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Department of Education

Viewing archives for Green Templeton College

Claire (郝煜) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and a China Oxford Scholarship Fund (COSF) scholar.

Claire holds a BA in Education and Physics from the University of Cambridge, an MA in Applied Linguistics from UCL Institution of Education, and an EdM in International Education Policy from Harvard University. She is passionate about exploring and supporting the transnational experiences of bi-/multilingual students in studying abroad contexts. Her research and professional interests include bilingualism, language and identity, international education, professional development, and school leadership.

Since 2015, Claire has served as the Director of International Education at Beijing Xinxuedao Education Group, a non-profit organisation that operates 31 schools with over 30,000 K-12 students in China. She has also worked as a high school counsellor and a teacher of Physics and Psychology.

Publications

Hao, Y. and Lantsman, G. (2022). Motivation in MOOCs: a qualitative study on the design and evaluation of an online IELTS course. The 7th IAFOR International Conference on Education.

Hao, Y. (2020). Education without borders: sojourner trips in students’ holistic development. In Wang, J. (Ed.). Family, Society, and Education. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2020). Learning how to learn: the role of metacognition and self-regulation in learning. In Wang, J. (Ed.). The Virtue of Thinking in Learning. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2019). Chinese students at a UK university: how linguistic repertoire mediates language and sojourner identity construction. Linguistics and Applied Linguistics Conference. Beijing Normal University.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2018). Examining Linguistic Diversity as a Resource for Higher Education in the Anglophone World. In Tong, V. C., Standen, A., & Sotiriou, M. (Ed.). Shaping Higher Education with Students: Ways to Connect Research and Teaching (pp.288-293). UCL Press.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2016). Making the most of linguistic diversity: the views and practices of bi/multilingual postgraduate students. The Multilingual University. ESRC Seminars.

Hao, Y. (2012). A Transformative Journey: China-US exchange student studying at an American high school. New World Press.

Pok Jing (Jane) Ho is a doctoral student at the Department of Education, specialising in educational assessment.

She is funded by the Bei Shan Tang Foundation Scholarship for Graduate Studies.

Her DPhil thesis examines validity in the Hong Kong Diploma of Secondary Education Examination, a large-scale, high-stakes test that informs higher education admissions decisions, using the argument-based approach to validation. In particular, her research identifies the claims made based on test scores, the validity evidence that supports or challenges such claims, and the social consequences that ensue as a result of test use.

Prior to her DPhil, she completed an M.A. in International Education Policy Analysis at Stanford University. She subsequently worked as a project officer at the Education University of Hong Kong, where she is now serving as a consultant alongside her studies.

A former secondary school teacher, Jane also holds a B.A. in English Studies (First Class Honours), a B.Ed. in English Language Education (First Class Honours), and an M.Ed. in Curriculum and Instruction from the Chinese University of Hong Kong, as well as the Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (CELTA) from Cambridge.

She is a Peer Supporter at Green Templeton College.

Publications

Ho, P. J. (2020). For some or for all: Vocational English for Hong Kong secondary school students. In C. Hong, & W. K. Ma (Eds.), Applied degree education and the future of work—Education 4.0 (pp. 87–95). Springer. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-15-3142-2

Ho, P. J. (2015). China-Africa “cooperation” in education. International Politics, 5. https://www.iir.cz/en/china-africa-cooperation-in-education

Jennifer’s DPhil focuses on adoptive families where  the adoptive parents also have birth children. She has worked in adoption support as a Parent Consultant for Adoption UK and as Head of Peer Services at PAC-UK, as well as managing the Adoption UK advice line and the parent training team.

She holds an MSc in Poverty Reduction: Policy and Practice from SOAS, and an MBA from Warwick Business School. She has worked in management consultancy in both the public and private sectors and is a board member of CoramBAAF.

Publications

The Right Tools for the Job. Information Age, November 1996

Global teams for the millennium; Management Decision, 36 (1): 31-33, February 1998

Lucy is a second-year DPhil student, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

Her DPhil research aims to engage in a meaningful and creative way with service children to explore how service life has shaped their experiences of education and sense of self. By choosing this focus, the research seeks to widen and nuance current understanding of service children’s educational experiences in addition to furthering knowledge into how service children see themselves. As a result of this, it is hoped that the research will support in developing the professional body of knowledge and understanding of this group of children in schools and help inform the Service Pupil Premium (SPP) funding choices in addition to wider school practice.

Before embarking on her DPhil at Oxford, Lucy completed her PGCE and MEd in Primary Education at the University of Cambridge. In addition to her DPhil work, Lucy is a Trustee for the Armed Forces Education Trust (AFET) – a grant-giving charity for service children – and a volunteer for the Oxford based charity, Big Brothers Big Sisters.

 

 

Aine is interested in improving the health outcomes of children and young people in the care system.

Fahad is reading for a DPhil in Education (part-time). He has over fifteen years professional experience in the education sector, in particular, higher education.

He has held senior roles in staff and student development, human resources, policy and strategy. Fahad holds a BSc in Education and Science and an MBA. Prior to commencing his doctoral studies, he was elected an Academic Visitor at St Antony’s College in the University of Oxford. Fahad’s research focus is on the quality of undergraduate medical education for Qatari doctors.

Shawna completed her undergraduate degree in Psycholinguistics at the University of Toronto in Canada, and later completed the MSc program in Applied Linguistics and Second language Acquisition at the University of Oxford.

She has a wide range of experiences in the field of Linguistics as a teaching and research assistant in areas such as theoretical linguistics, phonology, speech-language pathology, language acquisition, and creole studies. Being a native of Jamaica herself, Shawna has carried out extensive work on creole language acquisition. She worked with the University of the West Indies to draft the first Jamaican (Creole) as a Foreign Language course, and with the U.S Peace Corps to assess and revamp an existing language program for volunteers.

Shawna’s current research focuses on the development of writing skills among primary school learners in Jamaica who speak Jamaican Creole as a home language but are educated in English.

Publications
  • Helms-Park, R., Tucker, S, & Dronjic, V. (2016). From proto-writing to multimedia literacy: scripts and orthographies through the ages. In  Chen Bumgardner, V. Dronjic,, & R. Helms-Park (Eds.), Second Language Reading: Psycholinguistic and Cognitive Perspectives (pp. 1-31). New York, NY: Routledge Publishers.
  • Eriks-Brophy, A., Green, S., & Tucker, S. (2013).  Articulatory error patterns and phonological process use of preschool children with and without hearing loss. Volta Review.

Richard Canter is Visiting Professor of Surgical Education in the Nuffield Department of Surgical Sciences, University of Oxford.

Richard Canter qualified in medicine at the University of London in 1976, before becoming a surgeon at the Royal United Hospital, Bath. He completed a PhD in Management at the University of Bath in 1998 studying the nature of power in decision-making at the personal and organisation level in healthcare. Following the critical Kennedy report on surgical training in 2001, he was recruited to the Royal College of Surgeons of England as Deputy Director of Surgical Education with specific responsibility for curriculum development in surgical education in England. He was subsequently Head of the Postgraduate School of Surgery in Bristol until 2012, after which he concentrated on academic work at Oxford. He was appointed a visiting Professor in Oxford in in 2007, Emeritus Consultant at Oxford University Hospitals in 2015, and Associate Fellow at Green Templeton College, Oxford in 2015.

His interests are professionalism and, in particular, its relationship to leadership in healthcare systems. His current specific research interests are the effectiveness or otherwise of leadership education in respect of its impact on quality improvement in healthcare systems.

At the Royal College of Surgeons of England he was clinical lead and Chair of the Needs Analysis Group evaluating educational resources and organisational systems necessary for the implementation of reform of surgical training, and made recommendations for changes that were eventually adopted by all surgical training systems in the United Kingdom. During this appointment an opportunity arose in early 2003 at the end of the Serbian conflict to assist the European Agency for Reconstruction (EAR, a division of the EEC) in providing advice to the Kosovan Ministry of Health to develop new systems for surgical training.

Currently at Oxford, he is lead tutor for the module in Leadership and Management in Healthcare and Deputy Director of the Masters in Surgical Science, and supervises Masters and DPhil students on the subject of organisational change and leadership. In addition he has regular commitments in teaching postgraduate medical trainees and medical faculty on topics such as leadership, quality improvement, educational theory in healthcare, workplace assessments, supporting and talent managing  medical trainees, as well as occasional commitments to supervising students on the Said Business School Global Opportunity and Threats (Oxford) programme in exploring problems in complex systems.

Along the way he has written and spoken on many topics in medicine, obtained research grants, and has unexpectedly been given fellowships and medals. His main interest outside of work is playing music and he runs the Green Templeton College Big Band.

Prior to starting his DPhil, Eddy worked as a primary school teacher in Bristol, where he also completed his MSc in Educational Research.

He is particularly interested in the culture of high stakes, standardised testing, and how this might perpetuate existing inequalities in schools. His research focuses specifically on the interaction between knowledge, policy and pedagogy in the context of Literacy education.

 

Claire (郝煜) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and a China Oxford Scholarship Fund (COSF) scholar.

Claire holds a BA in Education and Physics from the University of Cambridge, an MA in Applied Linguistics from UCL Institution of Education, and an EdM in International Education Policy from Harvard University. She is passionate about exploring and supporting the transnational experiences of bi-/multilingual students in studying abroad contexts. Her research and professional interests include bilingualism, language and identity, international education, professional development, and school leadership.

Since 2015, Claire has served as the Director of International Education at Beijing Xinxuedao Education Group, a non-profit organisation that operates 31 schools with over 30,000 K-12 students in China. She has also worked as a high school counsellor and a teacher of Physics and Psychology.

Publications

Hao, Y. and Lantsman, G. (2022). Motivation in MOOCs: a qualitative study on the design and evaluation of an online IELTS course. The 7th IAFOR International Conference on Education.

Hao, Y. (2020). Education without borders: sojourner trips in students’ holistic development. In Wang, J. (Ed.). Family, Society, and Education. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2020). Learning how to learn: the role of metacognition and self-regulation in learning. In Wang, J. (Ed.). The Virtue of Thinking in Learning. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2019). Chinese students at a UK university: how linguistic repertoire mediates language and sojourner identity construction. Linguistics and Applied Linguistics Conference. Beijing Normal University.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2018). Examining Linguistic Diversity as a Resource for Higher Education in the Anglophone World. In Tong, V. C., Standen, A., & Sotiriou, M. (Ed.). Shaping Higher Education with Students: Ways to Connect Research and Teaching (pp.288-293). UCL Press.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2016). Making the most of linguistic diversity: the views and practices of bi/multilingual postgraduate students. The Multilingual University. ESRC Seminars.

Hao, Y. (2012). A Transformative Journey: China-US exchange student studying at an American high school. New World Press.

Pok Jing (Jane) Ho is a doctoral student at the Department of Education, specialising in educational assessment.

She is funded by the Bei Shan Tang Foundation Scholarship for Graduate Studies.

Her DPhil thesis examines validity in the Hong Kong Diploma of Secondary Education Examination, a large-scale, high-stakes test that informs higher education admissions decisions, using the argument-based approach to validation. In particular, her research identifies the claims made based on test scores, the validity evidence that supports or challenges such claims, and the social consequences that ensue as a result of test use.

Prior to her DPhil, she completed an M.A. in International Education Policy Analysis at Stanford University. She subsequently worked as a project officer at the Education University of Hong Kong, where she is now serving as a consultant alongside her studies.

A former secondary school teacher, Jane also holds a B.A. in English Studies (First Class Honours), a B.Ed. in English Language Education (First Class Honours), and an M.Ed. in Curriculum and Instruction from the Chinese University of Hong Kong, as well as the Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (CELTA) from Cambridge.

She is a Peer Supporter at Green Templeton College.

Publications

Ho, P. J. (2020). For some or for all: Vocational English for Hong Kong secondary school students. In C. Hong, & W. K. Ma (Eds.), Applied degree education and the future of work—Education 4.0 (pp. 87–95). Springer. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-15-3142-2

Ho, P. J. (2015). China-Africa “cooperation” in education. International Politics, 5. https://www.iir.cz/en/china-africa-cooperation-in-education

Jennifer’s DPhil focuses on adoptive families where  the adoptive parents also have birth children. She has worked in adoption support as a Parent Consultant for Adoption UK and as Head of Peer Services at PAC-UK, as well as managing the Adoption UK advice line and the parent training team.

She holds an MSc in Poverty Reduction: Policy and Practice from SOAS, and an MBA from Warwick Business School. She has worked in management consultancy in both the public and private sectors and is a board member of CoramBAAF.

Publications

The Right Tools for the Job. Information Age, November 1996

Global teams for the millennium; Management Decision, 36 (1): 31-33, February 1998

Lucy is a second-year DPhil student, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

Her DPhil research aims to engage in a meaningful and creative way with service children to explore how service life has shaped their experiences of education and sense of self. By choosing this focus, the research seeks to widen and nuance current understanding of service children’s educational experiences in addition to furthering knowledge into how service children see themselves. As a result of this, it is hoped that the research will support in developing the professional body of knowledge and understanding of this group of children in schools and help inform the Service Pupil Premium (SPP) funding choices in addition to wider school practice.

Before embarking on her DPhil at Oxford, Lucy completed her PGCE and MEd in Primary Education at the University of Cambridge. In addition to her DPhil work, Lucy is a Trustee for the Armed Forces Education Trust (AFET) – a grant-giving charity for service children – and a volunteer for the Oxford based charity, Big Brothers Big Sisters.

 

 

Aine is interested in improving the health outcomes of children and young people in the care system.

Fahad is reading for a DPhil in Education (part-time). He has over fifteen years professional experience in the education sector, in particular, higher education.

He has held senior roles in staff and student development, human resources, policy and strategy. Fahad holds a BSc in Education and Science and an MBA. Prior to commencing his doctoral studies, he was elected an Academic Visitor at St Antony’s College in the University of Oxford. Fahad’s research focus is on the quality of undergraduate medical education for Qatari doctors.

Shawna completed her undergraduate degree in Psycholinguistics at the University of Toronto in Canada, and later completed the MSc program in Applied Linguistics and Second language Acquisition at the University of Oxford.

She has a wide range of experiences in the field of Linguistics as a teaching and research assistant in areas such as theoretical linguistics, phonology, speech-language pathology, language acquisition, and creole studies. Being a native of Jamaica herself, Shawna has carried out extensive work on creole language acquisition. She worked with the University of the West Indies to draft the first Jamaican (Creole) as a Foreign Language course, and with the U.S Peace Corps to assess and revamp an existing language program for volunteers.

Shawna’s current research focuses on the development of writing skills among primary school learners in Jamaica who speak Jamaican Creole as a home language but are educated in English.

Publications
  • Helms-Park, R., Tucker, S, & Dronjic, V. (2016). From proto-writing to multimedia literacy: scripts and orthographies through the ages. In  Chen Bumgardner, V. Dronjic,, & R. Helms-Park (Eds.), Second Language Reading: Psycholinguistic and Cognitive Perspectives (pp. 1-31). New York, NY: Routledge Publishers.
  • Eriks-Brophy, A., Green, S., & Tucker, S. (2013).  Articulatory error patterns and phonological process use of preschool children with and without hearing loss. Volta Review.

Richard Canter is Visiting Professor of Surgical Education in the Nuffield Department of Surgical Sciences, University of Oxford.

Richard Canter qualified in medicine at the University of London in 1976, before becoming a surgeon at the Royal United Hospital, Bath. He completed a PhD in Management at the University of Bath in 1998 studying the nature of power in decision-making at the personal and organisation level in healthcare. Following the critical Kennedy report on surgical training in 2001, he was recruited to the Royal College of Surgeons of England as Deputy Director of Surgical Education with specific responsibility for curriculum development in surgical education in England. He was subsequently Head of the Postgraduate School of Surgery in Bristol until 2012, after which he concentrated on academic work at Oxford. He was appointed a visiting Professor in Oxford in in 2007, Emeritus Consultant at Oxford University Hospitals in 2015, and Associate Fellow at Green Templeton College, Oxford in 2015.

His interests are professionalism and, in particular, its relationship to leadership in healthcare systems. His current specific research interests are the effectiveness or otherwise of leadership education in respect of its impact on quality improvement in healthcare systems.

At the Royal College of Surgeons of England he was clinical lead and Chair of the Needs Analysis Group evaluating educational resources and organisational systems necessary for the implementation of reform of surgical training, and made recommendations for changes that were eventually adopted by all surgical training systems in the United Kingdom. During this appointment an opportunity arose in early 2003 at the end of the Serbian conflict to assist the European Agency for Reconstruction (EAR, a division of the EEC) in providing advice to the Kosovan Ministry of Health to develop new systems for surgical training.

Currently at Oxford, he is lead tutor for the module in Leadership and Management in Healthcare and Deputy Director of the Masters in Surgical Science, and supervises Masters and DPhil students on the subject of organisational change and leadership. In addition he has regular commitments in teaching postgraduate medical trainees and medical faculty on topics such as leadership, quality improvement, educational theory in healthcare, workplace assessments, supporting and talent managing  medical trainees, as well as occasional commitments to supervising students on the Said Business School Global Opportunity and Threats (Oxford) programme in exploring problems in complex systems.

Along the way he has written and spoken on many topics in medicine, obtained research grants, and has unexpectedly been given fellowships and medals. His main interest outside of work is playing music and he runs the Green Templeton College Big Band.

Prior to starting his DPhil, Eddy worked as a primary school teacher in Bristol, where he also completed his MSc in Educational Research.

He is particularly interested in the culture of high stakes, standardised testing, and how this might perpetuate existing inequalities in schools. His research focuses specifically on the interaction between knowledge, policy and pedagogy in the context of Literacy education.

 

Claire (郝煜) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and a China Oxford Scholarship Fund (COSF) scholar.

Claire holds a BA in Education and Physics from the University of Cambridge, an MA in Applied Linguistics from UCL Institution of Education, and an EdM in International Education Policy from Harvard University. She is passionate about exploring and supporting the transnational experiences of bi-/multilingual students in studying abroad contexts. Her research and professional interests include bilingualism, language and identity, international education, professional development, and school leadership.

Since 2015, Claire has served as the Director of International Education at Beijing Xinxuedao Education Group, a non-profit organisation that operates 31 schools with over 30,000 K-12 students in China. She has also worked as a high school counsellor and a teacher of Physics and Psychology.

Publications

Hao, Y. and Lantsman, G. (2022). Motivation in MOOCs: a qualitative study on the design and evaluation of an online IELTS course. The 7th IAFOR International Conference on Education.

Hao, Y. (2020). Education without borders: sojourner trips in students’ holistic development. In Wang, J. (Ed.). Family, Society, and Education. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2020). Learning how to learn: the role of metacognition and self-regulation in learning. In Wang, J. (Ed.). The Virtue of Thinking in Learning. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2019). Chinese students at a UK university: how linguistic repertoire mediates language and sojourner identity construction. Linguistics and Applied Linguistics Conference. Beijing Normal University.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2018). Examining Linguistic Diversity as a Resource for Higher Education in the Anglophone World. In Tong, V. C., Standen, A., & Sotiriou, M. (Ed.). Shaping Higher Education with Students: Ways to Connect Research and Teaching (pp.288-293). UCL Press.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2016). Making the most of linguistic diversity: the views and practices of bi/multilingual postgraduate students. The Multilingual University. ESRC Seminars.

Hao, Y. (2012). A Transformative Journey: China-US exchange student studying at an American high school. New World Press.

Pok Jing (Jane) Ho is a doctoral student at the Department of Education, specialising in educational assessment.

She is funded by the Bei Shan Tang Foundation Scholarship for Graduate Studies.

Her DPhil thesis examines validity in the Hong Kong Diploma of Secondary Education Examination, a large-scale, high-stakes test that informs higher education admissions decisions, using the argument-based approach to validation. In particular, her research identifies the claims made based on test scores, the validity evidence that supports or challenges such claims, and the social consequences that ensue as a result of test use.

Prior to her DPhil, she completed an M.A. in International Education Policy Analysis at Stanford University. She subsequently worked as a project officer at the Education University of Hong Kong, where she is now serving as a consultant alongside her studies.

A former secondary school teacher, Jane also holds a B.A. in English Studies (First Class Honours), a B.Ed. in English Language Education (First Class Honours), and an M.Ed. in Curriculum and Instruction from the Chinese University of Hong Kong, as well as the Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (CELTA) from Cambridge.

She is a Peer Supporter at Green Templeton College.

Publications

Ho, P. J. (2020). For some or for all: Vocational English for Hong Kong secondary school students. In C. Hong, & W. K. Ma (Eds.), Applied degree education and the future of work—Education 4.0 (pp. 87–95). Springer. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-15-3142-2

Ho, P. J. (2015). China-Africa “cooperation” in education. International Politics, 5. https://www.iir.cz/en/china-africa-cooperation-in-education

Jennifer’s DPhil focuses on adoptive families where  the adoptive parents also have birth children. She has worked in adoption support as a Parent Consultant for Adoption UK and as Head of Peer Services at PAC-UK, as well as managing the Adoption UK advice line and the parent training team.

She holds an MSc in Poverty Reduction: Policy and Practice from SOAS, and an MBA from Warwick Business School. She has worked in management consultancy in both the public and private sectors and is a board member of CoramBAAF.

Publications

The Right Tools for the Job. Information Age, November 1996

Global teams for the millennium; Management Decision, 36 (1): 31-33, February 1998

Lucy is a second-year DPhil student, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

Her DPhil research aims to engage in a meaningful and creative way with service children to explore how service life has shaped their experiences of education and sense of self. By choosing this focus, the research seeks to widen and nuance current understanding of service children’s educational experiences in addition to furthering knowledge into how service children see themselves. As a result of this, it is hoped that the research will support in developing the professional body of knowledge and understanding of this group of children in schools and help inform the Service Pupil Premium (SPP) funding choices in addition to wider school practice.

Before embarking on her DPhil at Oxford, Lucy completed her PGCE and MEd in Primary Education at the University of Cambridge. In addition to her DPhil work, Lucy is a Trustee for the Armed Forces Education Trust (AFET) – a grant-giving charity for service children – and a volunteer for the Oxford based charity, Big Brothers Big Sisters.

 

 

Aine is interested in improving the health outcomes of children and young people in the care system.

Fahad is reading for a DPhil in Education (part-time). He has over fifteen years professional experience in the education sector, in particular, higher education.

He has held senior roles in staff and student development, human resources, policy and strategy. Fahad holds a BSc in Education and Science and an MBA. Prior to commencing his doctoral studies, he was elected an Academic Visitor at St Antony’s College in the University of Oxford. Fahad’s research focus is on the quality of undergraduate medical education for Qatari doctors.

Shawna completed her undergraduate degree in Psycholinguistics at the University of Toronto in Canada, and later completed the MSc program in Applied Linguistics and Second language Acquisition at the University of Oxford.

She has a wide range of experiences in the field of Linguistics as a teaching and research assistant in areas such as theoretical linguistics, phonology, speech-language pathology, language acquisition, and creole studies. Being a native of Jamaica herself, Shawna has carried out extensive work on creole language acquisition. She worked with the University of the West Indies to draft the first Jamaican (Creole) as a Foreign Language course, and with the U.S Peace Corps to assess and revamp an existing language program for volunteers.

Shawna’s current research focuses on the development of writing skills among primary school learners in Jamaica who speak Jamaican Creole as a home language but are educated in English.

Publications
  • Helms-Park, R., Tucker, S, & Dronjic, V. (2016). From proto-writing to multimedia literacy: scripts and orthographies through the ages. In  Chen Bumgardner, V. Dronjic,, & R. Helms-Park (Eds.), Second Language Reading: Psycholinguistic and Cognitive Perspectives (pp. 1-31). New York, NY: Routledge Publishers.
  • Eriks-Brophy, A., Green, S., & Tucker, S. (2013).  Articulatory error patterns and phonological process use of preschool children with and without hearing loss. Volta Review.

Richard Canter is Visiting Professor of Surgical Education in the Nuffield Department of Surgical Sciences, University of Oxford.

Richard Canter qualified in medicine at the University of London in 1976, before becoming a surgeon at the Royal United Hospital, Bath. He completed a PhD in Management at the University of Bath in 1998 studying the nature of power in decision-making at the personal and organisation level in healthcare. Following the critical Kennedy report on surgical training in 2001, he was recruited to the Royal College of Surgeons of England as Deputy Director of Surgical Education with specific responsibility for curriculum development in surgical education in England. He was subsequently Head of the Postgraduate School of Surgery in Bristol until 2012, after which he concentrated on academic work at Oxford. He was appointed a visiting Professor in Oxford in in 2007, Emeritus Consultant at Oxford University Hospitals in 2015, and Associate Fellow at Green Templeton College, Oxford in 2015.

His interests are professionalism and, in particular, its relationship to leadership in healthcare systems. His current specific research interests are the effectiveness or otherwise of leadership education in respect of its impact on quality improvement in healthcare systems.

At the Royal College of Surgeons of England he was clinical lead and Chair of the Needs Analysis Group evaluating educational resources and organisational systems necessary for the implementation of reform of surgical training, and made recommendations for changes that were eventually adopted by all surgical training systems in the United Kingdom. During this appointment an opportunity arose in early 2003 at the end of the Serbian conflict to assist the European Agency for Reconstruction (EAR, a division of the EEC) in providing advice to the Kosovan Ministry of Health to develop new systems for surgical training.

Currently at Oxford, he is lead tutor for the module in Leadership and Management in Healthcare and Deputy Director of the Masters in Surgical Science, and supervises Masters and DPhil students on the subject of organisational change and leadership. In addition he has regular commitments in teaching postgraduate medical trainees and medical faculty on topics such as leadership, quality improvement, educational theory in healthcare, workplace assessments, supporting and talent managing  medical trainees, as well as occasional commitments to supervising students on the Said Business School Global Opportunity and Threats (Oxford) programme in exploring problems in complex systems.

Along the way he has written and spoken on many topics in medicine, obtained research grants, and has unexpectedly been given fellowships and medals. His main interest outside of work is playing music and he runs the Green Templeton College Big Band.

Prior to starting his DPhil, Eddy worked as a primary school teacher in Bristol, where he also completed his MSc in Educational Research.

He is particularly interested in the culture of high stakes, standardised testing, and how this might perpetuate existing inequalities in schools. His research focuses specifically on the interaction between knowledge, policy and pedagogy in the context of Literacy education.

 

Claire (郝煜) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and a China Oxford Scholarship Fund (COSF) scholar.

Claire holds a BA in Education and Physics from the University of Cambridge, an MA in Applied Linguistics from UCL Institution of Education, and an EdM in International Education Policy from Harvard University. She is passionate about exploring and supporting the transnational experiences of bi-/multilingual students in studying abroad contexts. Her research and professional interests include bilingualism, language and identity, international education, professional development, and school leadership.

Since 2015, Claire has served as the Director of International Education at Beijing Xinxuedao Education Group, a non-profit organisation that operates 31 schools with over 30,000 K-12 students in China. She has also worked as a high school counsellor and a teacher of Physics and Psychology.

Publications

Hao, Y. and Lantsman, G. (2022). Motivation in MOOCs: a qualitative study on the design and evaluation of an online IELTS course. The 7th IAFOR International Conference on Education.

Hao, Y. (2020). Education without borders: sojourner trips in students’ holistic development. In Wang, J. (Ed.). Family, Society, and Education. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2020). Learning how to learn: the role of metacognition and self-regulation in learning. In Wang, J. (Ed.). The Virtue of Thinking in Learning. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2019). Chinese students at a UK university: how linguistic repertoire mediates language and sojourner identity construction. Linguistics and Applied Linguistics Conference. Beijing Normal University.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2018). Examining Linguistic Diversity as a Resource for Higher Education in the Anglophone World. In Tong, V. C., Standen, A., & Sotiriou, M. (Ed.). Shaping Higher Education with Students: Ways to Connect Research and Teaching (pp.288-293). UCL Press.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2016). Making the most of linguistic diversity: the views and practices of bi/multilingual postgraduate students. The Multilingual University. ESRC Seminars.

Hao, Y. (2012). A Transformative Journey: China-US exchange student studying at an American high school. New World Press.

Pok Jing (Jane) Ho is a doctoral student at the Department of Education, specialising in educational assessment.

She is funded by the Bei Shan Tang Foundation Scholarship for Graduate Studies.

Her DPhil thesis examines validity in the Hong Kong Diploma of Secondary Education Examination, a large-scale, high-stakes test that informs higher education admissions decisions, using the argument-based approach to validation. In particular, her research identifies the claims made based on test scores, the validity evidence that supports or challenges such claims, and the social consequences that ensue as a result of test use.

Prior to her DPhil, she completed an M.A. in International Education Policy Analysis at Stanford University. She subsequently worked as a project officer at the Education University of Hong Kong, where she is now serving as a consultant alongside her studies.

A former secondary school teacher, Jane also holds a B.A. in English Studies (First Class Honours), a B.Ed. in English Language Education (First Class Honours), and an M.Ed. in Curriculum and Instruction from the Chinese University of Hong Kong, as well as the Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (CELTA) from Cambridge.

She is a Peer Supporter at Green Templeton College.

Publications

Ho, P. J. (2020). For some or for all: Vocational English for Hong Kong secondary school students. In C. Hong, & W. K. Ma (Eds.), Applied degree education and the future of work—Education 4.0 (pp. 87–95). Springer. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-15-3142-2

Ho, P. J. (2015). China-Africa “cooperation” in education. International Politics, 5. https://www.iir.cz/en/china-africa-cooperation-in-education

Jennifer’s DPhil focuses on adoptive families where  the adoptive parents also have birth children. She has worked in adoption support as a Parent Consultant for Adoption UK and as Head of Peer Services at PAC-UK, as well as managing the Adoption UK advice line and the parent training team.

She holds an MSc in Poverty Reduction: Policy and Practice from SOAS, and an MBA from Warwick Business School. She has worked in management consultancy in both the public and private sectors and is a board member of CoramBAAF.

Publications

The Right Tools for the Job. Information Age, November 1996

Global teams for the millennium; Management Decision, 36 (1): 31-33, February 1998

Lucy is a second-year DPhil student, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

Her DPhil research aims to engage in a meaningful and creative way with service children to explore how service life has shaped their experiences of education and sense of self. By choosing this focus, the research seeks to widen and nuance current understanding of service children’s educational experiences in addition to furthering knowledge into how service children see themselves. As a result of this, it is hoped that the research will support in developing the professional body of knowledge and understanding of this group of children in schools and help inform the Service Pupil Premium (SPP) funding choices in addition to wider school practice.

Before embarking on her DPhil at Oxford, Lucy completed her PGCE and MEd in Primary Education at the University of Cambridge. In addition to her DPhil work, Lucy is a Trustee for the Armed Forces Education Trust (AFET) – a grant-giving charity for service children – and a volunteer for the Oxford based charity, Big Brothers Big Sisters.

 

 

Aine is interested in improving the health outcomes of children and young people in the care system.

Fahad is reading for a DPhil in Education (part-time). He has over fifteen years professional experience in the education sector, in particular, higher education.

He has held senior roles in staff and student development, human resources, policy and strategy. Fahad holds a BSc in Education and Science and an MBA. Prior to commencing his doctoral studies, he was elected an Academic Visitor at St Antony’s College in the University of Oxford. Fahad’s research focus is on the quality of undergraduate medical education for Qatari doctors.

Shawna completed her undergraduate degree in Psycholinguistics at the University of Toronto in Canada, and later completed the MSc program in Applied Linguistics and Second language Acquisition at the University of Oxford.

She has a wide range of experiences in the field of Linguistics as a teaching and research assistant in areas such as theoretical linguistics, phonology, speech-language pathology, language acquisition, and creole studies. Being a native of Jamaica herself, Shawna has carried out extensive work on creole language acquisition. She worked with the University of the West Indies to draft the first Jamaican (Creole) as a Foreign Language course, and with the U.S Peace Corps to assess and revamp an existing language program for volunteers.

Shawna’s current research focuses on the development of writing skills among primary school learners in Jamaica who speak Jamaican Creole as a home language but are educated in English.

Publications
  • Helms-Park, R., Tucker, S, & Dronjic, V. (2016). From proto-writing to multimedia literacy: scripts and orthographies through the ages. In  Chen Bumgardner, V. Dronjic,, & R. Helms-Park (Eds.), Second Language Reading: Psycholinguistic and Cognitive Perspectives (pp. 1-31). New York, NY: Routledge Publishers.
  • Eriks-Brophy, A., Green, S., & Tucker, S. (2013).  Articulatory error patterns and phonological process use of preschool children with and without hearing loss. Volta Review.

Richard Canter is Visiting Professor of Surgical Education in the Nuffield Department of Surgical Sciences, University of Oxford.

Richard Canter qualified in medicine at the University of London in 1976, before becoming a surgeon at the Royal United Hospital, Bath. He completed a PhD in Management at the University of Bath in 1998 studying the nature of power in decision-making at the personal and organisation level in healthcare. Following the critical Kennedy report on surgical training in 2001, he was recruited to the Royal College of Surgeons of England as Deputy Director of Surgical Education with specific responsibility for curriculum development in surgical education in England. He was subsequently Head of the Postgraduate School of Surgery in Bristol until 2012, after which he concentrated on academic work at Oxford. He was appointed a visiting Professor in Oxford in in 2007, Emeritus Consultant at Oxford University Hospitals in 2015, and Associate Fellow at Green Templeton College, Oxford in 2015.

His interests are professionalism and, in particular, its relationship to leadership in healthcare systems. His current specific research interests are the effectiveness or otherwise of leadership education in respect of its impact on quality improvement in healthcare systems.

At the Royal College of Surgeons of England he was clinical lead and Chair of the Needs Analysis Group evaluating educational resources and organisational systems necessary for the implementation of reform of surgical training, and made recommendations for changes that were eventually adopted by all surgical training systems in the United Kingdom. During this appointment an opportunity arose in early 2003 at the end of the Serbian conflict to assist the European Agency for Reconstruction (EAR, a division of the EEC) in providing advice to the Kosovan Ministry of Health to develop new systems for surgical training.

Currently at Oxford, he is lead tutor for the module in Leadership and Management in Healthcare and Deputy Director of the Masters in Surgical Science, and supervises Masters and DPhil students on the subject of organisational change and leadership. In addition he has regular commitments in teaching postgraduate medical trainees and medical faculty on topics such as leadership, quality improvement, educational theory in healthcare, workplace assessments, supporting and talent managing  medical trainees, as well as occasional commitments to supervising students on the Said Business School Global Opportunity and Threats (Oxford) programme in exploring problems in complex systems.

Along the way he has written and spoken on many topics in medicine, obtained research grants, and has unexpectedly been given fellowships and medals. His main interest outside of work is playing music and he runs the Green Templeton College Big Band.

Prior to starting his DPhil, Eddy worked as a primary school teacher in Bristol, where he also completed his MSc in Educational Research.

He is particularly interested in the culture of high stakes, standardised testing, and how this might perpetuate existing inequalities in schools. His research focuses specifically on the interaction between knowledge, policy and pedagogy in the context of Literacy education.

 

Claire (郝煜) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and a China Oxford Scholarship Fund (COSF) scholar.

Claire holds a BA in Education and Physics from the University of Cambridge, an MA in Applied Linguistics from UCL Institution of Education, and an EdM in International Education Policy from Harvard University. She is passionate about exploring and supporting the transnational experiences of bi-/multilingual students in studying abroad contexts. Her research and professional interests include bilingualism, language and identity, international education, professional development, and school leadership.

Since 2015, Claire has served as the Director of International Education at Beijing Xinxuedao Education Group, a non-profit organisation that operates 31 schools with over 30,000 K-12 students in China. She has also worked as a high school counsellor and a teacher of Physics and Psychology.

Publications

Hao, Y. and Lantsman, G. (2022). Motivation in MOOCs: a qualitative study on the design and evaluation of an online IELTS course. The 7th IAFOR International Conference on Education.

Hao, Y. (2020). Education without borders: sojourner trips in students’ holistic development. In Wang, J. (Ed.). Family, Society, and Education. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2020). Learning how to learn: the role of metacognition and self-regulation in learning. In Wang, J. (Ed.). The Virtue of Thinking in Learning. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2019). Chinese students at a UK university: how linguistic repertoire mediates language and sojourner identity construction. Linguistics and Applied Linguistics Conference. Beijing Normal University.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2018). Examining Linguistic Diversity as a Resource for Higher Education in the Anglophone World. In Tong, V. C., Standen, A., & Sotiriou, M. (Ed.). Shaping Higher Education with Students: Ways to Connect Research and Teaching (pp.288-293). UCL Press.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2016). Making the most of linguistic diversity: the views and practices of bi/multilingual postgraduate students. The Multilingual University. ESRC Seminars.

Hao, Y. (2012). A Transformative Journey: China-US exchange student studying at an American high school. New World Press.

Pok Jing (Jane) Ho is a doctoral student at the Department of Education, specialising in educational assessment.

She is funded by the Bei Shan Tang Foundation Scholarship for Graduate Studies.

Her DPhil thesis examines validity in the Hong Kong Diploma of Secondary Education Examination, a large-scale, high-stakes test that informs higher education admissions decisions, using the argument-based approach to validation. In particular, her research identifies the claims made based on test scores, the validity evidence that supports or challenges such claims, and the social consequences that ensue as a result of test use.

Prior to her DPhil, she completed an M.A. in International Education Policy Analysis at Stanford University. She subsequently worked as a project officer at the Education University of Hong Kong, where she is now serving as a consultant alongside her studies.

A former secondary school teacher, Jane also holds a B.A. in English Studies (First Class Honours), a B.Ed. in English Language Education (First Class Honours), and an M.Ed. in Curriculum and Instruction from the Chinese University of Hong Kong, as well as the Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (CELTA) from Cambridge.

She is a Peer Supporter at Green Templeton College.

Publications

Ho, P. J. (2020). For some or for all: Vocational English for Hong Kong secondary school students. In C. Hong, & W. K. Ma (Eds.), Applied degree education and the future of work—Education 4.0 (pp. 87–95). Springer. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-15-3142-2

Ho, P. J. (2015). China-Africa “cooperation” in education. International Politics, 5. https://www.iir.cz/en/china-africa-cooperation-in-education

Jennifer’s DPhil focuses on adoptive families where  the adoptive parents also have birth children. She has worked in adoption support as a Parent Consultant for Adoption UK and as Head of Peer Services at PAC-UK, as well as managing the Adoption UK advice line and the parent training team.

She holds an MSc in Poverty Reduction: Policy and Practice from SOAS, and an MBA from Warwick Business School. She has worked in management consultancy in both the public and private sectors and is a board member of CoramBAAF.

Publications

The Right Tools for the Job. Information Age, November 1996

Global teams for the millennium; Management Decision, 36 (1): 31-33, February 1998

Lucy is a second-year DPhil student, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

Her DPhil research aims to engage in a meaningful and creative way with service children to explore how service life has shaped their experiences of education and sense of self. By choosing this focus, the research seeks to widen and nuance current understanding of service children’s educational experiences in addition to furthering knowledge into how service children see themselves. As a result of this, it is hoped that the research will support in developing the professional body of knowledge and understanding of this group of children in schools and help inform the Service Pupil Premium (SPP) funding choices in addition to wider school practice.

Before embarking on her DPhil at Oxford, Lucy completed her PGCE and MEd in Primary Education at the University of Cambridge. In addition to her DPhil work, Lucy is a Trustee for the Armed Forces Education Trust (AFET) – a grant-giving charity for service children – and a volunteer for the Oxford based charity, Big Brothers Big Sisters.

 

 

Aine is interested in improving the health outcomes of children and young people in the care system.

Fahad is reading for a DPhil in Education (part-time). He has over fifteen years professional experience in the education sector, in particular, higher education.

He has held senior roles in staff and student development, human resources, policy and strategy. Fahad holds a BSc in Education and Science and an MBA. Prior to commencing his doctoral studies, he was elected an Academic Visitor at St Antony’s College in the University of Oxford. Fahad’s research focus is on the quality of undergraduate medical education for Qatari doctors.

Shawna completed her undergraduate degree in Psycholinguistics at the University of Toronto in Canada, and later completed the MSc program in Applied Linguistics and Second language Acquisition at the University of Oxford.

She has a wide range of experiences in the field of Linguistics as a teaching and research assistant in areas such as theoretical linguistics, phonology, speech-language pathology, language acquisition, and creole studies. Being a native of Jamaica herself, Shawna has carried out extensive work on creole language acquisition. She worked with the University of the West Indies to draft the first Jamaican (Creole) as a Foreign Language course, and with the U.S Peace Corps to assess and revamp an existing language program for volunteers.

Shawna’s current research focuses on the development of writing skills among primary school learners in Jamaica who speak Jamaican Creole as a home language but are educated in English.

Publications
  • Helms-Park, R., Tucker, S, & Dronjic, V. (2016). From proto-writing to multimedia literacy: scripts and orthographies through the ages. In  Chen Bumgardner, V. Dronjic,, & R. Helms-Park (Eds.), Second Language Reading: Psycholinguistic and Cognitive Perspectives (pp. 1-31). New York, NY: Routledge Publishers.
  • Eriks-Brophy, A., Green, S., & Tucker, S. (2013).  Articulatory error patterns and phonological process use of preschool children with and without hearing loss. Volta Review.

Richard Canter is Visiting Professor of Surgical Education in the Nuffield Department of Surgical Sciences, University of Oxford.

Richard Canter qualified in medicine at the University of London in 1976, before becoming a surgeon at the Royal United Hospital, Bath. He completed a PhD in Management at the University of Bath in 1998 studying the nature of power in decision-making at the personal and organisation level in healthcare. Following the critical Kennedy report on surgical training in 2001, he was recruited to the Royal College of Surgeons of England as Deputy Director of Surgical Education with specific responsibility for curriculum development in surgical education in England. He was subsequently Head of the Postgraduate School of Surgery in Bristol until 2012, after which he concentrated on academic work at Oxford. He was appointed a visiting Professor in Oxford in in 2007, Emeritus Consultant at Oxford University Hospitals in 2015, and Associate Fellow at Green Templeton College, Oxford in 2015.

His interests are professionalism and, in particular, its relationship to leadership in healthcare systems. His current specific research interests are the effectiveness or otherwise of leadership education in respect of its impact on quality improvement in healthcare systems.

At the Royal College of Surgeons of England he was clinical lead and Chair of the Needs Analysis Group evaluating educational resources and organisational systems necessary for the implementation of reform of surgical training, and made recommendations for changes that were eventually adopted by all surgical training systems in the United Kingdom. During this appointment an opportunity arose in early 2003 at the end of the Serbian conflict to assist the European Agency for Reconstruction (EAR, a division of the EEC) in providing advice to the Kosovan Ministry of Health to develop new systems for surgical training.

Currently at Oxford, he is lead tutor for the module in Leadership and Management in Healthcare and Deputy Director of the Masters in Surgical Science, and supervises Masters and DPhil students on the subject of organisational change and leadership. In addition he has regular commitments in teaching postgraduate medical trainees and medical faculty on topics such as leadership, quality improvement, educational theory in healthcare, workplace assessments, supporting and talent managing  medical trainees, as well as occasional commitments to supervising students on the Said Business School Global Opportunity and Threats (Oxford) programme in exploring problems in complex systems.

Along the way he has written and spoken on many topics in medicine, obtained research grants, and has unexpectedly been given fellowships and medals. His main interest outside of work is playing music and he runs the Green Templeton College Big Band.

Prior to starting his DPhil, Eddy worked as a primary school teacher in Bristol, where he also completed his MSc in Educational Research.

He is particularly interested in the culture of high stakes, standardised testing, and how this might perpetuate existing inequalities in schools. His research focuses specifically on the interaction between knowledge, policy and pedagogy in the context of Literacy education.

 

Claire (郝煜) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and a China Oxford Scholarship Fund (COSF) scholar.

Claire holds a BA in Education and Physics from the University of Cambridge, an MA in Applied Linguistics from UCL Institution of Education, and an EdM in International Education Policy from Harvard University. She is passionate about exploring and supporting the transnational experiences of bi-/multilingual students in studying abroad contexts. Her research and professional interests include bilingualism, language and identity, international education, professional development, and school leadership.

Since 2015, Claire has served as the Director of International Education at Beijing Xinxuedao Education Group, a non-profit organisation that operates 31 schools with over 30,000 K-12 students in China. She has also worked as a high school counsellor and a teacher of Physics and Psychology.

Publications

Hao, Y. and Lantsman, G. (2022). Motivation in MOOCs: a qualitative study on the design and evaluation of an online IELTS course. The 7th IAFOR International Conference on Education.

Hao, Y. (2020). Education without borders: sojourner trips in students’ holistic development. In Wang, J. (Ed.). Family, Society, and Education. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2020). Learning how to learn: the role of metacognition and self-regulation in learning. In Wang, J. (Ed.). The Virtue of Thinking in Learning. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2019). Chinese students at a UK university: how linguistic repertoire mediates language and sojourner identity construction. Linguistics and Applied Linguistics Conference. Beijing Normal University.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2018). Examining Linguistic Diversity as a Resource for Higher Education in the Anglophone World. In Tong, V. C., Standen, A., & Sotiriou, M. (Ed.). Shaping Higher Education with Students: Ways to Connect Research and Teaching (pp.288-293). UCL Press.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2016). Making the most of linguistic diversity: the views and practices of bi/multilingual postgraduate students. The Multilingual University. ESRC Seminars.

Hao, Y. (2012). A Transformative Journey: China-US exchange student studying at an American high school. New World Press.

Pok Jing (Jane) Ho is a doctoral student at the Department of Education, specialising in educational assessment.

She is funded by the Bei Shan Tang Foundation Scholarship for Graduate Studies.

Her DPhil thesis examines validity in the Hong Kong Diploma of Secondary Education Examination, a large-scale, high-stakes test that informs higher education admissions decisions, using the argument-based approach to validation. In particular, her research identifies the claims made based on test scores, the validity evidence that supports or challenges such claims, and the social consequences that ensue as a result of test use.

Prior to her DPhil, she completed an M.A. in International Education Policy Analysis at Stanford University. She subsequently worked as a project officer at the Education University of Hong Kong, where she is now serving as a consultant alongside her studies.

A former secondary school teacher, Jane also holds a B.A. in English Studies (First Class Honours), a B.Ed. in English Language Education (First Class Honours), and an M.Ed. in Curriculum and Instruction from the Chinese University of Hong Kong, as well as the Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (CELTA) from Cambridge.

She is a Peer Supporter at Green Templeton College.

Publications

Ho, P. J. (2020). For some or for all: Vocational English for Hong Kong secondary school students. In C. Hong, & W. K. Ma (Eds.), Applied degree education and the future of work—Education 4.0 (pp. 87–95). Springer. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-15-3142-2

Ho, P. J. (2015). China-Africa “cooperation” in education. International Politics, 5. https://www.iir.cz/en/china-africa-cooperation-in-education

Jennifer’s DPhil focuses on adoptive families where  the adoptive parents also have birth children. She has worked in adoption support as a Parent Consultant for Adoption UK and as Head of Peer Services at PAC-UK, as well as managing the Adoption UK advice line and the parent training team.

She holds an MSc in Poverty Reduction: Policy and Practice from SOAS, and an MBA from Warwick Business School. She has worked in management consultancy in both the public and private sectors and is a board member of CoramBAAF.

Publications

The Right Tools for the Job. Information Age, November 1996

Global teams for the millennium; Management Decision, 36 (1): 31-33, February 1998

Lucy is a second-year DPhil student, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

Her DPhil research aims to engage in a meaningful and creative way with service children to explore how service life has shaped their experiences of education and sense of self. By choosing this focus, the research seeks to widen and nuance current understanding of service children’s educational experiences in addition to furthering knowledge into how service children see themselves. As a result of this, it is hoped that the research will support in developing the professional body of knowledge and understanding of this group of children in schools and help inform the Service Pupil Premium (SPP) funding choices in addition to wider school practice.

Before embarking on her DPhil at Oxford, Lucy completed her PGCE and MEd in Primary Education at the University of Cambridge. In addition to her DPhil work, Lucy is a Trustee for the Armed Forces Education Trust (AFET) – a grant-giving charity for service children – and a volunteer for the Oxford based charity, Big Brothers Big Sisters.

 

 

Aine is interested in improving the health outcomes of children and young people in the care system.

Fahad is reading for a DPhil in Education (part-time). He has over fifteen years professional experience in the education sector, in particular, higher education.

He has held senior roles in staff and student development, human resources, policy and strategy. Fahad holds a BSc in Education and Science and an MBA. Prior to commencing his doctoral studies, he was elected an Academic Visitor at St Antony’s College in the University of Oxford. Fahad’s research focus is on the quality of undergraduate medical education for Qatari doctors.

Shawna completed her undergraduate degree in Psycholinguistics at the University of Toronto in Canada, and later completed the MSc program in Applied Linguistics and Second language Acquisition at the University of Oxford.

She has a wide range of experiences in the field of Linguistics as a teaching and research assistant in areas such as theoretical linguistics, phonology, speech-language pathology, language acquisition, and creole studies. Being a native of Jamaica herself, Shawna has carried out extensive work on creole language acquisition. She worked with the University of the West Indies to draft the first Jamaican (Creole) as a Foreign Language course, and with the U.S Peace Corps to assess and revamp an existing language program for volunteers.

Shawna’s current research focuses on the development of writing skills among primary school learners in Jamaica who speak Jamaican Creole as a home language but are educated in English.

Publications
  • Helms-Park, R., Tucker, S, & Dronjic, V. (2016). From proto-writing to multimedia literacy: scripts and orthographies through the ages. In  Chen Bumgardner, V. Dronjic,, & R. Helms-Park (Eds.), Second Language Reading: Psycholinguistic and Cognitive Perspectives (pp. 1-31). New York, NY: Routledge Publishers.
  • Eriks-Brophy, A., Green, S., & Tucker, S. (2013).  Articulatory error patterns and phonological process use of preschool children with and without hearing loss. Volta Review.

Richard Canter is Visiting Professor of Surgical Education in the Nuffield Department of Surgical Sciences, University of Oxford.

Richard Canter qualified in medicine at the University of London in 1976, before becoming a surgeon at the Royal United Hospital, Bath. He completed a PhD in Management at the University of Bath in 1998 studying the nature of power in decision-making at the personal and organisation level in healthcare. Following the critical Kennedy report on surgical training in 2001, he was recruited to the Royal College of Surgeons of England as Deputy Director of Surgical Education with specific responsibility for curriculum development in surgical education in England. He was subsequently Head of the Postgraduate School of Surgery in Bristol until 2012, after which he concentrated on academic work at Oxford. He was appointed a visiting Professor in Oxford in in 2007, Emeritus Consultant at Oxford University Hospitals in 2015, and Associate Fellow at Green Templeton College, Oxford in 2015.

His interests are professionalism and, in particular, its relationship to leadership in healthcare systems. His current specific research interests are the effectiveness or otherwise of leadership education in respect of its impact on quality improvement in healthcare systems.

At the Royal College of Surgeons of England he was clinical lead and Chair of the Needs Analysis Group evaluating educational resources and organisational systems necessary for the implementation of reform of surgical training, and made recommendations for changes that were eventually adopted by all surgical training systems in the United Kingdom. During this appointment an opportunity arose in early 2003 at the end of the Serbian conflict to assist the European Agency for Reconstruction (EAR, a division of the EEC) in providing advice to the Kosovan Ministry of Health to develop new systems for surgical training.

Currently at Oxford, he is lead tutor for the module in Leadership and Management in Healthcare and Deputy Director of the Masters in Surgical Science, and supervises Masters and DPhil students on the subject of organisational change and leadership. In addition he has regular commitments in teaching postgraduate medical trainees and medical faculty on topics such as leadership, quality improvement, educational theory in healthcare, workplace assessments, supporting and talent managing  medical trainees, as well as occasional commitments to supervising students on the Said Business School Global Opportunity and Threats (Oxford) programme in exploring problems in complex systems.

Along the way he has written and spoken on many topics in medicine, obtained research grants, and has unexpectedly been given fellowships and medals. His main interest outside of work is playing music and he runs the Green Templeton College Big Band.

Prior to starting his DPhil, Eddy worked as a primary school teacher in Bristol, where he also completed his MSc in Educational Research.

He is particularly interested in the culture of high stakes, standardised testing, and how this might perpetuate existing inequalities in schools. His research focuses specifically on the interaction between knowledge, policy and pedagogy in the context of Literacy education.

 

Claire (郝煜) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and a China Oxford Scholarship Fund (COSF) scholar.

Claire holds a BA in Education and Physics from the University of Cambridge, an MA in Applied Linguistics from UCL Institution of Education, and an EdM in International Education Policy from Harvard University. She is passionate about exploring and supporting the transnational experiences of bi-/multilingual students in studying abroad contexts. Her research and professional interests include bilingualism, language and identity, international education, professional development, and school leadership.

Since 2015, Claire has served as the Director of International Education at Beijing Xinxuedao Education Group, a non-profit organisation that operates 31 schools with over 30,000 K-12 students in China. She has also worked as a high school counsellor and a teacher of Physics and Psychology.

Publications

Hao, Y. and Lantsman, G. (2022). Motivation in MOOCs: a qualitative study on the design and evaluation of an online IELTS course. The 7th IAFOR International Conference on Education.

Hao, Y. (2020). Education without borders: sojourner trips in students’ holistic development. In Wang, J. (Ed.). Family, Society, and Education. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2020). Learning how to learn: the role of metacognition and self-regulation in learning. In Wang, J. (Ed.). The Virtue of Thinking in Learning. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2019). Chinese students at a UK university: how linguistic repertoire mediates language and sojourner identity construction. Linguistics and Applied Linguistics Conference. Beijing Normal University.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2018). Examining Linguistic Diversity as a Resource for Higher Education in the Anglophone World. In Tong, V. C., Standen, A., & Sotiriou, M. (Ed.). Shaping Higher Education with Students: Ways to Connect Research and Teaching (pp.288-293). UCL Press.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2016). Making the most of linguistic diversity: the views and practices of bi/multilingual postgraduate students. The Multilingual University. ESRC Seminars.

Hao, Y. (2012). A Transformative Journey: China-US exchange student studying at an American high school. New World Press.

Pok Jing (Jane) Ho is a doctoral student at the Department of Education, specialising in educational assessment.

She is funded by the Bei Shan Tang Foundation Scholarship for Graduate Studies.

Her DPhil thesis examines validity in the Hong Kong Diploma of Secondary Education Examination, a large-scale, high-stakes test that informs higher education admissions decisions, using the argument-based approach to validation. In particular, her research identifies the claims made based on test scores, the validity evidence that supports or challenges such claims, and the social consequences that ensue as a result of test use.

Prior to her DPhil, she completed an M.A. in International Education Policy Analysis at Stanford University. She subsequently worked as a project officer at the Education University of Hong Kong, where she is now serving as a consultant alongside her studies.

A former secondary school teacher, Jane also holds a B.A. in English Studies (First Class Honours), a B.Ed. in English Language Education (First Class Honours), and an M.Ed. in Curriculum and Instruction from the Chinese University of Hong Kong, as well as the Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (CELTA) from Cambridge.

She is a Peer Supporter at Green Templeton College.

Publications

Ho, P. J. (2020). For some or for all: Vocational English for Hong Kong secondary school students. In C. Hong, & W. K. Ma (Eds.), Applied degree education and the future of work—Education 4.0 (pp. 87–95). Springer. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-15-3142-2

Ho, P. J. (2015). China-Africa “cooperation” in education. International Politics, 5. https://www.iir.cz/en/china-africa-cooperation-in-education

Jennifer’s DPhil focuses on adoptive families where  the adoptive parents also have birth children. She has worked in adoption support as a Parent Consultant for Adoption UK and as Head of Peer Services at PAC-UK, as well as managing the Adoption UK advice line and the parent training team.

She holds an MSc in Poverty Reduction: Policy and Practice from SOAS, and an MBA from Warwick Business School. She has worked in management consultancy in both the public and private sectors and is a board member of CoramBAAF.

Publications

The Right Tools for the Job. Information Age, November 1996

Global teams for the millennium; Management Decision, 36 (1): 31-33, February 1998

Lucy is a second-year DPhil student, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

Her DPhil research aims to engage in a meaningful and creative way with service children to explore how service life has shaped their experiences of education and sense of self. By choosing this focus, the research seeks to widen and nuance current understanding of service children’s educational experiences in addition to furthering knowledge into how service children see themselves. As a result of this, it is hoped that the research will support in developing the professional body of knowledge and understanding of this group of children in schools and help inform the Service Pupil Premium (SPP) funding choices in addition to wider school practice.

Before embarking on her DPhil at Oxford, Lucy completed her PGCE and MEd in Primary Education at the University of Cambridge. In addition to her DPhil work, Lucy is a Trustee for the Armed Forces Education Trust (AFET) – a grant-giving charity for service children – and a volunteer for the Oxford based charity, Big Brothers Big Sisters.

 

 

Aine is interested in improving the health outcomes of children and young people in the care system.

Fahad is reading for a DPhil in Education (part-time). He has over fifteen years professional experience in the education sector, in particular, higher education.

He has held senior roles in staff and student development, human resources, policy and strategy. Fahad holds a BSc in Education and Science and an MBA. Prior to commencing his doctoral studies, he was elected an Academic Visitor at St Antony’s College in the University of Oxford. Fahad’s research focus is on the quality of undergraduate medical education for Qatari doctors.

Shawna completed her undergraduate degree in Psycholinguistics at the University of Toronto in Canada, and later completed the MSc program in Applied Linguistics and Second language Acquisition at the University of Oxford.

She has a wide range of experiences in the field of Linguistics as a teaching and research assistant in areas such as theoretical linguistics, phonology, speech-language pathology, language acquisition, and creole studies. Being a native of Jamaica herself, Shawna has carried out extensive work on creole language acquisition. She worked with the University of the West Indies to draft the first Jamaican (Creole) as a Foreign Language course, and with the U.S Peace Corps to assess and revamp an existing language program for volunteers.

Shawna’s current research focuses on the development of writing skills among primary school learners in Jamaica who speak Jamaican Creole as a home language but are educated in English.

Publications
  • Helms-Park, R., Tucker, S, & Dronjic, V. (2016). From proto-writing to multimedia literacy: scripts and orthographies through the ages. In  Chen Bumgardner, V. Dronjic,, & R. Helms-Park (Eds.), Second Language Reading: Psycholinguistic and Cognitive Perspectives (pp. 1-31). New York, NY: Routledge Publishers.
  • Eriks-Brophy, A., Green, S., & Tucker, S. (2013).  Articulatory error patterns and phonological process use of preschool children with and without hearing loss. Volta Review.

Richard Canter is Visiting Professor of Surgical Education in the Nuffield Department of Surgical Sciences, University of Oxford.

Richard Canter qualified in medicine at the University of London in 1976, before becoming a surgeon at the Royal United Hospital, Bath. He completed a PhD in Management at the University of Bath in 1998 studying the nature of power in decision-making at the personal and organisation level in healthcare. Following the critical Kennedy report on surgical training in 2001, he was recruited to the Royal College of Surgeons of England as Deputy Director of Surgical Education with specific responsibility for curriculum development in surgical education in England. He was subsequently Head of the Postgraduate School of Surgery in Bristol until 2012, after which he concentrated on academic work at Oxford. He was appointed a visiting Professor in Oxford in in 2007, Emeritus Consultant at Oxford University Hospitals in 2015, and Associate Fellow at Green Templeton College, Oxford in 2015.

His interests are professionalism and, in particular, its relationship to leadership in healthcare systems. His current specific research interests are the effectiveness or otherwise of leadership education in respect of its impact on quality improvement in healthcare systems.

At the Royal College of Surgeons of England he was clinical lead and Chair of the Needs Analysis Group evaluating educational resources and organisational systems necessary for the implementation of reform of surgical training, and made recommendations for changes that were eventually adopted by all surgical training systems in the United Kingdom. During this appointment an opportunity arose in early 2003 at the end of the Serbian conflict to assist the European Agency for Reconstruction (EAR, a division of the EEC) in providing advice to the Kosovan Ministry of Health to develop new systems for surgical training.

Currently at Oxford, he is lead tutor for the module in Leadership and Management in Healthcare and Deputy Director of the Masters in Surgical Science, and supervises Masters and DPhil students on the subject of organisational change and leadership. In addition he has regular commitments in teaching postgraduate medical trainees and medical faculty on topics such as leadership, quality improvement, educational theory in healthcare, workplace assessments, supporting and talent managing  medical trainees, as well as occasional commitments to supervising students on the Said Business School Global Opportunity and Threats (Oxford) programme in exploring problems in complex systems.

Along the way he has written and spoken on many topics in medicine, obtained research grants, and has unexpectedly been given fellowships and medals. His main interest outside of work is playing music and he runs the Green Templeton College Big Band.

Prior to starting his DPhil, Eddy worked as a primary school teacher in Bristol, where he also completed his MSc in Educational Research.

He is particularly interested in the culture of high stakes, standardised testing, and how this might perpetuate existing inequalities in schools. His research focuses specifically on the interaction between knowledge, policy and pedagogy in the context of Literacy education.

 

Claire (郝煜) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and a China Oxford Scholarship Fund (COSF) scholar.

Claire holds a BA in Education and Physics from the University of Cambridge, an MA in Applied Linguistics from UCL Institution of Education, and an EdM in International Education Policy from Harvard University. She is passionate about exploring and supporting the transnational experiences of bi-/multilingual students in studying abroad contexts. Her research and professional interests include bilingualism, language and identity, international education, professional development, and school leadership.

Since 2015, Claire has served as the Director of International Education at Beijing Xinxuedao Education Group, a non-profit organisation that operates 31 schools with over 30,000 K-12 students in China. She has also worked as a high school counsellor and a teacher of Physics and Psychology.

Publications

Hao, Y. and Lantsman, G. (2022). Motivation in MOOCs: a qualitative study on the design and evaluation of an online IELTS course. The 7th IAFOR International Conference on Education.

Hao, Y. (2020). Education without borders: sojourner trips in students’ holistic development. In Wang, J. (Ed.). Family, Society, and Education. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2020). Learning how to learn: the role of metacognition and self-regulation in learning. In Wang, J. (Ed.). The Virtue of Thinking in Learning. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2019). Chinese students at a UK university: how linguistic repertoire mediates language and sojourner identity construction. Linguistics and Applied Linguistics Conference. Beijing Normal University.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2018). Examining Linguistic Diversity as a Resource for Higher Education in the Anglophone World. In Tong, V. C., Standen, A., & Sotiriou, M. (Ed.). Shaping Higher Education with Students: Ways to Connect Research and Teaching (pp.288-293). UCL Press.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2016). Making the most of linguistic diversity: the views and practices of bi/multilingual postgraduate students. The Multilingual University. ESRC Seminars.

Hao, Y. (2012). A Transformative Journey: China-US exchange student studying at an American high school. New World Press.

Pok Jing (Jane) Ho is a doctoral student at the Department of Education, specialising in educational assessment.

She is funded by the Bei Shan Tang Foundation Scholarship for Graduate Studies.

Her DPhil thesis examines validity in the Hong Kong Diploma of Secondary Education Examination, a large-scale, high-stakes test that informs higher education admissions decisions, using the argument-based approach to validation. In particular, her research identifies the claims made based on test scores, the validity evidence that supports or challenges such claims, and the social consequences that ensue as a result of test use.

Prior to her DPhil, she completed an M.A. in International Education Policy Analysis at Stanford University. She subsequently worked as a project officer at the Education University of Hong Kong, where she is now serving as a consultant alongside her studies.

A former secondary school teacher, Jane also holds a B.A. in English Studies (First Class Honours), a B.Ed. in English Language Education (First Class Honours), and an M.Ed. in Curriculum and Instruction from the Chinese University of Hong Kong, as well as the Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (CELTA) from Cambridge.

She is a Peer Supporter at Green Templeton College.

Publications

Ho, P. J. (2020). For some or for all: Vocational English for Hong Kong secondary school students. In C. Hong, & W. K. Ma (Eds.), Applied degree education and the future of work—Education 4.0 (pp. 87–95). Springer. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-15-3142-2

Ho, P. J. (2015). China-Africa “cooperation” in education. International Politics, 5. https://www.iir.cz/en/china-africa-cooperation-in-education

Jennifer’s DPhil focuses on adoptive families where  the adoptive parents also have birth children. She has worked in adoption support as a Parent Consultant for Adoption UK and as Head of Peer Services at PAC-UK, as well as managing the Adoption UK advice line and the parent training team.

She holds an MSc in Poverty Reduction: Policy and Practice from SOAS, and an MBA from Warwick Business School. She has worked in management consultancy in both the public and private sectors and is a board member of CoramBAAF.

Publications

The Right Tools for the Job. Information Age, November 1996

Global teams for the millennium; Management Decision, 36 (1): 31-33, February 1998

Lucy is a second-year DPhil student, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

Her DPhil research aims to engage in a meaningful and creative way with service children to explore how service life has shaped their experiences of education and sense of self. By choosing this focus, the research seeks to widen and nuance current understanding of service children’s educational experiences in addition to furthering knowledge into how service children see themselves. As a result of this, it is hoped that the research will support in developing the professional body of knowledge and understanding of this group of children in schools and help inform the Service Pupil Premium (SPP) funding choices in addition to wider school practice.

Before embarking on her DPhil at Oxford, Lucy completed her PGCE and MEd in Primary Education at the University of Cambridge. In addition to her DPhil work, Lucy is a Trustee for the Armed Forces Education Trust (AFET) – a grant-giving charity for service children – and a volunteer for the Oxford based charity, Big Brothers Big Sisters.

 

 

Aine is interested in improving the health outcomes of children and young people in the care system.

Fahad is reading for a DPhil in Education (part-time). He has over fifteen years professional experience in the education sector, in particular, higher education.

He has held senior roles in staff and student development, human resources, policy and strategy. Fahad holds a BSc in Education and Science and an MBA. Prior to commencing his doctoral studies, he was elected an Academic Visitor at St Antony’s College in the University of Oxford. Fahad’s research focus is on the quality of undergraduate medical education for Qatari doctors.

Shawna completed her undergraduate degree in Psycholinguistics at the University of Toronto in Canada, and later completed the MSc program in Applied Linguistics and Second language Acquisition at the University of Oxford.

She has a wide range of experiences in the field of Linguistics as a teaching and research assistant in areas such as theoretical linguistics, phonology, speech-language pathology, language acquisition, and creole studies. Being a native of Jamaica herself, Shawna has carried out extensive work on creole language acquisition. She worked with the University of the West Indies to draft the first Jamaican (Creole) as a Foreign Language course, and with the U.S Peace Corps to assess and revamp an existing language program for volunteers.

Shawna’s current research focuses on the development of writing skills among primary school learners in Jamaica who speak Jamaican Creole as a home language but are educated in English.

Publications
  • Helms-Park, R., Tucker, S, & Dronjic, V. (2016). From proto-writing to multimedia literacy: scripts and orthographies through the ages. In  Chen Bumgardner, V. Dronjic,, & R. Helms-Park (Eds.), Second Language Reading: Psycholinguistic and Cognitive Perspectives (pp. 1-31). New York, NY: Routledge Publishers.
  • Eriks-Brophy, A., Green, S., & Tucker, S. (2013).  Articulatory error patterns and phonological process use of preschool children with and without hearing loss. Volta Review.

Richard Canter is Visiting Professor of Surgical Education in the Nuffield Department of Surgical Sciences, University of Oxford.

Richard Canter qualified in medicine at the University of London in 1976, before becoming a surgeon at the Royal United Hospital, Bath. He completed a PhD in Management at the University of Bath in 1998 studying the nature of power in decision-making at the personal and organisation level in healthcare. Following the critical Kennedy report on surgical training in 2001, he was recruited to the Royal College of Surgeons of England as Deputy Director of Surgical Education with specific responsibility for curriculum development in surgical education in England. He was subsequently Head of the Postgraduate School of Surgery in Bristol until 2012, after which he concentrated on academic work at Oxford. He was appointed a visiting Professor in Oxford in in 2007, Emeritus Consultant at Oxford University Hospitals in 2015, and Associate Fellow at Green Templeton College, Oxford in 2015.

His interests are professionalism and, in particular, its relationship to leadership in healthcare systems. His current specific research interests are the effectiveness or otherwise of leadership education in respect of its impact on quality improvement in healthcare systems.

At the Royal College of Surgeons of England he was clinical lead and Chair of the Needs Analysis Group evaluating educational resources and organisational systems necessary for the implementation of reform of surgical training, and made recommendations for changes that were eventually adopted by all surgical training systems in the United Kingdom. During this appointment an opportunity arose in early 2003 at the end of the Serbian conflict to assist the European Agency for Reconstruction (EAR, a division of the EEC) in providing advice to the Kosovan Ministry of Health to develop new systems for surgical training.

Currently at Oxford, he is lead tutor for the module in Leadership and Management in Healthcare and Deputy Director of the Masters in Surgical Science, and supervises Masters and DPhil students on the subject of organisational change and leadership. In addition he has regular commitments in teaching postgraduate medical trainees and medical faculty on topics such as leadership, quality improvement, educational theory in healthcare, workplace assessments, supporting and talent managing  medical trainees, as well as occasional commitments to supervising students on the Said Business School Global Opportunity and Threats (Oxford) programme in exploring problems in complex systems.

Along the way he has written and spoken on many topics in medicine, obtained research grants, and has unexpectedly been given fellowships and medals. His main interest outside of work is playing music and he runs the Green Templeton College Big Band.

Prior to starting his DPhil, Eddy worked as a primary school teacher in Bristol, where he also completed his MSc in Educational Research.

He is particularly interested in the culture of high stakes, standardised testing, and how this might perpetuate existing inequalities in schools. His research focuses specifically on the interaction between knowledge, policy and pedagogy in the context of Literacy education.

 

Claire (郝煜) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and a China Oxford Scholarship Fund (COSF) scholar.

Claire holds a BA in Education and Physics from the University of Cambridge, an MA in Applied Linguistics from UCL Institution of Education, and an EdM in International Education Policy from Harvard University. She is passionate about exploring and supporting the transnational experiences of bi-/multilingual students in studying abroad contexts. Her research and professional interests include bilingualism, language and identity, international education, professional development, and school leadership.

Since 2015, Claire has served as the Director of International Education at Beijing Xinxuedao Education Group, a non-profit organisation that operates 31 schools with over 30,000 K-12 students in China. She has also worked as a high school counsellor and a teacher of Physics and Psychology.

Publications

Hao, Y. and Lantsman, G. (2022). Motivation in MOOCs: a qualitative study on the design and evaluation of an online IELTS course. The 7th IAFOR International Conference on Education.

Hao, Y. (2020). Education without borders: sojourner trips in students’ holistic development. In Wang, J. (Ed.). Family, Society, and Education. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2020). Learning how to learn: the role of metacognition and self-regulation in learning. In Wang, J. (Ed.). The Virtue of Thinking in Learning. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2019). Chinese students at a UK university: how linguistic repertoire mediates language and sojourner identity construction. Linguistics and Applied Linguistics Conference. Beijing Normal University.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2018). Examining Linguistic Diversity as a Resource for Higher Education in the Anglophone World. In Tong, V. C., Standen, A., & Sotiriou, M. (Ed.). Shaping Higher Education with Students: Ways to Connect Research and Teaching (pp.288-293). UCL Press.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2016). Making the most of linguistic diversity: the views and practices of bi/multilingual postgraduate students. The Multilingual University. ESRC Seminars.

Hao, Y. (2012). A Transformative Journey: China-US exchange student studying at an American high school. New World Press.

Pok Jing (Jane) Ho is a doctoral student at the Department of Education, specialising in educational assessment.

She is funded by the Bei Shan Tang Foundation Scholarship for Graduate Studies.

Her DPhil thesis examines validity in the Hong Kong Diploma of Secondary Education Examination, a large-scale, high-stakes test that informs higher education admissions decisions, using the argument-based approach to validation. In particular, her research identifies the claims made based on test scores, the validity evidence that supports or challenges such claims, and the social consequences that ensue as a result of test use.

Prior to her DPhil, she completed an M.A. in International Education Policy Analysis at Stanford University. She subsequently worked as a project officer at the Education University of Hong Kong, where she is now serving as a consultant alongside her studies.

A former secondary school teacher, Jane also holds a B.A. in English Studies (First Class Honours), a B.Ed. in English Language Education (First Class Honours), and an M.Ed. in Curriculum and Instruction from the Chinese University of Hong Kong, as well as the Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (CELTA) from Cambridge.

She is a Peer Supporter at Green Templeton College.

Publications

Ho, P. J. (2020). For some or for all: Vocational English for Hong Kong secondary school students. In C. Hong, & W. K. Ma (Eds.), Applied degree education and the future of work—Education 4.0 (pp. 87–95). Springer. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-15-3142-2

Ho, P. J. (2015). China-Africa “cooperation” in education. International Politics, 5. https://www.iir.cz/en/china-africa-cooperation-in-education

Jennifer’s DPhil focuses on adoptive families where  the adoptive parents also have birth children. She has worked in adoption support as a Parent Consultant for Adoption UK and as Head of Peer Services at PAC-UK, as well as managing the Adoption UK advice line and the parent training team.

She holds an MSc in Poverty Reduction: Policy and Practice from SOAS, and an MBA from Warwick Business School. She has worked in management consultancy in both the public and private sectors and is a board member of CoramBAAF.

Publications

The Right Tools for the Job. Information Age, November 1996

Global teams for the millennium; Management Decision, 36 (1): 31-33, February 1998

Lucy is a second-year DPhil student, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

Her DPhil research aims to engage in a meaningful and creative way with service children to explore how service life has shaped their experiences of education and sense of self. By choosing this focus, the research seeks to widen and nuance current understanding of service children’s educational experiences in addition to furthering knowledge into how service children see themselves. As a result of this, it is hoped that the research will support in developing the professional body of knowledge and understanding of this group of children in schools and help inform the Service Pupil Premium (SPP) funding choices in addition to wider school practice.

Before embarking on her DPhil at Oxford, Lucy completed her PGCE and MEd in Primary Education at the University of Cambridge. In addition to her DPhil work, Lucy is a Trustee for the Armed Forces Education Trust (AFET) – a grant-giving charity for service children – and a volunteer for the Oxford based charity, Big Brothers Big Sisters.

 

 

Aine is interested in improving the health outcomes of children and young people in the care system.

Fahad is reading for a DPhil in Education (part-time). He has over fifteen years professional experience in the education sector, in particular, higher education.

He has held senior roles in staff and student development, human resources, policy and strategy. Fahad holds a BSc in Education and Science and an MBA. Prior to commencing his doctoral studies, he was elected an Academic Visitor at St Antony’s College in the University of Oxford. Fahad’s research focus is on the quality of undergraduate medical education for Qatari doctors.

Shawna completed her undergraduate degree in Psycholinguistics at the University of Toronto in Canada, and later completed the MSc program in Applied Linguistics and Second language Acquisition at the University of Oxford.

She has a wide range of experiences in the field of Linguistics as a teaching and research assistant in areas such as theoretical linguistics, phonology, speech-language pathology, language acquisition, and creole studies. Being a native of Jamaica herself, Shawna has carried out extensive work on creole language acquisition. She worked with the University of the West Indies to draft the first Jamaican (Creole) as a Foreign Language course, and with the U.S Peace Corps to assess and revamp an existing language program for volunteers.

Shawna’s current research focuses on the development of writing skills among primary school learners in Jamaica who speak Jamaican Creole as a home language but are educated in English.

Publications
  • Helms-Park, R., Tucker, S, & Dronjic, V. (2016). From proto-writing to multimedia literacy: scripts and orthographies through the ages. In  Chen Bumgardner, V. Dronjic,, & R. Helms-Park (Eds.), Second Language Reading: Psycholinguistic and Cognitive Perspectives (pp. 1-31). New York, NY: Routledge Publishers.
  • Eriks-Brophy, A., Green, S., & Tucker, S. (2013).  Articulatory error patterns and phonological process use of preschool children with and without hearing loss. Volta Review.

Richard Canter is Visiting Professor of Surgical Education in the Nuffield Department of Surgical Sciences, University of Oxford.

Richard Canter qualified in medicine at the University of London in 1976, before becoming a surgeon at the Royal United Hospital, Bath. He completed a PhD in Management at the University of Bath in 1998 studying the nature of power in decision-making at the personal and organisation level in healthcare. Following the critical Kennedy report on surgical training in 2001, he was recruited to the Royal College of Surgeons of England as Deputy Director of Surgical Education with specific responsibility for curriculum development in surgical education in England. He was subsequently Head of the Postgraduate School of Surgery in Bristol until 2012, after which he concentrated on academic work at Oxford. He was appointed a visiting Professor in Oxford in in 2007, Emeritus Consultant at Oxford University Hospitals in 2015, and Associate Fellow at Green Templeton College, Oxford in 2015.

His interests are professionalism and, in particular, its relationship to leadership in healthcare systems. His current specific research interests are the effectiveness or otherwise of leadership education in respect of its impact on quality improvement in healthcare systems.

At the Royal College of Surgeons of England he was clinical lead and Chair of the Needs Analysis Group evaluating educational resources and organisational systems necessary for the implementation of reform of surgical training, and made recommendations for changes that were eventually adopted by all surgical training systems in the United Kingdom. During this appointment an opportunity arose in early 2003 at the end of the Serbian conflict to assist the European Agency for Reconstruction (EAR, a division of the EEC) in providing advice to the Kosovan Ministry of Health to develop new systems for surgical training.

Currently at Oxford, he is lead tutor for the module in Leadership and Management in Healthcare and Deputy Director of the Masters in Surgical Science, and supervises Masters and DPhil students on the subject of organisational change and leadership. In addition he has regular commitments in teaching postgraduate medical trainees and medical faculty on topics such as leadership, quality improvement, educational theory in healthcare, workplace assessments, supporting and talent managing  medical trainees, as well as occasional commitments to supervising students on the Said Business School Global Opportunity and Threats (Oxford) programme in exploring problems in complex systems.

Along the way he has written and spoken on many topics in medicine, obtained research grants, and has unexpectedly been given fellowships and medals. His main interest outside of work is playing music and he runs the Green Templeton College Big Band.

Prior to starting his DPhil, Eddy worked as a primary school teacher in Bristol, where he also completed his MSc in Educational Research.

He is particularly interested in the culture of high stakes, standardised testing, and how this might perpetuate existing inequalities in schools. His research focuses specifically on the interaction between knowledge, policy and pedagogy in the context of Literacy education.

 

Claire (郝煜) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and a China Oxford Scholarship Fund (COSF) scholar.

Claire holds a BA in Education and Physics from the University of Cambridge, an MA in Applied Linguistics from UCL Institution of Education, and an EdM in International Education Policy from Harvard University. She is passionate about exploring and supporting the transnational experiences of bi-/multilingual students in studying abroad contexts. Her research and professional interests include bilingualism, language and identity, international education, professional development, and school leadership.

Since 2015, Claire has served as the Director of International Education at Beijing Xinxuedao Education Group, a non-profit organisation that operates 31 schools with over 30,000 K-12 students in China. She has also worked as a high school counsellor and a teacher of Physics and Psychology.

Publications

Hao, Y. and Lantsman, G. (2022). Motivation in MOOCs: a qualitative study on the design and evaluation of an online IELTS course. The 7th IAFOR International Conference on Education.

Hao, Y. (2020). Education without borders: sojourner trips in students’ holistic development. In Wang, J. (Ed.). Family, Society, and Education. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2020). Learning how to learn: the role of metacognition and self-regulation in learning. In Wang, J. (Ed.). The Virtue of Thinking in Learning. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2019). Chinese students at a UK university: how linguistic repertoire mediates language and sojourner identity construction. Linguistics and Applied Linguistics Conference. Beijing Normal University.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2018). Examining Linguistic Diversity as a Resource for Higher Education in the Anglophone World. In Tong, V. C., Standen, A., & Sotiriou, M. (Ed.). Shaping Higher Education with Students: Ways to Connect Research and Teaching (pp.288-293). UCL Press.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2016). Making the most of linguistic diversity: the views and practices of bi/multilingual postgraduate students. The Multilingual University. ESRC Seminars.

Hao, Y. (2012). A Transformative Journey: China-US exchange student studying at an American high school. New World Press.

Pok Jing (Jane) Ho is a doctoral student at the Department of Education, specialising in educational assessment.

She is funded by the Bei Shan Tang Foundation Scholarship for Graduate Studies.

Her DPhil thesis examines validity in the Hong Kong Diploma of Secondary Education Examination, a large-scale, high-stakes test that informs higher education admissions decisions, using the argument-based approach to validation. In particular, her research identifies the claims made based on test scores, the validity evidence that supports or challenges such claims, and the social consequences that ensue as a result of test use.

Prior to her DPhil, she completed an M.A. in International Education Policy Analysis at Stanford University. She subsequently worked as a project officer at the Education University of Hong Kong, where she is now serving as a consultant alongside her studies.

A former secondary school teacher, Jane also holds a B.A. in English Studies (First Class Honours), a B.Ed. in English Language Education (First Class Honours), and an M.Ed. in Curriculum and Instruction from the Chinese University of Hong Kong, as well as the Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (CELTA) from Cambridge.

She is a Peer Supporter at Green Templeton College.

Publications

Ho, P. J. (2020). For some or for all: Vocational English for Hong Kong secondary school students. In C. Hong, & W. K. Ma (Eds.), Applied degree education and the future of work—Education 4.0 (pp. 87–95). Springer. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-15-3142-2

Ho, P. J. (2015). China-Africa “cooperation” in education. International Politics, 5. https://www.iir.cz/en/china-africa-cooperation-in-education

Jennifer’s DPhil focuses on adoptive families where  the adoptive parents also have birth children. She has worked in adoption support as a Parent Consultant for Adoption UK and as Head of Peer Services at PAC-UK, as well as managing the Adoption UK advice line and the parent training team.

She holds an MSc in Poverty Reduction: Policy and Practice from SOAS, and an MBA from Warwick Business School. She has worked in management consultancy in both the public and private sectors and is a board member of CoramBAAF.

Publications

The Right Tools for the Job. Information Age, November 1996

Global teams for the millennium; Management Decision, 36 (1): 31-33, February 1998

Lucy is a second-year DPhil student, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

Her DPhil research aims to engage in a meaningful and creative way with service children to explore how service life has shaped their experiences of education and sense of self. By choosing this focus, the research seeks to widen and nuance current understanding of service children’s educational experiences in addition to furthering knowledge into how service children see themselves. As a result of this, it is hoped that the research will support in developing the professional body of knowledge and understanding of this group of children in schools and help inform the Service Pupil Premium (SPP) funding choices in addition to wider school practice.

Before embarking on her DPhil at Oxford, Lucy completed her PGCE and MEd in Primary Education at the University of Cambridge. In addition to her DPhil work, Lucy is a Trustee for the Armed Forces Education Trust (AFET) – a grant-giving charity for service children – and a volunteer for the Oxford based charity, Big Brothers Big Sisters.

 

 

Aine is interested in improving the health outcomes of children and young people in the care system.

Fahad is reading for a DPhil in Education (part-time). He has over fifteen years professional experience in the education sector, in particular, higher education.

He has held senior roles in staff and student development, human resources, policy and strategy. Fahad holds a BSc in Education and Science and an MBA. Prior to commencing his doctoral studies, he was elected an Academic Visitor at St Antony’s College in the University of Oxford. Fahad’s research focus is on the quality of undergraduate medical education for Qatari doctors.

Shawna completed her undergraduate degree in Psycholinguistics at the University of Toronto in Canada, and later completed the MSc program in Applied Linguistics and Second language Acquisition at the University of Oxford.

She has a wide range of experiences in the field of Linguistics as a teaching and research assistant in areas such as theoretical linguistics, phonology, speech-language pathology, language acquisition, and creole studies. Being a native of Jamaica herself, Shawna has carried out extensive work on creole language acquisition. She worked with the University of the West Indies to draft the first Jamaican (Creole) as a Foreign Language course, and with the U.S Peace Corps to assess and revamp an existing language program for volunteers.

Shawna’s current research focuses on the development of writing skills among primary school learners in Jamaica who speak Jamaican Creole as a home language but are educated in English.

Publications
  • Helms-Park, R., Tucker, S, & Dronjic, V. (2016). From proto-writing to multimedia literacy: scripts and orthographies through the ages. In  Chen Bumgardner, V. Dronjic,, & R. Helms-Park (Eds.), Second Language Reading: Psycholinguistic and Cognitive Perspectives (pp. 1-31). New York, NY: Routledge Publishers.
  • Eriks-Brophy, A., Green, S., & Tucker, S. (2013).  Articulatory error patterns and phonological process use of preschool children with and without hearing loss. Volta Review.

Richard Canter is Visiting Professor of Surgical Education in the Nuffield Department of Surgical Sciences, University of Oxford.

Richard Canter qualified in medicine at the University of London in 1976, before becoming a surgeon at the Royal United Hospital, Bath. He completed a PhD in Management at the University of Bath in 1998 studying the nature of power in decision-making at the personal and organisation level in healthcare. Following the critical Kennedy report on surgical training in 2001, he was recruited to the Royal College of Surgeons of England as Deputy Director of Surgical Education with specific responsibility for curriculum development in surgical education in England. He was subsequently Head of the Postgraduate School of Surgery in Bristol until 2012, after which he concentrated on academic work at Oxford. He was appointed a visiting Professor in Oxford in in 2007, Emeritus Consultant at Oxford University Hospitals in 2015, and Associate Fellow at Green Templeton College, Oxford in 2015.

His interests are professionalism and, in particular, its relationship to leadership in healthcare systems. His current specific research interests are the effectiveness or otherwise of leadership education in respect of its impact on quality improvement in healthcare systems.

At the Royal College of Surgeons of England he was clinical lead and Chair of the Needs Analysis Group evaluating educational resources and organisational systems necessary for the implementation of reform of surgical training, and made recommendations for changes that were eventually adopted by all surgical training systems in the United Kingdom. During this appointment an opportunity arose in early 2003 at the end of the Serbian conflict to assist the European Agency for Reconstruction (EAR, a division of the EEC) in providing advice to the Kosovan Ministry of Health to develop new systems for surgical training.

Currently at Oxford, he is lead tutor for the module in Leadership and Management in Healthcare and Deputy Director of the Masters in Surgical Science, and supervises Masters and DPhil students on the subject of organisational change and leadership. In addition he has regular commitments in teaching postgraduate medical trainees and medical faculty on topics such as leadership, quality improvement, educational theory in healthcare, workplace assessments, supporting and talent managing  medical trainees, as well as occasional commitments to supervising students on the Said Business School Global Opportunity and Threats (Oxford) programme in exploring problems in complex systems.

Along the way he has written and spoken on many topics in medicine, obtained research grants, and has unexpectedly been given fellowships and medals. His main interest outside of work is playing music and he runs the Green Templeton College Big Band.

Prior to starting his DPhil, Eddy worked as a primary school teacher in Bristol, where he also completed his MSc in Educational Research.

He is particularly interested in the culture of high stakes, standardised testing, and how this might perpetuate existing inequalities in schools. His research focuses specifically on the interaction between knowledge, policy and pedagogy in the context of Literacy education.

 

Claire (郝煜) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and a China Oxford Scholarship Fund (COSF) scholar.

Claire holds a BA in Education and Physics from the University of Cambridge, an MA in Applied Linguistics from UCL Institution of Education, and an EdM in International Education Policy from Harvard University. She is passionate about exploring and supporting the transnational experiences of bi-/multilingual students in studying abroad contexts. Her research and professional interests include bilingualism, language and identity, international education, professional development, and school leadership.

Since 2015, Claire has served as the Director of International Education at Beijing Xinxuedao Education Group, a non-profit organisation that operates 31 schools with over 30,000 K-12 students in China. She has also worked as a high school counsellor and a teacher of Physics and Psychology.

Publications

Hao, Y. and Lantsman, G. (2022). Motivation in MOOCs: a qualitative study on the design and evaluation of an online IELTS course. The 7th IAFOR International Conference on Education.

Hao, Y. (2020). Education without borders: sojourner trips in students’ holistic development. In Wang, J. (Ed.). Family, Society, and Education. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2020). Learning how to learn: the role of metacognition and self-regulation in learning. In Wang, J. (Ed.). The Virtue of Thinking in Learning. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2019). Chinese students at a UK university: how linguistic repertoire mediates language and sojourner identity construction. Linguistics and Applied Linguistics Conference. Beijing Normal University.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2018). Examining Linguistic Diversity as a Resource for Higher Education in the Anglophone World. In Tong, V. C., Standen, A., & Sotiriou, M. (Ed.). Shaping Higher Education with Students: Ways to Connect Research and Teaching (pp.288-293). UCL Press.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2016). Making the most of linguistic diversity: the views and practices of bi/multilingual postgraduate students. The Multilingual University. ESRC Seminars.

Hao, Y. (2012). A Transformative Journey: China-US exchange student studying at an American high school. New World Press.

Pok Jing (Jane) Ho is a doctoral student at the Department of Education, specialising in educational assessment.

She is funded by the Bei Shan Tang Foundation Scholarship for Graduate Studies.

Her DPhil thesis examines validity in the Hong Kong Diploma of Secondary Education Examination, a large-scale, high-stakes test that informs higher education admissions decisions, using the argument-based approach to validation. In particular, her research identifies the claims made based on test scores, the validity evidence that supports or challenges such claims, and the social consequences that ensue as a result of test use.

Prior to her DPhil, she completed an M.A. in International Education Policy Analysis at Stanford University. She subsequently worked as a project officer at the Education University of Hong Kong, where she is now serving as a consultant alongside her studies.

A former secondary school teacher, Jane also holds a B.A. in English Studies (First Class Honours), a B.Ed. in English Language Education (First Class Honours), and an M.Ed. in Curriculum and Instruction from the Chinese University of Hong Kong, as well as the Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (CELTA) from Cambridge.

She is a Peer Supporter at Green Templeton College.

Publications

Ho, P. J. (2020). For some or for all: Vocational English for Hong Kong secondary school students. In C. Hong, & W. K. Ma (Eds.), Applied degree education and the future of work—Education 4.0 (pp. 87–95). Springer. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-15-3142-2

Ho, P. J. (2015). China-Africa “cooperation” in education. International Politics, 5. https://www.iir.cz/en/china-africa-cooperation-in-education

Jennifer’s DPhil focuses on adoptive families where  the adoptive parents also have birth children. She has worked in adoption support as a Parent Consultant for Adoption UK and as Head of Peer Services at PAC-UK, as well as managing the Adoption UK advice line and the parent training team.

She holds an MSc in Poverty Reduction: Policy and Practice from SOAS, and an MBA from Warwick Business School. She has worked in management consultancy in both the public and private sectors and is a board member of CoramBAAF.

Publications

The Right Tools for the Job. Information Age, November 1996

Global teams for the millennium; Management Decision, 36 (1): 31-33, February 1998

Lucy is a second-year DPhil student, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

Her DPhil research aims to engage in a meaningful and creative way with service children to explore how service life has shaped their experiences of education and sense of self. By choosing this focus, the research seeks to widen and nuance current understanding of service children’s educational experiences in addition to furthering knowledge into how service children see themselves. As a result of this, it is hoped that the research will support in developing the professional body of knowledge and understanding of this group of children in schools and help inform the Service Pupil Premium (SPP) funding choices in addition to wider school practice.

Before embarking on her DPhil at Oxford, Lucy completed her PGCE and MEd in Primary Education at the University of Cambridge. In addition to her DPhil work, Lucy is a Trustee for the Armed Forces Education Trust (AFET) – a grant-giving charity for service children – and a volunteer for the Oxford based charity, Big Brothers Big Sisters.

 

 

Aine is interested in improving the health outcomes of children and young people in the care system.

