.

Prior to joining the Department of Education Tessa completed an MSc in Educational Research (University of Bristol).

Yoon Young has been involved in a variety of academic and professional projects related to teacher education.

She is currently a member of the Teacher Education and Professional Learning (TEPL) research group at Oxford. Her doctoral research focuses on teacher education policy and practice in England. The study examines the relationship between individuals’ own objectives, the stated programme goals, and the national teachers’ standards in the operation of the Oxford Internship Scheme (OIS). It also explores the perceptions of stakeholders regarding ideal goals that could drive a re-conceptualised teacher education programme.

Prior to her doctorate, Yoon Young used to be a social studies teacher and subsequently worked as a consultant for the OECD’s Initial Teacher Preparation (ITP) Study. She holds a B.A. in Social Studies and Geography Education from the Ewha Womans University, and an M.A. in Educational Leadership from the University of Jyväskylä, where she was a grantee of the Korean Government Scholarship for Study Overseas.

Katy is a Deputy Headteacher and the founder of a Leadership and Coaching Institute, which she now co-directs.

Katy is an Associate Fellow at the Oxford Character Project and a Research Associate at the Oxford University Wellbeing Research Centre. She is the co-founder of Global Social Leaders, a leadership programme which has participants in 105 countries, all passionate about creating and sustaining positive change in the world.

Title of Thesis

How could school leaders improve the flourishing and wellbeing of teaching staff?

Books
  • Granville-Chapman, K. and Bidston, E (2020) Leader: Know, love and inspire your people. Carmarthen: Crownhouse Publishing
Book Chapters
  •  Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ In White, M. & McCallum, F. (Ed.s) Wellbeing and Resilience Education: Covid-19 And Its Impact on Education Systems. Routledge
Publications
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘Purpose and Leadership in Education and Beyond’. The Education Exchange. Available from: https://theeducation.exchange/purpose-and-leadership-in-education-and-beyond/
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘The Three Secrets of COVID-era Leadership’. Times Education Supplement. Available from: https://www.tes.com/news/three-secrets-covid-era-school-leadership
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2016) ‘Assessing the Impact of a Teacher Leadership Programme in a Teaching Schools Alliance. Journal of Teacher Action Research
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2014) ‘The Afghan conflict: causes and consequences.’ Geography Review 28(1): 22-27
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2013) What are the psychological factors that affect students’ academic resilience and can teachers influence these? Unpublished thesis
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘Unlocking Leadership Potential’, The Magazine of the Boarding School’s Association, 33: 42-45
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2009) ‘Learning to Lead’, Leader, The Education Leader Magazine 41: 22-25
Presentations
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2019) ‘How could leaders improve the flourishing of their teams?’ ‘Stowe Ed Conference’, Forthcoming: 7 Jan 2019
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2018) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education: 21 Jun 2018
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2017) ‘How can school leaders improve teacher flourishing?’ ‘Doing Education Differently Conference’, University of Oxford, Department of Education, 11 Mar 17
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2016) ‘Developing school leaders who enable teachers to flourish’ The Telegraph Festival of Education 23 Jun 16
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Developing leadership in pupils and teachers’ High School Affiliated to Renmin University of China, Beijing. 20 Oct 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Resilience for leaders.’ Global Social Leaders World Summit. 16 Aug 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Emotional Intelligence for Leaders.’ Global Leaders in Education. 12 Aug 15
  • Coates, S.; Fraser, H.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J.; and Nasim, A. (2015) ‘Breaking through the glass ceiling – how can schools empower our girls to become leaders?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education. 19 Jun 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. ‘Developing Leadership in Schools’ (2015). G20 Schools Conference. International conference for head teachers. 11 Apr 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2018) ‘Introduction’, Wellington Leadership Institute: Festival of Leadership. Mar 2012-15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘How the Young Learn to Lead’, Raffles Institution (Singapore) -Purdue University (USA) Education Forum on Gifted & Talented Youth 2012. Singapore. 15 Mar 12
  • Draper, D.; Dyer, R.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Schools’. Presentation for a meeting about pupil leadership and character development at 10 Downing Street. 16 Nov 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Young People’. Presentation for a meeting about leadership and character at 10 Downing Street. 7 Mar 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K. & Seldon, A. (2012) ‘Introduction’, Leading Your School in the 21st Century. 7 Feb 12

Kamal Armanious is particularly interested in the topic of education governance to explore what is possible in developing an improved governance system for technical and vocational education and training (TVET).

There have always been various calls from different international organisations such UNESCO, ILO, World Bank, OECD etc. to develop a transformed and transformative approach to TVET. This is attractive for certain theoretical as well as practical reasons; however, one set of limitations in achieving this vision lies in the arena of governance. Mr Armanious examines an imagined better model of governance that can be developed from the principles of a new approach and wider theoretical resources with consideration to national realities where there may be very serious obstacles in the way of realising this new governance approach and hence the overall planned transformation.

Title of Thesis

Education and Training Policies in Egypt: Good Governance and Stakeholders Participation

 

Amanda is completing a part-time DPhil, alongside working in Initial Teacher Education at Leeds Trinity University.

