Skip to content

Department of Education

Viewing archives for Hertford College

Thomas Procter-Legg is a DPhil Student in the Department of Education and is researching restorative practice within the context of special educational needs and disabilities.

His previous experience includes five years as the Head Teacher of a special academy in Oxfordshire UK, specialising in education for students with Special Educational Needs and Disabilities. He has also worked as a SEND Reviewer for Whole School SEND; a Teaching School Director; and as the Principal Designate on a successful Free School bid.

Thomas is passionate about restorative practice and is involved in many communities of practice, such as the Global Alliance for Restorative Justice and Social Justice, where he is a member of the research sub-group exploring the interactions between restorative justice and social justice.

Thomas is also a strong advocate for creativity in education; having previously gained a Fine Art degree from Chelsea College of Art. This heavily influenced his educational leadership and during his time as a Head Teacher, he became the co-founder of a co-constructed initiative between the academy and the University of Oxford Gardens Libraries and Museums. This work placed cultural learning opportunities and relationships at the heart of the curriculum and is the longest standing project between a special school and The University of Oxford. This sustainable partnership champions marginalised voices and has been highly celebrated e.g., inclusion in the Durham Commission for Creativity in Education; recent dissemination at the Museum Ideas Conference 2022; highly commended award at the Museum and Heritage Awards 2021; and awarded Platinum ArtsMark in 2021.

Whilst this creative work may seem to be separate from restorative practice, Thomas subscribes to the idea that there are significant overlaps, both within pedagogical practice and wider school culture, topics which his current research touch on within the context of special education.

 

Publications

Procter-Legg. (2022). A Discourse on Restorative Practice—Participants’ Views of a Divergent Ideology. Laws11(6), 86–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11060086

Procter-Legg. (2022). Practitioner Perspectives on a Restorative Community: An Inductive Evaluative Study of Conceptual, Pedagogical, and Routine Practice. Laws11(1), 4–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11010004

 

Supervisors

Ian Thompson and Jason Todd

Ivan is currently serving as a Facilitator (Teaching) in the Vice-Chancellor’s Colloquium and as an Editor of the Graduate Inequality Review in the University of Oxford. He has taken up lecturerships in a number of universities in Hong Kong and has run Education, Linguistics, Applied Linguistics, Sociolinguistics, and Academic English courses at undergraduate and postgraduate level.

Prior to joining Oxford, Ivan received his teacher-training in Hong Kong and his postgraduate training in Linguistics (with a specialisation in pragmatics) at University College London. His research interests include: mental representation of word meanings, language acquisition, educational technology, and ELT pedagogy.

Publications

  • Au, I. (2021). Unwinding the Fantasy: Using Breakout Rooms to Promote Language Exposure and Less-Public Feedback Practices in Online Synchronous Teaching. Paper presented at the PASHE 2021 – EAP Education and Practice: Supporting Students’ Needs, UCL (IOE).
  • Au, I. & Yiu, C. (2021). ‘Identity game’: so you think you are what your Instagram bio says about you. Paper presented at the Sociolinguistics Symposium 23, Hong Kong.
  • Au, I. (2021). The magic of breakout rooms in online synchronous teaching and learning of English. Paper presented at the 3rd International Conference on English Across the Curriculum, Hong Kong.
  • Choi, T. H., Chan, H., & Au, I. (2018). ‘Now you’re talking’: Teacher preparation through alumni talks in a community of practice. Paper presented at the Oxford Education Research Symposium.
  • Au, I. (2018). Branching out from the tree: Extending vocabulary acquisition with polysemy. Paper presented at HKBU-HU First Joint Symposium on Education 2018.

 

Supervisors

Elizabeth Wonnacott and Victoria Murphy

Thomas Procter-Legg is a DPhil Student in the Department of Education and is researching restorative practice within the context of special educational needs and disabilities.

His previous experience includes five years as the Head Teacher of a special academy in Oxfordshire UK, specialising in education for students with Special Educational Needs and Disabilities. He has also worked as a SEND Reviewer for Whole School SEND; a Teaching School Director; and as the Principal Designate on a successful Free School bid.

Thomas is passionate about restorative practice and is involved in many communities of practice, such as the Global Alliance for Restorative Justice and Social Justice, where he is a member of the research sub-group exploring the interactions between restorative justice and social justice.

Thomas is also a strong advocate for creativity in education; having previously gained a Fine Art degree from Chelsea College of Art. This heavily influenced his educational leadership and during his time as a Head Teacher, he became the co-founder of a co-constructed initiative between the academy and the University of Oxford Gardens Libraries and Museums. This work placed cultural learning opportunities and relationships at the heart of the curriculum and is the longest standing project between a special school and The University of Oxford. This sustainable partnership champions marginalised voices and has been highly celebrated e.g., inclusion in the Durham Commission for Creativity in Education; recent dissemination at the Museum Ideas Conference 2022; highly commended award at the Museum and Heritage Awards 2021; and awarded Platinum ArtsMark in 2021.

Whilst this creative work may seem to be separate from restorative practice, Thomas subscribes to the idea that there are significant overlaps, both within pedagogical practice and wider school culture, topics which his current research touch on within the context of special education.

 

Publications

Procter-Legg. (2022). A Discourse on Restorative Practice—Participants’ Views of a Divergent Ideology. Laws11(6), 86–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11060086

Procter-Legg. (2022). Practitioner Perspectives on a Restorative Community: An Inductive Evaluative Study of Conceptual, Pedagogical, and Routine Practice. Laws11(1), 4–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11010004

 

Supervisors

Ian Thompson and Jason Todd

Ivan is currently serving as a Facilitator (Teaching) in the Vice-Chancellor’s Colloquium and as an Editor of the Graduate Inequality Review in the University of Oxford. He has taken up lecturerships in a number of universities in Hong Kong and has run Education, Linguistics, Applied Linguistics, Sociolinguistics, and Academic English courses at undergraduate and postgraduate level.

Prior to joining Oxford, Ivan received his teacher-training in Hong Kong and his postgraduate training in Linguistics (with a specialisation in pragmatics) at University College London. His research interests include: mental representation of word meanings, language acquisition, educational technology, and ELT pedagogy.

Publications

  • Au, I. (2021). Unwinding the Fantasy: Using Breakout Rooms to Promote Language Exposure and Less-Public Feedback Practices in Online Synchronous Teaching. Paper presented at the PASHE 2021 – EAP Education and Practice: Supporting Students’ Needs, UCL (IOE).
  • Au, I. & Yiu, C. (2021). ‘Identity game’: so you think you are what your Instagram bio says about you. Paper presented at the Sociolinguistics Symposium 23, Hong Kong.
  • Au, I. (2021). The magic of breakout rooms in online synchronous teaching and learning of English. Paper presented at the 3rd International Conference on English Across the Curriculum, Hong Kong.
  • Choi, T. H., Chan, H., & Au, I. (2018). ‘Now you’re talking’: Teacher preparation through alumni talks in a community of practice. Paper presented at the Oxford Education Research Symposium.
  • Au, I. (2018). Branching out from the tree: Extending vocabulary acquisition with polysemy. Paper presented at HKBU-HU First Joint Symposium on Education 2018.

 

Supervisors

Elizabeth Wonnacott and Victoria Murphy

Thomas Procter-Legg is a DPhil Student in the Department of Education and is researching restorative practice within the context of special educational needs and disabilities.

His previous experience includes five years as the Head Teacher of a special academy in Oxfordshire UK, specialising in education for students with Special Educational Needs and Disabilities. He has also worked as a SEND Reviewer for Whole School SEND; a Teaching School Director; and as the Principal Designate on a successful Free School bid.

Thomas is passionate about restorative practice and is involved in many communities of practice, such as the Global Alliance for Restorative Justice and Social Justice, where he is a member of the research sub-group exploring the interactions between restorative justice and social justice.

Thomas is also a strong advocate for creativity in education; having previously gained a Fine Art degree from Chelsea College of Art. This heavily influenced his educational leadership and during his time as a Head Teacher, he became the co-founder of a co-constructed initiative between the academy and the University of Oxford Gardens Libraries and Museums. This work placed cultural learning opportunities and relationships at the heart of the curriculum and is the longest standing project between a special school and The University of Oxford. This sustainable partnership champions marginalised voices and has been highly celebrated e.g., inclusion in the Durham Commission for Creativity in Education; recent dissemination at the Museum Ideas Conference 2022; highly commended award at the Museum and Heritage Awards 2021; and awarded Platinum ArtsMark in 2021.

Whilst this creative work may seem to be separate from restorative practice, Thomas subscribes to the idea that there are significant overlaps, both within pedagogical practice and wider school culture, topics which his current research touch on within the context of special education.

 

Publications

Procter-Legg. (2022). A Discourse on Restorative Practice—Participants’ Views of a Divergent Ideology. Laws11(6), 86–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11060086

Procter-Legg. (2022). Practitioner Perspectives on a Restorative Community: An Inductive Evaluative Study of Conceptual, Pedagogical, and Routine Practice. Laws11(1), 4–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11010004

 

Supervisors

Ian Thompson and Jason Todd

Ivan is currently serving as a Facilitator (Teaching) in the Vice-Chancellor’s Colloquium and as an Editor of the Graduate Inequality Review in the University of Oxford. He has taken up lecturerships in a number of universities in Hong Kong and has run Education, Linguistics, Applied Linguistics, Sociolinguistics, and Academic English courses at undergraduate and postgraduate level.

Prior to joining Oxford, Ivan received his teacher-training in Hong Kong and his postgraduate training in Linguistics (with a specialisation in pragmatics) at University College London. His research interests include: mental representation of word meanings, language acquisition, educational technology, and ELT pedagogy.

Publications

  • Au, I. (2021). Unwinding the Fantasy: Using Breakout Rooms to Promote Language Exposure and Less-Public Feedback Practices in Online Synchronous Teaching. Paper presented at the PASHE 2021 – EAP Education and Practice: Supporting Students’ Needs, UCL (IOE).
  • Au, I. & Yiu, C. (2021). ‘Identity game’: so you think you are what your Instagram bio says about you. Paper presented at the Sociolinguistics Symposium 23, Hong Kong.
  • Au, I. (2021). The magic of breakout rooms in online synchronous teaching and learning of English. Paper presented at the 3rd International Conference on English Across the Curriculum, Hong Kong.
  • Choi, T. H., Chan, H., & Au, I. (2018). ‘Now you’re talking’: Teacher preparation through alumni talks in a community of practice. Paper presented at the Oxford Education Research Symposium.
  • Au, I. (2018). Branching out from the tree: Extending vocabulary acquisition with polysemy. Paper presented at HKBU-HU First Joint Symposium on Education 2018.

 

Supervisors

Elizabeth Wonnacott and Victoria Murphy

Thomas Procter-Legg is a DPhil Student in the Department of Education and is researching restorative practice within the context of special educational needs and disabilities.

His previous experience includes five years as the Head Teacher of a special academy in Oxfordshire UK, specialising in education for students with Special Educational Needs and Disabilities. He has also worked as a SEND Reviewer for Whole School SEND; a Teaching School Director; and as the Principal Designate on a successful Free School bid.

Thomas is passionate about restorative practice and is involved in many communities of practice, such as the Global Alliance for Restorative Justice and Social Justice, where he is a member of the research sub-group exploring the interactions between restorative justice and social justice.

Thomas is also a strong advocate for creativity in education; having previously gained a Fine Art degree from Chelsea College of Art. This heavily influenced his educational leadership and during his time as a Head Teacher, he became the co-founder of a co-constructed initiative between the academy and the University of Oxford Gardens Libraries and Museums. This work placed cultural learning opportunities and relationships at the heart of the curriculum and is the longest standing project between a special school and The University of Oxford. This sustainable partnership champions marginalised voices and has been highly celebrated e.g., inclusion in the Durham Commission for Creativity in Education; recent dissemination at the Museum Ideas Conference 2022; highly commended award at the Museum and Heritage Awards 2021; and awarded Platinum ArtsMark in 2021.

Whilst this creative work may seem to be separate from restorative practice, Thomas subscribes to the idea that there are significant overlaps, both within pedagogical practice and wider school culture, topics which his current research touch on within the context of special education.

 

Publications

Procter-Legg. (2022). A Discourse on Restorative Practice—Participants’ Views of a Divergent Ideology. Laws11(6), 86–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11060086

Procter-Legg. (2022). Practitioner Perspectives on a Restorative Community: An Inductive Evaluative Study of Conceptual, Pedagogical, and Routine Practice. Laws11(1), 4–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11010004

 

Supervisors

Ian Thompson and Jason Todd

Ivan is currently serving as a Facilitator (Teaching) in the Vice-Chancellor’s Colloquium and as an Editor of the Graduate Inequality Review in the University of Oxford. He has taken up lecturerships in a number of universities in Hong Kong and has run Education, Linguistics, Applied Linguistics, Sociolinguistics, and Academic English courses at undergraduate and postgraduate level.

Prior to joining Oxford, Ivan received his teacher-training in Hong Kong and his postgraduate training in Linguistics (with a specialisation in pragmatics) at University College London. His research interests include: mental representation of word meanings, language acquisition, educational technology, and ELT pedagogy.

Publications

  • Au, I. (2021). Unwinding the Fantasy: Using Breakout Rooms to Promote Language Exposure and Less-Public Feedback Practices in Online Synchronous Teaching. Paper presented at the PASHE 2021 – EAP Education and Practice: Supporting Students’ Needs, UCL (IOE).
  • Au, I. & Yiu, C. (2021). ‘Identity game’: so you think you are what your Instagram bio says about you. Paper presented at the Sociolinguistics Symposium 23, Hong Kong.
  • Au, I. (2021). The magic of breakout rooms in online synchronous teaching and learning of English. Paper presented at the 3rd International Conference on English Across the Curriculum, Hong Kong.
  • Choi, T. H., Chan, H., & Au, I. (2018). ‘Now you’re talking’: Teacher preparation through alumni talks in a community of practice. Paper presented at the Oxford Education Research Symposium.
  • Au, I. (2018). Branching out from the tree: Extending vocabulary acquisition with polysemy. Paper presented at HKBU-HU First Joint Symposium on Education 2018.

 

Supervisors

Elizabeth Wonnacott and Victoria Murphy

Thomas Procter-Legg is a DPhil Student in the Department of Education and is researching restorative practice within the context of special educational needs and disabilities.

His previous experience includes five years as the Head Teacher of a special academy in Oxfordshire UK, specialising in education for students with Special Educational Needs and Disabilities. He has also worked as a SEND Reviewer for Whole School SEND; a Teaching School Director; and as the Principal Designate on a successful Free School bid.

Thomas is passionate about restorative practice and is involved in many communities of practice, such as the Global Alliance for Restorative Justice and Social Justice, where he is a member of the research sub-group exploring the interactions between restorative justice and social justice.

Thomas is also a strong advocate for creativity in education; having previously gained a Fine Art degree from Chelsea College of Art. This heavily influenced his educational leadership and during his time as a Head Teacher, he became the co-founder of a co-constructed initiative between the academy and the University of Oxford Gardens Libraries and Museums. This work placed cultural learning opportunities and relationships at the heart of the curriculum and is the longest standing project between a special school and The University of Oxford. This sustainable partnership champions marginalised voices and has been highly celebrated e.g., inclusion in the Durham Commission for Creativity in Education; recent dissemination at the Museum Ideas Conference 2022; highly commended award at the Museum and Heritage Awards 2021; and awarded Platinum ArtsMark in 2021.

Whilst this creative work may seem to be separate from restorative practice, Thomas subscribes to the idea that there are significant overlaps, both within pedagogical practice and wider school culture, topics which his current research touch on within the context of special education.

 

Publications

Procter-Legg. (2022). A Discourse on Restorative Practice—Participants’ Views of a Divergent Ideology. Laws11(6), 86–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11060086

Procter-Legg. (2022). Practitioner Perspectives on a Restorative Community: An Inductive Evaluative Study of Conceptual, Pedagogical, and Routine Practice. Laws11(1), 4–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11010004

 

Supervisors

Ian Thompson and Jason Todd

Ivan is currently serving as a Facilitator (Teaching) in the Vice-Chancellor’s Colloquium and as an Editor of the Graduate Inequality Review in the University of Oxford. He has taken up lecturerships in a number of universities in Hong Kong and has run Education, Linguistics, Applied Linguistics, Sociolinguistics, and Academic English courses at undergraduate and postgraduate level.

Prior to joining Oxford, Ivan received his teacher-training in Hong Kong and his postgraduate training in Linguistics (with a specialisation in pragmatics) at University College London. His research interests include: mental representation of word meanings, language acquisition, educational technology, and ELT pedagogy.

Publications

  • Au, I. (2021). Unwinding the Fantasy: Using Breakout Rooms to Promote Language Exposure and Less-Public Feedback Practices in Online Synchronous Teaching. Paper presented at the PASHE 2021 – EAP Education and Practice: Supporting Students’ Needs, UCL (IOE).
  • Au, I. & Yiu, C. (2021). ‘Identity game’: so you think you are what your Instagram bio says about you. Paper presented at the Sociolinguistics Symposium 23, Hong Kong.
  • Au, I. (2021). The magic of breakout rooms in online synchronous teaching and learning of English. Paper presented at the 3rd International Conference on English Across the Curriculum, Hong Kong.
  • Choi, T. H., Chan, H., & Au, I. (2018). ‘Now you’re talking’: Teacher preparation through alumni talks in a community of practice. Paper presented at the Oxford Education Research Symposium.
  • Au, I. (2018). Branching out from the tree: Extending vocabulary acquisition with polysemy. Paper presented at HKBU-HU First Joint Symposium on Education 2018.

 

Supervisors

Elizabeth Wonnacott and Victoria Murphy

Thomas Procter-Legg is a DPhil Student in the Department of Education and is researching restorative practice within the context of special educational needs and disabilities.

His previous experience includes five years as the Head Teacher of a special academy in Oxfordshire UK, specialising in education for students with Special Educational Needs and Disabilities. He has also worked as a SEND Reviewer for Whole School SEND; a Teaching School Director; and as the Principal Designate on a successful Free School bid.

Thomas is passionate about restorative practice and is involved in many communities of practice, such as the Global Alliance for Restorative Justice and Social Justice, where he is a member of the research sub-group exploring the interactions between restorative justice and social justice.

Thomas is also a strong advocate for creativity in education; having previously gained a Fine Art degree from Chelsea College of Art. This heavily influenced his educational leadership and during his time as a Head Teacher, he became the co-founder of a co-constructed initiative between the academy and the University of Oxford Gardens Libraries and Museums. This work placed cultural learning opportunities and relationships at the heart of the curriculum and is the longest standing project between a special school and The University of Oxford. This sustainable partnership champions marginalised voices and has been highly celebrated e.g., inclusion in the Durham Commission for Creativity in Education; recent dissemination at the Museum Ideas Conference 2022; highly commended award at the Museum and Heritage Awards 2021; and awarded Platinum ArtsMark in 2021.

Whilst this creative work may seem to be separate from restorative practice, Thomas subscribes to the idea that there are significant overlaps, both within pedagogical practice and wider school culture, topics which his current research touch on within the context of special education.

 

Publications

Procter-Legg. (2022). A Discourse on Restorative Practice—Participants’ Views of a Divergent Ideology. Laws11(6), 86–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11060086

Procter-Legg. (2022). Practitioner Perspectives on a Restorative Community: An Inductive Evaluative Study of Conceptual, Pedagogical, and Routine Practice. Laws11(1), 4–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11010004

 

Supervisors

Ian Thompson and Jason Todd

Ivan is currently serving as a Facilitator (Teaching) in the Vice-Chancellor’s Colloquium and as an Editor of the Graduate Inequality Review in the University of Oxford. He has taken up lecturerships in a number of universities in Hong Kong and has run Education, Linguistics, Applied Linguistics, Sociolinguistics, and Academic English courses at undergraduate and postgraduate level.

Prior to joining Oxford, Ivan received his teacher-training in Hong Kong and his postgraduate training in Linguistics (with a specialisation in pragmatics) at University College London. His research interests include: mental representation of word meanings, language acquisition, educational technology, and ELT pedagogy.

Publications

  • Au, I. (2021). Unwinding the Fantasy: Using Breakout Rooms to Promote Language Exposure and Less-Public Feedback Practices in Online Synchronous Teaching. Paper presented at the PASHE 2021 – EAP Education and Practice: Supporting Students’ Needs, UCL (IOE).
  • Au, I. & Yiu, C. (2021). ‘Identity game’: so you think you are what your Instagram bio says about you. Paper presented at the Sociolinguistics Symposium 23, Hong Kong.
  • Au, I. (2021). The magic of breakout rooms in online synchronous teaching and learning of English. Paper presented at the 3rd International Conference on English Across the Curriculum, Hong Kong.
  • Choi, T. H., Chan, H., & Au, I. (2018). ‘Now you’re talking’: Teacher preparation through alumni talks in a community of practice. Paper presented at the Oxford Education Research Symposium.
  • Au, I. (2018). Branching out from the tree: Extending vocabulary acquisition with polysemy. Paper presented at HKBU-HU First Joint Symposium on Education 2018.

 

Supervisors

Elizabeth Wonnacott and Victoria Murphy

Thomas Procter-Legg is a DPhil Student in the Department of Education and is researching restorative practice within the context of special educational needs and disabilities.

His previous experience includes five years as the Head Teacher of a special academy in Oxfordshire UK, specialising in education for students with Special Educational Needs and Disabilities. He has also worked as a SEND Reviewer for Whole School SEND; a Teaching School Director; and as the Principal Designate on a successful Free School bid.

Thomas is passionate about restorative practice and is involved in many communities of practice, such as the Global Alliance for Restorative Justice and Social Justice, where he is a member of the research sub-group exploring the interactions between restorative justice and social justice.

Thomas is also a strong advocate for creativity in education; having previously gained a Fine Art degree from Chelsea College of Art. This heavily influenced his educational leadership and during his time as a Head Teacher, he became the co-founder of a co-constructed initiative between the academy and the University of Oxford Gardens Libraries and Museums. This work placed cultural learning opportunities and relationships at the heart of the curriculum and is the longest standing project between a special school and The University of Oxford. This sustainable partnership champions marginalised voices and has been highly celebrated e.g., inclusion in the Durham Commission for Creativity in Education; recent dissemination at the Museum Ideas Conference 2022; highly commended award at the Museum and Heritage Awards 2021; and awarded Platinum ArtsMark in 2021.

Whilst this creative work may seem to be separate from restorative practice, Thomas subscribes to the idea that there are significant overlaps, both within pedagogical practice and wider school culture, topics which his current research touch on within the context of special education.

 

Publications

Procter-Legg. (2022). A Discourse on Restorative Practice—Participants’ Views of a Divergent Ideology. Laws11(6), 86–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11060086

Procter-Legg. (2022). Practitioner Perspectives on a Restorative Community: An Inductive Evaluative Study of Conceptual, Pedagogical, and Routine Practice. Laws11(1), 4–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11010004

 

Supervisors

Ian Thompson and Jason Todd

Ivan is currently serving as a Facilitator (Teaching) in the Vice-Chancellor’s Colloquium and as an Editor of the Graduate Inequality Review in the University of Oxford. He has taken up lecturerships in a number of universities in Hong Kong and has run Education, Linguistics, Applied Linguistics, Sociolinguistics, and Academic English courses at undergraduate and postgraduate level.

Prior to joining Oxford, Ivan received his teacher-training in Hong Kong and his postgraduate training in Linguistics (with a specialisation in pragmatics) at University College London. His research interests include: mental representation of word meanings, language acquisition, educational technology, and ELT pedagogy.

Publications

  • Au, I. (2021). Unwinding the Fantasy: Using Breakout Rooms to Promote Language Exposure and Less-Public Feedback Practices in Online Synchronous Teaching. Paper presented at the PASHE 2021 – EAP Education and Practice: Supporting Students’ Needs, UCL (IOE).
  • Au, I. & Yiu, C. (2021). ‘Identity game’: so you think you are what your Instagram bio says about you. Paper presented at the Sociolinguistics Symposium 23, Hong Kong.
  • Au, I. (2021). The magic of breakout rooms in online synchronous teaching and learning of English. Paper presented at the 3rd International Conference on English Across the Curriculum, Hong Kong.
  • Choi, T. H., Chan, H., & Au, I. (2018). ‘Now you’re talking’: Teacher preparation through alumni talks in a community of practice. Paper presented at the Oxford Education Research Symposium.
  • Au, I. (2018). Branching out from the tree: Extending vocabulary acquisition with polysemy. Paper presented at HKBU-HU First Joint Symposium on Education 2018.

 

Supervisors

Elizabeth Wonnacott and Victoria Murphy

Thomas Procter-Legg is a DPhil Student in the Department of Education and is researching restorative practice within the context of special educational needs and disabilities.

His previous experience includes five years as the Head Teacher of a special academy in Oxfordshire UK, specialising in education for students with Special Educational Needs and Disabilities. He has also worked as a SEND Reviewer for Whole School SEND; a Teaching School Director; and as the Principal Designate on a successful Free School bid.

Thomas is passionate about restorative practice and is involved in many communities of practice, such as the Global Alliance for Restorative Justice and Social Justice, where he is a member of the research sub-group exploring the interactions between restorative justice and social justice.

Thomas is also a strong advocate for creativity in education; having previously gained a Fine Art degree from Chelsea College of Art. This heavily influenced his educational leadership and during his time as a Head Teacher, he became the co-founder of a co-constructed initiative between the academy and the University of Oxford Gardens Libraries and Museums. This work placed cultural learning opportunities and relationships at the heart of the curriculum and is the longest standing project between a special school and The University of Oxford. This sustainable partnership champions marginalised voices and has been highly celebrated e.g., inclusion in the Durham Commission for Creativity in Education; recent dissemination at the Museum Ideas Conference 2022; highly commended award at the Museum and Heritage Awards 2021; and awarded Platinum ArtsMark in 2021.

Whilst this creative work may seem to be separate from restorative practice, Thomas subscribes to the idea that there are significant overlaps, both within pedagogical practice and wider school culture, topics which his current research touch on within the context of special education.

 

Publications

Procter-Legg. (2022). A Discourse on Restorative Practice—Participants’ Views of a Divergent Ideology. Laws11(6), 86–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11060086

Procter-Legg. (2022). Practitioner Perspectives on a Restorative Community: An Inductive Evaluative Study of Conceptual, Pedagogical, and Routine Practice. Laws11(1), 4–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11010004

 

Supervisors

Ian Thompson and Jason Todd

Ivan is currently serving as a Facilitator (Teaching) in the Vice-Chancellor’s Colloquium and as an Editor of the Graduate Inequality Review in the University of Oxford. He has taken up lecturerships in a number of universities in Hong Kong and has run Education, Linguistics, Applied Linguistics, Sociolinguistics, and Academic English courses at undergraduate and postgraduate level.

Prior to joining Oxford, Ivan received his teacher-training in Hong Kong and his postgraduate training in Linguistics (with a specialisation in pragmatics) at University College London. His research interests include: mental representation of word meanings, language acquisition, educational technology, and ELT pedagogy.

Publications

  • Au, I. (2021). Unwinding the Fantasy: Using Breakout Rooms to Promote Language Exposure and Less-Public Feedback Practices in Online Synchronous Teaching. Paper presented at the PASHE 2021 – EAP Education and Practice: Supporting Students’ Needs, UCL (IOE).
  • Au, I. & Yiu, C. (2021). ‘Identity game’: so you think you are what your Instagram bio says about you. Paper presented at the Sociolinguistics Symposium 23, Hong Kong.
  • Au, I. (2021). The magic of breakout rooms in online synchronous teaching and learning of English. Paper presented at the 3rd International Conference on English Across the Curriculum, Hong Kong.
  • Choi, T. H., Chan, H., & Au, I. (2018). ‘Now you’re talking’: Teacher preparation through alumni talks in a community of practice. Paper presented at the Oxford Education Research Symposium.
  • Au, I. (2018). Branching out from the tree: Extending vocabulary acquisition with polysemy. Paper presented at HKBU-HU First Joint Symposium on Education 2018.

 

Supervisors

Elizabeth Wonnacott and Victoria Murphy

Thomas Procter-Legg is a DPhil Student in the Department of Education and is researching restorative practice within the context of special educational needs and disabilities.

His previous experience includes five years as the Head Teacher of a special academy in Oxfordshire UK, specialising in education for students with Special Educational Needs and Disabilities. He has also worked as a SEND Reviewer for Whole School SEND; a Teaching School Director; and as the Principal Designate on a successful Free School bid.

Thomas is passionate about restorative practice and is involved in many communities of practice, such as the Global Alliance for Restorative Justice and Social Justice, where he is a member of the research sub-group exploring the interactions between restorative justice and social justice.

Thomas is also a strong advocate for creativity in education; having previously gained a Fine Art degree from Chelsea College of Art. This heavily influenced his educational leadership and during his time as a Head Teacher, he became the co-founder of a co-constructed initiative between the academy and the University of Oxford Gardens Libraries and Museums. This work placed cultural learning opportunities and relationships at the heart of the curriculum and is the longest standing project between a special school and The University of Oxford. This sustainable partnership champions marginalised voices and has been highly celebrated e.g., inclusion in the Durham Commission for Creativity in Education; recent dissemination at the Museum Ideas Conference 2022; highly commended award at the Museum and Heritage Awards 2021; and awarded Platinum ArtsMark in 2021.

Whilst this creative work may seem to be separate from restorative practice, Thomas subscribes to the idea that there are significant overlaps, both within pedagogical practice and wider school culture, topics which his current research touch on within the context of special education.

 

Publications

Procter-Legg. (2022). A Discourse on Restorative Practice—Participants’ Views of a Divergent Ideology. Laws11(6), 86–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11060086

Procter-Legg. (2022). Practitioner Perspectives on a Restorative Community: An Inductive Evaluative Study of Conceptual, Pedagogical, and Routine Practice. Laws11(1), 4–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11010004

 

Supervisors

Ian Thompson and Jason Todd

Ivan is currently serving as a Facilitator (Teaching) in the Vice-Chancellor’s Colloquium and as an Editor of the Graduate Inequality Review in the University of Oxford. He has taken up lecturerships in a number of universities in Hong Kong and has run Education, Linguistics, Applied Linguistics, Sociolinguistics, and Academic English courses at undergraduate and postgraduate level.

Prior to joining Oxford, Ivan received his teacher-training in Hong Kong and his postgraduate training in Linguistics (with a specialisation in pragmatics) at University College London. His research interests include: mental representation of word meanings, language acquisition, educational technology, and ELT pedagogy.

Publications

  • Au, I. (2021). Unwinding the Fantasy: Using Breakout Rooms to Promote Language Exposure and Less-Public Feedback Practices in Online Synchronous Teaching. Paper presented at the PASHE 2021 – EAP Education and Practice: Supporting Students’ Needs, UCL (IOE).
  • Au, I. & Yiu, C. (2021). ‘Identity game’: so you think you are what your Instagram bio says about you. Paper presented at the Sociolinguistics Symposium 23, Hong Kong.
  • Au, I. (2021). The magic of breakout rooms in online synchronous teaching and learning of English. Paper presented at the 3rd International Conference on English Across the Curriculum, Hong Kong.
  • Choi, T. H., Chan, H., & Au, I. (2018). ‘Now you’re talking’: Teacher preparation through alumni talks in a community of practice. Paper presented at the Oxford Education Research Symposium.
  • Au, I. (2018). Branching out from the tree: Extending vocabulary acquisition with polysemy. Paper presented at HKBU-HU First Joint Symposium on Education 2018.

 

Supervisors

Elizabeth Wonnacott and Victoria Murphy

Thomas Procter-Legg is a DPhil Student in the Department of Education and is researching restorative practice within the context of special educational needs and disabilities.

His previous experience includes five years as the Head Teacher of a special academy in Oxfordshire UK, specialising in education for students with Special Educational Needs and Disabilities. He has also worked as a SEND Reviewer for Whole School SEND; a Teaching School Director; and as the Principal Designate on a successful Free School bid.

Thomas is passionate about restorative practice and is involved in many communities of practice, such as the Global Alliance for Restorative Justice and Social Justice, where he is a member of the research sub-group exploring the interactions between restorative justice and social justice.

Thomas is also a strong advocate for creativity in education; having previously gained a Fine Art degree from Chelsea College of Art. This heavily influenced his educational leadership and during his time as a Head Teacher, he became the co-founder of a co-constructed initiative between the academy and the University of Oxford Gardens Libraries and Museums. This work placed cultural learning opportunities and relationships at the heart of the curriculum and is the longest standing project between a special school and The University of Oxford. This sustainable partnership champions marginalised voices and has been highly celebrated e.g., inclusion in the Durham Commission for Creativity in Education; recent dissemination at the Museum Ideas Conference 2022; highly commended award at the Museum and Heritage Awards 2021; and awarded Platinum ArtsMark in 2021.

Whilst this creative work may seem to be separate from restorative practice, Thomas subscribes to the idea that there are significant overlaps, both within pedagogical practice and wider school culture, topics which his current research touch on within the context of special education.

 

Publications

Procter-Legg. (2022). A Discourse on Restorative Practice—Participants’ Views of a Divergent Ideology. Laws11(6), 86–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11060086

Procter-Legg. (2022). Practitioner Perspectives on a Restorative Community: An Inductive Evaluative Study of Conceptual, Pedagogical, and Routine Practice. Laws11(1), 4–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11010004

 

Supervisors

Ian Thompson and Jason Todd

Ivan is currently serving as a Facilitator (Teaching) in the Vice-Chancellor’s Colloquium and as an Editor of the Graduate Inequality Review in the University of Oxford. He has taken up lecturerships in a number of universities in Hong Kong and has run Education, Linguistics, Applied Linguistics, Sociolinguistics, and Academic English courses at undergraduate and postgraduate level.

Prior to joining Oxford, Ivan received his teacher-training in Hong Kong and his postgraduate training in Linguistics (with a specialisation in pragmatics) at University College London. His research interests include: mental representation of word meanings, language acquisition, educational technology, and ELT pedagogy.

Publications

  • Au, I. (2021). Unwinding the Fantasy: Using Breakout Rooms to Promote Language Exposure and Less-Public Feedback Practices in Online Synchronous Teaching. Paper presented at the PASHE 2021 – EAP Education and Practice: Supporting Students’ Needs, UCL (IOE).
  • Au, I. & Yiu, C. (2021). ‘Identity game’: so you think you are what your Instagram bio says about you. Paper presented at the Sociolinguistics Symposium 23, Hong Kong.
  • Au, I. (2021). The magic of breakout rooms in online synchronous teaching and learning of English. Paper presented at the 3rd International Conference on English Across the Curriculum, Hong Kong.
  • Choi, T. H., Chan, H., & Au, I. (2018). ‘Now you’re talking’: Teacher preparation through alumni talks in a community of practice. Paper presented at the Oxford Education Research Symposium.
  • Au, I. (2018). Branching out from the tree: Extending vocabulary acquisition with polysemy. Paper presented at HKBU-HU First Joint Symposium on Education 2018.

 

Supervisors

Elizabeth Wonnacott and Victoria Murphy

Thomas Procter-Legg is a DPhil Student in the Department of Education and is researching restorative practice within the context of special educational needs and disabilities.

His previous experience includes five years as the Head Teacher of a special academy in Oxfordshire UK, specialising in education for students with Special Educational Needs and Disabilities. He has also worked as a SEND Reviewer for Whole School SEND; a Teaching School Director; and as the Principal Designate on a successful Free School bid.

Thomas is passionate about restorative practice and is involved in many communities of practice, such as the Global Alliance for Restorative Justice and Social Justice, where he is a member of the research sub-group exploring the interactions between restorative justice and social justice.

Thomas is also a strong advocate for creativity in education; having previously gained a Fine Art degree from Chelsea College of Art. This heavily influenced his educational leadership and during his time as a Head Teacher, he became the co-founder of a co-constructed initiative between the academy and the University of Oxford Gardens Libraries and Museums. This work placed cultural learning opportunities and relationships at the heart of the curriculum and is the longest standing project between a special school and The University of Oxford. This sustainable partnership champions marginalised voices and has been highly celebrated e.g., inclusion in the Durham Commission for Creativity in Education; recent dissemination at the Museum Ideas Conference 2022; highly commended award at the Museum and Heritage Awards 2021; and awarded Platinum ArtsMark in 2021.

Whilst this creative work may seem to be separate from restorative practice, Thomas subscribes to the idea that there are significant overlaps, both within pedagogical practice and wider school culture, topics which his current research touch on within the context of special education.

 

Publications

Procter-Legg. (2022). A Discourse on Restorative Practice—Participants’ Views of a Divergent Ideology. Laws11(6), 86–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11060086

Procter-Legg. (2022). Practitioner Perspectives on a Restorative Community: An Inductive Evaluative Study of Conceptual, Pedagogical, and Routine Practice. Laws11(1), 4–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11010004

 

Supervisors

Ian Thompson and Jason Todd

Ivan is currently serving as a Facilitator (Teaching) in the Vice-Chancellor’s Colloquium and as an Editor of the Graduate Inequality Review in the University of Oxford. He has taken up lecturerships in a number of universities in Hong Kong and has run Education, Linguistics, Applied Linguistics, Sociolinguistics, and Academic English courses at undergraduate and postgraduate level.

Prior to joining Oxford, Ivan received his teacher-training in Hong Kong and his postgraduate training in Linguistics (with a specialisation in pragmatics) at University College London. His research interests include: mental representation of word meanings, language acquisition, educational technology, and ELT pedagogy.

Publications

  • Au, I. (2021). Unwinding the Fantasy: Using Breakout Rooms to Promote Language Exposure and Less-Public Feedback Practices in Online Synchronous Teaching. Paper presented at the PASHE 2021 – EAP Education and Practice: Supporting Students’ Needs, UCL (IOE).
  • Au, I. & Yiu, C. (2021). ‘Identity game’: so you think you are what your Instagram bio says about you. Paper presented at the Sociolinguistics Symposium 23, Hong Kong.
  • Au, I. (2021). The magic of breakout rooms in online synchronous teaching and learning of English. Paper presented at the 3rd International Conference on English Across the Curriculum, Hong Kong.
  • Choi, T. H., Chan, H., & Au, I. (2018). ‘Now you’re talking’: Teacher preparation through alumni talks in a community of practice. Paper presented at the Oxford Education Research Symposium.
  • Au, I. (2018). Branching out from the tree: Extending vocabulary acquisition with polysemy. Paper presented at HKBU-HU First Joint Symposium on Education 2018.

 

Supervisors

Elizabeth Wonnacott and Victoria Murphy

Thomas Procter-Legg is a DPhil Student in the Department of Education and is researching restorative practice within the context of special educational needs and disabilities.

His previous experience includes five years as the Head Teacher of a special academy in Oxfordshire UK, specialising in education for students with Special Educational Needs and Disabilities. He has also worked as a SEND Reviewer for Whole School SEND; a Teaching School Director; and as the Principal Designate on a successful Free School bid.

Thomas is passionate about restorative practice and is involved in many communities of practice, such as the Global Alliance for Restorative Justice and Social Justice, where he is a member of the research sub-group exploring the interactions between restorative justice and social justice.

Thomas is also a strong advocate for creativity in education; having previously gained a Fine Art degree from Chelsea College of Art. This heavily influenced his educational leadership and during his time as a Head Teacher, he became the co-founder of a co-constructed initiative between the academy and the University of Oxford Gardens Libraries and Museums. This work placed cultural learning opportunities and relationships at the heart of the curriculum and is the longest standing project between a special school and The University of Oxford. This sustainable partnership champions marginalised voices and has been highly celebrated e.g., inclusion in the Durham Commission for Creativity in Education; recent dissemination at the Museum Ideas Conference 2022; highly commended award at the Museum and Heritage Awards 2021; and awarded Platinum ArtsMark in 2021.

Whilst this creative work may seem to be separate from restorative practice, Thomas subscribes to the idea that there are significant overlaps, both within pedagogical practice and wider school culture, topics which his current research touch on within the context of special education.

 

Publications

Procter-Legg. (2022). A Discourse on Restorative Practice—Participants’ Views of a Divergent Ideology. Laws11(6), 86–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11060086

Procter-Legg. (2022). Practitioner Perspectives on a Restorative Community: An Inductive Evaluative Study of Conceptual, Pedagogical, and Routine Practice. Laws11(1), 4–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11010004

 

Supervisors

Ian Thompson and Jason Todd

Ivan is currently serving as a Facilitator (Teaching) in the Vice-Chancellor’s Colloquium and as an Editor of the Graduate Inequality Review in the University of Oxford. He has taken up lecturerships in a number of universities in Hong Kong and has run Education, Linguistics, Applied Linguistics, Sociolinguistics, and Academic English courses at undergraduate and postgraduate level.

Prior to joining Oxford, Ivan received his teacher-training in Hong Kong and his postgraduate training in Linguistics (with a specialisation in pragmatics) at University College London. His research interests include: mental representation of word meanings, language acquisition, educational technology, and ELT pedagogy.

Publications

  • Au, I. (2021). Unwinding the Fantasy: Using Breakout Rooms to Promote Language Exposure and Less-Public Feedback Practices in Online Synchronous Teaching. Paper presented at the PASHE 2021 – EAP Education and Practice: Supporting Students’ Needs, UCL (IOE).
  • Au, I. & Yiu, C. (2021). ‘Identity game’: so you think you are what your Instagram bio says about you. Paper presented at the Sociolinguistics Symposium 23, Hong Kong.
  • Au, I. (2021). The magic of breakout rooms in online synchronous teaching and learning of English. Paper presented at the 3rd International Conference on English Across the Curriculum, Hong Kong.
  • Choi, T. H., Chan, H., & Au, I. (2018). ‘Now you’re talking’: Teacher preparation through alumni talks in a community of practice. Paper presented at the Oxford Education Research Symposium.
  • Au, I. (2018). Branching out from the tree: Extending vocabulary acquisition with polysemy. Paper presented at HKBU-HU First Joint Symposium on Education 2018.

 

Supervisors

Elizabeth Wonnacott and Victoria Murphy

Thomas Procter-Legg is a DPhil Student in the Department of Education and is researching restorative practice within the context of special educational needs and disabilities.

His previous experience includes five years as the Head Teacher of a special academy in Oxfordshire UK, specialising in education for students with Special Educational Needs and Disabilities. He has also worked as a SEND Reviewer for Whole School SEND; a Teaching School Director; and as the Principal Designate on a successful Free School bid.

Thomas is passionate about restorative practice and is involved in many communities of practice, such as the Global Alliance for Restorative Justice and Social Justice, where he is a member of the research sub-group exploring the interactions between restorative justice and social justice.

Thomas is also a strong advocate for creativity in education; having previously gained a Fine Art degree from Chelsea College of Art. This heavily influenced his educational leadership and during his time as a Head Teacher, he became the co-founder of a co-constructed initiative between the academy and the University of Oxford Gardens Libraries and Museums. This work placed cultural learning opportunities and relationships at the heart of the curriculum and is the longest standing project between a special school and The University of Oxford. This sustainable partnership champions marginalised voices and has been highly celebrated e.g., inclusion in the Durham Commission for Creativity in Education; recent dissemination at the Museum Ideas Conference 2022; highly commended award at the Museum and Heritage Awards 2021; and awarded Platinum ArtsMark in 2021.

Whilst this creative work may seem to be separate from restorative practice, Thomas subscribes to the idea that there are significant overlaps, both within pedagogical practice and wider school culture, topics which his current research touch on within the context of special education.

 

Publications

Procter-Legg. (2022). A Discourse on Restorative Practice—Participants’ Views of a Divergent Ideology. Laws11(6), 86–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11060086

Procter-Legg. (2022). Practitioner Perspectives on a Restorative Community: An Inductive Evaluative Study of Conceptual, Pedagogical, and Routine Practice. Laws11(1), 4–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11010004

 

Supervisors

Ian Thompson and Jason Todd

Ivan is currently serving as a Facilitator (Teaching) in the Vice-Chancellor’s Colloquium and as an Editor of the Graduate Inequality Review in the University of Oxford. He has taken up lecturerships in a number of universities in Hong Kong and has run Education, Linguistics, Applied Linguistics, Sociolinguistics, and Academic English courses at undergraduate and postgraduate level.

Prior to joining Oxford, Ivan received his teacher-training in Hong Kong and his postgraduate training in Linguistics (with a specialisation in pragmatics) at University College London. His research interests include: mental representation of word meanings, language acquisition, educational technology, and ELT pedagogy.

Publications

  • Au, I. (2021). Unwinding the Fantasy: Using Breakout Rooms to Promote Language Exposure and Less-Public Feedback Practices in Online Synchronous Teaching. Paper presented at the PASHE 2021 – EAP Education and Practice: Supporting Students’ Needs, UCL (IOE).
  • Au, I. & Yiu, C. (2021). ‘Identity game’: so you think you are what your Instagram bio says about you. Paper presented at the Sociolinguistics Symposium 23, Hong Kong.
  • Au, I. (2021). The magic of breakout rooms in online synchronous teaching and learning of English. Paper presented at the 3rd International Conference on English Across the Curriculum, Hong Kong.
  • Choi, T. H., Chan, H., & Au, I. (2018). ‘Now you’re talking’: Teacher preparation through alumni talks in a community of practice. Paper presented at the Oxford Education Research Symposium.
  • Au, I. (2018). Branching out from the tree: Extending vocabulary acquisition with polysemy. Paper presented at HKBU-HU First Joint Symposium on Education 2018.

 

Supervisors

Elizabeth Wonnacott and Victoria Murphy

Thomas Procter-Legg is a DPhil Student in the Department of Education and is researching restorative practice within the context of special educational needs and disabilities.

His previous experience includes five years as the Head Teacher of a special academy in Oxfordshire UK, specialising in education for students with Special Educational Needs and Disabilities. He has also worked as a SEND Reviewer for Whole School SEND; a Teaching School Director; and as the Principal Designate on a successful Free School bid.

Thomas is passionate about restorative practice and is involved in many communities of practice, such as the Global Alliance for Restorative Justice and Social Justice, where he is a member of the research sub-group exploring the interactions between restorative justice and social justice.

Thomas is also a strong advocate for creativity in education; having previously gained a Fine Art degree from Chelsea College of Art. This heavily influenced his educational leadership and during his time as a Head Teacher, he became the co-founder of a co-constructed initiative between the academy and the University of Oxford Gardens Libraries and Museums. This work placed cultural learning opportunities and relationships at the heart of the curriculum and is the longest standing project between a special school and The University of Oxford. This sustainable partnership champions marginalised voices and has been highly celebrated e.g., inclusion in the Durham Commission for Creativity in Education; recent dissemination at the Museum Ideas Conference 2022; highly commended award at the Museum and Heritage Awards 2021; and awarded Platinum ArtsMark in 2021.

Whilst this creative work may seem to be separate from restorative practice, Thomas subscribes to the idea that there are significant overlaps, both within pedagogical practice and wider school culture, topics which his current research touch on within the context of special education.

 

Publications

Procter-Legg. (2022). A Discourse on Restorative Practice—Participants’ Views of a Divergent Ideology. Laws11(6), 86–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11060086

Procter-Legg. (2022). Practitioner Perspectives on a Restorative Community: An Inductive Evaluative Study of Conceptual, Pedagogical, and Routine Practice. Laws11(1), 4–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11010004

 

Supervisors

Ian Thompson and Jason Todd

Ivan is currently serving as a Facilitator (Teaching) in the Vice-Chancellor’s Colloquium and as an Editor of the Graduate Inequality Review in the University of Oxford. He has taken up lecturerships in a number of universities in Hong Kong and has run Education, Linguistics, Applied Linguistics, Sociolinguistics, and Academic English courses at undergraduate and postgraduate level.

Prior to joining Oxford, Ivan received his teacher-training in Hong Kong and his postgraduate training in Linguistics (with a specialisation in pragmatics) at University College London. His research interests include: mental representation of word meanings, language acquisition, educational technology, and ELT pedagogy.

Publications

  • Au, I. (2021). Unwinding the Fantasy: Using Breakout Rooms to Promote Language Exposure and Less-Public Feedback Practices in Online Synchronous Teaching. Paper presented at the PASHE 2021 – EAP Education and Practice: Supporting Students’ Needs, UCL (IOE).
  • Au, I. & Yiu, C. (2021). ‘Identity game’: so you think you are what your Instagram bio says about you. Paper presented at the Sociolinguistics Symposium 23, Hong Kong.
  • Au, I. (2021). The magic of breakout rooms in online synchronous teaching and learning of English. Paper presented at the 3rd International Conference on English Across the Curriculum, Hong Kong.
  • Choi, T. H., Chan, H., & Au, I. (2018). ‘Now you’re talking’: Teacher preparation through alumni talks in a community of practice. Paper presented at the Oxford Education Research Symposium.
  • Au, I. (2018). Branching out from the tree: Extending vocabulary acquisition with polysemy. Paper presented at HKBU-HU First Joint Symposium on Education 2018.

 

Supervisors

Elizabeth Wonnacott and Victoria Murphy

Thomas Procter-Legg is a DPhil Student in the Department of Education and is researching restorative practice within the context of special educational needs and disabilities.

His previous experience includes five years as the Head Teacher of a special academy in Oxfordshire UK, specialising in education for students with Special Educational Needs and Disabilities. He has also worked as a SEND Reviewer for Whole School SEND; a Teaching School Director; and as the Principal Designate on a successful Free School bid.

Thomas is passionate about restorative practice and is involved in many communities of practice, such as the Global Alliance for Restorative Justice and Social Justice, where he is a member of the research sub-group exploring the interactions between restorative justice and social justice.

Thomas is also a strong advocate for creativity in education; having previously gained a Fine Art degree from Chelsea College of Art. This heavily influenced his educational leadership and during his time as a Head Teacher, he became the co-founder of a co-constructed initiative between the academy and the University of Oxford Gardens Libraries and Museums. This work placed cultural learning opportunities and relationships at the heart of the curriculum and is the longest standing project between a special school and The University of Oxford. This sustainable partnership champions marginalised voices and has been highly celebrated e.g., inclusion in the Durham Commission for Creativity in Education; recent dissemination at the Museum Ideas Conference 2022; highly commended award at the Museum and Heritage Awards 2021; and awarded Platinum ArtsMark in 2021.

Whilst this creative work may seem to be separate from restorative practice, Thomas subscribes to the idea that there are significant overlaps, both within pedagogical practice and wider school culture, topics which his current research touch on within the context of special education.

 

Publications

Procter-Legg. (2022). A Discourse on Restorative Practice—Participants’ Views of a Divergent Ideology. Laws11(6), 86–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11060086

Procter-Legg. (2022). Practitioner Perspectives on a Restorative Community: An Inductive Evaluative Study of Conceptual, Pedagogical, and Routine Practice. Laws11(1), 4–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11010004

 

Supervisors

Ian Thompson and Jason Todd

Ivan is currently serving as a Facilitator (Teaching) in the Vice-Chancellor’s Colloquium and as an Editor of the Graduate Inequality Review in the University of Oxford. He has taken up lecturerships in a number of universities in Hong Kong and has run Education, Linguistics, Applied Linguistics, Sociolinguistics, and Academic English courses at undergraduate and postgraduate level.

Prior to joining Oxford, Ivan received his teacher-training in Hong Kong and his postgraduate training in Linguistics (with a specialisation in pragmatics) at University College London. His research interests include: mental representation of word meanings, language acquisition, educational technology, and ELT pedagogy.

Publications

  • Au, I. (2021). Unwinding the Fantasy: Using Breakout Rooms to Promote Language Exposure and Less-Public Feedback Practices in Online Synchronous Teaching. Paper presented at the PASHE 2021 – EAP Education and Practice: Supporting Students’ Needs, UCL (IOE).
  • Au, I. & Yiu, C. (2021). ‘Identity game’: so you think you are what your Instagram bio says about you. Paper presented at the Sociolinguistics Symposium 23, Hong Kong.
  • Au, I. (2021). The magic of breakout rooms in online synchronous teaching and learning of English. Paper presented at the 3rd International Conference on English Across the Curriculum, Hong Kong.
  • Choi, T. H., Chan, H., & Au, I. (2018). ‘Now you’re talking’: Teacher preparation through alumni talks in a community of practice. Paper presented at the Oxford Education Research Symposium.
  • Au, I. (2018). Branching out from the tree: Extending vocabulary acquisition with polysemy. Paper presented at HKBU-HU First Joint Symposium on Education 2018.

 

Supervisors

Elizabeth Wonnacott and Victoria Murphy

Thomas Procter-Legg is a DPhil Student in the Department of Education and is researching restorative practice within the context of special educational needs and disabilities.

His previous experience includes five years as the Head Teacher of a special academy in Oxfordshire UK, specialising in education for students with Special Educational Needs and Disabilities. He has also worked as a SEND Reviewer for Whole School SEND; a Teaching School Director; and as the Principal Designate on a successful Free School bid.

Thomas is passionate about restorative practice and is involved in many communities of practice, such as the Global Alliance for Restorative Justice and Social Justice, where he is a member of the research sub-group exploring the interactions between restorative justice and social justice.

Thomas is also a strong advocate for creativity in education; having previously gained a Fine Art degree from Chelsea College of Art. This heavily influenced his educational leadership and during his time as a Head Teacher, he became the co-founder of a co-constructed initiative between the academy and the University of Oxford Gardens Libraries and Museums. This work placed cultural learning opportunities and relationships at the heart of the curriculum and is the longest standing project between a special school and The University of Oxford. This sustainable partnership champions marginalised voices and has been highly celebrated e.g., inclusion in the Durham Commission for Creativity in Education; recent dissemination at the Museum Ideas Conference 2022; highly commended award at the Museum and Heritage Awards 2021; and awarded Platinum ArtsMark in 2021.

Whilst this creative work may seem to be separate from restorative practice, Thomas subscribes to the idea that there are significant overlaps, both within pedagogical practice and wider school culture, topics which his current research touch on within the context of special education.

 

Publications

Procter-Legg. (2022). A Discourse on Restorative Practice—Participants’ Views of a Divergent Ideology. Laws11(6), 86–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11060086

Procter-Legg. (2022). Practitioner Perspectives on a Restorative Community: An Inductive Evaluative Study of Conceptual, Pedagogical, and Routine Practice. Laws11(1), 4–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11010004

 

Supervisors

Ian Thompson and Jason Todd

Ivan is currently serving as a Facilitator (Teaching) in the Vice-Chancellor’s Colloquium and as an Editor of the Graduate Inequality Review in the University of Oxford. He has taken up lecturerships in a number of universities in Hong Kong and has run Education, Linguistics, Applied Linguistics, Sociolinguistics, and Academic English courses at undergraduate and postgraduate level.

Prior to joining Oxford, Ivan received his teacher-training in Hong Kong and his postgraduate training in Linguistics (with a specialisation in pragmatics) at University College London. His research interests include: mental representation of word meanings, language acquisition, educational technology, and ELT pedagogy.

Publications

  • Au, I. (2021). Unwinding the Fantasy: Using Breakout Rooms to Promote Language Exposure and Less-Public Feedback Practices in Online Synchronous Teaching. Paper presented at the PASHE 2021 – EAP Education and Practice: Supporting Students’ Needs, UCL (IOE).
  • Au, I. & Yiu, C. (2021). ‘Identity game’: so you think you are what your Instagram bio says about you. Paper presented at the Sociolinguistics Symposium 23, Hong Kong.
  • Au, I. (2021). The magic of breakout rooms in online synchronous teaching and learning of English. Paper presented at the 3rd International Conference on English Across the Curriculum, Hong Kong.
  • Choi, T. H., Chan, H., & Au, I. (2018). ‘Now you’re talking’: Teacher preparation through alumni talks in a community of practice. Paper presented at the Oxford Education Research Symposium.
  • Au, I. (2018). Branching out from the tree: Extending vocabulary acquisition with polysemy. Paper presented at HKBU-HU First Joint Symposium on Education 2018.

 

Supervisors

Elizabeth Wonnacott and Victoria Murphy

Thomas Procter-Legg is a DPhil Student in the Department of Education and is researching restorative practice within the context of special educational needs and disabilities.

His previous experience includes five years as the Head Teacher of a special academy in Oxfordshire UK, specialising in education for students with Special Educational Needs and Disabilities. He has also worked as a SEND Reviewer for Whole School SEND; a Teaching School Director; and as the Principal Designate on a successful Free School bid.

Thomas is passionate about restorative practice and is involved in many communities of practice, such as the Global Alliance for Restorative Justice and Social Justice, where he is a member of the research sub-group exploring the interactions between restorative justice and social justice.

Thomas is also a strong advocate for creativity in education; having previously gained a Fine Art degree from Chelsea College of Art. This heavily influenced his educational leadership and during his time as a Head Teacher, he became the co-founder of a co-constructed initiative between the academy and the University of Oxford Gardens Libraries and Museums. This work placed cultural learning opportunities and relationships at the heart of the curriculum and is the longest standing project between a special school and The University of Oxford. This sustainable partnership champions marginalised voices and has been highly celebrated e.g., inclusion in the Durham Commission for Creativity in Education; recent dissemination at the Museum Ideas Conference 2022; highly commended award at the Museum and Heritage Awards 2021; and awarded Platinum ArtsMark in 2021.

Whilst this creative work may seem to be separate from restorative practice, Thomas subscribes to the idea that there are significant overlaps, both within pedagogical practice and wider school culture, topics which his current research touch on within the context of special education.

 

Publications

Procter-Legg. (2022). A Discourse on Restorative Practice—Participants’ Views of a Divergent Ideology. Laws11(6), 86–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11060086

Procter-Legg. (2022). Practitioner Perspectives on a Restorative Community: An Inductive Evaluative Study of Conceptual, Pedagogical, and Routine Practice. Laws11(1), 4–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11010004

 

Supervisors

Ian Thompson and Jason Todd

Ivan is currently serving as a Facilitator (Teaching) in the Vice-Chancellor’s Colloquium and as an Editor of the Graduate Inequality Review in the University of Oxford. He has taken up lecturerships in a number of universities in Hong Kong and has run Education, Linguistics, Applied Linguistics, Sociolinguistics, and Academic English courses at undergraduate and postgraduate level.

Prior to joining Oxford, Ivan received his teacher-training in Hong Kong and his postgraduate training in Linguistics (with a specialisation in pragmatics) at University College London. His research interests include: mental representation of word meanings, language acquisition, educational technology, and ELT pedagogy.

Publications

  • Au, I. (2021). Unwinding the Fantasy: Using Breakout Rooms to Promote Language Exposure and Less-Public Feedback Practices in Online Synchronous Teaching. Paper presented at the PASHE 2021 – EAP Education and Practice: Supporting Students’ Needs, UCL (IOE).
  • Au, I. & Yiu, C. (2021). ‘Identity game’: so you think you are what your Instagram bio says about you. Paper presented at the Sociolinguistics Symposium 23, Hong Kong.
  • Au, I. (2021). The magic of breakout rooms in online synchronous teaching and learning of English. Paper presented at the 3rd International Conference on English Across the Curriculum, Hong Kong.
  • Choi, T. H., Chan, H., & Au, I. (2018). ‘Now you’re talking’: Teacher preparation through alumni talks in a community of practice. Paper presented at the Oxford Education Research Symposium.
  • Au, I. (2018). Branching out from the tree: Extending vocabulary acquisition with polysemy. Paper presented at HKBU-HU First Joint Symposium on Education 2018.

 

Supervisors

Elizabeth Wonnacott and Victoria Murphy

Thomas Procter-Legg is a DPhil Student in the Department of Education and is researching restorative practice within the context of special educational needs and disabilities.

His previous experience includes five years as the Head Teacher of a special academy in Oxfordshire UK, specialising in education for students with Special Educational Needs and Disabilities. He has also worked as a SEND Reviewer for Whole School SEND; a Teaching School Director; and as the Principal Designate on a successful Free School bid.

Thomas is passionate about restorative practice and is involved in many communities of practice, such as the Global Alliance for Restorative Justice and Social Justice, where he is a member of the research sub-group exploring the interactions between restorative justice and social justice.

Thomas is also a strong advocate for creativity in education; having previously gained a Fine Art degree from Chelsea College of Art. This heavily influenced his educational leadership and during his time as a Head Teacher, he became the co-founder of a co-constructed initiative between the academy and the University of Oxford Gardens Libraries and Museums. This work placed cultural learning opportunities and relationships at the heart of the curriculum and is the longest standing project between a special school and The University of Oxford. This sustainable partnership champions marginalised voices and has been highly celebrated e.g., inclusion in the Durham Commission for Creativity in Education; recent dissemination at the Museum Ideas Conference 2022; highly commended award at the Museum and Heritage Awards 2021; and awarded Platinum ArtsMark in 2021.

Whilst this creative work may seem to be separate from restorative practice, Thomas subscribes to the idea that there are significant overlaps, both within pedagogical practice and wider school culture, topics which his current research touch on within the context of special education.

 

Publications

Procter-Legg. (2022). A Discourse on Restorative Practice—Participants’ Views of a Divergent Ideology. Laws11(6), 86–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11060086

Procter-Legg. (2022). Practitioner Perspectives on a Restorative Community: An Inductive Evaluative Study of Conceptual, Pedagogical, and Routine Practice. Laws11(1), 4–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11010004

 

Supervisors

Ian Thompson and Jason Todd

Ivan is currently serving as a Facilitator (Teaching) in the Vice-Chancellor’s Colloquium and as an Editor of the Graduate Inequality Review in the University of Oxford. He has taken up lecturerships in a number of universities in Hong Kong and has run Education, Linguistics, Applied Linguistics, Sociolinguistics, and Academic English courses at undergraduate and postgraduate level.

Prior to joining Oxford, Ivan received his teacher-training in Hong Kong and his postgraduate training in Linguistics (with a specialisation in pragmatics) at University College London. His research interests include: mental representation of word meanings, language acquisition, educational technology, and ELT pedagogy.

Publications

  • Au, I. (2021). Unwinding the Fantasy: Using Breakout Rooms to Promote Language Exposure and Less-Public Feedback Practices in Online Synchronous Teaching. Paper presented at the PASHE 2021 – EAP Education and Practice: Supporting Students’ Needs, UCL (IOE).
  • Au, I. & Yiu, C. (2021). ‘Identity game’: so you think you are what your Instagram bio says about you. Paper presented at the Sociolinguistics Symposium 23, Hong Kong.
  • Au, I. (2021). The magic of breakout rooms in online synchronous teaching and learning of English. Paper presented at the 3rd International Conference on English Across the Curriculum, Hong Kong.
  • Choi, T. H., Chan, H., & Au, I. (2018). ‘Now you’re talking’: Teacher preparation through alumni talks in a community of practice. Paper presented at the Oxford Education Research Symposium.
  • Au, I. (2018). Branching out from the tree: Extending vocabulary acquisition with polysemy. Paper presented at HKBU-HU First Joint Symposium on Education 2018.

 

Supervisors

Elizabeth Wonnacott and Victoria Murphy

Thomas Procter-Legg is a DPhil Student in the Department of Education and is researching restorative practice within the context of special educational needs and disabilities.

His previous experience includes five years as the Head Teacher of a special academy in Oxfordshire UK, specialising in education for students with Special Educational Needs and Disabilities. He has also worked as a SEND Reviewer for Whole School SEND; a Teaching School Director; and as the Principal Designate on a successful Free School bid.

Thomas is passionate about restorative practice and is involved in many communities of practice, such as the Global Alliance for Restorative Justice and Social Justice, where he is a member of the research sub-group exploring the interactions between restorative justice and social justice.

Thomas is also a strong advocate for creativity in education; having previously gained a Fine Art degree from Chelsea College of Art. This heavily influenced his educational leadership and during his time as a Head Teacher, he became the co-founder of a co-constructed initiative between the academy and the University of Oxford Gardens Libraries and Museums. This work placed cultural learning opportunities and relationships at the heart of the curriculum and is the longest standing project between a special school and The University of Oxford. This sustainable partnership champions marginalised voices and has been highly celebrated e.g., inclusion in the Durham Commission for Creativity in Education; recent dissemination at the Museum Ideas Conference 2022; highly commended award at the Museum and Heritage Awards 2021; and awarded Platinum ArtsMark in 2021.

Whilst this creative work may seem to be separate from restorative practice, Thomas subscribes to the idea that there are significant overlaps, both within pedagogical practice and wider school culture, topics which his current research touch on within the context of special education.

 

Publications

Procter-Legg. (2022). A Discourse on Restorative Practice—Participants’ Views of a Divergent Ideology. Laws11(6), 86–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11060086

Procter-Legg. (2022). Practitioner Perspectives on a Restorative Community: An Inductive Evaluative Study of Conceptual, Pedagogical, and Routine Practice. Laws11(1), 4–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11010004

 

Supervisors

Ian Thompson and Jason Todd

Ivan is currently serving as a Facilitator (Teaching) in the Vice-Chancellor’s Colloquium and as an Editor of the Graduate Inequality Review in the University of Oxford. He has taken up lecturerships in a number of universities in Hong Kong and has run Education, Linguistics, Applied Linguistics, Sociolinguistics, and Academic English courses at undergraduate and postgraduate level.

Prior to joining Oxford, Ivan received his teacher-training in Hong Kong and his postgraduate training in Linguistics (with a specialisation in pragmatics) at University College London. His research interests include: mental representation of word meanings, language acquisition, educational technology, and ELT pedagogy.

Publications

  • Au, I. (2021). Unwinding the Fantasy: Using Breakout Rooms to Promote Language Exposure and Less-Public Feedback Practices in Online Synchronous Teaching. Paper presented at the PASHE 2021 – EAP Education and Practice: Supporting Students’ Needs, UCL (IOE).
  • Au, I. & Yiu, C. (2021). ‘Identity game’: so you think you are what your Instagram bio says about you. Paper presented at the Sociolinguistics Symposium 23, Hong Kong.
  • Au, I. (2021). The magic of breakout rooms in online synchronous teaching and learning of English. Paper presented at the 3rd International Conference on English Across the Curriculum, Hong Kong.
  • Choi, T. H., Chan, H., & Au, I. (2018). ‘Now you’re talking’: Teacher preparation through alumni talks in a community of practice. Paper presented at the Oxford Education Research Symposium.
  • Au, I. (2018). Branching out from the tree: Extending vocabulary acquisition with polysemy. Paper presented at HKBU-HU First Joint Symposium on Education 2018.

 

Supervisors

Elizabeth Wonnacott and Victoria Murphy

Thomas Procter-Legg is a DPhil Student in the Department of Education and is researching restorative practice within the context of special educational needs and disabilities.

His previous experience includes five years as the Head Teacher of a special academy in Oxfordshire UK, specialising in education for students with Special Educational Needs and Disabilities. He has also worked as a SEND Reviewer for Whole School SEND; a Teaching School Director; and as the Principal Designate on a successful Free School bid.

Thomas is passionate about restorative practice and is involved in many communities of practice, such as the Global Alliance for Restorative Justice and Social Justice, where he is a member of the research sub-group exploring the interactions between restorative justice and social justice.

Thomas is also a strong advocate for creativity in education; having previously gained a Fine Art degree from Chelsea College of Art. This heavily influenced his educational leadership and during his time as a Head Teacher, he became the co-founder of a co-constructed initiative between the academy and the University of Oxford Gardens Libraries and Museums. This work placed cultural learning opportunities and relationships at the heart of the curriculum and is the longest standing project between a special school and The University of Oxford. This sustainable partnership champions marginalised voices and has been highly celebrated e.g., inclusion in the Durham Commission for Creativity in Education; recent dissemination at the Museum Ideas Conference 2022; highly commended award at the Museum and Heritage Awards 2021; and awarded Platinum ArtsMark in 2021.

Whilst this creative work may seem to be separate from restorative practice, Thomas subscribes to the idea that there are significant overlaps, both within pedagogical practice and wider school culture, topics which his current research touch on within the context of special education.

 

Publications

Procter-Legg. (2022). A Discourse on Restorative Practice—Participants’ Views of a Divergent Ideology. Laws11(6), 86–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11060086

Procter-Legg. (2022). Practitioner Perspectives on a Restorative Community: An Inductive Evaluative Study of Conceptual, Pedagogical, and Routine Practice. Laws11(1), 4–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11010004

 

Supervisors

Ian Thompson and Jason Todd

Ivan is currently serving as a Facilitator (Teaching) in the Vice-Chancellor’s Colloquium and as an Editor of the Graduate Inequality Review in the University of Oxford. He has taken up lecturerships in a number of universities in Hong Kong and has run Education, Linguistics, Applied Linguistics, Sociolinguistics, and Academic English courses at undergraduate and postgraduate level.

Prior to joining Oxford, Ivan received his teacher-training in Hong Kong and his postgraduate training in Linguistics (with a specialisation in pragmatics) at University College London. His research interests include: mental representation of word meanings, language acquisition, educational technology, and ELT pedagogy.

Publications

  • Au, I. (2021). Unwinding the Fantasy: Using Breakout Rooms to Promote Language Exposure and Less-Public Feedback Practices in Online Synchronous Teaching. Paper presented at the PASHE 2021 – EAP Education and Practice: Supporting Students’ Needs, UCL (IOE).
  • Au, I. & Yiu, C. (2021). ‘Identity game’: so you think you are what your Instagram bio says about you. Paper presented at the Sociolinguistics Symposium 23, Hong Kong.
  • Au, I. (2021). The magic of breakout rooms in online synchronous teaching and learning of English. Paper presented at the 3rd International Conference on English Across the Curriculum, Hong Kong.
  • Choi, T. H., Chan, H., & Au, I. (2018). ‘Now you’re talking’: Teacher preparation through alumni talks in a community of practice. Paper presented at the Oxford Education Research Symposium.
  • Au, I. (2018). Branching out from the tree: Extending vocabulary acquisition with polysemy. Paper presented at HKBU-HU First Joint Symposium on Education 2018.

 

Supervisors

Elizabeth Wonnacott and Victoria Murphy

Thomas Procter-Legg is a DPhil Student in the Department of Education and is researching restorative practice within the context of special educational needs and disabilities.

His previous experience includes five years as the Head Teacher of a special academy in Oxfordshire UK, specialising in education for students with Special Educational Needs and Disabilities. He has also worked as a SEND Reviewer for Whole School SEND; a Teaching School Director; and as the Principal Designate on a successful Free School bid.

Thomas is passionate about restorative practice and is involved in many communities of practice, such as the Global Alliance for Restorative Justice and Social Justice, where he is a member of the research sub-group exploring the interactions between restorative justice and social justice.

Thomas is also a strong advocate for creativity in education; having previously gained a Fine Art degree from Chelsea College of Art. This heavily influenced his educational leadership and during his time as a Head Teacher, he became the co-founder of a co-constructed initiative between the academy and the University of Oxford Gardens Libraries and Museums. This work placed cultural learning opportunities and relationships at the heart of the curriculum and is the longest standing project between a special school and The University of Oxford. This sustainable partnership champions marginalised voices and has been highly celebrated e.g., inclusion in the Durham Commission for Creativity in Education; recent dissemination at the Museum Ideas Conference 2022; highly commended award at the Museum and Heritage Awards 2021; and awarded Platinum ArtsMark in 2021.

Whilst this creative work may seem to be separate from restorative practice, Thomas subscribes to the idea that there are significant overlaps, both within pedagogical practice and wider school culture, topics which his current research touch on within the context of special education.

 

Publications

Procter-Legg. (2022). A Discourse on Restorative Practice—Participants’ Views of a Divergent Ideology. Laws11(6), 86–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11060086

Procter-Legg. (2022). Practitioner Perspectives on a Restorative Community: An Inductive Evaluative Study of Conceptual, Pedagogical, and Routine Practice. Laws11(1), 4–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11010004

 

Supervisors

Ian Thompson and Jason Todd

Ivan is currently serving as a Facilitator (Teaching) in the Vice-Chancellor’s Colloquium and as an Editor of the Graduate Inequality Review in the University of Oxford. He has taken up lecturerships in a number of universities in Hong Kong and has run Education, Linguistics, Applied Linguistics, Sociolinguistics, and Academic English courses at undergraduate and postgraduate level.

Prior to joining Oxford, Ivan received his teacher-training in Hong Kong and his postgraduate training in Linguistics (with a specialisation in pragmatics) at University College London. His research interests include: mental representation of word meanings, language acquisition, educational technology, and ELT pedagogy.

Publications

  • Au, I. (2021). Unwinding the Fantasy: Using Breakout Rooms to Promote Language Exposure and Less-Public Feedback Practices in Online Synchronous Teaching. Paper presented at the PASHE 2021 – EAP Education and Practice: Supporting Students’ Needs, UCL (IOE).
  • Au, I. & Yiu, C. (2021). ‘Identity game’: so you think you are what your Instagram bio says about you. Paper presented at the Sociolinguistics Symposium 23, Hong Kong.
  • Au, I. (2021). The magic of breakout rooms in online synchronous teaching and learning of English. Paper presented at the 3rd International Conference on English Across the Curriculum, Hong Kong.
  • Choi, T. H., Chan, H., & Au, I. (2018). ‘Now you’re talking’: Teacher preparation through alumni talks in a community of practice. Paper presented at the Oxford Education Research Symposium.
  • Au, I. (2018). Branching out from the tree: Extending vocabulary acquisition with polysemy. Paper presented at HKBU-HU First Joint Symposium on Education 2018.

 

Supervisors

Elizabeth Wonnacott and Victoria Murphy

Thomas Procter-Legg is a DPhil Student in the Department of Education and is researching restorative practice within the context of special educational needs and disabilities.

His previous experience includes five years as the Head Teacher of a special academy in Oxfordshire UK, specialising in education for students with Special Educational Needs and Disabilities. He has also worked as a SEND Reviewer for Whole School SEND; a Teaching School Director; and as the Principal Designate on a successful Free School bid.

Thomas is passionate about restorative practice and is involved in many communities of practice, such as the Global Alliance for Restorative Justice and Social Justice, where he is a member of the research sub-group exploring the interactions between restorative justice and social justice.

Thomas is also a strong advocate for creativity in education; having previously gained a Fine Art degree from Chelsea College of Art. This heavily influenced his educational leadership and during his time as a Head Teacher, he became the co-founder of a co-constructed initiative between the academy and the University of Oxford Gardens Libraries and Museums. This work placed cultural learning opportunities and relationships at the heart of the curriculum and is the longest standing project between a special school and The University of Oxford. This sustainable partnership champions marginalised voices and has been highly celebrated e.g., inclusion in the Durham Commission for Creativity in Education; recent dissemination at the Museum Ideas Conference 2022; highly commended award at the Museum and Heritage Awards 2021; and awarded Platinum ArtsMark in 2021.

Whilst this creative work may seem to be separate from restorative practice, Thomas subscribes to the idea that there are significant overlaps, both within pedagogical practice and wider school culture, topics which his current research touch on within the context of special education.

 

Publications

Procter-Legg. (2022). A Discourse on Restorative Practice—Participants’ Views of a Divergent Ideology. Laws11(6), 86–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11060086

Procter-Legg. (2022). Practitioner Perspectives on a Restorative Community: An Inductive Evaluative Study of Conceptual, Pedagogical, and Routine Practice. Laws11(1), 4–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11010004

 

Supervisors

Ian Thompson and Jason Todd

Ivan is currently serving as a Facilitator (Teaching) in the Vice-Chancellor’s Colloquium and as an Editor of the Graduate Inequality Review in the University of Oxford. He has taken up lecturerships in a number of universities in Hong Kong and has run Education, Linguistics, Applied Linguistics, Sociolinguistics, and Academic English courses at undergraduate and postgraduate level.

Prior to joining Oxford, Ivan received his teacher-training in Hong Kong and his postgraduate training in Linguistics (with a specialisation in pragmatics) at University College London. His research interests include: mental representation of word meanings, language acquisition, educational technology, and ELT pedagogy.

Publications

  • Au, I. (2021). Unwinding the Fantasy: Using Breakout Rooms to Promote Language Exposure and Less-Public Feedback Practices in Online Synchronous Teaching. Paper presented at the PASHE 2021 – EAP Education and Practice: Supporting Students’ Needs, UCL (IOE).
  • Au, I. & Yiu, C. (2021). ‘Identity game’: so you think you are what your Instagram bio says about you. Paper presented at the Sociolinguistics Symposium 23, Hong Kong.
  • Au, I. (2021). The magic of breakout rooms in online synchronous teaching and learning of English. Paper presented at the 3rd International Conference on English Across the Curriculum, Hong Kong.
  • Choi, T. H., Chan, H., & Au, I. (2018). ‘Now you’re talking’: Teacher preparation through alumni talks in a community of practice. Paper presented at the Oxford Education Research Symposium.
  • Au, I. (2018). Branching out from the tree: Extending vocabulary acquisition with polysemy. Paper presented at HKBU-HU First Joint Symposium on Education 2018.

 

Supervisors

Elizabeth Wonnacott and Victoria Murphy

Thomas Procter-Legg is a DPhil Student in the Department of Education and is researching restorative practice within the context of special educational needs and disabilities.

His previous experience includes five years as the Head Teacher of a special academy in Oxfordshire UK, specialising in education for students with Special Educational Needs and Disabilities. He has also worked as a SEND Reviewer for Whole School SEND; a Teaching School Director; and as the Principal Designate on a successful Free School bid.

Thomas is passionate about restorative practice and is involved in many communities of practice, such as the Global Alliance for Restorative Justice and Social Justice, where he is a member of the research sub-group exploring the interactions between restorative justice and social justice.

Thomas is also a strong advocate for creativity in education; having previously gained a Fine Art degree from Chelsea College of Art. This heavily influenced his educational leadership and during his time as a Head Teacher, he became the co-founder of a co-constructed initiative between the academy and the University of Oxford Gardens Libraries and Museums. This work placed cultural learning opportunities and relationships at the heart of the curriculum and is the longest standing project between a special school and The University of Oxford. This sustainable partnership champions marginalised voices and has been highly celebrated e.g., inclusion in the Durham Commission for Creativity in Education; recent dissemination at the Museum Ideas Conference 2022; highly commended award at the Museum and Heritage Awards 2021; and awarded Platinum ArtsMark in 2021.

Whilst this creative work may seem to be separate from restorative practice, Thomas subscribes to the idea that there are significant overlaps, both within pedagogical practice and wider school culture, topics which his current research touch on within the context of special education.

 

Publications

Procter-Legg. (2022). A Discourse on Restorative Practice—Participants’ Views of a Divergent Ideology. Laws11(6), 86–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11060086

Procter-Legg. (2022). Practitioner Perspectives on a Restorative Community: An Inductive Evaluative Study of Conceptual, Pedagogical, and Routine Practice. Laws11(1), 4–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11010004

 

Supervisors

Ian Thompson and Jason Todd

Ivan is currently serving as a Facilitator (Teaching) in the Vice-Chancellor’s Colloquium and as an Editor of the Graduate Inequality Review in the University of Oxford. He has taken up lecturerships in a number of universities in Hong Kong and has run Education, Linguistics, Applied Linguistics, Sociolinguistics, and Academic English courses at undergraduate and postgraduate level.

Prior to joining Oxford, Ivan received his teacher-training in Hong Kong and his postgraduate training in Linguistics (with a specialisation in pragmatics) at University College London. His research interests include: mental representation of word meanings, language acquisition, educational technology, and ELT pedagogy.

Publications

  • Au, I. (2021). Unwinding the Fantasy: Using Breakout Rooms to Promote Language Exposure and Less-Public Feedback Practices in Online Synchronous Teaching. Paper presented at the PASHE 2021 – EAP Education and Practice: Supporting Students’ Needs, UCL (IOE).
  • Au, I. & Yiu, C. (2021). ‘Identity game’: so you think you are what your Instagram bio says about you. Paper presented at the Sociolinguistics Symposium 23, Hong Kong.
  • Au, I. (2021). The magic of breakout rooms in online synchronous teaching and learning of English. Paper presented at the 3rd International Conference on English Across the Curriculum, Hong Kong.
  • Choi, T. H., Chan, H., & Au, I. (2018). ‘Now you’re talking’: Teacher preparation through alumni talks in a community of practice. Paper presented at the Oxford Education Research Symposium.
  • Au, I. (2018). Branching out from the tree: Extending vocabulary acquisition with polysemy. Paper presented at HKBU-HU First Joint Symposium on Education 2018.

 

Supervisors

Elizabeth Wonnacott and Victoria Murphy

Thomas Procter-Legg is a DPhil Student in the Department of Education and is researching restorative practice within the context of special educational needs and disabilities.

His previous experience includes five years as the Head Teacher of a special academy in Oxfordshire UK, specialising in education for students with Special Educational Needs and Disabilities. He has also worked as a SEND Reviewer for Whole School SEND; a Teaching School Director; and as the Principal Designate on a successful Free School bid.

Thomas is passionate about restorative practice and is involved in many communities of practice, such as the Global Alliance for Restorative Justice and Social Justice, where he is a member of the research sub-group exploring the interactions between restorative justice and social justice.

Thomas is also a strong advocate for creativity in education; having previously gained a Fine Art degree from Chelsea College of Art. This heavily influenced his educational leadership and during his time as a Head Teacher, he became the co-founder of a co-constructed initiative between the academy and the University of Oxford Gardens Libraries and Museums. This work placed cultural learning opportunities and relationships at the heart of the curriculum and is the longest standing project between a special school and The University of Oxford. This sustainable partnership champions marginalised voices and has been highly celebrated e.g., inclusion in the Durham Commission for Creativity in Education; recent dissemination at the Museum Ideas Conference 2022; highly commended award at the Museum and Heritage Awards 2021; and awarded Platinum ArtsMark in 2021.

Whilst this creative work may seem to be separate from restorative practice, Thomas subscribes to the idea that there are significant overlaps, both within pedagogical practice and wider school culture, topics which his current research touch on within the context of special education.

 

Publications

Procter-Legg. (2022). A Discourse on Restorative Practice—Participants’ Views of a Divergent Ideology. Laws11(6), 86–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11060086

Procter-Legg. (2022). Practitioner Perspectives on a Restorative Community: An Inductive Evaluative Study of Conceptual, Pedagogical, and Routine Practice. Laws11(1), 4–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11010004

 

Supervisors

Ian Thompson and Jason Todd

Ivan is currently serving as a Facilitator (Teaching) in the Vice-Chancellor’s Colloquium and as an Editor of the Graduate Inequality Review in the University of Oxford. He has taken up lecturerships in a number of universities in Hong Kong and has run Education, Linguistics, Applied Linguistics, Sociolinguistics, and Academic English courses at undergraduate and postgraduate level.

Prior to joining Oxford, Ivan received his teacher-training in Hong Kong and his postgraduate training in Linguistics (with a specialisation in pragmatics) at University College London. His research interests include: mental representation of word meanings, language acquisition, educational technology, and ELT pedagogy.

Publications

  • Au, I. (2021). Unwinding the Fantasy: Using Breakout Rooms to Promote Language Exposure and Less-Public Feedback Practices in Online Synchronous Teaching. Paper presented at the PASHE 2021 – EAP Education and Practice: Supporting Students’ Needs, UCL (IOE).
  • Au, I. & Yiu, C. (2021). ‘Identity game’: so you think you are what your Instagram bio says about you. Paper presented at the Sociolinguistics Symposium 23, Hong Kong.
  • Au, I. (2021). The magic of breakout rooms in online synchronous teaching and learning of English. Paper presented at the 3rd International Conference on English Across the Curriculum, Hong Kong.
  • Choi, T. H., Chan, H., & Au, I. (2018). ‘Now you’re talking’: Teacher preparation through alumni talks in a community of practice. Paper presented at the Oxford Education Research Symposium.
  • Au, I. (2018). Branching out from the tree: Extending vocabulary acquisition with polysemy. Paper presented at HKBU-HU First Joint Symposium on Education 2018.

 

Supervisors

Elizabeth Wonnacott and Victoria Murphy

Thomas Procter-Legg is a DPhil Student in the Department of Education and is researching restorative practice within the context of special educational needs and disabilities.

His previous experience includes five years as the Head Teacher of a special academy in Oxfordshire UK, specialising in education for students with Special Educational Needs and Disabilities. He has also worked as a SEND Reviewer for Whole School SEND; a Teaching School Director; and as the Principal Designate on a successful Free School bid.

Thomas is passionate about restorative practice and is involved in many communities of practice, such as the Global Alliance for Restorative Justice and Social Justice, where he is a member of the research sub-group exploring the interactions between restorative justice and social justice.

Thomas is also a strong advocate for creativity in education; having previously gained a Fine Art degree from Chelsea College of Art. This heavily influenced his educational leadership and during his time as a Head Teacher, he became the co-founder of a co-constructed initiative between the academy and the University of Oxford Gardens Libraries and Museums. This work placed cultural learning opportunities and relationships at the heart of the curriculum and is the longest standing project between a special school and The University of Oxford. This sustainable partnership champions marginalised voices and has been highly celebrated e.g., inclusion in the Durham Commission for Creativity in Education; recent dissemination at the Museum Ideas Conference 2022; highly commended award at the Museum and Heritage Awards 2021; and awarded Platinum ArtsMark in 2021.

Whilst this creative work may seem to be separate from restorative practice, Thomas subscribes to the idea that there are significant overlaps, both within pedagogical practice and wider school culture, topics which his current research touch on within the context of special education.

 

Publications

Procter-Legg. (2022). A Discourse on Restorative Practice—Participants’ Views of a Divergent Ideology. Laws11(6), 86–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11060086

Procter-Legg. (2022). Practitioner Perspectives on a Restorative Community: An Inductive Evaluative Study of Conceptual, Pedagogical, and Routine Practice. Laws11(1), 4–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11010004

 

Supervisors

Ian Thompson and Jason Todd

Ivan is currently serving as a Facilitator (Teaching) in the Vice-Chancellor’s Colloquium and as an Editor of the Graduate Inequality Review in the University of Oxford. He has taken up lecturerships in a number of universities in Hong Kong and has run Education, Linguistics, Applied Linguistics, Sociolinguistics, and Academic English courses at undergraduate and postgraduate level.

Prior to joining Oxford, Ivan received his teacher-training in Hong Kong and his postgraduate training in Linguistics (with a specialisation in pragmatics) at University College London. His research interests include: mental representation of word meanings, language acquisition, educational technology, and ELT pedagogy.

Publications

  • Au, I. (2021). Unwinding the Fantasy: Using Breakout Rooms to Promote Language Exposure and Less-Public Feedback Practices in Online Synchronous Teaching. Paper presented at the PASHE 2021 – EAP Education and Practice: Supporting Students’ Needs, UCL (IOE).
  • Au, I. & Yiu, C. (2021). ‘Identity game’: so you think you are what your Instagram bio says about you. Paper presented at the Sociolinguistics Symposium 23, Hong Kong.
  • Au, I. (2021). The magic of breakout rooms in online synchronous teaching and learning of English. Paper presented at the 3rd International Conference on English Across the Curriculum, Hong Kong.
  • Choi, T. H., Chan, H., & Au, I. (2018). ‘Now you’re talking’: Teacher preparation through alumni talks in a community of practice. Paper presented at the Oxford Education Research Symposium.
  • Au, I. (2018). Branching out from the tree: Extending vocabulary acquisition with polysemy. Paper presented at HKBU-HU First Joint Symposium on Education 2018.

 

Supervisors

Elizabeth Wonnacott and Victoria Murphy

Thomas Procter-Legg is a DPhil Student in the Department of Education and is researching restorative practice within the context of special educational needs and disabilities.

His previous experience includes five years as the Head Teacher of a special academy in Oxfordshire UK, specialising in education for students with Special Educational Needs and Disabilities. He has also worked as a SEND Reviewer for Whole School SEND; a Teaching School Director; and as the Principal Designate on a successful Free School bid.

Thomas is passionate about restorative practice and is involved in many communities of practice, such as the Global Alliance for Restorative Justice and Social Justice, where he is a member of the research sub-group exploring the interactions between restorative justice and social justice.

Thomas is also a strong advocate for creativity in education; having previously gained a Fine Art degree from Chelsea College of Art. This heavily influenced his educational leadership and during his time as a Head Teacher, he became the co-founder of a co-constructed initiative between the academy and the University of Oxford Gardens Libraries and Museums. This work placed cultural learning opportunities and relationships at the heart of the curriculum and is the longest standing project between a special school and The University of Oxford. This sustainable partnership champions marginalised voices and has been highly celebrated e.g., inclusion in the Durham Commission for Creativity in Education; recent dissemination at the Museum Ideas Conference 2022; highly commended award at the Museum and Heritage Awards 2021; and awarded Platinum ArtsMark in 2021.

Whilst this creative work may seem to be separate from restorative practice, Thomas subscribes to the idea that there are significant overlaps, both within pedagogical practice and wider school culture, topics which his current research touch on within the context of special education.

 

Publications

Procter-Legg. (2022). A Discourse on Restorative Practice—Participants’ Views of a Divergent Ideology. Laws11(6), 86–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11060086

Procter-Legg. (2022). Practitioner Perspectives on a Restorative Community: An Inductive Evaluative Study of Conceptual, Pedagogical, and Routine Practice. Laws11(1), 4–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11010004

 

Supervisors

Ian Thompson and Jason Todd

Ivan is currently serving as a Facilitator (Teaching) in the Vice-Chancellor’s Colloquium and as an Editor of the Graduate Inequality Review in the University of Oxford. He has taken up lecturerships in a number of universities in Hong Kong and has run Education, Linguistics, Applied Linguistics, Sociolinguistics, and Academic English courses at undergraduate and postgraduate level.

Prior to joining Oxford, Ivan received his teacher-training in Hong Kong and his postgraduate training in Linguistics (with a specialisation in pragmatics) at University College London. His research interests include: mental representation of word meanings, language acquisition, educational technology, and ELT pedagogy.

Publications

  • Au, I. (2021). Unwinding the Fantasy: Using Breakout Rooms to Promote Language Exposure and Less-Public Feedback Practices in Online Synchronous Teaching. Paper presented at the PASHE 2021 – EAP Education and Practice: Supporting Students’ Needs, UCL (IOE).
  • Au, I. & Yiu, C. (2021). ‘Identity game’: so you think you are what your Instagram bio says about you. Paper presented at the Sociolinguistics Symposium 23, Hong Kong.
  • Au, I. (2021). The magic of breakout rooms in online synchronous teaching and learning of English. Paper presented at the 3rd International Conference on English Across the Curriculum, Hong Kong.
  • Choi, T. H., Chan, H., & Au, I. (2018). ‘Now you’re talking’: Teacher preparation through alumni talks in a community of practice. Paper presented at the Oxford Education Research Symposium.
  • Au, I. (2018). Branching out from the tree: Extending vocabulary acquisition with polysemy. Paper presented at HKBU-HU First Joint Symposium on Education 2018.

 

Supervisors

Elizabeth Wonnacott and Victoria Murphy

Thomas Procter-Legg is a DPhil Student in the Department of Education and is researching restorative practice within the context of special educational needs and disabilities.

His previous experience includes five years as the Head Teacher of a special academy in Oxfordshire UK, specialising in education for students with Special Educational Needs and Disabilities. He has also worked as a SEND Reviewer for Whole School SEND; a Teaching School Director; and as the Principal Designate on a successful Free School bid.

Thomas is passionate about restorative practice and is involved in many communities of practice, such as the Global Alliance for Restorative Justice and Social Justice, where he is a member of the research sub-group exploring the interactions between restorative justice and social justice.

Thomas is also a strong advocate for creativity in education; having previously gained a Fine Art degree from Chelsea College of Art. This heavily influenced his educational leadership and during his time as a Head Teacher, he became the co-founder of a co-constructed initiative between the academy and the University of Oxford Gardens Libraries and Museums. This work placed cultural learning opportunities and relationships at the heart of the curriculum and is the longest standing project between a special school and The University of Oxford. This sustainable partnership champions marginalised voices and has been highly celebrated e.g., inclusion in the Durham Commission for Creativity in Education; recent dissemination at the Museum Ideas Conference 2022; highly commended award at the Museum and Heritage Awards 2021; and awarded Platinum ArtsMark in 2021.

Whilst this creative work may seem to be separate from restorative practice, Thomas subscribes to the idea that there are significant overlaps, both within pedagogical practice and wider school culture, topics which his current research touch on within the context of special education.

 

Publications

Procter-Legg. (2022). A Discourse on Restorative Practice—Participants’ Views of a Divergent Ideology. Laws11(6), 86–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11060086

Procter-Legg. (2022). Practitioner Perspectives on a Restorative Community: An Inductive Evaluative Study of Conceptual, Pedagogical, and Routine Practice. Laws11(1), 4–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11010004

 

Supervisors

Ian Thompson and Jason Todd

Ivan is currently serving as a Facilitator (Teaching) in the Vice-Chancellor’s Colloquium and as an Editor of the Graduate Inequality Review in the University of Oxford. He has taken up lecturerships in a number of universities in Hong Kong and has run Education, Linguistics, Applied Linguistics, Sociolinguistics, and Academic English courses at undergraduate and postgraduate level.