Fahad is reading for a DPhil in Education (part-time). He has over fifteen years professional experience in the education sector, in particular, higher education.

He has held senior roles in staff and student development, human resources, policy and strategy. Fahad holds a BSc in Education and Science and an MBA. Prior to commencing his doctoral studies, he was elected an Academic Visitor at St Antony’s College in the University of Oxford. Fahad’s research focus is on the quality of undergraduate medical education for Qatari doctors.

Shawna completed her undergraduate degree in Psycholinguistics at the University of Toronto in Canada, and later completed the MSc program in Applied Linguistics and Second language Acquisition at the University of Oxford.

She has a wide range of experiences in the field of Linguistics as a teaching and research assistant in areas such as theoretical linguistics, phonology, speech-language pathology, language acquisition, and creole studies. Being a native of Jamaica herself, Shawna has carried out extensive work on creole language acquisition. She worked with the University of the West Indies to draft the first Jamaican (Creole) as a Foreign Language course, and with the U.S Peace Corps to assess and revamp an existing language program for volunteers.

Shawna’s current research focuses on the development of writing skills among primary school learners in Jamaica who speak Jamaican Creole as a home language but are educated in English.

Publications
  • Helms-Park, R., Tucker, S, & Dronjic, V. (2016). From proto-writing to multimedia literacy: scripts and orthographies through the ages. In  Chen Bumgardner, V. Dronjic,, & R. Helms-Park (Eds.), Second Language Reading: Psycholinguistic and Cognitive Perspectives (pp. 1-31). New York, NY: Routledge Publishers.
  • Eriks-Brophy, A., Green, S., & Tucker, S. (2013).  Articulatory error patterns and phonological process use of preschool children with and without hearing loss. Volta Review.

Richard Canter is Visiting Professor of Surgical Education in the Nuffield Department of Surgical Sciences, University of Oxford.

Richard Canter qualified in medicine at the University of London in 1976, before becoming a surgeon at the Royal United Hospital, Bath. He completed a PhD in Management at the University of Bath in 1998 studying the nature of power in decision-making at the personal and organisation level in healthcare. Following the critical Kennedy report on surgical training in 2001, he was recruited to the Royal College of Surgeons of England as Deputy Director of Surgical Education with specific responsibility for curriculum development in surgical education in England. He was subsequently Head of the Postgraduate School of Surgery in Bristol until 2012, after which he concentrated on academic work at Oxford. He was appointed a visiting Professor in Oxford in in 2007, Emeritus Consultant at Oxford University Hospitals in 2015, and Associate Fellow at Green Templeton College, Oxford in 2015.

His interests are professionalism and, in particular, its relationship to leadership in healthcare systems. His current specific research interests are the effectiveness or otherwise of leadership education in respect of its impact on quality improvement in healthcare systems.

At the Royal College of Surgeons of England he was clinical lead and Chair of the Needs Analysis Group evaluating educational resources and organisational systems necessary for the implementation of reform of surgical training, and made recommendations for changes that were eventually adopted by all surgical training systems in the United Kingdom. During this appointment an opportunity arose in early 2003 at the end of the Serbian conflict to assist the European Agency for Reconstruction (EAR, a division of the EEC) in providing advice to the Kosovan Ministry of Health to develop new systems for surgical training.

Currently at Oxford, he is lead tutor for the module in Leadership and Management in Healthcare and Deputy Director of the Masters in Surgical Science, and supervises Masters and DPhil students on the subject of organisational change and leadership. In addition he has regular commitments in teaching postgraduate medical trainees and medical faculty on topics such as leadership, quality improvement, educational theory in healthcare, workplace assessments, supporting and talent managing  medical trainees, as well as occasional commitments to supervising students on the Said Business School Global Opportunity and Threats (Oxford) programme in exploring problems in complex systems.

Along the way he has written and spoken on many topics in medicine, obtained research grants, and has unexpectedly been given fellowships and medals. His main interest outside of work is playing music and he runs the Green Templeton College Big Band.

Prior to starting his DPhil, Eddy worked as a primary school teacher in Bristol, where he also completed his MSc in Educational Research.

He is particularly interested in the culture of high stakes, standardised testing, and how this might perpetuate existing inequalities in schools. His research focuses specifically on the interaction between knowledge, policy and pedagogy in the context of Literacy education.

 

Claire (郝煜) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and a China Oxford Scholarship Fund (COSF) scholar.

Claire holds a BA in Education and Physics from the University of Cambridge, an MA in Applied Linguistics from UCL Institution of Education, and an EdM in International Education Policy from Harvard University. She is passionate about exploring and supporting the transnational experiences of bi-/multilingual students in studying abroad contexts. Her research and professional interests include bilingualism, language and identity, international education, professional development, and school leadership.

Since 2015, Claire has served as the Director of International Education at Beijing Xinxuedao Education Group, a non-profit organisation that operates 31 schools with over 30,000 K-12 students in China. She has also worked as a high school counsellor and a teacher of Physics and Psychology.

Publications

Hao, Y. and Lantsman, G. (2022). Motivation in MOOCs: a qualitative study on the design and evaluation of an online IELTS course. The 7th IAFOR International Conference on Education.

Hao, Y. (2020). Education without borders: sojourner trips in students’ holistic development. In Wang, J. (Ed.). Family, Society, and Education. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2020). Learning how to learn: the role of metacognition and self-regulation in learning. In Wang, J. (Ed.). The Virtue of Thinking in Learning. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2019). Chinese students at a UK university: how linguistic repertoire mediates language and sojourner identity construction. Linguistics and Applied Linguistics Conference. Beijing Normal University.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2018). Examining Linguistic Diversity as a Resource for Higher Education in the Anglophone World. In Tong, V. C., Standen, A., & Sotiriou, M. (Ed.). Shaping Higher Education with Students: Ways to Connect Research and Teaching (pp.288-293). UCL Press.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2016). Making the most of linguistic diversity: the views and practices of bi/multilingual postgraduate students. The Multilingual University. ESRC Seminars.

Hao, Y. (2012). A Transformative Journey: China-US exchange student studying at an American high school. New World Press.

Pok Jing (Jane) Ho is a doctoral student at the Department of Education, specialising in educational assessment.

She is funded by the Bei Shan Tang Foundation Scholarship for Graduate Studies.

Her DPhil thesis examines validity in the Hong Kong Diploma of Secondary Education Examination, a large-scale, high-stakes test that informs higher education admissions decisions, using the argument-based approach to validation. In particular, her research identifies the claims made based on test scores, the validity evidence that supports or challenges such claims, and the social consequences that ensue as a result of test use.

Prior to her DPhil, she completed an M.A. in International Education Policy Analysis at Stanford University. She subsequently worked as a project officer at the Education University of Hong Kong, where she is now serving as a consultant alongside her studies.

A former secondary school teacher, Jane also holds a B.A. in English Studies (First Class Honours), a B.Ed. in English Language Education (First Class Honours), and an M.Ed. in Curriculum and Instruction from the Chinese University of Hong Kong, as well as the Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (CELTA) from Cambridge.

She is a Peer Supporter at Green Templeton College.

Publications

Ho, P. J. (2020). For some or for all: Vocational English for Hong Kong secondary school students. In C. Hong, & W. K. Ma (Eds.), Applied degree education and the future of work—Education 4.0 (pp. 87–95). Springer. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-15-3142-2

Ho, P. J. (2015). China-Africa “cooperation” in education. International Politics, 5. https://www.iir.cz/en/china-africa-cooperation-in-education

Jennifer’s DPhil focuses on adoptive families where  the adoptive parents also have birth children. She has worked in adoption support as a Parent Consultant for Adoption UK and as Head of Peer Services at PAC-UK, as well as managing the Adoption UK advice line and the parent training team.

She holds an MSc in Poverty Reduction: Policy and Practice from SOAS, and an MBA from Warwick Business School. She has worked in management consultancy in both the public and private sectors and is a board member of CoramBAAF.

Publications

The Right Tools for the Job. Information Age, November 1996

Global teams for the millennium; Management Decision, 36 (1): 31-33, February 1998

Lucy is a second-year DPhil student, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

Her DPhil research aims to engage in a meaningful and creative way with service children to explore how service life has shaped their experiences of education and sense of self. By choosing this focus, the research seeks to widen and nuance current understanding of service children’s educational experiences in addition to furthering knowledge into how service children see themselves. As a result of this, it is hoped that the research will support in developing the professional body of knowledge and understanding of this group of children in schools and help inform the Service Pupil Premium (SPP) funding choices in addition to wider school practice.

Before embarking on her DPhil at Oxford, Lucy completed her PGCE and MEd in Primary Education at the University of Cambridge. In addition to her DPhil work, Lucy is a Trustee for the Armed Forces Education Trust (AFET) – a grant-giving charity for service children – and a volunteer for the Oxford based charity, Big Brothers Big Sisters.

 

 

Aine is interested in improving the health outcomes of children and young people in the care system.

Fahad is reading for a DPhil in Education (part-time). He has over fifteen years professional experience in the education sector, in particular, higher education.

He has held senior roles in staff and student development, human resources, policy and strategy. Fahad holds a BSc in Education and Science and an MBA. Prior to commencing his doctoral studies, he was elected an Academic Visitor at St Antony’s College in the University of Oxford. Fahad’s research focus is on the quality of undergraduate medical education for Qatari doctors.

Shawna completed her undergraduate degree in Psycholinguistics at the University of Toronto in Canada, and later completed the MSc program in Applied Linguistics and Second language Acquisition at the University of Oxford.

She has a wide range of experiences in the field of Linguistics as a teaching and research assistant in areas such as theoretical linguistics, phonology, speech-language pathology, language acquisition, and creole studies. Being a native of Jamaica herself, Shawna has carried out extensive work on creole language acquisition. She worked with the University of the West Indies to draft the first Jamaican (Creole) as a Foreign Language course, and with the U.S Peace Corps to assess and revamp an existing language program for volunteers.

Shawna’s current research focuses on the development of writing skills among primary school learners in Jamaica who speak Jamaican Creole as a home language but are educated in English.

Publications
  • Helms-Park, R., Tucker, S, & Dronjic, V. (2016). From proto-writing to multimedia literacy: scripts and orthographies through the ages. In  Chen Bumgardner, V. Dronjic,, & R. Helms-Park (Eds.), Second Language Reading: Psycholinguistic and Cognitive Perspectives (pp. 1-31). New York, NY: Routledge Publishers.
  • Eriks-Brophy, A., Green, S., & Tucker, S. (2013).  Articulatory error patterns and phonological process use of preschool children with and without hearing loss. Volta Review.

Richard Canter is Visiting Professor of Surgical Education in the Nuffield Department of Surgical Sciences, University of Oxford.

Richard Canter qualified in medicine at the University of London in 1976, before becoming a surgeon at the Royal United Hospital, Bath. He completed a PhD in Management at the University of Bath in 1998 studying the nature of power in decision-making at the personal and organisation level in healthcare. Following the critical Kennedy report on surgical training in 2001, he was recruited to the Royal College of Surgeons of England as Deputy Director of Surgical Education with specific responsibility for curriculum development in surgical education in England. He was subsequently Head of the Postgraduate School of Surgery in Bristol until 2012, after which he concentrated on academic work at Oxford. He was appointed a visiting Professor in Oxford in in 2007, Emeritus Consultant at Oxford University Hospitals in 2015, and Associate Fellow at Green Templeton College, Oxford in 2015.

His interests are professionalism and, in particular, its relationship to leadership in healthcare systems. His current specific research interests are the effectiveness or otherwise of leadership education in respect of its impact on quality improvement in healthcare systems.

At the Royal College of Surgeons of England he was clinical lead and Chair of the Needs Analysis Group evaluating educational resources and organisational systems necessary for the implementation of reform of surgical training, and made recommendations for changes that were eventually adopted by all surgical training systems in the United Kingdom. During this appointment an opportunity arose in early 2003 at the end of the Serbian conflict to assist the European Agency for Reconstruction (EAR, a division of the EEC) in providing advice to the Kosovan Ministry of Health to develop new systems for surgical training.

Currently at Oxford, he is lead tutor for the module in Leadership and Management in Healthcare and Deputy Director of the Masters in Surgical Science, and supervises Masters and DPhil students on the subject of organisational change and leadership. In addition he has regular commitments in teaching postgraduate medical trainees and medical faculty on topics such as leadership, quality improvement, educational theory in healthcare, workplace assessments, supporting and talent managing  medical trainees, as well as occasional commitments to supervising students on the Said Business School Global Opportunity and Threats (Oxford) programme in exploring problems in complex systems.

Along the way he has written and spoken on many topics in medicine, obtained research grants, and has unexpectedly been given fellowships and medals. His main interest outside of work is playing music and he runs the Green Templeton College Big Band.

Prior to starting his DPhil, Eddy worked as a primary school teacher in Bristol, where he also completed his MSc in Educational Research.

He is particularly interested in the culture of high stakes, standardised testing, and how this might perpetuate existing inequalities in schools. His research focuses specifically on the interaction between knowledge, policy and pedagogy in the context of Literacy education.

 

Claire (郝煜) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and a China Oxford Scholarship Fund (COSF) scholar.

Claire holds a BA in Education and Physics from the University of Cambridge, an MA in Applied Linguistics from UCL Institution of Education, and an EdM in International Education Policy from Harvard University. She is passionate about exploring and supporting the transnational experiences of bi-/multilingual students in studying abroad contexts. Her research and professional interests include bilingualism, language and identity, international education, professional development, and school leadership.

Since 2015, Claire has served as the Director of International Education at Beijing Xinxuedao Education Group, a non-profit organisation that operates 31 schools with over 30,000 K-12 students in China. She has also worked as a high school counsellor and a teacher of Physics and Psychology.

Publications

Hao, Y. and Lantsman, G. (2022). Motivation in MOOCs: a qualitative study on the design and evaluation of an online IELTS course. The 7th IAFOR International Conference on Education.

Hao, Y. (2020). Education without borders: sojourner trips in students’ holistic development. In Wang, J. (Ed.). Family, Society, and Education. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2020). Learning how to learn: the role of metacognition and self-regulation in learning. In Wang, J. (Ed.). The Virtue of Thinking in Learning. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2019). Chinese students at a UK university: how linguistic repertoire mediates language and sojourner identity construction. Linguistics and Applied Linguistics Conference. Beijing Normal University.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2018). Examining Linguistic Diversity as a Resource for Higher Education in the Anglophone World. In Tong, V. C., Standen, A., & Sotiriou, M. (Ed.). Shaping Higher Education with Students: Ways to Connect Research and Teaching (pp.288-293). UCL Press.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2016). Making the most of linguistic diversity: the views and practices of bi/multilingual postgraduate students. The Multilingual University. ESRC Seminars.

Hao, Y. (2012). A Transformative Journey: China-US exchange student studying at an American high school. New World Press.

Pok Jing (Jane) Ho is a doctoral student at the Department of Education, specialising in educational assessment.

She is funded by the Bei Shan Tang Foundation Scholarship for Graduate Studies.

Her DPhil thesis examines validity in the Hong Kong Diploma of Secondary Education Examination, a large-scale, high-stakes test that informs higher education admissions decisions, using the argument-based approach to validation. In particular, her research identifies the claims made based on test scores, the validity evidence that supports or challenges such claims, and the social consequences that ensue as a result of test use.

Prior to her DPhil, she completed an M.A. in International Education Policy Analysis at Stanford University. She subsequently worked as a project officer at the Education University of Hong Kong, where she is now serving as a consultant alongside her studies.

A former secondary school teacher, Jane also holds a B.A. in English Studies (First Class Honours), a B.Ed. in English Language Education (First Class Honours), and an M.Ed. in Curriculum and Instruction from the Chinese University of Hong Kong, as well as the Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (CELTA) from Cambridge.

She is a Peer Supporter at Green Templeton College.

Publications

Ho, P. J. (2020). For some or for all: Vocational English for Hong Kong secondary school students. In C. Hong, & W. K. Ma (Eds.), Applied degree education and the future of work—Education 4.0 (pp. 87–95). Springer. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-15-3142-2

Ho, P. J. (2015). China-Africa “cooperation” in education. International Politics, 5. https://www.iir.cz/en/china-africa-cooperation-in-education

Jennifer’s DPhil focuses on adoptive families where  the adoptive parents also have birth children. She has worked in adoption support as a Parent Consultant for Adoption UK and as Head of Peer Services at PAC-UK, as well as managing the Adoption UK advice line and the parent training team.

She holds an MSc in Poverty Reduction: Policy and Practice from SOAS, and an MBA from Warwick Business School. She has worked in management consultancy in both the public and private sectors and is a board member of CoramBAAF.

Publications

The Right Tools for the Job. Information Age, November 1996

Global teams for the millennium; Management Decision, 36 (1): 31-33, February 1998

Lucy is a second-year DPhil student, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

Her DPhil research aims to engage in a meaningful and creative way with service children to explore how service life has shaped their experiences of education and sense of self. By choosing this focus, the research seeks to widen and nuance current understanding of service children’s educational experiences in addition to furthering knowledge into how service children see themselves. As a result of this, it is hoped that the research will support in developing the professional body of knowledge and understanding of this group of children in schools and help inform the Service Pupil Premium (SPP) funding choices in addition to wider school practice.

Before embarking on her DPhil at Oxford, Lucy completed her PGCE and MEd in Primary Education at the University of Cambridge. In addition to her DPhil work, Lucy is a Trustee for the Armed Forces Education Trust (AFET) – a grant-giving charity for service children – and a volunteer for the Oxford based charity, Big Brothers Big Sisters.

 

 

Aine is interested in improving the health outcomes of children and young people in the care system.

Fahad is reading for a DPhil in Education (part-time). He has over fifteen years professional experience in the education sector, in particular, higher education.

He has held senior roles in staff and student development, human resources, policy and strategy. Fahad holds a BSc in Education and Science and an MBA. Prior to commencing his doctoral studies, he was elected an Academic Visitor at St Antony’s College in the University of Oxford. Fahad’s research focus is on the quality of undergraduate medical education for Qatari doctors.

Shawna completed her undergraduate degree in Psycholinguistics at the University of Toronto in Canada, and later completed the MSc program in Applied Linguistics and Second language Acquisition at the University of Oxford.

She has a wide range of experiences in the field of Linguistics as a teaching and research assistant in areas such as theoretical linguistics, phonology, speech-language pathology, language acquisition, and creole studies. Being a native of Jamaica herself, Shawna has carried out extensive work on creole language acquisition. She worked with the University of the West Indies to draft the first Jamaican (Creole) as a Foreign Language course, and with the U.S Peace Corps to assess and revamp an existing language program for volunteers.

Shawna’s current research focuses on the development of writing skills among primary school learners in Jamaica who speak Jamaican Creole as a home language but are educated in English.

Publications
  • Helms-Park, R., Tucker, S, & Dronjic, V. (2016). From proto-writing to multimedia literacy: scripts and orthographies through the ages. In  Chen Bumgardner, V. Dronjic,, & R. Helms-Park (Eds.), Second Language Reading: Psycholinguistic and Cognitive Perspectives (pp. 1-31). New York, NY: Routledge Publishers.
  • Eriks-Brophy, A., Green, S., & Tucker, S. (2013).  Articulatory error patterns and phonological process use of preschool children with and without hearing loss. Volta Review.

Richard Canter is Visiting Professor of Surgical Education in the Nuffield Department of Surgical Sciences, University of Oxford.

Richard Canter qualified in medicine at the University of London in 1976, before becoming a surgeon at the Royal United Hospital, Bath. He completed a PhD in Management at the University of Bath in 1998 studying the nature of power in decision-making at the personal and organisation level in healthcare. Following the critical Kennedy report on surgical training in 2001, he was recruited to the Royal College of Surgeons of England as Deputy Director of Surgical Education with specific responsibility for curriculum development in surgical education in England. He was subsequently Head of the Postgraduate School of Surgery in Bristol until 2012, after which he concentrated on academic work at Oxford. He was appointed a visiting Professor in Oxford in in 2007, Emeritus Consultant at Oxford University Hospitals in 2015, and Associate Fellow at Green Templeton College, Oxford in 2015.

His interests are professionalism and, in particular, its relationship to leadership in healthcare systems. His current specific research interests are the effectiveness or otherwise of leadership education in respect of its impact on quality improvement in healthcare systems.

At the Royal College of Surgeons of England he was clinical lead and Chair of the Needs Analysis Group evaluating educational resources and organisational systems necessary for the implementation of reform of surgical training, and made recommendations for changes that were eventually adopted by all surgical training systems in the United Kingdom. During this appointment an opportunity arose in early 2003 at the end of the Serbian conflict to assist the European Agency for Reconstruction (EAR, a division of the EEC) in providing advice to the Kosovan Ministry of Health to develop new systems for surgical training.

Currently at Oxford, he is lead tutor for the module in Leadership and Management in Healthcare and Deputy Director of the Masters in Surgical Science, and supervises Masters and DPhil students on the subject of organisational change and leadership. In addition he has regular commitments in teaching postgraduate medical trainees and medical faculty on topics such as leadership, quality improvement, educational theory in healthcare, workplace assessments, supporting and talent managing  medical trainees, as well as occasional commitments to supervising students on the Said Business School Global Opportunity and Threats (Oxford) programme in exploring problems in complex systems.

Along the way he has written and spoken on many topics in medicine, obtained research grants, and has unexpectedly been given fellowships and medals. His main interest outside of work is playing music and he runs the Green Templeton College Big Band.

Prior to starting his DPhil, Eddy worked as a primary school teacher in Bristol, where he also completed his MSc in Educational Research.

He is particularly interested in the culture of high stakes, standardised testing, and how this might perpetuate existing inequalities in schools. His research focuses specifically on the interaction between knowledge, policy and pedagogy in the context of Literacy education.

 

Claire (郝煜) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and a China Oxford Scholarship Fund (COSF) scholar.

Claire holds a BA in Education and Physics from the University of Cambridge, an MA in Applied Linguistics from UCL Institution of Education, and an EdM in International Education Policy from Harvard University. She is passionate about exploring and supporting the transnational experiences of bi-/multilingual students in studying abroad contexts. Her research and professional interests include bilingualism, language and identity, international education, professional development, and school leadership.

Since 2015, Claire has served as the Director of International Education at Beijing Xinxuedao Education Group, a non-profit organisation that operates 31 schools with over 30,000 K-12 students in China. She has also worked as a high school counsellor and a teacher of Physics and Psychology.

Publications

Hao, Y. and Lantsman, G. (2022). Motivation in MOOCs: a qualitative study on the design and evaluation of an online IELTS course. The 7th IAFOR International Conference on Education.

Hao, Y. (2020). Education without borders: sojourner trips in students’ holistic development. In Wang, J. (Ed.). Family, Society, and Education. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2020). Learning how to learn: the role of metacognition and self-regulation in learning. In Wang, J. (Ed.). The Virtue of Thinking in Learning. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2019). Chinese students at a UK university: how linguistic repertoire mediates language and sojourner identity construction. Linguistics and Applied Linguistics Conference. Beijing Normal University.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2018). Examining Linguistic Diversity as a Resource for Higher Education in the Anglophone World. In Tong, V. C., Standen, A., & Sotiriou, M. (Ed.). Shaping Higher Education with Students: Ways to Connect Research and Teaching (pp.288-293). UCL Press.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2016). Making the most of linguistic diversity: the views and practices of bi/multilingual postgraduate students. The Multilingual University. ESRC Seminars.

Hao, Y. (2012). A Transformative Journey: China-US exchange student studying at an American high school. New World Press.

Pok Jing (Jane) Ho is a doctoral student at the Department of Education, specialising in educational assessment.

She is funded by the Bei Shan Tang Foundation Scholarship for Graduate Studies.

Her DPhil thesis examines validity in the Hong Kong Diploma of Secondary Education Examination, a large-scale, high-stakes test that informs higher education admissions decisions, using the argument-based approach to validation. In particular, her research identifies the claims made based on test scores, the validity evidence that supports or challenges such claims, and the social consequences that ensue as a result of test use.

Prior to her DPhil, she completed an M.A. in International Education Policy Analysis at Stanford University. She subsequently worked as a project officer at the Education University of Hong Kong, where she is now serving as a consultant alongside her studies.

A former secondary school teacher, Jane also holds a B.A. in English Studies (First Class Honours), a B.Ed. in English Language Education (First Class Honours), and an M.Ed. in Curriculum and Instruction from the Chinese University of Hong Kong, as well as the Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (CELTA) from Cambridge.

She is a Peer Supporter at Green Templeton College.

Publications

Ho, P. J. (2020). For some or for all: Vocational English for Hong Kong secondary school students. In C. Hong, & W. K. Ma (Eds.), Applied degree education and the future of work—Education 4.0 (pp. 87–95). Springer. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-15-3142-2

Ho, P. J. (2015). China-Africa “cooperation” in education. International Politics, 5. https://www.iir.cz/en/china-africa-cooperation-in-education

Jennifer’s DPhil focuses on adoptive families where  the adoptive parents also have birth children. She has worked in adoption support as a Parent Consultant for Adoption UK and as Head of Peer Services at PAC-UK, as well as managing the Adoption UK advice line and the parent training team.

She holds an MSc in Poverty Reduction: Policy and Practice from SOAS, and an MBA from Warwick Business School. She has worked in management consultancy in both the public and private sectors and is a board member of CoramBAAF.

Publications

The Right Tools for the Job. Information Age, November 1996

Global teams for the millennium; Management Decision, 36 (1): 31-33, February 1998

Lucy is a second-year DPhil student, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

Her DPhil research aims to engage in a meaningful and creative way with service children to explore how service life has shaped their experiences of education and sense of self. By choosing this focus, the research seeks to widen and nuance current understanding of service children’s educational experiences in addition to furthering knowledge into how service children see themselves. As a result of this, it is hoped that the research will support in developing the professional body of knowledge and understanding of this group of children in schools and help inform the Service Pupil Premium (SPP) funding choices in addition to wider school practice.

Before embarking on her DPhil at Oxford, Lucy completed her PGCE and MEd in Primary Education at the University of Cambridge. In addition to her DPhil work, Lucy is a Trustee for the Armed Forces Education Trust (AFET) – a grant-giving charity for service children – and a volunteer for the Oxford based charity, Big Brothers Big Sisters.

 

 

Aine is interested in improving the health outcomes of children and young people in the care system.

Fahad is reading for a DPhil in Education (part-time). He has over fifteen years professional experience in the education sector, in particular, higher education.

He has held senior roles in staff and student development, human resources, policy and strategy. Fahad holds a BSc in Education and Science and an MBA. Prior to commencing his doctoral studies, he was elected an Academic Visitor at St Antony’s College in the University of Oxford. Fahad’s research focus is on the quality of undergraduate medical education for Qatari doctors.

Shawna completed her undergraduate degree in Psycholinguistics at the University of Toronto in Canada, and later completed the MSc program in Applied Linguistics and Second language Acquisition at the University of Oxford.

She has a wide range of experiences in the field of Linguistics as a teaching and research assistant in areas such as theoretical linguistics, phonology, speech-language pathology, language acquisition, and creole studies. Being a native of Jamaica herself, Shawna has carried out extensive work on creole language acquisition. She worked with the University of the West Indies to draft the first Jamaican (Creole) as a Foreign Language course, and with the U.S Peace Corps to assess and revamp an existing language program for volunteers.

Shawna’s current research focuses on the development of writing skills among primary school learners in Jamaica who speak Jamaican Creole as a home language but are educated in English.

Publications
  • Helms-Park, R., Tucker, S, & Dronjic, V. (2016). From proto-writing to multimedia literacy: scripts and orthographies through the ages. In  Chen Bumgardner, V. Dronjic,, & R. Helms-Park (Eds.), Second Language Reading: Psycholinguistic and Cognitive Perspectives (pp. 1-31). New York, NY: Routledge Publishers.
  • Eriks-Brophy, A., Green, S., & Tucker, S. (2013).  Articulatory error patterns and phonological process use of preschool children with and without hearing loss. Volta Review.

Richard Canter is Visiting Professor of Surgical Education in the Nuffield Department of Surgical Sciences, University of Oxford.

Richard Canter qualified in medicine at the University of London in 1976, before becoming a surgeon at the Royal United Hospital, Bath. He completed a PhD in Management at the University of Bath in 1998 studying the nature of power in decision-making at the personal and organisation level in healthcare. Following the critical Kennedy report on surgical training in 2001, he was recruited to the Royal College of Surgeons of England as Deputy Director of Surgical Education with specific responsibility for curriculum development in surgical education in England. He was subsequently Head of the Postgraduate School of Surgery in Bristol until 2012, after which he concentrated on academic work at Oxford. He was appointed a visiting Professor in Oxford in in 2007, Emeritus Consultant at Oxford University Hospitals in 2015, and Associate Fellow at Green Templeton College, Oxford in 2015.

His interests are professionalism and, in particular, its relationship to leadership in healthcare systems. His current specific research interests are the effectiveness or otherwise of leadership education in respect of its impact on quality improvement in healthcare systems.

At the Royal College of Surgeons of England he was clinical lead and Chair of the Needs Analysis Group evaluating educational resources and organisational systems necessary for the implementation of reform of surgical training, and made recommendations for changes that were eventually adopted by all surgical training systems in the United Kingdom. During this appointment an opportunity arose in early 2003 at the end of the Serbian conflict to assist the European Agency for Reconstruction (EAR, a division of the EEC) in providing advice to the Kosovan Ministry of Health to develop new systems for surgical training.

Currently at Oxford, he is lead tutor for the module in Leadership and Management in Healthcare and Deputy Director of the Masters in Surgical Science, and supervises Masters and DPhil students on the subject of organisational change and leadership. In addition he has regular commitments in teaching postgraduate medical trainees and medical faculty on topics such as leadership, quality improvement, educational theory in healthcare, workplace assessments, supporting and talent managing  medical trainees, as well as occasional commitments to supervising students on the Said Business School Global Opportunity and Threats (Oxford) programme in exploring problems in complex systems.

Along the way he has written and spoken on many topics in medicine, obtained research grants, and has unexpectedly been given fellowships and medals. His main interest outside of work is playing music and he runs the Green Templeton College Big Band.

Prior to starting his DPhil, Eddy worked as a primary school teacher in Bristol, where he also completed his MSc in Educational Research.

He is particularly interested in the culture of high stakes, standardised testing, and how this might perpetuate existing inequalities in schools. His research focuses specifically on the interaction between knowledge, policy and pedagogy in the context of Literacy education.

 

Claire (郝煜) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and a China Oxford Scholarship Fund (COSF) scholar.

Claire holds a BA in Education and Physics from the University of Cambridge, an MA in Applied Linguistics from UCL Institution of Education, and an EdM in International Education Policy from Harvard University. She is passionate about exploring and supporting the transnational experiences of bi-/multilingual students in studying abroad contexts. Her research and professional interests include bilingualism, language and identity, international education, professional development, and school leadership.

Since 2015, Claire has served as the Director of International Education at Beijing Xinxuedao Education Group, a non-profit organisation that operates 31 schools with over 30,000 K-12 students in China. She has also worked as a high school counsellor and a teacher of Physics and Psychology.

Publications

Hao, Y. and Lantsman, G. (2022). Motivation in MOOCs: a qualitative study on the design and evaluation of an online IELTS course. The 7th IAFOR International Conference on Education.

Hao, Y. (2020). Education without borders: sojourner trips in students’ holistic development. In Wang, J. (Ed.). Family, Society, and Education. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2020). Learning how to learn: the role of metacognition and self-regulation in learning. In Wang, J. (Ed.). The Virtue of Thinking in Learning. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2019). Chinese students at a UK university: how linguistic repertoire mediates language and sojourner identity construction. Linguistics and Applied Linguistics Conference. Beijing Normal University.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2018). Examining Linguistic Diversity as a Resource for Higher Education in the Anglophone World. In Tong, V. C., Standen, A., & Sotiriou, M. (Ed.). Shaping Higher Education with Students: Ways to Connect Research and Teaching (pp.288-293). UCL Press.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2016). Making the most of linguistic diversity: the views and practices of bi/multilingual postgraduate students. The Multilingual University. ESRC Seminars.

Hao, Y. (2012). A Transformative Journey: China-US exchange student studying at an American high school. New World Press.

Pok Jing (Jane) Ho is a doctoral student at the Department of Education, specialising in educational assessment.

She is funded by the Bei Shan Tang Foundation Scholarship for Graduate Studies.

Her DPhil thesis examines validity in the Hong Kong Diploma of Secondary Education Examination, a large-scale, high-stakes test that informs higher education admissions decisions, using the argument-based approach to validation. In particular, her research identifies the claims made based on test scores, the validity evidence that supports or challenges such claims, and the social consequences that ensue as a result of test use.

Prior to her DPhil, she completed an M.A. in International Education Policy Analysis at Stanford University. She subsequently worked as a project officer at the Education University of Hong Kong, where she is now serving as a consultant alongside her studies.

A former secondary school teacher, Jane also holds a B.A. in English Studies (First Class Honours), a B.Ed. in English Language Education (First Class Honours), and an M.Ed. in Curriculum and Instruction from the Chinese University of Hong Kong, as well as the Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (CELTA) from Cambridge.

She is a Peer Supporter at Green Templeton College.

Publications

Ho, P. J. (2020). For some or for all: Vocational English for Hong Kong secondary school students. In C. Hong, & W. K. Ma (Eds.), Applied degree education and the future of work—Education 4.0 (pp. 87–95). Springer. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-15-3142-2

Ho, P. J. (2015). China-Africa “cooperation” in education. International Politics, 5. https://www.iir.cz/en/china-africa-cooperation-in-education

Jennifer’s DPhil focuses on adoptive families where  the adoptive parents also have birth children. She has worked in adoption support as a Parent Consultant for Adoption UK and as Head of Peer Services at PAC-UK, as well as managing the Adoption UK advice line and the parent training team.

She holds an MSc in Poverty Reduction: Policy and Practice from SOAS, and an MBA from Warwick Business School. She has worked in management consultancy in both the public and private sectors and is a board member of CoramBAAF.

Publications

The Right Tools for the Job. Information Age, November 1996

Global teams for the millennium; Management Decision, 36 (1): 31-33, February 1998

Lucy is a second-year DPhil student, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

Her DPhil research aims to engage in a meaningful and creative way with service children to explore how service life has shaped their experiences of education and sense of self. By choosing this focus, the research seeks to widen and nuance current understanding of service children’s educational experiences in addition to furthering knowledge into how service children see themselves. As a result of this, it is hoped that the research will support in developing the professional body of knowledge and understanding of this group of children in schools and help inform the Service Pupil Premium (SPP) funding choices in addition to wider school practice.

Before embarking on her DPhil at Oxford, Lucy completed her PGCE and MEd in Primary Education at the University of Cambridge. In addition to her DPhil work, Lucy is a Trustee for the Armed Forces Education Trust (AFET) – a grant-giving charity for service children – and a volunteer for the Oxford based charity, Big Brothers Big Sisters.

 

 

Aine is interested in improving the health outcomes of children and young people in the care system.

Fahad is reading for a DPhil in Education (part-time). He has over fifteen years professional experience in the education sector, in particular, higher education.

He has held senior roles in staff and student development, human resources, policy and strategy. Fahad holds a BSc in Education and Science and an MBA. Prior to commencing his doctoral studies, he was elected an Academic Visitor at St Antony’s College in the University of Oxford. Fahad’s research focus is on the quality of undergraduate medical education for Qatari doctors.

Shawna completed her undergraduate degree in Psycholinguistics at the University of Toronto in Canada, and later completed the MSc program in Applied Linguistics and Second language Acquisition at the University of Oxford.

She has a wide range of experiences in the field of Linguistics as a teaching and research assistant in areas such as theoretical linguistics, phonology, speech-language pathology, language acquisition, and creole studies. Being a native of Jamaica herself, Shawna has carried out extensive work on creole language acquisition. She worked with the University of the West Indies to draft the first Jamaican (Creole) as a Foreign Language course, and with the U.S Peace Corps to assess and revamp an existing language program for volunteers.

Shawna’s current research focuses on the development of writing skills among primary school learners in Jamaica who speak Jamaican Creole as a home language but are educated in English.

Publications
  • Helms-Park, R., Tucker, S, & Dronjic, V. (2016). From proto-writing to multimedia literacy: scripts and orthographies through the ages. In  Chen Bumgardner, V. Dronjic,, & R. Helms-Park (Eds.), Second Language Reading: Psycholinguistic and Cognitive Perspectives (pp. 1-31). New York, NY: Routledge Publishers.
  • Eriks-Brophy, A., Green, S., & Tucker, S. (2013).  Articulatory error patterns and phonological process use of preschool children with and without hearing loss. Volta Review.

Richard Canter is Visiting Professor of Surgical Education in the Nuffield Department of Surgical Sciences, University of Oxford.

Richard Canter qualified in medicine at the University of London in 1976, before becoming a surgeon at the Royal United Hospital, Bath. He completed a PhD in Management at the University of Bath in 1998 studying the nature of power in decision-making at the personal and organisation level in healthcare. Following the critical Kennedy report on surgical training in 2001, he was recruited to the Royal College of Surgeons of England as Deputy Director of Surgical Education with specific responsibility for curriculum development in surgical education in England. He was subsequently Head of the Postgraduate School of Surgery in Bristol until 2012, after which he concentrated on academic work at Oxford. He was appointed a visiting Professor in Oxford in in 2007, Emeritus Consultant at Oxford University Hospitals in 2015, and Associate Fellow at Green Templeton College, Oxford in 2015.

His interests are professionalism and, in particular, its relationship to leadership in healthcare systems. His current specific research interests are the effectiveness or otherwise of leadership education in respect of its impact on quality improvement in healthcare systems.

At the Royal College of Surgeons of England he was clinical lead and Chair of the Needs Analysis Group evaluating educational resources and organisational systems necessary for the implementation of reform of surgical training, and made recommendations for changes that were eventually adopted by all surgical training systems in the United Kingdom. During this appointment an opportunity arose in early 2003 at the end of the Serbian conflict to assist the European Agency for Reconstruction (EAR, a division of the EEC) in providing advice to the Kosovan Ministry of Health to develop new systems for surgical training.

Currently at Oxford, he is lead tutor for the module in Leadership and Management in Healthcare and Deputy Director of the Masters in Surgical Science, and supervises Masters and DPhil students on the subject of organisational change and leadership. In addition he has regular commitments in teaching postgraduate medical trainees and medical faculty on topics such as leadership, quality improvement, educational theory in healthcare, workplace assessments, supporting and talent managing  medical trainees, as well as occasional commitments to supervising students on the Said Business School Global Opportunity and Threats (Oxford) programme in exploring problems in complex systems.

Along the way he has written and spoken on many topics in medicine, obtained research grants, and has unexpectedly been given fellowships and medals. His main interest outside of work is playing music and he runs the Green Templeton College Big Band.

Prior to starting his DPhil, Eddy worked as a primary school teacher in Bristol, where he also completed his MSc in Educational Research.

He is particularly interested in the culture of high stakes, standardised testing, and how this might perpetuate existing inequalities in schools. His research focuses specifically on the interaction between knowledge, policy and pedagogy in the context of Literacy education.

 

Claire (郝煜) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and a China Oxford Scholarship Fund (COSF) scholar.

Claire holds a BA in Education and Physics from the University of Cambridge, an MA in Applied Linguistics from UCL Institution of Education, and an EdM in International Education Policy from Harvard University. She is passionate about exploring and supporting the transnational experiences of bi-/multilingual students in studying abroad contexts. Her research and professional interests include bilingualism, language and identity, international education, professional development, and school leadership.

Since 2015, Claire has served as the Director of International Education at Beijing Xinxuedao Education Group, a non-profit organisation that operates 31 schools with over 30,000 K-12 students in China. She has also worked as a high school counsellor and a teacher of Physics and Psychology.

Publications

Hao, Y. and Lantsman, G. (2022). Motivation in MOOCs: a qualitative study on the design and evaluation of an online IELTS course. The 7th IAFOR International Conference on Education.

Hao, Y. (2020). Education without borders: sojourner trips in students’ holistic development. In Wang, J. (Ed.). Family, Society, and Education. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2020). Learning how to learn: the role of metacognition and self-regulation in learning. In Wang, J. (Ed.). The Virtue of Thinking in Learning. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2019). Chinese students at a UK university: how linguistic repertoire mediates language and sojourner identity construction. Linguistics and Applied Linguistics Conference. Beijing Normal University.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2018). Examining Linguistic Diversity as a Resource for Higher Education in the Anglophone World. In Tong, V. C., Standen, A., & Sotiriou, M. (Ed.). Shaping Higher Education with Students: Ways to Connect Research and Teaching (pp.288-293). UCL Press.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2016). Making the most of linguistic diversity: the views and practices of bi/multilingual postgraduate students. The Multilingual University. ESRC Seminars.

Hao, Y. (2012). A Transformative Journey: China-US exchange student studying at an American high school. New World Press.

Pok Jing (Jane) Ho is a doctoral student at the Department of Education, specialising in educational assessment.

She is funded by the Bei Shan Tang Foundation Scholarship for Graduate Studies.

Her DPhil thesis examines validity in the Hong Kong Diploma of Secondary Education Examination, a large-scale, high-stakes test that informs higher education admissions decisions, using the argument-based approach to validation. In particular, her research identifies the claims made based on test scores, the validity evidence that supports or challenges such claims, and the social consequences that ensue as a result of test use.

Prior to her DPhil, she completed an M.A. in International Education Policy Analysis at Stanford University. She subsequently worked as a project officer at the Education University of Hong Kong, where she is now serving as a consultant alongside her studies.

A former secondary school teacher, Jane also holds a B.A. in English Studies (First Class Honours), a B.Ed. in English Language Education (First Class Honours), and an M.Ed. in Curriculum and Instruction from the Chinese University of Hong Kong, as well as the Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (CELTA) from Cambridge.

She is a Peer Supporter at Green Templeton College.

Publications

Ho, P. J. (2020). For some or for all: Vocational English for Hong Kong secondary school students. In C. Hong, & W. K. Ma (Eds.), Applied degree education and the future of work—Education 4.0 (pp. 87–95). Springer. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-15-3142-2

Ho, P. J. (2015). China-Africa “cooperation” in education. International Politics, 5. https://www.iir.cz/en/china-africa-cooperation-in-education

Jennifer’s DPhil focuses on adoptive families where  the adoptive parents also have birth children. She has worked in adoption support as a Parent Consultant for Adoption UK and as Head of Peer Services at PAC-UK, as well as managing the Adoption UK advice line and the parent training team.

She holds an MSc in Poverty Reduction: Policy and Practice from SOAS, and an MBA from Warwick Business School. She has worked in management consultancy in both the public and private sectors and is a board member of CoramBAAF.

Publications

The Right Tools for the Job. Information Age, November 1996

Global teams for the millennium; Management Decision, 36 (1): 31-33, February 1998

Lucy is a second-year DPhil student, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

Her DPhil research aims to engage in a meaningful and creative way with service children to explore how service life has shaped their experiences of education and sense of self. By choosing this focus, the research seeks to widen and nuance current understanding of service children’s educational experiences in addition to furthering knowledge into how service children see themselves. As a result of this, it is hoped that the research will support in developing the professional body of knowledge and understanding of this group of children in schools and help inform the Service Pupil Premium (SPP) funding choices in addition to wider school practice.

Before embarking on her DPhil at Oxford, Lucy completed her PGCE and MEd in Primary Education at the University of Cambridge. In addition to her DPhil work, Lucy is a Trustee for the Armed Forces Education Trust (AFET) – a grant-giving charity for service children – and a volunteer for the Oxford based charity, Big Brothers Big Sisters.

 

 

Aine is interested in improving the health outcomes of children and young people in the care system.

Fahad is reading for a DPhil in Education (part-time). He has over fifteen years professional experience in the education sector, in particular, higher education.

He has held senior roles in staff and student development, human resources, policy and strategy. Fahad holds a BSc in Education and Science and an MBA. Prior to commencing his doctoral studies, he was elected an Academic Visitor at St Antony’s College in the University of Oxford. Fahad’s research focus is on the quality of undergraduate medical education for Qatari doctors.

Shawna completed her undergraduate degree in Psycholinguistics at the University of Toronto in Canada, and later completed the MSc program in Applied Linguistics and Second language Acquisition at the University of Oxford.

She has a wide range of experiences in the field of Linguistics as a teaching and research assistant in areas such as theoretical linguistics, phonology, speech-language pathology, language acquisition, and creole studies. Being a native of Jamaica herself, Shawna has carried out extensive work on creole language acquisition. She worked with the University of the West Indies to draft the first Jamaican (Creole) as a Foreign Language course, and with the U.S Peace Corps to assess and revamp an existing language program for volunteers.

Shawna’s current research focuses on the development of writing skills among primary school learners in Jamaica who speak Jamaican Creole as a home language but are educated in English.

Publications
  • Helms-Park, R., Tucker, S, & Dronjic, V. (2016). From proto-writing to multimedia literacy: scripts and orthographies through the ages. In  Chen Bumgardner, V. Dronjic,, & R. Helms-Park (Eds.), Second Language Reading: Psycholinguistic and Cognitive Perspectives (pp. 1-31). New York, NY: Routledge Publishers.
  • Eriks-Brophy, A., Green, S., & Tucker, S. (2013).  Articulatory error patterns and phonological process use of preschool children with and without hearing loss. Volta Review.

Richard Canter is Visiting Professor of Surgical Education in the Nuffield Department of Surgical Sciences, University of Oxford.

Richard Canter qualified in medicine at the University of London in 1976, before becoming a surgeon at the Royal United Hospital, Bath. He completed a PhD in Management at the University of Bath in 1998 studying the nature of power in decision-making at the personal and organisation level in healthcare. Following the critical Kennedy report on surgical training in 2001, he was recruited to the Royal College of Surgeons of England as Deputy Director of Surgical Education with specific responsibility for curriculum development in surgical education in England. He was subsequently Head of the Postgraduate School of Surgery in Bristol until 2012, after which he concentrated on academic work at Oxford. He was appointed a visiting Professor in Oxford in in 2007, Emeritus Consultant at Oxford University Hospitals in 2015, and Associate Fellow at Green Templeton College, Oxford in 2015.

His interests are professionalism and, in particular, its relationship to leadership in healthcare systems. His current specific research interests are the effectiveness or otherwise of leadership education in respect of its impact on quality improvement in healthcare systems.

At the Royal College of Surgeons of England he was clinical lead and Chair of the Needs Analysis Group evaluating educational resources and organisational systems necessary for the implementation of reform of surgical training, and made recommendations for changes that were eventually adopted by all surgical training systems in the United Kingdom. During this appointment an opportunity arose in early 2003 at the end of the Serbian conflict to assist the European Agency for Reconstruction (EAR, a division of the EEC) in providing advice to the Kosovan Ministry of Health to develop new systems for surgical training.

Currently at Oxford, he is lead tutor for the module in Leadership and Management in Healthcare and Deputy Director of the Masters in Surgical Science, and supervises Masters and DPhil students on the subject of organisational change and leadership. In addition he has regular commitments in teaching postgraduate medical trainees and medical faculty on topics such as leadership, quality improvement, educational theory in healthcare, workplace assessments, supporting and talent managing  medical trainees, as well as occasional commitments to supervising students on the Said Business School Global Opportunity and Threats (Oxford) programme in exploring problems in complex systems.

Along the way he has written and spoken on many topics in medicine, obtained research grants, and has unexpectedly been given fellowships and medals. His main interest outside of work is playing music and he runs the Green Templeton College Big Band.

Prior to starting his DPhil, Eddy worked as a primary school teacher in Bristol, where he also completed his MSc in Educational Research.

He is particularly interested in the culture of high stakes, standardised testing, and how this might perpetuate existing inequalities in schools. His research focuses specifically on the interaction between knowledge, policy and pedagogy in the context of Literacy education.

 

Claire (郝煜) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and a China Oxford Scholarship Fund (COSF) scholar.

Claire holds a BA in Education and Physics from the University of Cambridge, an MA in Applied Linguistics from UCL Institution of Education, and an EdM in International Education Policy from Harvard University. She is passionate about exploring and supporting the transnational experiences of bi-/multilingual students in studying abroad contexts. Her research and professional interests include bilingualism, language and identity, international education, professional development, and school leadership.

Since 2015, Claire has served as the Director of International Education at Beijing Xinxuedao Education Group, a non-profit organisation that operates 31 schools with over 30,000 K-12 students in China. She has also worked as a high school counsellor and a teacher of Physics and Psychology.

Publications

Hao, Y. and Lantsman, G. (2022). Motivation in MOOCs: a qualitative study on the design and evaluation of an online IELTS course. The 7th IAFOR International Conference on Education.

Hao, Y. (2020). Education without borders: sojourner trips in students’ holistic development. In Wang, J. (Ed.). Family, Society, and Education. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2020). Learning how to learn: the role of metacognition and self-regulation in learning. In Wang, J. (Ed.). The Virtue of Thinking in Learning. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2019). Chinese students at a UK university: how linguistic repertoire mediates language and sojourner identity construction. Linguistics and Applied Linguistics Conference. Beijing Normal University.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2018). Examining Linguistic Diversity as a Resource for Higher Education in the Anglophone World. In Tong, V. C., Standen, A., & Sotiriou, M. (Ed.). Shaping Higher Education with Students: Ways to Connect Research and Teaching (pp.288-293). UCL Press.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2016). Making the most of linguistic diversity: the views and practices of bi/multilingual postgraduate students. The Multilingual University. ESRC Seminars.

Hao, Y. (2012). A Transformative Journey: China-US exchange student studying at an American high school. New World Press.

Pok Jing (Jane) Ho is a doctoral student at the Department of Education, specialising in educational assessment.

She is funded by the Bei Shan Tang Foundation Scholarship for Graduate Studies.

Her DPhil thesis examines validity in the Hong Kong Diploma of Secondary Education Examination, a large-scale, high-stakes test that informs higher education admissions decisions, using the argument-based approach to validation. In particular, her research identifies the claims made based on test scores, the validity evidence that supports or challenges such claims, and the social consequences that ensue as a result of test use.

Prior to her DPhil, she completed an M.A. in International Education Policy Analysis at Stanford University. She subsequently worked as a project officer at the Education University of Hong Kong, where she is now serving as a consultant alongside her studies.

A former secondary school teacher, Jane also holds a B.A. in English Studies (First Class Honours), a B.Ed. in English Language Education (First Class Honours), and an M.Ed. in Curriculum and Instruction from the Chinese University of Hong Kong, as well as the Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (CELTA) from Cambridge.

She is a Peer Supporter at Green Templeton College.

Publications

Ho, P. J. (2020). For some or for all: Vocational English for Hong Kong secondary school students. In C. Hong, & W. K. Ma (Eds.), Applied degree education and the future of work—Education 4.0 (pp. 87–95). Springer. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-15-3142-2

Ho, P. J. (2015). China-Africa “cooperation” in education. International Politics, 5. https://www.iir.cz/en/china-africa-cooperation-in-education

Jennifer’s DPhil focuses on adoptive families where  the adoptive parents also have birth children. She has worked in adoption support as a Parent Consultant for Adoption UK and as Head of Peer Services at PAC-UK, as well as managing the Adoption UK advice line and the parent training team.

She holds an MSc in Poverty Reduction: Policy and Practice from SOAS, and an MBA from Warwick Business School. She has worked in management consultancy in both the public and private sectors and is a board member of CoramBAAF.

Publications

The Right Tools for the Job. Information Age, November 1996

Global teams for the millennium; Management Decision, 36 (1): 31-33, February 1998

Lucy is a second-year DPhil student, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

Her DPhil research aims to engage in a meaningful and creative way with service children to explore how service life has shaped their experiences of education and sense of self. By choosing this focus, the research seeks to widen and nuance current understanding of service children’s educational experiences in addition to furthering knowledge into how service children see themselves. As a result of this, it is hoped that the research will support in developing the professional body of knowledge and understanding of this group of children in schools and help inform the Service Pupil Premium (SPP) funding choices in addition to wider school practice.

Before embarking on her DPhil at Oxford, Lucy completed her PGCE and MEd in Primary Education at the University of Cambridge. In addition to her DPhil work, Lucy is a Trustee for the Armed Forces Education Trust (AFET) – a grant-giving charity for service children – and a volunteer for the Oxford based charity, Big Brothers Big Sisters.

 

 

Aine is interested in improving the health outcomes of children and young people in the care system.

Fahad is reading for a DPhil in Education (part-time). He has over fifteen years professional experience in the education sector, in particular, higher education.

He has held senior roles in staff and student development, human resources, policy and strategy. Fahad holds a BSc in Education and Science and an MBA. Prior to commencing his doctoral studies, he was elected an Academic Visitor at St Antony’s College in the University of Oxford. Fahad’s research focus is on the quality of undergraduate medical education for Qatari doctors.

Shawna completed her undergraduate degree in Psycholinguistics at the University of Toronto in Canada, and later completed the MSc program in Applied Linguistics and Second language Acquisition at the University of Oxford.

She has a wide range of experiences in the field of Linguistics as a teaching and research assistant in areas such as theoretical linguistics, phonology, speech-language pathology, language acquisition, and creole studies. Being a native of Jamaica herself, Shawna has carried out extensive work on creole language acquisition. She worked with the University of the West Indies to draft the first Jamaican (Creole) as a Foreign Language course, and with the U.S Peace Corps to assess and revamp an existing language program for volunteers.

Shawna’s current research focuses on the development of writing skills among primary school learners in Jamaica who speak Jamaican Creole as a home language but are educated in English.

Publications
  • Helms-Park, R., Tucker, S, & Dronjic, V. (2016). From proto-writing to multimedia literacy: scripts and orthographies through the ages. In  Chen Bumgardner, V. Dronjic,, & R. Helms-Park (Eds.), Second Language Reading: Psycholinguistic and Cognitive Perspectives (pp. 1-31). New York, NY: Routledge Publishers.
  • Eriks-Brophy, A., Green, S., & Tucker, S. (2013).  Articulatory error patterns and phonological process use of preschool children with and without hearing loss. Volta Review.

Richard Canter is Visiting Professor of Surgical Education in the Nuffield Department of Surgical Sciences, University of Oxford.

Richard Canter qualified in medicine at the University of London in 1976, before becoming a surgeon at the Royal United Hospital, Bath. He completed a PhD in Management at the University of Bath in 1998 studying the nature of power in decision-making at the personal and organisation level in healthcare. Following the critical Kennedy report on surgical training in 2001, he was recruited to the Royal College of Surgeons of England as Deputy Director of Surgical Education with specific responsibility for curriculum development in surgical education in England. He was subsequently Head of the Postgraduate School of Surgery in Bristol until 2012, after which he concentrated on academic work at Oxford. He was appointed a visiting Professor in Oxford in in 2007, Emeritus Consultant at Oxford University Hospitals in 2015, and Associate Fellow at Green Templeton College, Oxford in 2015.

His interests are professionalism and, in particular, its relationship to leadership in healthcare systems. His current specific research interests are the effectiveness or otherwise of leadership education in respect of its impact on quality improvement in healthcare systems.

At the Royal College of Surgeons of England he was clinical lead and Chair of the Needs Analysis Group evaluating educational resources and organisational systems necessary for the implementation of reform of surgical training, and made recommendations for changes that were eventually adopted by all surgical training systems in the United Kingdom. During this appointment an opportunity arose in early 2003 at the end of the Serbian conflict to assist the European Agency for Reconstruction (EAR, a division of the EEC) in providing advice to the Kosovan Ministry of Health to develop new systems for surgical training.

Currently at Oxford, he is lead tutor for the module in Leadership and Management in Healthcare and Deputy Director of the Masters in Surgical Science, and supervises Masters and DPhil students on the subject of organisational change and leadership. In addition he has regular commitments in teaching postgraduate medical trainees and medical faculty on topics such as leadership, quality improvement, educational theory in healthcare, workplace assessments, supporting and talent managing  medical trainees, as well as occasional commitments to supervising students on the Said Business School Global Opportunity and Threats (Oxford) programme in exploring problems in complex systems.

Along the way he has written and spoken on many topics in medicine, obtained research grants, and has unexpectedly been given fellowships and medals. His main interest outside of work is playing music and he runs the Green Templeton College Big Band.

Prior to starting his DPhil, Eddy worked as a primary school teacher in Bristol, where he also completed his MSc in Educational Research.

He is particularly interested in the culture of high stakes, standardised testing, and how this might perpetuate existing inequalities in schools. His research focuses specifically on the interaction between knowledge, policy and pedagogy in the context of Literacy education.

 

Claire (郝煜) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and a China Oxford Scholarship Fund (COSF) scholar.

Claire holds a BA in Education and Physics from the University of Cambridge, an MA in Applied Linguistics from UCL Institution of Education, and an EdM in International Education Policy from Harvard University. She is passionate about exploring and supporting the transnational experiences of bi-/multilingual students in studying abroad contexts. Her research and professional interests include bilingualism, language and identity, international education, professional development, and school leadership.

Since 2015, Claire has served as the Director of International Education at Beijing Xinxuedao Education Group, a non-profit organisation that operates 31 schools with over 30,000 K-12 students in China. She has also worked as a high school counsellor and a teacher of Physics and Psychology.

Publications

Hao, Y. and Lantsman, G. (2022). Motivation in MOOCs: a qualitative study on the design and evaluation of an online IELTS course. The 7th IAFOR International Conference on Education.

Hao, Y. (2020). Education without borders: sojourner trips in students’ holistic development. In Wang, J. (Ed.). Family, Society, and Education. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2020). Learning how to learn: the role of metacognition and self-regulation in learning. In Wang, J. (Ed.). The Virtue of Thinking in Learning. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2019). Chinese students at a UK university: how linguistic repertoire mediates language and sojourner identity construction. Linguistics and Applied Linguistics Conference. Beijing Normal University.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2018). Examining Linguistic Diversity as a Resource for Higher Education in the Anglophone World. In Tong, V. C., Standen, A., & Sotiriou, M. (Ed.). Shaping Higher Education with Students: Ways to Connect Research and Teaching (pp.288-293). UCL Press.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2016). Making the most of linguistic diversity: the views and practices of bi/multilingual postgraduate students. The Multilingual University. ESRC Seminars.

Hao, Y. (2012). A Transformative Journey: China-US exchange student studying at an American high school. New World Press.

Pok Jing (Jane) Ho is a doctoral student at the Department of Education, specialising in educational assessment.

She is funded by the Bei Shan Tang Foundation Scholarship for Graduate Studies.

Her DPhil thesis examines validity in the Hong Kong Diploma of Secondary Education Examination, a large-scale, high-stakes test that informs higher education admissions decisions, using the argument-based approach to validation. In particular, her research identifies the claims made based on test scores, the validity evidence that supports or challenges such claims, and the social consequences that ensue as a result of test use.

Prior to her DPhil, she completed an M.A. in International Education Policy Analysis at Stanford University. She subsequently worked as a project officer at the Education University of Hong Kong, where she is now serving as a consultant alongside her studies.

A former secondary school teacher, Jane also holds a B.A. in English Studies (First Class Honours), a B.Ed. in English Language Education (First Class Honours), and an M.Ed. in Curriculum and Instruction from the Chinese University of Hong Kong, as well as the Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (CELTA) from Cambridge.

She is a Peer Supporter at Green Templeton College.

Publications

Ho, P. J. (2020). For some or for all: Vocational English for Hong Kong secondary school students. In C. Hong, & W. K. Ma (Eds.), Applied degree education and the future of work—Education 4.0 (pp. 87–95). Springer. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-15-3142-2

Ho, P. J. (2015). China-Africa “cooperation” in education. International Politics, 5. https://www.iir.cz/en/china-africa-cooperation-in-education

Jennifer’s DPhil focuses on adoptive families where  the adoptive parents also have birth children. She has worked in adoption support as a Parent Consultant for Adoption UK and as Head of Peer Services at PAC-UK, as well as managing the Adoption UK advice line and the parent training team.

She holds an MSc in Poverty Reduction: Policy and Practice from SOAS, and an MBA from Warwick Business School. She has worked in management consultancy in both the public and private sectors and is a board member of CoramBAAF.

Publications

The Right Tools for the Job. Information Age, November 1996

Global teams for the millennium; Management Decision, 36 (1): 31-33, February 1998

Lucy is a second-year DPhil student, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

Her DPhil research aims to engage in a meaningful and creative way with service children to explore how service life has shaped their experiences of education and sense of self. By choosing this focus, the research seeks to widen and nuance current understanding of service children’s educational experiences in addition to furthering knowledge into how service children see themselves. As a result of this, it is hoped that the research will support in developing the professional body of knowledge and understanding of this group of children in schools and help inform the Service Pupil Premium (SPP) funding choices in addition to wider school practice.

Before embarking on her DPhil at Oxford, Lucy completed her PGCE and MEd in Primary Education at the University of Cambridge. In addition to her DPhil work, Lucy is a Trustee for the Armed Forces Education Trust (AFET) – a grant-giving charity for service children – and a volunteer for the Oxford based charity, Big Brothers Big Sisters.

 

 

Aine is interested in improving the health outcomes of children and young people in the care system.

Fahad is reading for a DPhil in Education (part-time). He has over fifteen years professional experience in the education sector, in particular, higher education.

He has held senior roles in staff and student development, human resources, policy and strategy. Fahad holds a BSc in Education and Science and an MBA. Prior to commencing his doctoral studies, he was elected an Academic Visitor at St Antony’s College in the University of Oxford. Fahad’s research focus is on the quality of undergraduate medical education for Qatari doctors.

Shawna completed her undergraduate degree in Psycholinguistics at the University of Toronto in Canada, and later completed the MSc program in Applied Linguistics and Second language Acquisition at the University of Oxford.

She has a wide range of experiences in the field of Linguistics as a teaching and research assistant in areas such as theoretical linguistics, phonology, speech-language pathology, language acquisition, and creole studies. Being a native of Jamaica herself, Shawna has carried out extensive work on creole language acquisition. She worked with the University of the West Indies to draft the first Jamaican (Creole) as a Foreign Language course, and with the U.S Peace Corps to assess and revamp an existing language program for volunteers.

Shawna’s current research focuses on the development of writing skills among primary school learners in Jamaica who speak Jamaican Creole as a home language but are educated in English.

Publications
  • Helms-Park, R., Tucker, S, & Dronjic, V. (2016). From proto-writing to multimedia literacy: scripts and orthographies through the ages. In  Chen Bumgardner, V. Dronjic,, & R. Helms-Park (Eds.), Second Language Reading: Psycholinguistic and Cognitive Perspectives (pp. 1-31). New York, NY: Routledge Publishers.
  • Eriks-Brophy, A., Green, S., & Tucker, S. (2013).  Articulatory error patterns and phonological process use of preschool children with and without hearing loss. Volta Review.

Richard Canter is Visiting Professor of Surgical Education in the Nuffield Department of Surgical Sciences, University of Oxford.

Richard Canter qualified in medicine at the University of London in 1976, before becoming a surgeon at the Royal United Hospital, Bath. He completed a PhD in Management at the University of Bath in 1998 studying the nature of power in decision-making at the personal and organisation level in healthcare. Following the critical Kennedy report on surgical training in 2001, he was recruited to the Royal College of Surgeons of England as Deputy Director of Surgical Education with specific responsibility for curriculum development in surgical education in England. He was subsequently Head of the Postgraduate School of Surgery in Bristol until 2012, after which he concentrated on academic work at Oxford. He was appointed a visiting Professor in Oxford in in 2007, Emeritus Consultant at Oxford University Hospitals in 2015, and Associate Fellow at Green Templeton College, Oxford in 2015.

His interests are professionalism and, in particular, its relationship to leadership in healthcare systems. His current specific research interests are the effectiveness or otherwise of leadership education in respect of its impact on quality improvement in healthcare systems.

At the Royal College of Surgeons of England he was clinical lead and Chair of the Needs Analysis Group evaluating educational resources and organisational systems necessary for the implementation of reform of surgical training, and made recommendations for changes that were eventually adopted by all surgical training systems in the United Kingdom. During this appointment an opportunity arose in early 2003 at the end of the Serbian conflict to assist the European Agency for Reconstruction (EAR, a division of the EEC) in providing advice to the Kosovan Ministry of Health to develop new systems for surgical training.

Currently at Oxford, he is lead tutor for the module in Leadership and Management in Healthcare and Deputy Director of the Masters in Surgical Science, and supervises Masters and DPhil students on the subject of organisational change and leadership. In addition he has regular commitments in teaching postgraduate medical trainees and medical faculty on topics such as leadership, quality improvement, educational theory in healthcare, workplace assessments, supporting and talent managing  medical trainees, as well as occasional commitments to supervising students on the Said Business School Global Opportunity and Threats (Oxford) programme in exploring problems in complex systems.

Along the way he has written and spoken on many topics in medicine, obtained research grants, and has unexpectedly been given fellowships and medals. His main interest outside of work is playing music and he runs the Green Templeton College Big Band.

Prior to starting his DPhil, Eddy worked as a primary school teacher in Bristol, where he also completed his MSc in Educational Research.

He is particularly interested in the culture of high stakes, standardised testing, and how this might perpetuate existing inequalities in schools. His research focuses specifically on the interaction between knowledge, policy and pedagogy in the context of Literacy education.

 

Claire (郝煜) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and a China Oxford Scholarship Fund (COSF) scholar.

Claire holds a BA in Education and Physics from the University of Cambridge, an MA in Applied Linguistics from UCL Institution of Education, and an EdM in International Education Policy from Harvard University. She is passionate about exploring and supporting the transnational experiences of bi-/multilingual students in studying abroad contexts. Her research and professional interests include bilingualism, language and identity, international education, professional development, and school leadership.

Since 2015, Claire has served as the Director of International Education at Beijing Xinxuedao Education Group, a non-profit organisation that operates 31 schools with over 30,000 K-12 students in China. She has also worked as a high school counsellor and a teacher of Physics and Psychology.

Publications

Hao, Y. and Lantsman, G. (2022). Motivation in MOOCs: a qualitative study on the design and evaluation of an online IELTS course. The 7th IAFOR International Conference on Education.

Hao, Y. (2020). Education without borders: sojourner trips in students’ holistic development. In Wang, J. (Ed.). Family, Society, and Education. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2020). Learning how to learn: the role of metacognition and self-regulation in learning. In Wang, J. (Ed.). The Virtue of Thinking in Learning. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2019). Chinese students at a UK university: how linguistic repertoire mediates language and sojourner identity construction. Linguistics and Applied Linguistics Conference. Beijing Normal University.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2018). Examining Linguistic Diversity as a Resource for Higher Education in the Anglophone World. In Tong, V. C., Standen, A., & Sotiriou, M. (Ed.). Shaping Higher Education with Students: Ways to Connect Research and Teaching (pp.288-293). UCL Press.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2016). Making the most of linguistic diversity: the views and practices of bi/multilingual postgraduate students. The Multilingual University. ESRC Seminars.

Hao, Y. (2012). A Transformative Journey: China-US exchange student studying at an American high school. New World Press.

Pok Jing (Jane) Ho is a doctoral student at the Department of Education, specialising in educational assessment.

She is funded by the Bei Shan Tang Foundation Scholarship for Graduate Studies.

Her DPhil thesis examines validity in the Hong Kong Diploma of Secondary Education Examination, a large-scale, high-stakes test that informs higher education admissions decisions, using the argument-based approach to validation. In particular, her research identifies the claims made based on test scores, the validity evidence that supports or challenges such claims, and the social consequences that ensue as a result of test use.

Prior to her DPhil, she completed an M.A. in International Education Policy Analysis at Stanford University. She subsequently worked as a project officer at the Education University of Hong Kong, where she is now serving as a consultant alongside her studies.

A former secondary school teacher, Jane also holds a B.A. in English Studies (First Class Honours), a B.Ed. in English Language Education (First Class Honours), and an M.Ed. in Curriculum and Instruction from the Chinese University of Hong Kong, as well as the Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (CELTA) from Cambridge.

She is a Peer Supporter at Green Templeton College.

Publications

Ho, P. J. (2020). For some or for all: Vocational English for Hong Kong secondary school students. In C. Hong, & W. K. Ma (Eds.), Applied degree education and the future of work—Education 4.0 (pp. 87–95). Springer. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-15-3142-2

Ho, P. J. (2015). China-Africa “cooperation” in education. International Politics, 5. https://www.iir.cz/en/china-africa-cooperation-in-education

Jennifer’s DPhil focuses on adoptive families where  the adoptive parents also have birth children. She has worked in adoption support as a Parent Consultant for Adoption UK and as Head of Peer Services at PAC-UK, as well as managing the Adoption UK advice line and the parent training team.

She holds an MSc in Poverty Reduction: Policy and Practice from SOAS, and an MBA from Warwick Business School. She has worked in management consultancy in both the public and private sectors and is a board member of CoramBAAF.

Publications

The Right Tools for the Job. Information Age, November 1996

Global teams for the millennium; Management Decision, 36 (1): 31-33, February 1998

Lucy is a second-year DPhil student, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

Her DPhil research aims to engage in a meaningful and creative way with service children to explore how service life has shaped their experiences of education and sense of self. By choosing this focus, the research seeks to widen and nuance current understanding of service children’s educational experiences in addition to furthering knowledge into how service children see themselves. As a result of this, it is hoped that the research will support in developing the professional body of knowledge and understanding of this group of children in schools and help inform the Service Pupil Premium (SPP) funding choices in addition to wider school practice.

Before embarking on her DPhil at Oxford, Lucy completed her PGCE and MEd in Primary Education at the University of Cambridge. In addition to her DPhil work, Lucy is a Trustee for the Armed Forces Education Trust (AFET) – a grant-giving charity for service children – and a volunteer for the Oxford based charity, Big Brothers Big Sisters.

 

 

Aine is interested in improving the health outcomes of children and young people in the care system.

Fahad is reading for a DPhil in Education (part-time). He has over fifteen years professional experience in the education sector, in particular, higher education.

He has held senior roles in staff and student development, human resources, policy and strategy. Fahad holds a BSc in Education and Science and an MBA. Prior to commencing his doctoral studies, he was elected an Academic Visitor at St Antony’s College in the University of Oxford. Fahad’s research focus is on the quality of undergraduate medical education for Qatari doctors.

Shawna completed her undergraduate degree in Psycholinguistics at the University of Toronto in Canada, and later completed the MSc program in Applied Linguistics and Second language Acquisition at the University of Oxford.

She has a wide range of experiences in the field of Linguistics as a teaching and research assistant in areas such as theoretical linguistics, phonology, speech-language pathology, language acquisition, and creole studies. Being a native of Jamaica herself, Shawna has carried out extensive work on creole language acquisition. She worked with the University of the West Indies to draft the first Jamaican (Creole) as a Foreign Language course, and with the U.S Peace Corps to assess and revamp an existing language program for volunteers.

Shawna’s current research focuses on the development of writing skills among primary school learners in Jamaica who speak Jamaican Creole as a home language but are educated in English.

Publications
  • Helms-Park, R., Tucker, S, & Dronjic, V. (2016). From proto-writing to multimedia literacy: scripts and orthographies through the ages. In  Chen Bumgardner, V. Dronjic,, & R. Helms-Park (Eds.), Second Language Reading: Psycholinguistic and Cognitive Perspectives (pp. 1-31). New York, NY: Routledge Publishers.
  • Eriks-Brophy, A., Green, S., & Tucker, S. (2013).  Articulatory error patterns and phonological process use of preschool children with and without hearing loss. Volta Review.

Richard Canter is Visiting Professor of Surgical Education in the Nuffield Department of Surgical Sciences, University of Oxford.

Richard Canter qualified in medicine at the University of London in 1976, before becoming a surgeon at the Royal United Hospital, Bath. He completed a PhD in Management at the University of Bath in 1998 studying the nature of power in decision-making at the personal and organisation level in healthcare. Following the critical Kennedy report on surgical training in 2001, he was recruited to the Royal College of Surgeons of England as Deputy Director of Surgical Education with specific responsibility for curriculum development in surgical education in England. He was subsequently Head of the Postgraduate School of Surgery in Bristol until 2012, after which he concentrated on academic work at Oxford. He was appointed a visiting Professor in Oxford in in 2007, Emeritus Consultant at Oxford University Hospitals in 2015, and Associate Fellow at Green Templeton College, Oxford in 2015.

His interests are professionalism and, in particular, its relationship to leadership in healthcare systems. His current specific research interests are the effectiveness or otherwise of leadership education in respect of its impact on quality improvement in healthcare systems.

At the Royal College of Surgeons of England he was clinical lead and Chair of the Needs Analysis Group evaluating educational resources and organisational systems necessary for the implementation of reform of surgical training, and made recommendations for changes that were eventually adopted by all surgical training systems in the United Kingdom. During this appointment an opportunity arose in early 2003 at the end of the Serbian conflict to assist the European Agency for Reconstruction (EAR, a division of the EEC) in providing advice to the Kosovan Ministry of Health to develop new systems for surgical training.

Currently at Oxford, he is lead tutor for the module in Leadership and Management in Healthcare and Deputy Director of the Masters in Surgical Science, and supervises Masters and DPhil students on the subject of organisational change and leadership. In addition he has regular commitments in teaching postgraduate medical trainees and medical faculty on topics such as leadership, quality improvement, educational theory in healthcare, workplace assessments, supporting and talent managing  medical trainees, as well as occasional commitments to supervising students on the Said Business School Global Opportunity and Threats (Oxford) programme in exploring problems in complex systems.

Along the way he has written and spoken on many topics in medicine, obtained research grants, and has unexpectedly been given fellowships and medals. His main interest outside of work is playing music and he runs the Green Templeton College Big Band.

Prior to starting his DPhil, Eddy worked as a primary school teacher in Bristol, where he also completed his MSc in Educational Research.

He is particularly interested in the culture of high stakes, standardised testing, and how this might perpetuate existing inequalities in schools. His research focuses specifically on the interaction between knowledge, policy and pedagogy in the context of Literacy education.

 

Claire (郝煜) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and a China Oxford Scholarship Fund (COSF) scholar.

Claire holds a BA in Education and Physics from the University of Cambridge, an MA in Applied Linguistics from UCL Institution of Education, and an EdM in International Education Policy from Harvard University. She is passionate about exploring and supporting the transnational experiences of bi-/multilingual students in studying abroad contexts. Her research and professional interests include bilingualism, language and identity, international education, professional development, and school leadership.

Since 2015, Claire has served as the Director of International Education at Beijing Xinxuedao Education Group, a non-profit organisation that operates 31 schools with over 30,000 K-12 students in China. She has also worked as a high school counsellor and a teacher of Physics and Psychology.

Publications

Hao, Y. and Lantsman, G. (2022). Motivation in MOOCs: a qualitative study on the design and evaluation of an online IELTS course. The 7th IAFOR International Conference on Education.

Hao, Y. (2020). Education without borders: sojourner trips in students’ holistic development. In Wang, J. (Ed.). Family, Society, and Education. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2020). Learning how to learn: the role of metacognition and self-regulation in learning. In Wang, J. (Ed.). The Virtue of Thinking in Learning. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2019). Chinese students at a UK university: how linguistic repertoire mediates language and sojourner identity construction. Linguistics and Applied Linguistics Conference. Beijing Normal University.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2018). Examining Linguistic Diversity as a Resource for Higher Education in the Anglophone World. In Tong, V. C., Standen, A., & Sotiriou, M. (Ed.). Shaping Higher Education with Students: Ways to Connect Research and Teaching (pp.288-293). UCL Press.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2016). Making the most of linguistic diversity: the views and practices of bi/multilingual postgraduate students. The Multilingual University. ESRC Seminars.

Hao, Y. (2012). A Transformative Journey: China-US exchange student studying at an American high school. New World Press.

Pok Jing (Jane) Ho is a doctoral student at the Department of Education, specialising in educational assessment.

She is funded by the Bei Shan Tang Foundation Scholarship for Graduate Studies.

Her DPhil thesis examines validity in the Hong Kong Diploma of Secondary Education Examination, a large-scale, high-stakes test that informs higher education admissions decisions, using the argument-based approach to validation. In particular, her research identifies the claims made based on test scores, the validity evidence that supports or challenges such claims, and the social consequences that ensue as a result of test use.

Prior to her DPhil, she completed an M.A. in International Education Policy Analysis at Stanford University. She subsequently worked as a project officer at the Education University of Hong Kong, where she is now serving as a consultant alongside her studies.

A former secondary school teacher, Jane also holds a B.A. in English Studies (First Class Honours), a B.Ed. in English Language Education (First Class Honours), and an M.Ed. in Curriculum and Instruction from the Chinese University of Hong Kong, as well as the Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (CELTA) from Cambridge.

She is a Peer Supporter at Green Templeton College.

Publications

Ho, P. J. (2020). For some or for all: Vocational English for Hong Kong secondary school students. In C. Hong, & W. K. Ma (Eds.), Applied degree education and the future of work—Education 4.0 (pp. 87–95). Springer. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-15-3142-2

Ho, P. J. (2015). China-Africa “cooperation” in education. International Politics, 5. https://www.iir.cz/en/china-africa-cooperation-in-education

Jennifer’s DPhil focuses on adoptive families where  the adoptive parents also have birth children. She has worked in adoption support as a Parent Consultant for Adoption UK and as Head of Peer Services at PAC-UK, as well as managing the Adoption UK advice line and the parent training team.

She holds an MSc in Poverty Reduction: Policy and Practice from SOAS, and an MBA from Warwick Business School. She has worked in management consultancy in both the public and private sectors and is a board member of CoramBAAF.

Publications

The Right Tools for the Job. Information Age, November 1996

Global teams for the millennium; Management Decision, 36 (1): 31-33, February 1998

Lucy is a second-year DPhil student, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

Her DPhil research aims to engage in a meaningful and creative way with service children to explore how service life has shaped their experiences of education and sense of self. By choosing this focus, the research seeks to widen and nuance current understanding of service children’s educational experiences in addition to furthering knowledge into how service children see themselves. As a result of this, it is hoped that the research will support in developing the professional body of knowledge and understanding of this group of children in schools and help inform the Service Pupil Premium (SPP) funding choices in addition to wider school practice.

Before embarking on her DPhil at Oxford, Lucy completed her PGCE and MEd in Primary Education at the University of Cambridge. In addition to her DPhil work, Lucy is a Trustee for the Armed Forces Education Trust (AFET) – a grant-giving charity for service children – and a volunteer for the Oxford based charity, Big Brothers Big Sisters.

 

 

Aine is interested in improving the health outcomes of children and young people in the care system.

Fahad is reading for a DPhil in Education (part-time). He has over fifteen years professional experience in the education sector, in particular, higher education.

He has held senior roles in staff and student development, human resources, policy and strategy. Fahad holds a BSc in Education and Science and an MBA. Prior to commencing his doctoral studies, he was elected an Academic Visitor at St Antony’s College in the University of Oxford. Fahad’s research focus is on the quality of undergraduate medical education for Qatari doctors.

Shawna completed her undergraduate degree in Psycholinguistics at the University of Toronto in Canada, and later completed the MSc program in Applied Linguistics and Second language Acquisition at the University of Oxford.

She has a wide range of experiences in the field of Linguistics as a teaching and research assistant in areas such as theoretical linguistics, phonology, speech-language pathology, language acquisition, and creole studies. Being a native of Jamaica herself, Shawna has carried out extensive work on creole language acquisition. She worked with the University of the West Indies to draft the first Jamaican (Creole) as a Foreign Language course, and with the U.S Peace Corps to assess and revamp an existing language program for volunteers.

Shawna’s current research focuses on the development of writing skills among primary school learners in Jamaica who speak Jamaican Creole as a home language but are educated in English.

Publications
  • Helms-Park, R., Tucker, S, & Dronjic, V. (2016). From proto-writing to multimedia literacy: scripts and orthographies through the ages. In  Chen Bumgardner, V. Dronjic,, & R. Helms-Park (Eds.), Second Language Reading: Psycholinguistic and Cognitive Perspectives (pp. 1-31). New York, NY: Routledge Publishers.
  • Eriks-Brophy, A., Green, S., & Tucker, S. (2013).  Articulatory error patterns and phonological process use of preschool children with and without hearing loss. Volta Review.

Richard Canter is Visiting Professor of Surgical Education in the Nuffield Department of Surgical Sciences, University of Oxford.

Richard Canter qualified in medicine at the University of London in 1976, before becoming a surgeon at the Royal United Hospital, Bath. He completed a PhD in Management at the University of Bath in 1998 studying the nature of power in decision-making at the personal and organisation level in healthcare. Following the critical Kennedy report on surgical training in 2001, he was recruited to the Royal College of Surgeons of England as Deputy Director of Surgical Education with specific responsibility for curriculum development in surgical education in England. He was subsequently Head of the Postgraduate School of Surgery in Bristol until 2012, after which he concentrated on academic work at Oxford. He was appointed a visiting Professor in Oxford in in 2007, Emeritus Consultant at Oxford University Hospitals in 2015, and Associate Fellow at Green Templeton College, Oxford in 2015.

His interests are professionalism and, in particular, its relationship to leadership in healthcare systems. His current specific research interests are the effectiveness or otherwise of leadership education in respect of its impact on quality improvement in healthcare systems.

At the Royal College of Surgeons of England he was clinical lead and Chair of the Needs Analysis Group evaluating educational resources and organisational systems necessary for the implementation of reform of surgical training, and made recommendations for changes that were eventually adopted by all surgical training systems in the United Kingdom. During this appointment an opportunity arose in early 2003 at the end of the Serbian conflict to assist the European Agency for Reconstruction (EAR, a division of the EEC) in providing advice to the Kosovan Ministry of Health to develop new systems for surgical training.

Currently at Oxford, he is lead tutor for the module in Leadership and Management in Healthcare and Deputy Director of the Masters in Surgical Science, and supervises Masters and DPhil students on the subject of organisational change and leadership. In addition he has regular commitments in teaching postgraduate medical trainees and medical faculty on topics such as leadership, quality improvement, educational theory in healthcare, workplace assessments, supporting and talent managing  medical trainees, as well as occasional commitments to supervising students on the Said Business School Global Opportunity and Threats (Oxford) programme in exploring problems in complex systems.

Along the way he has written and spoken on many topics in medicine, obtained research grants, and has unexpectedly been given fellowships and medals. His main interest outside of work is playing music and he runs the Green Templeton College Big Band.

Prior to starting his DPhil, Eddy worked as a primary school teacher in Bristol, where he also completed his MSc in Educational Research.

He is particularly interested in the culture of high stakes, standardised testing, and how this might perpetuate existing inequalities in schools. His research focuses specifically on the interaction between knowledge, policy and pedagogy in the context of Literacy education.

 

Claire (郝煜) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and a China Oxford Scholarship Fund (COSF) scholar.

Claire holds a BA in Education and Physics from the University of Cambridge, an MA in Applied Linguistics from UCL Institution of Education, and an EdM in International Education Policy from Harvard University. She is passionate about exploring and supporting the transnational experiences of bi-/multilingual students in studying abroad contexts. Her research and professional interests include bilingualism, language and identity, international education, professional development, and school leadership.

Since 2015, Claire has served as the Director of International Education at Beijing Xinxuedao Education Group, a non-profit organisation that operates 31 schools with over 30,000 K-12 students in China. She has also worked as a high school counsellor and a teacher of Physics and Psychology.

Publications

Hao, Y. and Lantsman, G. (2022). Motivation in MOOCs: a qualitative study on the design and evaluation of an online IELTS course. The 7th IAFOR International Conference on Education.

Hao, Y. (2020). Education without borders: sojourner trips in students’ holistic development. In Wang, J. (Ed.). Family, Society, and Education. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2020). Learning how to learn: the role of metacognition and self-regulation in learning. In Wang, J. (Ed.). The Virtue of Thinking in Learning. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2019). Chinese students at a UK university: how linguistic repertoire mediates language and sojourner identity construction. Linguistics and Applied Linguistics Conference. Beijing Normal University.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2018). Examining Linguistic Diversity as a Resource for Higher Education in the Anglophone World. In Tong, V. C., Standen, A., & Sotiriou, M. (Ed.). Shaping Higher Education with Students: Ways to Connect Research and Teaching (pp.288-293). UCL Press.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2016). Making the most of linguistic diversity: the views and practices of bi/multilingual postgraduate students. The Multilingual University. ESRC Seminars.

Hao, Y. (2012). A Transformative Journey: China-US exchange student studying at an American high school. New World Press.

Pok Jing (Jane) Ho is a doctoral student at the Department of Education, specialising in educational assessment.

She is funded by the Bei Shan Tang Foundation Scholarship for Graduate Studies.

Her DPhil thesis examines validity in the Hong Kong Diploma of Secondary Education Examination, a large-scale, high-stakes test that informs higher education admissions decisions, using the argument-based approach to validation. In particular, her research identifies the claims made based on test scores, the validity evidence that supports or challenges such claims, and the social consequences that ensue as a result of test use.

Prior to her DPhil, she completed an M.A. in International Education Policy Analysis at Stanford University. She subsequently worked as a project officer at the Education University of Hong Kong, where she is now serving as a consultant alongside her studies.

A former secondary school teacher, Jane also holds a B.A. in English Studies (First Class Honours), a B.Ed. in English Language Education (First Class Honours), and an M.Ed. in Curriculum and Instruction from the Chinese University of Hong Kong, as well as the Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (CELTA) from Cambridge.

She is a Peer Supporter at Green Templeton College.

Publications

Ho, P. J. (2020). For some or for all: Vocational English for Hong Kong secondary school students. In C. Hong, & W. K. Ma (Eds.), Applied degree education and the future of work—Education 4.0 (pp. 87–95). Springer. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-15-3142-2

Ho, P. J. (2015). China-Africa “cooperation” in education. International Politics, 5. https://www.iir.cz/en/china-africa-cooperation-in-education

Jennifer’s DPhil focuses on adoptive families where  the adoptive parents also have birth children. She has worked in adoption support as a Parent Consultant for Adoption UK and as Head of Peer Services at PAC-UK, as well as managing the Adoption UK advice line and the parent training team.

She holds an MSc in Poverty Reduction: Policy and Practice from SOAS, and an MBA from Warwick Business School. She has worked in management consultancy in both the public and private sectors and is a board member of CoramBAAF.

Publications

The Right Tools for the Job. Information Age, November 1996

Global teams for the millennium; Management Decision, 36 (1): 31-33, February 1998

Lucy is a second-year DPhil student, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

Her DPhil research aims to engage in a meaningful and creative way with service children to explore how service life has shaped their experiences of education and sense of self. By choosing this focus, the research seeks to widen and nuance current understanding of service children’s educational experiences in addition to furthering knowledge into how service children see themselves. As a result of this, it is hoped that the research will support in developing the professional body of knowledge and understanding of this group of children in schools and help inform the Service Pupil Premium (SPP) funding choices in addition to wider school practice.

Before embarking on her DPhil at Oxford, Lucy completed her PGCE and MEd in Primary Education at the University of Cambridge. In addition to her DPhil work, Lucy is a Trustee for the Armed Forces Education Trust (AFET) – a grant-giving charity for service children – and a volunteer for the Oxford based charity, Big Brothers Big Sisters.

 

 

Aine is interested in improving the health outcomes of children and young people in the care system.

Fahad is reading for a DPhil in Education (part-time). He has over fifteen years professional experience in the education sector, in particular, higher education.

He has held senior roles in staff and student development, human resources, policy and strategy. Fahad holds a BSc in Education and Science and an MBA. Prior to commencing his doctoral studies, he was elected an Academic Visitor at St Antony’s College in the University of Oxford. Fahad’s research focus is on the quality of undergraduate medical education for Qatari doctors.

Shawna completed her undergraduate degree in Psycholinguistics at the University of Toronto in Canada, and later completed the MSc program in Applied Linguistics and Second language Acquisition at the University of Oxford.

She has a wide range of experiences in the field of Linguistics as a teaching and research assistant in areas such as theoretical linguistics, phonology, speech-language pathology, language acquisition, and creole studies. Being a native of Jamaica herself, Shawna has carried out extensive work on creole language acquisition. She worked with the University of the West Indies to draft the first Jamaican (Creole) as a Foreign Language course, and with the U.S Peace Corps to assess and revamp an existing language program for volunteers.

Shawna’s current research focuses on the development of writing skills among primary school learners in Jamaica who speak Jamaican Creole as a home language but are educated in English.

Publications
  • Helms-Park, R., Tucker, S, & Dronjic, V. (2016). From proto-writing to multimedia literacy: scripts and orthographies through the ages. In  Chen Bumgardner, V. Dronjic,, & R. Helms-Park (Eds.), Second Language Reading: Psycholinguistic and Cognitive Perspectives (pp. 1-31). New York, NY: Routledge Publishers.
  • Eriks-Brophy, A., Green, S., & Tucker, S. (2013).  Articulatory error patterns and phonological process use of preschool children with and without hearing loss. Volta Review.

Richard Canter is Visiting Professor of Surgical Education in the Nuffield Department of Surgical Sciences, University of Oxford.

Richard Canter qualified in medicine at the University of London in 1976, before becoming a surgeon at the Royal United Hospital, Bath. He completed a PhD in Management at the University of Bath in 1998 studying the nature of power in decision-making at the personal and organisation level in healthcare. Following the critical Kennedy report on surgical training in 2001, he was recruited to the Royal College of Surgeons of England as Deputy Director of Surgical Education with specific responsibility for curriculum development in surgical education in England. He was subsequently Head of the Postgraduate School of Surgery in Bristol until 2012, after which he concentrated on academic work at Oxford. He was appointed a visiting Professor in Oxford in in 2007, Emeritus Consultant at Oxford University Hospitals in 2015, and Associate Fellow at Green Templeton College, Oxford in 2015.

His interests are professionalism and, in particular, its relationship to leadership in healthcare systems. His current specific research interests are the effectiveness or otherwise of leadership education in respect of its impact on quality improvement in healthcare systems.

At the Royal College of Surgeons of England he was clinical lead and Chair of the Needs Analysis Group evaluating educational resources and organisational systems necessary for the implementation of reform of surgical training, and made recommendations for changes that were eventually adopted by all surgical training systems in the United Kingdom. During this appointment an opportunity arose in early 2003 at the end of the Serbian conflict to assist the European Agency for Reconstruction (EAR, a division of the EEC) in providing advice to the Kosovan Ministry of Health to develop new systems for surgical training.

Currently at Oxford, he is lead tutor for the module in Leadership and Management in Healthcare and Deputy Director of the Masters in Surgical Science, and supervises Masters and DPhil students on the subject of organisational change and leadership. In addition he has regular commitments in teaching postgraduate medical trainees and medical faculty on topics such as leadership, quality improvement, educational theory in healthcare, workplace assessments, supporting and talent managing  medical trainees, as well as occasional commitments to supervising students on the Said Business School Global Opportunity and Threats (Oxford) programme in exploring problems in complex systems.

Along the way he has written and spoken on many topics in medicine, obtained research grants, and has unexpectedly been given fellowships and medals. His main interest outside of work is playing music and he runs the Green Templeton College Big Band.

Prior to starting his DPhil, Eddy worked as a primary school teacher in Bristol, where he also completed his MSc in Educational Research.

He is particularly interested in the culture of high stakes, standardised testing, and how this might perpetuate existing inequalities in schools. His research focuses specifically on the interaction between knowledge, policy and pedagogy in the context of Literacy education.

 

Claire (郝煜) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and a China Oxford Scholarship Fund (COSF) scholar.

Claire holds a BA in Education and Physics from the University of Cambridge, an MA in Applied Linguistics from UCL Institution of Education, and an EdM in International Education Policy from Harvard University. She is passionate about exploring and supporting the transnational experiences of bi-/multilingual students in studying abroad contexts. Her research and professional interests include bilingualism, language and identity, international education, professional development, and school leadership.

Since 2015, Claire has served as the Director of International Education at Beijing Xinxuedao Education Group, a non-profit organisation that operates 31 schools with over 30,000 K-12 students in China. She has also worked as a high school counsellor and a teacher of Physics and Psychology.

