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Department of Education

Viewing archives for Lady Margaret Hall

Pat is the Deputy Chief Executive of a large College Group.

A qualified accountant, she is accountable to the Corporation Board for the Group’s Estate, sustainability and for maintaining the Group’s outstanding financial health grade. Her specialisms include Leadership and Management, Identification and Application of Funding Streams as well as leading the Group in new acquisitions, ventures and developments. Pat is using her vast experience of public sector finances to explore the intersection of accounting, leadership and purpose.

Supervisors

James Robson and Ariel Lindorff

Alice received her Master’s in Child Study and Education from the Institute of Child Study at the University of Toronto. She has taught preschool through higher education as a teacher and principal in public and private schools in North America and Europe. Deeply committed to enhancing education, she believes in learning that connects students and teachers to the natural world and to their communities. She is actively involved in community organisations that promote intercultural, interracial, and interfaith understanding and allyship.

Supervisors

Steve Puttick

Victoria is an educational researcher and practitioner, specialising in educational support and methodology of teaching mathematics to low-achieving students. For over 9 years she has been working at Big Change Educational Centre (Moscow) which provides support to looked-after children.

Before joining the DPhil programme, she completed her undergraduate degree in Finance at Financial University in Moscow and then gained a MSc in Psychology of Education from the University of Bristol.

Victoria’s current research focuses on educational issues of care-experienced children and teaching mathematics to students of low achievement and motivation.

Supervisors

Karen Skilling and Gabriel Stylianides

Louise was born and raised in Glasgow and moved to Oxford to pursue a DPhil in Education.

Louise’s research interests are education policy, particularly higher education policy, as well as qualitative research into the experiences of students in higher education and reducing inequalities in access to higher education. Louise is also interested in educational capabilities, educational purpose, aspirations and philosophical debates about knowledge construction and co-construction. Louise has a First Class BA (Joint Honours) in Social Policy and Education from the University of Strathclyde, and two Masters degrees with Distinction also from the University of Strathclyde in Applied Educational and Social Research and Social Policy (Research Methods). Louise also participated in the University of Oxford’s UNIQ+ Graduate Access Programme in the summer of 2022, where she worked at the Department of Sociology with Melinda Mills, Bo Zhao and Evelina Akimova on research into the impact of socio-economic status on inequalities in access to veterinary care in Scotland. Louise’s DPhil thesis is interested in evaluating Lorella Terzi’s educational capabilities framework through the lens of contemporary higher education in order to gain an understanding of what graduate capabilities are identified by students and stakeholders as being necessary for enabling graduates to successfully thrive and adapt in a post-pandemic society.

 

Supervisors

Alis Oancea and Kelsey Inouye

Motema studied Neuroscience as an undergraduate at Dartmouth College in the USA and it is one of its courses, found interest in Education.

Motema then worked for various non-profit organisations in Lesotho and South Africa focusing on helping high school students from low SES backgrounds access opportunities to study in HE. In her Masters’ project Motema analysed Lesotho’s 2009 Curriculum and Assessment Policy. This analysis’ findings brought Motema to her current research interests which include gendered STEM education and decolonisation of education policies and curricula in Lesotho. For her DPhil project, Motema is interested in finding out the lived experiences of female Science teachers in Lesotho Secondary Schools especially focusing on the major changes in the Secondary school education system in Lesotho that have happened in the past five years as unique meeting points.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Judith Hillier

Danielle is a DPhil student researching how Black-British doctoral students navigate the spaces of the elite, providing a new theoretical framework to understand their agency better.

Her main interests are in Human Flourishing, Cultural Geography, Psychology, and Justice, and her work aims to inform and reform educational frameworks and practices.

Following Danielle’s BSc in Psychology and MRes in Research Methods in Psychology, she founded a social enterprise that merges psychological and academic strategies to guide undergraduate and master’s students study practices. In addition to this, Danielle provided pedagogical and behavioural support across SEN college, secondary and primary schools.

Some of Danielle’s notable work includes her research introducing a new University-wide EDI strategy at her former Higher Education institution, presenting insights and way-forwards on youth homelessness to HRH Prince Williams, and providing discipleship to next-gen leaders.

Dan is a part-time DPhil Education student whose research focuses on investigating reasons why individuals choose to study and then teach physics as a subject discipline and how these relate to issues of equity and power. He previously worked as a secondary school physics teacher in the West Midlands of England for around 15 years before taking up his current post as Associate Professor of Physics Education at the University of Birmingham where he works in widening participation in physics and teacher education.

Publications
  • Cottle, D 2022, ‘Harnessing the potential of recently retired physics teachers to mentor new physics teachers’, Physics Education, vol. 57, no. 1, 015020. https://doi.org/10.1088/1361-6552/ac3931
  • Cottle, D 2021, ‘Improving students’ mathematical skills in secondary science: ideas from mathematics pedagogy’, School Science Review, vol. 102, no. 381, pp. 61-64. <https://www.ase.org.uk/resources/school-science-review/issue-381/improving-students-mathematical-skills-in-secondary>
  • Cottle, D 2021, ‘The effects of Covid-19 on student transition from school to university in STEM subjects’, New Directions in the Teaching of Physical Sciences, vol. 16, no. 1, 3847, pp. 1-4. https://doi.org/10.29311/ndtps.v0i14.3847 
  • Cottle, D & Marshall, R 2016, ‘Exploring electrical resistance: a novel kinesthetic model helps to resolve some misconceptions’, Physics Education, vol. 51, no. 5. https://doi.org/10.1088/0031-9120/51/5/054004 

Chris is a third-year part time DPhil student. He is an experienced Director of Children’s Services working in London. He is interested in path dependence and whether it is a helpful concept to understand how children’s services work.

Yaoyao is a DPhil student in Education at Oxford.

Her research interest lies in Aptitude-Instruction-Interaction (ATI) in second language acquisition (SLA).

Yaoyao’s research investigates the mediating effects of individual differences in learners’ domain-general perceptual-cognitive abilities in instructed foreign language pronunciation acquisition in adulthood. She aims to further explore how aptitude hinders instructional effectiveness and help all students make the most of instruction regardless of aptitude profiles.

Yaoyao started her BA in the Japanese Language and Literature at Sun Yat-Sen University (中山大学) in China. She then moved to the University of Queensland to finish her BA with double majors in Japanese and Translation. After her BA, she worked as an English teacher in China for three years. Prior to her DPhil studies at Oxford, Yaoyao completed her Master’s degree in TESOL at Institute of Education, University College London. Her Master’s dissertation was supervised by Dr Kazuya Saito.

Pat is the Deputy Chief Executive of a large College Group.

A qualified accountant, she is accountable to the Corporation Board for the Group’s Estate, sustainability and for maintaining the Group’s outstanding financial health grade. Her specialisms include Leadership and Management, Identification and Application of Funding Streams as well as leading the Group in new acquisitions, ventures and developments. Pat is using her vast experience of public sector finances to explore the intersection of accounting, leadership and purpose.

Supervisors

James Robson and Ariel Lindorff

Alice received her Master’s in Child Study and Education from the Institute of Child Study at the University of Toronto. She has taught preschool through higher education as a teacher and principal in public and private schools in North America and Europe. Deeply committed to enhancing education, she believes in learning that connects students and teachers to the natural world and to their communities. She is actively involved in community organisations that promote intercultural, interracial, and interfaith understanding and allyship.

Supervisors

Steve Puttick

Victoria is an educational researcher and practitioner, specialising in educational support and methodology of teaching mathematics to low-achieving students. For over 9 years she has been working at Big Change Educational Centre (Moscow) which provides support to looked-after children.

Before joining the DPhil programme, she completed her undergraduate degree in Finance at Financial University in Moscow and then gained a MSc in Psychology of Education from the University of Bristol.

Victoria’s current research focuses on educational issues of care-experienced children and teaching mathematics to students of low achievement and motivation.

Supervisors

Karen Skilling and Gabriel Stylianides

Louise was born and raised in Glasgow and moved to Oxford to pursue a DPhil in Education.

Louise’s research interests are education policy, particularly higher education policy, as well as qualitative research into the experiences of students in higher education and reducing inequalities in access to higher education. Louise is also interested in educational capabilities, educational purpose, aspirations and philosophical debates about knowledge construction and co-construction. Louise has a First Class BA (Joint Honours) in Social Policy and Education from the University of Strathclyde, and two Masters degrees with Distinction also from the University of Strathclyde in Applied Educational and Social Research and Social Policy (Research Methods). Louise also participated in the University of Oxford’s UNIQ+ Graduate Access Programme in the summer of 2022, where she worked at the Department of Sociology with Melinda Mills, Bo Zhao and Evelina Akimova on research into the impact of socio-economic status on inequalities in access to veterinary care in Scotland. Louise’s DPhil thesis is interested in evaluating Lorella Terzi’s educational capabilities framework through the lens of contemporary higher education in order to gain an understanding of what graduate capabilities are identified by students and stakeholders as being necessary for enabling graduates to successfully thrive and adapt in a post-pandemic society.

 

Supervisors

Alis Oancea and Kelsey Inouye

Motema studied Neuroscience as an undergraduate at Dartmouth College in the USA and it is one of its courses, found interest in Education.

Motema then worked for various non-profit organisations in Lesotho and South Africa focusing on helping high school students from low SES backgrounds access opportunities to study in HE. In her Masters’ project Motema analysed Lesotho’s 2009 Curriculum and Assessment Policy. This analysis’ findings brought Motema to her current research interests which include gendered STEM education and decolonisation of education policies and curricula in Lesotho. For her DPhil project, Motema is interested in finding out the lived experiences of female Science teachers in Lesotho Secondary Schools especially focusing on the major changes in the Secondary school education system in Lesotho that have happened in the past five years as unique meeting points.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Judith Hillier

Danielle is a DPhil student researching how Black-British doctoral students navigate the spaces of the elite, providing a new theoretical framework to understand their agency better.

Her main interests are in Human Flourishing, Cultural Geography, Psychology, and Justice, and her work aims to inform and reform educational frameworks and practices.

Following Danielle’s BSc in Psychology and MRes in Research Methods in Psychology, she founded a social enterprise that merges psychological and academic strategies to guide undergraduate and master’s students study practices. In addition to this, Danielle provided pedagogical and behavioural support across SEN college, secondary and primary schools.

Some of Danielle’s notable work includes her research introducing a new University-wide EDI strategy at her former Higher Education institution, presenting insights and way-forwards on youth homelessness to HRH Prince Williams, and providing discipleship to next-gen leaders.

Dan is a part-time DPhil Education student whose research focuses on investigating reasons why individuals choose to study and then teach physics as a subject discipline and how these relate to issues of equity and power. He previously worked as a secondary school physics teacher in the West Midlands of England for around 15 years before taking up his current post as Associate Professor of Physics Education at the University of Birmingham where he works in widening participation in physics and teacher education.

Publications
  • Cottle, D 2022, ‘Harnessing the potential of recently retired physics teachers to mentor new physics teachers’, Physics Education, vol. 57, no. 1, 015020. https://doi.org/10.1088/1361-6552/ac3931
  • Cottle, D 2021, ‘Improving students’ mathematical skills in secondary science: ideas from mathematics pedagogy’, School Science Review, vol. 102, no. 381, pp. 61-64. <https://www.ase.org.uk/resources/school-science-review/issue-381/improving-students-mathematical-skills-in-secondary>
  • Cottle, D 2021, ‘The effects of Covid-19 on student transition from school to university in STEM subjects’, New Directions in the Teaching of Physical Sciences, vol. 16, no. 1, 3847, pp. 1-4. https://doi.org/10.29311/ndtps.v0i14.3847 
  • Cottle, D & Marshall, R 2016, ‘Exploring electrical resistance: a novel kinesthetic model helps to resolve some misconceptions’, Physics Education, vol. 51, no. 5. https://doi.org/10.1088/0031-9120/51/5/054004 

Chris is a third-year part time DPhil student. He is an experienced Director of Children’s Services working in London. He is interested in path dependence and whether it is a helpful concept to understand how children’s services work.

Yaoyao is a DPhil student in Education at Oxford.

Her research interest lies in Aptitude-Instruction-Interaction (ATI) in second language acquisition (SLA).

Yaoyao’s research investigates the mediating effects of individual differences in learners’ domain-general perceptual-cognitive abilities in instructed foreign language pronunciation acquisition in adulthood. She aims to further explore how aptitude hinders instructional effectiveness and help all students make the most of instruction regardless of aptitude profiles.

Yaoyao started her BA in the Japanese Language and Literature at Sun Yat-Sen University (中山大学) in China. She then moved to the University of Queensland to finish her BA with double majors in Japanese and Translation. After her BA, she worked as an English teacher in China for three years. Prior to her DPhil studies at Oxford, Yaoyao completed her Master’s degree in TESOL at Institute of Education, University College London. Her Master’s dissertation was supervised by Dr Kazuya Saito.

Pat is the Deputy Chief Executive of a large College Group.

A qualified accountant, she is accountable to the Corporation Board for the Group’s Estate, sustainability and for maintaining the Group’s outstanding financial health grade. Her specialisms include Leadership and Management, Identification and Application of Funding Streams as well as leading the Group in new acquisitions, ventures and developments. Pat is using her vast experience of public sector finances to explore the intersection of accounting, leadership and purpose.

Supervisors

James Robson and Ariel Lindorff

Alice received her Master’s in Child Study and Education from the Institute of Child Study at the University of Toronto. She has taught preschool through higher education as a teacher and principal in public and private schools in North America and Europe. Deeply committed to enhancing education, she believes in learning that connects students and teachers to the natural world and to their communities. She is actively involved in community organisations that promote intercultural, interracial, and interfaith understanding and allyship.

Supervisors

Steve Puttick

Victoria is an educational researcher and practitioner, specialising in educational support and methodology of teaching mathematics to low-achieving students. For over 9 years she has been working at Big Change Educational Centre (Moscow) which provides support to looked-after children.

Before joining the DPhil programme, she completed her undergraduate degree in Finance at Financial University in Moscow and then gained a MSc in Psychology of Education from the University of Bristol.

Victoria’s current research focuses on educational issues of care-experienced children and teaching mathematics to students of low achievement and motivation.

Supervisors

Karen Skilling and Gabriel Stylianides

Louise was born and raised in Glasgow and moved to Oxford to pursue a DPhil in Education.

Louise’s research interests are education policy, particularly higher education policy, as well as qualitative research into the experiences of students in higher education and reducing inequalities in access to higher education. Louise is also interested in educational capabilities, educational purpose, aspirations and philosophical debates about knowledge construction and co-construction. Louise has a First Class BA (Joint Honours) in Social Policy and Education from the University of Strathclyde, and two Masters degrees with Distinction also from the University of Strathclyde in Applied Educational and Social Research and Social Policy (Research Methods). Louise also participated in the University of Oxford’s UNIQ+ Graduate Access Programme in the summer of 2022, where she worked at the Department of Sociology with Melinda Mills, Bo Zhao and Evelina Akimova on research into the impact of socio-economic status on inequalities in access to veterinary care in Scotland. Louise’s DPhil thesis is interested in evaluating Lorella Terzi’s educational capabilities framework through the lens of contemporary higher education in order to gain an understanding of what graduate capabilities are identified by students and stakeholders as being necessary for enabling graduates to successfully thrive and adapt in a post-pandemic society.

 

Supervisors

Alis Oancea and Kelsey Inouye

Motema studied Neuroscience as an undergraduate at Dartmouth College in the USA and it is one of its courses, found interest in Education.

Motema then worked for various non-profit organisations in Lesotho and South Africa focusing on helping high school students from low SES backgrounds access opportunities to study in HE. In her Masters’ project Motema analysed Lesotho’s 2009 Curriculum and Assessment Policy. This analysis’ findings brought Motema to her current research interests which include gendered STEM education and decolonisation of education policies and curricula in Lesotho. For her DPhil project, Motema is interested in finding out the lived experiences of female Science teachers in Lesotho Secondary Schools especially focusing on the major changes in the Secondary school education system in Lesotho that have happened in the past five years as unique meeting points.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Judith Hillier

Danielle is a DPhil student researching how Black-British doctoral students navigate the spaces of the elite, providing a new theoretical framework to understand their agency better.

Her main interests are in Human Flourishing, Cultural Geography, Psychology, and Justice, and her work aims to inform and reform educational frameworks and practices.

Following Danielle’s BSc in Psychology and MRes in Research Methods in Psychology, she founded a social enterprise that merges psychological and academic strategies to guide undergraduate and master’s students study practices. In addition to this, Danielle provided pedagogical and behavioural support across SEN college, secondary and primary schools.

Some of Danielle’s notable work includes her research introducing a new University-wide EDI strategy at her former Higher Education institution, presenting insights and way-forwards on youth homelessness to HRH Prince Williams, and providing discipleship to next-gen leaders.

Dan is a part-time DPhil Education student whose research focuses on investigating reasons why individuals choose to study and then teach physics as a subject discipline and how these relate to issues of equity and power. He previously worked as a secondary school physics teacher in the West Midlands of England for around 15 years before taking up his current post as Associate Professor of Physics Education at the University of Birmingham where he works in widening participation in physics and teacher education.

Publications
  • Cottle, D 2022, ‘Harnessing the potential of recently retired physics teachers to mentor new physics teachers’, Physics Education, vol. 57, no. 1, 015020. https://doi.org/10.1088/1361-6552/ac3931
  • Cottle, D 2021, ‘Improving students’ mathematical skills in secondary science: ideas from mathematics pedagogy’, School Science Review, vol. 102, no. 381, pp. 61-64. <https://www.ase.org.uk/resources/school-science-review/issue-381/improving-students-mathematical-skills-in-secondary>
  • Cottle, D 2021, ‘The effects of Covid-19 on student transition from school to university in STEM subjects’, New Directions in the Teaching of Physical Sciences, vol. 16, no. 1, 3847, pp. 1-4. https://doi.org/10.29311/ndtps.v0i14.3847 
  • Cottle, D & Marshall, R 2016, ‘Exploring electrical resistance: a novel kinesthetic model helps to resolve some misconceptions’, Physics Education, vol. 51, no. 5. https://doi.org/10.1088/0031-9120/51/5/054004 

Chris is a third-year part time DPhil student. He is an experienced Director of Children’s Services working in London. He is interested in path dependence and whether it is a helpful concept to understand how children’s services work.

Yaoyao is a DPhil student in Education at Oxford.

Her research interest lies in Aptitude-Instruction-Interaction (ATI) in second language acquisition (SLA).

Yaoyao’s research investigates the mediating effects of individual differences in learners’ domain-general perceptual-cognitive abilities in instructed foreign language pronunciation acquisition in adulthood. She aims to further explore how aptitude hinders instructional effectiveness and help all students make the most of instruction regardless of aptitude profiles.

Yaoyao started her BA in the Japanese Language and Literature at Sun Yat-Sen University (中山大学) in China. She then moved to the University of Queensland to finish her BA with double majors in Japanese and Translation. After her BA, she worked as an English teacher in China for three years. Prior to her DPhil studies at Oxford, Yaoyao completed her Master’s degree in TESOL at Institute of Education, University College London. Her Master’s dissertation was supervised by Dr Kazuya Saito.

Pat is the Deputy Chief Executive of a large College Group.

A qualified accountant, she is accountable to the Corporation Board for the Group’s Estate, sustainability and for maintaining the Group’s outstanding financial health grade. Her specialisms include Leadership and Management, Identification and Application of Funding Streams as well as leading the Group in new acquisitions, ventures and developments. Pat is using her vast experience of public sector finances to explore the intersection of accounting, leadership and purpose.

Supervisors

James Robson and Ariel Lindorff

Alice received her Master’s in Child Study and Education from the Institute of Child Study at the University of Toronto. She has taught preschool through higher education as a teacher and principal in public and private schools in North America and Europe. Deeply committed to enhancing education, she believes in learning that connects students and teachers to the natural world and to their communities. She is actively involved in community organisations that promote intercultural, interracial, and interfaith understanding and allyship.

Supervisors

Steve Puttick

Victoria is an educational researcher and practitioner, specialising in educational support and methodology of teaching mathematics to low-achieving students. For over 9 years she has been working at Big Change Educational Centre (Moscow) which provides support to looked-after children.

Before joining the DPhil programme, she completed her undergraduate degree in Finance at Financial University in Moscow and then gained a MSc in Psychology of Education from the University of Bristol.

Victoria’s current research focuses on educational issues of care-experienced children and teaching mathematics to students of low achievement and motivation.

Supervisors

Karen Skilling and Gabriel Stylianides

Louise was born and raised in Glasgow and moved to Oxford to pursue a DPhil in Education.

Louise’s research interests are education policy, particularly higher education policy, as well as qualitative research into the experiences of students in higher education and reducing inequalities in access to higher education. Louise is also interested in educational capabilities, educational purpose, aspirations and philosophical debates about knowledge construction and co-construction. Louise has a First Class BA (Joint Honours) in Social Policy and Education from the University of Strathclyde, and two Masters degrees with Distinction also from the University of Strathclyde in Applied Educational and Social Research and Social Policy (Research Methods). Louise also participated in the University of Oxford’s UNIQ+ Graduate Access Programme in the summer of 2022, where she worked at the Department of Sociology with Melinda Mills, Bo Zhao and Evelina Akimova on research into the impact of socio-economic status on inequalities in access to veterinary care in Scotland. Louise’s DPhil thesis is interested in evaluating Lorella Terzi’s educational capabilities framework through the lens of contemporary higher education in order to gain an understanding of what graduate capabilities are identified by students and stakeholders as being necessary for enabling graduates to successfully thrive and adapt in a post-pandemic society.

 

Supervisors

Alis Oancea and Kelsey Inouye

Motema studied Neuroscience as an undergraduate at Dartmouth College in the USA and it is one of its courses, found interest in Education.

Motema then worked for various non-profit organisations in Lesotho and South Africa focusing on helping high school students from low SES backgrounds access opportunities to study in HE. In her Masters’ project Motema analysed Lesotho’s 2009 Curriculum and Assessment Policy. This analysis’ findings brought Motema to her current research interests which include gendered STEM education and decolonisation of education policies and curricula in Lesotho. For her DPhil project, Motema is interested in finding out the lived experiences of female Science teachers in Lesotho Secondary Schools especially focusing on the major changes in the Secondary school education system in Lesotho that have happened in the past five years as unique meeting points.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Judith Hillier

Danielle is a DPhil student researching how Black-British doctoral students navigate the spaces of the elite, providing a new theoretical framework to understand their agency better.

Her main interests are in Human Flourishing, Cultural Geography, Psychology, and Justice, and her work aims to inform and reform educational frameworks and practices.

Following Danielle’s BSc in Psychology and MRes in Research Methods in Psychology, she founded a social enterprise that merges psychological and academic strategies to guide undergraduate and master’s students study practices. In addition to this, Danielle provided pedagogical and behavioural support across SEN college, secondary and primary schools.

Some of Danielle’s notable work includes her research introducing a new University-wide EDI strategy at her former Higher Education institution, presenting insights and way-forwards on youth homelessness to HRH Prince Williams, and providing discipleship to next-gen leaders.

Dan is a part-time DPhil Education student whose research focuses on investigating reasons why individuals choose to study and then teach physics as a subject discipline and how these relate to issues of equity and power. He previously worked as a secondary school physics teacher in the West Midlands of England for around 15 years before taking up his current post as Associate Professor of Physics Education at the University of Birmingham where he works in widening participation in physics and teacher education.

Publications
  • Cottle, D 2022, ‘Harnessing the potential of recently retired physics teachers to mentor new physics teachers’, Physics Education, vol. 57, no. 1, 015020. https://doi.org/10.1088/1361-6552/ac3931
  • Cottle, D 2021, ‘Improving students’ mathematical skills in secondary science: ideas from mathematics pedagogy’, School Science Review, vol. 102, no. 381, pp. 61-64. <https://www.ase.org.uk/resources/school-science-review/issue-381/improving-students-mathematical-skills-in-secondary>
  • Cottle, D 2021, ‘The effects of Covid-19 on student transition from school to university in STEM subjects’, New Directions in the Teaching of Physical Sciences, vol. 16, no. 1, 3847, pp. 1-4. https://doi.org/10.29311/ndtps.v0i14.3847 
  • Cottle, D & Marshall, R 2016, ‘Exploring electrical resistance: a novel kinesthetic model helps to resolve some misconceptions’, Physics Education, vol. 51, no. 5. https://doi.org/10.1088/0031-9120/51/5/054004 

Chris is a third-year part time DPhil student. He is an experienced Director of Children’s Services working in London. He is interested in path dependence and whether it is a helpful concept to understand how children’s services work.

Yaoyao is a DPhil student in Education at Oxford.

Her research interest lies in Aptitude-Instruction-Interaction (ATI) in second language acquisition (SLA).

Yaoyao’s research investigates the mediating effects of individual differences in learners’ domain-general perceptual-cognitive abilities in instructed foreign language pronunciation acquisition in adulthood. She aims to further explore how aptitude hinders instructional effectiveness and help all students make the most of instruction regardless of aptitude profiles.

Yaoyao started her BA in the Japanese Language and Literature at Sun Yat-Sen University (中山大学) in China. She then moved to the University of Queensland to finish her BA with double majors in Japanese and Translation. After her BA, she worked as an English teacher in China for three years. Prior to her DPhil studies at Oxford, Yaoyao completed her Master’s degree in TESOL at Institute of Education, University College London. Her Master’s dissertation was supervised by Dr Kazuya Saito.

Pat is the Deputy Chief Executive of a large College Group.

A qualified accountant, she is accountable to the Corporation Board for the Group’s Estate, sustainability and for maintaining the Group’s outstanding financial health grade. Her specialisms include Leadership and Management, Identification and Application of Funding Streams as well as leading the Group in new acquisitions, ventures and developments. Pat is using her vast experience of public sector finances to explore the intersection of accounting, leadership and purpose.

Supervisors

James Robson and Ariel Lindorff

Alice received her Master’s in Child Study and Education from the Institute of Child Study at the University of Toronto. She has taught preschool through higher education as a teacher and principal in public and private schools in North America and Europe. Deeply committed to enhancing education, she believes in learning that connects students and teachers to the natural world and to their communities. She is actively involved in community organisations that promote intercultural, interracial, and interfaith understanding and allyship.

Supervisors

Steve Puttick

Victoria is an educational researcher and practitioner, specialising in educational support and methodology of teaching mathematics to low-achieving students. For over 9 years she has been working at Big Change Educational Centre (Moscow) which provides support to looked-after children.

Before joining the DPhil programme, she completed her undergraduate degree in Finance at Financial University in Moscow and then gained a MSc in Psychology of Education from the University of Bristol.

Victoria’s current research focuses on educational issues of care-experienced children and teaching mathematics to students of low achievement and motivation.

Supervisors

Karen Skilling and Gabriel Stylianides

Louise was born and raised in Glasgow and moved to Oxford to pursue a DPhil in Education.

Louise’s research interests are education policy, particularly higher education policy, as well as qualitative research into the experiences of students in higher education and reducing inequalities in access to higher education. Louise is also interested in educational capabilities, educational purpose, aspirations and philosophical debates about knowledge construction and co-construction. Louise has a First Class BA (Joint Honours) in Social Policy and Education from the University of Strathclyde, and two Masters degrees with Distinction also from the University of Strathclyde in Applied Educational and Social Research and Social Policy (Research Methods). Louise also participated in the University of Oxford’s UNIQ+ Graduate Access Programme in the summer of 2022, where she worked at the Department of Sociology with Melinda Mills, Bo Zhao and Evelina Akimova on research into the impact of socio-economic status on inequalities in access to veterinary care in Scotland. Louise’s DPhil thesis is interested in evaluating Lorella Terzi’s educational capabilities framework through the lens of contemporary higher education in order to gain an understanding of what graduate capabilities are identified by students and stakeholders as being necessary for enabling graduates to successfully thrive and adapt in a post-pandemic society.

 

Supervisors

Alis Oancea and Kelsey Inouye

Motema studied Neuroscience as an undergraduate at Dartmouth College in the USA and it is one of its courses, found interest in Education.

Motema then worked for various non-profit organisations in Lesotho and South Africa focusing on helping high school students from low SES backgrounds access opportunities to study in HE. In her Masters’ project Motema analysed Lesotho’s 2009 Curriculum and Assessment Policy. This analysis’ findings brought Motema to her current research interests which include gendered STEM education and decolonisation of education policies and curricula in Lesotho. For her DPhil project, Motema is interested in finding out the lived experiences of female Science teachers in Lesotho Secondary Schools especially focusing on the major changes in the Secondary school education system in Lesotho that have happened in the past five years as unique meeting points.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Judith Hillier

Danielle is a DPhil student researching how Black-British doctoral students navigate the spaces of the elite, providing a new theoretical framework to understand their agency better.

Her main interests are in Human Flourishing, Cultural Geography, Psychology, and Justice, and her work aims to inform and reform educational frameworks and practices.

Following Danielle’s BSc in Psychology and MRes in Research Methods in Psychology, she founded a social enterprise that merges psychological and academic strategies to guide undergraduate and master’s students study practices. In addition to this, Danielle provided pedagogical and behavioural support across SEN college, secondary and primary schools.

Some of Danielle’s notable work includes her research introducing a new University-wide EDI strategy at her former Higher Education institution, presenting insights and way-forwards on youth homelessness to HRH Prince Williams, and providing discipleship to next-gen leaders.

Dan is a part-time DPhil Education student whose research focuses on investigating reasons why individuals choose to study and then teach physics as a subject discipline and how these relate to issues of equity and power. He previously worked as a secondary school physics teacher in the West Midlands of England for around 15 years before taking up his current post as Associate Professor of Physics Education at the University of Birmingham where he works in widening participation in physics and teacher education.

Publications
  • Cottle, D 2022, ‘Harnessing the potential of recently retired physics teachers to mentor new physics teachers’, Physics Education, vol. 57, no. 1, 015020. https://doi.org/10.1088/1361-6552/ac3931
  • Cottle, D 2021, ‘Improving students’ mathematical skills in secondary science: ideas from mathematics pedagogy’, School Science Review, vol. 102, no. 381, pp. 61-64. <https://www.ase.org.uk/resources/school-science-review/issue-381/improving-students-mathematical-skills-in-secondary>
  • Cottle, D 2021, ‘The effects of Covid-19 on student transition from school to university in STEM subjects’, New Directions in the Teaching of Physical Sciences, vol. 16, no. 1, 3847, pp. 1-4. https://doi.org/10.29311/ndtps.v0i14.3847 
  • Cottle, D & Marshall, R 2016, ‘Exploring electrical resistance: a novel kinesthetic model helps to resolve some misconceptions’, Physics Education, vol. 51, no. 5. https://doi.org/10.1088/0031-9120/51/5/054004 

Chris is a third-year part time DPhil student. He is an experienced Director of Children’s Services working in London. He is interested in path dependence and whether it is a helpful concept to understand how children’s services work.

Yaoyao is a DPhil student in Education at Oxford.

Her research interest lies in Aptitude-Instruction-Interaction (ATI) in second language acquisition (SLA).

Yaoyao’s research investigates the mediating effects of individual differences in learners’ domain-general perceptual-cognitive abilities in instructed foreign language pronunciation acquisition in adulthood. She aims to further explore how aptitude hinders instructional effectiveness and help all students make the most of instruction regardless of aptitude profiles.

Yaoyao started her BA in the Japanese Language and Literature at Sun Yat-Sen University (中山大学) in China. She then moved to the University of Queensland to finish her BA with double majors in Japanese and Translation. After her BA, she worked as an English teacher in China for three years. Prior to her DPhil studies at Oxford, Yaoyao completed her Master’s degree in TESOL at Institute of Education, University College London. Her Master’s dissertation was supervised by Dr Kazuya Saito.