Prior to joining Oxford, Ivan received his teacher-training in Hong Kong and his postgraduate training in Linguistics (with a specialisation in pragmatics) at University College London. His research interests include: mental representation of word meanings, language acquisition, educational technology, and ELT pedagogy.

Publications

  • Au, I. (2021). Unwinding the Fantasy: Using Breakout Rooms to Promote Language Exposure and Less-Public Feedback Practices in Online Synchronous Teaching. Paper presented at the PASHE 2021 – EAP Education and Practice: Supporting Students’ Needs, UCL (IOE).
  • Au, I. & Yiu, C. (2021). ‘Identity game’: so you think you are what your Instagram bio says about you. Paper presented at the Sociolinguistics Symposium 23, Hong Kong.
  • Au, I. (2021). The magic of breakout rooms in online synchronous teaching and learning of English. Paper presented at the 3rd International Conference on English Across the Curriculum, Hong Kong.
  • Choi, T. H., Chan, H., & Au, I. (2018). ‘Now you’re talking’: Teacher preparation through alumni talks in a community of practice. Paper presented at the Oxford Education Research Symposium.
  • Au, I. (2018). Branching out from the tree: Extending vocabulary acquisition with polysemy. Paper presented at HKBU-HU First Joint Symposium on Education 2018.

 

Supervisors

Elizabeth Wonnacott and Victoria Murphy

Thomas Procter-Legg is a DPhil Student in the Department of Education and is researching restorative practice within the context of special educational needs and disabilities.

His previous experience includes five years as the Head Teacher of a special academy in Oxfordshire UK, specialising in education for students with Special Educational Needs and Disabilities. He has also worked as a SEND Reviewer for Whole School SEND; a Teaching School Director; and as the Principal Designate on a successful Free School bid.

Thomas is passionate about restorative practice and is involved in many communities of practice, such as the Global Alliance for Restorative Justice and Social Justice, where he is a member of the research sub-group exploring the interactions between restorative justice and social justice.

Thomas is also a strong advocate for creativity in education; having previously gained a Fine Art degree from Chelsea College of Art. This heavily influenced his educational leadership and during his time as a Head Teacher, he became the co-founder of a co-constructed initiative between the academy and the University of Oxford Gardens Libraries and Museums. This work placed cultural learning opportunities and relationships at the heart of the curriculum and is the longest standing project between a special school and The University of Oxford. This sustainable partnership champions marginalised voices and has been highly celebrated e.g., inclusion in the Durham Commission for Creativity in Education; recent dissemination at the Museum Ideas Conference 2022; highly commended award at the Museum and Heritage Awards 2021; and awarded Platinum ArtsMark in 2021.

Whilst this creative work may seem to be separate from restorative practice, Thomas subscribes to the idea that there are significant overlaps, both within pedagogical practice and wider school culture, topics which his current research touch on within the context of special education.

 

Publications

Procter-Legg. (2022). A Discourse on Restorative Practice—Participants’ Views of a Divergent Ideology. Laws11(6), 86–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11060086

Procter-Legg. (2022). Practitioner Perspectives on a Restorative Community: An Inductive Evaluative Study of Conceptual, Pedagogical, and Routine Practice. Laws11(1), 4–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11010004

 

Supervisors

Ian Thompson and Jason Todd

Ivan is currently serving as a Facilitator (Teaching) in the Vice-Chancellor’s Colloquium and as an Editor of the Graduate Inequality Review in the University of Oxford. He has taken up lecturerships in a number of universities in Hong Kong and has run Education, Linguistics, Applied Linguistics, Sociolinguistics, and Academic English courses at undergraduate and postgraduate level.

Prior to joining Oxford, Ivan received his teacher-training in Hong Kong and his postgraduate training in Linguistics (with a specialisation in pragmatics) at University College London. His research interests include: mental representation of word meanings, language acquisition, educational technology, and ELT pedagogy.

Publications

  • Au, I. (2021). Unwinding the Fantasy: Using Breakout Rooms to Promote Language Exposure and Less-Public Feedback Practices in Online Synchronous Teaching. Paper presented at the PASHE 2021 – EAP Education and Practice: Supporting Students’ Needs, UCL (IOE).
  • Au, I. & Yiu, C. (2021). ‘Identity game’: so you think you are what your Instagram bio says about you. Paper presented at the Sociolinguistics Symposium 23, Hong Kong.
  • Au, I. (2021). The magic of breakout rooms in online synchronous teaching and learning of English. Paper presented at the 3rd International Conference on English Across the Curriculum, Hong Kong.
  • Choi, T. H., Chan, H., & Au, I. (2018). ‘Now you’re talking’: Teacher preparation through alumni talks in a community of practice. Paper presented at the Oxford Education Research Symposium.
  • Au, I. (2018). Branching out from the tree: Extending vocabulary acquisition with polysemy. Paper presented at HKBU-HU First Joint Symposium on Education 2018.

 

Supervisors

Elizabeth Wonnacott and Victoria Murphy

Thomas Procter-Legg is a DPhil Student in the Department of Education and is researching restorative practice within the context of special educational needs and disabilities.

His previous experience includes five years as the Head Teacher of a special academy in Oxfordshire UK, specialising in education for students with Special Educational Needs and Disabilities. He has also worked as a SEND Reviewer for Whole School SEND; a Teaching School Director; and as the Principal Designate on a successful Free School bid.

Thomas is passionate about restorative practice and is involved in many communities of practice, such as the Global Alliance for Restorative Justice and Social Justice, where he is a member of the research sub-group exploring the interactions between restorative justice and social justice.

Thomas is also a strong advocate for creativity in education; having previously gained a Fine Art degree from Chelsea College of Art. This heavily influenced his educational leadership and during his time as a Head Teacher, he became the co-founder of a co-constructed initiative between the academy and the University of Oxford Gardens Libraries and Museums. This work placed cultural learning opportunities and relationships at the heart of the curriculum and is the longest standing project between a special school and The University of Oxford. This sustainable partnership champions marginalised voices and has been highly celebrated e.g., inclusion in the Durham Commission for Creativity in Education; recent dissemination at the Museum Ideas Conference 2022; highly commended award at the Museum and Heritage Awards 2021; and awarded Platinum ArtsMark in 2021.

Whilst this creative work may seem to be separate from restorative practice, Thomas subscribes to the idea that there are significant overlaps, both within pedagogical practice and wider school culture, topics which his current research touch on within the context of special education.

 

Publications

Procter-Legg. (2022). A Discourse on Restorative Practice—Participants’ Views of a Divergent Ideology. Laws11(6), 86–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11060086

Procter-Legg. (2022). Practitioner Perspectives on a Restorative Community: An Inductive Evaluative Study of Conceptual, Pedagogical, and Routine Practice. Laws11(1), 4–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11010004

 

Supervisors

Ian Thompson and Jason Todd

Ivan is currently serving as a Facilitator (Teaching) in the Vice-Chancellor’s Colloquium and as an Editor of the Graduate Inequality Review in the University of Oxford. He has taken up lecturerships in a number of universities in Hong Kong and has run Education, Linguistics, Applied Linguistics, Sociolinguistics, and Academic English courses at undergraduate and postgraduate level.

Prior to joining Oxford, Ivan received his teacher-training in Hong Kong and his postgraduate training in Linguistics (with a specialisation in pragmatics) at University College London. His research interests include: mental representation of word meanings, language acquisition, educational technology, and ELT pedagogy.

Publications

  • Au, I. (2021). Unwinding the Fantasy: Using Breakout Rooms to Promote Language Exposure and Less-Public Feedback Practices in Online Synchronous Teaching. Paper presented at the PASHE 2021 – EAP Education and Practice: Supporting Students’ Needs, UCL (IOE).
  • Au, I. & Yiu, C. (2021). ‘Identity game’: so you think you are what your Instagram bio says about you. Paper presented at the Sociolinguistics Symposium 23, Hong Kong.
  • Au, I. (2021). The magic of breakout rooms in online synchronous teaching and learning of English. Paper presented at the 3rd International Conference on English Across the Curriculum, Hong Kong.
  • Choi, T. H., Chan, H., & Au, I. (2018). ‘Now you’re talking’: Teacher preparation through alumni talks in a community of practice. Paper presented at the Oxford Education Research Symposium.
  • Au, I. (2018). Branching out from the tree: Extending vocabulary acquisition with polysemy. Paper presented at HKBU-HU First Joint Symposium on Education 2018.

 

Supervisors

Elizabeth Wonnacott and Victoria Murphy

Thomas Procter-Legg is a DPhil Student in the Department of Education and is researching restorative practice within the context of special educational needs and disabilities.

His previous experience includes five years as the Head Teacher of a special academy in Oxfordshire UK, specialising in education for students with Special Educational Needs and Disabilities. He has also worked as a SEND Reviewer for Whole School SEND; a Teaching School Director; and as the Principal Designate on a successful Free School bid.

Thomas is passionate about restorative practice and is involved in many communities of practice, such as the Global Alliance for Restorative Justice and Social Justice, where he is a member of the research sub-group exploring the interactions between restorative justice and social justice.

Thomas is also a strong advocate for creativity in education; having previously gained a Fine Art degree from Chelsea College of Art. This heavily influenced his educational leadership and during his time as a Head Teacher, he became the co-founder of a co-constructed initiative between the academy and the University of Oxford Gardens Libraries and Museums. This work placed cultural learning opportunities and relationships at the heart of the curriculum and is the longest standing project between a special school and The University of Oxford. This sustainable partnership champions marginalised voices and has been highly celebrated e.g., inclusion in the Durham Commission for Creativity in Education; recent dissemination at the Museum Ideas Conference 2022; highly commended award at the Museum and Heritage Awards 2021; and awarded Platinum ArtsMark in 2021.

Whilst this creative work may seem to be separate from restorative practice, Thomas subscribes to the idea that there are significant overlaps, both within pedagogical practice and wider school culture, topics which his current research touch on within the context of special education.

 

Publications

Procter-Legg. (2022). A Discourse on Restorative Practice—Participants’ Views of a Divergent Ideology. Laws11(6), 86–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11060086

Procter-Legg. (2022). Practitioner Perspectives on a Restorative Community: An Inductive Evaluative Study of Conceptual, Pedagogical, and Routine Practice. Laws11(1), 4–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11010004

 

Supervisors

Ian Thompson and Jason Todd

Ivan is currently serving as a Facilitator (Teaching) in the Vice-Chancellor’s Colloquium and as an Editor of the Graduate Inequality Review in the University of Oxford. He has taken up lecturerships in a number of universities in Hong Kong and has run Education, Linguistics, Applied Linguistics, Sociolinguistics, and Academic English courses at undergraduate and postgraduate level.

Prior to joining Oxford, Ivan received his teacher-training in Hong Kong and his postgraduate training in Linguistics (with a specialisation in pragmatics) at University College London. His research interests include: mental representation of word meanings, language acquisition, educational technology, and ELT pedagogy.

Publications

  • Au, I. (2021). Unwinding the Fantasy: Using Breakout Rooms to Promote Language Exposure and Less-Public Feedback Practices in Online Synchronous Teaching. Paper presented at the PASHE 2021 – EAP Education and Practice: Supporting Students’ Needs, UCL (IOE).
  • Au, I. & Yiu, C. (2021). ‘Identity game’: so you think you are what your Instagram bio says about you. Paper presented at the Sociolinguistics Symposium 23, Hong Kong.
  • Au, I. (2021). The magic of breakout rooms in online synchronous teaching and learning of English. Paper presented at the 3rd International Conference on English Across the Curriculum, Hong Kong.
  • Choi, T. H., Chan, H., & Au, I. (2018). ‘Now you’re talking’: Teacher preparation through alumni talks in a community of practice. Paper presented at the Oxford Education Research Symposium.
  • Au, I. (2018). Branching out from the tree: Extending vocabulary acquisition with polysemy. Paper presented at HKBU-HU First Joint Symposium on Education 2018.

 

Supervisors

Elizabeth Wonnacott and Victoria Murphy

Thomas Procter-Legg is a DPhil Student in the Department of Education and is researching restorative practice within the context of special educational needs and disabilities.

His previous experience includes five years as the Head Teacher of a special academy in Oxfordshire UK, specialising in education for students with Special Educational Needs and Disabilities. He has also worked as a SEND Reviewer for Whole School SEND; a Teaching School Director; and as the Principal Designate on a successful Free School bid.

Thomas is passionate about restorative practice and is involved in many communities of practice, such as the Global Alliance for Restorative Justice and Social Justice, where he is a member of the research sub-group exploring the interactions between restorative justice and social justice.

Thomas is also a strong advocate for creativity in education; having previously gained a Fine Art degree from Chelsea College of Art. This heavily influenced his educational leadership and during his time as a Head Teacher, he became the co-founder of a co-constructed initiative between the academy and the University of Oxford Gardens Libraries and Museums. This work placed cultural learning opportunities and relationships at the heart of the curriculum and is the longest standing project between a special school and The University of Oxford. This sustainable partnership champions marginalised voices and has been highly celebrated e.g., inclusion in the Durham Commission for Creativity in Education; recent dissemination at the Museum Ideas Conference 2022; highly commended award at the Museum and Heritage Awards 2021; and awarded Platinum ArtsMark in 2021.

Whilst this creative work may seem to be separate from restorative practice, Thomas subscribes to the idea that there are significant overlaps, both within pedagogical practice and wider school culture, topics which his current research touch on within the context of special education.

 

Publications

Procter-Legg. (2022). A Discourse on Restorative Practice—Participants’ Views of a Divergent Ideology. Laws11(6), 86–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11060086

Procter-Legg. (2022). Practitioner Perspectives on a Restorative Community: An Inductive Evaluative Study of Conceptual, Pedagogical, and Routine Practice. Laws11(1), 4–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11010004

 

Supervisors

Ian Thompson and Jason Todd

Ivan is currently serving as a Facilitator (Teaching) in the Vice-Chancellor’s Colloquium and as an Editor of the Graduate Inequality Review in the University of Oxford. He has taken up lecturerships in a number of universities in Hong Kong and has run Education, Linguistics, Applied Linguistics, Sociolinguistics, and Academic English courses at undergraduate and postgraduate level.

Prior to joining Oxford, Ivan received his teacher-training in Hong Kong and his postgraduate training in Linguistics (with a specialisation in pragmatics) at University College London. His research interests include: mental representation of word meanings, language acquisition, educational technology, and ELT pedagogy.

Publications

  • Au, I. (2021). Unwinding the Fantasy: Using Breakout Rooms to Promote Language Exposure and Less-Public Feedback Practices in Online Synchronous Teaching. Paper presented at the PASHE 2021 – EAP Education and Practice: Supporting Students’ Needs, UCL (IOE).
  • Au, I. & Yiu, C. (2021). ‘Identity game’: so you think you are what your Instagram bio says about you. Paper presented at the Sociolinguistics Symposium 23, Hong Kong.
  • Au, I. (2021). The magic of breakout rooms in online synchronous teaching and learning of English. Paper presented at the 3rd International Conference on English Across the Curriculum, Hong Kong.
  • Choi, T. H., Chan, H., & Au, I. (2018). ‘Now you’re talking’: Teacher preparation through alumni talks in a community of practice. Paper presented at the Oxford Education Research Symposium.
  • Au, I. (2018). Branching out from the tree: Extending vocabulary acquisition with polysemy. Paper presented at HKBU-HU First Joint Symposium on Education 2018.

 

Supervisors

Elizabeth Wonnacott and Victoria Murphy

Thomas Procter-Legg is a DPhil Student in the Department of Education and is researching restorative practice within the context of special educational needs and disabilities.

His previous experience includes five years as the Head Teacher of a special academy in Oxfordshire UK, specialising in education for students with Special Educational Needs and Disabilities. He has also worked as a SEND Reviewer for Whole School SEND; a Teaching School Director; and as the Principal Designate on a successful Free School bid.

Thomas is passionate about restorative practice and is involved in many communities of practice, such as the Global Alliance for Restorative Justice and Social Justice, where he is a member of the research sub-group exploring the interactions between restorative justice and social justice.

Thomas is also a strong advocate for creativity in education; having previously gained a Fine Art degree from Chelsea College of Art. This heavily influenced his educational leadership and during his time as a Head Teacher, he became the co-founder of a co-constructed initiative between the academy and the University of Oxford Gardens Libraries and Museums. This work placed cultural learning opportunities and relationships at the heart of the curriculum and is the longest standing project between a special school and The University of Oxford. This sustainable partnership champions marginalised voices and has been highly celebrated e.g., inclusion in the Durham Commission for Creativity in Education; recent dissemination at the Museum Ideas Conference 2022; highly commended award at the Museum and Heritage Awards 2021; and awarded Platinum ArtsMark in 2021.

Whilst this creative work may seem to be separate from restorative practice, Thomas subscribes to the idea that there are significant overlaps, both within pedagogical practice and wider school culture, topics which his current research touch on within the context of special education.

 

Publications

Procter-Legg. (2022). A Discourse on Restorative Practice—Participants’ Views of a Divergent Ideology. Laws11(6), 86–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11060086

Procter-Legg. (2022). Practitioner Perspectives on a Restorative Community: An Inductive Evaluative Study of Conceptual, Pedagogical, and Routine Practice. Laws11(1), 4–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11010004

 

Supervisors

Ian Thompson and Jason Todd

Ivan is currently serving as a Facilitator (Teaching) in the Vice-Chancellor’s Colloquium and as an Editor of the Graduate Inequality Review in the University of Oxford. He has taken up lecturerships in a number of universities in Hong Kong and has run Education, Linguistics, Applied Linguistics, Sociolinguistics, and Academic English courses at undergraduate and postgraduate level.

Prior to joining Oxford, Ivan received his teacher-training in Hong Kong and his postgraduate training in Linguistics (with a specialisation in pragmatics) at University College London. His research interests include: mental representation of word meanings, language acquisition, educational technology, and ELT pedagogy.

Publications

  • Au, I. (2021). Unwinding the Fantasy: Using Breakout Rooms to Promote Language Exposure and Less-Public Feedback Practices in Online Synchronous Teaching. Paper presented at the PASHE 2021 – EAP Education and Practice: Supporting Students’ Needs, UCL (IOE).
  • Au, I. & Yiu, C. (2021). ‘Identity game’: so you think you are what your Instagram bio says about you. Paper presented at the Sociolinguistics Symposium 23, Hong Kong.
  • Au, I. (2021). The magic of breakout rooms in online synchronous teaching and learning of English. Paper presented at the 3rd International Conference on English Across the Curriculum, Hong Kong.
  • Choi, T. H., Chan, H., & Au, I. (2018). ‘Now you’re talking’: Teacher preparation through alumni talks in a community of practice. Paper presented at the Oxford Education Research Symposium.
  • Au, I. (2018). Branching out from the tree: Extending vocabulary acquisition with polysemy. Paper presented at HKBU-HU First Joint Symposium on Education 2018.

 

Supervisors

Elizabeth Wonnacott and Victoria Murphy

Thomas Procter-Legg is a DPhil Student in the Department of Education and is researching restorative practice within the context of special educational needs and disabilities.

His previous experience includes five years as the Head Teacher of a special academy in Oxfordshire UK, specialising in education for students with Special Educational Needs and Disabilities. He has also worked as a SEND Reviewer for Whole School SEND; a Teaching School Director; and as the Principal Designate on a successful Free School bid.

Thomas is passionate about restorative practice and is involved in many communities of practice, such as the Global Alliance for Restorative Justice and Social Justice, where he is a member of the research sub-group exploring the interactions between restorative justice and social justice.

Thomas is also a strong advocate for creativity in education; having previously gained a Fine Art degree from Chelsea College of Art. This heavily influenced his educational leadership and during his time as a Head Teacher, he became the co-founder of a co-constructed initiative between the academy and the University of Oxford Gardens Libraries and Museums. This work placed cultural learning opportunities and relationships at the heart of the curriculum and is the longest standing project between a special school and The University of Oxford. This sustainable partnership champions marginalised voices and has been highly celebrated e.g., inclusion in the Durham Commission for Creativity in Education; recent dissemination at the Museum Ideas Conference 2022; highly commended award at the Museum and Heritage Awards 2021; and awarded Platinum ArtsMark in 2021.

Whilst this creative work may seem to be separate from restorative practice, Thomas subscribes to the idea that there are significant overlaps, both within pedagogical practice and wider school culture, topics which his current research touch on within the context of special education.

 

Publications

Procter-Legg. (2022). A Discourse on Restorative Practice—Participants’ Views of a Divergent Ideology. Laws11(6), 86–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11060086

Procter-Legg. (2022). Practitioner Perspectives on a Restorative Community: An Inductive Evaluative Study of Conceptual, Pedagogical, and Routine Practice. Laws11(1), 4–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11010004

 

Supervisors

Ian Thompson and Jason Todd

Ivan is currently serving as a Facilitator (Teaching) in the Vice-Chancellor’s Colloquium and as an Editor of the Graduate Inequality Review in the University of Oxford. He has taken up lecturerships in a number of universities in Hong Kong and has run Education, Linguistics, Applied Linguistics, Sociolinguistics, and Academic English courses at undergraduate and postgraduate level.

Prior to joining Oxford, Ivan received his teacher-training in Hong Kong and his postgraduate training in Linguistics (with a specialisation in pragmatics) at University College London. His research interests include: mental representation of word meanings, language acquisition, educational technology, and ELT pedagogy.

Publications

  • Au, I. (2021). Unwinding the Fantasy: Using Breakout Rooms to Promote Language Exposure and Less-Public Feedback Practices in Online Synchronous Teaching. Paper presented at the PASHE 2021 – EAP Education and Practice: Supporting Students’ Needs, UCL (IOE).
  • Au, I. & Yiu, C. (2021). ‘Identity game’: so you think you are what your Instagram bio says about you. Paper presented at the Sociolinguistics Symposium 23, Hong Kong.
  • Au, I. (2021). The magic of breakout rooms in online synchronous teaching and learning of English. Paper presented at the 3rd International Conference on English Across the Curriculum, Hong Kong.
  • Choi, T. H., Chan, H., & Au, I. (2018). ‘Now you’re talking’: Teacher preparation through alumni talks in a community of practice. Paper presented at the Oxford Education Research Symposium.
  • Au, I. (2018). Branching out from the tree: Extending vocabulary acquisition with polysemy. Paper presented at HKBU-HU First Joint Symposium on Education 2018.

 

Supervisors

Elizabeth Wonnacott and Victoria Murphy

Thomas Procter-Legg is a DPhil Student in the Department of Education and is researching restorative practice within the context of special educational needs and disabilities.

His previous experience includes five years as the Head Teacher of a special academy in Oxfordshire UK, specialising in education for students with Special Educational Needs and Disabilities. He has also worked as a SEND Reviewer for Whole School SEND; a Teaching School Director; and as the Principal Designate on a successful Free School bid.

Thomas is passionate about restorative practice and is involved in many communities of practice, such as the Global Alliance for Restorative Justice and Social Justice, where he is a member of the research sub-group exploring the interactions between restorative justice and social justice.

Thomas is also a strong advocate for creativity in education; having previously gained a Fine Art degree from Chelsea College of Art. This heavily influenced his educational leadership and during his time as a Head Teacher, he became the co-founder of a co-constructed initiative between the academy and the University of Oxford Gardens Libraries and Museums. This work placed cultural learning opportunities and relationships at the heart of the curriculum and is the longest standing project between a special school and The University of Oxford. This sustainable partnership champions marginalised voices and has been highly celebrated e.g., inclusion in the Durham Commission for Creativity in Education; recent dissemination at the Museum Ideas Conference 2022; highly commended award at the Museum and Heritage Awards 2021; and awarded Platinum ArtsMark in 2021.

Whilst this creative work may seem to be separate from restorative practice, Thomas subscribes to the idea that there are significant overlaps, both within pedagogical practice and wider school culture, topics which his current research touch on within the context of special education.

 

Publications

Procter-Legg. (2022). A Discourse on Restorative Practice—Participants’ Views of a Divergent Ideology. Laws11(6), 86–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11060086

Procter-Legg. (2022). Practitioner Perspectives on a Restorative Community: An Inductive Evaluative Study of Conceptual, Pedagogical, and Routine Practice. Laws11(1), 4–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11010004

 

Supervisors

Ian Thompson and Jason Todd

Ivan is currently serving as a Facilitator (Teaching) in the Vice-Chancellor’s Colloquium and as an Editor of the Graduate Inequality Review in the University of Oxford. He has taken up lecturerships in a number of universities in Hong Kong and has run Education, Linguistics, Applied Linguistics, Sociolinguistics, and Academic English courses at undergraduate and postgraduate level.

Prior to joining Oxford, Ivan received his teacher-training in Hong Kong and his postgraduate training in Linguistics (with a specialisation in pragmatics) at University College London. His research interests include: mental representation of word meanings, language acquisition, educational technology, and ELT pedagogy.

Publications

  • Au, I. (2021). Unwinding the Fantasy: Using Breakout Rooms to Promote Language Exposure and Less-Public Feedback Practices in Online Synchronous Teaching. Paper presented at the PASHE 2021 – EAP Education and Practice: Supporting Students’ Needs, UCL (IOE).
  • Au, I. & Yiu, C. (2021). ‘Identity game’: so you think you are what your Instagram bio says about you. Paper presented at the Sociolinguistics Symposium 23, Hong Kong.
  • Au, I. (2021). The magic of breakout rooms in online synchronous teaching and learning of English. Paper presented at the 3rd International Conference on English Across the Curriculum, Hong Kong.
  • Choi, T. H., Chan, H., & Au, I. (2018). ‘Now you’re talking’: Teacher preparation through alumni talks in a community of practice. Paper presented at the Oxford Education Research Symposium.
  • Au, I. (2018). Branching out from the tree: Extending vocabulary acquisition with polysemy. Paper presented at HKBU-HU First Joint Symposium on Education 2018.

 

Supervisors

Elizabeth Wonnacott and Victoria Murphy

Thomas Procter-Legg is a DPhil Student in the Department of Education and is researching restorative practice within the context of special educational needs and disabilities.

His previous experience includes five years as the Head Teacher of a special academy in Oxfordshire UK, specialising in education for students with Special Educational Needs and Disabilities. He has also worked as a SEND Reviewer for Whole School SEND; a Teaching School Director; and as the Principal Designate on a successful Free School bid.

Thomas is passionate about restorative practice and is involved in many communities of practice, such as the Global Alliance for Restorative Justice and Social Justice, where he is a member of the research sub-group exploring the interactions between restorative justice and social justice.

Thomas is also a strong advocate for creativity in education; having previously gained a Fine Art degree from Chelsea College of Art. This heavily influenced his educational leadership and during his time as a Head Teacher, he became the co-founder of a co-constructed initiative between the academy and the University of Oxford Gardens Libraries and Museums. This work placed cultural learning opportunities and relationships at the heart of the curriculum and is the longest standing project between a special school and The University of Oxford. This sustainable partnership champions marginalised voices and has been highly celebrated e.g., inclusion in the Durham Commission for Creativity in Education; recent dissemination at the Museum Ideas Conference 2022; highly commended award at the Museum and Heritage Awards 2021; and awarded Platinum ArtsMark in 2021.

Whilst this creative work may seem to be separate from restorative practice, Thomas subscribes to the idea that there are significant overlaps, both within pedagogical practice and wider school culture, topics which his current research touch on within the context of special education.

 

Publications

Procter-Legg. (2022). A Discourse on Restorative Practice—Participants’ Views of a Divergent Ideology. Laws11(6), 86–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11060086

Procter-Legg. (2022). Practitioner Perspectives on a Restorative Community: An Inductive Evaluative Study of Conceptual, Pedagogical, and Routine Practice. Laws11(1), 4–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11010004

 

Supervisors

Ian Thompson and Jason Todd

Ivan is currently serving as a Facilitator (Teaching) in the Vice-Chancellor’s Colloquium and as an Editor of the Graduate Inequality Review in the University of Oxford. He has taken up lecturerships in a number of universities in Hong Kong and has run Education, Linguistics, Applied Linguistics, Sociolinguistics, and Academic English courses at undergraduate and postgraduate level.

Prior to joining Oxford, Ivan received his teacher-training in Hong Kong and his postgraduate training in Linguistics (with a specialisation in pragmatics) at University College London. His research interests include: mental representation of word meanings, language acquisition, educational technology, and ELT pedagogy.

Publications

  • Au, I. (2021). Unwinding the Fantasy: Using Breakout Rooms to Promote Language Exposure and Less-Public Feedback Practices in Online Synchronous Teaching. Paper presented at the PASHE 2021 – EAP Education and Practice: Supporting Students’ Needs, UCL (IOE).
  • Au, I. & Yiu, C. (2021). ‘Identity game’: so you think you are what your Instagram bio says about you. Paper presented at the Sociolinguistics Symposium 23, Hong Kong.
  • Au, I. (2021). The magic of breakout rooms in online synchronous teaching and learning of English. Paper presented at the 3rd International Conference on English Across the Curriculum, Hong Kong.
  • Choi, T. H., Chan, H., & Au, I. (2018). ‘Now you’re talking’: Teacher preparation through alumni talks in a community of practice. Paper presented at the Oxford Education Research Symposium.
  • Au, I. (2018). Branching out from the tree: Extending vocabulary acquisition with polysemy. Paper presented at HKBU-HU First Joint Symposium on Education 2018.

 

Supervisors

Elizabeth Wonnacott and Victoria Murphy

Thomas Procter-Legg is a DPhil Student in the Department of Education and is researching restorative practice within the context of special educational needs and disabilities.

His previous experience includes five years as the Head Teacher of a special academy in Oxfordshire UK, specialising in education for students with Special Educational Needs and Disabilities. He has also worked as a SEND Reviewer for Whole School SEND; a Teaching School Director; and as the Principal Designate on a successful Free School bid.

Thomas is passionate about restorative practice and is involved in many communities of practice, such as the Global Alliance for Restorative Justice and Social Justice, where he is a member of the research sub-group exploring the interactions between restorative justice and social justice.

Thomas is also a strong advocate for creativity in education; having previously gained a Fine Art degree from Chelsea College of Art. This heavily influenced his educational leadership and during his time as a Head Teacher, he became the co-founder of a co-constructed initiative between the academy and the University of Oxford Gardens Libraries and Museums. This work placed cultural learning opportunities and relationships at the heart of the curriculum and is the longest standing project between a special school and The University of Oxford. This sustainable partnership champions marginalised voices and has been highly celebrated e.g., inclusion in the Durham Commission for Creativity in Education; recent dissemination at the Museum Ideas Conference 2022; highly commended award at the Museum and Heritage Awards 2021; and awarded Platinum ArtsMark in 2021.

Whilst this creative work may seem to be separate from restorative practice, Thomas subscribes to the idea that there are significant overlaps, both within pedagogical practice and wider school culture, topics which his current research touch on within the context of special education.

 

Publications

Procter-Legg. (2022). A Discourse on Restorative Practice—Participants’ Views of a Divergent Ideology. Laws11(6), 86–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11060086

Procter-Legg. (2022). Practitioner Perspectives on a Restorative Community: An Inductive Evaluative Study of Conceptual, Pedagogical, and Routine Practice. Laws11(1), 4–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11010004

 

Supervisors

Ian Thompson and Jason Todd

Ivan is currently serving as a Facilitator (Teaching) in the Vice-Chancellor’s Colloquium and as an Editor of the Graduate Inequality Review in the University of Oxford. He has taken up lecturerships in a number of universities in Hong Kong and has run Education, Linguistics, Applied Linguistics, Sociolinguistics, and Academic English courses at undergraduate and postgraduate level.

Prior to joining Oxford, Ivan received his teacher-training in Hong Kong and his postgraduate training in Linguistics (with a specialisation in pragmatics) at University College London. His research interests include: mental representation of word meanings, language acquisition, educational technology, and ELT pedagogy.

Publications

  • Au, I. (2021). Unwinding the Fantasy: Using Breakout Rooms to Promote Language Exposure and Less-Public Feedback Practices in Online Synchronous Teaching. Paper presented at the PASHE 2021 – EAP Education and Practice: Supporting Students’ Needs, UCL (IOE).
  • Au, I. & Yiu, C. (2021). ‘Identity game’: so you think you are what your Instagram bio says about you. Paper presented at the Sociolinguistics Symposium 23, Hong Kong.
  • Au, I. (2021). The magic of breakout rooms in online synchronous teaching and learning of English. Paper presented at the 3rd International Conference on English Across the Curriculum, Hong Kong.
  • Choi, T. H., Chan, H., & Au, I. (2018). ‘Now you’re talking’: Teacher preparation through alumni talks in a community of practice. Paper presented at the Oxford Education Research Symposium.
  • Au, I. (2018). Branching out from the tree: Extending vocabulary acquisition with polysemy. Paper presented at HKBU-HU First Joint Symposium on Education 2018.

 

Supervisors

Elizabeth Wonnacott and Victoria Murphy

Thomas Procter-Legg is a DPhil Student in the Department of Education and is researching restorative practice within the context of special educational needs and disabilities.

His previous experience includes five years as the Head Teacher of a special academy in Oxfordshire UK, specialising in education for students with Special Educational Needs and Disabilities. He has also worked as a SEND Reviewer for Whole School SEND; a Teaching School Director; and as the Principal Designate on a successful Free School bid.

Thomas is passionate about restorative practice and is involved in many communities of practice, such as the Global Alliance for Restorative Justice and Social Justice, where he is a member of the research sub-group exploring the interactions between restorative justice and social justice.

Thomas is also a strong advocate for creativity in education; having previously gained a Fine Art degree from Chelsea College of Art. This heavily influenced his educational leadership and during his time as a Head Teacher, he became the co-founder of a co-constructed initiative between the academy and the University of Oxford Gardens Libraries and Museums. This work placed cultural learning opportunities and relationships at the heart of the curriculum and is the longest standing project between a special school and The University of Oxford. This sustainable partnership champions marginalised voices and has been highly celebrated e.g., inclusion in the Durham Commission for Creativity in Education; recent dissemination at the Museum Ideas Conference 2022; highly commended award at the Museum and Heritage Awards 2021; and awarded Platinum ArtsMark in 2021.

Whilst this creative work may seem to be separate from restorative practice, Thomas subscribes to the idea that there are significant overlaps, both within pedagogical practice and wider school culture, topics which his current research touch on within the context of special education.

 

Publications

Procter-Legg. (2022). A Discourse on Restorative Practice—Participants’ Views of a Divergent Ideology. Laws11(6), 86–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11060086

Procter-Legg. (2022). Practitioner Perspectives on a Restorative Community: An Inductive Evaluative Study of Conceptual, Pedagogical, and Routine Practice. Laws11(1), 4–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11010004

 

Supervisors

Ian Thompson and Jason Todd

Ivan is currently serving as a Facilitator (Teaching) in the Vice-Chancellor’s Colloquium and as an Editor of the Graduate Inequality Review in the University of Oxford. He has taken up lecturerships in a number of universities in Hong Kong and has run Education, Linguistics, Applied Linguistics, Sociolinguistics, and Academic English courses at undergraduate and postgraduate level.

Prior to joining Oxford, Ivan received his teacher-training in Hong Kong and his postgraduate training in Linguistics (with a specialisation in pragmatics) at University College London. His research interests include: mental representation of word meanings, language acquisition, educational technology, and ELT pedagogy.

Publications

  • Au, I. (2021). Unwinding the Fantasy: Using Breakout Rooms to Promote Language Exposure and Less-Public Feedback Practices in Online Synchronous Teaching. Paper presented at the PASHE 2021 – EAP Education and Practice: Supporting Students’ Needs, UCL (IOE).
  • Au, I. & Yiu, C. (2021). ‘Identity game’: so you think you are what your Instagram bio says about you. Paper presented at the Sociolinguistics Symposium 23, Hong Kong.
  • Au, I. (2021). The magic of breakout rooms in online synchronous teaching and learning of English. Paper presented at the 3rd International Conference on English Across the Curriculum, Hong Kong.
  • Choi, T. H., Chan, H., & Au, I. (2018). ‘Now you’re talking’: Teacher preparation through alumni talks in a community of practice. Paper presented at the Oxford Education Research Symposium.
  • Au, I. (2018). Branching out from the tree: Extending vocabulary acquisition with polysemy. Paper presented at HKBU-HU First Joint Symposium on Education 2018.

 

Supervisors

Elizabeth Wonnacott and Victoria Murphy

Thomas Procter-Legg is a DPhil Student in the Department of Education and is researching restorative practice within the context of special educational needs and disabilities.

His previous experience includes five years as the Head Teacher of a special academy in Oxfordshire UK, specialising in education for students with Special Educational Needs and Disabilities. He has also worked as a SEND Reviewer for Whole School SEND; a Teaching School Director; and as the Principal Designate on a successful Free School bid.

Thomas is passionate about restorative practice and is involved in many communities of practice, such as the Global Alliance for Restorative Justice and Social Justice, where he is a member of the research sub-group exploring the interactions between restorative justice and social justice.

Thomas is also a strong advocate for creativity in education; having previously gained a Fine Art degree from Chelsea College of Art. This heavily influenced his educational leadership and during his time as a Head Teacher, he became the co-founder of a co-constructed initiative between the academy and the University of Oxford Gardens Libraries and Museums. This work placed cultural learning opportunities and relationships at the heart of the curriculum and is the longest standing project between a special school and The University of Oxford. This sustainable partnership champions marginalised voices and has been highly celebrated e.g., inclusion in the Durham Commission for Creativity in Education; recent dissemination at the Museum Ideas Conference 2022; highly commended award at the Museum and Heritage Awards 2021; and awarded Platinum ArtsMark in 2021.

Whilst this creative work may seem to be separate from restorative practice, Thomas subscribes to the idea that there are significant overlaps, both within pedagogical practice and wider school culture, topics which his current research touch on within the context of special education.

 

Publications

Procter-Legg. (2022). A Discourse on Restorative Practice—Participants’ Views of a Divergent Ideology. Laws11(6), 86–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11060086

Procter-Legg. (2022). Practitioner Perspectives on a Restorative Community: An Inductive Evaluative Study of Conceptual, Pedagogical, and Routine Practice. Laws11(1), 4–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11010004

 

Supervisors

Ian Thompson and Jason Todd

Ivan is currently serving as a Facilitator (Teaching) in the Vice-Chancellor’s Colloquium and as an Editor of the Graduate Inequality Review in the University of Oxford. He has taken up lecturerships in a number of universities in Hong Kong and has run Education, Linguistics, Applied Linguistics, Sociolinguistics, and Academic English courses at undergraduate and postgraduate level.

Prior to joining Oxford, Ivan received his teacher-training in Hong Kong and his postgraduate training in Linguistics (with a specialisation in pragmatics) at University College London. His research interests include: mental representation of word meanings, language acquisition, educational technology, and ELT pedagogy.

Publications

  • Au, I. (2021). Unwinding the Fantasy: Using Breakout Rooms to Promote Language Exposure and Less-Public Feedback Practices in Online Synchronous Teaching. Paper presented at the PASHE 2021 – EAP Education and Practice: Supporting Students’ Needs, UCL (IOE).
  • Au, I. & Yiu, C. (2021). ‘Identity game’: so you think you are what your Instagram bio says about you. Paper presented at the Sociolinguistics Symposium 23, Hong Kong.
  • Au, I. (2021). The magic of breakout rooms in online synchronous teaching and learning of English. Paper presented at the 3rd International Conference on English Across the Curriculum, Hong Kong.
  • Choi, T. H., Chan, H., & Au, I. (2018). ‘Now you’re talking’: Teacher preparation through alumni talks in a community of practice. Paper presented at the Oxford Education Research Symposium.
  • Au, I. (2018). Branching out from the tree: Extending vocabulary acquisition with polysemy. Paper presented at HKBU-HU First Joint Symposium on Education 2018.

 

Supervisors

Elizabeth Wonnacott and Victoria Murphy

Thomas Procter-Legg is a DPhil Student in the Department of Education and is researching restorative practice within the context of special educational needs and disabilities.

His previous experience includes five years as the Head Teacher of a special academy in Oxfordshire UK, specialising in education for students with Special Educational Needs and Disabilities. He has also worked as a SEND Reviewer for Whole School SEND; a Teaching School Director; and as the Principal Designate on a successful Free School bid.

Thomas is passionate about restorative practice and is involved in many communities of practice, such as the Global Alliance for Restorative Justice and Social Justice, where he is a member of the research sub-group exploring the interactions between restorative justice and social justice.

Thomas is also a strong advocate for creativity in education; having previously gained a Fine Art degree from Chelsea College of Art. This heavily influenced his educational leadership and during his time as a Head Teacher, he became the co-founder of a co-constructed initiative between the academy and the University of Oxford Gardens Libraries and Museums. This work placed cultural learning opportunities and relationships at the heart of the curriculum and is the longest standing project between a special school and The University of Oxford. This sustainable partnership champions marginalised voices and has been highly celebrated e.g., inclusion in the Durham Commission for Creativity in Education; recent dissemination at the Museum Ideas Conference 2022; highly commended award at the Museum and Heritage Awards 2021; and awarded Platinum ArtsMark in 2021.

Whilst this creative work may seem to be separate from restorative practice, Thomas subscribes to the idea that there are significant overlaps, both within pedagogical practice and wider school culture, topics which his current research touch on within the context of special education.

 

Publications

Procter-Legg. (2022). A Discourse on Restorative Practice—Participants’ Views of a Divergent Ideology. Laws11(6), 86–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11060086

Procter-Legg. (2022). Practitioner Perspectives on a Restorative Community: An Inductive Evaluative Study of Conceptual, Pedagogical, and Routine Practice. Laws11(1), 4–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11010004

 

Supervisors

Ian Thompson and Jason Todd

Ivan is currently serving as a Facilitator (Teaching) in the Vice-Chancellor’s Colloquium and as an Editor of the Graduate Inequality Review in the University of Oxford. He has taken up lecturerships in a number of universities in Hong Kong and has run Education, Linguistics, Applied Linguistics, Sociolinguistics, and Academic English courses at undergraduate and postgraduate level.

Prior to joining Oxford, Ivan received his teacher-training in Hong Kong and his postgraduate training in Linguistics (with a specialisation in pragmatics) at University College London. His research interests include: mental representation of word meanings, language acquisition, educational technology, and ELT pedagogy.

Publications

  • Au, I. (2021). Unwinding the Fantasy: Using Breakout Rooms to Promote Language Exposure and Less-Public Feedback Practices in Online Synchronous Teaching. Paper presented at the PASHE 2021 – EAP Education and Practice: Supporting Students’ Needs, UCL (IOE).
  • Au, I. & Yiu, C. (2021). ‘Identity game’: so you think you are what your Instagram bio says about you. Paper presented at the Sociolinguistics Symposium 23, Hong Kong.
  • Au, I. (2021). The magic of breakout rooms in online synchronous teaching and learning of English. Paper presented at the 3rd International Conference on English Across the Curriculum, Hong Kong.
  • Choi, T. H., Chan, H., & Au, I. (2018). ‘Now you’re talking’: Teacher preparation through alumni talks in a community of practice. Paper presented at the Oxford Education Research Symposium.
  • Au, I. (2018). Branching out from the tree: Extending vocabulary acquisition with polysemy. Paper presented at HKBU-HU First Joint Symposium on Education 2018.

 

Supervisors

Elizabeth Wonnacott and Victoria Murphy

Thomas Procter-Legg is a DPhil Student in the Department of Education and is researching restorative practice within the context of special educational needs and disabilities.

His previous experience includes five years as the Head Teacher of a special academy in Oxfordshire UK, specialising in education for students with Special Educational Needs and Disabilities. He has also worked as a SEND Reviewer for Whole School SEND; a Teaching School Director; and as the Principal Designate on a successful Free School bid.

Thomas is passionate about restorative practice and is involved in many communities of practice, such as the Global Alliance for Restorative Justice and Social Justice, where he is a member of the research sub-group exploring the interactions between restorative justice and social justice.

Thomas is also a strong advocate for creativity in education; having previously gained a Fine Art degree from Chelsea College of Art. This heavily influenced his educational leadership and during his time as a Head Teacher, he became the co-founder of a co-constructed initiative between the academy and the University of Oxford Gardens Libraries and Museums. This work placed cultural learning opportunities and relationships at the heart of the curriculum and is the longest standing project between a special school and The University of Oxford. This sustainable partnership champions marginalised voices and has been highly celebrated e.g., inclusion in the Durham Commission for Creativity in Education; recent dissemination at the Museum Ideas Conference 2022; highly commended award at the Museum and Heritage Awards 2021; and awarded Platinum ArtsMark in 2021.

Whilst this creative work may seem to be separate from restorative practice, Thomas subscribes to the idea that there are significant overlaps, both within pedagogical practice and wider school culture, topics which his current research touch on within the context of special education.

 

Publications

Procter-Legg. (2022). A Discourse on Restorative Practice—Participants’ Views of a Divergent Ideology. Laws11(6), 86–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11060086

Procter-Legg. (2022). Practitioner Perspectives on a Restorative Community: An Inductive Evaluative Study of Conceptual, Pedagogical, and Routine Practice. Laws11(1), 4–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11010004

 

Supervisors

Ian Thompson and Jason Todd

Ivan is currently serving as a Facilitator (Teaching) in the Vice-Chancellor’s Colloquium and as an Editor of the Graduate Inequality Review in the University of Oxford. He has taken up lecturerships in a number of universities in Hong Kong and has run Education, Linguistics, Applied Linguistics, Sociolinguistics, and Academic English courses at undergraduate and postgraduate level.

Prior to joining Oxford, Ivan received his teacher-training in Hong Kong and his postgraduate training in Linguistics (with a specialisation in pragmatics) at University College London. His research interests include: mental representation of word meanings, language acquisition, educational technology, and ELT pedagogy.

Publications

  • Au, I. (2021). Unwinding the Fantasy: Using Breakout Rooms to Promote Language Exposure and Less-Public Feedback Practices in Online Synchronous Teaching. Paper presented at the PASHE 2021 – EAP Education and Practice: Supporting Students’ Needs, UCL (IOE).
  • Au, I. & Yiu, C. (2021). ‘Identity game’: so you think you are what your Instagram bio says about you. Paper presented at the Sociolinguistics Symposium 23, Hong Kong.
  • Au, I. (2021). The magic of breakout rooms in online synchronous teaching and learning of English. Paper presented at the 3rd International Conference on English Across the Curriculum, Hong Kong.
  • Choi, T. H., Chan, H., & Au, I. (2018). ‘Now you’re talking’: Teacher preparation through alumni talks in a community of practice. Paper presented at the Oxford Education Research Symposium.
  • Au, I. (2018). Branching out from the tree: Extending vocabulary acquisition with polysemy. Paper presented at HKBU-HU First Joint Symposium on Education 2018.

 

Supervisors

Elizabeth Wonnacott and Victoria Murphy

Thomas Procter-Legg is a DPhil Student in the Department of Education and is researching restorative practice within the context of special educational needs and disabilities.

His previous experience includes five years as the Head Teacher of a special academy in Oxfordshire UK, specialising in education for students with Special Educational Needs and Disabilities. He has also worked as a SEND Reviewer for Whole School SEND; a Teaching School Director; and as the Principal Designate on a successful Free School bid.

Thomas is passionate about restorative practice and is involved in many communities of practice, such as the Global Alliance for Restorative Justice and Social Justice, where he is a member of the research sub-group exploring the interactions between restorative justice and social justice.

Thomas is also a strong advocate for creativity in education; having previously gained a Fine Art degree from Chelsea College of Art. This heavily influenced his educational leadership and during his time as a Head Teacher, he became the co-founder of a co-constructed initiative between the academy and the University of Oxford Gardens Libraries and Museums. This work placed cultural learning opportunities and relationships at the heart of the curriculum and is the longest standing project between a special school and The University of Oxford. This sustainable partnership champions marginalised voices and has been highly celebrated e.g., inclusion in the Durham Commission for Creativity in Education; recent dissemination at the Museum Ideas Conference 2022; highly commended award at the Museum and Heritage Awards 2021; and awarded Platinum ArtsMark in 2021.

Whilst this creative work may seem to be separate from restorative practice, Thomas subscribes to the idea that there are significant overlaps, both within pedagogical practice and wider school culture, topics which his current research touch on within the context of special education.

 

Publications

Procter-Legg. (2022). A Discourse on Restorative Practice—Participants’ Views of a Divergent Ideology. Laws11(6), 86–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11060086

Procter-Legg. (2022). Practitioner Perspectives on a Restorative Community: An Inductive Evaluative Study of Conceptual, Pedagogical, and Routine Practice. Laws11(1), 4–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11010004

 

Supervisors

Ian Thompson and Jason Todd

Ivan is currently serving as a Facilitator (Teaching) in the Vice-Chancellor’s Colloquium and as an Editor of the Graduate Inequality Review in the University of Oxford. He has taken up lecturerships in a number of universities in Hong Kong and has run Education, Linguistics, Applied Linguistics, Sociolinguistics, and Academic English courses at undergraduate and postgraduate level.

Prior to joining Oxford, Ivan received his teacher-training in Hong Kong and his postgraduate training in Linguistics (with a specialisation in pragmatics) at University College London. His research interests include: mental representation of word meanings, language acquisition, educational technology, and ELT pedagogy.

Publications

  • Au, I. (2021). Unwinding the Fantasy: Using Breakout Rooms to Promote Language Exposure and Less-Public Feedback Practices in Online Synchronous Teaching. Paper presented at the PASHE 2021 – EAP Education and Practice: Supporting Students’ Needs, UCL (IOE).
  • Au, I. & Yiu, C. (2021). ‘Identity game’: so you think you are what your Instagram bio says about you. Paper presented at the Sociolinguistics Symposium 23, Hong Kong.
  • Au, I. (2021). The magic of breakout rooms in online synchronous teaching and learning of English. Paper presented at the 3rd International Conference on English Across the Curriculum, Hong Kong.
  • Choi, T. H., Chan, H., & Au, I. (2018). ‘Now you’re talking’: Teacher preparation through alumni talks in a community of practice. Paper presented at the Oxford Education Research Symposium.
  • Au, I. (2018). Branching out from the tree: Extending vocabulary acquisition with polysemy. Paper presented at HKBU-HU First Joint Symposium on Education 2018.

 

Supervisors

Elizabeth Wonnacott and Victoria Murphy

Thomas Procter-Legg is a DPhil Student in the Department of Education and is researching restorative practice within the context of special educational needs and disabilities.

His previous experience includes five years as the Head Teacher of a special academy in Oxfordshire UK, specialising in education for students with Special Educational Needs and Disabilities. He has also worked as a SEND Reviewer for Whole School SEND; a Teaching School Director; and as the Principal Designate on a successful Free School bid.

Thomas is passionate about restorative practice and is involved in many communities of practice, such as the Global Alliance for Restorative Justice and Social Justice, where he is a member of the research sub-group exploring the interactions between restorative justice and social justice.

Thomas is also a strong advocate for creativity in education; having previously gained a Fine Art degree from Chelsea College of Art. This heavily influenced his educational leadership and during his time as a Head Teacher, he became the co-founder of a co-constructed initiative between the academy and the University of Oxford Gardens Libraries and Museums. This work placed cultural learning opportunities and relationships at the heart of the curriculum and is the longest standing project between a special school and The University of Oxford. This sustainable partnership champions marginalised voices and has been highly celebrated e.g., inclusion in the Durham Commission for Creativity in Education; recent dissemination at the Museum Ideas Conference 2022; highly commended award at the Museum and Heritage Awards 2021; and awarded Platinum ArtsMark in 2021.

Whilst this creative work may seem to be separate from restorative practice, Thomas subscribes to the idea that there are significant overlaps, both within pedagogical practice and wider school culture, topics which his current research touch on within the context of special education.

 

Publications

Procter-Legg. (2022). A Discourse on Restorative Practice—Participants’ Views of a Divergent Ideology. Laws11(6), 86–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11060086

Procter-Legg. (2022). Practitioner Perspectives on a Restorative Community: An Inductive Evaluative Study of Conceptual, Pedagogical, and Routine Practice. Laws11(1), 4–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11010004

 

Supervisors

Ian Thompson and Jason Todd

Ivan is currently serving as a Facilitator (Teaching) in the Vice-Chancellor’s Colloquium and as an Editor of the Graduate Inequality Review in the University of Oxford. He has taken up lecturerships in a number of universities in Hong Kong and has run Education, Linguistics, Applied Linguistics, Sociolinguistics, and Academic English courses at undergraduate and postgraduate level.

Prior to joining Oxford, Ivan received his teacher-training in Hong Kong and his postgraduate training in Linguistics (with a specialisation in pragmatics) at University College London. His research interests include: mental representation of word meanings, language acquisition, educational technology, and ELT pedagogy.

Publications

  • Au, I. (2021). Unwinding the Fantasy: Using Breakout Rooms to Promote Language Exposure and Less-Public Feedback Practices in Online Synchronous Teaching. Paper presented at the PASHE 2021 – EAP Education and Practice: Supporting Students’ Needs, UCL (IOE).
  • Au, I. & Yiu, C. (2021). ‘Identity game’: so you think you are what your Instagram bio says about you. Paper presented at the Sociolinguistics Symposium 23, Hong Kong.
  • Au, I. (2021). The magic of breakout rooms in online synchronous teaching and learning of English. Paper presented at the 3rd International Conference on English Across the Curriculum, Hong Kong.
  • Choi, T. H., Chan, H., & Au, I. (2018). ‘Now you’re talking’: Teacher preparation through alumni talks in a community of practice. Paper presented at the Oxford Education Research Symposium.
  • Au, I. (2018). Branching out from the tree: Extending vocabulary acquisition with polysemy. Paper presented at HKBU-HU First Joint Symposium on Education 2018.

 

Supervisors

Elizabeth Wonnacott and Victoria Murphy

Thomas Procter-Legg is a DPhil Student in the Department of Education and is researching restorative practice within the context of special educational needs and disabilities.

His previous experience includes five years as the Head Teacher of a special academy in Oxfordshire UK, specialising in education for students with Special Educational Needs and Disabilities. He has also worked as a SEND Reviewer for Whole School SEND; a Teaching School Director; and as the Principal Designate on a successful Free School bid.

Thomas is passionate about restorative practice and is involved in many communities of practice, such as the Global Alliance for Restorative Justice and Social Justice, where he is a member of the research sub-group exploring the interactions between restorative justice and social justice.

Thomas is also a strong advocate for creativity in education; having previously gained a Fine Art degree from Chelsea College of Art. This heavily influenced his educational leadership and during his time as a Head Teacher, he became the co-founder of a co-constructed initiative between the academy and the University of Oxford Gardens Libraries and Museums. This work placed cultural learning opportunities and relationships at the heart of the curriculum and is the longest standing project between a special school and The University of Oxford. This sustainable partnership champions marginalised voices and has been highly celebrated e.g., inclusion in the Durham Commission for Creativity in Education; recent dissemination at the Museum Ideas Conference 2022; highly commended award at the Museum and Heritage Awards 2021; and awarded Platinum ArtsMark in 2021.

Whilst this creative work may seem to be separate from restorative practice, Thomas subscribes to the idea that there are significant overlaps, both within pedagogical practice and wider school culture, topics which his current research touch on within the context of special education.

 

Publications

Procter-Legg. (2022). A Discourse on Restorative Practice—Participants’ Views of a Divergent Ideology. Laws11(6), 86–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11060086

Procter-Legg. (2022). Practitioner Perspectives on a Restorative Community: An Inductive Evaluative Study of Conceptual, Pedagogical, and Routine Practice. Laws11(1), 4–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11010004

 

Supervisors

Ian Thompson and Jason Todd

Ivan is currently serving as a Facilitator (Teaching) in the Vice-Chancellor’s Colloquium and as an Editor of the Graduate Inequality Review in the University of Oxford. He has taken up lecturerships in a number of universities in Hong Kong and has run Education, Linguistics, Applied Linguistics, Sociolinguistics, and Academic English courses at undergraduate and postgraduate level.

Prior to joining Oxford, Ivan received his teacher-training in Hong Kong and his postgraduate training in Linguistics (with a specialisation in pragmatics) at University College London. His research interests include: mental representation of word meanings, language acquisition, educational technology, and ELT pedagogy.

Publications

  • Au, I. (2021). Unwinding the Fantasy: Using Breakout Rooms to Promote Language Exposure and Less-Public Feedback Practices in Online Synchronous Teaching. Paper presented at the PASHE 2021 – EAP Education and Practice: Supporting Students’ Needs, UCL (IOE).
  • Au, I. & Yiu, C. (2021). ‘Identity game’: so you think you are what your Instagram bio says about you. Paper presented at the Sociolinguistics Symposium 23, Hong Kong.
  • Au, I. (2021). The magic of breakout rooms in online synchronous teaching and learning of English. Paper presented at the 3rd International Conference on English Across the Curriculum, Hong Kong.
  • Choi, T. H., Chan, H., & Au, I. (2018). ‘Now you’re talking’: Teacher preparation through alumni talks in a community of practice. Paper presented at the Oxford Education Research Symposium.
  • Au, I. (2018). Branching out from the tree: Extending vocabulary acquisition with polysemy. Paper presented at HKBU-HU First Joint Symposium on Education 2018.

 

Supervisors

Elizabeth Wonnacott and Victoria Murphy

Thomas Procter-Legg is a DPhil Student in the Department of Education and is researching restorative practice within the context of special educational needs and disabilities.

His previous experience includes five years as the Head Teacher of a special academy in Oxfordshire UK, specialising in education for students with Special Educational Needs and Disabilities. He has also worked as a SEND Reviewer for Whole School SEND; a Teaching School Director; and as the Principal Designate on a successful Free School bid.

Thomas is passionate about restorative practice and is involved in many communities of practice, such as the Global Alliance for Restorative Justice and Social Justice, where he is a member of the research sub-group exploring the interactions between restorative justice and social justice.

Thomas is also a strong advocate for creativity in education; having previously gained a Fine Art degree from Chelsea College of Art. This heavily influenced his educational leadership and during his time as a Head Teacher, he became the co-founder of a co-constructed initiative between the academy and the University of Oxford Gardens Libraries and Museums. This work placed cultural learning opportunities and relationships at the heart of the curriculum and is the longest standing project between a special school and The University of Oxford. This sustainable partnership champions marginalised voices and has been highly celebrated e.g., inclusion in the Durham Commission for Creativity in Education; recent dissemination at the Museum Ideas Conference 2022; highly commended award at the Museum and Heritage Awards 2021; and awarded Platinum ArtsMark in 2021.

Whilst this creative work may seem to be separate from restorative practice, Thomas subscribes to the idea that there are significant overlaps, both within pedagogical practice and wider school culture, topics which his current research touch on within the context of special education.

 

Publications

Procter-Legg. (2022). A Discourse on Restorative Practice—Participants’ Views of a Divergent Ideology. Laws11(6), 86–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11060086

Procter-Legg. (2022). Practitioner Perspectives on a Restorative Community: An Inductive Evaluative Study of Conceptual, Pedagogical, and Routine Practice. Laws11(1), 4–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11010004

 

Supervisors

Ian Thompson and Jason Todd

Ivan is currently serving as a Facilitator (Teaching) in the Vice-Chancellor’s Colloquium and as an Editor of the Graduate Inequality Review in the University of Oxford. He has taken up lecturerships in a number of universities in Hong Kong and has run Education, Linguistics, Applied Linguistics, Sociolinguistics, and Academic English courses at undergraduate and postgraduate level.

Prior to joining Oxford, Ivan received his teacher-training in Hong Kong and his postgraduate training in Linguistics (with a specialisation in pragmatics) at University College London. His research interests include: mental representation of word meanings, language acquisition, educational technology, and ELT pedagogy.

Publications

  • Au, I. (2021). Unwinding the Fantasy: Using Breakout Rooms to Promote Language Exposure and Less-Public Feedback Practices in Online Synchronous Teaching. Paper presented at the PASHE 2021 – EAP Education and Practice: Supporting Students’ Needs, UCL (IOE).
  • Au, I. & Yiu, C. (2021). ‘Identity game’: so you think you are what your Instagram bio says about you. Paper presented at the Sociolinguistics Symposium 23, Hong Kong.
  • Au, I. (2021). The magic of breakout rooms in online synchronous teaching and learning of English. Paper presented at the 3rd International Conference on English Across the Curriculum, Hong Kong.
  • Choi, T. H., Chan, H., & Au, I. (2018). ‘Now you’re talking’: Teacher preparation through alumni talks in a community of practice. Paper presented at the Oxford Education Research Symposium.
  • Au, I. (2018). Branching out from the tree: Extending vocabulary acquisition with polysemy. Paper presented at HKBU-HU First Joint Symposium on Education 2018.

 

Supervisors

Elizabeth Wonnacott and Victoria Murphy

Thomas Procter-Legg is a DPhil Student in the Department of Education and is researching restorative practice within the context of special educational needs and disabilities.

His previous experience includes five years as the Head Teacher of a special academy in Oxfordshire UK, specialising in education for students with Special Educational Needs and Disabilities. He has also worked as a SEND Reviewer for Whole School SEND; a Teaching School Director; and as the Principal Designate on a successful Free School bid.

Thomas is passionate about restorative practice and is involved in many communities of practice, such as the Global Alliance for Restorative Justice and Social Justice, where he is a member of the research sub-group exploring the interactions between restorative justice and social justice.

Thomas is also a strong advocate for creativity in education; having previously gained a Fine Art degree from Chelsea College of Art. This heavily influenced his educational leadership and during his time as a Head Teacher, he became the co-founder of a co-constructed initiative between the academy and the University of Oxford Gardens Libraries and Museums. This work placed cultural learning opportunities and relationships at the heart of the curriculum and is the longest standing project between a special school and The University of Oxford. This sustainable partnership champions marginalised voices and has been highly celebrated e.g., inclusion in the Durham Commission for Creativity in Education; recent dissemination at the Museum Ideas Conference 2022; highly commended award at the Museum and Heritage Awards 2021; and awarded Platinum ArtsMark in 2021.

Whilst this creative work may seem to be separate from restorative practice, Thomas subscribes to the idea that there are significant overlaps, both within pedagogical practice and wider school culture, topics which his current research touch on within the context of special education.

 

Publications

Procter-Legg. (2022). A Discourse on Restorative Practice—Participants’ Views of a Divergent Ideology. Laws11(6), 86–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11060086

Procter-Legg. (2022). Practitioner Perspectives on a Restorative Community: An Inductive Evaluative Study of Conceptual, Pedagogical, and Routine Practice. Laws11(1), 4–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11010004

 

Supervisors

Ian Thompson and Jason Todd

Ivan is currently serving as a Facilitator (Teaching) in the Vice-Chancellor’s Colloquium and as an Editor of the Graduate Inequality Review in the University of Oxford. He has taken up lecturerships in a number of universities in Hong Kong and has run Education, Linguistics, Applied Linguistics, Sociolinguistics, and Academic English courses at undergraduate and postgraduate level.

Prior to joining Oxford, Ivan received his teacher-training in Hong Kong and his postgraduate training in Linguistics (with a specialisation in pragmatics) at University College London. His research interests include: mental representation of word meanings, language acquisition, educational technology, and ELT pedagogy.

Publications

  • Au, I. (2021). Unwinding the Fantasy: Using Breakout Rooms to Promote Language Exposure and Less-Public Feedback Practices in Online Synchronous Teaching. Paper presented at the PASHE 2021 – EAP Education and Practice: Supporting Students’ Needs, UCL (IOE).
  • Au, I. & Yiu, C. (2021). ‘Identity game’: so you think you are what your Instagram bio says about you. Paper presented at the Sociolinguistics Symposium 23, Hong Kong.
  • Au, I. (2021). The magic of breakout rooms in online synchronous teaching and learning of English. Paper presented at the 3rd International Conference on English Across the Curriculum, Hong Kong.
  • Choi, T. H., Chan, H., & Au, I. (2018). ‘Now you’re talking’: Teacher preparation through alumni talks in a community of practice. Paper presented at the Oxford Education Research Symposium.
  • Au, I. (2018). Branching out from the tree: Extending vocabulary acquisition with polysemy. Paper presented at HKBU-HU First Joint Symposium on Education 2018.

 

Supervisors

Elizabeth Wonnacott and Victoria Murphy

Thomas Procter-Legg is a DPhil Student in the Department of Education and is researching restorative practice within the context of special educational needs and disabilities.

His previous experience includes five years as the Head Teacher of a special academy in Oxfordshire UK, specialising in education for students with Special Educational Needs and Disabilities. He has also worked as a SEND Reviewer for Whole School SEND; a Teaching School Director; and as the Principal Designate on a successful Free School bid.

Thomas is passionate about restorative practice and is involved in many communities of practice, such as the Global Alliance for Restorative Justice and Social Justice, where he is a member of the research sub-group exploring the interactions between restorative justice and social justice.

Thomas is also a strong advocate for creativity in education; having previously gained a Fine Art degree from Chelsea College of Art. This heavily influenced his educational leadership and during his time as a Head Teacher, he became the co-founder of a co-constructed initiative between the academy and the University of Oxford Gardens Libraries and Museums. This work placed cultural learning opportunities and relationships at the heart of the curriculum and is the longest standing project between a special school and The University of Oxford. This sustainable partnership champions marginalised voices and has been highly celebrated e.g., inclusion in the Durham Commission for Creativity in Education; recent dissemination at the Museum Ideas Conference 2022; highly commended award at the Museum and Heritage Awards 2021; and awarded Platinum ArtsMark in 2021.

Whilst this creative work may seem to be separate from restorative practice, Thomas subscribes to the idea that there are significant overlaps, both within pedagogical practice and wider school culture, topics which his current research touch on within the context of special education.

 

Publications

Procter-Legg. (2022). A Discourse on Restorative Practice—Participants’ Views of a Divergent Ideology. Laws11(6), 86–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11060086

Procter-Legg. (2022). Practitioner Perspectives on a Restorative Community: An Inductive Evaluative Study of Conceptual, Pedagogical, and Routine Practice. Laws11(1), 4–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11010004

 

Supervisors

Ian Thompson and Jason Todd

Ivan is currently serving as a Facilitator (Teaching) in the Vice-Chancellor’s Colloquium and as an Editor of the Graduate Inequality Review in the University of Oxford. He has taken up lecturerships in a number of universities in Hong Kong and has run Education, Linguistics, Applied Linguistics, Sociolinguistics, and Academic English courses at undergraduate and postgraduate level.

Prior to joining Oxford, Ivan received his teacher-training in Hong Kong and his postgraduate training in Linguistics (with a specialisation in pragmatics) at University College London. His research interests include: mental representation of word meanings, language acquisition, educational technology, and ELT pedagogy.

Publications

  • Au, I. (2021). Unwinding the Fantasy: Using Breakout Rooms to Promote Language Exposure and Less-Public Feedback Practices in Online Synchronous Teaching. Paper presented at the PASHE 2021 – EAP Education and Practice: Supporting Students’ Needs, UCL (IOE).
  • Au, I. & Yiu, C. (2021). ‘Identity game’: so you think you are what your Instagram bio says about you. Paper presented at the Sociolinguistics Symposium 23, Hong Kong.
  • Au, I. (2021). The magic of breakout rooms in online synchronous teaching and learning of English. Paper presented at the 3rd International Conference on English Across the Curriculum, Hong Kong.
  • Choi, T. H., Chan, H., & Au, I. (2018). ‘Now you’re talking’: Teacher preparation through alumni talks in a community of practice. Paper presented at the Oxford Education Research Symposium.
  • Au, I. (2018). Branching out from the tree: Extending vocabulary acquisition with polysemy. Paper presented at HKBU-HU First Joint Symposium on Education 2018.

 

Supervisors

Elizabeth Wonnacott and Victoria Murphy

Thomas Procter-Legg is a DPhil Student in the Department of Education and is researching restorative practice within the context of special educational needs and disabilities.

His previous experience includes five years as the Head Teacher of a special academy in Oxfordshire UK, specialising in education for students with Special Educational Needs and Disabilities. He has also worked as a SEND Reviewer for Whole School SEND; a Teaching School Director; and as the Principal Designate on a successful Free School bid.

Thomas is passionate about restorative practice and is involved in many communities of practice, such as the Global Alliance for Restorative Justice and Social Justice, where he is a member of the research sub-group exploring the interactions between restorative justice and social justice.

Thomas is also a strong advocate for creativity in education; having previously gained a Fine Art degree from Chelsea College of Art. This heavily influenced his educational leadership and during his time as a Head Teacher, he became the co-founder of a co-constructed initiative between the academy and the University of Oxford Gardens Libraries and Museums. This work placed cultural learning opportunities and relationships at the heart of the curriculum and is the longest standing project between a special school and The University of Oxford. This sustainable partnership champions marginalised voices and has been highly celebrated e.g., inclusion in the Durham Commission for Creativity in Education; recent dissemination at the Museum Ideas Conference 2022; highly commended award at the Museum and Heritage Awards 2021; and awarded Platinum ArtsMark in 2021.

Whilst this creative work may seem to be separate from restorative practice, Thomas subscribes to the idea that there are significant overlaps, both within pedagogical practice and wider school culture, topics which his current research touch on within the context of special education.

 

Publications

Procter-Legg. (2022). A Discourse on Restorative Practice—Participants’ Views of a Divergent Ideology. Laws11(6), 86–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11060086

Procter-Legg. (2022). Practitioner Perspectives on a Restorative Community: An Inductive Evaluative Study of Conceptual, Pedagogical, and Routine Practice. Laws11(1), 4–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11010004

 

Supervisors

Ian Thompson and Jason Todd

Ivan is currently serving as a Facilitator (Teaching) in the Vice-Chancellor’s Colloquium and as an Editor of the Graduate Inequality Review in the University of Oxford. He has taken up lecturerships in a number of universities in Hong Kong and has run Education, Linguistics, Applied Linguistics, Sociolinguistics, and Academic English courses at undergraduate and postgraduate level.

Prior to joining Oxford, Ivan received his teacher-training in Hong Kong and his postgraduate training in Linguistics (with a specialisation in pragmatics) at University College London. His research interests include: mental representation of word meanings, language acquisition, educational technology, and ELT pedagogy.

Publications

  • Au, I. (2021). Unwinding the Fantasy: Using Breakout Rooms to Promote Language Exposure and Less-Public Feedback Practices in Online Synchronous Teaching. Paper presented at the PASHE 2021 – EAP Education and Practice: Supporting Students’ Needs, UCL (IOE).
  • Au, I. & Yiu, C. (2021). ‘Identity game’: so you think you are what your Instagram bio says about you. Paper presented at the Sociolinguistics Symposium 23, Hong Kong.
  • Au, I. (2021). The magic of breakout rooms in online synchronous teaching and learning of English. Paper presented at the 3rd International Conference on English Across the Curriculum, Hong Kong.
  • Choi, T. H., Chan, H., & Au, I. (2018). ‘Now you’re talking’: Teacher preparation through alumni talks in a community of practice. Paper presented at the Oxford Education Research Symposium.
  • Au, I. (2018). Branching out from the tree: Extending vocabulary acquisition with polysemy. Paper presented at HKBU-HU First Joint Symposium on Education 2018.

 

Supervisors

Elizabeth Wonnacott and Victoria Murphy

Thomas Procter-Legg is a DPhil Student in the Department of Education and is researching restorative practice within the context of special educational needs and disabilities.

His previous experience includes five years as the Head Teacher of a special academy in Oxfordshire UK, specialising in education for students with Special Educational Needs and Disabilities. He has also worked as a SEND Reviewer for Whole School SEND; a Teaching School Director; and as the Principal Designate on a successful Free School bid.

Thomas is passionate about restorative practice and is involved in many communities of practice, such as the Global Alliance for Restorative Justice and Social Justice, where he is a member of the research sub-group exploring the interactions between restorative justice and social justice.

Thomas is also a strong advocate for creativity in education; having previously gained a Fine Art degree from Chelsea College of Art. This heavily influenced his educational leadership and during his time as a Head Teacher, he became the co-founder of a co-constructed initiative between the academy and the University of Oxford Gardens Libraries and Museums. This work placed cultural learning opportunities and relationships at the heart of the curriculum and is the longest standing project between a special school and The University of Oxford. This sustainable partnership champions marginalised voices and has been highly celebrated e.g., inclusion in the Durham Commission for Creativity in Education; recent dissemination at the Museum Ideas Conference 2022; highly commended award at the Museum and Heritage Awards 2021; and awarded Platinum ArtsMark in 2021.

Whilst this creative work may seem to be separate from restorative practice, Thomas subscribes to the idea that there are significant overlaps, both within pedagogical practice and wider school culture, topics which his current research touch on within the context of special education.

 

Publications

Procter-Legg. (2022). A Discourse on Restorative Practice—Participants’ Views of a Divergent Ideology. Laws11(6), 86–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11060086

Procter-Legg. (2022). Practitioner Perspectives on a Restorative Community: An Inductive Evaluative Study of Conceptual, Pedagogical, and Routine Practice. Laws11(1), 4–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11010004

 

Supervisors

Ian Thompson and Jason Todd

Ivan is currently serving as a Facilitator (Teaching) in the Vice-Chancellor’s Colloquium and as an Editor of the Graduate Inequality Review in the University of Oxford. He has taken up lecturerships in a number of universities in Hong Kong and has run Education, Linguistics, Applied Linguistics, Sociolinguistics, and Academic English courses at undergraduate and postgraduate level.

Prior to joining Oxford, Ivan received his teacher-training in Hong Kong and his postgraduate training in Linguistics (with a specialisation in pragmatics) at University College London. His research interests include: mental representation of word meanings, language acquisition, educational technology, and ELT pedagogy.

Publications

  • Au, I. (2021). Unwinding the Fantasy: Using Breakout Rooms to Promote Language Exposure and Less-Public Feedback Practices in Online Synchronous Teaching. Paper presented at the PASHE 2021 – EAP Education and Practice: Supporting Students’ Needs, UCL (IOE).
  • Au, I. & Yiu, C. (2021). ‘Identity game’: so you think you are what your Instagram bio says about you. Paper presented at the Sociolinguistics Symposium 23, Hong Kong.
  • Au, I. (2021). The magic of breakout rooms in online synchronous teaching and learning of English. Paper presented at the 3rd International Conference on English Across the Curriculum, Hong Kong.
  • Choi, T. H., Chan, H., & Au, I. (2018). ‘Now you’re talking’: Teacher preparation through alumni talks in a community of practice. Paper presented at the Oxford Education Research Symposium.
  • Au, I. (2018). Branching out from the tree: Extending vocabulary acquisition with polysemy. Paper presented at HKBU-HU First Joint Symposium on Education 2018.

 

Supervisors

Elizabeth Wonnacott and Victoria Murphy

Thomas Procter-Legg is a DPhil Student in the Department of Education and is researching restorative practice within the context of special educational needs and disabilities.

His previous experience includes five years as the Head Teacher of a special academy in Oxfordshire UK, specialising in education for students with Special Educational Needs and Disabilities. He has also worked as a SEND Reviewer for Whole School SEND; a Teaching School Director; and as the Principal Designate on a successful Free School bid.

Thomas is passionate about restorative practice and is involved in many communities of practice, such as the Global Alliance for Restorative Justice and Social Justice, where he is a member of the research sub-group exploring the interactions between restorative justice and social justice.

Thomas is also a strong advocate for creativity in education; having previously gained a Fine Art degree from Chelsea College of Art. This heavily influenced his educational leadership and during his time as a Head Teacher, he became the co-founder of a co-constructed initiative between the academy and the University of Oxford Gardens Libraries and Museums. This work placed cultural learning opportunities and relationships at the heart of the curriculum and is the longest standing project between a special school and The University of Oxford. This sustainable partnership champions marginalised voices and has been highly celebrated e.g., inclusion in the Durham Commission for Creativity in Education; recent dissemination at the Museum Ideas Conference 2022; highly commended award at the Museum and Heritage Awards 2021; and awarded Platinum ArtsMark in 2021.

Whilst this creative work may seem to be separate from restorative practice, Thomas subscribes to the idea that there are significant overlaps, both within pedagogical practice and wider school culture, topics which his current research touch on within the context of special education.

 

Publications

Procter-Legg. (2022). A Discourse on Restorative Practice—Participants’ Views of a Divergent Ideology. Laws11(6), 86–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11060086

Procter-Legg. (2022). Practitioner Perspectives on a Restorative Community: An Inductive Evaluative Study of Conceptual, Pedagogical, and Routine Practice. Laws11(1), 4–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11010004

 

Supervisors

Ian Thompson and Jason Todd

Ivan is currently serving as a Facilitator (Teaching) in the Vice-Chancellor’s Colloquium and as an Editor of the Graduate Inequality Review in the University of Oxford. He has taken up lecturerships in a number of universities in Hong Kong and has run Education, Linguistics, Applied Linguistics, Sociolinguistics, and Academic English courses at undergraduate and postgraduate level.

Prior to joining Oxford, Ivan received his teacher-training in Hong Kong and his postgraduate training in Linguistics (with a specialisation in pragmatics) at University College London. His research interests include: mental representation of word meanings, language acquisition, educational technology, and ELT pedagogy.

Publications

  • Au, I. (2021). Unwinding the Fantasy: Using Breakout Rooms to Promote Language Exposure and Less-Public Feedback Practices in Online Synchronous Teaching. Paper presented at the PASHE 2021 – EAP Education and Practice: Supporting Students’ Needs, UCL (IOE).
  • Au, I. & Yiu, C. (2021). ‘Identity game’: so you think you are what your Instagram bio says about you. Paper presented at the Sociolinguistics Symposium 23, Hong Kong.
  • Au, I. (2021). The magic of breakout rooms in online synchronous teaching and learning of English. Paper presented at the 3rd International Conference on English Across the Curriculum, Hong Kong.
  • Choi, T. H., Chan, H., & Au, I. (2018). ‘Now you’re talking’: Teacher preparation through alumni talks in a community of practice. Paper presented at the Oxford Education Research Symposium.
  • Au, I. (2018). Branching out from the tree: Extending vocabulary acquisition with polysemy. Paper presented at HKBU-HU First Joint Symposium on Education 2018.

 

Supervisors

Elizabeth Wonnacott and Victoria Murphy

Thomas Procter-Legg is a DPhil Student in the Department of Education and is researching restorative practice within the context of special educational needs and disabilities.

His previous experience includes five years as the Head Teacher of a special academy in Oxfordshire UK, specialising in education for students with Special Educational Needs and Disabilities. He has also worked as a SEND Reviewer for Whole School SEND; a Teaching School Director; and as the Principal Designate on a successful Free School bid.

Thomas is passionate about restorative practice and is involved in many communities of practice, such as the Global Alliance for Restorative Justice and Social Justice, where he is a member of the research sub-group exploring the interactions between restorative justice and social justice.

Thomas is also a strong advocate for creativity in education; having previously gained a Fine Art degree from Chelsea College of Art. This heavily influenced his educational leadership and during his time as a Head Teacher, he became the co-founder of a co-constructed initiative between the academy and the University of Oxford Gardens Libraries and Museums. This work placed cultural learning opportunities and relationships at the heart of the curriculum and is the longest standing project between a special school and The University of Oxford. This sustainable partnership champions marginalised voices and has been highly celebrated e.g., inclusion in the Durham Commission for Creativity in Education; recent dissemination at the Museum Ideas Conference 2022; highly commended award at the Museum and Heritage Awards 2021; and awarded Platinum ArtsMark in 2021.

Whilst this creative work may seem to be separate from restorative practice, Thomas subscribes to the idea that there are significant overlaps, both within pedagogical practice and wider school culture, topics which his current research touch on within the context of special education.

 

Publications

Procter-Legg. (2022). A Discourse on Restorative Practice—Participants’ Views of a Divergent Ideology. Laws11(6), 86–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11060086

Procter-Legg. (2022). Practitioner Perspectives on a Restorative Community: An Inductive Evaluative Study of Conceptual, Pedagogical, and Routine Practice. Laws11(1), 4–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11010004

 

Supervisors

Ian Thompson and Jason Todd

Ivan is currently serving as a Facilitator (Teaching) in the Vice-Chancellor’s Colloquium and as an Editor of the Graduate Inequality Review in the University of Oxford. He has taken up lecturerships in a number of universities in Hong Kong and has run Education, Linguistics, Applied Linguistics, Sociolinguistics, and Academic English courses at undergraduate and postgraduate level.

Prior to joining Oxford, Ivan received his teacher-training in Hong Kong and his postgraduate training in Linguistics (with a specialisation in pragmatics) at University College London. His research interests include: mental representation of word meanings, language acquisition, educational technology, and ELT pedagogy.

Publications

  • Au, I. (2021). Unwinding the Fantasy: Using Breakout Rooms to Promote Language Exposure and Less-Public Feedback Practices in Online Synchronous Teaching. Paper presented at the PASHE 2021 – EAP Education and Practice: Supporting Students’ Needs, UCL (IOE).
  • Au, I. & Yiu, C. (2021). ‘Identity game’: so you think you are what your Instagram bio says about you. Paper presented at the Sociolinguistics Symposium 23, Hong Kong.
  • Au, I. (2021). The magic of breakout rooms in online synchronous teaching and learning of English. Paper presented at the 3rd International Conference on English Across the Curriculum, Hong Kong.
  • Choi, T. H., Chan, H., & Au, I. (2018). ‘Now you’re talking’: Teacher preparation through alumni talks in a community of practice. Paper presented at the Oxford Education Research Symposium.
  • Au, I. (2018). Branching out from the tree: Extending vocabulary acquisition with polysemy. Paper presented at HKBU-HU First Joint Symposium on Education 2018.

 

Supervisors

Elizabeth Wonnacott and Victoria Murphy

Thomas Procter-Legg is a DPhil Student in the Department of Education and is researching restorative practice within the context of special educational needs and disabilities.

His previous experience includes five years as the Head Teacher of a special academy in Oxfordshire UK, specialising in education for students with Special Educational Needs and Disabilities. He has also worked as a SEND Reviewer for Whole School SEND; a Teaching School Director; and as the Principal Designate on a successful Free School bid.

Thomas is passionate about restorative practice and is involved in many communities of practice, such as the Global Alliance for Restorative Justice and Social Justice, where he is a member of the research sub-group exploring the interactions between restorative justice and social justice.

Thomas is also a strong advocate for creativity in education; having previously gained a Fine Art degree from Chelsea College of Art. This heavily influenced his educational leadership and during his time as a Head Teacher, he became the co-founder of a co-constructed initiative between the academy and the University of Oxford Gardens Libraries and Museums. This work placed cultural learning opportunities and relationships at the heart of the curriculum and is the longest standing project between a special school and The University of Oxford. This sustainable partnership champions marginalised voices and has been highly celebrated e.g., inclusion in the Durham Commission for Creativity in Education; recent dissemination at the Museum Ideas Conference 2022; highly commended award at the Museum and Heritage Awards 2021; and awarded Platinum ArtsMark in 2021.

Whilst this creative work may seem to be separate from restorative practice, Thomas subscribes to the idea that there are significant overlaps, both within pedagogical practice and wider school culture, topics which his current research touch on within the context of special education.

 

Publications

Procter-Legg. (2022). A Discourse on Restorative Practice—Participants’ Views of a Divergent Ideology. Laws11(6), 86–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11060086

Procter-Legg. (2022). Practitioner Perspectives on a Restorative Community: An Inductive Evaluative Study of Conceptual, Pedagogical, and Routine Practice. Laws11(1), 4–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11010004

 

Supervisors

Ian Thompson and Jason Todd

Ivan is currently serving as a Facilitator (Teaching) in the Vice-Chancellor’s Colloquium and as an Editor of the Graduate Inequality Review in the University of Oxford. He has taken up lecturerships in a number of universities in Hong Kong and has run Education, Linguistics, Applied Linguistics, Sociolinguistics, and Academic English courses at undergraduate and postgraduate level.

Prior to joining Oxford, Ivan received his teacher-training in Hong Kong and his postgraduate training in Linguistics (with a specialisation in pragmatics) at University College London. His research interests include: mental representation of word meanings, language acquisition, educational technology, and ELT pedagogy.

Publications

  • Au, I. (2021). Unwinding the Fantasy: Using Breakout Rooms to Promote Language Exposure and Less-Public Feedback Practices in Online Synchronous Teaching. Paper presented at the PASHE 2021 – EAP Education and Practice: Supporting Students’ Needs, UCL (IOE).
  • Au, I. & Yiu, C. (2021). ‘Identity game’: so you think you are what your Instagram bio says about you. Paper presented at the Sociolinguistics Symposium 23, Hong Kong.
  • Au, I. (2021). The magic of breakout rooms in online synchronous teaching and learning of English. Paper presented at the 3rd International Conference on English Across the Curriculum, Hong Kong.
  • Choi, T. H., Chan, H., & Au, I. (2018). ‘Now you’re talking’: Teacher preparation through alumni talks in a community of practice. Paper presented at the Oxford Education Research Symposium.
  • Au, I. (2018). Branching out from the tree: Extending vocabulary acquisition with polysemy. Paper presented at HKBU-HU First Joint Symposium on Education 2018.

 

Supervisors

Elizabeth Wonnacott and Victoria Murphy

Thomas Procter-Legg is a DPhil Student in the Department of Education and is researching restorative practice within the context of special educational needs and disabilities.

His previous experience includes five years as the Head Teacher of a special academy in Oxfordshire UK, specialising in education for students with Special Educational Needs and Disabilities. He has also worked as a SEND Reviewer for Whole School SEND; a Teaching School Director; and as the Principal Designate on a successful Free School bid.

Thomas is passionate about restorative practice and is involved in many communities of practice, such as the Global Alliance for Restorative Justice and Social Justice, where he is a member of the research sub-group exploring the interactions between restorative justice and social justice.

Thomas is also a strong advocate for creativity in education; having previously gained a Fine Art degree from Chelsea College of Art. This heavily influenced his educational leadership and during his time as a Head Teacher, he became the co-founder of a co-constructed initiative between the academy and the University of Oxford Gardens Libraries and Museums. This work placed cultural learning opportunities and relationships at the heart of the curriculum and is the longest standing project between a special school and The University of Oxford. This sustainable partnership champions marginalised voices and has been highly celebrated e.g., inclusion in the Durham Commission for Creativity in Education; recent dissemination at the Museum Ideas Conference 2022; highly commended award at the Museum and Heritage Awards 2021; and awarded Platinum ArtsMark in 2021.

Whilst this creative work may seem to be separate from restorative practice, Thomas subscribes to the idea that there are significant overlaps, both within pedagogical practice and wider school culture, topics which his current research touch on within the context of special education.

 

Publications

Procter-Legg. (2022). A Discourse on Restorative Practice—Participants’ Views of a Divergent Ideology. Laws11(6), 86–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11060086

Procter-Legg. (2022). Practitioner Perspectives on a Restorative Community: An Inductive Evaluative Study of Conceptual, Pedagogical, and Routine Practice. Laws11(1), 4–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11010004

 

Supervisors

Ian Thompson and Jason Todd

Ivan is currently serving as a Facilitator (Teaching) in the Vice-Chancellor’s Colloquium and as an Editor of the Graduate Inequality Review in the University of Oxford. He has taken up lecturerships in a number of universities in Hong Kong and has run Education, Linguistics, Applied Linguistics, Sociolinguistics, and Academic English courses at undergraduate and postgraduate level.

Prior to joining Oxford, Ivan received his teacher-training in Hong Kong and his postgraduate training in Linguistics (with a specialisation in pragmatics) at University College London. His research interests include: mental representation of word meanings, language acquisition, educational technology, and ELT pedagogy.

Publications

  • Au, I. (2021). Unwinding the Fantasy: Using Breakout Rooms to Promote Language Exposure and Less-Public Feedback Practices in Online Synchronous Teaching. Paper presented at the PASHE 2021 – EAP Education and Practice: Supporting Students’ Needs, UCL (IOE).
  • Au, I. & Yiu, C. (2021). ‘Identity game’: so you think you are what your Instagram bio says about you. Paper presented at the Sociolinguistics Symposium 23, Hong Kong.
  • Au, I. (2021). The magic of breakout rooms in online synchronous teaching and learning of English. Paper presented at the 3rd International Conference on English Across the Curriculum, Hong Kong.
  • Choi, T. H., Chan, H., & Au, I. (2018). ‘Now you’re talking’: Teacher preparation through alumni talks in a community of practice. Paper presented at the Oxford Education Research Symposium.
  • Au, I. (2018). Branching out from the tree: Extending vocabulary acquisition with polysemy. Paper presented at HKBU-HU First Joint Symposium on Education 2018.

 

Supervisors

Elizabeth Wonnacott and Victoria Murphy

Thomas Procter-Legg is a DPhil Student in the Department of Education and is researching restorative practice within the context of special educational needs and disabilities.

His previous experience includes five years as the Head Teacher of a special academy in Oxfordshire UK, specialising in education for students with Special Educational Needs and Disabilities. He has also worked as a SEND Reviewer for Whole School SEND; a Teaching School Director; and as the Principal Designate on a successful Free School bid.

Thomas is passionate about restorative practice and is involved in many communities of practice, such as the Global Alliance for Restorative Justice and Social Justice, where he is a member of the research sub-group exploring the interactions between restorative justice and social justice.

Thomas is also a strong advocate for creativity in education; having previously gained a Fine Art degree from Chelsea College of Art. This heavily influenced his educational leadership and during his time as a Head Teacher, he became the co-founder of a co-constructed initiative between the academy and the University of Oxford Gardens Libraries and Museums. This work placed cultural learning opportunities and relationships at the heart of the curriculum and is the longest standing project between a special school and The University of Oxford. This sustainable partnership champions marginalised voices and has been highly celebrated e.g., inclusion in the Durham Commission for Creativity in Education; recent dissemination at the Museum Ideas Conference 2022; highly commended award at the Museum and Heritage Awards 2021; and awarded Platinum ArtsMark in 2021.

Whilst this creative work may seem to be separate from restorative practice, Thomas subscribes to the idea that there are significant overlaps, both within pedagogical practice and wider school culture, topics which his current research touch on within the context of special education.

 

Publications

Procter-Legg. (2022). A Discourse on Restorative Practice—Participants’ Views of a Divergent Ideology. Laws11(6), 86–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11060086

Procter-Legg. (2022). Practitioner Perspectives on a Restorative Community: An Inductive Evaluative Study of Conceptual, Pedagogical, and Routine Practice. Laws11(1), 4–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11010004

 

Supervisors

Ian Thompson and Jason Todd

Ivan is currently serving as a Facilitator (Teaching) in the Vice-Chancellor’s Colloquium and as an Editor of the Graduate Inequality Review in the University of Oxford. He has taken up lecturerships in a number of universities in Hong Kong and has run Education, Linguistics, Applied Linguistics, Sociolinguistics, and Academic English courses at undergraduate and postgraduate level.

Prior to joining Oxford, Ivan received his teacher-training in Hong Kong and his postgraduate training in Linguistics (with a specialisation in pragmatics) at University College London. His research interests include: mental representation of word meanings, language acquisition, educational technology, and ELT pedagogy.

Publications

  • Au, I. (2021). Unwinding the Fantasy: Using Breakout Rooms to Promote Language Exposure and Less-Public Feedback Practices in Online Synchronous Teaching. Paper presented at the PASHE 2021 – EAP Education and Practice: Supporting Students’ Needs, UCL (IOE).
  • Au, I. & Yiu, C. (2021). ‘Identity game’: so you think you are what your Instagram bio says about you. Paper presented at the Sociolinguistics Symposium 23, Hong Kong.
  • Au, I. (2021). The magic of breakout rooms in online synchronous teaching and learning of English. Paper presented at the 3rd International Conference on English Across the Curriculum, Hong Kong.
  • Choi, T. H., Chan, H., & Au, I. (2018). ‘Now you’re talking’: Teacher preparation through alumni talks in a community of practice. Paper presented at the Oxford Education Research Symposium.
  • Au, I. (2018). Branching out from the tree: Extending vocabulary acquisition with polysemy. Paper presented at HKBU-HU First Joint Symposium on Education 2018.

 

Supervisors

Elizabeth Wonnacott and Victoria Murphy

Thomas Procter-Legg is a DPhil Student in the Department of Education and is researching restorative practice within the context of special educational needs and disabilities.

His previous experience includes five years as the Head Teacher of a special academy in Oxfordshire UK, specialising in education for students with Special Educational Needs and Disabilities. He has also worked as a SEND Reviewer for Whole School SEND; a Teaching School Director; and as the Principal Designate on a successful Free School bid.

Thomas is passionate about restorative practice and is involved in many communities of practice, such as the Global Alliance for Restorative Justice and Social Justice, where he is a member of the research sub-group exploring the interactions between restorative justice and social justice.