Publications

Hao, Y. and Lantsman, G. (2022). Motivation in MOOCs: a qualitative study on the design and evaluation of an online IELTS course. The 7th IAFOR International Conference on Education.

Hao, Y. (2020). Education without borders: sojourner trips in students’ holistic development. In Wang, J. (Ed.). Family, Society, and Education. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2020). Learning how to learn: the role of metacognition and self-regulation in learning. In Wang, J. (Ed.). The Virtue of Thinking in Learning. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2019). Chinese students at a UK university: how linguistic repertoire mediates language and sojourner identity construction. Linguistics and Applied Linguistics Conference. Beijing Normal University.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2018). Examining Linguistic Diversity as a Resource for Higher Education in the Anglophone World. In Tong, V. C., Standen, A., & Sotiriou, M. (Ed.). Shaping Higher Education with Students: Ways to Connect Research and Teaching (pp.288-293). UCL Press.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2016). Making the most of linguistic diversity: the views and practices of bi/multilingual postgraduate students. The Multilingual University. ESRC Seminars.

Hao, Y. (2012). A Transformative Journey: China-US exchange student studying at an American high school. New World Press.

Pok Jing (Jane) Ho is a doctoral student at the Department of Education, specialising in educational assessment.

She is funded by the Bei Shan Tang Foundation Scholarship for Graduate Studies.

Her DPhil thesis examines validity in the Hong Kong Diploma of Secondary Education Examination, a large-scale, high-stakes test that informs higher education admissions decisions, using the argument-based approach to validation. In particular, her research identifies the claims made based on test scores, the validity evidence that supports or challenges such claims, and the social consequences that ensue as a result of test use.

Prior to her DPhil, she completed an M.A. in International Education Policy Analysis at Stanford University. She subsequently worked as a project officer at the Education University of Hong Kong, where she is now serving as a consultant alongside her studies.

A former secondary school teacher, Jane also holds a B.A. in English Studies (First Class Honours), a B.Ed. in English Language Education (First Class Honours), and an M.Ed. in Curriculum and Instruction from the Chinese University of Hong Kong, as well as the Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (CELTA) from Cambridge.

She is a Peer Supporter at Green Templeton College.

Publications

Ho, P. J. (2020). For some or for all: Vocational English for Hong Kong secondary school students. In C. Hong, & W. K. Ma (Eds.), Applied degree education and the future of work—Education 4.0 (pp. 87–95). Springer. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-15-3142-2

Ho, P. J. (2015). China-Africa “cooperation” in education. International Politics, 5. https://www.iir.cz/en/china-africa-cooperation-in-education

Jennifer’s DPhil focuses on adoptive families where  the adoptive parents also have birth children. She has worked in adoption support as a Parent Consultant for Adoption UK and as Head of Peer Services at PAC-UK, as well as managing the Adoption UK advice line and the parent training team.

She holds an MSc in Poverty Reduction: Policy and Practice from SOAS, and an MBA from Warwick Business School. She has worked in management consultancy in both the public and private sectors and is a board member of CoramBAAF.

Publications

The Right Tools for the Job. Information Age, November 1996

Global teams for the millennium; Management Decision, 36 (1): 31-33, February 1998

Lucy is a second-year DPhil student, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

Her DPhil research aims to engage in a meaningful and creative way with service children to explore how service life has shaped their experiences of education and sense of self. By choosing this focus, the research seeks to widen and nuance current understanding of service children’s educational experiences in addition to furthering knowledge into how service children see themselves. As a result of this, it is hoped that the research will support in developing the professional body of knowledge and understanding of this group of children in schools and help inform the Service Pupil Premium (SPP) funding choices in addition to wider school practice.

Before embarking on her DPhil at Oxford, Lucy completed her PGCE and MEd in Primary Education at the University of Cambridge. In addition to her DPhil work, Lucy is a Trustee for the Armed Forces Education Trust (AFET) – a grant-giving charity for service children – and a volunteer for the Oxford based charity, Big Brothers Big Sisters.

 

 

Aine is interested in improving the health outcomes of children and young people in the care system.

Fahad is reading for a DPhil in Education (part-time). He has over fifteen years professional experience in the education sector, in particular, higher education.

He has held senior roles in staff and student development, human resources, policy and strategy. Fahad holds a BSc in Education and Science and an MBA. Prior to commencing his doctoral studies, he was elected an Academic Visitor at St Antony’s College in the University of Oxford. Fahad’s research focus is on the quality of undergraduate medical education for Qatari doctors.

Shawna completed her undergraduate degree in Psycholinguistics at the University of Toronto in Canada, and later completed the MSc program in Applied Linguistics and Second language Acquisition at the University of Oxford.

She has a wide range of experiences in the field of Linguistics as a teaching and research assistant in areas such as theoretical linguistics, phonology, speech-language pathology, language acquisition, and creole studies. Being a native of Jamaica herself, Shawna has carried out extensive work on creole language acquisition. She worked with the University of the West Indies to draft the first Jamaican (Creole) as a Foreign Language course, and with the U.S Peace Corps to assess and revamp an existing language program for volunteers.

Shawna’s current research focuses on the development of writing skills among primary school learners in Jamaica who speak Jamaican Creole as a home language but are educated in English.

Publications
  • Helms-Park, R., Tucker, S, & Dronjic, V. (2016). From proto-writing to multimedia literacy: scripts and orthographies through the ages. In  Chen Bumgardner, V. Dronjic,, & R. Helms-Park (Eds.), Second Language Reading: Psycholinguistic and Cognitive Perspectives (pp. 1-31). New York, NY: Routledge Publishers.
  • Eriks-Brophy, A., Green, S., & Tucker, S. (2013).  Articulatory error patterns and phonological process use of preschool children with and without hearing loss. Volta Review.

Richard Canter is Visiting Professor of Surgical Education in the Nuffield Department of Surgical Sciences, University of Oxford.

Richard Canter qualified in medicine at the University of London in 1976, before becoming a surgeon at the Royal United Hospital, Bath. He completed a PhD in Management at the University of Bath in 1998 studying the nature of power in decision-making at the personal and organisation level in healthcare. Following the critical Kennedy report on surgical training in 2001, he was recruited to the Royal College of Surgeons of England as Deputy Director of Surgical Education with specific responsibility for curriculum development in surgical education in England. He was subsequently Head of the Postgraduate School of Surgery in Bristol until 2012, after which he concentrated on academic work at Oxford. He was appointed a visiting Professor in Oxford in in 2007, Emeritus Consultant at Oxford University Hospitals in 2015, and Associate Fellow at Green Templeton College, Oxford in 2015.

His interests are professionalism and, in particular, its relationship to leadership in healthcare systems. His current specific research interests are the effectiveness or otherwise of leadership education in respect of its impact on quality improvement in healthcare systems.

At the Royal College of Surgeons of England he was clinical lead and Chair of the Needs Analysis Group evaluating educational resources and organisational systems necessary for the implementation of reform of surgical training, and made recommendations for changes that were eventually adopted by all surgical training systems in the United Kingdom. During this appointment an opportunity arose in early 2003 at the end of the Serbian conflict to assist the European Agency for Reconstruction (EAR, a division of the EEC) in providing advice to the Kosovan Ministry of Health to develop new systems for surgical training.

Currently at Oxford, he is lead tutor for the module in Leadership and Management in Healthcare and Deputy Director of the Masters in Surgical Science, and supervises Masters and DPhil students on the subject of organisational change and leadership. In addition he has regular commitments in teaching postgraduate medical trainees and medical faculty on topics such as leadership, quality improvement, educational theory in healthcare, workplace assessments, supporting and talent managing  medical trainees, as well as occasional commitments to supervising students on the Said Business School Global Opportunity and Threats (Oxford) programme in exploring problems in complex systems.

Along the way he has written and spoken on many topics in medicine, obtained research grants, and has unexpectedly been given fellowships and medals. His main interest outside of work is playing music and he runs the Green Templeton College Big Band.

Prior to starting his DPhil, Eddy worked as a primary school teacher in Bristol, where he also completed his MSc in Educational Research.

He is particularly interested in the culture of high stakes, standardised testing, and how this might perpetuate existing inequalities in schools. His research focuses specifically on the interaction between knowledge, policy and pedagogy in the context of Literacy education.

 

Claire (郝煜) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and a China Oxford Scholarship Fund (COSF) scholar.

Claire holds a BA in Education and Physics from the University of Cambridge, an MA in Applied Linguistics from UCL Institution of Education, and an EdM in International Education Policy from Harvard University. She is passionate about exploring and supporting the transnational experiences of bi-/multilingual students in studying abroad contexts. Her research and professional interests include bilingualism, language and identity, international education, professional development, and school leadership.

Since 2015, Claire has served as the Director of International Education at Beijing Xinxuedao Education Group, a non-profit organisation that operates 31 schools with over 30,000 K-12 students in China. She has also worked as a high school counsellor and a teacher of Physics and Psychology.

Publications

Hao, Y. and Lantsman, G. (2022). Motivation in MOOCs: a qualitative study on the design and evaluation of an online IELTS course. The 7th IAFOR International Conference on Education.

Hao, Y. (2020). Education without borders: sojourner trips in students’ holistic development. In Wang, J. (Ed.). Family, Society, and Education. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2020). Learning how to learn: the role of metacognition and self-regulation in learning. In Wang, J. (Ed.). The Virtue of Thinking in Learning. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2019). Chinese students at a UK university: how linguistic repertoire mediates language and sojourner identity construction. Linguistics and Applied Linguistics Conference. Beijing Normal University.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2018). Examining Linguistic Diversity as a Resource for Higher Education in the Anglophone World. In Tong, V. C., Standen, A., & Sotiriou, M. (Ed.). Shaping Higher Education with Students: Ways to Connect Research and Teaching (pp.288-293). UCL Press.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2016). Making the most of linguistic diversity: the views and practices of bi/multilingual postgraduate students. The Multilingual University. ESRC Seminars.

Hao, Y. (2012). A Transformative Journey: China-US exchange student studying at an American high school. New World Press.

Pok Jing (Jane) Ho is a doctoral student at the Department of Education, specialising in educational assessment.

She is funded by the Bei Shan Tang Foundation Scholarship for Graduate Studies.

Her DPhil thesis examines validity in the Hong Kong Diploma of Secondary Education Examination, a large-scale, high-stakes test that informs higher education admissions decisions, using the argument-based approach to validation. In particular, her research identifies the claims made based on test scores, the validity evidence that supports or challenges such claims, and the social consequences that ensue as a result of test use.

Prior to her DPhil, she completed an M.A. in International Education Policy Analysis at Stanford University. She subsequently worked as a project officer at the Education University of Hong Kong, where she is now serving as a consultant alongside her studies.

A former secondary school teacher, Jane also holds a B.A. in English Studies (First Class Honours), a B.Ed. in English Language Education (First Class Honours), and an M.Ed. in Curriculum and Instruction from the Chinese University of Hong Kong, as well as the Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (CELTA) from Cambridge.

She is a Peer Supporter at Green Templeton College.

Publications

Ho, P. J. (2020). For some or for all: Vocational English for Hong Kong secondary school students. In C. Hong, & W. K. Ma (Eds.), Applied degree education and the future of work—Education 4.0 (pp. 87–95). Springer. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-15-3142-2

Ho, P. J. (2015). China-Africa “cooperation” in education. International Politics, 5. https://www.iir.cz/en/china-africa-cooperation-in-education

Jennifer’s DPhil focuses on adoptive families where  the adoptive parents also have birth children. She has worked in adoption support as a Parent Consultant for Adoption UK and as Head of Peer Services at PAC-UK, as well as managing the Adoption UK advice line and the parent training team.

She holds an MSc in Poverty Reduction: Policy and Practice from SOAS, and an MBA from Warwick Business School. She has worked in management consultancy in both the public and private sectors and is a board member of CoramBAAF.

Publications

The Right Tools for the Job. Information Age, November 1996

Global teams for the millennium; Management Decision, 36 (1): 31-33, February 1998

Lucy is a second-year DPhil student, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

Her DPhil research aims to engage in a meaningful and creative way with service children to explore how service life has shaped their experiences of education and sense of self. By choosing this focus, the research seeks to widen and nuance current understanding of service children’s educational experiences in addition to furthering knowledge into how service children see themselves. As a result of this, it is hoped that the research will support in developing the professional body of knowledge and understanding of this group of children in schools and help inform the Service Pupil Premium (SPP) funding choices in addition to wider school practice.

Before embarking on her DPhil at Oxford, Lucy completed her PGCE and MEd in Primary Education at the University of Cambridge. In addition to her DPhil work, Lucy is a Trustee for the Armed Forces Education Trust (AFET) – a grant-giving charity for service children – and a volunteer for the Oxford based charity, Big Brothers Big Sisters.

 

 

Aine is interested in improving the health outcomes of children and young people in the care system.

Fahad is reading for a DPhil in Education (part-time). He has over fifteen years professional experience in the education sector, in particular, higher education.

He has held senior roles in staff and student development, human resources, policy and strategy. Fahad holds a BSc in Education and Science and an MBA. Prior to commencing his doctoral studies, he was elected an Academic Visitor at St Antony’s College in the University of Oxford. Fahad’s research focus is on the quality of undergraduate medical education for Qatari doctors.

Shawna completed her undergraduate degree in Psycholinguistics at the University of Toronto in Canada, and later completed the MSc program in Applied Linguistics and Second language Acquisition at the University of Oxford.

She has a wide range of experiences in the field of Linguistics as a teaching and research assistant in areas such as theoretical linguistics, phonology, speech-language pathology, language acquisition, and creole studies. Being a native of Jamaica herself, Shawna has carried out extensive work on creole language acquisition. She worked with the University of the West Indies to draft the first Jamaican (Creole) as a Foreign Language course, and with the U.S Peace Corps to assess and revamp an existing language program for volunteers.

Shawna’s current research focuses on the development of writing skills among primary school learners in Jamaica who speak Jamaican Creole as a home language but are educated in English.

Publications
  • Helms-Park, R., Tucker, S, & Dronjic, V. (2016). From proto-writing to multimedia literacy: scripts and orthographies through the ages. In  Chen Bumgardner, V. Dronjic,, & R. Helms-Park (Eds.), Second Language Reading: Psycholinguistic and Cognitive Perspectives (pp. 1-31). New York, NY: Routledge Publishers.
  • Eriks-Brophy, A., Green, S., & Tucker, S. (2013).  Articulatory error patterns and phonological process use of preschool children with and without hearing loss. Volta Review.

Richard Canter is Visiting Professor of Surgical Education in the Nuffield Department of Surgical Sciences, University of Oxford.

Richard Canter qualified in medicine at the University of London in 1976, before becoming a surgeon at the Royal United Hospital, Bath. He completed a PhD in Management at the University of Bath in 1998 studying the nature of power in decision-making at the personal and organisation level in healthcare. Following the critical Kennedy report on surgical training in 2001, he was recruited to the Royal College of Surgeons of England as Deputy Director of Surgical Education with specific responsibility for curriculum development in surgical education in England. He was subsequently Head of the Postgraduate School of Surgery in Bristol until 2012, after which he concentrated on academic work at Oxford. He was appointed a visiting Professor in Oxford in in 2007, Emeritus Consultant at Oxford University Hospitals in 2015, and Associate Fellow at Green Templeton College, Oxford in 2015.

His interests are professionalism and, in particular, its relationship to leadership in healthcare systems. His current specific research interests are the effectiveness or otherwise of leadership education in respect of its impact on quality improvement in healthcare systems.

At the Royal College of Surgeons of England he was clinical lead and Chair of the Needs Analysis Group evaluating educational resources and organisational systems necessary for the implementation of reform of surgical training, and made recommendations for changes that were eventually adopted by all surgical training systems in the United Kingdom. During this appointment an opportunity arose in early 2003 at the end of the Serbian conflict to assist the European Agency for Reconstruction (EAR, a division of the EEC) in providing advice to the Kosovan Ministry of Health to develop new systems for surgical training.

Currently at Oxford, he is lead tutor for the module in Leadership and Management in Healthcare and Deputy Director of the Masters in Surgical Science, and supervises Masters and DPhil students on the subject of organisational change and leadership. In addition he has regular commitments in teaching postgraduate medical trainees and medical faculty on topics such as leadership, quality improvement, educational theory in healthcare, workplace assessments, supporting and talent managing  medical trainees, as well as occasional commitments to supervising students on the Said Business School Global Opportunity and Threats (Oxford) programme in exploring problems in complex systems.

Along the way he has written and spoken on many topics in medicine, obtained research grants, and has unexpectedly been given fellowships and medals. His main interest outside of work is playing music and he runs the Green Templeton College Big Band.

Prior to starting his DPhil, Eddy worked as a primary school teacher in Bristol, where he also completed his MSc in Educational Research.

He is particularly interested in the culture of high stakes, standardised testing, and how this might perpetuate existing inequalities in schools. His research focuses specifically on the interaction between knowledge, policy and pedagogy in the context of Literacy education.

 

Claire (郝煜) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and a China Oxford Scholarship Fund (COSF) scholar.

Claire holds a BA in Education and Physics from the University of Cambridge, an MA in Applied Linguistics from UCL Institution of Education, and an EdM in International Education Policy from Harvard University. She is passionate about exploring and supporting the transnational experiences of bi-/multilingual students in studying abroad contexts. Her research and professional interests include bilingualism, language and identity, international education, professional development, and school leadership.

Since 2015, Claire has served as the Director of International Education at Beijing Xinxuedao Education Group, a non-profit organisation that operates 31 schools with over 30,000 K-12 students in China. She has also worked as a high school counsellor and a teacher of Physics and Psychology.

Publications

Hao, Y. and Lantsman, G. (2022). Motivation in MOOCs: a qualitative study on the design and evaluation of an online IELTS course. The 7th IAFOR International Conference on Education.

Hao, Y. (2020). Education without borders: sojourner trips in students’ holistic development. In Wang, J. (Ed.). Family, Society, and Education. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2020). Learning how to learn: the role of metacognition and self-regulation in learning. In Wang, J. (Ed.). The Virtue of Thinking in Learning. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2019). Chinese students at a UK university: how linguistic repertoire mediates language and sojourner identity construction. Linguistics and Applied Linguistics Conference. Beijing Normal University.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2018). Examining Linguistic Diversity as a Resource for Higher Education in the Anglophone World. In Tong, V. C., Standen, A., & Sotiriou, M. (Ed.). Shaping Higher Education with Students: Ways to Connect Research and Teaching (pp.288-293). UCL Press.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2016). Making the most of linguistic diversity: the views and practices of bi/multilingual postgraduate students. The Multilingual University. ESRC Seminars.

Hao, Y. (2012). A Transformative Journey: China-US exchange student studying at an American high school. New World Press.

Pok Jing (Jane) Ho is a doctoral student at the Department of Education, specialising in educational assessment.

She is funded by the Bei Shan Tang Foundation Scholarship for Graduate Studies.

Her DPhil thesis examines validity in the Hong Kong Diploma of Secondary Education Examination, a large-scale, high-stakes test that informs higher education admissions decisions, using the argument-based approach to validation. In particular, her research identifies the claims made based on test scores, the validity evidence that supports or challenges such claims, and the social consequences that ensue as a result of test use.

Prior to her DPhil, she completed an M.A. in International Education Policy Analysis at Stanford University. She subsequently worked as a project officer at the Education University of Hong Kong, where she is now serving as a consultant alongside her studies.

A former secondary school teacher, Jane also holds a B.A. in English Studies (First Class Honours), a B.Ed. in English Language Education (First Class Honours), and an M.Ed. in Curriculum and Instruction from the Chinese University of Hong Kong, as well as the Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (CELTA) from Cambridge.

She is a Peer Supporter at Green Templeton College.

Publications

Ho, P. J. (2020). For some or for all: Vocational English for Hong Kong secondary school students. In C. Hong, & W. K. Ma (Eds.), Applied degree education and the future of work—Education 4.0 (pp. 87–95). Springer. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-15-3142-2

Ho, P. J. (2015). China-Africa “cooperation” in education. International Politics, 5. https://www.iir.cz/en/china-africa-cooperation-in-education

Jennifer’s DPhil focuses on adoptive families where  the adoptive parents also have birth children. She has worked in adoption support as a Parent Consultant for Adoption UK and as Head of Peer Services at PAC-UK, as well as managing the Adoption UK advice line and the parent training team.

She holds an MSc in Poverty Reduction: Policy and Practice from SOAS, and an MBA from Warwick Business School. She has worked in management consultancy in both the public and private sectors and is a board member of CoramBAAF.

Publications

The Right Tools for the Job. Information Age, November 1996

Global teams for the millennium; Management Decision, 36 (1): 31-33, February 1998

Lucy is a second-year DPhil student, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

Her DPhil research aims to engage in a meaningful and creative way with service children to explore how service life has shaped their experiences of education and sense of self. By choosing this focus, the research seeks to widen and nuance current understanding of service children’s educational experiences in addition to furthering knowledge into how service children see themselves. As a result of this, it is hoped that the research will support in developing the professional body of knowledge and understanding of this group of children in schools and help inform the Service Pupil Premium (SPP) funding choices in addition to wider school practice.

Before embarking on her DPhil at Oxford, Lucy completed her PGCE and MEd in Primary Education at the University of Cambridge. In addition to her DPhil work, Lucy is a Trustee for the Armed Forces Education Trust (AFET) – a grant-giving charity for service children – and a volunteer for the Oxford based charity, Big Brothers Big Sisters.

 

 

Aine is interested in improving the health outcomes of children and young people in the care system.

Fahad is reading for a DPhil in Education (part-time). He has over fifteen years professional experience in the education sector, in particular, higher education.

He has held senior roles in staff and student development, human resources, policy and strategy. Fahad holds a BSc in Education and Science and an MBA. Prior to commencing his doctoral studies, he was elected an Academic Visitor at St Antony’s College in the University of Oxford. Fahad’s research focus is on the quality of undergraduate medical education for Qatari doctors.

Shawna completed her undergraduate degree in Psycholinguistics at the University of Toronto in Canada, and later completed the MSc program in Applied Linguistics and Second language Acquisition at the University of Oxford.

She has a wide range of experiences in the field of Linguistics as a teaching and research assistant in areas such as theoretical linguistics, phonology, speech-language pathology, language acquisition, and creole studies. Being a native of Jamaica herself, Shawna has carried out extensive work on creole language acquisition. She worked with the University of the West Indies to draft the first Jamaican (Creole) as a Foreign Language course, and with the U.S Peace Corps to assess and revamp an existing language program for volunteers.

Shawna’s current research focuses on the development of writing skills among primary school learners in Jamaica who speak Jamaican Creole as a home language but are educated in English.

Publications
  • Helms-Park, R., Tucker, S, & Dronjic, V. (2016). From proto-writing to multimedia literacy: scripts and orthographies through the ages. In  Chen Bumgardner, V. Dronjic,, & R. Helms-Park (Eds.), Second Language Reading: Psycholinguistic and Cognitive Perspectives (pp. 1-31). New York, NY: Routledge Publishers.
  • Eriks-Brophy, A., Green, S., & Tucker, S. (2013).  Articulatory error patterns and phonological process use of preschool children with and without hearing loss. Volta Review.

Richard Canter is Visiting Professor of Surgical Education in the Nuffield Department of Surgical Sciences, University of Oxford.

Richard Canter qualified in medicine at the University of London in 1976, before becoming a surgeon at the Royal United Hospital, Bath. He completed a PhD in Management at the University of Bath in 1998 studying the nature of power in decision-making at the personal and organisation level in healthcare. Following the critical Kennedy report on surgical training in 2001, he was recruited to the Royal College of Surgeons of England as Deputy Director of Surgical Education with specific responsibility for curriculum development in surgical education in England. He was subsequently Head of the Postgraduate School of Surgery in Bristol until 2012, after which he concentrated on academic work at Oxford. He was appointed a visiting Professor in Oxford in in 2007, Emeritus Consultant at Oxford University Hospitals in 2015, and Associate Fellow at Green Templeton College, Oxford in 2015.

His interests are professionalism and, in particular, its relationship to leadership in healthcare systems. His current specific research interests are the effectiveness or otherwise of leadership education in respect of its impact on quality improvement in healthcare systems.

At the Royal College of Surgeons of England he was clinical lead and Chair of the Needs Analysis Group evaluating educational resources and organisational systems necessary for the implementation of reform of surgical training, and made recommendations for changes that were eventually adopted by all surgical training systems in the United Kingdom. During this appointment an opportunity arose in early 2003 at the end of the Serbian conflict to assist the European Agency for Reconstruction (EAR, a division of the EEC) in providing advice to the Kosovan Ministry of Health to develop new systems for surgical training.

Currently at Oxford, he is lead tutor for the module in Leadership and Management in Healthcare and Deputy Director of the Masters in Surgical Science, and supervises Masters and DPhil students on the subject of organisational change and leadership. In addition he has regular commitments in teaching postgraduate medical trainees and medical faculty on topics such as leadership, quality improvement, educational theory in healthcare, workplace assessments, supporting and talent managing  medical trainees, as well as occasional commitments to supervising students on the Said Business School Global Opportunity and Threats (Oxford) programme in exploring problems in complex systems.

Along the way he has written and spoken on many topics in medicine, obtained research grants, and has unexpectedly been given fellowships and medals. His main interest outside of work is playing music and he runs the Green Templeton College Big Band.

Prior to starting his DPhil, Eddy worked as a primary school teacher in Bristol, where he also completed his MSc in Educational Research.

He is particularly interested in the culture of high stakes, standardised testing, and how this might perpetuate existing inequalities in schools. His research focuses specifically on the interaction between knowledge, policy and pedagogy in the context of Literacy education.

 

Claire (郝煜) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and a China Oxford Scholarship Fund (COSF) scholar.

Claire holds a BA in Education and Physics from the University of Cambridge, an MA in Applied Linguistics from UCL Institution of Education, and an EdM in International Education Policy from Harvard University. She is passionate about exploring and supporting the transnational experiences of bi-/multilingual students in studying abroad contexts. Her research and professional interests include bilingualism, language and identity, international education, professional development, and school leadership.

Since 2015, Claire has served as the Director of International Education at Beijing Xinxuedao Education Group, a non-profit organisation that operates 31 schools with over 30,000 K-12 students in China. She has also worked as a high school counsellor and a teacher of Physics and Psychology.

Publications

Hao, Y. and Lantsman, G. (2022). Motivation in MOOCs: a qualitative study on the design and evaluation of an online IELTS course. The 7th IAFOR International Conference on Education.

Hao, Y. (2020). Education without borders: sojourner trips in students’ holistic development. In Wang, J. (Ed.). Family, Society, and Education. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2020). Learning how to learn: the role of metacognition and self-regulation in learning. In Wang, J. (Ed.). The Virtue of Thinking in Learning. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2019). Chinese students at a UK university: how linguistic repertoire mediates language and sojourner identity construction. Linguistics and Applied Linguistics Conference. Beijing Normal University.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2018). Examining Linguistic Diversity as a Resource for Higher Education in the Anglophone World. In Tong, V. C., Standen, A., & Sotiriou, M. (Ed.). Shaping Higher Education with Students: Ways to Connect Research and Teaching (pp.288-293). UCL Press.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2016). Making the most of linguistic diversity: the views and practices of bi/multilingual postgraduate students. The Multilingual University. ESRC Seminars.

Hao, Y. (2012). A Transformative Journey: China-US exchange student studying at an American high school. New World Press.

Pok Jing (Jane) Ho is a doctoral student at the Department of Education, specialising in educational assessment.

She is funded by the Bei Shan Tang Foundation Scholarship for Graduate Studies.

Her DPhil thesis examines validity in the Hong Kong Diploma of Secondary Education Examination, a large-scale, high-stakes test that informs higher education admissions decisions, using the argument-based approach to validation. In particular, her research identifies the claims made based on test scores, the validity evidence that supports or challenges such claims, and the social consequences that ensue as a result of test use.

Prior to her DPhil, she completed an M.A. in International Education Policy Analysis at Stanford University. She subsequently worked as a project officer at the Education University of Hong Kong, where she is now serving as a consultant alongside her studies.

A former secondary school teacher, Jane also holds a B.A. in English Studies (First Class Honours), a B.Ed. in English Language Education (First Class Honours), and an M.Ed. in Curriculum and Instruction from the Chinese University of Hong Kong, as well as the Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (CELTA) from Cambridge.

She is a Peer Supporter at Green Templeton College.

Publications

Ho, P. J. (2020). For some or for all: Vocational English for Hong Kong secondary school students. In C. Hong, & W. K. Ma (Eds.), Applied degree education and the future of work—Education 4.0 (pp. 87–95). Springer. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-15-3142-2

Ho, P. J. (2015). China-Africa “cooperation” in education. International Politics, 5. https://www.iir.cz/en/china-africa-cooperation-in-education

Jennifer’s DPhil focuses on adoptive families where  the adoptive parents also have birth children. She has worked in adoption support as a Parent Consultant for Adoption UK and as Head of Peer Services at PAC-UK, as well as managing the Adoption UK advice line and the parent training team.

She holds an MSc in Poverty Reduction: Policy and Practice from SOAS, and an MBA from Warwick Business School. She has worked in management consultancy in both the public and private sectors and is a board member of CoramBAAF.

Publications

The Right Tools for the Job. Information Age, November 1996

Global teams for the millennium; Management Decision, 36 (1): 31-33, February 1998

Lucy is a second-year DPhil student, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

Her DPhil research aims to engage in a meaningful and creative way with service children to explore how service life has shaped their experiences of education and sense of self. By choosing this focus, the research seeks to widen and nuance current understanding of service children’s educational experiences in addition to furthering knowledge into how service children see themselves. As a result of this, it is hoped that the research will support in developing the professional body of knowledge and understanding of this group of children in schools and help inform the Service Pupil Premium (SPP) funding choices in addition to wider school practice.

Before embarking on her DPhil at Oxford, Lucy completed her PGCE and MEd in Primary Education at the University of Cambridge. In addition to her DPhil work, Lucy is a Trustee for the Armed Forces Education Trust (AFET) – a grant-giving charity for service children – and a volunteer for the Oxford based charity, Big Brothers Big Sisters.

 

 

Aine is interested in improving the health outcomes of children and young people in the care system.

Fahad is reading for a DPhil in Education (part-time). He has over fifteen years professional experience in the education sector, in particular, higher education.

He has held senior roles in staff and student development, human resources, policy and strategy. Fahad holds a BSc in Education and Science and an MBA. Prior to commencing his doctoral studies, he was elected an Academic Visitor at St Antony’s College in the University of Oxford. Fahad’s research focus is on the quality of undergraduate medical education for Qatari doctors.

Shawna completed her undergraduate degree in Psycholinguistics at the University of Toronto in Canada, and later completed the MSc program in Applied Linguistics and Second language Acquisition at the University of Oxford.

She has a wide range of experiences in the field of Linguistics as a teaching and research assistant in areas such as theoretical linguistics, phonology, speech-language pathology, language acquisition, and creole studies. Being a native of Jamaica herself, Shawna has carried out extensive work on creole language acquisition. She worked with the University of the West Indies to draft the first Jamaican (Creole) as a Foreign Language course, and with the U.S Peace Corps to assess and revamp an existing language program for volunteers.

Shawna’s current research focuses on the development of writing skills among primary school learners in Jamaica who speak Jamaican Creole as a home language but are educated in English.

Publications
  • Helms-Park, R., Tucker, S, & Dronjic, V. (2016). From proto-writing to multimedia literacy: scripts and orthographies through the ages. In  Chen Bumgardner, V. Dronjic,, & R. Helms-Park (Eds.), Second Language Reading: Psycholinguistic and Cognitive Perspectives (pp. 1-31). New York, NY: Routledge Publishers.
  • Eriks-Brophy, A., Green, S., & Tucker, S. (2013).  Articulatory error patterns and phonological process use of preschool children with and without hearing loss. Volta Review.

Richard Canter is Visiting Professor of Surgical Education in the Nuffield Department of Surgical Sciences, University of Oxford.

Richard Canter qualified in medicine at the University of London in 1976, before becoming a surgeon at the Royal United Hospital, Bath. He completed a PhD in Management at the University of Bath in 1998 studying the nature of power in decision-making at the personal and organisation level in healthcare. Following the critical Kennedy report on surgical training in 2001, he was recruited to the Royal College of Surgeons of England as Deputy Director of Surgical Education with specific responsibility for curriculum development in surgical education in England. He was subsequently Head of the Postgraduate School of Surgery in Bristol until 2012, after which he concentrated on academic work at Oxford. He was appointed a visiting Professor in Oxford in in 2007, Emeritus Consultant at Oxford University Hospitals in 2015, and Associate Fellow at Green Templeton College, Oxford in 2015.

His interests are professionalism and, in particular, its relationship to leadership in healthcare systems. His current specific research interests are the effectiveness or otherwise of leadership education in respect of its impact on quality improvement in healthcare systems.

At the Royal College of Surgeons of England he was clinical lead and Chair of the Needs Analysis Group evaluating educational resources and organisational systems necessary for the implementation of reform of surgical training, and made recommendations for changes that were eventually adopted by all surgical training systems in the United Kingdom. During this appointment an opportunity arose in early 2003 at the end of the Serbian conflict to assist the European Agency for Reconstruction (EAR, a division of the EEC) in providing advice to the Kosovan Ministry of Health to develop new systems for surgical training.

Currently at Oxford, he is lead tutor for the module in Leadership and Management in Healthcare and Deputy Director of the Masters in Surgical Science, and supervises Masters and DPhil students on the subject of organisational change and leadership. In addition he has regular commitments in teaching postgraduate medical trainees and medical faculty on topics such as leadership, quality improvement, educational theory in healthcare, workplace assessments, supporting and talent managing  medical trainees, as well as occasional commitments to supervising students on the Said Business School Global Opportunity and Threats (Oxford) programme in exploring problems in complex systems.

Along the way he has written and spoken on many topics in medicine, obtained research grants, and has unexpectedly been given fellowships and medals. His main interest outside of work is playing music and he runs the Green Templeton College Big Band.

Prior to starting his DPhil, Eddy worked as a primary school teacher in Bristol, where he also completed his MSc in Educational Research.

He is particularly interested in the culture of high stakes, standardised testing, and how this might perpetuate existing inequalities in schools. His research focuses specifically on the interaction between knowledge, policy and pedagogy in the context of Literacy education.

 

Claire (郝煜) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and a China Oxford Scholarship Fund (COSF) scholar.

Claire holds a BA in Education and Physics from the University of Cambridge, an MA in Applied Linguistics from UCL Institution of Education, and an EdM in International Education Policy from Harvard University. She is passionate about exploring and supporting the transnational experiences of bi-/multilingual students in studying abroad contexts. Her research and professional interests include bilingualism, language and identity, international education, professional development, and school leadership.

Since 2015, Claire has served as the Director of International Education at Beijing Xinxuedao Education Group, a non-profit organisation that operates 31 schools with over 30,000 K-12 students in China. She has also worked as a high school counsellor and a teacher of Physics and Psychology.

Publications

Hao, Y. and Lantsman, G. (2022). Motivation in MOOCs: a qualitative study on the design and evaluation of an online IELTS course. The 7th IAFOR International Conference on Education.

Hao, Y. (2020). Education without borders: sojourner trips in students’ holistic development. In Wang, J. (Ed.). Family, Society, and Education. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2020). Learning how to learn: the role of metacognition and self-regulation in learning. In Wang, J. (Ed.). The Virtue of Thinking in Learning. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2019). Chinese students at a UK university: how linguistic repertoire mediates language and sojourner identity construction. Linguistics and Applied Linguistics Conference. Beijing Normal University.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2018). Examining Linguistic Diversity as a Resource for Higher Education in the Anglophone World. In Tong, V. C., Standen, A., & Sotiriou, M. (Ed.). Shaping Higher Education with Students: Ways to Connect Research and Teaching (pp.288-293). UCL Press.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2016). Making the most of linguistic diversity: the views and practices of bi/multilingual postgraduate students. The Multilingual University. ESRC Seminars.

Hao, Y. (2012). A Transformative Journey: China-US exchange student studying at an American high school. New World Press.

Pok Jing (Jane) Ho is a doctoral student at the Department of Education, specialising in educational assessment.

She is funded by the Bei Shan Tang Foundation Scholarship for Graduate Studies.

Her DPhil thesis examines validity in the Hong Kong Diploma of Secondary Education Examination, a large-scale, high-stakes test that informs higher education admissions decisions, using the argument-based approach to validation. In particular, her research identifies the claims made based on test scores, the validity evidence that supports or challenges such claims, and the social consequences that ensue as a result of test use.

Prior to her DPhil, she completed an M.A. in International Education Policy Analysis at Stanford University. She subsequently worked as a project officer at the Education University of Hong Kong, where she is now serving as a consultant alongside her studies.

A former secondary school teacher, Jane also holds a B.A. in English Studies (First Class Honours), a B.Ed. in English Language Education (First Class Honours), and an M.Ed. in Curriculum and Instruction from the Chinese University of Hong Kong, as well as the Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (CELTA) from Cambridge.

She is a Peer Supporter at Green Templeton College.

Publications

Ho, P. J. (2020). For some or for all: Vocational English for Hong Kong secondary school students. In C. Hong, & W. K. Ma (Eds.), Applied degree education and the future of work—Education 4.0 (pp. 87–95). Springer. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-15-3142-2

Ho, P. J. (2015). China-Africa “cooperation” in education. International Politics, 5. https://www.iir.cz/en/china-africa-cooperation-in-education

Jennifer’s DPhil focuses on adoptive families where  the adoptive parents also have birth children. She has worked in adoption support as a Parent Consultant for Adoption UK and as Head of Peer Services at PAC-UK, as well as managing the Adoption UK advice line and the parent training team.

She holds an MSc in Poverty Reduction: Policy and Practice from SOAS, and an MBA from Warwick Business School. She has worked in management consultancy in both the public and private sectors and is a board member of CoramBAAF.

Publications

The Right Tools for the Job. Information Age, November 1996

Global teams for the millennium; Management Decision, 36 (1): 31-33, February 1998

Lucy is a second-year DPhil student, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

Her DPhil research aims to engage in a meaningful and creative way with service children to explore how service life has shaped their experiences of education and sense of self. By choosing this focus, the research seeks to widen and nuance current understanding of service children’s educational experiences in addition to furthering knowledge into how service children see themselves. As a result of this, it is hoped that the research will support in developing the professional body of knowledge and understanding of this group of children in schools and help inform the Service Pupil Premium (SPP) funding choices in addition to wider school practice.

Before embarking on her DPhil at Oxford, Lucy completed her PGCE and MEd in Primary Education at the University of Cambridge. In addition to her DPhil work, Lucy is a Trustee for the Armed Forces Education Trust (AFET) – a grant-giving charity for service children – and a volunteer for the Oxford based charity, Big Brothers Big Sisters.

 

 

Aine is interested in improving the health outcomes of children and young people in the care system.

Fahad is reading for a DPhil in Education (part-time). He has over fifteen years professional experience in the education sector, in particular, higher education.

He has held senior roles in staff and student development, human resources, policy and strategy. Fahad holds a BSc in Education and Science and an MBA. Prior to commencing his doctoral studies, he was elected an Academic Visitor at St Antony’s College in the University of Oxford. Fahad’s research focus is on the quality of undergraduate medical education for Qatari doctors.

Shawna completed her undergraduate degree in Psycholinguistics at the University of Toronto in Canada, and later completed the MSc program in Applied Linguistics and Second language Acquisition at the University of Oxford.

She has a wide range of experiences in the field of Linguistics as a teaching and research assistant in areas such as theoretical linguistics, phonology, speech-language pathology, language acquisition, and creole studies. Being a native of Jamaica herself, Shawna has carried out extensive work on creole language acquisition. She worked with the University of the West Indies to draft the first Jamaican (Creole) as a Foreign Language course, and with the U.S Peace Corps to assess and revamp an existing language program for volunteers.

Shawna’s current research focuses on the development of writing skills among primary school learners in Jamaica who speak Jamaican Creole as a home language but are educated in English.

Publications
  • Helms-Park, R., Tucker, S, & Dronjic, V. (2016). From proto-writing to multimedia literacy: scripts and orthographies through the ages. In  Chen Bumgardner, V. Dronjic,, & R. Helms-Park (Eds.), Second Language Reading: Psycholinguistic and Cognitive Perspectives (pp. 1-31). New York, NY: Routledge Publishers.
  • Eriks-Brophy, A., Green, S., & Tucker, S. (2013).  Articulatory error patterns and phonological process use of preschool children with and without hearing loss. Volta Review.

Richard Canter is Visiting Professor of Surgical Education in the Nuffield Department of Surgical Sciences, University of Oxford.

Richard Canter qualified in medicine at the University of London in 1976, before becoming a surgeon at the Royal United Hospital, Bath. He completed a PhD in Management at the University of Bath in 1998 studying the nature of power in decision-making at the personal and organisation level in healthcare. Following the critical Kennedy report on surgical training in 2001, he was recruited to the Royal College of Surgeons of England as Deputy Director of Surgical Education with specific responsibility for curriculum development in surgical education in England. He was subsequently Head of the Postgraduate School of Surgery in Bristol until 2012, after which he concentrated on academic work at Oxford. He was appointed a visiting Professor in Oxford in in 2007, Emeritus Consultant at Oxford University Hospitals in 2015, and Associate Fellow at Green Templeton College, Oxford in 2015.

His interests are professionalism and, in particular, its relationship to leadership in healthcare systems. His current specific research interests are the effectiveness or otherwise of leadership education in respect of its impact on quality improvement in healthcare systems.

At the Royal College of Surgeons of England he was clinical lead and Chair of the Needs Analysis Group evaluating educational resources and organisational systems necessary for the implementation of reform of surgical training, and made recommendations for changes that were eventually adopted by all surgical training systems in the United Kingdom. During this appointment an opportunity arose in early 2003 at the end of the Serbian conflict to assist the European Agency for Reconstruction (EAR, a division of the EEC) in providing advice to the Kosovan Ministry of Health to develop new systems for surgical training.

Currently at Oxford, he is lead tutor for the module in Leadership and Management in Healthcare and Deputy Director of the Masters in Surgical Science, and supervises Masters and DPhil students on the subject of organisational change and leadership. In addition he has regular commitments in teaching postgraduate medical trainees and medical faculty on topics such as leadership, quality improvement, educational theory in healthcare, workplace assessments, supporting and talent managing  medical trainees, as well as occasional commitments to supervising students on the Said Business School Global Opportunity and Threats (Oxford) programme in exploring problems in complex systems.

Along the way he has written and spoken on many topics in medicine, obtained research grants, and has unexpectedly been given fellowships and medals. His main interest outside of work is playing music and he runs the Green Templeton College Big Band.

Prior to starting his DPhil, Eddy worked as a primary school teacher in Bristol, where he also completed his MSc in Educational Research.

He is particularly interested in the culture of high stakes, standardised testing, and how this might perpetuate existing inequalities in schools. His research focuses specifically on the interaction between knowledge, policy and pedagogy in the context of Literacy education.

 

Claire (郝煜) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and a China Oxford Scholarship Fund (COSF) scholar.

Claire holds a BA in Education and Physics from the University of Cambridge, an MA in Applied Linguistics from UCL Institution of Education, and an EdM in International Education Policy from Harvard University. She is passionate about exploring and supporting the transnational experiences of bi-/multilingual students in studying abroad contexts. Her research and professional interests include bilingualism, language and identity, international education, professional development, and school leadership.

Since 2015, Claire has served as the Director of International Education at Beijing Xinxuedao Education Group, a non-profit organisation that operates 31 schools with over 30,000 K-12 students in China. She has also worked as a high school counsellor and a teacher of Physics and Psychology.

Publications

Hao, Y. and Lantsman, G. (2022). Motivation in MOOCs: a qualitative study on the design and evaluation of an online IELTS course. The 7th IAFOR International Conference on Education.

Hao, Y. (2020). Education without borders: sojourner trips in students’ holistic development. In Wang, J. (Ed.). Family, Society, and Education. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2020). Learning how to learn: the role of metacognition and self-regulation in learning. In Wang, J. (Ed.). The Virtue of Thinking in Learning. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2019). Chinese students at a UK university: how linguistic repertoire mediates language and sojourner identity construction. Linguistics and Applied Linguistics Conference. Beijing Normal University.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2018). Examining Linguistic Diversity as a Resource for Higher Education in the Anglophone World. In Tong, V. C., Standen, A., & Sotiriou, M. (Ed.). Shaping Higher Education with Students: Ways to Connect Research and Teaching (pp.288-293). UCL Press.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2016). Making the most of linguistic diversity: the views and practices of bi/multilingual postgraduate students. The Multilingual University. ESRC Seminars.

Hao, Y. (2012). A Transformative Journey: China-US exchange student studying at an American high school. New World Press.

Pok Jing (Jane) Ho is a doctoral student at the Department of Education, specialising in educational assessment.

She is funded by the Bei Shan Tang Foundation Scholarship for Graduate Studies.

Her DPhil thesis examines validity in the Hong Kong Diploma of Secondary Education Examination, a large-scale, high-stakes test that informs higher education admissions decisions, using the argument-based approach to validation. In particular, her research identifies the claims made based on test scores, the validity evidence that supports or challenges such claims, and the social consequences that ensue as a result of test use.

Prior to her DPhil, she completed an M.A. in International Education Policy Analysis at Stanford University. She subsequently worked as a project officer at the Education University of Hong Kong, where she is now serving as a consultant alongside her studies.

A former secondary school teacher, Jane also holds a B.A. in English Studies (First Class Honours), a B.Ed. in English Language Education (First Class Honours), and an M.Ed. in Curriculum and Instruction from the Chinese University of Hong Kong, as well as the Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (CELTA) from Cambridge.

She is a Peer Supporter at Green Templeton College.

Publications

Ho, P. J. (2020). For some or for all: Vocational English for Hong Kong secondary school students. In C. Hong, & W. K. Ma (Eds.), Applied degree education and the future of work—Education 4.0 (pp. 87–95). Springer. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-15-3142-2

Ho, P. J. (2015). China-Africa “cooperation” in education. International Politics, 5. https://www.iir.cz/en/china-africa-cooperation-in-education

Jennifer’s DPhil focuses on adoptive families where  the adoptive parents also have birth children. She has worked in adoption support as a Parent Consultant for Adoption UK and as Head of Peer Services at PAC-UK, as well as managing the Adoption UK advice line and the parent training team.

She holds an MSc in Poverty Reduction: Policy and Practice from SOAS, and an MBA from Warwick Business School. She has worked in management consultancy in both the public and private sectors and is a board member of CoramBAAF.

Publications

The Right Tools for the Job. Information Age, November 1996

Global teams for the millennium; Management Decision, 36 (1): 31-33, February 1998

Lucy is a second-year DPhil student, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

Her DPhil research aims to engage in a meaningful and creative way with service children to explore how service life has shaped their experiences of education and sense of self. By choosing this focus, the research seeks to widen and nuance current understanding of service children’s educational experiences in addition to furthering knowledge into how service children see themselves. As a result of this, it is hoped that the research will support in developing the professional body of knowledge and understanding of this group of children in schools and help inform the Service Pupil Premium (SPP) funding choices in addition to wider school practice.

Before embarking on her DPhil at Oxford, Lucy completed her PGCE and MEd in Primary Education at the University of Cambridge. In addition to her DPhil work, Lucy is a Trustee for the Armed Forces Education Trust (AFET) – a grant-giving charity for service children – and a volunteer for the Oxford based charity, Big Brothers Big Sisters.

 

 

Aine is interested in improving the health outcomes of children and young people in the care system.

Fahad is reading for a DPhil in Education (part-time). He has over fifteen years professional experience in the education sector, in particular, higher education.

He has held senior roles in staff and student development, human resources, policy and strategy. Fahad holds a BSc in Education and Science and an MBA. Prior to commencing his doctoral studies, he was elected an Academic Visitor at St Antony’s College in the University of Oxford. Fahad’s research focus is on the quality of undergraduate medical education for Qatari doctors.

Shawna completed her undergraduate degree in Psycholinguistics at the University of Toronto in Canada, and later completed the MSc program in Applied Linguistics and Second language Acquisition at the University of Oxford.

She has a wide range of experiences in the field of Linguistics as a teaching and research assistant in areas such as theoretical linguistics, phonology, speech-language pathology, language acquisition, and creole studies. Being a native of Jamaica herself, Shawna has carried out extensive work on creole language acquisition. She worked with the University of the West Indies to draft the first Jamaican (Creole) as a Foreign Language course, and with the U.S Peace Corps to assess and revamp an existing language program for volunteers.

Shawna’s current research focuses on the development of writing skills among primary school learners in Jamaica who speak Jamaican Creole as a home language but are educated in English.

Publications
  • Helms-Park, R., Tucker, S, & Dronjic, V. (2016). From proto-writing to multimedia literacy: scripts and orthographies through the ages. In  Chen Bumgardner, V. Dronjic,, & R. Helms-Park (Eds.), Second Language Reading: Psycholinguistic and Cognitive Perspectives (pp. 1-31). New York, NY: Routledge Publishers.
  • Eriks-Brophy, A., Green, S., & Tucker, S. (2013).  Articulatory error patterns and phonological process use of preschool children with and without hearing loss. Volta Review.

Richard Canter is Visiting Professor of Surgical Education in the Nuffield Department of Surgical Sciences, University of Oxford.

Richard Canter qualified in medicine at the University of London in 1976, before becoming a surgeon at the Royal United Hospital, Bath. He completed a PhD in Management at the University of Bath in 1998 studying the nature of power in decision-making at the personal and organisation level in healthcare. Following the critical Kennedy report on surgical training in 2001, he was recruited to the Royal College of Surgeons of England as Deputy Director of Surgical Education with specific responsibility for curriculum development in surgical education in England. He was subsequently Head of the Postgraduate School of Surgery in Bristol until 2012, after which he concentrated on academic work at Oxford. He was appointed a visiting Professor in Oxford in in 2007, Emeritus Consultant at Oxford University Hospitals in 2015, and Associate Fellow at Green Templeton College, Oxford in 2015.

His interests are professionalism and, in particular, its relationship to leadership in healthcare systems. His current specific research interests are the effectiveness or otherwise of leadership education in respect of its impact on quality improvement in healthcare systems.

At the Royal College of Surgeons of England he was clinical lead and Chair of the Needs Analysis Group evaluating educational resources and organisational systems necessary for the implementation of reform of surgical training, and made recommendations for changes that were eventually adopted by all surgical training systems in the United Kingdom. During this appointment an opportunity arose in early 2003 at the end of the Serbian conflict to assist the European Agency for Reconstruction (EAR, a division of the EEC) in providing advice to the Kosovan Ministry of Health to develop new systems for surgical training.

Currently at Oxford, he is lead tutor for the module in Leadership and Management in Healthcare and Deputy Director of the Masters in Surgical Science, and supervises Masters and DPhil students on the subject of organisational change and leadership. In addition he has regular commitments in teaching postgraduate medical trainees and medical faculty on topics such as leadership, quality improvement, educational theory in healthcare, workplace assessments, supporting and talent managing  medical trainees, as well as occasional commitments to supervising students on the Said Business School Global Opportunity and Threats (Oxford) programme in exploring problems in complex systems.

Along the way he has written and spoken on many topics in medicine, obtained research grants, and has unexpectedly been given fellowships and medals. His main interest outside of work is playing music and he runs the Green Templeton College Big Band.

Prior to starting his DPhil, Eddy worked as a primary school teacher in Bristol, where he also completed his MSc in Educational Research.

He is particularly interested in the culture of high stakes, standardised testing, and how this might perpetuate existing inequalities in schools. His research focuses specifically on the interaction between knowledge, policy and pedagogy in the context of Literacy education.

 

Claire (郝煜) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and a China Oxford Scholarship Fund (COSF) scholar.

Claire holds a BA in Education and Physics from the University of Cambridge, an MA in Applied Linguistics from UCL Institution of Education, and an EdM in International Education Policy from Harvard University. She is passionate about exploring and supporting the transnational experiences of bi-/multilingual students in studying abroad contexts. Her research and professional interests include bilingualism, language and identity, international education, professional development, and school leadership.

Since 2015, Claire has served as the Director of International Education at Beijing Xinxuedao Education Group, a non-profit organisation that operates 31 schools with over 30,000 K-12 students in China. She has also worked as a high school counsellor and a teacher of Physics and Psychology.

Publications

Hao, Y. and Lantsman, G. (2022). Motivation in MOOCs: a qualitative study on the design and evaluation of an online IELTS course. The 7th IAFOR International Conference on Education.

Hao, Y. (2020). Education without borders: sojourner trips in students’ holistic development. In Wang, J. (Ed.). Family, Society, and Education. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2020). Learning how to learn: the role of metacognition and self-regulation in learning. In Wang, J. (Ed.). The Virtue of Thinking in Learning. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2019). Chinese students at a UK university: how linguistic repertoire mediates language and sojourner identity construction. Linguistics and Applied Linguistics Conference. Beijing Normal University.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2018). Examining Linguistic Diversity as a Resource for Higher Education in the Anglophone World. In Tong, V. C., Standen, A., & Sotiriou, M. (Ed.). Shaping Higher Education with Students: Ways to Connect Research and Teaching (pp.288-293). UCL Press.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2016). Making the most of linguistic diversity: the views and practices of bi/multilingual postgraduate students. The Multilingual University. ESRC Seminars.

Hao, Y. (2012). A Transformative Journey: China-US exchange student studying at an American high school. New World Press.

Pok Jing (Jane) Ho is a doctoral student at the Department of Education, specialising in educational assessment.

She is funded by the Bei Shan Tang Foundation Scholarship for Graduate Studies.

Her DPhil thesis examines validity in the Hong Kong Diploma of Secondary Education Examination, a large-scale, high-stakes test that informs higher education admissions decisions, using the argument-based approach to validation. In particular, her research identifies the claims made based on test scores, the validity evidence that supports or challenges such claims, and the social consequences that ensue as a result of test use.

Prior to her DPhil, she completed an M.A. in International Education Policy Analysis at Stanford University. She subsequently worked as a project officer at the Education University of Hong Kong, where she is now serving as a consultant alongside her studies.

A former secondary school teacher, Jane also holds a B.A. in English Studies (First Class Honours), a B.Ed. in English Language Education (First Class Honours), and an M.Ed. in Curriculum and Instruction from the Chinese University of Hong Kong, as well as the Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (CELTA) from Cambridge.

She is a Peer Supporter at Green Templeton College.

Publications

Ho, P. J. (2020). For some or for all: Vocational English for Hong Kong secondary school students. In C. Hong, & W. K. Ma (Eds.), Applied degree education and the future of work—Education 4.0 (pp. 87–95). Springer. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-15-3142-2

Ho, P. J. (2015). China-Africa “cooperation” in education. International Politics, 5. https://www.iir.cz/en/china-africa-cooperation-in-education

Jennifer’s DPhil focuses on adoptive families where  the adoptive parents also have birth children. She has worked in adoption support as a Parent Consultant for Adoption UK and as Head of Peer Services at PAC-UK, as well as managing the Adoption UK advice line and the parent training team.

She holds an MSc in Poverty Reduction: Policy and Practice from SOAS, and an MBA from Warwick Business School. She has worked in management consultancy in both the public and private sectors and is a board member of CoramBAAF.

Publications

The Right Tools for the Job. Information Age, November 1996

Global teams for the millennium; Management Decision, 36 (1): 31-33, February 1998

Lucy is a second-year DPhil student, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

Her DPhil research aims to engage in a meaningful and creative way with service children to explore how service life has shaped their experiences of education and sense of self. By choosing this focus, the research seeks to widen and nuance current understanding of service children’s educational experiences in addition to furthering knowledge into how service children see themselves. As a result of this, it is hoped that the research will support in developing the professional body of knowledge and understanding of this group of children in schools and help inform the Service Pupil Premium (SPP) funding choices in addition to wider school practice.

Before embarking on her DPhil at Oxford, Lucy completed her PGCE and MEd in Primary Education at the University of Cambridge. In addition to her DPhil work, Lucy is a Trustee for the Armed Forces Education Trust (AFET) – a grant-giving charity for service children – and a volunteer for the Oxford based charity, Big Brothers Big Sisters.

 

 

Aine is interested in improving the health outcomes of children and young people in the care system.

Fahad is reading for a DPhil in Education (part-time). He has over fifteen years professional experience in the education sector, in particular, higher education.

He has held senior roles in staff and student development, human resources, policy and strategy. Fahad holds a BSc in Education and Science and an MBA. Prior to commencing his doctoral studies, he was elected an Academic Visitor at St Antony’s College in the University of Oxford. Fahad’s research focus is on the quality of undergraduate medical education for Qatari doctors.

Shawna completed her undergraduate degree in Psycholinguistics at the University of Toronto in Canada, and later completed the MSc program in Applied Linguistics and Second language Acquisition at the University of Oxford.

She has a wide range of experiences in the field of Linguistics as a teaching and research assistant in areas such as theoretical linguistics, phonology, speech-language pathology, language acquisition, and creole studies. Being a native of Jamaica herself, Shawna has carried out extensive work on creole language acquisition. She worked with the University of the West Indies to draft the first Jamaican (Creole) as a Foreign Language course, and with the U.S Peace Corps to assess and revamp an existing language program for volunteers.

Shawna’s current research focuses on the development of writing skills among primary school learners in Jamaica who speak Jamaican Creole as a home language but are educated in English.

Publications
  • Helms-Park, R., Tucker, S, & Dronjic, V. (2016). From proto-writing to multimedia literacy: scripts and orthographies through the ages. In  Chen Bumgardner, V. Dronjic,, & R. Helms-Park (Eds.), Second Language Reading: Psycholinguistic and Cognitive Perspectives (pp. 1-31). New York, NY: Routledge Publishers.
  • Eriks-Brophy, A., Green, S., & Tucker, S. (2013).  Articulatory error patterns and phonological process use of preschool children with and without hearing loss. Volta Review.

Richard Canter is Visiting Professor of Surgical Education in the Nuffield Department of Surgical Sciences, University of Oxford.

Richard Canter qualified in medicine at the University of London in 1976, before becoming a surgeon at the Royal United Hospital, Bath. He completed a PhD in Management at the University of Bath in 1998 studying the nature of power in decision-making at the personal and organisation level in healthcare. Following the critical Kennedy report on surgical training in 2001, he was recruited to the Royal College of Surgeons of England as Deputy Director of Surgical Education with specific responsibility for curriculum development in surgical education in England. He was subsequently Head of the Postgraduate School of Surgery in Bristol until 2012, after which he concentrated on academic work at Oxford. He was appointed a visiting Professor in Oxford in in 2007, Emeritus Consultant at Oxford University Hospitals in 2015, and Associate Fellow at Green Templeton College, Oxford in 2015.

His interests are professionalism and, in particular, its relationship to leadership in healthcare systems. His current specific research interests are the effectiveness or otherwise of leadership education in respect of its impact on quality improvement in healthcare systems.

At the Royal College of Surgeons of England he was clinical lead and Chair of the Needs Analysis Group evaluating educational resources and organisational systems necessary for the implementation of reform of surgical training, and made recommendations for changes that were eventually adopted by all surgical training systems in the United Kingdom. During this appointment an opportunity arose in early 2003 at the end of the Serbian conflict to assist the European Agency for Reconstruction (EAR, a division of the EEC) in providing advice to the Kosovan Ministry of Health to develop new systems for surgical training.

Currently at Oxford, he is lead tutor for the module in Leadership and Management in Healthcare and Deputy Director of the Masters in Surgical Science, and supervises Masters and DPhil students on the subject of organisational change and leadership. In addition he has regular commitments in teaching postgraduate medical trainees and medical faculty on topics such as leadership, quality improvement, educational theory in healthcare, workplace assessments, supporting and talent managing  medical trainees, as well as occasional commitments to supervising students on the Said Business School Global Opportunity and Threats (Oxford) programme in exploring problems in complex systems.

Along the way he has written and spoken on many topics in medicine, obtained research grants, and has unexpectedly been given fellowships and medals. His main interest outside of work is playing music and he runs the Green Templeton College Big Band.

Prior to starting his DPhil, Eddy worked as a primary school teacher in Bristol, where he also completed his MSc in Educational Research.

He is particularly interested in the culture of high stakes, standardised testing, and how this might perpetuate existing inequalities in schools. His research focuses specifically on the interaction between knowledge, policy and pedagogy in the context of Literacy education.

 

Claire (郝煜) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and a China Oxford Scholarship Fund (COSF) scholar.

Claire holds a BA in Education and Physics from the University of Cambridge, an MA in Applied Linguistics from UCL Institution of Education, and an EdM in International Education Policy from Harvard University. She is passionate about exploring and supporting the transnational experiences of bi-/multilingual students in studying abroad contexts. Her research and professional interests include bilingualism, language and identity, international education, professional development, and school leadership.

Since 2015, Claire has served as the Director of International Education at Beijing Xinxuedao Education Group, a non-profit organisation that operates 31 schools with over 30,000 K-12 students in China. She has also worked as a high school counsellor and a teacher of Physics and Psychology.

Publications

Hao, Y. and Lantsman, G. (2022). Motivation in MOOCs: a qualitative study on the design and evaluation of an online IELTS course. The 7th IAFOR International Conference on Education.

Hao, Y. (2020). Education without borders: sojourner trips in students’ holistic development. In Wang, J. (Ed.). Family, Society, and Education. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2020). Learning how to learn: the role of metacognition and self-regulation in learning. In Wang, J. (Ed.). The Virtue of Thinking in Learning. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2019). Chinese students at a UK university: how linguistic repertoire mediates language and sojourner identity construction. Linguistics and Applied Linguistics Conference. Beijing Normal University.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2018). Examining Linguistic Diversity as a Resource for Higher Education in the Anglophone World. In Tong, V. C., Standen, A., & Sotiriou, M. (Ed.). Shaping Higher Education with Students: Ways to Connect Research and Teaching (pp.288-293). UCL Press.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2016). Making the most of linguistic diversity: the views and practices of bi/multilingual postgraduate students. The Multilingual University. ESRC Seminars.

Hao, Y. (2012). A Transformative Journey: China-US exchange student studying at an American high school. New World Press.

Pok Jing (Jane) Ho is a doctoral student at the Department of Education, specialising in educational assessment.

She is funded by the Bei Shan Tang Foundation Scholarship for Graduate Studies.

Her DPhil thesis examines validity in the Hong Kong Diploma of Secondary Education Examination, a large-scale, high-stakes test that informs higher education admissions decisions, using the argument-based approach to validation. In particular, her research identifies the claims made based on test scores, the validity evidence that supports or challenges such claims, and the social consequences that ensue as a result of test use.

Prior to her DPhil, she completed an M.A. in International Education Policy Analysis at Stanford University. She subsequently worked as a project officer at the Education University of Hong Kong, where she is now serving as a consultant alongside her studies.

A former secondary school teacher, Jane also holds a B.A. in English Studies (First Class Honours), a B.Ed. in English Language Education (First Class Honours), and an M.Ed. in Curriculum and Instruction from the Chinese University of Hong Kong, as well as the Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (CELTA) from Cambridge.

She is a Peer Supporter at Green Templeton College.

Publications

Ho, P. J. (2020). For some or for all: Vocational English for Hong Kong secondary school students. In C. Hong, & W. K. Ma (Eds.), Applied degree education and the future of work—Education 4.0 (pp. 87–95). Springer. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-15-3142-2

Ho, P. J. (2015). China-Africa “cooperation” in education. International Politics, 5. https://www.iir.cz/en/china-africa-cooperation-in-education

Jennifer’s DPhil focuses on adoptive families where  the adoptive parents also have birth children. She has worked in adoption support as a Parent Consultant for Adoption UK and as Head of Peer Services at PAC-UK, as well as managing the Adoption UK advice line and the parent training team.

She holds an MSc in Poverty Reduction: Policy and Practice from SOAS, and an MBA from Warwick Business School. She has worked in management consultancy in both the public and private sectors and is a board member of CoramBAAF.

Publications

The Right Tools for the Job. Information Age, November 1996

Global teams for the millennium; Management Decision, 36 (1): 31-33, February 1998

Lucy is a second-year DPhil student, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

Her DPhil research aims to engage in a meaningful and creative way with service children to explore how service life has shaped their experiences of education and sense of self. By choosing this focus, the research seeks to widen and nuance current understanding of service children’s educational experiences in addition to furthering knowledge into how service children see themselves. As a result of this, it is hoped that the research will support in developing the professional body of knowledge and understanding of this group of children in schools and help inform the Service Pupil Premium (SPP) funding choices in addition to wider school practice.

Before embarking on her DPhil at Oxford, Lucy completed her PGCE and MEd in Primary Education at the University of Cambridge. In addition to her DPhil work, Lucy is a Trustee for the Armed Forces Education Trust (AFET) – a grant-giving charity for service children – and a volunteer for the Oxford based charity, Big Brothers Big Sisters.

 

 

Aine is interested in improving the health outcomes of children and young people in the care system.

Fahad is reading for a DPhil in Education (part-time). He has over fifteen years professional experience in the education sector, in particular, higher education.

He has held senior roles in staff and student development, human resources, policy and strategy. Fahad holds a BSc in Education and Science and an MBA. Prior to commencing his doctoral studies, he was elected an Academic Visitor at St Antony’s College in the University of Oxford. Fahad’s research focus is on the quality of undergraduate medical education for Qatari doctors.

Shawna completed her undergraduate degree in Psycholinguistics at the University of Toronto in Canada, and later completed the MSc program in Applied Linguistics and Second language Acquisition at the University of Oxford.

She has a wide range of experiences in the field of Linguistics as a teaching and research assistant in areas such as theoretical linguistics, phonology, speech-language pathology, language acquisition, and creole studies. Being a native of Jamaica herself, Shawna has carried out extensive work on creole language acquisition. She worked with the University of the West Indies to draft the first Jamaican (Creole) as a Foreign Language course, and with the U.S Peace Corps to assess and revamp an existing language program for volunteers.

Shawna’s current research focuses on the development of writing skills among primary school learners in Jamaica who speak Jamaican Creole as a home language but are educated in English.

Publications
  • Helms-Park, R., Tucker, S, & Dronjic, V. (2016). From proto-writing to multimedia literacy: scripts and orthographies through the ages. In  Chen Bumgardner, V. Dronjic,, & R. Helms-Park (Eds.), Second Language Reading: Psycholinguistic and Cognitive Perspectives (pp. 1-31). New York, NY: Routledge Publishers.
  • Eriks-Brophy, A., Green, S., & Tucker, S. (2013).  Articulatory error patterns and phonological process use of preschool children with and without hearing loss. Volta Review.

Richard Canter is Visiting Professor of Surgical Education in the Nuffield Department of Surgical Sciences, University of Oxford.

Richard Canter qualified in medicine at the University of London in 1976, before becoming a surgeon at the Royal United Hospital, Bath. He completed a PhD in Management at the University of Bath in 1998 studying the nature of power in decision-making at the personal and organisation level in healthcare. Following the critical Kennedy report on surgical training in 2001, he was recruited to the Royal College of Surgeons of England as Deputy Director of Surgical Education with specific responsibility for curriculum development in surgical education in England. He was subsequently Head of the Postgraduate School of Surgery in Bristol until 2012, after which he concentrated on academic work at Oxford. He was appointed a visiting Professor in Oxford in in 2007, Emeritus Consultant at Oxford University Hospitals in 2015, and Associate Fellow at Green Templeton College, Oxford in 2015.

His interests are professionalism and, in particular, its relationship to leadership in healthcare systems. His current specific research interests are the effectiveness or otherwise of leadership education in respect of its impact on quality improvement in healthcare systems.

At the Royal College of Surgeons of England he was clinical lead and Chair of the Needs Analysis Group evaluating educational resources and organisational systems necessary for the implementation of reform of surgical training, and made recommendations for changes that were eventually adopted by all surgical training systems in the United Kingdom. During this appointment an opportunity arose in early 2003 at the end of the Serbian conflict to assist the European Agency for Reconstruction (EAR, a division of the EEC) in providing advice to the Kosovan Ministry of Health to develop new systems for surgical training.

Currently at Oxford, he is lead tutor for the module in Leadership and Management in Healthcare and Deputy Director of the Masters in Surgical Science, and supervises Masters and DPhil students on the subject of organisational change and leadership. In addition he has regular commitments in teaching postgraduate medical trainees and medical faculty on topics such as leadership, quality improvement, educational theory in healthcare, workplace assessments, supporting and talent managing  medical trainees, as well as occasional commitments to supervising students on the Said Business School Global Opportunity and Threats (Oxford) programme in exploring problems in complex systems.

Along the way he has written and spoken on many topics in medicine, obtained research grants, and has unexpectedly been given fellowships and medals. His main interest outside of work is playing music and he runs the Green Templeton College Big Band.

Prior to starting his DPhil, Eddy worked as a primary school teacher in Bristol, where he also completed his MSc in Educational Research.

He is particularly interested in the culture of high stakes, standardised testing, and how this might perpetuate existing inequalities in schools. His research focuses specifically on the interaction between knowledge, policy and pedagogy in the context of Literacy education.

 

Claire (郝煜) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and a China Oxford Scholarship Fund (COSF) scholar.

Claire holds a BA in Education and Physics from the University of Cambridge, an MA in Applied Linguistics from UCL Institution of Education, and an EdM in International Education Policy from Harvard University. She is passionate about exploring and supporting the transnational experiences of bi-/multilingual students in studying abroad contexts. Her research and professional interests include bilingualism, language and identity, international education, professional development, and school leadership.

Since 2015, Claire has served as the Director of International Education at Beijing Xinxuedao Education Group, a non-profit organisation that operates 31 schools with over 30,000 K-12 students in China. She has also worked as a high school counsellor and a teacher of Physics and Psychology.

Publications

Hao, Y. and Lantsman, G. (2022). Motivation in MOOCs: a qualitative study on the design and evaluation of an online IELTS course. The 7th IAFOR International Conference on Education.

Hao, Y. (2020). Education without borders: sojourner trips in students’ holistic development. In Wang, J. (Ed.). Family, Society, and Education. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2020). Learning how to learn: the role of metacognition and self-regulation in learning. In Wang, J. (Ed.). The Virtue of Thinking in Learning. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2019). Chinese students at a UK university: how linguistic repertoire mediates language and sojourner identity construction. Linguistics and Applied Linguistics Conference. Beijing Normal University.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2018). Examining Linguistic Diversity as a Resource for Higher Education in the Anglophone World. In Tong, V. C., Standen, A., & Sotiriou, M. (Ed.). Shaping Higher Education with Students: Ways to Connect Research and Teaching (pp.288-293). UCL Press.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2016). Making the most of linguistic diversity: the views and practices of bi/multilingual postgraduate students. The Multilingual University. ESRC Seminars.

Hao, Y. (2012). A Transformative Journey: China-US exchange student studying at an American high school. New World Press.

Pok Jing (Jane) Ho is a doctoral student at the Department of Education, specialising in educational assessment.

She is funded by the Bei Shan Tang Foundation Scholarship for Graduate Studies.

Her DPhil thesis examines validity in the Hong Kong Diploma of Secondary Education Examination, a large-scale, high-stakes test that informs higher education admissions decisions, using the argument-based approach to validation. In particular, her research identifies the claims made based on test scores, the validity evidence that supports or challenges such claims, and the social consequences that ensue as a result of test use.

Prior to her DPhil, she completed an M.A. in International Education Policy Analysis at Stanford University. She subsequently worked as a project officer at the Education University of Hong Kong, where she is now serving as a consultant alongside her studies.

A former secondary school teacher, Jane also holds a B.A. in English Studies (First Class Honours), a B.Ed. in English Language Education (First Class Honours), and an M.Ed. in Curriculum and Instruction from the Chinese University of Hong Kong, as well as the Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (CELTA) from Cambridge.

She is a Peer Supporter at Green Templeton College.

Publications

Ho, P. J. (2020). For some or for all: Vocational English for Hong Kong secondary school students. In C. Hong, & W. K. Ma (Eds.), Applied degree education and the future of work—Education 4.0 (pp. 87–95). Springer. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-15-3142-2

Ho, P. J. (2015). China-Africa “cooperation” in education. International Politics, 5. https://www.iir.cz/en/china-africa-cooperation-in-education

Jennifer’s DPhil focuses on adoptive families where  the adoptive parents also have birth children. She has worked in adoption support as a Parent Consultant for Adoption UK and as Head of Peer Services at PAC-UK, as well as managing the Adoption UK advice line and the parent training team.

She holds an MSc in Poverty Reduction: Policy and Practice from SOAS, and an MBA from Warwick Business School. She has worked in management consultancy in both the public and private sectors and is a board member of CoramBAAF.

Publications

The Right Tools for the Job. Information Age, November 1996

Global teams for the millennium; Management Decision, 36 (1): 31-33, February 1998

Lucy is a second-year DPhil student, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

Her DPhil research aims to engage in a meaningful and creative way with service children to explore how service life has shaped their experiences of education and sense of self. By choosing this focus, the research seeks to widen and nuance current understanding of service children’s educational experiences in addition to furthering knowledge into how service children see themselves. As a result of this, it is hoped that the research will support in developing the professional body of knowledge and understanding of this group of children in schools and help inform the Service Pupil Premium (SPP) funding choices in addition to wider school practice.

Before embarking on her DPhil at Oxford, Lucy completed her PGCE and MEd in Primary Education at the University of Cambridge. In addition to her DPhil work, Lucy is a Trustee for the Armed Forces Education Trust (AFET) – a grant-giving charity for service children – and a volunteer for the Oxford based charity, Big Brothers Big Sisters.

 

 

Aine is interested in improving the health outcomes of children and young people in the care system.

Fahad is reading for a DPhil in Education (part-time). He has over fifteen years professional experience in the education sector, in particular, higher education.

He has held senior roles in staff and student development, human resources, policy and strategy. Fahad holds a BSc in Education and Science and an MBA. Prior to commencing his doctoral studies, he was elected an Academic Visitor at St Antony’s College in the University of Oxford. Fahad’s research focus is on the quality of undergraduate medical education for Qatari doctors.

Shawna completed her undergraduate degree in Psycholinguistics at the University of Toronto in Canada, and later completed the MSc program in Applied Linguistics and Second language Acquisition at the University of Oxford.

She has a wide range of experiences in the field of Linguistics as a teaching and research assistant in areas such as theoretical linguistics, phonology, speech-language pathology, language acquisition, and creole studies. Being a native of Jamaica herself, Shawna has carried out extensive work on creole language acquisition. She worked with the University of the West Indies to draft the first Jamaican (Creole) as a Foreign Language course, and with the U.S Peace Corps to assess and revamp an existing language program for volunteers.

Shawna’s current research focuses on the development of writing skills among primary school learners in Jamaica who speak Jamaican Creole as a home language but are educated in English.

Publications
  • Helms-Park, R., Tucker, S, & Dronjic, V. (2016). From proto-writing to multimedia literacy: scripts and orthographies through the ages. In  Chen Bumgardner, V. Dronjic,, & R. Helms-Park (Eds.), Second Language Reading: Psycholinguistic and Cognitive Perspectives (pp. 1-31). New York, NY: Routledge Publishers.
  • Eriks-Brophy, A., Green, S., & Tucker, S. (2013).  Articulatory error patterns and phonological process use of preschool children with and without hearing loss. Volta Review.

Richard Canter is Visiting Professor of Surgical Education in the Nuffield Department of Surgical Sciences, University of Oxford.

Richard Canter qualified in medicine at the University of London in 1976, before becoming a surgeon at the Royal United Hospital, Bath. He completed a PhD in Management at the University of Bath in 1998 studying the nature of power in decision-making at the personal and organisation level in healthcare. Following the critical Kennedy report on surgical training in 2001, he was recruited to the Royal College of Surgeons of England as Deputy Director of Surgical Education with specific responsibility for curriculum development in surgical education in England. He was subsequently Head of the Postgraduate School of Surgery in Bristol until 2012, after which he concentrated on academic work at Oxford. He was appointed a visiting Professor in Oxford in in 2007, Emeritus Consultant at Oxford University Hospitals in 2015, and Associate Fellow at Green Templeton College, Oxford in 2015.

His interests are professionalism and, in particular, its relationship to leadership in healthcare systems. His current specific research interests are the effectiveness or otherwise of leadership education in respect of its impact on quality improvement in healthcare systems.

At the Royal College of Surgeons of England he was clinical lead and Chair of the Needs Analysis Group evaluating educational resources and organisational systems necessary for the implementation of reform of surgical training, and made recommendations for changes that were eventually adopted by all surgical training systems in the United Kingdom. During this appointment an opportunity arose in early 2003 at the end of the Serbian conflict to assist the European Agency for Reconstruction (EAR, a division of the EEC) in providing advice to the Kosovan Ministry of Health to develop new systems for surgical training.

Currently at Oxford, he is lead tutor for the module in Leadership and Management in Healthcare and Deputy Director of the Masters in Surgical Science, and supervises Masters and DPhil students on the subject of organisational change and leadership. In addition he has regular commitments in teaching postgraduate medical trainees and medical faculty on topics such as leadership, quality improvement, educational theory in healthcare, workplace assessments, supporting and talent managing  medical trainees, as well as occasional commitments to supervising students on the Said Business School Global Opportunity and Threats (Oxford) programme in exploring problems in complex systems.

Along the way he has written and spoken on many topics in medicine, obtained research grants, and has unexpectedly been given fellowships and medals. His main interest outside of work is playing music and he runs the Green Templeton College Big Band.

Prior to starting his DPhil, Eddy worked as a primary school teacher in Bristol, where he also completed his MSc in Educational Research.

He is particularly interested in the culture of high stakes, standardised testing, and how this might perpetuate existing inequalities in schools. His research focuses specifically on the interaction between knowledge, policy and pedagogy in the context of Literacy education.

 

Claire (郝煜) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and a China Oxford Scholarship Fund (COSF) scholar.

Claire holds a BA in Education and Physics from the University of Cambridge, an MA in Applied Linguistics from UCL Institution of Education, and an EdM in International Education Policy from Harvard University. She is passionate about exploring and supporting the transnational experiences of bi-/multilingual students in studying abroad contexts. Her research and professional interests include bilingualism, language and identity, international education, professional development, and school leadership.

Since 2015, Claire has served as the Director of International Education at Beijing Xinxuedao Education Group, a non-profit organisation that operates 31 schools with over 30,000 K-12 students in China. She has also worked as a high school counsellor and a teacher of Physics and Psychology.

Publications

Hao, Y. and Lantsman, G. (2022). Motivation in MOOCs: a qualitative study on the design and evaluation of an online IELTS course. The 7th IAFOR International Conference on Education.

Hao, Y. (2020). Education without borders: sojourner trips in students’ holistic development. In Wang, J. (Ed.). Family, Society, and Education. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2020). Learning how to learn: the role of metacognition and self-regulation in learning. In Wang, J. (Ed.). The Virtue of Thinking in Learning. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2019). Chinese students at a UK university: how linguistic repertoire mediates language and sojourner identity construction. Linguistics and Applied Linguistics Conference. Beijing Normal University.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2018). Examining Linguistic Diversity as a Resource for Higher Education in the Anglophone World. In Tong, V. C., Standen, A., & Sotiriou, M. (Ed.). Shaping Higher Education with Students: Ways to Connect Research and Teaching (pp.288-293). UCL Press.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2016). Making the most of linguistic diversity: the views and practices of bi/multilingual postgraduate students. The Multilingual University. ESRC Seminars.

Hao, Y. (2012). A Transformative Journey: China-US exchange student studying at an American high school. New World Press.

Pok Jing (Jane) Ho is a doctoral student at the Department of Education, specialising in educational assessment.

She is funded by the Bei Shan Tang Foundation Scholarship for Graduate Studies.

Her DPhil thesis examines validity in the Hong Kong Diploma of Secondary Education Examination, a large-scale, high-stakes test that informs higher education admissions decisions, using the argument-based approach to validation. In particular, her research identifies the claims made based on test scores, the validity evidence that supports or challenges such claims, and the social consequences that ensue as a result of test use.

Prior to her DPhil, she completed an M.A. in International Education Policy Analysis at Stanford University. She subsequently worked as a project officer at the Education University of Hong Kong, where she is now serving as a consultant alongside her studies.

A former secondary school teacher, Jane also holds a B.A. in English Studies (First Class Honours), a B.Ed. in English Language Education (First Class Honours), and an M.Ed. in Curriculum and Instruction from the Chinese University of Hong Kong, as well as the Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (CELTA) from Cambridge.

She is a Peer Supporter at Green Templeton College.

Publications

Ho, P. J. (2020). For some or for all: Vocational English for Hong Kong secondary school students. In C. Hong, & W. K. Ma (Eds.), Applied degree education and the future of work—Education 4.0 (pp. 87–95). Springer. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-15-3142-2

Ho, P. J. (2015). China-Africa “cooperation” in education. International Politics, 5. https://www.iir.cz/en/china-africa-cooperation-in-education

Jennifer’s DPhil focuses on adoptive families where  the adoptive parents also have birth children. She has worked in adoption support as a Parent Consultant for Adoption UK and as Head of Peer Services at PAC-UK, as well as managing the Adoption UK advice line and the parent training team.

She holds an MSc in Poverty Reduction: Policy and Practice from SOAS, and an MBA from Warwick Business School. She has worked in management consultancy in both the public and private sectors and is a board member of CoramBAAF.

Publications

The Right Tools for the Job. Information Age, November 1996

Global teams for the millennium; Management Decision, 36 (1): 31-33, February 1998

Lucy is a second-year DPhil student, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

Her DPhil research aims to engage in a meaningful and creative way with service children to explore how service life has shaped their experiences of education and sense of self. By choosing this focus, the research seeks to widen and nuance current understanding of service children’s educational experiences in addition to furthering knowledge into how service children see themselves. As a result of this, it is hoped that the research will support in developing the professional body of knowledge and understanding of this group of children in schools and help inform the Service Pupil Premium (SPP) funding choices in addition to wider school practice.

Before embarking on her DPhil at Oxford, Lucy completed her PGCE and MEd in Primary Education at the University of Cambridge. In addition to her DPhil work, Lucy is a Trustee for the Armed Forces Education Trust (AFET) – a grant-giving charity for service children – and a volunteer for the Oxford based charity, Big Brothers Big Sisters.

 

 

Aine is interested in improving the health outcomes of children and young people in the care system.

Fahad is reading for a DPhil in Education (part-time). He has over fifteen years professional experience in the education sector, in particular, higher education.

He has held senior roles in staff and student development, human resources, policy and strategy. Fahad holds a BSc in Education and Science and an MBA. Prior to commencing his doctoral studies, he was elected an Academic Visitor at St Antony’s College in the University of Oxford. Fahad’s research focus is on the quality of undergraduate medical education for Qatari doctors.

Shawna completed her undergraduate degree in Psycholinguistics at the University of Toronto in Canada, and later completed the MSc program in Applied Linguistics and Second language Acquisition at the University of Oxford.

She has a wide range of experiences in the field of Linguistics as a teaching and research assistant in areas such as theoretical linguistics, phonology, speech-language pathology, language acquisition, and creole studies. Being a native of Jamaica herself, Shawna has carried out extensive work on creole language acquisition. She worked with the University of the West Indies to draft the first Jamaican (Creole) as a Foreign Language course, and with the U.S Peace Corps to assess and revamp an existing language program for volunteers.

Shawna’s current research focuses on the development of writing skills among primary school learners in Jamaica who speak Jamaican Creole as a home language but are educated in English.

Publications
  • Helms-Park, R., Tucker, S, & Dronjic, V. (2016). From proto-writing to multimedia literacy: scripts and orthographies through the ages. In  Chen Bumgardner, V. Dronjic,, & R. Helms-Park (Eds.), Second Language Reading: Psycholinguistic and Cognitive Perspectives (pp. 1-31). New York, NY: Routledge Publishers.
  • Eriks-Brophy, A., Green, S., & Tucker, S. (2013).  Articulatory error patterns and phonological process use of preschool children with and without hearing loss. Volta Review.

Richard Canter is Visiting Professor of Surgical Education in the Nuffield Department of Surgical Sciences, University of Oxford.

Richard Canter qualified in medicine at the University of London in 1976, before becoming a surgeon at the Royal United Hospital, Bath. He completed a PhD in Management at the University of Bath in 1998 studying the nature of power in decision-making at the personal and organisation level in healthcare. Following the critical Kennedy report on surgical training in 2001, he was recruited to the Royal College of Surgeons of England as Deputy Director of Surgical Education with specific responsibility for curriculum development in surgical education in England. He was subsequently Head of the Postgraduate School of Surgery in Bristol until 2012, after which he concentrated on academic work at Oxford. He was appointed a visiting Professor in Oxford in in 2007, Emeritus Consultant at Oxford University Hospitals in 2015, and Associate Fellow at Green Templeton College, Oxford in 2015.

His interests are professionalism and, in particular, its relationship to leadership in healthcare systems. His current specific research interests are the effectiveness or otherwise of leadership education in respect of its impact on quality improvement in healthcare systems.

At the Royal College of Surgeons of England he was clinical lead and Chair of the Needs Analysis Group evaluating educational resources and organisational systems necessary for the implementation of reform of surgical training, and made recommendations for changes that were eventually adopted by all surgical training systems in the United Kingdom. During this appointment an opportunity arose in early 2003 at the end of the Serbian conflict to assist the European Agency for Reconstruction (EAR, a division of the EEC) in providing advice to the Kosovan Ministry of Health to develop new systems for surgical training.

Currently at Oxford, he is lead tutor for the module in Leadership and Management in Healthcare and Deputy Director of the Masters in Surgical Science, and supervises Masters and DPhil students on the subject of organisational change and leadership. In addition he has regular commitments in teaching postgraduate medical trainees and medical faculty on topics such as leadership, quality improvement, educational theory in healthcare, workplace assessments, supporting and talent managing  medical trainees, as well as occasional commitments to supervising students on the Said Business School Global Opportunity and Threats (Oxford) programme in exploring problems in complex systems.

Along the way he has written and spoken on many topics in medicine, obtained research grants, and has unexpectedly been given fellowships and medals. His main interest outside of work is playing music and he runs the Green Templeton College Big Band.

Prior to starting his DPhil, Eddy worked as a primary school teacher in Bristol, where he also completed his MSc in Educational Research.

He is particularly interested in the culture of high stakes, standardised testing, and how this might perpetuate existing inequalities in schools. His research focuses specifically on the interaction between knowledge, policy and pedagogy in the context of Literacy education.

 

Claire (郝煜) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and a China Oxford Scholarship Fund (COSF) scholar.

Claire holds a BA in Education and Physics from the University of Cambridge, an MA in Applied Linguistics from UCL Institution of Education, and an EdM in International Education Policy from Harvard University. She is passionate about exploring and supporting the transnational experiences of bi-/multilingual students in studying abroad contexts. Her research and professional interests include bilingualism, language and identity, international education, professional development, and school leadership.

Since 2015, Claire has served as the Director of International Education at Beijing Xinxuedao Education Group, a non-profit organisation that operates 31 schools with over 30,000 K-12 students in China. She has also worked as a high school counsellor and a teacher of Physics and Psychology.

Publications

Hao, Y. and Lantsman, G. (2022). Motivation in MOOCs: a qualitative study on the design and evaluation of an online IELTS course. The 7th IAFOR International Conference on Education.

Hao, Y. (2020). Education without borders: sojourner trips in students’ holistic development. In Wang, J. (Ed.). Family, Society, and Education. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2020). Learning how to learn: the role of metacognition and self-regulation in learning. In Wang, J. (Ed.). The Virtue of Thinking in Learning. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2019). Chinese students at a UK university: how linguistic repertoire mediates language and sojourner identity construction. Linguistics and Applied Linguistics Conference. Beijing Normal University.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2018). Examining Linguistic Diversity as a Resource for Higher Education in the Anglophone World. In Tong, V. C., Standen, A., & Sotiriou, M. (Ed.). Shaping Higher Education with Students: Ways to Connect Research and Teaching (pp.288-293). UCL Press.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2016). Making the most of linguistic diversity: the views and practices of bi/multilingual postgraduate students. The Multilingual University. ESRC Seminars.

Hao, Y. (2012). A Transformative Journey: China-US exchange student studying at an American high school. New World Press.

Pok Jing (Jane) Ho is a doctoral student at the Department of Education, specialising in educational assessment.

She is funded by the Bei Shan Tang Foundation Scholarship for Graduate Studies.

Her DPhil thesis examines validity in the Hong Kong Diploma of Secondary Education Examination, a large-scale, high-stakes test that informs higher education admissions decisions, using the argument-based approach to validation. In particular, her research identifies the claims made based on test scores, the validity evidence that supports or challenges such claims, and the social consequences that ensue as a result of test use.

Prior to her DPhil, she completed an M.A. in International Education Policy Analysis at Stanford University. She subsequently worked as a project officer at the Education University of Hong Kong, where she is now serving as a consultant alongside her studies.

A former secondary school teacher, Jane also holds a B.A. in English Studies (First Class Honours), a B.Ed. in English Language Education (First Class Honours), and an M.Ed. in Curriculum and Instruction from the Chinese University of Hong Kong, as well as the Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (CELTA) from Cambridge.

She is a Peer Supporter at Green Templeton College.

Publications

Ho, P. J. (2020). For some or for all: Vocational English for Hong Kong secondary school students. In C. Hong, & W. K. Ma (Eds.), Applied degree education and the future of work—Education 4.0 (pp. 87–95). Springer. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-15-3142-2

Ho, P. J. (2015). China-Africa “cooperation” in education. International Politics, 5. https://www.iir.cz/en/china-africa-cooperation-in-education

Jennifer’s DPhil focuses on adoptive families where  the adoptive parents also have birth children. She has worked in adoption support as a Parent Consultant for Adoption UK and as Head of Peer Services at PAC-UK, as well as managing the Adoption UK advice line and the parent training team.

She holds an MSc in Poverty Reduction: Policy and Practice from SOAS, and an MBA from Warwick Business School. She has worked in management consultancy in both the public and private sectors and is a board member of CoramBAAF.

Publications

The Right Tools for the Job. Information Age, November 1996

Global teams for the millennium; Management Decision, 36 (1): 31-33, February 1998

Lucy is a second-year DPhil student, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

Her DPhil research aims to engage in a meaningful and creative way with service children to explore how service life has shaped their experiences of education and sense of self. By choosing this focus, the research seeks to widen and nuance current understanding of service children’s educational experiences in addition to furthering knowledge into how service children see themselves. As a result of this, it is hoped that the research will support in developing the professional body of knowledge and understanding of this group of children in schools and help inform the Service Pupil Premium (SPP) funding choices in addition to wider school practice.

Before embarking on her DPhil at Oxford, Lucy completed her PGCE and MEd in Primary Education at the University of Cambridge. In addition to her DPhil work, Lucy is a Trustee for the Armed Forces Education Trust (AFET) – a grant-giving charity for service children – and a volunteer for the Oxford based charity, Big Brothers Big Sisters.

 

 

Aine is interested in improving the health outcomes of children and young people in the care system.

Fahad is reading for a DPhil in Education (part-time). He has over fifteen years professional experience in the education sector, in particular, higher education.

He has held senior roles in staff and student development, human resources, policy and strategy. Fahad holds a BSc in Education and Science and an MBA. Prior to commencing his doctoral studies, he was elected an Academic Visitor at St Antony’s College in the University of Oxford. Fahad’s research focus is on the quality of undergraduate medical education for Qatari doctors.

Shawna completed her undergraduate degree in Psycholinguistics at the University of Toronto in Canada, and later completed the MSc program in Applied Linguistics and Second language Acquisition at the University of Oxford.