Pat is the Deputy Chief Executive of a large College Group.

A qualified accountant, she is accountable to the Corporation Board for the Group’s Estate, sustainability and for maintaining the Group’s outstanding financial health grade. Her specialisms include Leadership and Management, Identification and Application of Funding Streams as well as leading the Group in new acquisitions, ventures and developments. Pat is using her vast experience of public sector finances to explore the intersection of accounting, leadership and purpose.

Supervisors

James Robson and Ariel Lindorff

Alice received her Master’s in Child Study and Education from the Institute of Child Study at the University of Toronto. She has taught preschool through higher education as a teacher and principal in public and private schools in North America and Europe. Deeply committed to enhancing education, she believes in learning that connects students and teachers to the natural world and to their communities. She is actively involved in community organisations that promote intercultural, interracial, and interfaith understanding and allyship.

Supervisors

Steve Puttick

Victoria is an educational researcher and practitioner, specialising in educational support and methodology of teaching mathematics to low-achieving students. For over 9 years she has been working at Big Change Educational Centre (Moscow) which provides support to looked-after children.

Before joining the DPhil programme, she completed her undergraduate degree in Finance at Financial University in Moscow and then gained a MSc in Psychology of Education from the University of Bristol.

Victoria’s current research focuses on educational issues of care-experienced children and teaching mathematics to students of low achievement and motivation.

Supervisors

Karen Skilling and Gabriel Stylianides

Louise was born and raised in Glasgow and moved to Oxford to pursue a DPhil in Education.

Louise’s research interests are education policy, particularly higher education policy, as well as qualitative research into the experiences of students in higher education and reducing inequalities in access to higher education. Louise is also interested in educational capabilities, educational purpose, aspirations and philosophical debates about knowledge construction and co-construction. Louise has a First Class BA (Joint Honours) in Social Policy and Education from the University of Strathclyde, and two Masters degrees with Distinction also from the University of Strathclyde in Applied Educational and Social Research and Social Policy (Research Methods). Louise also participated in the University of Oxford’s UNIQ+ Graduate Access Programme in the summer of 2022, where she worked at the Department of Sociology with Melinda Mills, Bo Zhao and Evelina Akimova on research into the impact of socio-economic status on inequalities in access to veterinary care in Scotland. Louise’s DPhil thesis is interested in evaluating Lorella Terzi’s educational capabilities framework through the lens of contemporary higher education in order to gain an understanding of what graduate capabilities are identified by students and stakeholders as being necessary for enabling graduates to successfully thrive and adapt in a post-pandemic society.

 

Supervisors

Alis Oancea and Kelsey Inouye

Motema studied Neuroscience as an undergraduate at Dartmouth College in the USA and it is one of its courses, found interest in Education.

Motema then worked for various non-profit organisations in Lesotho and South Africa focusing on helping high school students from low SES backgrounds access opportunities to study in HE. In her Masters’ project Motema analysed Lesotho’s 2009 Curriculum and Assessment Policy. This analysis’ findings brought Motema to her current research interests which include gendered STEM education and decolonisation of education policies and curricula in Lesotho. For her DPhil project, Motema is interested in finding out the lived experiences of female Science teachers in Lesotho Secondary Schools especially focusing on the major changes in the Secondary school education system in Lesotho that have happened in the past five years as unique meeting points.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Judith Hillier

Danielle is a DPhil student researching how Black-British doctoral students navigate the spaces of the elite, providing a new theoretical framework to understand their agency better.

Her main interests are in Human Flourishing, Cultural Geography, Psychology, and Justice, and her work aims to inform and reform educational frameworks and practices.

Following Danielle’s BSc in Psychology and MRes in Research Methods in Psychology, she founded a social enterprise that merges psychological and academic strategies to guide undergraduate and master’s students study practices. In addition to this, Danielle provided pedagogical and behavioural support across SEN college, secondary and primary schools.

Some of Danielle’s notable work includes her research introducing a new University-wide EDI strategy at her former Higher Education institution, presenting insights and way-forwards on youth homelessness to HRH Prince Williams, and providing discipleship to next-gen leaders.

Dan is a part-time DPhil Education student whose research focuses on investigating reasons why individuals choose to study and then teach physics as a subject discipline and how these relate to issues of equity and power. He previously worked as a secondary school physics teacher in the West Midlands of England for around 15 years before taking up his current post as Associate Professor of Physics Education at the University of Birmingham where he works in widening participation in physics and teacher education.

Publications
  • Cottle, D 2022, ‘Harnessing the potential of recently retired physics teachers to mentor new physics teachers’, Physics Education, vol. 57, no. 1, 015020. https://doi.org/10.1088/1361-6552/ac3931
  • Cottle, D 2021, ‘Improving students’ mathematical skills in secondary science: ideas from mathematics pedagogy’, School Science Review, vol. 102, no. 381, pp. 61-64. <https://www.ase.org.uk/resources/school-science-review/issue-381/improving-students-mathematical-skills-in-secondary>
  • Cottle, D 2021, ‘The effects of Covid-19 on student transition from school to university in STEM subjects’, New Directions in the Teaching of Physical Sciences, vol. 16, no. 1, 3847, pp. 1-4. https://doi.org/10.29311/ndtps.v0i14.3847 
  • Cottle, D & Marshall, R 2016, ‘Exploring electrical resistance: a novel kinesthetic model helps to resolve some misconceptions’, Physics Education, vol. 51, no. 5. https://doi.org/10.1088/0031-9120/51/5/054004 

Chris is a third-year part time DPhil student. He is an experienced Director of Children’s Services working in London. He is interested in path dependence and whether it is a helpful concept to understand how children’s services work.

Yaoyao is a DPhil student in Education at Oxford.

Her research interest lies in Aptitude-Instruction-Interaction (ATI) in second language acquisition (SLA).

Yaoyao’s research investigates the mediating effects of individual differences in learners’ domain-general perceptual-cognitive abilities in instructed foreign language pronunciation acquisition in adulthood. She aims to further explore how aptitude hinders instructional effectiveness and help all students make the most of instruction regardless of aptitude profiles.

Yaoyao started her BA in the Japanese Language and Literature at Sun Yat-Sen University (中山大学) in China. She then moved to the University of Queensland to finish her BA with double majors in Japanese and Translation. After her BA, she worked as an English teacher in China for three years. Prior to her DPhil studies at Oxford, Yaoyao completed her Master’s degree in TESOL at Institute of Education, University College London. Her Master’s dissertation was supervised by Dr Kazuya Saito.

Pat is the Deputy Chief Executive of a large College Group.

A qualified accountant, she is accountable to the Corporation Board for the Group’s Estate, sustainability and for maintaining the Group’s outstanding financial health grade. Her specialisms include Leadership and Management, Identification and Application of Funding Streams as well as leading the Group in new acquisitions, ventures and developments. Pat is using her vast experience of public sector finances to explore the intersection of accounting, leadership and purpose.

Supervisors

James Robson and Ariel Lindorff

Alice received her Master’s in Child Study and Education from the Institute of Child Study at the University of Toronto. She has taught preschool through higher education as a teacher and principal in public and private schools in North America and Europe. Deeply committed to enhancing education, she believes in learning that connects students and teachers to the natural world and to their communities. She is actively involved in community organisations that promote intercultural, interracial, and interfaith understanding and allyship.

Supervisors

Steve Puttick

Victoria is an educational researcher and practitioner, specialising in educational support and methodology of teaching mathematics to low-achieving students. For over 9 years she has been working at Big Change Educational Centre (Moscow) which provides support to looked-after children.

Before joining the DPhil programme, she completed her undergraduate degree in Finance at Financial University in Moscow and then gained a MSc in Psychology of Education from the University of Bristol.

Victoria’s current research focuses on educational issues of care-experienced children and teaching mathematics to students of low achievement and motivation.

Supervisors

Karen Skilling and Gabriel Stylianides

Louise was born and raised in Glasgow and moved to Oxford to pursue a DPhil in Education.

Louise’s research interests are education policy, particularly higher education policy, as well as qualitative research into the experiences of students in higher education and reducing inequalities in access to higher education. Louise is also interested in educational capabilities, educational purpose, aspirations and philosophical debates about knowledge construction and co-construction. Louise has a First Class BA (Joint Honours) in Social Policy and Education from the University of Strathclyde, and two Masters degrees with Distinction also from the University of Strathclyde in Applied Educational and Social Research and Social Policy (Research Methods). Louise also participated in the University of Oxford’s UNIQ+ Graduate Access Programme in the summer of 2022, where she worked at the Department of Sociology with Melinda Mills, Bo Zhao and Evelina Akimova on research into the impact of socio-economic status on inequalities in access to veterinary care in Scotland. Louise’s DPhil thesis is interested in evaluating Lorella Terzi’s educational capabilities framework through the lens of contemporary higher education in order to gain an understanding of what graduate capabilities are identified by students and stakeholders as being necessary for enabling graduates to successfully thrive and adapt in a post-pandemic society.

 

Supervisors

Alis Oancea and Kelsey Inouye

Motema studied Neuroscience as an undergraduate at Dartmouth College in the USA and it is one of its courses, found interest in Education.

Motema then worked for various non-profit organisations in Lesotho and South Africa focusing on helping high school students from low SES backgrounds access opportunities to study in HE. In her Masters’ project Motema analysed Lesotho’s 2009 Curriculum and Assessment Policy. This analysis’ findings brought Motema to her current research interests which include gendered STEM education and decolonisation of education policies and curricula in Lesotho. For her DPhil project, Motema is interested in finding out the lived experiences of female Science teachers in Lesotho Secondary Schools especially focusing on the major changes in the Secondary school education system in Lesotho that have happened in the past five years as unique meeting points.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Judith Hillier

Danielle is a DPhil student researching how Black-British doctoral students navigate the spaces of the elite, providing a new theoretical framework to understand their agency better.

Her main interests are in Human Flourishing, Cultural Geography, Psychology, and Justice, and her work aims to inform and reform educational frameworks and practices.

Following Danielle’s BSc in Psychology and MRes in Research Methods in Psychology, she founded a social enterprise that merges psychological and academic strategies to guide undergraduate and master’s students study practices. In addition to this, Danielle provided pedagogical and behavioural support across SEN college, secondary and primary schools.

Some of Danielle’s notable work includes her research introducing a new University-wide EDI strategy at her former Higher Education institution, presenting insights and way-forwards on youth homelessness to HRH Prince Williams, and providing discipleship to next-gen leaders.

Dan is a part-time DPhil Education student whose research focuses on investigating reasons why individuals choose to study and then teach physics as a subject discipline and how these relate to issues of equity and power. He previously worked as a secondary school physics teacher in the West Midlands of England for around 15 years before taking up his current post as Associate Professor of Physics Education at the University of Birmingham where he works in widening participation in physics and teacher education.

Publications
  • Cottle, D 2022, ‘Harnessing the potential of recently retired physics teachers to mentor new physics teachers’, Physics Education, vol. 57, no. 1, 015020. https://doi.org/10.1088/1361-6552/ac3931
  • Cottle, D 2021, ‘Improving students’ mathematical skills in secondary science: ideas from mathematics pedagogy’, School Science Review, vol. 102, no. 381, pp. 61-64. <https://www.ase.org.uk/resources/school-science-review/issue-381/improving-students-mathematical-skills-in-secondary>
  • Cottle, D 2021, ‘The effects of Covid-19 on student transition from school to university in STEM subjects’, New Directions in the Teaching of Physical Sciences, vol. 16, no. 1, 3847, pp. 1-4. https://doi.org/10.29311/ndtps.v0i14.3847 
  • Cottle, D & Marshall, R 2016, ‘Exploring electrical resistance: a novel kinesthetic model helps to resolve some misconceptions’, Physics Education, vol. 51, no. 5. https://doi.org/10.1088/0031-9120/51/5/054004 

Chris is a third-year part time DPhil student. He is an experienced Director of Children’s Services working in London. He is interested in path dependence and whether it is a helpful concept to understand how children’s services work.

Yaoyao is a DPhil student in Education at Oxford.

Her research interest lies in Aptitude-Instruction-Interaction (ATI) in second language acquisition (SLA).

Yaoyao’s research investigates the mediating effects of individual differences in learners’ domain-general perceptual-cognitive abilities in instructed foreign language pronunciation acquisition in adulthood. She aims to further explore how aptitude hinders instructional effectiveness and help all students make the most of instruction regardless of aptitude profiles.

Yaoyao started her BA in the Japanese Language and Literature at Sun Yat-Sen University (中山大学) in China. She then moved to the University of Queensland to finish her BA with double majors in Japanese and Translation. After her BA, she worked as an English teacher in China for three years. Prior to her DPhil studies at Oxford, Yaoyao completed her Master’s degree in TESOL at Institute of Education, University College London. Her Master’s dissertation was supervised by Dr Kazuya Saito.

Pat is the Deputy Chief Executive of a large College Group.

A qualified accountant, she is accountable to the Corporation Board for the Group’s Estate, sustainability and for maintaining the Group’s outstanding financial health grade. Her specialisms include Leadership and Management, Identification and Application of Funding Streams as well as leading the Group in new acquisitions, ventures and developments. Pat is using her vast experience of public sector finances to explore the intersection of accounting, leadership and purpose.

Supervisors

James Robson and Ariel Lindorff

Alice received her Master’s in Child Study and Education from the Institute of Child Study at the University of Toronto. She has taught preschool through higher education as a teacher and principal in public and private schools in North America and Europe. Deeply committed to enhancing education, she believes in learning that connects students and teachers to the natural world and to their communities. She is actively involved in community organisations that promote intercultural, interracial, and interfaith understanding and allyship.

Supervisors

Steve Puttick

Victoria is an educational researcher and practitioner, specialising in educational support and methodology of teaching mathematics to low-achieving students. For over 9 years she has been working at Big Change Educational Centre (Moscow) which provides support to looked-after children.

Before joining the DPhil programme, she completed her undergraduate degree in Finance at Financial University in Moscow and then gained a MSc in Psychology of Education from the University of Bristol.

Victoria’s current research focuses on educational issues of care-experienced children and teaching mathematics to students of low achievement and motivation.

Supervisors

Karen Skilling and Gabriel Stylianides

Louise was born and raised in Glasgow and moved to Oxford to pursue a DPhil in Education.

Louise’s research interests are education policy, particularly higher education policy, as well as qualitative research into the experiences of students in higher education and reducing inequalities in access to higher education. Louise is also interested in educational capabilities, educational purpose, aspirations and philosophical debates about knowledge construction and co-construction. Louise has a First Class BA (Joint Honours) in Social Policy and Education from the University of Strathclyde, and two Masters degrees with Distinction also from the University of Strathclyde in Applied Educational and Social Research and Social Policy (Research Methods). Louise also participated in the University of Oxford’s UNIQ+ Graduate Access Programme in the summer of 2022, where she worked at the Department of Sociology with Melinda Mills, Bo Zhao and Evelina Akimova on research into the impact of socio-economic status on inequalities in access to veterinary care in Scotland. Louise’s DPhil thesis is interested in evaluating Lorella Terzi’s educational capabilities framework through the lens of contemporary higher education in order to gain an understanding of what graduate capabilities are identified by students and stakeholders as being necessary for enabling graduates to successfully thrive and adapt in a post-pandemic society.

 

Supervisors

Alis Oancea and Kelsey Inouye

Motema studied Neuroscience as an undergraduate at Dartmouth College in the USA and it is one of its courses, found interest in Education.

Motema then worked for various non-profit organisations in Lesotho and South Africa focusing on helping high school students from low SES backgrounds access opportunities to study in HE. In her Masters’ project Motema analysed Lesotho’s 2009 Curriculum and Assessment Policy. This analysis’ findings brought Motema to her current research interests which include gendered STEM education and decolonisation of education policies and curricula in Lesotho. For her DPhil project, Motema is interested in finding out the lived experiences of female Science teachers in Lesotho Secondary Schools especially focusing on the major changes in the Secondary school education system in Lesotho that have happened in the past five years as unique meeting points.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Judith Hillier

Danielle is a DPhil student researching how Black-British doctoral students navigate the spaces of the elite, providing a new theoretical framework to understand their agency better.

Her main interests are in Human Flourishing, Cultural Geography, Psychology, and Justice, and her work aims to inform and reform educational frameworks and practices.

Following Danielle’s BSc in Psychology and MRes in Research Methods in Psychology, she founded a social enterprise that merges psychological and academic strategies to guide undergraduate and master’s students study practices. In addition to this, Danielle provided pedagogical and behavioural support across SEN college, secondary and primary schools.

Some of Danielle’s notable work includes her research introducing a new University-wide EDI strategy at her former Higher Education institution, presenting insights and way-forwards on youth homelessness to HRH Prince Williams, and providing discipleship to next-gen leaders.

Dan is a part-time DPhil Education student whose research focuses on investigating reasons why individuals choose to study and then teach physics as a subject discipline and how these relate to issues of equity and power. He previously worked as a secondary school physics teacher in the West Midlands of England for around 15 years before taking up his current post as Associate Professor of Physics Education at the University of Birmingham where he works in widening participation in physics and teacher education.

Publications
  • Cottle, D 2022, ‘Harnessing the potential of recently retired physics teachers to mentor new physics teachers’, Physics Education, vol. 57, no. 1, 015020. https://doi.org/10.1088/1361-6552/ac3931
  • Cottle, D 2021, ‘Improving students’ mathematical skills in secondary science: ideas from mathematics pedagogy’, School Science Review, vol. 102, no. 381, pp. 61-64. <https://www.ase.org.uk/resources/school-science-review/issue-381/improving-students-mathematical-skills-in-secondary>
  • Cottle, D 2021, ‘The effects of Covid-19 on student transition from school to university in STEM subjects’, New Directions in the Teaching of Physical Sciences, vol. 16, no. 1, 3847, pp. 1-4. https://doi.org/10.29311/ndtps.v0i14.3847 
  • Cottle, D & Marshall, R 2016, ‘Exploring electrical resistance: a novel kinesthetic model helps to resolve some misconceptions’, Physics Education, vol. 51, no. 5. https://doi.org/10.1088/0031-9120/51/5/054004 

Chris is a third-year part time DPhil student. He is an experienced Director of Children’s Services working in London. He is interested in path dependence and whether it is a helpful concept to understand how children’s services work.

Yaoyao is a DPhil student in Education at Oxford.

Her research interest lies in Aptitude-Instruction-Interaction (ATI) in second language acquisition (SLA).

Yaoyao’s research investigates the mediating effects of individual differences in learners’ domain-general perceptual-cognitive abilities in instructed foreign language pronunciation acquisition in adulthood. She aims to further explore how aptitude hinders instructional effectiveness and help all students make the most of instruction regardless of aptitude profiles.

Yaoyao started her BA in the Japanese Language and Literature at Sun Yat-Sen University (中山大学) in China. She then moved to the University of Queensland to finish her BA with double majors in Japanese and Translation. After her BA, she worked as an English teacher in China for three years. Prior to her DPhil studies at Oxford, Yaoyao completed her Master’s degree in TESOL at Institute of Education, University College London. Her Master’s dissertation was supervised by Dr Kazuya Saito.

Pat is the Deputy Chief Executive of a large College Group.

A qualified accountant, she is accountable to the Corporation Board for the Group’s Estate, sustainability and for maintaining the Group’s outstanding financial health grade. Her specialisms include Leadership and Management, Identification and Application of Funding Streams as well as leading the Group in new acquisitions, ventures and developments. Pat is using her vast experience of public sector finances to explore the intersection of accounting, leadership and purpose.

Supervisors

James Robson and Ariel Lindorff

Alice received her Master’s in Child Study and Education from the Institute of Child Study at the University of Toronto. She has taught preschool through higher education as a teacher and principal in public and private schools in North America and Europe. Deeply committed to enhancing education, she believes in learning that connects students and teachers to the natural world and to their communities. She is actively involved in community organisations that promote intercultural, interracial, and interfaith understanding and allyship.

Supervisors

Steve Puttick

Victoria is an educational researcher and practitioner, specialising in educational support and methodology of teaching mathematics to low-achieving students. For over 9 years she has been working at Big Change Educational Centre (Moscow) which provides support to looked-after children.

Before joining the DPhil programme, she completed her undergraduate degree in Finance at Financial University in Moscow and then gained a MSc in Psychology of Education from the University of Bristol.

Victoria’s current research focuses on educational issues of care-experienced children and teaching mathematics to students of low achievement and motivation.

Supervisors

Karen Skilling and Gabriel Stylianides

Louise was born and raised in Glasgow and moved to Oxford to pursue a DPhil in Education.

Louise’s research interests are education policy, particularly higher education policy, as well as qualitative research into the experiences of students in higher education and reducing inequalities in access to higher education. Louise is also interested in educational capabilities, educational purpose, aspirations and philosophical debates about knowledge construction and co-construction. Louise has a First Class BA (Joint Honours) in Social Policy and Education from the University of Strathclyde, and two Masters degrees with Distinction also from the University of Strathclyde in Applied Educational and Social Research and Social Policy (Research Methods). Louise also participated in the University of Oxford’s UNIQ+ Graduate Access Programme in the summer of 2022, where she worked at the Department of Sociology with Melinda Mills, Bo Zhao and Evelina Akimova on research into the impact of socio-economic status on inequalities in access to veterinary care in Scotland. Louise’s DPhil thesis is interested in evaluating Lorella Terzi’s educational capabilities framework through the lens of contemporary higher education in order to gain an understanding of what graduate capabilities are identified by students and stakeholders as being necessary for enabling graduates to successfully thrive and adapt in a post-pandemic society.

 

Supervisors

Alis Oancea and Kelsey Inouye

Motema studied Neuroscience as an undergraduate at Dartmouth College in the USA and it is one of its courses, found interest in Education.

Motema then worked for various non-profit organisations in Lesotho and South Africa focusing on helping high school students from low SES backgrounds access opportunities to study in HE. In her Masters’ project Motema analysed Lesotho’s 2009 Curriculum and Assessment Policy. This analysis’ findings brought Motema to her current research interests which include gendered STEM education and decolonisation of education policies and curricula in Lesotho. For her DPhil project, Motema is interested in finding out the lived experiences of female Science teachers in Lesotho Secondary Schools especially focusing on the major changes in the Secondary school education system in Lesotho that have happened in the past five years as unique meeting points.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Judith Hillier

Danielle is a DPhil student researching how Black-British doctoral students navigate the spaces of the elite, providing a new theoretical framework to understand their agency better.

Her main interests are in Human Flourishing, Cultural Geography, Psychology, and Justice, and her work aims to inform and reform educational frameworks and practices.

Following Danielle’s BSc in Psychology and MRes in Research Methods in Psychology, she founded a social enterprise that merges psychological and academic strategies to guide undergraduate and master’s students study practices. In addition to this, Danielle provided pedagogical and behavioural support across SEN college, secondary and primary schools.

Some of Danielle’s notable work includes her research introducing a new University-wide EDI strategy at her former Higher Education institution, presenting insights and way-forwards on youth homelessness to HRH Prince Williams, and providing discipleship to next-gen leaders.

Dan is a part-time DPhil Education student whose research focuses on investigating reasons why individuals choose to study and then teach physics as a subject discipline and how these relate to issues of equity and power. He previously worked as a secondary school physics teacher in the West Midlands of England for around 15 years before taking up his current post as Associate Professor of Physics Education at the University of Birmingham where he works in widening participation in physics and teacher education.

Publications
  • Cottle, D 2022, ‘Harnessing the potential of recently retired physics teachers to mentor new physics teachers’, Physics Education, vol. 57, no. 1, 015020. https://doi.org/10.1088/1361-6552/ac3931
  • Cottle, D 2021, ‘Improving students’ mathematical skills in secondary science: ideas from mathematics pedagogy’, School Science Review, vol. 102, no. 381, pp. 61-64. <https://www.ase.org.uk/resources/school-science-review/issue-381/improving-students-mathematical-skills-in-secondary>
  • Cottle, D 2021, ‘The effects of Covid-19 on student transition from school to university in STEM subjects’, New Directions in the Teaching of Physical Sciences, vol. 16, no. 1, 3847, pp. 1-4. https://doi.org/10.29311/ndtps.v0i14.3847 
  • Cottle, D & Marshall, R 2016, ‘Exploring electrical resistance: a novel kinesthetic model helps to resolve some misconceptions’, Physics Education, vol. 51, no. 5. https://doi.org/10.1088/0031-9120/51/5/054004 

Chris is a third-year part time DPhil student. He is an experienced Director of Children’s Services working in London. He is interested in path dependence and whether it is a helpful concept to understand how children’s services work.

Yaoyao is a DPhil student in Education at Oxford.

Her research interest lies in Aptitude-Instruction-Interaction (ATI) in second language acquisition (SLA).

Yaoyao’s research investigates the mediating effects of individual differences in learners’ domain-general perceptual-cognitive abilities in instructed foreign language pronunciation acquisition in adulthood. She aims to further explore how aptitude hinders instructional effectiveness and help all students make the most of instruction regardless of aptitude profiles.

Yaoyao started her BA in the Japanese Language and Literature at Sun Yat-Sen University (中山大学) in China. She then moved to the University of Queensland to finish her BA with double majors in Japanese and Translation. After her BA, she worked as an English teacher in China for three years. Prior to her DPhil studies at Oxford, Yaoyao completed her Master’s degree in TESOL at Institute of Education, University College London. Her Master’s dissertation was supervised by Dr Kazuya Saito.

Pat is the Deputy Chief Executive of a large College Group.

A qualified accountant, she is accountable to the Corporation Board for the Group’s Estate, sustainability and for maintaining the Group’s outstanding financial health grade. Her specialisms include Leadership and Management, Identification and Application of Funding Streams as well as leading the Group in new acquisitions, ventures and developments. Pat is using her vast experience of public sector finances to explore the intersection of accounting, leadership and purpose.

Supervisors

James Robson and Ariel Lindorff

Alice received her Master’s in Child Study and Education from the Institute of Child Study at the University of Toronto. She has taught preschool through higher education as a teacher and principal in public and private schools in North America and Europe. Deeply committed to enhancing education, she believes in learning that connects students and teachers to the natural world and to their communities. She is actively involved in community organisations that promote intercultural, interracial, and interfaith understanding and allyship.

Supervisors

Steve Puttick

Victoria is an educational researcher and practitioner, specialising in educational support and methodology of teaching mathematics to low-achieving students. For over 9 years she has been working at Big Change Educational Centre (Moscow) which provides support to looked-after children.

Before joining the DPhil programme, she completed her undergraduate degree in Finance at Financial University in Moscow and then gained a MSc in Psychology of Education from the University of Bristol.

Victoria’s current research focuses on educational issues of care-experienced children and teaching mathematics to students of low achievement and motivation.

Supervisors

Karen Skilling and Gabriel Stylianides

Louise was born and raised in Glasgow and moved to Oxford to pursue a DPhil in Education.

Louise’s research interests are education policy, particularly higher education policy, as well as qualitative research into the experiences of students in higher education and reducing inequalities in access to higher education. Louise is also interested in educational capabilities, educational purpose, aspirations and philosophical debates about knowledge construction and co-construction. Louise has a First Class BA (Joint Honours) in Social Policy and Education from the University of Strathclyde, and two Masters degrees with Distinction also from the University of Strathclyde in Applied Educational and Social Research and Social Policy (Research Methods). Louise also participated in the University of Oxford’s UNIQ+ Graduate Access Programme in the summer of 2022, where she worked at the Department of Sociology with Melinda Mills, Bo Zhao and Evelina Akimova on research into the impact of socio-economic status on inequalities in access to veterinary care in Scotland. Louise’s DPhil thesis is interested in evaluating Lorella Terzi’s educational capabilities framework through the lens of contemporary higher education in order to gain an understanding of what graduate capabilities are identified by students and stakeholders as being necessary for enabling graduates to successfully thrive and adapt in a post-pandemic society.

 

Supervisors

Alis Oancea and Kelsey Inouye

Motema studied Neuroscience as an undergraduate at Dartmouth College in the USA and it is one of its courses, found interest in Education.

Motema then worked for various non-profit organisations in Lesotho and South Africa focusing on helping high school students from low SES backgrounds access opportunities to study in HE. In her Masters’ project Motema analysed Lesotho’s 2009 Curriculum and Assessment Policy. This analysis’ findings brought Motema to her current research interests which include gendered STEM education and decolonisation of education policies and curricula in Lesotho. For her DPhil project, Motema is interested in finding out the lived experiences of female Science teachers in Lesotho Secondary Schools especially focusing on the major changes in the Secondary school education system in Lesotho that have happened in the past five years as unique meeting points.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Judith Hillier

Danielle is a DPhil student researching how Black-British doctoral students navigate the spaces of the elite, providing a new theoretical framework to understand their agency better.

Her main interests are in Human Flourishing, Cultural Geography, Psychology, and Justice, and her work aims to inform and reform educational frameworks and practices.

Following Danielle’s BSc in Psychology and MRes in Research Methods in Psychology, she founded a social enterprise that merges psychological and academic strategies to guide undergraduate and master’s students study practices. In addition to this, Danielle provided pedagogical and behavioural support across SEN college, secondary and primary schools.

Some of Danielle’s notable work includes her research introducing a new University-wide EDI strategy at her former Higher Education institution, presenting insights and way-forwards on youth homelessness to HRH Prince Williams, and providing discipleship to next-gen leaders.

Dan is a part-time DPhil Education student whose research focuses on investigating reasons why individuals choose to study and then teach physics as a subject discipline and how these relate to issues of equity and power. He previously worked as a secondary school physics teacher in the West Midlands of England for around 15 years before taking up his current post as Associate Professor of Physics Education at the University of Birmingham where he works in widening participation in physics and teacher education.

Publications
  • Cottle, D 2022, ‘Harnessing the potential of recently retired physics teachers to mentor new physics teachers’, Physics Education, vol. 57, no. 1, 015020. https://doi.org/10.1088/1361-6552/ac3931
  • Cottle, D 2021, ‘Improving students’ mathematical skills in secondary science: ideas from mathematics pedagogy’, School Science Review, vol. 102, no. 381, pp. 61-64. <https://www.ase.org.uk/resources/school-science-review/issue-381/improving-students-mathematical-skills-in-secondary>
  • Cottle, D 2021, ‘The effects of Covid-19 on student transition from school to university in STEM subjects’, New Directions in the Teaching of Physical Sciences, vol. 16, no. 1, 3847, pp. 1-4. https://doi.org/10.29311/ndtps.v0i14.3847 
  • Cottle, D & Marshall, R 2016, ‘Exploring electrical resistance: a novel kinesthetic model helps to resolve some misconceptions’, Physics Education, vol. 51, no. 5. https://doi.org/10.1088/0031-9120/51/5/054004 

Chris is a third-year part time DPhil student. He is an experienced Director of Children’s Services working in London. He is interested in path dependence and whether it is a helpful concept to understand how children’s services work.

Yaoyao is a DPhil student in Education at Oxford.

Her research interest lies in Aptitude-Instruction-Interaction (ATI) in second language acquisition (SLA).

Yaoyao’s research investigates the mediating effects of individual differences in learners’ domain-general perceptual-cognitive abilities in instructed foreign language pronunciation acquisition in adulthood. She aims to further explore how aptitude hinders instructional effectiveness and help all students make the most of instruction regardless of aptitude profiles.

Yaoyao started her BA in the Japanese Language and Literature at Sun Yat-Sen University (中山大学) in China. She then moved to the University of Queensland to finish her BA with double majors in Japanese and Translation. After her BA, she worked as an English teacher in China for three years. Prior to her DPhil studies at Oxford, Yaoyao completed her Master’s degree in TESOL at Institute of Education, University College London. Her Master’s dissertation was supervised by Dr Kazuya Saito.