Her research is focused on understanding tensions, contradictions and conflicts that teachers in disadvantaged schools may experience when they engage in research activity.  Her research focus is influenced by her own experiences of working as a research-active teacher in disadvantaged schools, and recent work in teacher education to support experienced and beginning teachers in developing their own research activities.

One of the aims of Amanda’s research is to construct a framework to support teachers in pursuing research activity and critical scholarship work which articulates with wider social movements to address issues of poverty and disadvantage in schools.

Title of Thesis

Teachers’ perspectives on tensions between policy, practice and research in disadvantaged schools

Publications 

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2017) A ‘usable past’ of teacher education in England: history in JET’s anniversary issue. Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy, 43 (5), pp.616-627.

Nuttall, A. (2016) The ‘curriculum challenge’: Moving towards the ‘Storyline’ approach in a case study urban primary school.  Improving Schools, 19 (2), pp. 154-166.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Learning {Re}imagined: A review.  Primary First, 15, pp. 17-18.

Nuttall, A. and Doherty, J. (2014) Disaffected boys and the achievement gap: the ‘wallpaper effect’ and what is hidden by a focus on school results.  The Urban Review, 46 (5), pp.800-815.

Conference Papers and Presentations

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2018) “No child is pre-ordained to fail” Teachers questioning policy assumptions.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Newcastle, 11-13 September.

Nuttall, A. and Tobbell, C. (2017) Trainee teachers’ perspectives on practitioner enquiry.  Paper presented at the 8th TEAN Conference: Thinking Deeply about Education, Birmingham, 11-12 May.

Nuttall, A. (2017) Assessment at primary level: quality, comparability and improving secondary readiness.  A perspective from ITE.  Speech at the Westminster Education Forum Keynote Seminar: Next steps for reforming primary education: effective teaching practices, assessment and accountably, London, 18 January.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Deficit narratives and lived realities: whose poverty is it?  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the Australian Association for Research in Education, Melbourne, 27 November – 1 December.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Disenfranchised boys’ reflections on their urban schooling experience: “What a Waste!”.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Philpott, C., Beckett, L. and Wrigley, T. (2016) Collaborative practitioner inquiry: making a difference to urban schools.  Innovation session (school visits and symposium) presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Finn, B. and Beckett, L. (2015) Teachers’ constructions of poverty effects: Their research evidence.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Belfast, 15-17 September.

Nuttall, A. (2014) Teachers’ voice on disengaged boys: the role of one teacher-researcher in an English primary school. Paper presented at the Joint Australian Association for Research in Education and the New Zealand Association for Research in Education Conference, Brisbane, 30 November – 4 December.

Abigail’s research explores the role of education in students’ personal development and how this can be supported by policy, curricula, initial teacher education and teacher professional development. In particular she focuses on history education, citizenship education and peace education as vehicles for dialogue. These opportunities for students to engage with social questions are vital for building cohesive societies. This flows from the recognition that traditional forums for developing public understanding, such as post-conflict truth commissions, need to be complemented by intergenerational and educational perspectives.

Abigail has taught History, Politics, Debating as well as Relationships and Sex Education to secondary school students in South Africa, England and the USA.

She holds postgraduate degrees in Post-Conflict and Transitional Justice (University of Cape Town), in Education, Globalisation and International Development (University of Cambridge) and in African Studies (University of Oxford). She is a Rhodes Scholar, Mandela-Magdalene Scholar and Mandela-Rhodes Scholar.

Title of thesis

GCSE History, Policy Reform and Student Development: How students and teachers navigate the thematic study “Empires, Migration and the People”

Conference papers

Teaching Migration, Belonging, and Empire in Secondary Schools: evaluation of a teacher professional development program, (2019) History Educators International Research Network Conference, Lead author: Dr Jason Todd, University of Vienna, Austria.

“The Problems and Prospects of Teaching South Africa’s Recent History: Teachers’ Perspectives”, (2018) Sustainability, peace and education – Exploring promise and practice: BAICE 20th Anniversary Symposium, University of Bristol, England.

“New Generations, Old Wounds: Learning History at Home and School in Northern Ireland”, (2018) European Social Science and History Conference,
Queens University Belfast, Northern Ireland.

“The Methodological Challenges of Investigating the Role of History Teaching in Peacebuilding”, (2017), Present Past: Time, Memory, and the Negotiation of Historical Justice Conference, Columbia University, United States of America.

“Teaching South Africa’s Truth and Reconciliation Commission”, (2017) European Conference on African Studies, Universität Basel, Switzerland.

Research Assistant Publications

Review of the evidence on feedback in primary and secondary schools, (forthcoming, 2021) for the Education Endowment Foundation, Lead author: Prof Velda Elliott.

Teaching Migration, Belonging, and Empire in Secondary Schools, (2019), for Runnymede Trust and the European Research Council, Lead authors: Kimberly McIntosh, Dr Jason Todd and Prof Nandini Das.

Gender and the Politics of Reconciliation (2016), for The Institute for Justice and Reconciliation, Lead author: Dr Helen Scanlon

SOLE AUTHOR PUBLICATIONS

‘Transitions, Truth-Telling and Teaching History’, Cambridge Open-Review Educational Research e-Journal, Vol. 4, 2017.