She has a wide range of experiences in the field of Linguistics as a teaching and research assistant in areas such as theoretical linguistics, phonology, speech-language pathology, language acquisition, and creole studies. Being a native of Jamaica herself, Shawna has carried out extensive work on creole language acquisition. She worked with the University of the West Indies to draft the first Jamaican (Creole) as a Foreign Language course, and with the U.S Peace Corps to assess and revamp an existing language program for volunteers.

Shawna’s current research focuses on the development of writing skills among primary school learners in Jamaica who speak Jamaican Creole as a home language but are educated in English.

Publications
  • Helms-Park, R., Tucker, S, & Dronjic, V. (2016). From proto-writing to multimedia literacy: scripts and orthographies through the ages. In  Chen Bumgardner, V. Dronjic,, & R. Helms-Park (Eds.), Second Language Reading: Psycholinguistic and Cognitive Perspectives (pp. 1-31). New York, NY: Routledge Publishers.
  • Eriks-Brophy, A., Green, S., & Tucker, S. (2013).  Articulatory error patterns and phonological process use of preschool children with and without hearing loss. Volta Review.

Richard Canter is Visiting Professor of Surgical Education in the Nuffield Department of Surgical Sciences, University of Oxford.

Richard Canter qualified in medicine at the University of London in 1976, before becoming a surgeon at the Royal United Hospital, Bath. He completed a PhD in Management at the University of Bath in 1998 studying the nature of power in decision-making at the personal and organisation level in healthcare. Following the critical Kennedy report on surgical training in 2001, he was recruited to the Royal College of Surgeons of England as Deputy Director of Surgical Education with specific responsibility for curriculum development in surgical education in England. He was subsequently Head of the Postgraduate School of Surgery in Bristol until 2012, after which he concentrated on academic work at Oxford. He was appointed a visiting Professor in Oxford in in 2007, Emeritus Consultant at Oxford University Hospitals in 2015, and Associate Fellow at Green Templeton College, Oxford in 2015.

His interests are professionalism and, in particular, its relationship to leadership in healthcare systems. His current specific research interests are the effectiveness or otherwise of leadership education in respect of its impact on quality improvement in healthcare systems.

At the Royal College of Surgeons of England he was clinical lead and Chair of the Needs Analysis Group evaluating educational resources and organisational systems necessary for the implementation of reform of surgical training, and made recommendations for changes that were eventually adopted by all surgical training systems in the United Kingdom. During this appointment an opportunity arose in early 2003 at the end of the Serbian conflict to assist the European Agency for Reconstruction (EAR, a division of the EEC) in providing advice to the Kosovan Ministry of Health to develop new systems for surgical training.

Currently at Oxford, he is lead tutor for the module in Leadership and Management in Healthcare and Deputy Director of the Masters in Surgical Science, and supervises Masters and DPhil students on the subject of organisational change and leadership. In addition he has regular commitments in teaching postgraduate medical trainees and medical faculty on topics such as leadership, quality improvement, educational theory in healthcare, workplace assessments, supporting and talent managing  medical trainees, as well as occasional commitments to supervising students on the Said Business School Global Opportunity and Threats (Oxford) programme in exploring problems in complex systems.

Along the way he has written and spoken on many topics in medicine, obtained research grants, and has unexpectedly been given fellowships and medals. His main interest outside of work is playing music and he runs the Green Templeton College Big Band.

Prior to starting his DPhil, Eddy worked as a primary school teacher in Bristol, where he also completed his MSc in Educational Research.

He is particularly interested in the culture of high stakes, standardised testing, and how this might perpetuate existing inequalities in schools. His research focuses specifically on the interaction between knowledge, policy and pedagogy in the context of Literacy education.

 

Claire (郝煜) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and a China Oxford Scholarship Fund (COSF) scholar.

Claire holds a BA in Education and Physics from the University of Cambridge, an MA in Applied Linguistics from UCL Institution of Education, and an EdM in International Education Policy from Harvard University. She is passionate about exploring and supporting the transnational experiences of bi-/multilingual students in studying abroad contexts. Her research and professional interests include bilingualism, language and identity, international education, professional development, and school leadership.

Since 2015, Claire has served as the Director of International Education at Beijing Xinxuedao Education Group, a non-profit organisation that operates 31 schools with over 30,000 K-12 students in China. She has also worked as a high school counsellor and a teacher of Physics and Psychology.

Publications

Hao, Y. and Lantsman, G. (2022). Motivation in MOOCs: a qualitative study on the design and evaluation of an online IELTS course. The 7th IAFOR International Conference on Education.

Hao, Y. (2020). Education without borders: sojourner trips in students’ holistic development. In Wang, J. (Ed.). Family, Society, and Education. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2020). Learning how to learn: the role of metacognition and self-regulation in learning. In Wang, J. (Ed.). The Virtue of Thinking in Learning. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2019). Chinese students at a UK university: how linguistic repertoire mediates language and sojourner identity construction. Linguistics and Applied Linguistics Conference. Beijing Normal University.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2018). Examining Linguistic Diversity as a Resource for Higher Education in the Anglophone World. In Tong, V. C., Standen, A., & Sotiriou, M. (Ed.). Shaping Higher Education with Students: Ways to Connect Research and Teaching (pp.288-293). UCL Press.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2016). Making the most of linguistic diversity: the views and practices of bi/multilingual postgraduate students. The Multilingual University. ESRC Seminars.

Hao, Y. (2012). A Transformative Journey: China-US exchange student studying at an American high school. New World Press.

Pok Jing (Jane) Ho is a doctoral student at the Department of Education, specialising in educational assessment.

She is funded by the Bei Shan Tang Foundation Scholarship for Graduate Studies.

Her DPhil thesis examines validity in the Hong Kong Diploma of Secondary Education Examination, a large-scale, high-stakes test that informs higher education admissions decisions, using the argument-based approach to validation. In particular, her research identifies the claims made based on test scores, the validity evidence that supports or challenges such claims, and the social consequences that ensue as a result of test use.

Prior to her DPhil, she completed an M.A. in International Education Policy Analysis at Stanford University. She subsequently worked as a project officer at the Education University of Hong Kong, where she is now serving as a consultant alongside her studies.

A former secondary school teacher, Jane also holds a B.A. in English Studies (First Class Honours), a B.Ed. in English Language Education (First Class Honours), and an M.Ed. in Curriculum and Instruction from the Chinese University of Hong Kong, as well as the Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (CELTA) from Cambridge.

She is a Peer Supporter at Green Templeton College.

Publications

Ho, P. J. (2020). For some or for all: Vocational English for Hong Kong secondary school students. In C. Hong, & W. K. Ma (Eds.), Applied degree education and the future of work—Education 4.0 (pp. 87–95). Springer. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-15-3142-2

Ho, P. J. (2015). China-Africa “cooperation” in education. International Politics, 5. https://www.iir.cz/en/china-africa-cooperation-in-education

Jennifer’s DPhil focuses on adoptive families where  the adoptive parents also have birth children. She has worked in adoption support as a Parent Consultant for Adoption UK and as Head of Peer Services at PAC-UK, as well as managing the Adoption UK advice line and the parent training team.

She holds an MSc in Poverty Reduction: Policy and Practice from SOAS, and an MBA from Warwick Business School. She has worked in management consultancy in both the public and private sectors and is a board member of CoramBAAF.

Publications

The Right Tools for the Job. Information Age, November 1996

Global teams for the millennium; Management Decision, 36 (1): 31-33, February 1998

Lucy is a second-year DPhil student, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

Her DPhil research aims to engage in a meaningful and creative way with service children to explore how service life has shaped their experiences of education and sense of self. By choosing this focus, the research seeks to widen and nuance current understanding of service children’s educational experiences in addition to furthering knowledge into how service children see themselves. As a result of this, it is hoped that the research will support in developing the professional body of knowledge and understanding of this group of children in schools and help inform the Service Pupil Premium (SPP) funding choices in addition to wider school practice.

Before embarking on her DPhil at Oxford, Lucy completed her PGCE and MEd in Primary Education at the University of Cambridge. In addition to her DPhil work, Lucy is a Trustee for the Armed Forces Education Trust (AFET) – a grant-giving charity for service children – and a volunteer for the Oxford based charity, Big Brothers Big Sisters.

 

 

Aine is interested in improving the health outcomes of children and young people in the care system.

Fahad is reading for a DPhil in Education (part-time). He has over fifteen years professional experience in the education sector, in particular, higher education.

He has held senior roles in staff and student development, human resources, policy and strategy. Fahad holds a BSc in Education and Science and an MBA. Prior to commencing his doctoral studies, he was elected an Academic Visitor at St Antony’s College in the University of Oxford. Fahad’s research focus is on the quality of undergraduate medical education for Qatari doctors.

Shawna completed her undergraduate degree in Psycholinguistics at the University of Toronto in Canada, and later completed the MSc program in Applied Linguistics and Second language Acquisition at the University of Oxford.

She has a wide range of experiences in the field of Linguistics as a teaching and research assistant in areas such as theoretical linguistics, phonology, speech-language pathology, language acquisition, and creole studies. Being a native of Jamaica herself, Shawna has carried out extensive work on creole language acquisition. She worked with the University of the West Indies to draft the first Jamaican (Creole) as a Foreign Language course, and with the U.S Peace Corps to assess and revamp an existing language program for volunteers.

Shawna’s current research focuses on the development of writing skills among primary school learners in Jamaica who speak Jamaican Creole as a home language but are educated in English.

Publications
  • Helms-Park, R., Tucker, S, & Dronjic, V. (2016). From proto-writing to multimedia literacy: scripts and orthographies through the ages. In  Chen Bumgardner, V. Dronjic,, & R. Helms-Park (Eds.), Second Language Reading: Psycholinguistic and Cognitive Perspectives (pp. 1-31). New York, NY: Routledge Publishers.
  • Eriks-Brophy, A., Green, S., & Tucker, S. (2013).  Articulatory error patterns and phonological process use of preschool children with and without hearing loss. Volta Review.

Richard Canter is Visiting Professor of Surgical Education in the Nuffield Department of Surgical Sciences, University of Oxford.

Richard Canter qualified in medicine at the University of London in 1976, before becoming a surgeon at the Royal United Hospital, Bath. He completed a PhD in Management at the University of Bath in 1998 studying the nature of power in decision-making at the personal and organisation level in healthcare. Following the critical Kennedy report on surgical training in 2001, he was recruited to the Royal College of Surgeons of England as Deputy Director of Surgical Education with specific responsibility for curriculum development in surgical education in England. He was subsequently Head of the Postgraduate School of Surgery in Bristol until 2012, after which he concentrated on academic work at Oxford. He was appointed a visiting Professor in Oxford in in 2007, Emeritus Consultant at Oxford University Hospitals in 2015, and Associate Fellow at Green Templeton College, Oxford in 2015.

His interests are professionalism and, in particular, its relationship to leadership in healthcare systems. His current specific research interests are the effectiveness or otherwise of leadership education in respect of its impact on quality improvement in healthcare systems.

At the Royal College of Surgeons of England he was clinical lead and Chair of the Needs Analysis Group evaluating educational resources and organisational systems necessary for the implementation of reform of surgical training, and made recommendations for changes that were eventually adopted by all surgical training systems in the United Kingdom. During this appointment an opportunity arose in early 2003 at the end of the Serbian conflict to assist the European Agency for Reconstruction (EAR, a division of the EEC) in providing advice to the Kosovan Ministry of Health to develop new systems for surgical training.

Currently at Oxford, he is lead tutor for the module in Leadership and Management in Healthcare and Deputy Director of the Masters in Surgical Science, and supervises Masters and DPhil students on the subject of organisational change and leadership. In addition he has regular commitments in teaching postgraduate medical trainees and medical faculty on topics such as leadership, quality improvement, educational theory in healthcare, workplace assessments, supporting and talent managing  medical trainees, as well as occasional commitments to supervising students on the Said Business School Global Opportunity and Threats (Oxford) programme in exploring problems in complex systems.

Along the way he has written and spoken on many topics in medicine, obtained research grants, and has unexpectedly been given fellowships and medals. His main interest outside of work is playing music and he runs the Green Templeton College Big Band.

Prior to starting his DPhil, Eddy worked as a primary school teacher in Bristol, where he also completed his MSc in Educational Research.

He is particularly interested in the culture of high stakes, standardised testing, and how this might perpetuate existing inequalities in schools. His research focuses specifically on the interaction between knowledge, policy and pedagogy in the context of Literacy education.

 

Claire (郝煜) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and a China Oxford Scholarship Fund (COSF) scholar.

Claire holds a BA in Education and Physics from the University of Cambridge, an MA in Applied Linguistics from UCL Institution of Education, and an EdM in International Education Policy from Harvard University. She is passionate about exploring and supporting the transnational experiences of bi-/multilingual students in studying abroad contexts. Her research and professional interests include bilingualism, language and identity, international education, professional development, and school leadership.

Since 2015, Claire has served as the Director of International Education at Beijing Xinxuedao Education Group, a non-profit organisation that operates 31 schools with over 30,000 K-12 students in China. She has also worked as a high school counsellor and a teacher of Physics and Psychology.

Publications

Hao, Y. and Lantsman, G. (2022). Motivation in MOOCs: a qualitative study on the design and evaluation of an online IELTS course. The 7th IAFOR International Conference on Education.

Hao, Y. (2020). Education without borders: sojourner trips in students’ holistic development. In Wang, J. (Ed.). Family, Society, and Education. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2020). Learning how to learn: the role of metacognition and self-regulation in learning. In Wang, J. (Ed.). The Virtue of Thinking in Learning. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2019). Chinese students at a UK university: how linguistic repertoire mediates language and sojourner identity construction. Linguistics and Applied Linguistics Conference. Beijing Normal University.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2018). Examining Linguistic Diversity as a Resource for Higher Education in the Anglophone World. In Tong, V. C., Standen, A., & Sotiriou, M. (Ed.). Shaping Higher Education with Students: Ways to Connect Research and Teaching (pp.288-293). UCL Press.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2016). Making the most of linguistic diversity: the views and practices of bi/multilingual postgraduate students. The Multilingual University. ESRC Seminars.

Hao, Y. (2012). A Transformative Journey: China-US exchange student studying at an American high school. New World Press.

Pok Jing (Jane) Ho is a doctoral student at the Department of Education, specialising in educational assessment.

She is funded by the Bei Shan Tang Foundation Scholarship for Graduate Studies.

Her DPhil thesis examines validity in the Hong Kong Diploma of Secondary Education Examination, a large-scale, high-stakes test that informs higher education admissions decisions, using the argument-based approach to validation. In particular, her research identifies the claims made based on test scores, the validity evidence that supports or challenges such claims, and the social consequences that ensue as a result of test use.

Prior to her DPhil, she completed an M.A. in International Education Policy Analysis at Stanford University. She subsequently worked as a project officer at the Education University of Hong Kong, where she is now serving as a consultant alongside her studies.

A former secondary school teacher, Jane also holds a B.A. in English Studies (First Class Honours), a B.Ed. in English Language Education (First Class Honours), and an M.Ed. in Curriculum and Instruction from the Chinese University of Hong Kong, as well as the Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (CELTA) from Cambridge.

She is a Peer Supporter at Green Templeton College.

Publications

Ho, P. J. (2020). For some or for all: Vocational English for Hong Kong secondary school students. In C. Hong, & W. K. Ma (Eds.), Applied degree education and the future of work—Education 4.0 (pp. 87–95). Springer. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-15-3142-2

Ho, P. J. (2015). China-Africa “cooperation” in education. International Politics, 5. https://www.iir.cz/en/china-africa-cooperation-in-education

Jennifer’s DPhil focuses on adoptive families where  the adoptive parents also have birth children. She has worked in adoption support as a Parent Consultant for Adoption UK and as Head of Peer Services at PAC-UK, as well as managing the Adoption UK advice line and the parent training team.

She holds an MSc in Poverty Reduction: Policy and Practice from SOAS, and an MBA from Warwick Business School. She has worked in management consultancy in both the public and private sectors and is a board member of CoramBAAF.

Publications

The Right Tools for the Job. Information Age, November 1996

Global teams for the millennium; Management Decision, 36 (1): 31-33, February 1998

Lucy is a second-year DPhil student, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

Her DPhil research aims to engage in a meaningful and creative way with service children to explore how service life has shaped their experiences of education and sense of self. By choosing this focus, the research seeks to widen and nuance current understanding of service children’s educational experiences in addition to furthering knowledge into how service children see themselves. As a result of this, it is hoped that the research will support in developing the professional body of knowledge and understanding of this group of children in schools and help inform the Service Pupil Premium (SPP) funding choices in addition to wider school practice.

Before embarking on her DPhil at Oxford, Lucy completed her PGCE and MEd in Primary Education at the University of Cambridge. In addition to her DPhil work, Lucy is a Trustee for the Armed Forces Education Trust (AFET) – a grant-giving charity for service children – and a volunteer for the Oxford based charity, Big Brothers Big Sisters.

 

 

Aine is interested in improving the health outcomes of children and young people in the care system.

Fahad is reading for a DPhil in Education (part-time). He has over fifteen years professional experience in the education sector, in particular, higher education.

He has held senior roles in staff and student development, human resources, policy and strategy. Fahad holds a BSc in Education and Science and an MBA. Prior to commencing his doctoral studies, he was elected an Academic Visitor at St Antony’s College in the University of Oxford. Fahad’s research focus is on the quality of undergraduate medical education for Qatari doctors.

Shawna completed her undergraduate degree in Psycholinguistics at the University of Toronto in Canada, and later completed the MSc program in Applied Linguistics and Second language Acquisition at the University of Oxford.

She has a wide range of experiences in the field of Linguistics as a teaching and research assistant in areas such as theoretical linguistics, phonology, speech-language pathology, language acquisition, and creole studies. Being a native of Jamaica herself, Shawna has carried out extensive work on creole language acquisition. She worked with the University of the West Indies to draft the first Jamaican (Creole) as a Foreign Language course, and with the U.S Peace Corps to assess and revamp an existing language program for volunteers.

Shawna’s current research focuses on the development of writing skills among primary school learners in Jamaica who speak Jamaican Creole as a home language but are educated in English.

Publications
  • Helms-Park, R., Tucker, S, & Dronjic, V. (2016). From proto-writing to multimedia literacy: scripts and orthographies through the ages. In  Chen Bumgardner, V. Dronjic,, & R. Helms-Park (Eds.), Second Language Reading: Psycholinguistic and Cognitive Perspectives (pp. 1-31). New York, NY: Routledge Publishers.
  • Eriks-Brophy, A., Green, S., & Tucker, S. (2013).  Articulatory error patterns and phonological process use of preschool children with and without hearing loss. Volta Review.

Richard Canter is Visiting Professor of Surgical Education in the Nuffield Department of Surgical Sciences, University of Oxford.

Richard Canter qualified in medicine at the University of London in 1976, before becoming a surgeon at the Royal United Hospital, Bath. He completed a PhD in Management at the University of Bath in 1998 studying the nature of power in decision-making at the personal and organisation level in healthcare. Following the critical Kennedy report on surgical training in 2001, he was recruited to the Royal College of Surgeons of England as Deputy Director of Surgical Education with specific responsibility for curriculum development in surgical education in England. He was subsequently Head of the Postgraduate School of Surgery in Bristol until 2012, after which he concentrated on academic work at Oxford. He was appointed a visiting Professor in Oxford in in 2007, Emeritus Consultant at Oxford University Hospitals in 2015, and Associate Fellow at Green Templeton College, Oxford in 2015.

His interests are professionalism and, in particular, its relationship to leadership in healthcare systems. His current specific research interests are the effectiveness or otherwise of leadership education in respect of its impact on quality improvement in healthcare systems.

At the Royal College of Surgeons of England he was clinical lead and Chair of the Needs Analysis Group evaluating educational resources and organisational systems necessary for the implementation of reform of surgical training, and made recommendations for changes that were eventually adopted by all surgical training systems in the United Kingdom. During this appointment an opportunity arose in early 2003 at the end of the Serbian conflict to assist the European Agency for Reconstruction (EAR, a division of the EEC) in providing advice to the Kosovan Ministry of Health to develop new systems for surgical training.

Currently at Oxford, he is lead tutor for the module in Leadership and Management in Healthcare and Deputy Director of the Masters in Surgical Science, and supervises Masters and DPhil students on the subject of organisational change and leadership. In addition he has regular commitments in teaching postgraduate medical trainees and medical faculty on topics such as leadership, quality improvement, educational theory in healthcare, workplace assessments, supporting and talent managing  medical trainees, as well as occasional commitments to supervising students on the Said Business School Global Opportunity and Threats (Oxford) programme in exploring problems in complex systems.

Along the way he has written and spoken on many topics in medicine, obtained research grants, and has unexpectedly been given fellowships and medals. His main interest outside of work is playing music and he runs the Green Templeton College Big Band.

Prior to starting his DPhil, Eddy worked as a primary school teacher in Bristol, where he also completed his MSc in Educational Research.

He is particularly interested in the culture of high stakes, standardised testing, and how this might perpetuate existing inequalities in schools. His research focuses specifically on the interaction between knowledge, policy and pedagogy in the context of Literacy education.

 

Claire (郝煜) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and a China Oxford Scholarship Fund (COSF) scholar.

Claire holds a BA in Education and Physics from the University of Cambridge, an MA in Applied Linguistics from UCL Institution of Education, and an EdM in International Education Policy from Harvard University. She is passionate about exploring and supporting the transnational experiences of bi-/multilingual students in studying abroad contexts. Her research and professional interests include bilingualism, language and identity, international education, professional development, and school leadership.

Since 2015, Claire has served as the Director of International Education at Beijing Xinxuedao Education Group, a non-profit organisation that operates 31 schools with over 30,000 K-12 students in China. She has also worked as a high school counsellor and a teacher of Physics and Psychology.

Publications

Hao, Y. and Lantsman, G. (2022). Motivation in MOOCs: a qualitative study on the design and evaluation of an online IELTS course. The 7th IAFOR International Conference on Education.

Hao, Y. (2020). Education without borders: sojourner trips in students’ holistic development. In Wang, J. (Ed.). Family, Society, and Education. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2020). Learning how to learn: the role of metacognition and self-regulation in learning. In Wang, J. (Ed.). The Virtue of Thinking in Learning. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2019). Chinese students at a UK university: how linguistic repertoire mediates language and sojourner identity construction. Linguistics and Applied Linguistics Conference. Beijing Normal University.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2018). Examining Linguistic Diversity as a Resource for Higher Education in the Anglophone World. In Tong, V. C., Standen, A., & Sotiriou, M. (Ed.). Shaping Higher Education with Students: Ways to Connect Research and Teaching (pp.288-293). UCL Press.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2016). Making the most of linguistic diversity: the views and practices of bi/multilingual postgraduate students. The Multilingual University. ESRC Seminars.

Hao, Y. (2012). A Transformative Journey: China-US exchange student studying at an American high school. New World Press.

Pok Jing (Jane) Ho is a doctoral student at the Department of Education, specialising in educational assessment.

She is funded by the Bei Shan Tang Foundation Scholarship for Graduate Studies.

Her DPhil thesis examines validity in the Hong Kong Diploma of Secondary Education Examination, a large-scale, high-stakes test that informs higher education admissions decisions, using the argument-based approach to validation. In particular, her research identifies the claims made based on test scores, the validity evidence that supports or challenges such claims, and the social consequences that ensue as a result of test use.

Prior to her DPhil, she completed an M.A. in International Education Policy Analysis at Stanford University. She subsequently worked as a project officer at the Education University of Hong Kong, where she is now serving as a consultant alongside her studies.

A former secondary school teacher, Jane also holds a B.A. in English Studies (First Class Honours), a B.Ed. in English Language Education (First Class Honours), and an M.Ed. in Curriculum and Instruction from the Chinese University of Hong Kong, as well as the Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (CELTA) from Cambridge.

She is a Peer Supporter at Green Templeton College.

Publications

Ho, P. J. (2020). For some or for all: Vocational English for Hong Kong secondary school students. In C. Hong, & W. K. Ma (Eds.), Applied degree education and the future of work—Education 4.0 (pp. 87–95). Springer. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-15-3142-2

Ho, P. J. (2015). China-Africa “cooperation” in education. International Politics, 5. https://www.iir.cz/en/china-africa-cooperation-in-education

Jennifer’s DPhil focuses on adoptive families where  the adoptive parents also have birth children. She has worked in adoption support as a Parent Consultant for Adoption UK and as Head of Peer Services at PAC-UK, as well as managing the Adoption UK advice line and the parent training team.

She holds an MSc in Poverty Reduction: Policy and Practice from SOAS, and an MBA from Warwick Business School. She has worked in management consultancy in both the public and private sectors and is a board member of CoramBAAF.

Publications

The Right Tools for the Job. Information Age, November 1996

Global teams for the millennium; Management Decision, 36 (1): 31-33, February 1998

Lucy is a second-year DPhil student, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

Her DPhil research aims to engage in a meaningful and creative way with service children to explore how service life has shaped their experiences of education and sense of self. By choosing this focus, the research seeks to widen and nuance current understanding of service children’s educational experiences in addition to furthering knowledge into how service children see themselves. As a result of this, it is hoped that the research will support in developing the professional body of knowledge and understanding of this group of children in schools and help inform the Service Pupil Premium (SPP) funding choices in addition to wider school practice.

Before embarking on her DPhil at Oxford, Lucy completed her PGCE and MEd in Primary Education at the University of Cambridge. In addition to her DPhil work, Lucy is a Trustee for the Armed Forces Education Trust (AFET) – a grant-giving charity for service children – and a volunteer for the Oxford based charity, Big Brothers Big Sisters.

 

 

Aine is interested in improving the health outcomes of children and young people in the care system.

Fahad is reading for a DPhil in Education (part-time). He has over fifteen years professional experience in the education sector, in particular, higher education.

He has held senior roles in staff and student development, human resources, policy and strategy. Fahad holds a BSc in Education and Science and an MBA. Prior to commencing his doctoral studies, he was elected an Academic Visitor at St Antony’s College in the University of Oxford. Fahad’s research focus is on the quality of undergraduate medical education for Qatari doctors.

Shawna completed her undergraduate degree in Psycholinguistics at the University of Toronto in Canada, and later completed the MSc program in Applied Linguistics and Second language Acquisition at the University of Oxford.

She has a wide range of experiences in the field of Linguistics as a teaching and research assistant in areas such as theoretical linguistics, phonology, speech-language pathology, language acquisition, and creole studies. Being a native of Jamaica herself, Shawna has carried out extensive work on creole language acquisition. She worked with the University of the West Indies to draft the first Jamaican (Creole) as a Foreign Language course, and with the U.S Peace Corps to assess and revamp an existing language program for volunteers.

Shawna’s current research focuses on the development of writing skills among primary school learners in Jamaica who speak Jamaican Creole as a home language but are educated in English.

Publications
  • Helms-Park, R., Tucker, S, & Dronjic, V. (2016). From proto-writing to multimedia literacy: scripts and orthographies through the ages. In  Chen Bumgardner, V. Dronjic,, & R. Helms-Park (Eds.), Second Language Reading: Psycholinguistic and Cognitive Perspectives (pp. 1-31). New York, NY: Routledge Publishers.
  • Eriks-Brophy, A., Green, S., & Tucker, S. (2013).  Articulatory error patterns and phonological process use of preschool children with and without hearing loss. Volta Review.

Richard Canter is Visiting Professor of Surgical Education in the Nuffield Department of Surgical Sciences, University of Oxford.

Richard Canter qualified in medicine at the University of London in 1976, before becoming a surgeon at the Royal United Hospital, Bath. He completed a PhD in Management at the University of Bath in 1998 studying the nature of power in decision-making at the personal and organisation level in healthcare. Following the critical Kennedy report on surgical training in 2001, he was recruited to the Royal College of Surgeons of England as Deputy Director of Surgical Education with specific responsibility for curriculum development in surgical education in England. He was subsequently Head of the Postgraduate School of Surgery in Bristol until 2012, after which he concentrated on academic work at Oxford. He was appointed a visiting Professor in Oxford in in 2007, Emeritus Consultant at Oxford University Hospitals in 2015, and Associate Fellow at Green Templeton College, Oxford in 2015.

His interests are professionalism and, in particular, its relationship to leadership in healthcare systems. His current specific research interests are the effectiveness or otherwise of leadership education in respect of its impact on quality improvement in healthcare systems.

At the Royal College of Surgeons of England he was clinical lead and Chair of the Needs Analysis Group evaluating educational resources and organisational systems necessary for the implementation of reform of surgical training, and made recommendations for changes that were eventually adopted by all surgical training systems in the United Kingdom. During this appointment an opportunity arose in early 2003 at the end of the Serbian conflict to assist the European Agency for Reconstruction (EAR, a division of the EEC) in providing advice to the Kosovan Ministry of Health to develop new systems for surgical training.

Currently at Oxford, he is lead tutor for the module in Leadership and Management in Healthcare and Deputy Director of the Masters in Surgical Science, and supervises Masters and DPhil students on the subject of organisational change and leadership. In addition he has regular commitments in teaching postgraduate medical trainees and medical faculty on topics such as leadership, quality improvement, educational theory in healthcare, workplace assessments, supporting and talent managing  medical trainees, as well as occasional commitments to supervising students on the Said Business School Global Opportunity and Threats (Oxford) programme in exploring problems in complex systems.

Along the way he has written and spoken on many topics in medicine, obtained research grants, and has unexpectedly been given fellowships and medals. His main interest outside of work is playing music and he runs the Green Templeton College Big Band.

Prior to starting his DPhil, Eddy worked as a primary school teacher in Bristol, where he also completed his MSc in Educational Research.

He is particularly interested in the culture of high stakes, standardised testing, and how this might perpetuate existing inequalities in schools. His research focuses specifically on the interaction between knowledge, policy and pedagogy in the context of Literacy education.

 

Claire (郝煜) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and a China Oxford Scholarship Fund (COSF) scholar.

Claire holds a BA in Education and Physics from the University of Cambridge, an MA in Applied Linguistics from UCL Institution of Education, and an EdM in International Education Policy from Harvard University. She is passionate about exploring and supporting the transnational experiences of bi-/multilingual students in studying abroad contexts. Her research and professional interests include bilingualism, language and identity, international education, professional development, and school leadership.

Since 2015, Claire has served as the Director of International Education at Beijing Xinxuedao Education Group, a non-profit organisation that operates 31 schools with over 30,000 K-12 students in China. She has also worked as a high school counsellor and a teacher of Physics and Psychology.

Publications

Hao, Y. and Lantsman, G. (2022). Motivation in MOOCs: a qualitative study on the design and evaluation of an online IELTS course. The 7th IAFOR International Conference on Education.

Hao, Y. (2020). Education without borders: sojourner trips in students’ holistic development. In Wang, J. (Ed.). Family, Society, and Education. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2020). Learning how to learn: the role of metacognition and self-regulation in learning. In Wang, J. (Ed.). The Virtue of Thinking in Learning. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2019). Chinese students at a UK university: how linguistic repertoire mediates language and sojourner identity construction. Linguistics and Applied Linguistics Conference. Beijing Normal University.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2018). Examining Linguistic Diversity as a Resource for Higher Education in the Anglophone World. In Tong, V. C., Standen, A., & Sotiriou, M. (Ed.). Shaping Higher Education with Students: Ways to Connect Research and Teaching (pp.288-293). UCL Press.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2016). Making the most of linguistic diversity: the views and practices of bi/multilingual postgraduate students. The Multilingual University. ESRC Seminars.

Hao, Y. (2012). A Transformative Journey: China-US exchange student studying at an American high school. New World Press.

Pok Jing (Jane) Ho is a doctoral student at the Department of Education, specialising in educational assessment.

She is funded by the Bei Shan Tang Foundation Scholarship for Graduate Studies.

Her DPhil thesis examines validity in the Hong Kong Diploma of Secondary Education Examination, a large-scale, high-stakes test that informs higher education admissions decisions, using the argument-based approach to validation. In particular, her research identifies the claims made based on test scores, the validity evidence that supports or challenges such claims, and the social consequences that ensue as a result of test use.

Prior to her DPhil, she completed an M.A. in International Education Policy Analysis at Stanford University. She subsequently worked as a project officer at the Education University of Hong Kong, where she is now serving as a consultant alongside her studies.

A former secondary school teacher, Jane also holds a B.A. in English Studies (First Class Honours), a B.Ed. in English Language Education (First Class Honours), and an M.Ed. in Curriculum and Instruction from the Chinese University of Hong Kong, as well as the Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (CELTA) from Cambridge.

She is a Peer Supporter at Green Templeton College.

Publications

Ho, P. J. (2020). For some or for all: Vocational English for Hong Kong secondary school students. In C. Hong, & W. K. Ma (Eds.), Applied degree education and the future of work—Education 4.0 (pp. 87–95). Springer. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-15-3142-2

Ho, P. J. (2015). China-Africa “cooperation” in education. International Politics, 5. https://www.iir.cz/en/china-africa-cooperation-in-education

Jennifer’s DPhil focuses on adoptive families where  the adoptive parents also have birth children. She has worked in adoption support as a Parent Consultant for Adoption UK and as Head of Peer Services at PAC-UK, as well as managing the Adoption UK advice line and the parent training team.

She holds an MSc in Poverty Reduction: Policy and Practice from SOAS, and an MBA from Warwick Business School. She has worked in management consultancy in both the public and private sectors and is a board member of CoramBAAF.

Publications

The Right Tools for the Job. Information Age, November 1996

Global teams for the millennium; Management Decision, 36 (1): 31-33, February 1998

Lucy is a second-year DPhil student, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

Her DPhil research aims to engage in a meaningful and creative way with service children to explore how service life has shaped their experiences of education and sense of self. By choosing this focus, the research seeks to widen and nuance current understanding of service children’s educational experiences in addition to furthering knowledge into how service children see themselves. As a result of this, it is hoped that the research will support in developing the professional body of knowledge and understanding of this group of children in schools and help inform the Service Pupil Premium (SPP) funding choices in addition to wider school practice.

Before embarking on her DPhil at Oxford, Lucy completed her PGCE and MEd in Primary Education at the University of Cambridge. In addition to her DPhil work, Lucy is a Trustee for the Armed Forces Education Trust (AFET) – a grant-giving charity for service children – and a volunteer for the Oxford based charity, Big Brothers Big Sisters.

 

 

Aine is interested in improving the health outcomes of children and young people in the care system.

Fahad is reading for a DPhil in Education (part-time). He has over fifteen years professional experience in the education sector, in particular, higher education.

He has held senior roles in staff and student development, human resources, policy and strategy. Fahad holds a BSc in Education and Science and an MBA. Prior to commencing his doctoral studies, he was elected an Academic Visitor at St Antony’s College in the University of Oxford. Fahad’s research focus is on the quality of undergraduate medical education for Qatari doctors.

Shawna completed her undergraduate degree in Psycholinguistics at the University of Toronto in Canada, and later completed the MSc program in Applied Linguistics and Second language Acquisition at the University of Oxford.

She has a wide range of experiences in the field of Linguistics as a teaching and research assistant in areas such as theoretical linguistics, phonology, speech-language pathology, language acquisition, and creole studies. Being a native of Jamaica herself, Shawna has carried out extensive work on creole language acquisition. She worked with the University of the West Indies to draft the first Jamaican (Creole) as a Foreign Language course, and with the U.S Peace Corps to assess and revamp an existing language program for volunteers.

Shawna’s current research focuses on the development of writing skills among primary school learners in Jamaica who speak Jamaican Creole as a home language but are educated in English.

Publications
  • Helms-Park, R., Tucker, S, & Dronjic, V. (2016). From proto-writing to multimedia literacy: scripts and orthographies through the ages. In  Chen Bumgardner, V. Dronjic,, & R. Helms-Park (Eds.), Second Language Reading: Psycholinguistic and Cognitive Perspectives (pp. 1-31). New York, NY: Routledge Publishers.
  • Eriks-Brophy, A., Green, S., & Tucker, S. (2013).  Articulatory error patterns and phonological process use of preschool children with and without hearing loss. Volta Review.

Richard Canter is Visiting Professor of Surgical Education in the Nuffield Department of Surgical Sciences, University of Oxford.

Richard Canter qualified in medicine at the University of London in 1976, before becoming a surgeon at the Royal United Hospital, Bath. He completed a PhD in Management at the University of Bath in 1998 studying the nature of power in decision-making at the personal and organisation level in healthcare. Following the critical Kennedy report on surgical training in 2001, he was recruited to the Royal College of Surgeons of England as Deputy Director of Surgical Education with specific responsibility for curriculum development in surgical education in England. He was subsequently Head of the Postgraduate School of Surgery in Bristol until 2012, after which he concentrated on academic work at Oxford. He was appointed a visiting Professor in Oxford in in 2007, Emeritus Consultant at Oxford University Hospitals in 2015, and Associate Fellow at Green Templeton College, Oxford in 2015.

His interests are professionalism and, in particular, its relationship to leadership in healthcare systems. His current specific research interests are the effectiveness or otherwise of leadership education in respect of its impact on quality improvement in healthcare systems.

At the Royal College of Surgeons of England he was clinical lead and Chair of the Needs Analysis Group evaluating educational resources and organisational systems necessary for the implementation of reform of surgical training, and made recommendations for changes that were eventually adopted by all surgical training systems in the United Kingdom. During this appointment an opportunity arose in early 2003 at the end of the Serbian conflict to assist the European Agency for Reconstruction (EAR, a division of the EEC) in providing advice to the Kosovan Ministry of Health to develop new systems for surgical training.

Currently at Oxford, he is lead tutor for the module in Leadership and Management in Healthcare and Deputy Director of the Masters in Surgical Science, and supervises Masters and DPhil students on the subject of organisational change and leadership. In addition he has regular commitments in teaching postgraduate medical trainees and medical faculty on topics such as leadership, quality improvement, educational theory in healthcare, workplace assessments, supporting and talent managing  medical trainees, as well as occasional commitments to supervising students on the Said Business School Global Opportunity and Threats (Oxford) programme in exploring problems in complex systems.

Along the way he has written and spoken on many topics in medicine, obtained research grants, and has unexpectedly been given fellowships and medals. His main interest outside of work is playing music and he runs the Green Templeton College Big Band.

Prior to starting his DPhil, Eddy worked as a primary school teacher in Bristol, where he also completed his MSc in Educational Research.

He is particularly interested in the culture of high stakes, standardised testing, and how this might perpetuate existing inequalities in schools. His research focuses specifically on the interaction between knowledge, policy and pedagogy in the context of Literacy education.

 

Claire (郝煜) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and a China Oxford Scholarship Fund (COSF) scholar.

Claire holds a BA in Education and Physics from the University of Cambridge, an MA in Applied Linguistics from UCL Institution of Education, and an EdM in International Education Policy from Harvard University. She is passionate about exploring and supporting the transnational experiences of bi-/multilingual students in studying abroad contexts. Her research and professional interests include bilingualism, language and identity, international education, professional development, and school leadership.

Since 2015, Claire has served as the Director of International Education at Beijing Xinxuedao Education Group, a non-profit organisation that operates 31 schools with over 30,000 K-12 students in China. She has also worked as a high school counsellor and a teacher of Physics and Psychology.

Publications

Hao, Y. and Lantsman, G. (2022). Motivation in MOOCs: a qualitative study on the design and evaluation of an online IELTS course. The 7th IAFOR International Conference on Education.

Hao, Y. (2020). Education without borders: sojourner trips in students’ holistic development. In Wang, J. (Ed.). Family, Society, and Education. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2020). Learning how to learn: the role of metacognition and self-regulation in learning. In Wang, J. (Ed.). The Virtue of Thinking in Learning. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2019). Chinese students at a UK university: how linguistic repertoire mediates language and sojourner identity construction. Linguistics and Applied Linguistics Conference. Beijing Normal University.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2018). Examining Linguistic Diversity as a Resource for Higher Education in the Anglophone World. In Tong, V. C., Standen, A., & Sotiriou, M. (Ed.). Shaping Higher Education with Students: Ways to Connect Research and Teaching (pp.288-293). UCL Press.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2016). Making the most of linguistic diversity: the views and practices of bi/multilingual postgraduate students. The Multilingual University. ESRC Seminars.

Hao, Y. (2012). A Transformative Journey: China-US exchange student studying at an American high school. New World Press.

Pok Jing (Jane) Ho is a doctoral student at the Department of Education, specialising in educational assessment.

She is funded by the Bei Shan Tang Foundation Scholarship for Graduate Studies.

Her DPhil thesis examines validity in the Hong Kong Diploma of Secondary Education Examination, a large-scale, high-stakes test that informs higher education admissions decisions, using the argument-based approach to validation. In particular, her research identifies the claims made based on test scores, the validity evidence that supports or challenges such claims, and the social consequences that ensue as a result of test use.

Prior to her DPhil, she completed an M.A. in International Education Policy Analysis at Stanford University. She subsequently worked as a project officer at the Education University of Hong Kong, where she is now serving as a consultant alongside her studies.

A former secondary school teacher, Jane also holds a B.A. in English Studies (First Class Honours), a B.Ed. in English Language Education (First Class Honours), and an M.Ed. in Curriculum and Instruction from the Chinese University of Hong Kong, as well as the Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (CELTA) from Cambridge.

She is a Peer Supporter at Green Templeton College.

Publications

Ho, P. J. (2020). For some or for all: Vocational English for Hong Kong secondary school students. In C. Hong, & W. K. Ma (Eds.), Applied degree education and the future of work—Education 4.0 (pp. 87–95). Springer. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-15-3142-2

Ho, P. J. (2015). China-Africa “cooperation” in education. International Politics, 5. https://www.iir.cz/en/china-africa-cooperation-in-education

Jennifer’s DPhil focuses on adoptive families where  the adoptive parents also have birth children. She has worked in adoption support as a Parent Consultant for Adoption UK and as Head of Peer Services at PAC-UK, as well as managing the Adoption UK advice line and the parent training team.

She holds an MSc in Poverty Reduction: Policy and Practice from SOAS, and an MBA from Warwick Business School. She has worked in management consultancy in both the public and private sectors and is a board member of CoramBAAF.

Publications

The Right Tools for the Job. Information Age, November 1996

Global teams for the millennium; Management Decision, 36 (1): 31-33, February 1998

Lucy is a second-year DPhil student, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

Her DPhil research aims to engage in a meaningful and creative way with service children to explore how service life has shaped their experiences of education and sense of self. By choosing this focus, the research seeks to widen and nuance current understanding of service children’s educational experiences in addition to furthering knowledge into how service children see themselves. As a result of this, it is hoped that the research will support in developing the professional body of knowledge and understanding of this group of children in schools and help inform the Service Pupil Premium (SPP) funding choices in addition to wider school practice.

Before embarking on her DPhil at Oxford, Lucy completed her PGCE and MEd in Primary Education at the University of Cambridge. In addition to her DPhil work, Lucy is a Trustee for the Armed Forces Education Trust (AFET) – a grant-giving charity for service children – and a volunteer for the Oxford based charity, Big Brothers Big Sisters.

 

 

Aine is interested in improving the health outcomes of children and young people in the care system.

Fahad is reading for a DPhil in Education (part-time). He has over fifteen years professional experience in the education sector, in particular, higher education.

He has held senior roles in staff and student development, human resources, policy and strategy. Fahad holds a BSc in Education and Science and an MBA. Prior to commencing his doctoral studies, he was elected an Academic Visitor at St Antony’s College in the University of Oxford. Fahad’s research focus is on the quality of undergraduate medical education for Qatari doctors.

Shawna completed her undergraduate degree in Psycholinguistics at the University of Toronto in Canada, and later completed the MSc program in Applied Linguistics and Second language Acquisition at the University of Oxford.

She has a wide range of experiences in the field of Linguistics as a teaching and research assistant in areas such as theoretical linguistics, phonology, speech-language pathology, language acquisition, and creole studies. Being a native of Jamaica herself, Shawna has carried out extensive work on creole language acquisition. She worked with the University of the West Indies to draft the first Jamaican (Creole) as a Foreign Language course, and with the U.S Peace Corps to assess and revamp an existing language program for volunteers.

Shawna’s current research focuses on the development of writing skills among primary school learners in Jamaica who speak Jamaican Creole as a home language but are educated in English.

Publications
  • Helms-Park, R., Tucker, S, & Dronjic, V. (2016). From proto-writing to multimedia literacy: scripts and orthographies through the ages. In  Chen Bumgardner, V. Dronjic,, & R. Helms-Park (Eds.), Second Language Reading: Psycholinguistic and Cognitive Perspectives (pp. 1-31). New York, NY: Routledge Publishers.
  • Eriks-Brophy, A., Green, S., & Tucker, S. (2013).  Articulatory error patterns and phonological process use of preschool children with and without hearing loss. Volta Review.

Richard Canter is Visiting Professor of Surgical Education in the Nuffield Department of Surgical Sciences, University of Oxford.

Richard Canter qualified in medicine at the University of London in 1976, before becoming a surgeon at the Royal United Hospital, Bath. He completed a PhD in Management at the University of Bath in 1998 studying the nature of power in decision-making at the personal and organisation level in healthcare. Following the critical Kennedy report on surgical training in 2001, he was recruited to the Royal College of Surgeons of England as Deputy Director of Surgical Education with specific responsibility for curriculum development in surgical education in England. He was subsequently Head of the Postgraduate School of Surgery in Bristol until 2012, after which he concentrated on academic work at Oxford. He was appointed a visiting Professor in Oxford in in 2007, Emeritus Consultant at Oxford University Hospitals in 2015, and Associate Fellow at Green Templeton College, Oxford in 2015.

His interests are professionalism and, in particular, its relationship to leadership in healthcare systems. His current specific research interests are the effectiveness or otherwise of leadership education in respect of its impact on quality improvement in healthcare systems.

At the Royal College of Surgeons of England he was clinical lead and Chair of the Needs Analysis Group evaluating educational resources and organisational systems necessary for the implementation of reform of surgical training, and made recommendations for changes that were eventually adopted by all surgical training systems in the United Kingdom. During this appointment an opportunity arose in early 2003 at the end of the Serbian conflict to assist the European Agency for Reconstruction (EAR, a division of the EEC) in providing advice to the Kosovan Ministry of Health to develop new systems for surgical training.

Currently at Oxford, he is lead tutor for the module in Leadership and Management in Healthcare and Deputy Director of the Masters in Surgical Science, and supervises Masters and DPhil students on the subject of organisational change and leadership. In addition he has regular commitments in teaching postgraduate medical trainees and medical faculty on topics such as leadership, quality improvement, educational theory in healthcare, workplace assessments, supporting and talent managing  medical trainees, as well as occasional commitments to supervising students on the Said Business School Global Opportunity and Threats (Oxford) programme in exploring problems in complex systems.

Along the way he has written and spoken on many topics in medicine, obtained research grants, and has unexpectedly been given fellowships and medals. His main interest outside of work is playing music and he runs the Green Templeton College Big Band.

Prior to starting his DPhil, Eddy worked as a primary school teacher in Bristol, where he also completed his MSc in Educational Research.

He is particularly interested in the culture of high stakes, standardised testing, and how this might perpetuate existing inequalities in schools. His research focuses specifically on the interaction between knowledge, policy and pedagogy in the context of Literacy education.

 

Claire (郝煜) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and a China Oxford Scholarship Fund (COSF) scholar.

Claire holds a BA in Education and Physics from the University of Cambridge, an MA in Applied Linguistics from UCL Institution of Education, and an EdM in International Education Policy from Harvard University. She is passionate about exploring and supporting the transnational experiences of bi-/multilingual students in studying abroad contexts. Her research and professional interests include bilingualism, language and identity, international education, professional development, and school leadership.

Since 2015, Claire has served as the Director of International Education at Beijing Xinxuedao Education Group, a non-profit organisation that operates 31 schools with over 30,000 K-12 students in China. She has also worked as a high school counsellor and a teacher of Physics and Psychology.

Publications

Hao, Y. and Lantsman, G. (2022). Motivation in MOOCs: a qualitative study on the design and evaluation of an online IELTS course. The 7th IAFOR International Conference on Education.

Hao, Y. (2020). Education without borders: sojourner trips in students’ holistic development. In Wang, J. (Ed.). Family, Society, and Education. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2020). Learning how to learn: the role of metacognition and self-regulation in learning. In Wang, J. (Ed.). The Virtue of Thinking in Learning. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2019). Chinese students at a UK university: how linguistic repertoire mediates language and sojourner identity construction. Linguistics and Applied Linguistics Conference. Beijing Normal University.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2018). Examining Linguistic Diversity as a Resource for Higher Education in the Anglophone World. In Tong, V. C., Standen, A., & Sotiriou, M. (Ed.). Shaping Higher Education with Students: Ways to Connect Research and Teaching (pp.288-293). UCL Press.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2016). Making the most of linguistic diversity: the views and practices of bi/multilingual postgraduate students. The Multilingual University. ESRC Seminars.

Hao, Y. (2012). A Transformative Journey: China-US exchange student studying at an American high school. New World Press.

Pok Jing (Jane) Ho is a doctoral student at the Department of Education, specialising in educational assessment.

She is funded by the Bei Shan Tang Foundation Scholarship for Graduate Studies.

Her DPhil thesis examines validity in the Hong Kong Diploma of Secondary Education Examination, a large-scale, high-stakes test that informs higher education admissions decisions, using the argument-based approach to validation. In particular, her research identifies the claims made based on test scores, the validity evidence that supports or challenges such claims, and the social consequences that ensue as a result of test use.

Prior to her DPhil, she completed an M.A. in International Education Policy Analysis at Stanford University. She subsequently worked as a project officer at the Education University of Hong Kong, where she is now serving as a consultant alongside her studies.

A former secondary school teacher, Jane also holds a B.A. in English Studies (First Class Honours), a B.Ed. in English Language Education (First Class Honours), and an M.Ed. in Curriculum and Instruction from the Chinese University of Hong Kong, as well as the Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (CELTA) from Cambridge.

She is a Peer Supporter at Green Templeton College.

Publications

Ho, P. J. (2020). For some or for all: Vocational English for Hong Kong secondary school students. In C. Hong, & W. K. Ma (Eds.), Applied degree education and the future of work—Education 4.0 (pp. 87–95). Springer. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-15-3142-2

Ho, P. J. (2015). China-Africa “cooperation” in education. International Politics, 5. https://www.iir.cz/en/china-africa-cooperation-in-education

Jennifer’s DPhil focuses on adoptive families where  the adoptive parents also have birth children. She has worked in adoption support as a Parent Consultant for Adoption UK and as Head of Peer Services at PAC-UK, as well as managing the Adoption UK advice line and the parent training team.

She holds an MSc in Poverty Reduction: Policy and Practice from SOAS, and an MBA from Warwick Business School. She has worked in management consultancy in both the public and private sectors and is a board member of CoramBAAF.

Publications

The Right Tools for the Job. Information Age, November 1996

Global teams for the millennium; Management Decision, 36 (1): 31-33, February 1998

Lucy is a second-year DPhil student, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

Her DPhil research aims to engage in a meaningful and creative way with service children to explore how service life has shaped their experiences of education and sense of self. By choosing this focus, the research seeks to widen and nuance current understanding of service children’s educational experiences in addition to furthering knowledge into how service children see themselves. As a result of this, it is hoped that the research will support in developing the professional body of knowledge and understanding of this group of children in schools and help inform the Service Pupil Premium (SPP) funding choices in addition to wider school practice.

Before embarking on her DPhil at Oxford, Lucy completed her PGCE and MEd in Primary Education at the University of Cambridge. In addition to her DPhil work, Lucy is a Trustee for the Armed Forces Education Trust (AFET) – a grant-giving charity for service children – and a volunteer for the Oxford based charity, Big Brothers Big Sisters.

 

 

Aine is interested in improving the health outcomes of children and young people in the care system.

Fahad is reading for a DPhil in Education (part-time). He has over fifteen years professional experience in the education sector, in particular, higher education.

He has held senior roles in staff and student development, human resources, policy and strategy. Fahad holds a BSc in Education and Science and an MBA. Prior to commencing his doctoral studies, he was elected an Academic Visitor at St Antony’s College in the University of Oxford. Fahad’s research focus is on the quality of undergraduate medical education for Qatari doctors.

Shawna completed her undergraduate degree in Psycholinguistics at the University of Toronto in Canada, and later completed the MSc program in Applied Linguistics and Second language Acquisition at the University of Oxford.

She has a wide range of experiences in the field of Linguistics as a teaching and research assistant in areas such as theoretical linguistics, phonology, speech-language pathology, language acquisition, and creole studies. Being a native of Jamaica herself, Shawna has carried out extensive work on creole language acquisition. She worked with the University of the West Indies to draft the first Jamaican (Creole) as a Foreign Language course, and with the U.S Peace Corps to assess and revamp an existing language program for volunteers.

Shawna’s current research focuses on the development of writing skills among primary school learners in Jamaica who speak Jamaican Creole as a home language but are educated in English.

Publications
  • Helms-Park, R., Tucker, S, & Dronjic, V. (2016). From proto-writing to multimedia literacy: scripts and orthographies through the ages. In  Chen Bumgardner, V. Dronjic,, & R. Helms-Park (Eds.), Second Language Reading: Psycholinguistic and Cognitive Perspectives (pp. 1-31). New York, NY: Routledge Publishers.
  • Eriks-Brophy, A., Green, S., & Tucker, S. (2013).  Articulatory error patterns and phonological process use of preschool children with and without hearing loss. Volta Review.

Richard Canter is Visiting Professor of Surgical Education in the Nuffield Department of Surgical Sciences, University of Oxford.

Richard Canter qualified in medicine at the University of London in 1976, before becoming a surgeon at the Royal United Hospital, Bath. He completed a PhD in Management at the University of Bath in 1998 studying the nature of power in decision-making at the personal and organisation level in healthcare. Following the critical Kennedy report on surgical training in 2001, he was recruited to the Royal College of Surgeons of England as Deputy Director of Surgical Education with specific responsibility for curriculum development in surgical education in England. He was subsequently Head of the Postgraduate School of Surgery in Bristol until 2012, after which he concentrated on academic work at Oxford. He was appointed a visiting Professor in Oxford in in 2007, Emeritus Consultant at Oxford University Hospitals in 2015, and Associate Fellow at Green Templeton College, Oxford in 2015.

His interests are professionalism and, in particular, its relationship to leadership in healthcare systems. His current specific research interests are the effectiveness or otherwise of leadership education in respect of its impact on quality improvement in healthcare systems.

At the Royal College of Surgeons of England he was clinical lead and Chair of the Needs Analysis Group evaluating educational resources and organisational systems necessary for the implementation of reform of surgical training, and made recommendations for changes that were eventually adopted by all surgical training systems in the United Kingdom. During this appointment an opportunity arose in early 2003 at the end of the Serbian conflict to assist the European Agency for Reconstruction (EAR, a division of the EEC) in providing advice to the Kosovan Ministry of Health to develop new systems for surgical training.

Currently at Oxford, he is lead tutor for the module in Leadership and Management in Healthcare and Deputy Director of the Masters in Surgical Science, and supervises Masters and DPhil students on the subject of organisational change and leadership. In addition he has regular commitments in teaching postgraduate medical trainees and medical faculty on topics such as leadership, quality improvement, educational theory in healthcare, workplace assessments, supporting and talent managing  medical trainees, as well as occasional commitments to supervising students on the Said Business School Global Opportunity and Threats (Oxford) programme in exploring problems in complex systems.

Along the way he has written and spoken on many topics in medicine, obtained research grants, and has unexpectedly been given fellowships and medals. His main interest outside of work is playing music and he runs the Green Templeton College Big Band.

Prior to starting his DPhil, Eddy worked as a primary school teacher in Bristol, where he also completed his MSc in Educational Research.

He is particularly interested in the culture of high stakes, standardised testing, and how this might perpetuate existing inequalities in schools. His research focuses specifically on the interaction between knowledge, policy and pedagogy in the context of Literacy education.

 

Claire (郝煜) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and a China Oxford Scholarship Fund (COSF) scholar.

Claire holds a BA in Education and Physics from the University of Cambridge, an MA in Applied Linguistics from UCL Institution of Education, and an EdM in International Education Policy from Harvard University. She is passionate about exploring and supporting the transnational experiences of bi-/multilingual students in studying abroad contexts. Her research and professional interests include bilingualism, language and identity, international education, professional development, and school leadership.

Since 2015, Claire has served as the Director of International Education at Beijing Xinxuedao Education Group, a non-profit organisation that operates 31 schools with over 30,000 K-12 students in China. She has also worked as a high school counsellor and a teacher of Physics and Psychology.

Publications

Hao, Y. and Lantsman, G. (2022). Motivation in MOOCs: a qualitative study on the design and evaluation of an online IELTS course. The 7th IAFOR International Conference on Education.

Hao, Y. (2020). Education without borders: sojourner trips in students’ holistic development. In Wang, J. (Ed.). Family, Society, and Education. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2020). Learning how to learn: the role of metacognition and self-regulation in learning. In Wang, J. (Ed.). The Virtue of Thinking in Learning. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2019). Chinese students at a UK university: how linguistic repertoire mediates language and sojourner identity construction. Linguistics and Applied Linguistics Conference. Beijing Normal University.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2018). Examining Linguistic Diversity as a Resource for Higher Education in the Anglophone World. In Tong, V. C., Standen, A., & Sotiriou, M. (Ed.). Shaping Higher Education with Students: Ways to Connect Research and Teaching (pp.288-293). UCL Press.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2016). Making the most of linguistic diversity: the views and practices of bi/multilingual postgraduate students. The Multilingual University. ESRC Seminars.

Hao, Y. (2012). A Transformative Journey: China-US exchange student studying at an American high school. New World Press.

Pok Jing (Jane) Ho is a doctoral student at the Department of Education, specialising in educational assessment.

She is funded by the Bei Shan Tang Foundation Scholarship for Graduate Studies.

Her DPhil thesis examines validity in the Hong Kong Diploma of Secondary Education Examination, a large-scale, high-stakes test that informs higher education admissions decisions, using the argument-based approach to validation. In particular, her research identifies the claims made based on test scores, the validity evidence that supports or challenges such claims, and the social consequences that ensue as a result of test use.

Prior to her DPhil, she completed an M.A. in International Education Policy Analysis at Stanford University. She subsequently worked as a project officer at the Education University of Hong Kong, where she is now serving as a consultant alongside her studies.

A former secondary school teacher, Jane also holds a B.A. in English Studies (First Class Honours), a B.Ed. in English Language Education (First Class Honours), and an M.Ed. in Curriculum and Instruction from the Chinese University of Hong Kong, as well as the Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (CELTA) from Cambridge.

She is a Peer Supporter at Green Templeton College.

Publications

Ho, P. J. (2020). For some or for all: Vocational English for Hong Kong secondary school students. In C. Hong, & W. K. Ma (Eds.), Applied degree education and the future of work—Education 4.0 (pp. 87–95). Springer. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-15-3142-2

Ho, P. J. (2015). China-Africa “cooperation” in education. International Politics, 5. https://www.iir.cz/en/china-africa-cooperation-in-education

Jennifer’s DPhil focuses on adoptive families where  the adoptive parents also have birth children. She has worked in adoption support as a Parent Consultant for Adoption UK and as Head of Peer Services at PAC-UK, as well as managing the Adoption UK advice line and the parent training team.

She holds an MSc in Poverty Reduction: Policy and Practice from SOAS, and an MBA from Warwick Business School. She has worked in management consultancy in both the public and private sectors and is a board member of CoramBAAF.

Publications

The Right Tools for the Job. Information Age, November 1996

Global teams for the millennium; Management Decision, 36 (1): 31-33, February 1998

Lucy is a second-year DPhil student, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

Her DPhil research aims to engage in a meaningful and creative way with service children to explore how service life has shaped their experiences of education and sense of self. By choosing this focus, the research seeks to widen and nuance current understanding of service children’s educational experiences in addition to furthering knowledge into how service children see themselves. As a result of this, it is hoped that the research will support in developing the professional body of knowledge and understanding of this group of children in schools and help inform the Service Pupil Premium (SPP) funding choices in addition to wider school practice.

Before embarking on her DPhil at Oxford, Lucy completed her PGCE and MEd in Primary Education at the University of Cambridge. In addition to her DPhil work, Lucy is a Trustee for the Armed Forces Education Trust (AFET) – a grant-giving charity for service children – and a volunteer for the Oxford based charity, Big Brothers Big Sisters.

 

 

Aine is interested in improving the health outcomes of children and young people in the care system.

Fahad is reading for a DPhil in Education (part-time). He has over fifteen years professional experience in the education sector, in particular, higher education.

He has held senior roles in staff and student development, human resources, policy and strategy. Fahad holds a BSc in Education and Science and an MBA. Prior to commencing his doctoral studies, he was elected an Academic Visitor at St Antony’s College in the University of Oxford. Fahad’s research focus is on the quality of undergraduate medical education for Qatari doctors.

Shawna completed her undergraduate degree in Psycholinguistics at the University of Toronto in Canada, and later completed the MSc program in Applied Linguistics and Second language Acquisition at the University of Oxford.

She has a wide range of experiences in the field of Linguistics as a teaching and research assistant in areas such as theoretical linguistics, phonology, speech-language pathology, language acquisition, and creole studies. Being a native of Jamaica herself, Shawna has carried out extensive work on creole language acquisition. She worked with the University of the West Indies to draft the first Jamaican (Creole) as a Foreign Language course, and with the U.S Peace Corps to assess and revamp an existing language program for volunteers.

Shawna’s current research focuses on the development of writing skills among primary school learners in Jamaica who speak Jamaican Creole as a home language but are educated in English.

Publications
  • Helms-Park, R., Tucker, S, & Dronjic, V. (2016). From proto-writing to multimedia literacy: scripts and orthographies through the ages. In  Chen Bumgardner, V. Dronjic,, & R. Helms-Park (Eds.), Second Language Reading: Psycholinguistic and Cognitive Perspectives (pp. 1-31). New York, NY: Routledge Publishers.
  • Eriks-Brophy, A., Green, S., & Tucker, S. (2013).  Articulatory error patterns and phonological process use of preschool children with and without hearing loss. Volta Review.

Richard Canter is Visiting Professor of Surgical Education in the Nuffield Department of Surgical Sciences, University of Oxford.

Richard Canter qualified in medicine at the University of London in 1976, before becoming a surgeon at the Royal United Hospital, Bath. He completed a PhD in Management at the University of Bath in 1998 studying the nature of power in decision-making at the personal and organisation level in healthcare. Following the critical Kennedy report on surgical training in 2001, he was recruited to the Royal College of Surgeons of England as Deputy Director of Surgical Education with specific responsibility for curriculum development in surgical education in England. He was subsequently Head of the Postgraduate School of Surgery in Bristol until 2012, after which he concentrated on academic work at Oxford. He was appointed a visiting Professor in Oxford in in 2007, Emeritus Consultant at Oxford University Hospitals in 2015, and Associate Fellow at Green Templeton College, Oxford in 2015.

His interests are professionalism and, in particular, its relationship to leadership in healthcare systems. His current specific research interests are the effectiveness or otherwise of leadership education in respect of its impact on quality improvement in healthcare systems.

At the Royal College of Surgeons of England he was clinical lead and Chair of the Needs Analysis Group evaluating educational resources and organisational systems necessary for the implementation of reform of surgical training, and made recommendations for changes that were eventually adopted by all surgical training systems in the United Kingdom. During this appointment an opportunity arose in early 2003 at the end of the Serbian conflict to assist the European Agency for Reconstruction (EAR, a division of the EEC) in providing advice to the Kosovan Ministry of Health to develop new systems for surgical training.

Currently at Oxford, he is lead tutor for the module in Leadership and Management in Healthcare and Deputy Director of the Masters in Surgical Science, and supervises Masters and DPhil students on the subject of organisational change and leadership. In addition he has regular commitments in teaching postgraduate medical trainees and medical faculty on topics such as leadership, quality improvement, educational theory in healthcare, workplace assessments, supporting and talent managing  medical trainees, as well as occasional commitments to supervising students on the Said Business School Global Opportunity and Threats (Oxford) programme in exploring problems in complex systems.

Along the way he has written and spoken on many topics in medicine, obtained research grants, and has unexpectedly been given fellowships and medals. His main interest outside of work is playing music and he runs the Green Templeton College Big Band.

Prior to starting his DPhil, Eddy worked as a primary school teacher in Bristol, where he also completed his MSc in Educational Research.

He is particularly interested in the culture of high stakes, standardised testing, and how this might perpetuate existing inequalities in schools. His research focuses specifically on the interaction between knowledge, policy and pedagogy in the context of Literacy education.

 

Claire (郝煜) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and a China Oxford Scholarship Fund (COSF) scholar.

Claire holds a BA in Education and Physics from the University of Cambridge, an MA in Applied Linguistics from UCL Institution of Education, and an EdM in International Education Policy from Harvard University. She is passionate about exploring and supporting the transnational experiences of bi-/multilingual students in studying abroad contexts. Her research and professional interests include bilingualism, language and identity, international education, professional development, and school leadership.

Since 2015, Claire has served as the Director of International Education at Beijing Xinxuedao Education Group, a non-profit organisation that operates 31 schools with over 30,000 K-12 students in China. She has also worked as a high school counsellor and a teacher of Physics and Psychology.

Publications

Hao, Y. and Lantsman, G. (2022). Motivation in MOOCs: a qualitative study on the design and evaluation of an online IELTS course. The 7th IAFOR International Conference on Education.

Hao, Y. (2020). Education without borders: sojourner trips in students’ holistic development. In Wang, J. (Ed.). Family, Society, and Education. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2020). Learning how to learn: the role of metacognition and self-regulation in learning. In Wang, J. (Ed.). The Virtue of Thinking in Learning. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2019). Chinese students at a UK university: how linguistic repertoire mediates language and sojourner identity construction. Linguistics and Applied Linguistics Conference. Beijing Normal University.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2018). Examining Linguistic Diversity as a Resource for Higher Education in the Anglophone World. In Tong, V. C., Standen, A., & Sotiriou, M. (Ed.). Shaping Higher Education with Students: Ways to Connect Research and Teaching (pp.288-293). UCL Press.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2016). Making the most of linguistic diversity: the views and practices of bi/multilingual postgraduate students. The Multilingual University. ESRC Seminars.

Hao, Y. (2012). A Transformative Journey: China-US exchange student studying at an American high school. New World Press.

Pok Jing (Jane) Ho is a doctoral student at the Department of Education, specialising in educational assessment.

She is funded by the Bei Shan Tang Foundation Scholarship for Graduate Studies.

Her DPhil thesis examines validity in the Hong Kong Diploma of Secondary Education Examination, a large-scale, high-stakes test that informs higher education admissions decisions, using the argument-based approach to validation. In particular, her research identifies the claims made based on test scores, the validity evidence that supports or challenges such claims, and the social consequences that ensue as a result of test use.

Prior to her DPhil, she completed an M.A. in International Education Policy Analysis at Stanford University. She subsequently worked as a project officer at the Education University of Hong Kong, where she is now serving as a consultant alongside her studies.

A former secondary school teacher, Jane also holds a B.A. in English Studies (First Class Honours), a B.Ed. in English Language Education (First Class Honours), and an M.Ed. in Curriculum and Instruction from the Chinese University of Hong Kong, as well as the Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (CELTA) from Cambridge.

She is a Peer Supporter at Green Templeton College.

Publications

Ho, P. J. (2020). For some or for all: Vocational English for Hong Kong secondary school students. In C. Hong, & W. K. Ma (Eds.), Applied degree education and the future of work—Education 4.0 (pp. 87–95). Springer. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-15-3142-2

Ho, P. J. (2015). China-Africa “cooperation” in education. International Politics, 5. https://www.iir.cz/en/china-africa-cooperation-in-education

Jennifer’s DPhil focuses on adoptive families where  the adoptive parents also have birth children. She has worked in adoption support as a Parent Consultant for Adoption UK and as Head of Peer Services at PAC-UK, as well as managing the Adoption UK advice line and the parent training team.

She holds an MSc in Poverty Reduction: Policy and Practice from SOAS, and an MBA from Warwick Business School. She has worked in management consultancy in both the public and private sectors and is a board member of CoramBAAF.

Publications

The Right Tools for the Job. Information Age, November 1996

Global teams for the millennium; Management Decision, 36 (1): 31-33, February 1998

Lucy is a second-year DPhil student, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

Her DPhil research aims to engage in a meaningful and creative way with service children to explore how service life has shaped their experiences of education and sense of self. By choosing this focus, the research seeks to widen and nuance current understanding of service children’s educational experiences in addition to furthering knowledge into how service children see themselves. As a result of this, it is hoped that the research will support in developing the professional body of knowledge and understanding of this group of children in schools and help inform the Service Pupil Premium (SPP) funding choices in addition to wider school practice.

Before embarking on her DPhil at Oxford, Lucy completed her PGCE and MEd in Primary Education at the University of Cambridge. In addition to her DPhil work, Lucy is a Trustee for the Armed Forces Education Trust (AFET) – a grant-giving charity for service children – and a volunteer for the Oxford based charity, Big Brothers Big Sisters.

 

 

Aine is interested in improving the health outcomes of children and young people in the care system.

Fahad is reading for a DPhil in Education (part-time). He has over fifteen years professional experience in the education sector, in particular, higher education.

He has held senior roles in staff and student development, human resources, policy and strategy. Fahad holds a BSc in Education and Science and an MBA. Prior to commencing his doctoral studies, he was elected an Academic Visitor at St Antony’s College in the University of Oxford. Fahad’s research focus is on the quality of undergraduate medical education for Qatari doctors.

Shawna completed her undergraduate degree in Psycholinguistics at the University of Toronto in Canada, and later completed the MSc program in Applied Linguistics and Second language Acquisition at the University of Oxford.

She has a wide range of experiences in the field of Linguistics as a teaching and research assistant in areas such as theoretical linguistics, phonology, speech-language pathology, language acquisition, and creole studies. Being a native of Jamaica herself, Shawna has carried out extensive work on creole language acquisition. She worked with the University of the West Indies to draft the first Jamaican (Creole) as a Foreign Language course, and with the U.S Peace Corps to assess and revamp an existing language program for volunteers.

Shawna’s current research focuses on the development of writing skills among primary school learners in Jamaica who speak Jamaican Creole as a home language but are educated in English.

Publications
  • Helms-Park, R., Tucker, S, & Dronjic, V. (2016). From proto-writing to multimedia literacy: scripts and orthographies through the ages. In  Chen Bumgardner, V. Dronjic,, & R. Helms-Park (Eds.), Second Language Reading: Psycholinguistic and Cognitive Perspectives (pp. 1-31). New York, NY: Routledge Publishers.
  • Eriks-Brophy, A., Green, S., & Tucker, S. (2013).  Articulatory error patterns and phonological process use of preschool children with and without hearing loss. Volta Review.

Richard Canter is Visiting Professor of Surgical Education in the Nuffield Department of Surgical Sciences, University of Oxford.

Richard Canter qualified in medicine at the University of London in 1976, before becoming a surgeon at the Royal United Hospital, Bath. He completed a PhD in Management at the University of Bath in 1998 studying the nature of power in decision-making at the personal and organisation level in healthcare. Following the critical Kennedy report on surgical training in 2001, he was recruited to the Royal College of Surgeons of England as Deputy Director of Surgical Education with specific responsibility for curriculum development in surgical education in England. He was subsequently Head of the Postgraduate School of Surgery in Bristol until 2012, after which he concentrated on academic work at Oxford. He was appointed a visiting Professor in Oxford in in 2007, Emeritus Consultant at Oxford University Hospitals in 2015, and Associate Fellow at Green Templeton College, Oxford in 2015.

His interests are professionalism and, in particular, its relationship to leadership in healthcare systems. His current specific research interests are the effectiveness or otherwise of leadership education in respect of its impact on quality improvement in healthcare systems.

At the Royal College of Surgeons of England he was clinical lead and Chair of the Needs Analysis Group evaluating educational resources and organisational systems necessary for the implementation of reform of surgical training, and made recommendations for changes that were eventually adopted by all surgical training systems in the United Kingdom. During this appointment an opportunity arose in early 2003 at the end of the Serbian conflict to assist the European Agency for Reconstruction (EAR, a division of the EEC) in providing advice to the Kosovan Ministry of Health to develop new systems for surgical training.

Currently at Oxford, he is lead tutor for the module in Leadership and Management in Healthcare and Deputy Director of the Masters in Surgical Science, and supervises Masters and DPhil students on the subject of organisational change and leadership. In addition he has regular commitments in teaching postgraduate medical trainees and medical faculty on topics such as leadership, quality improvement, educational theory in healthcare, workplace assessments, supporting and talent managing  medical trainees, as well as occasional commitments to supervising students on the Said Business School Global Opportunity and Threats (Oxford) programme in exploring problems in complex systems.

Along the way he has written and spoken on many topics in medicine, obtained research grants, and has unexpectedly been given fellowships and medals. His main interest outside of work is playing music and he runs the Green Templeton College Big Band.

Prior to starting his DPhil, Eddy worked as a primary school teacher in Bristol, where he also completed his MSc in Educational Research.

He is particularly interested in the culture of high stakes, standardised testing, and how this might perpetuate existing inequalities in schools. His research focuses specifically on the interaction between knowledge, policy and pedagogy in the context of Literacy education.

 

Claire (郝煜) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and a China Oxford Scholarship Fund (COSF) scholar.

Claire holds a BA in Education and Physics from the University of Cambridge, an MA in Applied Linguistics from UCL Institution of Education, and an EdM in International Education Policy from Harvard University. She is passionate about exploring and supporting the transnational experiences of bi-/multilingual students in studying abroad contexts. Her research and professional interests include bilingualism, language and identity, international education, professional development, and school leadership.

Since 2015, Claire has served as the Director of International Education at Beijing Xinxuedao Education Group, a non-profit organisation that operates 31 schools with over 30,000 K-12 students in China. She has also worked as a high school counsellor and a teacher of Physics and Psychology.

Publications

Hao, Y. and Lantsman, G. (2022). Motivation in MOOCs: a qualitative study on the design and evaluation of an online IELTS course. The 7th IAFOR International Conference on Education.

Hao, Y. (2020). Education without borders: sojourner trips in students’ holistic development. In Wang, J. (Ed.). Family, Society, and Education. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2020). Learning how to learn: the role of metacognition and self-regulation in learning. In Wang, J. (Ed.). The Virtue of Thinking in Learning. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2019). Chinese students at a UK university: how linguistic repertoire mediates language and sojourner identity construction. Linguistics and Applied Linguistics Conference. Beijing Normal University.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2018). Examining Linguistic Diversity as a Resource for Higher Education in the Anglophone World. In Tong, V. C., Standen, A., & Sotiriou, M. (Ed.). Shaping Higher Education with Students: Ways to Connect Research and Teaching (pp.288-293). UCL Press.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2016). Making the most of linguistic diversity: the views and practices of bi/multilingual postgraduate students. The Multilingual University. ESRC Seminars.

Hao, Y. (2012). A Transformative Journey: China-US exchange student studying at an American high school. New World Press.

Pok Jing (Jane) Ho is a doctoral student at the Department of Education, specialising in educational assessment.

She is funded by the Bei Shan Tang Foundation Scholarship for Graduate Studies.

Her DPhil thesis examines validity in the Hong Kong Diploma of Secondary Education Examination, a large-scale, high-stakes test that informs higher education admissions decisions, using the argument-based approach to validation. In particular, her research identifies the claims made based on test scores, the validity evidence that supports or challenges such claims, and the social consequences that ensue as a result of test use.

Prior to her DPhil, she completed an M.A. in International Education Policy Analysis at Stanford University. She subsequently worked as a project officer at the Education University of Hong Kong, where she is now serving as a consultant alongside her studies.

A former secondary school teacher, Jane also holds a B.A. in English Studies (First Class Honours), a B.Ed. in English Language Education (First Class Honours), and an M.Ed. in Curriculum and Instruction from the Chinese University of Hong Kong, as well as the Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (CELTA) from Cambridge.

She is a Peer Supporter at Green Templeton College.

Publications

Ho, P. J. (2020). For some or for all: Vocational English for Hong Kong secondary school students. In C. Hong, & W. K. Ma (Eds.), Applied degree education and the future of work—Education 4.0 (pp. 87–95). Springer. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-15-3142-2

Ho, P. J. (2015). China-Africa “cooperation” in education. International Politics, 5. https://www.iir.cz/en/china-africa-cooperation-in-education

Jennifer’s DPhil focuses on adoptive families where  the adoptive parents also have birth children. She has worked in adoption support as a Parent Consultant for Adoption UK and as Head of Peer Services at PAC-UK, as well as managing the Adoption UK advice line and the parent training team.

She holds an MSc in Poverty Reduction: Policy and Practice from SOAS, and an MBA from Warwick Business School. She has worked in management consultancy in both the public and private sectors and is a board member of CoramBAAF.

Publications

The Right Tools for the Job. Information Age, November 1996

Global teams for the millennium; Management Decision, 36 (1): 31-33, February 1998

Lucy is a second-year DPhil student, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

Her DPhil research aims to engage in a meaningful and creative way with service children to explore how service life has shaped their experiences of education and sense of self. By choosing this focus, the research seeks to widen and nuance current understanding of service children’s educational experiences in addition to furthering knowledge into how service children see themselves. As a result of this, it is hoped that the research will support in developing the professional body of knowledge and understanding of this group of children in schools and help inform the Service Pupil Premium (SPP) funding choices in addition to wider school practice.

Before embarking on her DPhil at Oxford, Lucy completed her PGCE and MEd in Primary Education at the University of Cambridge. In addition to her DPhil work, Lucy is a Trustee for the Armed Forces Education Trust (AFET) – a grant-giving charity for service children – and a volunteer for the Oxford based charity, Big Brothers Big Sisters.

 

 

Aine is interested in improving the health outcomes of children and young people in the care system.

Fahad is reading for a DPhil in Education (part-time). He has over fifteen years professional experience in the education sector, in particular, higher education.

He has held senior roles in staff and student development, human resources, policy and strategy. Fahad holds a BSc in Education and Science and an MBA. Prior to commencing his doctoral studies, he was elected an Academic Visitor at St Antony’s College in the University of Oxford. Fahad’s research focus is on the quality of undergraduate medical education for Qatari doctors.

Shawna completed her undergraduate degree in Psycholinguistics at the University of Toronto in Canada, and later completed the MSc program in Applied Linguistics and Second language Acquisition at the University of Oxford.

She has a wide range of experiences in the field of Linguistics as a teaching and research assistant in areas such as theoretical linguistics, phonology, speech-language pathology, language acquisition, and creole studies. Being a native of Jamaica herself, Shawna has carried out extensive work on creole language acquisition. She worked with the University of the West Indies to draft the first Jamaican (Creole) as a Foreign Language course, and with the U.S Peace Corps to assess and revamp an existing language program for volunteers.

Shawna’s current research focuses on the development of writing skills among primary school learners in Jamaica who speak Jamaican Creole as a home language but are educated in English.

Publications
  • Helms-Park, R., Tucker, S, & Dronjic, V. (2016). From proto-writing to multimedia literacy: scripts and orthographies through the ages. In  Chen Bumgardner, V. Dronjic,, & R. Helms-Park (Eds.), Second Language Reading: Psycholinguistic and Cognitive Perspectives (pp. 1-31). New York, NY: Routledge Publishers.
  • Eriks-Brophy, A., Green, S., & Tucker, S. (2013).  Articulatory error patterns and phonological process use of preschool children with and without hearing loss. Volta Review.

Richard Canter is Visiting Professor of Surgical Education in the Nuffield Department of Surgical Sciences, University of Oxford.

Richard Canter qualified in medicine at the University of London in 1976, before becoming a surgeon at the Royal United Hospital, Bath. He completed a PhD in Management at the University of Bath in 1998 studying the nature of power in decision-making at the personal and organisation level in healthcare. Following the critical Kennedy report on surgical training in 2001, he was recruited to the Royal College of Surgeons of England as Deputy Director of Surgical Education with specific responsibility for curriculum development in surgical education in England. He was subsequently Head of the Postgraduate School of Surgery in Bristol until 2012, after which he concentrated on academic work at Oxford. He was appointed a visiting Professor in Oxford in in 2007, Emeritus Consultant at Oxford University Hospitals in 2015, and Associate Fellow at Green Templeton College, Oxford in 2015.

His interests are professionalism and, in particular, its relationship to leadership in healthcare systems. His current specific research interests are the effectiveness or otherwise of leadership education in respect of its impact on quality improvement in healthcare systems.

At the Royal College of Surgeons of England he was clinical lead and Chair of the Needs Analysis Group evaluating educational resources and organisational systems necessary for the implementation of reform of surgical training, and made recommendations for changes that were eventually adopted by all surgical training systems in the United Kingdom. During this appointment an opportunity arose in early 2003 at the end of the Serbian conflict to assist the European Agency for Reconstruction (EAR, a division of the EEC) in providing advice to the Kosovan Ministry of Health to develop new systems for surgical training.

Currently at Oxford, he is lead tutor for the module in Leadership and Management in Healthcare and Deputy Director of the Masters in Surgical Science, and supervises Masters and DPhil students on the subject of organisational change and leadership. In addition he has regular commitments in teaching postgraduate medical trainees and medical faculty on topics such as leadership, quality improvement, educational theory in healthcare, workplace assessments, supporting and talent managing  medical trainees, as well as occasional commitments to supervising students on the Said Business School Global Opportunity and Threats (Oxford) programme in exploring problems in complex systems.

Along the way he has written and spoken on many topics in medicine, obtained research grants, and has unexpectedly been given fellowships and medals. His main interest outside of work is playing music and he runs the Green Templeton College Big Band.

Prior to starting his DPhil, Eddy worked as a primary school teacher in Bristol, where he also completed his MSc in Educational Research.

He is particularly interested in the culture of high stakes, standardised testing, and how this might perpetuate existing inequalities in schools. His research focuses specifically on the interaction between knowledge, policy and pedagogy in the context of Literacy education.

 

Claire (郝煜) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and a China Oxford Scholarship Fund (COSF) scholar.

Claire holds a BA in Education and Physics from the University of Cambridge, an MA in Applied Linguistics from UCL Institution of Education, and an EdM in International Education Policy from Harvard University. She is passionate about exploring and supporting the transnational experiences of bi-/multilingual students in studying abroad contexts. Her research and professional interests include bilingualism, language and identity, international education, professional development, and school leadership.

Since 2015, Claire has served as the Director of International Education at Beijing Xinxuedao Education Group, a non-profit organisation that operates 31 schools with over 30,000 K-12 students in China. She has also worked as a high school counsellor and a teacher of Physics and Psychology.

Publications

Hao, Y. and Lantsman, G. (2022). Motivation in MOOCs: a qualitative study on the design and evaluation of an online IELTS course. The 7th IAFOR International Conference on Education.

Hao, Y. (2020). Education without borders: sojourner trips in students’ holistic development. In Wang, J. (Ed.). Family, Society, and Education. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2020). Learning how to learn: the role of metacognition and self-regulation in learning. In Wang, J. (Ed.). The Virtue of Thinking in Learning. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2019). Chinese students at a UK university: how linguistic repertoire mediates language and sojourner identity construction. Linguistics and Applied Linguistics Conference. Beijing Normal University.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2018). Examining Linguistic Diversity as a Resource for Higher Education in the Anglophone World. In Tong, V. C., Standen, A., & Sotiriou, M. (Ed.). Shaping Higher Education with Students: Ways to Connect Research and Teaching (pp.288-293). UCL Press.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2016). Making the most of linguistic diversity: the views and practices of bi/multilingual postgraduate students. The Multilingual University. ESRC Seminars.

Hao, Y. (2012). A Transformative Journey: China-US exchange student studying at an American high school. New World Press.

Pok Jing (Jane) Ho is a doctoral student at the Department of Education, specialising in educational assessment.

She is funded by the Bei Shan Tang Foundation Scholarship for Graduate Studies.

Her DPhil thesis examines validity in the Hong Kong Diploma of Secondary Education Examination, a large-scale, high-stakes test that informs higher education admissions decisions, using the argument-based approach to validation. In particular, her research identifies the claims made based on test scores, the validity evidence that supports or challenges such claims, and the social consequences that ensue as a result of test use.

Prior to her DPhil, she completed an M.A. in International Education Policy Analysis at Stanford University. She subsequently worked as a project officer at the Education University of Hong Kong, where she is now serving as a consultant alongside her studies.

A former secondary school teacher, Jane also holds a B.A. in English Studies (First Class Honours), a B.Ed. in English Language Education (First Class Honours), and an M.Ed. in Curriculum and Instruction from the Chinese University of Hong Kong, as well as the Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (CELTA) from Cambridge.

She is a Peer Supporter at Green Templeton College.

Publications

Ho, P. J. (2020). For some or for all: Vocational English for Hong Kong secondary school students. In C. Hong, & W. K. Ma (Eds.), Applied degree education and the future of work—Education 4.0 (pp. 87–95). Springer. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-15-3142-2

Ho, P. J. (2015). China-Africa “cooperation” in education. International Politics, 5. https://www.iir.cz/en/china-africa-cooperation-in-education

Jennifer’s DPhil focuses on adoptive families where  the adoptive parents also have birth children. She has worked in adoption support as a Parent Consultant for Adoption UK and as Head of Peer Services at PAC-UK, as well as managing the Adoption UK advice line and the parent training team.

She holds an MSc in Poverty Reduction: Policy and Practice from SOAS, and an MBA from Warwick Business School. She has worked in management consultancy in both the public and private sectors and is a board member of CoramBAAF.

Publications

The Right Tools for the Job. Information Age, November 1996

Global teams for the millennium; Management Decision, 36 (1): 31-33, February 1998

Lucy is a second-year DPhil student, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

Her DPhil research aims to engage in a meaningful and creative way with service children to explore how service life has shaped their experiences of education and sense of self. By choosing this focus, the research seeks to widen and nuance current understanding of service children’s educational experiences in addition to furthering knowledge into how service children see themselves. As a result of this, it is hoped that the research will support in developing the professional body of knowledge and understanding of this group of children in schools and help inform the Service Pupil Premium (SPP) funding choices in addition to wider school practice.

Before embarking on her DPhil at Oxford, Lucy completed her PGCE and MEd in Primary Education at the University of Cambridge. In addition to her DPhil work, Lucy is a Trustee for the Armed Forces Education Trust (AFET) – a grant-giving charity for service children – and a volunteer for the Oxford based charity, Big Brothers Big Sisters.

 

 

Aine is interested in improving the health outcomes of children and young people in the care system.

Fahad is reading for a DPhil in Education (part-time). He has over fifteen years professional experience in the education sector, in particular, higher education.

He has held senior roles in staff and student development, human resources, policy and strategy. Fahad holds a BSc in Education and Science and an MBA. Prior to commencing his doctoral studies, he was elected an Academic Visitor at St Antony’s College in the University of Oxford. Fahad’s research focus is on the quality of undergraduate medical education for Qatari doctors.

Shawna completed her undergraduate degree in Psycholinguistics at the University of Toronto in Canada, and later completed the MSc program in Applied Linguistics and Second language Acquisition at the University of Oxford.

She has a wide range of experiences in the field of Linguistics as a teaching and research assistant in areas such as theoretical linguistics, phonology, speech-language pathology, language acquisition, and creole studies. Being a native of Jamaica herself, Shawna has carried out extensive work on creole language acquisition. She worked with the University of the West Indies to draft the first Jamaican (Creole) as a Foreign Language course, and with the U.S Peace Corps to assess and revamp an existing language program for volunteers.

Shawna’s current research focuses on the development of writing skills among primary school learners in Jamaica who speak Jamaican Creole as a home language but are educated in English.

Publications
  • Helms-Park, R., Tucker, S, & Dronjic, V. (2016). From proto-writing to multimedia literacy: scripts and orthographies through the ages. In  Chen Bumgardner, V. Dronjic,, & R. Helms-Park (Eds.), Second Language Reading: Psycholinguistic and Cognitive Perspectives (pp. 1-31). New York, NY: Routledge Publishers.
  • Eriks-Brophy, A., Green, S., & Tucker, S. (2013).  Articulatory error patterns and phonological process use of preschool children with and without hearing loss. Volta Review.

Richard Canter is Visiting Professor of Surgical Education in the Nuffield Department of Surgical Sciences, University of Oxford.

Richard Canter qualified in medicine at the University of London in 1976, before becoming a surgeon at the Royal United Hospital, Bath. He completed a PhD in Management at the University of Bath in 1998 studying the nature of power in decision-making at the personal and organisation level in healthcare. Following the critical Kennedy report on surgical training in 2001, he was recruited to the Royal College of Surgeons of England as Deputy Director of Surgical Education with specific responsibility for curriculum development in surgical education in England. He was subsequently Head of the Postgraduate School of Surgery in Bristol until 2012, after which he concentrated on academic work at Oxford. He was appointed a visiting Professor in Oxford in in 2007, Emeritus Consultant at Oxford University Hospitals in 2015, and Associate Fellow at Green Templeton College, Oxford in 2015.

His interests are professionalism and, in particular, its relationship to leadership in healthcare systems. His current specific research interests are the effectiveness or otherwise of leadership education in respect of its impact on quality improvement in healthcare systems.

At the Royal College of Surgeons of England he was clinical lead and Chair of the Needs Analysis Group evaluating educational resources and organisational systems necessary for the implementation of reform of surgical training, and made recommendations for changes that were eventually adopted by all surgical training systems in the United Kingdom. During this appointment an opportunity arose in early 2003 at the end of the Serbian conflict to assist the European Agency for Reconstruction (EAR, a division of the EEC) in providing advice to the Kosovan Ministry of Health to develop new systems for surgical training.

Currently at Oxford, he is lead tutor for the module in Leadership and Management in Healthcare and Deputy Director of the Masters in Surgical Science, and supervises Masters and DPhil students on the subject of organisational change and leadership. In addition he has regular commitments in teaching postgraduate medical trainees and medical faculty on topics such as leadership, quality improvement, educational theory in healthcare, workplace assessments, supporting and talent managing  medical trainees, as well as occasional commitments to supervising students on the Said Business School Global Opportunity and Threats (Oxford) programme in exploring problems in complex systems.

Along the way he has written and spoken on many topics in medicine, obtained research grants, and has unexpectedly been given fellowships and medals. His main interest outside of work is playing music and he runs the Green Templeton College Big Band.

Prior to starting his DPhil, Eddy worked as a primary school teacher in Bristol, where he also completed his MSc in Educational Research.

He is particularly interested in the culture of high stakes, standardised testing, and how this might perpetuate existing inequalities in schools. His research focuses specifically on the interaction between knowledge, policy and pedagogy in the context of Literacy education.

 

Claire (郝煜) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and a China Oxford Scholarship Fund (COSF) scholar.

Claire holds a BA in Education and Physics from the University of Cambridge, an MA in Applied Linguistics from UCL Institution of Education, and an EdM in International Education Policy from Harvard University. She is passionate about exploring and supporting the transnational experiences of bi-/multilingual students in studying abroad contexts. Her research and professional interests include bilingualism, language and identity, international education, professional development, and school leadership.

Since 2015, Claire has served as the Director of International Education at Beijing Xinxuedao Education Group, a non-profit organisation that operates 31 schools with over 30,000 K-12 students in China. She has also worked as a high school counsellor and a teacher of Physics and Psychology.

Publications

Hao, Y. and Lantsman, G. (2022). Motivation in MOOCs: a qualitative study on the design and evaluation of an online IELTS course. The 7th IAFOR International Conference on Education.