Pat is the Deputy Chief Executive of a large College Group.

A qualified accountant, she is accountable to the Corporation Board for the Group’s Estate, sustainability and for maintaining the Group’s outstanding financial health grade. Her specialisms include Leadership and Management, Identification and Application of Funding Streams as well as leading the Group in new acquisitions, ventures and developments. Pat is using her vast experience of public sector finances to explore the intersection of accounting, leadership and purpose.

Supervisors

James Robson and Ariel Lindorff

Alice received her Master’s in Child Study and Education from the Institute of Child Study at the University of Toronto. She has taught preschool through higher education as a teacher and principal in public and private schools in North America and Europe. Deeply committed to enhancing education, she believes in learning that connects students and teachers to the natural world and to their communities. She is actively involved in community organisations that promote intercultural, interracial, and interfaith understanding and allyship.

Supervisors

Steve Puttick

Victoria is an educational researcher and practitioner, specialising in educational support and methodology of teaching mathematics to low-achieving students. For over 9 years she has been working at Big Change Educational Centre (Moscow) which provides support to looked-after children.

Before joining the DPhil programme, she completed her undergraduate degree in Finance at Financial University in Moscow and then gained a MSc in Psychology of Education from the University of Bristol.

Victoria’s current research focuses on educational issues of care-experienced children and teaching mathematics to students of low achievement and motivation.

Supervisors

Karen Skilling and Gabriel Stylianides

Louise was born and raised in Glasgow and moved to Oxford to pursue a DPhil in Education.

Louise’s research interests are education policy, particularly higher education policy, as well as qualitative research into the experiences of students in higher education and reducing inequalities in access to higher education. Louise is also interested in educational capabilities, educational purpose, aspirations and philosophical debates about knowledge construction and co-construction. Louise has a First Class BA (Joint Honours) in Social Policy and Education from the University of Strathclyde, and two Masters degrees with Distinction also from the University of Strathclyde in Applied Educational and Social Research and Social Policy (Research Methods). Louise also participated in the University of Oxford’s UNIQ+ Graduate Access Programme in the summer of 2022, where she worked at the Department of Sociology with Melinda Mills, Bo Zhao and Evelina Akimova on research into the impact of socio-economic status on inequalities in access to veterinary care in Scotland. Louise’s DPhil thesis is interested in evaluating Lorella Terzi’s educational capabilities framework through the lens of contemporary higher education in order to gain an understanding of what graduate capabilities are identified by students and stakeholders as being necessary for enabling graduates to successfully thrive and adapt in a post-pandemic society.

 

Supervisors

Alis Oancea and Kelsey Inouye

Motema studied Neuroscience as an undergraduate at Dartmouth College in the USA and it is one of its courses, found interest in Education.

Motema then worked for various non-profit organisations in Lesotho and South Africa focusing on helping high school students from low SES backgrounds access opportunities to study in HE. In her Masters’ project Motema analysed Lesotho’s 2009 Curriculum and Assessment Policy. This analysis’ findings brought Motema to her current research interests which include gendered STEM education and decolonisation of education policies and curricula in Lesotho. For her DPhil project, Motema is interested in finding out the lived experiences of female Science teachers in Lesotho Secondary Schools especially focusing on the major changes in the Secondary school education system in Lesotho that have happened in the past five years as unique meeting points.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Judith Hillier

Danielle is a DPhil student researching how Black-British doctoral students navigate the spaces of the elite, providing a new theoretical framework to understand their agency better.

Her main interests are in Human Flourishing, Cultural Geography, Psychology, and Justice, and her work aims to inform and reform educational frameworks and practices.

Following Danielle’s BSc in Psychology and MRes in Research Methods in Psychology, she founded a social enterprise that merges psychological and academic strategies to guide undergraduate and master’s students study practices. In addition to this, Danielle provided pedagogical and behavioural support across SEN college, secondary and primary schools.

Some of Danielle’s notable work includes her research introducing a new University-wide EDI strategy at her former Higher Education institution, presenting insights and way-forwards on youth homelessness to HRH Prince Williams, and providing discipleship to next-gen leaders.

Dan is a part-time DPhil Education student whose research focuses on investigating reasons why individuals choose to study and then teach physics as a subject discipline and how these relate to issues of equity and power. He previously worked as a secondary school physics teacher in the West Midlands of England for around 15 years before taking up his current post as Associate Professor of Physics Education at the University of Birmingham where he works in widening participation in physics and teacher education.

Publications
  • Cottle, D 2022, ‘Harnessing the potential of recently retired physics teachers to mentor new physics teachers’, Physics Education, vol. 57, no. 1, 015020. https://doi.org/10.1088/1361-6552/ac3931
  • Cottle, D 2021, ‘Improving students’ mathematical skills in secondary science: ideas from mathematics pedagogy’, School Science Review, vol. 102, no. 381, pp. 61-64. <https://www.ase.org.uk/resources/school-science-review/issue-381/improving-students-mathematical-skills-in-secondary>
  • Cottle, D 2021, ‘The effects of Covid-19 on student transition from school to university in STEM subjects’, New Directions in the Teaching of Physical Sciences, vol. 16, no. 1, 3847, pp. 1-4. https://doi.org/10.29311/ndtps.v0i14.3847 
  • Cottle, D & Marshall, R 2016, ‘Exploring electrical resistance: a novel kinesthetic model helps to resolve some misconceptions’, Physics Education, vol. 51, no. 5. https://doi.org/10.1088/0031-9120/51/5/054004 

Chris is a third-year part time DPhil student. He is an experienced Director of Children’s Services working in London. He is interested in path dependence and whether it is a helpful concept to understand how children’s services work.

Yaoyao is a DPhil student in Education at Oxford.

Her research interest lies in Aptitude-Instruction-Interaction (ATI) in second language acquisition (SLA).

Yaoyao’s research investigates the mediating effects of individual differences in learners’ domain-general perceptual-cognitive abilities in instructed foreign language pronunciation acquisition in adulthood. She aims to further explore how aptitude hinders instructional effectiveness and help all students make the most of instruction regardless of aptitude profiles.

Yaoyao started her BA in the Japanese Language and Literature at Sun Yat-Sen University (中山大学) in China. She then moved to the University of Queensland to finish her BA with double majors in Japanese and Translation. After her BA, she worked as an English teacher in China for three years. Prior to her DPhil studies at Oxford, Yaoyao completed her Master’s degree in TESOL at Institute of Education, University College London. Her Master’s dissertation was supervised by Dr Kazuya Saito.

Pat is the Deputy Chief Executive of a large College Group.

A qualified accountant, she is accountable to the Corporation Board for the Group’s Estate, sustainability and for maintaining the Group’s outstanding financial health grade. Her specialisms include Leadership and Management, Identification and Application of Funding Streams as well as leading the Group in new acquisitions, ventures and developments. Pat is using her vast experience of public sector finances to explore the intersection of accounting, leadership and purpose.

Supervisors

James Robson and Ariel Lindorff

Alice received her Master’s in Child Study and Education from the Institute of Child Study at the University of Toronto. She has taught preschool through higher education as a teacher and principal in public and private schools in North America and Europe. Deeply committed to enhancing education, she believes in learning that connects students and teachers to the natural world and to their communities. She is actively involved in community organisations that promote intercultural, interracial, and interfaith understanding and allyship.

Supervisors

Steve Puttick

Victoria is an educational researcher and practitioner, specialising in educational support and methodology of teaching mathematics to low-achieving students. For over 9 years she has been working at Big Change Educational Centre (Moscow) which provides support to looked-after children.

Before joining the DPhil programme, she completed her undergraduate degree in Finance at Financial University in Moscow and then gained a MSc in Psychology of Education from the University of Bristol.

Victoria’s current research focuses on educational issues of care-experienced children and teaching mathematics to students of low achievement and motivation.

Supervisors

Karen Skilling and Gabriel Stylianides

Louise was born and raised in Glasgow and moved to Oxford to pursue a DPhil in Education.

Louise’s research interests are education policy, particularly higher education policy, as well as qualitative research into the experiences of students in higher education and reducing inequalities in access to higher education. Louise is also interested in educational capabilities, educational purpose, aspirations and philosophical debates about knowledge construction and co-construction. Louise has a First Class BA (Joint Honours) in Social Policy and Education from the University of Strathclyde, and two Masters degrees with Distinction also from the University of Strathclyde in Applied Educational and Social Research and Social Policy (Research Methods). Louise also participated in the University of Oxford’s UNIQ+ Graduate Access Programme in the summer of 2022, where she worked at the Department of Sociology with Melinda Mills, Bo Zhao and Evelina Akimova on research into the impact of socio-economic status on inequalities in access to veterinary care in Scotland. Louise’s DPhil thesis is interested in evaluating Lorella Terzi’s educational capabilities framework through the lens of contemporary higher education in order to gain an understanding of what graduate capabilities are identified by students and stakeholders as being necessary for enabling graduates to successfully thrive and adapt in a post-pandemic society.

 

Supervisors

Alis Oancea and Kelsey Inouye

Motema studied Neuroscience as an undergraduate at Dartmouth College in the USA and it is one of its courses, found interest in Education.

Motema then worked for various non-profit organisations in Lesotho and South Africa focusing on helping high school students from low SES backgrounds access opportunities to study in HE. In her Masters’ project Motema analysed Lesotho’s 2009 Curriculum and Assessment Policy. This analysis’ findings brought Motema to her current research interests which include gendered STEM education and decolonisation of education policies and curricula in Lesotho. For her DPhil project, Motema is interested in finding out the lived experiences of female Science teachers in Lesotho Secondary Schools especially focusing on the major changes in the Secondary school education system in Lesotho that have happened in the past five years as unique meeting points.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Judith Hillier

Danielle is a DPhil student researching how Black-British doctoral students navigate the spaces of the elite, providing a new theoretical framework to understand their agency better.

Her main interests are in Human Flourishing, Cultural Geography, Psychology, and Justice, and her work aims to inform and reform educational frameworks and practices.

Following Danielle’s BSc in Psychology and MRes in Research Methods in Psychology, she founded a social enterprise that merges psychological and academic strategies to guide undergraduate and master’s students study practices. In addition to this, Danielle provided pedagogical and behavioural support across SEN college, secondary and primary schools.

Some of Danielle’s notable work includes her research introducing a new University-wide EDI strategy at her former Higher Education institution, presenting insights and way-forwards on youth homelessness to HRH Prince Williams, and providing discipleship to next-gen leaders.

Dan is a part-time DPhil Education student whose research focuses on investigating reasons why individuals choose to study and then teach physics as a subject discipline and how these relate to issues of equity and power. He previously worked as a secondary school physics teacher in the West Midlands of England for around 15 years before taking up his current post as Associate Professor of Physics Education at the University of Birmingham where he works in widening participation in physics and teacher education.

Publications
  • Cottle, D 2022, ‘Harnessing the potential of recently retired physics teachers to mentor new physics teachers’, Physics Education, vol. 57, no. 1, 015020. https://doi.org/10.1088/1361-6552/ac3931
  • Cottle, D 2021, ‘Improving students’ mathematical skills in secondary science: ideas from mathematics pedagogy’, School Science Review, vol. 102, no. 381, pp. 61-64. <https://www.ase.org.uk/resources/school-science-review/issue-381/improving-students-mathematical-skills-in-secondary>
  • Cottle, D 2021, ‘The effects of Covid-19 on student transition from school to university in STEM subjects’, New Directions in the Teaching of Physical Sciences, vol. 16, no. 1, 3847, pp. 1-4. https://doi.org/10.29311/ndtps.v0i14.3847 
  • Cottle, D & Marshall, R 2016, ‘Exploring electrical resistance: a novel kinesthetic model helps to resolve some misconceptions’, Physics Education, vol. 51, no. 5. https://doi.org/10.1088/0031-9120/51/5/054004 

Chris is a third-year part time DPhil student. He is an experienced Director of Children’s Services working in London. He is interested in path dependence and whether it is a helpful concept to understand how children’s services work.

Yaoyao is a DPhil student in Education at Oxford.

Her research interest lies in Aptitude-Instruction-Interaction (ATI) in second language acquisition (SLA).

Yaoyao’s research investigates the mediating effects of individual differences in learners’ domain-general perceptual-cognitive abilities in instructed foreign language pronunciation acquisition in adulthood. She aims to further explore how aptitude hinders instructional effectiveness and help all students make the most of instruction regardless of aptitude profiles.

Yaoyao started her BA in the Japanese Language and Literature at Sun Yat-Sen University (中山大学) in China. She then moved to the University of Queensland to finish her BA with double majors in Japanese and Translation. After her BA, she worked as an English teacher in China for three years. Prior to her DPhil studies at Oxford, Yaoyao completed her Master’s degree in TESOL at Institute of Education, University College London. Her Master’s dissertation was supervised by Dr Kazuya Saito.

Pat is the Deputy Chief Executive of a large College Group.

A qualified accountant, she is accountable to the Corporation Board for the Group’s Estate, sustainability and for maintaining the Group’s outstanding financial health grade. Her specialisms include Leadership and Management, Identification and Application of Funding Streams as well as leading the Group in new acquisitions, ventures and developments. Pat is using her vast experience of public sector finances to explore the intersection of accounting, leadership and purpose.

Supervisors

James Robson and Ariel Lindorff

Alice received her Master’s in Child Study and Education from the Institute of Child Study at the University of Toronto. She has taught preschool through higher education as a teacher and principal in public and private schools in North America and Europe. Deeply committed to enhancing education, she believes in learning that connects students and teachers to the natural world and to their communities. She is actively involved in community organisations that promote intercultural, interracial, and interfaith understanding and allyship.

Supervisors

Steve Puttick

Victoria is an educational researcher and practitioner, specialising in educational support and methodology of teaching mathematics to low-achieving students. For over 9 years she has been working at Big Change Educational Centre (Moscow) which provides support to looked-after children.

Before joining the DPhil programme, she completed her undergraduate degree in Finance at Financial University in Moscow and then gained a MSc in Psychology of Education from the University of Bristol.

Victoria’s current research focuses on educational issues of care-experienced children and teaching mathematics to students of low achievement and motivation.

Supervisors

Karen Skilling and Gabriel Stylianides

Louise was born and raised in Glasgow and moved to Oxford to pursue a DPhil in Education.

Louise’s research interests are education policy, particularly higher education policy, as well as qualitative research into the experiences of students in higher education and reducing inequalities in access to higher education. Louise is also interested in educational capabilities, educational purpose, aspirations and philosophical debates about knowledge construction and co-construction. Louise has a First Class BA (Joint Honours) in Social Policy and Education from the University of Strathclyde, and two Masters degrees with Distinction also from the University of Strathclyde in Applied Educational and Social Research and Social Policy (Research Methods). Louise also participated in the University of Oxford’s UNIQ+ Graduate Access Programme in the summer of 2022, where she worked at the Department of Sociology with Melinda Mills, Bo Zhao and Evelina Akimova on research into the impact of socio-economic status on inequalities in access to veterinary care in Scotland. Louise’s DPhil thesis is interested in evaluating Lorella Terzi’s educational capabilities framework through the lens of contemporary higher education in order to gain an understanding of what graduate capabilities are identified by students and stakeholders as being necessary for enabling graduates to successfully thrive and adapt in a post-pandemic society.

 

Supervisors

Alis Oancea and Kelsey Inouye

Motema studied Neuroscience as an undergraduate at Dartmouth College in the USA and it is one of its courses, found interest in Education.

Motema then worked for various non-profit organisations in Lesotho and South Africa focusing on helping high school students from low SES backgrounds access opportunities to study in HE. In her Masters’ project Motema analysed Lesotho’s 2009 Curriculum and Assessment Policy. This analysis’ findings brought Motema to her current research interests which include gendered STEM education and decolonisation of education policies and curricula in Lesotho. For her DPhil project, Motema is interested in finding out the lived experiences of female Science teachers in Lesotho Secondary Schools especially focusing on the major changes in the Secondary school education system in Lesotho that have happened in the past five years as unique meeting points.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Judith Hillier

Danielle is a DPhil student researching how Black-British doctoral students navigate the spaces of the elite, providing a new theoretical framework to understand their agency better.

Her main interests are in Human Flourishing, Cultural Geography, Psychology, and Justice, and her work aims to inform and reform educational frameworks and practices.

Following Danielle’s BSc in Psychology and MRes in Research Methods in Psychology, she founded a social enterprise that merges psychological and academic strategies to guide undergraduate and master’s students study practices. In addition to this, Danielle provided pedagogical and behavioural support across SEN college, secondary and primary schools.

Some of Danielle’s notable work includes her research introducing a new University-wide EDI strategy at her former Higher Education institution, presenting insights and way-forwards on youth homelessness to HRH Prince Williams, and providing discipleship to next-gen leaders.

Dan is a part-time DPhil Education student whose research focuses on investigating reasons why individuals choose to study and then teach physics as a subject discipline and how these relate to issues of equity and power. He previously worked as a secondary school physics teacher in the West Midlands of England for around 15 years before taking up his current post as Associate Professor of Physics Education at the University of Birmingham where he works in widening participation in physics and teacher education.

Publications
  • Cottle, D 2022, ‘Harnessing the potential of recently retired physics teachers to mentor new physics teachers’, Physics Education, vol. 57, no. 1, 015020. https://doi.org/10.1088/1361-6552/ac3931
  • Cottle, D 2021, ‘Improving students’ mathematical skills in secondary science: ideas from mathematics pedagogy’, School Science Review, vol. 102, no. 381, pp. 61-64. <https://www.ase.org.uk/resources/school-science-review/issue-381/improving-students-mathematical-skills-in-secondary>
  • Cottle, D 2021, ‘The effects of Covid-19 on student transition from school to university in STEM subjects’, New Directions in the Teaching of Physical Sciences, vol. 16, no. 1, 3847, pp. 1-4. https://doi.org/10.29311/ndtps.v0i14.3847 
  • Cottle, D & Marshall, R 2016, ‘Exploring electrical resistance: a novel kinesthetic model helps to resolve some misconceptions’, Physics Education, vol. 51, no. 5. https://doi.org/10.1088/0031-9120/51/5/054004 

Chris is a third-year part time DPhil student. He is an experienced Director of Children’s Services working in London. He is interested in path dependence and whether it is a helpful concept to understand how children’s services work.

Yaoyao is a DPhil student in Education at Oxford.

Her research interest lies in Aptitude-Instruction-Interaction (ATI) in second language acquisition (SLA).

Yaoyao’s research investigates the mediating effects of individual differences in learners’ domain-general perceptual-cognitive abilities in instructed foreign language pronunciation acquisition in adulthood. She aims to further explore how aptitude hinders instructional effectiveness and help all students make the most of instruction regardless of aptitude profiles.

Yaoyao started her BA in the Japanese Language and Literature at Sun Yat-Sen University (中山大学) in China. She then moved to the University of Queensland to finish her BA with double majors in Japanese and Translation. After her BA, she worked as an English teacher in China for three years. Prior to her DPhil studies at Oxford, Yaoyao completed her Master’s degree in TESOL at Institute of Education, University College London. Her Master’s dissertation was supervised by Dr Kazuya Saito.

Pat is the Deputy Chief Executive of a large College Group.

A qualified accountant, she is accountable to the Corporation Board for the Group’s Estate, sustainability and for maintaining the Group’s outstanding financial health grade. Her specialisms include Leadership and Management, Identification and Application of Funding Streams as well as leading the Group in new acquisitions, ventures and developments. Pat is using her vast experience of public sector finances to explore the intersection of accounting, leadership and purpose.

Supervisors

James Robson and Ariel Lindorff

Alice received her Master’s in Child Study and Education from the Institute of Child Study at the University of Toronto. She has taught preschool through higher education as a teacher and principal in public and private schools in North America and Europe. Deeply committed to enhancing education, she believes in learning that connects students and teachers to the natural world and to their communities. She is actively involved in community organisations that promote intercultural, interracial, and interfaith understanding and allyship.

Supervisors

Steve Puttick

Victoria is an educational researcher and practitioner, specialising in educational support and methodology of teaching mathematics to low-achieving students. For over 9 years she has been working at Big Change Educational Centre (Moscow) which provides support to looked-after children.

Before joining the DPhil programme, she completed her undergraduate degree in Finance at Financial University in Moscow and then gained a MSc in Psychology of Education from the University of Bristol.

Victoria’s current research focuses on educational issues of care-experienced children and teaching mathematics to students of low achievement and motivation.

Supervisors

Karen Skilling and Gabriel Stylianides

Louise was born and raised in Glasgow and moved to Oxford to pursue a DPhil in Education.

Louise’s research interests are education policy, particularly higher education policy, as well as qualitative research into the experiences of students in higher education and reducing inequalities in access to higher education. Louise is also interested in educational capabilities, educational purpose, aspirations and philosophical debates about knowledge construction and co-construction. Louise has a First Class BA (Joint Honours) in Social Policy and Education from the University of Strathclyde, and two Masters degrees with Distinction also from the University of Strathclyde in Applied Educational and Social Research and Social Policy (Research Methods). Louise also participated in the University of Oxford’s UNIQ+ Graduate Access Programme in the summer of 2022, where she worked at the Department of Sociology with Melinda Mills, Bo Zhao and Evelina Akimova on research into the impact of socio-economic status on inequalities in access to veterinary care in Scotland. Louise’s DPhil thesis is interested in evaluating Lorella Terzi’s educational capabilities framework through the lens of contemporary higher education in order to gain an understanding of what graduate capabilities are identified by students and stakeholders as being necessary for enabling graduates to successfully thrive and adapt in a post-pandemic society.

 

Supervisors

Alis Oancea and Kelsey Inouye

Motema studied Neuroscience as an undergraduate at Dartmouth College in the USA and it is one of its courses, found interest in Education.

Motema then worked for various non-profit organisations in Lesotho and South Africa focusing on helping high school students from low SES backgrounds access opportunities to study in HE. In her Masters’ project Motema analysed Lesotho’s 2009 Curriculum and Assessment Policy. This analysis’ findings brought Motema to her current research interests which include gendered STEM education and decolonisation of education policies and curricula in Lesotho. For her DPhil project, Motema is interested in finding out the lived experiences of female Science teachers in Lesotho Secondary Schools especially focusing on the major changes in the Secondary school education system in Lesotho that have happened in the past five years as unique meeting points.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Judith Hillier

Danielle is a DPhil student researching how Black-British doctoral students navigate the spaces of the elite, providing a new theoretical framework to understand their agency better.

Her main interests are in Human Flourishing, Cultural Geography, Psychology, and Justice, and her work aims to inform and reform educational frameworks and practices.

Following Danielle’s BSc in Psychology and MRes in Research Methods in Psychology, she founded a social enterprise that merges psychological and academic strategies to guide undergraduate and master’s students study practices. In addition to this, Danielle provided pedagogical and behavioural support across SEN college, secondary and primary schools.

Some of Danielle’s notable work includes her research introducing a new University-wide EDI strategy at her former Higher Education institution, presenting insights and way-forwards on youth homelessness to HRH Prince Williams, and providing discipleship to next-gen leaders.

Dan is a part-time DPhil Education student whose research focuses on investigating reasons why individuals choose to study and then teach physics as a subject discipline and how these relate to issues of equity and power. He previously worked as a secondary school physics teacher in the West Midlands of England for around 15 years before taking up his current post as Associate Professor of Physics Education at the University of Birmingham where he works in widening participation in physics and teacher education.

Publications
  • Cottle, D 2022, ‘Harnessing the potential of recently retired physics teachers to mentor new physics teachers’, Physics Education, vol. 57, no. 1, 015020. https://doi.org/10.1088/1361-6552/ac3931
  • Cottle, D 2021, ‘Improving students’ mathematical skills in secondary science: ideas from mathematics pedagogy’, School Science Review, vol. 102, no. 381, pp. 61-64. <https://www.ase.org.uk/resources/school-science-review/issue-381/improving-students-mathematical-skills-in-secondary>
  • Cottle, D 2021, ‘The effects of Covid-19 on student transition from school to university in STEM subjects’, New Directions in the Teaching of Physical Sciences, vol. 16, no. 1, 3847, pp. 1-4. https://doi.org/10.29311/ndtps.v0i14.3847 
  • Cottle, D & Marshall, R 2016, ‘Exploring electrical resistance: a novel kinesthetic model helps to resolve some misconceptions’, Physics Education, vol. 51, no. 5. https://doi.org/10.1088/0031-9120/51/5/054004 

Chris is a third-year part time DPhil student. He is an experienced Director of Children’s Services working in London. He is interested in path dependence and whether it is a helpful concept to understand how children’s services work.

Yaoyao is a DPhil student in Education at Oxford.

Her research interest lies in Aptitude-Instruction-Interaction (ATI) in second language acquisition (SLA).

Yaoyao’s research investigates the mediating effects of individual differences in learners’ domain-general perceptual-cognitive abilities in instructed foreign language pronunciation acquisition in adulthood. She aims to further explore how aptitude hinders instructional effectiveness and help all students make the most of instruction regardless of aptitude profiles.

Yaoyao started her BA in the Japanese Language and Literature at Sun Yat-Sen University (中山大学) in China. She then moved to the University of Queensland to finish her BA with double majors in Japanese and Translation. After her BA, she worked as an English teacher in China for three years. Prior to her DPhil studies at Oxford, Yaoyao completed her Master’s degree in TESOL at Institute of Education, University College London. Her Master’s dissertation was supervised by Dr Kazuya Saito.

Pat is the Deputy Chief Executive of a large College Group.

A qualified accountant, she is accountable to the Corporation Board for the Group’s Estate, sustainability and for maintaining the Group’s outstanding financial health grade. Her specialisms include Leadership and Management, Identification and Application of Funding Streams as well as leading the Group in new acquisitions, ventures and developments. Pat is using her vast experience of public sector finances to explore the intersection of accounting, leadership and purpose.

Supervisors

James Robson and Ariel Lindorff

Alice received her Master’s in Child Study and Education from the Institute of Child Study at the University of Toronto. She has taught preschool through higher education as a teacher and principal in public and private schools in North America and Europe. Deeply committed to enhancing education, she believes in learning that connects students and teachers to the natural world and to their communities. She is actively involved in community organisations that promote intercultural, interracial, and interfaith understanding and allyship.

Supervisors

Steve Puttick

Victoria is an educational researcher and practitioner, specialising in educational support and methodology of teaching mathematics to low-achieving students. For over 9 years she has been working at Big Change Educational Centre (Moscow) which provides support to looked-after children.

Before joining the DPhil programme, she completed her undergraduate degree in Finance at Financial University in Moscow and then gained a MSc in Psychology of Education from the University of Bristol.

Victoria’s current research focuses on educational issues of care-experienced children and teaching mathematics to students of low achievement and motivation.

Supervisors

Karen Skilling and Gabriel Stylianides

Louise was born and raised in Glasgow and moved to Oxford to pursue a DPhil in Education.

Louise’s research interests are education policy, particularly higher education policy, as well as qualitative research into the experiences of students in higher education and reducing inequalities in access to higher education. Louise is also interested in educational capabilities, educational purpose, aspirations and philosophical debates about knowledge construction and co-construction. Louise has a First Class BA (Joint Honours) in Social Policy and Education from the University of Strathclyde, and two Masters degrees with Distinction also from the University of Strathclyde in Applied Educational and Social Research and Social Policy (Research Methods). Louise also participated in the University of Oxford’s UNIQ+ Graduate Access Programme in the summer of 2022, where she worked at the Department of Sociology with Melinda Mills, Bo Zhao and Evelina Akimova on research into the impact of socio-economic status on inequalities in access to veterinary care in Scotland. Louise’s DPhil thesis is interested in evaluating Lorella Terzi’s educational capabilities framework through the lens of contemporary higher education in order to gain an understanding of what graduate capabilities are identified by students and stakeholders as being necessary for enabling graduates to successfully thrive and adapt in a post-pandemic society.

 

Supervisors

Alis Oancea and Kelsey Inouye

Motema studied Neuroscience as an undergraduate at Dartmouth College in the USA and it is one of its courses, found interest in Education.

Motema then worked for various non-profit organisations in Lesotho and South Africa focusing on helping high school students from low SES backgrounds access opportunities to study in HE. In her Masters’ project Motema analysed Lesotho’s 2009 Curriculum and Assessment Policy. This analysis’ findings brought Motema to her current research interests which include gendered STEM education and decolonisation of education policies and curricula in Lesotho. For her DPhil project, Motema is interested in finding out the lived experiences of female Science teachers in Lesotho Secondary Schools especially focusing on the major changes in the Secondary school education system in Lesotho that have happened in the past five years as unique meeting points.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Judith Hillier

Danielle is a DPhil student researching how Black-British doctoral students navigate the spaces of the elite, providing a new theoretical framework to understand their agency better.

Her main interests are in Human Flourishing, Cultural Geography, Psychology, and Justice, and her work aims to inform and reform educational frameworks and practices.

Following Danielle’s BSc in Psychology and MRes in Research Methods in Psychology, she founded a social enterprise that merges psychological and academic strategies to guide undergraduate and master’s students study practices. In addition to this, Danielle provided pedagogical and behavioural support across SEN college, secondary and primary schools.

Some of Danielle’s notable work includes her research introducing a new University-wide EDI strategy at her former Higher Education institution, presenting insights and way-forwards on youth homelessness to HRH Prince Williams, and providing discipleship to next-gen leaders.

Dan is a part-time DPhil Education student whose research focuses on investigating reasons why individuals choose to study and then teach physics as a subject discipline and how these relate to issues of equity and power. He previously worked as a secondary school physics teacher in the West Midlands of England for around 15 years before taking up his current post as Associate Professor of Physics Education at the University of Birmingham where he works in widening participation in physics and teacher education.

Publications
  • Cottle, D 2022, ‘Harnessing the potential of recently retired physics teachers to mentor new physics teachers’, Physics Education, vol. 57, no. 1, 015020. https://doi.org/10.1088/1361-6552/ac3931
  • Cottle, D 2021, ‘Improving students’ mathematical skills in secondary science: ideas from mathematics pedagogy’, School Science Review, vol. 102, no. 381, pp. 61-64. <https://www.ase.org.uk/resources/school-science-review/issue-381/improving-students-mathematical-skills-in-secondary>
  • Cottle, D 2021, ‘The effects of Covid-19 on student transition from school to university in STEM subjects’, New Directions in the Teaching of Physical Sciences, vol. 16, no. 1, 3847, pp. 1-4. https://doi.org/10.29311/ndtps.v0i14.3847 
  • Cottle, D & Marshall, R 2016, ‘Exploring electrical resistance: a novel kinesthetic model helps to resolve some misconceptions’, Physics Education, vol. 51, no. 5. https://doi.org/10.1088/0031-9120/51/5/054004 

Chris is a third-year part time DPhil student. He is an experienced Director of Children’s Services working in London. He is interested in path dependence and whether it is a helpful concept to understand how children’s services work.

Yaoyao is a DPhil student in Education at Oxford.

Her research interest lies in Aptitude-Instruction-Interaction (ATI) in second language acquisition (SLA).

Yaoyao’s research investigates the mediating effects of individual differences in learners’ domain-general perceptual-cognitive abilities in instructed foreign language pronunciation acquisition in adulthood. She aims to further explore how aptitude hinders instructional effectiveness and help all students make the most of instruction regardless of aptitude profiles.

Yaoyao started her BA in the Japanese Language and Literature at Sun Yat-Sen University (中山大学) in China. She then moved to the University of Queensland to finish her BA with double majors in Japanese and Translation. After her BA, she worked as an English teacher in China for three years. Prior to her DPhil studies at Oxford, Yaoyao completed her Master’s degree in TESOL at Institute of Education, University College London. Her Master’s dissertation was supervised by Dr Kazuya Saito.