Thomas is also a strong advocate for creativity in education; having previously gained a Fine Art degree from Chelsea College of Art. This heavily influenced his educational leadership and during his time as a Head Teacher, he became the co-founder of a co-constructed initiative between the academy and the University of Oxford Gardens Libraries and Museums. This work placed cultural learning opportunities and relationships at the heart of the curriculum and is the longest standing project between a special school and The University of Oxford. This sustainable partnership champions marginalised voices and has been highly celebrated e.g., inclusion in the Durham Commission for Creativity in Education; recent dissemination at the Museum Ideas Conference 2022; highly commended award at the Museum and Heritage Awards 2021; and awarded Platinum ArtsMark in 2021.

Whilst this creative work may seem to be separate from restorative practice, Thomas subscribes to the idea that there are significant overlaps, both within pedagogical practice and wider school culture, topics which his current research touch on within the context of special education.

 

Publications

Procter-Legg. (2022). A Discourse on Restorative Practice—Participants’ Views of a Divergent Ideology. Laws11(6), 86–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11060086

Procter-Legg. (2022). Practitioner Perspectives on a Restorative Community: An Inductive Evaluative Study of Conceptual, Pedagogical, and Routine Practice. Laws11(1), 4–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11010004

 

Supervisors

Ian Thompson and Jason Todd

Ivan is currently serving as a Facilitator (Teaching) in the Vice-Chancellor’s Colloquium and as an Editor of the Graduate Inequality Review in the University of Oxford. He has taken up lecturerships in a number of universities in Hong Kong and has run Education, Linguistics, Applied Linguistics, Sociolinguistics, and Academic English courses at undergraduate and postgraduate level.

Prior to joining Oxford, Ivan received his teacher-training in Hong Kong and his postgraduate training in Linguistics (with a specialisation in pragmatics) at University College London. His research interests include: mental representation of word meanings, language acquisition, educational technology, and ELT pedagogy.

Publications

  • Au, I. (2021). Unwinding the Fantasy: Using Breakout Rooms to Promote Language Exposure and Less-Public Feedback Practices in Online Synchronous Teaching. Paper presented at the PASHE 2021 – EAP Education and Practice: Supporting Students’ Needs, UCL (IOE).
  • Au, I. & Yiu, C. (2021). ‘Identity game’: so you think you are what your Instagram bio says about you. Paper presented at the Sociolinguistics Symposium 23, Hong Kong.
  • Au, I. (2021). The magic of breakout rooms in online synchronous teaching and learning of English. Paper presented at the 3rd International Conference on English Across the Curriculum, Hong Kong.
  • Choi, T. H., Chan, H., & Au, I. (2018). ‘Now you’re talking’: Teacher preparation through alumni talks in a community of practice. Paper presented at the Oxford Education Research Symposium.
  • Au, I. (2018). Branching out from the tree: Extending vocabulary acquisition with polysemy. Paper presented at HKBU-HU First Joint Symposium on Education 2018.

 

Supervisors

Elizabeth Wonnacott and Victoria Murphy

Thomas Procter-Legg is a DPhil Student in the Department of Education and is researching restorative practice within the context of special educational needs and disabilities.

His previous experience includes five years as the Head Teacher of a special academy in Oxfordshire UK, specialising in education for students with Special Educational Needs and Disabilities. He has also worked as a SEND Reviewer for Whole School SEND; a Teaching School Director; and as the Principal Designate on a successful Free School bid.

Thomas is passionate about restorative practice and is involved in many communities of practice, such as the Global Alliance for Restorative Justice and Social Justice, where he is a member of the research sub-group exploring the interactions between restorative justice and social justice.

Thomas is also a strong advocate for creativity in education; having previously gained a Fine Art degree from Chelsea College of Art. This heavily influenced his educational leadership and during his time as a Head Teacher, he became the co-founder of a co-constructed initiative between the academy and the University of Oxford Gardens Libraries and Museums. This work placed cultural learning opportunities and relationships at the heart of the curriculum and is the longest standing project between a special school and The University of Oxford. This sustainable partnership champions marginalised voices and has been highly celebrated e.g., inclusion in the Durham Commission for Creativity in Education; recent dissemination at the Museum Ideas Conference 2022; highly commended award at the Museum and Heritage Awards 2021; and awarded Platinum ArtsMark in 2021.

Whilst this creative work may seem to be separate from restorative practice, Thomas subscribes to the idea that there are significant overlaps, both within pedagogical practice and wider school culture, topics which his current research touch on within the context of special education.

 

Publications

Procter-Legg. (2022). A Discourse on Restorative Practice—Participants’ Views of a Divergent Ideology. Laws11(6), 86–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11060086

Procter-Legg. (2022). Practitioner Perspectives on a Restorative Community: An Inductive Evaluative Study of Conceptual, Pedagogical, and Routine Practice. Laws11(1), 4–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11010004

 

Supervisors

Ian Thompson and Jason Todd

Ivan is currently serving as a Facilitator (Teaching) in the Vice-Chancellor’s Colloquium and as an Editor of the Graduate Inequality Review in the University of Oxford. He has taken up lecturerships in a number of universities in Hong Kong and has run Education, Linguistics, Applied Linguistics, Sociolinguistics, and Academic English courses at undergraduate and postgraduate level.

Prior to joining Oxford, Ivan received his teacher-training in Hong Kong and his postgraduate training in Linguistics (with a specialisation in pragmatics) at University College London. His research interests include: mental representation of word meanings, language acquisition, educational technology, and ELT pedagogy.

Publications

  • Au, I. (2021). Unwinding the Fantasy: Using Breakout Rooms to Promote Language Exposure and Less-Public Feedback Practices in Online Synchronous Teaching. Paper presented at the PASHE 2021 – EAP Education and Practice: Supporting Students’ Needs, UCL (IOE).
  • Au, I. & Yiu, C. (2021). ‘Identity game’: so you think you are what your Instagram bio says about you. Paper presented at the Sociolinguistics Symposium 23, Hong Kong.
  • Au, I. (2021). The magic of breakout rooms in online synchronous teaching and learning of English. Paper presented at the 3rd International Conference on English Across the Curriculum, Hong Kong.
  • Choi, T. H., Chan, H., & Au, I. (2018). ‘Now you’re talking’: Teacher preparation through alumni talks in a community of practice. Paper presented at the Oxford Education Research Symposium.
  • Au, I. (2018). Branching out from the tree: Extending vocabulary acquisition with polysemy. Paper presented at HKBU-HU First Joint Symposium on Education 2018.

 

Supervisors

Elizabeth Wonnacott and Victoria Murphy

Thomas Procter-Legg is a DPhil Student in the Department of Education and is researching restorative practice within the context of special educational needs and disabilities.

His previous experience includes five years as the Head Teacher of a special academy in Oxfordshire UK, specialising in education for students with Special Educational Needs and Disabilities. He has also worked as a SEND Reviewer for Whole School SEND; a Teaching School Director; and as the Principal Designate on a successful Free School bid.

Thomas is passionate about restorative practice and is involved in many communities of practice, such as the Global Alliance for Restorative Justice and Social Justice, where he is a member of the research sub-group exploring the interactions between restorative justice and social justice.

Thomas is also a strong advocate for creativity in education; having previously gained a Fine Art degree from Chelsea College of Art. This heavily influenced his educational leadership and during his time as a Head Teacher, he became the co-founder of a co-constructed initiative between the academy and the University of Oxford Gardens Libraries and Museums. This work placed cultural learning opportunities and relationships at the heart of the curriculum and is the longest standing project between a special school and The University of Oxford. This sustainable partnership champions marginalised voices and has been highly celebrated e.g., inclusion in the Durham Commission for Creativity in Education; recent dissemination at the Museum Ideas Conference 2022; highly commended award at the Museum and Heritage Awards 2021; and awarded Platinum ArtsMark in 2021.

Whilst this creative work may seem to be separate from restorative practice, Thomas subscribes to the idea that there are significant overlaps, both within pedagogical practice and wider school culture, topics which his current research touch on within the context of special education.

 

Publications

Procter-Legg. (2022). A Discourse on Restorative Practice—Participants’ Views of a Divergent Ideology. Laws11(6), 86–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11060086

Procter-Legg. (2022). Practitioner Perspectives on a Restorative Community: An Inductive Evaluative Study of Conceptual, Pedagogical, and Routine Practice. Laws11(1), 4–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11010004

 

Supervisors

Ian Thompson and Jason Todd

Ivan is currently serving as a Facilitator (Teaching) in the Vice-Chancellor’s Colloquium and as an Editor of the Graduate Inequality Review in the University of Oxford. He has taken up lecturerships in a number of universities in Hong Kong and has run Education, Linguistics, Applied Linguistics, Sociolinguistics, and Academic English courses at undergraduate and postgraduate level.

Prior to joining Oxford, Ivan received his teacher-training in Hong Kong and his postgraduate training in Linguistics (with a specialisation in pragmatics) at University College London. His research interests include: mental representation of word meanings, language acquisition, educational technology, and ELT pedagogy.

Publications

  • Au, I. (2021). Unwinding the Fantasy: Using Breakout Rooms to Promote Language Exposure and Less-Public Feedback Practices in Online Synchronous Teaching. Paper presented at the PASHE 2021 – EAP Education and Practice: Supporting Students’ Needs, UCL (IOE).
  • Au, I. & Yiu, C. (2021). ‘Identity game’: so you think you are what your Instagram bio says about you. Paper presented at the Sociolinguistics Symposium 23, Hong Kong.
  • Au, I. (2021). The magic of breakout rooms in online synchronous teaching and learning of English. Paper presented at the 3rd International Conference on English Across the Curriculum, Hong Kong.
  • Choi, T. H., Chan, H., & Au, I. (2018). ‘Now you’re talking’: Teacher preparation through alumni talks in a community of practice. Paper presented at the Oxford Education Research Symposium.
  • Au, I. (2018). Branching out from the tree: Extending vocabulary acquisition with polysemy. Paper presented at HKBU-HU First Joint Symposium on Education 2018.

 

Supervisors

Elizabeth Wonnacott and Victoria Murphy

Thomas Procter-Legg is a DPhil Student in the Department of Education and is researching restorative practice within the context of special educational needs and disabilities.

His previous experience includes five years as the Head Teacher of a special academy in Oxfordshire UK, specialising in education for students with Special Educational Needs and Disabilities. He has also worked as a SEND Reviewer for Whole School SEND; a Teaching School Director; and as the Principal Designate on a successful Free School bid.

Thomas is passionate about restorative practice and is involved in many communities of practice, such as the Global Alliance for Restorative Justice and Social Justice, where he is a member of the research sub-group exploring the interactions between restorative justice and social justice.

Thomas is also a strong advocate for creativity in education; having previously gained a Fine Art degree from Chelsea College of Art. This heavily influenced his educational leadership and during his time as a Head Teacher, he became the co-founder of a co-constructed initiative between the academy and the University of Oxford Gardens Libraries and Museums. This work placed cultural learning opportunities and relationships at the heart of the curriculum and is the longest standing project between a special school and The University of Oxford. This sustainable partnership champions marginalised voices and has been highly celebrated e.g., inclusion in the Durham Commission for Creativity in Education; recent dissemination at the Museum Ideas Conference 2022; highly commended award at the Museum and Heritage Awards 2021; and awarded Platinum ArtsMark in 2021.

Whilst this creative work may seem to be separate from restorative practice, Thomas subscribes to the idea that there are significant overlaps, both within pedagogical practice and wider school culture, topics which his current research touch on within the context of special education.

 

Publications

Procter-Legg. (2022). A Discourse on Restorative Practice—Participants’ Views of a Divergent Ideology. Laws11(6), 86–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11060086

Procter-Legg. (2022). Practitioner Perspectives on a Restorative Community: An Inductive Evaluative Study of Conceptual, Pedagogical, and Routine Practice. Laws11(1), 4–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11010004

 

Supervisors

Ian Thompson and Jason Todd

Ivan is currently serving as a Facilitator (Teaching) in the Vice-Chancellor’s Colloquium and as an Editor of the Graduate Inequality Review in the University of Oxford. He has taken up lecturerships in a number of universities in Hong Kong and has run Education, Linguistics, Applied Linguistics, Sociolinguistics, and Academic English courses at undergraduate and postgraduate level.

Prior to joining Oxford, Ivan received his teacher-training in Hong Kong and his postgraduate training in Linguistics (with a specialisation in pragmatics) at University College London. His research interests include: mental representation of word meanings, language acquisition, educational technology, and ELT pedagogy.

Publications

  • Au, I. (2021). Unwinding the Fantasy: Using Breakout Rooms to Promote Language Exposure and Less-Public Feedback Practices in Online Synchronous Teaching. Paper presented at the PASHE 2021 – EAP Education and Practice: Supporting Students’ Needs, UCL (IOE).
  • Au, I. & Yiu, C. (2021). ‘Identity game’: so you think you are what your Instagram bio says about you. Paper presented at the Sociolinguistics Symposium 23, Hong Kong.
  • Au, I. (2021). The magic of breakout rooms in online synchronous teaching and learning of English. Paper presented at the 3rd International Conference on English Across the Curriculum, Hong Kong.
  • Choi, T. H., Chan, H., & Au, I. (2018). ‘Now you’re talking’: Teacher preparation through alumni talks in a community of practice. Paper presented at the Oxford Education Research Symposium.
  • Au, I. (2018). Branching out from the tree: Extending vocabulary acquisition with polysemy. Paper presented at HKBU-HU First Joint Symposium on Education 2018.

 

Supervisors

Elizabeth Wonnacott and Victoria Murphy

Thomas Procter-Legg is a DPhil Student in the Department of Education and is researching restorative practice within the context of special educational needs and disabilities.

His previous experience includes five years as the Head Teacher of a special academy in Oxfordshire UK, specialising in education for students with Special Educational Needs and Disabilities. He has also worked as a SEND Reviewer for Whole School SEND; a Teaching School Director; and as the Principal Designate on a successful Free School bid.

Thomas is passionate about restorative practice and is involved in many communities of practice, such as the Global Alliance for Restorative Justice and Social Justice, where he is a member of the research sub-group exploring the interactions between restorative justice and social justice.

Thomas is also a strong advocate for creativity in education; having previously gained a Fine Art degree from Chelsea College of Art. This heavily influenced his educational leadership and during his time as a Head Teacher, he became the co-founder of a co-constructed initiative between the academy and the University of Oxford Gardens Libraries and Museums. This work placed cultural learning opportunities and relationships at the heart of the curriculum and is the longest standing project between a special school and The University of Oxford. This sustainable partnership champions marginalised voices and has been highly celebrated e.g., inclusion in the Durham Commission for Creativity in Education; recent dissemination at the Museum Ideas Conference 2022; highly commended award at the Museum and Heritage Awards 2021; and awarded Platinum ArtsMark in 2021.

Whilst this creative work may seem to be separate from restorative practice, Thomas subscribes to the idea that there are significant overlaps, both within pedagogical practice and wider school culture, topics which his current research touch on within the context of special education.

 

Publications

Procter-Legg. (2022). A Discourse on Restorative Practice—Participants’ Views of a Divergent Ideology. Laws11(6), 86–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11060086

Procter-Legg. (2022). Practitioner Perspectives on a Restorative Community: An Inductive Evaluative Study of Conceptual, Pedagogical, and Routine Practice. Laws11(1), 4–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11010004

 

Supervisors

Ian Thompson and Jason Todd

Ivan is currently serving as a Facilitator (Teaching) in the Vice-Chancellor’s Colloquium and as an Editor of the Graduate Inequality Review in the University of Oxford. He has taken up lecturerships in a number of universities in Hong Kong and has run Education, Linguistics, Applied Linguistics, Sociolinguistics, and Academic English courses at undergraduate and postgraduate level.

Prior to joining Oxford, Ivan received his teacher-training in Hong Kong and his postgraduate training in Linguistics (with a specialisation in pragmatics) at University College London. His research interests include: mental representation of word meanings, language acquisition, educational technology, and ELT pedagogy.

Publications

  • Au, I. (2021). Unwinding the Fantasy: Using Breakout Rooms to Promote Language Exposure and Less-Public Feedback Practices in Online Synchronous Teaching. Paper presented at the PASHE 2021 – EAP Education and Practice: Supporting Students’ Needs, UCL (IOE).
  • Au, I. & Yiu, C. (2021). ‘Identity game’: so you think you are what your Instagram bio says about you. Paper presented at the Sociolinguistics Symposium 23, Hong Kong.
  • Au, I. (2021). The magic of breakout rooms in online synchronous teaching and learning of English. Paper presented at the 3rd International Conference on English Across the Curriculum, Hong Kong.
  • Choi, T. H., Chan, H., & Au, I. (2018). ‘Now you’re talking’: Teacher preparation through alumni talks in a community of practice. Paper presented at the Oxford Education Research Symposium.
  • Au, I. (2018). Branching out from the tree: Extending vocabulary acquisition with polysemy. Paper presented at HKBU-HU First Joint Symposium on Education 2018.

 

Supervisors

Elizabeth Wonnacott and Victoria Murphy

Thomas Procter-Legg is a DPhil Student in the Department of Education and is researching restorative practice within the context of special educational needs and disabilities.

His previous experience includes five years as the Head Teacher of a special academy in Oxfordshire UK, specialising in education for students with Special Educational Needs and Disabilities. He has also worked as a SEND Reviewer for Whole School SEND; a Teaching School Director; and as the Principal Designate on a successful Free School bid.

Thomas is passionate about restorative practice and is involved in many communities of practice, such as the Global Alliance for Restorative Justice and Social Justice, where he is a member of the research sub-group exploring the interactions between restorative justice and social justice.

Thomas is also a strong advocate for creativity in education; having previously gained a Fine Art degree from Chelsea College of Art. This heavily influenced his educational leadership and during his time as a Head Teacher, he became the co-founder of a co-constructed initiative between the academy and the University of Oxford Gardens Libraries and Museums. This work placed cultural learning opportunities and relationships at the heart of the curriculum and is the longest standing project between a special school and The University of Oxford. This sustainable partnership champions marginalised voices and has been highly celebrated e.g., inclusion in the Durham Commission for Creativity in Education; recent dissemination at the Museum Ideas Conference 2022; highly commended award at the Museum and Heritage Awards 2021; and awarded Platinum ArtsMark in 2021.

Whilst this creative work may seem to be separate from restorative practice, Thomas subscribes to the idea that there are significant overlaps, both within pedagogical practice and wider school culture, topics which his current research touch on within the context of special education.

 

Publications

Procter-Legg. (2022). A Discourse on Restorative Practice—Participants’ Views of a Divergent Ideology. Laws11(6), 86–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11060086

Procter-Legg. (2022). Practitioner Perspectives on a Restorative Community: An Inductive Evaluative Study of Conceptual, Pedagogical, and Routine Practice. Laws11(1), 4–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11010004

 

Supervisors

Ian Thompson and Jason Todd

Ivan is currently serving as a Facilitator (Teaching) in the Vice-Chancellor’s Colloquium and as an Editor of the Graduate Inequality Review in the University of Oxford. He has taken up lecturerships in a number of universities in Hong Kong and has run Education, Linguistics, Applied Linguistics, Sociolinguistics, and Academic English courses at undergraduate and postgraduate level.

Prior to joining Oxford, Ivan received his teacher-training in Hong Kong and his postgraduate training in Linguistics (with a specialisation in pragmatics) at University College London. His research interests include: mental representation of word meanings, language acquisition, educational technology, and ELT pedagogy.

Publications

  • Au, I. (2021). Unwinding the Fantasy: Using Breakout Rooms to Promote Language Exposure and Less-Public Feedback Practices in Online Synchronous Teaching. Paper presented at the PASHE 2021 – EAP Education and Practice: Supporting Students’ Needs, UCL (IOE).
  • Au, I. & Yiu, C. (2021). ‘Identity game’: so you think you are what your Instagram bio says about you. Paper presented at the Sociolinguistics Symposium 23, Hong Kong.
  • Au, I. (2021). The magic of breakout rooms in online synchronous teaching and learning of English. Paper presented at the 3rd International Conference on English Across the Curriculum, Hong Kong.
  • Choi, T. H., Chan, H., & Au, I. (2018). ‘Now you’re talking’: Teacher preparation through alumni talks in a community of practice. Paper presented at the Oxford Education Research Symposium.
  • Au, I. (2018). Branching out from the tree: Extending vocabulary acquisition with polysemy. Paper presented at HKBU-HU First Joint Symposium on Education 2018.

 

Supervisors

Elizabeth Wonnacott and Victoria Murphy

Thomas Procter-Legg is a DPhil Student in the Department of Education and is researching restorative practice within the context of special educational needs and disabilities.

His previous experience includes five years as the Head Teacher of a special academy in Oxfordshire UK, specialising in education for students with Special Educational Needs and Disabilities. He has also worked as a SEND Reviewer for Whole School SEND; a Teaching School Director; and as the Principal Designate on a successful Free School bid.

Thomas is passionate about restorative practice and is involved in many communities of practice, such as the Global Alliance for Restorative Justice and Social Justice, where he is a member of the research sub-group exploring the interactions between restorative justice and social justice.

Thomas is also a strong advocate for creativity in education; having previously gained a Fine Art degree from Chelsea College of Art. This heavily influenced his educational leadership and during his time as a Head Teacher, he became the co-founder of a co-constructed initiative between the academy and the University of Oxford Gardens Libraries and Museums. This work placed cultural learning opportunities and relationships at the heart of the curriculum and is the longest standing project between a special school and The University of Oxford. This sustainable partnership champions marginalised voices and has been highly celebrated e.g., inclusion in the Durham Commission for Creativity in Education; recent dissemination at the Museum Ideas Conference 2022; highly commended award at the Museum and Heritage Awards 2021; and awarded Platinum ArtsMark in 2021.

Whilst this creative work may seem to be separate from restorative practice, Thomas subscribes to the idea that there are significant overlaps, both within pedagogical practice and wider school culture, topics which his current research touch on within the context of special education.

 

Publications

Procter-Legg. (2022). A Discourse on Restorative Practice—Participants’ Views of a Divergent Ideology. Laws11(6), 86–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11060086

Procter-Legg. (2022). Practitioner Perspectives on a Restorative Community: An Inductive Evaluative Study of Conceptual, Pedagogical, and Routine Practice. Laws11(1), 4–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11010004

 

Supervisors

Ian Thompson and Jason Todd

Ivan is currently serving as a Facilitator (Teaching) in the Vice-Chancellor’s Colloquium and as an Editor of the Graduate Inequality Review in the University of Oxford. He has taken up lecturerships in a number of universities in Hong Kong and has run Education, Linguistics, Applied Linguistics, Sociolinguistics, and Academic English courses at undergraduate and postgraduate level.

Prior to joining Oxford, Ivan received his teacher-training in Hong Kong and his postgraduate training in Linguistics (with a specialisation in pragmatics) at University College London. His research interests include: mental representation of word meanings, language acquisition, educational technology, and ELT pedagogy.

Publications

  • Au, I. (2021). Unwinding the Fantasy: Using Breakout Rooms to Promote Language Exposure and Less-Public Feedback Practices in Online Synchronous Teaching. Paper presented at the PASHE 2021 – EAP Education and Practice: Supporting Students’ Needs, UCL (IOE).
  • Au, I. & Yiu, C. (2021). ‘Identity game’: so you think you are what your Instagram bio says about you. Paper presented at the Sociolinguistics Symposium 23, Hong Kong.
  • Au, I. (2021). The magic of breakout rooms in online synchronous teaching and learning of English. Paper presented at the 3rd International Conference on English Across the Curriculum, Hong Kong.
  • Choi, T. H., Chan, H., & Au, I. (2018). ‘Now you’re talking’: Teacher preparation through alumni talks in a community of practice. Paper presented at the Oxford Education Research Symposium.
  • Au, I. (2018). Branching out from the tree: Extending vocabulary acquisition with polysemy. Paper presented at HKBU-HU First Joint Symposium on Education 2018.

 

Supervisors

Elizabeth Wonnacott and Victoria Murphy

Thomas Procter-Legg is a DPhil Student in the Department of Education and is researching restorative practice within the context of special educational needs and disabilities.

His previous experience includes five years as the Head Teacher of a special academy in Oxfordshire UK, specialising in education for students with Special Educational Needs and Disabilities. He has also worked as a SEND Reviewer for Whole School SEND; a Teaching School Director; and as the Principal Designate on a successful Free School bid.

Thomas is passionate about restorative practice and is involved in many communities of practice, such as the Global Alliance for Restorative Justice and Social Justice, where he is a member of the research sub-group exploring the interactions between restorative justice and social justice.

Thomas is also a strong advocate for creativity in education; having previously gained a Fine Art degree from Chelsea College of Art. This heavily influenced his educational leadership and during his time as a Head Teacher, he became the co-founder of a co-constructed initiative between the academy and the University of Oxford Gardens Libraries and Museums. This work placed cultural learning opportunities and relationships at the heart of the curriculum and is the longest standing project between a special school and The University of Oxford. This sustainable partnership champions marginalised voices and has been highly celebrated e.g., inclusion in the Durham Commission for Creativity in Education; recent dissemination at the Museum Ideas Conference 2022; highly commended award at the Museum and Heritage Awards 2021; and awarded Platinum ArtsMark in 2021.

Whilst this creative work may seem to be separate from restorative practice, Thomas subscribes to the idea that there are significant overlaps, both within pedagogical practice and wider school culture, topics which his current research touch on within the context of special education.

 

Publications

Procter-Legg. (2022). A Discourse on Restorative Practice—Participants’ Views of a Divergent Ideology. Laws11(6), 86–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11060086

Procter-Legg. (2022). Practitioner Perspectives on a Restorative Community: An Inductive Evaluative Study of Conceptual, Pedagogical, and Routine Practice. Laws11(1), 4–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11010004

 

Supervisors

Ian Thompson and Jason Todd

Ivan is currently serving as a Facilitator (Teaching) in the Vice-Chancellor’s Colloquium and as an Editor of the Graduate Inequality Review in the University of Oxford. He has taken up lecturerships in a number of universities in Hong Kong and has run Education, Linguistics, Applied Linguistics, Sociolinguistics, and Academic English courses at undergraduate and postgraduate level.

Prior to joining Oxford, Ivan received his teacher-training in Hong Kong and his postgraduate training in Linguistics (with a specialisation in pragmatics) at University College London. His research interests include: mental representation of word meanings, language acquisition, educational technology, and ELT pedagogy.

Publications

  • Au, I. (2021). Unwinding the Fantasy: Using Breakout Rooms to Promote Language Exposure and Less-Public Feedback Practices in Online Synchronous Teaching. Paper presented at the PASHE 2021 – EAP Education and Practice: Supporting Students’ Needs, UCL (IOE).
  • Au, I. & Yiu, C. (2021). ‘Identity game’: so you think you are what your Instagram bio says about you. Paper presented at the Sociolinguistics Symposium 23, Hong Kong.
  • Au, I. (2021). The magic of breakout rooms in online synchronous teaching and learning of English. Paper presented at the 3rd International Conference on English Across the Curriculum, Hong Kong.
  • Choi, T. H., Chan, H., & Au, I. (2018). ‘Now you’re talking’: Teacher preparation through alumni talks in a community of practice. Paper presented at the Oxford Education Research Symposium.
  • Au, I. (2018). Branching out from the tree: Extending vocabulary acquisition with polysemy. Paper presented at HKBU-HU First Joint Symposium on Education 2018.

 

Supervisors

Elizabeth Wonnacott and Victoria Murphy

Thomas Procter-Legg is a DPhil Student in the Department of Education and is researching restorative practice within the context of special educational needs and disabilities.

His previous experience includes five years as the Head Teacher of a special academy in Oxfordshire UK, specialising in education for students with Special Educational Needs and Disabilities. He has also worked as a SEND Reviewer for Whole School SEND; a Teaching School Director; and as the Principal Designate on a successful Free School bid.

Thomas is passionate about restorative practice and is involved in many communities of practice, such as the Global Alliance for Restorative Justice and Social Justice, where he is a member of the research sub-group exploring the interactions between restorative justice and social justice.

Thomas is also a strong advocate for creativity in education; having previously gained a Fine Art degree from Chelsea College of Art. This heavily influenced his educational leadership and during his time as a Head Teacher, he became the co-founder of a co-constructed initiative between the academy and the University of Oxford Gardens Libraries and Museums. This work placed cultural learning opportunities and relationships at the heart of the curriculum and is the longest standing project between a special school and The University of Oxford. This sustainable partnership champions marginalised voices and has been highly celebrated e.g., inclusion in the Durham Commission for Creativity in Education; recent dissemination at the Museum Ideas Conference 2022; highly commended award at the Museum and Heritage Awards 2021; and awarded Platinum ArtsMark in 2021.

Whilst this creative work may seem to be separate from restorative practice, Thomas subscribes to the idea that there are significant overlaps, both within pedagogical practice and wider school culture, topics which his current research touch on within the context of special education.

 

Publications

Procter-Legg. (2022). A Discourse on Restorative Practice—Participants’ Views of a Divergent Ideology. Laws11(6), 86–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11060086

Procter-Legg. (2022). Practitioner Perspectives on a Restorative Community: An Inductive Evaluative Study of Conceptual, Pedagogical, and Routine Practice. Laws11(1), 4–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11010004

 

Supervisors

Ian Thompson and Jason Todd

Ivan is currently serving as a Facilitator (Teaching) in the Vice-Chancellor’s Colloquium and as an Editor of the Graduate Inequality Review in the University of Oxford. He has taken up lecturerships in a number of universities in Hong Kong and has run Education, Linguistics, Applied Linguistics, Sociolinguistics, and Academic English courses at undergraduate and postgraduate level.

Prior to joining Oxford, Ivan received his teacher-training in Hong Kong and his postgraduate training in Linguistics (with a specialisation in pragmatics) at University College London. His research interests include: mental representation of word meanings, language acquisition, educational technology, and ELT pedagogy.

Publications

  • Au, I. (2021). Unwinding the Fantasy: Using Breakout Rooms to Promote Language Exposure and Less-Public Feedback Practices in Online Synchronous Teaching. Paper presented at the PASHE 2021 – EAP Education and Practice: Supporting Students’ Needs, UCL (IOE).
  • Au, I. & Yiu, C. (2021). ‘Identity game’: so you think you are what your Instagram bio says about you. Paper presented at the Sociolinguistics Symposium 23, Hong Kong.
  • Au, I. (2021). The magic of breakout rooms in online synchronous teaching and learning of English. Paper presented at the 3rd International Conference on English Across the Curriculum, Hong Kong.
  • Choi, T. H., Chan, H., & Au, I. (2018). ‘Now you’re talking’: Teacher preparation through alumni talks in a community of practice. Paper presented at the Oxford Education Research Symposium.
  • Au, I. (2018). Branching out from the tree: Extending vocabulary acquisition with polysemy. Paper presented at HKBU-HU First Joint Symposium on Education 2018.

 

Supervisors

Elizabeth Wonnacott and Victoria Murphy

Thomas Procter-Legg is a DPhil Student in the Department of Education and is researching restorative practice within the context of special educational needs and disabilities.

His previous experience includes five years as the Head Teacher of a special academy in Oxfordshire UK, specialising in education for students with Special Educational Needs and Disabilities. He has also worked as a SEND Reviewer for Whole School SEND; a Teaching School Director; and as the Principal Designate on a successful Free School bid.

Thomas is passionate about restorative practice and is involved in many communities of practice, such as the Global Alliance for Restorative Justice and Social Justice, where he is a member of the research sub-group exploring the interactions between restorative justice and social justice.

Thomas is also a strong advocate for creativity in education; having previously gained a Fine Art degree from Chelsea College of Art. This heavily influenced his educational leadership and during his time as a Head Teacher, he became the co-founder of a co-constructed initiative between the academy and the University of Oxford Gardens Libraries and Museums. This work placed cultural learning opportunities and relationships at the heart of the curriculum and is the longest standing project between a special school and The University of Oxford. This sustainable partnership champions marginalised voices and has been highly celebrated e.g., inclusion in the Durham Commission for Creativity in Education; recent dissemination at the Museum Ideas Conference 2022; highly commended award at the Museum and Heritage Awards 2021; and awarded Platinum ArtsMark in 2021.

Whilst this creative work may seem to be separate from restorative practice, Thomas subscribes to the idea that there are significant overlaps, both within pedagogical practice and wider school culture, topics which his current research touch on within the context of special education.

 

Publications

Procter-Legg. (2022). A Discourse on Restorative Practice—Participants’ Views of a Divergent Ideology. Laws11(6), 86–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11060086

Procter-Legg. (2022). Practitioner Perspectives on a Restorative Community: An Inductive Evaluative Study of Conceptual, Pedagogical, and Routine Practice. Laws11(1), 4–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11010004

 

Supervisors

Ian Thompson and Jason Todd

Ivan is currently serving as a Facilitator (Teaching) in the Vice-Chancellor’s Colloquium and as an Editor of the Graduate Inequality Review in the University of Oxford. He has taken up lecturerships in a number of universities in Hong Kong and has run Education, Linguistics, Applied Linguistics, Sociolinguistics, and Academic English courses at undergraduate and postgraduate level.

Prior to joining Oxford, Ivan received his teacher-training in Hong Kong and his postgraduate training in Linguistics (with a specialisation in pragmatics) at University College London. His research interests include: mental representation of word meanings, language acquisition, educational technology, and ELT pedagogy.

Publications

  • Au, I. (2021). Unwinding the Fantasy: Using Breakout Rooms to Promote Language Exposure and Less-Public Feedback Practices in Online Synchronous Teaching. Paper presented at the PASHE 2021 – EAP Education and Practice: Supporting Students’ Needs, UCL (IOE).
  • Au, I. & Yiu, C. (2021). ‘Identity game’: so you think you are what your Instagram bio says about you. Paper presented at the Sociolinguistics Symposium 23, Hong Kong.
  • Au, I. (2021). The magic of breakout rooms in online synchronous teaching and learning of English. Paper presented at the 3rd International Conference on English Across the Curriculum, Hong Kong.
  • Choi, T. H., Chan, H., & Au, I. (2018). ‘Now you’re talking’: Teacher preparation through alumni talks in a community of practice. Paper presented at the Oxford Education Research Symposium.
  • Au, I. (2018). Branching out from the tree: Extending vocabulary acquisition with polysemy. Paper presented at HKBU-HU First Joint Symposium on Education 2018.

 

Supervisors

Elizabeth Wonnacott and Victoria Murphy

Thomas Procter-Legg is a DPhil Student in the Department of Education and is researching restorative practice within the context of special educational needs and disabilities.

His previous experience includes five years as the Head Teacher of a special academy in Oxfordshire UK, specialising in education for students with Special Educational Needs and Disabilities. He has also worked as a SEND Reviewer for Whole School SEND; a Teaching School Director; and as the Principal Designate on a successful Free School bid.

Thomas is passionate about restorative practice and is involved in many communities of practice, such as the Global Alliance for Restorative Justice and Social Justice, where he is a member of the research sub-group exploring the interactions between restorative justice and social justice.

Thomas is also a strong advocate for creativity in education; having previously gained a Fine Art degree from Chelsea College of Art. This heavily influenced his educational leadership and during his time as a Head Teacher, he became the co-founder of a co-constructed initiative between the academy and the University of Oxford Gardens Libraries and Museums. This work placed cultural learning opportunities and relationships at the heart of the curriculum and is the longest standing project between a special school and The University of Oxford. This sustainable partnership champions marginalised voices and has been highly celebrated e.g., inclusion in the Durham Commission for Creativity in Education; recent dissemination at the Museum Ideas Conference 2022; highly commended award at the Museum and Heritage Awards 2021; and awarded Platinum ArtsMark in 2021.

Whilst this creative work may seem to be separate from restorative practice, Thomas subscribes to the idea that there are significant overlaps, both within pedagogical practice and wider school culture, topics which his current research touch on within the context of special education.

 

Publications

Procter-Legg. (2022). A Discourse on Restorative Practice—Participants’ Views of a Divergent Ideology. Laws11(6), 86–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11060086

Procter-Legg. (2022). Practitioner Perspectives on a Restorative Community: An Inductive Evaluative Study of Conceptual, Pedagogical, and Routine Practice. Laws11(1), 4–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11010004

 

Supervisors

Ian Thompson and Jason Todd

Ivan is currently serving as a Facilitator (Teaching) in the Vice-Chancellor’s Colloquium and as an Editor of the Graduate Inequality Review in the University of Oxford. He has taken up lecturerships in a number of universities in Hong Kong and has run Education, Linguistics, Applied Linguistics, Sociolinguistics, and Academic English courses at undergraduate and postgraduate level.

Prior to joining Oxford, Ivan received his teacher-training in Hong Kong and his postgraduate training in Linguistics (with a specialisation in pragmatics) at University College London. His research interests include: mental representation of word meanings, language acquisition, educational technology, and ELT pedagogy.

Publications

  • Au, I. (2021). Unwinding the Fantasy: Using Breakout Rooms to Promote Language Exposure and Less-Public Feedback Practices in Online Synchronous Teaching. Paper presented at the PASHE 2021 – EAP Education and Practice: Supporting Students’ Needs, UCL (IOE).
  • Au, I. & Yiu, C. (2021). ‘Identity game’: so you think you are what your Instagram bio says about you. Paper presented at the Sociolinguistics Symposium 23, Hong Kong.
  • Au, I. (2021). The magic of breakout rooms in online synchronous teaching and learning of English. Paper presented at the 3rd International Conference on English Across the Curriculum, Hong Kong.
  • Choi, T. H., Chan, H., & Au, I. (2018). ‘Now you’re talking’: Teacher preparation through alumni talks in a community of practice. Paper presented at the Oxford Education Research Symposium.
  • Au, I. (2018). Branching out from the tree: Extending vocabulary acquisition with polysemy. Paper presented at HKBU-HU First Joint Symposium on Education 2018.

 

Supervisors

Elizabeth Wonnacott and Victoria Murphy

Thomas Procter-Legg is a DPhil Student in the Department of Education and is researching restorative practice within the context of special educational needs and disabilities.

His previous experience includes five years as the Head Teacher of a special academy in Oxfordshire UK, specialising in education for students with Special Educational Needs and Disabilities. He has also worked as a SEND Reviewer for Whole School SEND; a Teaching School Director; and as the Principal Designate on a successful Free School bid.

Thomas is passionate about restorative practice and is involved in many communities of practice, such as the Global Alliance for Restorative Justice and Social Justice, where he is a member of the research sub-group exploring the interactions between restorative justice and social justice.

Thomas is also a strong advocate for creativity in education; having previously gained a Fine Art degree from Chelsea College of Art. This heavily influenced his educational leadership and during his time as a Head Teacher, he became the co-founder of a co-constructed initiative between the academy and the University of Oxford Gardens Libraries and Museums. This work placed cultural learning opportunities and relationships at the heart of the curriculum and is the longest standing project between a special school and The University of Oxford. This sustainable partnership champions marginalised voices and has been highly celebrated e.g., inclusion in the Durham Commission for Creativity in Education; recent dissemination at the Museum Ideas Conference 2022; highly commended award at the Museum and Heritage Awards 2021; and awarded Platinum ArtsMark in 2021.

Whilst this creative work may seem to be separate from restorative practice, Thomas subscribes to the idea that there are significant overlaps, both within pedagogical practice and wider school culture, topics which his current research touch on within the context of special education.

 

Publications

Procter-Legg. (2022). A Discourse on Restorative Practice—Participants’ Views of a Divergent Ideology. Laws11(6), 86–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11060086

Procter-Legg. (2022). Practitioner Perspectives on a Restorative Community: An Inductive Evaluative Study of Conceptual, Pedagogical, and Routine Practice. Laws11(1), 4–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11010004

 

Supervisors

Ian Thompson and Jason Todd

Ivan is currently serving as a Facilitator (Teaching) in the Vice-Chancellor’s Colloquium and as an Editor of the Graduate Inequality Review in the University of Oxford. He has taken up lecturerships in a number of universities in Hong Kong and has run Education, Linguistics, Applied Linguistics, Sociolinguistics, and Academic English courses at undergraduate and postgraduate level.

Prior to joining Oxford, Ivan received his teacher-training in Hong Kong and his postgraduate training in Linguistics (with a specialisation in pragmatics) at University College London. His research interests include: mental representation of word meanings, language acquisition, educational technology, and ELT pedagogy.

Publications

  • Au, I. (2021). Unwinding the Fantasy: Using Breakout Rooms to Promote Language Exposure and Less-Public Feedback Practices in Online Synchronous Teaching. Paper presented at the PASHE 2021 – EAP Education and Practice: Supporting Students’ Needs, UCL (IOE).
  • Au, I. & Yiu, C. (2021). ‘Identity game’: so you think you are what your Instagram bio says about you. Paper presented at the Sociolinguistics Symposium 23, Hong Kong.
  • Au, I. (2021). The magic of breakout rooms in online synchronous teaching and learning of English. Paper presented at the 3rd International Conference on English Across the Curriculum, Hong Kong.
  • Choi, T. H., Chan, H., & Au, I. (2018). ‘Now you’re talking’: Teacher preparation through alumni talks in a community of practice. Paper presented at the Oxford Education Research Symposium.
  • Au, I. (2018). Branching out from the tree: Extending vocabulary acquisition with polysemy. Paper presented at HKBU-HU First Joint Symposium on Education 2018.

 

Supervisors

Elizabeth Wonnacott and Victoria Murphy

Thomas Procter-Legg is a DPhil Student in the Department of Education and is researching restorative practice within the context of special educational needs and disabilities.

His previous experience includes five years as the Head Teacher of a special academy in Oxfordshire UK, specialising in education for students with Special Educational Needs and Disabilities. He has also worked as a SEND Reviewer for Whole School SEND; a Teaching School Director; and as the Principal Designate on a successful Free School bid.

Thomas is passionate about restorative practice and is involved in many communities of practice, such as the Global Alliance for Restorative Justice and Social Justice, where he is a member of the research sub-group exploring the interactions between restorative justice and social justice.

Thomas is also a strong advocate for creativity in education; having previously gained a Fine Art degree from Chelsea College of Art. This heavily influenced his educational leadership and during his time as a Head Teacher, he became the co-founder of a co-constructed initiative between the academy and the University of Oxford Gardens Libraries and Museums. This work placed cultural learning opportunities and relationships at the heart of the curriculum and is the longest standing project between a special school and The University of Oxford. This sustainable partnership champions marginalised voices and has been highly celebrated e.g., inclusion in the Durham Commission for Creativity in Education; recent dissemination at the Museum Ideas Conference 2022; highly commended award at the Museum and Heritage Awards 2021; and awarded Platinum ArtsMark in 2021.

Whilst this creative work may seem to be separate from restorative practice, Thomas subscribes to the idea that there are significant overlaps, both within pedagogical practice and wider school culture, topics which his current research touch on within the context of special education.

 

Publications

Procter-Legg. (2022). A Discourse on Restorative Practice—Participants’ Views of a Divergent Ideology. Laws11(6), 86–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11060086

Procter-Legg. (2022). Practitioner Perspectives on a Restorative Community: An Inductive Evaluative Study of Conceptual, Pedagogical, and Routine Practice. Laws11(1), 4–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11010004

 

Supervisors

Ian Thompson and Jason Todd

Ivan is currently serving as a Facilitator (Teaching) in the Vice-Chancellor’s Colloquium and as an Editor of the Graduate Inequality Review in the University of Oxford. He has taken up lecturerships in a number of universities in Hong Kong and has run Education, Linguistics, Applied Linguistics, Sociolinguistics, and Academic English courses at undergraduate and postgraduate level.

Prior to joining Oxford, Ivan received his teacher-training in Hong Kong and his postgraduate training in Linguistics (with a specialisation in pragmatics) at University College London. His research interests include: mental representation of word meanings, language acquisition, educational technology, and ELT pedagogy.

Publications

  • Au, I. (2021). Unwinding the Fantasy: Using Breakout Rooms to Promote Language Exposure and Less-Public Feedback Practices in Online Synchronous Teaching. Paper presented at the PASHE 2021 – EAP Education and Practice: Supporting Students’ Needs, UCL (IOE).
  • Au, I. & Yiu, C. (2021). ‘Identity game’: so you think you are what your Instagram bio says about you. Paper presented at the Sociolinguistics Symposium 23, Hong Kong.
  • Au, I. (2021). The magic of breakout rooms in online synchronous teaching and learning of English. Paper presented at the 3rd International Conference on English Across the Curriculum, Hong Kong.
  • Choi, T. H., Chan, H., & Au, I. (2018). ‘Now you’re talking’: Teacher preparation through alumni talks in a community of practice. Paper presented at the Oxford Education Research Symposium.
  • Au, I. (2018). Branching out from the tree: Extending vocabulary acquisition with polysemy. Paper presented at HKBU-HU First Joint Symposium on Education 2018.

 

Supervisors

Elizabeth Wonnacott and Victoria Murphy

Thomas Procter-Legg is a DPhil Student in the Department of Education and is researching restorative practice within the context of special educational needs and disabilities.

His previous experience includes five years as the Head Teacher of a special academy in Oxfordshire UK, specialising in education for students with Special Educational Needs and Disabilities. He has also worked as a SEND Reviewer for Whole School SEND; a Teaching School Director; and as the Principal Designate on a successful Free School bid.

Thomas is passionate about restorative practice and is involved in many communities of practice, such as the Global Alliance for Restorative Justice and Social Justice, where he is a member of the research sub-group exploring the interactions between restorative justice and social justice.

Thomas is also a strong advocate for creativity in education; having previously gained a Fine Art degree from Chelsea College of Art. This heavily influenced his educational leadership and during his time as a Head Teacher, he became the co-founder of a co-constructed initiative between the academy and the University of Oxford Gardens Libraries and Museums. This work placed cultural learning opportunities and relationships at the heart of the curriculum and is the longest standing project between a special school and The University of Oxford. This sustainable partnership champions marginalised voices and has been highly celebrated e.g., inclusion in the Durham Commission for Creativity in Education; recent dissemination at the Museum Ideas Conference 2022; highly commended award at the Museum and Heritage Awards 2021; and awarded Platinum ArtsMark in 2021.

Whilst this creative work may seem to be separate from restorative practice, Thomas subscribes to the idea that there are significant overlaps, both within pedagogical practice and wider school culture, topics which his current research touch on within the context of special education.

 

Publications

Procter-Legg. (2022). A Discourse on Restorative Practice—Participants’ Views of a Divergent Ideology. Laws11(6), 86–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11060086

Procter-Legg. (2022). Practitioner Perspectives on a Restorative Community: An Inductive Evaluative Study of Conceptual, Pedagogical, and Routine Practice. Laws11(1), 4–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11010004

 

Supervisors

Ian Thompson and Jason Todd

Ivan is currently serving as a Facilitator (Teaching) in the Vice-Chancellor’s Colloquium and as an Editor of the Graduate Inequality Review in the University of Oxford. He has taken up lecturerships in a number of universities in Hong Kong and has run Education, Linguistics, Applied Linguistics, Sociolinguistics, and Academic English courses at undergraduate and postgraduate level.

Prior to joining Oxford, Ivan received his teacher-training in Hong Kong and his postgraduate training in Linguistics (with a specialisation in pragmatics) at University College London. His research interests include: mental representation of word meanings, language acquisition, educational technology, and ELT pedagogy.

Publications

  • Au, I. (2021). Unwinding the Fantasy: Using Breakout Rooms to Promote Language Exposure and Less-Public Feedback Practices in Online Synchronous Teaching. Paper presented at the PASHE 2021 – EAP Education and Practice: Supporting Students’ Needs, UCL (IOE).
  • Au, I. & Yiu, C. (2021). ‘Identity game’: so you think you are what your Instagram bio says about you. Paper presented at the Sociolinguistics Symposium 23, Hong Kong.
  • Au, I. (2021). The magic of breakout rooms in online synchronous teaching and learning of English. Paper presented at the 3rd International Conference on English Across the Curriculum, Hong Kong.
  • Choi, T. H., Chan, H., & Au, I. (2018). ‘Now you’re talking’: Teacher preparation through alumni talks in a community of practice. Paper presented at the Oxford Education Research Symposium.
  • Au, I. (2018). Branching out from the tree: Extending vocabulary acquisition with polysemy. Paper presented at HKBU-HU First Joint Symposium on Education 2018.

 

Supervisors

Elizabeth Wonnacott and Victoria Murphy

Thomas Procter-Legg is a DPhil Student in the Department of Education and is researching restorative practice within the context of special educational needs and disabilities.

His previous experience includes five years as the Head Teacher of a special academy in Oxfordshire UK, specialising in education for students with Special Educational Needs and Disabilities. He has also worked as a SEND Reviewer for Whole School SEND; a Teaching School Director; and as the Principal Designate on a successful Free School bid.

Thomas is passionate about restorative practice and is involved in many communities of practice, such as the Global Alliance for Restorative Justice and Social Justice, where he is a member of the research sub-group exploring the interactions between restorative justice and social justice.

Thomas is also a strong advocate for creativity in education; having previously gained a Fine Art degree from Chelsea College of Art. This heavily influenced his educational leadership and during his time as a Head Teacher, he became the co-founder of a co-constructed initiative between the academy and the University of Oxford Gardens Libraries and Museums. This work placed cultural learning opportunities and relationships at the heart of the curriculum and is the longest standing project between a special school and The University of Oxford. This sustainable partnership champions marginalised voices and has been highly celebrated e.g., inclusion in the Durham Commission for Creativity in Education; recent dissemination at the Museum Ideas Conference 2022; highly commended award at the Museum and Heritage Awards 2021; and awarded Platinum ArtsMark in 2021.

Whilst this creative work may seem to be separate from restorative practice, Thomas subscribes to the idea that there are significant overlaps, both within pedagogical practice and wider school culture, topics which his current research touch on within the context of special education.

 

Publications

Procter-Legg. (2022). A Discourse on Restorative Practice—Participants’ Views of a Divergent Ideology. Laws11(6), 86–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11060086

Procter-Legg. (2022). Practitioner Perspectives on a Restorative Community: An Inductive Evaluative Study of Conceptual, Pedagogical, and Routine Practice. Laws11(1), 4–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11010004

 

Supervisors

Ian Thompson and Jason Todd

Ivan is currently serving as a Facilitator (Teaching) in the Vice-Chancellor’s Colloquium and as an Editor of the Graduate Inequality Review in the University of Oxford. He has taken up lecturerships in a number of universities in Hong Kong and has run Education, Linguistics, Applied Linguistics, Sociolinguistics, and Academic English courses at undergraduate and postgraduate level.

Prior to joining Oxford, Ivan received his teacher-training in Hong Kong and his postgraduate training in Linguistics (with a specialisation in pragmatics) at University College London. His research interests include: mental representation of word meanings, language acquisition, educational technology, and ELT pedagogy.

Publications

  • Au, I. (2021). Unwinding the Fantasy: Using Breakout Rooms to Promote Language Exposure and Less-Public Feedback Practices in Online Synchronous Teaching. Paper presented at the PASHE 2021 – EAP Education and Practice: Supporting Students’ Needs, UCL (IOE).
  • Au, I. & Yiu, C. (2021). ‘Identity game’: so you think you are what your Instagram bio says about you. Paper presented at the Sociolinguistics Symposium 23, Hong Kong.
  • Au, I. (2021). The magic of breakout rooms in online synchronous teaching and learning of English. Paper presented at the 3rd International Conference on English Across the Curriculum, Hong Kong.
  • Choi, T. H., Chan, H., & Au, I. (2018). ‘Now you’re talking’: Teacher preparation through alumni talks in a community of practice. Paper presented at the Oxford Education Research Symposium.
  • Au, I. (2018). Branching out from the tree: Extending vocabulary acquisition with polysemy. Paper presented at HKBU-HU First Joint Symposium on Education 2018.

 

Supervisors

Elizabeth Wonnacott and Victoria Murphy

Thomas Procter-Legg is a DPhil Student in the Department of Education and is researching restorative practice within the context of special educational needs and disabilities.

His previous experience includes five years as the Head Teacher of a special academy in Oxfordshire UK, specialising in education for students with Special Educational Needs and Disabilities. He has also worked as a SEND Reviewer for Whole School SEND; a Teaching School Director; and as the Principal Designate on a successful Free School bid.

Thomas is passionate about restorative practice and is involved in many communities of practice, such as the Global Alliance for Restorative Justice and Social Justice, where he is a member of the research sub-group exploring the interactions between restorative justice and social justice.

Thomas is also a strong advocate for creativity in education; having previously gained a Fine Art degree from Chelsea College of Art. This heavily influenced his educational leadership and during his time as a Head Teacher, he became the co-founder of a co-constructed initiative between the academy and the University of Oxford Gardens Libraries and Museums. This work placed cultural learning opportunities and relationships at the heart of the curriculum and is the longest standing project between a special school and The University of Oxford. This sustainable partnership champions marginalised voices and has been highly celebrated e.g., inclusion in the Durham Commission for Creativity in Education; recent dissemination at the Museum Ideas Conference 2022; highly commended award at the Museum and Heritage Awards 2021; and awarded Platinum ArtsMark in 2021.

Whilst this creative work may seem to be separate from restorative practice, Thomas subscribes to the idea that there are significant overlaps, both within pedagogical practice and wider school culture, topics which his current research touch on within the context of special education.

 

Publications

Procter-Legg. (2022). A Discourse on Restorative Practice—Participants’ Views of a Divergent Ideology. Laws11(6), 86–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11060086

Procter-Legg. (2022). Practitioner Perspectives on a Restorative Community: An Inductive Evaluative Study of Conceptual, Pedagogical, and Routine Practice. Laws11(1), 4–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11010004

 

Supervisors

Ian Thompson and Jason Todd

Ivan is currently serving as a Facilitator (Teaching) in the Vice-Chancellor’s Colloquium and as an Editor of the Graduate Inequality Review in the University of Oxford. He has taken up lecturerships in a number of universities in Hong Kong and has run Education, Linguistics, Applied Linguistics, Sociolinguistics, and Academic English courses at undergraduate and postgraduate level.

Prior to joining Oxford, Ivan received his teacher-training in Hong Kong and his postgraduate training in Linguistics (with a specialisation in pragmatics) at University College London. His research interests include: mental representation of word meanings, language acquisition, educational technology, and ELT pedagogy.

Publications

  • Au, I. (2021). Unwinding the Fantasy: Using Breakout Rooms to Promote Language Exposure and Less-Public Feedback Practices in Online Synchronous Teaching. Paper presented at the PASHE 2021 – EAP Education and Practice: Supporting Students’ Needs, UCL (IOE).
  • Au, I. & Yiu, C. (2021). ‘Identity game’: so you think you are what your Instagram bio says about you. Paper presented at the Sociolinguistics Symposium 23, Hong Kong.
  • Au, I. (2021). The magic of breakout rooms in online synchronous teaching and learning of English. Paper presented at the 3rd International Conference on English Across the Curriculum, Hong Kong.
  • Choi, T. H., Chan, H., & Au, I. (2018). ‘Now you’re talking’: Teacher preparation through alumni talks in a community of practice. Paper presented at the Oxford Education Research Symposium.
  • Au, I. (2018). Branching out from the tree: Extending vocabulary acquisition with polysemy. Paper presented at HKBU-HU First Joint Symposium on Education 2018.

 

Supervisors

Elizabeth Wonnacott and Victoria Murphy

Thomas Procter-Legg is a DPhil Student in the Department of Education and is researching restorative practice within the context of special educational needs and disabilities.

His previous experience includes five years as the Head Teacher of a special academy in Oxfordshire UK, specialising in education for students with Special Educational Needs and Disabilities. He has also worked as a SEND Reviewer for Whole School SEND; a Teaching School Director; and as the Principal Designate on a successful Free School bid.

Thomas is passionate about restorative practice and is involved in many communities of practice, such as the Global Alliance for Restorative Justice and Social Justice, where he is a member of the research sub-group exploring the interactions between restorative justice and social justice.

Thomas is also a strong advocate for creativity in education; having previously gained a Fine Art degree from Chelsea College of Art. This heavily influenced his educational leadership and during his time as a Head Teacher, he became the co-founder of a co-constructed initiative between the academy and the University of Oxford Gardens Libraries and Museums. This work placed cultural learning opportunities and relationships at the heart of the curriculum and is the longest standing project between a special school and The University of Oxford. This sustainable partnership champions marginalised voices and has been highly celebrated e.g., inclusion in the Durham Commission for Creativity in Education; recent dissemination at the Museum Ideas Conference 2022; highly commended award at the Museum and Heritage Awards 2021; and awarded Platinum ArtsMark in 2021.

Whilst this creative work may seem to be separate from restorative practice, Thomas subscribes to the idea that there are significant overlaps, both within pedagogical practice and wider school culture, topics which his current research touch on within the context of special education.

 

Publications

Procter-Legg. (2022). A Discourse on Restorative Practice—Participants’ Views of a Divergent Ideology. Laws11(6), 86–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11060086

Procter-Legg. (2022). Practitioner Perspectives on a Restorative Community: An Inductive Evaluative Study of Conceptual, Pedagogical, and Routine Practice. Laws11(1), 4–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11010004

 

Supervisors

Ian Thompson and Jason Todd

Ivan is currently serving as a Facilitator (Teaching) in the Vice-Chancellor’s Colloquium and as an Editor of the Graduate Inequality Review in the University of Oxford. He has taken up lecturerships in a number of universities in Hong Kong and has run Education, Linguistics, Applied Linguistics, Sociolinguistics, and Academic English courses at undergraduate and postgraduate level.

Prior to joining Oxford, Ivan received his teacher-training in Hong Kong and his postgraduate training in Linguistics (with a specialisation in pragmatics) at University College London. His research interests include: mental representation of word meanings, language acquisition, educational technology, and ELT pedagogy.

Publications

  • Au, I. (2021). Unwinding the Fantasy: Using Breakout Rooms to Promote Language Exposure and Less-Public Feedback Practices in Online Synchronous Teaching. Paper presented at the PASHE 2021 – EAP Education and Practice: Supporting Students’ Needs, UCL (IOE).
  • Au, I. & Yiu, C. (2021). ‘Identity game’: so you think you are what your Instagram bio says about you. Paper presented at the Sociolinguistics Symposium 23, Hong Kong.
  • Au, I. (2021). The magic of breakout rooms in online synchronous teaching and learning of English. Paper presented at the 3rd International Conference on English Across the Curriculum, Hong Kong.
  • Choi, T. H., Chan, H., & Au, I. (2018). ‘Now you’re talking’: Teacher preparation through alumni talks in a community of practice. Paper presented at the Oxford Education Research Symposium.
  • Au, I. (2018). Branching out from the tree: Extending vocabulary acquisition with polysemy. Paper presented at HKBU-HU First Joint Symposium on Education 2018.

 

Supervisors

Elizabeth Wonnacott and Victoria Murphy

Thomas Procter-Legg is a DPhil Student in the Department of Education and is researching restorative practice within the context of special educational needs and disabilities.

His previous experience includes five years as the Head Teacher of a special academy in Oxfordshire UK, specialising in education for students with Special Educational Needs and Disabilities. He has also worked as a SEND Reviewer for Whole School SEND; a Teaching School Director; and as the Principal Designate on a successful Free School bid.

Thomas is passionate about restorative practice and is involved in many communities of practice, such as the Global Alliance for Restorative Justice and Social Justice, where he is a member of the research sub-group exploring the interactions between restorative justice and social justice.

Thomas is also a strong advocate for creativity in education; having previously gained a Fine Art degree from Chelsea College of Art. This heavily influenced his educational leadership and during his time as a Head Teacher, he became the co-founder of a co-constructed initiative between the academy and the University of Oxford Gardens Libraries and Museums. This work placed cultural learning opportunities and relationships at the heart of the curriculum and is the longest standing project between a special school and The University of Oxford. This sustainable partnership champions marginalised voices and has been highly celebrated e.g., inclusion in the Durham Commission for Creativity in Education; recent dissemination at the Museum Ideas Conference 2022; highly commended award at the Museum and Heritage Awards 2021; and awarded Platinum ArtsMark in 2021.

Whilst this creative work may seem to be separate from restorative practice, Thomas subscribes to the idea that there are significant overlaps, both within pedagogical practice and wider school culture, topics which his current research touch on within the context of special education.

 

Publications

Procter-Legg. (2022). A Discourse on Restorative Practice—Participants’ Views of a Divergent Ideology. Laws11(6), 86–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11060086

Procter-Legg. (2022). Practitioner Perspectives on a Restorative Community: An Inductive Evaluative Study of Conceptual, Pedagogical, and Routine Practice. Laws11(1), 4–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11010004

 

Supervisors

Ian Thompson and Jason Todd

Ivan is currently serving as a Facilitator (Teaching) in the Vice-Chancellor’s Colloquium and as an Editor of the Graduate Inequality Review in the University of Oxford. He has taken up lecturerships in a number of universities in Hong Kong and has run Education, Linguistics, Applied Linguistics, Sociolinguistics, and Academic English courses at undergraduate and postgraduate level.

Prior to joining Oxford, Ivan received his teacher-training in Hong Kong and his postgraduate training in Linguistics (with a specialisation in pragmatics) at University College London. His research interests include: mental representation of word meanings, language acquisition, educational technology, and ELT pedagogy.

Publications

  • Au, I. (2021). Unwinding the Fantasy: Using Breakout Rooms to Promote Language Exposure and Less-Public Feedback Practices in Online Synchronous Teaching. Paper presented at the PASHE 2021 – EAP Education and Practice: Supporting Students’ Needs, UCL (IOE).
  • Au, I. & Yiu, C. (2021). ‘Identity game’: so you think you are what your Instagram bio says about you. Paper presented at the Sociolinguistics Symposium 23, Hong Kong.
  • Au, I. (2021). The magic of breakout rooms in online synchronous teaching and learning of English. Paper presented at the 3rd International Conference on English Across the Curriculum, Hong Kong.
  • Choi, T. H., Chan, H., & Au, I. (2018). ‘Now you’re talking’: Teacher preparation through alumni talks in a community of practice. Paper presented at the Oxford Education Research Symposium.
  • Au, I. (2018). Branching out from the tree: Extending vocabulary acquisition with polysemy. Paper presented at HKBU-HU First Joint Symposium on Education 2018.

 

Supervisors

Elizabeth Wonnacott and Victoria Murphy

Thomas Procter-Legg is a DPhil Student in the Department of Education and is researching restorative practice within the context of special educational needs and disabilities.

His previous experience includes five years as the Head Teacher of a special academy in Oxfordshire UK, specialising in education for students with Special Educational Needs and Disabilities. He has also worked as a SEND Reviewer for Whole School SEND; a Teaching School Director; and as the Principal Designate on a successful Free School bid.

Thomas is passionate about restorative practice and is involved in many communities of practice, such as the Global Alliance for Restorative Justice and Social Justice, where he is a member of the research sub-group exploring the interactions between restorative justice and social justice.

Thomas is also a strong advocate for creativity in education; having previously gained a Fine Art degree from Chelsea College of Art. This heavily influenced his educational leadership and during his time as a Head Teacher, he became the co-founder of a co-constructed initiative between the academy and the University of Oxford Gardens Libraries and Museums. This work placed cultural learning opportunities and relationships at the heart of the curriculum and is the longest standing project between a special school and The University of Oxford. This sustainable partnership champions marginalised voices and has been highly celebrated e.g., inclusion in the Durham Commission for Creativity in Education; recent dissemination at the Museum Ideas Conference 2022; highly commended award at the Museum and Heritage Awards 2021; and awarded Platinum ArtsMark in 2021.

Whilst this creative work may seem to be separate from restorative practice, Thomas subscribes to the idea that there are significant overlaps, both within pedagogical practice and wider school culture, topics which his current research touch on within the context of special education.

 

Publications

Procter-Legg. (2022). A Discourse on Restorative Practice—Participants’ Views of a Divergent Ideology. Laws11(6), 86–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11060086

Procter-Legg. (2022). Practitioner Perspectives on a Restorative Community: An Inductive Evaluative Study of Conceptual, Pedagogical, and Routine Practice. Laws11(1), 4–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11010004

 

Supervisors

Ian Thompson and Jason Todd

Ivan is currently serving as a Facilitator (Teaching) in the Vice-Chancellor’s Colloquium and as an Editor of the Graduate Inequality Review in the University of Oxford. He has taken up lecturerships in a number of universities in Hong Kong and has run Education, Linguistics, Applied Linguistics, Sociolinguistics, and Academic English courses at undergraduate and postgraduate level.

Prior to joining Oxford, Ivan received his teacher-training in Hong Kong and his postgraduate training in Linguistics (with a specialisation in pragmatics) at University College London. His research interests include: mental representation of word meanings, language acquisition, educational technology, and ELT pedagogy.

Publications

  • Au, I. (2021). Unwinding the Fantasy: Using Breakout Rooms to Promote Language Exposure and Less-Public Feedback Practices in Online Synchronous Teaching. Paper presented at the PASHE 2021 – EAP Education and Practice: Supporting Students’ Needs, UCL (IOE).
  • Au, I. & Yiu, C. (2021). ‘Identity game’: so you think you are what your Instagram bio says about you. Paper presented at the Sociolinguistics Symposium 23, Hong Kong.
  • Au, I. (2021). The magic of breakout rooms in online synchronous teaching and learning of English. Paper presented at the 3rd International Conference on English Across the Curriculum, Hong Kong.
  • Choi, T. H., Chan, H., & Au, I. (2018). ‘Now you’re talking’: Teacher preparation through alumni talks in a community of practice. Paper presented at the Oxford Education Research Symposium.
  • Au, I. (2018). Branching out from the tree: Extending vocabulary acquisition with polysemy. Paper presented at HKBU-HU First Joint Symposium on Education 2018.

 

Supervisors

Elizabeth Wonnacott and Victoria Murphy

Thomas Procter-Legg is a DPhil Student in the Department of Education and is researching restorative practice within the context of special educational needs and disabilities.

His previous experience includes five years as the Head Teacher of a special academy in Oxfordshire UK, specialising in education for students with Special Educational Needs and Disabilities. He has also worked as a SEND Reviewer for Whole School SEND; a Teaching School Director; and as the Principal Designate on a successful Free School bid.

Thomas is passionate about restorative practice and is involved in many communities of practice, such as the Global Alliance for Restorative Justice and Social Justice, where he is a member of the research sub-group exploring the interactions between restorative justice and social justice.

Thomas is also a strong advocate for creativity in education; having previously gained a Fine Art degree from Chelsea College of Art. This heavily influenced his educational leadership and during his time as a Head Teacher, he became the co-founder of a co-constructed initiative between the academy and the University of Oxford Gardens Libraries and Museums. This work placed cultural learning opportunities and relationships at the heart of the curriculum and is the longest standing project between a special school and The University of Oxford. This sustainable partnership champions marginalised voices and has been highly celebrated e.g., inclusion in the Durham Commission for Creativity in Education; recent dissemination at the Museum Ideas Conference 2022; highly commended award at the Museum and Heritage Awards 2021; and awarded Platinum ArtsMark in 2021.

Whilst this creative work may seem to be separate from restorative practice, Thomas subscribes to the idea that there are significant overlaps, both within pedagogical practice and wider school culture, topics which his current research touch on within the context of special education.

 

Publications

Procter-Legg. (2022). A Discourse on Restorative Practice—Participants’ Views of a Divergent Ideology. Laws11(6), 86–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11060086

Procter-Legg. (2022). Practitioner Perspectives on a Restorative Community: An Inductive Evaluative Study of Conceptual, Pedagogical, and Routine Practice. Laws11(1), 4–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11010004

 

Supervisors

Ian Thompson and Jason Todd

Ivan is currently serving as a Facilitator (Teaching) in the Vice-Chancellor’s Colloquium and as an Editor of the Graduate Inequality Review in the University of Oxford. He has taken up lecturerships in a number of universities in Hong Kong and has run Education, Linguistics, Applied Linguistics, Sociolinguistics, and Academic English courses at undergraduate and postgraduate level.

Prior to joining Oxford, Ivan received his teacher-training in Hong Kong and his postgraduate training in Linguistics (with a specialisation in pragmatics) at University College London. His research interests include: mental representation of word meanings, language acquisition, educational technology, and ELT pedagogy.

Publications

  • Au, I. (2021). Unwinding the Fantasy: Using Breakout Rooms to Promote Language Exposure and Less-Public Feedback Practices in Online Synchronous Teaching. Paper presented at the PASHE 2021 – EAP Education and Practice: Supporting Students’ Needs, UCL (IOE).
  • Au, I. & Yiu, C. (2021). ‘Identity game’: so you think you are what your Instagram bio says about you. Paper presented at the Sociolinguistics Symposium 23, Hong Kong.
  • Au, I. (2021). The magic of breakout rooms in online synchronous teaching and learning of English. Paper presented at the 3rd International Conference on English Across the Curriculum, Hong Kong.
  • Choi, T. H., Chan, H., & Au, I. (2018). ‘Now you’re talking’: Teacher preparation through alumni talks in a community of practice. Paper presented at the Oxford Education Research Symposium.
  • Au, I. (2018). Branching out from the tree: Extending vocabulary acquisition with polysemy. Paper presented at HKBU-HU First Joint Symposium on Education 2018.

 

Supervisors

Elizabeth Wonnacott and Victoria Murphy

Thomas Procter-Legg is a DPhil Student in the Department of Education and is researching restorative practice within the context of special educational needs and disabilities.

His previous experience includes five years as the Head Teacher of a special academy in Oxfordshire UK, specialising in education for students with Special Educational Needs and Disabilities. He has also worked as a SEND Reviewer for Whole School SEND; a Teaching School Director; and as the Principal Designate on a successful Free School bid.

Thomas is passionate about restorative practice and is involved in many communities of practice, such as the Global Alliance for Restorative Justice and Social Justice, where he is a member of the research sub-group exploring the interactions between restorative justice and social justice.

Thomas is also a strong advocate for creativity in education; having previously gained a Fine Art degree from Chelsea College of Art. This heavily influenced his educational leadership and during his time as a Head Teacher, he became the co-founder of a co-constructed initiative between the academy and the University of Oxford Gardens Libraries and Museums. This work placed cultural learning opportunities and relationships at the heart of the curriculum and is the longest standing project between a special school and The University of Oxford. This sustainable partnership champions marginalised voices and has been highly celebrated e.g., inclusion in the Durham Commission for Creativity in Education; recent dissemination at the Museum Ideas Conference 2022; highly commended award at the Museum and Heritage Awards 2021; and awarded Platinum ArtsMark in 2021.

Whilst this creative work may seem to be separate from restorative practice, Thomas subscribes to the idea that there are significant overlaps, both within pedagogical practice and wider school culture, topics which his current research touch on within the context of special education.

 

Publications

Procter-Legg. (2022). A Discourse on Restorative Practice—Participants’ Views of a Divergent Ideology. Laws11(6), 86–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11060086

Procter-Legg. (2022). Practitioner Perspectives on a Restorative Community: An Inductive Evaluative Study of Conceptual, Pedagogical, and Routine Practice. Laws11(1), 4–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11010004

 

Supervisors

Ian Thompson and Jason Todd

Ivan is currently serving as a Facilitator (Teaching) in the Vice-Chancellor’s Colloquium and as an Editor of the Graduate Inequality Review in the University of Oxford. He has taken up lecturerships in a number of universities in Hong Kong and has run Education, Linguistics, Applied Linguistics, Sociolinguistics, and Academic English courses at undergraduate and postgraduate level.

Prior to joining Oxford, Ivan received his teacher-training in Hong Kong and his postgraduate training in Linguistics (with a specialisation in pragmatics) at University College London. His research interests include: mental representation of word meanings, language acquisition, educational technology, and ELT pedagogy.

Publications

  • Au, I. (2021). Unwinding the Fantasy: Using Breakout Rooms to Promote Language Exposure and Less-Public Feedback Practices in Online Synchronous Teaching. Paper presented at the PASHE 2021 – EAP Education and Practice: Supporting Students’ Needs, UCL (IOE).
  • Au, I. & Yiu, C. (2021). ‘Identity game’: so you think you are what your Instagram bio says about you. Paper presented at the Sociolinguistics Symposium 23, Hong Kong.
  • Au, I. (2021). The magic of breakout rooms in online synchronous teaching and learning of English. Paper presented at the 3rd International Conference on English Across the Curriculum, Hong Kong.
  • Choi, T. H., Chan, H., & Au, I. (2018). ‘Now you’re talking’: Teacher preparation through alumni talks in a community of practice. Paper presented at the Oxford Education Research Symposium.
  • Au, I. (2018). Branching out from the tree: Extending vocabulary acquisition with polysemy. Paper presented at HKBU-HU First Joint Symposium on Education 2018.

 

Supervisors

Elizabeth Wonnacott and Victoria Murphy

Thomas Procter-Legg is a DPhil Student in the Department of Education and is researching restorative practice within the context of special educational needs and disabilities.

His previous experience includes five years as the Head Teacher of a special academy in Oxfordshire UK, specialising in education for students with Special Educational Needs and Disabilities. He has also worked as a SEND Reviewer for Whole School SEND; a Teaching School Director; and as the Principal Designate on a successful Free School bid.

Thomas is passionate about restorative practice and is involved in many communities of practice, such as the Global Alliance for Restorative Justice and Social Justice, where he is a member of the research sub-group exploring the interactions between restorative justice and social justice.

Thomas is also a strong advocate for creativity in education; having previously gained a Fine Art degree from Chelsea College of Art. This heavily influenced his educational leadership and during his time as a Head Teacher, he became the co-founder of a co-constructed initiative between the academy and the University of Oxford Gardens Libraries and Museums. This work placed cultural learning opportunities and relationships at the heart of the curriculum and is the longest standing project between a special school and The University of Oxford. This sustainable partnership champions marginalised voices and has been highly celebrated e.g., inclusion in the Durham Commission for Creativity in Education; recent dissemination at the Museum Ideas Conference 2022; highly commended award at the Museum and Heritage Awards 2021; and awarded Platinum ArtsMark in 2021.

Whilst this creative work may seem to be separate from restorative practice, Thomas subscribes to the idea that there are significant overlaps, both within pedagogical practice and wider school culture, topics which his current research touch on within the context of special education.

 

Publications

Procter-Legg. (2022). A Discourse on Restorative Practice—Participants’ Views of a Divergent Ideology. Laws11(6), 86–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11060086

Procter-Legg. (2022). Practitioner Perspectives on a Restorative Community: An Inductive Evaluative Study of Conceptual, Pedagogical, and Routine Practice. Laws11(1), 4–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11010004

 

Supervisors

Ian Thompson and Jason Todd

Ivan is currently serving as a Facilitator (Teaching) in the Vice-Chancellor’s Colloquium and as an Editor of the Graduate Inequality Review in the University of Oxford. He has taken up lecturerships in a number of universities in Hong Kong and has run Education, Linguistics, Applied Linguistics, Sociolinguistics, and Academic English courses at undergraduate and postgraduate level.

Prior to joining Oxford, Ivan received his teacher-training in Hong Kong and his postgraduate training in Linguistics (with a specialisation in pragmatics) at University College London. His research interests include: mental representation of word meanings, language acquisition, educational technology, and ELT pedagogy.

Publications

  • Au, I. (2021). Unwinding the Fantasy: Using Breakout Rooms to Promote Language Exposure and Less-Public Feedback Practices in Online Synchronous Teaching. Paper presented at the PASHE 2021 – EAP Education and Practice: Supporting Students’ Needs, UCL (IOE).
  • Au, I. & Yiu, C. (2021). ‘Identity game’: so you think you are what your Instagram bio says about you. Paper presented at the Sociolinguistics Symposium 23, Hong Kong.
  • Au, I. (2021). The magic of breakout rooms in online synchronous teaching and learning of English. Paper presented at the 3rd International Conference on English Across the Curriculum, Hong Kong.
  • Choi, T. H., Chan, H., & Au, I. (2018). ‘Now you’re talking’: Teacher preparation through alumni talks in a community of practice. Paper presented at the Oxford Education Research Symposium.
  • Au, I. (2018). Branching out from the tree: Extending vocabulary acquisition with polysemy. Paper presented at HKBU-HU First Joint Symposium on Education 2018.

 

Supervisors

Elizabeth Wonnacott and Victoria Murphy

Thomas Procter-Legg is a DPhil Student in the Department of Education and is researching restorative practice within the context of special educational needs and disabilities.

His previous experience includes five years as the Head Teacher of a special academy in Oxfordshire UK, specialising in education for students with Special Educational Needs and Disabilities. He has also worked as a SEND Reviewer for Whole School SEND; a Teaching School Director; and as the Principal Designate on a successful Free School bid.

Thomas is passionate about restorative practice and is involved in many communities of practice, such as the Global Alliance for Restorative Justice and Social Justice, where he is a member of the research sub-group exploring the interactions between restorative justice and social justice.

Thomas is also a strong advocate for creativity in education; having previously gained a Fine Art degree from Chelsea College of Art. This heavily influenced his educational leadership and during his time as a Head Teacher, he became the co-founder of a co-constructed initiative between the academy and the University of Oxford Gardens Libraries and Museums. This work placed cultural learning opportunities and relationships at the heart of the curriculum and is the longest standing project between a special school and The University of Oxford. This sustainable partnership champions marginalised voices and has been highly celebrated e.g., inclusion in the Durham Commission for Creativity in Education; recent dissemination at the Museum Ideas Conference 2022; highly commended award at the Museum and Heritage Awards 2021; and awarded Platinum ArtsMark in 2021.

Whilst this creative work may seem to be separate from restorative practice, Thomas subscribes to the idea that there are significant overlaps, both within pedagogical practice and wider school culture, topics which his current research touch on within the context of special education.

 

Publications

Procter-Legg. (2022). A Discourse on Restorative Practice—Participants’ Views of a Divergent Ideology. Laws11(6), 86–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11060086

Procter-Legg. (2022). Practitioner Perspectives on a Restorative Community: An Inductive Evaluative Study of Conceptual, Pedagogical, and Routine Practice. Laws11(1), 4–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11010004

 

Supervisors

Ian Thompson and Jason Todd

Ivan is currently serving as a Facilitator (Teaching) in the Vice-Chancellor’s Colloquium and as an Editor of the Graduate Inequality Review in the University of Oxford. He has taken up lecturerships in a number of universities in Hong Kong and has run Education, Linguistics, Applied Linguistics, Sociolinguistics, and Academic English courses at undergraduate and postgraduate level.

Prior to joining Oxford, Ivan received his teacher-training in Hong Kong and his postgraduate training in Linguistics (with a specialisation in pragmatics) at University College London. His research interests include: mental representation of word meanings, language acquisition, educational technology, and ELT pedagogy.

Publications

  • Au, I. (2021). Unwinding the Fantasy: Using Breakout Rooms to Promote Language Exposure and Less-Public Feedback Practices in Online Synchronous Teaching. Paper presented at the PASHE 2021 – EAP Education and Practice: Supporting Students’ Needs, UCL (IOE).
  • Au, I. & Yiu, C. (2021). ‘Identity game’: so you think you are what your Instagram bio says about you. Paper presented at the Sociolinguistics Symposium 23, Hong Kong.
  • Au, I. (2021). The magic of breakout rooms in online synchronous teaching and learning of English. Paper presented at the 3rd International Conference on English Across the Curriculum, Hong Kong.
  • Choi, T. H., Chan, H., & Au, I. (2018). ‘Now you’re talking’: Teacher preparation through alumni talks in a community of practice. Paper presented at the Oxford Education Research Symposium.
  • Au, I. (2018). Branching out from the tree: Extending vocabulary acquisition with polysemy. Paper presented at HKBU-HU First Joint Symposium on Education 2018.

 

Supervisors

Elizabeth Wonnacott and Victoria Murphy

Thomas Procter-Legg is a DPhil Student in the Department of Education and is researching restorative practice within the context of special educational needs and disabilities.

His previous experience includes five years as the Head Teacher of a special academy in Oxfordshire UK, specialising in education for students with Special Educational Needs and Disabilities. He has also worked as a SEND Reviewer for Whole School SEND; a Teaching School Director; and as the Principal Designate on a successful Free School bid.

Thomas is passionate about restorative practice and is involved in many communities of practice, such as the Global Alliance for Restorative Justice and Social Justice, where he is a member of the research sub-group exploring the interactions between restorative justice and social justice.

Thomas is also a strong advocate for creativity in education; having previously gained a Fine Art degree from Chelsea College of Art. This heavily influenced his educational leadership and during his time as a Head Teacher, he became the co-founder of a co-constructed initiative between the academy and the University of Oxford Gardens Libraries and Museums. This work placed cultural learning opportunities and relationships at the heart of the curriculum and is the longest standing project between a special school and The University of Oxford. This sustainable partnership champions marginalised voices and has been highly celebrated e.g., inclusion in the Durham Commission for Creativity in Education; recent dissemination at the Museum Ideas Conference 2022; highly commended award at the Museum and Heritage Awards 2021; and awarded Platinum ArtsMark in 2021.

Whilst this creative work may seem to be separate from restorative practice, Thomas subscribes to the idea that there are significant overlaps, both within pedagogical practice and wider school culture, topics which his current research touch on within the context of special education.

 

Publications

Procter-Legg. (2022). A Discourse on Restorative Practice—Participants’ Views of a Divergent Ideology. Laws11(6), 86–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11060086

Procter-Legg. (2022). Practitioner Perspectives on a Restorative Community: An Inductive Evaluative Study of Conceptual, Pedagogical, and Routine Practice. Laws11(1), 4–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11010004

 

Supervisors

Ian Thompson and Jason Todd

Ivan is currently serving as a Facilitator (Teaching) in the Vice-Chancellor’s Colloquium and as an Editor of the Graduate Inequality Review in the University of Oxford. He has taken up lecturerships in a number of universities in Hong Kong and has run Education, Linguistics, Applied Linguistics, Sociolinguistics, and Academic English courses at undergraduate and postgraduate level.

Prior to joining Oxford, Ivan received his teacher-training in Hong Kong and his postgraduate training in Linguistics (with a specialisation in pragmatics) at University College London. His research interests include: mental representation of word meanings, language acquisition, educational technology, and ELT pedagogy.

Publications

  • Au, I. (2021). Unwinding the Fantasy: Using Breakout Rooms to Promote Language Exposure and Less-Public Feedback Practices in Online Synchronous Teaching. Paper presented at the PASHE 2021 – EAP Education and Practice: Supporting Students’ Needs, UCL (IOE).
  • Au, I. & Yiu, C. (2021). ‘Identity game’: so you think you are what your Instagram bio says about you. Paper presented at the Sociolinguistics Symposium 23, Hong Kong.
  • Au, I. (2021). The magic of breakout rooms in online synchronous teaching and learning of English. Paper presented at the 3rd International Conference on English Across the Curriculum, Hong Kong.
  • Choi, T. H., Chan, H., & Au, I. (2018). ‘Now you’re talking’: Teacher preparation through alumni talks in a community of practice. Paper presented at the Oxford Education Research Symposium.
  • Au, I. (2018). Branching out from the tree: Extending vocabulary acquisition with polysemy. Paper presented at HKBU-HU First Joint Symposium on Education 2018.

 

Supervisors

Elizabeth Wonnacott and Victoria Murphy

Thomas Procter-Legg is a DPhil Student in the Department of Education and is researching restorative practice within the context of special educational needs and disabilities.

His previous experience includes five years as the Head Teacher of a special academy in Oxfordshire UK, specialising in education for students with Special Educational Needs and Disabilities. He has also worked as a SEND Reviewer for Whole School SEND; a Teaching School Director; and as the Principal Designate on a successful Free School bid.

Thomas is passionate about restorative practice and is involved in many communities of practice, such as the Global Alliance for Restorative Justice and Social Justice, where he is a member of the research sub-group exploring the interactions between restorative justice and social justice.

Thomas is also a strong advocate for creativity in education; having previously gained a Fine Art degree from Chelsea College of Art. This heavily influenced his educational leadership and during his time as a Head Teacher, he became the co-founder of a co-constructed initiative between the academy and the University of Oxford Gardens Libraries and Museums. This work placed cultural learning opportunities and relationships at the heart of the curriculum and is the longest standing project between a special school and The University of Oxford. This sustainable partnership champions marginalised voices and has been highly celebrated e.g., inclusion in the Durham Commission for Creativity in Education; recent dissemination at the Museum Ideas Conference 2022; highly commended award at the Museum and Heritage Awards 2021; and awarded Platinum ArtsMark in 2021.

Whilst this creative work may seem to be separate from restorative practice, Thomas subscribes to the idea that there are significant overlaps, both within pedagogical practice and wider school culture, topics which his current research touch on within the context of special education.

 

Publications

Procter-Legg. (2022). A Discourse on Restorative Practice—Participants’ Views of a Divergent Ideology. Laws11(6), 86–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11060086

Procter-Legg. (2022). Practitioner Perspectives on a Restorative Community: An Inductive Evaluative Study of Conceptual, Pedagogical, and Routine Practice. Laws11(1), 4–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11010004

 

Supervisors

Ian Thompson and Jason Todd

Ivan is currently serving as a Facilitator (Teaching) in the Vice-Chancellor’s Colloquium and as an Editor of the Graduate Inequality Review in the University of Oxford. He has taken up lecturerships in a number of universities in Hong Kong and has run Education, Linguistics, Applied Linguistics, Sociolinguistics, and Academic English courses at undergraduate and postgraduate level.

Prior to joining Oxford, Ivan received his teacher-training in Hong Kong and his postgraduate training in Linguistics (with a specialisation in pragmatics) at University College London. His research interests include: mental representation of word meanings, language acquisition, educational technology, and ELT pedagogy.

Publications

  • Au, I. (2021). Unwinding the Fantasy: Using Breakout Rooms to Promote Language Exposure and Less-Public Feedback Practices in Online Synchronous Teaching. Paper presented at the PASHE 2021 – EAP Education and Practice: Supporting Students’ Needs, UCL (IOE).
  • Au, I. & Yiu, C. (2021). ‘Identity game’: so you think you are what your Instagram bio says about you. Paper presented at the Sociolinguistics Symposium 23, Hong Kong.
  • Au, I. (2021). The magic of breakout rooms in online synchronous teaching and learning of English. Paper presented at the 3rd International Conference on English Across the Curriculum, Hong Kong.
  • Choi, T. H., Chan, H., & Au, I. (2018). ‘Now you’re talking’: Teacher preparation through alumni talks in a community of practice. Paper presented at the Oxford Education Research Symposium.
  • Au, I. (2018). Branching out from the tree: Extending vocabulary acquisition with polysemy. Paper presented at HKBU-HU First Joint Symposium on Education 2018.

 

Supervisors

Elizabeth Wonnacott and Victoria Murphy

Thomas Procter-Legg is a DPhil Student in the Department of Education and is researching restorative practice within the context of special educational needs and disabilities.

His previous experience includes five years as the Head Teacher of a special academy in Oxfordshire UK, specialising in education for students with Special Educational Needs and Disabilities. He has also worked as a SEND Reviewer for Whole School SEND; a Teaching School Director; and as the Principal Designate on a successful Free School bid.

Thomas is passionate about restorative practice and is involved in many communities of practice, such as the Global Alliance for Restorative Justice and Social Justice, where he is a member of the research sub-group exploring the interactions between restorative justice and social justice.

Thomas is also a strong advocate for creativity in education; having previously gained a Fine Art degree from Chelsea College of Art. This heavily influenced his educational leadership and during his time as a Head Teacher, he became the co-founder of a co-constructed initiative between the academy and the University of Oxford Gardens Libraries and Museums. This work placed cultural learning opportunities and relationships at the heart of the curriculum and is the longest standing project between a special school and The University of Oxford. This sustainable partnership champions marginalised voices and has been highly celebrated e.g., inclusion in the Durham Commission for Creativity in Education; recent dissemination at the Museum Ideas Conference 2022; highly commended award at the Museum and Heritage Awards 2021; and awarded Platinum ArtsMark in 2021.

Whilst this creative work may seem to be separate from restorative practice, Thomas subscribes to the idea that there are significant overlaps, both within pedagogical practice and wider school culture, topics which his current research touch on within the context of special education.

 

Publications

Procter-Legg. (2022). A Discourse on Restorative Practice—Participants’ Views of a Divergent Ideology. Laws11(6), 86–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11060086

Procter-Legg. (2022). Practitioner Perspectives on a Restorative Community: An Inductive Evaluative Study of Conceptual, Pedagogical, and Routine Practice. Laws11(1), 4–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11010004

 

Supervisors

Ian Thompson and Jason Todd

Ivan is currently serving as a Facilitator (Teaching) in the Vice-Chancellor’s Colloquium and as an Editor of the Graduate Inequality Review in the University of Oxford. He has taken up lecturerships in a number of universities in Hong Kong and has run Education, Linguistics, Applied Linguistics, Sociolinguistics, and Academic English courses at undergraduate and postgraduate level.

Prior to joining Oxford, Ivan received his teacher-training in Hong Kong and his postgraduate training in Linguistics (with a specialisation in pragmatics) at University College London. His research interests include: mental representation of word meanings, language acquisition, educational technology, and ELT pedagogy.

Publications

  • Au, I. (2021). Unwinding the Fantasy: Using Breakout Rooms to Promote Language Exposure and Less-Public Feedback Practices in Online Synchronous Teaching. Paper presented at the PASHE 2021 – EAP Education and Practice: Supporting Students’ Needs, UCL (IOE).
  • Au, I. & Yiu, C. (2021). ‘Identity game’: so you think you are what your Instagram bio says about you. Paper presented at the Sociolinguistics Symposium 23, Hong Kong.
  • Au, I. (2021). The magic of breakout rooms in online synchronous teaching and learning of English. Paper presented at the 3rd International Conference on English Across the Curriculum, Hong Kong.
  • Choi, T. H., Chan, H., & Au, I. (2018). ‘Now you’re talking’: Teacher preparation through alumni talks in a community of practice. Paper presented at the Oxford Education Research Symposium.
  • Au, I. (2018). Branching out from the tree: Extending vocabulary acquisition with polysemy. Paper presented at HKBU-HU First Joint Symposium on Education 2018.

 

Supervisors

Elizabeth Wonnacott and Victoria Murphy

Thomas Procter-Legg is a DPhil Student in the Department of Education and is researching restorative practice within the context of special educational needs and disabilities.

His previous experience includes five years as the Head Teacher of a special academy in Oxfordshire UK, specialising in education for students with Special Educational Needs and Disabilities. He has also worked as a SEND Reviewer for Whole School SEND; a Teaching School Director; and as the Principal Designate on a successful Free School bid.

Thomas is passionate about restorative practice and is involved in many communities of practice, such as the Global Alliance for Restorative Justice and Social Justice, where he is a member of the research sub-group exploring the interactions between restorative justice and social justice.

Thomas is also a strong advocate for creativity in education; having previously gained a Fine Art degree from Chelsea College of Art. This heavily influenced his educational leadership and during his time as a Head Teacher, he became the co-founder of a co-constructed initiative between the academy and the University of Oxford Gardens Libraries and Museums. This work placed cultural learning opportunities and relationships at the heart of the curriculum and is the longest standing project between a special school and The University of Oxford. This sustainable partnership champions marginalised voices and has been highly celebrated e.g., inclusion in the Durham Commission for Creativity in Education; recent dissemination at the Museum Ideas Conference 2022; highly commended award at the Museum and Heritage Awards 2021; and awarded Platinum ArtsMark in 2021.

Whilst this creative work may seem to be separate from restorative practice, Thomas subscribes to the idea that there are significant overlaps, both within pedagogical practice and wider school culture, topics which his current research touch on within the context of special education.

 

Publications

Procter-Legg. (2022). A Discourse on Restorative Practice—Participants’ Views of a Divergent Ideology. Laws11(6), 86–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11060086

Procter-Legg. (2022). Practitioner Perspectives on a Restorative Community: An Inductive Evaluative Study of Conceptual, Pedagogical, and Routine Practice. Laws11(1), 4–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11010004

 

Supervisors

Ian Thompson and Jason Todd

Ivan is currently serving as a Facilitator (Teaching) in the Vice-Chancellor’s Colloquium and as an Editor of the Graduate Inequality Review in the University of Oxford. He has taken up lecturerships in a number of universities in Hong Kong and has run Education, Linguistics, Applied Linguistics, Sociolinguistics, and Academic English courses at undergraduate and postgraduate level.

Prior to joining Oxford, Ivan received his teacher-training in Hong Kong and his postgraduate training in Linguistics (with a specialisation in pragmatics) at University College London. His research interests include: mental representation of word meanings, language acquisition, educational technology, and ELT pedagogy.