Hao, Y. (2020). Education without borders: sojourner trips in students’ holistic development. In Wang, J. (Ed.). Family, Society, and Education. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2020). Learning how to learn: the role of metacognition and self-regulation in learning. In Wang, J. (Ed.). The Virtue of Thinking in Learning. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2019). Chinese students at a UK university: how linguistic repertoire mediates language and sojourner identity construction. Linguistics and Applied Linguistics Conference. Beijing Normal University.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2018). Examining Linguistic Diversity as a Resource for Higher Education in the Anglophone World. In Tong, V. C., Standen, A., & Sotiriou, M. (Ed.). Shaping Higher Education with Students: Ways to Connect Research and Teaching (pp.288-293). UCL Press.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2016). Making the most of linguistic diversity: the views and practices of bi/multilingual postgraduate students. The Multilingual University. ESRC Seminars.

Hao, Y. (2012). A Transformative Journey: China-US exchange student studying at an American high school. New World Press.

Pok Jing (Jane) Ho is a doctoral student at the Department of Education, specialising in educational assessment.

She is funded by the Bei Shan Tang Foundation Scholarship for Graduate Studies.

Her DPhil thesis examines validity in the Hong Kong Diploma of Secondary Education Examination, a large-scale, high-stakes test that informs higher education admissions decisions, using the argument-based approach to validation. In particular, her research identifies the claims made based on test scores, the validity evidence that supports or challenges such claims, and the social consequences that ensue as a result of test use.

Prior to her DPhil, she completed an M.A. in International Education Policy Analysis at Stanford University. She subsequently worked as a project officer at the Education University of Hong Kong, where she is now serving as a consultant alongside her studies.

A former secondary school teacher, Jane also holds a B.A. in English Studies (First Class Honours), a B.Ed. in English Language Education (First Class Honours), and an M.Ed. in Curriculum and Instruction from the Chinese University of Hong Kong, as well as the Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (CELTA) from Cambridge.

She is a Peer Supporter at Green Templeton College.

Publications

Ho, P. J. (2020). For some or for all: Vocational English for Hong Kong secondary school students. In C. Hong, & W. K. Ma (Eds.), Applied degree education and the future of work—Education 4.0 (pp. 87–95). Springer. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-15-3142-2

Ho, P. J. (2015). China-Africa “cooperation” in education. International Politics, 5. https://www.iir.cz/en/china-africa-cooperation-in-education

Jennifer’s DPhil focuses on adoptive families where  the adoptive parents also have birth children. She has worked in adoption support as a Parent Consultant for Adoption UK and as Head of Peer Services at PAC-UK, as well as managing the Adoption UK advice line and the parent training team.

She holds an MSc in Poverty Reduction: Policy and Practice from SOAS, and an MBA from Warwick Business School. She has worked in management consultancy in both the public and private sectors and is a board member of CoramBAAF.

Publications

The Right Tools for the Job. Information Age, November 1996

Global teams for the millennium; Management Decision, 36 (1): 31-33, February 1998

Lucy is a second-year DPhil student, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

Her DPhil research aims to engage in a meaningful and creative way with service children to explore how service life has shaped their experiences of education and sense of self. By choosing this focus, the research seeks to widen and nuance current understanding of service children’s educational experiences in addition to furthering knowledge into how service children see themselves. As a result of this, it is hoped that the research will support in developing the professional body of knowledge and understanding of this group of children in schools and help inform the Service Pupil Premium (SPP) funding choices in addition to wider school practice.

Before embarking on her DPhil at Oxford, Lucy completed her PGCE and MEd in Primary Education at the University of Cambridge. In addition to her DPhil work, Lucy is a Trustee for the Armed Forces Education Trust (AFET) – a grant-giving charity for service children – and a volunteer for the Oxford based charity, Big Brothers Big Sisters.

 

 

Aine is interested in improving the health outcomes of children and young people in the care system.

Fahad is reading for a DPhil in Education (part-time). He has over fifteen years professional experience in the education sector, in particular, higher education.

He has held senior roles in staff and student development, human resources, policy and strategy. Fahad holds a BSc in Education and Science and an MBA. Prior to commencing his doctoral studies, he was elected an Academic Visitor at St Antony’s College in the University of Oxford. Fahad’s research focus is on the quality of undergraduate medical education for Qatari doctors.

Shawna completed her undergraduate degree in Psycholinguistics at the University of Toronto in Canada, and later completed the MSc program in Applied Linguistics and Second language Acquisition at the University of Oxford.

She has a wide range of experiences in the field of Linguistics as a teaching and research assistant in areas such as theoretical linguistics, phonology, speech-language pathology, language acquisition, and creole studies. Being a native of Jamaica herself, Shawna has carried out extensive work on creole language acquisition. She worked with the University of the West Indies to draft the first Jamaican (Creole) as a Foreign Language course, and with the U.S Peace Corps to assess and revamp an existing language program for volunteers.

Shawna’s current research focuses on the development of writing skills among primary school learners in Jamaica who speak Jamaican Creole as a home language but are educated in English.

Publications
  • Helms-Park, R., Tucker, S, & Dronjic, V. (2016). From proto-writing to multimedia literacy: scripts and orthographies through the ages. In  Chen Bumgardner, V. Dronjic,, & R. Helms-Park (Eds.), Second Language Reading: Psycholinguistic and Cognitive Perspectives (pp. 1-31). New York, NY: Routledge Publishers.
  • Eriks-Brophy, A., Green, S., & Tucker, S. (2013).  Articulatory error patterns and phonological process use of preschool children with and without hearing loss. Volta Review.

Richard Canter is Visiting Professor of Surgical Education in the Nuffield Department of Surgical Sciences, University of Oxford.

Richard Canter qualified in medicine at the University of London in 1976, before becoming a surgeon at the Royal United Hospital, Bath. He completed a PhD in Management at the University of Bath in 1998 studying the nature of power in decision-making at the personal and organisation level in healthcare. Following the critical Kennedy report on surgical training in 2001, he was recruited to the Royal College of Surgeons of England as Deputy Director of Surgical Education with specific responsibility for curriculum development in surgical education in England. He was subsequently Head of the Postgraduate School of Surgery in Bristol until 2012, after which he concentrated on academic work at Oxford. He was appointed a visiting Professor in Oxford in in 2007, Emeritus Consultant at Oxford University Hospitals in 2015, and Associate Fellow at Green Templeton College, Oxford in 2015.

His interests are professionalism and, in particular, its relationship to leadership in healthcare systems. His current specific research interests are the effectiveness or otherwise of leadership education in respect of its impact on quality improvement in healthcare systems.

At the Royal College of Surgeons of England he was clinical lead and Chair of the Needs Analysis Group evaluating educational resources and organisational systems necessary for the implementation of reform of surgical training, and made recommendations for changes that were eventually adopted by all surgical training systems in the United Kingdom. During this appointment an opportunity arose in early 2003 at the end of the Serbian conflict to assist the European Agency for Reconstruction (EAR, a division of the EEC) in providing advice to the Kosovan Ministry of Health to develop new systems for surgical training.

Currently at Oxford, he is lead tutor for the module in Leadership and Management in Healthcare and Deputy Director of the Masters in Surgical Science, and supervises Masters and DPhil students on the subject of organisational change and leadership. In addition he has regular commitments in teaching postgraduate medical trainees and medical faculty on topics such as leadership, quality improvement, educational theory in healthcare, workplace assessments, supporting and talent managing  medical trainees, as well as occasional commitments to supervising students on the Said Business School Global Opportunity and Threats (Oxford) programme in exploring problems in complex systems.

Along the way he has written and spoken on many topics in medicine, obtained research grants, and has unexpectedly been given fellowships and medals. His main interest outside of work is playing music and he runs the Green Templeton College Big Band.

Prior to starting his DPhil, Eddy worked as a primary school teacher in Bristol, where he also completed his MSc in Educational Research.

He is particularly interested in the culture of high stakes, standardised testing, and how this might perpetuate existing inequalities in schools. His research focuses specifically on the interaction between knowledge, policy and pedagogy in the context of Literacy education.

 

Claire (郝煜) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and a China Oxford Scholarship Fund (COSF) scholar.

Claire holds a BA in Education and Physics from the University of Cambridge, an MA in Applied Linguistics from UCL Institution of Education, and an EdM in International Education Policy from Harvard University. She is passionate about exploring and supporting the transnational experiences of bi-/multilingual students in studying abroad contexts. Her research and professional interests include bilingualism, language and identity, international education, professional development, and school leadership.

Since 2015, Claire has served as the Director of International Education at Beijing Xinxuedao Education Group, a non-profit organisation that operates 31 schools with over 30,000 K-12 students in China. She has also worked as a high school counsellor and a teacher of Physics and Psychology.

Publications

Hao, Y. and Lantsman, G. (2022). Motivation in MOOCs: a qualitative study on the design and evaluation of an online IELTS course. The 7th IAFOR International Conference on Education.

Hao, Y. (2020). Education without borders: sojourner trips in students’ holistic development. In Wang, J. (Ed.). Family, Society, and Education. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2020). Learning how to learn: the role of metacognition and self-regulation in learning. In Wang, J. (Ed.). The Virtue of Thinking in Learning. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2019). Chinese students at a UK university: how linguistic repertoire mediates language and sojourner identity construction. Linguistics and Applied Linguistics Conference. Beijing Normal University.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2018). Examining Linguistic Diversity as a Resource for Higher Education in the Anglophone World. In Tong, V. C., Standen, A., & Sotiriou, M. (Ed.). Shaping Higher Education with Students: Ways to Connect Research and Teaching (pp.288-293). UCL Press.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2016). Making the most of linguistic diversity: the views and practices of bi/multilingual postgraduate students. The Multilingual University. ESRC Seminars.

Hao, Y. (2012). A Transformative Journey: China-US exchange student studying at an American high school. New World Press.

Pok Jing (Jane) Ho is a doctoral student at the Department of Education, specialising in educational assessment.

She is funded by the Bei Shan Tang Foundation Scholarship for Graduate Studies.

Her DPhil thesis examines validity in the Hong Kong Diploma of Secondary Education Examination, a large-scale, high-stakes test that informs higher education admissions decisions, using the argument-based approach to validation. In particular, her research identifies the claims made based on test scores, the validity evidence that supports or challenges such claims, and the social consequences that ensue as a result of test use.

Prior to her DPhil, she completed an M.A. in International Education Policy Analysis at Stanford University. She subsequently worked as a project officer at the Education University of Hong Kong, where she is now serving as a consultant alongside her studies.

A former secondary school teacher, Jane also holds a B.A. in English Studies (First Class Honours), a B.Ed. in English Language Education (First Class Honours), and an M.Ed. in Curriculum and Instruction from the Chinese University of Hong Kong, as well as the Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (CELTA) from Cambridge.

She is a Peer Supporter at Green Templeton College.

Publications

Ho, P. J. (2020). For some or for all: Vocational English for Hong Kong secondary school students. In C. Hong, & W. K. Ma (Eds.), Applied degree education and the future of work—Education 4.0 (pp. 87–95). Springer. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-15-3142-2

Ho, P. J. (2015). China-Africa “cooperation” in education. International Politics, 5. https://www.iir.cz/en/china-africa-cooperation-in-education

Jennifer’s DPhil focuses on adoptive families where  the adoptive parents also have birth children. She has worked in adoption support as a Parent Consultant for Adoption UK and as Head of Peer Services at PAC-UK, as well as managing the Adoption UK advice line and the parent training team.

She holds an MSc in Poverty Reduction: Policy and Practice from SOAS, and an MBA from Warwick Business School. She has worked in management consultancy in both the public and private sectors and is a board member of CoramBAAF.

Publications

The Right Tools for the Job. Information Age, November 1996

Global teams for the millennium; Management Decision, 36 (1): 31-33, February 1998

Lucy is a second-year DPhil student, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

Her DPhil research aims to engage in a meaningful and creative way with service children to explore how service life has shaped their experiences of education and sense of self. By choosing this focus, the research seeks to widen and nuance current understanding of service children’s educational experiences in addition to furthering knowledge into how service children see themselves. As a result of this, it is hoped that the research will support in developing the professional body of knowledge and understanding of this group of children in schools and help inform the Service Pupil Premium (SPP) funding choices in addition to wider school practice.

Before embarking on her DPhil at Oxford, Lucy completed her PGCE and MEd in Primary Education at the University of Cambridge. In addition to her DPhil work, Lucy is a Trustee for the Armed Forces Education Trust (AFET) – a grant-giving charity for service children – and a volunteer for the Oxford based charity, Big Brothers Big Sisters.

 

 

Aine is interested in improving the health outcomes of children and young people in the care system.

Fahad is reading for a DPhil in Education (part-time). He has over fifteen years professional experience in the education sector, in particular, higher education.

He has held senior roles in staff and student development, human resources, policy and strategy. Fahad holds a BSc in Education and Science and an MBA. Prior to commencing his doctoral studies, he was elected an Academic Visitor at St Antony’s College in the University of Oxford. Fahad’s research focus is on the quality of undergraduate medical education for Qatari doctors.

Shawna completed her undergraduate degree in Psycholinguistics at the University of Toronto in Canada, and later completed the MSc program in Applied Linguistics and Second language Acquisition at the University of Oxford.

She has a wide range of experiences in the field of Linguistics as a teaching and research assistant in areas such as theoretical linguistics, phonology, speech-language pathology, language acquisition, and creole studies. Being a native of Jamaica herself, Shawna has carried out extensive work on creole language acquisition. She worked with the University of the West Indies to draft the first Jamaican (Creole) as a Foreign Language course, and with the U.S Peace Corps to assess and revamp an existing language program for volunteers.

Shawna’s current research focuses on the development of writing skills among primary school learners in Jamaica who speak Jamaican Creole as a home language but are educated in English.

Publications
  • Helms-Park, R., Tucker, S, & Dronjic, V. (2016). From proto-writing to multimedia literacy: scripts and orthographies through the ages. In  Chen Bumgardner, V. Dronjic,, & R. Helms-Park (Eds.), Second Language Reading: Psycholinguistic and Cognitive Perspectives (pp. 1-31). New York, NY: Routledge Publishers.
  • Eriks-Brophy, A., Green, S., & Tucker, S. (2013).  Articulatory error patterns and phonological process use of preschool children with and without hearing loss. Volta Review.

Richard Canter is Visiting Professor of Surgical Education in the Nuffield Department of Surgical Sciences, University of Oxford.

Richard Canter qualified in medicine at the University of London in 1976, before becoming a surgeon at the Royal United Hospital, Bath. He completed a PhD in Management at the University of Bath in 1998 studying the nature of power in decision-making at the personal and organisation level in healthcare. Following the critical Kennedy report on surgical training in 2001, he was recruited to the Royal College of Surgeons of England as Deputy Director of Surgical Education with specific responsibility for curriculum development in surgical education in England. He was subsequently Head of the Postgraduate School of Surgery in Bristol until 2012, after which he concentrated on academic work at Oxford. He was appointed a visiting Professor in Oxford in in 2007, Emeritus Consultant at Oxford University Hospitals in 2015, and Associate Fellow at Green Templeton College, Oxford in 2015.

His interests are professionalism and, in particular, its relationship to leadership in healthcare systems. His current specific research interests are the effectiveness or otherwise of leadership education in respect of its impact on quality improvement in healthcare systems.

At the Royal College of Surgeons of England he was clinical lead and Chair of the Needs Analysis Group evaluating educational resources and organisational systems necessary for the implementation of reform of surgical training, and made recommendations for changes that were eventually adopted by all surgical training systems in the United Kingdom. During this appointment an opportunity arose in early 2003 at the end of the Serbian conflict to assist the European Agency for Reconstruction (EAR, a division of the EEC) in providing advice to the Kosovan Ministry of Health to develop new systems for surgical training.

Currently at Oxford, he is lead tutor for the module in Leadership and Management in Healthcare and Deputy Director of the Masters in Surgical Science, and supervises Masters and DPhil students on the subject of organisational change and leadership. In addition he has regular commitments in teaching postgraduate medical trainees and medical faculty on topics such as leadership, quality improvement, educational theory in healthcare, workplace assessments, supporting and talent managing  medical trainees, as well as occasional commitments to supervising students on the Said Business School Global Opportunity and Threats (Oxford) programme in exploring problems in complex systems.

Along the way he has written and spoken on many topics in medicine, obtained research grants, and has unexpectedly been given fellowships and medals. His main interest outside of work is playing music and he runs the Green Templeton College Big Band.

Prior to starting his DPhil, Eddy worked as a primary school teacher in Bristol, where he also completed his MSc in Educational Research.

He is particularly interested in the culture of high stakes, standardised testing, and how this might perpetuate existing inequalities in schools. His research focuses specifically on the interaction between knowledge, policy and pedagogy in the context of Literacy education.

 

Claire (郝煜) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and a China Oxford Scholarship Fund (COSF) scholar.

Claire holds a BA in Education and Physics from the University of Cambridge, an MA in Applied Linguistics from UCL Institution of Education, and an EdM in International Education Policy from Harvard University. She is passionate about exploring and supporting the transnational experiences of bi-/multilingual students in studying abroad contexts. Her research and professional interests include bilingualism, language and identity, international education, professional development, and school leadership.

Since 2015, Claire has served as the Director of International Education at Beijing Xinxuedao Education Group, a non-profit organisation that operates 31 schools with over 30,000 K-12 students in China. She has also worked as a high school counsellor and a teacher of Physics and Psychology.

Publications

Hao, Y. and Lantsman, G. (2022). Motivation in MOOCs: a qualitative study on the design and evaluation of an online IELTS course. The 7th IAFOR International Conference on Education.

Hao, Y. (2020). Education without borders: sojourner trips in students’ holistic development. In Wang, J. (Ed.). Family, Society, and Education. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2020). Learning how to learn: the role of metacognition and self-regulation in learning. In Wang, J. (Ed.). The Virtue of Thinking in Learning. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2019). Chinese students at a UK university: how linguistic repertoire mediates language and sojourner identity construction. Linguistics and Applied Linguistics Conference. Beijing Normal University.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2018). Examining Linguistic Diversity as a Resource for Higher Education in the Anglophone World. In Tong, V. C., Standen, A., & Sotiriou, M. (Ed.). Shaping Higher Education with Students: Ways to Connect Research and Teaching (pp.288-293). UCL Press.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2016). Making the most of linguistic diversity: the views and practices of bi/multilingual postgraduate students. The Multilingual University. ESRC Seminars.

Hao, Y. (2012). A Transformative Journey: China-US exchange student studying at an American high school. New World Press.

Pok Jing (Jane) Ho is a doctoral student at the Department of Education, specialising in educational assessment.

She is funded by the Bei Shan Tang Foundation Scholarship for Graduate Studies.

Her DPhil thesis examines validity in the Hong Kong Diploma of Secondary Education Examination, a large-scale, high-stakes test that informs higher education admissions decisions, using the argument-based approach to validation. In particular, her research identifies the claims made based on test scores, the validity evidence that supports or challenges such claims, and the social consequences that ensue as a result of test use.

Prior to her DPhil, she completed an M.A. in International Education Policy Analysis at Stanford University. She subsequently worked as a project officer at the Education University of Hong Kong, where she is now serving as a consultant alongside her studies.

A former secondary school teacher, Jane also holds a B.A. in English Studies (First Class Honours), a B.Ed. in English Language Education (First Class Honours), and an M.Ed. in Curriculum and Instruction from the Chinese University of Hong Kong, as well as the Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (CELTA) from Cambridge.

She is a Peer Supporter at Green Templeton College.

Publications

Ho, P. J. (2020). For some or for all: Vocational English for Hong Kong secondary school students. In C. Hong, & W. K. Ma (Eds.), Applied degree education and the future of work—Education 4.0 (pp. 87–95). Springer. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-15-3142-2

Ho, P. J. (2015). China-Africa “cooperation” in education. International Politics, 5. https://www.iir.cz/en/china-africa-cooperation-in-education

Jennifer’s DPhil focuses on adoptive families where  the adoptive parents also have birth children. She has worked in adoption support as a Parent Consultant for Adoption UK and as Head of Peer Services at PAC-UK, as well as managing the Adoption UK advice line and the parent training team.

She holds an MSc in Poverty Reduction: Policy and Practice from SOAS, and an MBA from Warwick Business School. She has worked in management consultancy in both the public and private sectors and is a board member of CoramBAAF.

Publications

The Right Tools for the Job. Information Age, November 1996

Global teams for the millennium; Management Decision, 36 (1): 31-33, February 1998

Lucy is a second-year DPhil student, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

Her DPhil research aims to engage in a meaningful and creative way with service children to explore how service life has shaped their experiences of education and sense of self. By choosing this focus, the research seeks to widen and nuance current understanding of service children’s educational experiences in addition to furthering knowledge into how service children see themselves. As a result of this, it is hoped that the research will support in developing the professional body of knowledge and understanding of this group of children in schools and help inform the Service Pupil Premium (SPP) funding choices in addition to wider school practice.

Before embarking on her DPhil at Oxford, Lucy completed her PGCE and MEd in Primary Education at the University of Cambridge. In addition to her DPhil work, Lucy is a Trustee for the Armed Forces Education Trust (AFET) – a grant-giving charity for service children – and a volunteer for the Oxford based charity, Big Brothers Big Sisters.

 

 

Aine is interested in improving the health outcomes of children and young people in the care system.

Fahad is reading for a DPhil in Education (part-time). He has over fifteen years professional experience in the education sector, in particular, higher education.

He has held senior roles in staff and student development, human resources, policy and strategy. Fahad holds a BSc in Education and Science and an MBA. Prior to commencing his doctoral studies, he was elected an Academic Visitor at St Antony’s College in the University of Oxford. Fahad’s research focus is on the quality of undergraduate medical education for Qatari doctors.

Shawna completed her undergraduate degree in Psycholinguistics at the University of Toronto in Canada, and later completed the MSc program in Applied Linguistics and Second language Acquisition at the University of Oxford.

She has a wide range of experiences in the field of Linguistics as a teaching and research assistant in areas such as theoretical linguistics, phonology, speech-language pathology, language acquisition, and creole studies. Being a native of Jamaica herself, Shawna has carried out extensive work on creole language acquisition. She worked with the University of the West Indies to draft the first Jamaican (Creole) as a Foreign Language course, and with the U.S Peace Corps to assess and revamp an existing language program for volunteers.

Shawna’s current research focuses on the development of writing skills among primary school learners in Jamaica who speak Jamaican Creole as a home language but are educated in English.

Publications
  • Helms-Park, R., Tucker, S, & Dronjic, V. (2016). From proto-writing to multimedia literacy: scripts and orthographies through the ages. In  Chen Bumgardner, V. Dronjic,, & R. Helms-Park (Eds.), Second Language Reading: Psycholinguistic and Cognitive Perspectives (pp. 1-31). New York, NY: Routledge Publishers.
  • Eriks-Brophy, A., Green, S., & Tucker, S. (2013).  Articulatory error patterns and phonological process use of preschool children with and without hearing loss. Volta Review.

Richard Canter is Visiting Professor of Surgical Education in the Nuffield Department of Surgical Sciences, University of Oxford.

Richard Canter qualified in medicine at the University of London in 1976, before becoming a surgeon at the Royal United Hospital, Bath. He completed a PhD in Management at the University of Bath in 1998 studying the nature of power in decision-making at the personal and organisation level in healthcare. Following the critical Kennedy report on surgical training in 2001, he was recruited to the Royal College of Surgeons of England as Deputy Director of Surgical Education with specific responsibility for curriculum development in surgical education in England. He was subsequently Head of the Postgraduate School of Surgery in Bristol until 2012, after which he concentrated on academic work at Oxford. He was appointed a visiting Professor in Oxford in in 2007, Emeritus Consultant at Oxford University Hospitals in 2015, and Associate Fellow at Green Templeton College, Oxford in 2015.

His interests are professionalism and, in particular, its relationship to leadership in healthcare systems. His current specific research interests are the effectiveness or otherwise of leadership education in respect of its impact on quality improvement in healthcare systems.

At the Royal College of Surgeons of England he was clinical lead and Chair of the Needs Analysis Group evaluating educational resources and organisational systems necessary for the implementation of reform of surgical training, and made recommendations for changes that were eventually adopted by all surgical training systems in the United Kingdom. During this appointment an opportunity arose in early 2003 at the end of the Serbian conflict to assist the European Agency for Reconstruction (EAR, a division of the EEC) in providing advice to the Kosovan Ministry of Health to develop new systems for surgical training.

Currently at Oxford, he is lead tutor for the module in Leadership and Management in Healthcare and Deputy Director of the Masters in Surgical Science, and supervises Masters and DPhil students on the subject of organisational change and leadership. In addition he has regular commitments in teaching postgraduate medical trainees and medical faculty on topics such as leadership, quality improvement, educational theory in healthcare, workplace assessments, supporting and talent managing  medical trainees, as well as occasional commitments to supervising students on the Said Business School Global Opportunity and Threats (Oxford) programme in exploring problems in complex systems.

Along the way he has written and spoken on many topics in medicine, obtained research grants, and has unexpectedly been given fellowships and medals. His main interest outside of work is playing music and he runs the Green Templeton College Big Band.

Prior to starting his DPhil, Eddy worked as a primary school teacher in Bristol, where he also completed his MSc in Educational Research.

He is particularly interested in the culture of high stakes, standardised testing, and how this might perpetuate existing inequalities in schools. His research focuses specifically on the interaction between knowledge, policy and pedagogy in the context of Literacy education.

 

Claire (郝煜) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and a China Oxford Scholarship Fund (COSF) scholar.

Claire holds a BA in Education and Physics from the University of Cambridge, an MA in Applied Linguistics from UCL Institution of Education, and an EdM in International Education Policy from Harvard University. She is passionate about exploring and supporting the transnational experiences of bi-/multilingual students in studying abroad contexts. Her research and professional interests include bilingualism, language and identity, international education, professional development, and school leadership.

Since 2015, Claire has served as the Director of International Education at Beijing Xinxuedao Education Group, a non-profit organisation that operates 31 schools with over 30,000 K-12 students in China. She has also worked as a high school counsellor and a teacher of Physics and Psychology.

Publications

Hao, Y. and Lantsman, G. (2022). Motivation in MOOCs: a qualitative study on the design and evaluation of an online IELTS course. The 7th IAFOR International Conference on Education.

Hao, Y. (2020). Education without borders: sojourner trips in students’ holistic development. In Wang, J. (Ed.). Family, Society, and Education. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2020). Learning how to learn: the role of metacognition and self-regulation in learning. In Wang, J. (Ed.). The Virtue of Thinking in Learning. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2019). Chinese students at a UK university: how linguistic repertoire mediates language and sojourner identity construction. Linguistics and Applied Linguistics Conference. Beijing Normal University.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2018). Examining Linguistic Diversity as a Resource for Higher Education in the Anglophone World. In Tong, V. C., Standen, A., & Sotiriou, M. (Ed.). Shaping Higher Education with Students: Ways to Connect Research and Teaching (pp.288-293). UCL Press.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2016). Making the most of linguistic diversity: the views and practices of bi/multilingual postgraduate students. The Multilingual University. ESRC Seminars.

Hao, Y. (2012). A Transformative Journey: China-US exchange student studying at an American high school. New World Press.

Pok Jing (Jane) Ho is a doctoral student at the Department of Education, specialising in educational assessment.

She is funded by the Bei Shan Tang Foundation Scholarship for Graduate Studies.

Her DPhil thesis examines validity in the Hong Kong Diploma of Secondary Education Examination, a large-scale, high-stakes test that informs higher education admissions decisions, using the argument-based approach to validation. In particular, her research identifies the claims made based on test scores, the validity evidence that supports or challenges such claims, and the social consequences that ensue as a result of test use.

Prior to her DPhil, she completed an M.A. in International Education Policy Analysis at Stanford University. She subsequently worked as a project officer at the Education University of Hong Kong, where she is now serving as a consultant alongside her studies.

A former secondary school teacher, Jane also holds a B.A. in English Studies (First Class Honours), a B.Ed. in English Language Education (First Class Honours), and an M.Ed. in Curriculum and Instruction from the Chinese University of Hong Kong, as well as the Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (CELTA) from Cambridge.

She is a Peer Supporter at Green Templeton College.

Publications

Ho, P. J. (2020). For some or for all: Vocational English for Hong Kong secondary school students. In C. Hong, & W. K. Ma (Eds.), Applied degree education and the future of work—Education 4.0 (pp. 87–95). Springer. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-15-3142-2

Ho, P. J. (2015). China-Africa “cooperation” in education. International Politics, 5. https://www.iir.cz/en/china-africa-cooperation-in-education

Jennifer’s DPhil focuses on adoptive families where  the adoptive parents also have birth children. She has worked in adoption support as a Parent Consultant for Adoption UK and as Head of Peer Services at PAC-UK, as well as managing the Adoption UK advice line and the parent training team.

She holds an MSc in Poverty Reduction: Policy and Practice from SOAS, and an MBA from Warwick Business School. She has worked in management consultancy in both the public and private sectors and is a board member of CoramBAAF.

Publications

The Right Tools for the Job. Information Age, November 1996

Global teams for the millennium; Management Decision, 36 (1): 31-33, February 1998

Lucy is a second-year DPhil student, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

Her DPhil research aims to engage in a meaningful and creative way with service children to explore how service life has shaped their experiences of education and sense of self. By choosing this focus, the research seeks to widen and nuance current understanding of service children’s educational experiences in addition to furthering knowledge into how service children see themselves. As a result of this, it is hoped that the research will support in developing the professional body of knowledge and understanding of this group of children in schools and help inform the Service Pupil Premium (SPP) funding choices in addition to wider school practice.

Before embarking on her DPhil at Oxford, Lucy completed her PGCE and MEd in Primary Education at the University of Cambridge. In addition to her DPhil work, Lucy is a Trustee for the Armed Forces Education Trust (AFET) – a grant-giving charity for service children – and a volunteer for the Oxford based charity, Big Brothers Big Sisters.

 

 

Aine is interested in improving the health outcomes of children and young people in the care system.

Fahad is reading for a DPhil in Education (part-time). He has over fifteen years professional experience in the education sector, in particular, higher education.

He has held senior roles in staff and student development, human resources, policy and strategy. Fahad holds a BSc in Education and Science and an MBA. Prior to commencing his doctoral studies, he was elected an Academic Visitor at St Antony’s College in the University of Oxford. Fahad’s research focus is on the quality of undergraduate medical education for Qatari doctors.

Shawna completed her undergraduate degree in Psycholinguistics at the University of Toronto in Canada, and later completed the MSc program in Applied Linguistics and Second language Acquisition at the University of Oxford.

She has a wide range of experiences in the field of Linguistics as a teaching and research assistant in areas such as theoretical linguistics, phonology, speech-language pathology, language acquisition, and creole studies. Being a native of Jamaica herself, Shawna has carried out extensive work on creole language acquisition. She worked with the University of the West Indies to draft the first Jamaican (Creole) as a Foreign Language course, and with the U.S Peace Corps to assess and revamp an existing language program for volunteers.

Shawna’s current research focuses on the development of writing skills among primary school learners in Jamaica who speak Jamaican Creole as a home language but are educated in English.

Publications
  • Helms-Park, R., Tucker, S, & Dronjic, V. (2016). From proto-writing to multimedia literacy: scripts and orthographies through the ages. In  Chen Bumgardner, V. Dronjic,, & R. Helms-Park (Eds.), Second Language Reading: Psycholinguistic and Cognitive Perspectives (pp. 1-31). New York, NY: Routledge Publishers.
  • Eriks-Brophy, A., Green, S., & Tucker, S. (2013).  Articulatory error patterns and phonological process use of preschool children with and without hearing loss. Volta Review.

Richard Canter is Visiting Professor of Surgical Education in the Nuffield Department of Surgical Sciences, University of Oxford.

Richard Canter qualified in medicine at the University of London in 1976, before becoming a surgeon at the Royal United Hospital, Bath. He completed a PhD in Management at the University of Bath in 1998 studying the nature of power in decision-making at the personal and organisation level in healthcare. Following the critical Kennedy report on surgical training in 2001, he was recruited to the Royal College of Surgeons of England as Deputy Director of Surgical Education with specific responsibility for curriculum development in surgical education in England. He was subsequently Head of the Postgraduate School of Surgery in Bristol until 2012, after which he concentrated on academic work at Oxford. He was appointed a visiting Professor in Oxford in in 2007, Emeritus Consultant at Oxford University Hospitals in 2015, and Associate Fellow at Green Templeton College, Oxford in 2015.

His interests are professionalism and, in particular, its relationship to leadership in healthcare systems. His current specific research interests are the effectiveness or otherwise of leadership education in respect of its impact on quality improvement in healthcare systems.

At the Royal College of Surgeons of England he was clinical lead and Chair of the Needs Analysis Group evaluating educational resources and organisational systems necessary for the implementation of reform of surgical training, and made recommendations for changes that were eventually adopted by all surgical training systems in the United Kingdom. During this appointment an opportunity arose in early 2003 at the end of the Serbian conflict to assist the European Agency for Reconstruction (EAR, a division of the EEC) in providing advice to the Kosovan Ministry of Health to develop new systems for surgical training.

Currently at Oxford, he is lead tutor for the module in Leadership and Management in Healthcare and Deputy Director of the Masters in Surgical Science, and supervises Masters and DPhil students on the subject of organisational change and leadership. In addition he has regular commitments in teaching postgraduate medical trainees and medical faculty on topics such as leadership, quality improvement, educational theory in healthcare, workplace assessments, supporting and talent managing  medical trainees, as well as occasional commitments to supervising students on the Said Business School Global Opportunity and Threats (Oxford) programme in exploring problems in complex systems.

Along the way he has written and spoken on many topics in medicine, obtained research grants, and has unexpectedly been given fellowships and medals. His main interest outside of work is playing music and he runs the Green Templeton College Big Band.

Prior to starting his DPhil, Eddy worked as a primary school teacher in Bristol, where he also completed his MSc in Educational Research.

He is particularly interested in the culture of high stakes, standardised testing, and how this might perpetuate existing inequalities in schools. His research focuses specifically on the interaction between knowledge, policy and pedagogy in the context of Literacy education.

 

Claire (郝煜) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and a China Oxford Scholarship Fund (COSF) scholar.

Claire holds a BA in Education and Physics from the University of Cambridge, an MA in Applied Linguistics from UCL Institution of Education, and an EdM in International Education Policy from Harvard University. She is passionate about exploring and supporting the transnational experiences of bi-/multilingual students in studying abroad contexts. Her research and professional interests include bilingualism, language and identity, international education, professional development, and school leadership.

Since 2015, Claire has served as the Director of International Education at Beijing Xinxuedao Education Group, a non-profit organisation that operates 31 schools with over 30,000 K-12 students in China. She has also worked as a high school counsellor and a teacher of Physics and Psychology.

Publications

Hao, Y. and Lantsman, G. (2022). Motivation in MOOCs: a qualitative study on the design and evaluation of an online IELTS course. The 7th IAFOR International Conference on Education.

Hao, Y. (2020). Education without borders: sojourner trips in students’ holistic development. In Wang, J. (Ed.). Family, Society, and Education. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2020). Learning how to learn: the role of metacognition and self-regulation in learning. In Wang, J. (Ed.). The Virtue of Thinking in Learning. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2019). Chinese students at a UK university: how linguistic repertoire mediates language and sojourner identity construction. Linguistics and Applied Linguistics Conference. Beijing Normal University.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2018). Examining Linguistic Diversity as a Resource for Higher Education in the Anglophone World. In Tong, V. C., Standen, A., & Sotiriou, M. (Ed.). Shaping Higher Education with Students: Ways to Connect Research and Teaching (pp.288-293). UCL Press.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2016). Making the most of linguistic diversity: the views and practices of bi/multilingual postgraduate students. The Multilingual University. ESRC Seminars.

Hao, Y. (2012). A Transformative Journey: China-US exchange student studying at an American high school. New World Press.

Pok Jing (Jane) Ho is a doctoral student at the Department of Education, specialising in educational assessment.

She is funded by the Bei Shan Tang Foundation Scholarship for Graduate Studies.

Her DPhil thesis examines validity in the Hong Kong Diploma of Secondary Education Examination, a large-scale, high-stakes test that informs higher education admissions decisions, using the argument-based approach to validation. In particular, her research identifies the claims made based on test scores, the validity evidence that supports or challenges such claims, and the social consequences that ensue as a result of test use.

Prior to her DPhil, she completed an M.A. in International Education Policy Analysis at Stanford University. She subsequently worked as a project officer at the Education University of Hong Kong, where she is now serving as a consultant alongside her studies.

A former secondary school teacher, Jane also holds a B.A. in English Studies (First Class Honours), a B.Ed. in English Language Education (First Class Honours), and an M.Ed. in Curriculum and Instruction from the Chinese University of Hong Kong, as well as the Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (CELTA) from Cambridge.

She is a Peer Supporter at Green Templeton College.

Publications

Ho, P. J. (2020). For some or for all: Vocational English for Hong Kong secondary school students. In C. Hong, & W. K. Ma (Eds.), Applied degree education and the future of work—Education 4.0 (pp. 87–95). Springer. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-15-3142-2

Ho, P. J. (2015). China-Africa “cooperation” in education. International Politics, 5. https://www.iir.cz/en/china-africa-cooperation-in-education

Jennifer’s DPhil focuses on adoptive families where  the adoptive parents also have birth children. She has worked in adoption support as a Parent Consultant for Adoption UK and as Head of Peer Services at PAC-UK, as well as managing the Adoption UK advice line and the parent training team.

She holds an MSc in Poverty Reduction: Policy and Practice from SOAS, and an MBA from Warwick Business School. She has worked in management consultancy in both the public and private sectors and is a board member of CoramBAAF.

Publications

The Right Tools for the Job. Information Age, November 1996

Global teams for the millennium; Management Decision, 36 (1): 31-33, February 1998

Lucy is a second-year DPhil student, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

Her DPhil research aims to engage in a meaningful and creative way with service children to explore how service life has shaped their experiences of education and sense of self. By choosing this focus, the research seeks to widen and nuance current understanding of service children’s educational experiences in addition to furthering knowledge into how service children see themselves. As a result of this, it is hoped that the research will support in developing the professional body of knowledge and understanding of this group of children in schools and help inform the Service Pupil Premium (SPP) funding choices in addition to wider school practice.

Before embarking on her DPhil at Oxford, Lucy completed her PGCE and MEd in Primary Education at the University of Cambridge. In addition to her DPhil work, Lucy is a Trustee for the Armed Forces Education Trust (AFET) – a grant-giving charity for service children – and a volunteer for the Oxford based charity, Big Brothers Big Sisters.

 

 

Aine is interested in improving the health outcomes of children and young people in the care system.

Fahad is reading for a DPhil in Education (part-time). He has over fifteen years professional experience in the education sector, in particular, higher education.

He has held senior roles in staff and student development, human resources, policy and strategy. Fahad holds a BSc in Education and Science and an MBA. Prior to commencing his doctoral studies, he was elected an Academic Visitor at St Antony’s College in the University of Oxford. Fahad’s research focus is on the quality of undergraduate medical education for Qatari doctors.

Shawna completed her undergraduate degree in Psycholinguistics at the University of Toronto in Canada, and later completed the MSc program in Applied Linguistics and Second language Acquisition at the University of Oxford.

She has a wide range of experiences in the field of Linguistics as a teaching and research assistant in areas such as theoretical linguistics, phonology, speech-language pathology, language acquisition, and creole studies. Being a native of Jamaica herself, Shawna has carried out extensive work on creole language acquisition. She worked with the University of the West Indies to draft the first Jamaican (Creole) as a Foreign Language course, and with the U.S Peace Corps to assess and revamp an existing language program for volunteers.

Shawna’s current research focuses on the development of writing skills among primary school learners in Jamaica who speak Jamaican Creole as a home language but are educated in English.

Publications
  • Helms-Park, R., Tucker, S, & Dronjic, V. (2016). From proto-writing to multimedia literacy: scripts and orthographies through the ages. In  Chen Bumgardner, V. Dronjic,, & R. Helms-Park (Eds.), Second Language Reading: Psycholinguistic and Cognitive Perspectives (pp. 1-31). New York, NY: Routledge Publishers.
  • Eriks-Brophy, A., Green, S., & Tucker, S. (2013).  Articulatory error patterns and phonological process use of preschool children with and without hearing loss. Volta Review.

Richard Canter is Visiting Professor of Surgical Education in the Nuffield Department of Surgical Sciences, University of Oxford.

Richard Canter qualified in medicine at the University of London in 1976, before becoming a surgeon at the Royal United Hospital, Bath. He completed a PhD in Management at the University of Bath in 1998 studying the nature of power in decision-making at the personal and organisation level in healthcare. Following the critical Kennedy report on surgical training in 2001, he was recruited to the Royal College of Surgeons of England as Deputy Director of Surgical Education with specific responsibility for curriculum development in surgical education in England. He was subsequently Head of the Postgraduate School of Surgery in Bristol until 2012, after which he concentrated on academic work at Oxford. He was appointed a visiting Professor in Oxford in in 2007, Emeritus Consultant at Oxford University Hospitals in 2015, and Associate Fellow at Green Templeton College, Oxford in 2015.

His interests are professionalism and, in particular, its relationship to leadership in healthcare systems. His current specific research interests are the effectiveness or otherwise of leadership education in respect of its impact on quality improvement in healthcare systems.

At the Royal College of Surgeons of England he was clinical lead and Chair of the Needs Analysis Group evaluating educational resources and organisational systems necessary for the implementation of reform of surgical training, and made recommendations for changes that were eventually adopted by all surgical training systems in the United Kingdom. During this appointment an opportunity arose in early 2003 at the end of the Serbian conflict to assist the European Agency for Reconstruction (EAR, a division of the EEC) in providing advice to the Kosovan Ministry of Health to develop new systems for surgical training.

Currently at Oxford, he is lead tutor for the module in Leadership and Management in Healthcare and Deputy Director of the Masters in Surgical Science, and supervises Masters and DPhil students on the subject of organisational change and leadership. In addition he has regular commitments in teaching postgraduate medical trainees and medical faculty on topics such as leadership, quality improvement, educational theory in healthcare, workplace assessments, supporting and talent managing  medical trainees, as well as occasional commitments to supervising students on the Said Business School Global Opportunity and Threats (Oxford) programme in exploring problems in complex systems.

Along the way he has written and spoken on many topics in medicine, obtained research grants, and has unexpectedly been given fellowships and medals. His main interest outside of work is playing music and he runs the Green Templeton College Big Band.

Prior to starting his DPhil, Eddy worked as a primary school teacher in Bristol, where he also completed his MSc in Educational Research.

He is particularly interested in the culture of high stakes, standardised testing, and how this might perpetuate existing inequalities in schools. His research focuses specifically on the interaction between knowledge, policy and pedagogy in the context of Literacy education.

 

Claire (郝煜) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and a China Oxford Scholarship Fund (COSF) scholar.

Claire holds a BA in Education and Physics from the University of Cambridge, an MA in Applied Linguistics from UCL Institution of Education, and an EdM in International Education Policy from Harvard University. She is passionate about exploring and supporting the transnational experiences of bi-/multilingual students in studying abroad contexts. Her research and professional interests include bilingualism, language and identity, international education, professional development, and school leadership.

Since 2015, Claire has served as the Director of International Education at Beijing Xinxuedao Education Group, a non-profit organisation that operates 31 schools with over 30,000 K-12 students in China. She has also worked as a high school counsellor and a teacher of Physics and Psychology.

Publications

Hao, Y. and Lantsman, G. (2022). Motivation in MOOCs: a qualitative study on the design and evaluation of an online IELTS course. The 7th IAFOR International Conference on Education.

Hao, Y. (2020). Education without borders: sojourner trips in students’ holistic development. In Wang, J. (Ed.). Family, Society, and Education. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2020). Learning how to learn: the role of metacognition and self-regulation in learning. In Wang, J. (Ed.). The Virtue of Thinking in Learning. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2019). Chinese students at a UK university: how linguistic repertoire mediates language and sojourner identity construction. Linguistics and Applied Linguistics Conference. Beijing Normal University.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2018). Examining Linguistic Diversity as a Resource for Higher Education in the Anglophone World. In Tong, V. C., Standen, A., & Sotiriou, M. (Ed.). Shaping Higher Education with Students: Ways to Connect Research and Teaching (pp.288-293). UCL Press.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2016). Making the most of linguistic diversity: the views and practices of bi/multilingual postgraduate students. The Multilingual University. ESRC Seminars.

Hao, Y. (2012). A Transformative Journey: China-US exchange student studying at an American high school. New World Press.

Pok Jing (Jane) Ho is a doctoral student at the Department of Education, specialising in educational assessment.

She is funded by the Bei Shan Tang Foundation Scholarship for Graduate Studies.

Her DPhil thesis examines validity in the Hong Kong Diploma of Secondary Education Examination, a large-scale, high-stakes test that informs higher education admissions decisions, using the argument-based approach to validation. In particular, her research identifies the claims made based on test scores, the validity evidence that supports or challenges such claims, and the social consequences that ensue as a result of test use.

Prior to her DPhil, she completed an M.A. in International Education Policy Analysis at Stanford University. She subsequently worked as a project officer at the Education University of Hong Kong, where she is now serving as a consultant alongside her studies.

A former secondary school teacher, Jane also holds a B.A. in English Studies (First Class Honours), a B.Ed. in English Language Education (First Class Honours), and an M.Ed. in Curriculum and Instruction from the Chinese University of Hong Kong, as well as the Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (CELTA) from Cambridge.

She is a Peer Supporter at Green Templeton College.

Publications

Ho, P. J. (2020). For some or for all: Vocational English for Hong Kong secondary school students. In C. Hong, & W. K. Ma (Eds.), Applied degree education and the future of work—Education 4.0 (pp. 87–95). Springer. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-15-3142-2

Ho, P. J. (2015). China-Africa “cooperation” in education. International Politics, 5. https://www.iir.cz/en/china-africa-cooperation-in-education

Jennifer’s DPhil focuses on adoptive families where  the adoptive parents also have birth children. She has worked in adoption support as a Parent Consultant for Adoption UK and as Head of Peer Services at PAC-UK, as well as managing the Adoption UK advice line and the parent training team.

She holds an MSc in Poverty Reduction: Policy and Practice from SOAS, and an MBA from Warwick Business School. She has worked in management consultancy in both the public and private sectors and is a board member of CoramBAAF.

Publications

The Right Tools for the Job. Information Age, November 1996

Global teams for the millennium; Management Decision, 36 (1): 31-33, February 1998

Lucy is a second-year DPhil student, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

Her DPhil research aims to engage in a meaningful and creative way with service children to explore how service life has shaped their experiences of education and sense of self. By choosing this focus, the research seeks to widen and nuance current understanding of service children’s educational experiences in addition to furthering knowledge into how service children see themselves. As a result of this, it is hoped that the research will support in developing the professional body of knowledge and understanding of this group of children in schools and help inform the Service Pupil Premium (SPP) funding choices in addition to wider school practice.

Before embarking on her DPhil at Oxford, Lucy completed her PGCE and MEd in Primary Education at the University of Cambridge. In addition to her DPhil work, Lucy is a Trustee for the Armed Forces Education Trust (AFET) – a grant-giving charity for service children – and a volunteer for the Oxford based charity, Big Brothers Big Sisters.

 

 

Aine is interested in improving the health outcomes of children and young people in the care system.

Fahad is reading for a DPhil in Education (part-time). He has over fifteen years professional experience in the education sector, in particular, higher education.

He has held senior roles in staff and student development, human resources, policy and strategy. Fahad holds a BSc in Education and Science and an MBA. Prior to commencing his doctoral studies, he was elected an Academic Visitor at St Antony’s College in the University of Oxford. Fahad’s research focus is on the quality of undergraduate medical education for Qatari doctors.

Shawna completed her undergraduate degree in Psycholinguistics at the University of Toronto in Canada, and later completed the MSc program in Applied Linguistics and Second language Acquisition at the University of Oxford.

She has a wide range of experiences in the field of Linguistics as a teaching and research assistant in areas such as theoretical linguistics, phonology, speech-language pathology, language acquisition, and creole studies. Being a native of Jamaica herself, Shawna has carried out extensive work on creole language acquisition. She worked with the University of the West Indies to draft the first Jamaican (Creole) as a Foreign Language course, and with the U.S Peace Corps to assess and revamp an existing language program for volunteers.

Shawna’s current research focuses on the development of writing skills among primary school learners in Jamaica who speak Jamaican Creole as a home language but are educated in English.

Publications
  • Helms-Park, R., Tucker, S, & Dronjic, V. (2016). From proto-writing to multimedia literacy: scripts and orthographies through the ages. In  Chen Bumgardner, V. Dronjic,, & R. Helms-Park (Eds.), Second Language Reading: Psycholinguistic and Cognitive Perspectives (pp. 1-31). New York, NY: Routledge Publishers.
  • Eriks-Brophy, A., Green, S., & Tucker, S. (2013).  Articulatory error patterns and phonological process use of preschool children with and without hearing loss. Volta Review.

Richard Canter is Visiting Professor of Surgical Education in the Nuffield Department of Surgical Sciences, University of Oxford.

Richard Canter qualified in medicine at the University of London in 1976, before becoming a surgeon at the Royal United Hospital, Bath. He completed a PhD in Management at the University of Bath in 1998 studying the nature of power in decision-making at the personal and organisation level in healthcare. Following the critical Kennedy report on surgical training in 2001, he was recruited to the Royal College of Surgeons of England as Deputy Director of Surgical Education with specific responsibility for curriculum development in surgical education in England. He was subsequently Head of the Postgraduate School of Surgery in Bristol until 2012, after which he concentrated on academic work at Oxford. He was appointed a visiting Professor in Oxford in in 2007, Emeritus Consultant at Oxford University Hospitals in 2015, and Associate Fellow at Green Templeton College, Oxford in 2015.

His interests are professionalism and, in particular, its relationship to leadership in healthcare systems. His current specific research interests are the effectiveness or otherwise of leadership education in respect of its impact on quality improvement in healthcare systems.

At the Royal College of Surgeons of England he was clinical lead and Chair of the Needs Analysis Group evaluating educational resources and organisational systems necessary for the implementation of reform of surgical training, and made recommendations for changes that were eventually adopted by all surgical training systems in the United Kingdom. During this appointment an opportunity arose in early 2003 at the end of the Serbian conflict to assist the European Agency for Reconstruction (EAR, a division of the EEC) in providing advice to the Kosovan Ministry of Health to develop new systems for surgical training.

Currently at Oxford, he is lead tutor for the module in Leadership and Management in Healthcare and Deputy Director of the Masters in Surgical Science, and supervises Masters and DPhil students on the subject of organisational change and leadership. In addition he has regular commitments in teaching postgraduate medical trainees and medical faculty on topics such as leadership, quality improvement, educational theory in healthcare, workplace assessments, supporting and talent managing  medical trainees, as well as occasional commitments to supervising students on the Said Business School Global Opportunity and Threats (Oxford) programme in exploring problems in complex systems.

Along the way he has written and spoken on many topics in medicine, obtained research grants, and has unexpectedly been given fellowships and medals. His main interest outside of work is playing music and he runs the Green Templeton College Big Band.

Prior to starting his DPhil, Eddy worked as a primary school teacher in Bristol, where he also completed his MSc in Educational Research.

He is particularly interested in the culture of high stakes, standardised testing, and how this might perpetuate existing inequalities in schools. His research focuses specifically on the interaction between knowledge, policy and pedagogy in the context of Literacy education.

 

Claire (郝煜) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and a China Oxford Scholarship Fund (COSF) scholar.

Claire holds a BA in Education and Physics from the University of Cambridge, an MA in Applied Linguistics from UCL Institution of Education, and an EdM in International Education Policy from Harvard University. She is passionate about exploring and supporting the transnational experiences of bi-/multilingual students in studying abroad contexts. Her research and professional interests include bilingualism, language and identity, international education, professional development, and school leadership.

Since 2015, Claire has served as the Director of International Education at Beijing Xinxuedao Education Group, a non-profit organisation that operates 31 schools with over 30,000 K-12 students in China. She has also worked as a high school counsellor and a teacher of Physics and Psychology.

Publications

Hao, Y. and Lantsman, G. (2022). Motivation in MOOCs: a qualitative study on the design and evaluation of an online IELTS course. The 7th IAFOR International Conference on Education.

Hao, Y. (2020). Education without borders: sojourner trips in students’ holistic development. In Wang, J. (Ed.). Family, Society, and Education. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2020). Learning how to learn: the role of metacognition and self-regulation in learning. In Wang, J. (Ed.). The Virtue of Thinking in Learning. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2019). Chinese students at a UK university: how linguistic repertoire mediates language and sojourner identity construction. Linguistics and Applied Linguistics Conference. Beijing Normal University.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2018). Examining Linguistic Diversity as a Resource for Higher Education in the Anglophone World. In Tong, V. C., Standen, A., & Sotiriou, M. (Ed.). Shaping Higher Education with Students: Ways to Connect Research and Teaching (pp.288-293). UCL Press.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2016). Making the most of linguistic diversity: the views and practices of bi/multilingual postgraduate students. The Multilingual University. ESRC Seminars.

Hao, Y. (2012). A Transformative Journey: China-US exchange student studying at an American high school. New World Press.

Pok Jing (Jane) Ho is a doctoral student at the Department of Education, specialising in educational assessment.

She is funded by the Bei Shan Tang Foundation Scholarship for Graduate Studies.

Her DPhil thesis examines validity in the Hong Kong Diploma of Secondary Education Examination, a large-scale, high-stakes test that informs higher education admissions decisions, using the argument-based approach to validation. In particular, her research identifies the claims made based on test scores, the validity evidence that supports or challenges such claims, and the social consequences that ensue as a result of test use.

Prior to her DPhil, she completed an M.A. in International Education Policy Analysis at Stanford University. She subsequently worked as a project officer at the Education University of Hong Kong, where she is now serving as a consultant alongside her studies.

A former secondary school teacher, Jane also holds a B.A. in English Studies (First Class Honours), a B.Ed. in English Language Education (First Class Honours), and an M.Ed. in Curriculum and Instruction from the Chinese University of Hong Kong, as well as the Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (CELTA) from Cambridge.

She is a Peer Supporter at Green Templeton College.

Publications

Ho, P. J. (2020). For some or for all: Vocational English for Hong Kong secondary school students. In C. Hong, & W. K. Ma (Eds.), Applied degree education and the future of work—Education 4.0 (pp. 87–95). Springer. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-15-3142-2

Ho, P. J. (2015). China-Africa “cooperation” in education. International Politics, 5. https://www.iir.cz/en/china-africa-cooperation-in-education

Jennifer’s DPhil focuses on adoptive families where  the adoptive parents also have birth children. She has worked in adoption support as a Parent Consultant for Adoption UK and as Head of Peer Services at PAC-UK, as well as managing the Adoption UK advice line and the parent training team.

She holds an MSc in Poverty Reduction: Policy and Practice from SOAS, and an MBA from Warwick Business School. She has worked in management consultancy in both the public and private sectors and is a board member of CoramBAAF.

Publications

The Right Tools for the Job. Information Age, November 1996

Global teams for the millennium; Management Decision, 36 (1): 31-33, February 1998

Lucy is a second-year DPhil student, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

Her DPhil research aims to engage in a meaningful and creative way with service children to explore how service life has shaped their experiences of education and sense of self. By choosing this focus, the research seeks to widen and nuance current understanding of service children’s educational experiences in addition to furthering knowledge into how service children see themselves. As a result of this, it is hoped that the research will support in developing the professional body of knowledge and understanding of this group of children in schools and help inform the Service Pupil Premium (SPP) funding choices in addition to wider school practice.

Before embarking on her DPhil at Oxford, Lucy completed her PGCE and MEd in Primary Education at the University of Cambridge. In addition to her DPhil work, Lucy is a Trustee for the Armed Forces Education Trust (AFET) – a grant-giving charity for service children – and a volunteer for the Oxford based charity, Big Brothers Big Sisters.

 

 

Aine is interested in improving the health outcomes of children and young people in the care system.

Fahad is reading for a DPhil in Education (part-time). He has over fifteen years professional experience in the education sector, in particular, higher education.

He has held senior roles in staff and student development, human resources, policy and strategy. Fahad holds a BSc in Education and Science and an MBA. Prior to commencing his doctoral studies, he was elected an Academic Visitor at St Antony’s College in the University of Oxford. Fahad’s research focus is on the quality of undergraduate medical education for Qatari doctors.

Shawna completed her undergraduate degree in Psycholinguistics at the University of Toronto in Canada, and later completed the MSc program in Applied Linguistics and Second language Acquisition at the University of Oxford.

She has a wide range of experiences in the field of Linguistics as a teaching and research assistant in areas such as theoretical linguistics, phonology, speech-language pathology, language acquisition, and creole studies. Being a native of Jamaica herself, Shawna has carried out extensive work on creole language acquisition. She worked with the University of the West Indies to draft the first Jamaican (Creole) as a Foreign Language course, and with the U.S Peace Corps to assess and revamp an existing language program for volunteers.

Shawna’s current research focuses on the development of writing skills among primary school learners in Jamaica who speak Jamaican Creole as a home language but are educated in English.

Publications
  • Helms-Park, R., Tucker, S, & Dronjic, V. (2016). From proto-writing to multimedia literacy: scripts and orthographies through the ages. In  Chen Bumgardner, V. Dronjic,, & R. Helms-Park (Eds.), Second Language Reading: Psycholinguistic and Cognitive Perspectives (pp. 1-31). New York, NY: Routledge Publishers.
  • Eriks-Brophy, A., Green, S., & Tucker, S. (2013).  Articulatory error patterns and phonological process use of preschool children with and without hearing loss. Volta Review.

Richard Canter is Visiting Professor of Surgical Education in the Nuffield Department of Surgical Sciences, University of Oxford.

Richard Canter qualified in medicine at the University of London in 1976, before becoming a surgeon at the Royal United Hospital, Bath. He completed a PhD in Management at the University of Bath in 1998 studying the nature of power in decision-making at the personal and organisation level in healthcare. Following the critical Kennedy report on surgical training in 2001, he was recruited to the Royal College of Surgeons of England as Deputy Director of Surgical Education with specific responsibility for curriculum development in surgical education in England. He was subsequently Head of the Postgraduate School of Surgery in Bristol until 2012, after which he concentrated on academic work at Oxford. He was appointed a visiting Professor in Oxford in in 2007, Emeritus Consultant at Oxford University Hospitals in 2015, and Associate Fellow at Green Templeton College, Oxford in 2015.

His interests are professionalism and, in particular, its relationship to leadership in healthcare systems. His current specific research interests are the effectiveness or otherwise of leadership education in respect of its impact on quality improvement in healthcare systems.

At the Royal College of Surgeons of England he was clinical lead and Chair of the Needs Analysis Group evaluating educational resources and organisational systems necessary for the implementation of reform of surgical training, and made recommendations for changes that were eventually adopted by all surgical training systems in the United Kingdom. During this appointment an opportunity arose in early 2003 at the end of the Serbian conflict to assist the European Agency for Reconstruction (EAR, a division of the EEC) in providing advice to the Kosovan Ministry of Health to develop new systems for surgical training.

Currently at Oxford, he is lead tutor for the module in Leadership and Management in Healthcare and Deputy Director of the Masters in Surgical Science, and supervises Masters and DPhil students on the subject of organisational change and leadership. In addition he has regular commitments in teaching postgraduate medical trainees and medical faculty on topics such as leadership, quality improvement, educational theory in healthcare, workplace assessments, supporting and talent managing  medical trainees, as well as occasional commitments to supervising students on the Said Business School Global Opportunity and Threats (Oxford) programme in exploring problems in complex systems.

Along the way he has written and spoken on many topics in medicine, obtained research grants, and has unexpectedly been given fellowships and medals. His main interest outside of work is playing music and he runs the Green Templeton College Big Band.

Prior to starting his DPhil, Eddy worked as a primary school teacher in Bristol, where he also completed his MSc in Educational Research.

He is particularly interested in the culture of high stakes, standardised testing, and how this might perpetuate existing inequalities in schools. His research focuses specifically on the interaction between knowledge, policy and pedagogy in the context of Literacy education.

 

Claire (郝煜) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and a China Oxford Scholarship Fund (COSF) scholar.

Claire holds a BA in Education and Physics from the University of Cambridge, an MA in Applied Linguistics from UCL Institution of Education, and an EdM in International Education Policy from Harvard University. She is passionate about exploring and supporting the transnational experiences of bi-/multilingual students in studying abroad contexts. Her research and professional interests include bilingualism, language and identity, international education, professional development, and school leadership.

Since 2015, Claire has served as the Director of International Education at Beijing Xinxuedao Education Group, a non-profit organisation that operates 31 schools with over 30,000 K-12 students in China. She has also worked as a high school counsellor and a teacher of Physics and Psychology.

Publications

Hao, Y. and Lantsman, G. (2022). Motivation in MOOCs: a qualitative study on the design and evaluation of an online IELTS course. The 7th IAFOR International Conference on Education.

Hao, Y. (2020). Education without borders: sojourner trips in students’ holistic development. In Wang, J. (Ed.). Family, Society, and Education. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2020). Learning how to learn: the role of metacognition and self-regulation in learning. In Wang, J. (Ed.). The Virtue of Thinking in Learning. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2019). Chinese students at a UK university: how linguistic repertoire mediates language and sojourner identity construction. Linguistics and Applied Linguistics Conference. Beijing Normal University.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2018). Examining Linguistic Diversity as a Resource for Higher Education in the Anglophone World. In Tong, V. C., Standen, A., & Sotiriou, M. (Ed.). Shaping Higher Education with Students: Ways to Connect Research and Teaching (pp.288-293). UCL Press.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2016). Making the most of linguistic diversity: the views and practices of bi/multilingual postgraduate students. The Multilingual University. ESRC Seminars.

Hao, Y. (2012). A Transformative Journey: China-US exchange student studying at an American high school. New World Press.

Pok Jing (Jane) Ho is a doctoral student at the Department of Education, specialising in educational assessment.

She is funded by the Bei Shan Tang Foundation Scholarship for Graduate Studies.

Her DPhil thesis examines validity in the Hong Kong Diploma of Secondary Education Examination, a large-scale, high-stakes test that informs higher education admissions decisions, using the argument-based approach to validation. In particular, her research identifies the claims made based on test scores, the validity evidence that supports or challenges such claims, and the social consequences that ensue as a result of test use.

Prior to her DPhil, she completed an M.A. in International Education Policy Analysis at Stanford University. She subsequently worked as a project officer at the Education University of Hong Kong, where she is now serving as a consultant alongside her studies.

A former secondary school teacher, Jane also holds a B.A. in English Studies (First Class Honours), a B.Ed. in English Language Education (First Class Honours), and an M.Ed. in Curriculum and Instruction from the Chinese University of Hong Kong, as well as the Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (CELTA) from Cambridge.

She is a Peer Supporter at Green Templeton College.

Publications

Ho, P. J. (2020). For some or for all: Vocational English for Hong Kong secondary school students. In C. Hong, & W. K. Ma (Eds.), Applied degree education and the future of work—Education 4.0 (pp. 87–95). Springer. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-15-3142-2

Ho, P. J. (2015). China-Africa “cooperation” in education. International Politics, 5. https://www.iir.cz/en/china-africa-cooperation-in-education

Jennifer’s DPhil focuses on adoptive families where  the adoptive parents also have birth children. She has worked in adoption support as a Parent Consultant for Adoption UK and as Head of Peer Services at PAC-UK, as well as managing the Adoption UK advice line and the parent training team.

She holds an MSc in Poverty Reduction: Policy and Practice from SOAS, and an MBA from Warwick Business School. She has worked in management consultancy in both the public and private sectors and is a board member of CoramBAAF.

Publications

The Right Tools for the Job. Information Age, November 1996

Global teams for the millennium; Management Decision, 36 (1): 31-33, February 1998

Lucy is a second-year DPhil student, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

Her DPhil research aims to engage in a meaningful and creative way with service children to explore how service life has shaped their experiences of education and sense of self. By choosing this focus, the research seeks to widen and nuance current understanding of service children’s educational experiences in addition to furthering knowledge into how service children see themselves. As a result of this, it is hoped that the research will support in developing the professional body of knowledge and understanding of this group of children in schools and help inform the Service Pupil Premium (SPP) funding choices in addition to wider school practice.

Before embarking on her DPhil at Oxford, Lucy completed her PGCE and MEd in Primary Education at the University of Cambridge. In addition to her DPhil work, Lucy is a Trustee for the Armed Forces Education Trust (AFET) – a grant-giving charity for service children – and a volunteer for the Oxford based charity, Big Brothers Big Sisters.

 

 

Aine is interested in improving the health outcomes of children and young people in the care system.

Fahad is reading for a DPhil in Education (part-time). He has over fifteen years professional experience in the education sector, in particular, higher education.

He has held senior roles in staff and student development, human resources, policy and strategy. Fahad holds a BSc in Education and Science and an MBA. Prior to commencing his doctoral studies, he was elected an Academic Visitor at St Antony’s College in the University of Oxford. Fahad’s research focus is on the quality of undergraduate medical education for Qatari doctors.

Shawna completed her undergraduate degree in Psycholinguistics at the University of Toronto in Canada, and later completed the MSc program in Applied Linguistics and Second language Acquisition at the University of Oxford.

She has a wide range of experiences in the field of Linguistics as a teaching and research assistant in areas such as theoretical linguistics, phonology, speech-language pathology, language acquisition, and creole studies. Being a native of Jamaica herself, Shawna has carried out extensive work on creole language acquisition. She worked with the University of the West Indies to draft the first Jamaican (Creole) as a Foreign Language course, and with the U.S Peace Corps to assess and revamp an existing language program for volunteers.

Shawna’s current research focuses on the development of writing skills among primary school learners in Jamaica who speak Jamaican Creole as a home language but are educated in English.

Publications
  • Helms-Park, R., Tucker, S, & Dronjic, V. (2016). From proto-writing to multimedia literacy: scripts and orthographies through the ages. In  Chen Bumgardner, V. Dronjic,, & R. Helms-Park (Eds.), Second Language Reading: Psycholinguistic and Cognitive Perspectives (pp. 1-31). New York, NY: Routledge Publishers.
  • Eriks-Brophy, A., Green, S., & Tucker, S. (2013).  Articulatory error patterns and phonological process use of preschool children with and without hearing loss. Volta Review.

Richard Canter is Visiting Professor of Surgical Education in the Nuffield Department of Surgical Sciences, University of Oxford.

Richard Canter qualified in medicine at the University of London in 1976, before becoming a surgeon at the Royal United Hospital, Bath. He completed a PhD in Management at the University of Bath in 1998 studying the nature of power in decision-making at the personal and organisation level in healthcare. Following the critical Kennedy report on surgical training in 2001, he was recruited to the Royal College of Surgeons of England as Deputy Director of Surgical Education with specific responsibility for curriculum development in surgical education in England. He was subsequently Head of the Postgraduate School of Surgery in Bristol until 2012, after which he concentrated on academic work at Oxford. He was appointed a visiting Professor in Oxford in in 2007, Emeritus Consultant at Oxford University Hospitals in 2015, and Associate Fellow at Green Templeton College, Oxford in 2015.

His interests are professionalism and, in particular, its relationship to leadership in healthcare systems. His current specific research interests are the effectiveness or otherwise of leadership education in respect of its impact on quality improvement in healthcare systems.

At the Royal College of Surgeons of England he was clinical lead and Chair of the Needs Analysis Group evaluating educational resources and organisational systems necessary for the implementation of reform of surgical training, and made recommendations for changes that were eventually adopted by all surgical training systems in the United Kingdom. During this appointment an opportunity arose in early 2003 at the end of the Serbian conflict to assist the European Agency for Reconstruction (EAR, a division of the EEC) in providing advice to the Kosovan Ministry of Health to develop new systems for surgical training.

Currently at Oxford, he is lead tutor for the module in Leadership and Management in Healthcare and Deputy Director of the Masters in Surgical Science, and supervises Masters and DPhil students on the subject of organisational change and leadership. In addition he has regular commitments in teaching postgraduate medical trainees and medical faculty on topics such as leadership, quality improvement, educational theory in healthcare, workplace assessments, supporting and talent managing  medical trainees, as well as occasional commitments to supervising students on the Said Business School Global Opportunity and Threats (Oxford) programme in exploring problems in complex systems.

Along the way he has written and spoken on many topics in medicine, obtained research grants, and has unexpectedly been given fellowships and medals. His main interest outside of work is playing music and he runs the Green Templeton College Big Band.

Prior to starting his DPhil, Eddy worked as a primary school teacher in Bristol, where he also completed his MSc in Educational Research.

He is particularly interested in the culture of high stakes, standardised testing, and how this might perpetuate existing inequalities in schools. His research focuses specifically on the interaction between knowledge, policy and pedagogy in the context of Literacy education.

 

Claire (郝煜) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and a China Oxford Scholarship Fund (COSF) scholar.

Claire holds a BA in Education and Physics from the University of Cambridge, an MA in Applied Linguistics from UCL Institution of Education, and an EdM in International Education Policy from Harvard University. She is passionate about exploring and supporting the transnational experiences of bi-/multilingual students in studying abroad contexts. Her research and professional interests include bilingualism, language and identity, international education, professional development, and school leadership.

Since 2015, Claire has served as the Director of International Education at Beijing Xinxuedao Education Group, a non-profit organisation that operates 31 schools with over 30,000 K-12 students in China. She has also worked as a high school counsellor and a teacher of Physics and Psychology.

Publications

Hao, Y. and Lantsman, G. (2022). Motivation in MOOCs: a qualitative study on the design and evaluation of an online IELTS course. The 7th IAFOR International Conference on Education.

Hao, Y. (2020). Education without borders: sojourner trips in students’ holistic development. In Wang, J. (Ed.). Family, Society, and Education. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2020). Learning how to learn: the role of metacognition and self-regulation in learning. In Wang, J. (Ed.). The Virtue of Thinking in Learning. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2019). Chinese students at a UK university: how linguistic repertoire mediates language and sojourner identity construction. Linguistics and Applied Linguistics Conference. Beijing Normal University.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2018). Examining Linguistic Diversity as a Resource for Higher Education in the Anglophone World. In Tong, V. C., Standen, A., & Sotiriou, M. (Ed.). Shaping Higher Education with Students: Ways to Connect Research and Teaching (pp.288-293). UCL Press.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2016). Making the most of linguistic diversity: the views and practices of bi/multilingual postgraduate students. The Multilingual University. ESRC Seminars.

Hao, Y. (2012). A Transformative Journey: China-US exchange student studying at an American high school. New World Press.

Pok Jing (Jane) Ho is a doctoral student at the Department of Education, specialising in educational assessment.

She is funded by the Bei Shan Tang Foundation Scholarship for Graduate Studies.

Her DPhil thesis examines validity in the Hong Kong Diploma of Secondary Education Examination, a large-scale, high-stakes test that informs higher education admissions decisions, using the argument-based approach to validation. In particular, her research identifies the claims made based on test scores, the validity evidence that supports or challenges such claims, and the social consequences that ensue as a result of test use.

Prior to her DPhil, she completed an M.A. in International Education Policy Analysis at Stanford University. She subsequently worked as a project officer at the Education University of Hong Kong, where she is now serving as a consultant alongside her studies.

A former secondary school teacher, Jane also holds a B.A. in English Studies (First Class Honours), a B.Ed. in English Language Education (First Class Honours), and an M.Ed. in Curriculum and Instruction from the Chinese University of Hong Kong, as well as the Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (CELTA) from Cambridge.

She is a Peer Supporter at Green Templeton College.

Publications

Ho, P. J. (2020). For some or for all: Vocational English for Hong Kong secondary school students. In C. Hong, & W. K. Ma (Eds.), Applied degree education and the future of work—Education 4.0 (pp. 87–95). Springer. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-15-3142-2

Ho, P. J. (2015). China-Africa “cooperation” in education. International Politics, 5. https://www.iir.cz/en/china-africa-cooperation-in-education

Jennifer’s DPhil focuses on adoptive families where  the adoptive parents also have birth children. She has worked in adoption support as a Parent Consultant for Adoption UK and as Head of Peer Services at PAC-UK, as well as managing the Adoption UK advice line and the parent training team.

She holds an MSc in Poverty Reduction: Policy and Practice from SOAS, and an MBA from Warwick Business School. She has worked in management consultancy in both the public and private sectors and is a board member of CoramBAAF.

Publications

The Right Tools for the Job. Information Age, November 1996

Global teams for the millennium; Management Decision, 36 (1): 31-33, February 1998

Lucy is a second-year DPhil student, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

Her DPhil research aims to engage in a meaningful and creative way with service children to explore how service life has shaped their experiences of education and sense of self. By choosing this focus, the research seeks to widen and nuance current understanding of service children’s educational experiences in addition to furthering knowledge into how service children see themselves. As a result of this, it is hoped that the research will support in developing the professional body of knowledge and understanding of this group of children in schools and help inform the Service Pupil Premium (SPP) funding choices in addition to wider school practice.

Before embarking on her DPhil at Oxford, Lucy completed her PGCE and MEd in Primary Education at the University of Cambridge. In addition to her DPhil work, Lucy is a Trustee for the Armed Forces Education Trust (AFET) – a grant-giving charity for service children – and a volunteer for the Oxford based charity, Big Brothers Big Sisters.

 

 

Aine is interested in improving the health outcomes of children and young people in the care system.

Fahad is reading for a DPhil in Education (part-time). He has over fifteen years professional experience in the education sector, in particular, higher education.

He has held senior roles in staff and student development, human resources, policy and strategy. Fahad holds a BSc in Education and Science and an MBA. Prior to commencing his doctoral studies, he was elected an Academic Visitor at St Antony’s College in the University of Oxford. Fahad’s research focus is on the quality of undergraduate medical education for Qatari doctors.

Shawna completed her undergraduate degree in Psycholinguistics at the University of Toronto in Canada, and later completed the MSc program in Applied Linguistics and Second language Acquisition at the University of Oxford.

She has a wide range of experiences in the field of Linguistics as a teaching and research assistant in areas such as theoretical linguistics, phonology, speech-language pathology, language acquisition, and creole studies. Being a native of Jamaica herself, Shawna has carried out extensive work on creole language acquisition. She worked with the University of the West Indies to draft the first Jamaican (Creole) as a Foreign Language course, and with the U.S Peace Corps to assess and revamp an existing language program for volunteers.

Shawna’s current research focuses on the development of writing skills among primary school learners in Jamaica who speak Jamaican Creole as a home language but are educated in English.

Publications
  • Helms-Park, R., Tucker, S, & Dronjic, V. (2016). From proto-writing to multimedia literacy: scripts and orthographies through the ages. In  Chen Bumgardner, V. Dronjic,, & R. Helms-Park (Eds.), Second Language Reading: Psycholinguistic and Cognitive Perspectives (pp. 1-31). New York, NY: Routledge Publishers.
  • Eriks-Brophy, A., Green, S., & Tucker, S. (2013).  Articulatory error patterns and phonological process use of preschool children with and without hearing loss. Volta Review.

Richard Canter is Visiting Professor of Surgical Education in the Nuffield Department of Surgical Sciences, University of Oxford.

Richard Canter qualified in medicine at the University of London in 1976, before becoming a surgeon at the Royal United Hospital, Bath. He completed a PhD in Management at the University of Bath in 1998 studying the nature of power in decision-making at the personal and organisation level in healthcare. Following the critical Kennedy report on surgical training in 2001, he was recruited to the Royal College of Surgeons of England as Deputy Director of Surgical Education with specific responsibility for curriculum development in surgical education in England. He was subsequently Head of the Postgraduate School of Surgery in Bristol until 2012, after which he concentrated on academic work at Oxford. He was appointed a visiting Professor in Oxford in in 2007, Emeritus Consultant at Oxford University Hospitals in 2015, and Associate Fellow at Green Templeton College, Oxford in 2015.

His interests are professionalism and, in particular, its relationship to leadership in healthcare systems. His current specific research interests are the effectiveness or otherwise of leadership education in respect of its impact on quality improvement in healthcare systems.

At the Royal College of Surgeons of England he was clinical lead and Chair of the Needs Analysis Group evaluating educational resources and organisational systems necessary for the implementation of reform of surgical training, and made recommendations for changes that were eventually adopted by all surgical training systems in the United Kingdom. During this appointment an opportunity arose in early 2003 at the end of the Serbian conflict to assist the European Agency for Reconstruction (EAR, a division of the EEC) in providing advice to the Kosovan Ministry of Health to develop new systems for surgical training.

Currently at Oxford, he is lead tutor for the module in Leadership and Management in Healthcare and Deputy Director of the Masters in Surgical Science, and supervises Masters and DPhil students on the subject of organisational change and leadership. In addition he has regular commitments in teaching postgraduate medical trainees and medical faculty on topics such as leadership, quality improvement, educational theory in healthcare, workplace assessments, supporting and talent managing  medical trainees, as well as occasional commitments to supervising students on the Said Business School Global Opportunity and Threats (Oxford) programme in exploring problems in complex systems.

Along the way he has written and spoken on many topics in medicine, obtained research grants, and has unexpectedly been given fellowships and medals. His main interest outside of work is playing music and he runs the Green Templeton College Big Band.

Prior to starting his DPhil, Eddy worked as a primary school teacher in Bristol, where he also completed his MSc in Educational Research.

He is particularly interested in the culture of high stakes, standardised testing, and how this might perpetuate existing inequalities in schools. His research focuses specifically on the interaction between knowledge, policy and pedagogy in the context of Literacy education.

 

Claire (郝煜) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and a China Oxford Scholarship Fund (COSF) scholar.

Claire holds a BA in Education and Physics from the University of Cambridge, an MA in Applied Linguistics from UCL Institution of Education, and an EdM in International Education Policy from Harvard University. She is passionate about exploring and supporting the transnational experiences of bi-/multilingual students in studying abroad contexts. Her research and professional interests include bilingualism, language and identity, international education, professional development, and school leadership.

Since 2015, Claire has served as the Director of International Education at Beijing Xinxuedao Education Group, a non-profit organisation that operates 31 schools with over 30,000 K-12 students in China. She has also worked as a high school counsellor and a teacher of Physics and Psychology.

Publications

Hao, Y. and Lantsman, G. (2022). Motivation in MOOCs: a qualitative study on the design and evaluation of an online IELTS course. The 7th IAFOR International Conference on Education.

Hao, Y. (2020). Education without borders: sojourner trips in students’ holistic development. In Wang, J. (Ed.). Family, Society, and Education. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2020). Learning how to learn: the role of metacognition and self-regulation in learning. In Wang, J. (Ed.). The Virtue of Thinking in Learning. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2019). Chinese students at a UK university: how linguistic repertoire mediates language and sojourner identity construction. Linguistics and Applied Linguistics Conference. Beijing Normal University.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2018). Examining Linguistic Diversity as a Resource for Higher Education in the Anglophone World. In Tong, V. C., Standen, A., & Sotiriou, M. (Ed.). Shaping Higher Education with Students: Ways to Connect Research and Teaching (pp.288-293). UCL Press.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2016). Making the most of linguistic diversity: the views and practices of bi/multilingual postgraduate students. The Multilingual University. ESRC Seminars.

Hao, Y. (2012). A Transformative Journey: China-US exchange student studying at an American high school. New World Press.

Pok Jing (Jane) Ho is a doctoral student at the Department of Education, specialising in educational assessment.

She is funded by the Bei Shan Tang Foundation Scholarship for Graduate Studies.

Her DPhil thesis examines validity in the Hong Kong Diploma of Secondary Education Examination, a large-scale, high-stakes test that informs higher education admissions decisions, using the argument-based approach to validation. In particular, her research identifies the claims made based on test scores, the validity evidence that supports or challenges such claims, and the social consequences that ensue as a result of test use.

Prior to her DPhil, she completed an M.A. in International Education Policy Analysis at Stanford University. She subsequently worked as a project officer at the Education University of Hong Kong, where she is now serving as a consultant alongside her studies.

A former secondary school teacher, Jane also holds a B.A. in English Studies (First Class Honours), a B.Ed. in English Language Education (First Class Honours), and an M.Ed. in Curriculum and Instruction from the Chinese University of Hong Kong, as well as the Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (CELTA) from Cambridge.

She is a Peer Supporter at Green Templeton College.

Publications

Ho, P. J. (2020). For some or for all: Vocational English for Hong Kong secondary school students. In C. Hong, & W. K. Ma (Eds.), Applied degree education and the future of work—Education 4.0 (pp. 87–95). Springer. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-15-3142-2

Ho, P. J. (2015). China-Africa “cooperation” in education. International Politics, 5. https://www.iir.cz/en/china-africa-cooperation-in-education

Jennifer’s DPhil focuses on adoptive families where  the adoptive parents also have birth children. She has worked in adoption support as a Parent Consultant for Adoption UK and as Head of Peer Services at PAC-UK, as well as managing the Adoption UK advice line and the parent training team.

She holds an MSc in Poverty Reduction: Policy and Practice from SOAS, and an MBA from Warwick Business School. She has worked in management consultancy in both the public and private sectors and is a board member of CoramBAAF.

Publications

The Right Tools for the Job. Information Age, November 1996

Global teams for the millennium; Management Decision, 36 (1): 31-33, February 1998

Lucy is a second-year DPhil student, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

Her DPhil research aims to engage in a meaningful and creative way with service children to explore how service life has shaped their experiences of education and sense of self. By choosing this focus, the research seeks to widen and nuance current understanding of service children’s educational experiences in addition to furthering knowledge into how service children see themselves. As a result of this, it is hoped that the research will support in developing the professional body of knowledge and understanding of this group of children in schools and help inform the Service Pupil Premium (SPP) funding choices in addition to wider school practice.

Before embarking on her DPhil at Oxford, Lucy completed her PGCE and MEd in Primary Education at the University of Cambridge. In addition to her DPhil work, Lucy is a Trustee for the Armed Forces Education Trust (AFET) – a grant-giving charity for service children – and a volunteer for the Oxford based charity, Big Brothers Big Sisters.

 

 

Aine is interested in improving the health outcomes of children and young people in the care system.

Fahad is reading for a DPhil in Education (part-time). He has over fifteen years professional experience in the education sector, in particular, higher education.

He has held senior roles in staff and student development, human resources, policy and strategy. Fahad holds a BSc in Education and Science and an MBA. Prior to commencing his doctoral studies, he was elected an Academic Visitor at St Antony’s College in the University of Oxford. Fahad’s research focus is on the quality of undergraduate medical education for Qatari doctors.

Shawna completed her undergraduate degree in Psycholinguistics at the University of Toronto in Canada, and later completed the MSc program in Applied Linguistics and Second language Acquisition at the University of Oxford.

She has a wide range of experiences in the field of Linguistics as a teaching and research assistant in areas such as theoretical linguistics, phonology, speech-language pathology, language acquisition, and creole studies. Being a native of Jamaica herself, Shawna has carried out extensive work on creole language acquisition. She worked with the University of the West Indies to draft the first Jamaican (Creole) as a Foreign Language course, and with the U.S Peace Corps to assess and revamp an existing language program for volunteers.

Shawna’s current research focuses on the development of writing skills among primary school learners in Jamaica who speak Jamaican Creole as a home language but are educated in English.

Publications
  • Helms-Park, R., Tucker, S, & Dronjic, V. (2016). From proto-writing to multimedia literacy: scripts and orthographies through the ages. In  Chen Bumgardner, V. Dronjic,, & R. Helms-Park (Eds.), Second Language Reading: Psycholinguistic and Cognitive Perspectives (pp. 1-31). New York, NY: Routledge Publishers.
  • Eriks-Brophy, A., Green, S., & Tucker, S. (2013).  Articulatory error patterns and phonological process use of preschool children with and without hearing loss. Volta Review.

Richard Canter is Visiting Professor of Surgical Education in the Nuffield Department of Surgical Sciences, University of Oxford.

Richard Canter qualified in medicine at the University of London in 1976, before becoming a surgeon at the Royal United Hospital, Bath. He completed a PhD in Management at the University of Bath in 1998 studying the nature of power in decision-making at the personal and organisation level in healthcare. Following the critical Kennedy report on surgical training in 2001, he was recruited to the Royal College of Surgeons of England as Deputy Director of Surgical Education with specific responsibility for curriculum development in surgical education in England. He was subsequently Head of the Postgraduate School of Surgery in Bristol until 2012, after which he concentrated on academic work at Oxford. He was appointed a visiting Professor in Oxford in in 2007, Emeritus Consultant at Oxford University Hospitals in 2015, and Associate Fellow at Green Templeton College, Oxford in 2015.

His interests are professionalism and, in particular, its relationship to leadership in healthcare systems. His current specific research interests are the effectiveness or otherwise of leadership education in respect of its impact on quality improvement in healthcare systems.

At the Royal College of Surgeons of England he was clinical lead and Chair of the Needs Analysis Group evaluating educational resources and organisational systems necessary for the implementation of reform of surgical training, and made recommendations for changes that were eventually adopted by all surgical training systems in the United Kingdom. During this appointment an opportunity arose in early 2003 at the end of the Serbian conflict to assist the European Agency for Reconstruction (EAR, a division of the EEC) in providing advice to the Kosovan Ministry of Health to develop new systems for surgical training.

Currently at Oxford, he is lead tutor for the module in Leadership and Management in Healthcare and Deputy Director of the Masters in Surgical Science, and supervises Masters and DPhil students on the subject of organisational change and leadership. In addition he has regular commitments in teaching postgraduate medical trainees and medical faculty on topics such as leadership, quality improvement, educational theory in healthcare, workplace assessments, supporting and talent managing  medical trainees, as well as occasional commitments to supervising students on the Said Business School Global Opportunity and Threats (Oxford) programme in exploring problems in complex systems.

Along the way he has written and spoken on many topics in medicine, obtained research grants, and has unexpectedly been given fellowships and medals. His main interest outside of work is playing music and he runs the Green Templeton College Big Band.

Prior to starting his DPhil, Eddy worked as a primary school teacher in Bristol, where he also completed his MSc in Educational Research.

He is particularly interested in the culture of high stakes, standardised testing, and how this might perpetuate existing inequalities in schools. His research focuses specifically on the interaction between knowledge, policy and pedagogy in the context of Literacy education.

 

Claire (郝煜) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and a China Oxford Scholarship Fund (COSF) scholar.

Claire holds a BA in Education and Physics from the University of Cambridge, an MA in Applied Linguistics from UCL Institution of Education, and an EdM in International Education Policy from Harvard University. She is passionate about exploring and supporting the transnational experiences of bi-/multilingual students in studying abroad contexts. Her research and professional interests include bilingualism, language and identity, international education, professional development, and school leadership.

Since 2015, Claire has served as the Director of International Education at Beijing Xinxuedao Education Group, a non-profit organisation that operates 31 schools with over 30,000 K-12 students in China. She has also worked as a high school counsellor and a teacher of Physics and Psychology.

Publications

Hao, Y. and Lantsman, G. (2022). Motivation in MOOCs: a qualitative study on the design and evaluation of an online IELTS course. The 7th IAFOR International Conference on Education.

Hao, Y. (2020). Education without borders: sojourner trips in students’ holistic development. In Wang, J. (Ed.). Family, Society, and Education. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2020). Learning how to learn: the role of metacognition and self-regulation in learning. In Wang, J. (Ed.). The Virtue of Thinking in Learning. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2019). Chinese students at a UK university: how linguistic repertoire mediates language and sojourner identity construction. Linguistics and Applied Linguistics Conference. Beijing Normal University.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2018). Examining Linguistic Diversity as a Resource for Higher Education in the Anglophone World. In Tong, V. C., Standen, A., & Sotiriou, M. (Ed.). Shaping Higher Education with Students: Ways to Connect Research and Teaching (pp.288-293). UCL Press.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2016). Making the most of linguistic diversity: the views and practices of bi/multilingual postgraduate students. The Multilingual University. ESRC Seminars.

Hao, Y. (2012). A Transformative Journey: China-US exchange student studying at an American high school. New World Press.

Pok Jing (Jane) Ho is a doctoral student at the Department of Education, specialising in educational assessment.

She is funded by the Bei Shan Tang Foundation Scholarship for Graduate Studies.

Her DPhil thesis examines validity in the Hong Kong Diploma of Secondary Education Examination, a large-scale, high-stakes test that informs higher education admissions decisions, using the argument-based approach to validation. In particular, her research identifies the claims made based on test scores, the validity evidence that supports or challenges such claims, and the social consequences that ensue as a result of test use.

Prior to her DPhil, she completed an M.A. in International Education Policy Analysis at Stanford University. She subsequently worked as a project officer at the Education University of Hong Kong, where she is now serving as a consultant alongside her studies.

A former secondary school teacher, Jane also holds a B.A. in English Studies (First Class Honours), a B.Ed. in English Language Education (First Class Honours), and an M.Ed. in Curriculum and Instruction from the Chinese University of Hong Kong, as well as the Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (CELTA) from Cambridge.

She is a Peer Supporter at Green Templeton College.

Publications

Ho, P. J. (2020). For some or for all: Vocational English for Hong Kong secondary school students. In C. Hong, & W. K. Ma (Eds.), Applied degree education and the future of work—Education 4.0 (pp. 87–95). Springer. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-15-3142-2

Ho, P. J. (2015). China-Africa “cooperation” in education. International Politics, 5. https://www.iir.cz/en/china-africa-cooperation-in-education

Jennifer’s DPhil focuses on adoptive families where  the adoptive parents also have birth children. She has worked in adoption support as a Parent Consultant for Adoption UK and as Head of Peer Services at PAC-UK, as well as managing the Adoption UK advice line and the parent training team.

She holds an MSc in Poverty Reduction: Policy and Practice from SOAS, and an MBA from Warwick Business School. She has worked in management consultancy in both the public and private sectors and is a board member of CoramBAAF.

Publications

The Right Tools for the Job. Information Age, November 1996

Global teams for the millennium; Management Decision, 36 (1): 31-33, February 1998

Lucy is a second-year DPhil student, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

Her DPhil research aims to engage in a meaningful and creative way with service children to explore how service life has shaped their experiences of education and sense of self. By choosing this focus, the research seeks to widen and nuance current understanding of service children’s educational experiences in addition to furthering knowledge into how service children see themselves. As a result of this, it is hoped that the research will support in developing the professional body of knowledge and understanding of this group of children in schools and help inform the Service Pupil Premium (SPP) funding choices in addition to wider school practice.

Before embarking on her DPhil at Oxford, Lucy completed her PGCE and MEd in Primary Education at the University of Cambridge. In addition to her DPhil work, Lucy is a Trustee for the Armed Forces Education Trust (AFET) – a grant-giving charity for service children – and a volunteer for the Oxford based charity, Big Brothers Big Sisters.

 

 

Aine is interested in improving the health outcomes of children and young people in the care system.

Fahad is reading for a DPhil in Education (part-time). He has over fifteen years professional experience in the education sector, in particular, higher education.

He has held senior roles in staff and student development, human resources, policy and strategy. Fahad holds a BSc in Education and Science and an MBA. Prior to commencing his doctoral studies, he was elected an Academic Visitor at St Antony’s College in the University of Oxford. Fahad’s research focus is on the quality of undergraduate medical education for Qatari doctors.

Shawna completed her undergraduate degree in Psycholinguistics at the University of Toronto in Canada, and later completed the MSc program in Applied Linguistics and Second language Acquisition at the University of Oxford.

She has a wide range of experiences in the field of Linguistics as a teaching and research assistant in areas such as theoretical linguistics, phonology, speech-language pathology, language acquisition, and creole studies. Being a native of Jamaica herself, Shawna has carried out extensive work on creole language acquisition. She worked with the University of the West Indies to draft the first Jamaican (Creole) as a Foreign Language course, and with the U.S Peace Corps to assess and revamp an existing language program for volunteers.

Shawna’s current research focuses on the development of writing skills among primary school learners in Jamaica who speak Jamaican Creole as a home language but are educated in English.