Pat is the Deputy Chief Executive of a large College Group.

A qualified accountant, she is accountable to the Corporation Board for the Group’s Estate, sustainability and for maintaining the Group’s outstanding financial health grade. Her specialisms include Leadership and Management, Identification and Application of Funding Streams as well as leading the Group in new acquisitions, ventures and developments. Pat is using her vast experience of public sector finances to explore the intersection of accounting, leadership and purpose.

Supervisors

James Robson and Ariel Lindorff

Alice received her Master’s in Child Study and Education from the Institute of Child Study at the University of Toronto. She has taught preschool through higher education as a teacher and principal in public and private schools in North America and Europe. Deeply committed to enhancing education, she believes in learning that connects students and teachers to the natural world and to their communities. She is actively involved in community organisations that promote intercultural, interracial, and interfaith understanding and allyship.

Supervisors

Steve Puttick

Victoria is an educational researcher and practitioner, specialising in educational support and methodology of teaching mathematics to low-achieving students. For over 9 years she has been working at Big Change Educational Centre (Moscow) which provides support to looked-after children.

Before joining the DPhil programme, she completed her undergraduate degree in Finance at Financial University in Moscow and then gained a MSc in Psychology of Education from the University of Bristol.

Victoria’s current research focuses on educational issues of care-experienced children and teaching mathematics to students of low achievement and motivation.

Supervisors

Karen Skilling and Gabriel Stylianides

Louise was born and raised in Glasgow and moved to Oxford to pursue a DPhil in Education.

Louise’s research interests are education policy, particularly higher education policy, as well as qualitative research into the experiences of students in higher education and reducing inequalities in access to higher education. Louise is also interested in educational capabilities, educational purpose, aspirations and philosophical debates about knowledge construction and co-construction. Louise has a First Class BA (Joint Honours) in Social Policy and Education from the University of Strathclyde, and two Masters degrees with Distinction also from the University of Strathclyde in Applied Educational and Social Research and Social Policy (Research Methods). Louise also participated in the University of Oxford’s UNIQ+ Graduate Access Programme in the summer of 2022, where she worked at the Department of Sociology with Melinda Mills, Bo Zhao and Evelina Akimova on research into the impact of socio-economic status on inequalities in access to veterinary care in Scotland. Louise’s DPhil thesis is interested in evaluating Lorella Terzi’s educational capabilities framework through the lens of contemporary higher education in order to gain an understanding of what graduate capabilities are identified by students and stakeholders as being necessary for enabling graduates to successfully thrive and adapt in a post-pandemic society.

 

Supervisors

Alis Oancea and Kelsey Inouye

Motema studied Neuroscience as an undergraduate at Dartmouth College in the USA and it is one of its courses, found interest in Education.

Motema then worked for various non-profit organisations in Lesotho and South Africa focusing on helping high school students from low SES backgrounds access opportunities to study in HE. In her Masters’ project Motema analysed Lesotho’s 2009 Curriculum and Assessment Policy. This analysis’ findings brought Motema to her current research interests which include gendered STEM education and decolonisation of education policies and curricula in Lesotho. For her DPhil project, Motema is interested in finding out the lived experiences of female Science teachers in Lesotho Secondary Schools especially focusing on the major changes in the Secondary school education system in Lesotho that have happened in the past five years as unique meeting points.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Judith Hillier

Danielle is a DPhil student researching how Black-British doctoral students navigate the spaces of the elite, providing a new theoretical framework to understand their agency better.

Her main interests are in Human Flourishing, Cultural Geography, Psychology, and Justice, and her work aims to inform and reform educational frameworks and practices.

Following Danielle’s BSc in Psychology and MRes in Research Methods in Psychology, she founded a social enterprise that merges psychological and academic strategies to guide undergraduate and master’s students study practices. In addition to this, Danielle provided pedagogical and behavioural support across SEN college, secondary and primary schools.

Some of Danielle’s notable work includes her research introducing a new University-wide EDI strategy at her former Higher Education institution, presenting insights and way-forwards on youth homelessness to HRH Prince Williams, and providing discipleship to next-gen leaders.

Dan is a part-time DPhil Education student whose research focuses on investigating reasons why individuals choose to study and then teach physics as a subject discipline and how these relate to issues of equity and power. He previously worked as a secondary school physics teacher in the West Midlands of England for around 15 years before taking up his current post as Associate Professor of Physics Education at the University of Birmingham where he works in widening participation in physics and teacher education.

Publications
  • Cottle, D 2022, ‘Harnessing the potential of recently retired physics teachers to mentor new physics teachers’, Physics Education, vol. 57, no. 1, 015020. https://doi.org/10.1088/1361-6552/ac3931
  • Cottle, D 2021, ‘Improving students’ mathematical skills in secondary science: ideas from mathematics pedagogy’, School Science Review, vol. 102, no. 381, pp. 61-64. <https://www.ase.org.uk/resources/school-science-review/issue-381/improving-students-mathematical-skills-in-secondary>
  • Cottle, D 2021, ‘The effects of Covid-19 on student transition from school to university in STEM subjects’, New Directions in the Teaching of Physical Sciences, vol. 16, no. 1, 3847, pp. 1-4. https://doi.org/10.29311/ndtps.v0i14.3847 
  • Cottle, D & Marshall, R 2016, ‘Exploring electrical resistance: a novel kinesthetic model helps to resolve some misconceptions’, Physics Education, vol. 51, no. 5. https://doi.org/10.1088/0031-9120/51/5/054004 

Chris is a third-year part time DPhil student. He is an experienced Director of Children’s Services working in London. He is interested in path dependence and whether it is a helpful concept to understand how children’s services work.

Yaoyao is a DPhil student in Education at Oxford.

Her research interest lies in Aptitude-Instruction-Interaction (ATI) in second language acquisition (SLA).

Yaoyao’s research investigates the mediating effects of individual differences in learners’ domain-general perceptual-cognitive abilities in instructed foreign language pronunciation acquisition in adulthood. She aims to further explore how aptitude hinders instructional effectiveness and help all students make the most of instruction regardless of aptitude profiles.

Yaoyao started her BA in the Japanese Language and Literature at Sun Yat-Sen University (中山大学) in China. She then moved to the University of Queensland to finish her BA with double majors in Japanese and Translation. After her BA, she worked as an English teacher in China for three years. Prior to her DPhil studies at Oxford, Yaoyao completed her Master’s degree in TESOL at Institute of Education, University College London. Her Master’s dissertation was supervised by Dr Kazuya Saito.

Pat is the Deputy Chief Executive of a large College Group.

A qualified accountant, she is accountable to the Corporation Board for the Group’s Estate, sustainability and for maintaining the Group’s outstanding financial health grade. Her specialisms include Leadership and Management, Identification and Application of Funding Streams as well as leading the Group in new acquisitions, ventures and developments. Pat is using her vast experience of public sector finances to explore the intersection of accounting, leadership and purpose.

Supervisors

James Robson and Ariel Lindorff

Alice received her Master’s in Child Study and Education from the Institute of Child Study at the University of Toronto. She has taught preschool through higher education as a teacher and principal in public and private schools in North America and Europe. Deeply committed to enhancing education, she believes in learning that connects students and teachers to the natural world and to their communities. She is actively involved in community organisations that promote intercultural, interracial, and interfaith understanding and allyship.

Supervisors

Steve Puttick

Victoria is an educational researcher and practitioner, specialising in educational support and methodology of teaching mathematics to low-achieving students. For over 9 years she has been working at Big Change Educational Centre (Moscow) which provides support to looked-after children.

Before joining the DPhil programme, she completed her undergraduate degree in Finance at Financial University in Moscow and then gained a MSc in Psychology of Education from the University of Bristol.

Victoria’s current research focuses on educational issues of care-experienced children and teaching mathematics to students of low achievement and motivation.

Supervisors

Karen Skilling and Gabriel Stylianides

Louise was born and raised in Glasgow and moved to Oxford to pursue a DPhil in Education.

Louise’s research interests are education policy, particularly higher education policy, as well as qualitative research into the experiences of students in higher education and reducing inequalities in access to higher education. Louise is also interested in educational capabilities, educational purpose, aspirations and philosophical debates about knowledge construction and co-construction. Louise has a First Class BA (Joint Honours) in Social Policy and Education from the University of Strathclyde, and two Masters degrees with Distinction also from the University of Strathclyde in Applied Educational and Social Research and Social Policy (Research Methods). Louise also participated in the University of Oxford’s UNIQ+ Graduate Access Programme in the summer of 2022, where she worked at the Department of Sociology with Melinda Mills, Bo Zhao and Evelina Akimova on research into the impact of socio-economic status on inequalities in access to veterinary care in Scotland. Louise’s DPhil thesis is interested in evaluating Lorella Terzi’s educational capabilities framework through the lens of contemporary higher education in order to gain an understanding of what graduate capabilities are identified by students and stakeholders as being necessary for enabling graduates to successfully thrive and adapt in a post-pandemic society.

 

Supervisors

Alis Oancea and Kelsey Inouye

Motema studied Neuroscience as an undergraduate at Dartmouth College in the USA and it is one of its courses, found interest in Education.

Motema then worked for various non-profit organisations in Lesotho and South Africa focusing on helping high school students from low SES backgrounds access opportunities to study in HE. In her Masters’ project Motema analysed Lesotho’s 2009 Curriculum and Assessment Policy. This analysis’ findings brought Motema to her current research interests which include gendered STEM education and decolonisation of education policies and curricula in Lesotho. For her DPhil project, Motema is interested in finding out the lived experiences of female Science teachers in Lesotho Secondary Schools especially focusing on the major changes in the Secondary school education system in Lesotho that have happened in the past five years as unique meeting points.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Judith Hillier

Danielle is a DPhil student researching how Black-British doctoral students navigate the spaces of the elite, providing a new theoretical framework to understand their agency better.

Her main interests are in Human Flourishing, Cultural Geography, Psychology, and Justice, and her work aims to inform and reform educational frameworks and practices.

Following Danielle’s BSc in Psychology and MRes in Research Methods in Psychology, she founded a social enterprise that merges psychological and academic strategies to guide undergraduate and master’s students study practices. In addition to this, Danielle provided pedagogical and behavioural support across SEN college, secondary and primary schools.

Some of Danielle’s notable work includes her research introducing a new University-wide EDI strategy at her former Higher Education institution, presenting insights and way-forwards on youth homelessness to HRH Prince Williams, and providing discipleship to next-gen leaders.

Dan is a part-time DPhil Education student whose research focuses on investigating reasons why individuals choose to study and then teach physics as a subject discipline and how these relate to issues of equity and power. He previously worked as a secondary school physics teacher in the West Midlands of England for around 15 years before taking up his current post as Associate Professor of Physics Education at the University of Birmingham where he works in widening participation in physics and teacher education.

Publications
  • Cottle, D 2022, ‘Harnessing the potential of recently retired physics teachers to mentor new physics teachers’, Physics Education, vol. 57, no. 1, 015020. https://doi.org/10.1088/1361-6552/ac3931
  • Cottle, D 2021, ‘Improving students’ mathematical skills in secondary science: ideas from mathematics pedagogy’, School Science Review, vol. 102, no. 381, pp. 61-64. <https://www.ase.org.uk/resources/school-science-review/issue-381/improving-students-mathematical-skills-in-secondary>
  • Cottle, D 2021, ‘The effects of Covid-19 on student transition from school to university in STEM subjects’, New Directions in the Teaching of Physical Sciences, vol. 16, no. 1, 3847, pp. 1-4. https://doi.org/10.29311/ndtps.v0i14.3847 
  • Cottle, D & Marshall, R 2016, ‘Exploring electrical resistance: a novel kinesthetic model helps to resolve some misconceptions’, Physics Education, vol. 51, no. 5. https://doi.org/10.1088/0031-9120/51/5/054004 

Chris is a third-year part time DPhil student. He is an experienced Director of Children’s Services working in London. He is interested in path dependence and whether it is a helpful concept to understand how children’s services work.

Yaoyao is a DPhil student in Education at Oxford.

Her research interest lies in Aptitude-Instruction-Interaction (ATI) in second language acquisition (SLA).

Yaoyao’s research investigates the mediating effects of individual differences in learners’ domain-general perceptual-cognitive abilities in instructed foreign language pronunciation acquisition in adulthood. She aims to further explore how aptitude hinders instructional effectiveness and help all students make the most of instruction regardless of aptitude profiles.

Yaoyao started her BA in the Japanese Language and Literature at Sun Yat-Sen University (中山大学) in China. She then moved to the University of Queensland to finish her BA with double majors in Japanese and Translation. After her BA, she worked as an English teacher in China for three years. Prior to her DPhil studies at Oxford, Yaoyao completed her Master’s degree in TESOL at Institute of Education, University College London. Her Master’s dissertation was supervised by Dr Kazuya Saito.

Pat is the Deputy Chief Executive of a large College Group.

A qualified accountant, she is accountable to the Corporation Board for the Group’s Estate, sustainability and for maintaining the Group’s outstanding financial health grade. Her specialisms include Leadership and Management, Identification and Application of Funding Streams as well as leading the Group in new acquisitions, ventures and developments. Pat is using her vast experience of public sector finances to explore the intersection of accounting, leadership and purpose.

Supervisors

James Robson and Ariel Lindorff

Alice received her Master’s in Child Study and Education from the Institute of Child Study at the University of Toronto. She has taught preschool through higher education as a teacher and principal in public and private schools in North America and Europe. Deeply committed to enhancing education, she believes in learning that connects students and teachers to the natural world and to their communities. She is actively involved in community organisations that promote intercultural, interracial, and interfaith understanding and allyship.

Supervisors

Steve Puttick

Victoria is an educational researcher and practitioner, specialising in educational support and methodology of teaching mathematics to low-achieving students. For over 9 years she has been working at Big Change Educational Centre (Moscow) which provides support to looked-after children.

Before joining the DPhil programme, she completed her undergraduate degree in Finance at Financial University in Moscow and then gained a MSc in Psychology of Education from the University of Bristol.

Victoria’s current research focuses on educational issues of care-experienced children and teaching mathematics to students of low achievement and motivation.

Supervisors

Karen Skilling and Gabriel Stylianides

Louise was born and raised in Glasgow and moved to Oxford to pursue a DPhil in Education.

Louise’s research interests are education policy, particularly higher education policy, as well as qualitative research into the experiences of students in higher education and reducing inequalities in access to higher education. Louise is also interested in educational capabilities, educational purpose, aspirations and philosophical debates about knowledge construction and co-construction. Louise has a First Class BA (Joint Honours) in Social Policy and Education from the University of Strathclyde, and two Masters degrees with Distinction also from the University of Strathclyde in Applied Educational and Social Research and Social Policy (Research Methods). Louise also participated in the University of Oxford’s UNIQ+ Graduate Access Programme in the summer of 2022, where she worked at the Department of Sociology with Melinda Mills, Bo Zhao and Evelina Akimova on research into the impact of socio-economic status on inequalities in access to veterinary care in Scotland. Louise’s DPhil thesis is interested in evaluating Lorella Terzi’s educational capabilities framework through the lens of contemporary higher education in order to gain an understanding of what graduate capabilities are identified by students and stakeholders as being necessary for enabling graduates to successfully thrive and adapt in a post-pandemic society.

 

Supervisors

Alis Oancea and Kelsey Inouye

Motema studied Neuroscience as an undergraduate at Dartmouth College in the USA and it is one of its courses, found interest in Education.

Motema then worked for various non-profit organisations in Lesotho and South Africa focusing on helping high school students from low SES backgrounds access opportunities to study in HE. In her Masters’ project Motema analysed Lesotho’s 2009 Curriculum and Assessment Policy. This analysis’ findings brought Motema to her current research interests which include gendered STEM education and decolonisation of education policies and curricula in Lesotho. For her DPhil project, Motema is interested in finding out the lived experiences of female Science teachers in Lesotho Secondary Schools especially focusing on the major changes in the Secondary school education system in Lesotho that have happened in the past five years as unique meeting points.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Judith Hillier

Danielle is a DPhil student researching how Black-British doctoral students navigate the spaces of the elite, providing a new theoretical framework to understand their agency better.

Her main interests are in Human Flourishing, Cultural Geography, Psychology, and Justice, and her work aims to inform and reform educational frameworks and practices.

Following Danielle’s BSc in Psychology and MRes in Research Methods in Psychology, she founded a social enterprise that merges psychological and academic strategies to guide undergraduate and master’s students study practices. In addition to this, Danielle provided pedagogical and behavioural support across SEN college, secondary and primary schools.

Some of Danielle’s notable work includes her research introducing a new University-wide EDI strategy at her former Higher Education institution, presenting insights and way-forwards on youth homelessness to HRH Prince Williams, and providing discipleship to next-gen leaders.

Dan is a part-time DPhil Education student whose research focuses on investigating reasons why individuals choose to study and then teach physics as a subject discipline and how these relate to issues of equity and power. He previously worked as a secondary school physics teacher in the West Midlands of England for around 15 years before taking up his current post as Associate Professor of Physics Education at the University of Birmingham where he works in widening participation in physics and teacher education.

Publications
  • Cottle, D 2022, ‘Harnessing the potential of recently retired physics teachers to mentor new physics teachers’, Physics Education, vol. 57, no. 1, 015020. https://doi.org/10.1088/1361-6552/ac3931
  • Cottle, D 2021, ‘Improving students’ mathematical skills in secondary science: ideas from mathematics pedagogy’, School Science Review, vol. 102, no. 381, pp. 61-64. <https://www.ase.org.uk/resources/school-science-review/issue-381/improving-students-mathematical-skills-in-secondary>
  • Cottle, D 2021, ‘The effects of Covid-19 on student transition from school to university in STEM subjects’, New Directions in the Teaching of Physical Sciences, vol. 16, no. 1, 3847, pp. 1-4. https://doi.org/10.29311/ndtps.v0i14.3847 
  • Cottle, D & Marshall, R 2016, ‘Exploring electrical resistance: a novel kinesthetic model helps to resolve some misconceptions’, Physics Education, vol. 51, no. 5. https://doi.org/10.1088/0031-9120/51/5/054004 

Chris is a third-year part time DPhil student. He is an experienced Director of Children’s Services working in London. He is interested in path dependence and whether it is a helpful concept to understand how children’s services work.

Yaoyao is a DPhil student in Education at Oxford.

Her research interest lies in Aptitude-Instruction-Interaction (ATI) in second language acquisition (SLA).

Yaoyao’s research investigates the mediating effects of individual differences in learners’ domain-general perceptual-cognitive abilities in instructed foreign language pronunciation acquisition in adulthood. She aims to further explore how aptitude hinders instructional effectiveness and help all students make the most of instruction regardless of aptitude profiles.

Yaoyao started her BA in the Japanese Language and Literature at Sun Yat-Sen University (中山大学) in China. She then moved to the University of Queensland to finish her BA with double majors in Japanese and Translation. After her BA, she worked as an English teacher in China for three years. Prior to her DPhil studies at Oxford, Yaoyao completed her Master’s degree in TESOL at Institute of Education, University College London. Her Master’s dissertation was supervised by Dr Kazuya Saito.

Pat is the Deputy Chief Executive of a large College Group.

A qualified accountant, she is accountable to the Corporation Board for the Group’s Estate, sustainability and for maintaining the Group’s outstanding financial health grade. Her specialisms include Leadership and Management, Identification and Application of Funding Streams as well as leading the Group in new acquisitions, ventures and developments. Pat is using her vast experience of public sector finances to explore the intersection of accounting, leadership and purpose.

Supervisors

James Robson and Ariel Lindorff

Alice received her Master’s in Child Study and Education from the Institute of Child Study at the University of Toronto. She has taught preschool through higher education as a teacher and principal in public and private schools in North America and Europe. Deeply committed to enhancing education, she believes in learning that connects students and teachers to the natural world and to their communities. She is actively involved in community organisations that promote intercultural, interracial, and interfaith understanding and allyship.

Supervisors

Steve Puttick

Victoria is an educational researcher and practitioner, specialising in educational support and methodology of teaching mathematics to low-achieving students. For over 9 years she has been working at Big Change Educational Centre (Moscow) which provides support to looked-after children.

Before joining the DPhil programme, she completed her undergraduate degree in Finance at Financial University in Moscow and then gained a MSc in Psychology of Education from the University of Bristol.

Victoria’s current research focuses on educational issues of care-experienced children and teaching mathematics to students of low achievement and motivation.

Supervisors

Karen Skilling and Gabriel Stylianides

Louise was born and raised in Glasgow and moved to Oxford to pursue a DPhil in Education.

Louise’s research interests are education policy, particularly higher education policy, as well as qualitative research into the experiences of students in higher education and reducing inequalities in access to higher education. Louise is also interested in educational capabilities, educational purpose, aspirations and philosophical debates about knowledge construction and co-construction. Louise has a First Class BA (Joint Honours) in Social Policy and Education from the University of Strathclyde, and two Masters degrees with Distinction also from the University of Strathclyde in Applied Educational and Social Research and Social Policy (Research Methods). Louise also participated in the University of Oxford’s UNIQ+ Graduate Access Programme in the summer of 2022, where she worked at the Department of Sociology with Melinda Mills, Bo Zhao and Evelina Akimova on research into the impact of socio-economic status on inequalities in access to veterinary care in Scotland. Louise’s DPhil thesis is interested in evaluating Lorella Terzi’s educational capabilities framework through the lens of contemporary higher education in order to gain an understanding of what graduate capabilities are identified by students and stakeholders as being necessary for enabling graduates to successfully thrive and adapt in a post-pandemic society.

 

Supervisors

Alis Oancea and Kelsey Inouye

Motema studied Neuroscience as an undergraduate at Dartmouth College in the USA and it is one of its courses, found interest in Education.

Motema then worked for various non-profit organisations in Lesotho and South Africa focusing on helping high school students from low SES backgrounds access opportunities to study in HE. In her Masters’ project Motema analysed Lesotho’s 2009 Curriculum and Assessment Policy. This analysis’ findings brought Motema to her current research interests which include gendered STEM education and decolonisation of education policies and curricula in Lesotho. For her DPhil project, Motema is interested in finding out the lived experiences of female Science teachers in Lesotho Secondary Schools especially focusing on the major changes in the Secondary school education system in Lesotho that have happened in the past five years as unique meeting points.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Judith Hillier

Danielle is a DPhil student researching how Black-British doctoral students navigate the spaces of the elite, providing a new theoretical framework to understand their agency better.

Her main interests are in Human Flourishing, Cultural Geography, Psychology, and Justice, and her work aims to inform and reform educational frameworks and practices.

Following Danielle’s BSc in Psychology and MRes in Research Methods in Psychology, she founded a social enterprise that merges psychological and academic strategies to guide undergraduate and master’s students study practices. In addition to this, Danielle provided pedagogical and behavioural support across SEN college, secondary and primary schools.

Some of Danielle’s notable work includes her research introducing a new University-wide EDI strategy at her former Higher Education institution, presenting insights and way-forwards on youth homelessness to HRH Prince Williams, and providing discipleship to next-gen leaders.

Dan is a part-time DPhil Education student whose research focuses on investigating reasons why individuals choose to study and then teach physics as a subject discipline and how these relate to issues of equity and power. He previously worked as a secondary school physics teacher in the West Midlands of England for around 15 years before taking up his current post as Associate Professor of Physics Education at the University of Birmingham where he works in widening participation in physics and teacher education.

Publications
  • Cottle, D 2022, ‘Harnessing the potential of recently retired physics teachers to mentor new physics teachers’, Physics Education, vol. 57, no. 1, 015020. https://doi.org/10.1088/1361-6552/ac3931
  • Cottle, D 2021, ‘Improving students’ mathematical skills in secondary science: ideas from mathematics pedagogy’, School Science Review, vol. 102, no. 381, pp. 61-64. <https://www.ase.org.uk/resources/school-science-review/issue-381/improving-students-mathematical-skills-in-secondary>
  • Cottle, D 2021, ‘The effects of Covid-19 on student transition from school to university in STEM subjects’, New Directions in the Teaching of Physical Sciences, vol. 16, no. 1, 3847, pp. 1-4. https://doi.org/10.29311/ndtps.v0i14.3847 
  • Cottle, D & Marshall, R 2016, ‘Exploring electrical resistance: a novel kinesthetic model helps to resolve some misconceptions’, Physics Education, vol. 51, no. 5. https://doi.org/10.1088/0031-9120/51/5/054004 

Chris is a third-year part time DPhil student. He is an experienced Director of Children’s Services working in London. He is interested in path dependence and whether it is a helpful concept to understand how children’s services work.

Yaoyao is a DPhil student in Education at Oxford.

Her research interest lies in Aptitude-Instruction-Interaction (ATI) in second language acquisition (SLA).

Yaoyao’s research investigates the mediating effects of individual differences in learners’ domain-general perceptual-cognitive abilities in instructed foreign language pronunciation acquisition in adulthood. She aims to further explore how aptitude hinders instructional effectiveness and help all students make the most of instruction regardless of aptitude profiles.

Yaoyao started her BA in the Japanese Language and Literature at Sun Yat-Sen University (中山大学) in China. She then moved to the University of Queensland to finish her BA with double majors in Japanese and Translation. After her BA, she worked as an English teacher in China for three years. Prior to her DPhil studies at Oxford, Yaoyao completed her Master’s degree in TESOL at Institute of Education, University College London. Her Master’s dissertation was supervised by Dr Kazuya Saito.

Pat is the Deputy Chief Executive of a large College Group.

A qualified accountant, she is accountable to the Corporation Board for the Group’s Estate, sustainability and for maintaining the Group’s outstanding financial health grade. Her specialisms include Leadership and Management, Identification and Application of Funding Streams as well as leading the Group in new acquisitions, ventures and developments. Pat is using her vast experience of public sector finances to explore the intersection of accounting, leadership and purpose.

Supervisors

James Robson and Ariel Lindorff

Alice received her Master’s in Child Study and Education from the Institute of Child Study at the University of Toronto. She has taught preschool through higher education as a teacher and principal in public and private schools in North America and Europe. Deeply committed to enhancing education, she believes in learning that connects students and teachers to the natural world and to their communities. She is actively involved in community organisations that promote intercultural, interracial, and interfaith understanding and allyship.

Supervisors

Steve Puttick

Victoria is an educational researcher and practitioner, specialising in educational support and methodology of teaching mathematics to low-achieving students. For over 9 years she has been working at Big Change Educational Centre (Moscow) which provides support to looked-after children.

Before joining the DPhil programme, she completed her undergraduate degree in Finance at Financial University in Moscow and then gained a MSc in Psychology of Education from the University of Bristol.

Victoria’s current research focuses on educational issues of care-experienced children and teaching mathematics to students of low achievement and motivation.

Supervisors

Karen Skilling and Gabriel Stylianides

Louise was born and raised in Glasgow and moved to Oxford to pursue a DPhil in Education.

Louise’s research interests are education policy, particularly higher education policy, as well as qualitative research into the experiences of students in higher education and reducing inequalities in access to higher education. Louise is also interested in educational capabilities, educational purpose, aspirations and philosophical debates about knowledge construction and co-construction. Louise has a First Class BA (Joint Honours) in Social Policy and Education from the University of Strathclyde, and two Masters degrees with Distinction also from the University of Strathclyde in Applied Educational and Social Research and Social Policy (Research Methods). Louise also participated in the University of Oxford’s UNIQ+ Graduate Access Programme in the summer of 2022, where she worked at the Department of Sociology with Melinda Mills, Bo Zhao and Evelina Akimova on research into the impact of socio-economic status on inequalities in access to veterinary care in Scotland. Louise’s DPhil thesis is interested in evaluating Lorella Terzi’s educational capabilities framework through the lens of contemporary higher education in order to gain an understanding of what graduate capabilities are identified by students and stakeholders as being necessary for enabling graduates to successfully thrive and adapt in a post-pandemic society.

 

Supervisors

Alis Oancea and Kelsey Inouye

Motema studied Neuroscience as an undergraduate at Dartmouth College in the USA and it is one of its courses, found interest in Education.

Motema then worked for various non-profit organisations in Lesotho and South Africa focusing on helping high school students from low SES backgrounds access opportunities to study in HE. In her Masters’ project Motema analysed Lesotho’s 2009 Curriculum and Assessment Policy. This analysis’ findings brought Motema to her current research interests which include gendered STEM education and decolonisation of education policies and curricula in Lesotho. For her DPhil project, Motema is interested in finding out the lived experiences of female Science teachers in Lesotho Secondary Schools especially focusing on the major changes in the Secondary school education system in Lesotho that have happened in the past five years as unique meeting points.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Judith Hillier

Danielle is a DPhil student researching how Black-British doctoral students navigate the spaces of the elite, providing a new theoretical framework to understand their agency better.

Her main interests are in Human Flourishing, Cultural Geography, Psychology, and Justice, and her work aims to inform and reform educational frameworks and practices.

Following Danielle’s BSc in Psychology and MRes in Research Methods in Psychology, she founded a social enterprise that merges psychological and academic strategies to guide undergraduate and master’s students study practices. In addition to this, Danielle provided pedagogical and behavioural support across SEN college, secondary and primary schools.

Some of Danielle’s notable work includes her research introducing a new University-wide EDI strategy at her former Higher Education institution, presenting insights and way-forwards on youth homelessness to HRH Prince Williams, and providing discipleship to next-gen leaders.

Dan is a part-time DPhil Education student whose research focuses on investigating reasons why individuals choose to study and then teach physics as a subject discipline and how these relate to issues of equity and power. He previously worked as a secondary school physics teacher in the West Midlands of England for around 15 years before taking up his current post as Associate Professor of Physics Education at the University of Birmingham where he works in widening participation in physics and teacher education.

Publications
  • Cottle, D 2022, ‘Harnessing the potential of recently retired physics teachers to mentor new physics teachers’, Physics Education, vol. 57, no. 1, 015020. https://doi.org/10.1088/1361-6552/ac3931
  • Cottle, D 2021, ‘Improving students’ mathematical skills in secondary science: ideas from mathematics pedagogy’, School Science Review, vol. 102, no. 381, pp. 61-64. <https://www.ase.org.uk/resources/school-science-review/issue-381/improving-students-mathematical-skills-in-secondary>
  • Cottle, D 2021, ‘The effects of Covid-19 on student transition from school to university in STEM subjects’, New Directions in the Teaching of Physical Sciences, vol. 16, no. 1, 3847, pp. 1-4. https://doi.org/10.29311/ndtps.v0i14.3847 
  • Cottle, D & Marshall, R 2016, ‘Exploring electrical resistance: a novel kinesthetic model helps to resolve some misconceptions’, Physics Education, vol. 51, no. 5. https://doi.org/10.1088/0031-9120/51/5/054004 

Chris is a third-year part time DPhil student. He is an experienced Director of Children’s Services working in London. He is interested in path dependence and whether it is a helpful concept to understand how children’s services work.

Yaoyao is a DPhil student in Education at Oxford.

Her research interest lies in Aptitude-Instruction-Interaction (ATI) in second language acquisition (SLA).

Yaoyao’s research investigates the mediating effects of individual differences in learners’ domain-general perceptual-cognitive abilities in instructed foreign language pronunciation acquisition in adulthood. She aims to further explore how aptitude hinders instructional effectiveness and help all students make the most of instruction regardless of aptitude profiles.

Yaoyao started her BA in the Japanese Language and Literature at Sun Yat-Sen University (中山大学) in China. She then moved to the University of Queensland to finish her BA with double majors in Japanese and Translation. After her BA, she worked as an English teacher in China for three years. Prior to her DPhil studies at Oxford, Yaoyao completed her Master’s degree in TESOL at Institute of Education, University College London. Her Master’s dissertation was supervised by Dr Kazuya Saito.