Publications

  • Au, I. (2021). Unwinding the Fantasy: Using Breakout Rooms to Promote Language Exposure and Less-Public Feedback Practices in Online Synchronous Teaching. Paper presented at the PASHE 2021 – EAP Education and Practice: Supporting Students’ Needs, UCL (IOE).
  • Au, I. & Yiu, C. (2021). ‘Identity game’: so you think you are what your Instagram bio says about you. Paper presented at the Sociolinguistics Symposium 23, Hong Kong.
  • Au, I. (2021). The magic of breakout rooms in online synchronous teaching and learning of English. Paper presented at the 3rd International Conference on English Across the Curriculum, Hong Kong.
  • Choi, T. H., Chan, H., & Au, I. (2018). ‘Now you’re talking’: Teacher preparation through alumni talks in a community of practice. Paper presented at the Oxford Education Research Symposium.
  • Au, I. (2018). Branching out from the tree: Extending vocabulary acquisition with polysemy. Paper presented at HKBU-HU First Joint Symposium on Education 2018.

 

Supervisors

Elizabeth Wonnacott and Victoria Murphy

Thomas Procter-Legg is a DPhil Student in the Department of Education and is researching restorative practice within the context of special educational needs and disabilities.

His previous experience includes five years as the Head Teacher of a special academy in Oxfordshire UK, specialising in education for students with Special Educational Needs and Disabilities. He has also worked as a SEND Reviewer for Whole School SEND; a Teaching School Director; and as the Principal Designate on a successful Free School bid.

Thomas is passionate about restorative practice and is involved in many communities of practice, such as the Global Alliance for Restorative Justice and Social Justice, where he is a member of the research sub-group exploring the interactions between restorative justice and social justice.

Thomas is also a strong advocate for creativity in education; having previously gained a Fine Art degree from Chelsea College of Art. This heavily influenced his educational leadership and during his time as a Head Teacher, he became the co-founder of a co-constructed initiative between the academy and the University of Oxford Gardens Libraries and Museums. This work placed cultural learning opportunities and relationships at the heart of the curriculum and is the longest standing project between a special school and The University of Oxford. This sustainable partnership champions marginalised voices and has been highly celebrated e.g., inclusion in the Durham Commission for Creativity in Education; recent dissemination at the Museum Ideas Conference 2022; highly commended award at the Museum and Heritage Awards 2021; and awarded Platinum ArtsMark in 2021.

Whilst this creative work may seem to be separate from restorative practice, Thomas subscribes to the idea that there are significant overlaps, both within pedagogical practice and wider school culture, topics which his current research touch on within the context of special education.

 

Publications

Procter-Legg. (2022). A Discourse on Restorative Practice—Participants’ Views of a Divergent Ideology. Laws11(6), 86–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11060086

Procter-Legg. (2022). Practitioner Perspectives on a Restorative Community: An Inductive Evaluative Study of Conceptual, Pedagogical, and Routine Practice. Laws11(1), 4–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11010004

 

Supervisors

Ian Thompson and Jason Todd

Ivan is currently serving as a Facilitator (Teaching) in the Vice-Chancellor’s Colloquium and as an Editor of the Graduate Inequality Review in the University of Oxford. He has taken up lecturerships in a number of universities in Hong Kong and has run Education, Linguistics, Applied Linguistics, Sociolinguistics, and Academic English courses at undergraduate and postgraduate level.

Prior to joining Oxford, Ivan received his teacher-training in Hong Kong and his postgraduate training in Linguistics (with a specialisation in pragmatics) at University College London. His research interests include: mental representation of word meanings, language acquisition, educational technology, and ELT pedagogy.

Publications

  • Au, I. (2021). Unwinding the Fantasy: Using Breakout Rooms to Promote Language Exposure and Less-Public Feedback Practices in Online Synchronous Teaching. Paper presented at the PASHE 2021 – EAP Education and Practice: Supporting Students’ Needs, UCL (IOE).
  • Au, I. & Yiu, C. (2021). ‘Identity game’: so you think you are what your Instagram bio says about you. Paper presented at the Sociolinguistics Symposium 23, Hong Kong.
  • Au, I. (2021). The magic of breakout rooms in online synchronous teaching and learning of English. Paper presented at the 3rd International Conference on English Across the Curriculum, Hong Kong.
  • Choi, T. H., Chan, H., & Au, I. (2018). ‘Now you’re talking’: Teacher preparation through alumni talks in a community of practice. Paper presented at the Oxford Education Research Symposium.
  • Au, I. (2018). Branching out from the tree: Extending vocabulary acquisition with polysemy. Paper presented at HKBU-HU First Joint Symposium on Education 2018.

 

Supervisors

Elizabeth Wonnacott and Victoria Murphy

Thomas Procter-Legg is a DPhil Student in the Department of Education and is researching restorative practice within the context of special educational needs and disabilities.

His previous experience includes five years as the Head Teacher of a special academy in Oxfordshire UK, specialising in education for students with Special Educational Needs and Disabilities. He has also worked as a SEND Reviewer for Whole School SEND; a Teaching School Director; and as the Principal Designate on a successful Free School bid.

Thomas is passionate about restorative practice and is involved in many communities of practice, such as the Global Alliance for Restorative Justice and Social Justice, where he is a member of the research sub-group exploring the interactions between restorative justice and social justice.

Thomas is also a strong advocate for creativity in education; having previously gained a Fine Art degree from Chelsea College of Art. This heavily influenced his educational leadership and during his time as a Head Teacher, he became the co-founder of a co-constructed initiative between the academy and the University of Oxford Gardens Libraries and Museums. This work placed cultural learning opportunities and relationships at the heart of the curriculum and is the longest standing project between a special school and The University of Oxford. This sustainable partnership champions marginalised voices and has been highly celebrated e.g., inclusion in the Durham Commission for Creativity in Education; recent dissemination at the Museum Ideas Conference 2022; highly commended award at the Museum and Heritage Awards 2021; and awarded Platinum ArtsMark in 2021.

Whilst this creative work may seem to be separate from restorative practice, Thomas subscribes to the idea that there are significant overlaps, both within pedagogical practice and wider school culture, topics which his current research touch on within the context of special education.

 

Publications

Procter-Legg. (2022). A Discourse on Restorative Practice—Participants’ Views of a Divergent Ideology. Laws11(6), 86–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11060086

Procter-Legg. (2022). Practitioner Perspectives on a Restorative Community: An Inductive Evaluative Study of Conceptual, Pedagogical, and Routine Practice. Laws11(1), 4–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11010004

 

Supervisors

Ian Thompson and Jason Todd

Ivan is currently serving as a Facilitator (Teaching) in the Vice-Chancellor’s Colloquium and as an Editor of the Graduate Inequality Review in the University of Oxford. He has taken up lecturerships in a number of universities in Hong Kong and has run Education, Linguistics, Applied Linguistics, Sociolinguistics, and Academic English courses at undergraduate and postgraduate level.

Prior to joining Oxford, Ivan received his teacher-training in Hong Kong and his postgraduate training in Linguistics (with a specialisation in pragmatics) at University College London. His research interests include: mental representation of word meanings, language acquisition, educational technology, and ELT pedagogy.

Publications

  • Au, I. (2021). Unwinding the Fantasy: Using Breakout Rooms to Promote Language Exposure and Less-Public Feedback Practices in Online Synchronous Teaching. Paper presented at the PASHE 2021 – EAP Education and Practice: Supporting Students’ Needs, UCL (IOE).
  • Au, I. & Yiu, C. (2021). ‘Identity game’: so you think you are what your Instagram bio says about you. Paper presented at the Sociolinguistics Symposium 23, Hong Kong.
  • Au, I. (2021). The magic of breakout rooms in online synchronous teaching and learning of English. Paper presented at the 3rd International Conference on English Across the Curriculum, Hong Kong.
  • Choi, T. H., Chan, H., & Au, I. (2018). ‘Now you’re talking’: Teacher preparation through alumni talks in a community of practice. Paper presented at the Oxford Education Research Symposium.
  • Au, I. (2018). Branching out from the tree: Extending vocabulary acquisition with polysemy. Paper presented at HKBU-HU First Joint Symposium on Education 2018.

 

Supervisors

Elizabeth Wonnacott and Victoria Murphy

Thomas Procter-Legg is a DPhil Student in the Department of Education and is researching restorative practice within the context of special educational needs and disabilities.

His previous experience includes five years as the Head Teacher of a special academy in Oxfordshire UK, specialising in education for students with Special Educational Needs and Disabilities. He has also worked as a SEND Reviewer for Whole School SEND; a Teaching School Director; and as the Principal Designate on a successful Free School bid.

Thomas is passionate about restorative practice and is involved in many communities of practice, such as the Global Alliance for Restorative Justice and Social Justice, where he is a member of the research sub-group exploring the interactions between restorative justice and social justice.

Thomas is also a strong advocate for creativity in education; having previously gained a Fine Art degree from Chelsea College of Art. This heavily influenced his educational leadership and during his time as a Head Teacher, he became the co-founder of a co-constructed initiative between the academy and the University of Oxford Gardens Libraries and Museums. This work placed cultural learning opportunities and relationships at the heart of the curriculum and is the longest standing project between a special school and The University of Oxford. This sustainable partnership champions marginalised voices and has been highly celebrated e.g., inclusion in the Durham Commission for Creativity in Education; recent dissemination at the Museum Ideas Conference 2022; highly commended award at the Museum and Heritage Awards 2021; and awarded Platinum ArtsMark in 2021.

Whilst this creative work may seem to be separate from restorative practice, Thomas subscribes to the idea that there are significant overlaps, both within pedagogical practice and wider school culture, topics which his current research touch on within the context of special education.

 

Publications

Procter-Legg. (2022). A Discourse on Restorative Practice—Participants’ Views of a Divergent Ideology. Laws11(6), 86–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11060086

Procter-Legg. (2022). Practitioner Perspectives on a Restorative Community: An Inductive Evaluative Study of Conceptual, Pedagogical, and Routine Practice. Laws11(1), 4–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11010004

 

Supervisors

Ian Thompson and Jason Todd

Ivan is currently serving as a Facilitator (Teaching) in the Vice-Chancellor’s Colloquium and as an Editor of the Graduate Inequality Review in the University of Oxford. He has taken up lecturerships in a number of universities in Hong Kong and has run Education, Linguistics, Applied Linguistics, Sociolinguistics, and Academic English courses at undergraduate and postgraduate level.

Prior to joining Oxford, Ivan received his teacher-training in Hong Kong and his postgraduate training in Linguistics (with a specialisation in pragmatics) at University College London. His research interests include: mental representation of word meanings, language acquisition, educational technology, and ELT pedagogy.

Publications

  • Au, I. (2021). Unwinding the Fantasy: Using Breakout Rooms to Promote Language Exposure and Less-Public Feedback Practices in Online Synchronous Teaching. Paper presented at the PASHE 2021 – EAP Education and Practice: Supporting Students’ Needs, UCL (IOE).
  • Au, I. & Yiu, C. (2021). ‘Identity game’: so you think you are what your Instagram bio says about you. Paper presented at the Sociolinguistics Symposium 23, Hong Kong.
  • Au, I. (2021). The magic of breakout rooms in online synchronous teaching and learning of English. Paper presented at the 3rd International Conference on English Across the Curriculum, Hong Kong.
  • Choi, T. H., Chan, H., & Au, I. (2018). ‘Now you’re talking’: Teacher preparation through alumni talks in a community of practice. Paper presented at the Oxford Education Research Symposium.
  • Au, I. (2018). Branching out from the tree: Extending vocabulary acquisition with polysemy. Paper presented at HKBU-HU First Joint Symposium on Education 2018.

 

Supervisors

Elizabeth Wonnacott and Victoria Murphy

Thomas Procter-Legg is a DPhil Student in the Department of Education and is researching restorative practice within the context of special educational needs and disabilities.

His previous experience includes five years as the Head Teacher of a special academy in Oxfordshire UK, specialising in education for students with Special Educational Needs and Disabilities. He has also worked as a SEND Reviewer for Whole School SEND; a Teaching School Director; and as the Principal Designate on a successful Free School bid.

Thomas is passionate about restorative practice and is involved in many communities of practice, such as the Global Alliance for Restorative Justice and Social Justice, where he is a member of the research sub-group exploring the interactions between restorative justice and social justice.

Thomas is also a strong advocate for creativity in education; having previously gained a Fine Art degree from Chelsea College of Art. This heavily influenced his educational leadership and during his time as a Head Teacher, he became the co-founder of a co-constructed initiative between the academy and the University of Oxford Gardens Libraries and Museums. This work placed cultural learning opportunities and relationships at the heart of the curriculum and is the longest standing project between a special school and The University of Oxford. This sustainable partnership champions marginalised voices and has been highly celebrated e.g., inclusion in the Durham Commission for Creativity in Education; recent dissemination at the Museum Ideas Conference 2022; highly commended award at the Museum and Heritage Awards 2021; and awarded Platinum ArtsMark in 2021.

Whilst this creative work may seem to be separate from restorative practice, Thomas subscribes to the idea that there are significant overlaps, both within pedagogical practice and wider school culture, topics which his current research touch on within the context of special education.

 

Publications

Procter-Legg. (2022). A Discourse on Restorative Practice—Participants’ Views of a Divergent Ideology. Laws11(6), 86–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11060086

Procter-Legg. (2022). Practitioner Perspectives on a Restorative Community: An Inductive Evaluative Study of Conceptual, Pedagogical, and Routine Practice. Laws11(1), 4–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11010004

 

Supervisors

Ian Thompson and Jason Todd

Ivan is currently serving as a Facilitator (Teaching) in the Vice-Chancellor’s Colloquium and as an Editor of the Graduate Inequality Review in the University of Oxford. He has taken up lecturerships in a number of universities in Hong Kong and has run Education, Linguistics, Applied Linguistics, Sociolinguistics, and Academic English courses at undergraduate and postgraduate level.

Prior to joining Oxford, Ivan received his teacher-training in Hong Kong and his postgraduate training in Linguistics (with a specialisation in pragmatics) at University College London. His research interests include: mental representation of word meanings, language acquisition, educational technology, and ELT pedagogy.

Publications

  • Au, I. (2021). Unwinding the Fantasy: Using Breakout Rooms to Promote Language Exposure and Less-Public Feedback Practices in Online Synchronous Teaching. Paper presented at the PASHE 2021 – EAP Education and Practice: Supporting Students’ Needs, UCL (IOE).
  • Au, I. & Yiu, C. (2021). ‘Identity game’: so you think you are what your Instagram bio says about you. Paper presented at the Sociolinguistics Symposium 23, Hong Kong.
  • Au, I. (2021). The magic of breakout rooms in online synchronous teaching and learning of English. Paper presented at the 3rd International Conference on English Across the Curriculum, Hong Kong.
  • Choi, T. H., Chan, H., & Au, I. (2018). ‘Now you’re talking’: Teacher preparation through alumni talks in a community of practice. Paper presented at the Oxford Education Research Symposium.
  • Au, I. (2018). Branching out from the tree: Extending vocabulary acquisition with polysemy. Paper presented at HKBU-HU First Joint Symposium on Education 2018.

 

Supervisors

Elizabeth Wonnacott and Victoria Murphy

Thomas Procter-Legg is a DPhil Student in the Department of Education and is researching restorative practice within the context of special educational needs and disabilities.

His previous experience includes five years as the Head Teacher of a special academy in Oxfordshire UK, specialising in education for students with Special Educational Needs and Disabilities. He has also worked as a SEND Reviewer for Whole School SEND; a Teaching School Director; and as the Principal Designate on a successful Free School bid.

Thomas is passionate about restorative practice and is involved in many communities of practice, such as the Global Alliance for Restorative Justice and Social Justice, where he is a member of the research sub-group exploring the interactions between restorative justice and social justice.

Thomas is also a strong advocate for creativity in education; having previously gained a Fine Art degree from Chelsea College of Art. This heavily influenced his educational leadership and during his time as a Head Teacher, he became the co-founder of a co-constructed initiative between the academy and the University of Oxford Gardens Libraries and Museums. This work placed cultural learning opportunities and relationships at the heart of the curriculum and is the longest standing project between a special school and The University of Oxford. This sustainable partnership champions marginalised voices and has been highly celebrated e.g., inclusion in the Durham Commission for Creativity in Education; recent dissemination at the Museum Ideas Conference 2022; highly commended award at the Museum and Heritage Awards 2021; and awarded Platinum ArtsMark in 2021.

Whilst this creative work may seem to be separate from restorative practice, Thomas subscribes to the idea that there are significant overlaps, both within pedagogical practice and wider school culture, topics which his current research touch on within the context of special education.

 

Publications

Procter-Legg. (2022). A Discourse on Restorative Practice—Participants’ Views of a Divergent Ideology. Laws11(6), 86–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11060086

Procter-Legg. (2022). Practitioner Perspectives on a Restorative Community: An Inductive Evaluative Study of Conceptual, Pedagogical, and Routine Practice. Laws11(1), 4–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11010004

 

Supervisors

Ian Thompson and Jason Todd

Ivan is currently serving as a Facilitator (Teaching) in the Vice-Chancellor’s Colloquium and as an Editor of the Graduate Inequality Review in the University of Oxford. He has taken up lecturerships in a number of universities in Hong Kong and has run Education, Linguistics, Applied Linguistics, Sociolinguistics, and Academic English courses at undergraduate and postgraduate level.

Prior to joining Oxford, Ivan received his teacher-training in Hong Kong and his postgraduate training in Linguistics (with a specialisation in pragmatics) at University College London. His research interests include: mental representation of word meanings, language acquisition, educational technology, and ELT pedagogy.

Publications

  • Au, I. (2021). Unwinding the Fantasy: Using Breakout Rooms to Promote Language Exposure and Less-Public Feedback Practices in Online Synchronous Teaching. Paper presented at the PASHE 2021 – EAP Education and Practice: Supporting Students’ Needs, UCL (IOE).
  • Au, I. & Yiu, C. (2021). ‘Identity game’: so you think you are what your Instagram bio says about you. Paper presented at the Sociolinguistics Symposium 23, Hong Kong.
  • Au, I. (2021). The magic of breakout rooms in online synchronous teaching and learning of English. Paper presented at the 3rd International Conference on English Across the Curriculum, Hong Kong.
  • Choi, T. H., Chan, H., & Au, I. (2018). ‘Now you’re talking’: Teacher preparation through alumni talks in a community of practice. Paper presented at the Oxford Education Research Symposium.
  • Au, I. (2018). Branching out from the tree: Extending vocabulary acquisition with polysemy. Paper presented at HKBU-HU First Joint Symposium on Education 2018.

 

Supervisors

Elizabeth Wonnacott and Victoria Murphy

Thomas Procter-Legg is a DPhil Student in the Department of Education and is researching restorative practice within the context of special educational needs and disabilities.

His previous experience includes five years as the Head Teacher of a special academy in Oxfordshire UK, specialising in education for students with Special Educational Needs and Disabilities. He has also worked as a SEND Reviewer for Whole School SEND; a Teaching School Director; and as the Principal Designate on a successful Free School bid.

Thomas is passionate about restorative practice and is involved in many communities of practice, such as the Global Alliance for Restorative Justice and Social Justice, where he is a member of the research sub-group exploring the interactions between restorative justice and social justice.

Thomas is also a strong advocate for creativity in education; having previously gained a Fine Art degree from Chelsea College of Art. This heavily influenced his educational leadership and during his time as a Head Teacher, he became the co-founder of a co-constructed initiative between the academy and the University of Oxford Gardens Libraries and Museums. This work placed cultural learning opportunities and relationships at the heart of the curriculum and is the longest standing project between a special school and The University of Oxford. This sustainable partnership champions marginalised voices and has been highly celebrated e.g., inclusion in the Durham Commission for Creativity in Education; recent dissemination at the Museum Ideas Conference 2022; highly commended award at the Museum and Heritage Awards 2021; and awarded Platinum ArtsMark in 2021.

Whilst this creative work may seem to be separate from restorative practice, Thomas subscribes to the idea that there are significant overlaps, both within pedagogical practice and wider school culture, topics which his current research touch on within the context of special education.

 

Publications

Procter-Legg. (2022). A Discourse on Restorative Practice—Participants’ Views of a Divergent Ideology. Laws11(6), 86–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11060086

Procter-Legg. (2022). Practitioner Perspectives on a Restorative Community: An Inductive Evaluative Study of Conceptual, Pedagogical, and Routine Practice. Laws11(1), 4–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11010004

 

Supervisors

Ian Thompson and Jason Todd

Ivan is currently serving as a Facilitator (Teaching) in the Vice-Chancellor’s Colloquium and as an Editor of the Graduate Inequality Review in the University of Oxford. He has taken up lecturerships in a number of universities in Hong Kong and has run Education, Linguistics, Applied Linguistics, Sociolinguistics, and Academic English courses at undergraduate and postgraduate level.

Prior to joining Oxford, Ivan received his teacher-training in Hong Kong and his postgraduate training in Linguistics (with a specialisation in pragmatics) at University College London. His research interests include: mental representation of word meanings, language acquisition, educational technology, and ELT pedagogy.

Publications

  • Au, I. (2021). Unwinding the Fantasy: Using Breakout Rooms to Promote Language Exposure and Less-Public Feedback Practices in Online Synchronous Teaching. Paper presented at the PASHE 2021 – EAP Education and Practice: Supporting Students’ Needs, UCL (IOE).
  • Au, I. & Yiu, C. (2021). ‘Identity game’: so you think you are what your Instagram bio says about you. Paper presented at the Sociolinguistics Symposium 23, Hong Kong.
  • Au, I. (2021). The magic of breakout rooms in online synchronous teaching and learning of English. Paper presented at the 3rd International Conference on English Across the Curriculum, Hong Kong.
  • Choi, T. H., Chan, H., & Au, I. (2018). ‘Now you’re talking’: Teacher preparation through alumni talks in a community of practice. Paper presented at the Oxford Education Research Symposium.
  • Au, I. (2018). Branching out from the tree: Extending vocabulary acquisition with polysemy. Paper presented at HKBU-HU First Joint Symposium on Education 2018.

 

Supervisors

Elizabeth Wonnacott and Victoria Murphy

Thomas Procter-Legg is a DPhil Student in the Department of Education and is researching restorative practice within the context of special educational needs and disabilities.

His previous experience includes five years as the Head Teacher of a special academy in Oxfordshire UK, specialising in education for students with Special Educational Needs and Disabilities. He has also worked as a SEND Reviewer for Whole School SEND; a Teaching School Director; and as the Principal Designate on a successful Free School bid.

Thomas is passionate about restorative practice and is involved in many communities of practice, such as the Global Alliance for Restorative Justice and Social Justice, where he is a member of the research sub-group exploring the interactions between restorative justice and social justice.

Thomas is also a strong advocate for creativity in education; having previously gained a Fine Art degree from Chelsea College of Art. This heavily influenced his educational leadership and during his time as a Head Teacher, he became the co-founder of a co-constructed initiative between the academy and the University of Oxford Gardens Libraries and Museums. This work placed cultural learning opportunities and relationships at the heart of the curriculum and is the longest standing project between a special school and The University of Oxford. This sustainable partnership champions marginalised voices and has been highly celebrated e.g., inclusion in the Durham Commission for Creativity in Education; recent dissemination at the Museum Ideas Conference 2022; highly commended award at the Museum and Heritage Awards 2021; and awarded Platinum ArtsMark in 2021.

Whilst this creative work may seem to be separate from restorative practice, Thomas subscribes to the idea that there are significant overlaps, both within pedagogical practice and wider school culture, topics which his current research touch on within the context of special education.

 

Publications

Procter-Legg. (2022). A Discourse on Restorative Practice—Participants’ Views of a Divergent Ideology. Laws11(6), 86–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11060086

Procter-Legg. (2022). Practitioner Perspectives on a Restorative Community: An Inductive Evaluative Study of Conceptual, Pedagogical, and Routine Practice. Laws11(1), 4–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11010004

 

Supervisors

Ian Thompson and Jason Todd

Ivan is currently serving as a Facilitator (Teaching) in the Vice-Chancellor’s Colloquium and as an Editor of the Graduate Inequality Review in the University of Oxford. He has taken up lecturerships in a number of universities in Hong Kong and has run Education, Linguistics, Applied Linguistics, Sociolinguistics, and Academic English courses at undergraduate and postgraduate level.

Prior to joining Oxford, Ivan received his teacher-training in Hong Kong and his postgraduate training in Linguistics (with a specialisation in pragmatics) at University College London. His research interests include: mental representation of word meanings, language acquisition, educational technology, and ELT pedagogy.

Publications

  • Au, I. (2021). Unwinding the Fantasy: Using Breakout Rooms to Promote Language Exposure and Less-Public Feedback Practices in Online Synchronous Teaching. Paper presented at the PASHE 2021 – EAP Education and Practice: Supporting Students’ Needs, UCL (IOE).
  • Au, I. & Yiu, C. (2021). ‘Identity game’: so you think you are what your Instagram bio says about you. Paper presented at the Sociolinguistics Symposium 23, Hong Kong.
  • Au, I. (2021). The magic of breakout rooms in online synchronous teaching and learning of English. Paper presented at the 3rd International Conference on English Across the Curriculum, Hong Kong.
  • Choi, T. H., Chan, H., & Au, I. (2018). ‘Now you’re talking’: Teacher preparation through alumni talks in a community of practice. Paper presented at the Oxford Education Research Symposium.
  • Au, I. (2018). Branching out from the tree: Extending vocabulary acquisition with polysemy. Paper presented at HKBU-HU First Joint Symposium on Education 2018.

 

Supervisors

Elizabeth Wonnacott and Victoria Murphy

Thomas Procter-Legg is a DPhil Student in the Department of Education and is researching restorative practice within the context of special educational needs and disabilities.

His previous experience includes five years as the Head Teacher of a special academy in Oxfordshire UK, specialising in education for students with Special Educational Needs and Disabilities. He has also worked as a SEND Reviewer for Whole School SEND; a Teaching School Director; and as the Principal Designate on a successful Free School bid.

Thomas is passionate about restorative practice and is involved in many communities of practice, such as the Global Alliance for Restorative Justice and Social Justice, where he is a member of the research sub-group exploring the interactions between restorative justice and social justice.

Thomas is also a strong advocate for creativity in education; having previously gained a Fine Art degree from Chelsea College of Art. This heavily influenced his educational leadership and during his time as a Head Teacher, he became the co-founder of a co-constructed initiative between the academy and the University of Oxford Gardens Libraries and Museums. This work placed cultural learning opportunities and relationships at the heart of the curriculum and is the longest standing project between a special school and The University of Oxford. This sustainable partnership champions marginalised voices and has been highly celebrated e.g., inclusion in the Durham Commission for Creativity in Education; recent dissemination at the Museum Ideas Conference 2022; highly commended award at the Museum and Heritage Awards 2021; and awarded Platinum ArtsMark in 2021.

Whilst this creative work may seem to be separate from restorative practice, Thomas subscribes to the idea that there are significant overlaps, both within pedagogical practice and wider school culture, topics which his current research touch on within the context of special education.

 

Publications

Procter-Legg. (2022). A Discourse on Restorative Practice—Participants’ Views of a Divergent Ideology. Laws11(6), 86–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11060086

Procter-Legg. (2022). Practitioner Perspectives on a Restorative Community: An Inductive Evaluative Study of Conceptual, Pedagogical, and Routine Practice. Laws11(1), 4–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11010004

 

Supervisors

Ian Thompson and Jason Todd

Ivan is currently serving as a Facilitator (Teaching) in the Vice-Chancellor’s Colloquium and as an Editor of the Graduate Inequality Review in the University of Oxford. He has taken up lecturerships in a number of universities in Hong Kong and has run Education, Linguistics, Applied Linguistics, Sociolinguistics, and Academic English courses at undergraduate and postgraduate level.

Prior to joining Oxford, Ivan received his teacher-training in Hong Kong and his postgraduate training in Linguistics (with a specialisation in pragmatics) at University College London. His research interests include: mental representation of word meanings, language acquisition, educational technology, and ELT pedagogy.

Publications

  • Au, I. (2021). Unwinding the Fantasy: Using Breakout Rooms to Promote Language Exposure and Less-Public Feedback Practices in Online Synchronous Teaching. Paper presented at the PASHE 2021 – EAP Education and Practice: Supporting Students’ Needs, UCL (IOE).
  • Au, I. & Yiu, C. (2021). ‘Identity game’: so you think you are what your Instagram bio says about you. Paper presented at the Sociolinguistics Symposium 23, Hong Kong.
  • Au, I. (2021). The magic of breakout rooms in online synchronous teaching and learning of English. Paper presented at the 3rd International Conference on English Across the Curriculum, Hong Kong.
  • Choi, T. H., Chan, H., & Au, I. (2018). ‘Now you’re talking’: Teacher preparation through alumni talks in a community of practice. Paper presented at the Oxford Education Research Symposium.
  • Au, I. (2018). Branching out from the tree: Extending vocabulary acquisition with polysemy. Paper presented at HKBU-HU First Joint Symposium on Education 2018.

 

Supervisors

Elizabeth Wonnacott and Victoria Murphy

Thomas Procter-Legg is a DPhil Student in the Department of Education and is researching restorative practice within the context of special educational needs and disabilities.

His previous experience includes five years as the Head Teacher of a special academy in Oxfordshire UK, specialising in education for students with Special Educational Needs and Disabilities. He has also worked as a SEND Reviewer for Whole School SEND; a Teaching School Director; and as the Principal Designate on a successful Free School bid.

Thomas is passionate about restorative practice and is involved in many communities of practice, such as the Global Alliance for Restorative Justice and Social Justice, where he is a member of the research sub-group exploring the interactions between restorative justice and social justice.

Thomas is also a strong advocate for creativity in education; having previously gained a Fine Art degree from Chelsea College of Art. This heavily influenced his educational leadership and during his time as a Head Teacher, he became the co-founder of a co-constructed initiative between the academy and the University of Oxford Gardens Libraries and Museums. This work placed cultural learning opportunities and relationships at the heart of the curriculum and is the longest standing project between a special school and The University of Oxford. This sustainable partnership champions marginalised voices and has been highly celebrated e.g., inclusion in the Durham Commission for Creativity in Education; recent dissemination at the Museum Ideas Conference 2022; highly commended award at the Museum and Heritage Awards 2021; and awarded Platinum ArtsMark in 2021.

Whilst this creative work may seem to be separate from restorative practice, Thomas subscribes to the idea that there are significant overlaps, both within pedagogical practice and wider school culture, topics which his current research touch on within the context of special education.

 

Publications

Procter-Legg. (2022). A Discourse on Restorative Practice—Participants’ Views of a Divergent Ideology. Laws11(6), 86–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11060086

Procter-Legg. (2022). Practitioner Perspectives on a Restorative Community: An Inductive Evaluative Study of Conceptual, Pedagogical, and Routine Practice. Laws11(1), 4–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11010004

 

Supervisors

Ian Thompson and Jason Todd

Ivan is currently serving as a Facilitator (Teaching) in the Vice-Chancellor’s Colloquium and as an Editor of the Graduate Inequality Review in the University of Oxford. He has taken up lecturerships in a number of universities in Hong Kong and has run Education, Linguistics, Applied Linguistics, Sociolinguistics, and Academic English courses at undergraduate and postgraduate level.

Prior to joining Oxford, Ivan received his teacher-training in Hong Kong and his postgraduate training in Linguistics (with a specialisation in pragmatics) at University College London. His research interests include: mental representation of word meanings, language acquisition, educational technology, and ELT pedagogy.

Publications

  • Au, I. (2021). Unwinding the Fantasy: Using Breakout Rooms to Promote Language Exposure and Less-Public Feedback Practices in Online Synchronous Teaching. Paper presented at the PASHE 2021 – EAP Education and Practice: Supporting Students’ Needs, UCL (IOE).
  • Au, I. & Yiu, C. (2021). ‘Identity game’: so you think you are what your Instagram bio says about you. Paper presented at the Sociolinguistics Symposium 23, Hong Kong.
  • Au, I. (2021). The magic of breakout rooms in online synchronous teaching and learning of English. Paper presented at the 3rd International Conference on English Across the Curriculum, Hong Kong.
  • Choi, T. H., Chan, H., & Au, I. (2018). ‘Now you’re talking’: Teacher preparation through alumni talks in a community of practice. Paper presented at the Oxford Education Research Symposium.
  • Au, I. (2018). Branching out from the tree: Extending vocabulary acquisition with polysemy. Paper presented at HKBU-HU First Joint Symposium on Education 2018.

 

Supervisors

Elizabeth Wonnacott and Victoria Murphy

Thomas Procter-Legg is a DPhil Student in the Department of Education and is researching restorative practice within the context of special educational needs and disabilities.

His previous experience includes five years as the Head Teacher of a special academy in Oxfordshire UK, specialising in education for students with Special Educational Needs and Disabilities. He has also worked as a SEND Reviewer for Whole School SEND; a Teaching School Director; and as the Principal Designate on a successful Free School bid.

Thomas is passionate about restorative practice and is involved in many communities of practice, such as the Global Alliance for Restorative Justice and Social Justice, where he is a member of the research sub-group exploring the interactions between restorative justice and social justice.

Thomas is also a strong advocate for creativity in education; having previously gained a Fine Art degree from Chelsea College of Art. This heavily influenced his educational leadership and during his time as a Head Teacher, he became the co-founder of a co-constructed initiative between the academy and the University of Oxford Gardens Libraries and Museums. This work placed cultural learning opportunities and relationships at the heart of the curriculum and is the longest standing project between a special school and The University of Oxford. This sustainable partnership champions marginalised voices and has been highly celebrated e.g., inclusion in the Durham Commission for Creativity in Education; recent dissemination at the Museum Ideas Conference 2022; highly commended award at the Museum and Heritage Awards 2021; and awarded Platinum ArtsMark in 2021.

Whilst this creative work may seem to be separate from restorative practice, Thomas subscribes to the idea that there are significant overlaps, both within pedagogical practice and wider school culture, topics which his current research touch on within the context of special education.

 

Publications

Procter-Legg. (2022). A Discourse on Restorative Practice—Participants’ Views of a Divergent Ideology. Laws11(6), 86–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11060086

Procter-Legg. (2022). Practitioner Perspectives on a Restorative Community: An Inductive Evaluative Study of Conceptual, Pedagogical, and Routine Practice. Laws11(1), 4–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11010004

 

Supervisors

Ian Thompson and Jason Todd

Ivan is currently serving as a Facilitator (Teaching) in the Vice-Chancellor’s Colloquium and as an Editor of the Graduate Inequality Review in the University of Oxford. He has taken up lecturerships in a number of universities in Hong Kong and has run Education, Linguistics, Applied Linguistics, Sociolinguistics, and Academic English courses at undergraduate and postgraduate level.

Prior to joining Oxford, Ivan received his teacher-training in Hong Kong and his postgraduate training in Linguistics (with a specialisation in pragmatics) at University College London. His research interests include: mental representation of word meanings, language acquisition, educational technology, and ELT pedagogy.

Publications

  • Au, I. (2021). Unwinding the Fantasy: Using Breakout Rooms to Promote Language Exposure and Less-Public Feedback Practices in Online Synchronous Teaching. Paper presented at the PASHE 2021 – EAP Education and Practice: Supporting Students’ Needs, UCL (IOE).
  • Au, I. & Yiu, C. (2021). ‘Identity game’: so you think you are what your Instagram bio says about you. Paper presented at the Sociolinguistics Symposium 23, Hong Kong.
  • Au, I. (2021). The magic of breakout rooms in online synchronous teaching and learning of English. Paper presented at the 3rd International Conference on English Across the Curriculum, Hong Kong.
  • Choi, T. H., Chan, H., & Au, I. (2018). ‘Now you’re talking’: Teacher preparation through alumni talks in a community of practice. Paper presented at the Oxford Education Research Symposium.
  • Au, I. (2018). Branching out from the tree: Extending vocabulary acquisition with polysemy. Paper presented at HKBU-HU First Joint Symposium on Education 2018.

 

Supervisors

Elizabeth Wonnacott and Victoria Murphy

Thomas Procter-Legg is a DPhil Student in the Department of Education and is researching restorative practice within the context of special educational needs and disabilities.

His previous experience includes five years as the Head Teacher of a special academy in Oxfordshire UK, specialising in education for students with Special Educational Needs and Disabilities. He has also worked as a SEND Reviewer for Whole School SEND; a Teaching School Director; and as the Principal Designate on a successful Free School bid.

Thomas is passionate about restorative practice and is involved in many communities of practice, such as the Global Alliance for Restorative Justice and Social Justice, where he is a member of the research sub-group exploring the interactions between restorative justice and social justice.

Thomas is also a strong advocate for creativity in education; having previously gained a Fine Art degree from Chelsea College of Art. This heavily influenced his educational leadership and during his time as a Head Teacher, he became the co-founder of a co-constructed initiative between the academy and the University of Oxford Gardens Libraries and Museums. This work placed cultural learning opportunities and relationships at the heart of the curriculum and is the longest standing project between a special school and The University of Oxford. This sustainable partnership champions marginalised voices and has been highly celebrated e.g., inclusion in the Durham Commission for Creativity in Education; recent dissemination at the Museum Ideas Conference 2022; highly commended award at the Museum and Heritage Awards 2021; and awarded Platinum ArtsMark in 2021.

Whilst this creative work may seem to be separate from restorative practice, Thomas subscribes to the idea that there are significant overlaps, both within pedagogical practice and wider school culture, topics which his current research touch on within the context of special education.

 

Publications

Procter-Legg. (2022). A Discourse on Restorative Practice—Participants’ Views of a Divergent Ideology. Laws11(6), 86–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11060086

Procter-Legg. (2022). Practitioner Perspectives on a Restorative Community: An Inductive Evaluative Study of Conceptual, Pedagogical, and Routine Practice. Laws11(1), 4–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11010004

 

Supervisors

Ian Thompson and Jason Todd

Ivan is currently serving as a Facilitator (Teaching) in the Vice-Chancellor’s Colloquium and as an Editor of the Graduate Inequality Review in the University of Oxford. He has taken up lecturerships in a number of universities in Hong Kong and has run Education, Linguistics, Applied Linguistics, Sociolinguistics, and Academic English courses at undergraduate and postgraduate level.

Prior to joining Oxford, Ivan received his teacher-training in Hong Kong and his postgraduate training in Linguistics (with a specialisation in pragmatics) at University College London. His research interests include: mental representation of word meanings, language acquisition, educational technology, and ELT pedagogy.

Publications

  • Au, I. (2021). Unwinding the Fantasy: Using Breakout Rooms to Promote Language Exposure and Less-Public Feedback Practices in Online Synchronous Teaching. Paper presented at the PASHE 2021 – EAP Education and Practice: Supporting Students’ Needs, UCL (IOE).
  • Au, I. & Yiu, C. (2021). ‘Identity game’: so you think you are what your Instagram bio says about you. Paper presented at the Sociolinguistics Symposium 23, Hong Kong.
  • Au, I. (2021). The magic of breakout rooms in online synchronous teaching and learning of English. Paper presented at the 3rd International Conference on English Across the Curriculum, Hong Kong.
  • Choi, T. H., Chan, H., & Au, I. (2018). ‘Now you’re talking’: Teacher preparation through alumni talks in a community of practice. Paper presented at the Oxford Education Research Symposium.
  • Au, I. (2018). Branching out from the tree: Extending vocabulary acquisition with polysemy. Paper presented at HKBU-HU First Joint Symposium on Education 2018.

 

Supervisors

Elizabeth Wonnacott and Victoria Murphy

Thomas Procter-Legg is a DPhil Student in the Department of Education and is researching restorative practice within the context of special educational needs and disabilities.

His previous experience includes five years as the Head Teacher of a special academy in Oxfordshire UK, specialising in education for students with Special Educational Needs and Disabilities. He has also worked as a SEND Reviewer for Whole School SEND; a Teaching School Director; and as the Principal Designate on a successful Free School bid.

Thomas is passionate about restorative practice and is involved in many communities of practice, such as the Global Alliance for Restorative Justice and Social Justice, where he is a member of the research sub-group exploring the interactions between restorative justice and social justice.

Thomas is also a strong advocate for creativity in education; having previously gained a Fine Art degree from Chelsea College of Art. This heavily influenced his educational leadership and during his time as a Head Teacher, he became the co-founder of a co-constructed initiative between the academy and the University of Oxford Gardens Libraries and Museums. This work placed cultural learning opportunities and relationships at the heart of the curriculum and is the longest standing project between a special school and The University of Oxford. This sustainable partnership champions marginalised voices and has been highly celebrated e.g., inclusion in the Durham Commission for Creativity in Education; recent dissemination at the Museum Ideas Conference 2022; highly commended award at the Museum and Heritage Awards 2021; and awarded Platinum ArtsMark in 2021.

Whilst this creative work may seem to be separate from restorative practice, Thomas subscribes to the idea that there are significant overlaps, both within pedagogical practice and wider school culture, topics which his current research touch on within the context of special education.

 

Publications

Procter-Legg. (2022). A Discourse on Restorative Practice—Participants’ Views of a Divergent Ideology. Laws11(6), 86–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11060086

Procter-Legg. (2022). Practitioner Perspectives on a Restorative Community: An Inductive Evaluative Study of Conceptual, Pedagogical, and Routine Practice. Laws11(1), 4–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11010004

 

Supervisors

Ian Thompson and Jason Todd

Ivan is currently serving as a Facilitator (Teaching) in the Vice-Chancellor’s Colloquium and as an Editor of the Graduate Inequality Review in the University of Oxford. He has taken up lecturerships in a number of universities in Hong Kong and has run Education, Linguistics, Applied Linguistics, Sociolinguistics, and Academic English courses at undergraduate and postgraduate level.

Prior to joining Oxford, Ivan received his teacher-training in Hong Kong and his postgraduate training in Linguistics (with a specialisation in pragmatics) at University College London. His research interests include: mental representation of word meanings, language acquisition, educational technology, and ELT pedagogy.

Publications

  • Au, I. (2021). Unwinding the Fantasy: Using Breakout Rooms to Promote Language Exposure and Less-Public Feedback Practices in Online Synchronous Teaching. Paper presented at the PASHE 2021 – EAP Education and Practice: Supporting Students’ Needs, UCL (IOE).
  • Au, I. & Yiu, C. (2021). ‘Identity game’: so you think you are what your Instagram bio says about you. Paper presented at the Sociolinguistics Symposium 23, Hong Kong.
  • Au, I. (2021). The magic of breakout rooms in online synchronous teaching and learning of English. Paper presented at the 3rd International Conference on English Across the Curriculum, Hong Kong.
  • Choi, T. H., Chan, H., & Au, I. (2018). ‘Now you’re talking’: Teacher preparation through alumni talks in a community of practice. Paper presented at the Oxford Education Research Symposium.
  • Au, I. (2018). Branching out from the tree: Extending vocabulary acquisition with polysemy. Paper presented at HKBU-HU First Joint Symposium on Education 2018.

 

Supervisors

Elizabeth Wonnacott and Victoria Murphy

Thomas Procter-Legg is a DPhil Student in the Department of Education and is researching restorative practice within the context of special educational needs and disabilities.

His previous experience includes five years as the Head Teacher of a special academy in Oxfordshire UK, specialising in education for students with Special Educational Needs and Disabilities. He has also worked as a SEND Reviewer for Whole School SEND; a Teaching School Director; and as the Principal Designate on a successful Free School bid.

Thomas is passionate about restorative practice and is involved in many communities of practice, such as the Global Alliance for Restorative Justice and Social Justice, where he is a member of the research sub-group exploring the interactions between restorative justice and social justice.

Thomas is also a strong advocate for creativity in education; having previously gained a Fine Art degree from Chelsea College of Art. This heavily influenced his educational leadership and during his time as a Head Teacher, he became the co-founder of a co-constructed initiative between the academy and the University of Oxford Gardens Libraries and Museums. This work placed cultural learning opportunities and relationships at the heart of the curriculum and is the longest standing project between a special school and The University of Oxford. This sustainable partnership champions marginalised voices and has been highly celebrated e.g., inclusion in the Durham Commission for Creativity in Education; recent dissemination at the Museum Ideas Conference 2022; highly commended award at the Museum and Heritage Awards 2021; and awarded Platinum ArtsMark in 2021.

Whilst this creative work may seem to be separate from restorative practice, Thomas subscribes to the idea that there are significant overlaps, both within pedagogical practice and wider school culture, topics which his current research touch on within the context of special education.

 

Publications

Procter-Legg. (2022). A Discourse on Restorative Practice—Participants’ Views of a Divergent Ideology. Laws11(6), 86–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11060086

Procter-Legg. (2022). Practitioner Perspectives on a Restorative Community: An Inductive Evaluative Study of Conceptual, Pedagogical, and Routine Practice. Laws11(1), 4–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11010004

 

Supervisors

Ian Thompson and Jason Todd

Ivan is currently serving as a Facilitator (Teaching) in the Vice-Chancellor’s Colloquium and as an Editor of the Graduate Inequality Review in the University of Oxford. He has taken up lecturerships in a number of universities in Hong Kong and has run Education, Linguistics, Applied Linguistics, Sociolinguistics, and Academic English courses at undergraduate and postgraduate level.

Prior to joining Oxford, Ivan received his teacher-training in Hong Kong and his postgraduate training in Linguistics (with a specialisation in pragmatics) at University College London. His research interests include: mental representation of word meanings, language acquisition, educational technology, and ELT pedagogy.

Publications

  • Au, I. (2021). Unwinding the Fantasy: Using Breakout Rooms to Promote Language Exposure and Less-Public Feedback Practices in Online Synchronous Teaching. Paper presented at the PASHE 2021 – EAP Education and Practice: Supporting Students’ Needs, UCL (IOE).
  • Au, I. & Yiu, C. (2021). ‘Identity game’: so you think you are what your Instagram bio says about you. Paper presented at the Sociolinguistics Symposium 23, Hong Kong.
  • Au, I. (2021). The magic of breakout rooms in online synchronous teaching and learning of English. Paper presented at the 3rd International Conference on English Across the Curriculum, Hong Kong.
  • Choi, T. H., Chan, H., & Au, I. (2018). ‘Now you’re talking’: Teacher preparation through alumni talks in a community of practice. Paper presented at the Oxford Education Research Symposium.
  • Au, I. (2018). Branching out from the tree: Extending vocabulary acquisition with polysemy. Paper presented at HKBU-HU First Joint Symposium on Education 2018.

 

Supervisors

Elizabeth Wonnacott and Victoria Murphy

Thomas Procter-Legg is a DPhil Student in the Department of Education and is researching restorative practice within the context of special educational needs and disabilities.

His previous experience includes five years as the Head Teacher of a special academy in Oxfordshire UK, specialising in education for students with Special Educational Needs and Disabilities. He has also worked as a SEND Reviewer for Whole School SEND; a Teaching School Director; and as the Principal Designate on a successful Free School bid.

Thomas is passionate about restorative practice and is involved in many communities of practice, such as the Global Alliance for Restorative Justice and Social Justice, where he is a member of the research sub-group exploring the interactions between restorative justice and social justice.

Thomas is also a strong advocate for creativity in education; having previously gained a Fine Art degree from Chelsea College of Art. This heavily influenced his educational leadership and during his time as a Head Teacher, he became the co-founder of a co-constructed initiative between the academy and the University of Oxford Gardens Libraries and Museums. This work placed cultural learning opportunities and relationships at the heart of the curriculum and is the longest standing project between a special school and The University of Oxford. This sustainable partnership champions marginalised voices and has been highly celebrated e.g., inclusion in the Durham Commission for Creativity in Education; recent dissemination at the Museum Ideas Conference 2022; highly commended award at the Museum and Heritage Awards 2021; and awarded Platinum ArtsMark in 2021.

Whilst this creative work may seem to be separate from restorative practice, Thomas subscribes to the idea that there are significant overlaps, both within pedagogical practice and wider school culture, topics which his current research touch on within the context of special education.

 

Publications

Procter-Legg. (2022). A Discourse on Restorative Practice—Participants’ Views of a Divergent Ideology. Laws11(6), 86–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11060086

Procter-Legg. (2022). Practitioner Perspectives on a Restorative Community: An Inductive Evaluative Study of Conceptual, Pedagogical, and Routine Practice. Laws11(1), 4–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11010004

 

Supervisors

Ian Thompson and Jason Todd

Ivan is currently serving as a Facilitator (Teaching) in the Vice-Chancellor’s Colloquium and as an Editor of the Graduate Inequality Review in the University of Oxford. He has taken up lecturerships in a number of universities in Hong Kong and has run Education, Linguistics, Applied Linguistics, Sociolinguistics, and Academic English courses at undergraduate and postgraduate level.

Prior to joining Oxford, Ivan received his teacher-training in Hong Kong and his postgraduate training in Linguistics (with a specialisation in pragmatics) at University College London. His research interests include: mental representation of word meanings, language acquisition, educational technology, and ELT pedagogy.

Publications

  • Au, I. (2021). Unwinding the Fantasy: Using Breakout Rooms to Promote Language Exposure and Less-Public Feedback Practices in Online Synchronous Teaching. Paper presented at the PASHE 2021 – EAP Education and Practice: Supporting Students’ Needs, UCL (IOE).
  • Au, I. & Yiu, C. (2021). ‘Identity game’: so you think you are what your Instagram bio says about you. Paper presented at the Sociolinguistics Symposium 23, Hong Kong.
  • Au, I. (2021). The magic of breakout rooms in online synchronous teaching and learning of English. Paper presented at the 3rd International Conference on English Across the Curriculum, Hong Kong.
  • Choi, T. H., Chan, H., & Au, I. (2018). ‘Now you’re talking’: Teacher preparation through alumni talks in a community of practice. Paper presented at the Oxford Education Research Symposium.
  • Au, I. (2018). Branching out from the tree: Extending vocabulary acquisition with polysemy. Paper presented at HKBU-HU First Joint Symposium on Education 2018.

 

Supervisors

Elizabeth Wonnacott and Victoria Murphy

Thomas Procter-Legg is a DPhil Student in the Department of Education and is researching restorative practice within the context of special educational needs and disabilities.

His previous experience includes five years as the Head Teacher of a special academy in Oxfordshire UK, specialising in education for students with Special Educational Needs and Disabilities. He has also worked as a SEND Reviewer for Whole School SEND; a Teaching School Director; and as the Principal Designate on a successful Free School bid.

Thomas is passionate about restorative practice and is involved in many communities of practice, such as the Global Alliance for Restorative Justice and Social Justice, where he is a member of the research sub-group exploring the interactions between restorative justice and social justice.

Thomas is also a strong advocate for creativity in education; having previously gained a Fine Art degree from Chelsea College of Art. This heavily influenced his educational leadership and during his time as a Head Teacher, he became the co-founder of a co-constructed initiative between the academy and the University of Oxford Gardens Libraries and Museums. This work placed cultural learning opportunities and relationships at the heart of the curriculum and is the longest standing project between a special school and The University of Oxford. This sustainable partnership champions marginalised voices and has been highly celebrated e.g., inclusion in the Durham Commission for Creativity in Education; recent dissemination at the Museum Ideas Conference 2022; highly commended award at the Museum and Heritage Awards 2021; and awarded Platinum ArtsMark in 2021.

Whilst this creative work may seem to be separate from restorative practice, Thomas subscribes to the idea that there are significant overlaps, both within pedagogical practice and wider school culture, topics which his current research touch on within the context of special education.

 

Publications

Procter-Legg. (2022). A Discourse on Restorative Practice—Participants’ Views of a Divergent Ideology. Laws11(6), 86–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11060086

Procter-Legg. (2022). Practitioner Perspectives on a Restorative Community: An Inductive Evaluative Study of Conceptual, Pedagogical, and Routine Practice. Laws11(1), 4–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11010004

 

Supervisors

Ian Thompson and Jason Todd

Ivan is currently serving as a Facilitator (Teaching) in the Vice-Chancellor’s Colloquium and as an Editor of the Graduate Inequality Review in the University of Oxford. He has taken up lecturerships in a number of universities in Hong Kong and has run Education, Linguistics, Applied Linguistics, Sociolinguistics, and Academic English courses at undergraduate and postgraduate level.

Prior to joining Oxford, Ivan received his teacher-training in Hong Kong and his postgraduate training in Linguistics (with a specialisation in pragmatics) at University College London. His research interests include: mental representation of word meanings, language acquisition, educational technology, and ELT pedagogy.

Publications

  • Au, I. (2021). Unwinding the Fantasy: Using Breakout Rooms to Promote Language Exposure and Less-Public Feedback Practices in Online Synchronous Teaching. Paper presented at the PASHE 2021 – EAP Education and Practice: Supporting Students’ Needs, UCL (IOE).
  • Au, I. & Yiu, C. (2021). ‘Identity game’: so you think you are what your Instagram bio says about you. Paper presented at the Sociolinguistics Symposium 23, Hong Kong.
  • Au, I. (2021). The magic of breakout rooms in online synchronous teaching and learning of English. Paper presented at the 3rd International Conference on English Across the Curriculum, Hong Kong.
  • Choi, T. H., Chan, H., & Au, I. (2018). ‘Now you’re talking’: Teacher preparation through alumni talks in a community of practice. Paper presented at the Oxford Education Research Symposium.
  • Au, I. (2018). Branching out from the tree: Extending vocabulary acquisition with polysemy. Paper presented at HKBU-HU First Joint Symposium on Education 2018.

 

Supervisors

Elizabeth Wonnacott and Victoria Murphy

Thomas Procter-Legg is a DPhil Student in the Department of Education and is researching restorative practice within the context of special educational needs and disabilities.

His previous experience includes five years as the Head Teacher of a special academy in Oxfordshire UK, specialising in education for students with Special Educational Needs and Disabilities. He has also worked as a SEND Reviewer for Whole School SEND; a Teaching School Director; and as the Principal Designate on a successful Free School bid.

Thomas is passionate about restorative practice and is involved in many communities of practice, such as the Global Alliance for Restorative Justice and Social Justice, where he is a member of the research sub-group exploring the interactions between restorative justice and social justice.

Thomas is also a strong advocate for creativity in education; having previously gained a Fine Art degree from Chelsea College of Art. This heavily influenced his educational leadership and during his time as a Head Teacher, he became the co-founder of a co-constructed initiative between the academy and the University of Oxford Gardens Libraries and Museums. This work placed cultural learning opportunities and relationships at the heart of the curriculum and is the longest standing project between a special school and The University of Oxford. This sustainable partnership champions marginalised voices and has been highly celebrated e.g., inclusion in the Durham Commission for Creativity in Education; recent dissemination at the Museum Ideas Conference 2022; highly commended award at the Museum and Heritage Awards 2021; and awarded Platinum ArtsMark in 2021.

Whilst this creative work may seem to be separate from restorative practice, Thomas subscribes to the idea that there are significant overlaps, both within pedagogical practice and wider school culture, topics which his current research touch on within the context of special education.

 

Publications

Procter-Legg. (2022). A Discourse on Restorative Practice—Participants’ Views of a Divergent Ideology. Laws11(6), 86–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11060086

Procter-Legg. (2022). Practitioner Perspectives on a Restorative Community: An Inductive Evaluative Study of Conceptual, Pedagogical, and Routine Practice. Laws11(1), 4–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11010004

 

Supervisors

Ian Thompson and Jason Todd

Ivan is currently serving as a Facilitator (Teaching) in the Vice-Chancellor’s Colloquium and as an Editor of the Graduate Inequality Review in the University of Oxford. He has taken up lecturerships in a number of universities in Hong Kong and has run Education, Linguistics, Applied Linguistics, Sociolinguistics, and Academic English courses at undergraduate and postgraduate level.

Prior to joining Oxford, Ivan received his teacher-training in Hong Kong and his postgraduate training in Linguistics (with a specialisation in pragmatics) at University College London. His research interests include: mental representation of word meanings, language acquisition, educational technology, and ELT pedagogy.

Publications

  • Au, I. (2021). Unwinding the Fantasy: Using Breakout Rooms to Promote Language Exposure and Less-Public Feedback Practices in Online Synchronous Teaching. Paper presented at the PASHE 2021 – EAP Education and Practice: Supporting Students’ Needs, UCL (IOE).
  • Au, I. & Yiu, C. (2021). ‘Identity game’: so you think you are what your Instagram bio says about you. Paper presented at the Sociolinguistics Symposium 23, Hong Kong.
  • Au, I. (2021). The magic of breakout rooms in online synchronous teaching and learning of English. Paper presented at the 3rd International Conference on English Across the Curriculum, Hong Kong.
  • Choi, T. H., Chan, H., & Au, I. (2018). ‘Now you’re talking’: Teacher preparation through alumni talks in a community of practice. Paper presented at the Oxford Education Research Symposium.
  • Au, I. (2018). Branching out from the tree: Extending vocabulary acquisition with polysemy. Paper presented at HKBU-HU First Joint Symposium on Education 2018.

 

Supervisors

Elizabeth Wonnacott and Victoria Murphy

Thomas Procter-Legg is a DPhil Student in the Department of Education and is researching restorative practice within the context of special educational needs and disabilities.

His previous experience includes five years as the Head Teacher of a special academy in Oxfordshire UK, specialising in education for students with Special Educational Needs and Disabilities. He has also worked as a SEND Reviewer for Whole School SEND; a Teaching School Director; and as the Principal Designate on a successful Free School bid.

Thomas is passionate about restorative practice and is involved in many communities of practice, such as the Global Alliance for Restorative Justice and Social Justice, where he is a member of the research sub-group exploring the interactions between restorative justice and social justice.

Thomas is also a strong advocate for creativity in education; having previously gained a Fine Art degree from Chelsea College of Art. This heavily influenced his educational leadership and during his time as a Head Teacher, he became the co-founder of a co-constructed initiative between the academy and the University of Oxford Gardens Libraries and Museums. This work placed cultural learning opportunities and relationships at the heart of the curriculum and is the longest standing project between a special school and The University of Oxford. This sustainable partnership champions marginalised voices and has been highly celebrated e.g., inclusion in the Durham Commission for Creativity in Education; recent dissemination at the Museum Ideas Conference 2022; highly commended award at the Museum and Heritage Awards 2021; and awarded Platinum ArtsMark in 2021.

Whilst this creative work may seem to be separate from restorative practice, Thomas subscribes to the idea that there are significant overlaps, both within pedagogical practice and wider school culture, topics which his current research touch on within the context of special education.

 

Publications

Procter-Legg. (2022). A Discourse on Restorative Practice—Participants’ Views of a Divergent Ideology. Laws11(6), 86–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11060086

Procter-Legg. (2022). Practitioner Perspectives on a Restorative Community: An Inductive Evaluative Study of Conceptual, Pedagogical, and Routine Practice. Laws11(1), 4–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11010004

 

Supervisors

Ian Thompson and Jason Todd

Ivan is currently serving as a Facilitator (Teaching) in the Vice-Chancellor’s Colloquium and as an Editor of the Graduate Inequality Review in the University of Oxford. He has taken up lecturerships in a number of universities in Hong Kong and has run Education, Linguistics, Applied Linguistics, Sociolinguistics, and Academic English courses at undergraduate and postgraduate level.

Prior to joining Oxford, Ivan received his teacher-training in Hong Kong and his postgraduate training in Linguistics (with a specialisation in pragmatics) at University College London. His research interests include: mental representation of word meanings, language acquisition, educational technology, and ELT pedagogy.

Publications

  • Au, I. (2021). Unwinding the Fantasy: Using Breakout Rooms to Promote Language Exposure and Less-Public Feedback Practices in Online Synchronous Teaching. Paper presented at the PASHE 2021 – EAP Education and Practice: Supporting Students’ Needs, UCL (IOE).
  • Au, I. & Yiu, C. (2021). ‘Identity game’: so you think you are what your Instagram bio says about you. Paper presented at the Sociolinguistics Symposium 23, Hong Kong.
  • Au, I. (2021). The magic of breakout rooms in online synchronous teaching and learning of English. Paper presented at the 3rd International Conference on English Across the Curriculum, Hong Kong.
  • Choi, T. H., Chan, H., & Au, I. (2018). ‘Now you’re talking’: Teacher preparation through alumni talks in a community of practice. Paper presented at the Oxford Education Research Symposium.
  • Au, I. (2018). Branching out from the tree: Extending vocabulary acquisition with polysemy. Paper presented at HKBU-HU First Joint Symposium on Education 2018.

 

Supervisors

Elizabeth Wonnacott and Victoria Murphy

Thomas Procter-Legg is a DPhil Student in the Department of Education and is researching restorative practice within the context of special educational needs and disabilities.

His previous experience includes five years as the Head Teacher of a special academy in Oxfordshire UK, specialising in education for students with Special Educational Needs and Disabilities. He has also worked as a SEND Reviewer for Whole School SEND; a Teaching School Director; and as the Principal Designate on a successful Free School bid.

Thomas is passionate about restorative practice and is involved in many communities of practice, such as the Global Alliance for Restorative Justice and Social Justice, where he is a member of the research sub-group exploring the interactions between restorative justice and social justice.

Thomas is also a strong advocate for creativity in education; having previously gained a Fine Art degree from Chelsea College of Art. This heavily influenced his educational leadership and during his time as a Head Teacher, he became the co-founder of a co-constructed initiative between the academy and the University of Oxford Gardens Libraries and Museums. This work placed cultural learning opportunities and relationships at the heart of the curriculum and is the longest standing project between a special school and The University of Oxford. This sustainable partnership champions marginalised voices and has been highly celebrated e.g., inclusion in the Durham Commission for Creativity in Education; recent dissemination at the Museum Ideas Conference 2022; highly commended award at the Museum and Heritage Awards 2021; and awarded Platinum ArtsMark in 2021.

Whilst this creative work may seem to be separate from restorative practice, Thomas subscribes to the idea that there are significant overlaps, both within pedagogical practice and wider school culture, topics which his current research touch on within the context of special education.

 

Publications

Procter-Legg. (2022). A Discourse on Restorative Practice—Participants’ Views of a Divergent Ideology. Laws11(6), 86–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11060086

Procter-Legg. (2022). Practitioner Perspectives on a Restorative Community: An Inductive Evaluative Study of Conceptual, Pedagogical, and Routine Practice. Laws11(1), 4–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11010004

 

Supervisors

Ian Thompson and Jason Todd

Ivan is currently serving as a Facilitator (Teaching) in the Vice-Chancellor’s Colloquium and as an Editor of the Graduate Inequality Review in the University of Oxford. He has taken up lecturerships in a number of universities in Hong Kong and has run Education, Linguistics, Applied Linguistics, Sociolinguistics, and Academic English courses at undergraduate and postgraduate level.

Prior to joining Oxford, Ivan received his teacher-training in Hong Kong and his postgraduate training in Linguistics (with a specialisation in pragmatics) at University College London. His research interests include: mental representation of word meanings, language acquisition, educational technology, and ELT pedagogy.

Publications

  • Au, I. (2021). Unwinding the Fantasy: Using Breakout Rooms to Promote Language Exposure and Less-Public Feedback Practices in Online Synchronous Teaching. Paper presented at the PASHE 2021 – EAP Education and Practice: Supporting Students’ Needs, UCL (IOE).
  • Au, I. & Yiu, C. (2021). ‘Identity game’: so you think you are what your Instagram bio says about you. Paper presented at the Sociolinguistics Symposium 23, Hong Kong.
  • Au, I. (2021). The magic of breakout rooms in online synchronous teaching and learning of English. Paper presented at the 3rd International Conference on English Across the Curriculum, Hong Kong.
  • Choi, T. H., Chan, H., & Au, I. (2018). ‘Now you’re talking’: Teacher preparation through alumni talks in a community of practice. Paper presented at the Oxford Education Research Symposium.
  • Au, I. (2018). Branching out from the tree: Extending vocabulary acquisition with polysemy. Paper presented at HKBU-HU First Joint Symposium on Education 2018.

 

Supervisors

Elizabeth Wonnacott and Victoria Murphy

Thomas Procter-Legg is a DPhil Student in the Department of Education and is researching restorative practice within the context of special educational needs and disabilities.

His previous experience includes five years as the Head Teacher of a special academy in Oxfordshire UK, specialising in education for students with Special Educational Needs and Disabilities. He has also worked as a SEND Reviewer for Whole School SEND; a Teaching School Director; and as the Principal Designate on a successful Free School bid.

Thomas is passionate about restorative practice and is involved in many communities of practice, such as the Global Alliance for Restorative Justice and Social Justice, where he is a member of the research sub-group exploring the interactions between restorative justice and social justice.

Thomas is also a strong advocate for creativity in education; having previously gained a Fine Art degree from Chelsea College of Art. This heavily influenced his educational leadership and during his time as a Head Teacher, he became the co-founder of a co-constructed initiative between the academy and the University of Oxford Gardens Libraries and Museums. This work placed cultural learning opportunities and relationships at the heart of the curriculum and is the longest standing project between a special school and The University of Oxford. This sustainable partnership champions marginalised voices and has been highly celebrated e.g., inclusion in the Durham Commission for Creativity in Education; recent dissemination at the Museum Ideas Conference 2022; highly commended award at the Museum and Heritage Awards 2021; and awarded Platinum ArtsMark in 2021.

Whilst this creative work may seem to be separate from restorative practice, Thomas subscribes to the idea that there are significant overlaps, both within pedagogical practice and wider school culture, topics which his current research touch on within the context of special education.

 

Publications

Procter-Legg. (2022). A Discourse on Restorative Practice—Participants’ Views of a Divergent Ideology. Laws11(6), 86–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11060086

Procter-Legg. (2022). Practitioner Perspectives on a Restorative Community: An Inductive Evaluative Study of Conceptual, Pedagogical, and Routine Practice. Laws11(1), 4–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11010004

 

Supervisors

Ian Thompson and Jason Todd

Ivan is currently serving as a Facilitator (Teaching) in the Vice-Chancellor’s Colloquium and as an Editor of the Graduate Inequality Review in the University of Oxford. He has taken up lecturerships in a number of universities in Hong Kong and has run Education, Linguistics, Applied Linguistics, Sociolinguistics, and Academic English courses at undergraduate and postgraduate level.

Prior to joining Oxford, Ivan received his teacher-training in Hong Kong and his postgraduate training in Linguistics (with a specialisation in pragmatics) at University College London. His research interests include: mental representation of word meanings, language acquisition, educational technology, and ELT pedagogy.

Publications

  • Au, I. (2021). Unwinding the Fantasy: Using Breakout Rooms to Promote Language Exposure and Less-Public Feedback Practices in Online Synchronous Teaching. Paper presented at the PASHE 2021 – EAP Education and Practice: Supporting Students’ Needs, UCL (IOE).
  • Au, I. & Yiu, C. (2021). ‘Identity game’: so you think you are what your Instagram bio says about you. Paper presented at the Sociolinguistics Symposium 23, Hong Kong.
  • Au, I. (2021). The magic of breakout rooms in online synchronous teaching and learning of English. Paper presented at the 3rd International Conference on English Across the Curriculum, Hong Kong.
  • Choi, T. H., Chan, H., & Au, I. (2018). ‘Now you’re talking’: Teacher preparation through alumni talks in a community of practice. Paper presented at the Oxford Education Research Symposium.
  • Au, I. (2018). Branching out from the tree: Extending vocabulary acquisition with polysemy. Paper presented at HKBU-HU First Joint Symposium on Education 2018.

 

Supervisors

Elizabeth Wonnacott and Victoria Murphy

Thomas Procter-Legg is a DPhil Student in the Department of Education and is researching restorative practice within the context of special educational needs and disabilities.

His previous experience includes five years as the Head Teacher of a special academy in Oxfordshire UK, specialising in education for students with Special Educational Needs and Disabilities. He has also worked as a SEND Reviewer for Whole School SEND; a Teaching School Director; and as the Principal Designate on a successful Free School bid.

Thomas is passionate about restorative practice and is involved in many communities of practice, such as the Global Alliance for Restorative Justice and Social Justice, where he is a member of the research sub-group exploring the interactions between restorative justice and social justice.

Thomas is also a strong advocate for creativity in education; having previously gained a Fine Art degree from Chelsea College of Art. This heavily influenced his educational leadership and during his time as a Head Teacher, he became the co-founder of a co-constructed initiative between the academy and the University of Oxford Gardens Libraries and Museums. This work placed cultural learning opportunities and relationships at the heart of the curriculum and is the longest standing project between a special school and The University of Oxford. This sustainable partnership champions marginalised voices and has been highly celebrated e.g., inclusion in the Durham Commission for Creativity in Education; recent dissemination at the Museum Ideas Conference 2022; highly commended award at the Museum and Heritage Awards 2021; and awarded Platinum ArtsMark in 2021.

Whilst this creative work may seem to be separate from restorative practice, Thomas subscribes to the idea that there are significant overlaps, both within pedagogical practice and wider school culture, topics which his current research touch on within the context of special education.

 

Publications

Procter-Legg. (2022). A Discourse on Restorative Practice—Participants’ Views of a Divergent Ideology. Laws11(6), 86–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11060086

Procter-Legg. (2022). Practitioner Perspectives on a Restorative Community: An Inductive Evaluative Study of Conceptual, Pedagogical, and Routine Practice. Laws11(1), 4–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11010004

 

Supervisors

Ian Thompson and Jason Todd

Ivan is currently serving as a Facilitator (Teaching) in the Vice-Chancellor’s Colloquium and as an Editor of the Graduate Inequality Review in the University of Oxford. He has taken up lecturerships in a number of universities in Hong Kong and has run Education, Linguistics, Applied Linguistics, Sociolinguistics, and Academic English courses at undergraduate and postgraduate level.

Prior to joining Oxford, Ivan received his teacher-training in Hong Kong and his postgraduate training in Linguistics (with a specialisation in pragmatics) at University College London. His research interests include: mental representation of word meanings, language acquisition, educational technology, and ELT pedagogy.

Publications

  • Au, I. (2021). Unwinding the Fantasy: Using Breakout Rooms to Promote Language Exposure and Less-Public Feedback Practices in Online Synchronous Teaching. Paper presented at the PASHE 2021 – EAP Education and Practice: Supporting Students’ Needs, UCL (IOE).
  • Au, I. & Yiu, C. (2021). ‘Identity game’: so you think you are what your Instagram bio says about you. Paper presented at the Sociolinguistics Symposium 23, Hong Kong.
  • Au, I. (2021). The magic of breakout rooms in online synchronous teaching and learning of English. Paper presented at the 3rd International Conference on English Across the Curriculum, Hong Kong.
  • Choi, T. H., Chan, H., & Au, I. (2018). ‘Now you’re talking’: Teacher preparation through alumni talks in a community of practice. Paper presented at the Oxford Education Research Symposium.
  • Au, I. (2018). Branching out from the tree: Extending vocabulary acquisition with polysemy. Paper presented at HKBU-HU First Joint Symposium on Education 2018.

 

Supervisors

Elizabeth Wonnacott and Victoria Murphy

Thomas Procter-Legg is a DPhil Student in the Department of Education and is researching restorative practice within the context of special educational needs and disabilities.

His previous experience includes five years as the Head Teacher of a special academy in Oxfordshire UK, specialising in education for students with Special Educational Needs and Disabilities. He has also worked as a SEND Reviewer for Whole School SEND; a Teaching School Director; and as the Principal Designate on a successful Free School bid.

Thomas is passionate about restorative practice and is involved in many communities of practice, such as the Global Alliance for Restorative Justice and Social Justice, where he is a member of the research sub-group exploring the interactions between restorative justice and social justice.

Thomas is also a strong advocate for creativity in education; having previously gained a Fine Art degree from Chelsea College of Art. This heavily influenced his educational leadership and during his time as a Head Teacher, he became the co-founder of a co-constructed initiative between the academy and the University of Oxford Gardens Libraries and Museums. This work placed cultural learning opportunities and relationships at the heart of the curriculum and is the longest standing project between a special school and The University of Oxford. This sustainable partnership champions marginalised voices and has been highly celebrated e.g., inclusion in the Durham Commission for Creativity in Education; recent dissemination at the Museum Ideas Conference 2022; highly commended award at the Museum and Heritage Awards 2021; and awarded Platinum ArtsMark in 2021.

Whilst this creative work may seem to be separate from restorative practice, Thomas subscribes to the idea that there are significant overlaps, both within pedagogical practice and wider school culture, topics which his current research touch on within the context of special education.

 

Publications

Procter-Legg. (2022). A Discourse on Restorative Practice—Participants’ Views of a Divergent Ideology. Laws11(6), 86–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11060086

Procter-Legg. (2022). Practitioner Perspectives on a Restorative Community: An Inductive Evaluative Study of Conceptual, Pedagogical, and Routine Practice. Laws11(1), 4–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11010004

 

Supervisors

Ian Thompson and Jason Todd

Ivan is currently serving as a Facilitator (Teaching) in the Vice-Chancellor’s Colloquium and as an Editor of the Graduate Inequality Review in the University of Oxford. He has taken up lecturerships in a number of universities in Hong Kong and has run Education, Linguistics, Applied Linguistics, Sociolinguistics, and Academic English courses at undergraduate and postgraduate level.

Prior to joining Oxford, Ivan received his teacher-training in Hong Kong and his postgraduate training in Linguistics (with a specialisation in pragmatics) at University College London. His research interests include: mental representation of word meanings, language acquisition, educational technology, and ELT pedagogy.

Publications

  • Au, I. (2021). Unwinding the Fantasy: Using Breakout Rooms to Promote Language Exposure and Less-Public Feedback Practices in Online Synchronous Teaching. Paper presented at the PASHE 2021 – EAP Education and Practice: Supporting Students’ Needs, UCL (IOE).
  • Au, I. & Yiu, C. (2021). ‘Identity game’: so you think you are what your Instagram bio says about you. Paper presented at the Sociolinguistics Symposium 23, Hong Kong.
  • Au, I. (2021). The magic of breakout rooms in online synchronous teaching and learning of English. Paper presented at the 3rd International Conference on English Across the Curriculum, Hong Kong.
  • Choi, T. H., Chan, H., & Au, I. (2018). ‘Now you’re talking’: Teacher preparation through alumni talks in a community of practice. Paper presented at the Oxford Education Research Symposium.
  • Au, I. (2018). Branching out from the tree: Extending vocabulary acquisition with polysemy. Paper presented at HKBU-HU First Joint Symposium on Education 2018.

 

Supervisors

Elizabeth Wonnacott and Victoria Murphy

Thomas Procter-Legg is a DPhil Student in the Department of Education and is researching restorative practice within the context of special educational needs and disabilities.

His previous experience includes five years as the Head Teacher of a special academy in Oxfordshire UK, specialising in education for students with Special Educational Needs and Disabilities. He has also worked as a SEND Reviewer for Whole School SEND; a Teaching School Director; and as the Principal Designate on a successful Free School bid.

Thomas is passionate about restorative practice and is involved in many communities of practice, such as the Global Alliance for Restorative Justice and Social Justice, where he is a member of the research sub-group exploring the interactions between restorative justice and social justice.

Thomas is also a strong advocate for creativity in education; having previously gained a Fine Art degree from Chelsea College of Art. This heavily influenced his educational leadership and during his time as a Head Teacher, he became the co-founder of a co-constructed initiative between the academy and the University of Oxford Gardens Libraries and Museums. This work placed cultural learning opportunities and relationships at the heart of the curriculum and is the longest standing project between a special school and The University of Oxford. This sustainable partnership champions marginalised voices and has been highly celebrated e.g., inclusion in the Durham Commission for Creativity in Education; recent dissemination at the Museum Ideas Conference 2022; highly commended award at the Museum and Heritage Awards 2021; and awarded Platinum ArtsMark in 2021.

Whilst this creative work may seem to be separate from restorative practice, Thomas subscribes to the idea that there are significant overlaps, both within pedagogical practice and wider school culture, topics which his current research touch on within the context of special education.

 

Publications

Procter-Legg. (2022). A Discourse on Restorative Practice—Participants’ Views of a Divergent Ideology. Laws11(6), 86–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11060086

Procter-Legg. (2022). Practitioner Perspectives on a Restorative Community: An Inductive Evaluative Study of Conceptual, Pedagogical, and Routine Practice. Laws11(1), 4–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11010004

 

Supervisors

Ian Thompson and Jason Todd

Ivan is currently serving as a Facilitator (Teaching) in the Vice-Chancellor’s Colloquium and as an Editor of the Graduate Inequality Review in the University of Oxford. He has taken up lecturerships in a number of universities in Hong Kong and has run Education, Linguistics, Applied Linguistics, Sociolinguistics, and Academic English courses at undergraduate and postgraduate level.

Prior to joining Oxford, Ivan received his teacher-training in Hong Kong and his postgraduate training in Linguistics (with a specialisation in pragmatics) at University College London. His research interests include: mental representation of word meanings, language acquisition, educational technology, and ELT pedagogy.

Publications

  • Au, I. (2021). Unwinding the Fantasy: Using Breakout Rooms to Promote Language Exposure and Less-Public Feedback Practices in Online Synchronous Teaching. Paper presented at the PASHE 2021 – EAP Education and Practice: Supporting Students’ Needs, UCL (IOE).
  • Au, I. & Yiu, C. (2021). ‘Identity game’: so you think you are what your Instagram bio says about you. Paper presented at the Sociolinguistics Symposium 23, Hong Kong.
  • Au, I. (2021). The magic of breakout rooms in online synchronous teaching and learning of English. Paper presented at the 3rd International Conference on English Across the Curriculum, Hong Kong.
  • Choi, T. H., Chan, H., & Au, I. (2018). ‘Now you’re talking’: Teacher preparation through alumni talks in a community of practice. Paper presented at the Oxford Education Research Symposium.
  • Au, I. (2018). Branching out from the tree: Extending vocabulary acquisition with polysemy. Paper presented at HKBU-HU First Joint Symposium on Education 2018.

 

Supervisors

Elizabeth Wonnacott and Victoria Murphy

Thomas Procter-Legg is a DPhil Student in the Department of Education and is researching restorative practice within the context of special educational needs and disabilities.

His previous experience includes five years as the Head Teacher of a special academy in Oxfordshire UK, specialising in education for students with Special Educational Needs and Disabilities. He has also worked as a SEND Reviewer for Whole School SEND; a Teaching School Director; and as the Principal Designate on a successful Free School bid.

Thomas is passionate about restorative practice and is involved in many communities of practice, such as the Global Alliance for Restorative Justice and Social Justice, where he is a member of the research sub-group exploring the interactions between restorative justice and social justice.

Thomas is also a strong advocate for creativity in education; having previously gained a Fine Art degree from Chelsea College of Art. This heavily influenced his educational leadership and during his time as a Head Teacher, he became the co-founder of a co-constructed initiative between the academy and the University of Oxford Gardens Libraries and Museums. This work placed cultural learning opportunities and relationships at the heart of the curriculum and is the longest standing project between a special school and The University of Oxford. This sustainable partnership champions marginalised voices and has been highly celebrated e.g., inclusion in the Durham Commission for Creativity in Education; recent dissemination at the Museum Ideas Conference 2022; highly commended award at the Museum and Heritage Awards 2021; and awarded Platinum ArtsMark in 2021.

Whilst this creative work may seem to be separate from restorative practice, Thomas subscribes to the idea that there are significant overlaps, both within pedagogical practice and wider school culture, topics which his current research touch on within the context of special education.

 

Publications

Procter-Legg. (2022). A Discourse on Restorative Practice—Participants’ Views of a Divergent Ideology. Laws11(6), 86–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11060086

Procter-Legg. (2022). Practitioner Perspectives on a Restorative Community: An Inductive Evaluative Study of Conceptual, Pedagogical, and Routine Practice. Laws11(1), 4–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11010004

 

Supervisors

Ian Thompson and Jason Todd

Ivan is currently serving as a Facilitator (Teaching) in the Vice-Chancellor’s Colloquium and as an Editor of the Graduate Inequality Review in the University of Oxford. He has taken up lecturerships in a number of universities in Hong Kong and has run Education, Linguistics, Applied Linguistics, Sociolinguistics, and Academic English courses at undergraduate and postgraduate level.

Prior to joining Oxford, Ivan received his teacher-training in Hong Kong and his postgraduate training in Linguistics (with a specialisation in pragmatics) at University College London. His research interests include: mental representation of word meanings, language acquisition, educational technology, and ELT pedagogy.

Publications

  • Au, I. (2021). Unwinding the Fantasy: Using Breakout Rooms to Promote Language Exposure and Less-Public Feedback Practices in Online Synchronous Teaching. Paper presented at the PASHE 2021 – EAP Education and Practice: Supporting Students’ Needs, UCL (IOE).
  • Au, I. & Yiu, C. (2021). ‘Identity game’: so you think you are what your Instagram bio says about you. Paper presented at the Sociolinguistics Symposium 23, Hong Kong.
  • Au, I. (2021). The magic of breakout rooms in online synchronous teaching and learning of English. Paper presented at the 3rd International Conference on English Across the Curriculum, Hong Kong.
  • Choi, T. H., Chan, H., & Au, I. (2018). ‘Now you’re talking’: Teacher preparation through alumni talks in a community of practice. Paper presented at the Oxford Education Research Symposium.
  • Au, I. (2018). Branching out from the tree: Extending vocabulary acquisition with polysemy. Paper presented at HKBU-HU First Joint Symposium on Education 2018.

 

Supervisors

Elizabeth Wonnacott and Victoria Murphy

Thomas Procter-Legg is a DPhil Student in the Department of Education and is researching restorative practice within the context of special educational needs and disabilities.

His previous experience includes five years as the Head Teacher of a special academy in Oxfordshire UK, specialising in education for students with Special Educational Needs and Disabilities. He has also worked as a SEND Reviewer for Whole School SEND; a Teaching School Director; and as the Principal Designate on a successful Free School bid.

Thomas is passionate about restorative practice and is involved in many communities of practice, such as the Global Alliance for Restorative Justice and Social Justice, where he is a member of the research sub-group exploring the interactions between restorative justice and social justice.

Thomas is also a strong advocate for creativity in education; having previously gained a Fine Art degree from Chelsea College of Art. This heavily influenced his educational leadership and during his time as a Head Teacher, he became the co-founder of a co-constructed initiative between the academy and the University of Oxford Gardens Libraries and Museums. This work placed cultural learning opportunities and relationships at the heart of the curriculum and is the longest standing project between a special school and The University of Oxford. This sustainable partnership champions marginalised voices and has been highly celebrated e.g., inclusion in the Durham Commission for Creativity in Education; recent dissemination at the Museum Ideas Conference 2022; highly commended award at the Museum and Heritage Awards 2021; and awarded Platinum ArtsMark in 2021.

Whilst this creative work may seem to be separate from restorative practice, Thomas subscribes to the idea that there are significant overlaps, both within pedagogical practice and wider school culture, topics which his current research touch on within the context of special education.

 

Publications

Procter-Legg. (2022). A Discourse on Restorative Practice—Participants’ Views of a Divergent Ideology. Laws11(6), 86–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11060086

Procter-Legg. (2022). Practitioner Perspectives on a Restorative Community: An Inductive Evaluative Study of Conceptual, Pedagogical, and Routine Practice. Laws11(1), 4–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11010004

 

Supervisors

Ian Thompson and Jason Todd

Ivan is currently serving as a Facilitator (Teaching) in the Vice-Chancellor’s Colloquium and as an Editor of the Graduate Inequality Review in the University of Oxford. He has taken up lecturerships in a number of universities in Hong Kong and has run Education, Linguistics, Applied Linguistics, Sociolinguistics, and Academic English courses at undergraduate and postgraduate level.

Prior to joining Oxford, Ivan received his teacher-training in Hong Kong and his postgraduate training in Linguistics (with a specialisation in pragmatics) at University College London. His research interests include: mental representation of word meanings, language acquisition, educational technology, and ELT pedagogy.

Publications

  • Au, I. (2021). Unwinding the Fantasy: Using Breakout Rooms to Promote Language Exposure and Less-Public Feedback Practices in Online Synchronous Teaching. Paper presented at the PASHE 2021 – EAP Education and Practice: Supporting Students’ Needs, UCL (IOE).
  • Au, I. & Yiu, C. (2021). ‘Identity game’: so you think you are what your Instagram bio says about you. Paper presented at the Sociolinguistics Symposium 23, Hong Kong.
  • Au, I. (2021). The magic of breakout rooms in online synchronous teaching and learning of English. Paper presented at the 3rd International Conference on English Across the Curriculum, Hong Kong.
  • Choi, T. H., Chan, H., & Au, I. (2018). ‘Now you’re talking’: Teacher preparation through alumni talks in a community of practice. Paper presented at the Oxford Education Research Symposium.
  • Au, I. (2018). Branching out from the tree: Extending vocabulary acquisition with polysemy. Paper presented at HKBU-HU First Joint Symposium on Education 2018.

 

Supervisors

Elizabeth Wonnacott and Victoria Murphy

Thomas Procter-Legg is a DPhil Student in the Department of Education and is researching restorative practice within the context of special educational needs and disabilities.

His previous experience includes five years as the Head Teacher of a special academy in Oxfordshire UK, specialising in education for students with Special Educational Needs and Disabilities. He has also worked as a SEND Reviewer for Whole School SEND; a Teaching School Director; and as the Principal Designate on a successful Free School bid.

Thomas is passionate about restorative practice and is involved in many communities of practice, such as the Global Alliance for Restorative Justice and Social Justice, where he is a member of the research sub-group exploring the interactions between restorative justice and social justice.

Thomas is also a strong advocate for creativity in education; having previously gained a Fine Art degree from Chelsea College of Art. This heavily influenced his educational leadership and during his time as a Head Teacher, he became the co-founder of a co-constructed initiative between the academy and the University of Oxford Gardens Libraries and Museums. This work placed cultural learning opportunities and relationships at the heart of the curriculum and is the longest standing project between a special school and The University of Oxford. This sustainable partnership champions marginalised voices and has been highly celebrated e.g., inclusion in the Durham Commission for Creativity in Education; recent dissemination at the Museum Ideas Conference 2022; highly commended award at the Museum and Heritage Awards 2021; and awarded Platinum ArtsMark in 2021.

Whilst this creative work may seem to be separate from restorative practice, Thomas subscribes to the idea that there are significant overlaps, both within pedagogical practice and wider school culture, topics which his current research touch on within the context of special education.

 

Publications

Procter-Legg. (2022). A Discourse on Restorative Practice—Participants’ Views of a Divergent Ideology. Laws11(6), 86–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11060086

Procter-Legg. (2022). Practitioner Perspectives on a Restorative Community: An Inductive Evaluative Study of Conceptual, Pedagogical, and Routine Practice. Laws11(1), 4–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11010004

 

Supervisors

Ian Thompson and Jason Todd

Ivan is currently serving as a Facilitator (Teaching) in the Vice-Chancellor’s Colloquium and as an Editor of the Graduate Inequality Review in the University of Oxford. He has taken up lecturerships in a number of universities in Hong Kong and has run Education, Linguistics, Applied Linguistics, Sociolinguistics, and Academic English courses at undergraduate and postgraduate level.

Prior to joining Oxford, Ivan received his teacher-training in Hong Kong and his postgraduate training in Linguistics (with a specialisation in pragmatics) at University College London. His research interests include: mental representation of word meanings, language acquisition, educational technology, and ELT pedagogy.

Publications

  • Au, I. (2021). Unwinding the Fantasy: Using Breakout Rooms to Promote Language Exposure and Less-Public Feedback Practices in Online Synchronous Teaching. Paper presented at the PASHE 2021 – EAP Education and Practice: Supporting Students’ Needs, UCL (IOE).
  • Au, I. & Yiu, C. (2021). ‘Identity game’: so you think you are what your Instagram bio says about you. Paper presented at the Sociolinguistics Symposium 23, Hong Kong.
  • Au, I. (2021). The magic of breakout rooms in online synchronous teaching and learning of English. Paper presented at the 3rd International Conference on English Across the Curriculum, Hong Kong.
  • Choi, T. H., Chan, H., & Au, I. (2018). ‘Now you’re talking’: Teacher preparation through alumni talks in a community of practice. Paper presented at the Oxford Education Research Symposium.
  • Au, I. (2018). Branching out from the tree: Extending vocabulary acquisition with polysemy. Paper presented at HKBU-HU First Joint Symposium on Education 2018.

 

Supervisors

Elizabeth Wonnacott and Victoria Murphy

Thomas Procter-Legg is a DPhil Student in the Department of Education and is researching restorative practice within the context of special educational needs and disabilities.

His previous experience includes five years as the Head Teacher of a special academy in Oxfordshire UK, specialising in education for students with Special Educational Needs and Disabilities. He has also worked as a SEND Reviewer for Whole School SEND; a Teaching School Director; and as the Principal Designate on a successful Free School bid.

Thomas is passionate about restorative practice and is involved in many communities of practice, such as the Global Alliance for Restorative Justice and Social Justice, where he is a member of the research sub-group exploring the interactions between restorative justice and social justice.

Thomas is also a strong advocate for creativity in education; having previously gained a Fine Art degree from Chelsea College of Art. This heavily influenced his educational leadership and during his time as a Head Teacher, he became the co-founder of a co-constructed initiative between the academy and the University of Oxford Gardens Libraries and Museums. This work placed cultural learning opportunities and relationships at the heart of the curriculum and is the longest standing project between a special school and The University of Oxford. This sustainable partnership champions marginalised voices and has been highly celebrated e.g., inclusion in the Durham Commission for Creativity in Education; recent dissemination at the Museum Ideas Conference 2022; highly commended award at the Museum and Heritage Awards 2021; and awarded Platinum ArtsMark in 2021.

Whilst this creative work may seem to be separate from restorative practice, Thomas subscribes to the idea that there are significant overlaps, both within pedagogical practice and wider school culture, topics which his current research touch on within the context of special education.

 

Publications

Procter-Legg. (2022). A Discourse on Restorative Practice—Participants’ Views of a Divergent Ideology. Laws11(6), 86–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11060086

Procter-Legg. (2022). Practitioner Perspectives on a Restorative Community: An Inductive Evaluative Study of Conceptual, Pedagogical, and Routine Practice. Laws11(1), 4–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11010004

 

Supervisors

Ian Thompson and Jason Todd

Ivan is currently serving as a Facilitator (Teaching) in the Vice-Chancellor’s Colloquium and as an Editor of the Graduate Inequality Review in the University of Oxford. He has taken up lecturerships in a number of universities in Hong Kong and has run Education, Linguistics, Applied Linguistics, Sociolinguistics, and Academic English courses at undergraduate and postgraduate level.

Prior to joining Oxford, Ivan received his teacher-training in Hong Kong and his postgraduate training in Linguistics (with a specialisation in pragmatics) at University College London. His research interests include: mental representation of word meanings, language acquisition, educational technology, and ELT pedagogy.

Publications

  • Au, I. (2021). Unwinding the Fantasy: Using Breakout Rooms to Promote Language Exposure and Less-Public Feedback Practices in Online Synchronous Teaching. Paper presented at the PASHE 2021 – EAP Education and Practice: Supporting Students’ Needs, UCL (IOE).
  • Au, I. & Yiu, C. (2021). ‘Identity game’: so you think you are what your Instagram bio says about you. Paper presented at the Sociolinguistics Symposium 23, Hong Kong.
  • Au, I. (2021). The magic of breakout rooms in online synchronous teaching and learning of English. Paper presented at the 3rd International Conference on English Across the Curriculum, Hong Kong.
  • Choi, T. H., Chan, H., & Au, I. (2018). ‘Now you’re talking’: Teacher preparation through alumni talks in a community of practice. Paper presented at the Oxford Education Research Symposium.
  • Au, I. (2018). Branching out from the tree: Extending vocabulary acquisition with polysemy. Paper presented at HKBU-HU First Joint Symposium on Education 2018.

 

Supervisors

Elizabeth Wonnacott and Victoria Murphy

Thomas Procter-Legg is a DPhil Student in the Department of Education and is researching restorative practice within the context of special educational needs and disabilities.

His previous experience includes five years as the Head Teacher of a special academy in Oxfordshire UK, specialising in education for students with Special Educational Needs and Disabilities. He has also worked as a SEND Reviewer for Whole School SEND; a Teaching School Director; and as the Principal Designate on a successful Free School bid.

Thomas is passionate about restorative practice and is involved in many communities of practice, such as the Global Alliance for Restorative Justice and Social Justice, where he is a member of the research sub-group exploring the interactions between restorative justice and social justice.

Thomas is also a strong advocate for creativity in education; having previously gained a Fine Art degree from Chelsea College of Art. This heavily influenced his educational leadership and during his time as a Head Teacher, he became the co-founder of a co-constructed initiative between the academy and the University of Oxford Gardens Libraries and Museums. This work placed cultural learning opportunities and relationships at the heart of the curriculum and is the longest standing project between a special school and The University of Oxford. This sustainable partnership champions marginalised voices and has been highly celebrated e.g., inclusion in the Durham Commission for Creativity in Education; recent dissemination at the Museum Ideas Conference 2022; highly commended award at the Museum and Heritage Awards 2021; and awarded Platinum ArtsMark in 2021.

Whilst this creative work may seem to be separate from restorative practice, Thomas subscribes to the idea that there are significant overlaps, both within pedagogical practice and wider school culture, topics which his current research touch on within the context of special education.