Publications
  • Helms-Park, R., Tucker, S, & Dronjic, V. (2016). From proto-writing to multimedia literacy: scripts and orthographies through the ages. In  Chen Bumgardner, V. Dronjic,, & R. Helms-Park (Eds.), Second Language Reading: Psycholinguistic and Cognitive Perspectives (pp. 1-31). New York, NY: Routledge Publishers.
  • Eriks-Brophy, A., Green, S., & Tucker, S. (2013).  Articulatory error patterns and phonological process use of preschool children with and without hearing loss. Volta Review.

Richard Canter is Visiting Professor of Surgical Education in the Nuffield Department of Surgical Sciences, University of Oxford.

Richard Canter qualified in medicine at the University of London in 1976, before becoming a surgeon at the Royal United Hospital, Bath. He completed a PhD in Management at the University of Bath in 1998 studying the nature of power in decision-making at the personal and organisation level in healthcare. Following the critical Kennedy report on surgical training in 2001, he was recruited to the Royal College of Surgeons of England as Deputy Director of Surgical Education with specific responsibility for curriculum development in surgical education in England. He was subsequently Head of the Postgraduate School of Surgery in Bristol until 2012, after which he concentrated on academic work at Oxford. He was appointed a visiting Professor in Oxford in in 2007, Emeritus Consultant at Oxford University Hospitals in 2015, and Associate Fellow at Green Templeton College, Oxford in 2015.

His interests are professionalism and, in particular, its relationship to leadership in healthcare systems. His current specific research interests are the effectiveness or otherwise of leadership education in respect of its impact on quality improvement in healthcare systems.

At the Royal College of Surgeons of England he was clinical lead and Chair of the Needs Analysis Group evaluating educational resources and organisational systems necessary for the implementation of reform of surgical training, and made recommendations for changes that were eventually adopted by all surgical training systems in the United Kingdom. During this appointment an opportunity arose in early 2003 at the end of the Serbian conflict to assist the European Agency for Reconstruction (EAR, a division of the EEC) in providing advice to the Kosovan Ministry of Health to develop new systems for surgical training.

Currently at Oxford, he is lead tutor for the module in Leadership and Management in Healthcare and Deputy Director of the Masters in Surgical Science, and supervises Masters and DPhil students on the subject of organisational change and leadership. In addition he has regular commitments in teaching postgraduate medical trainees and medical faculty on topics such as leadership, quality improvement, educational theory in healthcare, workplace assessments, supporting and talent managing  medical trainees, as well as occasional commitments to supervising students on the Said Business School Global Opportunity and Threats (Oxford) programme in exploring problems in complex systems.

Along the way he has written and spoken on many topics in medicine, obtained research grants, and has unexpectedly been given fellowships and medals. His main interest outside of work is playing music and he runs the Green Templeton College Big Band.

Prior to starting his DPhil, Eddy worked as a primary school teacher in Bristol, where he also completed his MSc in Educational Research.

He is particularly interested in the culture of high stakes, standardised testing, and how this might perpetuate existing inequalities in schools. His research focuses specifically on the interaction between knowledge, policy and pedagogy in the context of Literacy education.

 

Claire (郝煜) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and a China Oxford Scholarship Fund (COSF) scholar.

Claire holds a BA in Education and Physics from the University of Cambridge, an MA in Applied Linguistics from UCL Institution of Education, and an EdM in International Education Policy from Harvard University. She is passionate about exploring and supporting the transnational experiences of bi-/multilingual students in studying abroad contexts. Her research and professional interests include bilingualism, language and identity, international education, professional development, and school leadership.

Since 2015, Claire has served as the Director of International Education at Beijing Xinxuedao Education Group, a non-profit organisation that operates 31 schools with over 30,000 K-12 students in China. She has also worked as a high school counsellor and a teacher of Physics and Psychology.

Publications

Hao, Y. and Lantsman, G. (2022). Motivation in MOOCs: a qualitative study on the design and evaluation of an online IELTS course. The 7th IAFOR International Conference on Education.

Hao, Y. (2020). Education without borders: sojourner trips in students’ holistic development. In Wang, J. (Ed.). Family, Society, and Education. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2020). Learning how to learn: the role of metacognition and self-regulation in learning. In Wang, J. (Ed.). The Virtue of Thinking in Learning. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2019). Chinese students at a UK university: how linguistic repertoire mediates language and sojourner identity construction. Linguistics and Applied Linguistics Conference. Beijing Normal University.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2018). Examining Linguistic Diversity as a Resource for Higher Education in the Anglophone World. In Tong, V. C., Standen, A., & Sotiriou, M. (Ed.). Shaping Higher Education with Students: Ways to Connect Research and Teaching (pp.288-293). UCL Press.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2016). Making the most of linguistic diversity: the views and practices of bi/multilingual postgraduate students. The Multilingual University. ESRC Seminars.

Hao, Y. (2012). A Transformative Journey: China-US exchange student studying at an American high school. New World Press.

Pok Jing (Jane) Ho is a doctoral student at the Department of Education, specialising in educational assessment.

She is funded by the Bei Shan Tang Foundation Scholarship for Graduate Studies.

Her DPhil thesis examines validity in the Hong Kong Diploma of Secondary Education Examination, a large-scale, high-stakes test that informs higher education admissions decisions, using the argument-based approach to validation. In particular, her research identifies the claims made based on test scores, the validity evidence that supports or challenges such claims, and the social consequences that ensue as a result of test use.

Prior to her DPhil, she completed an M.A. in International Education Policy Analysis at Stanford University. She subsequently worked as a project officer at the Education University of Hong Kong, where she is now serving as a consultant alongside her studies.

A former secondary school teacher, Jane also holds a B.A. in English Studies (First Class Honours), a B.Ed. in English Language Education (First Class Honours), and an M.Ed. in Curriculum and Instruction from the Chinese University of Hong Kong, as well as the Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (CELTA) from Cambridge.

She is a Peer Supporter at Green Templeton College.

Publications

Ho, P. J. (2020). For some or for all: Vocational English for Hong Kong secondary school students. In C. Hong, & W. K. Ma (Eds.), Applied degree education and the future of work—Education 4.0 (pp. 87–95). Springer. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-15-3142-2

Ho, P. J. (2015). China-Africa “cooperation” in education. International Politics, 5. https://www.iir.cz/en/china-africa-cooperation-in-education

Jennifer’s DPhil focuses on adoptive families where  the adoptive parents also have birth children. She has worked in adoption support as a Parent Consultant for Adoption UK and as Head of Peer Services at PAC-UK, as well as managing the Adoption UK advice line and the parent training team.

She holds an MSc in Poverty Reduction: Policy and Practice from SOAS, and an MBA from Warwick Business School. She has worked in management consultancy in both the public and private sectors and is a board member of CoramBAAF.

Publications

The Right Tools for the Job. Information Age, November 1996

Global teams for the millennium; Management Decision, 36 (1): 31-33, February 1998

Lucy is a second-year DPhil student, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

Her DPhil research aims to engage in a meaningful and creative way with service children to explore how service life has shaped their experiences of education and sense of self. By choosing this focus, the research seeks to widen and nuance current understanding of service children’s educational experiences in addition to furthering knowledge into how service children see themselves. As a result of this, it is hoped that the research will support in developing the professional body of knowledge and understanding of this group of children in schools and help inform the Service Pupil Premium (SPP) funding choices in addition to wider school practice.

Before embarking on her DPhil at Oxford, Lucy completed her PGCE and MEd in Primary Education at the University of Cambridge. In addition to her DPhil work, Lucy is a Trustee for the Armed Forces Education Trust (AFET) – a grant-giving charity for service children – and a volunteer for the Oxford based charity, Big Brothers Big Sisters.

 

 

Aine is interested in improving the health outcomes of children and young people in the care system.

Fahad is reading for a DPhil in Education (part-time). He has over fifteen years professional experience in the education sector, in particular, higher education.

He has held senior roles in staff and student development, human resources, policy and strategy. Fahad holds a BSc in Education and Science and an MBA. Prior to commencing his doctoral studies, he was elected an Academic Visitor at St Antony’s College in the University of Oxford. Fahad’s research focus is on the quality of undergraduate medical education for Qatari doctors.

Shawna completed her undergraduate degree in Psycholinguistics at the University of Toronto in Canada, and later completed the MSc program in Applied Linguistics and Second language Acquisition at the University of Oxford.

She has a wide range of experiences in the field of Linguistics as a teaching and research assistant in areas such as theoretical linguistics, phonology, speech-language pathology, language acquisition, and creole studies. Being a native of Jamaica herself, Shawna has carried out extensive work on creole language acquisition. She worked with the University of the West Indies to draft the first Jamaican (Creole) as a Foreign Language course, and with the U.S Peace Corps to assess and revamp an existing language program for volunteers.

Shawna’s current research focuses on the development of writing skills among primary school learners in Jamaica who speak Jamaican Creole as a home language but are educated in English.

Publications
  • Helms-Park, R., Tucker, S, & Dronjic, V. (2016). From proto-writing to multimedia literacy: scripts and orthographies through the ages. In  Chen Bumgardner, V. Dronjic,, & R. Helms-Park (Eds.), Second Language Reading: Psycholinguistic and Cognitive Perspectives (pp. 1-31). New York, NY: Routledge Publishers.
  • Eriks-Brophy, A., Green, S., & Tucker, S. (2013).  Articulatory error patterns and phonological process use of preschool children with and without hearing loss. Volta Review.

Richard Canter is Visiting Professor of Surgical Education in the Nuffield Department of Surgical Sciences, University of Oxford.

Richard Canter qualified in medicine at the University of London in 1976, before becoming a surgeon at the Royal United Hospital, Bath. He completed a PhD in Management at the University of Bath in 1998 studying the nature of power in decision-making at the personal and organisation level in healthcare. Following the critical Kennedy report on surgical training in 2001, he was recruited to the Royal College of Surgeons of England as Deputy Director of Surgical Education with specific responsibility for curriculum development in surgical education in England. He was subsequently Head of the Postgraduate School of Surgery in Bristol until 2012, after which he concentrated on academic work at Oxford. He was appointed a visiting Professor in Oxford in in 2007, Emeritus Consultant at Oxford University Hospitals in 2015, and Associate Fellow at Green Templeton College, Oxford in 2015.

His interests are professionalism and, in particular, its relationship to leadership in healthcare systems. His current specific research interests are the effectiveness or otherwise of leadership education in respect of its impact on quality improvement in healthcare systems.

At the Royal College of Surgeons of England he was clinical lead and Chair of the Needs Analysis Group evaluating educational resources and organisational systems necessary for the implementation of reform of surgical training, and made recommendations for changes that were eventually adopted by all surgical training systems in the United Kingdom. During this appointment an opportunity arose in early 2003 at the end of the Serbian conflict to assist the European Agency for Reconstruction (EAR, a division of the EEC) in providing advice to the Kosovan Ministry of Health to develop new systems for surgical training.

Currently at Oxford, he is lead tutor for the module in Leadership and Management in Healthcare and Deputy Director of the Masters in Surgical Science, and supervises Masters and DPhil students on the subject of organisational change and leadership. In addition he has regular commitments in teaching postgraduate medical trainees and medical faculty on topics such as leadership, quality improvement, educational theory in healthcare, workplace assessments, supporting and talent managing  medical trainees, as well as occasional commitments to supervising students on the Said Business School Global Opportunity and Threats (Oxford) programme in exploring problems in complex systems.

Along the way he has written and spoken on many topics in medicine, obtained research grants, and has unexpectedly been given fellowships and medals. His main interest outside of work is playing music and he runs the Green Templeton College Big Band.

Prior to starting his DPhil, Eddy worked as a primary school teacher in Bristol, where he also completed his MSc in Educational Research.

He is particularly interested in the culture of high stakes, standardised testing, and how this might perpetuate existing inequalities in schools. His research focuses specifically on the interaction between knowledge, policy and pedagogy in the context of Literacy education.

 

Claire (郝煜) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and a China Oxford Scholarship Fund (COSF) scholar.

Claire holds a BA in Education and Physics from the University of Cambridge, an MA in Applied Linguistics from UCL Institution of Education, and an EdM in International Education Policy from Harvard University. She is passionate about exploring and supporting the transnational experiences of bi-/multilingual students in studying abroad contexts. Her research and professional interests include bilingualism, language and identity, international education, professional development, and school leadership.

Since 2015, Claire has served as the Director of International Education at Beijing Xinxuedao Education Group, a non-profit organisation that operates 31 schools with over 30,000 K-12 students in China. She has also worked as a high school counsellor and a teacher of Physics and Psychology.

Publications

Hao, Y. and Lantsman, G. (2022). Motivation in MOOCs: a qualitative study on the design and evaluation of an online IELTS course. The 7th IAFOR International Conference on Education.

Hao, Y. (2020). Education without borders: sojourner trips in students’ holistic development. In Wang, J. (Ed.). Family, Society, and Education. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2020). Learning how to learn: the role of metacognition and self-regulation in learning. In Wang, J. (Ed.). The Virtue of Thinking in Learning. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2019). Chinese students at a UK university: how linguistic repertoire mediates language and sojourner identity construction. Linguistics and Applied Linguistics Conference. Beijing Normal University.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2018). Examining Linguistic Diversity as a Resource for Higher Education in the Anglophone World. In Tong, V. C., Standen, A., & Sotiriou, M. (Ed.). Shaping Higher Education with Students: Ways to Connect Research and Teaching (pp.288-293). UCL Press.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2016). Making the most of linguistic diversity: the views and practices of bi/multilingual postgraduate students. The Multilingual University. ESRC Seminars.

Hao, Y. (2012). A Transformative Journey: China-US exchange student studying at an American high school. New World Press.

Pok Jing (Jane) Ho is a doctoral student at the Department of Education, specialising in educational assessment.

She is funded by the Bei Shan Tang Foundation Scholarship for Graduate Studies.

Her DPhil thesis examines validity in the Hong Kong Diploma of Secondary Education Examination, a large-scale, high-stakes test that informs higher education admissions decisions, using the argument-based approach to validation. In particular, her research identifies the claims made based on test scores, the validity evidence that supports or challenges such claims, and the social consequences that ensue as a result of test use.

Prior to her DPhil, she completed an M.A. in International Education Policy Analysis at Stanford University. She subsequently worked as a project officer at the Education University of Hong Kong, where she is now serving as a consultant alongside her studies.

A former secondary school teacher, Jane also holds a B.A. in English Studies (First Class Honours), a B.Ed. in English Language Education (First Class Honours), and an M.Ed. in Curriculum and Instruction from the Chinese University of Hong Kong, as well as the Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (CELTA) from Cambridge.

She is a Peer Supporter at Green Templeton College.

Publications

Ho, P. J. (2020). For some or for all: Vocational English for Hong Kong secondary school students. In C. Hong, & W. K. Ma (Eds.), Applied degree education and the future of work—Education 4.0 (pp. 87–95). Springer. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-15-3142-2

Ho, P. J. (2015). China-Africa “cooperation” in education. International Politics, 5. https://www.iir.cz/en/china-africa-cooperation-in-education

Jennifer’s DPhil focuses on adoptive families where  the adoptive parents also have birth children. She has worked in adoption support as a Parent Consultant for Adoption UK and as Head of Peer Services at PAC-UK, as well as managing the Adoption UK advice line and the parent training team.

She holds an MSc in Poverty Reduction: Policy and Practice from SOAS, and an MBA from Warwick Business School. She has worked in management consultancy in both the public and private sectors and is a board member of CoramBAAF.

Publications

The Right Tools for the Job. Information Age, November 1996

Global teams for the millennium; Management Decision, 36 (1): 31-33, February 1998

Lucy is a second-year DPhil student, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

Her DPhil research aims to engage in a meaningful and creative way with service children to explore how service life has shaped their experiences of education and sense of self. By choosing this focus, the research seeks to widen and nuance current understanding of service children’s educational experiences in addition to furthering knowledge into how service children see themselves. As a result of this, it is hoped that the research will support in developing the professional body of knowledge and understanding of this group of children in schools and help inform the Service Pupil Premium (SPP) funding choices in addition to wider school practice.

Before embarking on her DPhil at Oxford, Lucy completed her PGCE and MEd in Primary Education at the University of Cambridge. In addition to her DPhil work, Lucy is a Trustee for the Armed Forces Education Trust (AFET) – a grant-giving charity for service children – and a volunteer for the Oxford based charity, Big Brothers Big Sisters.

 

 

Aine is interested in improving the health outcomes of children and young people in the care system.

Fahad is reading for a DPhil in Education (part-time). He has over fifteen years professional experience in the education sector, in particular, higher education.

He has held senior roles in staff and student development, human resources, policy and strategy. Fahad holds a BSc in Education and Science and an MBA. Prior to commencing his doctoral studies, he was elected an Academic Visitor at St Antony’s College in the University of Oxford. Fahad’s research focus is on the quality of undergraduate medical education for Qatari doctors.

Shawna completed her undergraduate degree in Psycholinguistics at the University of Toronto in Canada, and later completed the MSc program in Applied Linguistics and Second language Acquisition at the University of Oxford.

She has a wide range of experiences in the field of Linguistics as a teaching and research assistant in areas such as theoretical linguistics, phonology, speech-language pathology, language acquisition, and creole studies. Being a native of Jamaica herself, Shawna has carried out extensive work on creole language acquisition. She worked with the University of the West Indies to draft the first Jamaican (Creole) as a Foreign Language course, and with the U.S Peace Corps to assess and revamp an existing language program for volunteers.

Shawna’s current research focuses on the development of writing skills among primary school learners in Jamaica who speak Jamaican Creole as a home language but are educated in English.

Publications
  • Helms-Park, R., Tucker, S, & Dronjic, V. (2016). From proto-writing to multimedia literacy: scripts and orthographies through the ages. In  Chen Bumgardner, V. Dronjic,, & R. Helms-Park (Eds.), Second Language Reading: Psycholinguistic and Cognitive Perspectives (pp. 1-31). New York, NY: Routledge Publishers.
  • Eriks-Brophy, A., Green, S., & Tucker, S. (2013).  Articulatory error patterns and phonological process use of preschool children with and without hearing loss. Volta Review.

Richard Canter is Visiting Professor of Surgical Education in the Nuffield Department of Surgical Sciences, University of Oxford.

Richard Canter qualified in medicine at the University of London in 1976, before becoming a surgeon at the Royal United Hospital, Bath. He completed a PhD in Management at the University of Bath in 1998 studying the nature of power in decision-making at the personal and organisation level in healthcare. Following the critical Kennedy report on surgical training in 2001, he was recruited to the Royal College of Surgeons of England as Deputy Director of Surgical Education with specific responsibility for curriculum development in surgical education in England. He was subsequently Head of the Postgraduate School of Surgery in Bristol until 2012, after which he concentrated on academic work at Oxford. He was appointed a visiting Professor in Oxford in in 2007, Emeritus Consultant at Oxford University Hospitals in 2015, and Associate Fellow at Green Templeton College, Oxford in 2015.

His interests are professionalism and, in particular, its relationship to leadership in healthcare systems. His current specific research interests are the effectiveness or otherwise of leadership education in respect of its impact on quality improvement in healthcare systems.

At the Royal College of Surgeons of England he was clinical lead and Chair of the Needs Analysis Group evaluating educational resources and organisational systems necessary for the implementation of reform of surgical training, and made recommendations for changes that were eventually adopted by all surgical training systems in the United Kingdom. During this appointment an opportunity arose in early 2003 at the end of the Serbian conflict to assist the European Agency for Reconstruction (EAR, a division of the EEC) in providing advice to the Kosovan Ministry of Health to develop new systems for surgical training.

Currently at Oxford, he is lead tutor for the module in Leadership and Management in Healthcare and Deputy Director of the Masters in Surgical Science, and supervises Masters and DPhil students on the subject of organisational change and leadership. In addition he has regular commitments in teaching postgraduate medical trainees and medical faculty on topics such as leadership, quality improvement, educational theory in healthcare, workplace assessments, supporting and talent managing  medical trainees, as well as occasional commitments to supervising students on the Said Business School Global Opportunity and Threats (Oxford) programme in exploring problems in complex systems.

Along the way he has written and spoken on many topics in medicine, obtained research grants, and has unexpectedly been given fellowships and medals. His main interest outside of work is playing music and he runs the Green Templeton College Big Band.

Prior to starting his DPhil, Eddy worked as a primary school teacher in Bristol, where he also completed his MSc in Educational Research.

He is particularly interested in the culture of high stakes, standardised testing, and how this might perpetuate existing inequalities in schools. His research focuses specifically on the interaction between knowledge, policy and pedagogy in the context of Literacy education.

 

Claire (郝煜) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and a China Oxford Scholarship Fund (COSF) scholar.

Claire holds a BA in Education and Physics from the University of Cambridge, an MA in Applied Linguistics from UCL Institution of Education, and an EdM in International Education Policy from Harvard University. She is passionate about exploring and supporting the transnational experiences of bi-/multilingual students in studying abroad contexts. Her research and professional interests include bilingualism, language and identity, international education, professional development, and school leadership.

Since 2015, Claire has served as the Director of International Education at Beijing Xinxuedao Education Group, a non-profit organisation that operates 31 schools with over 30,000 K-12 students in China. She has also worked as a high school counsellor and a teacher of Physics and Psychology.

Publications

Hao, Y. and Lantsman, G. (2022). Motivation in MOOCs: a qualitative study on the design and evaluation of an online IELTS course. The 7th IAFOR International Conference on Education.

Hao, Y. (2020). Education without borders: sojourner trips in students’ holistic development. In Wang, J. (Ed.). Family, Society, and Education. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2020). Learning how to learn: the role of metacognition and self-regulation in learning. In Wang, J. (Ed.). The Virtue of Thinking in Learning. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2019). Chinese students at a UK university: how linguistic repertoire mediates language and sojourner identity construction. Linguistics and Applied Linguistics Conference. Beijing Normal University.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2018). Examining Linguistic Diversity as a Resource for Higher Education in the Anglophone World. In Tong, V. C., Standen, A., & Sotiriou, M. (Ed.). Shaping Higher Education with Students: Ways to Connect Research and Teaching (pp.288-293). UCL Press.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2016). Making the most of linguistic diversity: the views and practices of bi/multilingual postgraduate students. The Multilingual University. ESRC Seminars.

Hao, Y. (2012). A Transformative Journey: China-US exchange student studying at an American high school. New World Press.

Pok Jing (Jane) Ho is a doctoral student at the Department of Education, specialising in educational assessment.

She is funded by the Bei Shan Tang Foundation Scholarship for Graduate Studies.

Her DPhil thesis examines validity in the Hong Kong Diploma of Secondary Education Examination, a large-scale, high-stakes test that informs higher education admissions decisions, using the argument-based approach to validation. In particular, her research identifies the claims made based on test scores, the validity evidence that supports or challenges such claims, and the social consequences that ensue as a result of test use.

Prior to her DPhil, she completed an M.A. in International Education Policy Analysis at Stanford University. She subsequently worked as a project officer at the Education University of Hong Kong, where she is now serving as a consultant alongside her studies.

A former secondary school teacher, Jane also holds a B.A. in English Studies (First Class Honours), a B.Ed. in English Language Education (First Class Honours), and an M.Ed. in Curriculum and Instruction from the Chinese University of Hong Kong, as well as the Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (CELTA) from Cambridge.

She is a Peer Supporter at Green Templeton College.

Publications

Ho, P. J. (2020). For some or for all: Vocational English for Hong Kong secondary school students. In C. Hong, & W. K. Ma (Eds.), Applied degree education and the future of work—Education 4.0 (pp. 87–95). Springer. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-15-3142-2

Ho, P. J. (2015). China-Africa “cooperation” in education. International Politics, 5. https://www.iir.cz/en/china-africa-cooperation-in-education

Jennifer’s DPhil focuses on adoptive families where  the adoptive parents also have birth children. She has worked in adoption support as a Parent Consultant for Adoption UK and as Head of Peer Services at PAC-UK, as well as managing the Adoption UK advice line and the parent training team.

She holds an MSc in Poverty Reduction: Policy and Practice from SOAS, and an MBA from Warwick Business School. She has worked in management consultancy in both the public and private sectors and is a board member of CoramBAAF.

Publications

The Right Tools for the Job. Information Age, November 1996

Global teams for the millennium; Management Decision, 36 (1): 31-33, February 1998

Lucy is a second-year DPhil student, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

Her DPhil research aims to engage in a meaningful and creative way with service children to explore how service life has shaped their experiences of education and sense of self. By choosing this focus, the research seeks to widen and nuance current understanding of service children’s educational experiences in addition to furthering knowledge into how service children see themselves. As a result of this, it is hoped that the research will support in developing the professional body of knowledge and understanding of this group of children in schools and help inform the Service Pupil Premium (SPP) funding choices in addition to wider school practice.

Before embarking on her DPhil at Oxford, Lucy completed her PGCE and MEd in Primary Education at the University of Cambridge. In addition to her DPhil work, Lucy is a Trustee for the Armed Forces Education Trust (AFET) – a grant-giving charity for service children – and a volunteer for the Oxford based charity, Big Brothers Big Sisters.

 

 

Aine is interested in improving the health outcomes of children and young people in the care system.

Fahad is reading for a DPhil in Education (part-time). He has over fifteen years professional experience in the education sector, in particular, higher education.

He has held senior roles in staff and student development, human resources, policy and strategy. Fahad holds a BSc in Education and Science and an MBA. Prior to commencing his doctoral studies, he was elected an Academic Visitor at St Antony’s College in the University of Oxford. Fahad’s research focus is on the quality of undergraduate medical education for Qatari doctors.

Shawna completed her undergraduate degree in Psycholinguistics at the University of Toronto in Canada, and later completed the MSc program in Applied Linguistics and Second language Acquisition at the University of Oxford.

She has a wide range of experiences in the field of Linguistics as a teaching and research assistant in areas such as theoretical linguistics, phonology, speech-language pathology, language acquisition, and creole studies. Being a native of Jamaica herself, Shawna has carried out extensive work on creole language acquisition. She worked with the University of the West Indies to draft the first Jamaican (Creole) as a Foreign Language course, and with the U.S Peace Corps to assess and revamp an existing language program for volunteers.

Shawna’s current research focuses on the development of writing skills among primary school learners in Jamaica who speak Jamaican Creole as a home language but are educated in English.

Publications
  • Helms-Park, R., Tucker, S, & Dronjic, V. (2016). From proto-writing to multimedia literacy: scripts and orthographies through the ages. In  Chen Bumgardner, V. Dronjic,, & R. Helms-Park (Eds.), Second Language Reading: Psycholinguistic and Cognitive Perspectives (pp. 1-31). New York, NY: Routledge Publishers.
  • Eriks-Brophy, A., Green, S., & Tucker, S. (2013).  Articulatory error patterns and phonological process use of preschool children with and without hearing loss. Volta Review.

Richard Canter is Visiting Professor of Surgical Education in the Nuffield Department of Surgical Sciences, University of Oxford.

Richard Canter qualified in medicine at the University of London in 1976, before becoming a surgeon at the Royal United Hospital, Bath. He completed a PhD in Management at the University of Bath in 1998 studying the nature of power in decision-making at the personal and organisation level in healthcare. Following the critical Kennedy report on surgical training in 2001, he was recruited to the Royal College of Surgeons of England as Deputy Director of Surgical Education with specific responsibility for curriculum development in surgical education in England. He was subsequently Head of the Postgraduate School of Surgery in Bristol until 2012, after which he concentrated on academic work at Oxford. He was appointed a visiting Professor in Oxford in in 2007, Emeritus Consultant at Oxford University Hospitals in 2015, and Associate Fellow at Green Templeton College, Oxford in 2015.

His interests are professionalism and, in particular, its relationship to leadership in healthcare systems. His current specific research interests are the effectiveness or otherwise of leadership education in respect of its impact on quality improvement in healthcare systems.

At the Royal College of Surgeons of England he was clinical lead and Chair of the Needs Analysis Group evaluating educational resources and organisational systems necessary for the implementation of reform of surgical training, and made recommendations for changes that were eventually adopted by all surgical training systems in the United Kingdom. During this appointment an opportunity arose in early 2003 at the end of the Serbian conflict to assist the European Agency for Reconstruction (EAR, a division of the EEC) in providing advice to the Kosovan Ministry of Health to develop new systems for surgical training.

Currently at Oxford, he is lead tutor for the module in Leadership and Management in Healthcare and Deputy Director of the Masters in Surgical Science, and supervises Masters and DPhil students on the subject of organisational change and leadership. In addition he has regular commitments in teaching postgraduate medical trainees and medical faculty on topics such as leadership, quality improvement, educational theory in healthcare, workplace assessments, supporting and talent managing  medical trainees, as well as occasional commitments to supervising students on the Said Business School Global Opportunity and Threats (Oxford) programme in exploring problems in complex systems.

Along the way he has written and spoken on many topics in medicine, obtained research grants, and has unexpectedly been given fellowships and medals. His main interest outside of work is playing music and he runs the Green Templeton College Big Band.

Prior to starting his DPhil, Eddy worked as a primary school teacher in Bristol, where he also completed his MSc in Educational Research.

He is particularly interested in the culture of high stakes, standardised testing, and how this might perpetuate existing inequalities in schools. His research focuses specifically on the interaction between knowledge, policy and pedagogy in the context of Literacy education.

 

Claire (郝煜) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and a China Oxford Scholarship Fund (COSF) scholar.

Claire holds a BA in Education and Physics from the University of Cambridge, an MA in Applied Linguistics from UCL Institution of Education, and an EdM in International Education Policy from Harvard University. She is passionate about exploring and supporting the transnational experiences of bi-/multilingual students in studying abroad contexts. Her research and professional interests include bilingualism, language and identity, international education, professional development, and school leadership.

Since 2015, Claire has served as the Director of International Education at Beijing Xinxuedao Education Group, a non-profit organisation that operates 31 schools with over 30,000 K-12 students in China. She has also worked as a high school counsellor and a teacher of Physics and Psychology.

Publications

Hao, Y. and Lantsman, G. (2022). Motivation in MOOCs: a qualitative study on the design and evaluation of an online IELTS course. The 7th IAFOR International Conference on Education.

Hao, Y. (2020). Education without borders: sojourner trips in students’ holistic development. In Wang, J. (Ed.). Family, Society, and Education. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2020). Learning how to learn: the role of metacognition and self-regulation in learning. In Wang, J. (Ed.). The Virtue of Thinking in Learning. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2019). Chinese students at a UK university: how linguistic repertoire mediates language and sojourner identity construction. Linguistics and Applied Linguistics Conference. Beijing Normal University.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2018). Examining Linguistic Diversity as a Resource for Higher Education in the Anglophone World. In Tong, V. C., Standen, A., & Sotiriou, M. (Ed.). Shaping Higher Education with Students: Ways to Connect Research and Teaching (pp.288-293). UCL Press.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2016). Making the most of linguistic diversity: the views and practices of bi/multilingual postgraduate students. The Multilingual University. ESRC Seminars.

Hao, Y. (2012). A Transformative Journey: China-US exchange student studying at an American high school. New World Press.

Pok Jing (Jane) Ho is a doctoral student at the Department of Education, specialising in educational assessment.

She is funded by the Bei Shan Tang Foundation Scholarship for Graduate Studies.

Her DPhil thesis examines validity in the Hong Kong Diploma of Secondary Education Examination, a large-scale, high-stakes test that informs higher education admissions decisions, using the argument-based approach to validation. In particular, her research identifies the claims made based on test scores, the validity evidence that supports or challenges such claims, and the social consequences that ensue as a result of test use.

Prior to her DPhil, she completed an M.A. in International Education Policy Analysis at Stanford University. She subsequently worked as a project officer at the Education University of Hong Kong, where she is now serving as a consultant alongside her studies.

A former secondary school teacher, Jane also holds a B.A. in English Studies (First Class Honours), a B.Ed. in English Language Education (First Class Honours), and an M.Ed. in Curriculum and Instruction from the Chinese University of Hong Kong, as well as the Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (CELTA) from Cambridge.

She is a Peer Supporter at Green Templeton College.

Publications

Ho, P. J. (2020). For some or for all: Vocational English for Hong Kong secondary school students. In C. Hong, & W. K. Ma (Eds.), Applied degree education and the future of work—Education 4.0 (pp. 87–95). Springer. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-15-3142-2

Ho, P. J. (2015). China-Africa “cooperation” in education. International Politics, 5. https://www.iir.cz/en/china-africa-cooperation-in-education

Jennifer’s DPhil focuses on adoptive families where  the adoptive parents also have birth children. She has worked in adoption support as a Parent Consultant for Adoption UK and as Head of Peer Services at PAC-UK, as well as managing the Adoption UK advice line and the parent training team.

She holds an MSc in Poverty Reduction: Policy and Practice from SOAS, and an MBA from Warwick Business School. She has worked in management consultancy in both the public and private sectors and is a board member of CoramBAAF.

Publications

The Right Tools for the Job. Information Age, November 1996

Global teams for the millennium; Management Decision, 36 (1): 31-33, February 1998

Lucy is a second-year DPhil student, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

Her DPhil research aims to engage in a meaningful and creative way with service children to explore how service life has shaped their experiences of education and sense of self. By choosing this focus, the research seeks to widen and nuance current understanding of service children’s educational experiences in addition to furthering knowledge into how service children see themselves. As a result of this, it is hoped that the research will support in developing the professional body of knowledge and understanding of this group of children in schools and help inform the Service Pupil Premium (SPP) funding choices in addition to wider school practice.

Before embarking on her DPhil at Oxford, Lucy completed her PGCE and MEd in Primary Education at the University of Cambridge. In addition to her DPhil work, Lucy is a Trustee for the Armed Forces Education Trust (AFET) – a grant-giving charity for service children – and a volunteer for the Oxford based charity, Big Brothers Big Sisters.

 

 

Aine is interested in improving the health outcomes of children and young people in the care system.

Fahad is reading for a DPhil in Education (part-time). He has over fifteen years professional experience in the education sector, in particular, higher education.

He has held senior roles in staff and student development, human resources, policy and strategy. Fahad holds a BSc in Education and Science and an MBA. Prior to commencing his doctoral studies, he was elected an Academic Visitor at St Antony’s College in the University of Oxford. Fahad’s research focus is on the quality of undergraduate medical education for Qatari doctors.

Shawna completed her undergraduate degree in Psycholinguistics at the University of Toronto in Canada, and later completed the MSc program in Applied Linguistics and Second language Acquisition at the University of Oxford.

She has a wide range of experiences in the field of Linguistics as a teaching and research assistant in areas such as theoretical linguistics, phonology, speech-language pathology, language acquisition, and creole studies. Being a native of Jamaica herself, Shawna has carried out extensive work on creole language acquisition. She worked with the University of the West Indies to draft the first Jamaican (Creole) as a Foreign Language course, and with the U.S Peace Corps to assess and revamp an existing language program for volunteers.

Shawna’s current research focuses on the development of writing skills among primary school learners in Jamaica who speak Jamaican Creole as a home language but are educated in English.

Publications
  • Helms-Park, R., Tucker, S, & Dronjic, V. (2016). From proto-writing to multimedia literacy: scripts and orthographies through the ages. In  Chen Bumgardner, V. Dronjic,, & R. Helms-Park (Eds.), Second Language Reading: Psycholinguistic and Cognitive Perspectives (pp. 1-31). New York, NY: Routledge Publishers.
  • Eriks-Brophy, A., Green, S., & Tucker, S. (2013).  Articulatory error patterns and phonological process use of preschool children with and without hearing loss. Volta Review.

Richard Canter is Visiting Professor of Surgical Education in the Nuffield Department of Surgical Sciences, University of Oxford.

Richard Canter qualified in medicine at the University of London in 1976, before becoming a surgeon at the Royal United Hospital, Bath. He completed a PhD in Management at the University of Bath in 1998 studying the nature of power in decision-making at the personal and organisation level in healthcare. Following the critical Kennedy report on surgical training in 2001, he was recruited to the Royal College of Surgeons of England as Deputy Director of Surgical Education with specific responsibility for curriculum development in surgical education in England. He was subsequently Head of the Postgraduate School of Surgery in Bristol until 2012, after which he concentrated on academic work at Oxford. He was appointed a visiting Professor in Oxford in in 2007, Emeritus Consultant at Oxford University Hospitals in 2015, and Associate Fellow at Green Templeton College, Oxford in 2015.

His interests are professionalism and, in particular, its relationship to leadership in healthcare systems. His current specific research interests are the effectiveness or otherwise of leadership education in respect of its impact on quality improvement in healthcare systems.

At the Royal College of Surgeons of England he was clinical lead and Chair of the Needs Analysis Group evaluating educational resources and organisational systems necessary for the implementation of reform of surgical training, and made recommendations for changes that were eventually adopted by all surgical training systems in the United Kingdom. During this appointment an opportunity arose in early 2003 at the end of the Serbian conflict to assist the European Agency for Reconstruction (EAR, a division of the EEC) in providing advice to the Kosovan Ministry of Health to develop new systems for surgical training.

Currently at Oxford, he is lead tutor for the module in Leadership and Management in Healthcare and Deputy Director of the Masters in Surgical Science, and supervises Masters and DPhil students on the subject of organisational change and leadership. In addition he has regular commitments in teaching postgraduate medical trainees and medical faculty on topics such as leadership, quality improvement, educational theory in healthcare, workplace assessments, supporting and talent managing  medical trainees, as well as occasional commitments to supervising students on the Said Business School Global Opportunity and Threats (Oxford) programme in exploring problems in complex systems.

Along the way he has written and spoken on many topics in medicine, obtained research grants, and has unexpectedly been given fellowships and medals. His main interest outside of work is playing music and he runs the Green Templeton College Big Band.

Prior to starting his DPhil, Eddy worked as a primary school teacher in Bristol, where he also completed his MSc in Educational Research.

He is particularly interested in the culture of high stakes, standardised testing, and how this might perpetuate existing inequalities in schools. His research focuses specifically on the interaction between knowledge, policy and pedagogy in the context of Literacy education.

 

Claire (郝煜) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and a China Oxford Scholarship Fund (COSF) scholar.

Claire holds a BA in Education and Physics from the University of Cambridge, an MA in Applied Linguistics from UCL Institution of Education, and an EdM in International Education Policy from Harvard University. She is passionate about exploring and supporting the transnational experiences of bi-/multilingual students in studying abroad contexts. Her research and professional interests include bilingualism, language and identity, international education, professional development, and school leadership.

Since 2015, Claire has served as the Director of International Education at Beijing Xinxuedao Education Group, a non-profit organisation that operates 31 schools with over 30,000 K-12 students in China. She has also worked as a high school counsellor and a teacher of Physics and Psychology.

Publications

Hao, Y. and Lantsman, G. (2022). Motivation in MOOCs: a qualitative study on the design and evaluation of an online IELTS course. The 7th IAFOR International Conference on Education.

Hao, Y. (2020). Education without borders: sojourner trips in students’ holistic development. In Wang, J. (Ed.). Family, Society, and Education. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2020). Learning how to learn: the role of metacognition and self-regulation in learning. In Wang, J. (Ed.). The Virtue of Thinking in Learning. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2019). Chinese students at a UK university: how linguistic repertoire mediates language and sojourner identity construction. Linguistics and Applied Linguistics Conference. Beijing Normal University.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2018). Examining Linguistic Diversity as a Resource for Higher Education in the Anglophone World. In Tong, V. C., Standen, A., & Sotiriou, M. (Ed.). Shaping Higher Education with Students: Ways to Connect Research and Teaching (pp.288-293). UCL Press.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2016). Making the most of linguistic diversity: the views and practices of bi/multilingual postgraduate students. The Multilingual University. ESRC Seminars.

Hao, Y. (2012). A Transformative Journey: China-US exchange student studying at an American high school. New World Press.

Pok Jing (Jane) Ho is a doctoral student at the Department of Education, specialising in educational assessment.

She is funded by the Bei Shan Tang Foundation Scholarship for Graduate Studies.

Her DPhil thesis examines validity in the Hong Kong Diploma of Secondary Education Examination, a large-scale, high-stakes test that informs higher education admissions decisions, using the argument-based approach to validation. In particular, her research identifies the claims made based on test scores, the validity evidence that supports or challenges such claims, and the social consequences that ensue as a result of test use.

Prior to her DPhil, she completed an M.A. in International Education Policy Analysis at Stanford University. She subsequently worked as a project officer at the Education University of Hong Kong, where she is now serving as a consultant alongside her studies.

A former secondary school teacher, Jane also holds a B.A. in English Studies (First Class Honours), a B.Ed. in English Language Education (First Class Honours), and an M.Ed. in Curriculum and Instruction from the Chinese University of Hong Kong, as well as the Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (CELTA) from Cambridge.

She is a Peer Supporter at Green Templeton College.

Publications

Ho, P. J. (2020). For some or for all: Vocational English for Hong Kong secondary school students. In C. Hong, & W. K. Ma (Eds.), Applied degree education and the future of work—Education 4.0 (pp. 87–95). Springer. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-15-3142-2

Ho, P. J. (2015). China-Africa “cooperation” in education. International Politics, 5. https://www.iir.cz/en/china-africa-cooperation-in-education

Jennifer’s DPhil focuses on adoptive families where  the adoptive parents also have birth children. She has worked in adoption support as a Parent Consultant for Adoption UK and as Head of Peer Services at PAC-UK, as well as managing the Adoption UK advice line and the parent training team.

She holds an MSc in Poverty Reduction: Policy and Practice from SOAS, and an MBA from Warwick Business School. She has worked in management consultancy in both the public and private sectors and is a board member of CoramBAAF.

Publications

The Right Tools for the Job. Information Age, November 1996

Global teams for the millennium; Management Decision, 36 (1): 31-33, February 1998

Lucy is a second-year DPhil student, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

Her DPhil research aims to engage in a meaningful and creative way with service children to explore how service life has shaped their experiences of education and sense of self. By choosing this focus, the research seeks to widen and nuance current understanding of service children’s educational experiences in addition to furthering knowledge into how service children see themselves. As a result of this, it is hoped that the research will support in developing the professional body of knowledge and understanding of this group of children in schools and help inform the Service Pupil Premium (SPP) funding choices in addition to wider school practice.

Before embarking on her DPhil at Oxford, Lucy completed her PGCE and MEd in Primary Education at the University of Cambridge. In addition to her DPhil work, Lucy is a Trustee for the Armed Forces Education Trust (AFET) – a grant-giving charity for service children – and a volunteer for the Oxford based charity, Big Brothers Big Sisters.

 

 

Aine is interested in improving the health outcomes of children and young people in the care system.

Fahad is reading for a DPhil in Education (part-time). He has over fifteen years professional experience in the education sector, in particular, higher education.

He has held senior roles in staff and student development, human resources, policy and strategy. Fahad holds a BSc in Education and Science and an MBA. Prior to commencing his doctoral studies, he was elected an Academic Visitor at St Antony’s College in the University of Oxford. Fahad’s research focus is on the quality of undergraduate medical education for Qatari doctors.

Shawna completed her undergraduate degree in Psycholinguistics at the University of Toronto in Canada, and later completed the MSc program in Applied Linguistics and Second language Acquisition at the University of Oxford.

She has a wide range of experiences in the field of Linguistics as a teaching and research assistant in areas such as theoretical linguistics, phonology, speech-language pathology, language acquisition, and creole studies. Being a native of Jamaica herself, Shawna has carried out extensive work on creole language acquisition. She worked with the University of the West Indies to draft the first Jamaican (Creole) as a Foreign Language course, and with the U.S Peace Corps to assess and revamp an existing language program for volunteers.

Shawna’s current research focuses on the development of writing skills among primary school learners in Jamaica who speak Jamaican Creole as a home language but are educated in English.

Publications
  • Helms-Park, R., Tucker, S, & Dronjic, V. (2016). From proto-writing to multimedia literacy: scripts and orthographies through the ages. In  Chen Bumgardner, V. Dronjic,, & R. Helms-Park (Eds.), Second Language Reading: Psycholinguistic and Cognitive Perspectives (pp. 1-31). New York, NY: Routledge Publishers.
  • Eriks-Brophy, A., Green, S., & Tucker, S. (2013).  Articulatory error patterns and phonological process use of preschool children with and without hearing loss. Volta Review.

Richard Canter is Visiting Professor of Surgical Education in the Nuffield Department of Surgical Sciences, University of Oxford.

Richard Canter qualified in medicine at the University of London in 1976, before becoming a surgeon at the Royal United Hospital, Bath. He completed a PhD in Management at the University of Bath in 1998 studying the nature of power in decision-making at the personal and organisation level in healthcare. Following the critical Kennedy report on surgical training in 2001, he was recruited to the Royal College of Surgeons of England as Deputy Director of Surgical Education with specific responsibility for curriculum development in surgical education in England. He was subsequently Head of the Postgraduate School of Surgery in Bristol until 2012, after which he concentrated on academic work at Oxford. He was appointed a visiting Professor in Oxford in in 2007, Emeritus Consultant at Oxford University Hospitals in 2015, and Associate Fellow at Green Templeton College, Oxford in 2015.

His interests are professionalism and, in particular, its relationship to leadership in healthcare systems. His current specific research interests are the effectiveness or otherwise of leadership education in respect of its impact on quality improvement in healthcare systems.

At the Royal College of Surgeons of England he was clinical lead and Chair of the Needs Analysis Group evaluating educational resources and organisational systems necessary for the implementation of reform of surgical training, and made recommendations for changes that were eventually adopted by all surgical training systems in the United Kingdom. During this appointment an opportunity arose in early 2003 at the end of the Serbian conflict to assist the European Agency for Reconstruction (EAR, a division of the EEC) in providing advice to the Kosovan Ministry of Health to develop new systems for surgical training.

Currently at Oxford, he is lead tutor for the module in Leadership and Management in Healthcare and Deputy Director of the Masters in Surgical Science, and supervises Masters and DPhil students on the subject of organisational change and leadership. In addition he has regular commitments in teaching postgraduate medical trainees and medical faculty on topics such as leadership, quality improvement, educational theory in healthcare, workplace assessments, supporting and talent managing  medical trainees, as well as occasional commitments to supervising students on the Said Business School Global Opportunity and Threats (Oxford) programme in exploring problems in complex systems.

Along the way he has written and spoken on many topics in medicine, obtained research grants, and has unexpectedly been given fellowships and medals. His main interest outside of work is playing music and he runs the Green Templeton College Big Band.

Prior to starting his DPhil, Eddy worked as a primary school teacher in Bristol, where he also completed his MSc in Educational Research.

He is particularly interested in the culture of high stakes, standardised testing, and how this might perpetuate existing inequalities in schools. His research focuses specifically on the interaction between knowledge, policy and pedagogy in the context of Literacy education.

 

Claire (郝煜) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and a China Oxford Scholarship Fund (COSF) scholar.

Claire holds a BA in Education and Physics from the University of Cambridge, an MA in Applied Linguistics from UCL Institution of Education, and an EdM in International Education Policy from Harvard University. She is passionate about exploring and supporting the transnational experiences of bi-/multilingual students in studying abroad contexts. Her research and professional interests include bilingualism, language and identity, international education, professional development, and school leadership.

Since 2015, Claire has served as the Director of International Education at Beijing Xinxuedao Education Group, a non-profit organisation that operates 31 schools with over 30,000 K-12 students in China. She has also worked as a high school counsellor and a teacher of Physics and Psychology.

Publications

Hao, Y. and Lantsman, G. (2022). Motivation in MOOCs: a qualitative study on the design and evaluation of an online IELTS course. The 7th IAFOR International Conference on Education.

Hao, Y. (2020). Education without borders: sojourner trips in students’ holistic development. In Wang, J. (Ed.). Family, Society, and Education. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2020). Learning how to learn: the role of metacognition and self-regulation in learning. In Wang, J. (Ed.). The Virtue of Thinking in Learning. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2019). Chinese students at a UK university: how linguistic repertoire mediates language and sojourner identity construction. Linguistics and Applied Linguistics Conference. Beijing Normal University.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2018). Examining Linguistic Diversity as a Resource for Higher Education in the Anglophone World. In Tong, V. C., Standen, A., & Sotiriou, M. (Ed.). Shaping Higher Education with Students: Ways to Connect Research and Teaching (pp.288-293). UCL Press.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2016). Making the most of linguistic diversity: the views and practices of bi/multilingual postgraduate students. The Multilingual University. ESRC Seminars.

Hao, Y. (2012). A Transformative Journey: China-US exchange student studying at an American high school. New World Press.

Pok Jing (Jane) Ho is a doctoral student at the Department of Education, specialising in educational assessment.

She is funded by the Bei Shan Tang Foundation Scholarship for Graduate Studies.

Her DPhil thesis examines validity in the Hong Kong Diploma of Secondary Education Examination, a large-scale, high-stakes test that informs higher education admissions decisions, using the argument-based approach to validation. In particular, her research identifies the claims made based on test scores, the validity evidence that supports or challenges such claims, and the social consequences that ensue as a result of test use.

Prior to her DPhil, she completed an M.A. in International Education Policy Analysis at Stanford University. She subsequently worked as a project officer at the Education University of Hong Kong, where she is now serving as a consultant alongside her studies.

A former secondary school teacher, Jane also holds a B.A. in English Studies (First Class Honours), a B.Ed. in English Language Education (First Class Honours), and an M.Ed. in Curriculum and Instruction from the Chinese University of Hong Kong, as well as the Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (CELTA) from Cambridge.

She is a Peer Supporter at Green Templeton College.

Publications

Ho, P. J. (2020). For some or for all: Vocational English for Hong Kong secondary school students. In C. Hong, & W. K. Ma (Eds.), Applied degree education and the future of work—Education 4.0 (pp. 87–95). Springer. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-15-3142-2

Ho, P. J. (2015). China-Africa “cooperation” in education. International Politics, 5. https://www.iir.cz/en/china-africa-cooperation-in-education

Jennifer’s DPhil focuses on adoptive families where  the adoptive parents also have birth children. She has worked in adoption support as a Parent Consultant for Adoption UK and as Head of Peer Services at PAC-UK, as well as managing the Adoption UK advice line and the parent training team.

She holds an MSc in Poverty Reduction: Policy and Practice from SOAS, and an MBA from Warwick Business School. She has worked in management consultancy in both the public and private sectors and is a board member of CoramBAAF.

Publications

The Right Tools for the Job. Information Age, November 1996

Global teams for the millennium; Management Decision, 36 (1): 31-33, February 1998

Lucy is a second-year DPhil student, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

Her DPhil research aims to engage in a meaningful and creative way with service children to explore how service life has shaped their experiences of education and sense of self. By choosing this focus, the research seeks to widen and nuance current understanding of service children’s educational experiences in addition to furthering knowledge into how service children see themselves. As a result of this, it is hoped that the research will support in developing the professional body of knowledge and understanding of this group of children in schools and help inform the Service Pupil Premium (SPP) funding choices in addition to wider school practice.

Before embarking on her DPhil at Oxford, Lucy completed her PGCE and MEd in Primary Education at the University of Cambridge. In addition to her DPhil work, Lucy is a Trustee for the Armed Forces Education Trust (AFET) – a grant-giving charity for service children – and a volunteer for the Oxford based charity, Big Brothers Big Sisters.

 

 

Aine is interested in improving the health outcomes of children and young people in the care system.

Fahad is reading for a DPhil in Education (part-time). He has over fifteen years professional experience in the education sector, in particular, higher education.

He has held senior roles in staff and student development, human resources, policy and strategy. Fahad holds a BSc in Education and Science and an MBA. Prior to commencing his doctoral studies, he was elected an Academic Visitor at St Antony’s College in the University of Oxford. Fahad’s research focus is on the quality of undergraduate medical education for Qatari doctors.

Shawna completed her undergraduate degree in Psycholinguistics at the University of Toronto in Canada, and later completed the MSc program in Applied Linguistics and Second language Acquisition at the University of Oxford.

She has a wide range of experiences in the field of Linguistics as a teaching and research assistant in areas such as theoretical linguistics, phonology, speech-language pathology, language acquisition, and creole studies. Being a native of Jamaica herself, Shawna has carried out extensive work on creole language acquisition. She worked with the University of the West Indies to draft the first Jamaican (Creole) as a Foreign Language course, and with the U.S Peace Corps to assess and revamp an existing language program for volunteers.

Shawna’s current research focuses on the development of writing skills among primary school learners in Jamaica who speak Jamaican Creole as a home language but are educated in English.

Publications
  • Helms-Park, R., Tucker, S, & Dronjic, V. (2016). From proto-writing to multimedia literacy: scripts and orthographies through the ages. In  Chen Bumgardner, V. Dronjic,, & R. Helms-Park (Eds.), Second Language Reading: Psycholinguistic and Cognitive Perspectives (pp. 1-31). New York, NY: Routledge Publishers.
  • Eriks-Brophy, A., Green, S., & Tucker, S. (2013).  Articulatory error patterns and phonological process use of preschool children with and without hearing loss. Volta Review.

Richard Canter is Visiting Professor of Surgical Education in the Nuffield Department of Surgical Sciences, University of Oxford.

Richard Canter qualified in medicine at the University of London in 1976, before becoming a surgeon at the Royal United Hospital, Bath. He completed a PhD in Management at the University of Bath in 1998 studying the nature of power in decision-making at the personal and organisation level in healthcare. Following the critical Kennedy report on surgical training in 2001, he was recruited to the Royal College of Surgeons of England as Deputy Director of Surgical Education with specific responsibility for curriculum development in surgical education in England. He was subsequently Head of the Postgraduate School of Surgery in Bristol until 2012, after which he concentrated on academic work at Oxford. He was appointed a visiting Professor in Oxford in in 2007, Emeritus Consultant at Oxford University Hospitals in 2015, and Associate Fellow at Green Templeton College, Oxford in 2015.

His interests are professionalism and, in particular, its relationship to leadership in healthcare systems. His current specific research interests are the effectiveness or otherwise of leadership education in respect of its impact on quality improvement in healthcare systems.

At the Royal College of Surgeons of England he was clinical lead and Chair of the Needs Analysis Group evaluating educational resources and organisational systems necessary for the implementation of reform of surgical training, and made recommendations for changes that were eventually adopted by all surgical training systems in the United Kingdom. During this appointment an opportunity arose in early 2003 at the end of the Serbian conflict to assist the European Agency for Reconstruction (EAR, a division of the EEC) in providing advice to the Kosovan Ministry of Health to develop new systems for surgical training.

Currently at Oxford, he is lead tutor for the module in Leadership and Management in Healthcare and Deputy Director of the Masters in Surgical Science, and supervises Masters and DPhil students on the subject of organisational change and leadership. In addition he has regular commitments in teaching postgraduate medical trainees and medical faculty on topics such as leadership, quality improvement, educational theory in healthcare, workplace assessments, supporting and talent managing  medical trainees, as well as occasional commitments to supervising students on the Said Business School Global Opportunity and Threats (Oxford) programme in exploring problems in complex systems.

Along the way he has written and spoken on many topics in medicine, obtained research grants, and has unexpectedly been given fellowships and medals. His main interest outside of work is playing music and he runs the Green Templeton College Big Band.

Prior to starting his DPhil, Eddy worked as a primary school teacher in Bristol, where he also completed his MSc in Educational Research.

He is particularly interested in the culture of high stakes, standardised testing, and how this might perpetuate existing inequalities in schools. His research focuses specifically on the interaction between knowledge, policy and pedagogy in the context of Literacy education.

 

Claire (郝煜) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and a China Oxford Scholarship Fund (COSF) scholar.

Claire holds a BA in Education and Physics from the University of Cambridge, an MA in Applied Linguistics from UCL Institution of Education, and an EdM in International Education Policy from Harvard University. She is passionate about exploring and supporting the transnational experiences of bi-/multilingual students in studying abroad contexts. Her research and professional interests include bilingualism, language and identity, international education, professional development, and school leadership.

Since 2015, Claire has served as the Director of International Education at Beijing Xinxuedao Education Group, a non-profit organisation that operates 31 schools with over 30,000 K-12 students in China. She has also worked as a high school counsellor and a teacher of Physics and Psychology.

Publications

Hao, Y. and Lantsman, G. (2022). Motivation in MOOCs: a qualitative study on the design and evaluation of an online IELTS course. The 7th IAFOR International Conference on Education.

Hao, Y. (2020). Education without borders: sojourner trips in students’ holistic development. In Wang, J. (Ed.). Family, Society, and Education. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2020). Learning how to learn: the role of metacognition and self-regulation in learning. In Wang, J. (Ed.). The Virtue of Thinking in Learning. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2019). Chinese students at a UK university: how linguistic repertoire mediates language and sojourner identity construction. Linguistics and Applied Linguistics Conference. Beijing Normal University.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2018). Examining Linguistic Diversity as a Resource for Higher Education in the Anglophone World. In Tong, V. C., Standen, A., & Sotiriou, M. (Ed.). Shaping Higher Education with Students: Ways to Connect Research and Teaching (pp.288-293). UCL Press.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2016). Making the most of linguistic diversity: the views and practices of bi/multilingual postgraduate students. The Multilingual University. ESRC Seminars.

Hao, Y. (2012). A Transformative Journey: China-US exchange student studying at an American high school. New World Press.

Pok Jing (Jane) Ho is a doctoral student at the Department of Education, specialising in educational assessment.

She is funded by the Bei Shan Tang Foundation Scholarship for Graduate Studies.

Her DPhil thesis examines validity in the Hong Kong Diploma of Secondary Education Examination, a large-scale, high-stakes test that informs higher education admissions decisions, using the argument-based approach to validation. In particular, her research identifies the claims made based on test scores, the validity evidence that supports or challenges such claims, and the social consequences that ensue as a result of test use.

Prior to her DPhil, she completed an M.A. in International Education Policy Analysis at Stanford University. She subsequently worked as a project officer at the Education University of Hong Kong, where she is now serving as a consultant alongside her studies.

A former secondary school teacher, Jane also holds a B.A. in English Studies (First Class Honours), a B.Ed. in English Language Education (First Class Honours), and an M.Ed. in Curriculum and Instruction from the Chinese University of Hong Kong, as well as the Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (CELTA) from Cambridge.

She is a Peer Supporter at Green Templeton College.

Publications

Ho, P. J. (2020). For some or for all: Vocational English for Hong Kong secondary school students. In C. Hong, & W. K. Ma (Eds.), Applied degree education and the future of work—Education 4.0 (pp. 87–95). Springer. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-15-3142-2

Ho, P. J. (2015). China-Africa “cooperation” in education. International Politics, 5. https://www.iir.cz/en/china-africa-cooperation-in-education

Jennifer’s DPhil focuses on adoptive families where  the adoptive parents also have birth children. She has worked in adoption support as a Parent Consultant for Adoption UK and as Head of Peer Services at PAC-UK, as well as managing the Adoption UK advice line and the parent training team.

She holds an MSc in Poverty Reduction: Policy and Practice from SOAS, and an MBA from Warwick Business School. She has worked in management consultancy in both the public and private sectors and is a board member of CoramBAAF.

Publications

The Right Tools for the Job. Information Age, November 1996

Global teams for the millennium; Management Decision, 36 (1): 31-33, February 1998

Lucy is a second-year DPhil student, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

Her DPhil research aims to engage in a meaningful and creative way with service children to explore how service life has shaped their experiences of education and sense of self. By choosing this focus, the research seeks to widen and nuance current understanding of service children’s educational experiences in addition to furthering knowledge into how service children see themselves. As a result of this, it is hoped that the research will support in developing the professional body of knowledge and understanding of this group of children in schools and help inform the Service Pupil Premium (SPP) funding choices in addition to wider school practice.

Before embarking on her DPhil at Oxford, Lucy completed her PGCE and MEd in Primary Education at the University of Cambridge. In addition to her DPhil work, Lucy is a Trustee for the Armed Forces Education Trust (AFET) – a grant-giving charity for service children – and a volunteer for the Oxford based charity, Big Brothers Big Sisters.

 

 

Aine is interested in improving the health outcomes of children and young people in the care system.

Fahad is reading for a DPhil in Education (part-time). He has over fifteen years professional experience in the education sector, in particular, higher education.

He has held senior roles in staff and student development, human resources, policy and strategy. Fahad holds a BSc in Education and Science and an MBA. Prior to commencing his doctoral studies, he was elected an Academic Visitor at St Antony’s College in the University of Oxford. Fahad’s research focus is on the quality of undergraduate medical education for Qatari doctors.

Shawna completed her undergraduate degree in Psycholinguistics at the University of Toronto in Canada, and later completed the MSc program in Applied Linguistics and Second language Acquisition at the University of Oxford.

She has a wide range of experiences in the field of Linguistics as a teaching and research assistant in areas such as theoretical linguistics, phonology, speech-language pathology, language acquisition, and creole studies. Being a native of Jamaica herself, Shawna has carried out extensive work on creole language acquisition. She worked with the University of the West Indies to draft the first Jamaican (Creole) as a Foreign Language course, and with the U.S Peace Corps to assess and revamp an existing language program for volunteers.

Shawna’s current research focuses on the development of writing skills among primary school learners in Jamaica who speak Jamaican Creole as a home language but are educated in English.

Publications
  • Helms-Park, R., Tucker, S, & Dronjic, V. (2016). From proto-writing to multimedia literacy: scripts and orthographies through the ages. In  Chen Bumgardner, V. Dronjic,, & R. Helms-Park (Eds.), Second Language Reading: Psycholinguistic and Cognitive Perspectives (pp. 1-31). New York, NY: Routledge Publishers.
  • Eriks-Brophy, A., Green, S., & Tucker, S. (2013).  Articulatory error patterns and phonological process use of preschool children with and without hearing loss. Volta Review.

Richard Canter is Visiting Professor of Surgical Education in the Nuffield Department of Surgical Sciences, University of Oxford.

Richard Canter qualified in medicine at the University of London in 1976, before becoming a surgeon at the Royal United Hospital, Bath. He completed a PhD in Management at the University of Bath in 1998 studying the nature of power in decision-making at the personal and organisation level in healthcare. Following the critical Kennedy report on surgical training in 2001, he was recruited to the Royal College of Surgeons of England as Deputy Director of Surgical Education with specific responsibility for curriculum development in surgical education in England. He was subsequently Head of the Postgraduate School of Surgery in Bristol until 2012, after which he concentrated on academic work at Oxford. He was appointed a visiting Professor in Oxford in in 2007, Emeritus Consultant at Oxford University Hospitals in 2015, and Associate Fellow at Green Templeton College, Oxford in 2015.

His interests are professionalism and, in particular, its relationship to leadership in healthcare systems. His current specific research interests are the effectiveness or otherwise of leadership education in respect of its impact on quality improvement in healthcare systems.

At the Royal College of Surgeons of England he was clinical lead and Chair of the Needs Analysis Group evaluating educational resources and organisational systems necessary for the implementation of reform of surgical training, and made recommendations for changes that were eventually adopted by all surgical training systems in the United Kingdom. During this appointment an opportunity arose in early 2003 at the end of the Serbian conflict to assist the European Agency for Reconstruction (EAR, a division of the EEC) in providing advice to the Kosovan Ministry of Health to develop new systems for surgical training.

Currently at Oxford, he is lead tutor for the module in Leadership and Management in Healthcare and Deputy Director of the Masters in Surgical Science, and supervises Masters and DPhil students on the subject of organisational change and leadership. In addition he has regular commitments in teaching postgraduate medical trainees and medical faculty on topics such as leadership, quality improvement, educational theory in healthcare, workplace assessments, supporting and talent managing  medical trainees, as well as occasional commitments to supervising students on the Said Business School Global Opportunity and Threats (Oxford) programme in exploring problems in complex systems.

Along the way he has written and spoken on many topics in medicine, obtained research grants, and has unexpectedly been given fellowships and medals. His main interest outside of work is playing music and he runs the Green Templeton College Big Band.

Prior to starting his DPhil, Eddy worked as a primary school teacher in Bristol, where he also completed his MSc in Educational Research.

He is particularly interested in the culture of high stakes, standardised testing, and how this might perpetuate existing inequalities in schools. His research focuses specifically on the interaction between knowledge, policy and pedagogy in the context of Literacy education.

 

Claire (郝煜) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and a China Oxford Scholarship Fund (COSF) scholar.

Claire holds a BA in Education and Physics from the University of Cambridge, an MA in Applied Linguistics from UCL Institution of Education, and an EdM in International Education Policy from Harvard University. She is passionate about exploring and supporting the transnational experiences of bi-/multilingual students in studying abroad contexts. Her research and professional interests include bilingualism, language and identity, international education, professional development, and school leadership.

Since 2015, Claire has served as the Director of International Education at Beijing Xinxuedao Education Group, a non-profit organisation that operates 31 schools with over 30,000 K-12 students in China. She has also worked as a high school counsellor and a teacher of Physics and Psychology.

Publications

Hao, Y. and Lantsman, G. (2022). Motivation in MOOCs: a qualitative study on the design and evaluation of an online IELTS course. The 7th IAFOR International Conference on Education.

Hao, Y. (2020). Education without borders: sojourner trips in students’ holistic development. In Wang, J. (Ed.). Family, Society, and Education. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2020). Learning how to learn: the role of metacognition and self-regulation in learning. In Wang, J. (Ed.). The Virtue of Thinking in Learning. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2019). Chinese students at a UK university: how linguistic repertoire mediates language and sojourner identity construction. Linguistics and Applied Linguistics Conference. Beijing Normal University.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2018). Examining Linguistic Diversity as a Resource for Higher Education in the Anglophone World. In Tong, V. C., Standen, A., & Sotiriou, M. (Ed.). Shaping Higher Education with Students: Ways to Connect Research and Teaching (pp.288-293). UCL Press.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2016). Making the most of linguistic diversity: the views and practices of bi/multilingual postgraduate students. The Multilingual University. ESRC Seminars.

Hao, Y. (2012). A Transformative Journey: China-US exchange student studying at an American high school. New World Press.

Pok Jing (Jane) Ho is a doctoral student at the Department of Education, specialising in educational assessment.

She is funded by the Bei Shan Tang Foundation Scholarship for Graduate Studies.

Her DPhil thesis examines validity in the Hong Kong Diploma of Secondary Education Examination, a large-scale, high-stakes test that informs higher education admissions decisions, using the argument-based approach to validation. In particular, her research identifies the claims made based on test scores, the validity evidence that supports or challenges such claims, and the social consequences that ensue as a result of test use.

Prior to her DPhil, she completed an M.A. in International Education Policy Analysis at Stanford University. She subsequently worked as a project officer at the Education University of Hong Kong, where she is now serving as a consultant alongside her studies.

A former secondary school teacher, Jane also holds a B.A. in English Studies (First Class Honours), a B.Ed. in English Language Education (First Class Honours), and an M.Ed. in Curriculum and Instruction from the Chinese University of Hong Kong, as well as the Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (CELTA) from Cambridge.

She is a Peer Supporter at Green Templeton College.

Publications

Ho, P. J. (2020). For some or for all: Vocational English for Hong Kong secondary school students. In C. Hong, & W. K. Ma (Eds.), Applied degree education and the future of work—Education 4.0 (pp. 87–95). Springer. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-15-3142-2

Ho, P. J. (2015). China-Africa “cooperation” in education. International Politics, 5. https://www.iir.cz/en/china-africa-cooperation-in-education

Jennifer’s DPhil focuses on adoptive families where  the adoptive parents also have birth children. She has worked in adoption support as a Parent Consultant for Adoption UK and as Head of Peer Services at PAC-UK, as well as managing the Adoption UK advice line and the parent training team.

She holds an MSc in Poverty Reduction: Policy and Practice from SOAS, and an MBA from Warwick Business School. She has worked in management consultancy in both the public and private sectors and is a board member of CoramBAAF.

Publications

The Right Tools for the Job. Information Age, November 1996

Global teams for the millennium; Management Decision, 36 (1): 31-33, February 1998

Lucy is a second-year DPhil student, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

Her DPhil research aims to engage in a meaningful and creative way with service children to explore how service life has shaped their experiences of education and sense of self. By choosing this focus, the research seeks to widen and nuance current understanding of service children’s educational experiences in addition to furthering knowledge into how service children see themselves. As a result of this, it is hoped that the research will support in developing the professional body of knowledge and understanding of this group of children in schools and help inform the Service Pupil Premium (SPP) funding choices in addition to wider school practice.

Before embarking on her DPhil at Oxford, Lucy completed her PGCE and MEd in Primary Education at the University of Cambridge. In addition to her DPhil work, Lucy is a Trustee for the Armed Forces Education Trust (AFET) – a grant-giving charity for service children – and a volunteer for the Oxford based charity, Big Brothers Big Sisters.

 

 

Aine is interested in improving the health outcomes of children and young people in the care system.

Fahad is reading for a DPhil in Education (part-time). He has over fifteen years professional experience in the education sector, in particular, higher education.

He has held senior roles in staff and student development, human resources, policy and strategy. Fahad holds a BSc in Education and Science and an MBA. Prior to commencing his doctoral studies, he was elected an Academic Visitor at St Antony’s College in the University of Oxford. Fahad’s research focus is on the quality of undergraduate medical education for Qatari doctors.

Shawna completed her undergraduate degree in Psycholinguistics at the University of Toronto in Canada, and later completed the MSc program in Applied Linguistics and Second language Acquisition at the University of Oxford.

She has a wide range of experiences in the field of Linguistics as a teaching and research assistant in areas such as theoretical linguistics, phonology, speech-language pathology, language acquisition, and creole studies. Being a native of Jamaica herself, Shawna has carried out extensive work on creole language acquisition. She worked with the University of the West Indies to draft the first Jamaican (Creole) as a Foreign Language course, and with the U.S Peace Corps to assess and revamp an existing language program for volunteers.

Shawna’s current research focuses on the development of writing skills among primary school learners in Jamaica who speak Jamaican Creole as a home language but are educated in English.

Publications
  • Helms-Park, R., Tucker, S, & Dronjic, V. (2016). From proto-writing to multimedia literacy: scripts and orthographies through the ages. In  Chen Bumgardner, V. Dronjic,, & R. Helms-Park (Eds.), Second Language Reading: Psycholinguistic and Cognitive Perspectives (pp. 1-31). New York, NY: Routledge Publishers.
  • Eriks-Brophy, A., Green, S., & Tucker, S. (2013).  Articulatory error patterns and phonological process use of preschool children with and without hearing loss. Volta Review.

Richard Canter is Visiting Professor of Surgical Education in the Nuffield Department of Surgical Sciences, University of Oxford.

Richard Canter qualified in medicine at the University of London in 1976, before becoming a surgeon at the Royal United Hospital, Bath. He completed a PhD in Management at the University of Bath in 1998 studying the nature of power in decision-making at the personal and organisation level in healthcare. Following the critical Kennedy report on surgical training in 2001, he was recruited to the Royal College of Surgeons of England as Deputy Director of Surgical Education with specific responsibility for curriculum development in surgical education in England. He was subsequently Head of the Postgraduate School of Surgery in Bristol until 2012, after which he concentrated on academic work at Oxford. He was appointed a visiting Professor in Oxford in in 2007, Emeritus Consultant at Oxford University Hospitals in 2015, and Associate Fellow at Green Templeton College, Oxford in 2015.

His interests are professionalism and, in particular, its relationship to leadership in healthcare systems. His current specific research interests are the effectiveness or otherwise of leadership education in respect of its impact on quality improvement in healthcare systems.

At the Royal College of Surgeons of England he was clinical lead and Chair of the Needs Analysis Group evaluating educational resources and organisational systems necessary for the implementation of reform of surgical training, and made recommendations for changes that were eventually adopted by all surgical training systems in the United Kingdom. During this appointment an opportunity arose in early 2003 at the end of the Serbian conflict to assist the European Agency for Reconstruction (EAR, a division of the EEC) in providing advice to the Kosovan Ministry of Health to develop new systems for surgical training.

Currently at Oxford, he is lead tutor for the module in Leadership and Management in Healthcare and Deputy Director of the Masters in Surgical Science, and supervises Masters and DPhil students on the subject of organisational change and leadership. In addition he has regular commitments in teaching postgraduate medical trainees and medical faculty on topics such as leadership, quality improvement, educational theory in healthcare, workplace assessments, supporting and talent managing  medical trainees, as well as occasional commitments to supervising students on the Said Business School Global Opportunity and Threats (Oxford) programme in exploring problems in complex systems.

Along the way he has written and spoken on many topics in medicine, obtained research grants, and has unexpectedly been given fellowships and medals. His main interest outside of work is playing music and he runs the Green Templeton College Big Band.

Prior to starting his DPhil, Eddy worked as a primary school teacher in Bristol, where he also completed his MSc in Educational Research.

He is particularly interested in the culture of high stakes, standardised testing, and how this might perpetuate existing inequalities in schools. His research focuses specifically on the interaction between knowledge, policy and pedagogy in the context of Literacy education.

 

Claire (郝煜) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and a China Oxford Scholarship Fund (COSF) scholar.

Claire holds a BA in Education and Physics from the University of Cambridge, an MA in Applied Linguistics from UCL Institution of Education, and an EdM in International Education Policy from Harvard University. She is passionate about exploring and supporting the transnational experiences of bi-/multilingual students in studying abroad contexts. Her research and professional interests include bilingualism, language and identity, international education, professional development, and school leadership.

Since 2015, Claire has served as the Director of International Education at Beijing Xinxuedao Education Group, a non-profit organisation that operates 31 schools with over 30,000 K-12 students in China. She has also worked as a high school counsellor and a teacher of Physics and Psychology.

Publications

Hao, Y. and Lantsman, G. (2022). Motivation in MOOCs: a qualitative study on the design and evaluation of an online IELTS course. The 7th IAFOR International Conference on Education.

Hao, Y. (2020). Education without borders: sojourner trips in students’ holistic development. In Wang, J. (Ed.). Family, Society, and Education. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2020). Learning how to learn: the role of metacognition and self-regulation in learning. In Wang, J. (Ed.). The Virtue of Thinking in Learning. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2019). Chinese students at a UK university: how linguistic repertoire mediates language and sojourner identity construction. Linguistics and Applied Linguistics Conference. Beijing Normal University.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2018). Examining Linguistic Diversity as a Resource for Higher Education in the Anglophone World. In Tong, V. C., Standen, A., & Sotiriou, M. (Ed.). Shaping Higher Education with Students: Ways to Connect Research and Teaching (pp.288-293). UCL Press.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2016). Making the most of linguistic diversity: the views and practices of bi/multilingual postgraduate students. The Multilingual University. ESRC Seminars.

Hao, Y. (2012). A Transformative Journey: China-US exchange student studying at an American high school. New World Press.

Pok Jing (Jane) Ho is a doctoral student at the Department of Education, specialising in educational assessment.

She is funded by the Bei Shan Tang Foundation Scholarship for Graduate Studies.

Her DPhil thesis examines validity in the Hong Kong Diploma of Secondary Education Examination, a large-scale, high-stakes test that informs higher education admissions decisions, using the argument-based approach to validation. In particular, her research identifies the claims made based on test scores, the validity evidence that supports or challenges such claims, and the social consequences that ensue as a result of test use.

Prior to her DPhil, she completed an M.A. in International Education Policy Analysis at Stanford University. She subsequently worked as a project officer at the Education University of Hong Kong, where she is now serving as a consultant alongside her studies.

A former secondary school teacher, Jane also holds a B.A. in English Studies (First Class Honours), a B.Ed. in English Language Education (First Class Honours), and an M.Ed. in Curriculum and Instruction from the Chinese University of Hong Kong, as well as the Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (CELTA) from Cambridge.

She is a Peer Supporter at Green Templeton College.

Publications

Ho, P. J. (2020). For some or for all: Vocational English for Hong Kong secondary school students. In C. Hong, & W. K. Ma (Eds.), Applied degree education and the future of work—Education 4.0 (pp. 87–95). Springer. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-15-3142-2

Ho, P. J. (2015). China-Africa “cooperation” in education. International Politics, 5. https://www.iir.cz/en/china-africa-cooperation-in-education

Jennifer’s DPhil focuses on adoptive families where  the adoptive parents also have birth children. She has worked in adoption support as a Parent Consultant for Adoption UK and as Head of Peer Services at PAC-UK, as well as managing the Adoption UK advice line and the parent training team.

She holds an MSc in Poverty Reduction: Policy and Practice from SOAS, and an MBA from Warwick Business School. She has worked in management consultancy in both the public and private sectors and is a board member of CoramBAAF.

Publications

The Right Tools for the Job. Information Age, November 1996

Global teams for the millennium; Management Decision, 36 (1): 31-33, February 1998

Lucy is a second-year DPhil student, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

Her DPhil research aims to engage in a meaningful and creative way with service children to explore how service life has shaped their experiences of education and sense of self. By choosing this focus, the research seeks to widen and nuance current understanding of service children’s educational experiences in addition to furthering knowledge into how service children see themselves. As a result of this, it is hoped that the research will support in developing the professional body of knowledge and understanding of this group of children in schools and help inform the Service Pupil Premium (SPP) funding choices in addition to wider school practice.

Before embarking on her DPhil at Oxford, Lucy completed her PGCE and MEd in Primary Education at the University of Cambridge. In addition to her DPhil work, Lucy is a Trustee for the Armed Forces Education Trust (AFET) – a grant-giving charity for service children – and a volunteer for the Oxford based charity, Big Brothers Big Sisters.

 

 

Aine is interested in improving the health outcomes of children and young people in the care system.

Fahad is reading for a DPhil in Education (part-time). He has over fifteen years professional experience in the education sector, in particular, higher education.

He has held senior roles in staff and student development, human resources, policy and strategy. Fahad holds a BSc in Education and Science and an MBA. Prior to commencing his doctoral studies, he was elected an Academic Visitor at St Antony’s College in the University of Oxford. Fahad’s research focus is on the quality of undergraduate medical education for Qatari doctors.

Shawna completed her undergraduate degree in Psycholinguistics at the University of Toronto in Canada, and later completed the MSc program in Applied Linguistics and Second language Acquisition at the University of Oxford.

She has a wide range of experiences in the field of Linguistics as a teaching and research assistant in areas such as theoretical linguistics, phonology, speech-language pathology, language acquisition, and creole studies. Being a native of Jamaica herself, Shawna has carried out extensive work on creole language acquisition. She worked with the University of the West Indies to draft the first Jamaican (Creole) as a Foreign Language course, and with the U.S Peace Corps to assess and revamp an existing language program for volunteers.

Shawna’s current research focuses on the development of writing skills among primary school learners in Jamaica who speak Jamaican Creole as a home language but are educated in English.

Publications
  • Helms-Park, R., Tucker, S, & Dronjic, V. (2016). From proto-writing to multimedia literacy: scripts and orthographies through the ages. In  Chen Bumgardner, V. Dronjic,, & R. Helms-Park (Eds.), Second Language Reading: Psycholinguistic and Cognitive Perspectives (pp. 1-31). New York, NY: Routledge Publishers.
  • Eriks-Brophy, A., Green, S., & Tucker, S. (2013).  Articulatory error patterns and phonological process use of preschool children with and without hearing loss. Volta Review.

Richard Canter is Visiting Professor of Surgical Education in the Nuffield Department of Surgical Sciences, University of Oxford.

Richard Canter qualified in medicine at the University of London in 1976, before becoming a surgeon at the Royal United Hospital, Bath. He completed a PhD in Management at the University of Bath in 1998 studying the nature of power in decision-making at the personal and organisation level in healthcare. Following the critical Kennedy report on surgical training in 2001, he was recruited to the Royal College of Surgeons of England as Deputy Director of Surgical Education with specific responsibility for curriculum development in surgical education in England. He was subsequently Head of the Postgraduate School of Surgery in Bristol until 2012, after which he concentrated on academic work at Oxford. He was appointed a visiting Professor in Oxford in in 2007, Emeritus Consultant at Oxford University Hospitals in 2015, and Associate Fellow at Green Templeton College, Oxford in 2015.

His interests are professionalism and, in particular, its relationship to leadership in healthcare systems. His current specific research interests are the effectiveness or otherwise of leadership education in respect of its impact on quality improvement in healthcare systems.

At the Royal College of Surgeons of England he was clinical lead and Chair of the Needs Analysis Group evaluating educational resources and organisational systems necessary for the implementation of reform of surgical training, and made recommendations for changes that were eventually adopted by all surgical training systems in the United Kingdom. During this appointment an opportunity arose in early 2003 at the end of the Serbian conflict to assist the European Agency for Reconstruction (EAR, a division of the EEC) in providing advice to the Kosovan Ministry of Health to develop new systems for surgical training.

Currently at Oxford, he is lead tutor for the module in Leadership and Management in Healthcare and Deputy Director of the Masters in Surgical Science, and supervises Masters and DPhil students on the subject of organisational change and leadership. In addition he has regular commitments in teaching postgraduate medical trainees and medical faculty on topics such as leadership, quality improvement, educational theory in healthcare, workplace assessments, supporting and talent managing  medical trainees, as well as occasional commitments to supervising students on the Said Business School Global Opportunity and Threats (Oxford) programme in exploring problems in complex systems.

Along the way he has written and spoken on many topics in medicine, obtained research grants, and has unexpectedly been given fellowships and medals. His main interest outside of work is playing music and he runs the Green Templeton College Big Band.

Prior to starting his DPhil, Eddy worked as a primary school teacher in Bristol, where he also completed his MSc in Educational Research.

He is particularly interested in the culture of high stakes, standardised testing, and how this might perpetuate existing inequalities in schools. His research focuses specifically on the interaction between knowledge, policy and pedagogy in the context of Literacy education.

 

Claire (郝煜) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and a China Oxford Scholarship Fund (COSF) scholar.

Claire holds a BA in Education and Physics from the University of Cambridge, an MA in Applied Linguistics from UCL Institution of Education, and an EdM in International Education Policy from Harvard University. She is passionate about exploring and supporting the transnational experiences of bi-/multilingual students in studying abroad contexts. Her research and professional interests include bilingualism, language and identity, international education, professional development, and school leadership.

Since 2015, Claire has served as the Director of International Education at Beijing Xinxuedao Education Group, a non-profit organisation that operates 31 schools with over 30,000 K-12 students in China. She has also worked as a high school counsellor and a teacher of Physics and Psychology.

Publications

Hao, Y. and Lantsman, G. (2022). Motivation in MOOCs: a qualitative study on the design and evaluation of an online IELTS course. The 7th IAFOR International Conference on Education.

Hao, Y. (2020). Education without borders: sojourner trips in students’ holistic development. In Wang, J. (Ed.). Family, Society, and Education. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2020). Learning how to learn: the role of metacognition and self-regulation in learning. In Wang, J. (Ed.). The Virtue of Thinking in Learning. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2019). Chinese students at a UK university: how linguistic repertoire mediates language and sojourner identity construction. Linguistics and Applied Linguistics Conference. Beijing Normal University.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2018). Examining Linguistic Diversity as a Resource for Higher Education in the Anglophone World. In Tong, V. C., Standen, A., & Sotiriou, M. (Ed.). Shaping Higher Education with Students: Ways to Connect Research and Teaching (pp.288-293). UCL Press.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2016). Making the most of linguistic diversity: the views and practices of bi/multilingual postgraduate students. The Multilingual University. ESRC Seminars.

Hao, Y. (2012). A Transformative Journey: China-US exchange student studying at an American high school. New World Press.

Pok Jing (Jane) Ho is a doctoral student at the Department of Education, specialising in educational assessment.

She is funded by the Bei Shan Tang Foundation Scholarship for Graduate Studies.

Her DPhil thesis examines validity in the Hong Kong Diploma of Secondary Education Examination, a large-scale, high-stakes test that informs higher education admissions decisions, using the argument-based approach to validation. In particular, her research identifies the claims made based on test scores, the validity evidence that supports or challenges such claims, and the social consequences that ensue as a result of test use.

Prior to her DPhil, she completed an M.A. in International Education Policy Analysis at Stanford University. She subsequently worked as a project officer at the Education University of Hong Kong, where she is now serving as a consultant alongside her studies.

A former secondary school teacher, Jane also holds a B.A. in English Studies (First Class Honours), a B.Ed. in English Language Education (First Class Honours), and an M.Ed. in Curriculum and Instruction from the Chinese University of Hong Kong, as well as the Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (CELTA) from Cambridge.

She is a Peer Supporter at Green Templeton College.

Publications

Ho, P. J. (2020). For some or for all: Vocational English for Hong Kong secondary school students. In C. Hong, & W. K. Ma (Eds.), Applied degree education and the future of work—Education 4.0 (pp. 87–95). Springer. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-15-3142-2

Ho, P. J. (2015). China-Africa “cooperation” in education. International Politics, 5. https://www.iir.cz/en/china-africa-cooperation-in-education

Jennifer’s DPhil focuses on adoptive families where  the adoptive parents also have birth children. She has worked in adoption support as a Parent Consultant for Adoption UK and as Head of Peer Services at PAC-UK, as well as managing the Adoption UK advice line and the parent training team.

She holds an MSc in Poverty Reduction: Policy and Practice from SOAS, and an MBA from Warwick Business School. She has worked in management consultancy in both the public and private sectors and is a board member of CoramBAAF.

Publications

The Right Tools for the Job. Information Age, November 1996

Global teams for the millennium; Management Decision, 36 (1): 31-33, February 1998

Lucy is a second-year DPhil student, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

Her DPhil research aims to engage in a meaningful and creative way with service children to explore how service life has shaped their experiences of education and sense of self. By choosing this focus, the research seeks to widen and nuance current understanding of service children’s educational experiences in addition to furthering knowledge into how service children see themselves. As a result of this, it is hoped that the research will support in developing the professional body of knowledge and understanding of this group of children in schools and help inform the Service Pupil Premium (SPP) funding choices in addition to wider school practice.

Before embarking on her DPhil at Oxford, Lucy completed her PGCE and MEd in Primary Education at the University of Cambridge. In addition to her DPhil work, Lucy is a Trustee for the Armed Forces Education Trust (AFET) – a grant-giving charity for service children – and a volunteer for the Oxford based charity, Big Brothers Big Sisters.

 

 

Aine is interested in improving the health outcomes of children and young people in the care system.

Fahad is reading for a DPhil in Education (part-time). He has over fifteen years professional experience in the education sector, in particular, higher education.

He has held senior roles in staff and student development, human resources, policy and strategy. Fahad holds a BSc in Education and Science and an MBA. Prior to commencing his doctoral studies, he was elected an Academic Visitor at St Antony’s College in the University of Oxford. Fahad’s research focus is on the quality of undergraduate medical education for Qatari doctors.

Shawna completed her undergraduate degree in Psycholinguistics at the University of Toronto in Canada, and later completed the MSc program in Applied Linguistics and Second language Acquisition at the University of Oxford.

She has a wide range of experiences in the field of Linguistics as a teaching and research assistant in areas such as theoretical linguistics, phonology, speech-language pathology, language acquisition, and creole studies. Being a native of Jamaica herself, Shawna has carried out extensive work on creole language acquisition. She worked with the University of the West Indies to draft the first Jamaican (Creole) as a Foreign Language course, and with the U.S Peace Corps to assess and revamp an existing language program for volunteers.

Shawna’s current research focuses on the development of writing skills among primary school learners in Jamaica who speak Jamaican Creole as a home language but are educated in English.

Publications
  • Helms-Park, R., Tucker, S, & Dronjic, V. (2016). From proto-writing to multimedia literacy: scripts and orthographies through the ages. In  Chen Bumgardner, V. Dronjic,, & R. Helms-Park (Eds.), Second Language Reading: Psycholinguistic and Cognitive Perspectives (pp. 1-31). New York, NY: Routledge Publishers.
  • Eriks-Brophy, A., Green, S., & Tucker, S. (2013).  Articulatory error patterns and phonological process use of preschool children with and without hearing loss. Volta Review.

Richard Canter is Visiting Professor of Surgical Education in the Nuffield Department of Surgical Sciences, University of Oxford.

Richard Canter qualified in medicine at the University of London in 1976, before becoming a surgeon at the Royal United Hospital, Bath. He completed a PhD in Management at the University of Bath in 1998 studying the nature of power in decision-making at the personal and organisation level in healthcare. Following the critical Kennedy report on surgical training in 2001, he was recruited to the Royal College of Surgeons of England as Deputy Director of Surgical Education with specific responsibility for curriculum development in surgical education in England. He was subsequently Head of the Postgraduate School of Surgery in Bristol until 2012, after which he concentrated on academic work at Oxford. He was appointed a visiting Professor in Oxford in in 2007, Emeritus Consultant at Oxford University Hospitals in 2015, and Associate Fellow at Green Templeton College, Oxford in 2015.

His interests are professionalism and, in particular, its relationship to leadership in healthcare systems. His current specific research interests are the effectiveness or otherwise of leadership education in respect of its impact on quality improvement in healthcare systems.

At the Royal College of Surgeons of England he was clinical lead and Chair of the Needs Analysis Group evaluating educational resources and organisational systems necessary for the implementation of reform of surgical training, and made recommendations for changes that were eventually adopted by all surgical training systems in the United Kingdom. During this appointment an opportunity arose in early 2003 at the end of the Serbian conflict to assist the European Agency for Reconstruction (EAR, a division of the EEC) in providing advice to the Kosovan Ministry of Health to develop new systems for surgical training.

Currently at Oxford, he is lead tutor for the module in Leadership and Management in Healthcare and Deputy Director of the Masters in Surgical Science, and supervises Masters and DPhil students on the subject of organisational change and leadership. In addition he has regular commitments in teaching postgraduate medical trainees and medical faculty on topics such as leadership, quality improvement, educational theory in healthcare, workplace assessments, supporting and talent managing  medical trainees, as well as occasional commitments to supervising students on the Said Business School Global Opportunity and Threats (Oxford) programme in exploring problems in complex systems.

Along the way he has written and spoken on many topics in medicine, obtained research grants, and has unexpectedly been given fellowships and medals. His main interest outside of work is playing music and he runs the Green Templeton College Big Band.

Prior to starting his DPhil, Eddy worked as a primary school teacher in Bristol, where he also completed his MSc in Educational Research.

He is particularly interested in the culture of high stakes, standardised testing, and how this might perpetuate existing inequalities in schools. His research focuses specifically on the interaction between knowledge, policy and pedagogy in the context of Literacy education.

 

Claire (郝煜) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and a China Oxford Scholarship Fund (COSF) scholar.

Claire holds a BA in Education and Physics from the University of Cambridge, an MA in Applied Linguistics from UCL Institution of Education, and an EdM in International Education Policy from Harvard University. She is passionate about exploring and supporting the transnational experiences of bi-/multilingual students in studying abroad contexts. Her research and professional interests include bilingualism, language and identity, international education, professional development, and school leadership.

Since 2015, Claire has served as the Director of International Education at Beijing Xinxuedao Education Group, a non-profit organisation that operates 31 schools with over 30,000 K-12 students in China. She has also worked as a high school counsellor and a teacher of Physics and Psychology.

Publications

Hao, Y. and Lantsman, G. (2022). Motivation in MOOCs: a qualitative study on the design and evaluation of an online IELTS course. The 7th IAFOR International Conference on Education.

Hao, Y. (2020). Education without borders: sojourner trips in students’ holistic development. In Wang, J. (Ed.). Family, Society, and Education. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2020). Learning how to learn: the role of metacognition and self-regulation in learning. In Wang, J. (Ed.). The Virtue of Thinking in Learning. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2019). Chinese students at a UK university: how linguistic repertoire mediates language and sojourner identity construction. Linguistics and Applied Linguistics Conference. Beijing Normal University.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2018). Examining Linguistic Diversity as a Resource for Higher Education in the Anglophone World. In Tong, V. C., Standen, A., & Sotiriou, M. (Ed.). Shaping Higher Education with Students: Ways to Connect Research and Teaching (pp.288-293). UCL Press.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2016). Making the most of linguistic diversity: the views and practices of bi/multilingual postgraduate students. The Multilingual University. ESRC Seminars.

Hao, Y. (2012). A Transformative Journey: China-US exchange student studying at an American high school. New World Press.

Pok Jing (Jane) Ho is a doctoral student at the Department of Education, specialising in educational assessment.