Paul Riser is a DPhil Student in the department. His research focuses broadly on students’ (especially the marginalised) identities work in upper-secondary English Language Arts classrooms.

Prior to starting his doctoral studies, Paul earned a BSc in English Language Arts (Secondary Education) with a minor in Theology and a BA in Spanish and International Studies with a minor in Psychology from Texas Lutheran University. His MA in English Literature and Language is from St. Mary’s University.

As part of his postgraduate schoolwork, Paul undertook a placement in two graduate certificate programs, earning both his School Counselor certification and School Principal certification for all grade levels in the state of Texas, USA. In addition to English Language Arts and Reading (4th-12th grades), he is also qualified to teach Health (all levels), Journalism (7-12), Speech (7-12), Social Studies (7-12), and English as a Second Language (all levels) in Texas. Further, Paul holds a teaching certification in California, USA, the United Kingdom and Wales, the Kingdom of Denmark, and the Netherlands.

As a public school English teacher for 8 years, Paul was awarded many distinctions including, but not limited to: El maestro de impacto, two Harvard Book Awards, Teacher of the Year, and Texas Parent-Teacher Association Life Member.

His research to inform his doctoral thesis work will be completed in the United States of America. Furthermore, his research interests revolve around the nexus points of gender, ethnicity, sexuality, economic status, and religion as they relate to the agency students have in the classroom.

Paul is the 2019-2020 Student Liaison Coordinator for the Department of Education, Oxford. In this role, he is charged with leading/convening weekly workshops on a variety of research training topics, co-organizing networking and career advice opportunities for graduate students, and liaising with Cambridge University personnel to organize the annual Oxbridge Exchange. Furthermore, Paul supports the Higher Degrees Office as appropriate and meets regularly with directors and other stakeholders to discuss issues of common student concern in order to develop student identity and community throughout the Department.

Paul serves as the representative student voice on the Social Sciences Division Equality & Diversity Steering Group for the University of Oxford.

Paul is also a part-time Research Assistant working with professionals and other academics within the Department of Education on funded and individual projects as needed.

Supervisors: Associate Professors Jenni Ingram and Velda Elliott & Departmental Lecturer Jason Todd.

Thesis Title: ‘Using Positioning Theory to Understand Marginalised Students’ Identities Work and Their Learning Experiences in English Language Arts Classrooms’

Open-Access Publication:
Ingram, Jenni, & Riser, P.A. (2019). Experiences of problem solving in whole class interactions. Avances De Investigación En Educación Matemática, Avances de Investigación en Educación Matemática, Number 16; October 2019.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.35763/aiem.v0i16.279

Tessa is currently completing a part-time DPhil, alongside work as a senior leader in a London secondary school.

Her research explores how teachers on school-based ITE routes (TeachFirst and School Direct salaried) approach learning from experience. The research takes an action research approach: working with participant beginning teachers and mentors to critically examine and reflect on the processes of learning to teach, using their conversations as stimulus data.

Prior to joining the Department of Education Tessa completed an MSc in Educational Research (University of Bristol).

Yoon Young has been involved in a variety of academic and professional projects related to teacher education.

She is currently a member of the Teacher Education and Professional Learning (TEPL) research group at Oxford. Her doctoral research focuses on teacher education policy and practice in England. The study examines the relationship between individuals’ own objectives, the stated programme goals, and the national teachers’ standards in the operation of the Oxford Internship Scheme (OIS). It also explores the perceptions of stakeholders regarding ideal goals that could drive a re-conceptualised teacher education programme.

Prior to her doctorate, Yoon Young used to be a social studies teacher and subsequently worked as a consultant for the OECD’s Initial Teacher Preparation (ITP) Study. She holds a B.A. in Social Studies and Geography Education from the Ewha Womans University, and an M.A. in Educational Leadership from the University of Jyväskylä, where she was a grantee of the Korean Government Scholarship for Study Overseas.

Katy is a Deputy Headteacher and the founder of a Leadership and Coaching Institute, which she now co-directs.

Katy is an Associate Fellow at the Oxford Character Project and a Research Associate at the Oxford University Wellbeing Research Centre. She is the co-founder of Global Social Leaders, a leadership programme which has participants in 105 countries, all passionate about creating and sustaining positive change in the world.

Title of Thesis

How could school leaders improve the flourishing and wellbeing of teaching staff?

Books
  • Granville-Chapman, K. and Bidston, E (2020) Leader: Know, love and inspire your people. Carmarthen: Crownhouse Publishing
Book Chapters
  •  Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ In White, M. & McCallum, F. (Ed.s) Wellbeing and Resilience Education: Covid-19 And Its Impact on Education Systems. Routledge
Publications
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘Purpose and Leadership in Education and Beyond’. The Education Exchange. Available from: https://theeducation.exchange/purpose-and-leadership-in-education-and-beyond/
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘The Three Secrets of COVID-era Leadership’. Times Education Supplement. Available from: https://www.tes.com/news/three-secrets-covid-era-school-leadership
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2016) ‘Assessing the Impact of a Teacher Leadership Programme in a Teachi