Pat is the Deputy Chief Executive of a large College Group.

A qualified accountant, she is accountable to the Corporation Board for the Group’s Estate, sustainability and for maintaining the Group’s outstanding financial health grade. Her specialisms include Leadership and Management, Identification and Application of Funding Streams as well as leading the Group in new acquisitions, ventures and developments. Pat is using her vast experience of public sector finances to explore the intersection of accounting, leadership and purpose.

Supervisors

James Robson and Ariel Lindorff

Alice received her Master’s in Child Study and Education from the Institute of Child Study at the University of Toronto. She has taught preschool through higher education as a teacher and principal in public and private schools in North America and Europe. Deeply committed to enhancing education, she believes in learning that connects students and teachers to the natural world and to their communities. She is actively involved in community organisations that promote intercultural, interracial, and interfaith understanding and allyship.

Supervisors

Steve Puttick

Victoria is an educational researcher and practitioner, specialising in educational support and methodology of teaching mathematics to low-achieving students. For over 9 years she has been working at Big Change Educational Centre (Moscow) which provides support to looked-after children.

Before joining the DPhil programme, she completed her undergraduate degree in Finance at Financial University in Moscow and then gained a MSc in Psychology of Education from the University of Bristol.

Victoria’s current research focuses on educational issues of care-experienced children and teaching mathematics to students of low achievement and motivation.

Supervisors

Karen Skilling and Gabriel Stylianides

Louise was born and raised in Glasgow and moved to Oxford to pursue a DPhil in Education.

Louise’s research interests are education policy, particularly higher education policy, as well as qualitative research into the experiences of students in higher education and reducing inequalities in access to higher education. Louise is also interested in educational capabilities, educational purpose, aspirations and philosophical debates about knowledge construction and co-construction. Louise has a First Class BA (Joint Honours) in Social Policy and Education from the University of Strathclyde, and two Masters degrees with Distinction also from the University of Strathclyde in Applied Educational and Social Research and Social Policy (Research Methods). Louise also participated in the University of Oxford’s UNIQ+ Graduate Access Programme in the summer of 2022, where she worked at the Department of Sociology with Melinda Mills, Bo Zhao and Evelina Akimova on research into the impact of socio-economic status on inequalities in access to veterinary care in Scotland. Louise’s DPhil thesis is interested in evaluating Lorella Terzi’s educational capabilities framework through the lens of contemporary higher education in order to gain an understanding of what graduate capabilities are identified by students and stakeholders as being necessary for enabling graduates to successfully thrive and adapt in a post-pandemic society.

 

Supervisors

Alis Oancea and Kelsey Inouye

Motema studied Neuroscience as an undergraduate at Dartmouth College in the USA and it is one of its courses, found interest in Education.

Motema then worked for various non-profit organisations in Lesotho and South Africa focusing on helping high school students from low SES backgrounds access opportunities to study in HE. In her Masters’ project Motema analysed Lesotho’s 2009 Curriculum and Assessment Policy. This analysis’ findings brought Motema to her current research interests which include gendered STEM education and decolonisation of education policies and curricula in Lesotho. For her DPhil project, Motema is interested in finding out the lived experiences of female Science teachers in Lesotho Secondary Schools especially focusing on the major changes in the Secondary school education system in Lesotho that have happened in the past five years as unique meeting points.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Judith Hillier

Danielle is a DPhil student researching how Black-British doctoral students navigate the spaces of the elite, providing a new theoretical framework to understand their agency better.

Her main interests are in Human Flourishing, Cultural Geography, Psychology, and Justice, and her work aims to inform and reform educational frameworks and practices.

Following Danielle’s BSc in Psychology and MRes in Research Methods in Psychology, she founded a social enterprise that merges psychological and academic strategies to guide undergraduate and master’s students study practices. In addition to this, Danielle provided pedagogical and behavioural support across SEN college, secondary and primary schools.

Some of Danielle’s notable work includes her research introducing a new University-wide EDI strategy at her former Higher Education institution, presenting insights and way-forwards on youth homelessness to HRH Prince Williams, and providing discipleship to next-gen leaders.

Dan is a part-time DPhil Education student whose research focuses on investigating reasons why individuals choose to study and then teach physics as a subject discipline and how these relate to issues of equity and power. He previously worked as a secondary school physics teacher in the West Midlands of England for around 15 years before taking up his current post as Associate Professor of Physics Education at the University of Birmingham where he works in widening participation in physics and teacher education.

Publications
  • Cottle, D 2022, ‘Harnessing the potential of recently retired physics teachers to mentor new physics teachers’, Physics Education, vol. 57, no. 1, 015020. https://doi.org/10.1088/1361-6552/ac3931
  • Cottle, D 2021, ‘Improving students’ mathematical skills in secondary science: ideas from mathematics pedagogy’, School Science Review, vol. 102, no. 381, pp. 61-64. <https://www.ase.org.uk/resources/school-science-review/issue-381/improving-students-mathematical-skills-in-secondary>
  • Cottle, D 2021, ‘The effects of Covid-19 on student transition from school to university in STEM subjects’, New Directions in the Teaching of Physical Sciences, vol. 16, no. 1, 3847, pp. 1-4. https://doi.org/10.29311/ndtps.v0i14.3847 
  • Cottle, D & Marshall, R 2016, ‘Exploring electrical resistance: a novel kinesthetic model helps to resolve some misconceptions’, Physics Education, vol. 51, no. 5. https://doi.org/10.1088/0031-9120/51/5/054004 

Chris is a third-year part time DPhil student. He is an experienced Director of Children’s Services working in London. He is interested in path dependence and whether it is a helpful concept to understand how children’s services work.

Yaoyao is a DPhil student in Education at Oxford.

Her research interest lies in Aptitude-Instruction-Interaction (ATI) in second language acquisition (SLA).

Yaoyao’s research investigates the mediating effects of individual differences in learners’ domain-general perceptual-cognitive abilities in instructed foreign language pronunciation acquisition in adulthood. She aims to further explore how aptitude hinders instructional effectiveness and help all students make the most of instruction regardless of aptitude profiles.

Yaoyao started her BA in the Japanese Language and Literature at Sun Yat-Sen University (中山大学) in China. She then moved to the University of Queensland to finish her BA with double majors in Japanese and Translation. After her BA, she worked as an English teacher in China for three years. Prior to her DPhil studies at Oxford, Yaoyao completed her Master’s degree in TESOL at Institute of Education, University College London. Her Master’s dissertation was supervised by Dr Kazuya Saito.

Pat is the Deputy Chief Executive of a large College Group.

A qualified accountant, she is accountable to the Corporation Board for the Group’s Estate, sustainability and for maintaining the Group’s outstanding financial health grade. Her specialisms include Leadership and Management, Identification and Application of Funding Streams as well as leading the Group in new acquisitions, ventures and developments. Pat is using her vast experience of public sector finances to explore the intersection of accounting, leadership and purpose.

Supervisors

James Robson and Ariel Lindorff

Alice received her Master’s in Child Study and Education from the Institute of Child Study at the University of Toronto. She has taught preschool through higher education as a teacher and principal in public and private schools in North America and Europe. Deeply committed to enhancing education, she believes in learning that connects students and teachers to the natural world and to their communities. She is actively involved in community organisations that promote intercultural, interracial, and interfaith understanding and allyship.

Supervisors

Steve Puttick

Victoria is an educational researcher and practitioner, specialising in educational support and methodology of teaching mathematics to low-achieving students. For over 9 years she has been working at Big Change Educational Centre (Moscow) which provides support to looked-after children.

Before joining the DPhil programme, she completed her undergraduate degree in Finance at Financial University in Moscow and then gained a MSc in Psychology of Education from the University of Bristol.

Victoria’s current research focuses on educational issues of care-experienced children and teaching mathematics to students of low achievement and motivation.

Supervisors

Karen Skilling and Gabriel Stylianides

Louise was born and raised in Glasgow and moved to Oxford to pursue a DPhil in Education.

Louise’s research interests are education policy, particularly higher education policy, as well as qualitative research into the experiences of students in higher education and reducing inequalities in access to higher education. Louise is also interested in educational capabilities, educational purpose, aspirations and philosophical debates about knowledge construction and co-construction. Louise has a First Class BA (Joint Honours) in Social Policy and Education from the University of Strathclyde, and two Masters degrees with Distinction also from the University of Strathclyde in Applied Educational and Social Research and Social Policy (Research Methods). Louise also participated in the University of Oxford’s UNIQ+ Graduate Access Programme in the summer of 2022, where she worked at the Department of Sociology with Melinda Mills, Bo Zhao and Evelina Akimova on research into the impact of socio-economic status on inequalities in access to veterinary care in Scotland. Louise’s DPhil thesis is interested in evaluating Lorella Terzi’s educational capabilities framework through the lens of contemporary higher education in order to gain an understanding of what graduate capabilities are identified by students and stakeholders as being necessary for enabling graduates to successfully thrive and adapt in a post-pandemic society.

 

Supervisors

Alis Oancea and Kelsey Inouye

Motema studied Neuroscience as an undergraduate at Dartmouth College in the USA and it is one of its courses, found interest in Education.

Motema then worked for various non-profit organisations in Lesotho and South Africa focusing on helping high school students from low SES backgrounds access opportunities to study in HE. In her Masters’ project Motema analysed Lesotho’s 2009 Curriculum and Assessment Policy. This analysis’ findings brought Motema to her current research interests which include gendered STEM education and decolonisation of education policies and curricula in Lesotho. For her DPhil project, Motema is interested in finding out the lived experiences of female Science teachers in Lesotho Secondary Schools especially focusing on the major changes in the Secondary school education system in Lesotho that have happened in the past five years as unique meeting points.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Judith Hillier

Danielle is a DPhil student researching how Black-British doctoral students navigate the spaces of the elite, providing a new theoretical framework to understand their agency better.

Her main interests are in Human Flourishing, Cultural Geography, Psychology, and Justice, and her work aims to inform and reform educational frameworks and practices.

Following Danielle’s BSc in Psychology and MRes in Research Methods in Psychology, she founded a social enterprise that merges psychological and academic strategies to guide undergraduate and master’s students study practices. In addition to this, Danielle provided pedagogical and behavioural support across SEN college, secondary and primary schools.

Some of Danielle’s notable work includes her research introducing a new University-wide EDI strategy at her former Higher Education institution, presenting insights and way-forwards on youth homelessness to HRH Prince Williams, and providing discipleship to next-gen leaders.

Dan is a part-time DPhil Education student whose research focuses on investigating reasons why individuals choose to study and then teach physics as a subject discipline and how these relate to issues of equity and power. He previously worked as a secondary school physics teacher in the West Midlands of England for around 15 years before taking up his current post as Associate Professor of Physics Education at the University of Birmingham where he works in widening participation in physics and teacher education.

Publications
  • Cottle, D 2022, ‘Harnessing the potential of recently retired physics teachers to mentor new physics teachers’, Physics Education, vol. 57, no. 1, 015020. https://doi.org/10.1088/1361-6552/ac3931
  • Cottle, D 2021, ‘Improving students’ mathematical skills in secondary science: ideas from mathematics pedagogy’, School Science Review, vol. 102, no. 381, pp. 61-64. <https://www.ase.org.uk/resources/school-science-review/issue-381/improving-students-mathematical-skills-in-secondary>
  • Cottle, D 2021, ‘The effects of Covid-19 on student transition from school to university in STEM subjects’, New Directions in the Teaching of Physical Sciences, vol. 16, no. 1, 3847, pp. 1-4. https://doi.org/10.29311/ndtps.v0i14.3847 
  • Cottle, D & Marshall, R 2016, ‘Exploring electrical resistance: a novel kinesthetic model helps to resolve some misconceptions’, Physics Education, vol. 51, no. 5. https://doi.org/10.1088/0031-9120/51/5/054004 

Chris is a third-year part time DPhil student. He is an experienced Director of Children’s Services working in London. He is interested in path dependence and whether it is a helpful concept to understand how children’s services work.

Yaoyao is a DPhil student in Education at Oxford.

Her research interest lies in Aptitude-Instruction-Interaction (ATI) in second language acquisition (SLA).

Yaoyao’s research investigates the mediating effects of individual differences in learners’ domain-general perceptual-cognitive abilities in instructed foreign language pronunciation acquisition in adulthood. She aims to further explore how aptitude hinders instructional effectiveness and help all students make the most of instruction regardless of aptitude profiles.

Yaoyao started her BA in the Japanese Language and Literature at Sun Yat-Sen University (中山大学) in China. She then moved to the University of Queensland to finish her BA with double majors in Japanese and Translation. After her BA, she worked as an English teacher in China for three years. Prior to her DPhil studies at Oxford, Yaoyao completed her Master’s degree in TESOL at Institute of Education, University College London. Her Master’s dissertation was supervised by Dr Kazuya Saito.

Pat is the Deputy Chief Executive of a large College Group.

A qualified accountant, she is accountable to the Corporation Board for the Group’s Estate, sustainability and for maintaining the Group’s outstanding financial health grade. Her specialisms include Leadership and Management, Identification and Application of Funding Streams as well as leading the Group in new acquisitions, ventures and developments. Pat is using her vast experience of public sector finances to explore the intersection of accounting, leadership and purpose.

Supervisors

James Robson and Ariel Lindorff

Alice received her Master’s in Child Study and Education from the Institute of Child Study at the University of Toronto. She has taught preschool through higher education as a teacher and principal in public and private schools in North America and Europe. Deeply committed to enhancing education, she believes in learning that connects students and teachers to the natural world and to their communities. She is actively involved in community organisations that promote intercultural, interracial, and interfaith understanding and allyship.

Supervisors

Steve Puttick

Victoria is an educational researcher and practitioner, specialising in educational support and methodology of teaching mathematics to low-achieving students. For over 9 years she has been working at Big Change Educational Centre (Moscow) which provides support to looked-after children.

Before joining the DPhil programme, she completed her undergraduate degree in Finance at Financial University in Moscow and then gained a MSc in Psychology of Education from the University of Bristol.

Victoria’s current research focuses on educational issues of care-experienced children and teaching mathematics to students of low achievement and motivation.

Supervisors

Karen Skilling and Gabriel Stylianides

Louise was born and raised in Glasgow and moved to Oxford to pursue a DPhil in Education.

Louise’s research interests are education policy, particularly higher education policy, as well as qualitative research into the experiences of students in higher education and reducing inequalities in access to higher education. Louise is also interested in educational capabilities, educational purpose, aspirations and philosophical debates about knowledge construction and co-construction. Louise has a First Class BA (Joint Honours) in Social Policy and Education from the University of Strathclyde, and two Masters degrees with Distinction also from the University of Strathclyde in Applied Educational and Social Research and Social Policy (Research Methods). Louise also participated in the University of Oxford’s UNIQ+ Graduate Access Programme in the summer of 2022, where she worked at the Department of Sociology with Melinda Mills, Bo Zhao and Evelina Akimova on research into the impact of socio-economic status on inequalities in access to veterinary care in Scotland. Louise’s DPhil thesis is interested in evaluating Lorella Terzi’s educational capabilities framework through the lens of contemporary higher education in order to gain an understanding of what graduate capabilities are identified by students and stakeholders as being necessary for enabling graduates to successfully thrive and adapt in a post-pandemic society.

 

Supervisors

Alis Oancea and Kelsey Inouye

Motema studied Neuroscience as an undergraduate at Dartmouth College in the USA and it is one of its courses, found interest in Education.

Motema then worked for various non-profit organisations in Lesotho and South Africa focusing on helping high school students from low SES backgrounds access opportunities to study in HE. In her Masters’ project Motema analysed Lesotho’s 2009 Curriculum and Assessment Policy. This analysis’ findings brought Motema to her current research interests which include gendered STEM education and decolonisation of education policies and curricula in Lesotho. For her DPhil project, Motema is interested in finding out the lived experiences of female Science teachers in Lesotho Secondary Schools especially focusing on the major changes in the Secondary school education system in Lesotho that have happened in the past five years as unique meeting points.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Judith Hillier

Danielle is a DPhil student researching how Black-British doctoral students navigate the spaces of the elite, providing a new theoretical framework to understand their agency better.

Her main interests are in Human Flourishing, Cultural Geography, Psychology, and Justice, and her work aims to inform and reform educational frameworks and practices.

Following Danielle’s BSc in Psychology and MRes in Research Methods in Psychology, she founded a social enterprise that merges psychological and academic strategies to guide undergraduate and master’s students study practices. In addition to this, Danielle provided pedagogical and behavioural support across SEN college, secondary and primary schools.

Some of Danielle’s notable work includes her research introducing a new University-wide EDI strategy at her former Higher Education institution, presenting insights and way-forwards on youth homelessness to HRH Prince Williams, and providing discipleship to next-gen leaders.

Dan is a part-time DPhil Education student whose research focuses on investigating reasons why individuals choose to study and then teach physics as a subject discipline and how these relate to issues of equity and power. He previously worked as a secondary school physics teacher in the West Midlands of England for around 15 years before taking up his current post as Associate Professor of Physics Education at the University of Birmingham where he works in widening participation in physics and teacher education.

Publications
  • Cottle, D 2022, ‘Harnessing the potential of recently retired physics teachers to mentor new physics teachers’, Physics Education, vol. 57, no. 1, 015020. https://doi.org/10.1088/1361-6552/ac3931
  • Cottle, D 2021, ‘Improving students’ mathematical skills in secondary science: ideas from mathematics pedagogy’, School Science Review, vol. 102, no. 381, pp. 61-64. <https://www.ase.org.uk/resources/school-science-review/issue-381/improving-students-mathematical-skills-in-secondary>
  • Cottle, D 2021, ‘The effects of Covid-19 on student transition from school to university in STEM subjects’, New Directions in the Teaching of Physical Sciences, vol. 16, no. 1, 3847, pp. 1-4. https://doi.org/10.29311/ndtps.v0i14.3847 
  • Cottle, D & Marshall, R 2016, ‘Exploring electrical resistance: a novel kinesthetic model helps to resolve some misconceptions’, Physics Education, vol. 51, no. 5. https://doi.org/10.1088/0031-9120/51/5/054004 

Chris is a third-year part time DPhil student. He is an experienced Director of Children’s Services working in London. He is interested in path dependence and whether it is a helpful concept to understand how children’s services work.

Yaoyao is a DPhil student in Education at Oxford.

Her research interest lies in Aptitude-Instruction-Interaction (ATI) in second language acquisition (SLA).

Yaoyao’s research investigates the mediating effects of individual differences in learners’ domain-general perceptual-cognitive abilities in instructed foreign language pronunciation acquisition in adulthood. She aims to further explore how aptitude hinders instructional effectiveness and help all students make the most of instruction regardless of aptitude profiles.

Yaoyao started her BA in the Japanese Language and Literature at Sun Yat-Sen University (中山大学) in China. She then moved to the University of Queensland to finish her BA with double majors in Japanese and Translation. After her BA, she worked as an English teacher in China for three years. Prior to her DPhil studies at Oxford, Yaoyao completed her Master’s degree in TESOL at Institute of Education, University College London. Her Master’s dissertation was supervised by Dr Kazuya Saito.

Pat is the Deputy Chief Executive of a large College Group.

A qualified accountant, she is accountable to the Corporation Board for the Group’s Estate, sustainability and for maintaining the Group’s outstanding financial health grade. Her specialisms include Leadership and Management, Identification and Application of Funding Streams as well as leading the Group in new acquisitions, ventures and developments. Pat is using her vast experience of public sector finances to explore the intersection of accounting, leadership and purpose.

Supervisors

James Robson and Ariel Lindorff

Alice received her Master’s in Child Study and Education from the Institute of Child Study at the University of Toronto. She has taught preschool through higher education as a teacher and principal in public and private schools in North America and Europe. Deeply committed to enhancing education, she believes in learning that connects students and teachers to the natural world and to their communities. She is actively involved in community organisations that promote intercultural, interracial, and interfaith understanding and allyship.

Supervisors

Steve Puttick

Victoria is an educational researcher and practitioner, specialising in educational support and methodology of teaching mathematics to low-achieving students. For over 9 years she has been working at Big Change Educational Centre (Moscow) which provides support to looked-after children.

Before joining the DPhil programme, she completed her undergraduate degree in Finance at Financial University in Moscow and then gained a MSc in Psychology of Education from the University of Bristol.

Victoria’s current research focuses on educational issues of care-experienced children and teaching mathematics to students of low achievement and motivation.

Supervisors

Karen Skilling and Gabriel Stylianides

Louise was born and raised in Glasgow and moved to Oxford to pursue a DPhil in Education.

Louise’s research interests are education policy, particularly higher education policy, as well as qualitative research into the experiences of students in higher education and reducing inequalities in access to higher education. Louise is also interested in educational capabilities, educational purpose, aspirations and philosophical debates about knowledge construction and co-construction. Louise has a First Class BA (Joint Honours) in Social Policy and Education from the University of Strathclyde, and two Masters degrees with Distinction also from the University of Strathclyde in Applied Educational and Social Research and Social Policy (Research Methods). Louise also participated in the University of Oxford’s UNIQ+ Graduate Access Programme in the summer of 2022, where she worked at the Department of Sociology with Melinda Mills, Bo Zhao and Evelina Akimova on research into the impact of socio-economic status on inequalities in access to veterinary care in Scotland. Louise’s DPhil thesis is interested in evaluating Lorella Terzi’s educational capabilities framework through the lens of contemporary higher education in order to gain an understanding of what graduate capabilities are identified by students and stakeholders as being necessary for enabling graduates to successfully thrive and adapt in a post-pandemic society.

 

Supervisors

Alis Oancea and Kelsey Inouye

Motema studied Neuroscience as an undergraduate at Dartmouth College in the USA and it is one of its courses, found interest in Education.

Motema then worked for various non-profit organisations in Lesotho and South Africa focusing on helping high school students from low SES backgrounds access opportunities to study in HE. In her Masters’ project Motema analysed Lesotho’s 2009 Curriculum and Assessment Policy. This analysis’ findings brought Motema to her current research interests which include gendered STEM education and decolonisation of education policies and curricula in Lesotho. For her DPhil project, Motema is interested in finding out the lived experiences of female Science teachers in Lesotho Secondary Schools especially focusing on the major changes in the Secondary school education system in Lesotho that have happened in the past five years as unique meeting points.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Judith Hillier

Danielle is a DPhil student researching how Black-British doctoral students navigate the spaces of the elite, providing a new theoretical framework to understand their agency better.

Her main interests are in Human Flourishing, Cultural Geography, Psychology, and Justice, and her work aims to inform and reform educational frameworks and practices.

Following Danielle’s BSc in Psychology and MRes in Research Methods in Psychology, she founded a social enterprise that merges psychological and academic strategies to guide undergraduate and master’s students study practices. In addition to this, Danielle provided pedagogical and behavioural support across SEN college, secondary and primary schools.

Some of Danielle’s notable work includes her research introducing a new University-wide EDI strategy at her former Higher Education institution, presenting insights and way-forwards on youth homelessness to HRH Prince Williams, and providing discipleship to next-gen leaders.

Dan is a part-time DPhil Education student whose research focuses on investigating reasons why individuals choose to study and then teach physics as a subject discipline and how these relate to issues of equity and power. He previously worked as a secondary school physics teacher in the West Midlands of England for around 15 years before taking up his current post as Associate Professor of Physics Education at the University of Birmingham where he works in widening participation in physics and teacher education.

Publications
  • Cottle, D 2022, ‘Harnessing the potential of recently retired physics teachers to mentor new physics teachers’, Physics Education, vol. 57, no. 1, 015020. https://doi.org/10.1088/1361-6552/ac3931
  • Cottle, D 2021, ‘Improving students’ mathematical skills in secondary science: ideas from mathematics pedagogy’, School Science Review, vol. 102, no. 381, pp. 61-64. <https://www.ase.org.uk/resources/school-science-review/issue-381/improving-students-mathematical-skills-in-secondary>
  • Cottle, D 2021, ‘The effects of Covid-19 on student transition from school to university in STEM subjects’, New Directions in the Teaching of Physical Sciences, vol. 16, no. 1, 3847, pp. 1-4. https://doi.org/10.29311/ndtps.v0i14.3847 
  • Cottle, D & Marshall, R 2016, ‘Exploring electrical resistance: a novel kinesthetic model helps to resolve some misconceptions’, Physics Education, vol. 51, no. 5. https://doi.org/10.1088/0031-9120/51/5/054004 

Chris is a third-year part time DPhil student. He is an experienced Director of Children’s Services working in London. He is interested in path dependence and whether it is a helpful concept to understand how children’s services work.

Yaoyao is a DPhil student in Education at Oxford.

Her research interest lies in Aptitude-Instruction-Interaction (ATI) in second language acquisition (SLA).

Yaoyao’s research investigates the mediating effects of individual differences in learners’ domain-general perceptual-cognitive abilities in instructed foreign language pronunciation acquisition in adulthood. She aims to further explore how aptitude hinders instructional effectiveness and help all students make the most of instruction regardless of aptitude profiles.

Yaoyao started her BA in the Japanese Language and Literature at Sun Yat-Sen University (中山大学) in China. She then moved to the University of Queensland to finish her BA with double majors in Japanese and Translation. After her BA, she worked as an English teacher in China for three years. Prior to her DPhil studies at Oxford, Yaoyao completed her Master’s degree in TESOL at Institute of Education, University College London. Her Master’s dissertation was supervised by Dr Kazuya Saito.

Pat is the Deputy Chief Executive of a large College Group.

A qualified accountant, she is accountable to the Corporation Board for the Group’s Estate, sustainability and for maintaining the Group’s outstanding financial health grade. Her specialisms include Leadership and Management, Identification and Application of Funding Streams as well as leading the Group in new acquisitions, ventures and developments. Pat is using her vast experience of public sector finances to explore the intersection of accounting, leadership and purpose.

Supervisors

James Robson and Ariel Lindorff

Alice received her Master’s in Child Study and Education from the Institute of Child Study at the University of Toronto. She has taught preschool through higher education as a teacher and principal in public and private schools in North America and Europe. Deeply committed to enhancing education, she believes in learning that connects students and teachers to the natural world and to their communities. She is actively involved in community organisations that promote intercultural, interracial, and interfaith understanding and allyship.

Supervisors

Steve Puttick

Victoria is an educational researcher and practitioner, specialising in educational support and methodology of teaching mathematics to low-achieving students. For over 9 years she has been working at Big Change Educational Centre (Moscow) which provides support to looked-after children.

Before joining the DPhil programme, she completed her undergraduate degree in Finance at Financial University in Moscow and then gained a MSc in Psychology of Education from the University of Bristol.

Victoria’s current research focuses on educational issues of care-experienced children and teaching mathematics to students of low achievement and motivation.

Supervisors

Karen Skilling and Gabriel Stylianides

Louise was born and raised in Glasgow and moved to Oxford to pursue a DPhil in Education.

Louise’s research interests are education policy, particularly higher education policy, as well as qualitative research into the experiences of students in higher education and reducing inequalities in access to higher education. Louise is also interested in educational capabilities, educational purpose, aspirations and philosophical debates about knowledge construction and co-construction. Louise has a First Class BA (Joint Honours) in Social Policy and Education from the University of Strathclyde, and two Masters degrees with Distinction also from the University of Strathclyde in Applied Educational and Social Research and Social Policy (Research Methods). Louise also participated in the University of Oxford’s UNIQ+ Graduate Access Programme in the summer of 2022, where she worked at the Department of Sociology with Melinda Mills, Bo Zhao and Evelina Akimova on research into the impact of socio-economic status on inequalities in access to veterinary care in Scotland. Louise’s DPhil thesis is interested in evaluating Lorella Terzi’s educational capabilities framework through the lens of contemporary higher education in order to gain an understanding of what graduate capabilities are identified by students and stakeholders as being necessary for enabling graduates to successfully thrive and adapt in a post-pandemic society.

 

Supervisors

Alis Oancea and Kelsey Inouye

Motema studied Neuroscience as an undergraduate at Dartmouth College in the USA and it is one of its courses, found interest in Education.

Motema then worked for various non-profit organisations in Lesotho and South Africa focusing on helping high school students from low SES backgrounds access opportunities to study in HE. In her Masters’ project Motema analysed Lesotho’s 2009 Curriculum and Assessment Policy. This analysis’ findings brought Motema to her current research interests which include gendered STEM education and decolonisation of education policies and curricula in Lesotho. For her DPhil project, Motema is interested in finding out the lived experiences of female Science teachers in Lesotho Secondary Schools especially focusing on the major changes in the Secondary school education system in Lesotho that have happened in the past five years as unique meeting points.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Judith Hillier

Danielle is a DPhil student researching how Black-British doctoral students navigate the spaces of the elite, providing a new theoretical framework to understand their agency better.

Her main interests are in Human Flourishing, Cultural Geography, Psychology, and Justice, and her work aims to inform and reform educational frameworks and practices.

Following Danielle’s BSc in Psychology and MRes in Research Methods in Psychology, she founded a social enterprise that merges psychological and academic strategies to guide undergraduate and master’s students study practices. In addition to this, Danielle provided pedagogical and behavioural support across SEN college, secondary and primary schools.

Some of Danielle’s notable work includes her research introducing a new University-wide EDI strategy at her former Higher Education institution, presenting insights and way-forwards on youth homelessness to HRH Prince Williams, and providing discipleship to next-gen leaders.

Dan is a part-time DPhil Education student whose research focuses on investigating reasons why individuals choose to study and then teach physics as a subject discipline and how these relate to issues of equity and power. He previously worked as a secondary school physics teacher in the West Midlands of England for around 15 years before taking up his current post as Associate Professor of Physics Education at the University of Birmingham where he works in widening participation in physics and teacher education.

Publications
  • Cottle, D 2022, ‘Harnessing the potential of recently retired physics teachers to mentor new physics teachers’, Physics Education, vol. 57, no. 1, 015020. https://doi.org/10.1088/1361-6552/ac3931
  • Cottle, D 2021, ‘Improving students’ mathematical skills in secondary science: ideas from mathematics pedagogy’, School Science Review, vol. 102, no. 381, pp. 61-64. <https://www.ase.org.uk/resources/school-science-review/issue-381/improving-students-mathematical-skills-in-secondary>
  • Cottle, D 2021, ‘The effects of Covid-19 on student transition from school to university in STEM subjects’, New Directions in the Teaching of Physical Sciences, vol. 16, no. 1, 3847, pp. 1-4. https://doi.org/10.29311/ndtps.v0i14.3847 
  • Cottle, D & Marshall, R 2016, ‘Exploring electrical resistance: a novel kinesthetic model helps to resolve some misconceptions’, Physics Education, vol. 51, no. 5. https://doi.org/10.1088/0031-9120/51/5/054004 

Chris is a third-year part time DPhil student. He is an experienced Director of Children’s Services working in London. He is interested in path dependence and whether it is a helpful concept to understand how children’s services work.

Yaoyao is a DPhil student in Education at Oxford.

Her research interest lies in Aptitude-Instruction-Interaction (ATI) in second language acquisition (SLA).

Yaoyao’s research investigates the mediating effects of individual differences in learners’ domain-general perceptual-cognitive abilities in instructed foreign language pronunciation acquisition in adulthood. She aims to further explore how aptitude hinders instructional effectiveness and help all students make the most of instruction regardless of aptitude profiles.

Yaoyao started her BA in the Japanese Language and Literature at Sun Yat-Sen University (中山大学) in China. She then moved to the University of Queensland to finish her BA with double majors in Japanese and Translation. After her BA, she worked as an English teacher in China for three years. Prior to her DPhil studies at Oxford, Yaoyao completed her Master’s degree in TESOL at Institute of Education, University College London. Her Master’s dissertation was supervised by Dr Kazuya Saito.