She is funded by the Bei Shan Tang Foundation Scholarship for Graduate Studies.

Her DPhil thesis examines validity in the Hong Kong Diploma of Secondary Education Examination, a large-scale, high-stakes test that informs higher education admissions decisions, using the argument-based approach to validation. In particular, her research identifies the claims made based on test scores, the validity evidence that supports or challenges such claims, and the social consequences that ensue as a result of test use.

Prior to her DPhil, she completed an M.A. in International Education Policy Analysis at Stanford University. She subsequently worked as a project officer at the Education University of Hong Kong, where she is now serving as a consultant alongside her studies.

A former secondary school teacher, Jane also holds a B.A. in English Studies (First Class Honours), a B.Ed. in English Language Education (First Class Honours), and an M.Ed. in Curriculum and Instruction from the Chinese University of Hong Kong, as well as the Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (CELTA) from Cambridge.

She is a Peer Supporter at Green Templeton College.

Publications

Ho, P. J. (2020). For some or for all: Vocational English for Hong Kong secondary school students. In C. Hong, & W. K. Ma (Eds.), Applied degree education and the future of work—Education 4.0 (pp. 87–95). Springer. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-15-3142-2

Ho, P. J. (2015). China-Africa “cooperation” in education. International Politics, 5. https://www.iir.cz/en/china-africa-cooperation-in-education

Jennifer’s DPhil focuses on adoptive families where  the adoptive parents also have birth children. She has worked in adoption support as a Parent Consultant for Adoption UK and as Head of Peer Services at PAC-UK, as well as managing the Adoption UK advice line and the parent training team.

She holds an MSc in Poverty Reduction: Policy and Practice from SOAS, and an MBA from Warwick Business School. She has worked in management consultancy in both the public and private sectors and is a board member of CoramBAAF.

Publications

The Right Tools for the Job. Information Age, November 1996

Global teams for the millennium; Management Decision, 36 (1): 31-33, February 1998

Lucy is a second-year DPhil student, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

Her DPhil research aims to engage in a meaningful and creative way with service children to explore how service life has shaped their experiences of education and sense of self. By choosing this focus, the research seeks to widen and nuance current understanding of service children’s educational experiences in addition to furthering knowledge into how service children see themselves. As a result of this, it is hoped that the research will support in developing the professional body of knowledge and understanding of this group of children in schools and help inform the Service Pupil Premium (SPP) funding choices in addition to wider school practice.

Before embarking on her DPhil at Oxford, Lucy completed her PGCE and MEd in Primary Education at the University of Cambridge. In addition to her DPhil work, Lucy is a Trustee for the Armed Forces Education Trust (AFET) – a grant-giving charity for service children – and a volunteer for the Oxford based charity, Big Brothers Big Sisters.

 

 

Aine is interested in improving the health outcomes of children and young people in the care system.

Fahad is reading for a DPhil in Education (part-time). He has over fifteen years professional experience in the education sector, in particular, higher education.

He has held senior roles in staff and student development, human resources, policy and strategy. Fahad holds a BSc in Education and Science and an MBA. Prior to commencing his doctoral studies, he was elected an Academic Visitor at St Antony’s College in the University of Oxford. Fahad’s research focus is on the quality of undergraduate medical education for Qatari doctors.

Shawna completed her undergraduate degree in Psycholinguistics at the University of Toronto in Canada, and later completed the MSc program in Applied Linguistics and Second language Acquisition at the University of Oxford.

She has a wide range of experiences in the field of Linguistics as a teaching and research assistant in areas such as theoretical linguistics, phonology, speech-language pathology, language acquisition, and creole studies. Being a native of Jamaica herself, Shawna has carried out extensive work on creole language acquisition. She worked with the University of the West Indies to draft the first Jamaican (Creole) as a Foreign Language course, and with the U.S Peace Corps to assess and revamp an existing language program for volunteers.

Shawna’s current research focuses on the development of writing skills among primary school learners in Jamaica who speak Jamaican Creole as a home language but are educated in English.

Publications
  • Helms-Park, R., Tucker, S, & Dronjic, V. (2016). From proto-writing to multimedia literacy: scripts and orthographies through the ages. In  Chen Bumgardner, V. Dronjic,, & R. Helms-Park (Eds.), Second Language Reading: Psycholinguistic and Cognitive Perspectives (pp. 1-31). New York, NY: Routledge Publishers.
  • Eriks-Brophy, A., Green, S., & Tucker, S. (2013).  Articulatory error patterns and phonological process use of preschool children with and without hearing loss. Volta Review.

Richard Canter is Visiting Professor of Surgical Education in the Nuffield Department of Surgical Sciences, University of Oxford.

Richard Canter qualified in medicine at the University of London in 1976, before becoming a surgeon at the Royal United Hospital, Bath. He completed a PhD in Management at the University of Bath in 1998 studying the nature of power in decision-making at the personal and organisation level in healthcare. Following the critical Kennedy report on surgical training in 2001, he was recruited to the Royal College of Surgeons of England as Deputy Director of Surgical Education with specific responsibility for curriculum development in surgical education in England. He was subsequently Head of the Postgraduate School of Surgery in Bristol until 2012, after which he concentrated on academic work at Oxford. He was appointed a visiting Professor in Oxford in in 2007, Emeritus Consultant at Oxford University Hospitals in 2015, and Associate Fellow at Green Templeton College, Oxford in 2015.

His interests are professionalism and, in particular, its relationship to leadership in healthcare systems. His current specific research interests are the effectiveness or otherwise of leadership education in respect of its impact on quality improvement in healthcare systems.

At the Royal College of Surgeons of England he was clinical lead and Chair of the Needs Analysis Group evaluating educational resources and organisational systems necessary for the implementation of reform of surgical training, and made recommendations for changes that were eventually adopted by all surgical training systems in the United Kingdom. During this appointment an opportunity arose in early 2003 at the end of the Serbian conflict to assist the European Agency for Reconstruction (EAR, a division of the EEC) in providing advice to the Kosovan Ministry of Health to develop new systems for surgical training.

Currently at Oxford, he is lead tutor for the module in Leadership and Management in Healthcare and Deputy Director of the Masters in Surgical Science, and supervises Masters and DPhil students on the subject of organisational change and leadership. In addition he has regular commitments in teaching postgraduate medical trainees and medical faculty on topics such as leadership, quality improvement, educational theory in healthcare, workplace assessments, supporting and talent managing  medical trainees, as well as occasional commitments to supervising students on the Said Business School Global Opportunity and Threats (Oxford) programme in exploring problems in complex systems.

Along the way he has written and spoken on many topics in medicine, obtained research grants, and has unexpectedly been given fellowships and medals. His main interest outside of work is playing music and he runs the Green Templeton College Big Band.

Prior to starting his DPhil, Eddy worked as a primary school teacher in Bristol, where he also completed his MSc in Educational Research.

He is particularly interested in the culture of high stakes, standardised testing, and how this might perpetuate existing inequalities in schools. His research focuses specifically on the interaction between knowledge, policy and pedagogy in the context of Literacy education.

 

Claire (郝煜) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and a China Oxford Scholarship Fund (COSF) scholar.

Claire holds a BA in Education and Physics from the University of Cambridge, an MA in Applied Linguistics from UCL Institution of Education, and an EdM in International Education Policy from Harvard University. She is passionate about exploring and supporting the transnational experiences of bi-/multilingual students in studying abroad contexts. Her research and professional interests include bilingualism, language and identity, international education, professional development, and school leadership.

Since 2015, Claire has served as the Director of International Education at Beijing Xinxuedao Education Group, a non-profit organisation that operates 31 schools with over 30,000 K-12 students in China. She has also worked as a high school counsellor and a teacher of Physics and Psychology.

Publications

Hao, Y. and Lantsman, G. (2022). Motivation in MOOCs: a qualitative study on the design and evaluation of an online IELTS course. The 7th IAFOR International Conference on Education.

Hao, Y. (2020). Education without borders: sojourner trips in students’ holistic development. In Wang, J. (Ed.). Family, Society, and Education. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2020). Learning how to learn: the role of metacognition and self-regulation in learning. In Wang, J. (Ed.). The Virtue of Thinking in Learning. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2019). Chinese students at a UK university: how linguistic repertoire mediates language and sojourner identity construction. Linguistics and Applied Linguistics Conference. Beijing Normal University.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2018). Examining Linguistic Diversity as a Resource for Higher Education in the Anglophone World. In Tong, V. C., Standen, A., & Sotiriou, M. (Ed.). Shaping Higher Education with Students: Ways to Connect Research and Teaching (pp.288-293). UCL Press.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2016). Making the most of linguistic diversity: the views and practices of bi/multilingual postgraduate students. The Multilingual University. ESRC Seminars.

Hao, Y. (2012). A Transformative Journey: China-US exchange student studying at an American high school. New World Press.

Pok Jing (Jane) Ho is a doctoral student at the Department of Education, specialising in educational assessment.

She is funded by the Bei Shan Tang Foundation Scholarship for Graduate Studies.

Her DPhil thesis examines validity in the Hong Kong Diploma of Secondary Education Examination, a large-scale, high-stakes test that informs higher education admissions decisions, using the argument-based approach to validation. In particular, her research identifies the claims made based on test scores, the validity evidence that supports or challenges such claims, and the social consequences that ensue as a result of test use.

Prior to her DPhil, she completed an M.A. in International Education Policy Analysis at Stanford University. She subsequently worked as a project officer at the Education University of Hong Kong, where she is now serving as a consultant alongside her studies.

A former secondary school teacher, Jane also holds a B.A. in English Studies (First Class Honours), a B.Ed. in English Language Education (First Class Honours), and an M.Ed. in Curriculum and Instruction from the Chinese University of Hong Kong, as well as the Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (CELTA) from Cambridge.

She is a Peer Supporter at Green Templeton College.

Publications

Ho, P. J. (2020). For some or for all: Vocational English for Hong Kong secondary school students. In C. Hong, & W. K. Ma (Eds.), Applied degree education and the future of work—Education 4.0 (pp. 87–95). Springer. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-15-3142-2

Ho, P. J. (2015). China-Africa “cooperation” in education. International Politics, 5. https://www.iir.cz/en/china-africa-cooperation-in-education

Jennifer’s DPhil focuses on adoptive families where  the adoptive parents also have birth children. She has worked in adoption support as a Parent Consultant for Adoption UK and as Head of Peer Services at PAC-UK, as well as managing the Adoption UK advice line and the parent training team.

She holds an MSc in Poverty Reduction: Policy and Practice from SOAS, and an MBA from Warwick Business School. She has worked in management consultancy in both the public and private sectors and is a board member of CoramBAAF.

Publications

The Right Tools for the Job. Information Age, November 1996

Global teams for the millennium; Management Decision, 36 (1): 31-33, February 1998

Lucy is a second-year DPhil student, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

Her DPhil research aims to engage in a meaningful and creative way with service children to explore how service life has shaped their experiences of education and sense of self. By choosing this focus, the research seeks to widen and nuance current understanding of service children’s educational experiences in addition to furthering knowledge into how service children see themselves. As a result of this, it is hoped that the research will support in developing the professional body of knowledge and understanding of this group of children in schools and help inform the Service Pupil Premium (SPP) funding choices in addition to wider school practice.

Before embarking on her DPhil at Oxford, Lucy completed her PGCE and MEd in Primary Education at the University of Cambridge. In addition to her DPhil work, Lucy is a Trustee for the Armed Forces Education Trust (AFET) – a grant-giving charity for service children – and a volunteer for the Oxford based charity, Big Brothers Big Sisters.

 

 

Aine is interested in improving the health outcomes of children and young people in the care system.

Fahad is reading for a DPhil in Education (part-time). He has over fifteen years professional experience in the education sector, in particular, higher education.

He has held senior roles in staff and student development, human resources, policy and strategy. Fahad holds a BSc in Education and Science and an MBA. Prior to commencing his doctoral studies, he was elected an Academic Visitor at St Antony’s College in the University of Oxford. Fahad’s research focus is on the quality of undergraduate medical education for Qatari doctors.

Shawna completed her undergraduate degree in Psycholinguistics at the University of Toronto in Canada, and later completed the MSc program in Applied Linguistics and Second language Acquisition at the University of Oxford.

She has a wide range of experiences in the field of Linguistics as a teaching and research assistant in areas such as theoretical linguistics, phonology, speech-language pathology, language acquisition, and creole studies. Being a native of Jamaica herself, Shawna has carried out extensive work on creole language acquisition. She worked with the University of the West Indies to draft the first Jamaican (Creole) as a Foreign Language course, and with the U.S Peace Corps to assess and revamp an existing language program for volunteers.

Shawna’s current research focuses on the development of writing skills among primary school learners in Jamaica who speak Jamaican Creole as a home language but are educated in English.

Publications
  • Helms-Park, R., Tucker, S, & Dronjic, V. (2016). From proto-writing to multimedia literacy: scripts and orthographies through the ages. In  Chen Bumgardner, V. Dronjic,, & R. Helms-Park (Eds.), Second Language Reading: Psycholinguistic and Cognitive Perspectives (pp. 1-31). New York, NY: Routledge Publishers.
  • Eriks-Brophy, A., Green, S., & Tucker, S. (2013).  Articulatory error patterns and phonological process use of preschool children with and without hearing loss. Volta Review.

Richard Canter is Visiting Professor of Surgical Education in the Nuffield Department of Surgical Sciences, University of Oxford.

Richard Canter qualified in medicine at the University of London in 1976, before becoming a surgeon at the Royal United Hospital, Bath. He completed a PhD in Management at the University of Bath in 1998 studying the nature of power in decision-making at the personal and organisation level in healthcare. Following the critical Kennedy report on surgical training in 2001, he was recruited to the Royal College of Surgeons of England as Deputy Director of Surgical Education with specific responsibility for curriculum development in surgical education in England. He was subsequently Head of the Postgraduate School of Surgery in Bristol until 2012, after which he concentrated on academic work at Oxford. He was appointed a visiting Professor in Oxford in in 2007, Emeritus Consultant at Oxford University Hospitals in 2015, and Associate Fellow at Green Templeton College, Oxford in 2015.

His interests are professionalism and, in particular, its relationship to leadership in healthcare systems. His current specific research interests are the effectiveness or otherwise of leadership education in respect of its impact on quality improvement in healthcare systems.

At the Royal College of Surgeons of England he was clinical lead and Chair of the Needs Analysis Group evaluating educational resources and organisational systems necessary for the implementation of reform of surgical training, and made recommendations for changes that were eventually adopted by all surgical training systems in the United Kingdom. During this appointment an opportunity arose in early 2003 at the end of the Serbian conflict to assist the European Agency for Reconstruction (EAR, a division of the EEC) in providing advice to the Kosovan Ministry of Health to develop new systems for surgical training.

Currently at Oxford, he is lead tutor for the module in Leadership and Management in Healthcare and Deputy Director of the Masters in Surgical Science, and supervises Masters and DPhil students on the subject of organisational change and leadership. In addition he has regular commitments in teaching postgraduate medical trainees and medical faculty on topics such as leadership, quality improvement, educational theory in healthcare, workplace assessments, supporting and talent managing  medical trainees, as well as occasional commitments to supervising students on the Said Business School Global Opportunity and Threats (Oxford) programme in exploring problems in complex systems.

Along the way he has written and spoken on many topics in medicine, obtained research grants, and has unexpectedly been given fellowships and medals. His main interest outside of work is playing music and he runs the Green Templeton College Big Band.

Prior to starting his DPhil, Eddy worked as a primary school teacher in Bristol, where he also completed his MSc in Educational Research.

He is particularly interested in the culture of high stakes, standardised testing, and how this might perpetuate existing inequalities in schools. His research focuses specifically on the interaction between knowledge, policy and pedagogy in the context of Literacy education.

 

Claire (郝煜) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and a China Oxford Scholarship Fund (COSF) scholar.

Claire holds a BA in Education and Physics from the University of Cambridge, an MA in Applied Linguistics from UCL Institution of Education, and an EdM in International Education Policy from Harvard University. She is passionate about exploring and supporting the transnational experiences of bi-/multilingual students in studying abroad contexts. Her research and professional interests include bilingualism, language and identity, international education, professional development, and school leadership.

Since 2015, Claire has served as the Director of International Education at Beijing Xinxuedao Education Group, a non-profit organisation that operates 31 schools with over 30,000 K-12 students in China. She has also worked as a high school counsellor and a teacher of Physics and Psychology.

Publications

Hao, Y. and Lantsman, G. (2022). Motivation in MOOCs: a qualitative study on the design and evaluation of an online IELTS course. The 7th IAFOR International Conference on Education.

Hao, Y. (2020). Education without borders: sojourner trips in students’ holistic development. In Wang, J. (Ed.). Family, Society, and Education. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2020). Learning how to learn: the role of metacognition and self-regulation in learning. In Wang, J. (Ed.). The Virtue of Thinking in Learning. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2019). Chinese students at a UK university: how linguistic repertoire mediates language and sojourner identity construction. Linguistics and Applied Linguistics Conference. Beijing Normal University.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2018). Examining Linguistic Diversity as a Resource for Higher Education in the Anglophone World. In Tong, V. C., Standen, A., & Sotiriou, M. (Ed.). Shaping Higher Education with Students: Ways to Connect Research and Teaching (pp.288-293). UCL Press.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2016). Making the most of linguistic diversity: the views and practices of bi/multilingual postgraduate students. The Multilingual University. ESRC Seminars.

Hao, Y. (2012). A Transformative Journey: China-US exchange student studying at an American high school. New World Press.

Pok Jing (Jane) Ho is a doctoral student at the Department of Education, specialising in educational assessment.

She is funded by the Bei Shan Tang Foundation Scholarship for Graduate Studies.

Her DPhil thesis examines validity in the Hong Kong Diploma of Secondary Education Examination, a large-scale, high-stakes test that informs higher education admissions decisions, using the argument-based approach to validation. In particular, her research identifies the claims made based on test scores, the validity evidence that supports or challenges such claims, and the social consequences that ensue as a result of test use.

Prior to her DPhil, she completed an M.A. in International Education Policy Analysis at Stanford University. She subsequently worked as a project officer at the Education University of Hong Kong, where she is now serving as a consultant alongside her studies.

A former secondary school teacher, Jane also holds a B.A. in English Studies (First Class Honours), a B.Ed. in English Language Education (First Class Honours), and an M.Ed. in Curriculum and Instruction from the Chinese University of Hong Kong, as well as the Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (CELTA) from Cambridge.

She is a Peer Supporter at Green Templeton College.

Publications

Ho, P. J. (2020). For some or for all: Vocational English for Hong Kong secondary school students. In C. Hong, & W. K. Ma (Eds.), Applied degree education and the future of work—Education 4.0 (pp. 87–95). Springer. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-15-3142-2

Ho, P. J. (2015). China-Africa “cooperation” in education. International Politics, 5. https://www.iir.cz/en/china-africa-cooperation-in-education

Jennifer’s DPhil focuses on adoptive families where  the adoptive parents also have birth children. She has worked in adoption support as a Parent Consultant for Adoption UK and as Head of Peer Services at PAC-UK, as well as managing the Adoption UK advice line and the parent training team.

She holds an MSc in Poverty Reduction: Policy and Practice from SOAS, and an MBA from Warwick Business School. She has worked in management consultancy in both the public and private sectors and is a board member of CoramBAAF.

Publications

The Right Tools for the Job. Information Age, November 1996

Global teams for the millennium; Management Decision, 36 (1): 31-33, February 1998

Lucy is a second-year DPhil student, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

Her DPhil research aims to engage in a meaningful and creative way with service children to explore how service life has shaped their experiences of education and sense of self. By choosing this focus, the research seeks to widen and nuance current understanding of service children’s educational experiences in addition to furthering knowledge into how service children see themselves. As a result of this, it is hoped that the research will support in developing the professional body of knowledge and understanding of this group of children in schools and help inform the Service Pupil Premium (SPP) funding choices in addition to wider school practice.

Before embarking on her DPhil at Oxford, Lucy completed her PGCE and MEd in Primary Education at the University of Cambridge. In addition to her DPhil work, Lucy is a Trustee for the Armed Forces Education Trust (AFET) – a grant-giving charity for service children – and a volunteer for the Oxford based charity, Big Brothers Big Sisters.

 

 

Aine is interested in improving the health outcomes of children and young people in the care system.

Fahad is reading for a DPhil in Education (part-time). He has over fifteen years professional experience in the education sector, in particular, higher education.

He has held senior roles in staff and student development, human resources, policy and strategy. Fahad holds a BSc in Education and Science and an MBA. Prior to commencing his doctoral studies, he was elected an Academic Visitor at St Antony’s College in the University of Oxford. Fahad’s research focus is on the quality of undergraduate medical education for Qatari doctors.

Shawna completed her undergraduate degree in Psycholinguistics at the University of Toronto in Canada, and later completed the MSc program in Applied Linguistics and Second language Acquisition at the University of Oxford.

She has a wide range of experiences in the field of Linguistics as a teaching and research assistant in areas such as theoretical linguistics, phonology, speech-language pathology, language acquisition, and creole studies. Being a native of Jamaica herself, Shawna has carried out extensive work on creole language acquisition. She worked with the University of the West Indies to draft the first Jamaican (Creole) as a Foreign Language course, and with the U.S Peace Corps to assess and revamp an existing language program for volunteers.

Shawna’s current research focuses on the development of writing skills among primary school learners in Jamaica who speak Jamaican Creole as a home language but are educated in English.

Publications
  • Helms-Park, R., Tucker, S, & Dronjic, V. (2016). From proto-writing to multimedia literacy: scripts and orthographies through the ages. In  Chen Bumgardner, V. Dronjic,, & R. Helms-Park (Eds.), Second Language Reading: Psycholinguistic and Cognitive Perspectives (pp. 1-31). New York, NY: Routledge Publishers.
  • Eriks-Brophy, A., Green, S., & Tucker, S. (2013).  Articulatory error patterns and phonological process use of preschool children with and without hearing loss. Volta Review.

Richard Canter is Visiting Professor of Surgical Education in the Nuffield Department of Surgical Sciences, University of Oxford.

Richard Canter qualified in medicine at the University of London in 1976, before becoming a surgeon at the Royal United Hospital, Bath. He completed a PhD in Management at the University of Bath in 1998 studying the nature of power in decision-making at the personal and organisation level in healthcare. Following the critical Kennedy report on surgical training in 2001, he was recruited to the Royal College of Surgeons of England as Deputy Director of Surgical Education with specific responsibility for curriculum development in surgical education in England. He was subsequently Head of the Postgraduate School of Surgery in Bristol until 2012, after which he concentrated on academic work at Oxford. He was appointed a visiting Professor in Oxford in in 2007, Emeritus Consultant at Oxford University Hospitals in 2015, and Associate Fellow at Green Templeton College, Oxford in 2015.

His interests are professionalism and, in particular, its relationship to leadership in healthcare systems. His current specific research interests are the effectiveness or otherwise of leadership education in respect of its impact on quality improvement in healthcare systems.

At the Royal College of Surgeons of England he was clinical lead and Chair of the Needs Analysis Group evaluating educational resources and organisational systems necessary for the implementation of reform of surgical training, and made recommendations for changes that were eventually adopted by all surgical training systems in the United Kingdom. During this appointment an opportunity arose in early 2003 at the end of the Serbian conflict to assist the European Agency for Reconstruction (EAR, a division of the EEC) in providing advice to the Kosovan Ministry of Health to develop new systems for surgical training.

Currently at Oxford, he is lead tutor for the module in Leadership and Management in Healthcare and Deputy Director of the Masters in Surgical Science, and supervises Masters and DPhil students on the subject of organisational change and leadership. In addition he has regular commitments in teaching postgraduate medical trainees and medical faculty on topics such as leadership, quality improvement, educational theory in healthcare, workplace assessments, supporting and talent managing  medical trainees, as well as occasional commitments to supervising students on the Said Business School Global Opportunity and Threats (Oxford) programme in exploring problems in complex systems.

Along the way he has written and spoken on many topics in medicine, obtained research grants, and has unexpectedly been given fellowships and medals. His main interest outside of work is playing music and he runs the Green Templeton College Big Band.

Prior to starting his DPhil, Eddy worked as a primary school teacher in Bristol, where he also completed his MSc in Educational Research.

He is particularly interested in the culture of high stakes, standardised testing, and how this might perpetuate existing inequalities in schools. His research focuses specifically on the interaction between knowledge, policy and pedagogy in the context of Literacy education.

 

Claire (郝煜) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and a China Oxford Scholarship Fund (COSF) scholar.

Claire holds a BA in Education and Physics from the University of Cambridge, an MA in Applied Linguistics from UCL Institution of Education, and an EdM in International Education Policy from Harvard University. She is passionate about exploring and supporting the transnational experiences of bi-/multilingual students in studying abroad contexts. Her research and professional interests include bilingualism, language and identity, international education, professional development, and school leadership.

Since 2015, Claire has served as the Director of International Education at Beijing Xinxuedao Education Group, a non-profit organisation that operates 31 schools with over 30,000 K-12 students in China. She has also worked as a high school counsellor and a teacher of Physics and Psychology.

Publications

Hao, Y. and Lantsman, G. (2022). Motivation in MOOCs: a qualitative study on the design and evaluation of an online IELTS course. The 7th IAFOR International Conference on Education.

Hao, Y. (2020). Education without borders: sojourner trips in students’ holistic development. In Wang, J. (Ed.). Family, Society, and Education. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2020). Learning how to learn: the role of metacognition and self-regulation in learning. In Wang, J. (Ed.). The Virtue of Thinking in Learning. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2019). Chinese students at a UK university: how linguistic repertoire mediates language and sojourner identity construction. Linguistics and Applied Linguistics Conference. Beijing Normal University.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2018). Examining Linguistic Diversity as a Resource for Higher Education in the Anglophone World. In Tong, V. C., Standen, A., & Sotiriou, M. (Ed.). Shaping Higher Education with Students: Ways to Connect Research and Teaching (pp.288-293). UCL Press.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2016). Making the most of linguistic diversity: the views and practices of bi/multilingual postgraduate students. The Multilingual University. ESRC Seminars.

Hao, Y. (2012). A Transformative Journey: China-US exchange student studying at an American high school. New World Press.

Pok Jing (Jane) Ho is a doctoral student at the Department of Education, specialising in educational assessment.

She is funded by the Bei Shan Tang Foundation Scholarship for Graduate Studies.

Her DPhil thesis examines validity in the Hong Kong Diploma of Secondary Education Examination, a large-scale, high-stakes test that informs higher education admissions decisions, using the argument-based approach to validation. In particular, her research identifies the claims made based on test scores, the validity evidence that supports or challenges such claims, and the social consequences that ensue as a result of test use.

Prior to her DPhil, she completed an M.A. in International Education Policy Analysis at Stanford University. She subsequently worked as a project officer at the Education University of Hong Kong, where she is now serving as a consultant alongside her studies.

A former secondary school teacher, Jane also holds a B.A. in English Studies (First Class Honours), a B.Ed. in English Language Education (First Class Honours), and an M.Ed. in Curriculum and Instruction from the Chinese University of Hong Kong, as well as the Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (CELTA) from Cambridge.

She is a Peer Supporter at Green Templeton College.

Publications

Ho, P. J. (2020). For some or for all: Vocational English for Hong Kong secondary school students. In C. Hong, & W. K. Ma (Eds.), Applied degree education and the future of work—Education 4.0 (pp. 87–95). Springer. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-15-3142-2

Ho, P. J. (2015). China-Africa “cooperation” in education. International Politics, 5. https://www.iir.cz/en/china-africa-cooperation-in-education

Jennifer’s DPhil focuses on adoptive families where  the adoptive parents also have birth children. She has worked in adoption support as a Parent Consultant for Adoption UK and as Head of Peer Services at PAC-UK, as well as managing the Adoption UK advice line and the parent training team.

She holds an MSc in Poverty Reduction: Policy and Practice from SOAS, and an MBA from Warwick Business School. She has worked in management consultancy in both the public and private sectors and is a board member of CoramBAAF.

Publications

The Right Tools for the Job. Information Age, November 1996

Global teams for the millennium; Management Decision, 36 (1): 31-33, February 1998

Lucy is a second-year DPhil student, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

Her DPhil research aims to engage in a meaningful and creative way with service children to explore how service life has shaped their experiences of education and sense of self. By choosing this focus, the research seeks to widen and nuance current understanding of service children’s educational experiences in addition to furthering knowledge into how service children see themselves. As a result of this, it is hoped that the research will support in developing the professional body of knowledge and understanding of this group of children in schools and help inform the Service Pupil Premium (SPP) funding choices in addition to wider school practice.

Before embarking on her DPhil at Oxford, Lucy completed her PGCE and MEd in Primary Education at the University of Cambridge. In addition to her DPhil work, Lucy is a Trustee for the Armed Forces Education Trust (AFET) – a grant-giving charity for service children – and a volunteer for the Oxford based charity, Big Brothers Big Sisters.

 

 

Aine is interested in improving the health outcomes of children and young people in the care system.

Fahad is reading for a DPhil in Education (part-time). He has over fifteen years professional experience in the education sector, in particular, higher education.

He has held senior roles in staff and student development, human resources, policy and strategy. Fahad holds a BSc in Education and Science and an MBA. Prior to commencing his doctoral studies, he was elected an Academic Visitor at St Antony’s College in the University of Oxford. Fahad’s research focus is on the quality of undergraduate medical education for Qatari doctors.

Shawna completed her undergraduate degree in Psycholinguistics at the University of Toronto in Canada, and later completed the MSc program in Applied Linguistics and Second language Acquisition at the University of Oxford.

She has a wide range of experiences in the field of Linguistics as a teaching and research assistant in areas such as theoretical linguistics, phonology, speech-language pathology, language acquisition, and creole studies. Being a native of Jamaica herself, Shawna has carried out extensive work on creole language acquisition. She worked with the University of the West Indies to draft the first Jamaican (Creole) as a Foreign Language course, and with the U.S Peace Corps to assess and revamp an existing language program for volunteers.

Shawna’s current research focuses on the development of writing skills among primary school learners in Jamaica who speak Jamaican Creole as a home language but are educated in English.

Publications
  • Helms-Park, R., Tucker, S, & Dronjic, V. (2016). From proto-writing to multimedia literacy: scripts and orthographies through the ages. In  Chen Bumgardner, V. Dronjic,, & R. Helms-Park (Eds.), Second Language Reading: Psycholinguistic and Cognitive Perspectives (pp. 1-31). New York, NY: Routledge Publishers.
  • Eriks-Brophy, A., Green, S., & Tucker, S. (2013).  Articulatory error patterns and phonological process use of preschool children with and without hearing loss. Volta Review.

Richard Canter is Visiting Professor of Surgical Education in the Nuffield Department of Surgical Sciences, University of Oxford.

Richard Canter qualified in medicine at the University of London in 1976, before becoming a surgeon at the Royal United Hospital, Bath. He completed a PhD in Management at the University of Bath in 1998 studying the nature of power in decision-making at the personal and organisation level in healthcare. Following the critical Kennedy report on surgical training in 2001, he was recruited to the Royal College of Surgeons of England as Deputy Director of Surgical Education with specific responsibility for curriculum development in surgical education in England. He was subsequently Head of the Postgraduate School of Surgery in Bristol until 2012, after which he concentrated on academic work at Oxford. He was appointed a visiting Professor in Oxford in in 2007, Emeritus Consultant at Oxford University Hospitals in 2015, and Associate Fellow at Green Templeton College, Oxford in 2015.

His interests are professionalism and, in particular, its relationship to leadership in healthcare systems. His current specific research interests are the effectiveness or otherwise of leadership education in respect of its impact on quality improvement in healthcare systems.

At the Royal College of Surgeons of England he was clinical lead and Chair of the Needs Analysis Group evaluating educational resources and organisational systems necessary for the implementation of reform of surgical training, and made recommendations for changes that were eventually adopted by all surgical training systems in the United Kingdom. During this appointment an opportunity arose in early 2003 at the end of the Serbian conflict to assist the European Agency for Reconstruction (EAR, a division of the EEC) in providing advice to the Kosovan Ministry of Health to develop new systems for surgical training.

Currently at Oxford, he is lead tutor for the module in Leadership and Management in Healthcare and Deputy Director of the Masters in Surgical Science, and supervises Masters and DPhil students on the subject of organisational change and leadership. In addition he has regular commitments in teaching postgraduate medical trainees and medical faculty on topics such as leadership, quality improvement, educational theory in healthcare, workplace assessments, supporting and talent managing  medical trainees, as well as occasional commitments to supervising students on the Said Business School Global Opportunity and Threats (Oxford) programme in exploring problems in complex systems.

Along the way he has written and spoken on many topics in medicine, obtained research grants, and has unexpectedly been given fellowships and medals. His main interest outside of work is playing music and he runs the Green Templeton College Big Band.

Prior to starting his DPhil, Eddy worked as a primary school teacher in Bristol, where he also completed his MSc in Educational Research.

He is particularly interested in the culture of high stakes, standardised testing, and how this might perpetuate existing inequalities in schools. His research focuses specifically on the interaction between knowledge, policy and pedagogy in the context of Literacy education.

 

Claire (郝煜) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and a China Oxford Scholarship Fund (COSF) scholar.

Claire holds a BA in Education and Physics from the University of Cambridge, an MA in Applied Linguistics from UCL Institution of Education, and an EdM in International Education Policy from Harvard University. She is passionate about exploring and supporting the transnational experiences of bi-/multilingual students in studying abroad contexts. Her research and professional interests include bilingualism, language and identity, international education, professional development, and school leadership.

Since 2015, Claire has served as the Director of International Education at Beijing Xinxuedao Education Group, a non-profit organisation that operates 31 schools with over 30,000 K-12 students in China. She has also worked as a high school counsellor and a teacher of Physics and Psychology.

Publications

Hao, Y. and Lantsman, G. (2022). Motivation in MOOCs: a qualitative study on the design and evaluation of an online IELTS course. The 7th IAFOR International Conference on Education.

Hao, Y. (2020). Education without borders: sojourner trips in students’ holistic development. In Wang, J. (Ed.). Family, Society, and Education. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2020). Learning how to learn: the role of metacognition and self-regulation in learning. In Wang, J. (Ed.). The Virtue of Thinking in Learning. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2019). Chinese students at a UK university: how linguistic repertoire mediates language and sojourner identity construction. Linguistics and Applied Linguistics Conference. Beijing Normal University.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2018). Examining Linguistic Diversity as a Resource for Higher Education in the Anglophone World. In Tong, V. C., Standen, A., & Sotiriou, M. (Ed.). Shaping Higher Education with Students: Ways to Connect Research and Teaching (pp.288-293). UCL Press.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2016). Making the most of linguistic diversity: the views and practices of bi/multilingual postgraduate students. The Multilingual University. ESRC Seminars.

Hao, Y. (2012). A Transformative Journey: China-US exchange student studying at an American high school. New World Press.

Pok Jing (Jane) Ho is a doctoral student at the Department of Education, specialising in educational assessment.

She is funded by the Bei Shan Tang Foundation Scholarship for Graduate Studies.

Her DPhil thesis examines validity in the Hong Kong Diploma of Secondary Education Examination, a large-scale, high-stakes test that informs higher education admissions decisions, using the argument-based approach to validation. In particular, her research identifies the claims made based on test scores, the validity evidence that supports or challenges such claims, and the social consequences that ensue as a result of test use.

Prior to her DPhil, she completed an M.A. in International Education Policy Analysis at Stanford University. She subsequently worked as a project officer at the Education University of Hong Kong, where she is now serving as a consultant alongside her studies.

A former secondary school teacher, Jane also holds a B.A. in English Studies (First Class Honours), a B.Ed. in English Language Education (First Class Honours), and an M.Ed. in Curriculum and Instruction from the Chinese University of Hong Kong, as well as the Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (CELTA) from Cambridge.

She is a Peer Supporter at Green Templeton College.

Publications

Ho, P. J. (2020). For some or for all: Vocational English for Hong Kong secondary school students. In C. Hong, & W. K. Ma (Eds.), Applied degree education and the future of work—Education 4.0 (pp. 87–95). Springer. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-15-3142-2

Ho, P. J. (2015). China-Africa “cooperation” in education. International Politics, 5. https://www.iir.cz/en/china-africa-cooperation-in-education

Jennifer’s DPhil focuses on adoptive families where  the adoptive parents also have birth children. She has worked in adoption support as a Parent Consultant for Adoption UK and as Head of Peer Services at PAC-UK, as well as managing the Adoption UK advice line and the parent training team.

She holds an MSc in Poverty Reduction: Policy and Practice from SOAS, and an MBA from Warwick Business School. She has worked in management consultancy in both the public and private sectors and is a board member of CoramBAAF.

Publications

The Right Tools for the Job. Information Age, November 1996

Global teams for the millennium; Management Decision, 36 (1): 31-33, February 1998

Lucy is a second-year DPhil student, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

Her DPhil research aims to engage in a meaningful and creative way with service children to explore how service life has shaped their experiences of education and sense of self. By choosing this focus, the research seeks to widen and nuance current understanding of service children’s educational experiences in addition to furthering knowledge into how service children see themselves. As a result of this, it is hoped that the research will support in developing the professional body of knowledge and understanding of this group of children in schools and help inform the Service Pupil Premium (SPP) funding choices in addition to wider school practice.

Before embarking on her DPhil at Oxford, Lucy completed her PGCE and MEd in Primary Education at the University of Cambridge. In addition to her DPhil work, Lucy is a Trustee for the Armed Forces Education Trust (AFET) – a grant-giving charity for service children – and a volunteer for the Oxford based charity, Big Brothers Big Sisters.

 

 

Aine is interested in improving the health outcomes of children and young people in the care system.

Fahad is reading for a DPhil in Education (part-time). He has over fifteen years professional experience in the education sector, in particular, higher education.

He has held senior roles in staff and student development, human resources, policy and strategy. Fahad holds a BSc in Education and Science and an MBA. Prior to commencing his doctoral studies, he was elected an Academic Visitor at St Antony’s College in the University of Oxford. Fahad’s research focus is on the quality of undergraduate medical education for Qatari doctors.

Shawna completed her undergraduate degree in Psycholinguistics at the University of Toronto in Canada, and later completed the MSc program in Applied Linguistics and Second language Acquisition at the University of Oxford.

She has a wide range of experiences in the field of Linguistics as a teaching and research assistant in areas such as theoretical linguistics, phonology, speech-language pathology, language acquisition, and creole studies. Being a native of Jamaica herself, Shawna has carried out extensive work on creole language acquisition. She worked with the University of the West Indies to draft the first Jamaican (Creole) as a Foreign Language course, and with the U.S Peace Corps to assess and revamp an existing language program for volunteers.

Shawna’s current research focuses on the development of writing skills among primary school learners in Jamaica who speak Jamaican Creole as a home language but are educated in English.

Publications
  • Helms-Park, R., Tucker, S, & Dronjic, V. (2016). From proto-writing to multimedia literacy: scripts and orthographies through the ages. In  Chen Bumgardner, V. Dronjic,, & R. Helms-Park (Eds.), Second Language Reading: Psycholinguistic and Cognitive Perspectives (pp. 1-31). New York, NY: Routledge Publishers.
  • Eriks-Brophy, A., Green, S., & Tucker, S. (2013).  Articulatory error patterns and phonological process use of preschool children with and without hearing loss. Volta Review.

Richard Canter is Visiting Professor of Surgical Education in the Nuffield Department of Surgical Sciences, University of Oxford.

Richard Canter qualified in medicine at the University of London in 1976, before becoming a surgeon at the Royal United Hospital, Bath. He completed a PhD in Management at the University of Bath in 1998 studying the nature of power in decision-making at the personal and organisation level in healthcare. Following the critical Kennedy report on surgical training in 2001, he was recruited to the Royal College of Surgeons of England as Deputy Director of Surgical Education with specific responsibility for curriculum development in surgical education in England. He was subsequently Head of the Postgraduate School of Surgery in Bristol until 2012, after which he concentrated on academic work at Oxford. He was appointed a visiting Professor in Oxford in in 2007, Emeritus Consultant at Oxford University Hospitals in 2015, and Associate Fellow at Green Templeton College, Oxford in 2015.

His interests are professionalism and, in particular, its relationship to leadership in healthcare systems. His current specific research interests are the effectiveness or otherwise of leadership education in respect of its impact on quality improvement in healthcare systems.

At the Royal College of Surgeons of England he was clinical lead and Chair of the Needs Analysis Group evaluating educational resources and organisational systems necessary for the implementation of reform of surgical training, and made recommendations for changes that were eventually adopted by all surgical training systems in the United Kingdom. During this appointment an opportunity arose in early 2003 at the end of the Serbian conflict to assist the European Agency for Reconstruction (EAR, a division of the EEC) in providing advice to the Kosovan Ministry of Health to develop new systems for surgical training.

Currently at Oxford, he is lead tutor for the module in Leadership and Management in Healthcare and Deputy Director of the Masters in Surgical Science, and supervises Masters and DPhil students on the subject of organisational change and leadership. In addition he has regular commitments in teaching postgraduate medical trainees and medical faculty on topics such as leadership, quality improvement, educational theory in healthcare, workplace assessments, supporting and talent managing  medical trainees, as well as occasional commitments to supervising students on the Said Business School Global Opportunity and Threats (Oxford) programme in exploring problems in complex systems.

Along the way he has written and spoken on many topics in medicine, obtained research grants, and has unexpectedly been given fellowships and medals. His main interest outside of work is playing music and he runs the Green Templeton College Big Band.

Prior to starting his DPhil, Eddy worked as a primary school teacher in Bristol, where he also completed his MSc in Educational Research.

He is particularly interested in the culture of high stakes, standardised testing, and how this might perpetuate existing inequalities in schools. His research focuses specifically on the interaction between knowledge, policy and pedagogy in the context of Literacy education.

 

Claire (郝煜) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and a China Oxford Scholarship Fund (COSF) scholar.

Claire holds a BA in Education and Physics from the University of Cambridge, an MA in Applied Linguistics from UCL Institution of Education, and an EdM in International Education Policy from Harvard University. She is passionate about exploring and supporting the transnational experiences of bi-/multilingual students in studying abroad contexts. Her research and professional interests include bilingualism, language and identity, international education, professional development, and school leadership.

Since 2015, Claire has served as the Director of International Education at Beijing Xinxuedao Education Group, a non-profit organisation that operates 31 schools with over 30,000 K-12 students in China. She has also worked as a high school counsellor and a teacher of Physics and Psychology.

Publications

Hao, Y. and Lantsman, G. (2022). Motivation in MOOCs: a qualitative study on the design and evaluation of an online IELTS course. The 7th IAFOR International Conference on Education.

Hao, Y. (2020). Education without borders: sojourner trips in students’ holistic development. In Wang, J. (Ed.). Family, Society, and Education. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2020). Learning how to learn: the role of metacognition and self-regulation in learning. In Wang, J. (Ed.). The Virtue of Thinking in Learning. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2019). Chinese students at a UK university: how linguistic repertoire mediates language and sojourner identity construction. Linguistics and Applied Linguistics Conference. Beijing Normal University.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2018). Examining Linguistic Diversity as a Resource for Higher Education in the Anglophone World. In Tong, V. C., Standen, A., & Sotiriou, M. (Ed.). Shaping Higher Education with Students: Ways to Connect Research and Teaching (pp.288-293). UCL Press.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2016). Making the most of linguistic diversity: the views and practices of bi/multilingual postgraduate students. The Multilingual University. ESRC Seminars.

Hao, Y. (2012). A Transformative Journey: China-US exchange student studying at an American high school. New World Press.

Pok Jing (Jane) Ho is a doctoral student at the Department of Education, specialising in educational assessment.

She is funded by the Bei Shan Tang Foundation Scholarship for Graduate Studies.

Her DPhil thesis examines validity in the Hong Kong Diploma of Secondary Education Examination, a large-scale, high-stakes test that informs higher education admissions decisions, using the argument-based approach to validation. In particular, her research identifies the claims made based on test scores, the validity evidence that supports or challenges such claims, and the social consequences that ensue as a result of test use.

Prior to her DPhil, she completed an M.A. in International Education Policy Analysis at Stanford University. She subsequently worked as a project officer at the Education University of Hong Kong, where she is now serving as a consultant alongside her studies.

A former secondary school teacher, Jane also holds a B.A. in English Studies (First Class Honours), a B.Ed. in English Language Education (First Class Honours), and an M.Ed. in Curriculum and Instruction from the Chinese University of Hong Kong, as well as the Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (CELTA) from Cambridge.

She is a Peer Supporter at Green Templeton College.

Publications

Ho, P. J. (2020). For some or for all: Vocational English for Hong Kong secondary school students. In C. Hong, & W. K. Ma (Eds.), Applied degree education and the future of work—Education 4.0 (pp. 87–95). Springer. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-15-3142-2

Ho, P. J. (2015). China-Africa “cooperation” in education. International Politics, 5. https://www.iir.cz/en/china-africa-cooperation-in-education

Jennifer’s DPhil focuses on adoptive families where  the adoptive parents also have birth children. She has worked in adoption support as a Parent Consultant for Adoption UK and as Head of Peer Services at PAC-UK, as well as managing the Adoption UK advice line and the parent training team.

She holds an MSc in Poverty Reduction: Policy and Practice from SOAS, and an MBA from Warwick Business School. She has worked in management consultancy in both the public and private sectors and is a board member of CoramBAAF.

Publications

The Right Tools for the Job. Information Age, November 1996

Global teams for the millennium; Management Decision, 36 (1): 31-33, February 1998

Lucy is a second-year DPhil student, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

Her DPhil research aims to engage in a meaningful and creative way with service children to explore how service life has shaped their experiences of education and sense of self. By choosing this focus, the research seeks to widen and nuance current understanding of service children’s educational experiences in addition to furthering knowledge into how service children see themselves. As a result of this, it is hoped that the research will support in developing the professional body of knowledge and understanding of this group of children in schools and help inform the Service Pupil Premium (SPP) funding choices in addition to wider school practice.

Before embarking on her DPhil at Oxford, Lucy completed her PGCE and MEd in Primary Education at the University of Cambridge. In addition to her DPhil work, Lucy is a Trustee for the Armed Forces Education Trust (AFET) – a grant-giving charity for service children – and a volunteer for the Oxford based charity, Big Brothers Big Sisters.

 

 

Aine is interested in improving the health outcomes of children and young people in the care system.

Fahad is reading for a DPhil in Education (part-time). He has over fifteen years professional experience in the education sector, in particular, higher education.

He has held senior roles in staff and student development, human resources, policy and strategy. Fahad holds a BSc in Education and Science and an MBA. Prior to commencing his doctoral studies, he was elected an Academic Visitor at St Antony’s College in the University of Oxford. Fahad’s research focus is on the quality of undergraduate medical education for Qatari doctors.

Shawna completed her undergraduate degree in Psycholinguistics at the University of Toronto in Canada, and later completed the MSc program in Applied Linguistics and Second language Acquisition at the University of Oxford.

She has a wide range of experiences in the field of Linguistics as a teaching and research assistant in areas such as theoretical linguistics, phonology, speech-language pathology, language acquisition, and creole studies. Being a native of Jamaica herself, Shawna has carried out extensive work on creole language acquisition. She worked with the University of the West Indies to draft the first Jamaican (Creole) as a Foreign Language course, and with the U.S Peace Corps to assess and revamp an existing language program for volunteers.

Shawna’s current research focuses on the development of writing skills among primary school learners in Jamaica who speak Jamaican Creole as a home language but are educated in English.

Publications
  • Helms-Park, R., Tucker, S, & Dronjic, V. (2016). From proto-writing to multimedia literacy: scripts and orthographies through the ages. In  Chen Bumgardner, V. Dronjic,, & R. Helms-Park (Eds.), Second Language Reading: Psycholinguistic and Cognitive Perspectives (pp. 1-31). New York, NY: Routledge Publishers.
  • Eriks-Brophy, A., Green, S., & Tucker, S. (2013).  Articulatory error patterns and phonological process use of preschool children with and without hearing loss. Volta Review.

Richard Canter is Visiting Professor of Surgical Education in the Nuffield Department of Surgical Sciences, University of Oxford.

Richard Canter qualified in medicine at the University of London in 1976, before becoming a surgeon at the Royal United Hospital, Bath. He completed a PhD in Management at the University of Bath in 1998 studying the nature of power in decision-making at the personal and organisation level in healthcare. Following the critical Kennedy report on surgical training in 2001, he was recruited to the Royal College of Surgeons of England as Deputy Director of Surgical Education with specific responsibility for curriculum development in surgical education in England. He was subsequently Head of the Postgraduate School of Surgery in Bristol until 2012, after which he concentrated on academic work at Oxford. He was appointed a visiting Professor in Oxford in in 2007, Emeritus Consultant at Oxford University Hospitals in 2015, and Associate Fellow at Green Templeton College, Oxford in 2015.

His interests are professionalism and, in particular, its relationship to leadership in healthcare systems. His current specific research interests are the effectiveness or otherwise of leadership education in respect of its impact on quality improvement in healthcare systems.

At the Royal College of Surgeons of England he was clinical lead and Chair of the Needs Analysis Group evaluating educational resources and organisational systems necessary for the implementation of reform of surgical training, and made recommendations for changes that were eventually adopted by all surgical training systems in the United Kingdom. During this appointment an opportunity arose in early 2003 at the end of the Serbian conflict to assist the European Agency for Reconstruction (EAR, a division of the EEC) in providing advice to the Kosovan Ministry of Health to develop new systems for surgical training.

Currently at Oxford, he is lead tutor for the module in Leadership and Management in Healthcare and Deputy Director of the Masters in Surgical Science, and supervises Masters and DPhil students on the subject of organisational change and leadership. In addition he has regular commitments in teaching postgraduate medical trainees and medical faculty on topics such as leadership, quality improvement, educational theory in healthcare, workplace assessments, supporting and talent managing  medical trainees, as well as occasional commitments to supervising students on the Said Business School Global Opportunity and Threats (Oxford) programme in exploring problems in complex systems.

Along the way he has written and spoken on many topics in medicine, obtained research grants, and has unexpectedly been given fellowships and medals. His main interest outside of work is playing music and he runs the Green Templeton College Big Band.

Prior to starting his DPhil, Eddy worked as a primary school teacher in Bristol, where he also completed his MSc in Educational Research.

He is particularly interested in the culture of high stakes, standardised testing, and how this might perpetuate existing inequalities in schools. His research focuses specifically on the interaction between knowledge, policy and pedagogy in the context of Literacy education.

 

Claire (郝煜) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and a China Oxford Scholarship Fund (COSF) scholar.

Claire holds a BA in Education and Physics from the University of Cambridge, an MA in Applied Linguistics from UCL Institution of Education, and an EdM in International Education Policy from Harvard University. She is passionate about exploring and supporting the transnational experiences of bi-/multilingual students in studying abroad contexts. Her research and professional interests include bilingualism, language and identity, international education, professional development, and school leadership.

Since 2015, Claire has served as the Director of International Education at Beijing Xinxuedao Education Group, a non-profit organisation that operates 31 schools with over 30,000 K-12 students in China. She has also worked as a high school counsellor and a teacher of Physics and Psychology.

Publications

Hao, Y. and Lantsman, G. (2022). Motivation in MOOCs: a qualitative study on the design and evaluation of an online IELTS course. The 7th IAFOR International Conference on Education.

Hao, Y. (2020). Education without borders: sojourner trips in students’ holistic development. In Wang, J. (Ed.). Family, Society, and Education. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2020). Learning how to learn: the role of metacognition and self-regulation in learning. In Wang, J. (Ed.). The Virtue of Thinking in Learning. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2019). Chinese students at a UK university: how linguistic repertoire mediates language and sojourner identity construction. Linguistics and Applied Linguistics Conference. Beijing Normal University.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2018). Examining Linguistic Diversity as a Resource for Higher Education in the Anglophone World. In Tong, V. C., Standen, A., & Sotiriou, M. (Ed.). Shaping Higher Education with Students: Ways to Connect Research and Teaching (pp.288-293). UCL Press.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2016). Making the most of linguistic diversity: the views and practices of bi/multilingual postgraduate students. The Multilingual University. ESRC Seminars.

Hao, Y. (2012). A Transformative Journey: China-US exchange student studying at an American high school. New World Press.

Pok Jing (Jane) Ho is a doctoral student at the Department of Education, specialising in educational assessment.

She is funded by the Bei Shan Tang Foundation Scholarship for Graduate Studies.

Her DPhil thesis examines validity in the Hong Kong Diploma of Secondary Education Examination, a large-scale, high-stakes test that informs higher education admissions decisions, using the argument-based approach to validation. In particular, her research identifies the claims made based on test scores, the validity evidence that supports or challenges such claims, and the social consequences that ensue as a result of test use.

Prior to her DPhil, she completed an M.A. in International Education Policy Analysis at Stanford University. She subsequently worked as a project officer at the Education University of Hong Kong, where she is now serving as a consultant alongside her studies.

A former secondary school teacher, Jane also holds a B.A. in English Studies (First Class Honours), a B.Ed. in English Language Education (First Class Honours), and an M.Ed. in Curriculum and Instruction from the Chinese University of Hong Kong, as well as the Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (CELTA) from Cambridge.

She is a Peer Supporter at Green Templeton College.

Publications

Ho, P. J. (2020). For some or for all: Vocational English for Hong Kong secondary school students. In C. Hong, & W. K. Ma (Eds.), Applied degree education and the future of work—Education 4.0 (pp. 87–95). Springer. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-15-3142-2

Ho, P. J. (2015). China-Africa “cooperation” in education. International Politics, 5. https://www.iir.cz/en/china-africa-cooperation-in-education

Jennifer’s DPhil focuses on adoptive families where  the adoptive parents also have birth children. She has worked in adoption support as a Parent Consultant for Adoption UK and as Head of Peer Services at PAC-UK, as well as managing the Adoption UK advice line and the parent training team.

She holds an MSc in Poverty Reduction: Policy and Practice from SOAS, and an MBA from Warwick Business School. She has worked in management consultancy in both the public and private sectors and is a board member of CoramBAAF.

Publications

The Right Tools for the Job. Information Age, November 1996

Global teams for the millennium; Management Decision, 36 (1): 31-33, February 1998

Lucy is a second-year DPhil student, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

Her DPhil research aims to engage in a meaningful and creative way with service children to explore how service life has shaped their experiences of education and sense of self. By choosing this focus, the research seeks to widen and nuance current understanding of service children’s educational experiences in addition to furthering knowledge into how service children see themselves. As a result of this, it is hoped that the research will support in developing the professional body of knowledge and understanding of this group of children in schools and help inform the Service Pupil Premium (SPP) funding choices in addition to wider school practice.

Before embarking on her DPhil at Oxford, Lucy completed her PGCE and MEd in Primary Education at the University of Cambridge. In addition to her DPhil work, Lucy is a Trustee for the Armed Forces Education Trust (AFET) – a grant-giving charity for service children – and a volunteer for the Oxford based charity, Big Brothers Big Sisters.

 

 

Aine is interested in improving the health outcomes of children and young people in the care system.

Fahad is reading for a DPhil in Education (part-time). He has over fifteen years professional experience in the education sector, in particular, higher education.

He has held senior roles in staff and student development, human resources, policy and strategy. Fahad holds a BSc in Education and Science and an MBA. Prior to commencing his doctoral studies, he was elected an Academic Visitor at St Antony’s College in the University of Oxford. Fahad’s research focus is on the quality of undergraduate medical education for Qatari doctors.

Shawna completed her undergraduate degree in Psycholinguistics at the University of Toronto in Canada, and later completed the MSc program in Applied Linguistics and Second language Acquisition at the University of Oxford.

She has a wide range of experiences in the field of Linguistics as a teaching and research assistant in areas such as theoretical linguistics, phonology, speech-language pathology, language acquisition, and creole studies. Being a native of Jamaica herself, Shawna has carried out extensive work on creole language acquisition. She worked with the University of the West Indies to draft the first Jamaican (Creole) as a Foreign Language course, and with the U.S Peace Corps to assess and revamp an existing language program for volunteers.

Shawna’s current research focuses on the development of writing skills among primary school learners in Jamaica who speak Jamaican Creole as a home language but are educated in English.

Publications
  • Helms-Park, R., Tucker, S, & Dronjic, V. (2016). From proto-writing to multimedia literacy: scripts and orthographies through the ages. In  Chen Bumgardner, V. Dronjic,, & R. Helms-Park (Eds.), Second Language Reading: Psycholinguistic and Cognitive Perspectives (pp. 1-31). New York, NY: Routledge Publishers.
  • Eriks-Brophy, A., Green, S., & Tucker, S. (2013).  Articulatory error patterns and phonological process use of preschool children with and without hearing loss. Volta Review.

Richard Canter is Visiting Professor of Surgical Education in the Nuffield Department of Surgical Sciences, University of Oxford.

Richard Canter qualified in medicine at the University of London in 1976, before becoming a surgeon at the Royal United Hospital, Bath. He completed a PhD in Management at the University of Bath in 1998 studying the nature of power in decision-making at the personal and organisation level in healthcare. Following the critical Kennedy report on surgical training in 2001, he was recruited to the Royal College of Surgeons of England as Deputy Director of Surgical Education with specific responsibility for curriculum development in surgical education in England. He was subsequently Head of the Postgraduate School of Surgery in Bristol until 2012, after which he concentrated on academic work at Oxford. He was appointed a visiting Professor in Oxford in in 2007, Emeritus Consultant at Oxford University Hospitals in 2015, and Associate Fellow at Green Templeton College, Oxford in 2015.

His interests are professionalism and, in particular, its relationship to leadership in healthcare systems. His current specific research interests are the effectiveness or otherwise of leadership education in respect of its impact on quality improvement in healthcare systems.

At the Royal College of Surgeons of England he was clinical lead and Chair of the Needs Analysis Group evaluating educational resources and organisational systems necessary for the implementation of reform of surgical training, and made recommendations for changes that were eventually adopted by all surgical training systems in the United Kingdom. During this appointment an opportunity arose in early 2003 at the end of the Serbian conflict to assist the European Agency for Reconstruction (EAR, a division of the EEC) in providing advice to the Kosovan Ministry of Health to develop new systems for surgical training.

Currently at Oxford, he is lead tutor for the module in Leadership and Management in Healthcare and Deputy Director of the Masters in Surgical Science, and supervises Masters and DPhil students on the subject of organisational change and leadership. In addition he has regular commitments in teaching postgraduate medical trainees and medical faculty on topics such as leadership, quality improvement, educational theory in healthcare, workplace assessments, supporting and talent managing  medical trainees, as well as occasional commitments to supervising students on the Said Business School Global Opportunity and Threats (Oxford) programme in exploring problems in complex systems.

Along the way he has written and spoken on many topics in medicine, obtained research grants, and has unexpectedly been given fellowships and medals. His main interest outside of work is playing music and he runs the Green Templeton College Big Band.

Prior to starting his DPhil, Eddy worked as a primary school teacher in Bristol, where he also completed his MSc in Educational Research.

He is particularly interested in the culture of high stakes, standardised testing, and how this might perpetuate existing inequalities in schools. His research focuses specifically on the interaction between knowledge, policy and pedagogy in the context of Literacy education.

 

Claire (郝煜) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and a China Oxford Scholarship Fund (COSF) scholar.

Claire holds a BA in Education and Physics from the University of Cambridge, an MA in Applied Linguistics from UCL Institution of Education, and an EdM in International Education Policy from Harvard University. She is passionate about exploring and supporting the transnational experiences of bi-/multilingual students in studying abroad contexts. Her research and professional interests include bilingualism, language and identity, international education, professional development, and school leadership.

Since 2015, Claire has served as the Director of International Education at Beijing Xinxuedao Education Group, a non-profit organisation that operates 31 schools with over 30,000 K-12 students in China. She has also worked as a high school counsellor and a teacher of Physics and Psychology.

Publications

Hao, Y. and Lantsman, G. (2022). Motivation in MOOCs: a qualitative study on the design and evaluation of an online IELTS course. The 7th IAFOR International Conference on Education.

Hao, Y. (2020). Education without borders: sojourner trips in students’ holistic development. In Wang, J. (Ed.). Family, Society, and Education. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2020). Learning how to learn: the role of metacognition and self-regulation in learning. In Wang, J. (Ed.). The Virtue of Thinking in Learning. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2019). Chinese students at a UK university: how linguistic repertoire mediates language and sojourner identity construction. Linguistics and Applied Linguistics Conference. Beijing Normal University.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2018). Examining Linguistic Diversity as a Resource for Higher Education in the Anglophone World. In Tong, V. C., Standen, A., & Sotiriou, M. (Ed.). Shaping Higher Education with Students: Ways to Connect Research and Teaching (pp.288-293). UCL Press.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2016). Making the most of linguistic diversity: the views and practices of bi/multilingual postgraduate students. The Multilingual University. ESRC Seminars.

Hao, Y. (2012). A Transformative Journey: China-US exchange student studying at an American high school. New World Press.

Pok Jing (Jane) Ho is a doctoral student at the Department of Education, specialising in educational assessment.

She is funded by the Bei Shan Tang Foundation Scholarship for Graduate Studies.

Her DPhil thesis examines validity in the Hong Kong Diploma of Secondary Education Examination, a large-scale, high-stakes test that informs higher education admissions decisions, using the argument-based approach to validation. In particular, her research identifies the claims made based on test scores, the validity evidence that supports or challenges such claims, and the social consequences that ensue as a result of test use.

Prior to her DPhil, she completed an M.A. in International Education Policy Analysis at Stanford University. She subsequently worked as a project officer at the Education University of Hong Kong, where she is now serving as a consultant alongside her studies.

A former secondary school teacher, Jane also holds a B.A. in English Studies (First Class Honours), a B.Ed. in English Language Education (First Class Honours), and an M.Ed. in Curriculum and Instruction from the Chinese University of Hong Kong, as well as the Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (CELTA) from Cambridge.

She is a Peer Supporter at Green Templeton College.

Publications

Ho, P. J. (2020). For some or for all: Vocational English for Hong Kong secondary school students. In C. Hong, & W. K. Ma (Eds.), Applied degree education and the future of work—Education 4.0 (pp. 87–95). Springer. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-15-3142-2

Ho, P. J. (2015). China-Africa “cooperation” in education. International Politics, 5. https://www.iir.cz/en/china-africa-cooperation-in-education

Jennifer’s DPhil focuses on adoptive families where  the adoptive parents also have birth children. She has worked in adoption support as a Parent Consultant for Adoption UK and as Head of Peer Services at PAC-UK, as well as managing the Adoption UK advice line and the parent training team.

She holds an MSc in Poverty Reduction: Policy and Practice from SOAS, and an MBA from Warwick Business School. She has worked in management consultancy in both the public and private sectors and is a board member of CoramBAAF.

Publications

The Right Tools for the Job. Information Age, November 1996

Global teams for the millennium; Management Decision, 36 (1): 31-33, February 1998

Lucy is a second-year DPhil student, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

Her DPhil research aims to engage in a meaningful and creative way with service children to explore how service life has shaped their experiences of education and sense of self. By choosing this focus, the research seeks to widen and nuance current understanding of service children’s educational experiences in addition to furthering knowledge into how service children see themselves. As a result of this, it is hoped that the research will support in developing the professional body of knowledge and understanding of this group of children in schools and help inform the Service Pupil Premium (SPP) funding choices in addition to wider school practice.

Before embarking on her DPhil at Oxford, Lucy completed her PGCE and MEd in Primary Education at the University of Cambridge. In addition to her DPhil work, Lucy is a Trustee for the Armed Forces Education Trust (AFET) – a grant-giving charity for service children – and a volunteer for the Oxford based charity, Big Brothers Big Sisters.

 

 

Aine is interested in improving the health outcomes of children and young people in the care system.

Fahad is reading for a DPhil in Education (part-time). He has over fifteen years professional experience in the education sector, in particular, higher education.

He has held senior roles in staff and student development, human resources, policy and strategy. Fahad holds a BSc in Education and Science and an MBA. Prior to commencing his doctoral studies, he was elected an Academic Visitor at St Antony’s College in the University of Oxford. Fahad’s research focus is on the quality of undergraduate medical education for Qatari doctors.

Shawna completed her undergraduate degree in Psycholinguistics at the University of Toronto in Canada, and later completed the MSc program in Applied Linguistics and Second language Acquisition at the University of Oxford.

She has a wide range of experiences in the field of Linguistics as a teaching and research assistant in areas such as theoretical linguistics, phonology, speech-language pathology, language acquisition, and creole studies. Being a native of Jamaica herself, Shawna has carried out extensive work on creole language acquisition. She worked with the University of the West Indies to draft the first Jamaican (Creole) as a Foreign Language course, and with the U.S Peace Corps to assess and revamp an existing language program for volunteers.

Shawna’s current research focuses on the development of writing skills among primary school learners in Jamaica who speak Jamaican Creole as a home language but are educated in English.

Publications
  • Helms-Park, R., Tucker, S, & Dronjic, V. (2016). From proto-writing to multimedia literacy: scripts and orthographies through the ages. In  Chen Bumgardner, V. Dronjic,, & R. Helms-Park (Eds.), Second Language Reading: Psycholinguistic and Cognitive Perspectives (pp. 1-31). New York, NY: Routledge Publishers.
  • Eriks-Brophy, A., Green, S., & Tucker, S. (2013).  Articulatory error patterns and phonological process use of preschool children with and without hearing loss. Volta Review.

Richard Canter is Visiting Professor of Surgical Education in the Nuffield Department of Surgical Sciences, University of Oxford.

Richard Canter qualified in medicine at the University of London in 1976, before becoming a surgeon at the Royal United Hospital, Bath. He completed a PhD in Management at the University of Bath in 1998 studying the nature of power in decision-making at the personal and organisation level in healthcare. Following the critical Kennedy report on surgical training in 2001, he was recruited to the Royal College of Surgeons of England as Deputy Director of Surgical Education with specific responsibility for curriculum development in surgical education in England. He was subsequently Head of the Postgraduate School of Surgery in Bristol until 2012, after which he concentrated on academic work at Oxford. He was appointed a visiting Professor in Oxford in in 2007, Emeritus Consultant at Oxford University Hospitals in 2015, and Associate Fellow at Green Templeton College, Oxford in 2015.

His interests are professionalism and, in particular, its relationship to leadership in healthcare systems. His current specific research interests are the effectiveness or otherwise of leadership education in respect of its impact on quality improvement in healthcare systems.

At the Royal College of Surgeons of England he was clinical lead and Chair of the Needs Analysis Group evaluating educational resources and organisational systems necessary for the implementation of reform of surgical training, and made recommendations for changes that were eventually adopted by all surgical training systems in the United Kingdom. During this appointment an opportunity arose in early 2003 at the end of the Serbian conflict to assist the European Agency for Reconstruction (EAR, a division of the EEC) in providing advice to the Kosovan Ministry of Health to develop new systems for surgical training.

Currently at Oxford, he is lead tutor for the module in Leadership and Management in Healthcare and Deputy Director of the Masters in Surgical Science, and supervises Masters and DPhil students on the subject of organisational change and leadership. In addition he has regular commitments in teaching postgraduate medical trainees and medical faculty on topics such as leadership, quality improvement, educational theory in healthcare, workplace assessments, supporting and talent managing  medical trainees, as well as occasional commitments to supervising students on the Said Business School Global Opportunity and Threats (Oxford) programme in exploring problems in complex systems.

Along the way he has written and spoken on many topics in medicine, obtained research grants, and has unexpectedly been given fellowships and medals. His main interest outside of work is playing music and he runs the Green Templeton College Big Band.

Prior to starting his DPhil, Eddy worked as a primary school teacher in Bristol, where he also completed his MSc in Educational Research.

He is particularly interested in the culture of high stakes, standardised testing, and how this might perpetuate existing inequalities in schools. His research focuses specifically on the interaction between knowledge, policy and pedagogy in the context of Literacy education.

 

Claire (郝煜) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and a China Oxford Scholarship Fund (COSF) scholar.

Claire holds a BA in Education and Physics from the University of Cambridge, an MA in Applied Linguistics from UCL Institution of Education, and an EdM in International Education Policy from Harvard University. She is passionate about exploring and supporting the transnational experiences of bi-/multilingual students in studying abroad contexts. Her research and professional interests include bilingualism, language and identity, international education, professional development, and school leadership.

Since 2015, Claire has served as the Director of International Education at Beijing Xinxuedao Education Group, a non-profit organisation that operates 31 schools with over 30,000 K-12 students in China. She has also worked as a high school counsellor and a teacher of Physics and Psychology.

Publications

Hao, Y. and Lantsman, G. (2022). Motivation in MOOCs: a qualitative study on the design and evaluation of an online IELTS course. The 7th IAFOR International Conference on Education.

Hao, Y. (2020). Education without borders: sojourner trips in students’ holistic development. In Wang, J. (Ed.). Family, Society, and Education. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2020). Learning how to learn: the role of metacognition and self-regulation in learning. In Wang, J. (Ed.). The Virtue of Thinking in Learning. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2019). Chinese students at a UK university: how linguistic repertoire mediates language and sojourner identity construction. Linguistics and Applied Linguistics Conference. Beijing Normal University.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2018). Examining Linguistic Diversity as a Resource for Higher Education in the Anglophone World. In Tong, V. C., Standen, A., & Sotiriou, M. (Ed.). Shaping Higher Education with Students: Ways to Connect Research and Teaching (pp.288-293). UCL Press.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2016). Making the most of linguistic diversity: the views and practices of bi/multilingual postgraduate students. The Multilingual University. ESRC Seminars.

Hao, Y. (2012). A Transformative Journey: China-US exchange student studying at an American high school. New World Press.

Pok Jing (Jane) Ho is a doctoral student at the Department of Education, specialising in educational assessment.

She is funded by the Bei Shan Tang Foundation Scholarship for Graduate Studies.

Her DPhil thesis examines validity in the Hong Kong Diploma of Secondary Education Examination, a large-scale, high-stakes test that informs higher education admissions decisions, using the argument-based approach to validation. In particular, her research identifies the claims made based on test scores, the validity evidence that supports or challenges such claims, and the social consequences that ensue as a result of test use.

Prior to her DPhil, she completed an M.A. in International Education Policy Analysis at Stanford University. She subsequently worked as a project officer at the Education University of Hong Kong, where she is now serving as a consultant alongside her studies.

A former secondary school teacher, Jane also holds a B.A. in English Studies (First Class Honours), a B.Ed. in English Language Education (First Class Honours), and an M.Ed. in Curriculum and Instruction from the Chinese University of Hong Kong, as well as the Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (CELTA) from Cambridge.

She is a Peer Supporter at Green Templeton College.

Publications

Ho, P. J. (2020). For some or for all: Vocational English for Hong Kong secondary school students. In C. Hong, & W. K. Ma (Eds.), Applied degree education and the future of work—Education 4.0 (pp. 87–95). Springer. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-15-3142-2

Ho, P. J. (2015). China-Africa “cooperation” in education. International Politics, 5. https://www.iir.cz/en/china-africa-cooperation-in-education

Jennifer’s DPhil focuses on adoptive families where  the adoptive parents also have birth children. She has worked in adoption support as a Parent Consultant for Adoption UK and as Head of Peer Services at PAC-UK, as well as managing the Adoption UK advice line and the parent training team.

She holds an MSc in Poverty Reduction: Policy and Practice from SOAS, and an MBA from Warwick Business School. She has worked in management consultancy in both the public and private sectors and is a board member of CoramBAAF.

Publications

The Right Tools for the Job. Information Age, November 1996

Global teams for the millennium; Management Decision, 36 (1): 31-33, February 1998

Lucy is a second-year DPhil student, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

Her DPhil research aims to engage in a meaningful and creative way with service children to explore how service life has shaped their experiences of education and sense of self. By choosing this focus, the research seeks to widen and nuance current understanding of service children’s educational experiences in addition to furthering knowledge into how service children see themselves. As a result of this, it is hoped that the research will support in developing the professional body of knowledge and understanding of this group of children in schools and help inform the Service Pupil Premium (SPP) funding choices in addition to wider school practice.

Before embarking on her DPhil at Oxford, Lucy completed her PGCE and MEd in Primary Education at the University of Cambridge. In addition to her DPhil work, Lucy is a Trustee for the Armed Forces Education Trust (AFET) – a grant-giving charity for service children – and a volunteer for the Oxford based charity, Big Brothers Big Sisters.

 

 

Aine is interested in improving the health outcomes of children and young people in the care system.

Fahad is reading for a DPhil in Education (part-time). He has over fifteen years professional experience in the education sector, in particular, higher education.

He has held senior roles in staff and student development, human resources, policy and strategy. Fahad holds a BSc in Education and Science and an MBA. Prior to commencing his doctoral studies, he was elected an Academic Visitor at St Antony’s College in the University of Oxford. Fahad’s research focus is on the quality of undergraduate medical education for Qatari doctors.

Shawna completed her undergraduate degree in Psycholinguistics at the University of Toronto in Canada, and later completed the MSc program in Applied Linguistics and Second language Acquisition at the University of Oxford.

She has a wide range of experiences in the field of Linguistics as a teaching and research assistant in areas such as theoretical linguistics, phonology, speech-language pathology, language acquisition, and creole studies. Being a native of Jamaica herself, Shawna has carried out extensive work on creole language acquisition. She worked with the University of the West Indies to draft the first Jamaican (Creole) as a Foreign Language course, and with the U.S Peace Corps to assess and revamp an existing language program for volunteers.

Shawna’s current research focuses on the development of writing skills among primary school learners in Jamaica who speak Jamaican Creole as a home language but are educated in English.

Publications
  • Helms-Park, R., Tucker, S, & Dronjic, V. (2016). From proto-writing to multimedia literacy: scripts and orthographies through the ages. In  Chen Bumgardner, V. Dronjic,, & R. Helms-Park (Eds.), Second Language Reading: Psycholinguistic and Cognitive Perspectives (pp. 1-31). New York, NY: Routledge Publishers.
  • Eriks-Brophy, A., Green, S., & Tucker, S. (2013).  Articulatory error patterns and phonological process use of preschool children with and without hearing loss. Volta Review.

Richard Canter is Visiting Professor of Surgical Education in the Nuffield Department of Surgical Sciences, University of Oxford.

Richard Canter qualified in medicine at the University of London in 1976, before becoming a surgeon at the Royal United Hospital, Bath. He completed a PhD in Management at the University of Bath in 1998 studying the nature of power in decision-making at the personal and organisation level in healthcare. Following the critical Kennedy report on surgical training in 2001, he was recruited to the Royal College of Surgeons of England as Deputy Director of Surgical Education with specific responsibility for curriculum development in surgical education in England. He was subsequently Head of the Postgraduate School of Surgery in Bristol until 2012, after which he concentrated on academic work at Oxford. He was appointed a visiting Professor in Oxford in in 2007, Emeritus Consultant at Oxford University Hospitals in 2015, and Associate Fellow at Green Templeton College, Oxford in 2015.

His interests are professionalism and, in particular, its relationship to leadership in healthcare systems. His current specific research interests are the effectiveness or otherwise of leadership education in respect of its impact on quality improvement in healthcare systems.

At the Royal College of Surgeons of England he was clinical lead and Chair of the Needs Analysis Group evaluating educational resources and organisational systems necessary for the implementation of reform of surgical training, and made recommendations for changes that were eventually adopted by all surgical training systems in the United Kingdom. During this appointment an opportunity arose in early 2003 at the end of the Serbian conflict to assist the European Agency for Reconstruction (EAR, a division of the EEC) in providing advice to the Kosovan Ministry of Health to develop new systems for surgical training.

Currently at Oxford, he is lead tutor for the module in Leadership and Management in Healthcare and Deputy Director of the Masters in Surgical Science, and supervises Masters and DPhil students on the subject of organisational change and leadership. In addition he has regular commitments in teaching postgraduate medical trainees and medical faculty on topics such as leadership, quality improvement, educational theory in healthcare, workplace assessments, supporting and talent managing  medical trainees, as well as occasional commitments to supervising students on the Said Business School Global Opportunity and Threats (Oxford) programme in exploring problems in complex systems.

Along the way he has written and spoken on many topics in medicine, obtained research grants, and has unexpectedly been given fellowships and medals. His main interest outside of work is playing music and he runs the Green Templeton College Big Band.

Prior to starting his DPhil, Eddy worked as a primary school teacher in Bristol, where he also completed his MSc in Educational Research.

He is particularly interested in the culture of high stakes, standardised testing, and how this might perpetuate existing inequalities in schools. His research focuses specifically on the interaction between knowledge, policy and pedagogy in the context of Literacy education.

 

Claire (郝煜) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and a China Oxford Scholarship Fund (COSF) scholar.

Claire holds a BA in Education and Physics from the University of Cambridge, an MA in Applied Linguistics from UCL Institution of Education, and an EdM in International Education Policy from Harvard University. She is passionate about exploring and supporting the transnational experiences of bi-/multilingual students in studying abroad contexts. Her research and professional interests include bilingualism, language and identity, international education, professional development, and school leadership.

Since 2015, Claire has served as the Director of International Education at Beijing Xinxuedao Education Group, a non-profit organisation that operates 31 schools with over 30,000 K-12 students in China. She has also worked as a high school counsellor and a teacher of Physics and Psychology.

Publications

Hao, Y. and Lantsman, G. (2022). Motivation in MOOCs: a qualitative study on the design and evaluation of an online IELTS course. The 7th IAFOR International Conference on Education.

Hao, Y. (2020). Education without borders: sojourner trips in students’ holistic development. In Wang, J. (Ed.). Family, Society, and Education. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2020). Learning how to learn: the role of metacognition and self-regulation in learning. In Wang, J. (Ed.). The Virtue of Thinking in Learning. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2019). Chinese students at a UK university: how linguistic repertoire mediates language and sojourner identity construction. Linguistics and Applied Linguistics Conference. Beijing Normal University.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2018). Examining Linguistic Diversity as a Resource for Higher Education in the Anglophone World. In Tong, V. C., Standen, A., & Sotiriou, M. (Ed.). Shaping Higher Education with Students: Ways to Connect Research and Teaching (pp.288-293). UCL Press.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2016). Making the most of linguistic diversity: the views and practices of bi/multilingual postgraduate students. The Multilingual University. ESRC Seminars.

Hao, Y. (2012). A Transformative Journey: China-US exchange student studying at an American high school. New World Press.

Pok Jing (Jane) Ho is a doctoral student at the Department of Education, specialising in educational assessment.

She is funded by the Bei Shan Tang Foundation Scholarship for Graduate Studies.

Her DPhil thesis examines validity in the Hong Kong Diploma of Secondary Education Examination, a large-scale, high-stakes test that informs higher education admissions decisions, using the argument-based approach to validation. In particular, her research identifies the claims made based on test scores, the validity evidence that supports or challenges such claims, and the social consequences that ensue as a result of test use.

Prior to her DPhil, she completed an M.A. in International Education Policy Analysis at Stanford University. She subsequently worked as a project officer at the Education University of Hong Kong, where she is now serving as a consultant alongside her studies.

A former secondary school teacher, Jane also holds a B.A. in English Studies (First Class Honours), a B.Ed. in English Language Education (First Class Honours), and an M.Ed. in Curriculum and Instruction from the Chinese University of Hong Kong, as well as the Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (CELTA) from Cambridge.

She is a Peer Supporter at Green Templeton College.

Publications

Ho, P. J. (2020). For some or for all: Vocational English for Hong Kong secondary school students. In C. Hong, & W. K. Ma (Eds.), Applied degree education and the future of work—Education 4.0 (pp. 87–95). Springer. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-15-3142-2

Ho, P. J. (2015). China-Africa “cooperation” in education. International Politics, 5. https://www.iir.cz/en/china-africa-cooperation-in-education

Jennifer’s DPhil focuses on adoptive families where  the adoptive parents also have birth children. She has worked in adoption support as a Parent Consultant for Adoption UK and as Head of Peer Services at PAC-UK, as well as managing the Adoption UK advice line and the parent training team.

She holds an MSc in Poverty Reduction: Policy and Practice from SOAS, and an MBA from Warwick Business School. She has worked in management consultancy in both the public and private sectors and is a board member of CoramBAAF.

Publications

The Right Tools for the Job. Information Age, November 1996

Global teams for the millennium; Management Decision, 36 (1): 31-33, February 1998

Lucy is a second-year DPhil student, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

Her DPhil research aims to engage in a meaningful and creative way with service children to explore how service life has shaped their experiences of education and sense of self. By choosing this focus, the research seeks to widen and nuance current understanding of service children’s educational experiences in addition to furthering knowledge into how service children see themselves. As a result of this, it is hoped that the research will support in developing the professional body of knowledge and understanding of this group of children in schools and help inform the Service Pupil Premium (SPP) funding choices in addition to wider school practice.

Before embarking on her DPhil at Oxford, Lucy completed her PGCE and MEd in Primary Education at the University of Cambridge. In addition to her DPhil work, Lucy is a Trustee for the Armed Forces Education Trust (AFET) – a grant-giving charity for service children – and a volunteer for the Oxford based charity, Big Brothers Big Sisters.

 

 

Aine is interested in improving the health outcomes of children and young people in the care system.

Fahad is reading for a DPhil in Education (part-time). He has over fifteen years professional experience in the education sector, in particular, higher education.

He has held senior roles in staff and student development, human resources, policy and strategy. Fahad holds a BSc in Education and Science and an MBA. Prior to commencing his doctoral studies, he was elected an Academic Visitor at St Antony’s College in the University of Oxford. Fahad’s research focus is on the quality of undergraduate medical education for Qatari doctors.

Shawna completed her undergraduate degree in Psycholinguistics at the University of Toronto in Canada, and later completed the MSc program in Applied Linguistics and Second language Acquisition at the University of Oxford.

She has a wide range of experiences in the field of Linguistics as a teaching and research assistant in areas such as theoretical linguistics, phonology, speech-language pathology, language acquisition, and creole studies. Being a native of Jamaica herself, Shawna has carried out extensive work on creole language acquisition. She worked with the University of the West Indies to draft the first Jamaican (Creole) as a Foreign Language course, and with the U.S Peace Corps to assess and revamp an existing language program for volunteers.

Shawna’s current research focuses on the development of writing skills among primary school learners in Jamaica who speak Jamaican Creole as a home language but are educated in English.

Publications
  • Helms-Park, R., Tucker, S, & Dronjic, V. (2016). From proto-writing to multimedia literacy: scripts and orthographies through the ages. In  Chen Bumgardner, V. Dronjic,, & R. Helms-Park (Eds.), Second Language Reading: Psycholinguistic and Cognitive Perspectives (pp. 1-31). New York, NY: Routledge Publishers.
  • Eriks-Brophy, A., Green, S., & Tucker, S. (2013).  Articulatory error patterns and phonological process use of preschool children with and without hearing loss. Volta Review.

Richard Canter is Visiting Professor of Surgical Education in the Nuffield Department of Surgical Sciences, University of Oxford.

Richard Canter qualified in medicine at the University of London in 1976, before becoming a surgeon at the Royal United Hospital, Bath. He completed a PhD in Management at the University of Bath in 1998 studying the nature of power in decision-making at the personal and organisation level in healthcare. Following the critical Kennedy report on surgical training in 2001, he was recruited to the Royal College of Surgeons of England as Deputy Director of Surgical Education with specific responsibility for curriculum development in surgical education in England. He was subsequently Head of the Postgraduate School of Surgery in Bristol until 2012, after which he concentrated on academic work at Oxford. He was appointed a visiting Professor in Oxford in in 2007, Emeritus Consultant at Oxford University Hospitals in 2015, and Associate Fellow at Green Templeton College, Oxford in 2015.

His interests are professionalism and, in particular, its relationship to leadership in healthcare systems. His current specific research interests are the effectiveness or otherwise of leadership education in respect of its impact on quality improvement in healthcare systems.

At the Royal College of Surgeons of England he was clinical lead and Chair of the Needs Analysis Group evaluating educational resources and organisational systems necessary for the implementation of reform of surgical training, and made recommendations for changes that were eventually adopted by all surgical training systems in the United Kingdom. During this appointment an opportunity arose in early 2003 at the end of the Serbian conflict to assist the European Agency for Reconstruction (EAR, a division of the EEC) in providing advice to the Kosovan Ministry of Health to develop new systems for surgical training.

Currently at Oxford, he is lead tutor for the module in Leadership and Management in Healthcare and Deputy Director of the Masters in Surgical Science, and supervises Masters and DPhil students on the subject of organisational change and leadership. In addition he has regular commitments in teaching postgraduate medical trainees and medical faculty on topics such as leadership, quality improvement, educational theory in healthcare, workplace assessments, supporting and talent managing  medical trainees, as well as occasional commitments to supervising students on the Said Business School Global Opportunity and Threats (Oxford) programme in exploring problems in complex systems.

Along the way he has written and spoken on many topics in medicine, obtained research grants, and has unexpectedly been given fellowships and medals. His main interest outside of work is playing music and he runs the Green Templeton College Big Band.

Prior to starting his DPhil, Eddy worked as a primary school teacher in Bristol, where he also completed his MSc in Educational Research.

He is particularly interested in the culture of high stakes, standardised testing, and how this might perpetuate existing inequalities in schools. His research focuses specifically on the interaction between knowledge, policy and pedagogy in the context of Literacy education.

 

Claire (郝煜) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and a China Oxford Scholarship Fund (COSF) scholar.

Claire holds a BA in Education and Physics from the University of Cambridge, an MA in Applied Linguistics from UCL Institution of Education, and an EdM in International Education Policy from Harvard University. She is passionate about exploring and supporting the transnational experiences of bi-/multilingual students in studying abroad contexts. Her research and professional interests include bilingualism, language and identity, international education, professional development, and school leadership.

Since 2015, Claire has served as the Director of International Education at Beijing Xinxuedao Education Group, a non-profit organisation that operates 31 schools with over 30,000 K-12 students in China. She has also worked as a high school counsellor and a teacher of Physics and Psychology.

Publications

Hao, Y. and Lantsman, G. (2022). Motivation in MOOCs: a qualitative study on the design and evaluation of an online IELTS course. The 7th IAFOR International Conference on Education.

Hao, Y. (2020). Education without borders: sojourner trips in students’ holistic development. In Wang, J. (Ed.). Family, Society, and Education. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2020). Learning how to learn: the role of metacognition and self-regulation in learning. In Wang, J. (Ed.). The Virtue of Thinking in Learning. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2019). Chinese students at a UK university: how linguistic repertoire mediates language and sojourner identity construction. Linguistics and Applied Linguistics Conference. Beijing Normal University.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2018). Examining Linguistic Diversity as a Resource for Higher Education in the Anglophone World. In Tong, V. C., Standen, A., & Sotiriou, M. (Ed.). Shaping Higher Education with Students: Ways to Connect Research and Teaching (pp.288-293). UCL Press.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2016). Making the most of linguistic diversity: the views and practices of bi/multilingual postgraduate students. The Multilingual University. ESRC Seminars.

Hao, Y. (2012). A Transformative Journey: China-US exchange student studying at an American high school. New World Press.

Pok Jing (Jane) Ho is a doctoral student at the Department of Education, specialising in educational assessment.

She is funded by the Bei Shan Tang Foundation Scholarship for Graduate Studies.

Her DPhil thesis examines validity in the Hong Kong Diploma of Secondary Education Examination, a large-scale, high-stakes test that informs higher education admissions decisions, using the argument-based approach to validation. In particular, her research identifies the claims made based on test scores, the validity evidence that supports or challenges such claims, and the social consequences that ensue as a result of test use.

Prior to her DPhil, she completed an M.A. in International Education Policy Analysis at Stanford University. She subsequently worked as a project officer at the Education University of Hong Kong, where she is now serving as a consultant alongside her studies.

A former secondary school teacher, Jane also holds a B.A. in English Studies (First Class Honours), a B.Ed. in English Language Education (First Class Honours), and an M.Ed. in Curriculum and Instruction from the Chinese University of Hong Kong, as well as the Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (CELTA) from Cambridge.

She is a Peer Supporter at Green Templeton College.

Publications

Ho, P. J. (2020). For some or for all: Vocational English for Hong Kong secondary school students. In C. Hong, & W. K. Ma (Eds.), Applied degree education and the future of work—Education 4.0 (pp. 87–95). Springer. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-15-3142-2

Ho, P. J. (2015). China-Africa “cooperation” in education. International Politics, 5. https://www.iir.cz/en/china-africa-cooperation-in-education

Jennifer’s DPhil focuses on adoptive families where  the adoptive parents also have birth children. She has worked in adoption support as a Parent Consultant for Adoption UK and as Head of Peer Services at PAC-UK, as well as managing the Adoption UK advice line and the parent training team.

She holds an MSc in Poverty Reduction: Policy and Practice from SOAS, and an MBA from Warwick Business School. She has worked in management consultancy in both the public and private sectors and is a board member of CoramBAAF.

Publications

The Right Tools for the Job. Information Age, November 1996

Global teams for the millennium; Management Decision, 36 (1): 31-33, February 1998

Lucy is a second-year DPhil student, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

Her DPhil research aims to engage in a meaningful and creative way with service children to explore how service life has shaped their experiences of education and sense of self. By choosing this focus, the research seeks to widen and nuance current understanding of service children’s educational experiences in addition to furthering knowledge into how service children see themselves. As a result of this, it is hoped that the research will support in developing the professional body of knowledge and understanding of this group of children in schools and help inform the Service Pupil Premium (SPP) funding choices in addition to wider school practice.

Before embarking on her DPhil at Oxford, Lucy completed her PGCE and MEd in Primary Education at the University of Cambridge. In addition to her DPhil work, Lucy is a Trustee for the Armed Forces Education Trust (AFET) – a grant-giving charity for service children – and a volunteer for the Oxford based charity, Big Brothers Big Sisters.

 

 

Aine is interested in improving the health outcomes of children and young people in the care system.

Fahad is reading for a DPhil in Education (part-time). He has over fifteen years professional experience in the education sector, in particular, higher education.

He has held senior roles in staff and student development, human resources, policy and strategy. Fahad holds a BSc in Education and Science and an MBA. Prior to commencing his doctoral studies, he was elected an Academic Visitor at St Antony’s College in the University of Oxford. Fahad’s research focus is on the quality of undergraduate medical education for Qatari doctors.

Shawna completed her undergraduate degree in Psycholinguistics at the University of Toronto in Canada, and later completed the MSc program in Applied Linguistics and Second language Acquisition at the University of Oxford.

She has a wide range of experiences in the field of Linguistics as a teaching and research assistant in areas such as theoretical linguistics, phonology, speech-language pathology, language acquisition, and creole studies. Being a native of Jamaica herself, Shawna has carried out extensive work on creole language acquisition. She worked with the University of the West Indies to draft the first Jamaican (Creole) as a Foreign Language course, and with the U.S Peace Corps to assess and revamp an existing language program for volunteers.

Shawna’s current research focuses on the development of writing skills among primary school learners in Jamaica who speak Jamaican Creole as a home language but are educated in English.

Publications
  • Helms-Park, R., Tucker, S, & Dronjic, V. (2016). From proto-writing to multimedia literacy: scripts and orthographies through the ages. In  Chen Bumgardner, V. Dronjic,, & R. Helms-Park (Eds.), Second Language Reading: Psycholinguistic and Cognitive Perspectives (pp. 1-31). New York, NY: Routledge Publishers.
  • Eriks-Brophy, A., Green, S., & Tucker, S. (2013).  Articulatory error patterns and phonological process use of preschool children with and without hearing loss. Volta Review.

Richard Canter is Visiting Professor of Surgical Education in the Nuffield Department of Surgical Sciences, University of Oxford.