 

Publications

Procter-Legg. (2022). A Discourse on Restorative Practice—Participants’ Views of a Divergent Ideology. Laws11(6), 86–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11060086

Procter-Legg. (2022). Practitioner Perspectives on a Restorative Community: An Inductive Evaluative Study of Conceptual, Pedagogical, and Routine Practice. Laws11(1), 4–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11010004

 

Supervisors

Ian Thompson and Jason Todd

Ivan is currently serving as a Facilitator (Teaching) in the Vice-Chancellor’s Colloquium and as an Editor of the Graduate Inequality Review in the University of Oxford. He has taken up lecturerships in a number of universities in Hong Kong and has run Education, Linguistics, Applied Linguistics, Sociolinguistics, and Academic English courses at undergraduate and postgraduate level.

Prior to joining Oxford, Ivan received his teacher-training in Hong Kong and his postgraduate training in Linguistics (with a specialisation in pragmatics) at University College London. His research interests include: mental representation of word meanings, language acquisition, educational technology, and ELT pedagogy.

Publications

  • Au, I. (2021). Unwinding the Fantasy: Using Breakout Rooms to Promote Language Exposure and Less-Public Feedback Practices in Online Synchronous Teaching. Paper presented at the PASHE 2021 – EAP Education and Practice: Supporting Students’ Needs, UCL (IOE).
  • Au, I. & Yiu, C. (2021). ‘Identity game’: so you think you are what your Instagram bio says about you. Paper presented at the Sociolinguistics Symposium 23, Hong Kong.
  • Au, I. (2021). The magic of breakout rooms in online synchronous teaching and learning of English. Paper presented at the 3rd International Conference on English Across the Curriculum, Hong Kong.
  • Choi, T. H., Chan, H., & Au, I. (2018). ‘Now you’re talking’: Teacher preparation through alumni talks in a community of practice. Paper presented at the Oxford Education Research Symposium.
  • Au, I. (2018). Branching out from the tree: Extending vocabulary acquisition with polysemy. Paper presented at HKBU-HU First Joint Symposium on Education 2018.

 

Supervisors

Elizabeth Wonnacott and Victoria Murphy

Thomas Procter-Legg is a DPhil Student in the Department of Education and is researching restorative practice within the context of special educational needs and disabilities.

His previous experience includes five years as the Head Teacher of a special academy in Oxfordshire UK, specialising in education for students with Special Educational Needs and Disabilities. He has also worked as a SEND Reviewer for Whole School SEND; a Teaching School Director; and as the Principal Designate on a successful Free School bid.

Thomas is passionate about restorative practice and is involved in many communities of practice, such as the Global Alliance for Restorative Justice and Social Justice, where he is a member of the research sub-group exploring the interactions between restorative justice and social justice.

Thomas is also a strong advocate for creativity in education; having previously gained a Fine Art degree from Chelsea College of Art. This heavily influenced his educational leadership and during his time as a Head Teacher, he became the co-founder of a co-constructed initiative between the academy and the University of Oxford Gardens Libraries and Museums. This work placed cultural learning opportunities and relationships at the heart of the curriculum and is the longest standing project between a special school and The University of Oxford. This sustainable partnership champions marginalised voices and has been highly celebrated e.g., inclusion in the Durham Commission for Creativity in Education; recent dissemination at the Museum Ideas Conference 2022; highly commended award at the Museum and Heritage Awards 2021; and awarded Platinum ArtsMark in 2021.

Whilst this creative work may seem to be separate from restorative practice, Thomas subscribes to the idea that there are significant overlaps, both within pedagogical practice and wider school culture, topics which his current research touch on within the context of special education.

 

Publications

Procter-Legg. (2022). A Discourse on Restorative Practice—Participants’ Views of a Divergent Ideology. Laws11(6), 86–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11060086

Procter-Legg. (2022). Practitioner Perspectives on a Restorative Community: An Inductive Evaluative Study of Conceptual, Pedagogical, and Routine Practice. Laws11(1), 4–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11010004

 

Supervisors

Ian Thompson and Jason Todd

Ivan is currently serving as a Facilitator (Teaching) in the Vice-Chancellor’s Colloquium and as an Editor of the Graduate Inequality Review in the University of Oxford. He has taken up lecturerships in a number of universities in Hong Kong and has run Education, Linguistics, Applied Linguistics, Sociolinguistics, and Academic English courses at undergraduate and postgraduate level.

Prior to joining Oxford, Ivan received his teacher-training in Hong Kong and his postgraduate training in Linguistics (with a specialisation in pragmatics) at University College London. His research interests include: mental representation of word meanings, language acquisition, educational technology, and ELT pedagogy.

Publications

  • Au, I. (2021). Unwinding the Fantasy: Using Breakout Rooms to Promote Language Exposure and Less-Public Feedback Practices in Online Synchronous Teaching. Paper presented at the PASHE 2021 – EAP Education and Practice: Supporting Students’ Needs, UCL (IOE).
  • Au, I. & Yiu, C. (2021). ‘Identity game’: so you think you are what your Instagram bio says about you. Paper presented at the Sociolinguistics Symposium 23, Hong Kong.
  • Au, I. (2021). The magic of breakout rooms in online synchronous teaching and learning of English. Paper presented at the 3rd International Conference on English Across the Curriculum, Hong Kong.
  • Choi, T. H., Chan, H., & Au, I. (2018). ‘Now you’re talking’: Teacher preparation through alumni talks in a community of practice. Paper presented at the Oxford Education Research Symposium.
  • Au, I. (2018). Branching out from the tree: Extending vocabulary acquisition with polysemy. Paper presented at HKBU-HU First Joint Symposium on Education 2018.

 

Supervisors

Elizabeth Wonnacott and Victoria Murphy

Thomas Procter-Legg is a DPhil Student in the Department of Education and is researching restorative practice within the context of special educational needs and disabilities.

His previous experience includes five years as the Head Teacher of a special academy in Oxfordshire UK, specialising in education for students with Special Educational Needs and Disabilities. He has also worked as a SEND Reviewer for Whole School SEND; a Teaching School Director; and as the Principal Designate on a successful Free School bid.

Thomas is passionate about restorative practice and is involved in many communities of practice, such as the Global Alliance for Restorative Justice and Social Justice, where he is a member of the research sub-group exploring the interactions between restorative justice and social justice.

Thomas is also a strong advocate for creativity in education; having previously gained a Fine Art degree from Chelsea College of Art. This heavily influenced his educational leadership and during his time as a Head Teacher, he became the co-founder of a co-constructed initiative between the academy and the University of Oxford Gardens Libraries and Museums. This work placed cultural learning opportunities and relationships at the heart of the curriculum and is the longest standing project between a special school and The University of Oxford. This sustainable partnership champions marginalised voices and has been highly celebrated e.g., inclusion in the Durham Commission for Creativity in Education; recent dissemination at the Museum Ideas Conference 2022; highly commended award at the Museum and Heritage Awards 2021; and awarded Platinum ArtsMark in 2021.

Whilst this creative work may seem to be separate from restorative practice, Thomas subscribes to the idea that there are significant overlaps, both within pedagogical practice and wider school culture, topics which his current research touch on within the context of special education.

 

Publications

Procter-Legg. (2022). A Discourse on Restorative Practice—Participants’ Views of a Divergent Ideology. Laws11(6), 86–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11060086

Procter-Legg. (2022). Practitioner Perspectives on a Restorative Community: An Inductive Evaluative Study of Conceptual, Pedagogical, and Routine Practice. Laws11(1), 4–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11010004

 

Supervisors

Ian Thompson and Jason Todd

Ivan is currently serving as a Facilitator (Teaching) in the Vice-Chancellor’s Colloquium and as an Editor of the Graduate Inequality Review in the University of Oxford. He has taken up lecturerships in a number of universities in Hong Kong and has run Education, Linguistics, Applied Linguistics, Sociolinguistics, and Academic English courses at undergraduate and postgraduate level.

Prior to joining Oxford, Ivan received his teacher-training in Hong Kong and his postgraduate training in Linguistics (with a specialisation in pragmatics) at University College London. His research interests include: mental representation of word meanings, language acquisition, educational technology, and ELT pedagogy.

Publications

  • Au, I. (2021). Unwinding the Fantasy: Using Breakout Rooms to Promote Language Exposure and Less-Public Feedback Practices in Online Synchronous Teaching. Paper presented at the PASHE 2021 – EAP Education and Practice: Supporting Students’ Needs, UCL (IOE).
  • Au, I. & Yiu, C. (2021). ‘Identity game’: so you think you are what your Instagram bio says about you. Paper presented at the Sociolinguistics Symposium 23, Hong Kong.
  • Au, I. (2021). The magic of breakout rooms in online synchronous teaching and learning of English. Paper presented at the 3rd International Conference on English Across the Curriculum, Hong Kong.
  • Choi, T. H., Chan, H., & Au, I. (2018). ‘Now you’re talking’: Teacher preparation through alumni talks in a community of practice. Paper presented at the Oxford Education Research Symposium.
  • Au, I. (2018). Branching out from the tree: Extending vocabulary acquisition with polysemy. Paper presented at HKBU-HU First Joint Symposium on Education 2018.

 

Supervisors

Elizabeth Wonnacott and Victoria Murphy

Thomas Procter-Legg is a DPhil Student in the Department of Education and is researching restorative practice within the context of special educational needs and disabilities.

His previous experience includes five years as the Head Teacher of a special academy in Oxfordshire UK, specialising in education for students with Special Educational Needs and Disabilities. He has also worked as a SEND Reviewer for Whole School SEND; a Teaching School Director; and as the Principal Designate on a successful Free School bid.

Thomas is passionate about restorative practice and is involved in many communities of practice, such as the Global Alliance for Restorative Justice and Social Justice, where he is a member of the research sub-group exploring the interactions between restorative justice and social justice.

Thomas is also a strong advocate for creativity in education; having previously gained a Fine Art degree from Chelsea College of Art. This heavily influenced his educational leadership and during his time as a Head Teacher, he became the co-founder of a co-constructed initiative between the academy and the University of Oxford Gardens Libraries and Museums. This work placed cultural learning opportunities and relationships at the heart of the curriculum and is the longest standing project between a special school and The University of Oxford. This sustainable partnership champions marginalised voices and has been highly celebrated e.g., inclusion in the Durham Commission for Creativity in Education; recent dissemination at the Museum Ideas Conference 2022; highly commended award at the Museum and Heritage Awards 2021; and awarded Platinum ArtsMark in 2021.

Whilst this creative work may seem to be separate from restorative practice, Thomas subscribes to the idea that there are significant overlaps, both within pedagogical practice and wider school culture, topics which his current research touch on within the context of special education.

 

Publications

Procter-Legg. (2022). A Discourse on Restorative Practice—Participants’ Views of a Divergent Ideology. Laws11(6), 86–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11060086

Procter-Legg. (2022). Practitioner Perspectives on a Restorative Community: An Inductive Evaluative Study of Conceptual, Pedagogical, and Routine Practice. Laws11(1), 4–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11010004

 

Supervisors

Ian Thompson and Jason Todd

Ivan is currently serving as a Facilitator (Teaching) in the Vice-Chancellor’s Colloquium and as an Editor of the Graduate Inequality Review in the University of Oxford. He has taken up lecturerships in a number of universities in Hong Kong and has run Education, Linguistics, Applied Linguistics, Sociolinguistics, and Academic English courses at undergraduate and postgraduate level.

Prior to joining Oxford, Ivan received his teacher-training in Hong Kong and his postgraduate training in Linguistics (with a specialisation in pragmatics) at University College London. His research interests include: mental representation of word meanings, language acquisition, educational technology, and ELT pedagogy.

Publications

  • Au, I. (2021). Unwinding the Fantasy: Using Breakout Rooms to Promote Language Exposure and Less-Public Feedback Practices in Online Synchronous Teaching. Paper presented at the PASHE 2021 – EAP Education and Practice: Supporting Students’ Needs, UCL (IOE).
  • Au, I. & Yiu, C. (2021). ‘Identity game’: so you think you are what your Instagram bio says about you. Paper presented at the Sociolinguistics Symposium 23, Hong Kong.
  • Au, I. (2021). The magic of breakout rooms in online synchronous teaching and learning of English. Paper presented at the 3rd International Conference on English Across the Curriculum, Hong Kong.
  • Choi, T. H., Chan, H., & Au, I. (2018). ‘Now you’re talking’: Teacher preparation through alumni talks in a community of practice. Paper presented at the Oxford Education Research Symposium.
  • Au, I. (2018). Branching out from the tree: Extending vocabulary acquisition with polysemy. Paper presented at HKBU-HU First Joint Symposium on Education 2018.

 

Supervisors

Elizabeth Wonnacott and Victoria Murphy

Thomas Procter-Legg is a DPhil Student in the Department of Education and is researching restorative practice within the context of special educational needs and disabilities.

His previous experience includes five years as the Head Teacher of a special academy in Oxfordshire UK, specialising in education for students with Special Educational Needs and Disabilities. He has also worked as a SEND Reviewer for Whole School SEND; a Teaching School Director; and as the Principal Designate on a successful Free School bid.

Thomas is passionate about restorative practice and is involved in many communities of practice, such as the Global Alliance for Restorative Justice and Social Justice, where he is a member of the research sub-group exploring the interactions between restorative justice and social justice.

Thomas is also a strong advocate for creativity in education; having previously gained a Fine Art degree from Chelsea College of Art. This heavily influenced his educational leadership and during his time as a Head Teacher, he became the co-founder of a co-constructed initiative between the academy and the University of Oxford Gardens Libraries and Museums. This work placed cultural learning opportunities and relationships at the heart of the curriculum and is the longest standing project between a special school and The University of Oxford. This sustainable partnership champions marginalised voices and has been highly celebrated e.g., inclusion in the Durham Commission for Creativity in Education; recent dissemination at the Museum Ideas Conference 2022; highly commended award at the Museum and Heritage Awards 2021; and awarded Platinum ArtsMark in 2021.

Whilst this creative work may seem to be separate from restorative practice, Thomas subscribes to the idea that there are significant overlaps, both within pedagogical practice and wider school culture, topics which his current research touch on within the context of special education.

 

Publications

Procter-Legg. (2022). A Discourse on Restorative Practice—Participants’ Views of a Divergent Ideology. Laws11(6), 86–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11060086

Procter-Legg. (2022). Practitioner Perspectives on a Restorative Community: An Inductive Evaluative Study of Conceptual, Pedagogical, and Routine Practice. Laws11(1), 4–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11010004

 

Supervisors

Ian Thompson and Jason Todd

Ivan is currently serving as a Facilitator (Teaching) in the Vice-Chancellor’s Colloquium and as an Editor of the Graduate Inequality Review in the University of Oxford. He has taken up lecturerships in a number of universities in Hong Kong and has run Education, Linguistics, Applied Linguistics, Sociolinguistics, and Academic English courses at undergraduate and postgraduate level.

Prior to joining Oxford, Ivan received his teacher-training in Hong Kong and his postgraduate training in Linguistics (with a specialisation in pragmatics) at University College London. His research interests include: mental representation of word meanings, language acquisition, educational technology, and ELT pedagogy.

Publications

  • Au, I. (2021). Unwinding the Fantasy: Using Breakout Rooms to Promote Language Exposure and Less-Public Feedback Practices in Online Synchronous Teaching. Paper presented at the PASHE 2021 – EAP Education and Practice: Supporting Students’ Needs, UCL (IOE).
  • Au, I. & Yiu, C. (2021). ‘Identity game’: so you think you are what your Instagram bio says about you. Paper presented at the Sociolinguistics Symposium 23, Hong Kong.
  • Au, I. (2021). The magic of breakout rooms in online synchronous teaching and learning of English. Paper presented at the 3rd International Conference on English Across the Curriculum, Hong Kong.
  • Choi, T. H., Chan, H., & Au, I. (2018). ‘Now you’re talking’: Teacher preparation through alumni talks in a community of practice. Paper presented at the Oxford Education Research Symposium.
  • Au, I. (2018). Branching out from the tree: Extending vocabulary acquisition with polysemy. Paper presented at HKBU-HU First Joint Symposium on Education 2018.

 

Supervisors

Elizabeth Wonnacott and Victoria Murphy

Thomas Procter-Legg is a DPhil Student in the Department of Education and is researching restorative practice within the context of special educational needs and disabilities.

His previous experience includes five years as the Head Teacher of a special academy in Oxfordshire UK, specialising in education for students with Special Educational Needs and Disabilities. He has also worked as a SEND Reviewer for Whole School SEND; a Teaching School Director; and as the Principal Designate on a successful Free School bid.

Thomas is passionate about restorative practice and is involved in many communities of practice, such as the Global Alliance for Restorative Justice and Social Justice, where he is a member of the research sub-group exploring the interactions between restorative justice and social justice.

Thomas is also a strong advocate for creativity in education; having previously gained a Fine Art degree from Chelsea College of Art. This heavily influenced his educational leadership and during his time as a Head Teacher, he became the co-founder of a co-constructed initiative between the academy and the University of Oxford Gardens Libraries and Museums. This work placed cultural learning opportunities and relationships at the heart of the curriculum and is the longest standing project between a special school and The University of Oxford. This sustainable partnership champions marginalised voices and has been highly celebrated e.g., inclusion in the Durham Commission for Creativity in Education; recent dissemination at the Museum Ideas Conference 2022; highly commended award at the Museum and Heritage Awards 2021; and awarded Platinum ArtsMark in 2021.

Whilst this creative work may seem to be separate from restorative practice, Thomas subscribes to the idea that there are significant overlaps, both within pedagogical practice and wider school culture, topics which his current research touch on within the context of special education.

 

Publications

Procter-Legg. (2022). A Discourse on Restorative Practice—Participants’ Views of a Divergent Ideology. Laws11(6), 86–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11060086

Procter-Legg. (2022). Practitioner Perspectives on a Restorative Community: An Inductive Evaluative Study of Conceptual, Pedagogical, and Routine Practice. Laws11(1), 4–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11010004

 

Supervisors

Ian Thompson and Jason Todd

Ivan is currently serving as a Facilitator (Teaching) in the Vice-Chancellor’s Colloquium and as an Editor of the Graduate Inequality Review in the University of Oxford. He has taken up lecturerships in a number of universities in Hong Kong and has run Education, Linguistics, Applied Linguistics, Sociolinguistics, and Academic English courses at undergraduate and postgraduate level.

Prior to joining Oxford, Ivan received his teacher-training in Hong Kong and his postgraduate training in Linguistics (with a specialisation in pragmatics) at University College London. His research interests include: mental representation of word meanings, language acquisition, educational technology, and ELT pedagogy.

Publications

  • Au, I. (2021). Unwinding the Fantasy: Using Breakout Rooms to Promote Language Exposure and Less-Public Feedback Practices in Online Synchronous Teaching. Paper presented at the PASHE 2021 – EAP Education and Practice: Supporting Students’ Needs, UCL (IOE).
  • Au, I. & Yiu, C. (2021). ‘Identity game’: so you think you are what your Instagram bio says about you. Paper presented at the Sociolinguistics Symposium 23, Hong Kong.
  • Au, I. (2021). The magic of breakout rooms in online synchronous teaching and learning of English. Paper presented at the 3rd International Conference on English Across the Curriculum, Hong Kong.
  • Choi, T. H., Chan, H., & Au, I. (2018). ‘Now you’re talking’: Teacher preparation through alumni talks in a community of practice. Paper presented at the Oxford Education Research Symposium.
  • Au, I. (2018). Branching out from the tree: Extending vocabulary acquisition with polysemy. Paper presented at HKBU-HU First Joint Symposium on Education 2018.

 

Supervisors

Elizabeth Wonnacott and Victoria Murphy

Thomas Procter-Legg is a DPhil Student in the Department of Education and is researching restorative practice within the context of special educational needs and disabilities.

His previous experience includes five years as the Head Teacher of a special academy in Oxfordshire UK, specialising in education for students with Special Educational Needs and Disabilities. He has also worked as a SEND Reviewer for Whole School SEND; a Teaching School Director; and as the Principal Designate on a successful Free School bid.

Thomas is passionate about restorative practice and is involved in many communities of practice, such as the Global Alliance for Restorative Justice and Social Justice, where he is a member of the research sub-group exploring the interactions between restorative justice and social justice.

Thomas is also a strong advocate for creativity in education; having previously gained a Fine Art degree from Chelsea College of Art. This heavily influenced his educational leadership and during his time as a Head Teacher, he became the co-founder of a co-constructed initiative between the academy and the University of Oxford Gardens Libraries and Museums. This work placed cultural learning opportunities and relationships at the heart of the curriculum and is the longest standing project between a special school and The University of Oxford. This sustainable partnership champions marginalised voices and has been highly celebrated e.g., inclusion in the Durham Commission for Creativity in Education; recent dissemination at the Museum Ideas Conference 2022; highly commended award at the Museum and Heritage Awards 2021; and awarded Platinum ArtsMark in 2021.

Whilst this creative work may seem to be separate from restorative practice, Thomas subscribes to the idea that there are significant overlaps, both within pedagogical practice and wider school culture, topics which his current research touch on within the context of special education.

 

Publications

Procter-Legg. (2022). A Discourse on Restorative Practice—Participants’ Views of a Divergent Ideology. Laws11(6), 86–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11060086

Procter-Legg. (2022). Practitioner Perspectives on a Restorative Community: An Inductive Evaluative Study of Conceptual, Pedagogical, and Routine Practice. Laws11(1), 4–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11010004

 

Supervisors

Ian Thompson and Jason Todd

Ivan is currently serving as a Facilitator (Teaching) in the Vice-Chancellor’s Colloquium and as an Editor of the Graduate Inequality Review in the University of Oxford. He has taken up lecturerships in a number of universities in Hong Kong and has run Education, Linguistics, Applied Linguistics, Sociolinguistics, and Academic English courses at undergraduate and postgraduate level.

Prior to joining Oxford, Ivan received his teacher-training in Hong Kong and his postgraduate training in Linguistics (with a specialisation in pragmatics) at University College London. His research interests include: mental representation of word meanings, language acquisition, educational technology, and ELT pedagogy.

Publications

  • Au, I. (2021). Unwinding the Fantasy: Using Breakout Rooms to Promote Language Exposure and Less-Public Feedback Practices in Online Synchronous Teaching. Paper presented at the PASHE 2021 – EAP Education and Practice: Supporting Students’ Needs, UCL (IOE).
  • Au, I. & Yiu, C. (2021). ‘Identity game’: so you think you are what your Instagram bio says about you. Paper presented at the Sociolinguistics Symposium 23, Hong Kong.
  • Au, I. (2021). The magic of breakout rooms in online synchronous teaching and learning of English. Paper presented at the 3rd International Conference on English Across the Curriculum, Hong Kong.
  • Choi, T. H., Chan, H., & Au, I. (2018). ‘Now you’re talking’: Teacher preparation through alumni talks in a community of practice. Paper presented at the Oxford Education Research Symposium.
  • Au, I. (2018). Branching out from the tree: Extending vocabulary acquisition with polysemy. Paper presented at HKBU-HU First Joint Symposium on Education 2018.

 

Supervisors

Elizabeth Wonnacott and Victoria Murphy

Thomas Procter-Legg is a DPhil Student in the Department of Education and is researching restorative practice within the context of special educational needs and disabilities.

His previous experience includes five years as the Head Teacher of a special academy in Oxfordshire UK, specialising in education for students with Special Educational Needs and Disabilities. He has also worked as a SEND Reviewer for Whole School SEND; a Teaching School Director; and as the Principal Designate on a successful Free School bid.

Thomas is passionate about restorative practice and is involved in many communities of practice, such as the Global Alliance for Restorative Justice and Social Justice, where he is a member of the research sub-group exploring the interactions between restorative justice and social justice.

Thomas is also a strong advocate for creativity in education; having previously gained a Fine Art degree from Chelsea College of Art. This heavily influenced his educational leadership and during his time as a Head Teacher, he became the co-founder of a co-constructed initiative between the academy and the University of Oxford Gardens Libraries and Museums. This work placed cultural learning opportunities and relationships at the heart of the curriculum and is the longest standing project between a special school and The University of Oxford. This sustainable partnership champions marginalised voices and has been highly celebrated e.g., inclusion in the Durham Commission for Creativity in Education; recent dissemination at the Museum Ideas Conference 2022; highly commended award at the Museum and Heritage Awards 2021; and awarded Platinum ArtsMark in 2021.

Whilst this creative work may seem to be separate from restorative practice, Thomas subscribes to the idea that there are significant overlaps, both within pedagogical practice and wider school culture, topics which his current research touch on within the context of special education.

 

Publications

Procter-Legg. (2022). A Discourse on Restorative Practice—Participants’ Views of a Divergent Ideology. Laws11(6), 86–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11060086

Procter-Legg. (2022). Practitioner Perspectives on a Restorative Community: An Inductive Evaluative Study of Conceptual, Pedagogical, and Routine Practice. Laws11(1), 4–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11010004

 

Supervisors

Ian Thompson and Jason Todd

Ivan is currently serving as a Facilitator (Teaching) in the Vice-Chancellor’s Colloquium and as an Editor of the Graduate Inequality Review in the University of Oxford. He has taken up lecturerships in a number of universities in Hong Kong and has run Education, Linguistics, Applied Linguistics, Sociolinguistics, and Academic English courses at undergraduate and postgraduate level.

Prior to joining Oxford, Ivan received his teacher-training in Hong Kong and his postgraduate training in Linguistics (with a specialisation in pragmatics) at University College London. His research interests include: mental representation of word meanings, language acquisition, educational technology, and ELT pedagogy.

Publications

  • Au, I. (2021). Unwinding the Fantasy: Using Breakout Rooms to Promote Language Exposure and Less-Public Feedback Practices in Online Synchronous Teaching. Paper presented at the PASHE 2021 – EAP Education and Practice: Supporting Students’ Needs, UCL (IOE).
  • Au, I. & Yiu, C. (2021). ‘Identity game’: so you think you are what your Instagram bio says about you. Paper presented at the Sociolinguistics Symposium 23, Hong Kong.
  • Au, I. (2021). The magic of breakout rooms in online synchronous teaching and learning of English. Paper presented at the 3rd International Conference on English Across the Curriculum, Hong Kong.
  • Choi, T. H., Chan, H., & Au, I. (2018). ‘Now you’re talking’: Teacher preparation through alumni talks in a community of practice. Paper presented at the Oxford Education Research Symposium.
  • Au, I. (2018). Branching out from the tree: Extending vocabulary acquisition with polysemy. Paper presented at HKBU-HU First Joint Symposium on Education 2018.

 

Supervisors

Elizabeth Wonnacott and Victoria Murphy

Thomas Procter-Legg is a DPhil Student in the Department of Education and is researching restorative practice within the context of special educational needs and disabilities.

His previous experience includes five years as the Head Teacher of a special academy in Oxfordshire UK, specialising in education for students with Special Educational Needs and Disabilities. He has also worked as a SEND Reviewer for Whole School SEND; a Teaching School Director; and as the Principal Designate on a successful Free School bid.

Thomas is passionate about restorative practice and is involved in many communities of practice, such as the Global Alliance for Restorative Justice and Social Justice, where he is a member of the research sub-group exploring the interactions between restorative justice and social justice.

Thomas is also a strong advocate for creativity in education; having previously gained a Fine Art degree from Chelsea College of Art. This heavily influenced his educational leadership and during his time as a Head Teacher, he became the co-founder of a co-constructed initiative between the academy and the University of Oxford Gardens Libraries and Museums. This work placed cultural learning opportunities and relationships at the heart of the curriculum and is the longest standing project between a special school and The University of Oxford. This sustainable partnership champions marginalised voices and has been highly celebrated e.g., inclusion in the Durham Commission for Creativity in Education; recent dissemination at the Museum Ideas Conference 2022; highly commended award at the Museum and Heritage Awards 2021; and awarded Platinum ArtsMark in 2021.

Whilst this creative work may seem to be separate from restorative practice, Thomas subscribes to the idea that there are significant overlaps, both within pedagogical practice and wider school culture, topics which his current research touch on within the context of special education.

 

Publications

Procter-Legg. (2022). A Discourse on Restorative Practice—Participants’ Views of a Divergent Ideology. Laws11(6), 86–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11060086

Procter-Legg. (2022). Practitioner Perspectives on a Restorative Community: An Inductive Evaluative Study of Conceptual, Pedagogical, and Routine Practice. Laws11(1), 4–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11010004

 

Supervisors

Ian Thompson and Jason Todd

Ivan is currently serving as a Facilitator (Teaching) in the Vice-Chancellor’s Colloquium and as an Editor of the Graduate Inequality Review in the University of Oxford. He has taken up lecturerships in a number of universities in Hong Kong and has run Education, Linguistics, Applied Linguistics, Sociolinguistics, and Academic English courses at undergraduate and postgraduate level.

Prior to joining Oxford, Ivan received his teacher-training in Hong Kong and his postgraduate training in Linguistics (with a specialisation in pragmatics) at University College London. His research interests include: mental representation of word meanings, language acquisition, educational technology, and ELT pedagogy.

Publications

  • Au, I. (2021). Unwinding the Fantasy: Using Breakout Rooms to Promote Language Exposure and Less-Public Feedback Practices in Online Synchronous Teaching. Paper presented at the PASHE 2021 – EAP Education and Practice: Supporting Students’ Needs, UCL (IOE).
  • Au, I. & Yiu, C. (2021). ‘Identity game’: so you think you are what your Instagram bio says about you. Paper presented at the Sociolinguistics Symposium 23, Hong Kong.
  • Au, I. (2021). The magic of breakout rooms in online synchronous teaching and learning of English. Paper presented at the 3rd International Conference on English Across the Curriculum, Hong Kong.
  • Choi, T. H., Chan, H., & Au, I. (2018). ‘Now you’re talking’: Teacher preparation through alumni talks in a community of practice. Paper presented at the Oxford Education Research Symposium.
  • Au, I. (2018). Branching out from the tree: Extending vocabulary acquisition with polysemy. Paper presented at HKBU-HU First Joint Symposium on Education 2018.

 

Supervisors

Elizabeth Wonnacott and Victoria Murphy

Thomas Procter-Legg is a DPhil Student in the Department of Education and is researching restorative practice within the context of special educational needs and disabilities.

His previous experience includes five years as the Head Teacher of a special academy in Oxfordshire UK, specialising in education for students with Special Educational Needs and Disabilities. He has also worked as a SEND Reviewer for Whole School SEND; a Teaching School Director; and as the Principal Designate on a successful Free School bid.

Thomas is passionate about restorative practice and is involved in many communities of practice, such as the Global Alliance for Restorative Justice and Social Justice, where he is a member of the research sub-group exploring the interactions between restorative justice and social justice.

Thomas is also a strong advocate for creativity in education; having previously gained a Fine Art degree from Chelsea College of Art. This heavily influenced his educational leadership and during his time as a Head Teacher, he became the co-founder of a co-constructed initiative between the academy and the University of Oxford Gardens Libraries and Museums. This work placed cultural learning opportunities and relationships at the heart of the curriculum and is the longest standing project between a special school and The University of Oxford. This sustainable partnership champions marginalised voices and has been highly celebrated e.g., inclusion in the Durham Commission for Creativity in Education; recent dissemination at the Museum Ideas Conference 2022; highly commended award at the Museum and Heritage Awards 2021; and awarded Platinum ArtsMark in 2021.

Whilst this creative work may seem to be separate from restorative practice, Thomas subscribes to the idea that there are significant overlaps, both within pedagogical practice and wider school culture, topics which his current research touch on within the context of special education.

 

Publications

Procter-Legg. (2022). A Discourse on Restorative Practice—Participants’ Views of a Divergent Ideology. Laws11(6), 86–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11060086

Procter-Legg. (2022). Practitioner Perspectives on a Restorative Community: An Inductive Evaluative Study of Conceptual, Pedagogical, and Routine Practice. Laws11(1), 4–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11010004

 

Supervisors

Ian Thompson and Jason Todd

Ivan is currently serving as a Facilitator (Teaching) in the Vice-Chancellor’s Colloquium and as an Editor of the Graduate Inequality Review in the University of Oxford. He has taken up lecturerships in a number of universities in Hong Kong and has run Education, Linguistics, Applied Linguistics, Sociolinguistics, and Academic English courses at undergraduate and postgraduate level.

Prior to joining Oxford, Ivan received his teacher-training in Hong Kong and his postgraduate training in Linguistics (with a specialisation in pragmatics) at University College London. His research interests include: mental representation of word meanings, language acquisition, educational technology, and ELT pedagogy.

Publications

  • Au, I. (2021). Unwinding the Fantasy: Using Breakout Rooms to Promote Language Exposure and Less-Public Feedback Practices in Online Synchronous Teaching. Paper presented at the PASHE 2021 – EAP Education and Practice: Supporting Students’ Needs, UCL (IOE).
  • Au, I. & Yiu, C. (2021). ‘Identity game’: so you think you are what your Instagram bio says about you. Paper presented at the Sociolinguistics Symposium 23, Hong Kong.
  • Au, I. (2021). The magic of breakout rooms in online synchronous teaching and learning of English. Paper presented at the 3rd International Conference on English Across the Curriculum, Hong Kong.
  • Choi, T. H., Chan, H., & Au, I. (2018). ‘Now you’re talking’: Teacher preparation through alumni talks in a community of practice. Paper presented at the Oxford Education Research Symposium.
  • Au, I. (2018). Branching out from the tree: Extending vocabulary acquisition with polysemy. Paper presented at HKBU-HU First Joint Symposium on Education 2018.

 

Supervisors

Elizabeth Wonnacott and Victoria Murphy

Thomas Procter-Legg is a DPhil Student in the Department of Education and is researching restorative practice within the context of special educational needs and disabilities.

His previous experience includes five years as the Head Teacher of a special academy in Oxfordshire UK, specialising in education for students with Special Educational Needs and Disabilities. He has also worked as a SEND Reviewer for Whole School SEND; a Teaching School Director; and as the Principal Designate on a successful Free School bid.

Thomas is passionate about restorative practice and is involved in many communities of practice, such as the Global Alliance for Restorative Justice and Social Justice, where he is a member of the research sub-group exploring the interactions between restorative justice and social justice.

Thomas is also a strong advocate for creativity in education; having previously gained a Fine Art degree from Chelsea College of Art. This heavily influenced his educational leadership and during his time as a Head Teacher, he became the co-founder of a co-constructed initiative between the academy and the University of Oxford Gardens Libraries and Museums. This work placed cultural learning opportunities and relationships at the heart of the curriculum and is the longest standing project between a special school and The University of Oxford. This sustainable partnership champions marginalised voices and has been highly celebrated e.g., inclusion in the Durham Commission for Creativity in Education; recent dissemination at the Museum Ideas Conference 2022; highly commended award at the Museum and Heritage Awards 2021; and awarded Platinum ArtsMark in 2021.

Whilst this creative work may seem to be separate from restorative practice, Thomas subscribes to the idea that there are significant overlaps, both within pedagogical practice and wider school culture, topics which his current research touch on within the context of special education.

 

Publications

Procter-Legg. (2022). A Discourse on Restorative Practice—Participants’ Views of a Divergent Ideology. Laws11(6), 86–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11060086

Procter-Legg. (2022). Practitioner Perspectives on a Restorative Community: An Inductive Evaluative Study of Conceptual, Pedagogical, and Routine Practice. Laws11(1), 4–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11010004

 

Supervisors

Ian Thompson and Jason Todd

Ivan is currently serving as a Facilitator (Teaching) in the Vice-Chancellor’s Colloquium and as an Editor of the Graduate Inequality Review in the University of Oxford. He has taken up lecturerships in a number of universities in Hong Kong and has run Education, Linguistics, Applied Linguistics, Sociolinguistics, and Academic English courses at undergraduate and postgraduate level.

Prior to joining Oxford, Ivan received his teacher-training in Hong Kong and his postgraduate training in Linguistics (with a specialisation in pragmatics) at University College London. His research interests include: mental representation of word meanings, language acquisition, educational technology, and ELT pedagogy.

Publications

  • Au, I. (2021). Unwinding the Fantasy: Using Breakout Rooms to Promote Language Exposure and Less-Public Feedback Practices in Online Synchronous Teaching. Paper presented at the PASHE 2021 – EAP Education and Practice: Supporting Students’ Needs, UCL (IOE).
  • Au, I. & Yiu, C. (2021). ‘Identity game’: so you think you are what your Instagram bio says about you. Paper presented at the Sociolinguistics Symposium 23, Hong Kong.
  • Au, I. (2021). The magic of breakout rooms in online synchronous teaching and learning of English. Paper presented at the 3rd International Conference on English Across the Curriculum, Hong Kong.
  • Choi, T. H., Chan, H., & Au, I. (2018). ‘Now you’re talking’: Teacher preparation through alumni talks in a community of practice. Paper presented at the Oxford Education Research Symposium.
  • Au, I. (2018). Branching out from the tree: Extending vocabulary acquisition with polysemy. Paper presented at HKBU-HU First Joint Symposium on Education 2018.

 

Supervisors

Elizabeth Wonnacott and Victoria Murphy

Thomas Procter-Legg is a DPhil Student in the Department of Education and is researching restorative practice within the context of special educational needs and disabilities.

His previous experience includes five years as the Head Teacher of a special academy in Oxfordshire UK, specialising in education for students with Special Educational Needs and Disabilities. He has also worked as a SEND Reviewer for Whole School SEND; a Teaching School Director; and as the Principal Designate on a successful Free School bid.

Thomas is passionate about restorative practice and is involved in many communities of practice, such as the Global Alliance for Restorative Justice and Social Justice, where he is a member of the research sub-group exploring the interactions between restorative justice and social justice.

Thomas is also a strong advocate for creativity in education; having previously gained a Fine Art degree from Chelsea College of Art. This heavily influenced his educational leadership and during his time as a Head Teacher, he became the co-founder of a co-constructed initiative between the academy and the University of Oxford Gardens Libraries and Museums. This work placed cultural learning opportunities and relationships at the heart of the curriculum and is the longest standing project between a special school and The University of Oxford. This sustainable partnership champions marginalised voices and has been highly celebrated e.g., inclusion in the Durham Commission for Creativity in Education; recent dissemination at the Museum Ideas Conference 2022; highly commended award at the Museum and Heritage Awards 2021; and awarded Platinum ArtsMark in 2021.

Whilst this creative work may seem to be separate from restorative practice, Thomas subscribes to the idea that there are significant overlaps, both within pedagogical practice and wider school culture, topics which his current research touch on within the context of special education.

 

Publications

Procter-Legg. (2022). A Discourse on Restorative Practice—Participants’ Views of a Divergent Ideology. Laws11(6), 86–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11060086

Procter-Legg. (2022). Practitioner Perspectives on a Restorative Community: An Inductive Evaluative Study of Conceptual, Pedagogical, and Routine Practice. Laws11(1), 4–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11010004

 

Supervisors

Ian Thompson and Jason Todd

Ivan is currently serving as a Facilitator (Teaching) in the Vice-Chancellor’s Colloquium and as an Editor of the Graduate Inequality Review in the University of Oxford. He has taken up lecturerships in a number of universities in Hong Kong and has run Education, Linguistics, Applied Linguistics, Sociolinguistics, and Academic English courses at undergraduate and postgraduate level.

Prior to joining Oxford, Ivan received his teacher-training in Hong Kong and his postgraduate training in Linguistics (with a specialisation in pragmatics) at University College London. His research interests include: mental representation of word meanings, language acquisition, educational technology, and ELT pedagogy.

Publications

  • Au, I. (2021). Unwinding the Fantasy: Using Breakout Rooms to Promote Language Exposure and Less-Public Feedback Practices in Online Synchronous Teaching. Paper presented at the PASHE 2021 – EAP Education and Practice: Supporting Students’ Needs, UCL (IOE).
  • Au, I. & Yiu, C. (2021). ‘Identity game’: so you think you are what your Instagram bio says about you. Paper presented at the Sociolinguistics Symposium 23, Hong Kong.
  • Au, I. (2021). The magic of breakout rooms in online synchronous teaching and learning of English. Paper presented at the 3rd International Conference on English Across the Curriculum, Hong Kong.
  • Choi, T. H., Chan, H., & Au, I. (2018). ‘Now you’re talking’: Teacher preparation through alumni talks in a community of practice. Paper presented at the Oxford Education Research Symposium.
  • Au, I. (2018). Branching out from the tree: Extending vocabulary acquisition with polysemy. Paper presented at HKBU-HU First Joint Symposium on Education 2018.

 

Supervisors

Elizabeth Wonnacott and Victoria Murphy

Thomas Procter-Legg is a DPhil Student in the Department of Education and is researching restorative practice within the context of special educational needs and disabilities.

His previous experience includes five years as the Head Teacher of a special academy in Oxfordshire UK, specialising in education for students with Special Educational Needs and Disabilities. He has also worked as a SEND Reviewer for Whole School SEND; a Teaching School Director; and as the Principal Designate on a successful Free School bid.

Thomas is passionate about restorative practice and is involved in many communities of practice, such as the Global Alliance for Restorative Justice and Social Justice, where he is a member of the research sub-group exploring the interactions between restorative justice and social justice.

Thomas is also a strong advocate for creativity in education; having previously gained a Fine Art degree from Chelsea College of Art. This heavily influenced his educational leadership and during his time as a Head Teacher, he became the co-founder of a co-constructed initiative between the academy and the University of Oxford Gardens Libraries and Museums. This work placed cultural learning opportunities and relationships at the heart of the curriculum and is the longest standing project between a special school and The University of Oxford. This sustainable partnership champions marginalised voices and has been highly celebrated e.g., inclusion in the Durham Commission for Creativity in Education; recent dissemination at the Museum Ideas Conference 2022; highly commended award at the Museum and Heritage Awards 2021; and awarded Platinum ArtsMark in 2021.

Whilst this creative work may seem to be separate from restorative practice, Thomas subscribes to the idea that there are significant overlaps, both within pedagogical practice and wider school culture, topics which his current research touch on within the context of special education.

 

Publications

Procter-Legg. (2022). A Discourse on Restorative Practice—Participants’ Views of a Divergent Ideology. Laws11(6), 86–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11060086

Procter-Legg. (2022). Practitioner Perspectives on a Restorative Community: An Inductive Evaluative Study of Conceptual, Pedagogical, and Routine Practice. Laws11(1), 4–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11010004

 

Supervisors

Ian Thompson and Jason Todd

Ivan is currently serving as a Facilitator (Teaching) in the Vice-Chancellor’s Colloquium and as an Editor of the Graduate Inequality Review in the University of Oxford. He has taken up lecturerships in a number of universities in Hong Kong and has run Education, Linguistics, Applied Linguistics, Sociolinguistics, and Academic English courses at undergraduate and postgraduate level.

Prior to joining Oxford, Ivan received his teacher-training in Hong Kong and his postgraduate training in Linguistics (with a specialisation in pragmatics) at University College London. His research interests include: mental representation of word meanings, language acquisition, educational technology, and ELT pedagogy.

Publications

  • Au, I. (2021). Unwinding the Fantasy: Using Breakout Rooms to Promote Language Exposure and Less-Public Feedback Practices in Online Synchronous Teaching. Paper presented at the PASHE 2021 – EAP Education and Practice: Supporting Students’ Needs, UCL (IOE).
  • Au, I. & Yiu, C. (2021). ‘Identity game’: so you think you are what your Instagram bio says about you. Paper presented at the Sociolinguistics Symposium 23, Hong Kong.
  • Au, I. (2021). The magic of breakout rooms in online synchronous teaching and learning of English. Paper presented at the 3rd International Conference on English Across the Curriculum, Hong Kong.
  • Choi, T. H., Chan, H., & Au, I. (2018). ‘Now you’re talking’: Teacher preparation through alumni talks in a community of practice. Paper presented at the Oxford Education Research Symposium.
  • Au, I. (2018). Branching out from the tree: Extending vocabulary acquisition with polysemy. Paper presented at HKBU-HU First Joint Symposium on Education 2018.

 

Supervisors

Elizabeth Wonnacott and Victoria Murphy

Thomas Procter-Legg is a DPhil Student in the Department of Education and is researching restorative practice within the context of special educational needs and disabilities.

His previous experience includes five years as the Head Teacher of a special academy in Oxfordshire UK, specialising in education for students with Special Educational Needs and Disabilities. He has also worked as a SEND Reviewer for Whole School SEND; a Teaching School Director; and as the Principal Designate on a successful Free School bid.

Thomas is passionate about restorative practice and is involved in many communities of practice, such as the Global Alliance for Restorative Justice and Social Justice, where he is a member of the research sub-group exploring the interactions between restorative justice and social justice.

Thomas is also a strong advocate for creativity in education; having previously gained a Fine Art degree from Chelsea College of Art. This heavily influenced his educational leadership and during his time as a Head Teacher, he became the co-founder of a co-constructed initiative between the academy and the University of Oxford Gardens Libraries and Museums. This work placed cultural learning opportunities and relationships at the heart of the curriculum and is the longest standing project between a special school and The University of Oxford. This sustainable partnership champions marginalised voices and has been highly celebrated e.g., inclusion in the Durham Commission for Creativity in Education; recent dissemination at the Museum Ideas Conference 2022; highly commended award at the Museum and Heritage Awards 2021; and awarded Platinum ArtsMark in 2021.

Whilst this creative work may seem to be separate from restorative practice, Thomas subscribes to the idea that there are significant overlaps, both within pedagogical practice and wider school culture, topics which his current research touch on within the context of special education.

 

Publications

Procter-Legg. (2022). A Discourse on Restorative Practice—Participants’ Views of a Divergent Ideology. Laws11(6), 86–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11060086

Procter-Legg. (2022). Practitioner Perspectives on a Restorative Community: An Inductive Evaluative Study of Conceptual, Pedagogical, and Routine Practice. Laws11(1), 4–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11010004

 

Supervisors

Ian Thompson and Jason Todd

Ivan is currently serving as a Facilitator (Teaching) in the Vice-Chancellor’s Colloquium and as an Editor of the Graduate Inequality Review in the University of Oxford. He has taken up lecturerships in a number of universities in Hong Kong and has run Education, Linguistics, Applied Linguistics, Sociolinguistics, and Academic English courses at undergraduate and postgraduate level.

Prior to joining Oxford, Ivan received his teacher-training in Hong Kong and his postgraduate training in Linguistics (with a specialisation in pragmatics) at University College London. His research interests include: mental representation of word meanings, language acquisition, educational technology, and ELT pedagogy.

Publications

  • Au, I. (2021). Unwinding the Fantasy: Using Breakout Rooms to Promote Language Exposure and Less-Public Feedback Practices in Online Synchronous Teaching. Paper presented at the PASHE 2021 – EAP Education and Practice: Supporting Students’ Needs, UCL (IOE).
  • Au, I. & Yiu, C. (2021). ‘Identity game’: so you think you are what your Instagram bio says about you. Paper presented at the Sociolinguistics Symposium 23, Hong Kong.
  • Au, I. (2021). The magic of breakout rooms in online synchronous teaching and learning of English. Paper presented at the 3rd International Conference on English Across the Curriculum, Hong Kong.
  • Choi, T. H., Chan, H., & Au, I. (2018). ‘Now you’re talking’: Teacher preparation through alumni talks in a community of practice. Paper presented at the Oxford Education Research Symposium.
  • Au, I. (2018). Branching out from the tree: Extending vocabulary acquisition with polysemy. Paper presented at HKBU-HU First Joint Symposium on Education 2018.

 

Supervisors

Elizabeth Wonnacott and Victoria Murphy

Thomas Procter-Legg is a DPhil Student in the Department of Education and is researching restorative practice within the context of special educational needs and disabilities.

His previous experience includes five years as the Head Teacher of a special academy in Oxfordshire UK, specialising in education for students with Special Educational Needs and Disabilities. He has also worked as a SEND Reviewer for Whole School SEND; a Teaching School Director; and as the Principal Designate on a successful Free School bid.

Thomas is passionate about restorative practice and is involved in many communities of practice, such as the Global Alliance for Restorative Justice and Social Justice, where he is a member of the research sub-group exploring the interactions between restorative justice and social justice.

Thomas is also a strong advocate for creativity in education; having previously gained a Fine Art degree from Chelsea College of Art. This heavily influenced his educational leadership and during his time as a Head Teacher, he became the co-founder of a co-constructed initiative between the academy and the University of Oxford Gardens Libraries and Museums. This work placed cultural learning opportunities and relationships at the heart of the curriculum and is the longest standing project between a special school and The University of Oxford. This sustainable partnership champions marginalised voices and has been highly celebrated e.g., inclusion in the Durham Commission for Creativity in Education; recent dissemination at the Museum Ideas Conference 2022; highly commended award at the Museum and Heritage Awards 2021; and awarded Platinum ArtsMark in 2021.

Whilst this creative work may seem to be separate from restorative practice, Thomas subscribes to the idea that there are significant overlaps, both within pedagogical practice and wider school culture, topics which his current research touch on within the context of special education.

 

Publications

Procter-Legg. (2022). A Discourse on Restorative Practice—Participants’ Views of a Divergent Ideology. Laws11(6), 86–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11060086

Procter-Legg. (2022). Practitioner Perspectives on a Restorative Community: An Inductive Evaluative Study of Conceptual, Pedagogical, and Routine Practice. Laws11(1), 4–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11010004

 

Supervisors

Ian Thompson and Jason Todd

Ivan is currently serving as a Facilitator (Teaching) in the Vice-Chancellor’s Colloquium and as an Editor of the Graduate Inequality Review in the University of Oxford. He has taken up lecturerships in a number of universities in Hong Kong and has run Education, Linguistics, Applied Linguistics, Sociolinguistics, and Academic English courses at undergraduate and postgraduate level.

Prior to joining Oxford, Ivan received his teacher-training in Hong Kong and his postgraduate training in Linguistics (with a specialisation in pragmatics) at University College London. His research interests include: mental representation of word meanings, language acquisition, educational technology, and ELT pedagogy.

Publications

  • Au, I. (2021). Unwinding the Fantasy: Using Breakout Rooms to Promote Language Exposure and Less-Public Feedback Practices in Online Synchronous Teaching. Paper presented at the PASHE 2021 – EAP Education and Practice: Supporting Students’ Needs, UCL (IOE).
  • Au, I. & Yiu, C. (2021). ‘Identity game’: so you think you are what your Instagram bio says about you. Paper presented at the Sociolinguistics Symposium 23, Hong Kong.
  • Au, I. (2021). The magic of breakout rooms in online synchronous teaching and learning of English. Paper presented at the 3rd International Conference on English Across the Curriculum, Hong Kong.
  • Choi, T. H., Chan, H., & Au, I. (2018). ‘Now you’re talking’: Teacher preparation through alumni talks in a community of practice. Paper presented at the Oxford Education Research Symposium.
  • Au, I. (2018). Branching out from the tree: Extending vocabulary acquisition with polysemy. Paper presented at HKBU-HU First Joint Symposium on Education 2018.

 

Supervisors

Elizabeth Wonnacott and Victoria Murphy

Thomas Procter-Legg is a DPhil Student in the Department of Education and is researching restorative practice within the context of special educational needs and disabilities.

His previous experience includes five years as the Head Teacher of a special academy in Oxfordshire UK, specialising in education for students with Special Educational Needs and Disabilities. He has also worked as a SEND Reviewer for Whole School SEND; a Teaching School Director; and as the Principal Designate on a successful Free School bid.

Thomas is passionate about restorative practice and is involved in many communities of practice, such as the Global Alliance for Restorative Justice and Social Justice, where he is a member of the research sub-group exploring the interactions between restorative justice and social justice.

Thomas is also a strong advocate for creativity in education; having previously gained a Fine Art degree from Chelsea College of Art. This heavily influenced his educational leadership and during his time as a Head Teacher, he became the co-founder of a co-constructed initiative between the academy and the University of Oxford Gardens Libraries and Museums. This work placed cultural learning opportunities and relationships at the heart of the curriculum and is the longest standing project between a special school and The University of Oxford. This sustainable partnership champions marginalised voices and has been highly celebrated e.g., inclusion in the Durham Commission for Creativity in Education; recent dissemination at the Museum Ideas Conference 2022; highly commended award at the Museum and Heritage Awards 2021; and awarded Platinum ArtsMark in 2021.

Whilst this creative work may seem to be separate from restorative practice, Thomas subscribes to the idea that there are significant overlaps, both within pedagogical practice and wider school culture, topics which his current research touch on within the context of special education.

 

Publications

Procter-Legg. (2022). A Discourse on Restorative Practice—Participants’ Views of a Divergent Ideology. Laws11(6), 86–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11060086

Procter-Legg. (2022). Practitioner Perspectives on a Restorative Community: An Inductive Evaluative Study of Conceptual, Pedagogical, and Routine Practice. Laws11(1), 4–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11010004

 

Supervisors

Ian Thompson and Jason Todd

Ivan is currently serving as a Facilitator (Teaching) in the Vice-Chancellor’s Colloquium and as an Editor of the Graduate Inequality Review in the University of Oxford. He has taken up lecturerships in a number of universities in Hong Kong and has run Education, Linguistics, Applied Linguistics, Sociolinguistics, and Academic English courses at undergraduate and postgraduate level.

Prior to joining Oxford, Ivan received his teacher-training in Hong Kong and his postgraduate training in Linguistics (with a specialisation in pragmatics) at University College London. His research interests include: mental representation of word meanings, language acquisition, educational technology, and ELT pedagogy.

Publications

  • Au, I. (2021). Unwinding the Fantasy: Using Breakout Rooms to Promote Language Exposure and Less-Public Feedback Practices in Online Synchronous Teaching. Paper presented at the PASHE 2021 – EAP Education and Practice: Supporting Students’ Needs, UCL (IOE).
  • Au, I. & Yiu, C. (2021). ‘Identity game’: so you think you are what your Instagram bio says about you. Paper presented at the Sociolinguistics Symposium 23, Hong Kong.
  • Au, I. (2021). The magic of breakout rooms in online synchronous teaching and learning of English. Paper presented at the 3rd International Conference on English Across the Curriculum, Hong Kong.
  • Choi, T. H., Chan, H., & Au, I. (2018). ‘Now you’re talking’: Teacher preparation through alumni talks in a community of practice. Paper presented at the Oxford Education Research Symposium.
  • Au, I. (2018). Branching out from the tree: Extending vocabulary acquisition with polysemy. Paper presented at HKBU-HU First Joint Symposium on Education 2018.

 

Supervisors

Elizabeth Wonnacott and Victoria Murphy

Thomas Procter-Legg is a DPhil Student in the Department of Education and is researching restorative practice within the context of special educational needs and disabilities.

His previous experience includes five years as the Head Teacher of a special academy in Oxfordshire UK, specialising in education for students with Special Educational Needs and Disabilities. He has also worked as a SEND Reviewer for Whole School SEND; a Teaching School Director; and as the Principal Designate on a successful Free School bid.

Thomas is passionate about restorative practice and is involved in many communities of practice, such as the Global Alliance for Restorative Justice and Social Justice, where he is a member of the research sub-group exploring the interactions between restorative justice and social justice.

Thomas is also a strong advocate for creativity in education; having previously gained a Fine Art degree from Chelsea College of Art. This heavily influenced his educational leadership and during his time as a Head Teacher, he became the co-founder of a co-constructed initiative between the academy and the University of Oxford Gardens Libraries and Museums. This work placed cultural learning opportunities and relationships at the heart of the curriculum and is the longest standing project between a special school and The University of Oxford. This sustainable partnership champions marginalised voices and has been highly celebrated e.g., inclusion in the Durham Commission for Creativity in Education; recent dissemination at the Museum Ideas Conference 2022; highly commended award at the Museum and Heritage Awards 2021; and awarded Platinum ArtsMark in 2021.

Whilst this creative work may seem to be separate from restorative practice, Thomas subscribes to the idea that there are significant overlaps, both within pedagogical practice and wider school culture, topics which his current research touch on within the context of special education.

 

Publications

Procter-Legg. (2022). A Discourse on Restorative Practice—Participants’ Views of a Divergent Ideology. Laws11(6), 86–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11060086

Procter-Legg. (2022). Practitioner Perspectives on a Restorative Community: An Inductive Evaluative Study of Conceptual, Pedagogical, and Routine Practice. Laws11(1), 4–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11010004

 

Supervisors

Ian Thompson and Jason Todd

Ivan is currently serving as a Facilitator (Teaching) in the Vice-Chancellor’s Colloquium and as an Editor of the Graduate Inequality Review in the University of Oxford. He has taken up lecturerships in a number of universities in Hong Kong and has run Education, Linguistics, Applied Linguistics, Sociolinguistics, and Academic English courses at undergraduate and postgraduate level.

Prior to joining Oxford, Ivan received his teacher-training in Hong Kong and his postgraduate training in Linguistics (with a specialisation in pragmatics) at University College London. His research interests include: mental representation of word meanings, language acquisition, educational technology, and ELT pedagogy.

Publications

  • Au, I. (2021). Unwinding the Fantasy: Using Breakout Rooms to Promote Language Exposure and Less-Public Feedback Practices in Online Synchronous Teaching. Paper presented at the PASHE 2021 – EAP Education and Practice: Supporting Students’ Needs, UCL (IOE).
  • Au, I. & Yiu, C. (2021). ‘Identity game’: so you think you are what your Instagram bio says about you. Paper presented at the Sociolinguistics Symposium 23, Hong Kong.
  • Au, I. (2021). The magic of breakout rooms in online synchronous teaching and learning of English. Paper presented at the 3rd International Conference on English Across the Curriculum, Hong Kong.
  • Choi, T. H., Chan, H., & Au, I. (2018). ‘Now you’re talking’: Teacher preparation through alumni talks in a community of practice. Paper presented at the Oxford Education Research Symposium.
  • Au, I. (2018). Branching out from the tree: Extending vocabulary acquisition with polysemy. Paper presented at HKBU-HU First Joint Symposium on Education 2018.

 

Supervisors

Elizabeth Wonnacott and Victoria Murphy

Thomas Procter-Legg is a DPhil Student in the Department of Education and is researching restorative practice within the context of special educational needs and disabilities.

His previous experience includes five years as the Head Teacher of a special academy in Oxfordshire UK, specialising in education for students with Special Educational Needs and Disabilities. He has also worked as a SEND Reviewer for Whole School SEND; a Teaching School Director; and as the Principal Designate on a successful Free School bid.

Thomas is passionate about restorative practice and is involved in many communities of practice, such as the Global Alliance for Restorative Justice and Social Justice, where he is a member of the research sub-group exploring the interactions between restorative justice and social justice.

Thomas is also a strong advocate for creativity in education; having previously gained a Fine Art degree from Chelsea College of Art. This heavily influenced his educational leadership and during his time as a Head Teacher, he became the co-founder of a co-constructed initiative between the academy and the University of Oxford Gardens Libraries and Museums. This work placed cultural learning opportunities and relationships at the heart of the curriculum and is the longest standing project between a special school and The University of Oxford. This sustainable partnership champions marginalised voices and has been highly celebrated e.g., inclusion in the Durham Commission for Creativity in Education; recent dissemination at the Museum Ideas Conference 2022; highly commended award at the Museum and Heritage Awards 2021; and awarded Platinum ArtsMark in 2021.

Whilst this creative work may seem to be separate from restorative practice, Thomas subscribes to the idea that there are significant overlaps, both within pedagogical practice and wider school culture, topics which his current research touch on within the context of special education.

 

Publications

Procter-Legg. (2022). A Discourse on Restorative Practice—Participants’ Views of a Divergent Ideology. Laws11(6), 86–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11060086

Procter-Legg. (2022). Practitioner Perspectives on a Restorative Community: An Inductive Evaluative Study of Conceptual, Pedagogical, and Routine Practice. Laws11(1), 4–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11010004

 

Supervisors

Ian Thompson and Jason Todd

Ivan is currently serving as a Facilitator (Teaching) in the Vice-Chancellor’s Colloquium and as an Editor of the Graduate Inequality Review in the University of Oxford. He has taken up lecturerships in a number of universities in Hong Kong and has run Education, Linguistics, Applied Linguistics, Sociolinguistics, and Academic English courses at undergraduate and postgraduate level.

Prior to joining Oxford, Ivan received his teacher-training in Hong Kong and his postgraduate training in Linguistics (with a specialisation in pragmatics) at University College London. His research interests include: mental representation of word meanings, language acquisition, educational technology, and ELT pedagogy.

Publications

  • Au, I. (2021). Unwinding the Fantasy: Using Breakout Rooms to Promote Language Exposure and Less-Public Feedback Practices in Online Synchronous Teaching. Paper presented at the PASHE 2021 – EAP Education and Practice: Supporting Students’ Needs, UCL (IOE).
  • Au, I. & Yiu, C. (2021). ‘Identity game’: so you think you are what your Instagram bio says about you. Paper presented at the Sociolinguistics Symposium 23, Hong Kong.
  • Au, I. (2021). The magic of breakout rooms in online synchronous teaching and learning of English. Paper presented at the 3rd International Conference on English Across the Curriculum, Hong Kong.
  • Choi, T. H., Chan, H., & Au, I. (2018). ‘Now you’re talking’: Teacher preparation through alumni talks in a community of practice. Paper presented at the Oxford Education Research Symposium.
  • Au, I. (2018). Branching out from the tree: Extending vocabulary acquisition with polysemy. Paper presented at HKBU-HU First Joint Symposium on Education 2018.

 

Supervisors

Elizabeth Wonnacott and Victoria Murphy

Thomas Procter-Legg is a DPhil Student in the Department of Education and is researching restorative practice within the context of special educational needs and disabilities.

His previous experience includes five years as the Head Teacher of a special academy in Oxfordshire UK, specialising in education for students with Special Educational Needs and Disabilities. He has also worked as a SEND Reviewer for Whole School SEND; a Teaching School Director; and as the Principal Designate on a successful Free School bid.

Thomas is passionate about restorative practice and is involved in many communities of practice, such as the Global Alliance for Restorative Justice and Social Justice, where he is a member of the research sub-group exploring the interactions between restorative justice and social justice.

Thomas is also a strong advocate for creativity in education; having previously gained a Fine Art degree from Chelsea College of Art. This heavily influenced his educational leadership and during his time as a Head Teacher, he became the co-founder of a co-constructed initiative between the academy and the University of Oxford Gardens Libraries and Museums. This work placed cultural learning opportunities and relationships at the heart of the curriculum and is the longest standing project between a special school and The University of Oxford. This sustainable partnership champions marginalised voices and has been highly celebrated e.g., inclusion in the Durham Commission for Creativity in Education; recent dissemination at the Museum Ideas Conference 2022; highly commended award at the Museum and Heritage Awards 2021; and awarded Platinum ArtsMark in 2021.

Whilst this creative work may seem to be separate from restorative practice, Thomas subscribes to the idea that there are significant overlaps, both within pedagogical practice and wider school culture, topics which his current research touch on within the context of special education.

 

Publications

Procter-Legg. (2022). A Discourse on Restorative Practice—Participants’ Views of a Divergent Ideology. Laws11(6), 86–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11060086

Procter-Legg. (2022). Practitioner Perspectives on a Restorative Community: An Inductive Evaluative Study of Conceptual, Pedagogical, and Routine Practice. Laws11(1), 4–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11010004

 

Supervisors

Ian Thompson and Jason Todd

Ivan is currently serving as a Facilitator (Teaching) in the Vice-Chancellor’s Colloquium and as an Editor of the Graduate Inequality Review in the University of Oxford. He has taken up lecturerships in a number of universities in Hong Kong and has run Education, Linguistics, Applied Linguistics, Sociolinguistics, and Academic English courses at undergraduate and postgraduate level.

Prior to joining Oxford, Ivan received his teacher-training in Hong Kong and his postgraduate training in Linguistics (with a specialisation in pragmatics) at University College London. His research interests include: mental representation of word meanings, language acquisition, educational technology, and ELT pedagogy.

Publications

  • Au, I. (2021). Unwinding the Fantasy: Using Breakout Rooms to Promote Language Exposure and Less-Public Feedback Practices in Online Synchronous Teaching. Paper presented at the PASHE 2021 – EAP Education and Practice: Supporting Students’ Needs, UCL (IOE).
  • Au, I. & Yiu, C. (2021). ‘Identity game’: so you think you are what your Instagram bio says about you. Paper presented at the Sociolinguistics Symposium 23, Hong Kong.
  • Au, I. (2021). The magic of breakout rooms in online synchronous teaching and learning of English. Paper presented at the 3rd International Conference on English Across the Curriculum, Hong Kong.
  • Choi, T. H., Chan, H., & Au, I. (2018). ‘Now you’re talking’: Teacher preparation through alumni talks in a community of practice. Paper presented at the Oxford Education Research Symposium.
  • Au, I. (2018). Branching out from the tree: Extending vocabulary acquisition with polysemy. Paper presented at HKBU-HU First Joint Symposium on Education 2018.

 

Supervisors

Elizabeth Wonnacott and Victoria Murphy

Thomas Procter-Legg is a DPhil Student in the Department of Education and is researching restorative practice within the context of special educational needs and disabilities.

His previous experience includes five years as the Head Teacher of a special academy in Oxfordshire UK, specialising in education for students with Special Educational Needs and Disabilities. He has also worked as a SEND Reviewer for Whole School SEND; a Teaching School Director; and as the Principal Designate on a successful Free School bid.

Thomas is passionate about restorative practice and is involved in many communities of practice, such as the Global Alliance for Restorative Justice and Social Justice, where he is a member of the research sub-group exploring the interactions between restorative justice and social justice.

Thomas is also a strong advocate for creativity in education; having previously gained a Fine Art degree from Chelsea College of Art. This heavily influenced his educational leadership and during his time as a Head Teacher, he became the co-founder of a co-constructed initiative between the academy and the University of Oxford Gardens Libraries and Museums. This work placed cultural learning opportunities and relationships at the heart of the curriculum and is the longest standing project between a special school and The University of Oxford. This sustainable partnership champions marginalised voices and has been highly celebrated e.g., inclusion in the Durham Commission for Creativity in Education; recent dissemination at the Museum Ideas Conference 2022; highly commended award at the Museum and Heritage Awards 2021; and awarded Platinum ArtsMark in 2021.

Whilst this creative work may seem to be separate from restorative practice, Thomas subscribes to the idea that there are significant overlaps, both within pedagogical practice and wider school culture, topics which his current research touch on within the context of special education.

 

Publications

Procter-Legg. (2022). A Discourse on Restorative Practice—Participants’ Views of a Divergent Ideology. Laws11(6), 86–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11060086

Procter-Legg. (2022). Practitioner Perspectives on a Restorative Community: An Inductive Evaluative Study of Conceptual, Pedagogical, and Routine Practice. Laws11(1), 4–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11010004

 

Supervisors

Ian Thompson and Jason Todd

Ivan is currently serving as a Facilitator (Teaching) in the Vice-Chancellor’s Colloquium and as an Editor of the Graduate Inequality Review in the University of Oxford. He has taken up lecturerships in a number of universities in Hong Kong and has run Education, Linguistics, Applied Linguistics, Sociolinguistics, and Academic English courses at undergraduate and postgraduate level.

Prior to joining Oxford, Ivan received his teacher-training in Hong Kong and his postgraduate training in Linguistics (with a specialisation in pragmatics) at University College London. His research interests include: mental representation of word meanings, language acquisition, educational technology, and ELT pedagogy.

Publications

  • Au, I. (2021). Unwinding the Fantasy: Using Breakout Rooms to Promote Language Exposure and Less-Public Feedback Practices in Online Synchronous Teaching. Paper presented at the PASHE 2021 – EAP Education and Practice: Supporting Students’ Needs, UCL (IOE).
  • Au, I. & Yiu, C. (2021). ‘Identity game’: so you think you are what your Instagram bio says about you. Paper presented at the Sociolinguistics Symposium 23, Hong Kong.
  • Au, I. (2021). The magic of breakout rooms in online synchronous teaching and learning of English. Paper presented at the 3rd International Conference on English Across the Curriculum, Hong Kong.
  • Choi, T. H., Chan, H., & Au, I. (2018). ‘Now you’re talking’: Teacher preparation through alumni talks in a community of practice. Paper presented at the Oxford Education Research Symposium.
  • Au, I. (2018). Branching out from the tree: Extending vocabulary acquisition with polysemy. Paper presented at HKBU-HU First Joint Symposium on Education 2018.

 

Supervisors

Elizabeth Wonnacott and Victoria Murphy

Thomas Procter-Legg is a DPhil Student in the Department of Education and is researching restorative practice within the context of special educational needs and disabilities.

His previous experience includes five years as the Head Teacher of a special academy in Oxfordshire UK, specialising in education for students with Special Educational Needs and Disabilities. He has also worked as a SEND Reviewer for Whole School SEND; a Teaching School Director; and as the Principal Designate on a successful Free School bid.

Thomas is passionate about restorative practice and is involved in many communities of practice, such as the Global Alliance for Restorative Justice and Social Justice, where he is a member of the research sub-group exploring the interactions between restorative justice and social justice.

Thomas is also a strong advocate for creativity in education; having previously gained a Fine Art degree from Chelsea College of Art. This heavily influenced his educational leadership and during his time as a Head Teacher, he became the co-founder of a co-constructed initiative between the academy and the University of Oxford Gardens Libraries and Museums. This work placed cultural learning opportunities and relationships at the heart of the curriculum and is the longest standing project between a special school and The University of Oxford. This sustainable partnership champions marginalised voices and has been highly celebrated e.g., inclusion in the Durham Commission for Creativity in Education; recent dissemination at the Museum Ideas Conference 2022; highly commended award at the Museum and Heritage Awards 2021; and awarded Platinum ArtsMark in 2021.

Whilst this creative work may seem to be separate from restorative practice, Thomas subscribes to the idea that there are significant overlaps, both within pedagogical practice and wider school culture, topics which his current research touch on within the context of special education.

 

Publications

Procter-Legg. (2022). A Discourse on Restorative Practice—Participants’ Views of a Divergent Ideology. Laws11(6), 86–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11060086

Procter-Legg. (2022). Practitioner Perspectives on a Restorative Community: An Inductive Evaluative Study of Conceptual, Pedagogical, and Routine Practice. Laws11(1), 4–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11010004

 

Supervisors

Ian Thompson and Jason Todd

Ivan is currently serving as a Facilitator (Teaching) in the Vice-Chancellor’s Colloquium and as an Editor of the Graduate Inequality Review in the University of Oxford. He has taken up lecturerships in a number of universities in Hong Kong and has run Education, Linguistics, Applied Linguistics, Sociolinguistics, and Academic English courses at undergraduate and postgraduate level.

Prior to joining Oxford, Ivan received his teacher-training in Hong Kong and his postgraduate training in Linguistics (with a specialisation in pragmatics) at University College London. His research interests include: mental representation of word meanings, language acquisition, educational technology, and ELT pedagogy.

Publications

  • Au, I. (2021). Unwinding the Fantasy: Using Breakout Rooms to Promote Language Exposure and Less-Public Feedback Practices in Online Synchronous Teaching. Paper presented at the PASHE 2021 – EAP Education and Practice: Supporting Students’ Needs, UCL (IOE).
  • Au, I. & Yiu, C. (2021). ‘Identity game’: so you think you are what your Instagram bio says about you. Paper presented at the Sociolinguistics Symposium 23, Hong Kong.
  • Au, I. (2021). The magic of breakout rooms in online synchronous teaching and learning of English. Paper presented at the 3rd International Conference on English Across the Curriculum, Hong Kong.
  • Choi, T. H., Chan, H., & Au, I. (2018). ‘Now you’re talking’: Teacher preparation through alumni talks in a community of practice. Paper presented at the Oxford Education Research Symposium.
  • Au, I. (2018). Branching out from the tree: Extending vocabulary acquisition with polysemy. Paper presented at HKBU-HU First Joint Symposium on Education 2018.

 

Supervisors

Elizabeth Wonnacott and Victoria Murphy

Thomas Procter-Legg is a DPhil Student in the Department of Education and is researching restorative practice within the context of special educational needs and disabilities.

His previous experience includes five years as the Head Teacher of a special academy in Oxfordshire UK, specialising in education for students with Special Educational Needs and Disabilities. He has also worked as a SEND Reviewer for Whole School SEND; a Teaching School Director; and as the Principal Designate on a successful Free School bid.

Thomas is passionate about restorative practice and is involved in many communities of practice, such as the Global Alliance for Restorative Justice and Social Justice, where he is a member of the research sub-group exploring the interactions between restorative justice and social justice.

Thomas is also a strong advocate for creativity in education; having previously gained a Fine Art degree from Chelsea College of Art. This heavily influenced his educational leadership and during his time as a Head Teacher, he became the co-founder of a co-constructed initiative between the academy and the University of Oxford Gardens Libraries and Museums. This work placed cultural learning opportunities and relationships at the heart of the curriculum and is the longest standing project between a special school and The University of Oxford. This sustainable partnership champions marginalised voices and has been highly celebrated e.g., inclusion in the Durham Commission for Creativity in Education; recent dissemination at the Museum Ideas Conference 2022; highly commended award at the Museum and Heritage Awards 2021; and awarded Platinum ArtsMark in 2021.

Whilst this creative work may seem to be separate from restorative practice, Thomas subscribes to the idea that there are significant overlaps, both within pedagogical practice and wider school culture, topics which his current research touch on within the context of special education.

 

Publications

Procter-Legg. (2022). A Discourse on Restorative Practice—Participants’ Views of a Divergent Ideology. Laws11(6), 86–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11060086

Procter-Legg. (2022). Practitioner Perspectives on a Restorative Community: An Inductive Evaluative Study of Conceptual, Pedagogical, and Routine Practice. Laws11(1), 4–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11010004

 

Supervisors

Ian Thompson and Jason Todd

Ivan is currently serving as a Facilitator (Teaching) in the Vice-Chancellor’s Colloquium and as an Editor of the Graduate Inequality Review in the University of Oxford. He has taken up lecturerships in a number of universities in Hong Kong and has run Education, Linguistics, Applied Linguistics, Sociolinguistics, and Academic English courses at undergraduate and postgraduate level.

Prior to joining Oxford, Ivan received his teacher-training in Hong Kong and his postgraduate training in Linguistics (with a specialisation in pragmatics) at University College London. His research interests include: mental representation of word meanings, language acquisition, educational technology, and ELT pedagogy.

Publications

  • Au, I. (2021). Unwinding the Fantasy: Using Breakout Rooms to Promote Language Exposure and Less-Public Feedback Practices in Online Synchronous Teaching. Paper presented at the PASHE 2021 – EAP Education and Practice: Supporting Students’ Needs, UCL (IOE).
  • Au, I. & Yiu, C. (2021). ‘Identity game’: so you think you are what your Instagram bio says about you. Paper presented at the Sociolinguistics Symposium 23, Hong Kong.
  • Au, I. (2021). The magic of breakout rooms in online synchronous teaching and learning of English. Paper presented at the 3rd International Conference on English Across the Curriculum, Hong Kong.
  • Choi, T. H., Chan, H., & Au, I. (2018). ‘Now you’re talking’: Teacher preparation through alumni talks in a community of practice. Paper presented at the Oxford Education Research Symposium.
  • Au, I. (2018). Branching out from the tree: Extending vocabulary acquisition with polysemy. Paper presented at HKBU-HU First Joint Symposium on Education 2018.

 

Supervisors

Elizabeth Wonnacott and Victoria Murphy

Thomas Procter-Legg is a DPhil Student in the Department of Education and is researching restorative practice within the context of special educational needs and disabilities.

His previous experience includes five years as the Head Teacher of a special academy in Oxfordshire UK, specialising in education for students with Special Educational Needs and Disabilities. He has also worked as a SEND Reviewer for Whole School SEND; a Teaching School Director; and as the Principal Designate on a successful Free School bid.

Thomas is passionate about restorative practice and is involved in many communities of practice, such as the Global Alliance for Restorative Justice and Social Justice, where he is a member of the research sub-group exploring the interactions between restorative justice and social justice.

Thomas is also a strong advocate for creativity in education; having previously gained a Fine Art degree from Chelsea College of Art. This heavily influenced his educational leadership and during his time as a Head Teacher, he became the co-founder of a co-constructed initiative between the academy and the University of Oxford Gardens Libraries and Museums. This work placed cultural learning opportunities and relationships at the heart of the curriculum and is the longest standing project between a special school and The University of Oxford. This sustainable partnership champions marginalised voices and has been highly celebrated e.g., inclusion in the Durham Commission for Creativity in Education; recent dissemination at the Museum Ideas Conference 2022; highly commended award at the Museum and Heritage Awards 2021; and awarded Platinum ArtsMark in 2021.

Whilst this creative work may seem to be separate from restorative practice, Thomas subscribes to the idea that there are significant overlaps, both within pedagogical practice and wider school culture, topics which his current research touch on within the context of special education.

 

Publications

Procter-Legg. (2022). A Discourse on Restorative Practice—Participants’ Views of a Divergent Ideology. Laws11(6), 86–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11060086

Procter-Legg. (2022). Practitioner Perspectives on a Restorative Community: An Inductive Evaluative Study of Conceptual, Pedagogical, and Routine Practice. Laws11(1), 4–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11010004

 

Supervisors

Ian Thompson and Jason Todd

Ivan is currently serving as a Facilitator (Teaching) in the Vice-Chancellor’s Colloquium and as an Editor of the Graduate Inequality Review in the University of Oxford. He has taken up lecturerships in a number of universities in Hong Kong and has run Education, Linguistics, Applied Linguistics, Sociolinguistics, and Academic English courses at undergraduate and postgraduate level.

Prior to joining Oxford, Ivan received his teacher-training in Hong Kong and his postgraduate training in Linguistics (with a specialisation in pragmatics) at University College London. His research interests include: mental representation of word meanings, language acquisition, educational technology, and ELT pedagogy.

Publications

  • Au, I. (2021). Unwinding the Fantasy: Using Breakout Rooms to Promote Language Exposure and Less-Public Feedback Practices in Online Synchronous Teaching. Paper presented at the PASHE 2021 – EAP Education and Practice: Supporting Students’ Needs, UCL (IOE).
  • Au, I. & Yiu, C. (2021). ‘Identity game’: so you think you are what your Instagram bio says about you. Paper presented at the Sociolinguistics Symposium 23, Hong Kong.
  • Au, I. (2021). The magic of breakout rooms in online synchronous teaching and learning of English. Paper presented at the 3rd International Conference on English Across the Curriculum, Hong Kong.
  • Choi, T. H., Chan, H., & Au, I. (2018). ‘Now you’re talking’: Teacher preparation through alumni talks in a community of practice. Paper presented at the Oxford Education Research Symposium.
  • Au, I. (2018). Branching out from the tree: Extending vocabulary acquisition with polysemy. Paper presented at HKBU-HU First Joint Symposium on Education 2018.

 

Supervisors

Elizabeth Wonnacott and Victoria Murphy

Thomas Procter-Legg is a DPhil Student in the Department of Education and is researching restorative practice within the context of special educational needs and disabilities.

His previous experience includes five years as the Head Teacher of a special academy in Oxfordshire UK, specialising in education for students with Special Educational Needs and Disabilities. He has also worked as a SEND Reviewer for Whole School SEND; a Teaching School Director; and as the Principal Designate on a successful Free School bid.

Thomas is passionate about restorative practice and is involved in many communities of practice, such as the Global Alliance for Restorative Justice and Social Justice, where he is a member of the research sub-group exploring the interactions between restorative justice and social justice.

Thomas is also a strong advocate for creativity in education; having previously gained a Fine Art degree from Chelsea College of Art. This heavily influenced his educational leadership and during his time as a Head Teacher, he became the co-founder of a co-constructed initiative between the academy and the University of Oxford Gardens Libraries and Museums. This work placed cultural learning opportunities and relationships at the heart of the curriculum and is the longest standing project between a special school and The University of Oxford. This sustainable partnership champions marginalised voices and has been highly celebrated e.g., inclusion in the Durham Commission for Creativity in Education; recent dissemination at the Museum Ideas Conference 2022; highly commended award at the Museum and Heritage Awards 2021; and awarded Platinum ArtsMark in 2021.

Whilst this creative work may seem to be separate from restorative practice, Thomas subscribes to the idea that there are significant overlaps, both within pedagogical practice and wider school culture, topics which his current research touch on within the context of special education.

 

Publications

Procter-Legg. (2022). A Discourse on Restorative Practice—Participants’ Views of a Divergent Ideology. Laws11(6), 86–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11060086

Procter-Legg. (2022). Practitioner Perspectives on a Restorative Community: An Inductive Evaluative Study of Conceptual, Pedagogical, and Routine Practice. Laws11(1), 4–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11010004

 

Supervisors

Ian Thompson and Jason Todd

Ivan is currently serving as a Facilitator (Teaching) in the Vice-Chancellor’s Colloquium and as an Editor of the Graduate Inequality Review in the University of Oxford. He has taken up lecturerships in a number of universities in Hong Kong and has run Education, Linguistics, Applied Linguistics, Sociolinguistics, and Academic English courses at undergraduate and postgraduate level.

Prior to joining Oxford, Ivan received his teacher-training in Hong Kong and his postgraduate training in Linguistics (with a specialisation in pragmatics) at University College London. His research interests include: mental representation of word meanings, language acquisition, educational technology, and ELT pedagogy.

Publications

  • Au, I. (2021). Unwinding the Fantasy: Using Breakout Rooms to Promote Language Exposure and Less-Public Feedback Practices in Online Synchronous Teaching. Paper presented at the PASHE 2021 – EAP Education and Practice: Supporting Students’ Needs, UCL (IOE).
  • Au, I. & Yiu, C. (2021). ‘Identity game’: so you think you are what your Instagram bio says about you. Paper presented at the Sociolinguistics Symposium 23, Hong Kong.
  • Au, I. (2021). The magic of breakout rooms in online synchronous teaching and learning of English. Paper presented at the 3rd International Conference on English Across the Curriculum, Hong Kong.
  • Choi, T. H., Chan, H., & Au, I. (2018). ‘Now you’re talking’: Teacher preparation through alumni talks in a community of practice. Paper presented at the Oxford Education Research Symposium.
  • Au, I. (2018). Branching out from the tree: Extending vocabulary acquisition with polysemy. Paper presented at HKBU-HU First Joint Symposium on Education 2018.

 

Supervisors

Elizabeth Wonnacott and Victoria Murphy

Thomas Procter-Legg is a DPhil Student in the Department of Education and is researching restorative practice within the context of special educational needs and disabilities.

His previous experience includes five years as the Head Teacher of a special academy in Oxfordshire UK, specialising in education for students with Special Educational Needs and Disabilities. He has also worked as a SEND Reviewer for Whole School SEND; a Teaching School Director; and as the Principal Designate on a successful Free School bid.

Thomas is passionate about restorative practice and is involved in many communities of practice, such as the Global Alliance for Restorative Justice and Social Justice, where he is a member of the research sub-group exploring the interactions between restorative justice and social justice.

Thomas is also a strong advocate for creativity in education; having previously gained a Fine Art degree from Chelsea College of Art. This heavily influenced his educational leadership and during his time as a Head Teacher, he became the co-founder of a co-constructed initiative between the academy and the University of Oxford Gardens Libraries and Museums. This work placed cultural learning opportunities and relationships at the heart of the curriculum and is the longest standing project between a special school and The University of Oxford. This sustainable partnership champions marginalised voices and has been highly celebrated e.g., inclusion in the Durham Commission for Creativity in Education; recent dissemination at the Museum Ideas Conference 2022; highly commended award at the Museum and Heritage Awards 2021; and awarded Platinum ArtsMark in 2021.

Whilst this creative work may seem to be separate from restorative practice, Thomas subscribes to the idea that there are significant overlaps, both within pedagogical practice and wider school culture, topics which his current research touch on within the context of special education.

 

Publications

Procter-Legg. (2022). A Discourse on Restorative Practice—Participants’ Views of a Divergent Ideology. Laws11(6), 86–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11060086

Procter-Legg. (2022). Practitioner Perspectives on a Restorative Community: An Inductive Evaluative Study of Conceptual, Pedagogical, and Routine Practice. Laws11(1), 4–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11010004

 

Supervisors

Ian Thompson and Jason Todd

Ivan is currently serving as a Facilitator (Teaching) in the Vice-Chancellor’s Colloquium and as an Editor of the Graduate Inequality Review in the University of Oxford. He has taken up lecturerships in a number of universities in Hong Kong and has run Education, Linguistics, Applied Linguistics, Sociolinguistics, and Academic English courses at undergraduate and postgraduate level.

Prior to joining Oxford, Ivan received his teacher-training in Hong Kong and his postgraduate training in Linguistics (with a specialisation in pragmatics) at University College London. His research interests include: mental representation of word meanings, language acquisition, educational technology, and ELT pedagogy.

Publications

  • Au, I. (2021). Unwinding the Fantasy: Using Breakout Rooms to Promote Language Exposure and Less-Public Feedback Practices in Online Synchronous Teaching. Paper presented at the PASHE 2021 – EAP Education and Practice: Supporting Students’ Needs, UCL (IOE).
  • Au, I. & Yiu, C. (2021). ‘Identity game’: so you think you are what your Instagram bio says about you. Paper presented at the Sociolinguistics Symposium 23, Hong Kong.
  • Au, I. (2021). The magic of breakout rooms in online synchronous teaching and learning of English. Paper presented at the 3rd International Conference on English Across the Curriculum, Hong Kong.
  • Choi, T. H., Chan, H., & Au, I. (2018). ‘Now you’re talking’: Teacher preparation through alumni talks in a community of practice. Paper presented at the Oxford Education Research Symposium.
  • Au, I. (2018). Branching out from the tree: Extending vocabulary acquisition with polysemy. Paper presented at HKBU-HU First Joint Symposium on Education 2018.

 

Supervisors

Elizabeth Wonnacott and Victoria Murphy

Thomas Procter-Legg is a DPhil Student in the Department of Education and is researching restorative practice within the context of special educational needs and disabilities.

His previous experience includes five years as the Head Teacher of a special academy in Oxfordshire UK, specialising in education for students with Special Educational Needs and Disabilities. He has also worked as a SEND Reviewer for Whole School SEND; a Teaching School Director; and as the Principal Designate on a successful Free School bid.

Thomas is passionate about restorative practice and is involved in many communities of practice, such as the Global Alliance for Restorative Justice and Social Justice, where he is a member of the research sub-group exploring the interactions between restorative justice and social justice.

Thomas is also a strong advocate for creativity in education; having previously gained a Fine Art degree from Chelsea College of Art. This heavily influenced his educational leadership and during his time as a Head Teacher, he became the co-founder of a co-constructed initiative between the academy and the University of Oxford Gardens Libraries and Museums. This work placed cultural learning opportunities and relationships at the heart of the curriculum and is the longest standing project between a special school and The University of Oxford. This sustainable partnership champions marginalised voices and has been highly celebrated e.g., inclusion in the Durham Commission for Creativity in Education; recent dissemination at the Museum Ideas Conference 2022; highly commended award at the Museum and Heritage Awards 2021; and awarded Platinum ArtsMark in 2021.

Whilst this creative work may seem to be separate from restorative practice, Thomas subscribes to the idea that there are significant overlaps, both within pedagogical practice and wider school culture, topics which his current research touch on within the context of special education.

 

Publications

Procter-Legg. (2022). A Discourse on Restorative Practice—Participants’ Views of a Divergent Ideology. Laws11(6), 86–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11060086

Procter-Legg. (2022). Practitioner Perspectives on a Restorative Community: An Inductive Evaluative Study of Conceptual, Pedagogical, and Routine Practice. Laws11(1), 4–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11010004

 

Supervisors

Ian Thompson and Jason Todd

Ivan is currently serving as a Facilitator (Teaching) in the Vice-Chancellor’s Colloquium and as an Editor of the Graduate Inequality Review in the University of Oxford. He has taken up lecturerships in a number of universities in Hong Kong and has run Education, Linguistics, Applied Linguistics, Sociolinguistics, and Academic English courses at undergraduate and postgraduate level.

Prior to joining Oxford, Ivan received his teacher-training in Hong Kong and his postgraduate training in Linguistics (with a specialisation in pragmatics) at University College London. His research interests include: mental representation of word meanings, language acquisition, educational technology, and ELT pedagogy.

Publications

  • Au, I. (2021). Unwinding the Fantasy: Using Breakout Rooms to Promote Language Exposure and Less-Public Feedback Practices in Online Synchronous Teaching. Paper presented at the PASHE 2021 – EAP Education and Practice: Supporting Students’ Needs, UCL (IOE).
  • Au, I. & Yiu, C. (2021). ‘Identity game’: so you think you are what your Instagram bio says about you. Paper presented at the Sociolinguistics Symposium 23, Hong Kong.
  • Au, I. (2021). The magic of breakout rooms in online synchronous teaching and learning of English. Paper presented at the 3rd International Conference on English Across the Curriculum, Hong Kong.
  • Choi, T. H., Chan, H., & Au, I. (2018). ‘Now you’re talking’: Teacher preparation through alumni talks in a community of practice. Paper presented at the Oxford Education Research Symposium.
  • Au, I. (2018). Branching out from the tree: Extending vocabulary acquisition with polysemy. Paper presented at HKBU-HU First Joint Symposium on Education 2018.

 

Supervisors

Elizabeth Wonnacott and Victoria Murphy

Thomas Procter-Legg is a DPhil Student in the Department of Education and is researching restorative practice within the context of special educational needs and disabilities.

His previous experience includes five years as the Head Teacher of a special academy in Oxfordshire UK, specialising in education for students with Special Educational Needs and Disabilities. He has also worked as a SEND Reviewer for Whole School SEND; a Teaching School Director; and as the Principal Designate on a successful Free School bid.

Thomas is passionate about restorative practice and is involved in many communities of practice, such as the Global Alliance for Restorative Justice and Social Justice, where he is a member of the research sub-group exploring the interactions between restorative justice and social justice.

Thomas is also a strong advocate for creativity in education; having previously gained a Fine Art degree from Chelsea College of Art. This heavily influenced his educational leadership and during his time as a Head Teacher, he became the co-founder of a co-constructed initiative between the academy and the University of Oxford Gardens Libraries and Museums. This work placed cultural learning opportunities and relationships at the heart of the curriculum and is the longest standing project between a special school and The University of Oxford. This sustainable partnership champions marginalised voices and has been highly celebrated e.g., inclusion in the Durham Commission for Creativity in Education; recent dissemination at the Museum Ideas Conference 2022; highly commended award at the Museum and Heritage Awards 2021; and awarded Platinum ArtsMark in 2021.

Whilst this creative work may seem to be separate from restorative practice, Thomas subscribes to the idea that there are significant overlaps, both within pedagogical practice and wider school culture, topics which his current research touch on within the context of special education.

 

Publications

Procter-Legg. (2022). A Discourse on Restorative Practice—Participants’ Views of a Divergent Ideology. Laws11(6), 86–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11060086

Procter-Legg. (2022). Practitioner Perspectives on a Restorative Community: An Inductive Evaluative Study of Conceptual, Pedagogical, and Routine Practice. Laws11(1), 4–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11010004

 

Supervisors

Ian Thompson and Jason Todd

Ivan is currently serving as a Facilitator (Teaching) in the Vice-Chancellor’s Colloquium and as an Editor of the Graduate Inequality Review in the University of Oxford. He has taken up lecturerships in a number of universities in Hong Kong and has run Education, Linguistics, Applied Linguistics, Sociolinguistics, and Academic English courses at undergraduate and postgraduate level.

Prior to joining Oxford, Ivan received his teacher-training in Hong Kong and his postgraduate training in Linguistics (with a specialisation in pragmatics) at University College London. His research interests include: mental representation of word meanings, language acquisition, educational technology, and ELT pedagogy.

Publications

  • Au, I. (2021). Unwinding the Fantasy: Using Breakout Rooms to Promote Language Exposure and Less-Public Feedback Practices in Online Synchronous Teaching. Paper presented at the PASHE 2021 – EAP Education and Practice: Supporting Students’ Needs, UCL (IOE).
  • Au, I. & Yiu, C. (2021). ‘Identity game’: so you think you are what your Instagram bio says about you. Paper presented at the Sociolinguistics Symposium 23, Hong Kong.
  • Au, I. (2021). The magic of breakout rooms in online synchronous teaching and learning of English. Paper presented at the 3rd International Conference on English Across the Curriculum, Hong Kong.
  • Choi, T. H., Chan, H., & Au, I. (2018). ‘Now you’re talking’: Teacher preparation through alumni talks in a community of practice. Paper presented at the Oxford Education Research Symposium.
  • Au, I. (2018). Branching out from the tree: Extending vocabulary acquisition with polysemy. Paper presented at HKBU-HU First Joint Symposium on Education 2018.

 

Supervisors

Elizabeth Wonnacott and Victoria Murphy

Thomas Procter-Legg is a DPhil Student in the Department of Education and is researching restorative practice within the context of special educational needs and disabilities.