Pat is the Deputy Chief Executive of a large College Group.

A qualified accountant, she is accountable to the Corporation Board for the Group’s Estate, sustainability and for maintaining the Group’s outstanding financial health grade. Her specialisms include Leadership and Management, Identification and Application of Funding Streams as well as leading the Group in new acquisitions, ventures and developments. Pat is using her vast experience of public sector finances to explore the intersection of accounting, leadership and purpose.

Supervisors

James Robson and Ariel Lindorff

Alice received her Master’s in Child Study and Education from the Institute of Child Study at the University of Toronto. She has taught preschool through higher education as a teacher and principal in public and private schools in North America and Europe. Deeply committed to enhancing education, she believes in learning that connects students and teachers to the natural world and to their communities. She is actively involved in community organisations that promote intercultural, interracial, and interfaith understanding and allyship.

Supervisors

Steve Puttick

Victoria is an educational researcher and practitioner, specialising in educational support and methodology of teaching mathematics to low-achieving students. For over 9 years she has been working at Big Change Educational Centre (Moscow) which provides support to looked-after children.

Before joining the DPhil programme, she completed her undergraduate degree in Finance at Financial University in Moscow and then gained a MSc in Psychology of Education from the University of Bristol.

Victoria’s current research focuses on educational issues of care-experienced children and teaching mathematics to students of low achievement and motivation.

Supervisors

Karen Skilling and Gabriel Stylianides

Louise was born and raised in Glasgow and moved to Oxford to pursue a DPhil in Education.

Louise’s research interests are education policy, particularly higher education policy, as well as qualitative research into the experiences of students in higher education and reducing inequalities in access to higher education. Louise is also interested in educational capabilities, educational purpose, aspirations and philosophical debates about knowledge construction and co-construction. Louise has a First Class BA (Joint Honours) in Social Policy and Education from the University of Strathclyde, and two Masters degrees with Distinction also from the University of Strathclyde in Applied Educational and Social Research and Social Policy (Research Methods). Louise also participated in the University of Oxford’s UNIQ+ Graduate Access Programme in the summer of 2022, where she worked at the Department of Sociology with Melinda Mills, Bo Zhao and Evelina Akimova on research into the impact of socio-economic status on inequalities in access to veterinary care in Scotland. Louise’s DPhil thesis is interested in evaluating Lorella Terzi’s educational capabilities framework through the lens of contemporary higher education in order to gain an understanding of what graduate capabilities are identified by students and stakeholders as being necessary for enabling graduates to successfully thrive and adapt in a post-pandemic society.

 

Supervisors

Alis Oancea and Kelsey Inouye

Motema studied Neuroscience as an undergraduate at Dartmouth College in the USA and it is one of its courses, found interest in Education.

Motema then worked for various non-profit organisations in Lesotho and South Africa focusing on helping high school students from low SES backgrounds access opportunities to study in HE. In her Masters’ project Motema analysed Lesotho’s 2009 Curriculum and Assessment Policy. This analysis’ findings brought Motema to her current research interests which include gendered STEM education and decolonisation of education policies and curricula in Lesotho. For her DPhil project, Motema is interested in finding out the lived experiences of female Science teachers in Lesotho Secondary Schools especially focusing on the major changes in the Secondary school education system in Lesotho that have happened in the past five years as unique meeting points.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Judith Hillier

Danielle is a DPhil student researching how Black-British doctoral students navigate the spaces of the elite, providing a new theoretical framework to understand their agency better.

Her main interests are in Human Flourishing, Cultural Geography, Psychology, and Justice, and her work aims to inform and reform educational frameworks and practices.

Following Danielle’s BSc in Psychology and MRes in Research Methods in Psychology, she founded a social enterprise that merges psychological and academic strategies to guide undergraduate and master’s students study practices. In addition to this, Danielle provided pedagogical and behavioural support across SEN college, secondary and primary schools.

Some of Danielle’s notable work includes her research introducing a new University-wide EDI strategy at her former Higher Education institution, presenting insights and way-forwards on youth homelessness to HRH Prince Williams, and providing discipleship to next-gen leaders.

Dan is a part-time DPhil Education student whose research focuses on investigating reasons why individuals choose to study and then teach physics as a subject discipline and how these relate to issues of equity and power. He previously worked as a secondary school physics teacher in the West Midlands of England for around 15 years before taking up his current post as Associate Professor of Physics Education at the University of Birmingham where he works in widening participation in physics and teacher education.

Publications
  • Cottle, D 2022, ‘Harnessing the potential of recently retired physics teachers to mentor new physics teachers’, Physics Education, vol. 57, no. 1, 015020. https://doi.org/10.1088/1361-6552/ac3931
  • Cottle, D 2021, ‘Improving students’ mathematical skills in secondary science: ideas from mathematics pedagogy’, School Science Review, vol. 102, no. 381, pp. 61-64. <https://www.ase.org.uk/resources/school-science-review/issue-381/improving-students-mathematical-skills-in-secondary>
  • Cottle, D 2021, ‘The effects of Covid-19 on student transition from school to university in STEM subjects’, New Directions in the Teaching of Physical Sciences, vol. 16, no. 1, 3847, pp. 1-4. https://doi.org/10.29311/ndtps.v0i14.3847 
  • Cottle, D & Marshall, R 2016, ‘Exploring electrical resistance: a novel kinesthetic model helps to resolve some misconceptions’, Physics Education, vol. 51, no. 5. https://doi.org/10.1088/0031-9120/51/5/054004 

Chris is a third-year part time DPhil student. He is an experienced Director of Children’s Services working in London. He is interested in path dependence and whether it is a helpful concept to understand how children’s services work.

Yaoyao is a DPhil student in Education at Oxford.

Her research interest lies in Aptitude-Instruction-Interaction (ATI) in second language acquisition (SLA).

Yaoyao’s research investigates the mediating effects of individual differences in learners’ domain-general perceptual-cognitive abilities in instructed foreign language pronunciation acquisition in adulthood. She aims to further explore how aptitude hinders instructional effectiveness and help all students make the most of instruction regardless of aptitude profiles.

Yaoyao started her BA in the Japanese Language and Literature at Sun Yat-Sen University (中山大学) in China. She then moved to the University of Queensland to finish her BA with double majors in Japanese and Translation. After her BA, she worked as an English teacher in China for three years. Prior to her DPhil studies at Oxford, Yaoyao completed her Master’s degree in TESOL at Institute of Education, University College London. Her Master’s dissertation was supervised by Dr Kazuya Saito.

Pat is the Deputy Chief Executive of a large College Group.

A qualified accountant, she is accountable to the Corporation Board for the Group’s Estate, sustainability and for maintaining the Group’s outstanding financial health grade. Her specialisms include Leadership and Management, Identification and Application of Funding Streams as well as leading the Group in new acquisitions, ventures and developments. Pat is using her vast experience of public sector finances to explore the intersection of accounting, leadership and purpose.

Supervisors

James Robson and Ariel Lindorff

Alice received her Master’s in Child Study and Education from the Institute of Child Study at the University of Toronto. She has taught preschool through higher education as a teacher and principal in public and private schools in North America and Europe. Deeply committed to enhancing education, she believes in learning that connects students and teachers to the natural world and to their communities. She is actively involved in community organisations that promote intercultural, interracial, and interfaith understanding and allyship.

Supervisors

Steve Puttick

Victoria is an educational researcher and practitioner, specialising in educational support and methodology of teaching mathematics to low-achieving students. For over 9 years she has been working at Big Change Educational Centre (Moscow) which provides support to looked-after children.

Before joining the DPhil programme, she completed her undergraduate degree in Finance at Financial University in Moscow and then gained a MSc in Psychology of Education from the University of Bristol.

Victoria’s current research focuses on educational issues of care-experienced children and teaching mathematics to students of low achievement and motivation.

Supervisors

Karen Skilling and Gabriel Stylianides

Louise was born and raised in Glasgow and moved to Oxford to pursue a DPhil in Education.

Louise’s research interests are education policy, particularly higher education policy, as well as qualitative research into the experiences of students in higher education and reducing inequalities in access to higher education. Louise is also interested in educational capabilities, educational purpose, aspirations and philosophical debates about knowledge construction and co-construction. Louise has a First Class BA (Joint Honours) in Social Policy and Education from the University of Strathclyde, and two Masters degrees with Distinction also from the University of Strathclyde in Applied Educational and Social Research and Social Policy (Research Methods). Louise also participated in the University of Oxford’s UNIQ+ Graduate Access Programme in the summer of 2022, where she worked at the Department of Sociology with Melinda Mills, Bo Zhao and Evelina Akimova on research into the impact of socio-economic status on inequalities in access to veterinary care in Scotland. Louise’s DPhil thesis is interested in evaluating Lorella Terzi’s educational capabilities framework through the lens of contemporary higher education in order to gain an understanding of what graduate capabilities are identified by students and stakeholders as being necessary for enabling graduates to successfully thrive and adapt in a post-pandemic society.

 

Supervisors

Alis Oancea and Kelsey Inouye

Motema studied Neuroscience as an undergraduate at Dartmouth College in the USA and it is one of its courses, found interest in Education.

Motema then worked for various non-profit organisations in Lesotho and South Africa focusing on helping high school students from low SES backgrounds access opportunities to study in HE. In her Masters’ project Motema analysed Lesotho’s 2009 Curriculum and Assessment Policy. This analysis’ findings brought Motema to her current research interests which include gendered STEM education and decolonisation of education policies and curricula in Lesotho. For her DPhil project, Motema is interested in finding out the lived experiences of female Science teachers in Lesotho Secondary Schools especially focusing on the major changes in the Secondary school education system in Lesotho that have happened in the past five years as unique meeting points.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Judith Hillier

Danielle is a DPhil student researching how Black-British doctoral students navigate the spaces of the elite, providing a new theoretical framework to understand their agency better.

Her main interests are in Human Flourishing, Cultural Geography, Psychology, and Justice, and her work aims to inform and reform educational frameworks and practices.

Following Danielle’s BSc in Psychology and MRes in Research Methods in Psychology, she founded a social enterprise that merges psychological and academic strategies to guide undergraduate and master’s students study practices. In addition to this, Danielle provided pedagogical and behavioural support across SEN college, secondary and primary schools.

Some of Danielle’s notable work includes her research introducing a new University-wide EDI strategy at her former Higher Education institution, presenting insights and way-forwards on youth homelessness to HRH Prince Williams, and providing discipleship to next-gen leaders.

Dan is a part-time DPhil Education student whose research focuses on investigating reasons why individuals choose to study and then teach physics as a subject discipline and how these relate to issues of equity and power. He previously worked as a secondary school physics teacher in the West Midlands of England for around 15 years before taking up his current post as Associate Professor of Physics Education at the University of Birmingham where he works in widening participation in physics and teacher education.

Publications
  • Cottle, D 2022, ‘Harnessing the potential of recently retired physics teachers to mentor new physics teachers’, Physics Education, vol. 57, no. 1, 015020. https://doi.org/10.1088/1361-6552/ac3931
  • Cottle, D 2021, ‘Improving students’ mathematical skills in secondary science: ideas from mathematics pedagogy’, School Science Review, vol. 102, no. 381, pp. 61-64. <https://www.ase.org.uk/resources/school-science-review/issue-381/improving-students-mathematical-skills-in-secondary>
  • Cottle, D 2021, ‘The effects of Covid-19 on student transition from school to university in STEM subjects’, New Directions in the Teaching of Physical Sciences, vol. 16, no. 1, 3847, pp. 1-4. https://doi.org/10.29311/ndtps.v0i14.3847 
  • Cottle, D & Marshall, R 2016, ‘Exploring electrical resistance: a novel kinesthetic model helps to resolve some misconceptions’, Physics Education, vol. 51, no. 5. https://doi.org/10.1088/0031-9120/51/5/054004 

Chris is a third-year part time DPhil student. He is an experienced Director of Children’s Services working in London. He is interested in path dependence and whether it is a helpful concept to understand how children’s services work.

Yaoyao is a DPhil student in Education at Oxford.

Her research interest lies in Aptitude-Instruction-Interaction (ATI) in second language acquisition (SLA).

Yaoyao’s research investigates the mediating effects of individual differences in learners’ domain-general perceptual-cognitive abilities in instructed foreign language pronunciation acquisition in adulthood. She aims to further explore how aptitude hinders instructional effectiveness and help all students make the most of instruction regardless of aptitude profiles.

Yaoyao started her BA in the Japanese Language and Literature at Sun Yat-Sen University (中山大学) in China. She then moved to the University of Queensland to finish her BA with double majors in Japanese and Translation. After her BA, she worked as an English teacher in China for three years. Prior to her DPhil studies at Oxford, Yaoyao completed her Master’s degree in TESOL at Institute of Education, University College London. Her Master’s dissertation was supervised by Dr Kazuya Saito.

Pat is the Deputy Chief Executive of a large College Group.

A qualified accountant, she is accountable to the Corporation Board for the Group’s Estate, sustainability and for maintaining the Group’s outstanding financial health grade. Her specialisms include Leadership and Management, Identification and Application of Funding Streams as well as leading the Group in new acquisitions, ventures and developments. Pat is using her vast experience of public sector finances to explore the intersection of accounting, leadership and purpose.

Supervisors

James Robson and Ariel Lindorff

Alice received her Master’s in Child Study and Education from the Institute of Child Study at the University of Toronto. She has taught preschool through higher education as a teacher and principal in public and private schools in North America and Europe. Deeply committed to enhancing education, she believes in learning that connects students and teachers to the natural world and to their communities. She is actively involved in community organisations that promote intercultural, interracial, and interfaith understanding and allyship.

Supervisors

Steve Puttick

Victoria is an educational researcher and practitioner, specialising in educational support and methodology of teaching mathematics to low-achieving students. For over 9 years she has been working at Big Change Educational Centre (Moscow) which provides support to looked-after children.

Before joining the DPhil programme, she completed her undergraduate degree in Finance at Financial University in Moscow and then gained a MSc in Psychology of Education from the University of Bristol.

Victoria’s current research focuses on educational issues of care-experienced children and teaching mathematics to students of low achievement and motivation.

Supervisors

Karen Skilling and Gabriel Stylianides

Louise was born and raised in Glasgow and moved to Oxford to pursue a DPhil in Education.

Louise’s research interests are education policy, particularly higher education policy, as well as qualitative research into the experiences of students in higher education and reducing inequalities in access to higher education. Louise is also interested in educational capabilities, educational purpose, aspirations and philosophical debates about knowledge construction and co-construction. Louise has a First Class BA (Joint Honours) in Social Policy and Education from the University of Strathclyde, and two Masters degrees with Distinction also from the University of Strathclyde in Applied Educational and Social Research and Social Policy (Research Methods). Louise also participated in the University of Oxford’s UNIQ+ Graduate Access Programme in the summer of 2022, where she worked at the Department of Sociology with Melinda Mills, Bo Zhao and Evelina Akimova on research into the impact of socio-economic status on inequalities in access to veterinary care in Scotland. Louise’s DPhil thesis is interested in evaluating Lorella Terzi’s educational capabilities framework through the lens of contemporary higher education in order to gain an understanding of what graduate capabilities are identified by students and stakeholders as being necessary for enabling graduates to successfully thrive and adapt in a post-pandemic society.

 

Supervisors

Alis Oancea and Kelsey Inouye

Motema studied Neuroscience as an undergraduate at Dartmouth College in the USA and it is one of its courses, found interest in Education.

Motema then worked for various non-profit organisations in Lesotho and South Africa focusing on helping high school students from low SES backgrounds access opportunities to study in HE. In her Masters’ project Motema analysed Lesotho’s 2009 Curriculum and Assessment Policy. This analysis’ findings brought Motema to her current research interests which include gendered STEM education and decolonisation of education policies and curricula in Lesotho. For her DPhil project, Motema is interested in finding out the lived experiences of female Science teachers in Lesotho Secondary Schools especially focusing on the major changes in the Secondary school education system in Lesotho that have happened in the past five years as unique meeting points.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Judith Hillier

Danielle is a DPhil student researching how Black-British doctoral students navigate the spaces of the elite, providing a new theoretical framework to understand their agency better.

Her main interests are in Human Flourishing, Cultural Geography, Psychology, and Justice, and her work aims to inform and reform educational frameworks and practices.

Following Danielle’s BSc in Psychology and MRes in Research Methods in Psychology, she founded a social enterprise that merges psychological and academic strategies to guide undergraduate and master’s students study practices. In addition to this, Danielle provided pedagogical and behavioural support across SEN college, secondary and primary schools.

Some of Danielle’s notable work includes her research introducing a new University-wide EDI strategy at her former Higher Education institution, presenting insights and way-forwards on youth homelessness to HRH Prince Williams, and providing discipleship to next-gen leaders.

Dan is a part-time DPhil Education student whose research focuses on investigating reasons why individuals choose to study and then teach physics as a subject discipline and how these relate to issues of equity and power. He previously worked as a secondary school physics teacher in the West Midlands of England for around 15 years before taking up his current post as Associate Professor of Physics Education at the University of Birmingham where he works in widening participation in physics and teacher education.

Publications
  • Cottle, D 2022, ‘Harnessing the potential of recently retired physics teachers to mentor new physics teachers’, Physics Education, vol. 57, no. 1, 015020. https://doi.org/10.1088/1361-6552/ac3931
  • Cottle, D 2021, ‘Improving students’ mathematical skills in secondary science: ideas from mathematics pedagogy’, School Science Review, vol. 102, no. 381, pp. 61-64. <https://www.ase.org.uk/resources/school-science-review/issue-381/improving-students-mathematical-skills-in-secondary>
  • Cottle, D 2021, ‘The effects of Covid-19 on student transition from school to university in STEM subjects’, New Directions in the Teaching of Physical Sciences, vol. 16, no. 1, 3847, pp. 1-4. https://doi.org/10.29311/ndtps.v0i14.3847 
  • Cottle, D & Marshall, R 2016, ‘Exploring electrical resistance: a novel kinesthetic model helps to resolve some misconceptions’, Physics Education, vol. 51, no. 5. https://doi.org/10.1088/0031-9120/51/5/054004 

Chris is a third-year part time DPhil student. He is an experienced Director of Children’s Services working in London. He is interested in path dependence and whether it is a helpful concept to understand how children’s services work.

Yaoyao is a DPhil student in Education at Oxford.

Her research interest lies in Aptitude-Instruction-Interaction (ATI) in second language acquisition (SLA).

Yaoyao’s research investigates the mediating effects of individual differences in learners’ domain-general perceptual-cognitive abilities in instructed foreign language pronunciation acquisition in adulthood. She aims to further explore how aptitude hinders instructional effectiveness and help all students make the most of instruction regardless of aptitude profiles.

Yaoyao started her BA in the Japanese Language and Literature at Sun Yat-Sen University (中山大学) in China. She then moved to the University of Queensland to finish her BA with double majors in Japanese and Translation. After her BA, she worked as an English teacher in China for three years. Prior to her DPhil studies at Oxford, Yaoyao completed her Master’s degree in TESOL at Institute of Education, University College London. Her Master’s dissertation was supervised by Dr Kazuya Saito.

Pat is the Deputy Chief Executive of a large College Group.

A qualified accountant, she is accountable to the Corporation Board for the Group’s Estate, sustainability and for maintaining the Group’s outstanding financial health grade. Her specialisms include Leadership and Management, Identification and Application of Funding Streams as well as leading the Group in new acquisitions, ventures and developments. Pat is using her vast experience of public sector finances to explore the intersection of accounting, leadership and purpose.

Supervisors

James Robson and Ariel Lindorff

Alice received her Master’s in Child Study and Education from the Institute of Child Study at the University of Toronto. She has taught preschool through higher education as a teacher and principal in public and private schools in North America and Europe. Deeply committed to enhancing education, she believes in learning that connects students and teachers to the natural world and to their communities. She is actively involved in community organisations that promote intercultural, interracial, and interfaith understanding and allyship.

Supervisors

Steve Puttick

Victoria is an educational researcher and practitioner, specialising in educational support and methodology of teaching mathematics to low-achieving students. For over 9 years she has been working at Big Change Educational Centre (Moscow) which provides support to looked-after children.

Before joining the DPhil programme, she completed her undergraduate degree in Finance at Financial University in Moscow and then gained a MSc in Psychology of Education from the University of Bristol.

Victoria’s current research focuses on educational issues of care-experienced children and teaching mathematics to students of low achievement and motivation.

Supervisors

Karen Skilling and Gabriel Stylianides

Louise was born and raised in Glasgow and moved to Oxford to pursue a DPhil in Education.

Louise’s research interests are education policy, particularly higher education policy, as well as qualitative research into the experiences of students in higher education and reducing inequalities in access to higher education. Louise is also interested in educational capabilities, educational purpose, aspirations and philosophical debates about knowledge construction and co-construction. Louise has a First Class BA (Joint Honours) in Social Policy and Education from the University of Strathclyde, and two Masters degrees with Distinction also from the University of Strathclyde in Applied Educational and Social Research and Social Policy (Research Methods). Louise also participated in the University of Oxford’s UNIQ+ Graduate Access Programme in the summer of 2022, where she worked at the Department of Sociology with Melinda Mills, Bo Zhao and Evelina Akimova on research into the impact of socio-economic status on inequalities in access to veterinary care in Scotland. Louise’s DPhil thesis is interested in evaluating Lorella Terzi’s educational capabilities framework through the lens of contemporary higher education in order to gain an understanding of what graduate capabilities are identified by students and stakeholders as being necessary for enabling graduates to successfully thrive and adapt in a post-pandemic society.

 

Supervisors

Alis Oancea and Kelsey Inouye

Motema studied Neuroscience as an undergraduate at Dartmouth College in the USA and it is one of its courses, found interest in Education.

Motema then worked for various non-profit organisations in Lesotho and South Africa focusing on helping high school students from low SES backgrounds access opportunities to study in HE. In her Masters’ project Motema analysed Lesotho’s 2009 Curriculum and Assessment Policy. This analysis’ findings brought Motema to her current research interests which include gendered STEM education and decolonisation of education policies and curricula in Lesotho. For her DPhil project, Motema is interested in finding out the lived experiences of female Science teachers in Lesotho Secondary Schools especially focusing on the major changes in the Secondary school education system in Lesotho that have happened in the past five years as unique meeting points.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Judith Hillier

Danielle is a DPhil student researching how Black-British doctoral students navigate the spaces of the elite, providing a new theoretical framework to understand their agency better.

Her main interests are in Human Flourishing, Cultural Geography, Psychology, and Justice, and her work aims to inform and reform educational frameworks and practices.

Following Danielle’s BSc in Psychology and MRes in Research Methods in Psychology, she founded a social enterprise that merges psychological and academic strategies to guide undergraduate and master’s students study practices. In addition to this, Danielle provided pedagogical and behavioural support across SEN college, secondary and primary schools.

Some of Danielle’s notable work includes her research introducing a new University-wide EDI strategy at her former Higher Education institution, presenting insights and way-forwards on youth homelessness to HRH Prince Williams, and providing discipleship to next-gen leaders.

Dan is a part-time DPhil Education student whose research focuses on investigating reasons why individuals choose to study and then teach physics as a subject discipline and how these relate to issues of equity and power. He previously worked as a secondary school physics teacher in the West Midlands of England for around 15 years before taking up his current post as Associate Professor of Physics Education at the University of Birmingham where he works in widening participation in physics and teacher education.

Publications
  • Cottle, D 2022, ‘Harnessing the potential of recently retired physics teachers to mentor new physics teachers’, Physics Education, vol. 57, no. 1, 015020. https://doi.org/10.1088/1361-6552/ac3931
  • Cottle, D 2021, ‘Improving students’ mathematical skills in secondary science: ideas from mathematics pedagogy’, School Science Review, vol. 102, no. 381, pp. 61-64. <https://www.ase.org.uk/resources/school-science-review/issue-381/improving-students-mathematical-skills-in-secondary>
  • Cottle, D 2021, ‘The effects of Covid-19 on student transition from school to university in STEM subjects’, New Directions in the Teaching of Physical Sciences, vol. 16, no. 1, 3847, pp. 1-4. https://doi.org/10.29311/ndtps.v0i14.3847 
  • Cottle, D & Marshall, R 2016, ‘Exploring electrical resistance: a novel kinesthetic model helps to resolve some misconceptions’, Physics Education, vol. 51, no. 5. https://doi.org/10.1088/0031-9120/51/5/054004 

Chris is a third-year part time DPhil student. He is an experienced Director of Children’s Services working in London. He is interested in path dependence and whether it is a helpful concept to understand how children’s services work.

Yaoyao is a DPhil student in Education at Oxford.

Her research interest lies in Aptitude-Instruction-Interaction (ATI) in second language acquisition (SLA).

Yaoyao’s research investigates the mediating effects of individual differences in learners’ domain-general perceptual-cognitive abilities in instructed foreign language pronunciation acquisition in adulthood. She aims to further explore how aptitude hinders instructional effectiveness and help all students make the most of instruction regardless of aptitude profiles.

Yaoyao started her BA in the Japanese Language and Literature at Sun Yat-Sen University (中山大学) in China. She then moved to the University of Queensland to finish her BA with double majors in Japanese and Translation. After her BA, she worked as an English teacher in China for three years. Prior to her DPhil studies at Oxford, Yaoyao completed her Master’s degree in TESOL at Institute of Education, University College London. Her Master’s dissertation was supervised by Dr Kazuya Saito.

Pat is the Deputy Chief Executive of a large College Group.

A qualified accountant, she is accountable to the Corporation Board for the Group’s Estate, sustainability and for maintaining the Group’s outstanding financial health grade. Her specialisms include Leadership and Management, Identification and Application of Funding Streams as well as leading the Group in new acquisitions, ventures and developments. Pat is using her vast experience of public sector finances to explore the intersection of accounting, leadership and purpose.

Supervisors

James Robson and Ariel Lindorff

Alice received her Master’s in Child Study and Education from the Institute of Child Study at the University of Toronto. She has taught preschool through higher education as a teacher and principal in public and private schools in North America and Europe. Deeply committed to enhancing education, she believes in learning that connects students and teachers to the natural world and to their communities. She is actively involved in community organisations that promote intercultural, interracial, and interfaith understanding and allyship.

Supervisors

Steve Puttick

Victoria is an educational researcher and practitioner, specialising in educational support and methodology of teaching mathematics to low-achieving students. For over 9 years she has been working at Big Change Educational Centre (Moscow) which provides support to looked-after children.

Before joining the DPhil programme, she completed her undergraduate degree in Finance at Financial University in Moscow and then gained a MSc in Psychology of Education from the University of Bristol.

Victoria’s current research focuses on educational issues of care-experienced children and teaching mathematics to students of low achievement and motivation.

Supervisors

Karen Skilling and Gabriel Stylianides

Louise was born and raised in Glasgow and moved to Oxford to pursue a DPhil in Education.

Louise’s research interests are education policy, particularly higher education policy, as well as qualitative research into the experiences of students in higher education and reducing inequalities in access to higher education. Louise is also interested in educational capabilities, educational purpose, aspirations and philosophical debates about knowledge construction and co-construction. Louise has a First Class BA (Joint Honours) in Social Policy and Education from the University of Strathclyde, and two Masters degrees with Distinction also from the University of Strathclyde in Applied Educational and Social Research and Social Policy (Research Methods). Louise also participated in the University of Oxford’s UNIQ+ Graduate Access Programme in the summer of 2022, where she worked at the Department of Sociology with Melinda Mills, Bo Zhao and Evelina Akimova on research into the impact of socio-economic status on inequalities in access to veterinary care in Scotland. Louise’s DPhil thesis is interested in evaluating Lorella Terzi’s educational capabilities framework through the lens of contemporary higher education in order to gain an understanding of what graduate capabilities are identified by students and stakeholders as being necessary for enabling graduates to successfully thrive and adapt in a post-pandemic society.

 

Supervisors

Alis Oancea and Kelsey Inouye

Motema studied Neuroscience as an undergraduate at Dartmouth College in the USA and it is one of its courses, found interest in Education.

Motema then worked for various non-profit organisations in Lesotho and South Africa focusing on helping high school students from low SES backgrounds access opportunities to study in HE. In her Masters’ project Motema analysed Lesotho’s 2009 Curriculum and Assessment Policy. This analysis’ findings brought Motema to her current research interests which include gendered STEM education and decolonisation of education policies and curricula in Lesotho. For her DPhil project, Motema is interested in finding out the lived experiences of female Science teachers in Lesotho Secondary Schools especially focusing on the major changes in the Secondary school education system in Lesotho that have happened in the past five years as unique meeting points.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Judith Hillier

Danielle is a DPhil student researching how Black-British doctoral students navigate the spaces of the elite, providing a new theoretical framework to understand their agency better.

Her main interests are in Human Flourishing, Cultural Geography, Psychology, and Justice, and her work aims to inform and reform educational frameworks and practices.

Following Danielle’s BSc in Psychology and MRes in Research Methods in Psychology, she founded a social enterprise that merges psychological and academic strategies to guide undergraduate and master’s students study practices. In addition to this, Danielle provided pedagogical and behavioural support across SEN college, secondary and primary schools.

Some of Danielle’s notable work includes her research introducing a new University-wide EDI strategy at her former Higher Education institution, presenting insights and way-forwards on youth homelessness to HRH Prince Williams, and providing discipleship to next-gen leaders.

Dan is a part-time DPhil Education student whose research focuses on investigating reasons why individuals choose to study and then teach physics as a subject discipline and how these relate to issues of equity and power. He previously worked as a secondary school physics teacher in the West Midlands of England for around 15 years before taking up his current post as Associate Professor of Physics Education at the University of Birmingham where he works in widening participation in physics and teacher education.

Publications
  • Cottle, D 2022, ‘Harnessing the potential of recently retired physics teachers to mentor new physics teachers’, Physics Education, vol. 57, no. 1, 015020. https://doi.org/10.1088/1361-6552/ac3931
  • Cottle, D 2021, ‘Improving students’ mathematical skills in secondary science: ideas from mathematics pedagogy’, School Science Review, vol. 102, no. 381, pp. 61-64. <https://www.ase.org.uk/resources/school-science-review/issue-381/improving-students-mathematical-skills-in-secondary>
  • Cottle, D 2021, ‘The effects of Covid-19 on student transition from school to university in STEM subjects’, New Directions in the Teaching of Physical Sciences, vol. 16, no. 1, 3847, pp. 1-4. https://doi.org/10.29311/ndtps.v0i14.3847 
  • Cottle, D & Marshall, R 2016, ‘Exploring electrical resistance: a novel kinesthetic model helps to resolve some misconceptions’, Physics Education, vol. 51, no. 5. https://doi.org/10.1088/0031-9120/51/5/054004 

Chris is a third-year part time DPhil student. He is an experienced Director of Children’s Services working in London. He is interested in path dependence and whether it is a helpful concept to understand how children’s services work.

Yaoyao is a DPhil student in Education at Oxford.

Her research interest lies in Aptitude-Instruction-Interaction (ATI) in second language acquisition (SLA).

Yaoyao’s research investigates the mediating effects of individual differences in learners’ domain-general perceptual-cognitive abilities in instructed foreign language pronunciation acquisition in adulthood. She aims to further explore how aptitude hinders instructional effectiveness and help all students make the most of instruction regardless of aptitude profiles.

Yaoyao started her BA in the Japanese Language and Literature at Sun Yat-Sen University (中山大学) in China. She then moved to the University of Queensland to finish her BA with double majors in Japanese and Translation. After her BA, she worked as an English teacher in China for three years. Prior to her DPhil studies at Oxford, Yaoyao completed her Master’s degree in TESOL at Institute of Education, University College London. Her Master’s dissertation was supervised by Dr Kazuya Saito.