Richard Canter qualified in medicine at the University of London in 1976, before becoming a surgeon at the Royal United Hospital, Bath. He completed a PhD in Management at the University of Bath in 1998 studying the nature of power in decision-making at the personal and organisation level in healthcare. Following the critical Kennedy report on surgical training in 2001, he was recruited to the Royal College of Surgeons of England as Deputy Director of Surgical Education with specific responsibility for curriculum development in surgical education in England. He was subsequently Head of the Postgraduate School of Surgery in Bristol until 2012, after which he concentrated on academic work at Oxford. He was appointed a visiting Professor in Oxford in in 2007, Emeritus Consultant at Oxford University Hospitals in 2015, and Associate Fellow at Green Templeton College, Oxford in 2015.

His interests are professionalism and, in particular, its relationship to leadership in healthcare systems. His current specific research interests are the effectiveness or otherwise of leadership education in respect of its impact on quality improvement in healthcare systems.

At the Royal College of Surgeons of England he was clinical lead and Chair of the Needs Analysis Group evaluating educational resources and organisational systems necessary for the implementation of reform of surgical training, and made recommendations for changes that were eventually adopted by all surgical training systems in the United Kingdom. During this appointment an opportunity arose in early 2003 at the end of the Serbian conflict to assist the European Agency for Reconstruction (EAR, a division of the EEC) in providing advice to the Kosovan Ministry of Health to develop new systems for surgical training.

Currently at Oxford, he is lead tutor for the module in Leadership and Management in Healthcare and Deputy Director of the Masters in Surgical Science, and supervises Masters and DPhil students on the subject of organisational change and leadership. In addition he has regular commitments in teaching postgraduate medical trainees and medical faculty on topics such as leadership, quality improvement, educational theory in healthcare, workplace assessments, supporting and talent managing  medical trainees, as well as occasional commitments to supervising students on the Said Business School Global Opportunity and Threats (Oxford) programme in exploring problems in complex systems.

Along the way he has written and spoken on many topics in medicine, obtained research grants, and has unexpectedly been given fellowships and medals. His main interest outside of work is playing music and he runs the Green Templeton College Big Band.

Prior to starting his DPhil, Eddy worked as a primary school teacher in Bristol, where he also completed his MSc in Educational Research.

He is particularly interested in the culture of high stakes, standardised testing, and how this might perpetuate existing inequalities in schools. His research focuses specifically on the interaction between knowledge, policy and pedagogy in the context of Literacy education.

 

Claire (郝煜) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and a China Oxford Scholarship Fund (COSF) scholar.

Claire holds a BA in Education and Physics from the University of Cambridge, an MA in Applied Linguistics from UCL Institution of Education, and an EdM in International Education Policy from Harvard University. She is passionate about exploring and supporting the transnational experiences of bi-/multilingual students in studying abroad contexts. Her research and professional interests include bilingualism, language and identity, international education, professional development, and school leadership.

Since 2015, Claire has served as the Director of International Education at Beijing Xinxuedao Education Group, a non-profit organisation that operates 31 schools with over 30,000 K-12 students in China. She has also worked as a high school counsellor and a teacher of Physics and Psychology.

Publications

Hao, Y. and Lantsman, G. (2022). Motivation in MOOCs: a qualitative study on the design and evaluation of an online IELTS course. The 7th IAFOR International Conference on Education.

Hao, Y. (2020). Education without borders: sojourner trips in students’ holistic development. In Wang, J. (Ed.). Family, Society, and Education. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2020). Learning how to learn: the role of metacognition and self-regulation in learning. In Wang, J. (Ed.). The Virtue of Thinking in Learning. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2019). Chinese students at a UK university: how linguistic repertoire mediates language and sojourner identity construction. Linguistics and Applied Linguistics Conference. Beijing Normal University.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2018). Examining Linguistic Diversity as a Resource for Higher Education in the Anglophone World. In Tong, V. C., Standen, A., & Sotiriou, M. (Ed.). Shaping Higher Education with Students: Ways to Connect Research and Teaching (pp.288-293). UCL Press.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2016). Making the most of linguistic diversity: the views and practices of bi/multilingual postgraduate students. The Multilingual University. ESRC Seminars.

Hao, Y. (2012). A Transformative Journey: China-US exchange student studying at an American high school. New World Press.

Pok Jing (Jane) Ho is a doctoral student at the Department of Education, specialising in educational assessment.

She is funded by the Bei Shan Tang Foundation Scholarship for Graduate Studies.

Her DPhil thesis examines validity in the Hong Kong Diploma of Secondary Education Examination, a large-scale, high-stakes test that informs higher education admissions decisions, using the argument-based approach to validation. In particular, her research identifies the claims made based on test scores, the validity evidence that supports or challenges such claims, and the social consequences that ensue as a result of test use.

Prior to her DPhil, she completed an M.A. in International Education Policy Analysis at Stanford University. She subsequently worked as a project officer at the Education University of Hong Kong, where she is now serving as a consultant alongside her studies.

A former secondary school teacher, Jane also holds a B.A. in English Studies (First Class Honours), a B.Ed. in English Language Education (First Class Honours), and an M.Ed. in Curriculum and Instruction from the Chinese University of Hong Kong, as well as the Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (CELTA) from Cambridge.

She is a Peer Supporter at Green Templeton College.

Publications

Ho, P. J. (2020). For some or for all: Vocational English for Hong Kong secondary school students. In C. Hong, & W. K. Ma (Eds.), Applied degree education and the future of work—Education 4.0 (pp. 87–95). Springer. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-15-3142-2

Ho, P. J. (2015). China-Africa “cooperation” in education. International Politics, 5. https://www.iir.cz/en/china-africa-cooperation-in-education

Jennifer’s DPhil focuses on adoptive families where  the adoptive parents also have birth children. She has worked in adoption support as a Parent Consultant for Adoption UK and as Head of Peer Services at PAC-UK, as well as managing the Adoption UK advice line and the parent training team.

She holds an MSc in Poverty Reduction: Policy and Practice from SOAS, and an MBA from Warwick Business School. She has worked in management consultancy in both the public and private sectors and is a board member of CoramBAAF.

Publications

The Right Tools for the Job. Information Age, November 1996

Global teams for the millennium; Management Decision, 36 (1): 31-33, February 1998

Lucy is a second-year DPhil student, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

Her DPhil research aims to engage in a meaningful and creative way with service children to explore how service life has shaped their experiences of education and sense of self. By choosing this focus, the research seeks to widen and nuance current understanding of service children’s educational experiences in addition to furthering knowledge into how service children see themselves. As a result of this, it is hoped that the research will support in developing the professional body of knowledge and understanding of this group of children in schools and help inform the Service Pupil Premium (SPP) funding choices in addition to wider school practice.

Before embarking on her DPhil at Oxford, Lucy completed her PGCE and MEd in Primary Education at the University of Cambridge. In addition to her DPhil work, Lucy is a Trustee for the Armed Forces Education Trust (AFET) – a grant-giving charity for service children – and a volunteer for the Oxford based charity, Big Brothers Big Sisters.

 

 

Aine is interested in improving the health outcomes of children and young people in the care system.

Fahad is reading for a DPhil in Education (part-time). He has over fifteen years professional experience in the education sector, in particular, higher education.

He has held senior roles in staff and student development, human resources, policy and strategy. Fahad holds a BSc in Education and Science and an MBA. Prior to commencing his doctoral studies, he was elected an Academic Visitor at St Antony’s College in the University of Oxford. Fahad’s research focus is on the quality of undergraduate medical education for Qatari doctors.

Shawna completed her undergraduate degree in Psycholinguistics at the University of Toronto in Canada, and later completed the MSc program in Applied Linguistics and Second language Acquisition at the University of Oxford.

She has a wide range of experiences in the field of Linguistics as a teaching and research assistant in areas such as theoretical linguistics, phonology, speech-language pathology, language acquisition, and creole studies. Being a native of Jamaica herself, Shawna has carried out extensive work on creole language acquisition. She worked with the University of the West Indies to draft the first Jamaican (Creole) as a Foreign Language course, and with the U.S Peace Corps to assess and revamp an existing language program for volunteers.

Shawna’s current research focuses on the development of writing skills among primary school learners in Jamaica who speak Jamaican Creole as a home language but are educated in English.

Publications
  • Helms-Park, R., Tucker, S, & Dronjic, V. (2016). From proto-writing to multimedia literacy: scripts and orthographies through the ages. In  Chen Bumgardner, V. Dronjic,, & R. Helms-Park (Eds.), Second Language Reading: Psycholinguistic and Cognitive Perspectives (pp. 1-31). New York, NY: Routledge Publishers.
  • Eriks-Brophy, A., Green, S., & Tucker, S. (2013).  Articulatory error patterns and phonological process use of preschool children with and without hearing loss. Volta Review.

Richard Canter is Visiting Professor of Surgical Education in the Nuffield Department of Surgical Sciences, University of Oxford.

Richard Canter qualified in medicine at the University of London in 1976, before becoming a surgeon at the Royal United Hospital, Bath. He completed a PhD in Management at the University of Bath in 1998 studying the nature of power in decision-making at the personal and organisation level in healthcare. Following the critical Kennedy report on surgical training in 2001, he was recruited to the Royal College of Surgeons of England as Deputy Director of Surgical Education with specific responsibility for curriculum development in surgical education in England. He was subsequently Head of the Postgraduate School of Surgery in Bristol until 2012, after which he concentrated on academic work at Oxford. He was appointed a visiting Professor in Oxford in in 2007, Emeritus Consultant at Oxford University Hospitals in 2015, and Associate Fellow at Green Templeton College, Oxford in 2015.

His interests are professionalism and, in particular, its relationship to leadership in healthcare systems. His current specific research interests are the effectiveness or otherwise of leadership education in respect of its impact on quality improvement in healthcare systems.

At the Royal College of Surgeons of England he was clinical lead and Chair of the Needs Analysis Group evaluating educational resources and organisational systems necessary for the implementation of reform of surgical training, and made recommendations for changes that were eventually adopted by all surgical training systems in the United Kingdom. During this appointment an opportunity arose in early 2003 at the end of the Serbian conflict to assist the European Agency for Reconstruction (EAR, a division of the EEC) in providing advice to the Kosovan Ministry of Health to develop new systems for surgical training.

Currently at Oxford, he is lead tutor for the module in Leadership and Management in Healthcare and Deputy Director of the Masters in Surgical Science, and supervises Masters and DPhil students on the subject of organisational change and leadership. In addition he has regular commitments in teaching postgraduate medical trainees and medical faculty on topics such as leadership, quality improvement, educational theory in healthcare, workplace assessments, supporting and talent managing  medical trainees, as well as occasional commitments to supervising students on the Said Business School Global Opportunity and Threats (Oxford) programme in exploring problems in complex systems.

Along the way he has written and spoken on many topics in medicine, obtained research grants, and has unexpectedly been given fellowships and medals. His main interest outside of work is playing music and he runs the Green Templeton College Big Band.

Prior to starting his DPhil, Eddy worked as a primary school teacher in Bristol, where he also completed his MSc in Educational Research.

He is particularly interested in the culture of high stakes, standardised testing, and how this might perpetuate existing inequalities in schools. His research focuses specifically on the interaction between knowledge, policy and pedagogy in the context of Literacy education.

 

Claire (郝煜) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and a China Oxford Scholarship Fund (COSF) scholar.

Claire holds a BA in Education and Physics from the University of Cambridge, an MA in Applied Linguistics from UCL Institution of Education, and an EdM in International Education Policy from Harvard University. She is passionate about exploring and supporting the transnational experiences of bi-/multilingual students in studying abroad contexts. Her research and professional interests include bilingualism, language and identity, international education, professional development, and school leadership.

Since 2015, Claire has served as the Director of International Education at Beijing Xinxuedao Education Group, a non-profit organisation that operates 31 schools with over 30,000 K-12 students in China. She has also worked as a high school counsellor and a teacher of Physics and Psychology.

Publications

Hao, Y. and Lantsman, G. (2022). Motivation in MOOCs: a qualitative study on the design and evaluation of an online IELTS course. The 7th IAFOR International Conference on Education.

Hao, Y. (2020). Education without borders: sojourner trips in students’ holistic development. In Wang, J. (Ed.). Family, Society, and Education. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2020). Learning how to learn: the role of metacognition and self-regulation in learning. In Wang, J. (Ed.). The Virtue of Thinking in Learning. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2019). Chinese students at a UK university: how linguistic repertoire mediates language and sojourner identity construction. Linguistics and Applied Linguistics Conference. Beijing Normal University.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2018). Examining Linguistic Diversity as a Resource for Higher Education in the Anglophone World. In Tong, V. C., Standen, A., & Sotiriou, M. (Ed.). Shaping Higher Education with Students: Ways to Connect Research and Teaching (pp.288-293). UCL Press.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2016). Making the most of linguistic diversity: the views and practices of bi/multilingual postgraduate students. The Multilingual University. ESRC Seminars.

Hao, Y. (2012). A Transformative Journey: China-US exchange student studying at an American high school. New World Press.

Pok Jing (Jane) Ho is a doctoral student at the Department of Education, specialising in educational assessment.

She is funded by the Bei Shan Tang Foundation Scholarship for Graduate Studies.

Her DPhil thesis examines validity in the Hong Kong Diploma of Secondary Education Examination, a large-scale, high-stakes test that informs higher education admissions decisions, using the argument-based approach to validation. In particular, her research identifies the claims made based on test scores, the validity evidence that supports or challenges such claims, and the social consequences that ensue as a result of test use.

Prior to her DPhil, she completed an M.A. in International Education Policy Analysis at Stanford University. She subsequently worked as a project officer at the Education University of Hong Kong, where she is now serving as a consultant alongside her studies.

A former secondary school teacher, Jane also holds a B.A. in English Studies (First Class Honours), a B.Ed. in English Language Education (First Class Honours), and an M.Ed. in Curriculum and Instruction from the Chinese University of Hong Kong, as well as the Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (CELTA) from Cambridge.

She is a Peer Supporter at Green Templeton College.

Publications

Ho, P. J. (2020). For some or for all: Vocational English for Hong Kong secondary school students. In C. Hong, & W. K. Ma (Eds.), Applied degree education and the future of work—Education 4.0 (pp. 87–95). Springer. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-15-3142-2

Ho, P. J. (2015). China-Africa “cooperation” in education. International Politics, 5. https://www.iir.cz/en/china-africa-cooperation-in-education

Jennifer’s DPhil focuses on adoptive families where  the adoptive parents also have birth children. She has worked in adoption support as a Parent Consultant for Adoption UK and as Head of Peer Services at PAC-UK, as well as managing the Adoption UK advice line and the parent training team.

She holds an MSc in Poverty Reduction: Policy and Practice from SOAS, and an MBA from Warwick Business School. She has worked in management consultancy in both the public and private sectors and is a board member of CoramBAAF.

Publications

The Right Tools for the Job. Information Age, November 1996

Global teams for the millennium; Management Decision, 36 (1): 31-33, February 1998

Lucy is a second-year DPhil student, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

Her DPhil research aims to engage in a meaningful and creative way with service children to explore how service life has shaped their experiences of education and sense of self. By choosing this focus, the research seeks to widen and nuance current understanding of service children’s educational experiences in addition to furthering knowledge into how service children see themselves. As a result of this, it is hoped that the research will support in developing the professional body of knowledge and understanding of this group of children in schools and help inform the Service Pupil Premium (SPP) funding choices in addition to wider school practice.

Before embarking on her DPhil at Oxford, Lucy completed her PGCE and MEd in Primary Education at the University of Cambridge. In addition to her DPhil work, Lucy is a Trustee for the Armed Forces Education Trust (AFET) – a grant-giving charity for service children – and a volunteer for the Oxford based charity, Big Brothers Big Sisters.

 

 

Aine is interested in improving the health outcomes of children and young people in the care system.

Fahad is reading for a DPhil in Education (part-time). He has over fifteen years professional experience in the education sector, in particular, higher education.

He has held senior roles in staff and student development, human resources, policy and strategy. Fahad holds a BSc in Education and Science and an MBA. Prior to commencing his doctoral studies, he was elected an Academic Visitor at St Antony’s College in the University of Oxford. Fahad’s research focus is on the quality of undergraduate medical education for Qatari doctors.

Shawna completed her undergraduate degree in Psycholinguistics at the University of Toronto in Canada, and later completed the MSc program in Applied Linguistics and Second language Acquisition at the University of Oxford.

She has a wide range of experiences in the field of Linguistics as a teaching and research assistant in areas such as theoretical linguistics, phonology, speech-language pathology, language acquisition, and creole studies. Being a native of Jamaica herself, Shawna has carried out extensive work on creole language acquisition. She worked with the University of the West Indies to draft the first Jamaican (Creole) as a Foreign Language course, and with the U.S Peace Corps to assess and revamp an existing language program for volunteers.

Shawna’s current research focuses on the development of writing skills among primary school learners in Jamaica who speak Jamaican Creole as a home language but are educated in English.

Publications
  • Helms-Park, R., Tucker, S, & Dronjic, V. (2016). From proto-writing to multimedia literacy: scripts and orthographies through the ages. In  Chen Bumgardner, V. Dronjic,, & R. Helms-Park (Eds.), Second Language Reading: Psycholinguistic and Cognitive Perspectives (pp. 1-31). New York, NY: Routledge Publishers.
  • Eriks-Brophy, A., Green, S., & Tucker, S. (2013).  Articulatory error patterns and phonological process use of preschool children with and without hearing loss. Volta Review.

Richard Canter is Visiting Professor of Surgical Education in the Nuffield Department of Surgical Sciences, University of Oxford.

Richard Canter qualified in medicine at the University of London in 1976, before becoming a surgeon at the Royal United Hospital, Bath. He completed a PhD in Management at the University of Bath in 1998 studying the nature of power in decision-making at the personal and organisation level in healthcare. Following the critical Kennedy report on surgical training in 2001, he was recruited to the Royal College of Surgeons of England as Deputy Director of Surgical Education with specific responsibility for curriculum development in surgical education in England. He was subsequently Head of the Postgraduate School of Surgery in Bristol until 2012, after which he concentrated on academic work at Oxford. He was appointed a visiting Professor in Oxford in in 2007, Emeritus Consultant at Oxford University Hospitals in 2015, and Associate Fellow at Green Templeton College, Oxford in 2015.

His interests are professionalism and, in particular, its relationship to leadership in healthcare systems. His current specific research interests are the effectiveness or otherwise of leadership education in respect of its impact on quality improvement in healthcare systems.

At the Royal College of Surgeons of England he was clinical lead and Chair of the Needs Analysis Group evaluating educational resources and organisational systems necessary for the implementation of reform of surgical training, and made recommendations for changes that were eventually adopted by all surgical training systems in the United Kingdom. During this appointment an opportunity arose in early 2003 at the end of the Serbian conflict to assist the European Agency for Reconstruction (EAR, a division of the EEC) in providing advice to the Kosovan Ministry of Health to develop new systems for surgical training.

Currently at Oxford, he is lead tutor for the module in Leadership and Management in Healthcare and Deputy Director of the Masters in Surgical Science, and supervises Masters and DPhil students on the subject of organisational change and leadership. In addition he has regular commitments in teaching postgraduate medical trainees and medical faculty on topics such as leadership, quality improvement, educational theory in healthcare, workplace assessments, supporting and talent managing  medical trainees, as well as occasional commitments to supervising students on the Said Business School Global Opportunity and Threats (Oxford) programme in exploring problems in complex systems.

Along the way he has written and spoken on many topics in medicine, obtained research grants, and has unexpectedly been given fellowships and medals. His main interest outside of work is playing music and he runs the Green Templeton College Big Band.

Prior to starting his DPhil, Eddy worked as a primary school teacher in Bristol, where he also completed his MSc in Educational Research.

He is particularly interested in the culture of high stakes, standardised testing, and how this might perpetuate existing inequalities in schools. His research focuses specifically on the interaction between knowledge, policy and pedagogy in the context of Literacy education.

 

Claire (郝煜) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and a China Oxford Scholarship Fund (COSF) scholar.

Claire holds a BA in Education and Physics from the University of Cambridge, an MA in Applied Linguistics from UCL Institution of Education, and an EdM in International Education Policy from Harvard University. She is passionate about exploring and supporting the transnational experiences of bi-/multilingual students in studying abroad contexts. Her research and professional interests include bilingualism, language and identity, international education, professional development, and school leadership.

Since 2015, Claire has served as the Director of International Education at Beijing Xinxuedao Education Group, a non-profit organisation that operates 31 schools with over 30,000 K-12 students in China. She has also worked as a high school counsellor and a teacher of Physics and Psychology.

Publications

Hao, Y. and Lantsman, G. (2022). Motivation in MOOCs: a qualitative study on the design and evaluation of an online IELTS course. The 7th IAFOR International Conference on Education.

Hao, Y. (2020). Education without borders: sojourner trips in students’ holistic development. In Wang, J. (Ed.). Family, Society, and Education. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2020). Learning how to learn: the role of metacognition and self-regulation in learning. In Wang, J. (Ed.). The Virtue of Thinking in Learning. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2019). Chinese students at a UK university: how linguistic repertoire mediates language and sojourner identity construction. Linguistics and Applied Linguistics Conference. Beijing Normal University.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2018). Examining Linguistic Diversity as a Resource for Higher Education in the Anglophone World. In Tong, V. C., Standen, A., & Sotiriou, M. (Ed.). Shaping Higher Education with Students: Ways to Connect Research and Teaching (pp.288-293). UCL Press.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2016). Making the most of linguistic diversity: the views and practices of bi/multilingual postgraduate students. The Multilingual University. ESRC Seminars.

Hao, Y. (2012). A Transformative Journey: China-US exchange student studying at an American high school. New World Press.

Pok Jing (Jane) Ho is a doctoral student at the Department of Education, specialising in educational assessment.

She is funded by the Bei Shan Tang Foundation Scholarship for Graduate Studies.

Her DPhil thesis examines validity in the Hong Kong Diploma of Secondary Education Examination, a large-scale, high-stakes test that informs higher education admissions decisions, using the argument-based approach to validation. In particular, her research identifies the claims made based on test scores, the validity evidence that supports or challenges such claims, and the social consequences that ensue as a result of test use.

Prior to her DPhil, she completed an M.A. in International Education Policy Analysis at Stanford University. She subsequently worked as a project officer at the Education University of Hong Kong, where she is now serving as a consultant alongside her studies.

A former secondary school teacher, Jane also holds a B.A. in English Studies (First Class Honours), a B.Ed. in English Language Education (First Class Honours), and an M.Ed. in Curriculum and Instruction from the Chinese University of Hong Kong, as well as the Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (CELTA) from Cambridge.

She is a Peer Supporter at Green Templeton College.

Publications

Ho, P. J. (2020). For some or for all: Vocational English for Hong Kong secondary school students. In C. Hong, & W. K. Ma (Eds.), Applied degree education and the future of work—Education 4.0 (pp. 87–95). Springer. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-15-3142-2

Ho, P. J. (2015). China-Africa “cooperation” in education. International Politics, 5. https://www.iir.cz/en/china-africa-cooperation-in-education

Jennifer’s DPhil focuses on adoptive families where  the adoptive parents also have birth children. She has worked in adoption support as a Parent Consultant for Adoption UK and as Head of Peer Services at PAC-UK, as well as managing the Adoption UK advice line and the parent training team.

She holds an MSc in Poverty Reduction: Policy and Practice from SOAS, and an MBA from Warwick Business School. She has worked in management consultancy in both the public and private sectors and is a board member of CoramBAAF.

Publications

The Right Tools for the Job. Information Age, November 1996

Global teams for the millennium; Management Decision, 36 (1): 31-33, February 1998

Lucy is a second-year DPhil student, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

Her DPhil research aims to engage in a meaningful and creative way with service children to explore how service life has shaped their experiences of education and sense of self. By choosing this focus, the research seeks to widen and nuance current understanding of service children’s educational experiences in addition to furthering knowledge into how service children see themselves. As a result of this, it is hoped that the research will support in developing the professional body of knowledge and understanding of this group of children in schools and help inform the Service Pupil Premium (SPP) funding choices in addition to wider school practice.

Before embarking on her DPhil at Oxford, Lucy completed her PGCE and MEd in Primary Education at the University of Cambridge. In addition to her DPhil work, Lucy is a Trustee for the Armed Forces Education Trust (AFET) – a grant-giving charity for service children – and a volunteer for the Oxford based charity, Big Brothers Big Sisters.

 

 

Aine is interested in improving the health outcomes of children and young people in the care system.

Fahad is reading for a DPhil in Education (part-time). He has over fifteen years professional experience in the education sector, in particular, higher education.

He has held senior roles in staff and student development, human resources, policy and strategy. Fahad holds a BSc in Education and Science and an MBA. Prior to commencing his doctoral studies, he was elected an Academic Visitor at St Antony’s College in the University of Oxford. Fahad’s research focus is on the quality of undergraduate medical education for Qatari doctors.

Shawna completed her undergraduate degree in Psycholinguistics at the University of Toronto in Canada, and later completed the MSc program in Applied Linguistics and Second language Acquisition at the University of Oxford.

She has a wide range of experiences in the field of Linguistics as a teaching and research assistant in areas such as theoretical linguistics, phonology, speech-language pathology, language acquisition, and creole studies. Being a native of Jamaica herself, Shawna has carried out extensive work on creole language acquisition. She worked with the University of the West Indies to draft the first Jamaican (Creole) as a Foreign Language course, and with the U.S Peace Corps to assess and revamp an existing language program for volunteers.

Shawna’s current research focuses on the development of writing skills among primary school learners in Jamaica who speak Jamaican Creole as a home language but are educated in English.

Publications
  • Helms-Park, R., Tucker, S, & Dronjic, V. (2016). From proto-writing to multimedia literacy: scripts and orthographies through the ages. In  Chen Bumgardner, V. Dronjic,, & R. Helms-Park (Eds.), Second Language Reading: Psycholinguistic and Cognitive Perspectives (pp. 1-31). New York, NY: Routledge Publishers.
  • Eriks-Brophy, A., Green, S., & Tucker, S. (2013).  Articulatory error patterns and phonological process use of preschool children with and without hearing loss. Volta Review.

Richard Canter is Visiting Professor of Surgical Education in the Nuffield Department of Surgical Sciences, University of Oxford.

Richard Canter qualified in medicine at the University of London in 1976, before becoming a surgeon at the Royal United Hospital, Bath. He completed a PhD in Management at the University of Bath in 1998 studying the nature of power in decision-making at the personal and organisation level in healthcare. Following the critical Kennedy report on surgical training in 2001, he was recruited to the Royal College of Surgeons of England as Deputy Director of Surgical Education with specific responsibility for curriculum development in surgical education in England. He was subsequently Head of the Postgraduate School of Surgery in Bristol until 2012, after which he concentrated on academic work at Oxford. He was appointed a visiting Professor in Oxford in in 2007, Emeritus Consultant at Oxford University Hospitals in 2015, and Associate Fellow at Green Templeton College, Oxford in 2015.

His interests are professionalism and, in particular, its relationship to leadership in healthcare systems. His current specific research interests are the effectiveness or otherwise of leadership education in respect of its impact on quality improvement in healthcare systems.

At the Royal College of Surgeons of England he was clinical lead and Chair of the Needs Analysis Group evaluating educational resources and organisational systems necessary for the implementation of reform of surgical training, and made recommendations for changes that were eventually adopted by all surgical training systems in the United Kingdom. During this appointment an opportunity arose in early 2003 at the end of the Serbian conflict to assist the European Agency for Reconstruction (EAR, a division of the EEC) in providing advice to the Kosovan Ministry of Health to develop new systems for surgical training.

Currently at Oxford, he is lead tutor for the module in Leadership and Management in Healthcare and Deputy Director of the Masters in Surgical Science, and supervises Masters and DPhil students on the subject of organisational change and leadership. In addition he has regular commitments in teaching postgraduate medical trainees and medical faculty on topics such as leadership, quality improvement, educational theory in healthcare, workplace assessments, supporting and talent managing  medical trainees, as well as occasional commitments to supervising students on the Said Business School Global Opportunity and Threats (Oxford) programme in exploring problems in complex systems.

Along the way he has written and spoken on many topics in medicine, obtained research grants, and has unexpectedly been given fellowships and medals. His main interest outside of work is playing music and he runs the Green Templeton College Big Band.

Prior to starting his DPhil, Eddy worked as a primary school teacher in Bristol, where he also completed his MSc in Educational Research.

He is particularly interested in the culture of high stakes, standardised testing, and how this might perpetuate existing inequalities in schools. His research focuses specifically on the interaction between knowledge, policy and pedagogy in the context of Literacy education.

 

Claire (郝煜) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and a China Oxford Scholarship Fund (COSF) scholar.

Claire holds a BA in Education and Physics from the University of Cambridge, an MA in Applied Linguistics from UCL Institution of Education, and an EdM in International Education Policy from Harvard University. She is passionate about exploring and supporting the transnational experiences of bi-/multilingual students in studying abroad contexts. Her research and professional interests include bilingualism, language and identity, international education, professional development, and school leadership.

Since 2015, Claire has served as the Director of International Education at Beijing Xinxuedao Education Group, a non-profit organisation that operates 31 schools with over 30,000 K-12 students in China. She has also worked as a high school counsellor and a teacher of Physics and Psychology.

Publications

Hao, Y. and Lantsman, G. (2022). Motivation in MOOCs: a qualitative study on the design and evaluation of an online IELTS course. The 7th IAFOR International Conference on Education.

Hao, Y. (2020). Education without borders: sojourner trips in students’ holistic development. In Wang, J. (Ed.). Family, Society, and Education. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2020). Learning how to learn: the role of metacognition and self-regulation in learning. In Wang, J. (Ed.). The Virtue of Thinking in Learning. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2019). Chinese students at a UK university: how linguistic repertoire mediates language and sojourner identity construction. Linguistics and Applied Linguistics Conference. Beijing Normal University.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2018). Examining Linguistic Diversity as a Resource for Higher Education in the Anglophone World. In Tong, V. C., Standen, A., & Sotiriou, M. (Ed.). Shaping Higher Education with Students: Ways to Connect Research and Teaching (pp.288-293). UCL Press.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2016). Making the most of linguistic diversity: the views and practices of bi/multilingual postgraduate students. The Multilingual University. ESRC Seminars.

Hao, Y. (2012). A Transformative Journey: China-US exchange student studying at an American high school. New World Press.

Pok Jing (Jane) Ho is a doctoral student at the Department of Education, specialising in educational assessment.

She is funded by the Bei Shan Tang Foundation Scholarship for Graduate Studies.

Her DPhil thesis examines validity in the Hong Kong Diploma of Secondary Education Examination, a large-scale, high-stakes test that informs higher education admissions decisions, using the argument-based approach to validation. In particular, her research identifies the claims made based on test scores, the validity evidence that supports or challenges such claims, and the social consequences that ensue as a result of test use.

Prior to her DPhil, she completed an M.A. in International Education Policy Analysis at Stanford University. She subsequently worked as a project officer at the Education University of Hong Kong, where she is now serving as a consultant alongside her studies.

A former secondary school teacher, Jane also holds a B.A. in English Studies (First Class Honours), a B.Ed. in English Language Education (First Class Honours), and an M.Ed. in Curriculum and Instruction from the Chinese University of Hong Kong, as well as the Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (CELTA) from Cambridge.

She is a Peer Supporter at Green Templeton College.

Publications

Ho, P. J. (2020). For some or for all: Vocational English for Hong Kong secondary school students. In C. Hong, & W. K. Ma (Eds.), Applied degree education and the future of work—Education 4.0 (pp. 87–95). Springer. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-15-3142-2

Ho, P. J. (2015). China-Africa “cooperation” in education. International Politics, 5. https://www.iir.cz/en/china-africa-cooperation-in-education

Jennifer’s DPhil focuses on adoptive families where  the adoptive parents also have birth children. She has worked in adoption support as a Parent Consultant for Adoption UK and as Head of Peer Services at PAC-UK, as well as managing the Adoption UK advice line and the parent training team.

She holds an MSc in Poverty Reduction: Policy and Practice from SOAS, and an MBA from Warwick Business School. She has worked in management consultancy in both the public and private sectors and is a board member of CoramBAAF.

Publications

The Right Tools for the Job. Information Age, November 1996

Global teams for the millennium; Management Decision, 36 (1): 31-33, February 1998

Lucy is a second-year DPhil student, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

Her DPhil research aims to engage in a meaningful and creative way with service children to explore how service life has shaped their experiences of education and sense of self. By choosing this focus, the research seeks to widen and nuance current understanding of service children’s educational experiences in addition to furthering knowledge into how service children see themselves. As a result of this, it is hoped that the research will support in developing the professional body of knowledge and understanding of this group of children in schools and help inform the Service Pupil Premium (SPP) funding choices in addition to wider school practice.

Before embarking on her DPhil at Oxford, Lucy completed her PGCE and MEd in Primary Education at the University of Cambridge. In addition to her DPhil work, Lucy is a Trustee for the Armed Forces Education Trust (AFET) – a grant-giving charity for service children – and a volunteer for the Oxford based charity, Big Brothers Big Sisters.

 

 

Aine is interested in improving the health outcomes of children and young people in the care system.

Fahad is reading for a DPhil in Education (part-time). He has over fifteen years professional experience in the education sector, in particular, higher education.

He has held senior roles in staff and student development, human resources, policy and strategy. Fahad holds a BSc in Education and Science and an MBA. Prior to commencing his doctoral studies, he was elected an Academic Visitor at St Antony’s College in the University of Oxford. Fahad’s research focus is on the quality of undergraduate medical education for Qatari doctors.

Shawna completed her undergraduate degree in Psycholinguistics at the University of Toronto in Canada, and later completed the MSc program in Applied Linguistics and Second language Acquisition at the University of Oxford.

She has a wide range of experiences in the field of Linguistics as a teaching and research assistant in areas such as theoretical linguistics, phonology, speech-language pathology, language acquisition, and creole studies. Being a native of Jamaica herself, Shawna has carried out extensive work on creole language acquisition. She worked with the University of the West Indies to draft the first Jamaican (Creole) as a Foreign Language course, and with the U.S Peace Corps to assess and revamp an existing language program for volunteers.

Shawna’s current research focuses on the development of writing skills among primary school learners in Jamaica who speak Jamaican Creole as a home language but are educated in English.

Publications
  • Helms-Park, R., Tucker, S, & Dronjic, V. (2016). From proto-writing to multimedia literacy: scripts and orthographies through the ages. In  Chen Bumgardner, V. Dronjic,, & R. Helms-Park (Eds.), Second Language Reading: Psycholinguistic and Cognitive Perspectives (pp. 1-31). New York, NY: Routledge Publishers.
  • Eriks-Brophy, A., Green, S., & Tucker, S. (2013).  Articulatory error patterns and phonological process use of preschool children with and without hearing loss. Volta Review.

Richard Canter is Visiting Professor of Surgical Education in the Nuffield Department of Surgical Sciences, University of Oxford.

Richard Canter qualified in medicine at the University of London in 1976, before becoming a surgeon at the Royal United Hospital, Bath. He completed a PhD in Management at the University of Bath in 1998 studying the nature of power in decision-making at the personal and organisation level in healthcare. Following the critical Kennedy report on surgical training in 2001, he was recruited to the Royal College of Surgeons of England as Deputy Director of Surgical Education with specific responsibility for curriculum development in surgical education in England. He was subsequently Head of the Postgraduate School of Surgery in Bristol until 2012, after which he concentrated on academic work at Oxford. He was appointed a visiting Professor in Oxford in in 2007, Emeritus Consultant at Oxford University Hospitals in 2015, and Associate Fellow at Green Templeton College, Oxford in 2015.

His interests are professionalism and, in particular, its relationship to leadership in healthcare systems. His current specific research interests are the effectiveness or otherwise of leadership education in respect of its impact on quality improvement in healthcare systems.

At the Royal College of Surgeons of England he was clinical lead and Chair of the Needs Analysis Group evaluating educational resources and organisational systems necessary for the implementation of reform of surgical training, and made recommendations for changes that were eventually adopted by all surgical training systems in the United Kingdom. During this appointment an opportunity arose in early 2003 at the end of the Serbian conflict to assist the European Agency for Reconstruction (EAR, a division of the EEC) in providing advice to the Kosovan Ministry of Health to develop new systems for surgical training.

Currently at Oxford, he is lead tutor for the module in Leadership and Management in Healthcare and Deputy Director of the Masters in Surgical Science, and supervises Masters and DPhil students on the subject of organisational change and leadership. In addition he has regular commitments in teaching postgraduate medical trainees and medical faculty on topics such as leadership, quality improvement, educational theory in healthcare, workplace assessments, supporting and talent managing  medical trainees, as well as occasional commitments to supervising students on the Said Business School Global Opportunity and Threats (Oxford) programme in exploring problems in complex systems.

Along the way he has written and spoken on many topics in medicine, obtained research grants, and has unexpectedly been given fellowships and medals. His main interest outside of work is playing music and he runs the Green Templeton College Big Band.

Prior to starting his DPhil, Eddy worked as a primary school teacher in Bristol, where he also completed his MSc in Educational Research.

He is particularly interested in the culture of high stakes, standardised testing, and how this might perpetuate existing inequalities in schools. His research focuses specifically on the interaction between knowledge, policy and pedagogy in the context of Literacy education.

 

Claire (郝煜) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and a China Oxford Scholarship Fund (COSF) scholar.

Claire holds a BA in Education and Physics from the University of Cambridge, an MA in Applied Linguistics from UCL Institution of Education, and an EdM in International Education Policy from Harvard University. She is passionate about exploring and supporting the transnational experiences of bi-/multilingual students in studying abroad contexts. Her research and professional interests include bilingualism, language and identity, international education, professional development, and school leadership.

Since 2015, Claire has served as the Director of International Education at Beijing Xinxuedao Education Group, a non-profit organisation that operates 31 schools with over 30,000 K-12 students in China. She has also worked as a high school counsellor and a teacher of Physics and Psychology.

Publications

Hao, Y. and Lantsman, G. (2022). Motivation in MOOCs: a qualitative study on the design and evaluation of an online IELTS course. The 7th IAFOR International Conference on Education.

Hao, Y. (2020). Education without borders: sojourner trips in students’ holistic development. In Wang, J. (Ed.). Family, Society, and Education. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2020). Learning how to learn: the role of metacognition and self-regulation in learning. In Wang, J. (Ed.). The Virtue of Thinking in Learning. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2019). Chinese students at a UK university: how linguistic repertoire mediates language and sojourner identity construction. Linguistics and Applied Linguistics Conference. Beijing Normal University.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2018). Examining Linguistic Diversity as a Resource for Higher Education in the Anglophone World. In Tong, V. C., Standen, A., & Sotiriou, M. (Ed.). Shaping Higher Education with Students: Ways to Connect Research and Teaching (pp.288-293). UCL Press.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2016). Making the most of linguistic diversity: the views and practices of bi/multilingual postgraduate students. The Multilingual University. ESRC Seminars.

Hao, Y. (2012). A Transformative Journey: China-US exchange student studying at an American high school. New World Press.

Pok Jing (Jane) Ho is a doctoral student at the Department of Education, specialising in educational assessment.

She is funded by the Bei Shan Tang Foundation Scholarship for Graduate Studies.

Her DPhil thesis examines validity in the Hong Kong Diploma of Secondary Education Examination, a large-scale, high-stakes test that informs higher education admissions decisions, using the argument-based approach to validation. In particular, her research identifies the claims made based on test scores, the validity evidence that supports or challenges such claims, and the social consequences that ensue as a result of test use.

Prior to her DPhil, she completed an M.A. in International Education Policy Analysis at Stanford University. She subsequently worked as a project officer at the Education University of Hong Kong, where she is now serving as a consultant alongside her studies.

A former secondary school teacher, Jane also holds a B.A. in English Studies (First Class Honours), a B.Ed. in English Language Education (First Class Honours), and an M.Ed. in Curriculum and Instruction from the Chinese University of Hong Kong, as well as the Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (CELTA) from Cambridge.

She is a Peer Supporter at Green Templeton College.

Publications

Ho, P. J. (2020). For some or for all: Vocational English for Hong Kong secondary school students. In C. Hong, & W. K. Ma (Eds.), Applied degree education and the future of work—Education 4.0 (pp. 87–95). Springer. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-15-3142-2

Ho, P. J. (2015). China-Africa “cooperation” in education. International Politics, 5. https://www.iir.cz/en/china-africa-cooperation-in-education

Jennifer’s DPhil focuses on adoptive families where  the adoptive parents also have birth children. She has worked in adoption support as a Parent Consultant for Adoption UK and as Head of Peer Services at PAC-UK, as well as managing the Adoption UK advice line and the parent training team.

She holds an MSc in Poverty Reduction: Policy and Practice from SOAS, and an MBA from Warwick Business School. She has worked in management consultancy in both the public and private sectors and is a board member of CoramBAAF.

Publications

The Right Tools for the Job. Information Age, November 1996

Global teams for the millennium; Management Decision, 36 (1): 31-33, February 1998

Lucy is a second-year DPhil student, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

Her DPhil research aims to engage in a meaningful and creative way with service children to explore how service life has shaped their experiences of education and sense of self. By choosing this focus, the research seeks to widen and nuance current understanding of service children’s educational experiences in addition to furthering knowledge into how service children see themselves. As a result of this, it is hoped that the research will support in developing the professional body of knowledge and understanding of this group of children in schools and help inform the Service Pupil Premium (SPP) funding choices in addition to wider school practice.

Before embarking on her DPhil at Oxford, Lucy completed her PGCE and MEd in Primary Education at the University of Cambridge. In addition to her DPhil work, Lucy is a Trustee for the Armed Forces Education Trust (AFET) – a grant-giving charity for service children – and a volunteer for the Oxford based charity, Big Brothers Big Sisters.

 

 

Aine is interested in improving the health outcomes of children and young people in the care system.

Fahad is reading for a DPhil in Education (part-time). He has over fifteen years professional experience in the education sector, in particular, higher education.

He has held senior roles in staff and student development, human resources, policy and strategy. Fahad holds a BSc in Education and Science and an MBA. Prior to commencing his doctoral studies, he was elected an Academic Visitor at St Antony’s College in the University of Oxford. Fahad’s research focus is on the quality of undergraduate medical education for Qatari doctors.

Shawna completed her undergraduate degree in Psycholinguistics at the University of Toronto in Canada, and later completed the MSc program in Applied Linguistics and Second language Acquisition at the University of Oxford.

She has a wide range of experiences in the field of Linguistics as a teaching and research assistant in areas such as theoretical linguistics, phonology, speech-language pathology, language acquisition, and creole studies. Being a native of Jamaica herself, Shawna has carried out extensive work on creole language acquisition. She worked with the University of the West Indies to draft the first Jamaican (Creole) as a Foreign Language course, and with the U.S Peace Corps to assess and revamp an existing language program for volunteers.

Shawna’s current research focuses on the development of writing skills among primary school learners in Jamaica who speak Jamaican Creole as a home language but are educated in English.

Publications
  • Helms-Park, R., Tucker, S, & Dronjic, V. (2016). From proto-writing to multimedia literacy: scripts and orthographies through the ages. In  Chen Bumgardner, V. Dronjic,, & R. Helms-Park (Eds.), Second Language Reading: Psycholinguistic and Cognitive Perspectives (pp. 1-31). New York, NY: Routledge Publishers.
  • Eriks-Brophy, A., Green, S., & Tucker, S. (2013).  Articulatory error patterns and phonological process use of preschool children with and without hearing loss. Volta Review.

Richard Canter is Visiting Professor of Surgical Education in the Nuffield Department of Surgical Sciences, University of Oxford.

Richard Canter qualified in medicine at the University of London in 1976, before becoming a surgeon at the Royal United Hospital, Bath. He completed a PhD in Management at the University of Bath in 1998 studying the nature of power in decision-making at the personal and organisation level in healthcare. Following the critical Kennedy report on surgical training in 2001, he was recruited to the Royal College of Surgeons of England as Deputy Director of Surgical Education with specific responsibility for curriculum development in surgical education in England. He was subsequently Head of the Postgraduate School of Surgery in Bristol until 2012, after which he concentrated on academic work at Oxford. He was appointed a visiting Professor in Oxford in in 2007, Emeritus Consultant at Oxford University Hospitals in 2015, and Associate Fellow at Green Templeton College, Oxford in 2015.

His interests are professionalism and, in particular, its relationship to leadership in healthcare systems. His current specific research interests are the effectiveness or otherwise of leadership education in respect of its impact on quality improvement in healthcare systems.

At the Royal College of Surgeons of England he was clinical lead and Chair of the Needs Analysis Group evaluating educational resources and organisational systems necessary for the implementation of reform of surgical training, and made recommendations for changes that were eventually adopted by all surgical training systems in the United Kingdom. During this appointment an opportunity arose in early 2003 at the end of the Serbian conflict to assist the European Agency for Reconstruction (EAR, a division of the EEC) in providing advice to the Kosovan Ministry of Health to develop new systems for surgical training.

Currently at Oxford, he is lead tutor for the module in Leadership and Management in Healthcare and Deputy Director of the Masters in Surgical Science, and supervises Masters and DPhil students on the subject of organisational change and leadership. In addition he has regular commitments in teaching postgraduate medical trainees and medical faculty on topics such as leadership, quality improvement, educational theory in healthcare, workplace assessments, supporting and talent managing  medical trainees, as well as occasional commitments to supervising students on the Said Business School Global Opportunity and Threats (Oxford) programme in exploring problems in complex systems.

Along the way he has written and spoken on many topics in medicine, obtained research grants, and has unexpectedly been given fellowships and medals. His main interest outside of work is playing music and he runs the Green Templeton College Big Band.

Prior to starting his DPhil, Eddy worked as a primary school teacher in Bristol, where he also completed his MSc in Educational Research.

He is particularly interested in the culture of high stakes, standardised testing, and how this might perpetuate existing inequalities in schools. His research focuses specifically on the interaction between knowledge, policy and pedagogy in the context of Literacy education.

 

Claire (郝煜) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and a China Oxford Scholarship Fund (COSF) scholar.

Claire holds a BA in Education and Physics from the University of Cambridge, an MA in Applied Linguistics from UCL Institution of Education, and an EdM in International Education Policy from Harvard University. She is passionate about exploring and supporting the transnational experiences of bi-/multilingual students in studying abroad contexts. Her research and professional interests include bilingualism, language and identity, international education, professional development, and school leadership.

Since 2015, Claire has served as the Director of International Education at Beijing Xinxuedao Education Group, a non-profit organisation that operates 31 schools with over 30,000 K-12 students in China. She has also worked as a high school counsellor and a teacher of Physics and Psychology.

Publications

Hao, Y. and Lantsman, G. (2022). Motivation in MOOCs: a qualitative study on the design and evaluation of an online IELTS course. The 7th IAFOR International Conference on Education.

Hao, Y. (2020). Education without borders: sojourner trips in students’ holistic development. In Wang, J. (Ed.). Family, Society, and Education. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2020). Learning how to learn: the role of metacognition and self-regulation in learning. In Wang, J. (Ed.). The Virtue of Thinking in Learning. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2019). Chinese students at a UK university: how linguistic repertoire mediates language and sojourner identity construction. Linguistics and Applied Linguistics Conference. Beijing Normal University.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2018). Examining Linguistic Diversity as a Resource for Higher Education in the Anglophone World. In Tong, V. C., Standen, A., & Sotiriou, M. (Ed.). Shaping Higher Education with Students: Ways to Connect Research and Teaching (pp.288-293). UCL Press.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2016). Making the most of linguistic diversity: the views and practices of bi/multilingual postgraduate students. The Multilingual University. ESRC Seminars.

Hao, Y. (2012). A Transformative Journey: China-US exchange student studying at an American high school. New World Press.

Pok Jing (Jane) Ho is a doctoral student at the Department of Education, specialising in educational assessment.

She is funded by the Bei Shan Tang Foundation Scholarship for Graduate Studies.

Her DPhil thesis examines validity in the Hong Kong Diploma of Secondary Education Examination, a large-scale, high-stakes test that informs higher education admissions decisions, using the argument-based approach to validation. In particular, her research identifies the claims made based on test scores, the validity evidence that supports or challenges such claims, and the social consequences that ensue as a result of test use.

Prior to her DPhil, she completed an M.A. in International Education Policy Analysis at Stanford University. She subsequently worked as a project officer at the Education University of Hong Kong, where she is now serving as a consultant alongside her studies.

A former secondary school teacher, Jane also holds a B.A. in English Studies (First Class Honours), a B.Ed. in English Language Education (First Class Honours), and an M.Ed. in Curriculum and Instruction from the Chinese University of Hong Kong, as well as the Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (CELTA) from Cambridge.

She is a Peer Supporter at Green Templeton College.

Publications

Ho, P. J. (2020). For some or for all: Vocational English for Hong Kong secondary school students. In C. Hong, & W. K. Ma (Eds.), Applied degree education and the future of work—Education 4.0 (pp. 87–95). Springer. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-15-3142-2

Ho, P. J. (2015). China-Africa “cooperation” in education. International Politics, 5. https://www.iir.cz/en/china-africa-cooperation-in-education

Jennifer’s DPhil focuses on adoptive families where  the adoptive parents also have birth children. She has worked in adoption support as a Parent Consultant for Adoption UK and as Head of Peer Services at PAC-UK, as well as managing the Adoption UK advice line and the parent training team.

She holds an MSc in Poverty Reduction: Policy and Practice from SOAS, and an MBA from Warwick Business School. She has worked in management consultancy in both the public and private sectors and is a board member of CoramBAAF.

Publications

The Right Tools for the Job. Information Age, November 1996

Global teams for the millennium; Management Decision, 36 (1): 31-33, February 1998

Lucy is a second-year DPhil student, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

Her DPhil research aims to engage in a meaningful and creative way with service children to explore how service life has shaped their experiences of education and sense of self. By choosing this focus, the research seeks to widen and nuance current understanding of service children’s educational experiences in addition to furthering knowledge into how service children see themselves. As a result of this, it is hoped that the research will support in developing the professional body of knowledge and understanding of this group of children in schools and help inform the Service Pupil Premium (SPP) funding choices in addition to wider school practice.

Before embarking on her DPhil at Oxford, Lucy completed her PGCE and MEd in Primary Education at the University of Cambridge. In addition to her DPhil work, Lucy is a Trustee for the Armed Forces Education Trust (AFET) – a grant-giving charity for service children – and a volunteer for the Oxford based charity, Big Brothers Big Sisters.

 

 

Aine is interested in improving the health outcomes of children and young people in the care system.

Fahad is reading for a DPhil in Education (part-time). He has over fifteen years professional experience in the education sector, in particular, higher education.

He has held senior roles in staff and student development, human resources, policy and strategy. Fahad holds a BSc in Education and Science and an MBA. Prior to commencing his doctoral studies, he was elected an Academic Visitor at St Antony’s College in the University of Oxford. Fahad’s research focus is on the quality of undergraduate medical education for Qatari doctors.

Shawna completed her undergraduate degree in Psycholinguistics at the University of Toronto in Canada, and later completed the MSc program in Applied Linguistics and Second language Acquisition at the University of Oxford.

She has a wide range of experiences in the field of Linguistics as a teaching and research assistant in areas such as theoretical linguistics, phonology, speech-language pathology, language acquisition, and creole studies. Being a native of Jamaica herself, Shawna has carried out extensive work on creole language acquisition. She worked with the University of the West Indies to draft the first Jamaican (Creole) as a Foreign Language course, and with the U.S Peace Corps to assess and revamp an existing language program for volunteers.

Shawna’s current research focuses on the development of writing skills among primary school learners in Jamaica who speak Jamaican Creole as a home language but are educated in English.

Publications
  • Helms-Park, R., Tucker, S, & Dronjic, V. (2016). From proto-writing to multimedia literacy: scripts and orthographies through the ages. In  Chen Bumgardner, V. Dronjic,, & R. Helms-Park (Eds.), Second Language Reading: Psycholinguistic and Cognitive Perspectives (pp. 1-31). New York, NY: Routledge Publishers.
  • Eriks-Brophy, A., Green, S., & Tucker, S. (2013).  Articulatory error patterns and phonological process use of preschool children with and without hearing loss. Volta Review.

Richard Canter is Visiting Professor of Surgical Education in the Nuffield Department of Surgical Sciences, University of Oxford.

Richard Canter qualified in medicine at the University of London in 1976, before becoming a surgeon at the Royal United Hospital, Bath. He completed a PhD in Management at the University of Bath in 1998 studying the nature of power in decision-making at the personal and organisation level in healthcare. Following the critical Kennedy report on surgical training in 2001, he was recruited to the Royal College of Surgeons of England as Deputy Director of Surgical Education with specific responsibility for curriculum development in surgical education in England. He was subsequently Head of the Postgraduate School of Surgery in Bristol until 2012, after which he concentrated on academic work at Oxford. He was appointed a visiting Professor in Oxford in in 2007, Emeritus Consultant at Oxford University Hospitals in 2015, and Associate Fellow at Green Templeton College, Oxford in 2015.

His interests are professionalism and, in particular, its relationship to leadership in healthcare systems. His current specific research interests are the effectiveness or otherwise of leadership education in respect of its impact on quality improvement in healthcare systems.

At the Royal College of Surgeons of England he was clinical lead and Chair of the Needs Analysis Group evaluating educational resources and organisational systems necessary for the implementation of reform of surgical training, and made recommendations for changes that were eventually adopted by all surgical training systems in the United Kingdom. During this appointment an opportunity arose in early 2003 at the end of the Serbian conflict to assist the European Agency for Reconstruction (EAR, a division of the EEC) in providing advice to the Kosovan Ministry of Health to develop new systems for surgical training.

Currently at Oxford, he is lead tutor for the module in Leadership and Management in Healthcare and Deputy Director of the Masters in Surgical Science, and supervises Masters and DPhil students on the subject of organisational change and leadership. In addition he has regular commitments in teaching postgraduate medical trainees and medical faculty on topics such as leadership, quality improvement, educational theory in healthcare, workplace assessments, supporting and talent managing  medical trainees, as well as occasional commitments to supervising students on the Said Business School Global Opportunity and Threats (Oxford) programme in exploring problems in complex systems.

Along the way he has written and spoken on many topics in medicine, obtained research grants, and has unexpectedly been given fellowships and medals. His main interest outside of work is playing music and he runs the Green Templeton College Big Band.

Prior to starting his DPhil, Eddy worked as a primary school teacher in Bristol, where he also completed his MSc in Educational Research.

He is particularly interested in the culture of high stakes, standardised testing, and how this might perpetuate existing inequalities in schools. His research focuses specifically on the interaction between knowledge, policy and pedagogy in the context of Literacy education.

 

Claire (郝煜) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and a China Oxford Scholarship Fund (COSF) scholar.

Claire holds a BA in Education and Physics from the University of Cambridge, an MA in Applied Linguistics from UCL Institution of Education, and an EdM in International Education Policy from Harvard University. She is passionate about exploring and supporting the transnational experiences of bi-/multilingual students in studying abroad contexts. Her research and professional interests include bilingualism, language and identity, international education, professional development, and school leadership.

Since 2015, Claire has served as the Director of International Education at Beijing Xinxuedao Education Group, a non-profit organisation that operates 31 schools with over 30,000 K-12 students in China. She has also worked as a high school counsellor and a teacher of Physics and Psychology.

Publications

Hao, Y. and Lantsman, G. (2022). Motivation in MOOCs: a qualitative study on the design and evaluation of an online IELTS course. The 7th IAFOR International Conference on Education.

Hao, Y. (2020). Education without borders: sojourner trips in students’ holistic development. In Wang, J. (Ed.). Family, Society, and Education. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2020). Learning how to learn: the role of metacognition and self-regulation in learning. In Wang, J. (Ed.). The Virtue of Thinking in Learning. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2019). Chinese students at a UK university: how linguistic repertoire mediates language and sojourner identity construction. Linguistics and Applied Linguistics Conference. Beijing Normal University.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2018). Examining Linguistic Diversity as a Resource for Higher Education in the Anglophone World. In Tong, V. C., Standen, A., & Sotiriou, M. (Ed.). Shaping Higher Education with Students: Ways to Connect Research and Teaching (pp.288-293). UCL Press.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2016). Making the most of linguistic diversity: the views and practices of bi/multilingual postgraduate students. The Multilingual University. ESRC Seminars.

Hao, Y. (2012). A Transformative Journey: China-US exchange student studying at an American high school. New World Press.

Pok Jing (Jane) Ho is a doctoral student at the Department of Education, specialising in educational assessment.

She is funded by the Bei Shan Tang Foundation Scholarship for Graduate Studies.

Her DPhil thesis examines validity in the Hong Kong Diploma of Secondary Education Examination, a large-scale, high-stakes test that informs higher education admissions decisions, using the argument-based approach to validation. In particular, her research identifies the claims made based on test scores, the validity evidence that supports or challenges such claims, and the social consequences that ensue as a result of test use.

Prior to her DPhil, she completed an M.A. in International Education Policy Analysis at Stanford University. She subsequently worked as a project officer at the Education University of Hong Kong, where she is now serving as a consultant alongside her studies.

A former secondary school teacher, Jane also holds a B.A. in English Studies (First Class Honours), a B.Ed. in English Language Education (First Class Honours), and an M.Ed. in Curriculum and Instruction from the Chinese University of Hong Kong, as well as the Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (CELTA) from Cambridge.

She is a Peer Supporter at Green Templeton College.

Publications

Ho, P. J. (2020). For some or for all: Vocational English for Hong Kong secondary school students. In C. Hong, & W. K. Ma (Eds.), Applied degree education and the future of work—Education 4.0 (pp. 87–95). Springer. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-15-3142-2

Ho, P. J. (2015). China-Africa “cooperation” in education. International Politics, 5. https://www.iir.cz/en/china-africa-cooperation-in-education

Jennifer’s DPhil focuses on adoptive families where  the adoptive parents also have birth children. She has worked in adoption support as a Parent Consultant for Adoption UK and as Head of Peer Services at PAC-UK, as well as managing the Adoption UK advice line and the parent training team.

She holds an MSc in Poverty Reduction: Policy and Practice from SOAS, and an MBA from Warwick Business School. She has worked in management consultancy in both the public and private sectors and is a board member of CoramBAAF.

Publications

The Right Tools for the Job. Information Age, November 1996

Global teams for the millennium; Management Decision, 36 (1): 31-33, February 1998

Lucy is a second-year DPhil student, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

Her DPhil research aims to engage in a meaningful and creative way with service children to explore how service life has shaped their experiences of education and sense of self. By choosing this focus, the research seeks to widen and nuance current understanding of service children’s educational experiences in addition to furthering knowledge into how service children see themselves. As a result of this, it is hoped that the research will support in developing the professional body of knowledge and understanding of this group of children in schools and help inform the Service Pupil Premium (SPP) funding choices in addition to wider school practice.

Before embarking on her DPhil at Oxford, Lucy completed her PGCE and MEd in Primary Education at the University of Cambridge. In addition to her DPhil work, Lucy is a Trustee for the Armed Forces Education Trust (AFET) – a grant-giving charity for service children – and a volunteer for the Oxford based charity, Big Brothers Big Sisters.

 

 

Aine is interested in improving the health outcomes of children and young people in the care system.

Fahad is reading for a DPhil in Education (part-time). He has over fifteen years professional experience in the education sector, in particular, higher education.

He has held senior roles in staff and student development, human resources, policy and strategy. Fahad holds a BSc in Education and Science and an MBA. Prior to commencing his doctoral studies, he was elected an Academic Visitor at St Antony’s College in the University of Oxford. Fahad’s research focus is on the quality of undergraduate medical education for Qatari doctors.

Shawna completed her undergraduate degree in Psycholinguistics at the University of Toronto in Canada, and later completed the MSc program in Applied Linguistics and Second language Acquisition at the University of Oxford.

She has a wide range of experiences in the field of Linguistics as a teaching and research assistant in areas such as theoretical linguistics, phonology, speech-language pathology, language acquisition, and creole studies. Being a native of Jamaica herself, Shawna has carried out extensive work on creole language acquisition. She worked with the University of the West Indies to draft the first Jamaican (Creole) as a Foreign Language course, and with the U.S Peace Corps to assess and revamp an existing language program for volunteers.

Shawna’s current research focuses on the development of writing skills among primary school learners in Jamaica who speak Jamaican Creole as a home language but are educated in English.

Publications
  • Helms-Park, R., Tucker, S, & Dronjic, V. (2016). From proto-writing to multimedia literacy: scripts and orthographies through the ages. In  Chen Bumgardner, V. Dronjic,, & R. Helms-Park (Eds.), Second Language Reading: Psycholinguistic and Cognitive Perspectives (pp. 1-31). New York, NY: Routledge Publishers.
  • Eriks-Brophy, A., Green, S., & Tucker, S. (2013).  Articulatory error patterns and phonological process use of preschool children with and without hearing loss. Volta Review.

Richard Canter is Visiting Professor of Surgical Education in the Nuffield Department of Surgical Sciences, University of Oxford.

Richard Canter qualified in medicine at the University of London in 1976, before becoming a surgeon at the Royal United Hospital, Bath. He completed a PhD in Management at the University of Bath in 1998 studying the nature of power in decision-making at the personal and organisation level in healthcare. Following the critical Kennedy report on surgical training in 2001, he was recruited to the Royal College of Surgeons of England as Deputy Director of Surgical Education with specific responsibility for curriculum development in surgical education in England. He was subsequently Head of the Postgraduate School of Surgery in Bristol until 2012, after which he concentrated on academic work at Oxford. He was appointed a visiting Professor in Oxford in in 2007, Emeritus Consultant at Oxford University Hospitals in 2015, and Associate Fellow at Green Templeton College, Oxford in 2015.

His interests are professionalism and, in particular, its relationship to leadership in healthcare systems. His current specific research interests are the effectiveness or otherwise of leadership education in respect of its impact on quality improvement in healthcare systems.

At the Royal College of Surgeons of England he was clinical lead and Chair of the Needs Analysis Group evaluating educational resources and organisational systems necessary for the implementation of reform of surgical training, and made recommendations for changes that were eventually adopted by all surgical training systems in the United Kingdom. During this appointment an opportunity arose in early 2003 at the end of the Serbian conflict to assist the European Agency for Reconstruction (EAR, a division of the EEC) in providing advice to the Kosovan Ministry of Health to develop new systems for surgical training.

Currently at Oxford, he is lead tutor for the module in Leadership and Management in Healthcare and Deputy Director of the Masters in Surgical Science, and supervises Masters and DPhil students on the subject of organisational change and leadership. In addition he has regular commitments in teaching postgraduate medical trainees and medical faculty on topics such as leadership, quality improvement, educational theory in healthcare, workplace assessments, supporting and talent managing  medical trainees, as well as occasional commitments to supervising students on the Said Business School Global Opportunity and Threats (Oxford) programme in exploring problems in complex systems.

Along the way he has written and spoken on many topics in medicine, obtained research grants, and has unexpectedly been given fellowships and medals. His main interest outside of work is playing music and he runs the Green Templeton College Big Band.

Prior to starting his DPhil, Eddy worked as a primary school teacher in Bristol, where he also completed his MSc in Educational Research.

He is particularly interested in the culture of high stakes, standardised testing, and how this might perpetuate existing inequalities in schools. His research focuses specifically on the interaction between knowledge, policy and pedagogy in the context of Literacy education.

 

Claire (郝煜) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and a China Oxford Scholarship Fund (COSF) scholar.

Claire holds a BA in Education and Physics from the University of Cambridge, an MA in Applied Linguistics from UCL Institution of Education, and an EdM in International Education Policy from Harvard University. She is passionate about exploring and supporting the transnational experiences of bi-/multilingual students in studying abroad contexts. Her research and professional interests include bilingualism, language and identity, international education, professional development, and school leadership.

Since 2015, Claire has served as the Director of International Education at Beijing Xinxuedao Education Group, a non-profit organisation that operates 31 schools with over 30,000 K-12 students in China. She has also worked as a high school counsellor and a teacher of Physics and Psychology.

Publications

Hao, Y. and Lantsman, G. (2022). Motivation in MOOCs: a qualitative study on the design and evaluation of an online IELTS course. The 7th IAFOR International Conference on Education.

Hao, Y. (2020). Education without borders: sojourner trips in students’ holistic development. In Wang, J. (Ed.). Family, Society, and Education. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2020). Learning how to learn: the role of metacognition and self-regulation in learning. In Wang, J. (Ed.). The Virtue of Thinking in Learning. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2019). Chinese students at a UK university: how linguistic repertoire mediates language and sojourner identity construction. Linguistics and Applied Linguistics Conference. Beijing Normal University.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2018). Examining Linguistic Diversity as a Resource for Higher Education in the Anglophone World. In Tong, V. C., Standen, A., & Sotiriou, M. (Ed.). Shaping Higher Education with Students: Ways to Connect Research and Teaching (pp.288-293). UCL Press.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2016). Making the most of linguistic diversity: the views and practices of bi/multilingual postgraduate students. The Multilingual University. ESRC Seminars.

Hao, Y. (2012). A Transformative Journey: China-US exchange student studying at an American high school. New World Press.

Pok Jing (Jane) Ho is a doctoral student at the Department of Education, specialising in educational assessment.

She is funded by the Bei Shan Tang Foundation Scholarship for Graduate Studies.

Her DPhil thesis examines validity in the Hong Kong Diploma of Secondary Education Examination, a large-scale, high-stakes test that informs higher education admissions decisions, using the argument-based approach to validation. In particular, her research identifies the claims made based on test scores, the validity evidence that supports or challenges such claims, and the social consequences that ensue as a result of test use.

Prior to her DPhil, she completed an M.A. in International Education Policy Analysis at Stanford University. She subsequently worked as a project officer at the Education University of Hong Kong, where she is now serving as a consultant alongside her studies.

A former secondary school teacher, Jane also holds a B.A. in English Studies (First Class Honours), a B.Ed. in English Language Education (First Class Honours), and an M.Ed. in Curriculum and Instruction from the Chinese University of Hong Kong, as well as the Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (CELTA) from Cambridge.

She is a Peer Supporter at Green Templeton College.

Publications

Ho, P. J. (2020). For some or for all: Vocational English for Hong Kong secondary school students. In C. Hong, & W. K. Ma (Eds.), Applied degree education and the future of work—Education 4.0 (pp. 87–95). Springer. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-15-3142-2

Ho, P. J. (2015). China-Africa “cooperation” in education. International Politics, 5. https://www.iir.cz/en/china-africa-cooperation-in-education

Jennifer’s DPhil focuses on adoptive families where  the adoptive parents also have birth children. She has worked in adoption support as a Parent Consultant for Adoption UK and as Head of Peer Services at PAC-UK, as well as managing the Adoption UK advice line and the parent training team.

She holds an MSc in Poverty Reduction: Policy and Practice from SOAS, and an MBA from Warwick Business School. She has worked in management consultancy in both the public and private sectors and is a board member of CoramBAAF.

Publications

The Right Tools for the Job. Information Age, November 1996

Global teams for the millennium; Management Decision, 36 (1): 31-33, February 1998

Lucy is a second-year DPhil student, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

Her DPhil research aims to engage in a meaningful and creative way with service children to explore how service life has shaped their experiences of education and sense of self. By choosing this focus, the research seeks to widen and nuance current understanding of service children’s educational experiences in addition to furthering knowledge into how service children see themselves. As a result of this, it is hoped that the research will support in developing the professional body of knowledge and understanding of this group of children in schools and help inform the Service Pupil Premium (SPP) funding choices in addition to wider school practice.

Before embarking on her DPhil at Oxford, Lucy completed her PGCE and MEd in Primary Education at the University of Cambridge. In addition to her DPhil work, Lucy is a Trustee for the Armed Forces Education Trust (AFET) – a grant-giving charity for service children – and a volunteer for the Oxford based charity, Big Brothers Big Sisters.

 

 

Aine is interested in improving the health outcomes of children and young people in the care system.

Fahad is reading for a DPhil in Education (part-time). He has over fifteen years professional experience in the education sector, in particular, higher education.

He has held senior roles in staff and student development, human resources, policy and strategy. Fahad holds a BSc in Education and Science and an MBA. Prior to commencing his doctoral studies, he was elected an Academic Visitor at St Antony’s College in the University of Oxford. Fahad’s research focus is on the quality of undergraduate medical education for Qatari doctors.

Shawna completed her undergraduate degree in Psycholinguistics at the University of Toronto in Canada, and later completed the MSc program in Applied Linguistics and Second language Acquisition at the University of Oxford.

She has a wide range of experiences in the field of Linguistics as a teaching and research assistant in areas such as theoretical linguistics, phonology, speech-language pathology, language acquisition, and creole studies. Being a native of Jamaica herself, Shawna has carried out extensive work on creole language acquisition. She worked with the University of the West Indies to draft the first Jamaican (Creole) as a Foreign Language course, and with the U.S Peace Corps to assess and revamp an existing language program for volunteers.

Shawna’s current research focuses on the development of writing skills among primary school learners in Jamaica who speak Jamaican Creole as a home language but are educated in English.

Publications
  • Helms-Park, R., Tucker, S, & Dronjic, V. (2016). From proto-writing to multimedia literacy: scripts and orthographies through the ages. In  Chen Bumgardner, V. Dronjic,, & R. Helms-Park (Eds.), Second Language Reading: Psycholinguistic and Cognitive Perspectives (pp. 1-31). New York, NY: Routledge Publishers.
  • Eriks-Brophy, A., Green, S., & Tucker, S. (2013).  Articulatory error patterns and phonological process use of preschool children with and without hearing loss. Volta Review.

Richard Canter is Visiting Professor of Surgical Education in the Nuffield Department of Surgical Sciences, University of Oxford.

Richard Canter qualified in medicine at the University of London in 1976, before becoming a surgeon at the Royal United Hospital, Bath. He completed a PhD in Management at the University of Bath in 1998 studying the nature of power in decision-making at the personal and organisation level in healthcare. Following the critical Kennedy report on surgical training in 2001, he was recruited to the Royal College of Surgeons of England as Deputy Director of Surgical Education with specific responsibility for curriculum development in surgical education in England. He was subsequently Head of the Postgraduate School of Surgery in Bristol until 2012, after which he concentrated on academic work at Oxford. He was appointed a visiting Professor in Oxford in in 2007, Emeritus Consultant at Oxford University Hospitals in 2015, and Associate Fellow at Green Templeton College, Oxford in 2015.

His interests are professionalism and, in particular, its relationship to leadership in healthcare systems. His current specific research interests are the effectiveness or otherwise of leadership education in respect of its impact on quality improvement in healthcare systems.

At the Royal College of Surgeons of England he was clinical lead and Chair of the Needs Analysis Group evaluating educational resources and organisational systems necessary for the implementation of reform of surgical training, and made recommendations for changes that were eventually adopted by all surgical training systems in the United Kingdom. During this appointment an opportunity arose in early 2003 at the end of the Serbian conflict to assist the European Agency for Reconstruction (EAR, a division of the EEC) in providing advice to the Kosovan Ministry of Health to develop new systems for surgical training.

Currently at Oxford, he is lead tutor for the module in Leadership and Management in Healthcare and Deputy Director of the Masters in Surgical Science, and supervises Masters and DPhil students on the subject of organisational change and leadership. In addition he has regular commitments in teaching postgraduate medical trainees and medical faculty on topics such as leadership, quality improvement, educational theory in healthcare, workplace assessments, supporting and talent managing  medical trainees, as well as occasional commitments to supervising students on the Said Business School Global Opportunity and Threats (Oxford) programme in exploring problems in complex systems.

Along the way he has written and spoken on many topics in medicine, obtained research grants, and has unexpectedly been given fellowships and medals. His main interest outside of work is playing music and he runs the Green Templeton College Big Band.

Prior to starting his DPhil, Eddy worked as a primary school teacher in Bristol, where he also completed his MSc in Educational Research.

He is particularly interested in the culture of high stakes, standardised testing, and how this might perpetuate existing inequalities in schools. His research focuses specifically on the interaction between knowledge, policy and pedagogy in the context of Literacy education.

 

Claire (郝煜) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and a China Oxford Scholarship Fund (COSF) scholar.

Claire holds a BA in Education and Physics from the University of Cambridge, an MA in Applied Linguistics from UCL Institution of Education, and an EdM in International Education Policy from Harvard University. She is passionate about exploring and supporting the transnational experiences of bi-/multilingual students in studying abroad contexts. Her research and professional interests include bilingualism, language and identity, international education, professional development, and school leadership.

Since 2015, Claire has served as the Director of International Education at Beijing Xinxuedao Education Group, a non-profit organisation that operates 31 schools with over 30,000 K-12 students in China. She has also worked as a high school counsellor and a teacher of Physics and Psychology.

Publications

Hao, Y. and Lantsman, G. (2022). Motivation in MOOCs: a qualitative study on the design and evaluation of an online IELTS course. The 7th IAFOR International Conference on Education.

Hao, Y. (2020). Education without borders: sojourner trips in students’ holistic development. In Wang, J. (Ed.). Family, Society, and Education. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2020). Learning how to learn: the role of metacognition and self-regulation in learning. In Wang, J. (Ed.). The Virtue of Thinking in Learning. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2019). Chinese students at a UK university: how linguistic repertoire mediates language and sojourner identity construction. Linguistics and Applied Linguistics Conference. Beijing Normal University.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2018). Examining Linguistic Diversity as a Resource for Higher Education in the Anglophone World. In Tong, V. C., Standen, A., & Sotiriou, M. (Ed.). Shaping Higher Education with Students: Ways to Connect Research and Teaching (pp.288-293). UCL Press.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2016). Making the most of linguistic diversity: the views and practices of bi/multilingual postgraduate students. The Multilingual University. ESRC Seminars.

Hao, Y. (2012). A Transformative Journey: China-US exchange student studying at an American high school. New World Press.

Pok Jing (Jane) Ho is a doctoral student at the Department of Education, specialising in educational assessment.

She is funded by the Bei Shan Tang Foundation Scholarship for Graduate Studies.

Her DPhil thesis examines validity in the Hong Kong Diploma of Secondary Education Examination, a large-scale, high-stakes test that informs higher education admissions decisions, using the argument-based approach to validation. In particular, her research identifies the claims made based on test scores, the validity evidence that supports or challenges such claims, and the social consequences that ensue as a result of test use.

Prior to her DPhil, she completed an M.A. in International Education Policy Analysis at Stanford University. She subsequently worked as a project officer at the Education University of Hong Kong, where she is now serving as a consultant alongside her studies.

A former secondary school teacher, Jane also holds a B.A. in English Studies (First Class Honours), a B.Ed. in English Language Education (First Class Honours), and an M.Ed. in Curriculum and Instruction from the Chinese University of Hong Kong, as well as the Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (CELTA) from Cambridge.

She is a Peer Supporter at Green Templeton College.

Publications

Ho, P. J. (2020). For some or for all: Vocational English for Hong Kong secondary school students. In C. Hong, & W. K. Ma (Eds.), Applied degree education and the future of work—Education 4.0 (pp. 87–95). Springer. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-15-3142-2

Ho, P. J. (2015). China-Africa “cooperation” in education. International Politics, 5. https://www.iir.cz/en/china-africa-cooperation-in-education

Jennifer’s DPhil focuses on adoptive families where  the adoptive parents also have birth children. She has worked in adoption support as a Parent Consultant for Adoption UK and as Head of Peer Services at PAC-UK, as well as managing the Adoption UK advice line and the parent training team.

She holds an MSc in Poverty Reduction: Policy and Practice from SOAS, and an MBA from Warwick Business School. She has worked in management consultancy in both the public and private sectors and is a board member of CoramBAAF.

Publications

The Right Tools for the Job. Information Age, November 1996

Global teams for the millennium; Management Decision, 36 (1): 31-33, February 1998

Lucy is a second-year DPhil student, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

Her DPhil research aims to engage in a meaningful and creative way with service children to explore how service life has shaped their experiences of education and sense of self. By choosing this focus, the research seeks to widen and nuance current understanding of service children’s educational experiences in addition to furthering knowledge into how service children see themselves. As a result of this, it is hoped that the research will support in developing the professional body of knowledge and understanding of this group of children in schools and help inform the Service Pupil Premium (SPP) funding choices in addition to wider school practice.

Before embarking on her DPhil at Oxford, Lucy completed her PGCE and MEd in Primary Education at the University of Cambridge. In addition to her DPhil work, Lucy is a Trustee for the Armed Forces Education Trust (AFET) – a grant-giving charity for service children – and a volunteer for the Oxford based charity, Big Brothers Big Sisters.

 

 

Aine is interested in improving the health outcomes of children and young people in the care system.

Fahad is reading for a DPhil in Education (part-time). He has over fifteen years professional experience in the education sector, in particular, higher education.

He has held senior roles in staff and student development, human resources, policy and strategy. Fahad holds a BSc in Education and Science and an MBA. Prior to commencing his doctoral studies, he was elected an Academic Visitor at St Antony’s College in the University of Oxford. Fahad’s research focus is on the quality of undergraduate medical education for Qatari doctors.

Shawna completed her undergraduate degree in Psycholinguistics at the University of Toronto in Canada, and later completed the MSc program in Applied Linguistics and Second language Acquisition at the University of Oxford.

She has a wide range of experiences in the field of Linguistics as a teaching and research assistant in areas such as theoretical linguistics, phonology, speech-language pathology, language acquisition, and creole studies. Being a native of Jamaica herself, Shawna has carried out extensive work on creole language acquisition. She worked with the University of the West Indies to draft the first Jamaican (Creole) as a Foreign Language course, and with the U.S Peace Corps to assess and revamp an existing language program for volunteers.

Shawna’s current research focuses on the development of writing skills among primary school learners in Jamaica who speak Jamaican Creole as a home language but are educated in English.

Publications
  • Helms-Park, R., Tucker, S, & Dronjic, V. (2016). From proto-writing to multimedia literacy: scripts and orthographies through the ages. In  Chen Bumgardner, V. Dronjic,, & R. Helms-Park (Eds.), Second Language Reading: Psycholinguistic and Cognitive Perspectives (pp. 1-31). New York, NY: Routledge Publishers.
  • Eriks-Brophy, A., Green, S., & Tucker, S. (2013).  Articulatory error patterns and phonological process use of preschool children with and without hearing loss. Volta Review.

Richard Canter is Visiting Professor of Surgical Education in the Nuffield Department of Surgical Sciences, University of Oxford.

Richard Canter qualified in medicine at the University of London in 1976, before becoming a surgeon at the Royal United Hospital, Bath. He completed a PhD in Management at the University of Bath in 1998 studying the nature of power in decision-making at the personal and organisation level in healthcare. Following the critical Kennedy report on surgical training in 2001, he was recruited to the Royal College of Surgeons of England as Deputy Director of Surgical Education with specific responsibility for curriculum development in surgical education in England. He was subsequently Head of the Postgraduate School of Surgery in Bristol until 2012, after which he concentrated on academic work at Oxford. He was appointed a visiting Professor in Oxford in in 2007, Emeritus Consultant at Oxford University Hospitals in 2015, and Associate Fellow at Green Templeton College, Oxford in 2015.

His interests are professionalism and, in particular, its relationship to leadership in healthcare systems. His current specific research interests are the effectiveness or otherwise of leadership education in respect of its impact on quality improvement in healthcare systems.

At the Royal College of Surgeons of England he was clinical lead and Chair of the Needs Analysis Group evaluating educational resources and organisational systems necessary for the implementation of reform of surgical training, and made recommendations for changes that were eventually adopted by all surgical training systems in the United Kingdom. During this appointment an opportunity arose in early 2003 at the end of the Serbian conflict to assist the European Agency for Reconstruction (EAR, a division of the EEC) in providing advice to the Kosovan Ministry of Health to develop new systems for surgical training.

Currently at Oxford, he is lead tutor for the module in Leadership and Management in Healthcare and Deputy Director of the Masters in Surgical Science, and supervises Masters and DPhil students on the subject of organisational change and leadership. In addition he has regular commitments in teaching postgraduate medical trainees and medical faculty on topics such as leadership, quality improvement, educational theory in healthcare, workplace assessments, supporting and talent managing  medical trainees, as well as occasional commitments to supervising students on the Said Business School Global Opportunity and Threats (Oxford) programme in exploring problems in complex systems.

Along the way he has written and spoken on many topics in medicine, obtained research grants, and has unexpectedly been given fellowships and medals. His main interest outside of work is playing music and he runs the Green Templeton College Big Band.

Prior to starting his DPhil, Eddy worked as a primary school teacher in Bristol, where he also completed his MSc in Educational Research.

He is particularly interested in the culture of high stakes, standardised testing, and how this might perpetuate existing inequalities in schools. His research focuses specifically on the interaction between knowledge, policy and pedagogy in the context of Literacy education.

 

Claire (郝煜) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and a China Oxford Scholarship Fund (COSF) scholar.

Claire holds a BA in Education and Physics from the University of Cambridge, an MA in Applied Linguistics from UCL Institution of Education, and an EdM in International Education Policy from Harvard University. She is passionate about exploring and supporting the transnational experiences of bi-/multilingual students in studying abroad contexts. Her research and professional interests include bilingualism, language and identity, international education, professional development, and school leadership.

Since 2015, Claire has served as the Director of International Education at Beijing Xinxuedao Education Group, a non-profit organisation that operates 31 schools with over 30,000 K-12 students in China. She has also worked as a high school counsellor and a teacher of Physics and Psychology.

Publications

Hao, Y. and Lantsman, G. (2022). Motivation in MOOCs: a qualitative study on the design and evaluation of an online IELTS course. The 7th IAFOR International Conference on Education.

Hao, Y. (2020). Education without borders: sojourner trips in students’ holistic development. In Wang, J. (Ed.). Family, Society, and Education. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2020). Learning how to learn: the role of metacognition and self-regulation in learning. In Wang, J. (Ed.). The Virtue of Thinking in Learning. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2019). Chinese students at a UK university: how linguistic repertoire mediates language and sojourner identity construction. Linguistics and Applied Linguistics Conference. Beijing Normal University.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2018). Examining Linguistic Diversity as a Resource for Higher Education in the Anglophone World. In Tong, V. C., Standen, A., & Sotiriou, M. (Ed.). Shaping Higher Education with Students: Ways to Connect Research and Teaching (pp.288-293). UCL Press.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2016). Making the most of linguistic diversity: the views and practices of bi/multilingual postgraduate students. The Multilingual University. ESRC Seminars.

Hao, Y. (2012). A Transformative Journey: China-US exchange student studying at an American high school. New World Press.

Pok Jing (Jane) Ho is a doctoral student at the Department of Education, specialising in educational assessment.

She is funded by the Bei Shan Tang Foundation Scholarship for Graduate Studies.

Her DPhil thesis examines validity in the Hong Kong Diploma of Secondary Education Examination, a large-scale, high-stakes test that informs higher education admissions decisions, using the argument-based approach to validation. In particular, her research identifies the claims made based on test scores, the validity evidence that supports or challenges such claims, and the social consequences that ensue as a result of test use.

Prior to her DPhil, she completed an M.A. in International Education Policy Analysis at Stanford University. She subsequently worked as a project officer at the Education University of Hong Kong, where she is now serving as a consultant alongside her studies.

A former secondary school teacher, Jane also holds a B.A. in English Studies (First Class Honours), a B.Ed. in English Language Education (First Class Honours), and an M.Ed. in Curriculum and Instruction from the Chinese University of Hong Kong, as well as the Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (CELTA) from Cambridge.

She is a Peer Supporter at Green Templeton College.

Publications

Ho, P. J. (2020). For some or for all: Vocational English for Hong Kong secondary school students. In C. Hong, & W. K. Ma (Eds.), Applied degree education and the future of work—Education 4.0 (pp. 87–95). Springer. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-15-3142-2

Ho, P. J. (2015). China-Africa “cooperation” in education. International Politics, 5. https://www.iir.cz/en/china-africa-cooperation-in-education

Jennifer’s DPhil focuses on adoptive families where  the adoptive parents also have birth children. She has worked in adoption support as a Parent Consultant for Adoption UK and as Head of Peer Services at PAC-UK, as well as managing the Adoption UK advice line and the parent training team.

She holds an MSc in Poverty Reduction: Policy and Practice from SOAS, and an MBA from Warwick Business School. She has worked in management consultancy in both the public and private sectors and is a board member of CoramBAAF.

Publications

The Right Tools for the Job. Information Age, November 1996

Global teams for the millennium; Management Decision, 36 (1): 31-33, February 1998

Lucy is a second-year DPhil student, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP studentship.

Her DPhil research aims to engage in a meaningful and creative way with service children to explore how service life has shaped their experiences of education and sense of self. By choosing this focus, the research seeks to widen and nuance current understanding of service children’s educational experiences in addition to furthering knowledge into how service children see themselves. As a result of this, it is hoped that the research will support in developing the professional body of knowledge and understanding of this group of children in schools and help inform the Service Pupil Premium (SPP) funding choices in addition to wider school practice.

Before embarking on her DPhil at Oxford, Lucy completed her PGCE and MEd in Primary Education at the University of Cambridge. In addition to her DPhil work, Lucy is a Trustee for the Armed Forces Education Trust (AFET) – a grant-giving charity for service children – and a volunteer for the Oxford based charity, Big Brothers Big Sisters.

 

 

Aine is interested in improving the health outcomes of children and young people in the care system.

Fahad is reading for a DPhil in Education (part-time). He has over fifteen years professional experience in the education sector, in particular, higher education.

He has held senior roles in staff and student development, human resources, policy and strategy. Fahad holds a BSc in Education and Science and an MBA. Prior to commencing his doctoral studies, he was elected an Academic Visitor at St Antony’s College in the University of Oxford. Fahad’s research focus is on the quality of undergraduate medical education for Qatari doctors.

Shawna completed her undergraduate degree in Psycholinguistics at the University of Toronto in Canada, and later completed the MSc program in Applied Linguistics and Second language Acquisition at the University of Oxford.

She has a wide range of experiences in the field of Linguistics as a teaching and research assistant in areas such as theoretical linguistics, phonology, speech-language pathology, language acquisition, and creole studies. Being a native of Jamaica herself, Shawna has carried out extensive work on creole language acquisition. She worked with the University of the West Indies to draft the first Jamaican (Creole) as a Foreign Language course, and with the U.S Peace Corps to assess and revamp an existing language program for volunteers.

Shawna’s current research focuses on the development of writing skills among primary school learners in Jamaica who speak Jamaican Creole as a home language but are educated in English.

Publications
  • Helms-Park, R., Tucker, S, & Dronjic, V. (2016). From proto-writing to multimedia literacy: scripts and orthographies through the ages. In  Chen Bumgardner, V. Dronjic,, & R. Helms-Park (Eds.), Second Language Reading: Psycholinguistic and Cognitive Perspectives (pp. 1-31). New York, NY: Routledge Publishers.
  • Eriks-Brophy, A., Green, S., & Tucker, S. (2013).  Articulatory error patterns and phonological process use of preschool children with and without hearing loss. Volta Review.

Richard Canter is Visiting Professor of Surgical Education in the Nuffield Department of Surgical Sciences, University of Oxford.

Richard Canter qualified in medicine at the University of London in 1976, before becoming a surgeon at the Royal United Hospital, Bath. He completed a PhD in Management at the University of Bath in 1998 studying the nature of power in decision-making at the personal and organisation level in healthcare. Following the critical Kennedy report on surgical training in 2001, he was recruited to the Royal College of Surgeons of England as Deputy Director of Surgical Education with specific responsibility for curriculum development in surgical education in England. He was subsequently Head of the Postgraduate School of Surgery in Bristol until 2012, after which he concentrated on academic work at Oxford. He was appointed a visiting Professor in Oxford in in 2007, Emeritus Consultant at Oxford University Hospitals in 2015, and Associate Fellow at Green Templeton College, Oxford in 2015.

His interests are professionalism and, in particular, its relationship to leadership in healthcare systems. His current specific research interests are the effectiveness or otherwise of leadership education in respect of its impact on quality improvement in healthcare systems.

At the Royal College of Surgeons of England he was clinical lead and Chair of the Needs Analysis Group evaluating educational resources and organisational systems necessary for the implementation of reform of surgical training, and made recommendations for changes that were eventually adopted by all surgical training systems in the United Kingdom. During this appointment an opportunity arose in early 2003 at the end of the Serbian conflict to assist the European Agency for Reconstruction (EAR, a division of the EEC) in providing advice to the Kosovan Ministry of Health to develop new systems for surgical training.

Currently at Oxford, he is lead tutor for the module in Leadership and Management in Healthcare and Deputy Director of the Masters in Surgical Science, and supervises Masters and DPhil students on the subject of organisational change and leadership. In addition he has regular commitments in teaching postgraduate medical trainees and medical faculty on topics such as leadership, quality improvement, educational theory in healthcare, workplace assessments, supporting and talent managing  medical trainees, as well as occasional commitments to supervising students on the Said Business School Global Opportunity and Threats (Oxford) programme in exploring problems in complex systems.

Along the way he has written and spoken on many topics in medicine, obtained research grants, and has unexpectedly been given fellowships and medals. His main interest outside of work is playing music and he runs the Green Templeton College Big Band.

Prior to starting his DPhil, Eddy worked as a primary school teacher in Bristol, where he also completed his MSc in Educational Research.

He is particularly interested in the culture of high stakes, standardised testing, and how this might perpetuate existing inequalities in schools. His research focuses specifically on the interaction between knowledge, policy and pedagogy in the context of Literacy education.

 

Claire (郝煜) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and a China Oxford Scholarship Fund (COSF) scholar.

Claire holds a BA in Education and Physics from the University of Cambridge, an MA in Applied Linguistics from UCL Institution of Education, and an EdM in International Education Policy from Harvard University. She is passionate about exploring and supporting the transnational experiences of bi-/multilingual students in studying abroad contexts. Her research and professional interests include bilingualism, language and identity, international education, professional development, and school leadership.

Since 2015, Claire has served as the Director of International Education at Beijing Xinxuedao Education Group, a non-profit organisation that operates 31 schools with over 30,000 K-12 students in China. She has also worked as a high school counsellor and a teacher of Physics and Psychology.

Publications

Hao, Y. and Lantsman, G. (2022). Motivation in MOOCs: a qualitative study on the design and evaluation of an online IELTS course. The 7th IAFOR International Conference on Education.

Hao, Y. (2020). Education without borders: sojourner trips in students’ holistic development. In Wang, J. (Ed.). Family, Society, and Education. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2020). Learning how to learn: the role of metacognition and self-regulation in learning. In Wang, J. (Ed.). The Virtue of Thinking in Learning. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2019). Chinese students at a UK university: how linguistic repertoire mediates language and sojourner identity construction. Linguistics and Applied Linguistics Conference. Beijing Normal University.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2018). Examining Linguistic Diversity as a Resource for Higher Education in the Anglophone World. In Tong, V. C., Standen, A., & Sotiriou, M. (Ed.). Shaping Higher Education with Students: Ways to Connect Research and Teaching (pp.288-293). UCL Press.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2016). Making the most of linguistic diversity: the views and practices of bi/multilingual postgraduate students. The Multilingual University. ESRC Seminars.

Hao, Y. (2012). A Transformative Journey: China-US exchange student studying at an American high school. New World Press.

Pok Jing (Jane) Ho is a doctoral student at the Department of Education, specialising in educational assessment.

She is funded by the Bei Shan Tang Foundation Scholarship for Graduate Studies.

Her DPhil thesis examines validity in the Hong Kong Diploma of Secondary Education Examination, a large-scale, high-stakes test that informs higher education admissions decisions, using the argument-based approach to validation. In particular, her research identifies the claims made based on test scores, the validity evidence that supports or challenges such claims, and the social consequences that ensue as a result of test use.

Prior to her DPhil, she completed an M.A. in International Education Policy Analysis at Stanford University. She subsequently worked as a project officer at the Education University of Hong Kong, where she is now serving as a consultant alongside her studies.

A former secondary school teacher, Jane also holds a B.A. in Engl