His previous experience includes five years as the Head Teacher of a special academy in Oxfordshire UK, specialising in education for students with Special Educational Needs and Disabilities. He has also worked as a SEND Reviewer for Whole School SEND; a Teaching School Director; and as the Principal Designate on a successful Free School bid.

Thomas is passionate about restorative practice and is involved in many communities of practice, such as the Global Alliance for Restorative Justice and Social Justice, where he is a member of the research sub-group exploring the interactions between restorative justice and social justice.

Thomas is also a strong advocate for creativity in education; having previously gained a Fine Art degree from Chelsea College of Art. This heavily influenced his educational leadership and during his time as a Head Teacher, he became the co-founder of a co-constructed initiative between the academy and the University of Oxford Gardens Libraries and Museums. This work placed cultural learning opportunities and relationships at the heart of the curriculum and is the longest standing project between a special school and The University of Oxford. This sustainable partnership champions marginalised voices and has been highly celebrated e.g., inclusion in the Durham Commission for Creativity in Education; recent dissemination at the Museum Ideas Conference 2022; highly commended award at the Museum and Heritage Awards 2021; and awarded Platinum ArtsMark in 2021.

Whilst this creative work may seem to be separate from restorative practice, Thomas subscribes to the idea that there are significant overlaps, both within pedagogical practice and wider school culture, topics which his current research touch on within the context of special education.

 

Publications

Procter-Legg. (2022). A Discourse on Restorative Practice—Participants’ Views of a Divergent Ideology. Laws11(6), 86–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11060086

Procter-Legg. (2022). Practitioner Perspectives on a Restorative Community: An Inductive Evaluative Study of Conceptual, Pedagogical, and Routine Practice. Laws11(1), 4–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11010004

 

Supervisors

Ian Thompson and Jason Todd

Ivan is currently serving as a Facilitator (Teaching) in the Vice-Chancellor’s Colloquium and as an Editor of the Graduate Inequality Review in the University of Oxford. He has taken up lecturerships in a number of universities in Hong Kong and has run Education, Linguistics, Applied Linguistics, Sociolinguistics, and Academic English courses at undergraduate and postgraduate level.

Prior to joining Oxford, Ivan received his teacher-training in Hong Kong and his postgraduate training in Linguistics (with a specialisation in pragmatics) at University College London. His research interests include: mental representation of word meanings, language acquisition, educational technology, and ELT pedagogy.

Publications

  • Au, I. (2021). Unwinding the Fantasy: Using Breakout Rooms to Promote Language Exposure and Less-Public Feedback Practices in Online Synchronous Teaching. Paper presented at the PASHE 2021 – EAP Education and Practice: Supporting Students’ Needs, UCL (IOE).
  • Au, I. & Yiu, C. (2021). ‘Identity game’: so you think you are what your Instagram bio says about you. Paper presented at the Sociolinguistics Symposium 23, Hong Kong.
  • Au, I. (2021). The magic of breakout rooms in online synchronous teaching and learning of English. Paper presented at the 3rd International Conference on English Across the Curriculum, Hong Kong.
  • Choi, T. H., Chan, H., & Au, I. (2018). ‘Now you’re talking’: Teacher preparation through alumni talks in a community of practice. Paper presented at the Oxford Education Research Symposium.
  • Au, I. (2018). Branching out from the tree: Extending vocabulary acquisition with polysemy. Paper presented at HKBU-HU First Joint Symposium on Education 2018.

 

Supervisors

Elizabeth Wonnacott and Victoria Murphy

Thomas Procter-Legg is a DPhil Student in the Department of Education and is researching restorative practice within the context of special educational needs and disabilities.

His previous experience includes five years as the Head Teacher of a special academy in Oxfordshire UK, specialising in education for students with Special Educational Needs and Disabilities. He has also worked as a SEND Reviewer for Whole School SEND; a Teaching School Director; and as the Principal Designate on a successful Free School bid.

Thomas is passionate about restorative practice and is involved in many communities of practice, such as the Global Alliance for Restorative Justice and Social Justice, where he is a member of the research sub-group exploring the interactions between restorative justice and social justice.

Thomas is also a strong advocate for creativity in education; having previously gained a Fine Art degree from Chelsea College of Art. This heavily influenced his educational leadership and during his time as a Head Teacher, he became the co-founder of a co-constructed initiative between the academy and the University of Oxford Gardens Libraries and Museums. This work placed cultural learning opportunities and relationships at the heart of the curriculum and is the longest standing project between a special school and The University of Oxford. This sustainable partnership champions marginalised voices and has been highly celebrated e.g., inclusion in the Durham Commission for Creativity in Education; recent dissemination at the Museum Ideas Conference 2022; highly commended award at the Museum and Heritage Awards 2021; and awarded Platinum ArtsMark in 2021.

Whilst this creative work may seem to be separate from restorative practice, Thomas subscribes to the idea that there are significant overlaps, both within pedagogical practice and wider school culture, topics which his current research touch on within the context of special education.

 

Publications

Procter-Legg. (2022). A Discourse on Restorative Practice—Participants’ Views of a Divergent Ideology. Laws11(6), 86–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11060086

Procter-Legg. (2022). Practitioner Perspectives on a Restorative Community: An Inductive Evaluative Study of Conceptual, Pedagogical, and Routine Practice. Laws11(1), 4–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11010004

 

Supervisors

Ian Thompson and Jason Todd

Ivan is currently serving as a Facilitator (Teaching) in the Vice-Chancellor’s Colloquium and as an Editor of the Graduate Inequality Review in the University of Oxford. He has taken up lecturerships in a number of universities in Hong Kong and has run Education, Linguistics, Applied Linguistics, Sociolinguistics, and Academic English courses at undergraduate and postgraduate level.

Prior to joining Oxford, Ivan received his teacher-training in Hong Kong and his postgraduate training in Linguistics (with a specialisation in pragmatics) at University College London. His research interests include: mental representation of word meanings, language acquisition, educational technology, and ELT pedagogy.

Publications

  • Au, I. (2021). Unwinding the Fantasy: Using Breakout Rooms to Promote Language Exposure and Less-Public Feedback Practices in Online Synchronous Teaching. Paper presented at the PASHE 2021 – EAP Education and Practice: Supporting Students’ Needs, UCL (IOE).
  • Au, I. & Yiu, C. (2021). ‘Identity game’: so you think you are what your Instagram bio says about you. Paper presented at the Sociolinguistics Symposium 23, Hong Kong.
  • Au, I. (2021). The magic of breakout rooms in online synchronous teaching and learning of English. Paper presented at the 3rd International Conference on English Across the Curriculum, Hong Kong.
  • Choi, T. H., Chan, H., & Au, I. (2018). ‘Now you’re talking’: Teacher preparation through alumni talks in a community of practice. Paper presented at the Oxford Education Research Symposium.
  • Au, I. (2018). Branching out from the tree: Extending vocabulary acquisition with polysemy. Paper presented at HKBU-HU First Joint Symposium on Education 2018.

 

Supervisors

Elizabeth Wonnacott and Victoria Murphy

Thomas Procter-Legg is a DPhil Student in the Department of Education and is researching restorative practice within the context of special educational needs and disabilities.

His previous experience includes five years as the Head Teacher of a special academy in Oxfordshire UK, specialising in education for students with Special Educational Needs and Disabilities. He has also worked as a SEND Reviewer for Whole School SEND; a Teaching School Director; and as the Principal Designate on a successful Free School bid.

Thomas is passionate about restorative practice and is involved in many communities of practice, such as the Global Alliance for Restorative Justice and Social Justice, where he is a member of the research sub-group exploring the interactions between restorative justice and social justice.

Thomas is also a strong advocate for creativity in education; having previously gained a Fine Art degree from Chelsea College of Art. This heavily influenced his educational leadership and during his time as a Head Teacher, he became the co-founder of a co-constructed initiative between the academy and the University of Oxford Gardens Libraries and Museums. This work placed cultural learning opportunities and relationships at the heart of the curriculum and is the longest standing project between a special school and The University of Oxford. This sustainable partnership champions marginalised voices and has been highly celebrated e.g., inclusion in the Durham Commission for Creativity in Education; recent dissemination at the Museum Ideas Conference 2022; highly commended award at the Museum and Heritage Awards 2021; and awarded Platinum ArtsMark in 2021.

Whilst this creative work may seem to be separate from restorative practice, Thomas subscribes to the idea that there are significant overlaps, both within pedagogical practice and wider school culture, topics which his current research touch on within the context of special education.

 

Publications

Procter-Legg. (2022). A Discourse on Restorative Practice—Participants’ Views of a Divergent Ideology. Laws11(6), 86–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11060086

Procter-Legg. (2022). Practitioner Perspectives on a Restorative Community: An Inductive Evaluative Study of Conceptual, Pedagogical, and Routine Practice. Laws11(1), 4–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11010004

 

Supervisors

Ian Thompson and Jason Todd

Ivan is currently serving as a Facilitator (Teaching) in the Vice-Chancellor’s Colloquium and as an Editor of the Graduate Inequality Review in the University of Oxford. He has taken up lecturerships in a number of universities in Hong Kong and has run Education, Linguistics, Applied Linguistics, Sociolinguistics, and Academic English courses at undergraduate and postgraduate level.

Prior to joining Oxford, Ivan received his teacher-training in Hong Kong and his postgraduate training in Linguistics (with a specialisation in pragmatics) at University College London. His research interests include: mental representation of word meanings, language acquisition, educational technology, and ELT pedagogy.

Publications

  • Au, I. (2021). Unwinding the Fantasy: Using Breakout Rooms to Promote Language Exposure and Less-Public Feedback Practices in Online Synchronous Teaching. Paper presented at the PASHE 2021 – EAP Education and Practice: Supporting Students’ Needs, UCL (IOE).
  • Au, I. & Yiu, C. (2021). ‘Identity game’: so you think you are what your Instagram bio says about you. Paper presented at the Sociolinguistics Symposium 23, Hong Kong.
  • Au, I. (2021). The magic of breakout rooms in online synchronous teaching and learning of English. Paper presented at the 3rd International Conference on English Across the Curriculum, Hong Kong.
  • Choi, T. H., Chan, H., & Au, I. (2018). ‘Now you’re talking’: Teacher preparation through alumni talks in a community of practice. Paper presented at the Oxford Education Research Symposium.
  • Au, I. (2018). Branching out from the tree: Extending vocabulary acquisition with polysemy. Paper presented at HKBU-HU First Joint Symposium on Education 2018.

 

Supervisors

Elizabeth Wonnacott and Victoria Murphy

Thomas Procter-Legg is a DPhil Student in the Department of Education and is researching restorative practice within the context of special educational needs and disabilities.

His previous experience includes five years as the Head Teacher of a special academy in Oxfordshire UK, specialising in education for students with Special Educational Needs and Disabilities. He has also worked as a SEND Reviewer for Whole School SEND; a Teaching School Director; and as the Principal Designate on a successful Free School bid.

Thomas is passionate about restorative practice and is involved in many communities of practice, such as the Global Alliance for Restorative Justice and Social Justice, where he is a member of the research sub-group exploring the interactions between restorative justice and social justice.

Thomas is also a strong advocate for creativity in education; having previously gained a Fine Art degree from Chelsea College of Art. This heavily influenced his educational leadership and during his time as a Head Teacher, he became the co-founder of a co-constructed initiative between the academy and the University of Oxford Gardens Libraries and Museums. This work placed cultural learning opportunities and relationships at the heart of the curriculum and is the longest standing project between a special school and The University of Oxford. This sustainable partnership champions marginalised voices and has been highly celebrated e.g., inclusion in the Durham Commission for Creativity in Education; recent dissemination at the Museum Ideas Conference 2022; highly commended award at the Museum and Heritage Awards 2021; and awarded Platinum ArtsMark in 2021.

Whilst this creative work may seem to be separate from restorative practice, Thomas subscribes to the idea that there are significant overlaps, both within pedagogical practice and wider school culture, topics which his current research touch on within the context of special education.

 

Publications

Procter-Legg. (2022). A Discourse on Restorative Practice—Participants’ Views of a Divergent Ideology. Laws11(6), 86–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11060086

Procter-Legg. (2022). Practitioner Perspectives on a Restorative Community: An Inductive Evaluative Study of Conceptual, Pedagogical, and Routine Practice. Laws11(1), 4–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11010004

 

Supervisors

Ian Thompson and Jason Todd

Ivan is currently serving as a Facilitator (Teaching) in the Vice-Chancellor’s Colloquium and as an Editor of the Graduate Inequality Review in the University of Oxford. He has taken up lecturerships in a number of universities in Hong Kong and has run Education, Linguistics, Applied Linguistics, Sociolinguistics, and Academic English courses at undergraduate and postgraduate level.

Prior to joining Oxford, Ivan received his teacher-training in Hong Kong and his postgraduate training in Linguistics (with a specialisation in pragmatics) at University College London. His research interests include: mental representation of word meanings, language acquisition, educational technology, and ELT pedagogy.

Publications

  • Au, I. (2021). Unwinding the Fantasy: Using Breakout Rooms to Promote Language Exposure and Less-Public Feedback Practices in Online Synchronous Teaching. Paper presented at the PASHE 2021 – EAP Education and Practice: Supporting Students’ Needs, UCL (IOE).
  • Au, I. & Yiu, C. (2021). ‘Identity game’: so you think you are what your Instagram bio says about you. Paper presented at the Sociolinguistics Symposium 23, Hong Kong.
  • Au, I. (2021). The magic of breakout rooms in online synchronous teaching and learning of English. Paper presented at the 3rd International Conference on English Across the Curriculum, Hong Kong.
  • Choi, T. H., Chan, H., & Au, I. (2018). ‘Now you’re talking’: Teacher preparation through alumni talks in a community of practice. Paper presented at the Oxford Education Research Symposium.
  • Au, I. (2018). Branching out from the tree: Extending vocabulary acquisition with polysemy. Paper presented at HKBU-HU First Joint Symposium on Education 2018.

 

Supervisors

Elizabeth Wonnacott and Victoria Murphy

Thomas Procter-Legg is a DPhil Student in the Department of Education and is researching restorative practice within the context of special educational needs and disabilities.

His previous experience includes five years as the Head Teacher of a special academy in Oxfordshire UK, specialising in education for students with Special Educational Needs and Disabilities. He has also worked as a SEND Reviewer for Whole School SEND; a Teaching School Director; and as the Principal Designate on a successful Free School bid.

Thomas is passionate about restorative practice and is involved in many communities of practice, such as the Global Alliance for Restorative Justice and Social Justice, where he is a member of the research sub-group exploring the interactions between restorative justice and social justice.

Thomas is also a strong advocate for creativity in education; having previously gained a Fine Art degree from Chelsea College of Art. This heavily influenced his educational leadership and during his time as a Head Teacher, he became the co-founder of a co-constructed initiative between the academy and the University of Oxford Gardens Libraries and Museums. This work placed cultural learning opportunities and relationships at the heart of the curriculum and is the longest standing project between a special school and The University of Oxford. This sustainable partnership champions marginalised voices and has been highly celebrated e.g., inclusion in the Durham Commission for Creativity in Education; recent dissemination at the Museum Ideas Conference 2022; highly commended award at the Museum and Heritage Awards 2021; and awarded Platinum ArtsMark in 2021.

Whilst this creative work may seem to be separate from restorative practice, Thomas subscribes to the idea that there are significant overlaps, both within pedagogical practice and wider school culture, topics which his current research touch on within the context of special education.

 

Publications

Procter-Legg. (2022). A Discourse on Restorative Practice—Participants’ Views of a Divergent Ideology. Laws11(6), 86–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11060086

Procter-Legg. (2022). Practitioner Perspectives on a Restorative Community: An Inductive Evaluative Study of Conceptual, Pedagogical, and Routine Practice. Laws11(1), 4–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11010004

 

Supervisors

Ian Thompson and Jason Todd

Ivan is currently serving as a Facilitator (Teaching) in the Vice-Chancellor’s Colloquium and as an Editor of the Graduate Inequality Review in the University of Oxford. He has taken up lecturerships in a number of universities in Hong Kong and has run Education, Linguistics, Applied Linguistics, Sociolinguistics, and Academic English courses at undergraduate and postgraduate level.

Prior to joining Oxford, Ivan received his teacher-training in Hong Kong and his postgraduate training in Linguistics (with a specialisation in pragmatics) at University College London. His research interests include: mental representation of word meanings, language acquisition, educational technology, and ELT pedagogy.

Publications

  • Au, I. (2021). Unwinding the Fantasy: Using Breakout Rooms to Promote Language Exposure and Less-Public Feedback Practices in Online Synchronous Teaching. Paper presented at the PASHE 2021 – EAP Education and Practice: Supporting Students’ Needs, UCL (IOE).
  • Au, I. & Yiu, C. (2021). ‘Identity game’: so you think you are what your Instagram bio says about you. Paper presented at the Sociolinguistics Symposium 23, Hong Kong.
  • Au, I. (2021). The magic of breakout rooms in online synchronous teaching and learning of English. Paper presented at the 3rd International Conference on English Across the Curriculum, Hong Kong.
  • Choi, T. H., Chan, H., & Au, I. (2018). ‘Now you’re talking’: Teacher preparation through alumni talks in a community of practice. Paper presented at the Oxford Education Research Symposium.
  • Au, I. (2018). Branching out from the tree: Extending vocabulary acquisition with polysemy. Paper presented at HKBU-HU First Joint Symposium on Education 2018.

 

Supervisors

Elizabeth Wonnacott and Victoria Murphy

Thomas Procter-Legg is a DPhil Student in the Department of Education and is researching restorative practice within the context of special educational needs and disabilities.

His previous experience includes five years as the Head Teacher of a special academy in Oxfordshire UK, specialising in education for students with Special Educational Needs and Disabilities. He has also worked as a SEND Reviewer for Whole School SEND; a Teaching School Director; and as the Principal Designate on a successful Free School bid.

Thomas is passionate about restorative practice and is involved in many communities of practice, such as the Global Alliance for Restorative Justice and Social Justice, where he is a member of the research sub-group exploring the interactions between restorative justice and social justice.

Thomas is also a strong advocate for creativity in education; having previously gained a Fine Art degree from Chelsea College of Art. This heavily influenced his educational leadership and during his time as a Head Teacher, he became the co-founder of a co-constructed initiative between the academy and the University of Oxford Gardens Libraries and Museums. This work placed cultural learning opportunities and relationships at the heart of the curriculum and is the longest standing project between a special school and The University of Oxford. This sustainable partnership champions marginalised voices and has been highly celebrated e.g., inclusion in the Durham Commission for Creativity in Education; recent dissemination at the Museum Ideas Conference 2022; highly commended award at the Museum and Heritage Awards 2021; and awarded Platinum ArtsMark in 2021.

Whilst this creative work may seem to be separate from restorative practice, Thomas subscribes to the idea that there are significant overlaps, both within pedagogical practice and wider school culture, topics which his current research touch on within the context of special education.

 

Publications

Procter-Legg. (2022). A Discourse on Restorative Practice—Participants’ Views of a Divergent Ideology. Laws11(6), 86–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11060086

Procter-Legg. (2022). Practitioner Perspectives on a Restorative Community: An Inductive Evaluative Study of Conceptual, Pedagogical, and Routine Practice. Laws11(1), 4–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11010004

 

Supervisors

Ian Thompson and Jason Todd

Ivan is currently serving as a Facilitator (Teaching) in the Vice-Chancellor’s Colloquium and as an Editor of the Graduate Inequality Review in the University of Oxford. He has taken up lecturerships in a number of universities in Hong Kong and has run Education, Linguistics, Applied Linguistics, Sociolinguistics, and Academic English courses at undergraduate and postgraduate level.

Prior to joining Oxford, Ivan received his teacher-training in Hong Kong and his postgraduate training in Linguistics (with a specialisation in pragmatics) at University College London. His research interests include: mental representation of word meanings, language acquisition, educational technology, and ELT pedagogy.

Publications

  • Au, I. (2021). Unwinding the Fantasy: Using Breakout Rooms to Promote Language Exposure and Less-Public Feedback Practices in Online Synchronous Teaching. Paper presented at the PASHE 2021 – EAP Education and Practice: Supporting Students’ Needs, UCL (IOE).
  • Au, I. & Yiu, C. (2021). ‘Identity game’: so you think you are what your Instagram bio says about you. Paper presented at the Sociolinguistics Symposium 23, Hong Kong.
  • Au, I. (2021). The magic of breakout rooms in online synchronous teaching and learning of English. Paper presented at the 3rd International Conference on English Across the Curriculum, Hong Kong.
  • Choi, T. H., Chan, H., & Au, I. (2018). ‘Now you’re talking’: Teacher preparation through alumni talks in a community of practice. Paper presented at the Oxford Education Research Symposium.
  • Au, I. (2018). Branching out from the tree: Extending vocabulary acquisition with polysemy. Paper presented at HKBU-HU First Joint Symposium on Education 2018.

 

Supervisors

Elizabeth Wonnacott and Victoria Murphy

Thomas Procter-Legg is a DPhil Student in the Department of Education and is researching restorative practice within the context of special educational needs and disabilities.

His previous experience includes five years as the Head Teacher of a special academy in Oxfordshire UK, specialising in education for students with Special Educational Needs and Disabilities. He has also worked as a SEND Reviewer for Whole School SEND; a Teaching School Director; and as the Principal Designate on a successful Free School bid.

Thomas is passionate about restorative practice and is involved in many communities of practice, such as the Global Alliance for Restorative Justice and Social Justice, where he is a member of the research sub-group exploring the interactions between restorative justice and social justice.

Thomas is also a strong advocate for creativity in education; having previously gained a Fine Art degree from Chelsea College of Art. This heavily influenced his educational leadership and during his time as a Head Teacher, he became the co-founder of a co-constructed initiative between the academy and the University of Oxford Gardens Libraries and Museums. This work placed cultural learning opportunities and relationships at the heart of the curriculum and is the longest standing project between a special school and The University of Oxford. This sustainable partnership champions marginalised voices and has been highly celebrated e.g., inclusion in the Durham Commission for Creativity in Education; recent dissemination at the Museum Ideas Conference 2022; highly commended award at the Museum and Heritage Awards 2021; and awarded Platinum ArtsMark in 2021.

Whilst this creative work may seem to be separate from restorative practice, Thomas subscribes to the idea that there are significant overlaps, both within pedagogical practice and wider school culture, topics which his current research touch on within the context of special education.

 

Publications

Procter-Legg. (2022). A Discourse on Restorative Practice—Participants’ Views of a Divergent Ideology. Laws11(6), 86–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11060086

Procter-Legg. (2022). Practitioner Perspectives on a Restorative Community: An Inductive Evaluative Study of Conceptual, Pedagogical, and Routine Practice. Laws11(1), 4–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11010004

 

Supervisors

Ian Thompson and Jason Todd

Ivan is currently serving as a Facilitator (Teaching) in the Vice-Chancellor’s Colloquium and as an Editor of the Graduate Inequality Review in the University of Oxford. He has taken up lecturerships in a number of universities in Hong Kong and has run Education, Linguistics, Applied Linguistics, Sociolinguistics, and Academic English courses at undergraduate and postgraduate level.

Prior to joining Oxford, Ivan received his teacher-training in Hong Kong and his postgraduate training in Linguistics (with a specialisation in pragmatics) at University College London. His research interests include: mental representation of word meanings, language acquisition, educational technology, and ELT pedagogy.

Publications

  • Au, I. (2021). Unwinding the Fantasy: Using Breakout Rooms to Promote Language Exposure and Less-Public Feedback Practices in Online Synchronous Teaching. Paper presented at the PASHE 2021 – EAP Education and Practice: Supporting Students’ Needs, UCL (IOE).
  • Au, I. & Yiu, C. (2021). ‘Identity game’: so you think you are what your Instagram bio says about you. Paper presented at the Sociolinguistics Symposium 23, Hong Kong.
  • Au, I. (2021). The magic of breakout rooms in online synchronous teaching and learning of English. Paper presented at the 3rd International Conference on English Across the Curriculum, Hong Kong.
  • Choi, T. H., Chan, H., & Au, I. (2018). ‘Now you’re talking’: Teacher preparation through alumni talks in a community of practice. Paper presented at the Oxford Education Research Symposium.
  • Au, I. (2018). Branching out from the tree: Extending vocabulary acquisition with polysemy. Paper presented at HKBU-HU First Joint Symposium on Education 2018.

 

Supervisors

Elizabeth Wonnacott and Victoria Murphy

Thomas Procter-Legg is a DPhil Student in the Department of Education and is researching restorative practice within the context of special educational needs and disabilities.

His previous experience includes five years as the Head Teacher of a special academy in Oxfordshire UK, specialising in education for students with Special Educational Needs and Disabilities. He has also worked as a SEND Reviewer for Whole School SEND; a Teaching School Director; and as the Principal Designate on a successful Free School bid.

Thomas is passionate about restorative practice and is involved in many communities of practice, such as the Global Alliance for Restorative Justice and Social Justice, where he is a member of the research sub-group exploring the interactions between restorative justice and social justice.

Thomas is also a strong advocate for creativity in education; having previously gained a Fine Art degree from Chelsea College of Art. This heavily influenced his educational leadership and during his time as a Head Teacher, he became the co-founder of a co-constructed initiative between the academy and the University of Oxford Gardens Libraries and Museums. This work placed cultural learning opportunities and relationships at the heart of the curriculum and is the longest standing project between a special school and The University of Oxford. This sustainable partnership champions marginalised voices and has been highly celebrated e.g., inclusion in the Durham Commission for Creativity in Education; recent dissemination at the Museum Ideas Conference 2022; highly commended award at the Museum and Heritage Awards 2021; and awarded Platinum ArtsMark in 2021.

Whilst this creative work may seem to be separate from restorative practice, Thomas subscribes to the idea that there are significant overlaps, both within pedagogical practice and wider school culture, topics which his current research touch on within the context of special education.

 

Publications

Procter-Legg. (2022). A Discourse on Restorative Practice—Participants’ Views of a Divergent Ideology. Laws11(6), 86–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11060086

Procter-Legg. (2022). Practitioner Perspectives on a Restorative Community: An Inductive Evaluative Study of Conceptual, Pedagogical, and Routine Practice. Laws11(1), 4–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11010004

 

Supervisors

Ian Thompson and Jason Todd

Ivan is currently serving as a Facilitator (Teaching) in the Vice-Chancellor’s Colloquium and as an Editor of the Graduate Inequality Review in the University of Oxford. He has taken up lecturerships in a number of universities in Hong Kong and has run Education, Linguistics, Applied Linguistics, Sociolinguistics, and Academic English courses at undergraduate and postgraduate level.

Prior to joining Oxford, Ivan received his teacher-training in Hong Kong and his postgraduate training in Linguistics (with a specialisation in pragmatics) at University College London. His research interests include: mental representation of word meanings, language acquisition, educational technology, and ELT pedagogy.

Publications

  • Au, I. (2021). Unwinding the Fantasy: Using Breakout Rooms to Promote Language Exposure and Less-Public Feedback Practices in Online Synchronous Teaching. Paper presented at the PASHE 2021 – EAP Education and Practice: Supporting Students’ Needs, UCL (IOE).
  • Au, I. & Yiu, C. (2021). ‘Identity game’: so you think you are what your Instagram bio says about you. Paper presented at the Sociolinguistics Symposium 23, Hong Kong.
  • Au, I. (2021). The magic of breakout rooms in online synchronous teaching and learning of English. Paper presented at the 3rd International Conference on English Across the Curriculum, Hong Kong.
  • Choi, T. H., Chan, H., & Au, I. (2018). ‘Now you’re talking’: Teacher preparation through alumni talks in a community of practice. Paper presented at the Oxford Education Research Symposium.
  • Au, I. (2018). Branching out from the tree: Extending vocabulary acquisition with polysemy. Paper presented at HKBU-HU First Joint Symposium on Education 2018.

 

Supervisors

Elizabeth Wonnacott and Victoria Murphy

Thomas Procter-Legg is a DPhil Student in the Department of Education and is researching restorative practice within the context of special educational needs and disabilities.

His previous experience includes five years as the Head Teacher of a special academy in Oxfordshire UK, specialising in education for students with Special Educational Needs and Disabilities. He has also worked as a SEND Reviewer for Whole School SEND; a Teaching School Director; and as the Principal Designate on a successful Free School bid.

Thomas is passionate about restorative practice and is involved in many communities of practice, such as the Global Alliance for Restorative Justice and Social Justice, where he is a member of the research sub-group exploring the interactions between restorative justice and social justice.

Thomas is also a strong advocate for creativity in education; having previously gained a Fine Art degree from Chelsea College of Art. This heavily influenced his educational leadership and during his time as a Head Teacher, he became the co-founder of a co-constructed initiative between the academy and the University of Oxford Gardens Libraries and Museums. This work placed cultural learning opportunities and relationships at the heart of the curriculum and is the longest standing project between a special school and The University of Oxford. This sustainable partnership champions marginalised voices and has been highly celebrated e.g., inclusion in the Durham Commission for Creativity in Education; recent dissemination at the Museum Ideas Conference 2022; highly commended award at the Museum and Heritage Awards 2021; and awarded Platinum ArtsMark in 2021.

Whilst this creative work may seem to be separate from restorative practice, Thomas subscribes to the idea that there are significant overlaps, both within pedagogical practice and wider school culture, topics which his current research touch on within the context of special education.

 

Publications

Procter-Legg. (2022). A Discourse on Restorative Practice—Participants’ Views of a Divergent Ideology. Laws11(6), 86–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11060086

Procter-Legg. (2022). Practitioner Perspectives on a Restorative Community: An Inductive Evaluative Study of Conceptual, Pedagogical, and Routine Practice. Laws11(1), 4–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11010004

 

Supervisors

Ian Thompson and Jason Todd

Ivan is currently serving as a Facilitator (Teaching) in the Vice-Chancellor’s Colloquium and as an Editor of the Graduate Inequality Review in the University of Oxford. He has taken up lecturerships in a number of universities in Hong Kong and has run Education, Linguistics, Applied Linguistics, Sociolinguistics, and Academic English courses at undergraduate and postgraduate level.

Prior to joining Oxford, Ivan received his teacher-training in Hong Kong and his postgraduate training in Linguistics (with a specialisation in pragmatics) at University College London. His research interests include: mental representation of word meanings, language acquisition, educational technology, and ELT pedagogy.

Publications

  • Au, I. (2021). Unwinding the Fantasy: Using Breakout Rooms to Promote Language Exposure and Less-Public Feedback Practices in Online Synchronous Teaching. Paper presented at the PASHE 2021 – EAP Education and Practice: Supporting Students’ Needs, UCL (IOE).
  • Au, I. & Yiu, C. (2021). ‘Identity game’: so you think you are what your Instagram bio says about you. Paper presented at the Sociolinguistics Symposium 23, Hong Kong.
  • Au, I. (2021). The magic of breakout rooms in online synchronous teaching and learning of English. Paper presented at the 3rd International Conference on English Across the Curriculum, Hong Kong.
  • Choi, T. H., Chan, H., & Au, I. (2018). ‘Now you’re talking’: Teacher preparation through alumni talks in a community of practice. Paper presented at the Oxford Education Research Symposium.
  • Au, I. (2018). Branching out from the tree: Extending vocabulary acquisition with polysemy. Paper presented at HKBU-HU First Joint Symposium on Education 2018.

 

Supervisors

Elizabeth Wonnacott and Victoria Murphy

Thomas Procter-Legg is a DPhil Student in the Department of Education and is researching restorative practice within the context of special educational needs and disabilities.

His previous experience includes five years as the Head Teacher of a special academy in Oxfordshire UK, specialising in education for students with Special Educational Needs and Disabilities. He has also worked as a SEND Reviewer for Whole School SEND; a Teaching School Director; and as the Principal Designate on a successful Free School bid.

Thomas is passionate about restorative practice and is involved in many communities of practice, such as the Global Alliance for Restorative Justice and Social Justice, where he is a member of the research sub-group exploring the interactions between restorative justice and social justice.

Thomas is also a strong advocate for creativity in education; having previously gained a Fine Art degree from Chelsea College of Art. This heavily influenced his educational leadership and during his time as a Head Teacher, he became the co-founder of a co-constructed initiative between the academy and the University of Oxford Gardens Libraries and Museums. This work placed cultural learning opportunities and relationships at the heart of the curriculum and is the longest standing project between a special school and The University of Oxford. This sustainable partnership champions marginalised voices and has been highly celebrated e.g., inclusion in the Durham Commission for Creativity in Education; recent dissemination at the Museum Ideas Conference 2022; highly commended award at the Museum and Heritage Awards 2021; and awarded Platinum ArtsMark in 2021.

Whilst this creative work may seem to be separate from restorative practice, Thomas subscribes to the idea that there are significant overlaps, both within pedagogical practice and wider school culture, topics which his current research touch on within the context of special education.

 

Publications

Procter-Legg. (2022). A Discourse on Restorative Practice—Participants’ Views of a Divergent Ideology. Laws11(6), 86–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11060086

Procter-Legg. (2022). Practitioner Perspectives on a Restorative Community: An Inductive Evaluative Study of Conceptual, Pedagogical, and Routine Practice. Laws11(1), 4–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11010004

 

Supervisors

Ian Thompson and Jason Todd

Ivan is currently serving as a Facilitator (Teaching) in the Vice-Chancellor’s Colloquium and as an Editor of the Graduate Inequality Review in the University of Oxford. He has taken up lecturerships in a number of universities in Hong Kong and has run Education, Linguistics, Applied Linguistics, Sociolinguistics, and Academic English courses at undergraduate and postgraduate level.

Prior to joining Oxford, Ivan received his teacher-training in Hong Kong and his postgraduate training in Linguistics (with a specialisation in pragmatics) at University College London. His research interests include: mental representation of word meanings, language acquisition, educational technology, and ELT pedagogy.

Publications

  • Au, I. (2021). Unwinding the Fantasy: Using Breakout Rooms to Promote Language Exposure and Less-Public Feedback Practices in Online Synchronous Teaching. Paper presented at the PASHE 2021 – EAP Education and Practice: Supporting Students’ Needs, UCL (IOE).
  • Au, I. & Yiu, C. (2021). ‘Identity game’: so you think you are what your Instagram bio says about you. Paper presented at the Sociolinguistics Symposium 23, Hong Kong.
  • Au, I. (2021). The magic of breakout rooms in online synchronous teaching and learning of English. Paper presented at the 3rd International Conference on English Across the Curriculum, Hong Kong.
  • Choi, T. H., Chan, H., & Au, I. (2018). ‘Now you’re talking’: Teacher preparation through alumni talks in a community of practice. Paper presented at the Oxford Education Research Symposium.
  • Au, I. (2018). Branching out from the tree: Extending vocabulary acquisition with polysemy. Paper presented at HKBU-HU First Joint Symposium on Education 2018.

 

Supervisors

Elizabeth Wonnacott and Victoria Murphy

Thomas Procter-Legg is a DPhil Student in the Department of Education and is researching restorative practice within the context of special educational needs and disabilities.

His previous experience includes five years as the Head Teacher of a special academy in Oxfordshire UK, specialising in education for students with Special Educational Needs and Disabilities. He has also worked as a SEND Reviewer for Whole School SEND; a Teaching School Director; and as the Principal Designate on a successful Free School bid.

Thomas is passionate about restorative practice and is involved in many communities of practice, such as the Global Alliance for Restorative Justice and Social Justice, where he is a member of the research sub-group exploring the interactions between restorative justice and social justice.

Thomas is also a strong advocate for creativity in education; having previously gained a Fine Art degree from Chelsea College of Art. This heavily influenced his educational leadership and during his time as a Head Teacher, he became the co-founder of a co-constructed initiative between the academy and the University of Oxford Gardens Libraries and Museums. This work placed cultural learning opportunities and relationships at the heart of the curriculum and is the longest standing project between a special school and The University of Oxford. This sustainable partnership champions marginalised voices and has been highly celebrated e.g., inclusion in the Durham Commission for Creativity in Education; recent dissemination at the Museum Ideas Conference 2022; highly commended award at the Museum and Heritage Awards 2021; and awarded Platinum ArtsMark in 2021.

Whilst this creative work may seem to be separate from restorative practice, Thomas subscribes to the idea that there are significant overlaps, both within pedagogical practice and wider school culture, topics which his current research touch on within the context of special education.

 

Publications

Procter-Legg. (2022). A Discourse on Restorative Practice—Participants’ Views of a Divergent Ideology. Laws11(6), 86–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11060086

Procter-Legg. (2022). Practitioner Perspectives on a Restorative Community: An Inductive Evaluative Study of Conceptual, Pedagogical, and Routine Practice. Laws11(1), 4–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11010004

 

Supervisors

Ian Thompson and Jason Todd

Ivan is currently serving as a Facilitator (Teaching) in the Vice-Chancellor’s Colloquium and as an Editor of the Graduate Inequality Review in the University of Oxford. He has taken up lecturerships in a number of universities in Hong Kong and has run Education, Linguistics, Applied Linguistics, Sociolinguistics, and Academic English courses at undergraduate and postgraduate level.

Prior to joining Oxford, Ivan received his teacher-training in Hong Kong and his postgraduate training in Linguistics (with a specialisation in pragmatics) at University College London. His research interests include: mental representation of word meanings, language acquisition, educational technology, and ELT pedagogy.

Publications

  • Au, I. (2021). Unwinding the Fantasy: Using Breakout Rooms to Promote Language Exposure and Less-Public Feedback Practices in Online Synchronous Teaching. Paper presented at the PASHE 2021 – EAP Education and Practice: Supporting Students’ Needs, UCL (IOE).
  • Au, I. & Yiu, C. (2021). ‘Identity game’: so you think you are what your Instagram bio says about you. Paper presented at the Sociolinguistics Symposium 23, Hong Kong.
  • Au, I. (2021). The magic of breakout rooms in online synchronous teaching and learning of English. Paper presented at the 3rd International Conference on English Across the Curriculum, Hong Kong.
  • Choi, T. H., Chan, H., & Au, I. (2018). ‘Now you’re talking’: Teacher preparation through alumni talks in a community of practice. Paper presented at the Oxford Education Research Symposium.
  • Au, I. (2018). Branching out from the tree: Extending vocabulary acquisition with polysemy. Paper presented at HKBU-HU First Joint Symposium on Education 2018.

 

Supervisors

Elizabeth Wonnacott and Victoria Murphy

Thomas Procter-Legg is a DPhil Student in the Department of Education and is researching restorative practice within the context of special educational needs and disabilities.

His previous experience includes five years as the Head Teacher of a special academy in Oxfordshire UK, specialising in education for students with Special Educational Needs and Disabilities. He has also worked as a SEND Reviewer for Whole School SEND; a Teaching School Director; and as the Principal Designate on a successful Free School bid.

Thomas is passionate about restorative practice and is involved in many communities of practice, such as the Global Alliance for Restorative Justice and Social Justice, where he is a member of the research sub-group exploring the interactions between restorative justice and social justice.

Thomas is also a strong advocate for creativity in education; having previously gained a Fine Art degree from Chelsea College of Art. This heavily influenced his educational leadership and during his time as a Head Teacher, he became the co-founder of a co-constructed initiative between the academy and the University of Oxford Gardens Libraries and Museums. This work placed cultural learning opportunities and relationships at the heart of the curriculum and is the longest standing project between a special school and The University of Oxford. This sustainable partnership champions marginalised voices and has been highly celebrated e.g., inclusion in the Durham Commission for Creativity in Education; recent dissemination at the Museum Ideas Conference 2022; highly commended award at the Museum and Heritage Awards 2021; and awarded Platinum ArtsMark in 2021.

Whilst this creative work may seem to be separate from restorative practice, Thomas subscribes to the idea that there are significant overlaps, both within pedagogical practice and wider school culture, topics which his current research touch on within the context of special education.

 

Publications

Procter-Legg. (2022). A Discourse on Restorative Practice—Participants’ Views of a Divergent Ideology. Laws11(6), 86–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11060086

Procter-Legg. (2022). Practitioner Perspectives on a Restorative Community: An Inductive Evaluative Study of Conceptual, Pedagogical, and Routine Practice. Laws11(1), 4–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11010004

 

Supervisors

Ian Thompson and Jason Todd

Ivan is currently serving as a Facilitator (Teaching) in the Vice-Chancellor’s Colloquium and as an Editor of the Graduate Inequality Review in the University of Oxford. He has taken up lecturerships in a number of universities in Hong Kong and has run Education, Linguistics, Applied Linguistics, Sociolinguistics, and Academic English courses at undergraduate and postgraduate level.

Prior to joining Oxford, Ivan received his teacher-training in Hong Kong and his postgraduate training in Linguistics (with a specialisation in pragmatics) at University College London. His research interests include: mental representation of word meanings, language acquisition, educational technology, and ELT pedagogy.

Publications

  • Au, I. (2021). Unwinding the Fantasy: Using Breakout Rooms to Promote Language Exposure and Less-Public Feedback Practices in Online Synchronous Teaching. Paper presented at the PASHE 2021 – EAP Education and Practice: Supporting Students’ Needs, UCL (IOE).
  • Au, I. & Yiu, C. (2021). ‘Identity game’: so you think you are what your Instagram bio says about you. Paper presented at the Sociolinguistics Symposium 23, Hong Kong.
  • Au, I. (2021). The magic of breakout rooms in online synchronous teaching and learning of English. Paper presented at the 3rd International Conference on English Across the Curriculum, Hong Kong.
  • Choi, T. H., Chan, H., & Au, I. (2018). ‘Now you’re talking’: Teacher preparation through alumni talks in a community of practice. Paper presented at the Oxford Education Research Symposium.
  • Au, I. (2018). Branching out from the tree: Extending vocabulary acquisition with polysemy. Paper presented at HKBU-HU First Joint Symposium on Education 2018.

 

Supervisors

Elizabeth Wonnacott and Victoria Murphy

Thomas Procter-Legg is a DPhil Student in the Department of Education and is researching restorative practice within the context of special educational needs and disabilities.

His previous experience includes five years as the Head Teacher of a special academy in Oxfordshire UK, specialising in education for students with Special Educational Needs and Disabilities. He has also worked as a SEND Reviewer for Whole School SEND; a Teaching School Director; and as the Principal Designate on a successful Free School bid.

Thomas is passionate about restorative practice and is involved in many communities of practice, such as the Global Alliance for Restorative Justice and Social Justice, where he is a member of the research sub-group exploring the interactions between restorative justice and social justice.

Thomas is also a strong advocate for creativity in education; having previously gained a Fine Art degree from Chelsea College of Art. This heavily influenced his educational leadership and during his time as a Head Teacher, he became the co-founder of a co-constructed initiative between the academy and the University of Oxford Gardens Libraries and Museums. This work placed cultural learning opportunities and relationships at the heart of the curriculum and is the longest standing project between a special school and The University of Oxford. This sustainable partnership champions marginalised voices and has been highly celebrated e.g., inclusion in the Durham Commission for Creativity in Education; recent dissemination at the Museum Ideas Conference 2022; highly commended award at the Museum and Heritage Awards 2021; and awarded Platinum ArtsMark in 2021.

Whilst this creative work may seem to be separate from restorative practice, Thomas subscribes to the idea that there are significant overlaps, both within pedagogical practice and wider school culture, topics which his current research touch on within the context of special education.

 

Publications

Procter-Legg. (2022). A Discourse on Restorative Practice—Participants’ Views of a Divergent Ideology. Laws11(6), 86–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11060086

Procter-Legg. (2022). Practitioner Perspectives on a Restorative Community: An Inductive Evaluative Study of Conceptual, Pedagogical, and Routine Practice. Laws11(1), 4–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11010004

 

Supervisors

Ian Thompson and Jason Todd

Ivan is currently serving as a Facilitator (Teaching) in the Vice-Chancellor’s Colloquium and as an Editor of the Graduate Inequality Review in the University of Oxford. He has taken up lecturerships in a number of universities in Hong Kong and has run Education, Linguistics, Applied Linguistics, Sociolinguistics, and Academic English courses at undergraduate and postgraduate level.

Prior to joining Oxford, Ivan received his teacher-training in Hong Kong and his postgraduate training in Linguistics (with a specialisation in pragmatics) at University College London. His research interests include: mental representation of word meanings, language acquisition, educational technology, and ELT pedagogy.

Publications

  • Au, I. (2021). Unwinding the Fantasy: Using Breakout Rooms to Promote Language Exposure and Less-Public Feedback Practices in Online Synchronous Teaching. Paper presented at the PASHE 2021 – EAP Education and Practice: Supporting Students’ Needs, UCL (IOE).
  • Au, I. & Yiu, C. (2021). ‘Identity game’: so you think you are what your Instagram bio says about you. Paper presented at the Sociolinguistics Symposium 23, Hong Kong.
  • Au, I. (2021). The magic of breakout rooms in online synchronous teaching and learning of English. Paper presented at the 3rd International Conference on English Across the Curriculum, Hong Kong.
  • Choi, T. H., Chan, H., & Au, I. (2018). ‘Now you’re talking’: Teacher preparation through alumni talks in a community of practice. Paper presented at the Oxford Education Research Symposium.
  • Au, I. (2018). Branching out from the tree: Extending vocabulary acquisition with polysemy. Paper presented at HKBU-HU First Joint Symposium on Education 2018.

 

Supervisors

Elizabeth Wonnacott and Victoria Murphy

Thomas Procter-Legg is a DPhil Student in the Department of Education and is researching restorative practice within the context of special educational needs and disabilities.

His previous experience includes five years as the Head Teacher of a special academy in Oxfordshire UK, specialising in education for students with Special Educational Needs and Disabilities. He has also worked as a SEND Reviewer for Whole School SEND; a Teaching School Director; and as the Principal Designate on a successful Free School bid.

Thomas is passionate about restorative practice and is involved in many communities of practice, such as the Global Alliance for Restorative Justice and Social Justice, where he is a member of the research sub-group exploring the interactions between restorative justice and social justice.

Thomas is also a strong advocate for creativity in education; having previously gained a Fine Art degree from Chelsea College of Art. This heavily influenced his educational leadership and during his time as a Head Teacher, he became the co-founder of a co-constructed initiative between the academy and the University of Oxford Gardens Libraries and Museums. This work placed cultural learning opportunities and relationships at the heart of the curriculum and is the longest standing project between a special school and The University of Oxford. This sustainable partnership champions marginalised voices and has been highly celebrated e.g., inclusion in the Durham Commission for Creativity in Education; recent dissemination at the Museum Ideas Conference 2022; highly commended award at the Museum and Heritage Awards 2021; and awarded Platinum ArtsMark in 2021.

Whilst this creative work may seem to be separate from restorative practice, Thomas subscribes to the idea that there are significant overlaps, both within pedagogical practice and wider school culture, topics which his current research touch on within the context of special education.

 

Publications

Procter-Legg. (2022). A Discourse on Restorative Practice—Participants’ Views of a Divergent Ideology. Laws11(6), 86–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11060086

Procter-Legg. (2022). Practitioner Perspectives on a Restorative Community: An Inductive Evaluative Study of Conceptual, Pedagogical, and Routine Practice. Laws11(1), 4–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11010004

 

Supervisors

Ian Thompson and Jason Todd

Ivan is currently serving as a Facilitator (Teaching) in the Vice-Chancellor’s Colloquium and as an Editor of the Graduate Inequality Review in the University of Oxford. He has taken up lecturerships in a number of universities in Hong Kong and has run Education, Linguistics, Applied Linguistics, Sociolinguistics, and Academic English courses at undergraduate and postgraduate level.

Prior to joining Oxford, Ivan received his teacher-training in Hong Kong and his postgraduate training in Linguistics (with a specialisation in pragmatics) at University College London. His research interests include: mental representation of word meanings, language acquisition, educational technology, and ELT pedagogy.

Publications

  • Au, I. (2021). Unwinding the Fantasy: Using Breakout Rooms to Promote Language Exposure and Less-Public Feedback Practices in Online Synchronous Teaching. Paper presented at the PASHE 2021 – EAP Education and Practice: Supporting Students’ Needs, UCL (IOE).
  • Au, I. & Yiu, C. (2021). ‘Identity game’: so you think you are what your Instagram bio says about you. Paper presented at the Sociolinguistics Symposium 23, Hong Kong.
  • Au, I. (2021). The magic of breakout rooms in online synchronous teaching and learning of English. Paper presented at the 3rd International Conference on English Across the Curriculum, Hong Kong.
  • Choi, T. H., Chan, H., & Au, I. (2018). ‘Now you’re talking’: Teacher preparation through alumni talks in a community of practice. Paper presented at the Oxford Education Research Symposium.
  • Au, I. (2018). Branching out from the tree: Extending vocabulary acquisition with polysemy. Paper presented at HKBU-HU First Joint Symposium on Education 2018.

 

Supervisors

Elizabeth Wonnacott and Victoria Murphy

Thomas Procter-Legg is a DPhil Student in the Department of Education and is researching restorative practice within the context of special educational needs and disabilities.

His previous experience includes five years as the Head Teacher of a special academy in Oxfordshire UK, specialising in education for students with Special Educational Needs and Disabilities. He has also worked as a SEND Reviewer for Whole School SEND; a Teaching School Director; and as the Principal Designate on a successful Free School bid.

Thomas is passionate about restorative practice and is involved in many communities of practice, such as the Global Alliance for Restorative Justice and Social Justice, where he is a member of the research sub-group exploring the interactions between restorative justice and social justice.

Thomas is also a strong advocate for creativity in education; having previously gained a Fine Art degree from Chelsea College of Art. This heavily influenced his educational leadership and during his time as a Head Teacher, he became the co-founder of a co-constructed initiative between the academy and the University of Oxford Gardens Libraries and Museums. This work placed cultural learning opportunities and relationships at the heart of the curriculum and is the longest standing project between a special school and The University of Oxford. This sustainable partnership champions marginalised voices and has been highly celebrated e.g., inclusion in the Durham Commission for Creativity in Education; recent dissemination at the Museum Ideas Conference 2022; highly commended award at the Museum and Heritage Awards 2021; and awarded Platinum ArtsMark in 2021.

Whilst this creative work may seem to be separate from restorative practice, Thomas subscribes to the idea that there are significant overlaps, both within pedagogical practice and wider school culture, topics which his current research touch on within the context of special education.

 

Publications

Procter-Legg. (2022). A Discourse on Restorative Practice—Participants’ Views of a Divergent Ideology. Laws11(6), 86–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11060086

Procter-Legg. (2022). Practitioner Perspectives on a Restorative Community: An Inductive Evaluative Study of Conceptual, Pedagogical, and Routine Practice. Laws11(1), 4–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11010004

 

Supervisors

Ian Thompson and Jason Todd

Ivan is currently serving as a Facilitator (Teaching) in the Vice-Chancellor’s Colloquium and as an Editor of the Graduate Inequality Review in the University of Oxford. He has taken up lecturerships in a number of universities in Hong Kong and has run Education, Linguistics, Applied Linguistics, Sociolinguistics, and Academic English courses at undergraduate and postgraduate level.

Prior to joining Oxford, Ivan received his teacher-training in Hong Kong and his postgraduate training in Linguistics (with a specialisation in pragmatics) at University College London. His research interests include: mental representation of word meanings, language acquisition, educational technology, and ELT pedagogy.

Publications

  • Au, I. (2021). Unwinding the Fantasy: Using Breakout Rooms to Promote Language Exposure and Less-Public Feedback Practices in Online Synchronous Teaching. Paper presented at the PASHE 2021 – EAP Education and Practice: Supporting Students’ Needs, UCL (IOE).
  • Au, I. & Yiu, C. (2021). ‘Identity game’: so you think you are what your Instagram bio says about you. Paper presented at the Sociolinguistics Symposium 23, Hong Kong.
  • Au, I. (2021). The magic of breakout rooms in online synchronous teaching and learning of English. Paper presented at the 3rd International Conference on English Across the Curriculum, Hong Kong.
  • Choi, T. H., Chan, H., & Au, I. (2018). ‘Now you’re talking’: Teacher preparation through alumni talks in a community of practice. Paper presented at the Oxford Education Research Symposium.
  • Au, I. (2018). Branching out from the tree: Extending vocabulary acquisition with polysemy. Paper presented at HKBU-HU First Joint Symposium on Education 2018.

 

Supervisors

Elizabeth Wonnacott and Victoria Murphy

Thomas Procter-Legg is a DPhil Student in the Department of Education and is researching restorative practice within the context of special educational needs and disabilities.

His previous experience includes five years as the Head Teacher of a special academy in Oxfordshire UK, specialising in education for students with Special Educational Needs and Disabilities. He has also worked as a SEND Reviewer for Whole School SEND; a Teaching School Director; and as the Principal Designate on a successful Free School bid.

Thomas is passionate about restorative practice and is involved in many communities of practice, such as the Global Alliance for Restorative Justice and Social Justice, where he is a member of the research sub-group exploring the interactions between restorative justice and social justice.

Thomas is also a strong advocate for creativity in education; having previously gained a Fine Art degree from Chelsea College of Art. This heavily influenced his educational leadership and during his time as a Head Teacher, he became the co-founder of a co-constructed initiative between the academy and the University of Oxford Gardens Libraries and Museums. This work placed cultural learning opportunities and relationships at the heart of the curriculum and is the longest standing project between a special school and The University of Oxford. This sustainable partnership champions marginalised voices and has been highly celebrated e.g., inclusion in the Durham Commission for Creativity in Education; recent dissemination at the Museum Ideas Conference 2022; highly commended award at the Museum and Heritage Awards 2021; and awarded Platinum ArtsMark in 2021.

Whilst this creative work may seem to be separate from restorative practice, Thomas subscribes to the idea that there are significant overlaps, both within pedagogical practice and wider school culture, topics which his current research touch on within the context of special education.

 

Publications

Procter-Legg. (2022). A Discourse on Restorative Practice—Participants’ Views of a Divergent Ideology. Laws11(6), 86–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11060086

Procter-Legg. (2022). Practitioner Perspectives on a Restorative Community: An Inductive Evaluative Study of Conceptual, Pedagogical, and Routine Practice. Laws11(1), 4–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11010004

 

Supervisors

Ian Thompson and Jason Todd

Ivan is currently serving as a Facilitator (Teaching) in the Vice-Chancellor’s Colloquium and as an Editor of the Graduate Inequality Review in the University of Oxford. He has taken up lecturerships in a number of universities in Hong Kong and has run Education, Linguistics, Applied Linguistics, Sociolinguistics, and Academic English courses at undergraduate and postgraduate level.

Prior to joining Oxford, Ivan received his teacher-training in Hong Kong and his postgraduate training in Linguistics (with a specialisation in pragmatics) at University College London. His research interests include: mental representation of word meanings, language acquisition, educational technology, and ELT pedagogy.

Publications

  • Au, I. (2021). Unwinding the Fantasy: Using Breakout Rooms to Promote Language Exposure and Less-Public Feedback Practices in Online Synchronous Teaching. Paper presented at the PASHE 2021 – EAP Education and Practice: Supporting Students’ Needs, UCL (IOE).
  • Au, I. & Yiu, C. (2021). ‘Identity game’: so you think you are what your Instagram bio says about you. Paper presented at the Sociolinguistics Symposium 23, Hong Kong.
  • Au, I. (2021). The magic of breakout rooms in online synchronous teaching and learning of English. Paper presented at the 3rd International Conference on English Across the Curriculum, Hong Kong.
  • Choi, T. H., Chan, H., & Au, I. (2018). ‘Now you’re talking’: Teacher preparation through alumni talks in a community of practice. Paper presented at the Oxford Education Research Symposium.
  • Au, I. (2018). Branching out from the tree: Extending vocabulary acquisition with polysemy. Paper presented at HKBU-HU First Joint Symposium on Education 2018.

 

Supervisors

Elizabeth Wonnacott and Victoria Murphy

Thomas Procter-Legg is a DPhil Student in the Department of Education and is researching restorative practice within the context of special educational needs and disabilities.

His previous experience includes five years as the Head Teacher of a special academy in Oxfordshire UK, specialising in education for students with Special Educational Needs and Disabilities. He has also worked as a SEND Reviewer for Whole School SEND; a Teaching School Director; and as the Principal Designate on a successful Free School bid.

Thomas is passionate about restorative practice and is involved in many communities of practice, such as the Global Alliance for Restorative Justice and Social Justice, where he is a member of the research sub-group exploring the interactions between restorative justice and social justice.

Thomas is also a strong advocate for creativity in education; having previously gained a Fine Art degree from Chelsea College of Art. This heavily influenced his educational leadership and during his time as a Head Teacher, he became the co-founder of a co-constructed initiative between the academy and the University of Oxford Gardens Libraries and Museums. This work placed cultural learning opportunities and relationships at the heart of the curriculum and is the longest standing project between a special school and The University of Oxford. This sustainable partnership champions marginalised voices and has been highly celebrated e.g., inclusion in the Durham Commission for Creativity in Education; recent dissemination at the Museum Ideas Conference 2022; highly commended award at the Museum and Heritage Awards 2021; and awarded Platinum ArtsMark in 2021.

Whilst this creative work may seem to be separate from restorative practice, Thomas subscribes to the idea that there are significant overlaps, both within pedagogical practice and wider school culture, topics which his current research touch on within the context of special education.

 

Publications

Procter-Legg. (2022). A Discourse on Restorative Practice—Participants’ Views of a Divergent Ideology. Laws11(6), 86–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11060086

Procter-Legg. (2022). Practitioner Perspectives on a Restorative Community: An Inductive Evaluative Study of Conceptual, Pedagogical, and Routine Practice. Laws11(1), 4–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11010004

 

Supervisors

Ian Thompson and Jason Todd

Ivan is currently serving as a Facilitator (Teaching) in the Vice-Chancellor’s Colloquium and as an Editor of the Graduate Inequality Review in the University of Oxford. He has taken up lecturerships in a number of universities in Hong Kong and has run Education, Linguistics, Applied Linguistics, Sociolinguistics, and Academic English courses at undergraduate and postgraduate level.

Prior to joining Oxford, Ivan received his teacher-training in Hong Kong and his postgraduate training in Linguistics (with a specialisation in pragmatics) at University College London. His research interests include: mental representation of word meanings, language acquisition, educational technology, and ELT pedagogy.

Publications

  • Au, I. (2021). Unwinding the Fantasy: Using Breakout Rooms to Promote Language Exposure and Less-Public Feedback Practices in Online Synchronous Teaching. Paper presented at the PASHE 2021 – EAP Education and Practice: Supporting Students’ Needs, UCL (IOE).
  • Au, I. & Yiu, C. (2021). ‘Identity game’: so you think you are what your Instagram bio says about you. Paper presented at the Sociolinguistics Symposium 23, Hong Kong.
  • Au, I. (2021). The magic of breakout rooms in online synchronous teaching and learning of English. Paper presented at the 3rd International Conference on English Across the Curriculum, Hong Kong.
  • Choi, T. H., Chan, H., & Au, I. (2018). ‘Now you’re talking’: Teacher preparation through alumni talks in a community of practice. Paper presented at the Oxford Education Research Symposium.
  • Au, I. (2018). Branching out from the tree: Extending vocabulary acquisition with polysemy. Paper presented at HKBU-HU First Joint Symposium on Education 2018.

 

Supervisors

Elizabeth Wonnacott and Victoria Murphy

Thomas Procter-Legg is a DPhil Student in the Department of Education and is researching restorative practice within the context of special educational needs and disabilities.

His previous experience includes five years as the Head Teacher of a special academy in Oxfordshire UK, specialising in education for students with Special Educational Needs and Disabilities. He has also worked as a SEND Reviewer for Whole School SEND; a Teaching School Director; and as the Principal Designate on a successful Free School bid.

Thomas is passionate about restorative practice and is involved in many communities of practice, such as the Global Alliance for Restorative Justice and Social Justice, where he is a member of the research sub-group exploring the interactions between restorative justice and social justice.

Thomas is also a strong advocate for creativity in education; having previously gained a Fine Art degree from Chelsea College of Art. This heavily influenced his educational leadership and during his time as a Head Teacher, he became the co-founder of a co-constructed initiative between the academy and the University of Oxford Gardens Libraries and Museums. This work placed cultural learning opportunities and relationships at the heart of the curriculum and is the longest standing project between a special school and The University of Oxford. This sustainable partnership champions marginalised voices and has been highly celebrated e.g., inclusion in the Durham Commission for Creativity in Education; recent dissemination at the Museum Ideas Conference 2022; highly commended award at the Museum and Heritage Awards 2021; and awarded Platinum ArtsMark in 2021.

Whilst this creative work may seem to be separate from restorative practice, Thomas subscribes to the idea that there are significant overlaps, both within pedagogical practice and wider school culture, topics which his current research touch on within the context of special education.

 

Publications

Procter-Legg. (2022). A Discourse on Restorative Practice—Participants’ Views of a Divergent Ideology. Laws11(6), 86–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11060086

Procter-Legg. (2022). Practitioner Perspectives on a Restorative Community: An Inductive Evaluative Study of Conceptual, Pedagogical, and Routine Practice. Laws11(1), 4–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11010004

 

Supervisors

Ian Thompson and Jason Todd

Ivan is currently serving as a Facilitator (Teaching) in the Vice-Chancellor’s Colloquium and as an Editor of the Graduate Inequality Review in the University of Oxford. He has taken up lecturerships in a number of universities in Hong Kong and has run Education, Linguistics, Applied Linguistics, Sociolinguistics, and Academic English courses at undergraduate and postgraduate level.

Prior to joining Oxford, Ivan received his teacher-training in Hong Kong and his postgraduate training in Linguistics (with a specialisation in pragmatics) at University College London. His research interests include: mental representation of word meanings, language acquisition, educational technology, and ELT pedagogy.

Publications

  • Au, I. (2021). Unwinding the Fantasy: Using Breakout Rooms to Promote Language Exposure and Less-Public Feedback Practices in Online Synchronous Teaching. Paper presented at the PASHE 2021 – EAP Education and Practice: Supporting Students’ Needs, UCL (IOE).
  • Au, I. & Yiu, C. (2021). ‘Identity game’: so you think you are what your Instagram bio says about you. Paper presented at the Sociolinguistics Symposium 23, Hong Kong.
  • Au, I. (2021). The magic of breakout rooms in online synchronous teaching and learning of English. Paper presented at the 3rd International Conference on English Across the Curriculum, Hong Kong.
  • Choi, T. H., Chan, H., & Au, I. (2018). ‘Now you’re talking’: Teacher preparation through alumni talks in a community of practice. Paper presented at the Oxford Education Research Symposium.
  • Au, I. (2018). Branching out from the tree: Extending vocabulary acquisition with polysemy. Paper presented at HKBU-HU First Joint Symposium on Education 2018.

 

Supervisors

Elizabeth Wonnacott and Victoria Murphy

Thomas Procter-Legg is a DPhil Student in the Department of Education and is researching restorative practice within the context of special educational needs and disabilities.

His previous experience includes five years as the Head Teacher of a special academy in Oxfordshire UK, specialising in education for students with Special Educational Needs and Disabilities. He has also worked as a SEND Reviewer for Whole School SEND; a Teaching School Director; and as the Principal Designate on a successful Free School bid.

Thomas is passionate about restorative practice and is involved in many communities of practice, such as the Global Alliance for Restorative Justice and Social Justice, where he is a member of the research sub-group exploring the interactions between restorative justice and social justice.

Thomas is also a strong advocate for creativity in education; having previously gained a Fine Art degree from Chelsea College of Art. This heavily influenced his educational leadership and during his time as a Head Teacher, he became the co-founder of a co-constructed initiative between the academy and the University of Oxford Gardens Libraries and Museums. This work placed cultural learning opportunities and relationships at the heart of the curriculum and is the longest standing project between a special school and The University of Oxford. This sustainable partnership champions marginalised voices and has been highly celebrated e.g., inclusion in the Durham Commission for Creativity in Education; recent dissemination at the Museum Ideas Conference 2022; highly commended award at the Museum and Heritage Awards 2021; and awarded Platinum ArtsMark in 2021.

Whilst this creative work may seem to be separate from restorative practice, Thomas subscribes to the idea that there are significant overlaps, both within pedagogical practice and wider school culture, topics which his current research touch on within the context of special education.

 

Publications

Procter-Legg. (2022). A Discourse on Restorative Practice—Participants’ Views of a Divergent Ideology. Laws11(6), 86–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11060086

Procter-Legg. (2022). Practitioner Perspectives on a Restorative Community: An Inductive Evaluative Study of Conceptual, Pedagogical, and Routine Practice. Laws11(1), 4–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11010004

 

Supervisors

Ian Thompson and Jason Todd

Ivan is currently serving as a Facilitator (Teaching) in the Vice-Chancellor’s Colloquium and as an Editor of the Graduate Inequality Review in the University of Oxford. He has taken up lecturerships in a number of universities in Hong Kong and has run Education, Linguistics, Applied Linguistics, Sociolinguistics, and Academic English courses at undergraduate and postgraduate level.

Prior to joining Oxford, Ivan received his teacher-training in Hong Kong and his postgraduate training in Linguistics (with a specialisation in pragmatics) at University College London. His research interests include: mental representation of word meanings, language acquisition, educational technology, and ELT pedagogy.

Publications

  • Au, I. (2021). Unwinding the Fantasy: Using Breakout Rooms to Promote Language Exposure and Less-Public Feedback Practices in Online Synchronous Teaching. Paper presented at the PASHE 2021 – EAP Education and Practice: Supporting Students’ Needs, UCL (IOE).
  • Au, I. & Yiu, C. (2021). ‘Identity game’: so you think you are what your Instagram bio says about you. Paper presented at the Sociolinguistics Symposium 23, Hong Kong.
  • Au, I. (2021). The magic of breakout rooms in online synchronous teaching and learning of English. Paper presented at the 3rd International Conference on English Across the Curriculum, Hong Kong.
  • Choi, T. H., Chan, H., & Au, I. (2018). ‘Now you’re talking’: Teacher preparation through alumni talks in a community of practice. Paper presented at the Oxford Education Research Symposium.
  • Au, I. (2018). Branching out from the tree: Extending vocabulary acquisition with polysemy. Paper presented at HKBU-HU First Joint Symposium on Education 2018.

 

Supervisors

Elizabeth Wonnacott and Victoria Murphy

Thomas Procter-Legg is a DPhil Student in the Department of Education and is researching restorative practice within the context of special educational needs and disabilities.

His previous experience includes five years as the Head Teacher of a special academy in Oxfordshire UK, specialising in education for students with Special Educational Needs and Disabilities. He has also worked as a SEND Reviewer for Whole School SEND; a Teaching School Director; and as the Principal Designate on a successful Free School bid.

Thomas is passionate about restorative practice and is involved in many communities of practice, such as the Global Alliance for Restorative Justice and Social Justice, where he is a member of the research sub-group exploring the interactions between restorative justice and social justice.

Thomas is also a strong advocate for creativity in education; having previously gained a Fine Art degree from Chelsea College of Art. This heavily influenced his educational leadership and during his time as a Head Teacher, he became the co-founder of a co-constructed initiative between the academy and the University of Oxford Gardens Libraries and Museums. This work placed cultural learning opportunities and relationships at the heart of the curriculum and is the longest standing project between a special school and The University of Oxford. This sustainable partnership champions marginalised voices and has been highly celebrated e.g., inclusion in the Durham Commission for Creativity in Education; recent dissemination at the Museum Ideas Conference 2022; highly commended award at the Museum and Heritage Awards 2021; and awarded Platinum ArtsMark in 2021.

Whilst this creative work may seem to be separate from restorative practice, Thomas subscribes to the idea that there are significant overlaps, both within pedagogical practice and wider school culture, topics which his current research touch on within the context of special education.

 

Publications

Procter-Legg. (2022). A Discourse on Restorative Practice—Participants’ Views of a Divergent Ideology. Laws11(6), 86–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11060086

Procter-Legg. (2022). Practitioner Perspectives on a Restorative Community: An Inductive Evaluative Study of Conceptual, Pedagogical, and Routine Practice. Laws11(1), 4–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11010004

 

Supervisors

Ian Thompson and Jason Todd

Ivan is currently serving as a Facilitator (Teaching) in the Vice-Chancellor’s Colloquium and as an Editor of the Graduate Inequality Review in the University of Oxford. He has taken up lecturerships in a number of universities in Hong Kong and has run Education, Linguistics, Applied Linguistics, Sociolinguistics, and Academic English courses at undergraduate and postgraduate level.

Prior to joining Oxford, Ivan received his teacher-training in Hong Kong and his postgraduate training in Linguistics (with a specialisation in pragmatics) at University College London. His research interests include: mental representation of word meanings, language acquisition, educational technology, and ELT pedagogy.

Publications

  • Au, I. (2021). Unwinding the Fantasy: Using Breakout Rooms to Promote Language Exposure and Less-Public Feedback Practices in Online Synchronous Teaching. Paper presented at the PASHE 2021 – EAP Education and Practice: Supporting Students’ Needs, UCL (IOE).
  • Au, I. & Yiu, C. (2021). ‘Identity game’: so you think you are what your Instagram bio says about you. Paper presented at the Sociolinguistics Symposium 23, Hong Kong.
  • Au, I. (2021). The magic of breakout rooms in online synchronous teaching and learning of English. Paper presented at the 3rd International Conference on English Across the Curriculum, Hong Kong.
  • Choi, T. H., Chan, H., & Au, I. (2018). ‘Now you’re talking’: Teacher preparation through alumni talks in a community of practice. Paper presented at the Oxford Education Research Symposium.
  • Au, I. (2018). Branching out from the tree: Extending vocabulary acquisition with polysemy. Paper presented at HKBU-HU First Joint Symposium on Education 2018.

 

Supervisors

Elizabeth Wonnacott and Victoria Murphy

Thomas Procter-Legg is a DPhil Student in the Department of Education and is researching restorative practice within the context of special educational needs and disabilities.

His previous experience includes five years as the Head Teacher of a special academy in Oxfordshire UK, specialising in education for students with Special Educational Needs and Disabilities. He has also worked as a SEND Reviewer for Whole School SEND; a Teaching School Director; and as the Principal Designate on a successful Free School bid.

Thomas is passionate about restorative practice and is involved in many communities of practice, such as the Global Alliance for Restorative Justice and Social Justice, where he is a member of the research sub-group exploring the interactions between restorative justice and social justice.

Thomas is also a strong advocate for creativity in education; having previously gained a Fine Art degree from Chelsea College of Art. This heavily influenced his educational leadership and during his time as a Head Teacher, he became the co-founder of a co-constructed initiative between the academy and the University of Oxford Gardens Libraries and Museums. This work placed cultural learning opportunities and relationships at the heart of the curriculum and is the longest standing project between a special school and The University of Oxford. This sustainable partnership champions marginalised voices and has been highly celebrated e.g., inclusion in the Durham Commission for Creativity in Education; recent dissemination at the Museum Ideas Conference 2022; highly commended award at the Museum and Heritage Awards 2021; and awarded Platinum ArtsMark in 2021.

Whilst this creative work may seem to be separate from restorative practice, Thomas subscribes to the idea that there are significant overlaps, both within pedagogical practice and wider school culture, topics which his current research touch on within the context of special education.

 

Publications

Procter-Legg. (2022). A Discourse on Restorative Practice—Participants’ Views of a Divergent Ideology. Laws11(6), 86–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11060086

Procter-Legg. (2022). Practitioner Perspectives on a Restorative Community: An Inductive Evaluative Study of Conceptual, Pedagogical, and Routine Practice. Laws11(1), 4–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11010004

 

Supervisors

Ian Thompson and Jason Todd

Ivan is currently serving as a Facilitator (Teaching) in the Vice-Chancellor’s Colloquium and as an Editor of the Graduate Inequality Review in the University of Oxford. He has taken up lecturerships in a number of universities in Hong Kong and has run Education, Linguistics, Applied Linguistics, Sociolinguistics, and Academic English courses at undergraduate and postgraduate level.

Prior to joining Oxford, Ivan received his teacher-training in Hong Kong and his postgraduate training in Linguistics (with a specialisation in pragmatics) at University College London. His research interests include: mental representation of word meanings, language acquisition, educational technology, and ELT pedagogy.

Publications

  • Au, I. (2021). Unwinding the Fantasy: Using Breakout Rooms to Promote Language Exposure and Less-Public Feedback Practices in Online Synchronous Teaching. Paper presented at the PASHE 2021 – EAP Education and Practice: Supporting Students’ Needs, UCL (IOE).
  • Au, I. & Yiu, C. (2021). ‘Identity game’: so you think you are what your Instagram bio says about you. Paper presented at the Sociolinguistics Symposium 23, Hong Kong.
  • Au, I. (2021). The magic of breakout rooms in online synchronous teaching and learning of English. Paper presented at the 3rd International Conference on English Across the Curriculum, Hong Kong.
  • Choi, T. H., Chan, H., & Au, I. (2018). ‘Now you’re talking’: Teacher preparation through alumni talks in a community of practice. Paper presented at the Oxford Education Research Symposium.
  • Au, I. (2018). Branching out from the tree: Extending vocabulary acquisition with polysemy. Paper presented at HKBU-HU First Joint Symposium on Education 2018.

 

Supervisors

Elizabeth Wonnacott and Victoria Murphy

Thomas Procter-Legg is a DPhil Student in the Department of Education and is researching restorative practice within the context of special educational needs and disabilities.

His previous experience includes five years as the Head Teacher of a special academy in Oxfordshire UK, specialising in education for students with Special Educational Needs and Disabilities. He has also worked as a SEND Reviewer for Whole School SEND; a Teaching School Director; and as the Principal Designate on a successful Free School bid.

Thomas is passionate about restorative practice and is involved in many communities of practice, such as the Global Alliance for Restorative Justice and Social Justice, where he is a member of the research sub-group exploring the interactions between restorative justice and social justice.

Thomas is also a strong advocate for creativity in education; having previously gained a Fine Art degree from Chelsea College of Art. This heavily influenced his educational leadership and during his time as a Head Teacher, he became the co-founder of a co-constructed initiative between the academy and the University of Oxford Gardens Libraries and Museums. This work placed cultural learning opportunities and relationships at the heart of the curriculum and is the longest standing project between a special school and The University of Oxford. This sustainable partnership champions marginalised voices and has been highly celebrated e.g., inclusion in the Durham Commission for Creativity in Education; recent dissemination at the Museum Ideas Conference 2022; highly commended award at the Museum and Heritage Awards 2021; and awarded Platinum ArtsMark in 2021.

Whilst this creative work may seem to be separate from restorative practice, Thomas subscribes to the idea that there are significant overlaps, both within pedagogical practice and wider school culture, topics which his current research touch on within the context of special education.

 

Publications

Procter-Legg. (2022). A Discourse on Restorative Practice—Participants’ Views of a Divergent Ideology. Laws11(6), 86–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11060086

Procter-Legg. (2022). Practitioner Perspectives on a Restorative Community: An Inductive Evaluative Study of Conceptual, Pedagogical, and Routine Practice. Laws11(1), 4–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11010004

 

Supervisors

Ian Thompson and Jason Todd

Ivan is currently serving as a Facilitator (Teaching) in the Vice-Chancellor’s Colloquium and as an Editor of the Graduate Inequality Review in the University of Oxford. He has taken up lecturerships in a number of universities in Hong Kong and has run Education, Linguistics, Applied Linguistics, Sociolinguistics, and Academic English courses at undergraduate and postgraduate level.

Prior to joining Oxford, Ivan received his teacher-training in Hong Kong and his postgraduate training in Linguistics (with a specialisation in pragmatics) at University College London. His research interests include: mental representation of word meanings, language acquisition, educational technology, and ELT pedagogy.

Publications

  • Au, I. (2021). Unwinding the Fantasy: Using Breakout Rooms to Promote Language Exposure and Less-Public Feedback Practices in Online Synchronous Teaching. Paper presented at the PASHE 2021 – EAP Education and Practice: Supporting Students’ Needs, UCL (IOE).
  • Au, I. & Yiu, C. (2021). ‘Identity game’: so you think you are what your Instagram bio says about you. Paper presented at the Sociolinguistics Symposium 23, Hong Kong.
  • Au, I. (2021). The magic of breakout rooms in online synchronous teaching and learning of English. Paper presented at the 3rd International Conference on English Across the Curriculum, Hong Kong.
  • Choi, T. H., Chan, H., & Au, I. (2018). ‘Now you’re talking’: Teacher preparation through alumni talks in a community of practice. Paper presented at the Oxford Education Research Symposium.
  • Au, I. (2018). Branching out from the tree: Extending vocabulary acquisition with polysemy. Paper presented at HKBU-HU First Joint Symposium on Education 2018.

 

Supervisors

Elizabeth Wonnacott and Victoria Murphy

Thomas Procter-Legg is a DPhil Student in the Department of Education and is researching restorative practice within the context of special educational needs and disabilities.

His previous experience includes five years as the Head Teacher of a special academy in Oxfordshire UK, specialising in education for students with Special Educational Needs and Disabilities. He has also worked as a SEND Reviewer for Whole School SEND; a Teaching School Director; and as the Principal Designate on a successful Free School bid.

Thomas is passionate about restorative practice and is involved in many communities of practice, such as the Global Alliance for Restorative Justice and Social Justice, where he is a member of the research sub-group exploring the interactions between restorative justice and social justice.

Thomas is also a strong advocate for creativity in education; having previously gained a Fine Art degree from Chelsea College of Art. This heavily influenced his educational leadership and during his time as a Head Teacher, he became the co-founder of a co-constructed initiative between the academy and the University of Oxford Gardens Libraries and Museums. This work placed cultural learning opportunities and relationships at the heart of the curriculum and is the longest standing project between a special school and The University of Oxford. This sustainable partnership champions marginalised voices and has been highly celebrated e.g., inclusion in the Durham Commission for Creativity in Education; recent dissemination at the Museum Ideas Conference 2022; highly commended award at the Museum and Heritage Awards 2021; and awarded Platinum ArtsMark in 2021.

Whilst this creative work may seem to be separate from restorative practice, Thomas subscribes to the idea that there are significant overlaps, both within pedagogical practice and wider school culture, topics which his current research touch on within the context of special education.

 

Publications

Procter-Legg. (2022). A Discourse on Restorative Practice—Participants’ Views of a Divergent Ideology. Laws11(6), 86–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11060086

Procter-Legg. (2022). Practitioner Perspectives on a Restorative Community: An Inductive Evaluative Study of Conceptual, Pedagogical, and Routine Practice. Laws11(1), 4–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11010004

 

Supervisors

Ian Thompson and Jason Todd

Ivan is currently serving as a Facilitator (Teaching) in the Vice-Chancellor’s Colloquium and as an Editor of the Graduate Inequality Review in the University of Oxford. He has taken up lecturerships in a number of universities in Hong Kong and has run Education, Linguistics, Applied Linguistics, Sociolinguistics, and Academic English courses at undergraduate and postgraduate level.

Prior to joining Oxford, Ivan received his teacher-training in Hong Kong and his postgraduate training in Linguistics (with a specialisation in pragmatics) at University College London. His research interests include: mental representation of word meanings, language acquisition, educational technology, and ELT pedagogy.

Publications

  • Au, I. (2021). Unwinding the Fantasy: Using Breakout Rooms to Promote Language Exposure and Less-Public Feedback Practices in Online Synchronous Teaching. Paper presented at the PASHE 2021 – EAP Education and Practice: Supporting Students’ Needs, UCL (IOE).
  • Au, I. & Yiu, C. (2021). ‘Identity game’: so you think you are what your Instagram bio says about you. Paper presented at the Sociolinguistics Symposium 23, Hong Kong.
  • Au, I. (2021). The magic of breakout rooms in online synchronous teaching and learning of English. Paper presented at the 3rd International Conference on English Across the Curriculum, Hong Kong.
  • Choi, T. H., Chan, H., & Au, I. (2018). ‘Now you’re talking’: Teacher preparation through alumni talks in a community of practice. Paper presented at the Oxford Education Research Symposium.
  • Au, I. (2018). Branching out from the tree: Extending vocabulary acquisition with polysemy. Paper presented at HKBU-HU First Joint Symposium on Education 2018.

 

Supervisors

Elizabeth Wonnacott and Victoria Murphy

Thomas Procter-Legg is a DPhil Student in the Department of Education and is researching restorative practice within the context of special educational needs and disabilities.

His previous experience includes five years as the Head Teacher of a special academy in Oxfordshire UK, specialising in education for students with Special Educational Needs and Disabilities. He has also worked as a SEND Reviewer for Whole School SEND; a Teaching School Director; and as the Principal Designate on a successful Free School bid.

Thomas is passionate about restorative practice and is involved in many communities of practice, such as the Global Alliance for Restorative Justice and Social Justice, where he is a member of the research sub-group exploring the interactions between restorative justice and social justice.

Thomas is also a strong advocate for creativity in education; having previously gained a Fine Art degree from Chelsea College of Art. This heavily influenced his educational leadership and during his time as a Head Teacher, he became the co-founder of a co-constructed initiative between the academy and the University of Oxford Gardens Libraries and Museums. This work placed cultural learning opportunities and relationships at the heart of the curriculum and is the longest standing project between a special school and The University of Oxford. This sustainable partnership champions marginalised voices and has been highly celebrated e.g., inclusion in the Durham Commission for Creativity in Education; recent dissemination at the Museum Ideas Conference 2022; highly commended award at the Museum and Heritage Awards 2021; and awarded Platinum ArtsMark in 2021.

Whilst this creative work may seem to be separate from restorative practice, Thomas subscribes to the idea that there are significant overlaps, both within pedagogical practice and wider school culture, topics which his current research touch on within the context of special education.

 

Publications

Procter-Legg. (2022). A Discourse on Restorative Practice—Participants’ Views of a Divergent Ideology. Laws11(6), 86–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11060086

Procter-Legg. (2022). Practitioner Perspectives on a Restorative Community: An Inductive Evaluative Study of Conceptual, Pedagogical, and Routine Practice. Laws11(1), 4–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11010004

 

Supervisors

Ian Thompson and Jason Todd

Ivan is currently serving as a Facilitator (Teaching) in the Vice-Chancellor’s Colloquium and as an Editor of the Graduate Inequality Review in the University of Oxford. He has taken up lecturerships in a number of universities in Hong Kong and has run Education, Linguistics, Applied Linguistics, Sociolinguistics, and Academic English courses at undergraduate and postgraduate level.

Prior to joining Oxford, Ivan received his teacher-training in Hong Kong and his postgraduate training in Linguistics (with a specialisation in pragmatics) at University College London. His research interests include: mental representation of word meanings, language acquisition, educational technology, and ELT pedagogy.

Publications

  • Au, I. (2021). Unwinding the Fantasy: Using Breakout Rooms to Promote Language Exposure and Less-Public Feedback Practices in Online Synchronous Teaching. Paper presented at the PASHE 2021 – EAP Education and Practice: Supporting Students’ Needs, UCL (IOE).
  • Au, I. & Yiu, C. (2021). ‘Identity game’: so you think you are what your Instagram bio says about you. Paper presented at the Sociolinguistics Symposium 23, Hong Kong.
  • Au, I. (2021). The magic of breakout rooms in online synchronous teaching and learning of English. Paper presented at the 3rd International Conference on English Across the Curriculum, Hong Kong.
  • Choi, T. H., Chan, H., & Au, I. (2018). ‘Now you’re talking’: Teacher preparation through alumni talks in a community of practice. Paper presented at the Oxford Education Research Symposium.
  • Au, I. (2018). Branching out from the tree: Extending vocabulary acquisition with polysemy. Paper presented at HKBU-HU First Joint Symposium on Education 2018.

 

Supervisors

Elizabeth Wonnacott and Victoria Murphy

Thomas Procter-Legg is a DPhil Student in the Department of Education and is researching restorative practice within the context of special educational needs and disabilities.

His previous experience includes five years as the Head Teacher of a special academy in Oxfordshire UK, specialising in education for students with Special Educational Needs and Disabilities. He has also worked as a SEND Reviewer for Whole School SEND; a Teaching School Director; and as the Principal Designate on a successful Free School bid.

Thomas is passionate about restorative practice and is involved in many communities of practice, such as the Global Alliance for Restorative Justice and Social Justice, where he is a member of the research sub-group exploring the interactions between restorative justice and social justice.

Thomas is also a strong advocate for creativity in education; having previously gained a Fine Art degree from Chelsea College of Art. This heavily influenced his educational leadership and during his time as a Head Teacher, he became the co-founder of a co-constructed initiative between the academy and the University of Oxford Gardens Libraries and Museums. This work placed cultural learning opportunities and relationships at the heart of the curriculum and is the longest standing project between a special school and The University of Oxford. This sustainable partnership champions marginalised voices and has been highly celebrated e.g., inclusion in the Durham Commission for Creativity in Education; recent dissemination at the Museum Ideas Conference 2022; highly commended award at the Museum and Heritage Awards 2021; and awarded Platinum ArtsMark in 2021.

Whilst this creative work may seem to be separate from restorative practice, Thomas subscribes to the idea that there are significant overlaps, both within pedagogical practice and wider school culture, topics which his current research touch on within the context of special education.

 

Publications

Procter-Legg. (2022). A Discourse on Restorative Practice—Participants’ Views of a Divergent Ideology. Laws11(6), 86–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11060086

Procter-Legg. (2022). Practitioner Perspectives on a Restorative Community: An Inductive Evaluative Study of Conceptual, Pedagogical, and Routine Practice. Laws11(1), 4–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11010004

 

Supervisors

Ian Thompson and Jason Todd

Ivan is currently serving as a Facilitator (Teaching) in the Vice-Chancellor’s Colloquium and as an Editor of the Graduate Inequality Review in the University of Oxford. He has taken up lecturerships in a number of universities in Hong Kong and has run Education, Linguistics, Applied Linguistics, Sociolinguistics, and Academic English courses at undergraduate and postgraduate level.

Prior to joining Oxford, Ivan received his teacher-training in Hong Kong and his postgraduate training in Linguistics (with a specialisation in pragmatics) at University College London. His research interests include: mental representation of word meanings, language acquisition, educational technology, and ELT pedagogy.

Publications

  • Au, I. (2021). Unwinding the Fantasy: Using Breakout Rooms to Promote Language Exposure and Less-Public Feedback Practices in Online Synchronous Teaching. Paper presented at the PASHE 2021 – EAP Education and Practice: Supporting Students’ Needs, UCL (IOE).
  • Au, I. & Yiu, C. (2021). ‘Identity game’: so you think you are what your Instagram bio says about you. Paper presented at the Sociolinguistics Symposium 23, Hong Kong.
  • Au, I. (2021). The magic of breakout rooms in online synchronous teaching and learning of English. Paper presented at the 3rd International Conference on English Across the Curriculum, Hong Kong.
  • Choi, T. H., Chan, H., & Au, I. (2018). ‘Now you’re talking’: Teacher preparation through alumni talks in a community of practice. Paper presented at the Oxford Education Research Symposium.
  • Au, I. (2018). Branching out from the tree: Extending vocabulary acquisition with polysemy. Paper presented at HKBU-HU First Joint Symposium on Education 2018.

 

Supervisors

Elizabeth Wonnacott and Victoria Murphy

Thomas Procter-Legg is a DPhil Student in the Department of Education and is researching restorative practice within the context of special educational needs and disabilities.

His previous experience includes five years as the Head Teacher of a special academy in Oxfordshire UK, specialising in education for students with Special Educational Needs and Disabilities. He has also worked as a SEND Reviewer for Whole School SEND; a Teaching School Director; and as the Principal Designate on a successful Free School bid.

Thomas is passionate about restorative practice and is involved in many communities of practice, such as the Global Alliance for Restorative Justice and Social Justice, where he is a member of the research sub-group exploring the interactions between restorative justice and social justice.

Thomas is also a strong advocate for creativity in education; having previously gained a Fine Art degree from Chelsea College of Art. This heavily influenced his educational leadership and during his time as a Head Teacher, he became the co-founder of a co-constructed initiative between the academy and the University of Oxford Gardens Libraries and Museums. This work placed cultural learning opportunities and relationships at the heart of the curriculum and is the longest standing project between a special school and The University of Oxford. This sustainable partnership champions marginalised voices and has been highly celebrated e.g., inclusion in the Durham Commission for Creativity in Education; recent dissemination at the Museum Ideas Conference 2022; highly commended award at the Museum and Heritage Awards 2021; and awarded Platinum ArtsMark in 2021.

Whilst this creative work may seem to be separate from restorative practice, Thomas subscribes to the idea that there are significant overlaps, both within pedagogical practice and wider school culture, topics which his current research touch on within the context of special education.

 

Publications

Procter-Legg. (2022). A Discourse on Restorative Practice—Participants’ Views of a Divergent Ideology. Laws11(6), 86–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11060086

Procter-Legg. (2022). Practitioner Perspectives on a Restorative Community: An Inductive Evaluative Study of Conceptual, Pedagogical, and Routine Practice. Laws11(1), 4–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11010004

 

Supervisors

Ian Thompson and Jason Todd

Ivan is currently serving as a Facilitator (Teaching) in the Vice-Chancellor’s Colloquium and as an Editor of the Graduate Inequality Review in the University of Oxford. He has taken up lecturerships in a number of universities in Hong Kong and has run Education, Linguistics, Applied Linguistics, Sociolinguistics, and Academic English courses at undergraduate and postgraduate level.

Prior to joining Oxford, Ivan received his teacher-training in Hong Kong and his postgraduate training in Linguistics (with a specialisation in pragmatics) at University College London. His research interests include: mental representation of word meanings, language acquisition, educational technology, and ELT pedagogy.

Publications

  • Au, I. (2021). Unwinding the Fantasy: Using Breakout Rooms to Promote Language Exposure and Less-Public Feedback Practices in Online Synchronous Teaching. Paper presented at the PASHE 2021 – EAP Education and Practice: Supporting Students’ Needs, UCL (IOE).
  • Au, I. & Yiu, C. (2021). ‘Identity game’: so you think you are what your Instagram bio says about you. Paper presented at the Sociolinguistics Symposium 23, Hong Kong.
  • Au, I. (2021). The magic of breakout rooms in online synchronous teaching and learning of English. Paper presented at the 3rd International Conference on English Across the Curriculum, Hong Kong.
  • Choi, T. H., Chan, H., & Au, I. (2018). ‘Now you’re talking’: Teacher preparation through alumni talks in a community of practice. Paper presented at the Oxford Education Research Symposium.
  • Au, I. (2018). Branching out from the tree: Extending vocabulary acquisition with polysemy. Paper presented at HKBU-HU First Joint Symposium on Education 2018.

 

Supervisors

Elizabeth Wonnacott and Victoria Murphy

Thomas Procter-Legg is a DPhil Student in the Department of Education and is researching restorative practice within the context of special educational needs and disabilities.

His previous experience includes five years as the Head Teacher of a special academy in Oxfordshire UK, specialising in education for students with Special Educational Needs and Disabilities. He has also worked as a SEND Reviewer for Whole School SEND; a Teaching School Director; and as the Principal Designate on a successful Free School bid.

Thomas is passionate about restorative practice and is involved in many communities of practice, such as the Global Alliance for Restorative Justice and Social Justice, where he is a member of the research sub-group exploring the interactions between restorative justice and social justice.

Thomas is also a strong advocate for creativity in education; having previously gained a Fine Art degree from Chelsea College of Art. This heavily influenced his educational leadership and during his time as a Head Teacher, he became the co-founder of a co-constructed initiative between the academy and the University of Oxford Gardens Libraries and Museums. This work placed cultural learning opportunities and relationships at the heart of the curriculum and is the longest standing project between a special school and The University of Oxford. This sustainable partnership champions marginalised voices and has been highly celebrated e.g., inclusion in the Durham Commission for Creativity in Education; recent dissemination at the Museum Ideas Conference 2022; highly commended award at the Museum and Heritage Awards 2021; and awarded Platinum ArtsMark in 2021.

Whilst this creative work may seem to be separate from restorative practice, Thomas subscribes to the idea that there are significant overlaps, both within pedagogical practice and wider school culture, topics which his current research touch on within the context of special education.

 

Publications

Procter-Legg. (2022). A Discourse on Restorative Practice—Participants’ Views of a Divergent Ideology. Laws11(6), 86–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11060086

Procter-Legg. (2022). Practitioner Perspectives on a Restorative Community: An Inductive Evaluative Study of Conceptual, Pedagogical, and Routine Practice. Laws11(1), 4–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11010004

 

Supervisors

Ian Thompson and Jason Todd

Ivan is currently serving as a Facilitator (Teaching) in the Vice-Chancellor’s Colloquium and as an Editor of the Graduate Inequality Review in the University of Oxford. He has taken up lecturerships in a number of universities in Hong Kong and has run Education, Linguistics, Applied Linguistics, Sociolinguistics, and Academic English courses at undergraduate and postgraduate level.