Pat is the Deputy Chief Executive of a large College Group.

A qualified accountant, she is accountable to the Corporation Board for the Group’s Estate, sustainability and for maintaining the Group’s outstanding financial health grade. Her specialisms include Leadership and Management, Identification and Application of Funding Streams as well as leading the Group in new acquisitions, ventures and developments. Pat is using her vast experience of public sector finances to explore the intersection of accounting, leadership and purpose.

Supervisors

James Robson and Ariel Lindorff

Alice received her Master’s in Child Study and Education from the Institute of Child Study at the University of Toronto. She has taught preschool through higher education as a teacher and principal in public and private schools in North America and Europe. Deeply committed to enhancing education, she believes in learning that connects students and teachers to the natural world and to their communities. She is actively involved in community organisations that promote intercultural, interracial, and interfaith understanding and allyship.

Supervisors

Steve Puttick

Victoria is an educational researcher and practitioner, specialising in educational support and methodology of teaching mathematics to low-achieving students. For over 9 years she has been working at Big Change Educational Centre (Moscow) which provides support to looked-after children.

Before joining the DPhil programme, she completed her undergraduate degree in Finance at Financial University in Moscow and then gained a MSc in Psychology of Education from the University of Bristol.

Victoria’s current research focuses on educational issues of care-experienced children and teaching mathematics to students of low achievement and motivation.

Supervisors

Karen Skilling and Gabriel Stylianides

Louise was born and raised in Glasgow and moved to Oxford to pursue a DPhil in Education.

Louise’s research interests are education policy, particularly higher education policy, as well as qualitative research into the experiences of students in higher education and reducing inequalities in access to higher education. Louise is also interested in educational capabilities, educational purpose, aspirations and philosophical debates about knowledge construction and co-construction. Louise has a First Class BA (Joint Honours) in Social Policy and Education from the University of Strathclyde, and two Masters degrees with Distinction also from the University of Strathclyde in Applied Educational and Social Research and Social Policy (Research Methods). Louise also participated in the University of Oxford’s UNIQ+ Graduate Access Programme in the summer of 2022, where she worked at the Department of Sociology with Melinda Mills, Bo Zhao and Evelina Akimova on research into the impact of socio-economic status on inequalities in access to veterinary care in Scotland. Louise’s DPhil thesis is interested in evaluating Lorella Terzi’s educational capabilities framework through the lens of contemporary higher education in order to gain an understanding of what graduate capabilities are identified by students and stakeholders as being necessary for enabling graduates to successfully thrive and adapt in a post-pandemic society.

 

Supervisors

Alis Oancea and Kelsey Inouye

Motema studied Neuroscience as an undergraduate at Dartmouth College in the USA and it is one of its courses, found interest in Education.

Motema then worked for various non-profit organisations in Lesotho and South Africa focusing on helping high school students from low SES backgrounds access opportunities to study in HE. In her Masters’ project Motema analysed Lesotho’s 2009 Curriculum and Assessment Policy. This analysis’ findings brought Motema to her current research interests which include gendered STEM education and decolonisation of education policies and curricula in Lesotho. For her DPhil project, Motema is interested in finding out the lived experiences of female Science teachers in Lesotho Secondary Schools especially focusing on the major changes in the Secondary school education system in Lesotho that have happened in the past five years as unique meeting points.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Judith Hillier

Danielle is a DPhil student researching how Black-British doctoral students navigate the spaces of the elite, providing a new theoretical framework to understand their agency better.

Her main interests are in Human Flourishing, Cultural Geography, Psychology, and Justice, and her work aims to inform and reform educational frameworks and practices.

Following Danielle’s BSc in Psychology and MRes in Research Methods in Psychology, she founded a social enterprise that merges psychological and academic strategies to guide undergraduate and master’s students study practices. In addition to this, Danielle provided pedagogical and behavioural support across SEN college, secondary and primary schools.

Some of Danielle’s notable work includes her research introducing a new University-wide EDI strategy at her former Higher Education institution, presenting insights and way-forwards on youth homelessness to HRH Prince Williams, and providing discipleship to next-gen leaders.

Dan is a part-time DPhil Education student whose research focuses on investigating reasons why individuals choose to study and then teach physics as a subject discipline and how these relate to issues of equity and power. He previously worked as a secondary school physics teacher in the West Midlands of England for around 15 years before taking up his current post as Associate Professor of Physics Education at the University of Birmingham where he works in widening participation in physics and teacher education.

Publications
  • Cottle, D 2022, ‘Harnessing the potential of recently retired physics teachers to mentor new physics teachers’, Physics Education, vol. 57, no. 1, 015020. https://doi.org/10.1088/1361-6552/ac3931
  • Cottle, D 2021, ‘Improving students’ mathematical skills in secondary science: ideas from mathematics pedagogy’, School Science Review, vol. 102, no. 381, pp. 61-64. <https://www.ase.org.uk/resources/school-science-review/issue-381/improving-students-mathematical-skills-in-secondary>
  • Cottle, D 2021, ‘The effects of Covid-19 on student transition from school to university in STEM subjects’, New Directions in the Teaching of Physical Sciences, vol. 16, no. 1, 3847, pp. 1-4. https://doi.org/10.29311/ndtps.v0i14.3847 
  • Cottle, D & Marshall, R 2016, ‘Exploring electrical resistance: a novel kinesthetic model helps to resolve some misconceptions’, Physics Education, vol. 51, no. 5. https://doi.org/10.1088/0031-9120/51/5/054004 

Chris is a third-year part time DPhil student. He is an experienced Director of Children’s Services working in London. He is interested in path dependence and whether it is a helpful concept to understand how children’s services work.

Yaoyao is a DPhil student in Education at Oxford.

Her research interest lies in Aptitude-Instruction-Interaction (ATI) in second language acquisition (SLA).

Yaoyao’s research investigates the mediating effects of individual differences in learners’ domain-general perceptual-cognitive abilities in instructed foreign language pronunciation acquisition in adulthood. She aims to further explore how aptitude hinders instructional effectiveness and help all students make the most of instruction regardless of aptitude profiles.

Yaoyao started her BA in the Japanese Language and Literature at Sun Yat-Sen University (中山大学) in China. She then moved to the University of Queensland to finish her BA with double majors in Japanese and Translation. After her BA, she worked as an English teacher in China for three years. Prior to her DPhil studies at Oxford, Yaoyao completed her Master’s degree in TESOL at Institute of Education, University College London. Her Master’s dissertation was supervised by Dr Kazuya Saito.

Pat is the Deputy Chief Executive of a large College Group.

A qualified accountant, she is accountable to the Corporation Board for the Group’s Estate, sustainability and for maintaining the Group’s outstanding financial health grade. Her specialisms include Leadership and Management, Identification and Application of Funding Streams as well as leading the Group in new acquisitions, ventures and developments. Pat is using her vast experience of public sector finances to explore the intersection of accounting, leadership and purpose.

Supervisors

James Robson and Ariel Lindorff

Alice received her Master’s in Child Study and Education from the Institute of Child Study at the University of Toronto. She has taught preschool through higher education as a teacher and principal in public and private schools in North America and Europe. Deeply committed to enhancing education, she believes in learning that connects students and teachers to the natural world and to their communities. She is actively involved in community organisations that promote intercultural, interracial, and interfaith understanding and allyship.

Supervisors

Steve Puttick

Victoria is an educational researcher and practitioner, specialising in educational support and methodology of teaching mathematics to low-achieving students. For over 9 years she has been working at Big Change Educational Centre (Moscow) which provides support to looked-after children.

Before joining the DPhil programme, she completed her undergraduate degree in Finance at Financial University in Moscow and then gained a MSc in Psychology of Education from the University of Bristol.

Victoria’s current research focuses on educational issues of care-experienced children and teaching mathematics to students of low achievement and motivation.

Supervisors

Karen Skilling and Gabriel Stylianides

Louise was born and raised in Glasgow and moved to Oxford to pursue a DPhil in Education.

Louise’s research interests are education policy, particularly higher education policy, as well as qualitative research into the experiences of students in higher education and reducing inequalities in access to higher education. Louise is also interested in educational capabilities, educational purpose, aspirations and philosophical debates about knowledge construction and co-construction. Louise has a First Class BA (Joint Honours) in Social Policy and Education from the University of Strathclyde, and two Masters degrees with Distinction also from the University of Strathclyde in Applied Educational and Social Research and Social Policy (Research Methods). Louise also participated in the University of Oxford’s UNIQ+ Graduate Access Programme in the summer of 2022, where she worked at the Department of Sociology with Melinda Mills, Bo Zhao and Evelina Akimova on research into the impact of socio-economic status on inequalities in access to veterinary care in Scotland. Louise’s DPhil thesis is interested in evaluating Lorella Terzi’s educational capabilities framework through the lens of contemporary higher education in order to gain an understanding of what graduate capabilities are identified by students and stakeholders as being necessary for enabling graduates to successfully thrive and adapt in a post-pandemic society.

 

Supervisors

Alis Oancea and Kelsey Inouye

Motema studied Neuroscience as an undergraduate at Dartmouth College in the USA and it is one of its courses, found interest in Education.

Motema then worked for various non-profit organisations in Lesotho and South Africa focusing on helping high school students from low SES backgrounds access opportunities to study in HE. In her Masters’ project Motema analysed Lesotho’s 2009 Curriculum and Assessment Policy. This analysis’ findings brought Motema to her current research interests which include gendered STEM education and decolonisation of education policies and curricula in Lesotho. For her DPhil project, Motema is interested in finding out the lived experiences of female Science teachers in Lesotho Secondary Schools especially focusing on the major changes in the Secondary school education system in Lesotho that have happened in the past five years as unique meeting points.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Judith Hillier

Danielle is a DPhil student researching how Black-British doctoral students navigate the spaces of the elite, providing a new theoretical framework to understand their agency better.

Her main interests are in Human Flourishing, Cultural Geography, Psychology, and Justice, and her work aims to inform and reform educational frameworks and practices.

Following Danielle’s BSc in Psychology and MRes in Research Methods in Psychology, she founded a social enterprise that merges psychological and academic strategies to guide undergraduate and master’s students study practices. In addition to this, Danielle provided pedagogical and behavioural support across SEN college, secondary and primary schools.

Some of Danielle’s notable work includes her research introducing a new University-wide EDI strategy at her former Higher Education institution, presenting insights and way-forwards on youth homelessness to HRH Prince Williams, and providing discipleship to next-gen leaders.

Dan is a part-time DPhil Education student whose research focuses on investigating reasons why individuals choose to study and then teach physics as a subject discipline and how these relate to issues of equity and power. He previously worked as a secondary school physics teacher in the West Midlands of England for around 15 years before taking up his current post as Associate Professor of Physics Education at the University of Birmingham where he works in widening participation in physics and teacher education.

Publications
  • Cottle, D 2022, ‘Harnessing the potential of recently retired physics teachers to mentor new physics teachers’, Physics Education, vol. 57, no. 1, 015020. https://doi.org/10.1088/1361-6552/ac3931
  • Cottle, D 2021, ‘Improving students’ mathematical skills in secondary science: ideas from mathematics pedagogy’, School Science Review, vol. 102, no. 381, pp. 61-64. <https://www.ase.org.uk/resources/school-science-review/issue-381/improving-students-mathematical-skills-in-secondary>
  • Cottle, D 2021, ‘The effects of Covid-19 on student transition from school to university in STEM subjects’, New Directions in the Teaching of Physical Sciences, vol. 16, no. 1, 3847, pp. 1-4. https://doi.org/10.29311/ndtps.v0i14.3847 
  • Cottle, D & Marshall, R 2016, ‘Exploring electrical resistance: a novel kinesthetic model helps to resolve some misconceptions’, Physics Education, vol. 51, no. 5. https://doi.org/10.1088/0031-9120/51/5/054004 

Chris is a third-year part time DPhil student. He is an experienced Director of Children’s Services working in London. He is interested in path dependence and whether it is a helpful concept to understand how children’s services work.

Yaoyao is a DPhil student in Education at Oxford.

Her research interest lies in Aptitude-Instruction-Interaction (ATI) in second language acquisition (SLA).

Yaoyao’s research investigates the mediating effects of individual differences in learners’ domain-general perceptual-cognitive abilities in instructed foreign language pronunciation acquisition in adulthood. She aims to further explore how aptitude hinders instructional effectiveness and help all students make the most of instruction regardless of aptitude profiles.

Yaoyao started her BA in the Japanese Language and Literature at Sun Yat-Sen University (中山大学) in China. She then moved to the University of Queensland to finish her BA with double majors in Japanese and Translation. After her BA, she worked as an English teacher in China for three years. Prior to her DPhil studies at Oxford, Yaoyao completed her Master’s degree in TESOL at Institute of Education, University College London. Her Master’s dissertation was supervised by Dr Kazuya Saito.

Pat is the Deputy Chief Executive of a large College Group.

A qualified accountant, she is accountable to the Corporation Board for the Group’s Estate, sustainability and for maintaining the Group’s outstanding financial health grade. Her specialisms include Leadership and Management, Identification and Application of Funding Streams as well as leading the Group in new acquisitions, ventures and developments. Pat is using her vast experience of public sector finances to explore the intersection of accounting, leadership and purpose.

Supervisors

James Robson and Ariel Lindorff

Alice received her Master’s in Child Study and Education from the Institute of Child Study at the University of Toronto. She has taught preschool through higher education as a teacher and principal in public and private schools in North America and Europe. Deeply committed to enhancing education, she believes in learning that connects students and teachers to the natural world and to their communities. She is actively involved in community organisations that promote intercultural, interracial, and interfaith understanding and allyship.

Supervisors

Steve Puttick

Victoria is an educational researcher and practitioner, specialising in educational support and methodology of teaching mathematics to low-achieving students. For over 9 years she has been working at Big Change Educational Centre (Moscow) which provides support to looked-after children.

Before joining the DPhil programme, she completed her undergraduate degree in Finance at Financial University in Moscow and then gained a MSc in Psychology of Education from the University of Bristol.

Victoria’s current research focuses on educational issues of care-experienced children and teaching mathematics to students of low achievement and motivation.

Supervisors

Karen Skilling and Gabriel Stylianides

Louise was born and raised in Glasgow and moved to Oxford to pursue a DPhil in Education.

Louise’s research interests are education policy, particularly higher education policy, as well as qualitative research into the experiences of students in higher education and reducing inequalities in access to higher education. Louise is also interested in educational capabilities, educational purpose, aspirations and philosophical debates about knowledge construction and co-construction. Louise has a First Class BA (Joint Honours) in Social Policy and Education from the University of Strathclyde, and two Masters degrees with Distinction also from the University of Strathclyde in Applied Educational and Social Research and Social Policy (Research Methods). Louise also participated in the University of Oxford’s UNIQ+ Graduate Access Programme in the summer of 2022, where she worked at the Department of Sociology with Melinda Mills, Bo Zhao and Evelina Akimova on research into the impact of socio-economic status on inequalities in access to veterinary care in Scotland. Louise’s DPhil thesis is interested in evaluating Lorella Terzi’s educational capabilities framework through the lens of contemporary higher education in order to gain an understanding of what graduate capabilities are identified by students and stakeholders as being necessary for enabling graduates to successfully thrive and adapt in a post-pandemic society.

 

Supervisors

Alis Oancea and Kelsey Inouye

Motema studied Neuroscience as an undergraduate at Dartmouth College in the USA and it is one of its courses, found interest in Education.

Motema then worked for various non-profit organisations in Lesotho and South Africa focusing on helping high school students from low SES backgrounds access opportunities to study in HE. In her Masters’ project Motema analysed Lesotho’s 2009 Curriculum and Assessment Policy. This analysis’ findings brought Motema to her current research interests which include gendered STEM education and decolonisation of education policies and curricula in Lesotho. For her DPhil project, Motema is interested in finding out the lived experiences of female Science teachers in Lesotho Secondary Schools especially focusing on the major changes in the Secondary school education system in Lesotho that have happened in the past five years as unique meeting points.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Judith Hillier

Danielle is a DPhil student researching how Black-British doctoral students navigate the spaces of the elite, providing a new theoretical framework to understand their agency better.

Her main interests are in Human Flourishing, Cultural Geography, Psychology, and Justice, and her work aims to inform and reform educational frameworks and practices.

Following Danielle’s BSc in Psychology and MRes in Research Methods in Psychology, she founded a social enterprise that merges psychological and academic strategies to guide undergraduate and master’s students study practices. In addition to this, Danielle provided pedagogical and behavioural support across SEN college, secondary and primary schools.

Some of Danielle’s notable work includes her research introducing a new University-wide EDI strategy at her former Higher Education institution, presenting insights and way-forwards on youth homelessness to HRH Prince Williams, and providing discipleship to next-gen leaders.

Dan is a part-time DPhil Education student whose research focuses on investigating reasons why individuals choose to study and then teach physics as a subject discipline and how these relate to issues of equity and power. He previously worked as a secondary school physics teacher in the West Midlands of England for around 15 years before taking up his current post as Associate Professor of Physics Education at the University of Birmingham where he works in widening participation in physics and teacher education.

Publications
  • Cottle, D 2022, ‘Harnessing the potential of recently retired physics teachers to mentor new physics teachers’, Physics Education, vol. 57, no. 1, 015020. https://doi.org/10.1088/1361-6552/ac3931
  • Cottle, D 2021, ‘Improving students’ mathematical skills in secondary science: ideas from mathematics pedagogy’, School Science Review, vol. 102, no. 381, pp. 61-64. <https://www.ase.org.uk/resources/school-science-review/issue-381/improving-students-mathematical-skills-in-secondary>
  • Cottle, D 2021, ‘The effects of Covid-19 on student transition from school to university in STEM subjects’, New Directions in the Teaching of Physical Sciences, vol. 16, no. 1, 3847, pp. 1-4. https://doi.org/10.29311/ndtps.v0i14.3847 
  • Cottle, D & Marshall, R 2016, ‘Exploring electrical resistance: a novel kinesthetic model helps to resolve some misconceptions’, Physics Education, vol. 51, no. 5. https://doi.org/10.1088/0031-9120/51/5/054004 

Chris is a third-year part time DPhil student. He is an experienced Director of Children’s Services working in London. He is interested in path dependence and whether it is a helpful concept to understand how children’s services work.

Yaoyao is a DPhil student in Education at Oxford.

Her research interest lies in Aptitude-Instruction-Interaction (ATI) in second language acquisition (SLA).

Yaoyao’s research investigates the mediating effects of individual differences in learners’ domain-general perceptual-cognitive abilities in instructed foreign language pronunciation acquisition in adulthood. She aims to further explore how aptitude hinders instructional effectiveness and help all students make the most of instruction regardless of aptitude profiles.

Yaoyao started her BA in the Japanese Language and Literature at Sun Yat-Sen University (中山大学) in China. She then moved to the University of Queensland to finish her BA with double majors in Japanese and Translation. After her BA, she worked as an English teacher in China for three years. Prior to her DPhil studies at Oxford, Yaoyao completed her Master’s degree in TESOL at Institute of Education, University College London. Her Master’s dissertation was supervised by Dr Kazuya Saito.

Pat is the Deputy Chief Executive of a large College Group.

A qualified accountant, she is accountable to the Corporation Board for the Group’s Estate, sustainability and for maintaining the Group’s outstanding financial health grade. Her specialisms include Leadership and Management, Identification and Application of Funding Streams as well as leading the Group in new acquisitions, ventures and developments. Pat is using her vast experience of public sector finances to explore the intersection of accounting, leadership and purpose.

Supervisors

James Robson and Ariel Lindorff

Alice received her Master’s in Child Study and Education from the Institute of Child Study at the University of Toronto. She has taught preschool through higher education as a teacher and principal in public and private schools in North America and Europe. Deeply committed to enhancing education, she believes in learning that connects students and teachers to the natural world and to their communities. She is actively involved in community organisations that promote intercultural, interracial, and interfaith understanding and allyship.

Supervisors

Steve Puttick

Victoria is an educational researcher and practitioner, specialising in educational support and methodology of teaching mathematics to low-achieving students. For over 9 years she has been working at Big Change Educational Centre (Moscow) which provides support to looked-after children.

Before joining the DPhil programme, she completed her undergraduate degree in Finance at Financial University in Moscow and then gained a MSc in Psychology of Education from the University of Bristol.

Victoria’s current research focuses on educational issues of care-experienced children and teaching mathematics to students of low achievement and motivation.

Supervisors

Karen Skilling and Gabriel Stylianides

Louise was born and raised in Glasgow and moved to Oxford to pursue a DPhil in Education.

Louise’s research interests are education policy, particularly higher education policy, as well as qualitative research into the experiences of students in higher education and reducing inequalities in access to higher education. Louise is also interested in educational capabilities, educational purpose, aspirations and philosophical debates about knowledge construction and co-construction. Louise has a First Class BA (Joint Honours) in Social Policy and Education from the University of Strathclyde, and two Masters degrees with Distinction also from the University of Strathclyde in Applied Educational and Social Research and Social Policy (Research Methods). Louise also participated in the University of Oxford’s UNIQ+ Graduate Access Programme in the summer of 2022, where she worked at the Department of Sociology with Melinda Mills, Bo Zhao and Evelina Akimova on research into the impact of socio-economic status on inequalities in access to veterinary care in Scotland. Louise’s DPhil thesis is interested in evaluating Lorella Terzi’s educational capabilities framework through the lens of contemporary higher education in order to gain an understanding of what graduate capabilities are identified by students and stakeholders as being necessary for enabling graduates to successfully thrive and adapt in a post-pandemic society.

 

Supervisors

Alis Oancea and Kelsey Inouye

Motema studied Neuroscience as an undergraduate at Dartmouth College in the USA and it is one of its courses, found interest in Education.

Motema then worked for various non-profit organisations in Lesotho and South Africa focusing on helping high school students from low SES backgrounds access opportunities to study in HE. In her Masters’ project Motema analysed Lesotho’s 2009 Curriculum and Assessment Policy. This analysis’ findings brought Motema to her current research interests which include gendered STEM education and decolonisation of education policies and curricula in Lesotho. For her DPhil project, Motema is interested in finding out the lived experiences of female Science teachers in Lesotho Secondary Schools especially focusing on the major changes in the Secondary school education system in Lesotho that have happened in the past five years as unique meeting points.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Judith Hillier

Danielle is a DPhil student researching how Black-British doctoral students navigate the spaces of the elite, providing a new theoretical framework to understand their agency better.

Her main interests are in Human Flourishing, Cultural Geography, Psychology, and Justice, and her work aims to inform and reform educational frameworks and practices.

Following Danielle’s BSc in Psychology and MRes in Research Methods in Psychology, she founded a social enterprise that merges psychological and academic strategies to guide undergraduate and master’s students study practices. In addition to this, Danielle provided pedagogical and behavioural support across SEN college, secondary and primary schools.

Some of Danielle’s notable work includes her research introducing a new University-wide EDI strategy at her former Higher Education institution, presenting insights and way-forwards on youth homelessness to HRH Prince Williams, and providing discipleship to next-gen leaders.

Dan is a part-time DPhil Education student whose research focuses on investigating reasons why individuals choose to study and then teach physics as a subject discipline and how these relate to issues of equity and power. He previously worked as a secondary school physics teacher in the West Midlands of England for around 15 years before taking up his current post as Associate Professor of Physics Education at the University of Birmingham where he works in widening participation in physics and teacher education.

Publications
  • Cottle, D 2022, ‘Harnessing the potential of recently retired physics teachers to mentor new physics teachers’, Physics Education, vol. 57, no. 1, 015020. https://doi.org/10.1088/1361-6552/ac3931
  • Cottle, D 2021, ‘Improving students’ mathematical skills in secondary science: ideas from mathematics pedagogy’, School Science Review, vol. 102, no. 381, pp. 61-64. <https://www.ase.org.uk/resources/school-science-review/issue-381/improving-students-mathematical-skills-in-secondary>
  • Cottle, D 2021, ‘The effects of Covid-19 on student transition from school to university in STEM subjects’, New Directions in the Teaching of Physical Sciences, vol. 16, no. 1, 3847, pp. 1-4. https://doi.org/10.29311/ndtps.v0i14.3847 
  • Cottle, D & Marshall, R 2016, ‘Exploring electrical resistance: a novel kinesthetic model helps to resolve some misconceptions’, Physics Education, vol. 51, no. 5. https://doi.org/10.1088/0031-9120/51/5/054004 

Chris is a third-year part time DPhil student. He is an experienced Director of Children’s Services working in London. He is interested in path dependence and whether it is a helpful concept to understand how children’s services work.

Yaoyao is a DPhil student in Education at Oxford.

Her research interest lies in Aptitude-Instruction-Interaction (ATI) in second language acquisition (SLA).

Yaoyao’s research investigates the mediating effects of individual differences in learners’ domain-general perceptual-cognitive abilities in instructed foreign language pronunciation acquisition in adulthood. She aims to further explore how aptitude hinders instructional effectiveness and help all students make the most of instruction regardless of aptitude profiles.

Yaoyao started her BA in the Japanese Language and Literature at Sun Yat-Sen University (中山大学) in China. She then moved to the University of Queensland to finish her BA with double majors in Japanese and Translation. After her BA, she worked as an English teacher in China for three years. Prior to her DPhil studies at Oxford, Yaoyao completed her Master’s degree in TESOL at Institute of Education, University College London. Her Master’s dissertation was supervised by Dr Kazuya Saito.

Pat is the Deputy Chief Executive of a large College Group.

A qualified accountant, she is accountable to the Corporation Board for the Group’s Estate, sustainability and for maintaining the Group’s outstanding financial health grade. Her specialisms include Leadership and Management, Identification and Application of Funding Streams as well as leading the Group in new acquisitions, ventures and developments. Pat is using her vast experience of public sector finances to explore the intersection of accounting, leadership and purpose.

Supervisors

James Robson and Ariel Lindorff

Alice received her Master’s in Child Study and Education from the Institute of Child Study at the University of Toronto. She has taught preschool through higher education as a teacher and principal in public and private schools in North America and Europe. Deeply committed to enhancing education, she believes in learning that connects students and teachers to the natural world and to their communities. She is actively involved in community organisations that promote intercultural, interracial, and interfaith understanding and allyship.

Supervisors

Steve Puttick

Victoria is an educational researcher and practitioner, specialising in educational support and methodology of teaching mathematics to low-achieving students. For over 9 years she has been working at Big Change Educational Centre (Moscow) which provides support to looked-after children.

Before joining the DPhil programme, she completed her undergraduate degree in Finance at Financial University in Moscow and then gained a MSc in Psychology of Education from the University of Bristol.

Victoria’s current research focuses on educational issues of care-experienced children and teaching mathematics to students of low achievement and motivation.

Supervisors

Karen Skilling and Gabriel Stylianides

Louise was born and raised in Glasgow and moved to Oxford to pursue a DPhil in Education.

Louise’s research interests are education policy, particularly higher education policy, as well as qualitative research into the experiences of students in higher education and reducing inequalities in access to higher education. Louise is also interested in educational capabilities, educational purpose, aspirations and philosophical debates about knowledge construction and co-construction. Louise has a First Class BA (Joint Honours) in Social Policy and Education from the University of Strathclyde, and two Masters degrees with Distinction also from the University of Strathclyde in Applied Educational and Social Research and Social Policy (Research Methods). Louise also participated in the University of Oxford’s UNIQ+ Graduate Access Programme in the summer of 2022, where she worked at the Department of Sociology with Melinda Mills, Bo Zhao and Evelina Akimova on research into the impact of socio-economic status on inequalities in access to veterinary care in Scotland. Louise’s DPhil thesis is interested in evaluating Lorella Terzi’s educational capabilities framework through the lens of contemporary higher education in order to gain an understanding of what graduate capabilities are identified by students and stakeholders as being necessary for enabling graduates to successfully thrive and adapt in a post-pandemic society.

 

Supervisors

Alis Oancea and Kelsey Inouye

Motema studied Neuroscience as an undergraduate at Dartmouth College in the USA and it is one of its courses, found interest in Education.

Motema then worked for various non-profit organisations in Lesotho and South Africa focusing on helping high school students from low SES backgrounds access opportunities to study in HE. In her Masters’ project Motema analysed Lesotho’s 2009 Curriculum and Assessment Policy. This analysis’ findings brought Motema to her current research interests which include gendered STEM education and decolonisation of education policies and curricula in Lesotho. For her DPhil project, Motema is interested in finding out the lived experiences of female Science teachers in Lesotho Secondary Schools especially focusing on the major changes in the Secondary school education system in Lesotho that have happened in the past five years as unique meeting points.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Judith Hillier

Danielle is a DPhil student researching how Black-British doctoral students navigate the spaces of the elite, providing a new theoretical framework to understand their agency better.

Her main interests are in Human Flourishing, Cultural Geography, Psychology, and Justice, and her work aims to inform and reform educational frameworks and practices.

Following Danielle’s BSc in Psychology and MRes in Research Methods in Psychology, she founded a social enterprise that merges psychological and academic strategies to guide undergraduate and master’s students study practices. In addition to this, Danielle provided pedagogical and behavioural support across SEN college, secondary and primary schools.

Some of Danielle’s notable work includes her research introducing a new University-wide EDI strategy at her former Higher Education institution, presenting insights and way-forwards on youth homelessness to HRH Prince Williams, and providing discipleship to next-gen leaders.

Dan is a part-time DPhil Education student whose research focuses on investigating reasons why individuals choose to study and then teach physics as a subject discipline and how these relate to issues of equity and power. He previously worked as a secondary school physics teacher in the West Midlands of England for around 15 years before taking up his current post as Associate Professor of Physics Education at the University of Birmingham where he works in widening participation in physics and teacher education.

Publications
  • Cottle, D 2022, ‘Harnessing the potential of recently retired physics teachers to mentor new physics teachers’, Physics Education, vol. 57, no. 1, 015020. https://doi.org/10.1088/1361-6552/ac3931
  • Cottle, D 2021, ‘Improving students’ mathematical skills in secondary science: ideas from mathematics pedagogy’, School Science Review, vol. 102, no. 381, pp. 61-64. <https://www.ase.org.uk/resources/school-science-review/issue-381/improving-students-mathematical-skills-in-secondary>
  • Cottle, D 2021, ‘The effects of Covid-19 on student transition from school to university in STEM subjects’, New Directions in the Teaching of Physical Sciences, vol. 16, no. 1, 3847, pp. 1-4. https://doi.org/10.29311/ndtps.v0i14.3847 
  • Cottle, D & Marshall, R 2016, ‘Exploring electrical resistance: a novel kinesthetic model helps to resolve some misconceptions’, Physics Education, vol. 51, no. 5. https://doi.org/10.1088/0031-9120/51/5/054004 

Chris is a third-year part time DPhil student. He is an experienced Director of Children’s Services working in London. He is interested in path dependence and whether it is a helpful concept to understand how children’s services work.

Yaoyao is a DPhil student in Education at Oxford.

Her research interest lies in Aptitude-Instruction-Interaction (ATI) in second language acquisition (SLA).

Yaoyao’s research investigates the mediating effects of individual differences in learners’ domain-general perceptual-cognitive abilities in instructed foreign language pronunciation acquisition in adulthood. She aims to further explore how aptitude hinders instructional effectiveness and help all students make the most of instruction regardless of aptitude profiles.

Yaoyao started her BA in the Japanese Language and Literature at Sun Yat-Sen University (中山大学) in China. She then moved to the University of Queensland to finish her BA with double majors in Japanese and Translation. After her BA, she worked as an English teacher in China for three years. Prior to her DPhil studies at Oxford, Yaoyao completed her Master’s degree in TESOL at Institute of Education, University College London. Her Master’s dissertation was supervised by Dr Kazuya Saito.

Pat is the Deputy Chief Executive of a large College Group.