Prior to joining Oxford, Ivan received his teacher-training in Hong Kong and his postgraduate training in Linguistics (with a specialisation in pragmatics) at University College London. His research interests include: mental representation of word meanings, language acquisition, educational technology, and ELT pedagogy.

Publications

  • Au, I. (2021). Unwinding the Fantasy: Using Breakout Rooms to Promote Language Exposure and Less-Public Feedback Practices in Online Synchronous Teaching. Paper presented at the PASHE 2021 – EAP Education and Practice: Supporting Students’ Needs, UCL (IOE).
  • Au, I. & Yiu, C. (2021). ‘Identity game’: so you think you are what your Instagram bio says about you. Paper presented at the Sociolinguistics Symposium 23, Hong Kong.
  • Au, I. (2021). The magic of breakout rooms in online synchronous teaching and learning of English. Paper presented at the 3rd International Conference on English Across the Curriculum, Hong Kong.
  • Choi, T. H., Chan, H., & Au, I. (2018). ‘Now you’re talking’: Teacher preparation through alumni talks in a community of practice. Paper presented at the Oxford Education Research Symposium.
  • Au, I. (2018). Branching out from the tree: Extending vocabulary acquisition with polysemy. Paper presented at HKBU-HU First Joint Symposium on Education 2018.

 

Supervisors

Elizabeth Wonnacott and Victoria Murphy

Thomas Procter-Legg is a DPhil Student in the Department of Education and is researching restorative practice within the context of special educational needs and disabilities.

His previous experience includes five years as the Head Teacher of a special academy in Oxfordshire UK, specialising in education for students with Special Educational Needs and Disabilities. He has also worked as a SEND Reviewer for Whole School SEND; a Teaching School Director; and as the Principal Designate on a successful Free School bid.

Thomas is passionate about restorative practice and is involved in many communities of practice, such as the Global Alliance for Restorative Justice and Social Justice, where he is a member of the research sub-group exploring the interactions between restorative justice and social justice.

Thomas is also a strong advocate for creativity in education; having previously gained a Fine Art degree from Chelsea College of Art. This heavily influenced his educational leadership and during his time as a Head Teacher, he became the co-founder of a co-constructed initiative between the academy and the University of Oxford Gardens Libraries and Museums. This work placed cultural learning opportunities and relationships at the heart of the curriculum and is the longest standing project between a special school and The University of Oxford. This sustainable partnership champions marginalised voices and has been highly celebrated e.g., inclusion in the Durham Commission for Creativity in Education; recent dissemination at the Museum Ideas Conference 2022; highly commended award at the Museum and Heritage Awards 2021; and awarded Platinum ArtsMark in 2021.

Whilst this creative work may seem to be separate from restorative practice, Thomas subscribes to the idea that there are significant overlaps, both within pedagogical practice and wider school culture, topics which his current research touch on within the context of special education.

 

Publications

Procter-Legg. (2022). A Discourse on Restorative Practice—Participants’ Views of a Divergent Ideology. Laws11(6), 86–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11060086

Procter-Legg. (2022). Practitioner Perspectives on a Restorative Community: An Inductive Evaluative Study of Conceptual, Pedagogical, and Routine Practice. Laws11(1), 4–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11010004

 

Supervisors

Ian Thompson and Jason Todd

Ivan is currently serving as a Facilitator (Teaching) in the Vice-Chancellor’s Colloquium and as an Editor of the Graduate Inequality Review in the University of Oxford. He has taken up lecturerships in a number of universities in Hong Kong and has run Education, Linguistics, Applied Linguistics, Sociolinguistics, and Academic English courses at undergraduate and postgraduate level.

Prior to joining Oxford, Ivan received his teacher-training in Hong Kong and his postgraduate training in Linguistics (with a specialisation in pragmatics) at University College London. His research interests include: mental representation of word meanings, language acquisition, educational technology, and ELT pedagogy.

Publications

  • Au, I. (2021). Unwinding the Fantasy: Using Breakout Rooms to Promote Language Exposure and Less-Public Feedback Practices in Online Synchronous Teaching. Paper presented at the PASHE 2021 – EAP Education and Practice: Supporting Students’ Needs, UCL (IOE).
  • Au, I. & Yiu, C. (2021). ‘Identity game’: so you think you are what your Instagram bio says about you. Paper presented at the Sociolinguistics Symposium 23, Hong Kong.
  • Au, I. (2021). The magic of breakout rooms in online synchronous teaching and learning of English. Paper presented at the 3rd International Conference on English Across the Curriculum, Hong Kong.
  • Choi, T. H., Chan, H., & Au, I. (2018). ‘Now you’re talking’: Teacher preparation through alumni talks in a community of practice. Paper presented at the Oxford Education Research Symposium.
  • Au, I. (2018). Branching out from the tree: Extending vocabulary acquisition with polysemy. Paper presented at HKBU-HU First Joint Symposium on Education 2018.

 

Supervisors

Elizabeth Wonnacott and Victoria Murphy

Thomas Procter-Legg is a DPhil Student in the Department of Education and is researching restorative practice within the context of special educational needs and disabilities.

His previous experience includes five years as the Head Teacher of a special academy in Oxfordshire UK, specialising in education for students with Special Educational Needs and Disabilities. He has also worked as a SEND Reviewer for Whole School SEND; a Teaching School Director; and as the Principal Designate on a successful Free School bid.

Thomas is passionate about restorative practice and is involved in many communities of practice, such as the Global Alliance for Restorative Justice and Social Justice, where he is a member of the research sub-group exploring the interactions between restorative justice and social justice.

Thomas is also a strong advocate for creativity in education; having previously gained a Fine Art degree from Chelsea College of Art. This heavily influenced his educational leadership and during his time as a Head Teacher, he became the co-founder of a co-constructed initiative between the academy and the University of Oxford Gardens Libraries and Museums. This work placed cultural learning opportunities and relationships at the heart of the curriculum and is the longest standing project between a special school and The University of Oxford. This sustainable partnership champions marginalised voices and has been highly celebrated e.g., inclusion in the Durham Commission for Creativity in Education; recent dissemination at the Museum Ideas Conference 2022; highly commended award at the Museum and Heritage Awards 2021; and awarded Platinum ArtsMark in 2021.

Whilst this creative work may seem to be separate from restorative practice, Thomas subscribes to the idea that there are significant overlaps, both within pedagogical practice and wider school culture, topics which his current research touch on within the context of special education.

 

Publications

Procter-Legg. (2022). A Discourse on Restorative Practice—Participants’ Views of a Divergent Ideology. Laws11(6), 86–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11060086

Procter-Legg. (2022). Practitioner Perspectives on a Restorative Community: An Inductive Evaluative Study of Conceptual, Pedagogical, and Routine Practice. Laws11(1), 4–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11010004

 

Supervisors

Ian Thompson and Jason Todd

Ivan is currently serving as a Facilitator (Teaching) in the Vice-Chancellor’s Colloquium and as an Editor of the Graduate Inequality Review in the University of Oxford. He has taken up lecturerships in a number of universities in Hong Kong and has run Education, Linguistics, Applied Linguistics, Sociolinguistics, and Academic English courses at undergraduate and postgraduate level.

Prior to joining Oxford, Ivan received his teacher-training in Hong Kong and his postgraduate training in Linguistics (with a specialisation in pragmatics) at University College London. His research interests include: mental representation of word meanings, language acquisition, educational technology, and ELT pedagogy.

Publications

  • Au, I. (2021). Unwinding the Fantasy: Using Breakout Rooms to Promote Language Exposure and Less-Public Feedback Practices in Online Synchronous Teaching. Paper presented at the PASHE 2021 – EAP Education and Practice: Supporting Students’ Needs, UCL (IOE).
  • Au, I. & Yiu, C. (2021). ‘Identity game’: so you think you are what your Instagram bio says about you. Paper presented at the Sociolinguistics Symposium 23, Hong Kong.
  • Au, I. (2021). The magic of breakout rooms in online synchronous teaching and learning of English. Paper presented at the 3rd International Conference on English Across the Curriculum, Hong Kong.
  • Choi, T. H., Chan, H., & Au, I. (2018). ‘Now you’re talking’: Teacher preparation through alumni talks in a community of practice. Paper presented at the Oxford Education Research Symposium.
  • Au, I. (2018). Branching out from the tree: Extending vocabulary acquisition with polysemy. Paper presented at HKBU-HU First Joint Symposium on Education 2018.

 

Supervisors

Elizabeth Wonnacott and Victoria Murphy

Thomas Procter-Legg is a DPhil Student in the Department of Education and is researching restorative practice within the context of special educational needs and disabilities.

His previous experience includes five years as the Head Teacher of a special academy in Oxfordshire UK, specialising in education for students with Special Educational Needs and Disabilities. He has also worked as a SEND Reviewer for Whole School SEND; a Teaching School Director; and as the Principal Designate on a successful Free School bid.

Thomas is passionate about restorative practice and is involved in many communities of practice, such as the Global Alliance for Restorative Justice and Social Justice, where he is a member of the research sub-group exploring the interactions between restorative justice and social justice.

Thomas is also a strong advocate for creativity in education; having previously gained a Fine Art degree from Chelsea College of Art. This heavily influenced his educational leadership and during his time as a Head Teacher, he became the co-founder of a co-constructed initiative between the academy and the University of Oxford Gardens Libraries and Museums. This work placed cultural learning opportunities and relationships at the heart of the curriculum and is the longest standing project between a special school and The University of Oxford. This sustainable partnership champions marginalised voices and has been highly celebrated e.g., inclusion in the Durham Commission for Creativity in Education; recent dissemination at the Museum Ideas Conference 2022; highly commended award at the Museum and Heritage Awards 2021; and awarded Platinum ArtsMark in 2021.

Whilst this creative work may seem to be separate from restorative practice, Thomas subscribes to the idea that there are significant overlaps, both within pedagogical practice and wider school culture, topics which his current research touch on within the context of special education.

 

Publications

Procter-Legg. (2022). A Discourse on Restorative Practice—Participants’ Views of a Divergent Ideology. Laws11(6), 86–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11060086

Procter-Legg. (2022). Practitioner Perspectives on a Restorative Community: An Inductive Evaluative Study of Conceptual, Pedagogical, and Routine Practice. Laws11(1), 4–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11010004

 

Supervisors

Ian Thompson and Jason Todd

Ivan is currently serving as a Facilitator (Teaching) in the Vice-Chancellor’s Colloquium and as an Editor of the Graduate Inequality Review in the University of Oxford. He has taken up lecturerships in a number of universities in Hong Kong and has run Education, Linguistics, Applied Linguistics, Sociolinguistics, and Academic English courses at undergraduate and postgraduate level.

Prior to joining Oxford, Ivan received his teacher-training in Hong Kong and his postgraduate training in Linguistics (with a specialisation in pragmatics) at University College London. His research interests include: mental representation of word meanings, language acquisition, educational technology, and ELT pedagogy.

Publications

  • Au, I. (2021). Unwinding the Fantasy: Using Breakout Rooms to Promote Language Exposure and Less-Public Feedback Practices in Online Synchronous Teaching. Paper presented at the PASHE 2021 – EAP Education and Practice: Supporting Students’ Needs, UCL (IOE).
  • Au, I. & Yiu, C. (2021). ‘Identity game’: so you think you are what your Instagram bio says about you. Paper presented at the Sociolinguistics Symposium 23, Hong Kong.
  • Au, I. (2021). The magic of breakout rooms in online synchronous teaching and learning of English. Paper presented at the 3rd International Conference on English Across the Curriculum, Hong Kong.
  • Choi, T. H., Chan, H., & Au, I. (2018). ‘Now you’re talking’: Teacher preparation through alumni talks in a community of practice. Paper presented at the Oxford Education Research Symposium.
  • Au, I. (2018). Branching out from the tree: Extending vocabulary acquisition with polysemy. Paper presented at HKBU-HU First Joint Symposium on Education 2018.

 

Supervisors

Elizabeth Wonnacott and Victoria Murphy

Thomas Procter-Legg is a DPhil Student in the Department of Education and is researching restorative practice within the context of special educational needs and disabilities.

His previous experience includes five years as the Head Teacher of a special academy in Oxfordshire UK, specialising in education for students with Special Educational Needs and Disabilities. He has also worked as a SEND Reviewer for Whole School SEND; a Teaching School Director; and as the Principal Designate on a successful Free School bid.

Thomas is passionate about restorative practice and is involved in many communities of practice, such as the Global Alliance for Restorative Justice and Social Justice, where he is a member of the research sub-group exploring the interactions between restorative justice and social justice.

Thomas is also a strong advocate for creativity in education; having previously gained a Fine Art degree from Chelsea College of Art. This heavily influenced his educational leadership and during his time as a Head Teacher, he became the co-founder of a co-constructed initiative between the academy and the University of Oxford Gardens Libraries and Museums. This work placed cultural learning opportunities and relationships at the heart of the curriculum and is the longest standing project between a special school and The University of Oxford. This sustainable partnership champions marginalised voices and has been highly celebrated e.g., inclusion in the Durham Commission for Creativity in Education; recent dissemination at the Museum Ideas Conference 2022; highly commended award at the Museum and Heritage Awards 2021; and awarded Platinum ArtsMark in 2021.

Whilst this creative work may seem to be separate from restorative practice, Thomas subscribes to the idea that there are significant overlaps, both within pedagogical practice and wider school culture, topics which his current research touch on within the context of special education.

 

Publications

Procter-Legg. (2022). A Discourse on Restorative Practice—Participants’ Views of a Divergent Ideology. Laws11(6), 86–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11060086

Procter-Legg. (2022). Practitioner Perspectives on a Restorative Community: An Inductive Evaluative Study of Conceptual, Pedagogical, and Routine Practice. Laws11(1), 4–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11010004

 

Supervisors

Ian Thompson and Jason Todd

Ivan is currently serving as a Facilitator (Teaching) in the Vice-Chancellor’s Colloquium and as an Editor of the Graduate Inequality Review in the University of Oxford. He has taken up lecturerships in a number of universities in Hong Kong and has run Education, Linguistics, Applied Linguistics, Sociolinguistics, and Academic English courses at undergraduate and postgraduate level.

Prior to joining Oxford, Ivan received his teacher-training in Hong Kong and his postgraduate training in Linguistics (with a specialisation in pragmatics) at University College London. His research interests include: mental representation of word meanings, language acquisition, educational technology, and ELT pedagogy.

Publications

  • Au, I. (2021). Unwinding the Fantasy: Using Breakout Rooms to Promote Language Exposure and Less-Public Feedback Practices in Online Synchronous Teaching. Paper presented at the PASHE 2021 – EAP Education and Practice: Supporting Students’ Needs, UCL (IOE).
  • Au, I. & Yiu, C. (2021). ‘Identity game’: so you think you are what your Instagram bio says about you. Paper presented at the Sociolinguistics Symposium 23, Hong Kong.
  • Au, I. (2021). The magic of breakout rooms in online synchronous teaching and learning of English. Paper presented at the 3rd International Conference on English Across the Curriculum, Hong Kong.
  • Choi, T. H., Chan, H., & Au, I. (2018). ‘Now you’re talking’: Teacher preparation through alumni talks in a community of practice. Paper presented at the Oxford Education Research Symposium.
  • Au, I. (2018). Branching out from the tree: Extending vocabulary acquisition with polysemy. Paper presented at HKBU-HU First Joint Symposium on Education 2018.

 

Supervisors

Elizabeth Wonnacott and Victoria Murphy

Thomas Procter-Legg is a DPhil Student in the Department of Education and is researching restorative practice within the context of special educational needs and disabilities.

His previous experience includes five years as the Head Teacher of a special academy in Oxfordshire UK, specialising in education for students with Special Educational Needs and Disabilities. He has also worked as a SEND Reviewer for Whole School SEND; a Teaching School Director; and as the Principal Designate on a successful Free School bid.

Thomas is passionate about restorative practice and is involved in many communities of practice, such as the Global Alliance for Restorative Justice and Social Justice, where he is a member of the research sub-group exploring the interactions between restorative justice and social justice.

Thomas is also a strong advocate for creativity in education; having previously gained a Fine Art degree from Chelsea College of Art. This heavily influenced his educational leadership and during his time as a Head Teacher, he became the co-founder of a co-constructed initiative between the academy and the University of Oxford Gardens Libraries and Museums. This work placed cultural learning opportunities and relationships at the heart of the curriculum and is the longest standing project between a special school and The University of Oxford. This sustainable partnership champions marginalised voices and has been highly celebrated e.g., inclusion in the Durham Commission for Creativity in Education; recent dissemination at the Museum Ideas Conference 2022; highly commended award at the Museum and Heritage Awards 2021; and awarded Platinum ArtsMark in 2021.

Whilst this creative work may seem to be separate from restorative practice, Thomas subscribes to the idea that there are significant overlaps, both within pedagogical practice and wider school culture, topics which his current research touch on within the context of special education.

 

Publications

Procter-Legg. (2022). A Discourse on Restorative Practice—Participants’ Views of a Divergent Ideology. Laws11(6), 86–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11060086

Procter-Legg. (2022). Practitioner Perspectives on a Restorative Community: An Inductive Evaluative Study of Conceptual, Pedagogical, and Routine Practice. Laws11(1), 4–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11010004

 

Supervisors

Ian Thompson and Jason Todd

Ivan is currently serving as a Facilitator (Teaching) in the Vice-Chancellor’s Colloquium and as an Editor of the Graduate Inequality Review in the University of Oxford. He has taken up lecturerships in a number of universities in Hong Kong and has run Education, Linguistics, Applied Linguistics, Sociolinguistics, and Academic English courses at undergraduate and postgraduate level.

Prior to joining Oxford, Ivan received his teacher-training in Hong Kong and his postgraduate training in Linguistics (with a specialisation in pragmatics) at University College London. His research interests include: mental representation of word meanings, language acquisition, educational technology, and ELT pedagogy.

Publications

  • Au, I. (2021). Unwinding the Fantasy: Using Breakout Rooms to Promote Language Exposure and Less-Public Feedback Practices in Online Synchronous Teaching. Paper presented at the PASHE 2021 – EAP Education and Practice: Supporting Students’ Needs, UCL (IOE).
  • Au, I. & Yiu, C. (2021). ‘Identity game’: so you think you are what your Instagram bio says about you. Paper presented at the Sociolinguistics Symposium 23, Hong Kong.
  • Au, I. (2021). The magic of breakout rooms in online synchronous teaching and learning of English. Paper presented at the 3rd International Conference on English Across the Curriculum, Hong Kong.
  • Choi, T. H., Chan, H., & Au, I. (2018). ‘Now you’re talking’: Teacher preparation through alumni talks in a community of practice. Paper presented at the Oxford Education Research Symposium.
  • Au, I. (2018). Branching out from the tree: Extending vocabulary acquisition with polysemy. Paper presented at HKBU-HU First Joint Symposium on Education 2018.

 

Supervisors

Elizabeth Wonnacott and Victoria Murphy

Thomas Procter-Legg is a DPhil Student in the Department of Education and is researching restorative practice within the context of special educational needs and disabilities.

His previous experience includes five years as the Head Teacher of a special academy in Oxfordshire UK, specialising in education for students with Special Educational Needs and Disabilities. He has also worked as a SEND Reviewer for Whole School SEND; a Teaching School Director; and as the Principal Designate on a successful Free School bid.

Thomas is passionate about restorative practice and is involved in many communities of practice, such as the Global Alliance for Restorative Justice and Social Justice, where he is a member of the research sub-group exploring the interactions between restorative justice and social justice.

Thomas is also a strong advocate for creativity in education; having previously gained a Fine Art degree from Chelsea College of Art. This heavily influenced his educational leadership and during his time as a Head Teacher, he became the co-founder of a co-constructed initiative between the academy and the University of Oxford Gardens Libraries and Museums. This work placed cultural learning opportunities and relationships at the heart of the curriculum and is the longest standing project between a special school and The University of Oxford. This sustainable partnership champions marginalised voices and has been highly celebrated e.g., inclusion in the Durham Commission for Creativity in Education; recent dissemination at the Museum Ideas Conference 2022; highly commended award at the Museum and Heritage Awards 2021; and awarded Platinum ArtsMark in 2021.

Whilst this creative work may seem to be separate from restorative practice, Thomas subscribes to the idea that there are significant overlaps, both within pedagogical practice and wider school culture, topics which his current research touch on within the context of special education.

 

Publications

Procter-Legg. (2022). A Discourse on Restorative Practice—Participants’ Views of a Divergent Ideology. Laws11(6), 86–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11060086

Procter-Legg. (2022). Practitioner Perspectives on a Restorative Community: An Inductive Evaluative Study of Conceptual, Pedagogical, and Routine Practice. Laws11(1), 4–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11010004

 

Supervisors

Ian Thompson and Jason Todd

Ivan is currently serving as a Facilitator (Teaching) in the Vice-Chancellor’s Colloquium and as an Editor of the Graduate Inequality Review in the University of Oxford. He has taken up lecturerships in a number of universities in Hong Kong and has run Education, Linguistics, Applied Linguistics, Sociolinguistics, and Academic English courses at undergraduate and postgraduate level.

Prior to joining Oxford, Ivan received his teacher-training in Hong Kong and his postgraduate training in Linguistics (with a specialisation in pragmatics) at University College London. His research interests include: mental representation of word meanings, language acquisition, educational technology, and ELT pedagogy.

Publications

  • Au, I. (2021). Unwinding the Fantasy: Using Breakout Rooms to Promote Language Exposure and Less-Public Feedback Practices in Online Synchronous Teaching. Paper presented at the PASHE 2021 – EAP Education and Practice: Supporting Students’ Needs, UCL (IOE).
  • Au, I. & Yiu, C. (2021). ‘Identity game’: so you think you are what your Instagram bio says about you. Paper presented at the Sociolinguistics Symposium 23, Hong Kong.
  • Au, I. (2021). The magic of breakout rooms in online synchronous teaching and learning of English. Paper presented at the 3rd International Conference on English Across the Curriculum, Hong Kong.
  • Choi, T. H., Chan, H., & Au, I. (2018). ‘Now you’re talking’: Teacher preparation through alumni talks in a community of practice. Paper presented at the Oxford Education Research Symposium.
  • Au, I. (2018). Branching out from the tree: Extending vocabulary acquisition with polysemy. Paper presented at HKBU-HU First Joint Symposium on Education 2018.

 

Supervisors

Elizabeth Wonnacott and Victoria Murphy

Thomas Procter-Legg is a DPhil Student in the Department of Education and is researching restorative practice within the context of special educational needs and disabilities.

His previous experience includes five years as the Head Teacher of a special academy in Oxfordshire UK, specialising in education for students with Special Educational Needs and Disabilities. He has also worked as a SEND Reviewer for Whole School SEND; a Teaching School Director; and as the Principal Designate on a successful Free School bid.

Thomas is passionate about restorative practice and is involved in many communities of practice, such as the Global Alliance for Restorative Justice and Social Justice, where he is a member of the research sub-group exploring the interactions between restorative justice and social justice.

Thomas is also a strong advocate for creativity in education; having previously gained a Fine Art degree from Chelsea College of Art. This heavily influenced his educational leadership and during his time as a Head Teacher, he became the co-founder of a co-constructed initiative between the academy and the University of Oxford Gardens Libraries and Museums. This work placed cultural learning opportunities and relationships at the heart of the curriculum and is the longest standing project between a special school and The University of Oxford. This sustainable partnership champions marginalised voices and has been highly celebrated e.g., inclusion in the Durham Commission for Creativity in Education; recent dissemination at the Museum Ideas Conference 2022; highly commended award at the Museum and Heritage Awards 2021; and awarded Platinum ArtsMark in 2021.

Whilst this creative work may seem to be separate from restorative practice, Thomas subscribes to the idea that there are significant overlaps, both within pedagogical practice and wider school culture, topics which his current research touch on within the context of special education.

 

Publications

Procter-Legg. (2022). A Discourse on Restorative Practice—Participants’ Views of a Divergent Ideology. Laws11(6), 86–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11060086

Procter-Legg. (2022). Practitioner Perspectives on a Restorative Community: An Inductive Evaluative Study of Conceptual, Pedagogical, and Routine Practice. Laws11(1), 4–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11010004

 

Supervisors

Ian Thompson and Jason Todd

Ivan is currently serving as a Facilitator (Teaching) in the Vice-Chancellor’s Colloquium and as an Editor of the Graduate Inequality Review in the University of Oxford. He has taken up lecturerships in a number of universities in Hong Kong and has run Education, Linguistics, Applied Linguistics, Sociolinguistics, and Academic English courses at undergraduate and postgraduate level.

Prior to joining Oxford, Ivan received his teacher-training in Hong Kong and his postgraduate training in Linguistics (with a specialisation in pragmatics) at University College London. His research interests include: mental representation of word meanings, language acquisition, educational technology, and ELT pedagogy.

Publications

  • Au, I. (2021). Unwinding the Fantasy: Using Breakout Rooms to Promote Language Exposure and Less-Public Feedback Practices in Online Synchronous Teaching. Paper presented at the PASHE 2021 – EAP Education and Practice: Supporting Students’ Needs, UCL (IOE).
  • Au, I. & Yiu, C. (2021). ‘Identity game’: so you think you are what your Instagram bio says about you. Paper presented at the Sociolinguistics Symposium 23, Hong Kong.
  • Au, I. (2021). The magic of breakout rooms in online synchronous teaching and learning of English. Paper presented at the 3rd International Conference on English Across the Curriculum, Hong Kong.
  • Choi, T. H., Chan, H., & Au, I. (2018). ‘Now you’re talking’: Teacher preparation through alumni talks in a community of practice. Paper presented at the Oxford Education Research Symposium.
  • Au, I. (2018). Branching out from the tree: Extending vocabulary acquisition with polysemy. Paper presented at HKBU-HU First Joint Symposium on Education 2018.

 

Supervisors

Elizabeth Wonnacott and Victoria Murphy

Thomas Procter-Legg is a DPhil Student in the Department of Education and is researching restorative practice within the context of special educational needs and disabilities.

His previous experience includes five years as the Head Teacher of a special academy in Oxfordshire UK, specialising in education for students with Special Educational Needs and Disabilities. He has also worked as a SEND Reviewer for Whole School SEND; a Teaching School Director; and as the Principal Designate on a successful Free School bid.

Thomas is passionate about restorative practice and is involved in many communities of practice, such as the Global Alliance for Restorative Justice and Social Justice, where he is a member of the research sub-group exploring the interactions between restorative justice and social justice.

Thomas is also a strong advocate for creativity in education; having previously gained a Fine Art degree from Chelsea College of Art. This heavily influenced his educational leadership and during his time as a Head Teacher, he became the co-founder of a co-constructed initiative between the academy and the University of Oxford Gardens Libraries and Museums. This work placed cultural learning opportunities and relationships at the heart of the curriculum and is the longest standing project between a special school and The University of Oxford. This sustainable partnership champions marginalised voices and has been highly celebrated e.g., inclusion in the Durham Commission for Creativity in Education; recent dissemination at the Museum Ideas Conference 2022; highly commended award at the Museum and Heritage Awards 2021; and awarded Platinum ArtsMark in 2021.

Whilst this creative work may seem to be separate from restorative practice, Thomas subscribes to the idea that there are significant overlaps, both within pedagogical practice and wider school culture, topics which his current research touch on within the context of special education.

 

Publications

Procter-Legg. (2022). A Discourse on Restorative Practice—Participants’ Views of a Divergent Ideology. Laws11(6), 86–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11060086

Procter-Legg. (2022). Practitioner Perspectives on a Restorative Community: An Inductive Evaluative Study of Conceptual, Pedagogical, and Routine Practice. Laws11(1), 4–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11010004

 

Supervisors

Ian Thompson and Jason Todd

Ivan is currently serving as a Facilitator (Teaching) in the Vice-Chancellor’s Colloquium and as an Editor of the Graduate Inequality Review in the University of Oxford. He has taken up lecturerships in a number of universities in Hong Kong and has run Education, Linguistics, Applied Linguistics, Sociolinguistics, and Academic English courses at undergraduate and postgraduate level.

Prior to joining Oxford, Ivan received his teacher-training in Hong Kong and his postgraduate training in Linguistics (with a specialisation in pragmatics) at University College London. His research interests include: mental representation of word meanings, language acquisition, educational technology, and ELT pedagogy.

Publications

  • Au, I. (2021). Unwinding the Fantasy: Using Breakout Rooms to Promote Language Exposure and Less-Public Feedback Practices in Online Synchronous Teaching. Paper presented at the PASHE 2021 – EAP Education and Practice: Supporting Students’ Needs, UCL (IOE).
  • Au, I. & Yiu, C. (2021). ‘Identity game’: so you think you are what your Instagram bio says about you. Paper presented at the Sociolinguistics Symposium 23, Hong Kong.
  • Au, I. (2021). The magic of breakout rooms in online synchronous teaching and learning of English. Paper presented at the 3rd International Conference on English Across the Curriculum, Hong Kong.
  • Choi, T. H., Chan, H., & Au, I. (2018). ‘Now you’re talking’: Teacher preparation through alumni talks in a community of practice. Paper presented at the Oxford Education Research Symposium.
  • Au, I. (2018). Branching out from the tree: Extending vocabulary acquisition with polysemy. Paper presented at HKBU-HU First Joint Symposium on Education 2018.

 

Supervisors

Elizabeth Wonnacott and Victoria Murphy

Thomas Procter-Legg is a DPhil Student in the Department of Education and is researching restorative practice within the context of special educational needs and disabilities.

His previous experience includes five years as the Head Teacher of a special academy in Oxfordshire UK, specialising in education for students with Special Educational Needs and Disabilities. He has also worked as a SEND Reviewer for Whole School SEND; a Teaching School Director; and as the Principal Designate on a successful Free School bid.

Thomas is passionate about restorative practice and is involved in many communities of practice, such as the Global Alliance for Restorative Justice and Social Justice, where he is a member of the research sub-group exploring the interactions between restorative justice and social justice.

Thomas is also a strong advocate for creativity in education; having previously gained a Fine Art degree from Chelsea College of Art. This heavily influenced his educational leadership and during his time as a Head Teacher, he became the co-founder of a co-constructed initiative between the academy and the University of Oxford Gardens Libraries and Museums. This work placed cultural learning opportunities and relationships at the heart of the curriculum and is the longest standing project between a special school and The University of Oxford. This sustainable partnership champions marginalised voices and has been highly celebrated e.g., inclusion in the Durham Commission for Creativity in Education; recent dissemination at the Museum Ideas Conference 2022; highly commended award at the Museum and Heritage Awards 2021; and awarded Platinum ArtsMark in 2021.

Whilst this creative work may seem to be separate from restorative practice, Thomas subscribes to the idea that there are significant overlaps, both within pedagogical practice and wider school culture, topics which his current research touch on within the context of special education.

 

Publications

Procter-Legg. (2022). A Discourse on Restorative Practice—Participants’ Views of a Divergent Ideology. Laws11(6), 86–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11060086

Procter-Legg. (2022). Practitioner Perspectives on a Restorative Community: An Inductive Evaluative Study of Conceptual, Pedagogical, and Routine Practice. Laws11(1), 4–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11010004

 

Supervisors

Ian Thompson and Jason Todd

Ivan is currently serving as a Facilitator (Teaching) in the Vice-Chancellor’s Colloquium and as an Editor of the Graduate Inequality Review in the University of Oxford. He has taken up lecturerships in a number of universities in Hong Kong and has run Education, Linguistics, Applied Linguistics, Sociolinguistics, and Academic English courses at undergraduate and postgraduate level.

Prior to joining Oxford, Ivan received his teacher-training in Hong Kong and his postgraduate training in Linguistics (with a specialisation in pragmatics) at University College London. His research interests include: mental representation of word meanings, language acquisition, educational technology, and ELT pedagogy.

Publications

  • Au, I. (2021). Unwinding the Fantasy: Using Breakout Rooms to Promote Language Exposure and Less-Public Feedback Practices in Online Synchronous Teaching. Paper presented at the PASHE 2021 – EAP Education and Practice: Supporting Students’ Needs, UCL (IOE).
  • Au, I. & Yiu, C. (2021). ‘Identity game’: so you think you are what your Instagram bio says about you. Paper presented at the Sociolinguistics Symposium 23, Hong Kong.
  • Au, I. (2021). The magic of breakout rooms in online synchronous teaching and learning of English. Paper presented at the 3rd International Conference on English Across the Curriculum, Hong Kong.
  • Choi, T. H., Chan, H., & Au, I. (2018). ‘Now you’re talking’: Teacher preparation through alumni talks in a community of practice. Paper presented at the Oxford Education Research Symposium.
  • Au, I. (2018). Branching out from the tree: Extending vocabulary acquisition with polysemy. Paper presented at HKBU-HU First Joint Symposium on Education 2018.

 

Supervisors

Elizabeth Wonnacott and Victoria Murphy

Thomas Procter-Legg is a DPhil Student in the Department of Education and is researching restorative practice within the context of special educational needs and disabilities.

His previous experience includes five years as the Head Teacher of a special academy in Oxfordshire UK, specialising in education for students with Special Educational Needs and Disabilities. He has also worked as a SEND Reviewer for Whole School SEND; a Teaching School Director; and as the Principal Designate on a successful Free School bid.

Thomas is passionate about restorative practice and is involved in many communities of practice, such as the Global Alliance for Restorative Justice and Social Justice, where he is a member of the research sub-group exploring the interactions between restorative justice and social justice.

Thomas is also a strong advocate for creativity in education; having previously gained a Fine Art degree from Chelsea College of Art. This heavily influenced his educational leadership and during his time as a Head Teacher, he became the co-founder of a co-constructed initiative between the academy and the University of Oxford Gardens Libraries and Museums. This work placed cultural learning opportunities and relationships at the heart of the curriculum and is the longest standing project between a special school and The University of Oxford. This sustainable partnership champions marginalised voices and has been highly celebrated e.g., inclusion in the Durham Commission for Creativity in Education; recent dissemination at the Museum Ideas Conference 2022; highly commended award at the Museum and Heritage Awards 2021; and awarded Platinum ArtsMark in 2021.

Whilst this creative work may seem to be separate from restorative practice, Thomas subscribes to the idea that there are significant overlaps, both within pedagogical practice and wider school culture, topics which his current research touch on within the context of special education.

 

Publications

Procter-Legg. (2022). A Discourse on Restorative Practice—Participants’ Views of a Divergent Ideology. Laws11(6), 86–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11060086

Procter-Legg. (2022). Practitioner Perspectives on a Restorative Community: An Inductive Evaluative Study of Conceptual, Pedagogical, and Routine Practice. Laws11(1), 4–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11010004

 

Supervisors

Ian Thompson and Jason Todd

Ivan is currently serving as a Facilitator (Teaching) in the Vice-Chancellor’s Colloquium and as an Editor of the Graduate Inequality Review in the University of Oxford. He has taken up lecturerships in a number of universities in Hong Kong and has run Education, Linguistics, Applied Linguistics, Sociolinguistics, and Academic English courses at undergraduate and postgraduate level.

Prior to joining Oxford, Ivan received his teacher-training in Hong Kong and his postgraduate training in Linguistics (with a specialisation in pragmatics) at University College London. His research interests include: mental representation of word meanings, language acquisition, educational technology, and ELT pedagogy.

Publications

  • Au, I. (2021). Unwinding the Fantasy: Using Breakout Rooms to Promote Language Exposure and Less-Public Feedback Practices in Online Synchronous Teaching. Paper presented at the PASHE 2021 – EAP Education and Practice: Supporting Students’ Needs, UCL (IOE).
  • Au, I. & Yiu, C. (2021). ‘Identity game’: so you think you are what your Instagram bio says about you. Paper presented at the Sociolinguistics Symposium 23, Hong Kong.
  • Au, I. (2021). The magic of breakout rooms in online synchronous teaching and learning of English. Paper presented at the 3rd International Conference on English Across the Curriculum, Hong Kong.
  • Choi, T. H., Chan, H., & Au, I. (2018). ‘Now you’re talking’: Teacher preparation through alumni talks in a community of practice. Paper presented at the Oxford Education Research Symposium.
  • Au, I. (2018). Branching out from the tree: Extending vocabulary acquisition with polysemy. Paper presented at HKBU-HU First Joint Symposium on Education 2018.

 

Supervisors

Elizabeth Wonnacott and Victoria Murphy

Thomas Procter-Legg is a DPhil Student in the Department of Education and is researching restorative practice within the context of special educational needs and disabilities.

His previous experience includes five years as the Head Teacher of a special academy in Oxfordshire UK, specialising in education for students with Special Educational Needs and Disabilities. He has also worked as a SEND Reviewer for Whole School SEND; a Teaching School Director; and as the Principal Designate on a successful Free School bid.

Thomas is passionate about restorative practice and is involved in many communities of practice, such as the Global Alliance for Restorative Justice and Social Justice, where he is a member of the research sub-group exploring the interactions between restorative justice and social justice.

Thomas is also a strong advocate for creativity in education; having previously gained a Fine Art degree from Chelsea College of Art. This heavily influenced his educational leadership and during his time as a Head Teacher, he became the co-founder of a co-constructed initiative between the academy and the University of Oxford Gardens Libraries and Museums. This work placed cultural learning opportunities and relationships at the heart of the curriculum and is the longest standing project between a special school and The University of Oxford. This sustainable partnership champions marginalised voices and has been highly celebrated e.g., inclusion in the Durham Commission for Creativity in Education; recent dissemination at the Museum Ideas Conference 2022; highly commended award at the Museum and Heritage Awards 2021; and awarded Platinum ArtsMark in 2021.

Whilst this creative work may seem to be separate from restorative practice, Thomas subscribes to the idea that there are significant overlaps, both within pedagogical practice and wider school culture, topics which his current research touch on within the context of special education.

 

Publications

Procter-Legg. (2022). A Discourse on Restorative Practice—Participants’ Views of a Divergent Ideology. Laws11(6), 86–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11060086

Procter-Legg. (2022). Practitioner Perspectives on a Restorative Community: An Inductive Evaluative Study of Conceptual, Pedagogical, and Routine Practice. Laws11(1), 4–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11010004

 

Supervisors

Ian Thompson and Jason Todd

Ivan is currently serving as a Facilitator (Teaching) in the Vice-Chancellor’s Colloquium and as an Editor of the Graduate Inequality Review in the University of Oxford. He has taken up lecturerships in a number of universities in Hong Kong and has run Education, Linguistics, Applied Linguistics, Sociolinguistics, and Academic English courses at undergraduate and postgraduate level.

Prior to joining Oxford, Ivan received his teacher-training in Hong Kong and his postgraduate training in Linguistics (with a specialisation in pragmatics) at University College London. His research interests include: mental representation of word meanings, language acquisition, educational technology, and ELT pedagogy.

Publications

  • Au, I. (2021). Unwinding the Fantasy: Using Breakout Rooms to Promote Language Exposure and Less-Public Feedback Practices in Online Synchronous Teaching. Paper presented at the PASHE 2021 – EAP Education and Practice: Supporting Students’ Needs, UCL (IOE).
  • Au, I. & Yiu, C. (2021). ‘Identity game’: so you think you are what your Instagram bio says about you. Paper presented at the Sociolinguistics Symposium 23, Hong Kong.
  • Au, I. (2021). The magic of breakout rooms in online synchronous teaching and learning of English. Paper presented at the 3rd International Conference on English Across the Curriculum, Hong Kong.
  • Choi, T. H., Chan, H., & Au, I. (2018). ‘Now you’re talking’: Teacher preparation through alumni talks in a community of practice. Paper presented at the Oxford Education Research Symposium.
  • Au, I. (2018). Branching out from the tree: Extending vocabulary acquisition with polysemy. Paper presented at HKBU-HU First Joint Symposium on Education 2018.

 

Supervisors

Elizabeth Wonnacott and Victoria Murphy

Thomas Procter-Legg is a DPhil Student in the Department of Education and is researching restorative practice within the context of special educational needs and disabilities.

His previous experience includes five years as the Head Teacher of a special academy in Oxfordshire UK, specialising in education for students with Special Educational Needs and Disabilities. He has also worked as a SEND Reviewer for Whole School SEND; a Teaching School Director; and as the Principal Designate on a successful Free School bid.

Thomas is passionate about restorative practice and is involved in many communities of practice, such as the Global Alliance for Restorative Justice and Social Justice, where he is a member of the research sub-group exploring the interactions between restorative justice and social justice.

Thomas is also a strong advocate for creativity in education; having previously gained a Fine Art degree from Chelsea College of Art. This heavily influenced his educational leadership and during his time as a Head Teacher, he became the co-founder of a co-constructed initiative between the academy and the University of Oxford Gardens Libraries and Museums. This work placed cultural learning opportunities and relationships at the heart of the curriculum and is the longest standing project between a special school and The University of Oxford. This sustainable partnership champions marginalised voices and has been highly celebrated e.g., inclusion in the Durham Commission for Creativity in Education; recent dissemination at the Museum Ideas Conference 2022; highly commended award at the Museum and Heritage Awards 2021; and awarded Platinum ArtsMark in 2021.

Whilst this creative work may seem to be separate from restorative practice, Thomas subscribes to the idea that there are significant overlaps, both within pedagogical practice and wider school culture, topics which his current research touch on within the context of special education.

 

Publications

Procter-Legg. (2022). A Discourse on Restorative Practice—Participants’ Views of a Divergent Ideology. Laws11(6), 86–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11060086

Procter-Legg. (2022). Practitioner Perspectives on a Restorative Community: An Inductive Evaluative Study of Conceptual, Pedagogical, and Routine Practice. Laws11(1), 4–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11010004

 

Supervisors

Ian Thompson and Jason Todd

Ivan is currently serving as a Facilitator (Teaching) in the Vice-Chancellor’s Colloquium and as an Editor of the Graduate Inequality Review in the University of Oxford. He has taken up lecturerships in a number of universities in Hong Kong and has run Education, Linguistics, Applied Linguistics, Sociolinguistics, and Academic English courses at undergraduate and postgraduate level.

Prior to joining Oxford, Ivan received his teacher-training in Hong Kong and his postgraduate training in Linguistics (with a specialisation in pragmatics) at University College London. His research interests include: mental representation of word meanings, language acquisition, educational technology, and ELT pedagogy.

Publications

  • Au, I. (2021). Unwinding the Fantasy: Using Breakout Rooms to Promote Language Exposure and Less-Public Feedback Practices in Online Synchronous Teaching. Paper presented at the PASHE 2021 – EAP Education and Practice: Supporting Students’ Needs, UCL (IOE).
  • Au, I. & Yiu, C. (2021). ‘Identity game’: so you think you are what your Instagram bio says about you. Paper presented at the Sociolinguistics Symposium 23, Hong Kong.
  • Au, I. (2021). The magic of breakout rooms in online synchronous teaching and learning of English. Paper presented at the 3rd International Conference on English Across the Curriculum, Hong Kong.
  • Choi, T. H., Chan, H., & Au, I. (2018). ‘Now you’re talking’: Teacher preparation through alumni talks in a community of practice. Paper presented at the Oxford Education Research Symposium.
  • Au, I. (2018). Branching out from the tree: Extending vocabulary acquisition with polysemy. Paper presented at HKBU-HU First Joint Symposium on Education 2018.

 

Supervisors

Elizabeth Wonnacott and Victoria Murphy

Thomas Procter-Legg is a DPhil Student in the Department of Education and is researching restorative practice within the context of special educational needs and disabilities.

His previous experience includes five years as the Head Teacher of a special academy in Oxfordshire UK, specialising in education for students with Special Educational Needs and Disabilities. He has also worked as a SEND Reviewer for Whole School SEND; a Teaching School Director; and as the Principal Designate on a successful Free School bid.

Thomas is passionate about restorative practice and is involved in many communities of practice, such as the Global Alliance for Restorative Justice and Social Justice, where he is a member of the research sub-group exploring the interactions between restorative justice and social justice.

Thomas is also a strong advocate for creativity in education; having previously gained a Fine Art degree from Chelsea College of Art. This heavily influenced his educational leadership and during his time as a Head Teacher, he became the co-founder of a co-constructed initiative between the academy and the University of Oxford Gardens Libraries and Museums. This work placed cultural learning opportunities and relationships at the heart of the curriculum and is the longest standing project between a special school and The University of Oxford. This sustainable partnership champions marginalised voices and has been highly celebrated e.g., inclusion in the Durham Commission for Creativity in Education; recent dissemination at the Museum Ideas Conference 2022; highly commended award at the Museum and Heritage Awards 2021; and awarded Platinum ArtsMark in 2021.

Whilst this creative work may seem to be separate from restorative practice, Thomas subscribes to the idea that there are significant overlaps, both within pedagogical practice and wider school culture, topics which his current research touch on within the context of special education.

 

Publications

Procter-Legg. (2022). A Discourse on Restorative Practice—Participants’ Views of a Divergent Ideology. Laws11(6), 86–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11060086

Procter-Legg. (2022). Practitioner Perspectives on a Restorative Community: An Inductive Evaluative Study of Conceptual, Pedagogical, and Routine Practice. Laws11(1), 4–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11010004

 

Supervisors

Ian Thompson and Jason Todd

Ivan is currently serving as a Facilitator (Teaching) in the Vice-Chancellor’s Colloquium and as an Editor of the Graduate Inequality Review in the University of Oxford. He has taken up lecturerships in a number of universities in Hong Kong and has run Education, Linguistics, Applied Linguistics, Sociolinguistics, and Academic English courses at undergraduate and postgraduate level.

Prior to joining Oxford, Ivan received his teacher-training in Hong Kong and his postgraduate training in Linguistics (with a specialisation in pragmatics) at University College London. His research interests include: mental representation of word meanings, language acquisition, educational technology, and ELT pedagogy.

Publications

  • Au, I. (2021). Unwinding the Fantasy: Using Breakout Rooms to Promote Language Exposure and Less-Public Feedback Practices in Online Synchronous Teaching. Paper presented at the PASHE 2021 – EAP Education and Practice: Supporting Students’ Needs, UCL (IOE).
  • Au, I. & Yiu, C. (2021). ‘Identity game’: so you think you are what your Instagram bio says about you. Paper presented at the Sociolinguistics Symposium 23, Hong Kong.
  • Au, I. (2021). The magic of breakout rooms in online synchronous teaching and learning of English. Paper presented at the 3rd International Conference on English Across the Curriculum, Hong Kong.
  • Choi, T. H., Chan, H., & Au, I. (2018). ‘Now you’re talking’: Teacher preparation through alumni talks in a community of practice. Paper presented at the Oxford Education Research Symposium.
  • Au, I. (2018). Branching out from the tree: Extending vocabulary acquisition with polysemy. Paper presented at HKBU-HU First Joint Symposium on Education 2018.

 

Supervisors

Elizabeth Wonnacott and Victoria Murphy

Thomas Procter-Legg is a DPhil Student in the Department of Education and is researching restorative practice within the context of special educational needs and disabilities.

His previous experience includes five years as the Head Teacher of a special academy in Oxfordshire UK, specialising in education for students with Special Educational Needs and Disabilities. He has also worked as a SEND Reviewer for Whole School SEND; a Teaching School Director; and as the Principal Designate on a successful Free School bid.

Thomas is passionate about restorative practice and is involved in many communities of practice, such as the Global Alliance for Restorative Justice and Social Justice, where he is a member of the research sub-group exploring the interactions between restorative justice and social justice.

Thomas is also a strong advocate for creativity in education; having previously gained a Fine Art degree from Chelsea College of Art. This heavily influenced his educational leadership and during his time as a Head Teacher, he became the co-founder of a co-constructed initiative between the academy and the University of Oxford Gardens Libraries and Museums. This work placed cultural learning opportunities and relationships at the heart of the curriculum and is the longest standing project between a special school and The University of Oxford. This sustainable partnership champions marginalised voices and has been highly celebrated e.g., inclusion in the Durham Commission for Creativity in Education; recent dissemination at the Museum Ideas Conference 2022; highly commended award at the Museum and Heritage Awards 2021; and awarded Platinum ArtsMark in 2021.

Whilst this creative work may seem to be separate from restorative practice, Thomas subscribes to the idea that there are significant overlaps, both within pedagogical practice and wider school culture, topics which his current research touch on within the context of special education.

 

Publications

Procter-Legg. (2022). A Discourse on Restorative Practice—Participants’ Views of a Divergent Ideology. Laws11(6), 86–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11060086

Procter-Legg. (2022). Practitioner Perspectives on a Restorative Community: An Inductive Evaluative Study of Conceptual, Pedagogical, and Routine Practice. Laws11(1), 4–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11010004

 

Supervisors

Ian Thompson and Jason Todd

Ivan is currently serving as a Facilitator (Teaching) in the Vice-Chancellor’s Colloquium and as an Editor of the Graduate Inequality Review in the University of Oxford. He has taken up lecturerships in a number of universities in Hong Kong and has run Education, Linguistics, Applied Linguistics, Sociolinguistics, and Academic English courses at undergraduate and postgraduate level.

Prior to joining Oxford, Ivan received his teacher-training in Hong Kong and his postgraduate training in Linguistics (with a specialisation in pragmatics) at University College London. His research interests include: mental representation of word meanings, language acquisition, educational technology, and ELT pedagogy.

Publications

  • Au, I. (2021). Unwinding the Fantasy: Using Breakout Rooms to Promote Language Exposure and Less-Public Feedback Practices in Online Synchronous Teaching. Paper presented at the PASHE 2021 – EAP Education and Practice: Supporting Students’ Needs, UCL (IOE).
  • Au, I. & Yiu, C. (2021). ‘Identity game’: so you think you are what your Instagram bio says about you. Paper presented at the Sociolinguistics Symposium 23, Hong Kong.
  • Au, I. (2021). The magic of breakout rooms in online synchronous teaching and learning of English. Paper presented at the 3rd International Conference on English Across the Curriculum, Hong Kong.
  • Choi, T. H., Chan, H., & Au, I. (2018). ‘Now you’re talking’: Teacher preparation through alumni talks in a community of practice. Paper presented at the Oxford Education Research Symposium.
  • Au, I. (2018). Branching out from the tree: Extending vocabulary acquisition with polysemy. Paper presented at HKBU-HU First Joint Symposium on Education 2018.

 

Supervisors

Elizabeth Wonnacott and Victoria Murphy

Thomas Procter-Legg is a DPhil Student in the Department of Education and is researching restorative practice within the context of special educational needs and disabilities.

His previous experience includes five years as the Head Teacher of a special academy in Oxfordshire UK, specialising in education for students with Special Educational Needs and Disabilities. He has also worked as a SEND Reviewer for Whole School SEND; a Teaching School Director; and as the Principal Designate on a successful Free School bid.

Thomas is passionate about restorative practice and is involved in many communities of practice, such as the Global Alliance for Restorative Justice and Social Justice, where he is a member of the research sub-group exploring the interactions between restorative justice and social justice.

Thomas is also a strong advocate for creativity in education; having previously gained a Fine Art degree from Chelsea College of Art. This heavily influenced his educational leadership and during his time as a Head Teacher, he became the co-founder of a co-constructed initiative between the academy and the University of Oxford Gardens Libraries and Museums. This work placed cultural learning opportunities and relationships at the heart of the curriculum and is the longest standing project between a special school and The University of Oxford. This sustainable partnership champions marginalised voices and has been highly celebrated e.g., inclusion in the Durham Commission for Creativity in Education; recent dissemination at the Museum Ideas Conference 2022; highly commended award at the Museum and Heritage Awards 2021; and awarded Platinum ArtsMark in 2021.

Whilst this creative work may seem to be separate from restorative practice, Thomas subscribes to the idea that there are significant overlaps, both within pedagogical practice and wider school culture, topics which his current research touch on within the context of special education.

 

Publications

Procter-Legg. (2022). A Discourse on Restorative Practice—Participants’ Views of a Divergent Ideology. Laws11(6), 86–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11060086

Procter-Legg. (2022). Practitioner Perspectives on a Restorative Community: An Inductive Evaluative Study of Conceptual, Pedagogical, and Routine Practice. Laws11(1), 4–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11010004

 

Supervisors

Ian Thompson and Jason Todd

Ivan is currently serving as a Facilitator (Teaching) in the Vice-Chancellor’s Colloquium and as an Editor of the Graduate Inequality Review in the University of Oxford. He has taken up lecturerships in a number of universities in Hong Kong and has run Education, Linguistics, Applied Linguistics, Sociolinguistics, and Academic English courses at undergraduate and postgraduate level.

Prior to joining Oxford, Ivan received his teacher-training in Hong Kong and his postgraduate training in Linguistics (with a specialisation in pragmatics) at University College London. His research interests include: mental representation of word meanings, language acquisition, educational technology, and ELT pedagogy.

Publications

  • Au, I. (2021). Unwinding the Fantasy: Using Breakout Rooms to Promote Language Exposure and Less-Public Feedback Practices in Online Synchronous Teaching. Paper presented at the PASHE 2021 – EAP Education and Practice: Supporting Students’ Needs, UCL (IOE).
  • Au, I. & Yiu, C. (2021). ‘Identity game’: so you think you are what your Instagram bio says about you. Paper presented at the Sociolinguistics Symposium 23, Hong Kong.
  • Au, I. (2021). The magic of breakout rooms in online synchronous teaching and learning of English. Paper presented at the 3rd International Conference on English Across the Curriculum, Hong Kong.
  • Choi, T. H., Chan, H., & Au, I. (2018). ‘Now you’re talking’: Teacher preparation through alumni talks in a community of practice. Paper presented at the Oxford Education Research Symposium.
  • Au, I. (2018). Branching out from the tree: Extending vocabulary acquisition with polysemy. Paper presented at HKBU-HU First Joint Symposium on Education 2018.

 

Supervisors

Elizabeth Wonnacott and Victoria Murphy

Thomas Procter-Legg is a DPhil Student in the Department of Education and is researching restorative practice within the context of special educational needs and disabilities.

His previous experience includes five years as the Head Teacher of a special academy in Oxfordshire UK, specialising in education for students with Special Educational Needs and Disabilities. He has also worked as a SEND Reviewer for Whole School SEND; a Teaching School Director; and as the Principal Designate on a successful Free School bid.

Thomas is passionate about restorative practice and is involved in many communities of practice, such as the Global Alliance for Restorative Justice and Social Justice, where he is a member of the research sub-group exploring the interactions between restorative justice and social justice.

Thomas is also a strong advocate for creativity in education; having previously gained a Fine Art degree from Chelsea College of Art. This heavily influenced his educational leadership and during his time as a Head Teacher, he became the co-founder of a co-constructed initiative between the academy and the University of Oxford Gardens Libraries and Museums. This work placed cultural learning opportunities and relationships at the heart of the curriculum and is the longest standing project between a special school and The University of Oxford. This sustainable partnership champions marginalised voices and has been highly celebrated e.g., inclusion in the Durham Commission for Creativity in Education; recent dissemination at the Museum Ideas Conference 2022; highly commended award at the Museum and Heritage Awards 2021; and awarded Platinum ArtsMark in 2021.

Whilst this creative work may seem to be separate from restorative practice, Thomas subscribes to the idea that there are significant overlaps, both within pedagogical practice and wider school culture, topics which his current research touch on within the context of special education.

 

Publications

Procter-Legg. (2022). A Discourse on Restorative Practice—Participants’ Views of a Divergent Ideology. Laws11(6), 86–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11060086

Procter-Legg. (2022). Practitioner Perspectives on a Restorative Community: An Inductive Evaluative Study of Conceptual, Pedagogical, and Routine Practice. Laws11(1), 4–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11010004

 

Supervisors

Ian Thompson and Jason Todd

Ivan is currently serving as a Facilitator (Teaching) in the Vice-Chancellor’s Colloquium and as an Editor of the Graduate Inequality Review in the University of Oxford. He has taken up lecturerships in a number of universities in Hong Kong and has run Education, Linguistics, Applied Linguistics, Sociolinguistics, and Academic English courses at undergraduate and postgraduate level.

Prior to joining Oxford, Ivan received his teacher-training in Hong Kong and his postgraduate training in Linguistics (with a specialisation in pragmatics) at University College London. His research interests include: mental representation of word meanings, language acquisition, educational technology, and ELT pedagogy.

Publications

  • Au, I. (2021). Unwinding the Fantasy: Using Breakout Rooms to Promote Language Exposure and Less-Public Feedback Practices in Online Synchronous Teaching. Paper presented at the PASHE 2021 – EAP Education and Practice: Supporting Students’ Needs, UCL (IOE).
  • Au, I. & Yiu, C. (2021). ‘Identity game’: so you think you are what your Instagram bio says about you. Paper presented at the Sociolinguistics Symposium 23, Hong Kong.
  • Au, I. (2021). The magic of breakout rooms in online synchronous teaching and learning of English. Paper presented at the 3rd International Conference on English Across the Curriculum, Hong Kong.
  • Choi, T. H., Chan, H., & Au, I. (2018). ‘Now you’re talking’: Teacher preparation through alumni talks in a community of practice. Paper presented at the Oxford Education Research Symposium.
  • Au, I. (2018). Branching out from the tree: Extending vocabulary acquisition with polysemy. Paper presented at HKBU-HU First Joint Symposium on Education 2018.

 

Supervisors

Elizabeth Wonnacott and Victoria Murphy

Thomas Procter-Legg is a DPhil Student in the Department of Education and is researching restorative practice within the context of special educational needs and disabilities.

His previous experience includes five years as the Head Teacher of a special academy in Oxfordshire UK, specialising in education for students with Special Educational Needs and Disabilities. He has also worked as a SEND Reviewer for Whole School SEND; a Teaching School Director; and as the Principal Designate on a successful Free School bid.

Thomas is passionate about restorative practice and is involved in many communities of practice, such as the Global Alliance for Restorative Justice and Social Justice, where he is a member of the research sub-group exploring the interactions between restorative justice and social justice.

Thomas is also a strong advocate for creativity in education; having previously gained a Fine Art degree from Chelsea College of Art. This heavily influenced his educational leadership and during his time as a Head Teacher, he became the co-founder of a co-constructed initiative between the academy and the University of Oxford Gardens Libraries and Museums. This work placed cultural learning opportunities and relationships at the heart of the curriculum and is the longest standing project between a special school and The University of Oxford. This sustainable partnership champions marginalised voices and has been highly celebrated e.g., inclusion in the Durham Commission for Creativity in Education; recent dissemination at the Museum Ideas Conference 2022; highly commended award at the Museum and Heritage Awards 2021; and awarded Platinum ArtsMark in 2021.

Whilst this creative work may seem to be separate from restorative practice, Thomas subscribes to the idea that there are significant overlaps, both within pedagogical practice and wider school culture, topics which his current research touch on within the context of special education.

 

Publications

Procter-Legg. (2022). A Discourse on Restorative Practice—Participants’ Views of a Divergent Ideology. Laws11(6), 86–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11060086

Procter-Legg. (2022). Practitioner Perspectives on a Restorative Community: An Inductive Evaluative Study of Conceptual, Pedagogical, and Routine Practice. Laws11(1), 4–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11010004

 

Supervisors

Ian Thompson and Jason Todd

Ivan is currently serving as a Facilitator (Teaching) in the Vice-Chancellor’s Colloquium and as an Editor of the Graduate Inequality Review in the University of Oxford. He has taken up lecturerships in a number of universities in Hong Kong and has run Education, Linguistics, Applied Linguistics, Sociolinguistics, and Academic English courses at undergraduate and postgraduate level.

Prior to joining Oxford, Ivan received his teacher-training in Hong Kong and his postgraduate training in Linguistics (with a specialisation in pragmatics) at University College London. His research interests include: mental representation of word meanings, language acquisition, educational technology, and ELT pedagogy.

Publications

  • Au, I. (2021). Unwinding the Fantasy: Using Breakout Rooms to Promote Language Exposure and Less-Public Feedback Practices in Online Synchronous Teaching. Paper presented at the PASHE 2021 – EAP Education and Practice: Supporting Students’ Needs, UCL (IOE).
  • Au, I. & Yiu, C. (2021). ‘Identity game’: so you think you are what your Instagram bio says about you. Paper presented at the Sociolinguistics Symposium 23, Hong Kong.
  • Au, I. (2021). The magic of breakout rooms in online synchronous teaching and learning of English. Paper presented at the 3rd International Conference on English Across the Curriculum, Hong Kong.
  • Choi, T. H., Chan, H., & Au, I. (2018). ‘Now you’re talking’: Teacher preparation through alumni talks in a community of practice. Paper presented at the Oxford Education Research Symposium.
  • Au, I. (2018). Branching out from the tree: Extending vocabulary acquisition with polysemy. Paper presented at HKBU-HU First Joint Symposium on Education 2018.

 

Supervisors

Elizabeth Wonnacott and Victoria Murphy

Thomas Procter-Legg is a DPhil Student in the Department of Education and is researching restorative practice within the context of special educational needs and disabilities.

His previous experience includes five years as the Head Teacher of a special academy in Oxfordshire UK, specialising in education for students with Special Educational Needs and Disabilities. He has also worked as a SEND Reviewer for Whole School SEND; a Teaching School Director; and as the Principal Designate on a successful Free School bid.

Thomas is passionate about restorative practice and is involved in many communities of practice, such as the Global Alliance for Restorative Justice and Social Justice, where he is a member of the research sub-group exploring the interactions between restorative justice and social justice.

Thomas is also a strong advocate for creativity in education; having previously gained a Fine Art degree from Chelsea College of Art. This heavily influenced his educational leadership and during his time as a Head Teacher, he became the co-founder of a co-constructed initiative between the academy and the University of Oxford Gardens Libraries and Museums. This work placed cultural learning opportunities and relationships at the heart of the curriculum and is the longest standing project between a special school and The University of Oxford. This sustainable partnership champions marginalised voices and has been highly celebrated e.g., inclusion in the Durham Commission for Creativity in Education; recent dissemination at the Museum Ideas Conference 2022; highly commended award at the Museum and Heritage Awards 2021; and awarded Platinum ArtsMark in 2021.

Whilst this creative work may seem to be separate from restorative practice, Thomas subscribes to the idea that there are significant overlaps, both within pedagogical practice and wider school culture, topics which his current research touch on within the context of special education.

 

Publications

Procter-Legg. (2022). A Discourse on Restorative Practice—Participants’ Views of a Divergent Ideology. Laws11(6), 86–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11060086

Procter-Legg. (2022). Practitioner Perspectives on a Restorative Community: An Inductive Evaluative Study of Conceptual, Pedagogical, and Routine Practice. Laws11(1), 4–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11010004

 

Supervisors

Ian Thompson and Jason Todd

Ivan is currently serving as a Facilitator (Teaching) in the Vice-Chancellor’s Colloquium and as an Editor of the Graduate Inequality Review in the University of Oxford. He has taken up lecturerships in a number of universities in Hong Kong and has run Education, Linguistics, Applied Linguistics, Sociolinguistics, and Academic English courses at undergraduate and postgraduate level.

Prior to joining Oxford, Ivan received his teacher-training in Hong Kong and his postgraduate training in Linguistics (with a specialisation in pragmatics) at University College London. His research interests include: mental representation of word meanings, language acquisition, educational technology, and ELT pedagogy.

Publications

  • Au, I. (2021). Unwinding the Fantasy: Using Breakout Rooms to Promote Language Exposure and Less-Public Feedback Practices in Online Synchronous Teaching. Paper presented at the PASHE 2021 – EAP Education and Practice: Supporting Students’ Needs, UCL (IOE).
  • Au, I. & Yiu, C. (2021). ‘Identity game’: so you think you are what your Instagram bio says about you. Paper presented at the Sociolinguistics Symposium 23, Hong Kong.
  • Au, I. (2021). The magic of breakout rooms in online synchronous teaching and learning of English. Paper presented at the 3rd International Conference on English Across the Curriculum, Hong Kong.
  • Choi, T. H., Chan, H., & Au, I. (2018). ‘Now you’re talking’: Teacher preparation through alumni talks in a community of practice. Paper presented at the Oxford Education Research Symposium.
  • Au, I. (2018). Branching out from the tree: Extending vocabulary acquisition with polysemy. Paper presented at HKBU-HU First Joint Symposium on Education 2018.

 

Supervisors

Elizabeth Wonnacott and Victoria Murphy

Thomas Procter-Legg is a DPhil Student in the Department of Education and is researching restorative practice within the context of special educational needs and disabilities.

His previous experience includes five years as the Head Teacher of a special academy in Oxfordshire UK, specialising in education for students with Special Educational Needs and Disabilities. He has also worked as a SEND Reviewer for Whole School SEND; a Teaching School Director; and as the Principal Designate on a successful Free School bid.

Thomas is passionate about restorative practice and is involved in many communities of practice, such as the Global Alliance for Restorative Justice and Social Justice, where he is a member of the research sub-group exploring the interactions between restorative justice and social justice.

Thomas is also a strong advocate for creativity in education; having previously gained a Fine Art degree from Chelsea College of Art. This heavily influenced his educational leadership and during his time as a Head Teacher, he became the co-founder of a co-constructed initiative between the academy and the University of Oxford Gardens Libraries and Museums. This work placed cultural learning opportunities and relationships at the heart of the curriculum and is the longest standing project between a special school and The University of Oxford. This sustainable partnership champions marginalised voices and has been highly celebrated e.g., inclusion in the Durham Commission for Creativity in Education; recent dissemination at the Museum Ideas Conference 2022; highly commended award at the Museum and Heritage Awards 2021; and awarded Platinum ArtsMark in 2021.

Whilst this creative work may seem to be separate from restorative practice, Thomas subscribes to the idea that there are significant overlaps, both within pedagogical practice and wider school culture, topics which his current research touch on within the context of special education.

 

Publications

Procter-Legg. (2022). A Discourse on Restorative Practice—Participants’ Views of a Divergent Ideology. Laws11(6), 86–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11060086

Procter-Legg. (2022). Practitioner Perspectives on a Restorative Community: An Inductive Evaluative Study of Conceptual, Pedagogical, and Routine Practice. Laws11(1), 4–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11010004

 

Supervisors

Ian Thompson and Jason Todd

Ivan is currently serving as a Facilitator (Teaching) in the Vice-Chancellor’s Colloquium and as an Editor of the Graduate Inequality Review in the University of Oxford. He has taken up lecturerships in a number of universities in Hong Kong and has run Education, Linguistics, Applied Linguistics, Sociolinguistics, and Academic English courses at undergraduate and postgraduate level.

Prior to joining Oxford, Ivan received his teacher-training in Hong Kong and his postgraduate training in Linguistics (with a specialisation in pragmatics) at University College London. His research interests include: mental representation of word meanings, language acquisition, educational technology, and ELT pedagogy.

Publications

  • Au, I. (2021). Unwinding the Fantasy: Using Breakout Rooms to Promote Language Exposure and Less-Public Feedback Practices in Online Synchronous Teaching. Paper presented at the PASHE 2021 – EAP Education and Practice: Supporting Students’ Needs, UCL (IOE).
  • Au, I. & Yiu, C. (2021). ‘Identity game’: so you think you are what your Instagram bio says about you. Paper presented at the Sociolinguistics Symposium 23, Hong Kong.
  • Au, I. (2021). The magic of breakout rooms in online synchronous teaching and learning of English. Paper presented at the 3rd International Conference on English Across the Curriculum, Hong Kong.
  • Choi, T. H., Chan, H., & Au, I. (2018). ‘Now you’re talking’: Teacher preparation through alumni talks in a community of practice. Paper presented at the Oxford Education Research Symposium.
  • Au, I. (2018). Branching out from the tree: Extending vocabulary acquisition with polysemy. Paper presented at HKBU-HU First Joint Symposium on Education 2018.

 

Supervisors

Elizabeth Wonnacott and Victoria Murphy

Thomas Procter-Legg is a DPhil Student in the Department of Education and is researching restorative practice within the context of special educational needs and disabilities.

His previous experience includes five years as the Head Teacher of a special academy in Oxfordshire UK, specialising in education for students with Special Educational Needs and Disabilities. He has also worked as a SEND Reviewer for Whole School SEND; a Teaching School Director; and as the Principal Designate on a successful Free School bid.

Thomas is passionate about restorative practice and is involved in many communities of practice, such as the Global Alliance for Restorative Justice and Social Justice, where he is a member of the research sub-group exploring the interactions between restorative justice and social justice.

Thomas is also a strong advocate for creativity in education; having previously gained a Fine Art degree from Chelsea College of Art. This heavily influenced his educational leadership and during his time as a Head Teacher, he became the co-founder of a co-constructed initiative between the academy and the University of Oxford Gardens Libraries and Museums. This work placed cultural learning opportunities and relationships at the heart of the curriculum and is the longest standing project between a special school and The University of Oxford. This sustainable partnership champions marginalised voices and has been highly celebrated e.g., inclusion in the Durham Commission for Creativity in Education; recent dissemination at the Museum Ideas Conference 2022; highly commended award at the Museum and Heritage Awards 2021; and awarded Platinum ArtsMark in 2021.

Whilst this creative work may seem to be separate from restorative practice, Thomas subscribes to the idea that there are significant overlaps, both within pedagogical practice and wider school culture, topics which his current research touch on within the context of special education.

 

Publications

Procter-Legg. (2022). A Discourse on Restorative Practice—Participants’ Views of a Divergent Ideology. Laws11(6), 86–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11060086

Procter-Legg. (2022). Practitioner Perspectives on a Restorative Community: An Inductive Evaluative Study of Conceptual, Pedagogical, and Routine Practice. Laws11(1), 4–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11010004

 

Supervisors

Ian Thompson and Jason Todd

Ivan is currently serving as a Facilitator (Teaching) in the Vice-Chancellor’s Colloquium and as an Editor of the Graduate Inequality Review in the University of Oxford. He has taken up lecturerships in a number of universities in Hong Kong and has run Education, Linguistics, Applied Linguistics, Sociolinguistics, and Academic English courses at undergraduate and postgraduate level.

Prior to joining Oxford, Ivan received his teacher-training in Hong Kong and his postgraduate training in Linguistics (with a specialisation in pragmatics) at University College London. His research interests include: mental representation of word meanings, language acquisition, educational technology, and ELT pedagogy.

Publications

  • Au, I. (2021). Unwinding the Fantasy: Using Breakout Rooms to Promote Language Exposure and Less-Public Feedback Practices in Online Synchronous Teaching. Paper presented at the PASHE 2021 – EAP Education and Practice: Supporting Students’ Needs, UCL (IOE).
  • Au, I. & Yiu, C. (2021). ‘Identity game’: so you think you are what your Instagram bio says about you. Paper presented at the Sociolinguistics Symposium 23, Hong Kong.
  • Au, I. (2021). The magic of breakout rooms in online synchronous teaching and learning of English. Paper presented at the 3rd International Conference on English Across the Curriculum, Hong Kong.
  • Choi, T. H., Chan, H., & Au, I. (2018). ‘Now you’re talking’: Teacher preparation through alumni talks in a community of practice. Paper presented at the Oxford Education Research Symposium.
  • Au, I. (2018). Branching out from the tree: Extending vocabulary acquisition with polysemy. Paper presented at HKBU-HU First Joint Symposium on Education 2018.

 

Supervisors

Elizabeth Wonnacott and Victoria Murphy

Thomas Procter-Legg is a DPhil Student in the Department of Education and is researching restorative practice within the context of special educational needs and disabilities.

His previous experience includes five years as the Head Teacher of a special academy in Oxfordshire UK, specialising in education for students with Special Educational Needs and Disabilities. He has also worked as a SEND Reviewer for Whole School SEND; a Teaching School Director; and as the Principal Designate on a successful Free School bid.

Thomas is passionate about restorative practice and is involved in many communities of practice, such as the Global Alliance for Restorative Justice and Social Justice, where he is a member of the research sub-group exploring the interactions between restorative justice and social justice.

Thomas is also a strong advocate for creativity in education; having previously gained a Fine Art degree from Chelsea College of Art. This heavily influenced his educational leadership and during his time as a Head Teacher, he became the co-founder of a co-constructed initiative between the academy and the University of Oxford Gardens Libraries and Museums. This work placed cultural learning opportunities and relationships at the heart of the curriculum and is the longest standing project between a special school and The University of Oxford. This sustainable partnership champions marginalised voices and has been highly celebrated e.g., inclusion in the Durham Commission for Creativity in Education; recent dissemination at the Museum Ideas Conference 2022; highly commended award at the Museum and Heritage Awards 2021; and awarded Platinum ArtsMark in 2021.

Whilst this creative work may seem to be separate from restorative practice, Thomas subscribes to the idea that there are significant overlaps, both within pedagogical practice and wider school culture, topics which his current research touch on within the context of special education.

 

Publications

Procter-Legg. (2022). A Discourse on Restorative Practice—Participants’ Views of a Divergent Ideology. Laws11(6), 86–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11060086

Procter-Legg. (2022). Practitioner Perspectives on a Restorative Community: An Inductive Evaluative Study of Conceptual, Pedagogical, and Routine Practice. Laws11(1), 4–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11010004

 

Supervisors

Ian Thompson and Jason Todd

Ivan is currently serving as a Facilitator (Teaching) in the Vice-Chancellor’s Colloquium and as an Editor of the Graduate Inequality Review in the University of Oxford. He has taken up lecturerships in a number of universities in Hong Kong and has run Education, Linguistics, Applied Linguistics, Sociolinguistics, and Academic English courses at undergraduate and postgraduate level.

Prior to joining Oxford, Ivan received his teacher-training in Hong Kong and his postgraduate training in Linguistics (with a specialisation in pragmatics) at University College London. His research interests include: mental representation of word meanings, language acquisition, educational technology, and ELT pedagogy.

Publications

  • Au, I. (2021). Unwinding the Fantasy: Using Breakout Rooms to Promote Language Exposure and Less-Public Feedback Practices in Online Synchronous Teaching. Paper presented at the PASHE 2021 – EAP Education and Practice: Supporting Students’ Needs, UCL (IOE).
  • Au, I. & Yiu, C. (2021). ‘Identity game’: so you think you are what your Instagram bio says about you. Paper presented at the Sociolinguistics Symposium 23, Hong Kong.
  • Au, I. (2021). The magic of breakout rooms in online synchronous teaching and learning of English. Paper presented at the 3rd International Conference on English Across the Curriculum, Hong Kong.
  • Choi, T. H., Chan, H., & Au, I. (2018). ‘Now you’re talking’: Teacher preparation through alumni talks in a community of practice. Paper presented at the Oxford Education Research Symposium.
  • Au, I. (2018). Branching out from the tree: Extending vocabulary acquisition with polysemy. Paper presented at HKBU-HU First Joint Symposium on Education 2018.

 

Supervisors

Elizabeth Wonnacott and Victoria Murphy

Thomas Procter-Legg is a DPhil Student in the Department of Education and is researching restorative practice within the context of special educational needs and disabilities.

His previous experience includes five years as the Head Teacher of a special academy in Oxfordshire UK, specialising in education for students with Special Educational Needs and Disabilities. He has also worked as a SEND Reviewer for Whole School SEND; a Teaching School Director; and as the Principal Designate on a successful Free School bid.

Thomas is passionate about restorative practice and is involved in many communities of practice, such as the Global Alliance for Restorative Justice and Social Justice, where he is a member of the research sub-group exploring the interactions between restorative justice and social justice.

Thomas is also a strong advocate for creativity in education; having previously gained a Fine Art degree from Chelsea College of Art. This heavily influenced his educational leadership and during his time as a Head Teacher, he became the co-founder of a co-constructed initiative between the academy and the University of Oxford Gardens Libraries and Museums. This work placed cultural learning opportunities and relationships at the heart of the curriculum and is the longest standing project between a special school and The University of Oxford. This sustainable partnership champions marginalised voices and has been highly celebrated e.g., inclusion in the Durham Commission for Creativity in Education; recent dissemination at the Museum Ideas Conference 2022; highly commended award at the Museum and Heritage Awards 2021; and awarded Platinum ArtsMark in 2021.

Whilst this creative work may seem to be separate from restorative practice, Thomas subscribes to the idea that there are significant overlaps, both within pedagogical practice and wider school culture, topics which his current research touch on within the context of special education.

 

Publications

Procter-Legg. (2022). A Discourse on Restorative Practice—Participants’ Views of a Divergent Ideology. Laws11(6), 86–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11060086

Procter-Legg. (2022). Practitioner Perspectives on a Restorative Community: An Inductive Evaluative Study of Conceptual, Pedagogical, and Routine Practice. Laws11(1), 4–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11010004

 

Supervisors

Ian Thompson and Jason Todd

Ivan is currently serving as a Facilitator (Teaching) in the Vice-Chancellor’s Colloquium and as an Editor of the Graduate Inequality Review in the University of Oxford. He has taken up lecturerships in a number of universities in Hong Kong and has run Education, Linguistics, Applied Linguistics, Sociolinguistics, and Academic English courses at undergraduate and postgraduate level.

Prior to joining Oxford, Ivan received his teacher-training in Hong Kong and his postgraduate training in Linguistics (with a specialisation in pragmatics) at University College London. His research interests include: mental representation of word meanings, language acquisition, educational technology, and ELT pedagogy.

Publications

  • Au, I. (2021). Unwinding the Fantasy: Using Breakout Rooms to Promote Language Exposure and Less-Public Feedback Practices in Online Synchronous Teaching. Paper presented at the PASHE 2021 – EAP Education and Practice: Supporting Students’ Needs, UCL (IOE).
  • Au, I. & Yiu, C. (2021). ‘Identity game’: so you think you are what your Instagram bio says about you. Paper presented at the Sociolinguistics Symposium 23, Hong Kong.
  • Au, I. (2021). The magic of breakout rooms in online synchronous teaching and learning of English. Paper presented at the 3rd International Conference on English Across the Curriculum, Hong Kong.
  • Choi, T. H., Chan, H., & Au, I. (2018). ‘Now you’re talking’: Teacher preparation through alumni talks in a community of practice. Paper presented at the Oxford Education Research Symposium.
  • Au, I. (2018). Branching out from the tree: Extending vocabulary acquisition with polysemy. Paper presented at HKBU-HU First Joint Symposium on Education 2018.

 

Supervisors

Elizabeth Wonnacott and Victoria Murphy

Thomas Procter-Legg is a DPhil Student in the Department of Education and is researching restorative practice within the context of special educational needs and disabilities.

His previous experience includes five years as the Head Teacher of a special academy in Oxfordshire UK, specialising in education for students with Special Educational Needs and Disabilities. He has also worked as a SEND Reviewer for Whole School SEND; a Teaching School Director; and as the Principal Designate on a successful Free School bid.

Thomas is passionate about restorative practice and is involved in many communities of practice, such as the Global Alliance for Restorative Justice and Social Justice, where he is a member of the research sub-group exploring the interactions between restorative justice and social justice.

Thomas is also a strong advocate for creativity in education; having previously gained a Fine Art degree from Chelsea College of Art. This heavily influenced his educational leadership and during his time as a Head Teacher, he became the co-founder of a co-constructed initiative between the academy and the University of Oxford Gardens Libraries and Museums. This work placed cultural learning opportunities and relationships at the heart of the curriculum and is the longest standing project between a special school and The University of Oxford. This sustainable partnership champions marginalised voices and has been highly celebrated e.g., inclusion in the Durham Commission for Creativity in Education; recent dissemination at the Museum Ideas Conference 2022; highly commended award at the Museum and Heritage Awards 2021; and awarded Platinum ArtsMark in 2021.

Whilst this creative work may seem to be separate from restorative practice, Thomas subscribes to the idea that there are significant overlaps, both within pedagogical practice and wider school culture, topics which his current research touch on within the context of special education.

 

Publications

Procter-Legg. (2022). A Discourse on Restorative Practice—Participants’ Views of a Divergent Ideology. Laws11(6), 86–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11060086

Procter-Legg. (2022). Practitioner Perspectives on a Restorative Community: An Inductive Evaluative Study of Conceptual, Pedagogical, and Routine Practice. Laws11(1), 4–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11010004

 

Supervisors

Ian Thompson and Jason Todd

Ivan is currently serving as a Facilitator (Teaching) in the Vice-Chancellor’s Colloquium and as an Editor of the Graduate Inequality Review in the University of Oxford. He has taken up lecturerships in a number of universities in Hong Kong and has run Education, Linguistics, Applied Linguistics, Sociolinguistics, and Academic English courses at undergraduate and postgraduate level.

Prior to joining Oxford, Ivan received his teacher-training in Hong Kong and his postgraduate training in Linguistics (with a specialisation in pragmatics) at University College London. His research interests include: mental representation of word meanings, language acquisition, educational technology, and ELT pedagogy.

Publications

  • Au, I. (2021). Unwinding the Fantasy: Using Breakout Rooms to Promote Language Exposure and Less-Public Feedback Practices in Online Synchronous Teaching. Paper presented at the PASHE 2021 – EAP Education and Practice: Supporting Students’ Needs, UCL (IOE).
  • Au, I. & Yiu, C. (2021). ‘Identity game’: so you think you are what your Instagram bio says about you. Paper presented at the Sociolinguistics Symposium 23, Hong Kong.
  • Au, I. (2021). The magic of breakout rooms in online synchronous teaching and learning of English. Paper presented at the 3rd International Conference on English Across the Curriculum, Hong Kong.
  • Choi, T. H., Chan, H., & Au, I. (2018). ‘Now you’re talking’: Teacher preparation through alumni talks in a community of practice. Paper presented at the Oxford Education Research Symposium.
  • Au, I. (2018). Branching out from the tree: Extending vocabulary acquisition with polysemy. Paper presented at HKBU-HU First Joint Symposium on Education 2018.

 

Supervisors

Elizabeth Wonnacott and Victoria Murphy

Thomas Procter-Legg is a DPhil Student in the Department of Education and is researching restorative practice within the context of special educational needs and disabilities.

His previous experience includes five years as the Head Teacher of a special academy in Oxfordshire UK, specialising in education for students with Special Educational Needs and Disabilities. He has also worked as a SEND Reviewer for Whole School SEND; a Teaching School Director; and as the Principal Designate on a successful Free School bid.

Thomas is passionate about restorative practice and is involved in many communities of practice, such as the Global Alliance for Restorative Justice and Social Justice, where he is a member of the research sub-group exploring the interactions between restorative justice and social justice.

Thomas is also a strong advocate for creativity in education; having previously gained a Fine Art degree from Chelsea College of Art. This heavily influenced his educational leadership and during his time as a Head Teacher, he became the co-founder of a co-constructed initiative between the academy and the University of Oxford Gardens Libraries and Museums. This work placed cultural learning opportunities and relationships at the heart of the curriculum and is the longest standing project between a special school and The University of Oxford. This sustainable partnership champions marginalised voices and has been highly celebrated e.g., inclusion in the Durham Commission for Creativity in Education; recent dissemination at the Museum Ideas Conference 2022; highly commended award at the Museum and Heritage Awards 2021; and awarded Platinum ArtsMark in 2021.

Whilst this creative work may seem to be separate from restorative practice, Thomas subscribes to the idea that there are significant overlaps, both within pedagogical practice and wider school culture, topics which his current research touch on within the context of special education.

 

Publications

Procter-Legg. (2022). A Discourse on Restorative Practice—Participants’ Views of a Divergent Ideology. Laws11(6), 86–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11060086

Procter-Legg. (2022). Practitioner Perspectives on a Restorative Community: An Inductive Evaluative Study of Conceptual, Pedagogical, and Routine Practice. Laws11(1), 4–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11010004

 

Supervisors

Ian Thompson and Jason Todd

Ivan is currently serving as a Facilitator (Teaching) in the Vice-Chancellor’s Colloquium and as an Editor of the Graduate Inequality Review in the University of Oxford. He has taken up lecturerships in a number of universities in Hong Kong and has run Education, Linguistics, Applied Linguistics, Sociolinguistics, and Academic English courses at undergraduate and postgraduate level.

Prior to joining Oxford, Ivan received his teacher-training in Hong Kong and his postgraduate training in Linguistics (with a specialisation in pragmatics) at University College London. His research interests include: mental representation of word meanings, language acquisition, educational technology, and ELT pedagogy.

Publications

  • Au, I. (2021). Unwinding the Fantasy: Using Breakout Rooms to Promote Language Exposure and Less-Public Feedback Practices in Online Synchronous Teaching. Paper presented at the PASHE 2021 – EAP Education and Practice: Supporting Students’ Needs, UCL (IOE).
  • Au, I. & Yiu, C. (2021). ‘Identity game’: so you think you are what your Instagram bio says about you. Paper presented at the Sociolinguistics Symposium 23, Hong Kong.
  • Au, I. (2021). The magic of breakout rooms in online synchronous teaching and learning of English. Paper presented at the 3rd International Conference on English Across the Curriculum, Hong Kong.
  • Choi, T. H., Chan, H., & Au, I. (2018). ‘Now you’re talking’: Teacher preparation through alumni talks in a community of practice. Paper presented at the Oxford Education Research Symposium.
  • Au, I. (2018). Branching out from the tree: Extending vocabulary acquisition with polysemy. Paper presented at HKBU-HU First Joint Symposium on Education 2018.

 

Supervisors

Elizabeth Wonnacott and Victoria Murphy

Thomas Procter-Legg is a DPhil Student in the Department of Education and is researching restorative practice within the context of special educational needs and disabilities.

His previous experience includes five years as the Head Teacher of a special academy in Oxfordshire UK, specialising in education for students with Special Educational Needs and Disabilities. He has also worked as a SEND Reviewer for Whole School SEND; a Teaching School Director; and as the Principal Designate on a successful Free School bid.

Thomas is passionate about restorative practice and is involved in many communities of practice, such as the Global Alliance for Restorative Justice and Social Justice, where he is a member of the research sub-group exploring the interactions between restorative justice and social justice.

Thomas is also a strong advocate for creativity in education; having previously gained a Fine Art degree from Chelsea College of Art. This heavily influenced his educational leadership and during his time as a Head Teacher, he became the co-founder of a co-constructed initiative between the academy and the University of Oxford Gardens Libraries and Museums. This work placed cultural learning opportunities and relationships at the heart of the curriculum and is the longest standing project between a special school and The University of Oxford. This sustainable partnership champions marginalised voices and has been highly celebrated e.g., inclusion in the Durham Commission for Creativity in Education; recent dissemination at the Museum Ideas Conference 2022; highly commended award at the Museum and Heritage Awards 2021; and awarded Platinum ArtsMark in 2021.

Whilst this creative work may seem to be separate from restorative practice, Thomas subscribes to the idea that there are significant overlaps, both within pedagogical practice and wider school culture, topics which his current research touch on within the context of special education.

 

Publications

Procter-Legg. (2022). A Discourse on Restorative Practice—Participants’ Views of a Divergent Ideology. Laws11(6), 86–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11060086

Procter-Legg. (2022). Practitioner Perspectives on a Restorative Community: An Inductive Evaluative Study of Conceptual, Pedagogical, and Routine Practice. Laws11(1), 4–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11010004

 

Supervisors

Ian Thompson and Jason Todd

Ivan is currently serving as a Facilitator (Teaching) in the Vice-Chancellor’s Colloquium and as an Editor of the Graduate Inequality Review in the University of Oxford. He has taken up lecturerships in a number of universities in Hong Kong and has run Education, Linguistics, Applied Linguistics, Sociolinguistics, and Academic English courses at undergraduate and postgraduate level.

Prior to joining Oxford, Ivan received his teacher-training in Hong Kong and his postgraduate training in Linguistics (with a specialisation in pragmatics) at University College London. His research interests include: mental representation of word meanings, language acquisition, educational technology, and ELT pedagogy.

Publications

  • Au, I. (2021). Unwinding the Fantasy: Using Breakout Rooms to Promote Language Exposure and Less-Public Feedback Practices in Online Synchronous Teaching. Paper presented at the PASHE 2021 – EAP Education and Practice: Supporting Students’ Needs, UCL (IOE).
  • Au, I. & Yiu, C. (2021). ‘Identity game’: so you think you are what your Instagram bio says about you. Paper presented at the Sociolinguistics Symposium 23, Hong Kong.
  • Au, I. (2021). The magic of breakout rooms in online synchronous teaching and learning of English. Paper presented at the 3rd International Conference on English Across the Curriculum, Hong Kong.
  • Choi, T. H., Chan, H., & Au, I. (2018). ‘Now you’re talking’: Teacher preparation through alumni talks in a community of practice. Paper presented at the Oxford Education Research Symposium.
  • Au, I. (2018). Branching out from the tree: Extending vocabulary acquisition with polysemy. Paper presented at HKBU-HU First Joint Symposium on Education 2018.

 

Supervisors

Elizabeth Wonnacott and Victoria Murphy

Thomas Procter-Legg is a DPhil Student in the Department of Education and is researching restorative practice within the context of special educational needs and disabilities.

His previous experience includes five years as the Head Teacher of a special academy in Oxfordshire UK, specialising in education for students with Special Educational Needs and Disabilities. He has also worked as a SEND Reviewer for Whole School SEND; a Teaching School Director; and as the Principal Designate on a successful Free School bid.

Thomas is passionate about restorative practice and is involved in many communities of practice, such as the Global Alliance for Restorative Justice and Social Justice, where he is a member of the research sub-group exploring the interactions between restorative justice and social justice.

Thomas is also a strong advocate for creativity in education; having previously gained a Fine Art degree from Chelsea College of Art. This heavily influenced his educational leadership and during his time as a Head Teacher, he became the co-founder of a co-constructed initiative between the academy and the University of Oxford Gardens Libraries and Museums. This work placed cultural learning opportunities and relationships at the heart of the curriculum and is the longest standing project between a special school and The University of Oxford. This sustainable partnership champions marginalised voices and has been highly celebrated e.g., inclusion in the Durham Commission for Creativity in Education; recent dissemination at the Museum Ideas Conference 2022; highly commended award at the Museum and Heritage Awards 2021; and awarded Platinum ArtsMark in 2021.

Whilst this creative work may seem to be separate from restorative practice, Thomas subscribes to the idea that there are significant overlaps, both within pedagogical practice and wider school culture, topics which his current research touch on within the context of special education.

 

Publications

Procter-Legg. (2022). A Discourse on Restorative Practice—Participants’ Views of a Divergent Ideology. Laws11(6), 86–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11060086

Procter-Legg. (2022). Practitioner Perspectives on a Restorative Community: An Inductive Evaluative Study of Conceptual, Pedagogical, and Routine Practice. Laws11(1), 4–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11010004

 

Supervisors

Ian Thompson and Jason Todd

Ivan is currently serving as a Facilitator (Teaching) in the Vice-Chancellor’s Colloquium and as an Editor of the Graduate Inequality Review in the University of Oxford. He has taken up lecturerships in a number of universities in Hong Kong and has run Education, Linguistics, Applied Linguistics, Sociolinguistics, and Academic English courses at undergraduate and postgraduate level.

Prior to joining Oxford, Ivan received his teacher-training in Hong Kong and his postgraduate training in Linguistics (with a specialisation in pragmatics) at University College London. His research interests include: mental representation of word meanings, language acquisition, educational technology, and ELT pedagogy.

Publications

  • Au, I. (2021). Unwinding the Fantasy: Using Breakout Rooms to Promote Language Exposure and Less-Public Feedback Practices in Online Synchronous Teaching. Paper presented at the PASHE 2021 – EAP Education and Practice: Supporting Students’ Needs, UCL (IOE).
  • Au, I. & Yiu, C. (2021). ‘Identity game’: so you think you are what your Instagram bio says about you. Paper presented at the Sociolinguistics Symposium 23, Hong Kong.
  • Au, I. (2021). The magic of breakout rooms in online synchronous teaching and learning of English. Paper presented at the 3rd International Conference on English Across the Curriculum, Hong Kong.
  • Choi, T. H., Chan, H., & Au, I. (2018). ‘Now you’re talking’: Teacher preparation through alumni talks in a community of practice. Paper presented at the Oxford Education Research Symposium.
  • Au, I. (2018). Branching out from the tree: Extending vocabulary acquisition with polysemy. Paper presented at HKBU-HU First Joint Symposium on Education 2018.

 

Supervisors

Elizabeth Wonnacott and Victoria Murphy

Thomas Procter-Legg is a DPhil Student in the Department of Education and is researching restorative practice within the context of special educational needs and disabilities.

His previous experience includes five years as the Head Teacher of a special academy in Oxfordshire UK, specialising in education for students with Special Educational Needs and Disabilities. He has also worked as a SEND Reviewer for Whole School SEND; a Teaching School Director; and as the Principal Designate on a successful Free School bid.

Thomas is passionate about restorative practice and is involved in many communities of practice, such as the Global Alliance for Restorative Justice and Social Justice, where he is a member of the research sub-group exploring the interactions between restorative justice and social justice.

Thomas is also a strong advocate for creativity in education; having previously gained a Fine Art degree from Chelsea College of Art. This heavily influenced his educational leadership and during his time as a Head Teacher, he became the co-founder of a co-constructed initiative between the academy and the University of Oxford Gardens Libraries and Museums. This work placed cultural learning opportunities and relationships at the heart of the curriculum and is the longest standing project between a special school and The University of Oxford. This sustainable partnership champions marginalised voices and has been highly celebrated e.g., inclusion in the Durham Commission for Creativity in Education; recent dissemination at the Museum Ideas Conference 2022; highly commended award at the Museum and Heritage Awards 2021; and awarded Platinum ArtsMark in 2021.

Whilst this creative work may seem to be separate from restorative practice, Thomas subscribes to the idea that there are significant overlaps, both within pedagogical practice and wider school culture, topics which his current research touch on within the context of special education.

 

Publications

Procter-Legg. (2022). A Discourse on Restorative Practice—Participants’ Views of a Divergent Ideology. Laws11(6), 86–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11060086

Procter-Legg. (2022). Practitioner Perspectives on a Restorative Community: An Inductive Evaluative Study of Conceptual, Pedagogical, and Routine Practice. Laws11(1), 4–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11010004

 

Supervisors

Ian Thompson and Jason Todd

Ivan is currently serving as a Facilitator (Teaching) in the Vice-Chancellor’s Colloquium and as an Editor of the Graduate Inequality Review in the University of Oxford. He has taken up lecturerships in a number of universities in Hong Kong and has run Education, Linguistics, Applied Linguistics, Sociolinguistics, and Academic English courses at undergraduate and postgraduate level.

Prior to joining Oxford, Ivan received his teacher-training in Hong Kong and his postgraduate training in Linguistics (with a specialisation in pragmatics) at University College London. His research interests include: mental representation of word meanings, language acquisition, educational technology, and ELT pedagogy.

Publications

  • Au, I. (2021). Unwinding the Fantasy: Using Breakout Rooms to Promote Language Exposure and Less-Public Feedback Practices in Online Synchronous Teaching. Paper presented at the PASHE 2021 – EAP Education and Practice: Supporting Students’ Needs, UCL (IOE).
  • Au, I. & Yiu, C. (2021). ‘Identity game’: so you think you are what your Instagram bio says about you. Paper presented at the Sociolinguistics Symposium 23, Hong Kong.
  • Au, I. (2021). The magic of breakout rooms in online synchronous teaching and learning of English. Paper presented at the 3rd International Conference on English Across the Curriculum, Hong Kong.
  • Choi, T. H., Chan, H., & Au, I. (2018). ‘Now you’re talking’: Teacher preparation through alumni talks in a community of practice. Paper presented at the Oxford Education Research Symposium.
  • Au, I. (2018). Branching out from the tree: Extending vocabulary acquisition with polysemy. Paper presented at HKBU-HU First Joint Symposium on Education 2018.

 

Supervisors

Elizabeth Wonnacott and Victoria Murphy

Thomas Procter-Legg is a DPhil Student in the Department of Education and is researching restorative practice within the context of special educational needs and disabilities.

His previous experience includes five years as the Head Teacher of a special academy in Oxfordshire UK, specialising in education for students with Special Educational Needs and Disabilities. He has also worked as a SEND Reviewer for Whole School SEND; a Teaching School Director; and as the Principal Designate on a successful Free School bid.

Thomas is passionate about restorative practice and is involved in many communities of practice, such as the Global Alliance for Restorative Justice and Social Justice, where he is a member of the research sub-group exploring the interactions between restorative justice and social justice.

Thomas is also a strong advocate for creativity in education; having previously gained a Fine Art degree from Chelsea College of Art. This heavily influenced his educational leadership and during his time as a Head Teacher, he became the co-founder of a co-constructed initiative between the academy and the University of Oxford Gardens Libraries and Museums. This work placed cultural learning opportunities and relationships at the heart of the curriculum and is the longest standing project between a special school and The University of Oxford. This sustainable partnership champions marginalised voices and has been highly celebrated e.g., inclusion in the Durham Commission for Creativity in Education; recent dissemination at the Museum Ideas Conference 2022; highly commended award at the Museum and Heritage Awards 2021; and awarded Platinum ArtsMark in 2021.

Whilst this creative work may seem to be separate from restorative practice, Thomas subscribes to the idea that there are significant overlaps, both within pedagogical practice and wider school culture, topics which his current research touch on within the context of special education.

 

Publications

Procter-Legg. (2022). A Discourse on Restorative Practice—Participants’ Views of a Divergent Ideology. Laws11(6), 86–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11060086

Procter-Legg. (2022). Practitioner Perspectives on a Restorative Community: An Inductive Evaluative Study of Conceptual, Pedagogical, and Routine Practice. Laws11(1), 4–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11010004

 

Supervisors

Ian Thompson and Jason Todd

Ivan is currently serving as a Facilitator (Teaching) in the Vice-Chancellor’s Colloquium and as an Editor of the Graduate Inequality Review in the University of Oxford. He has taken up lecturerships in a number of universities in Hong Kong and has run Education, Linguistics, Applied Linguistics, Sociolinguistics, and Academic English courses at undergraduate and postgraduate level.

Prior to joining Oxford, Ivan received his teacher-training in Hong Kong and his postgraduate training in Linguistics (with a specialisation in pragmatics) at University College London. His research interests include: mental representation of word meanings, language acquisition, educational technology, and ELT pedagogy.

Publications

  • Au, I. (2021). Unwinding the Fantasy: Using Breakout Rooms to Promote Language Exposure and Less-Public Feedback Practices in Online Synchronous Teaching. Paper presented at the PASHE 2021 – EAP Education and Practice: Supporting Students’ Needs, UCL (IOE).
  • Au, I. & Yiu, C. (2021). ‘Identity game’: so you think you are what your Instagram bio says about you. Paper presented at the Sociolinguistics Symposium 23, Hong Kong.
  • Au, I. (2021). The magic of breakout rooms in online synchronous teaching and learning of English. Paper presented at the 3rd International Conference on English Across the Curriculum, Hong Kong.
  • Choi, T. H., Chan, H., & Au, I. (2018). ‘Now you’re talking’: Teacher preparation through alumni talks in a community of practice. Paper presented at the Oxford Education Research Symposium.
  • Au, I. (2018). Branching out from the tree: Extending vocabulary acquisition with polysemy. Paper presented at HKBU-HU First Joint Symposium on Education 2018.

 

Supervisors

Elizabeth Wonnacott and Victoria Murphy

Thomas Procter-Legg is a DPhil Student in the Department of Education and is researching restorative practice within the context of special educational needs and disabilities.

His previous experience includes five years as the Head Teacher of a special academy in Oxfordshire UK, specialising in education for students with Special Educational Needs and Disabilities. He has also worked as a SEND Reviewer for Whole School SEND; a Teaching School Director; and as the Principal Designate on a successful Free School bid.

Thomas is passionate about restorative practice and is involved in many communities of practice, such as the Global Alliance for Restorative Justice and Social Justice, where he is a member of the research sub-group exploring the interactions between restorative justice and social justice.

Thomas is also a strong advocate for creativity in education; having previously gained a Fine Art degree from Chelsea College of Art. This heavily influenced his educational leadership and during his time as a Head Teacher, he became the co-founder of a co-constructed initiative between the academy and the University of Oxford Gardens Libraries and Museums. This work placed cultural learning opportunities and relationships at the heart of the curriculum and is the longest standing project between a special school and The University of Oxford. This sustainable partnership champions marginalised voices and has been highly celebrated e.g., inclusion in the Durham Commission for Creativity in Education; recent dissemination at the Museum Ideas Conference 2022; highly commended award at the Museum and Heritage Awards 2021; and awarded Platinum ArtsMark in 2021.

Whilst this creative work may seem to be separate from restorative practice, Thomas subscribes to the idea that there are significant overlaps, both within pedagogical practice and wider school culture, topics which his current research touch on within the context of special education.

 

Publications

Procter-Legg. (2022). A Discourse on Restorative Practice—Participants’ Views of a Divergent Ideology. Laws11(6), 86–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11060086

Procter-Legg. (2022). Practitioner Perspectives on a Restorative Community: An Inductive Evaluative Study of Conceptual, Pedagogical, and Routine Practice. Laws11(1), 4–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11010004

 

Supervisors

Ian Thompson and Jason Todd

Ivan is currently serving as a Facilitator (Teaching) in the Vice-Chancellor’s Colloquium and as an Editor of the Graduate Inequality Review in the University of Oxford. He has taken up lecturerships in a number of universities in Hong Kong and has run Education, Linguistics, Applied Linguistics, Sociolinguistics, and Academic English courses at undergraduate and postgraduate level.

Prior to joining Oxford, Ivan received his teacher-training in Hong Kong and his postgraduate training in Linguistics (with a specialisation in pragmatics) at University College London. His research interests include: mental representation of word meanings, language acquisition, educational technology, and ELT pedagogy.

Publications

  • Au, I. (2021). Unwinding the Fantasy: Using Breakout Rooms to Promote Language Exposure and Less-Public Feedback Practices in Online Synchronous Teaching. Paper presented at the PASHE 2021 – EAP Education and Practice: Supporting Students’ Needs, UCL (IOE).
  • Au, I. & Yiu, C. (2021). ‘Identity game’: so you think you are what your Instagram bio says about you. Paper presented at the Sociolinguistics Symposium 23, Hong Kong.
  • Au, I. (2021). The magic of breakout rooms in online synchronous teaching and learning of English. Paper presented at the 3rd International Conference on English Across the Curriculum, Hong Kong.
  • Choi, T. H., Chan, H., & Au, I. (2018). ‘Now you’re talking’: Teacher preparation through alumni talks in a community of practice. Paper presented at the Oxford Education Research Symposium.
  • Au, I. (2018). Branching out from the tree: Extending vocabulary acquisition with polysemy. Paper presented at HKBU-HU First Joint Symposium on Education 2018.

 

Supervisors

Elizabeth Wonnacott and Victoria Murphy

Thomas Procter-Legg is a DPhil Student in the Department of Education and is researching restorative practice within the context of special educational needs and disabilities.

His previous experience includes five years as the Head Teacher of a special academy in Oxfordshire UK, specialising in education for students with Special Educational Needs and Disabilities. He has also worked as a SEND Reviewer for Whole School SEND; a Teaching School Director; and as the Principal Designate on a successful Free School bid.

Thomas is passionate about restorative practice and is involved in many communities of practice, such as the Global Alliance for Restorative Justice and Social Justice, where he is a member of the research sub-group exploring the interactions between restorative justice and social justice.

Thomas is also a strong advocate for creativity in education; having previously gained a Fine Art degree from Chelsea College of Art. This heavily influenced his educational leadership and during his time as a Head Teacher, he became the co-founder of a co-constructed initiative between the academy and the University of Oxford Gardens Libraries and Museums. This work placed cultural learning opportunities and relationships at the heart of the curriculum and is the longest standing project between a special school and The University of Oxford. This sustainable partnership champions marginalised voices and has been highly celebrated e.g., inclusion in the Durham Commission for Creativity in Education; recent dissemination at the Museum Ideas Conference 2022; highly commended award at the Museum and Heritage Awards 2021; and awarded Platinum ArtsMark in 2021.

Whilst this creative work may seem to be separate from restorative practice, Thomas subscribes to the idea that there are significant overlaps, both within pedagogical practice and wider school culture, topics which his current research touch on within the context of special education.

 

Publications

Procter-Legg. (2022). A Discourse on Restorative Practice—Participants’ Views of a Divergent Ideology. Laws11(6), 86–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11060086

Procter-Legg. (2022). Practitioner Perspectives on a Restorative Community: An Inductive Evaluative Study of Conceptual, Pedagogical, and Routine Practice. Laws11(1), 4–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11010004

 

Supervisors

Ian Thompson and Jason Todd

Ivan is currently serving as a Facilitator (Teaching) in the Vice-Chancellor’s Colloquium and as an Editor of the Graduate Inequality Review in the University of Oxford. He has taken up lecturerships in a number of universities in Hong Kong and has run Education, Linguistics, Applied Linguistics, Sociolinguistics, and Academic English courses at undergraduate and postgraduate level.

Prior to joining Oxford, Ivan received his teacher-training in Hong Kong and his postgraduate training in Linguistics (with a specialisation in pragmatics) at University College London. His research interests include: mental representation of word meanings, language acquisition, educational technology, and ELT pedagogy.

Publications

  • Au, I. (2021). Unwinding the Fantasy: Using Breakout Rooms to Promote Language Exposure and Less-Public Feedback Practices in Online Synchronous Teaching. Paper presented at the PASHE 2021 – EAP Education and Practice: Supporting Students’ Needs, UCL (IOE).
  • Au, I. & Yiu, C. (2021). ‘Identity game’: so you think you are what your Instagram bio says about you. Paper presented at the Sociolinguistics Symposium 23, Hong Kong.
  • Au, I. (2021). The magic of breakout rooms in online synchronous teaching and learning of English. Paper presented at the 3rd International Conference on English Across the Curriculum, Hong Kong.
  • Choi, T. H., Chan, H., & Au, I. (2018). ‘Now you’re talking’: Teacher preparation through alumni talks in a community of practice. Paper presented at the Oxford Education Research Symposium.
  • Au, I. (2018). Branching out from the tree: Extending vocabulary acquisition with polysemy. Paper presented at HKBU-HU First Joint Symposium on Education 2018.

 

Supervisors

Elizabeth Wonnacott and Victoria Murphy

Thomas Procter-Legg is a DPhil Student in the Department of Education and is researching restorative practice within the context of special educational needs and disabilities.

His previous experience includes five years as the Head Teacher of a special academy in Oxfordshire UK, specialising in education for students with Special Educational Needs and Disabilities. He has also worked as a SEND Reviewer for Whole School SEND; a Teaching School Director; and as the Principal Designate on a successful Free School bid.

Thomas is passionate about restorative practice and is involved in many communities of practice, such as the Global Alliance for Restorative Justice and Social Justice, where he is a member of the research sub-group exploring the interactions between restorative justice and social justice.

Thomas is also a strong advocate for creativity in education; having previously gained a Fine Art degree from Chelsea College of Art. This heavily influenced his educational leadership and during his time as a Head Teacher, he became the co-founder of a co-constructed initiative between the academy and the University of Oxford Gardens Libraries and Museums. This work placed cultural learning opportunities and relationships at the heart of the curriculum and is the longest standing project between a special school and The University of Oxford. This sustainable partnership champions marginalised voices and has been highly celebrated e.g., inclusion in the Durham Commission for Creativity in Education; recent dissemination at the Museum Ideas Conference 2022; highly commended award at the Museum and Heritage Awards 2021; and awarded Platinum ArtsMark in 2021.

Whilst this creative work may seem to be separate from restorative practice, Thomas subscribes to the idea that there are significant overlaps, both within pedagogical practice and wider school culture, topics which his current research touch on within the context of special education.

 

Publications

Procter-Legg. (2022). A Discourse on Restorative Practice—Participants’ Views of a Divergent Ideology. Laws11(6), 86–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11060086

Procter-Legg. (2022). Practitioner Perspectives on a Restorative Community: An Inductive Evaluative Study of Conceptual, Pedagogical, and Routine Practice. Laws11(1), 4–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11010004

 

Supervisors

Ian Thompson and Jason Todd

Ivan is currently serving as a Facilitator (Teaching) in the Vice-Chancellor’s Colloquium and as an Editor of the Graduate Inequality Review in the University of Oxford. He has taken up lecturerships in a number of universities in Hong Kong and has run Education, Linguistics, Applied Linguistics, Sociolinguistics, and Academic English courses at undergraduate and postgraduate level.

Prior to joining Oxford, Ivan received his teacher-training in Hong Kong and his postgraduate training in Linguistics (with a specialisation in pragmatics) at University College London. His research interests include: mental representation of word meanings, language acquisition, educational technology, and ELT pedagogy.

Publications

  • Au, I. (2021). Unwinding the Fantasy: Using Breakout Rooms to Promote Language Exposure and Less-Public Feedback Practices in Online Synchronous Teaching. Paper presented at the PASHE 2021 – EAP Education and Practice: Supporting Students’ Needs, UCL (IOE).
  • Au, I. & Yiu, C. (2021). ‘Identity game’: so you think you are what your Instagram bio says about you. Paper presented at the Sociolinguistics Symposium 23, Hong Kong.
  • Au, I. (2021). The magic of breakout rooms in online synchronous teaching and learning of English. Paper presented at the 3rd International Conference on English Across the Curriculum, Hong Kong.
  • Choi, T. H., Chan, H., & Au, I. (2018). ‘Now you’re talking’: Teacher preparation through alumni talks in a community of practice. Paper presented at the Oxford Education Research Symposium.
  • Au, I. (2018). Branching out from the tree: Extending vocabulary acquisition with polysemy. Paper presented at HKBU-HU First Joint Symposium on Education 2018.

 

Supervisors

Elizabeth Wonnacott and Victoria Murphy

Thomas Procter-Legg is a DPhil Student in the Department of Education and is researching restorative practice within the context of special educational needs and disabilities.

His previous experience includes five years as the Head Teacher of a special academy in Oxfordshire UK, specialising in education for students with Special Educational Needs and Disabilities. He has also worked as a SEND Reviewer for Whole School SEND; a Teaching School Director; and as the Principal Designate on a successful Free School bid.

Thomas is passionate about restorative practice and is involved in many communities of practice, such as the Global Alliance for Restorative Justice and Social Justice, where he is a member of the research sub-group exploring the interactions between restorative justice and social justice.

Thomas is also a strong advocate for creativity in education; having previously gained a Fine Art degree from Chelsea College of Art. This heavily influenced his educational leadership and during his time as a Head Teacher, he became the co-founder of a co-constructed initiative between the academy and the University of Oxford Gardens Libraries and Museums. This work placed cultural learning opportunities and relationships at the heart of the curriculum and is the longest standing project between a special school and The University of Oxford. This sustainable partnership champions marginalised voices and has been highly celebrated e.g., inclusion in the Durham Commission for Creativity in Education; recent dissemination at the Museum Ideas Conference 2022; highly commended award at the Museum and Heritage Awards 2021; and awarded Platinum ArtsMark in 2021.

Whilst this creative work may seem to be separate from restorative practice, Thomas subscribes to the idea that there are significant overlaps, both within pedagogical practice and wider school culture, topics which his current research touch on within the context of special education.

 

Publications

Procter-Legg. (2022). A Discourse on Restorative Practice—Participants’ Views of a Divergent Ideology. Laws11(6), 86–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11060086

Procter-Legg. (2022). Practitioner Perspectives on a Restorative Community: An Inductive Evaluative Study of Conceptual, Pedagogical, and Routine Practice. Laws11(1), 4–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11010004

 

Supervisors

Ian Thompson and Jason Todd

Ivan is currently serving as a Facilitator (Teaching) in the Vice-Chancellor’s Colloquium and as an Editor of the Graduate Inequality Review in the University of Oxford. He has taken up lecturerships in a number of universities in Hong Kong and has run Education, Linguistics, Applied Linguistics, Sociolinguistics, and Academic English courses at undergraduate and postgraduate level.

Prior to joining Oxford, Ivan received his teacher-training in Hong Kong and his postgraduate training in Linguistics (with a specialisation in pragmatics) at University College London. His research interests include: mental representation of word meanings, language acquisition, educational technology, and ELT pedagogy.

Publications

  • Au, I. (2021). Unwinding the Fantasy: Using Breakout Rooms to Promote Language Exposure and Less-Public Feedback Practices in Online Synchronous Teaching. Paper presented at the PASHE 2021 – EAP Education and Practice: Supporting Students’ Needs, UCL (IOE).
  • Au, I. & Yiu, C. (2021). ‘Identity game’: so you think you are what your Instagram bio says about you. Paper presented at the Sociolinguistics Symposium 23, Hong Kong.
  • Au, I. (2021). The magic of breakout rooms in online synchronous teaching and learning of English. Paper presented at the 3rd International Conference on English Across the Curriculum, Hong Kong.
  • Choi, T. H., Chan, H., & Au, I. (2018). ‘Now you’re talking’: Teacher preparation through alumni talks in a community of practice. Paper presented at the Oxford Education Research Symposium.
  • Au, I. (2018). Branching out from the tree: Extending vocabulary acquisition with polysemy. Paper presented at HKBU-HU First Joint Symposium on Education 2018.

 

Supervisors

Elizabeth Wonnacott and Victoria Murphy

Thomas Procter-Legg is a DPhil Student in the Department of Education and is researching restorative practice within the context of special educational needs and disabilities.

His previous experience includes five years as the Head Teacher of a special academy in Oxfordshire UK, specialising in education for students with Special Educational Needs and Disabilities. He has also worked as a SEND Reviewer for Whole School SEND; a Teaching School Director; and as the Principal Designate on a successful Free School bid.

Thomas is passionate about restorative practice and is involved in many communities of practice, such as the Global Alliance for Restorative Justice and Social Justice, where he is a member of the research sub-group exploring the interactions between restorative justice and social justice.

Thomas is also a strong advocate for creativity in education; having previously gained a Fine Art degree from Chelsea College of Art. This heavily influenced his educational leadership and during his time as a Head Teacher, he became the co-founder of a co-constructed initiative between the academy and the University of Oxford Gardens Libraries and Museums. This work placed cultural learning opportunities and relationships at the heart of the curriculum and is the longest standing project between a special school and The University of Oxford. This sustainable partnership champions marginalised voices and has been highly celebrated e.g., inclusion in the Durham Commission for Creativity in Education; recent dissemination at the Museum Ideas Conference 2022; highly commended award at the Museum and Heritage Awards 2021; and awarded Platinum ArtsMark in 2021.

Whilst this creative work may seem to be separate from restorative practice, Thomas subscribes to the idea that there are significant overlaps, both within pedagogical practice and wider school culture, topics which his current research touch on within the context of special education.

 

Publications

Procter-Legg. (2022). A Discourse on Restorative Practice—Participants’ Views of a Divergent Ideology. Laws11(6), 86–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11060086

Procter-Legg. (2022). Practitioner Perspectives on a Restorative Community: An Inductive Evaluative Study of Conceptual, Pedagogical, and Routine Practice. Laws11(1), 4–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11010004

 

Supervisors

Ian Thompson and Jason Todd

Ivan is currently serving as a Facilitator (Teaching) in the Vice-Chancellor’s Colloquium and as an Editor of the Graduate Inequality Review in the University of Oxford. He has taken up lecturerships in a number of universities in Hong Kong and has run Education, Linguistics, Applied Linguistics, Sociolinguistics, and Academic English courses at undergraduate and postgraduate level.

Prior to joining Oxford, Ivan received his teacher-training in Hong Kong and his postgraduate training in Linguistics (with a specialisation in pragmatics) at University College London. His research interests include: mental representation of word meanings, language acquisition, educational technology, and ELT pedagogy.

Publications

  • Au, I. (2021). Unwinding the Fantasy: Using Breakout Rooms to Promote Language Exposure and Less-Public Feedback Practices in Online Synchronous Teaching. Paper presented at the PASHE 2021 – EAP Education and Practice: Supporting Students’ Needs, UCL (IOE).
  • Au, I. & Yiu, C. (2021). ‘Identity game’: so you think you are what your Instagram bio says about you. Paper presented at the Sociolinguistics Symposium 23, Hong Kong.
  • Au, I. (2021). The magic of breakout rooms in online synchronous teaching and learning of English. Paper presented at the 3rd International Conference on English Across the Curriculum, Hong Kong.
  • Choi, T. H., Chan, H., & Au, I. (2018). ‘Now you’re talking’: Teacher preparation through alumni talks in a community of practice. Paper presented at the Oxford Education Research Symposium.
  • Au, I. (2018). Branching out from the tree: Extending vocabulary acquisition with polysemy. Paper presented at HKBU-HU First Joint Symposium on Education 2018.

 

Supervisors

Elizabeth Wonnacott and Victoria Murphy

Thomas Procter-Legg is a DPhil Student in the Department of Education and is researching restorative practice within the context of special educational needs and disabilities.

His previous experience includes five years as the Head Teacher of a special academy in Oxfordshire UK, specialising in education for students with Special Educational Needs and Disabilities. He has also worked as a SEND Reviewer for Whole School SEND; a Teaching School Director; and as the Principal Designate on a successful Free School bid.

Thomas is passionate about restorative practice and is involved in many communities of practice, such as the Global Alliance for Restorative Justice and Social Justice, where he is a member of the research sub-group exploring the interactions between restorative justice and social justice.

Thomas is also a strong advocate for creativity in education; having previously gained a Fine Art degree from Chelsea College of Art. This heavily influenced his educational leadership and during his time as a Head Teacher, he became the co-founder of a co-constructed initiative between the academy and the University of Oxford Gardens Libraries and Museums. This work placed cultural learning opportunities and relationships at the heart of the curriculum and is the longest standing project between a special school and The University of Oxford. This sustainable partnership champions marginalised voices and has been highly celebrated e.g., inclusion in the Durham Commission for Creativity in Education; recent dissemination at the Museum Ideas Conference 2022; highly commended award at the Museum and Heritage Awards 2021; and awarded Platinum ArtsMark in 2021.

Whilst this creative work may seem to be separate from restorative practice, Thomas subscribes to the idea that there are significant overlaps, both within pedagogical practice and wider school culture, topics which his current research touch on within the context of special education.

 

Publications

Procter-Legg. (2022). A Discourse on Restorative Practice—Participants’ Views of a Divergent Ideology. Laws11(6), 86–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11060086

Procter-Legg. (2022). Practitioner Perspectives on a Restorative Community: An Inductive Evaluative Study of Conceptual, Pedagogical, and Routine Practice. Laws11(1), 4–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11010004

 

Supervisors

Ian Thompson and Jason Todd

Ivan is currently serving as a Facilitator (Teaching) in the Vice-Chancellor’s Colloquium and as an Editor of the Graduate Inequality Review in the University of Oxford. He has taken up lecturerships in a number of universities in Hong Kong and has run Education, Linguistics, Applied Linguistics, Sociolinguistics, and Academic English courses at undergraduate and postgraduate level.

Prior to joining Oxford, Ivan received his teacher-training in Hong Kong and his postgraduate training in Linguistics (with a specialisation in pragmatics) at University College London. His research interests include: mental representation of word meanings, language acquisition, educational technology, and ELT pedagogy.

Publications

  • Au, I. (2021). Unwinding the Fantasy: Using Breakout Rooms to Promote Language Exposure and Less-Public Feedback Practices in Online Synchronous Teaching. Paper presented at the PASHE 2021 – EAP Education and Practice: Supporting Students’ Needs, UCL (IOE).
  • Au, I. & Yiu, C. (2021). ‘Identity game’: so you think you are what your Instagram bio says about you. Paper presented at the Sociolinguistics Symposium 23, Hong Kong.
  • Au, I. (2021). The magic of breakout rooms in online synchronous teaching and learning of English. Paper presented at the 3rd International Conference on English Across the Curriculum, Hong Kong.
  • Choi, T. H., Chan, H., & Au, I. (2018). ‘Now you’re talking’: Teacher preparation through alumni talks in a community of practice. Paper presented at the Oxford Education Research Symposium.
  • Au, I. (2018). Branching out from the tree: Extending vocabulary acquisition with polysemy. Paper presented at HKBU-HU First Joint Symposium on Education 2018.

 

Supervisors

Elizabeth Wonnacott and Victoria Murphy

Thomas Procter-Legg is a DPhil Student in the Department of Education and is researching restorative practice within the context of special educational needs and disabilities.

His previous experience includes five years as the Head Teacher of a special academy in Oxfordshire UK, specialising in education for students with Special Educational Needs and Disabilities. He has also worked as a SEND Reviewer for Whole School SEND; a Teaching School Director; and as the Principal Designate on a successful Free School bid.

Thomas is passionate about restorative practice and is involved in many communities of practice, such as the Global Alliance for Restorative Justice and Social Justice, where he is a member of the research sub-group exploring the interactions between restorative justice and social justice.

Thomas is also a strong advocate for creativity in education; having previously gained a Fine Art degree from Chelsea College of Art. This heavily influenced his educational leadership and during his time as a Head Teacher, he became the co-founder of a co-constructed initiative between the academy and the University of Oxford Gardens Libraries and Museums. This work placed cultural learning opportunities and relationships at the heart of the curriculum and is the longest standing project between a special school and The University of Oxford. This sustainable partnership champions marginalised voices and has been highly celebrated e.g., inclusion in the Durham Commission for Creativity in Education; recent dissemination at the Museum Ideas Conference 2022; highly commended award at the Museum and Heritage Awards 2021; and awarded Platinum ArtsMark in 2021.

Whilst this creative work may seem to be separate from restorative practice, Thomas subscribes to the idea that there are significant overlaps, both within pedagogical practice and wider school culture, topics which his current research touch on within the context of special education.

 

Publications

Procter-Legg. (2022). A Discourse on Restorative Practice—Participants’ Views of a Divergent Ideology. Laws11(6), 86–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11060086

Procter-Legg. (2022). Practitioner Perspectives on a Restorative Community: An Inductive Evaluative Study of Conceptual, Pedagogical, and Routine Practice. Laws11(1), 4–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11010004

 

Supervisors

Ian Thompson and Jason Todd

Ivan is currently serving as a Facilitator (Teaching) in the Vice-Chancellor’s Colloquium and as an Editor of the Graduate Inequality Review in the University of Oxford. He has taken up lecturerships in a number of universities in Hong Kong and has run Education, Linguistics, Applied Linguistics, Sociolinguistics, and Academic English courses at undergraduate and postgraduate level.

Prior to joining Oxford, Ivan received his teacher-training in Hong Kong and his postgraduate training in Linguistics (with a specialisation in pragmatics) at University College London. His research interests include: mental representation of word meanings, language acquisition, educational technology, and ELT pedagogy.

Publications

  • Au, I. (2021). Unwinding the Fantasy: Using Breakout Rooms to Promote Language Exposure and Less-Public Feedback Practices in Online Synchronous Teaching. Paper presented at the PASHE 2021 – EAP Education and Practice: Supporting Students’ Needs, UCL (IOE).
  • Au, I. & Yiu, C. (2021). ‘Identity game’: so you think you are what your Instagram bio says about you. Paper presented at the Sociolinguistics Symposium 23, Hong Kong.
  • Au, I. (2021). The magic of breakout rooms in online synchronous teaching and learning of English. Paper presented at the 3rd International Conference on English Across the Curriculum, Hong Kong.
  • Choi, T. H., Chan, H., & Au, I. (2018). ‘Now you’re talking’: Teacher preparation through alumni talks in a community of practice. Paper presented at the Oxford Education Research Symposium.
  • Au, I. (2018). Branching out from the tree: Extending vocabulary acquisition with polysemy. Paper presented at HKBU-HU First Joint Symposium on Education 2018.

 

Supervisors

Elizabeth Wonnacott and Victoria Murphy

Thomas Procter-Legg is a DPhil Student in the Department of Education and is researching restorative practice within the context of special educational needs and disabilities.

His previous experience includes five years as the Head Teacher of a special academy in Oxfordshire UK, specialising in education for students with Special Educational Needs and Disabilities. He has also worked as a SEND Reviewer for Whole School SEND; a Teaching School Director; and as the Principal Designate on a successful Free School bid.

Thomas is passionate about restorative practice and is involved in many communities of practice, such as the Global Alliance for Restorative Justice and Social Justice, where he is a member of the research sub-group exploring the interactions between restorative justice and social justice.

Thomas is also a strong advocate for creativity in education; having previously gained a Fine Art degree from Chelsea College of Art. This heavily influenced his educational leadership and during his time as a Head Teacher, he became the co-founder of a co-constructed initiative between the academy and the University of Oxford Gardens Libraries and Museums. This work placed cultural learning opportunities and relationships at the heart of the curriculum and is the longest standing project between a special school and The University of Oxford. This sustainable partnership champions marginalised voices and has been highly celebrated e.g., inclusion in the Durham Commission for Creativity in Education; recent dissemination at the Museum Ideas Conference 2022; highly commended award at the Museum and Heritage Awards 2021; and awarded Platinum ArtsMark in 2021.

Whilst this creative work may seem to be separate from restorative practice, Thomas subscribes to the idea that there are significant overlaps, both within pedagogical practice and wider school culture, topics which his current research touch on within the context of special education.

 

Publications

Procter-Legg. (2022). A Discourse on Restorative Practice—Participants’ Views of a Divergent Ideology. Laws11(6), 86–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11060086

Procter-Legg. (2022). Practitioner Perspectives on a Restorative Community: An Inductive Evaluative Study of Conceptual, Pedagogical, and Routine Practice. Laws11(1), 4–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11010004

 

Supervisors

Ian Thompson and Jason Todd

Ivan is currently serving as a Facilitator (Teaching) in the Vice-Chancellor’s Colloquium and as an Editor of the Graduate Inequality Review in the University of Oxford. He has taken up lecturerships in a number of universities in Hong Kong and has run Education, Linguistics, Applied Linguistics, Sociolinguistics, and Academic English courses at undergraduate and postgraduate level.

Prior to joining Oxford, Ivan received his teacher-training in Hong Kong and his postgraduate training in Linguistics (with a specialisation in pragmatics) at University College London. His research interests include: mental representation of word meanings, language acquisition, educational technology, and ELT pedagogy.

Publications

  • Au, I. (2021). Unwinding the Fantasy: Using Breakout Rooms to Promote Language Exposure and Less-Public Feedback Practices in Online Synchronous Teaching. Paper presented at the PASHE 2021 – EAP Education and Practice: Supporting Students’ Needs, UCL (IOE).
  • Au, I. & Yiu, C. (2021). ‘Identity game’: so you think you are what your Instagram bio says about you. Paper presented at the Sociolinguistics Symposium 23, Hong Kong.
  • Au, I. (2021). The magic of breakout rooms in online synchronous teaching and learning of English. Paper presented at the 3rd International Conference on English Across the Curriculum, Hong Kong.
  • Choi, T. H., Chan, H., & Au, I. (2018). ‘Now you’re talking’: Teacher preparation through alumni talks in a community of practice. Paper presented at the Oxford Education Research Symposium.
  • Au, I. (2018). Branching out from the tree: Extending vocabulary acquisition with polysemy. Paper presented at HKBU-HU First Joint Symposium on Education 2018.

 

Supervisors

Elizabeth Wonnacott and Victoria Murphy

Thomas Procter-Legg is a DPhil Student in the Department of Education and is researching restorative practice within the context of special educational needs and disabilities.

His previous experience includes five years as the Head Teacher of a special academy in Oxfordshire UK, specialising in education for students with Special Educational Needs and Disabilities. He has also worked as a SEND Reviewer for Whole School SEND; a Teaching School Director; and as the Principal Designate on a successful Free School bid.

Thomas is passionate about restorative practice and is involved in many communities of practice, such as the Global Alliance for Restorative Justice and Social Justice, where he is a member of the research sub-group exploring the interactions between restorative justice and social justice.

Thomas is also a strong advocate for creativity in education; having previously gained a Fine Art degree from Chelsea College of Art. This heavily influenced his educational leadership and during his time as a Head Teacher, he became the co-founder of a co-constructed initiative between the academy and the University of Oxford Gardens Libraries and Museums. This work placed cultural learning opportunities and relationships at the heart of the curriculum and is the longest standing project between a special school and The University of Oxford. This sustainable partnership champions marginalised voices and has been highly celebrated e.g., inclusion in the Durham Commission for Creativity in Education; recent dissemination at the Museum Ideas Conference 2022; highly commended award at the Museum and Heritage Awards 2021; and awarded Platinum ArtsMark in 2021.

Whilst this creative work may seem to be separate from restorative practice, Thomas subscribes to the idea that there are significant overlaps, both within pedagogical practice and wider school culture, topics which his current research touch on within the context of special education.

 

Publications

Procter-Legg. (2022). A Discourse on Restorative Practice—Participants’ Views of a Divergent Ideology. Laws11(6), 86–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11060086

Procter-Legg. (2022). Practitioner Perspectives on a Restorative Community: An Inductive Evaluative Study of Conceptual, Pedagogical, and Routine Practice. Laws11(1), 4–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11010004

 

Supervisors

Ian Thompson and Jason Todd

Ivan is currently serving as a Facilitator (Teaching) in the Vice-Chancellor’s Colloquium and as an Editor of the Graduate Inequality Review in the University of Oxford. He has taken up lecturerships in a number of universities in Hong Kong and has run Education, Linguistics, Applied Linguistics, Sociolinguistics, and Academic English courses at undergraduate and postgraduate level.

Prior to joining Oxford, Ivan received his teacher-training in Hong Kong and his postgraduate training in Linguistics (with a specialisation in pragmatics) at University College London. His research interests include: mental representation of word meanings, language acquisition, educational technology, and ELT pedagogy.

Publications

  • Au, I. (2021). Unwinding the Fantasy: Using Breakout Rooms to Promote Language Exposure and Less-Public Feedback Practices in Online Synchronous Teaching. Paper presented at the PASHE 2021 – EAP Education and Practice: Supporting Students’ Needs, UCL (IOE).
  • Au, I. & Yiu, C. (2021). ‘Identity game’: so you think you are what your Instagram bio says about you. Paper presented at the Sociolinguistics Symposium 23, Hong Kong.
  • Au, I. (2021). The magic of breakout rooms in online synchronous teaching and learning of English. Paper presented at the 3rd International Conference on English Across the Curriculum, Hong Kong.
  • Choi, T. H., Chan, H., & Au, I. (2018). ‘Now you’re talking’: Teacher preparation through alumni talks in a community of practice. Paper presented at the Oxford Education Research Symposium.
  • Au, I. (2018). Branching out from the tree: Extending vocabulary acquisition with polysemy. Paper presented at HKBU-HU First Joint Symposium on Education 2018.

 

Supervisors

Elizabeth Wonnacott and Victoria Murphy

Thomas Procter-Legg is a DPhil Student in the Department of Education and is researching restorative practice within the context of special educational needs and disabilities.

His previous experience includes five years as the Head Teacher of a special academy in Oxfordshire UK, specialising in education for students with Special Educational Needs and Disabilities. He has also worked as a SEND Reviewer for Whole School SEND; a Teaching School Director; and as the Principal Designate on a successful Free School bid.

Thomas is passionate about restorative practice and is involved in many communities of practice, such as the Global Alliance for Restorative Justice and Social Justice, where he is a member of the research sub-group exploring the interactions between restorative justice and social justice.

Thomas is also a strong advocate for creativity in education; having previously gained a Fine Art degree from Chelsea College of Art. This heavily influenced his educational leadership and during his time as a Head Teacher, he became the co-founder of a co-constructed initiative between the academy and the University of Oxford Gardens Libraries and Museums. This work placed cultural learning opportunities and relationships at the heart of the curriculum and is the longest standing project between a special school and The University of Oxford. This sustainable partnership champions marginalised voices and has been highly celebrated e.g., inclusion in the Durham Commission for Creativity in Education; recent dissemination at the Museum Ideas Conference 2022; highly commended award at the Museum and Heritage Awards 2021; and awarded Platinum ArtsMark in 2021.

Whilst this creative work may seem to be separate from restorative practice, Thomas subscribes to the idea that there are significant overlaps, both within pedagogical practice and wider school culture, topics which his current research touch on within the context of special education.

 

Publications

Procter-Legg. (2022). A Discourse on Restorative Practice—Participants’ Views of a Divergent Ideology. Laws11(6), 86–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11060086

Procter-Legg. (2022). Practitioner Perspectives on a Restorative Community: An Inductive Evaluative Study of Conceptual, Pedagogical, and Routine Practice. Laws11(1), 4–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11010004

 

Supervisors

Ian Thompson and Jason Todd

Ivan is currently serving as a Facilitator (Teaching) in the Vice-Chancellor’s Colloquium and as an Editor of the Graduate Inequality Review in the University of Oxford. He has taken up lecturerships in a number of universities in Hong Kong and has run Education, Linguistics, Applied Linguistics, Sociolinguistics, and Academic English courses at undergraduate and postgraduate level.

Prior to joining Oxford, Ivan received his teacher-training in Hong Kong and his postgraduate training in Linguistics (with a specialisation in pragmatics) at University College London. His research interests include: mental representation of word meanings, language acquisition, educational technology, and ELT pedagogy.

Publications

  • Au, I. (2021). Unwinding the Fantasy: Using Breakout Rooms to Promote Language Exposure and Less-Public Feedback Practices in Online Synchronous Teaching. Paper presented at the PASHE 2021 – EAP Education and Practice: Supporting Students’ Needs, UCL (IOE).
  • Au, I. & Yiu, C. (2021). ‘Identity game’: so you think you are what your Instagram bio says about you. Paper presented at the Sociolinguistics Symposium 23, Hong Kong.
  • Au, I. (2021). The magic of breakout rooms in online synchronous teaching and learning of English. Paper presented at the 3rd International Conference on English Across the Curriculum, Hong Kong.
  • Choi, T. H., Chan, H., & Au, I. (2018). ‘Now you’re talking’: Teacher preparation through alumni talks in a community of practice. Paper presented at the Oxford Education Research Symposium.
  • Au, I. (2018). Branching out from the tree: Extending vocabulary acquisition with polysemy. Paper presented at HKBU-HU First Joint Symposium on Education 2018.

 

Supervisors

Elizabeth Wonnacott and Victoria Murphy

Thomas Procter-Legg is a DPhil Student in the Department of Education and is researching restorative practice within the context of special educational needs and disabilities.

His previous experience includes five years as the Head Teacher of a special academy in Oxfordshire UK, specialising in education for students with Special Educational Needs and Disabilities. He has also worked as a SEND Reviewer for Whole School SEND; a Teaching School Director; and as the Principal Designate on a successful Free School bid.

Thomas is passionate about restorative practice and is involved in many communities of practice, such as the Global Alliance for Restorative Justice and Social Justice, where he is a member of the research sub-group exploring the interactions between restorative justice and social justice.

Thomas is also a strong advocate for creativity in education; having previously gained a Fine Art degree from Chelsea College of Art. This heavily influenced his educational leadership and during his time as a Head Teacher, he became the co-founder of a co-constructed initiative between the academy and the University of Oxford Gardens Libraries and Museums. This work placed cultural learning opportunities and relationships at the heart of the curriculum and is the longest standing project between a special school and The University of Oxford. This sustainable partnership champions marginalised voices and has been highly celebrated e.g., inclusion in the Durham Commission for Creativity in Education; recent dissemination at the Museum Ideas Conference 2022; highly commended award at the Museum and Heritage Awards 2021; and awarded Platinum ArtsMark in 2021.

Whilst this creative work may seem to be separate from restorative practice, Thomas subscribes to the idea that there are significant overlaps, both within pedagogical practice and wider school culture, topics which his current research touch on within the context of special education.

 

Publications

Procter-Legg. (2022). A Discourse on Restorative Practice—Participants’ Views of a Divergent Ideology. Laws11(6), 86–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11060086

Procter-Legg. (2022). Practitioner Perspectives on a Restorative Community: An Inductive Evaluative Study of Conceptual, Pedagogical, and Routine Practice. Laws11(1), 4–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11010004

 

Supervisors

Ian Thompson and Jason Todd

Ivan is currently serving as a Facilitator (Teaching) in the Vice-Chancellor’s Colloquium and as an Editor of the Graduate Inequality Review in the University of Oxford. He has taken up lecturerships in a number of universities in Hong Kong and has run Education, Linguistics, Applied Linguistics, Sociolinguistics, and Academic English courses at undergraduate and postgraduate level.

Prior to joining Oxford, Ivan received his teacher-training in Hong Kong and his postgraduate training in Linguistics (with a specialisation in pragmatics) at University College London. His research interests include: mental representation of word meanings, language acquisition, educational technology, and ELT pedagogy.

Publications

  • Au, I. (2021). Unwinding the Fantasy: Using Breakout Rooms to Promote Language Exposure and Less-Public Feedback Practices in Online Synchronous Teaching. Paper presented at the PASHE 2021 – EAP Education and Practice: Supporting Students’ Needs, UCL (IOE).
  • Au, I. & Yiu, C. (2021). ‘Identity game’: so you think you are what your Instagram bio says about you. Paper presented at the Sociolinguistics Symposium 23, Hong Kong.
  • Au, I. (2021). The magic of breakout rooms in online synchronous teaching and learning of English. Paper presented at the 3rd International Conference on English Across the Curriculum, Hong Kong.
  • Choi, T. H., Chan, H., & Au, I. (2018). ‘Now you’re talking’: Teacher preparation through alumni talks in a community of practice. Paper presented at the Oxford Education Research Symposium.
  • Au, I. (2018). Branching out from the tree: Extending vocabulary acquisition with polysemy. Paper presented at HKBU-HU First Joint Symposium on Education 2018.

 

Supervisors

Elizabeth Wonnacott and Victoria Murphy

Thomas Procter-Legg is a DPhil Student in the Department of Education and is researching restorative practice within the context of special educational needs and disabilities.

His previous experience includes five years as the Head Teacher of a special academy in Oxfordshire UK, specialising in education for students with Special Educational Needs and Disabilities. He has also worked as a SEND Reviewer for Whole School SEND; a Teaching School Director; and as the Principal Designate on a successful Free School bid.

Thomas is passionate about restorative practice and is involved in many communities of practice, such as the Global Alliance for Restorative Justice and Social Justice, where he is a member of the research sub-group exploring the interactions between restorative justice and social justice.

Thomas is also a strong advocate for creativity in education; having previously gained a Fine Art degree from Chelsea College of Art. This heavily influenced his educational leadership and during his time as a Head Teacher, he became the co-founder of a co-constructed initiative between the academy and the University of Oxford Gardens Libraries and Museums. This work placed cultural learning opportunities and relationships at the heart of the curriculum and is the longest standing project between a special school and The University of Oxford. This sustainable partnership champions marginalised voices and has been highly celebrated e.g., inclusion in the Durham Commission for Creativity in Education; recent dissemination at the Museum Ideas Conference 2022; highly commended award at the Museum and Heritage Awards 2021; and awarded Platinum ArtsMark in 2021.

Whilst this creative work may seem to be separate from restorative practice, Thomas subscribes to the idea that there are significant overlaps, both within pedagogical practice and wider school culture, topics which his current research touch on within the context of special education.

 

Publications

Procter-Legg. (2022). A Discourse on Restorative Practice—Participants’ Views of a Divergent Ideology. Laws11(6), 86–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11060086

Procter-Legg. (2022). Practitioner Perspectives on a Restorative Community: An Inductive Evaluative Study of Conceptual, Pedagogical, and Routine Practice. Laws11(1), 4–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11010004

 

Supervisors

Ian Thompson and Jason Todd

Ivan is currently serving as a Facilitator (Teaching) in the Vice-Chancellor’s Colloquium and as an Editor of the Graduate Inequality Review in the University of Oxford. He has taken up lecturerships in a number of universities in Hong Kong and has run Education, Linguistics, Applied Linguistics, Sociolinguistics, and Academic English courses at undergraduate and postgraduate level.

Prior to joining Oxford, Ivan received his teacher-training in Hong Kong and his postgraduate training in Linguistics (with a specialisation in pragmatics) at University College London. His research interests include: mental representation of word meanings, language acquisition, educational technology, and ELT pedagogy.

Publications

  • Au, I. (2021). Unwinding the Fantasy: Using Breakout Rooms to Promote Language Exposure and Less-Public Feedback Practices in Online Synchronous Teaching. Paper presented at the PASHE 2021 – EAP Education and Practice: Supporting Students’ Needs, UCL (IOE).
  • Au, I. & Yiu, C. (2021). ‘Identity game’: so you think you are what your Instagram bio says about you. Paper presented at the Sociolinguistics Symposium 23, Hong Kong.
  • Au, I. (2021). The magic of breakout rooms in online synchronous teaching and learning of English. Paper presented at the 3rd International Conference on English Across the Curriculum, Hong Kong.
  • Choi, T. H., Chan, H., & Au, I. (2018). ‘Now you’re talking’: Teacher preparation through alumni talks in a community of practice. Paper presented at the Oxford Education Research Symposium.
  • Au, I. (2018). Branching out from the tree: Extending vocabulary acquisition with polysemy. Paper presented at HKBU-HU First Joint Symposium on Education 2018.

 

Supervisors

Elizabeth Wonnacott and Victoria Murphy

Thomas Procter-Legg is a DPhil Student in the Department of Education and is researching restorative practice within the context of special educational needs and disabilities.

His previous experience includes five years as the Head Teacher of a special academy in Oxfordshire UK, specialising in education for students with Special Educational Needs and Disabilities. He has also worked as a SEND Reviewer for Whole School SEND; a Teaching School Director; and as the Principal Designate on a successful Free School bid.

Thomas is passionate about restorative practice and is involved in many communities of practice, such as the Global Alliance for Restorative Justice and Social Justice, where he is a member of the research sub-group exploring the interactions between restorative justice and social justice.

Thomas is also a strong advocate for creativity in education; having previously gained a Fine Art degree from Chelsea College of Art. This heavily influenced his educational leadership and during his time as a Head Teacher, he became the co-founder of a co-constructed initiative between the academy and the University of Oxford Gardens Libraries and Museums. This work placed cultural learning opportunities and relationships at the heart of the curriculum and is the longest standing project between a special school and The University of Oxford. This sustainable partnership champions marginalised voices and has been highly celebrated e.g., inclusion in the Durham Commission for Creativity in Education; recent dissemination at the Museum Ideas Conference 2022; highly commended award at the Museum and Heritage Awards 2021; and awarded Platinum ArtsMark in 2021.

Whilst this creative work may seem to be separate from restorative practice, Thomas subscribes to the idea that there are significant overlaps, both within pedagogical practice and wider school culture, topics which his current research touch on within the context of special education.

 

Publications

Procter-Legg. (2022). A Discourse on Restorative Practice—Participants’ Views of a Divergent Ideology. Laws11(6), 86–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11060086

Procter-Legg. (2022). Practitioner Perspectives on a Restorative Community: An Inductive Evaluative Study of Conceptual, Pedagogical, and Routine Practice. Laws11(1), 4–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11010004

 

Supervisors

Ian Thompson and Jason Todd

Ivan is currently serving as a Facilitator (Teaching) in the Vice-Chancellor’s Colloquium and as an Editor of the Graduate Inequality Review in the University of Oxford. He has taken up lecturerships in a number of universities in Hong Kong and has run Education, Linguistics, Applied Linguistics, Sociolinguistics, and Academic English courses at undergraduate and postgraduate level.

Prior to joining Oxford, Ivan received his teacher-training in Hong Kong and his postgraduate training in Linguistics (with a specialisation in pragmatics) at University College London. His research interests include: mental representation of word meanings, language acquisition, educational technology, and ELT pedagogy.

Publications

  • Au, I. (2021). Unwinding the Fantasy: Using Breakout Rooms to Promote Language Exposure and Less-Public Feedback Practices in Online Synchronous Teaching. Paper presented at the PASHE 2021 – EAP Education and Practice: Supporting Students’ Needs, UCL (IOE).
  • Au, I. & Yiu, C. (2021). ‘Identity game’: so you think you are what your Instagram bio says about you. Paper presented at the Sociolinguistics Symposium 23, Hong Kong.
  • Au, I. (2021). The magic of breakout rooms in online synchronous teaching and learning of English. Paper presented at the 3rd International Conference on English Across the Curriculum, Hong Kong.
  • Choi, T. H., Chan, H., & Au, I. (2018). ‘Now you’re talking’: Teacher preparation through alumni talks in a community of practice. Paper presented at the Oxford Education Research Symposium.
  • Au, I. (2018). Branching out from the tree: Extending vocabulary acquisition with polysemy. Paper presented at HKBU-HU First Joint Symposium on Education 2018.

 

Supervisors

Elizabeth Wonnacott and Victoria Murphy

Thomas Procter-Legg is a DPhil Student in the Department of Education and is researching restorative practice within the context of special educational needs and disabilities.

His previous experience includes five years as the Head Teacher of a special academy in Oxfordshire UK, specialising in education for students with Special Educational Needs and Disabilities. He has also worked as a SEND Reviewer for Whole School SEND; a Teaching School Director; and as the Principal Designate on a successful Free School bid.

Thomas is passionate about restorative practice and is involved in many communities of practice, such as the Global Alliance for Restorative Justice and Social Justice, where he is a member of the research sub-group exploring the interactions between restorative justice and social justice.

Thomas is also a strong advocate for creativity in education; having previously gained a Fine Art degree from Chelsea College of Art. This heavily influenced his educational leadership and during his time as a Head Teacher, he became the co-founder of a co-constructed initiative between the academy and the University of Oxford Gardens Libraries and Museums. This work placed cultural learning opportunities and relationships at the heart of the curriculum and is the longest standing project between a special school and The University of Oxford. This sustainable partnership champions marginalised voices and has been highly celebrated e.g., inclusion in the Durham Commission for Creativity in Education; recent dissemination at the Museum Ideas Conference 2022; highly commended award at the Museum and Heritage Awards 2021; and awarded Platinum ArtsMark in 2021.

Whilst this creative work may seem to be separate from restorative practice, Thomas subscribes to the idea that there are significant overlaps, both within pedagogical practice and wider school culture, topics which his current research touch on within the context of special education.

 

Publications

Procter-Legg. (2022). A Discourse on Restorative Practice—Participants’ Views of a Divergent Ideology. Laws11(6), 86–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11060086

Procter-Legg. (2022). Practitioner Perspectives on a Restorative Community: An Inductive Evaluative Study of Conceptual, Pedagogical, and Routine Practice. Laws11(1), 4–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11010004

 

Supervisors

Ian Thompson and Jason Todd

Ivan is currently serving as a Facilitator (Teaching) in the Vice-Chancellor’s Colloquium and as an Editor of the Graduate Inequality Review in the University of Oxford. He has taken up lecturerships in a number of universities in Hong Kong and has run Education, Linguistics, Applied Linguistics, Sociolinguistics, and Academic English courses at undergraduate and postgraduate level.

Prior to joining Oxford, Ivan received his teacher-training in Hong Kong and his postgraduate training in Linguistics (with a specialisation in pragmatics) at University College London. His research interests include: mental representation of word meanings, language acquisition, educational technology, and ELT pedagogy.

Publications

  • Au, I. (2021). Unwinding the Fantasy: Using Breakout Rooms to Promote Language Exposure and Less-Public Feedback Practices in Online Synchronous Teaching. Paper presented at the PASHE 2021 – EAP Education and Practice: Supporting Students’ Needs, UCL (IOE).
  • Au, I. & Yiu, C. (2021). ‘Identity game’: so you think you are what your Instagram bio says about you. Paper presented at the Sociolinguistics Symposium 23, Hong Kong.
  • Au, I. (2021). The magic of breakout rooms in online synchronous teaching and learning of English. Paper presented at the 3rd International Conference on English Across the Curriculum, Hong Kong.
  • Choi, T. H., Chan, H., & Au, I. (2018). ‘Now you’re talking’: Teacher preparation through alumni talks in a community of practice. Paper presented at the Oxford Education Research Symposium.
  • Au, I. (2018). Branching out from the tree: Extending vocabulary acquisition with polysemy. Paper presented at HKBU-HU First Joint Symposium on Education 2018.

 

Supervisors

Elizabeth Wonnacott and Victoria Murphy

Thomas Procter-Legg is a DPhil Student in the Department of Education and is researching restorative practice within the context of special educational needs and disabilities.

His previous experience includes five years as the Head Teacher of a special academy in Oxfordshire UK, specialising in education for students with Special Educational Needs and Disabilities. He has also worked as a SEND Reviewer for Whole School SEND; a Teaching School Director; and as the Principal Designate on a successful Free School bid.

Thomas is passionate about restorative practice and is involved in many communities of practice, such as the Global Alliance for Restorative Justice and Social Justice, where he is a member of the research sub-group exploring the interactions between restorative justice and social justice.

Thomas is also a strong advocate for creativity in education; having previously gained a Fine Art degree from Chelsea College of Art. This heavily influenced his educational leadership and during his time as a Head Teacher, he became the co-founder of a co-constructed initiative between the academy and the University of Oxford Gardens Libraries and Museums. This work placed cultural learning opportunities and relationships at the heart of the curriculum and is the longest standing project between a special school and The University of Oxford. This sustainable partnership champions marginalised voices and has been highly celebrated e.g., inclusion in the Durham Commission for Creativity in Education; recent dissemination at the Museum Ideas Conference 2022; highly commended award at the Museum and Heritage Awards 2021; and awarded Platinum ArtsMark in 2021.

Whilst this creative work may seem to be separate from restorative practice, Thomas subscribes to the idea that there are significant overlaps, both within pedagogical practice and wider school culture, topics which his current research touch on within the context of special education.

 

Publications

Procter-Legg. (2022). A Discourse on Restorative Practice—Participants’ Views of a Divergent Ideology. Laws11(6), 86–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11060086

Procter-Legg. (2022). Practitioner Perspectives on a Restorative Community: An Inductive Evaluative Study of Conceptual, Pedagogical, and Routine Practice. Laws11(1), 4–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11010004

 

Supervisors

Ian Thompson and Jason Todd

Ivan is currently serving as a Facilitator (Teaching) in the Vice-Chancellor’s Colloquium and as an Editor of the Graduate Inequality Review in the University of Oxford. He has taken up lecturerships in a number of universities in Hong Kong and has run Education, Linguistics, Applied Linguistics, Sociolinguistics, and Academic English courses at undergraduate and postgraduate level.

Prior to joining Oxford, Ivan received his teacher-training in Hong Kong and his postgraduate training in Linguistics (with a specialisation in pragmatics) at University College London. His research interests include: mental representation of word meanings, language acquisition, educational technology, and ELT pedagogy.

Publications

  • Au, I. (2021). Unwinding the Fantasy: Using Breakout Rooms to Promote Language Exposure and Less-Public Feedback Practices in Online Synchronous Teaching. Paper presented at the PASHE 2021 – EAP Education and Practice: Supporting Students’ Needs, UCL (IOE).
  • Au, I. & Yiu, C. (2021). ‘Identity game’: so you think you are what your Instagram bio says about you. Paper presented at the Sociolinguistics Symposium 23, Hong Kong.
  • Au, I. (2021). The magic of breakout rooms in online synchronous teaching and learning of English. Paper presented at the 3rd International Conference on English Across the Curriculum, Hong Kong.
  • Choi, T. H., Chan, H., & Au, I. (2018). ‘Now you’re talking’: Teacher preparation through alumni talks in a community of practice. Paper presented at the Oxford Education Research Symposium.
  • Au, I. (2018). Branching out from the tree: Extending vocabulary acquisition with polysemy. Paper presented at HKBU-HU First Joint Symposium on Education 2018.

 

Supervisors

Elizabeth Wonnacott and Victoria Murphy

Thomas Procter-Legg is a DPhil Student in the Department of Education and is researching restorative practice within the context of special educational needs and disabilities.

His previous experience includes five years as the Head Teacher of a special academy in Oxfordshire UK, specialising in education for students with Special Educational Needs and Disabilities. He has also worked as a SEND Reviewer for Whole School SEND; a Teaching School Director; and as the Principal Designate on a successful Free School bid.

Thomas is passionate about restorative practice and is involved in many communities of practice, such as the Global Alliance for Restorative Justice and Social Justice, where he is a member of the research sub-group exploring the interactions between restorative justice and social justice.

Thomas is also a strong advocate for creativity in education; having previously gained a Fine Art degree from Chelsea College of Art. This heavily influenced his educational leadership and during his time as a Head Teacher, he became the co-founder of a co-constructed initiative between the academy and the University of Oxford Gardens Libraries and Museums. This work placed cultural learning opportunities and relationships at the heart of the curriculum and is the longest standing project between a special school and The University of Oxford. This sustainable partnership champions marginalised voices and has been highly celebrated e.g., inclusion in the Durham Commission for Creativity in Education; recent dissemination at the Museum Ideas Conference 2022; highly commended award at the Museum and Heritage Awards 2021; and awarded Platinum ArtsMark in 2021.

Whilst this creative work may seem to be separate from restorative practice, Thomas subscribes to the idea that there are significant overlaps, both within pedagogical practice and wider school culture, topics which his current research touch on within the context of special education.

 

Publications

Procter-Legg. (2022). A Discourse on Restorative Practice—Participants’ Views of a Divergent Ideology. Laws11(6), 86–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11060086

Procter-Legg. (2022). Practitioner Perspectives on a Restorative Community: An Inductive Evaluative Study of Conceptual, Pedagogical, and Routine Practice. Laws11(1), 4–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11010004

 

Supervisors

Ian Thompson and Jason Todd

Ivan is currently serving as a Facilitator (Teaching) in the Vice-Chancellor’s Colloquium and as an Editor of the Graduate Inequality Review in the University of Oxford. He has taken up lecturerships in a number of universities in Hong Kong and has run Education, Linguistics, Applied Linguistics, Sociolinguistics, and Academic English courses at undergraduate and postgraduate level.

Prior to joining Oxford, Ivan received his teacher-training in Hong Kong and his postgraduate training in Linguistics (with a specialisation in pragmatics) at University College London. His research interests include: mental representation of word meanings, language acquisition, educational technology, and ELT pedagogy.

Publications

  • Au, I. (2021). Unwinding the Fantasy: Using Breakout Rooms to Promote Language Exposure and Less-Public Feedback Practices in Online Synchronous Teaching. Paper presented at the PASHE 2021 – EAP Education and Practice: Supporting Students’ Needs, UCL (IOE).
  • Au, I. & Yiu, C. (2021). ‘Identity game’: so you think you are what your Instagram bio says about you. Paper presented at the Sociolinguistics Symposium 23, Hong Kong.
  • Au, I. (2021). The magic of breakout rooms in online synchronous teaching and learning of English. Paper presented at the 3rd International Conference on English Across the Curriculum, Hong Kong.
  • Choi, T. H., Chan, H., & Au, I. (2018). ‘Now you’re talking’: Teacher preparation through alumni talks in a community of practice. Paper presented at the Oxford Education Research Symposium.
  • Au, I. (2018). Branching out from the tree: Extending vocabulary acquisition with polysemy. Paper presented at HKBU-HU First Joint Symposium on Education 2018.

 

Supervisors

Elizabeth Wonnacott and Victoria Murphy

Thomas Procter-Legg is a DPhil Student in the Department of Education and is researching restorative practice within the context of special educational needs and disabilities.

His previous experience includes five years as the Head Teacher of a special academy in Oxfordshire UK, specialising in education for students with Special Educational Needs and Disabilities. He has also worked as a SEND Reviewer for Whole School SEND; a Teaching School Director; and as the Principal Designate on a successful Free School bid.

Thomas is passionate about restorative practice and is involved in many communities of practice, such as the Global Alliance for Restorative Justice and Social Justice, where he is a member of the research sub-group exploring the interactions between restorative justice and social justice.

Thomas is also a strong advocate for creativity in education; having previously gained a Fine Art degree from Chelsea College of Art. This heavily influenced his educational leadership and during his time as a Head Teacher, he became the co-founder of a co-constructed initiative between the academy and the University of Oxford Gardens Libraries and Museums. This work placed cultural learning opportunities and relationships at the heart of the curriculum and is the longest standing project between a special school and The University of Oxford. This sustainable partnership champions marginalised voices and has been highly celebrated e.g., inclusion in the Durham Commission for Creativity in Education; recent dissemination at the Museum Ideas Conference 2022; highly commended award at the Museum and Heritage Awards 2021; and awarded Platinum ArtsMark in 2021.

Whilst this creative work may seem to be separate from restorative practice, Thomas subscribes to the idea that there are significant overlaps, both within pedagogical practice and wider school culture, topics which his current research touch on within the context of special education.

 

Publications

Procter-Legg. (2022). A Discourse on Restorative Practice—Participants’ Views of a Divergent Ideology. Laws11(6), 86–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11060086

Procter-Legg. (2022). Practitioner Perspectives on a Restorative Community: An Inductive Evaluative Study of Conceptual, Pedagogical, and Routine Practice. Laws11(1), 4–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11010004

 

Supervisors

Ian Thompson and Jason Todd

Ivan is currently serving as a Facilitator (Teaching) in the Vice-Chancellor’s Colloquium and as an Editor of the Graduate Inequality Review in the University of Oxford. He has taken up lecturerships in a number of universities in Hong Kong and has run Education, Linguistics, Applied Linguistics, Sociolinguistics, and Academic English courses at undergraduate and postgraduate level.

Prior to joining Oxford, Ivan received his teacher-training in Hong Kong and his postgraduate training in Linguistics (with a specialisation in pragmatics) at University College London. His research interests include: mental representation of word meanings, language acquisition, educational technology, and ELT pedagogy.

Publications

  • Au, I. (2021). Unwinding the Fantasy: Using Breakout Rooms to Promote Language Exposure and Less-Public Feedback Practices in Online Synchronous Teaching. Paper presented at the PASHE 2021 – EAP Education and Practice: Supporting Students’ Needs, UCL (IOE).
  • Au, I. & Yiu, C. (2021). ‘Identity game’: so you think you are what your Instagram bio says about you. Paper presented at the Sociolinguistics Symposium 23, Hong Kong.
  • Au, I. (2021). The magic of breakout rooms in online synchronous teaching and learning of English. Paper presented at the 3rd International Conference on English Across the Curriculum, Hong Kong.
  • Choi, T. H., Chan, H., & Au, I. (2018). ‘Now you’re talking’: Teacher preparation through alumni talks in a community of practice. Paper presented at the Oxford Education Research Symposium.
  • Au, I. (2018). Branching out from the tree: Extending vocabulary acquisition with polysemy. Paper presented at HKBU-HU First Joint Symposium on Education 2018.

 

Supervisors

Elizabeth Wonnacott and Victoria Murphy

Thomas Procter-Legg is a DPhil Student in the Department of Education and is researching restorative practice within the context of special educational needs and disabilities.

His previous experience includes five years as the Head Teacher of a special academy in Oxfordshire UK, specialising in education for students with Special Educational Needs and Disabilities. He has also worked as a SEND Reviewer for Whole School SEND; a Teaching School Director; and as the Principal Designate on a successful Free School bid.

Thomas is passionate about restorative practice and is involved in many communities of practice, such as the Global Alliance for Restorative Justice and Social Justice, where he is a member of the research sub-group exploring the interactions between restorative justice and social justice.

Thomas is also a strong advocate for creativity in education; having previously gained a Fine Art degree from Chelsea College of Art. This heavily influenced his educational leadership and during his time as a Head Teacher, he became the co-founder of a co-constructed initiative between the academy and the University of Oxford Gardens Libraries and Museums. This work placed cultural learning opportunities and relationships at the heart of the curriculum and is the longest standing project between a special school and The University of Oxford. This sustainable partnership champions marginalised voices and has been highly celebrated e.g., inclusion in the Durham Commission for Creativity in Education; recent dissemination at the Museum Ideas Conference 2022; highly commended award at the Museum and Heritage Awards 2021; and awarded Platinum ArtsMark in 2021.

Whilst this creative work may seem to be separate from restorative practice, Thomas subscribes to the idea that there are significant overlaps, both within pedagogical practice and wider school culture, topics which his current research touch on within the context of special education.

 

Publications

Procter-Legg. (2022). A Discourse on Restorative Practice—Participants’ Views of a Divergent Ideology. Laws11(6), 86–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11060086

Procter-Legg. (2022). Practitioner Perspectives on a Restorative Community: An Inductive Evaluative Study of Conceptual, Pedagogical, and Routine Practice. Laws11(1), 4–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11010004

 

Supervisors

Ian Thompson and Jason Todd

Ivan is currently serving as a Facilitator (Teaching) in the Vice-Chancellor’s Colloquium and as an Editor of the Graduate Inequality Review in the University of Oxford. He has taken up lecturerships in a number of universities in Hong Kong and has run Education, Linguistics, Applied Linguistics, Sociolinguistics, and Academic English courses at undergraduate and postgraduate level.

Prior to joining Oxford, Ivan received his teacher-training in Hong Kong and his postgraduate training in Linguistics (with a specialisation in pragmatics) at University College London. His research interests include: mental representation of word meanings, language acquisition, educational technology, and ELT pedagogy.

Publications

  • Au, I. (2021). Unwinding the Fantasy: Using Breakout Rooms to Promote Language Exposure and Less-Public Feedback Practices in Online Synchronous Teaching. Paper presented at the PASHE 2021 – EAP Education and Practice: Supporting Students’ Needs, UCL (IOE).
  • Au, I. & Yiu, C. (2021). ‘Identity game’: so you think you are what your Instagram bio says about you. Paper presented at the Sociolinguistics Symposium 23, Hong Kong.
  • Au, I. (2021). The magic of breakout rooms in online synchronous teaching and learning of English. Paper presented at the 3rd International Conference on English Across the Curriculum, Hong Kong.
  • Choi, T. H., Chan, H., & Au, I. (2018). ‘Now you’re talking’: Teacher preparation through alumni talks in a community of practice. Paper presented at the Oxford Education Research Symposium.
  • Au, I. (2018). Branching out from the tree: Extending vocabulary acquisition with polysemy. Paper presented at HKBU-HU First Joint Symposium on Education 2018.

 

Supervisors

Elizabeth Wonnacott and Victoria Murphy

Thomas Procter-Legg is a DPhil Student in the Department of Education and is researching restorative practice within the context of special educational needs and disabilities.

His previous experience includes five years as the Head Teacher of a special academy in Oxfordshire UK, specialising in education for students with Special Educational Needs and Disabilities. He has also worked as a SEND Reviewer for Whole School SEND; a Teaching School Director; and as the Principal Designate on a successful Free School bid.

Thomas is passionate about restorative practice and is involved in many communities of practice, such as the Global Alliance for Restorative Justice and Social Justice, where he is a member of the research sub-group exploring the interactions between restorative justice and social justice.

Thomas is also a strong advocate for creativity in education; having previously gained a Fine Art degree from Chelsea College of Art. This heavily influenced his educational leadership and during his time as a Head Teacher, he became the co-founder of a co-constructed initiative between the academy and the University of Oxford Gardens Libraries and Museums. This work placed cultural learning opportunities and relationships at the heart of the curriculum and is the longest standing project between a special school and The University of Oxford. This sustainable partnership champions marginalised voices and has been highly celebrated e.g., inclusion in the Durham Commission for Creativity in Education; recent dissemination at the Museum Ideas Conference 2022; highly commended award at the Museum and Heritage Awards 2021; and awarded Platinum ArtsMark in 2021.

Whilst this creative work may seem to be separate from restorative practice, Thomas subscribes to the idea that there are significant overlaps, both within pedagogical practice and wider school culture, topics which his current research touch on within the context of special education.

 

Publications

Procter-Legg. (2022). A Discourse on Restorative Practice—Participants’ Views of a Divergent Ideology. Laws11(6), 86–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11060086

Procter-Legg. (2022). Practitioner Perspectives on a Restorative Community: An Inductive Evaluative Study of Conceptual, Pedagogical, and Routine Practice. Laws11(1), 4–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11010004

 

Supervisors

Ian Thompson and Jason Todd

Ivan is currently serving as a Facilitator (Teaching) in the Vice-Chancellor’s Colloquium and as an Editor of the Graduate Inequality Review in the University of Oxford. He has taken up lecturerships in a number of universities in Hong Kong and has run Education, Linguistics, Applied Linguistics, Sociolinguistics, and Academic English courses at undergraduate and postgraduate level.

Prior to joining Oxford, Ivan received his teacher-training in Hong Kong and his postgraduate training in Linguistics (with a specialisation in pragmatics) at University College London. His research interests include: mental representation of word meanings, language acquisition, educational technology, and ELT pedagogy.

Publications

  • Au, I. (2021). Unwinding the Fantasy: Using Breakout Rooms to Promote Language Exposure and Less-Public Feedback Practices in Online Synchronous Teaching. Paper presented at the PASHE 2021 – EAP Education and Practice: Supporting Students’ Needs, UCL (IOE).
  • Au, I. & Yiu, C. (2021). ‘Identity game’: so you think you are what your Instagram bio says about you. Paper presented at the Sociolinguistics Symposium 23, Hong Kong.
  • Au, I. (2021). The magic of breakout rooms in online synchronous teaching and learning of English. Paper presented at the 3rd International Conference on English Across the Curriculum, Hong Kong.
  • Choi, T. H., Chan, H., & Au, I. (2018). ‘Now you’re talking’: Teacher preparation through alumni talks in a community of practice. Paper presented at the Oxford Education Research Symposium.
  • Au, I. (2018). Branching out from the tree: Extending vocabulary acquisition with polysemy. Paper presented at HKBU-HU First Joint Symposium on Education 2018.

 

Supervisors

Elizabeth Wonnacott and Victoria Murphy

Thomas Procter-Legg is a DPhil Student in the Department of Education and is researching restorative practice within the context of special educational needs and disabilities.

His previous experience includes five years as the Head Teacher of a special academy in Oxfordshire UK, specialising in education for students with Special Educational Needs and Disabilities. He has also worked as a SEND Reviewer for Whole School SEND; a Teaching School Director; and as the Principal Designate on a successful Free School bid.

Thomas is passionate about restorative practice and is involved in many communities of practice, such as the Global Alliance for Restorative Justice and Social Justice, where he is a member of the research sub-group exploring the interactions between restorative justice and social justice.

Thomas is also a strong advocate for creativity in education; having previously gained a Fine Art degree from Chelsea College of Art. This heavily influenced his educational leadership and during his time as a Head Teacher, he became the co-founder of a co-constructed initiative between the academy and the University of Oxford Gardens Libraries and Museums. This work placed cultural learning opportunities and relationships at the heart of the curriculum and is the longest standing project between a special school and The University of Oxford. This sustainable partnership champions marginalised voices and has been highly celebrated e.g., inclusion in the Durham Commission for Creativity in Education; recent dissemination at the Museum Ideas Conference 2022; highly commended award at the Museum and Heritage Awards 2021; and awarded Platinum ArtsMark in 2021.

Whilst this creative work may seem to be separate from restorative practice, Thomas subscribes to the idea that there are significant overlaps, both within pedagogical practice and wider school culture, topics which his current research touch on within the context of special education.

 

Publications

Procter-Legg. (2022). A Discourse on Restorative Practice—Participants’ Views of a Divergent Ideology. Laws11(6), 86–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11060086

Procter-Legg. (2022). Practitioner Perspectives on a Restorative Community: An Inductive Evaluative Study of Conceptual, Pedagogical, and Routine Practice. Laws11(1), 4–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11010004

 

Supervisors

Ian Thompson and Jason Todd

Ivan is currently serving as a Facilitator (Teaching) in the Vice-Chancellor’s Colloquium and as an Editor of the Graduate Inequality Review in the University of Oxford. He has taken up lecturerships in a number of universities in Hong Kong and has run Education, Linguistics, Applied Linguistics, Sociolinguistics, and Academic English courses at undergraduate and postgraduate level.

Prior to joining Oxford, Ivan received his teacher-training in Hong Kong and his postgraduate training in Linguistics (with a specialisation in pragmatics) at University College London. His research interests include: mental representation of word meanings, language acquisition, educational technology, and ELT pedagogy.

Publications

  • Au, I. (2021). Unwinding the Fantasy: Using Breakout Rooms to Promote Language Exposure and Less-Public Feedback Practices in Online Synchronous Teaching. Paper presented at the PASHE 2021 – EAP Education and Practice: Supporting Students’ Needs, UCL (IOE).
  • Au, I. & Yiu, C. (2021). ‘Identity game’: so you think you are what your Instagram bio says about you. Paper presented at the Sociolinguistics Symposium 23, Hong Kong.
  • Au, I. (2021). The magic of breakout rooms in online synchronous teaching and learning of English. Paper presented at the 3rd International Conference on English Across the Curriculum, Hong Kong.
  • Choi, T. H., Chan, H., & Au, I. (2018). ‘Now you’re talking’: Teacher preparation through alumni talks in a community of practice. Paper presented at the Oxford Education Research Symposium.
  • Au, I. (2018). Branching out from the tree: Extending vocabulary acquisition with polysemy. Paper presented at HKBU-HU First Joint Symposium on Education 2018.

 

Supervisors

Elizabeth Wonnacott and Victoria Murphy

Thomas Procter-Legg is a DPhil Student in the Department of Education and is researching restorative practice within the context of special educational needs and disabilities.

His previous experience includes five years as the Head Teacher of a special academy in Oxfordshire UK, specialising in education for students with Special Educational Needs and Disabilities. He has also worked as a SEND Reviewer for Whole School SEND; a Teaching School Director; and as the Principal Designate on a successful Free School bid.

Thomas is passionate about restorative practice and is involved in many communities of practice, such as the Global Alliance for Restorative Justice and Social Justice, where he is a member of the research sub-group exploring the interactions between restorative justice and social justice.

Thomas is also a strong advocate for creativity in education; having previously gained a Fine Art degree from Chelsea College of Art. This heavily influenced his educational leadership and during his time as a Head Teacher, he became the co-founder of a co-constructed initiative between the academy and the University of Oxford Gardens Libraries and Museums. This work placed cultural learning opportunities and relationships at the heart of the curriculum and is the longest standing project between a special school and The University of Oxford. This sustainable partnership champions marginalised voices and has been highly celebrated e.g., inclusion in the Durham Commission for Creativity in Education; recent dissemination at the Museum Ideas Conference 2022; highly commended award at the Museum and Heritage Awards 2021; and awarded Platinum ArtsMark in 2021.

Whilst this creative work may seem to be separate from restorative practice, Thomas subscribes to the idea that there are significant overlaps, both within pedagogical practice and wider school culture, topics which his current research touch on within the context of special education.

 

Publications

Procter-Legg. (2022). A Discourse on Restorative Practice—Participants’ Views of a Divergent Ideology. Laws11(6), 86–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11060086

Procter-Legg. (2022). Practitioner Perspectives on a Restorative Community: An Inductive Evaluative Study of Conceptual, Pedagogical, and Routine Practice. Laws11(1), 4–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11010004

 

Supervisors

Ian Thompson and Jason Todd

Ivan is currently serving as a Facilitator (Teaching) in the Vice-Chancellor’s Colloquium and as an Editor of the Graduate Inequality Review in the University of Oxford. He has taken up lecturerships in a number of universities in Hong Kong and has run Education, Linguistics, Applied Linguistics, Sociolinguistics, and Academic English courses at undergraduate and postgraduate level.

Prior to joining Oxford, Ivan received his teacher-training in Hong Kong and his postgraduate training in Linguistics (with a specialisation in pragmatics) at University College London. His research interests include: mental representation of word meanings, language acquisition, educational technology, and ELT pedagogy.

Publications

  • Au, I. (2021). Unwinding the Fantasy: Using Breakout Rooms to Promote Language Exposure and Less-Public Feedback Practices in Online Synchronous Teaching. Paper presented at the PASHE 2021 – EAP Education and Practice: Supporting Students’ Needs, UCL (IOE).
  • Au, I. & Yiu, C. (2021). ‘Identity game’: so you think you are what your Instagram bio says about you. Paper presented at the Sociolinguistics Symposium 23, Hong Kong.
  • Au, I. (2021). The magic of breakout rooms in online synchronous teaching and learning of English. Paper presented at the 3rd International Conference on English Across the Curriculum, Hong Kong.
  • Choi, T. H., Chan, H., & Au, I. (2018). ‘Now you’re talking’: Teacher preparation through alumni talks in a community of practice. Paper presented at the Oxford Education Research Symposium.
  • Au, I. (2018). Branching out from the tree: Extending vocabulary acquisition with polysemy. Paper presented at HKBU-HU First Joint Symposium on Education 2018.

 

Supervisors

Elizabeth Wonnacott and Victoria Murphy

Thomas Procter-Legg is a DPhil Student in the Department of Education and is researching restorative practice within the context of special educational needs and disabilities.

His previous experience includes five years as the Head Teacher of a special academy in Oxfordshire UK, specialising in education for students with Special Educational Needs and Disabilities. He has also worked as a SEND Reviewer for Whole School SEND; a Teaching School Director; and as the Principal Designate on a successful Free School bid.

Thomas is passionate about restorative practice and is involved in many communities of practice, such as the Global Alliance for Restorative Justice and Social Justice, where he is a member of the research sub-group exploring the interactions between restorative justice and social justice.

Thomas is also a strong advocate for creativity in education; having previously gained a Fine Art degree from Chelsea College of Art. This heavily influenced his educational leadership and during his time as a Head Teacher, he became the co-founder of a co-constructed initiative between the academy and the University of Oxford Gardens Libraries and Museums. This work placed cultural learning opportunities and relationships at the heart of the curriculum and is the longest standing project between a special school and The University of Oxford. This sustainable partnership champions marginalised voices and has been highly celebrated e.g., inclusion in the Durham Commission for Creativity in Education; recent dissemination at the Museum Ideas Conference 2022; highly commended award at the Museum and Heritage Awards 2021; and awarded Platinum ArtsMark in 2021.

Whilst this creative work may seem to be separate from restorative practice, Thomas subscribes to the idea that there are significant overlaps, both within pedagogical practice and wider school culture, topics which his current research touch on within the context of special education.

 

Publications

Procter-Legg. (2022). A Discourse on Restorative Practice—Participants’ Views of a Divergent Ideology. Laws11(6), 86–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11060086

Procter-Legg. (2022). Practitioner Perspectives on a Restorative Community: An Inductive Evaluative Study of Conceptual, Pedagogical, and Routine Practice. Laws11(1), 4–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11010004

 

Supervisors

Ian Thompson and Jason Todd

Ivan is currently serving as a Facilitator (Teaching) in the Vice-Chancellor’s Colloquium and as an Editor of the Graduate Inequality Review in the University of Oxford. He has taken up lecturerships in a number of universities in Hong Kong and has run Education, Linguistics, Applied Linguistics, Sociolinguistics, and Academic English courses at undergraduate and postgraduate level.

Prior to joining Oxford, Ivan received his teacher-training in Hong Kong and his postgraduate training in Linguistics (with a specialisation in pragmatics) at University College London. His research interests include: mental representation of word meanings, language acquisition, educational technology, and ELT pedagogy.

Publications

  • Au, I. (2021). Unwinding the Fantasy: Using Breakout Rooms to Promote Language Exposure and Less-Public Feedback Practices in Online Synchronous Teaching. Paper presented at the PASHE 2021 – EAP Education and Practice: Supporting Students’ Needs, UCL (IOE).
  • Au, I. & Yiu, C. (2021). ‘Identity game’: so you think you are what your Instagram bio says about you. Paper presented at the Sociolinguistics Symposium 23, Hong Kong.
  • Au, I. (2021). The magic of breakout rooms in online synchronous teaching and learning of English. Paper presented at the 3rd International Conference on English Across the Curriculum, Hong Kong.
  • Choi, T. H., Chan, H., & Au, I. (2018). ‘Now you’re talking’: Teacher preparation through alumni talks in a community of practice. Paper presented at the Oxford Education Research Symposium.
  • Au, I. (2018). Branching out from the tree: Extending vocabulary acquisition with polysemy. Paper presented at HKBU-HU First Joint Symposium on Education 2018.

 

Supervisors

Elizabeth Wonnacott and Victoria Murphy

Thomas Procter-Legg is a DPhil Student in the Department of Education and is researching restorative practice within the context of special educational needs and disabilities.

His previous experience includes five years as the Head Teacher of a special academy in Oxfordshire UK, specialising in education for students with Special Educational Needs and Disabilities. He has also worked as a SEND Reviewer for Whole School SEND; a Teaching School Director; and as the Principal Designate on a successful Free School bid.

Thomas is passionate about restorative practice and is involved in many communities of practice, such as the Global Alliance for Restorative Justice and Social Justice, where he is a member of the research sub-group exploring the interactions between restorative justice and social justice.

Thomas is also a strong advocate for creativity in education; having previously gained a Fine Art degree from Chelsea College of Art. This heavily influenced his educational leadership and during his time as a Head Teacher, he became the co-founder of a co-constructed initiative between the academy and the University of Oxford Gardens Libraries and Museums. This work placed cultural learning opportunities and relationships at the heart of the curriculum and is the longest standing project between a special school and The University of Oxford. This sustainable partnership champions marginalised voices and has been highly celebrated e.g., inclusion in the Durham Commission for Creativity in Education; recent dissemination at the Museum Ideas Conference 2022; highly commended award at the Museum and Heritage Awards 2021; and awarded Platinum ArtsMark in 2021.

Whilst this creative work may seem to be separate from restorative practice, Thomas subscribes to the idea that there are significant overlaps, both within pedagogical practice and wider school culture, topics which his current research touch on within the context of special education.

 

Publications

Procter-Legg. (2022). A Discourse on Restorative Practice—Participants’ Views of a Divergent Ideology. Laws11(6), 86–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11060086

Procter-Legg. (2022). Practitioner Perspectives on a Restorative Community: An Inductive Evaluative Study of Conceptual, Pedagogical, and Routine Practice. Laws11(1), 4–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11010004

 

Supervisors

Ian Thompson and Jason Todd

Ivan is currently serving as a Facilitator (Teaching) in the Vice-Chancellor’s Colloquium and as an Editor of the Graduate Inequality Review in the University of Oxford. He has taken up lecturerships in a number of universities in Hong Kong and has run Education, Linguistics, Applied Linguistics, Sociolinguistics, and Academic English courses at undergraduate and postgraduate level.

Prior to joining Oxford, Ivan received his teacher-training in Hong Kong and his postgraduate training in Linguistics (with a specialisation in pragmatics) at University College London. His research interests include: mental representation of word meanings, language acquisition, educational technology, and ELT pedagogy.

Publications

  • Au, I. (2021). Unwinding the Fantasy: Using Breakout Rooms to Promote Language Exposure and Less-Public Feedback Practices in Online Synchronous Teaching. Paper presented at the PASHE 2021 – EAP Education and Practice: Supporting Students’ Needs, UCL (IOE).
  • Au, I. & Yiu, C. (2021). ‘Identity game’: so you think you are what your Instagram bio says about you. Paper presented at the Sociolinguistics Symposium 23, Hong Kong.
  • Au, I. (2021). The magic of breakout rooms in online synchronous teaching and learning of English. Paper presented at the 3rd International Conference on English Across the Curriculum, Hong Kong.
  • Choi, T. H., Chan, H., & Au, I. (2018). ‘Now you’re talking’: Teacher preparation through alumni talks in a community of practice. Paper presented at the Oxford Education Research Symposium.
  • Au, I. (2018). Branching out from the tree: Extending vocabulary acquisition with polysemy. Paper presented at HKBU-HU First Joint Symposium on Education 2018.

 

Supervisors

Elizabeth Wonnacott and Victoria Murphy

Thomas Procter-Legg is a DPhil Student in the Department of Education and is researching restorative practice within the context of special educational needs and disabilities.

His previous experience includes five years as the Head Teacher of a special academy in Oxfordshire UK, specialising in education for students with Special Educational Needs and Disabilities. He has also worked as a SEND Reviewer for Whole School SEND; a Teaching School Director; and as the Principal Designate on a successful Free School bid.

Thomas is passionate about restorative practice and is involved in many communities of practice, such as the Global Alliance for Restorative Justice and Social Justice, where he is a member of the research sub-group exploring the interactions between restorative justice and social justice.

Thomas is also a strong advocate for creativity in education; having previously gained a Fine Art degree from Chelsea College of Art. This heavily influenced his educational leadership and during his time as a Head Teacher, he became the co-founder of a co-constructed initiative between the academy and the University of Oxford Gardens Libraries and Museums. This work placed cultural learning opportunities and relationships at the heart of the curriculum and is the longest standing project between a special school and The University of Oxford. This sustainable partnership champions marginalised voices and has been highly celebrated e.g., inclusion in the Durham Commission for Creativity in Education; recent dissemination at the Museum Ideas Conference 2022; highly commended award at the Museum and Heritage Awards 2021; and awarded Platinum ArtsMark in 2021.

Whilst this creative work may seem to be separate from restorative practice, Thomas subscribes to the idea that there are significant overlaps, both within pedagogical practice and wider school culture, topics which his current research touch on within the context of special education.

 

Publications

Procter-Legg. (2022). A Discourse on Restorative Practice—Participants’ Views of a Divergent Ideology. Laws11(6), 86–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11060086

Procter-Legg. (2022). Practitioner Perspectives on a Restorative Community: An Inductive Evaluative Study of Conceptual, Pedagogical, and Routine Practice. Laws11(1), 4–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11010004

 

Supervisors

Ian Thompson and Jason Todd

Ivan is currently serving as a Facilitator (Teaching) in the Vice-Chancellor’s Colloquium and as an Editor of the Graduate Inequality Review in the University of Oxford. He has taken up lecturerships in a number of universities in Hong Kong and has run Education, Linguistics, Applied Linguistics, Sociolinguistics, and Academic English courses at undergraduate and postgraduate level.

Prior to joining Oxford, Ivan received his teacher-training in Hong Kong and his postgraduate training in Linguistics (with a specialisation in pragmatics) at University College London. His research interests include: mental representation of word meanings, language acquisition, educational technology, and ELT pedagogy.

Publications

  • Au, I. (2021). Unwinding the Fantasy: Using Breakout Rooms to Promote Language Exposure and Less-Public Feedback Practices in Online Synchronous Teaching. Paper presented at the PASHE 2021 – EAP Education and Practice: Supporting Students’ Needs, UCL (IOE).
  • Au, I. & Yiu, C. (2021). ‘Identity game’: so you think you are what your Instagram bio says about you. Paper presented at the Sociolinguistics Symposium 23, Hong Kong.
  • Au, I. (2021). The magic of breakout rooms in online synchronous teaching and learning of English. Paper presented at the 3rd International Conference on English Across the Curriculum, Hong Kong.
  • Choi, T. H., Chan, H., & Au, I. (2018). ‘Now you’re talking’: Teacher preparation through alumni talks in a community of practice. Paper presented at the Oxford Education Research Symposium.
  • Au, I. (2018). Branching out from the tree: Extending vocabulary acquisition with polysemy. Paper presented at HKBU-HU First Joint Symposium on Education 2018.

 

Supervisors

Elizabeth Wonnacott and Victoria Murphy

Thomas Procter-Legg is a DPhil Student in the Department of Education and is researching restorative practice within the context of special educational needs and disabilities.

His previous experience includes five years as the Head Teacher of a special academy in Oxfordshire UK, specialising in education for students with Special Educational Needs and Disabilities. He has also worked as a SEND Reviewer for Whole School SEND; a Teaching School Director; and as the Principal Designate on a successful Free School bid.

Thomas is passionate about restorative practice and is involved in many communities of practice, such as the Global Alliance for Restorative Justice and Social Justice, where he is a member of the research sub-group exploring the interactions between restorative justice and social justice.

Thomas is also a strong advocate for creativity in education; having previously gained a Fine Art degree from Chelsea College of Art. This heavily influenced his educational leadership and during his time as a Head Teacher, he became the co-founder of a co-constructed initiative between the academy and the University of Oxford Gardens Libraries and Museums. This work placed cultural learning opportunities and relationships at the heart of the curriculum and is the longest standing project between a special school and The University of Oxford. This sustainable partnership champions marginalised voices and has been highly celebrated e.g., inclusion in the Durham Commission for Creativity in Education; recent dissemination at the Museum Ideas Conference 2022; highly commended award at the Museum and Heritage Awards 2021; and awarded Platinum ArtsMark in 2021.

Whilst this creative work may seem to be separate from restorative practice, Thomas subscribes to the idea that there are significant overlaps, both within pedagogical practice and wider school culture, topics which his current research touch on within the context of special education.

 

Publications

Procter-Legg. (2022). A Discourse on Restorative Practice—Participants’ Views of a Divergent Ideology. Laws11(6), 86–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11060086

Procter-Legg. (2022). Practitioner Perspectives on a Restorative Community: An Inductive Evaluative Study of Conceptual, Pedagogical, and Routine Practice. Laws11(1), 4–. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws11010004

 

Supervisors

Ian Thompson and Jason Todd

Ivan is currently serving as a Facilitator (Teaching) in the Vice-Chancellor’s Colloquium and as an Editor of the Graduate Inequality Review in the University of Oxford. He has taken up lecturerships in a number of universities in Hong Kong and has run Education, Linguistics, Applied Linguistics, Sociolinguistics, and Academic English courses at undergraduate and postgraduate level.

Prior to joining Oxford, Ivan received his teacher-training in Hong Kong and his postgraduate training in Linguistics (with a specialisation in pragmatics) at University College London. His research interests include: mental representation of word meanings, language acquisition, educational technology, and ELT pedagogy.

Publications

  • Au, I. (2021). Unwinding the Fantasy: Using Breakout Rooms to Promote Language Exposure and Less-Public Feedback Practices in Online Synchronous Teaching. Paper presented at the PASHE 2021 – EAP Education and Practice: Supporting Students’ Needs, UCL (IOE).
  • Au, I. & Yiu, C. (2021). ‘Identity game’: so you think you are what your Instagram bio says about you. Paper presented at the Sociolinguistics Symposium 23, Hong Kong.
  • Au, I. (2021). The magic of breakout rooms in online synchronous teaching and learning of English. Paper presented at the 3rd International Conference on Engli