A qualified accountant, she is accountable to the Corporation Board for the Group’s Estate, sustainability and for maintaining the Group’s outstanding financial health grade. Her specialisms include Leadership and Management, Identification and Application of Funding Streams as well as leading the Group in new acquisitions, ventures and developments. Pat is using her vast experience of public sector finances to explore the intersection of accounting, leadership and purpose.

Supervisors

James Robson and Ariel Lindorff

Alice received her Master’s in Child Study and Education from the Institute of Child Study at the University of Toronto. She has taught preschool through higher education as a teacher and principal in public and private schools in North America and Europe. Deeply committed to enhancing education, she believes in learning that connects students and teachers to the natural world and to their communities. She is actively involved in community organisations that promote intercultural, interracial, and interfaith understanding and allyship.

Supervisors

Steve Puttick

Victoria is an educational researcher and practitioner, specialising in educational support and methodology of teaching mathematics to low-achieving students. For over 9 years she has been working at Big Change Educational Centre (Moscow) which provides support to looked-after children.

Before joining the DPhil programme, she completed her undergraduate degree in Finance at Financial University in Moscow and then gained a MSc in Psychology of Education from the University of Bristol.

Victoria’s current research focuses on educational issues of care-experienced children and teaching mathematics to students of low achievement and motivation.

Supervisors

Karen Skilling and Gabriel Stylianides

Louise was born and raised in Glasgow and moved to Oxford to pursue a DPhil in Education.

Louise’s research interests are education policy, particularly higher education policy, as well as qualitative research into the experiences of students in higher education and reducing inequalities in access to higher education. Louise is also interested in educational capabilities, educational purpose, aspirations and philosophical debates about knowledge construction and co-construction. Louise has a First Class BA (Joint Honours) in Social Policy and Education from the University of Strathclyde, and two Masters degrees with Distinction also from the University of Strathclyde in Applied Educational and Social Research and Social Policy (Research Methods). Louise also participated in the University of Oxford’s UNIQ+ Graduate Access Programme in the summer of 2022, where she worked at the Department of Sociology with Melinda Mills, Bo Zhao and Evelina Akimova on research into the impact of socio-economic status on inequalities in access to veterinary care in Scotland. Louise’s DPhil thesis is interested in evaluating Lorella Terzi’s educational capabilities framework through the lens of contemporary higher education in order to gain an understanding of what graduate capabilities are identified by students and stakeholders as being necessary for enabling graduates to successfully thrive and adapt in a post-pandemic society.

 

Supervisors

Alis Oancea and Kelsey Inouye

Motema studied Neuroscience as an undergraduate at Dartmouth College in the USA and it is one of its courses, found interest in Education.

Motema then worked for various non-profit organisations in Lesotho and South Africa focusing on helping high school students from low SES backgrounds access opportunities to study in HE. In her Masters’ project Motema analysed Lesotho’s 2009 Curriculum and Assessment Policy. This analysis’ findings brought Motema to her current research interests which include gendered STEM education and decolonisation of education policies and curricula in Lesotho. For her DPhil project, Motema is interested in finding out the lived experiences of female Science teachers in Lesotho Secondary Schools especially focusing on the major changes in the Secondary school education system in Lesotho that have happened in the past five years as unique meeting points.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Judith Hillier

Danielle is a DPhil student researching how Black-British doctoral students navigate the spaces of the elite, providing a new theoretical framework to understand their agency better.

Her main interests are in Human Flourishing, Cultural Geography, Psychology, and Justice, and her work aims to inform and reform educational frameworks and practices.

Following Danielle’s BSc in Psychology and MRes in Research Methods in Psychology, she founded a social enterprise that merges psychological and academic strategies to guide undergraduate and master’s students study practices. In addition to this, Danielle provided pedagogical and behavioural support across SEN college, secondary and primary schools.

Some of Danielle’s notable work includes her research introducing a new University-wide EDI strategy at her former Higher Education institution, presenting insights and way-forwards on youth homelessness to HRH Prince Williams, and providing discipleship to next-gen leaders.

Dan is a part-time DPhil Education student whose research focuses on investigating reasons why individuals choose to study and then teach physics as a subject discipline and how these relate to issues of equity and power. He previously worked as a secondary school physics teacher in the West Midlands of England for around 15 years before taking up his current post as Associate Professor of Physics Education at the University of Birmingham where he works in widening participation in physics and teacher education.

Publications
  • Cottle, D 2022, ‘Harnessing the potential of recently retired physics teachers to mentor new physics teachers’, Physics Education, vol. 57, no. 1, 015020. https://doi.org/10.1088/1361-6552/ac3931
  • Cottle, D 2021, ‘Improving students’ mathematical skills in secondary science: ideas from mathematics pedagogy’, School Science Review, vol. 102, no. 381, pp. 61-64. <https://www.ase.org.uk/resources/school-science-review/issue-381/improving-students-mathematical-skills-in-secondary>
  • Cottle, D 2021, ‘The effects of Covid-19 on student transition from school to university in STEM subjects’, New Directions in the Teaching of Physical Sciences, vol. 16, no. 1, 3847, pp. 1-4. https://doi.org/10.29311/ndtps.v0i14.3847 
  • Cottle, D & Marshall, R 2016, ‘Exploring electrical resistance: a novel kinesthetic model helps to resolve some misconceptions’, Physics Education, vol. 51, no. 5. https://doi.org/10.1088/0031-9120/51/5/054004 

Chris is a third-year part time DPhil student. He is an experienced Director of Children’s Services working in London. He is interested in path dependence and whether it is a helpful concept to understand how children’s services work.

Yaoyao is a DPhil student in Education at Oxford.

Her research interest lies in Aptitude-Instruction-Interaction (ATI) in second language acquisition (SLA).

Yaoyao’s research investigates the mediating effects of individual differences in learners’ domain-general perceptual-cognitive abilities in instructed foreign language pronunciation acquisition in adulthood. She aims to further explore how aptitude hinders instructional effectiveness and help all students make the most of instruction regardless of aptitude profiles.

Yaoyao started her BA in the Japanese Language and Literature at Sun Yat-Sen University (中山大学) in China. She then moved to the University of Queensland to finish her BA with double majors in Japanese and Translation. After her BA, she worked as an English teacher in China for three years. Prior to her DPhil studies at Oxford, Yaoyao completed her Master’s degree in TESOL at Institute of Education, University College London. Her Master’s dissertation was supervised by Dr Kazuya Saito.

Pat is the Deputy Chief Executive of a large College Group.

A qualified accountant, she is accountable to the Corporation Board for the Group’s Estate, sustainability and for maintaining the Group’s outstanding financial health grade. Her specialisms include Leadership and Management, Identification and Application of Funding Streams as well as leading the Group in new acquisitions, ventures and developments. Pat is using her vast experience of public sector finances to explore the intersection of accounting, leadership and purpose.

Supervisors

James Robson and Ariel Lindorff

Alice received her Master’s in Child Study and Education from the Institute of Child Study at the University of Toronto. She has taught preschool through higher education as a teacher and principal in public and private schools in North America and Europe. Deeply committed to enhancing education, she believes in learning that connects students and teachers to the natural world and to their communities. She is actively involved in community organisations that promote intercultural, interracial, and interfaith understanding and allyship.

Supervisors

Steve Puttick

Victoria is an educational researcher and practitioner, specialising in educational support and methodology of teaching mathematics to low-achieving students. For over 9 years she has been working at Big Change Educational Centre (Moscow) which provides support to looked-after children.

Before joining the DPhil programme, she completed her undergraduate degree in Finance at Financial University in Moscow and then gained a MSc in Psychology of Education from the University of Bristol.

Victoria’s current research focuses on educational issues of care-experienced children and teaching mathematics to students of low achievement and motivation.

Supervisors

Karen Skilling and Gabriel Stylianides

Louise was born and raised in Glasgow and moved to Oxford to pursue a DPhil in Education.

Louise’s research interests are education policy, particularly higher education policy, as well as qualitative research into the experiences of students in higher education and reducing inequalities in access to higher education. Louise is also interested in educational capabilities, educational purpose, aspirations and philosophical debates about knowledge construction and co-construction. Louise has a First Class BA (Joint Honours) in Social Policy and Education from the University of Strathclyde, and two Masters degrees with Distinction also from the University of Strathclyde in Applied Educational and Social Research and Social Policy (Research Methods). Louise also participated in the University of Oxford’s UNIQ+ Graduate Access Programme in the summer of 2022, where she worked at the Department of Sociology with Melinda Mills, Bo Zhao and Evelina Akimova on research into the impact of socio-economic status on inequalities in access to veterinary care in Scotland. Louise’s DPhil thesis is interested in evaluating Lorella Terzi’s educational capabilities framework through the lens of contemporary higher education in order to gain an understanding of what graduate capabilities are identified by students and stakeholders as being necessary for enabling graduates to successfully thrive and adapt in a post-pandemic society.

 

Supervisors

Alis Oancea and Kelsey Inouye

Motema studied Neuroscience as an undergraduate at Dartmouth College in the USA and it is one of its courses, found interest in Education.

Motema then worked for various non-profit organisations in Lesotho and South Africa focusing on helping high school students from low SES backgrounds access opportunities to study in HE. In her Masters’ project Motema analysed Lesotho’s 2009 Curriculum and Assessment Policy. This analysis’ findings brought Motema to her current research interests which include gendered STEM education and decolonisation of education policies and curricula in Lesotho. For her DPhil project, Motema is interested in finding out the lived experiences of female Science teachers in Lesotho Secondary Schools especially focusing on the major changes in the Secondary school education system in Lesotho that have happened in the past five years as unique meeting points.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Judith Hillier

Danielle is a DPhil student researching how Black-British doctoral students navigate the spaces of the elite, providing a new theoretical framework to understand their agency better.

Her main interests are in Human Flourishing, Cultural Geography, Psychology, and Justice, and her work aims to inform and reform educational frameworks and practices.

Following Danielle’s BSc in Psychology and MRes in Research Methods in Psychology, she founded a social enterprise that merges psychological and academic strategies to guide undergraduate and master’s students study practices. In addition to this, Danielle provided pedagogical and behavioural support across SEN college, secondary and primary schools.

Some of Danielle’s notable work includes her research introducing a new University-wide EDI strategy at her former Higher Education institution, presenting insights and way-forwards on youth homelessness to HRH Prince Williams, and providing discipleship to next-gen leaders.

Dan is a part-time DPhil Education student whose research focuses on investigating reasons why individuals choose to study and then teach physics as a subject discipline and how these relate to issues of equity and power. He previously worked as a secondary school physics teacher in the West Midlands of England for around 15 years before taking up his current post as Associate Professor of Physics Education at the University of Birmingham where he works in widening participation in physics and teacher education.

Publications
  • Cottle, D 2022, ‘Harnessing the potential of recently retired physics teachers to mentor new physics teachers’, Physics Education, vol. 57, no. 1, 015020. https://doi.org/10.1088/1361-6552/ac3931
  • Cottle, D 2021, ‘Improving students’ mathematical skills in secondary science: ideas from mathematics pedagogy’, School Science Review, vol. 102, no. 381, pp. 61-64. <https://www.ase.org.uk/resources/school-science-review/issue-381/improving-students-mathematical-skills-in-secondary>
  • Cottle, D 2021, ‘The effects of Covid-19 on student transition from school to university in STEM subjects’, New Directions in the Teaching of Physical Sciences, vol. 16, no. 1, 3847, pp. 1-4. https://doi.org/10.29311/ndtps.v0i14.3847 
  • Cottle, D & Marshall, R 2016, ‘Exploring electrical resistance: a novel kinesthetic model helps to resolve some misconceptions’, Physics Education, vol. 51, no. 5. https://doi.org/10.1088/0031-9120/51/5/054004 

Chris is a third-year part time DPhil student. He is an experienced Director of Children’s Services working in London. He is interested in path dependence and whether it is a helpful concept to understand how children’s services work.

Yaoyao is a DPhil student in Education at Oxford.

Her research interest lies in Aptitude-Instruction-Interaction (ATI) in second language acquisition (SLA).

Yaoyao’s research investigates the mediating effects of individual differences in learners’ domain-general perceptual-cognitive abilities in instructed foreign language pronunciation acquisition in adulthood. She aims to further explore how aptitude hinders instructional effectiveness and help all students make the most of instruction regardless of aptitude profiles.

Yaoyao started her BA in the Japanese Language and Literature at Sun Yat-Sen University (中山大学) in China. She then moved to the University of Queensland to finish her BA with double majors in Japanese and Translation. After her BA, she worked as an English teacher in China for three years. Prior to her DPhil studies at Oxford, Yaoyao completed her Master’s degree in TESOL at Institute of Education, University College London. Her Master’s dissertation was supervised by Dr Kazuya Saito.

Pat is the Deputy Chief Executive of a large College Group.

A qualified accountant, she is accountable to the Corporation Board for the Group’s Estate, sustainability and for maintaining the Group’s outstanding financial health grade. Her specialisms include Leadership and Management, Identification and Application of Funding Streams as well as leading the Group in new acquisitions, ventures and developments. Pat is using her vast experience of public sector finances to explore the intersection of accounting, leadership and purpose.

Supervisors

James Robson and Ariel Lindorff

Alice received her Master’s in Child Study and Education from the Institute of Child Study at the University of Toronto. She has taught preschool through higher education as a teacher and principal in public and private schools in North America and Europe. Deeply committed to enhancing education, she believes in learning that connects students and teachers to the natural world and to their communities. She is actively involved in community organisations that promote intercultural, interracial, and interfaith understanding and allyship.

Supervisors

Steve Puttick

Victoria is an educational researcher and practitioner, specialising in educational support and methodology of teaching mathematics to low-achieving students. For over 9 years she has been working at Big Change Educational Centre (Moscow) which provides support to looked-after children.

Before joining the DPhil programme, she completed her undergraduate degree in Finance at Financial University in Moscow and then gained a MSc in Psychology of Education from the University of Bristol.

Victoria’s current research focuses on educational issues of care-experienced children and teaching mathematics to students of low achievement and motivation.

Supervisors

Karen Skilling and Gabriel Stylianides

Louise was born and raised in Glasgow and moved to Oxford to pursue a DPhil in Education.

Louise’s research interests are education policy, particularly higher education policy, as well as qualitative research into the experiences of students in higher education and reducing inequalities in access to higher education. Louise is also interested in educational capabilities, educational purpose, aspirations and philosophical debates about knowledge construction and co-construction. Louise has a First Class BA (Joint Honours) in Social Policy and Education from the University of Strathclyde, and two Masters degrees with Distinction also from the University of Strathclyde in Applied Educational and Social Research and Social Policy (Research Methods). Louise also participated in the University of Oxford’s UNIQ+ Graduate Access Programme in the summer of 2022, where she worked at the Department of Sociology with Melinda Mills, Bo Zhao and Evelina Akimova on research into the impact of socio-economic status on inequalities in access to veterinary care in Scotland. Louise’s DPhil thesis is interested in evaluating Lorella Terzi’s educational capabilities framework through the lens of contemporary higher education in order to gain an understanding of what graduate capabilities are identified by students and stakeholders as being necessary for enabling graduates to successfully thrive and adapt in a post-pandemic society.

 

Supervisors

Alis Oancea and Kelsey Inouye

Motema studied Neuroscience as an undergraduate at Dartmouth College in the USA and it is one of its courses, found interest in Education.

Motema then worked for various non-profit organisations in Lesotho and South Africa focusing on helping high school students from low SES backgrounds access opportunities to study in HE. In her Masters’ project Motema analysed Lesotho’s 2009 Curriculum and Assessment Policy. This analysis’ findings brought Motema to her current research interests which include gendered STEM education and decolonisation of education policies and curricula in Lesotho. For her DPhil project, Motema is interested in finding out the lived experiences of female Science teachers in Lesotho Secondary Schools especially focusing on the major changes in the Secondary school education system in Lesotho that have happened in the past five years as unique meeting points.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Judith Hillier

Danielle is a DPhil student researching how Black-British doctoral students navigate the spaces of the elite, providing a new theoretical framework to understand their agency better.

Her main interests are in Human Flourishing, Cultural Geography, Psychology, and Justice, and her work aims to inform and reform educational frameworks and practices.

Following Danielle’s BSc in Psychology and MRes in Research Methods in Psychology, she founded a social enterprise that merges psychological and academic strategies to guide undergraduate and master’s students study practices. In addition to this, Danielle provided pedagogical and behavioural support across SEN college, secondary and primary schools.

Some of Danielle’s notable work includes her research introducing a new University-wide EDI strategy at her former Higher Education institution, presenting insights and way-forwards on youth homelessness to HRH Prince Williams, and providing discipleship to next-gen leaders.

Dan is a part-time DPhil Education student whose research focuses on investigating reasons why individuals choose to study and then teach physics as a subject discipline and how these relate to issues of equity and power. He previously worked as a secondary school physics teacher in the West Midlands of England for around 15 years before taking up his current post as Associate Professor of Physics Education at the University of Birmingham where he works in widening participation in physics and teacher education.

Publications
  • Cottle, D 2022, ‘Harnessing the potential of recently retired physics teachers to mentor new physics teachers’, Physics Education, vol. 57, no. 1, 015020. https://doi.org/10.1088/1361-6552/ac3931
  • Cottle, D 2021, ‘Improving students’ mathematical skills in secondary science: ideas from mathematics pedagogy’, School Science Review, vol. 102, no. 381, pp. 61-64. <https://www.ase.org.uk/resources/school-science-review/issue-381/improving-students-mathematical-skills-in-secondary>
  • Cottle, D 2021, ‘The effects of Covid-19 on student transition from school to university in STEM subjects’, New Directions in the Teaching of Physical Sciences, vol. 16, no. 1, 3847, pp. 1-4. https://doi.org/10.29311/ndtps.v0i14.3847 
  • Cottle, D & Marshall, R 2016, ‘Exploring electrical resistance: a novel kinesthetic model helps to resolve some misconceptions’, Physics Education, vol. 51, no. 5. https://doi.org/10.1088/0031-9120/51/5/054004 

Chris is a third-year part time DPhil student. He is an experienced Director of Children’s Services working in London. He is interested in path dependence and whether it is a helpful concept to understand how children’s services work.

Yaoyao is a DPhil student in Education at Oxford.

Her research interest lies in Aptitude-Instruction-Interaction (ATI) in second language acquisition (SLA).

Yaoyao’s research investigates the mediating effects of individual differences in learners’ domain-general perceptual-cognitive abilities in instructed foreign language pronunciation acquisition in adulthood. She aims to further explore how aptitude hinders instructional effectiveness and help all students make the most of instruction regardless of aptitude profiles.

Yaoyao started her BA in the Japanese Language and Literature at Sun Yat-Sen University (中山大学) in China. She then moved to the University of Queensland to finish her BA with double majors in Japanese and Translation. After her BA, she worked as an English teacher in China for three years. Prior to her DPhil studies at Oxford, Yaoyao completed her Master’s degree in TESOL at Institute of Education, University College London. Her Master’s dissertation was supervised by Dr Kazuya Saito.

Pat is the Deputy Chief Executive of a large College Group.

A qualified accountant, she is accountable to the Corporation Board for the Group’s Estate, sustainability and for maintaining the Group’s outstanding financial health grade. Her specialisms include Leadership and Management, Identification and Application of Funding Streams as well as leading the Group in new acquisitions, ventures and developments. Pat is using her vast experience of public sector finances to explore the intersection of accounting, leadership and purpose.

Supervisors

James Robson and Ariel Lindorff

Alice received her Master’s in Child Study and Education from the Institute of Child Study at the University of Toronto. She has taught preschool through higher education as a teacher and principal in public and private schools in North America and Europe. Deeply committed to enhancing education, she believes in learning that connects students and teachers to the natural world and to their communities. She is actively involved in community organisations that promote intercultural, interracial, and interfaith understanding and allyship.

Supervisors

Steve Puttick

Victoria is an educational researcher and practitioner, specialising in educational support and methodology of teaching mathematics to low-achieving students. For over 9 years she has been working at Big Change Educational Centre (Moscow) which provides support to looked-after children.

Before joining the DPhil programme, she completed her undergraduate degree in Finance at Financial University in Moscow and then gained a MSc in Psychology of Education from the University of Bristol.

Victoria’s current research focuses on educational issues of care-experienced children and teaching mathematics to students of low achievement and motivation.

Supervisors

Karen Skilling and Gabriel Stylianides

Louise was born and raised in Glasgow and moved to Oxford to pursue a DPhil in Education.

Louise’s research interests are education policy, particularly higher education policy, as well as qualitative research into the experiences of students in higher education and reducing inequalities in access to higher education. Louise is also interested in educational capabilities, educational purpose, aspirations and philosophical debates about knowledge construction and co-construction. Louise has a First Class BA (Joint Honours) in Social Policy and Education from the University of Strathclyde, and two Masters degrees with Distinction also from the University of Strathclyde in Applied Educational and Social Research and Social Policy (Research Methods). Louise also participated in the University of Oxford’s UNIQ+ Graduate Access Programme in the summer of 2022, where she worked at the Department of Sociology with Melinda Mills, Bo Zhao and Evelina Akimova on research into the impact of socio-economic status on inequalities in access to veterinary care in Scotland. Louise’s DPhil thesis is interested in evaluating Lorella Terzi’s educational capabilities framework through the lens of contemporary higher education in order to gain an understanding of what graduate capabilities are identified by students and stakeholders as being necessary for enabling graduates to successfully thrive and adapt in a post-pandemic society.

 

Supervisors

Alis Oancea and Kelsey Inouye

Motema studied Neuroscience as an undergraduate at Dartmouth College in the USA and it is one of its courses, found interest in Education.

Motema then worked for various non-profit organisations in Lesotho and South Africa focusing on helping high school students from low SES backgrounds access opportunities to study in HE. In her Masters’ project Motema analysed Lesotho’s 2009 Curriculum and Assessment Policy. This analysis’ findings brought Motema to her current research interests which include gendered STEM education and decolonisation of education policies and curricula in Lesotho. For her DPhil project, Motema is interested in finding out the lived experiences of female Science teachers in Lesotho Secondary Schools especially focusing on the major changes in the Secondary school education system in Lesotho that have happened in the past five years as unique meeting points.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Judith Hillier

Danielle is a DPhil student researching how Black-British doctoral students navigate the spaces of the elite, providing a new theoretical framework to understand their agency better.

Her main interests are in Human Flourishing, Cultural Geography, Psychology, and Justice, and her work aims to inform and reform educational frameworks and practices.

Following Danielle’s BSc in Psychology and MRes in Research Methods in Psychology, she founded a social enterprise that merges psychological and academic strategies to guide undergraduate and master’s students study practices. In addition to this, Danielle provided pedagogical and behavioural support across SEN college, secondary and primary schools.

Some of Danielle’s notable work includes her research introducing a new University-wide EDI strategy at her former Higher Education institution, presenting insights and way-forwards on youth homelessness to HRH Prince Williams, and providing discipleship to next-gen leaders.

Dan is a part-time DPhil Education student whose research focuses on investigating reasons why individuals choose to study and then teach physics as a subject discipline and how these relate to issues of equity and power. He previously worked as a secondary school physics teacher in the West Midlands of England for around 15 years before taking up his current post as Associate Professor of Physics Education at the University of Birmingham where he works in widening participation in physics and teacher education.

Publications
  • Cottle, D 2022, ‘Harnessing the potential of recently retired physics teachers to mentor new physics teachers’, Physics Education, vol. 57, no. 1, 015020. https://doi.org/10.1088/1361-6552/ac3931
  • Cottle, D 2021, ‘Improving students’ mathematical skills in secondary science: ideas from mathematics pedagogy’, School Science Review, vol. 102, no. 381, pp. 61-64. <https://www.ase.org.uk/resources/school-science-review/issue-381/improving-students-mathematical-skills-in-secondary>
  • Cottle, D 2021, ‘The effects of Covid-19 on student transition from school to university in STEM subjects’, New Directions in the Teaching of Physical Sciences, vol. 16, no. 1, 3847, pp. 1-4. https://doi.org/10.29311/ndtps.v0i14.3847 
  • Cottle, D & Marshall, R 2016, ‘Exploring electrical resistance: a novel kinesthetic model helps to resolve some misconceptions’, Physics Education, vol. 51, no. 5. https://doi.org/10.1088/0031-9120/51/5/054004 

Chris is a third-year part time DPhil student. He is an experienced Director of Children’s Services working in London. He is interested in path dependence and whether it is a helpful concept to understand how children’s services work.

Yaoyao is a DPhil student in Education at Oxford.

Her research interest lies in Aptitude-Instruction-Interaction (ATI) in second language acquisition (SLA).

Yaoyao’s research investigates the mediating effects of individual differences in learners’ domain-general perceptual-cognitive abilities in instructed foreign language pronunciation acquisition in adulthood. She aims to further explore how aptitude hinders instructional effectiveness and help all students make the most of instruction regardless of aptitude profiles.

Yaoyao started her BA in the Japanese Language and Literature at Sun Yat-Sen University (中山大学) in China. She then moved to the University of Queensland to finish her BA with double majors in Japanese and Translation. After her BA, she worked as an English teacher in China for three years. Prior to her DPhil studies at Oxford, Yaoyao completed her Master’s degree in TESOL at Institute of Education, University College London. Her Master’s dissertation was supervised by Dr Kazuya Saito.

Pat is the Deputy Chief Executive of a large College Group.

A qualified accountant, she is accountable to the Corporation Board for the Group’s Estate, sustainability and for maintaining the Group’s outstanding financial health grade. Her specialisms include Leadership and Management, Identification and Application of Funding Streams as well as leading the Group in new acquisitions, ventures and developments. Pat is using her vast experience of public sector finances to explore the intersection of accounting, leadership and purpose.

Supervisors

James Robson and Ariel Lindorff

Alice received her Master’s in Child Study and Education from the Institute of Child Study at the University of Toronto. She has taught preschool through higher education as a teacher and principal in public and private schools in North America and Europe. Deeply committed to enhancing education, she believes in learning that connects students and teachers to the natural world and to their communities. She is actively involved in community organisations that promote intercultural, interracial, and interfaith understanding and allyship.

Supervisors

Steve Puttick

Victoria is an educational researcher and practitioner, specialising in educational support and methodology of teaching mathematics to low-achieving students. For over 9 years she has been working at Big Change Educational Centre (Moscow) which provides support to looked-after children.

Before joining the DPhil programme, she completed her undergraduate degree in Finance at Financial University in Moscow and then gained a MSc in Psychology of Education from the University of Bristol.

Victoria’s current research focuses on educational issues of care-experienced children and teaching mathematics to students of low achievement and motivation.

Supervisors

Karen Skilling and Gabriel Stylianides

Louise was born and raised in Glasgow and moved to Oxford to pursue a DPhil in Education.

Louise’s research interests are education policy, particularly higher education policy, as well as qualitative research into the experiences of students in higher education and reducing inequalities in access to higher education. Louise is also interested in educational capabilities, educational purpose, aspirations and philosophical debates about knowledge construction and co-construction. Louise has a First Class BA (Joint Honours) in Social Policy and Education from the University of Strathclyde, and two Masters degrees with Distinction also from the University of Strathclyde in Applied Educational and Social Research and Social Policy (Research Methods). Louise also participated in the University of Oxford’s UNIQ+ Graduate Access Programme in the summer of 2022, where she worked at the Department of Sociology with Melinda Mills, Bo Zhao and Evelina Akimova on research into the impact of socio-economic status on inequalities in access to veterinary care in Scotland. Louise’s DPhil thesis is interested in evaluating Lorella Terzi’s educational capabilities framework through the lens of contemporary higher education in order to gain an understanding of what graduate capabilities are identified by students and stakeholders as being necessary for enabling graduates to successfully thrive and adapt in a post-pandemic society.

 

Supervisors

Alis Oancea and Kelsey Inouye

Motema studied Neuroscience as an undergraduate at Dartmouth College in the USA and it is one of its courses, found interest in Education.

Motema then worked for various non-profit organisations in Lesotho and South Africa focusing on helping high school students from low SES backgrounds access opportunities to study in HE. In her Masters’ project Motema analysed Lesotho’s 2009 Curriculum and Assessment Policy. This analysis’ findings brought Motema to her current research interests which include gendered STEM education and decolonisation of education policies and curricula in Lesotho. For her DPhil project, Motema is interested in finding out the lived experiences of female Science teachers in Lesotho Secondary Schools especially focusing on the major changes in the Secondary school education system in Lesotho that have happened in the past five years as unique meeting points.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Judith Hillier

Danielle is a DPhil student researching how Black-British doctoral students navigate the spaces of the elite, providing a new theoretical framework to understand their agency better.

Her main interests are in Human Flourishing, Cultural Geography, Psychology, and Justice, and her work aims to inform and reform educational frameworks and practices.

Following Danielle’s BSc in Psychology and MRes in Research Methods in Psychology, she founded a social enterprise that merges psychological and academic strategies to guide undergraduate and master’s students study practices. In addition to this, Danielle provided pedagogical and behavioural support across SEN college, secondary and primary schools.

Some of Danielle’s notable work includes her research introducing a new University-wide EDI strategy at her former Higher Education institution, presenting insights and way-forwards on youth homelessness to HRH Prince Williams, and providing discipleship to next-gen leaders.

Dan is a part-time DPhil Education student whose research focuses on investigating reasons why individuals choose to study and then teach physics as a subject discipline and how these relate to issues of equity and power. He previously worked as a secondary school physics teacher in the West Midlands of England for around 15 years before taking up his current post as Associate Professor of Physics Education at the University of Birmingham where he works in widening participation in physics and teacher education.

Publications
  • Cottle, D 2022, ‘Harnessing the potential of recently retired physics teachers to mentor new physics teachers’, Physics Education, vol. 57, no. 1, 015020. https://doi.org/10.1088/1361-6552/ac3931
  • Cottle, D 2021, ‘Improving students’ mathematical skills in secondary science: ideas from mathematics pedagogy’, School Science Review, vol. 102, no. 381, pp. 61-64. <https://www.ase.org.uk/resources/school-science-review/issue-381/improving-students-mathematical-skills-in-secondary>
  • Cottle, D 2021, ‘The effects of Covid-19 on student transition from school to university in STEM subjects’, New Directions in the Teaching of Physical Sciences, vol. 16, no. 1, 3847, pp. 1-4. https://doi.org/10.29311/ndtps.v0i14.3847 
  • Cottle, D & Marshall, R 2016, ‘Exploring electrical resistance: a novel kinesthetic model helps to resolve some misconceptions’, Physics Education, vol. 51, no. 5. https://doi.org/10.1088/0031-9120/51/5/054004 

Chris is a third-year part time DPhil student. He is an experienced Director of Children’s Services working in London. He is interested in path dependence and whether it is a helpful concept to understand how children’s services work.

Yaoyao is a DPhil student in Education at Oxford.

Her research interest lies in Aptitude-Instruction-Interaction (ATI) in second language acquisition (SLA).

Yaoyao’s research investigates the mediating effects of individual differences in learners’ domain-general perceptual-cognitive abilities in instructed foreign language pronunciation acquisition in adulthood. She aims to further explore how aptitude hinders instructional effectiveness and help all students make the most of instruction regardless of aptitude profiles.

Yaoyao started her BA in the Japanese Language and Literature at Sun Yat-Sen University (中山大学) in China. She then moved to the University of Queensland to finish her BA with double majors in Japanese and Translation. After her BA, she worked as an English teacher in China for three years. Prior to her DPhil studies at Oxford, Yaoyao completed her Master’s degree in TESOL at Institute of Education, University College London. Her Master’s dissertation was supervised by Dr Kazuya Saito.

Pat is the Deputy Chief Executive of a large College Group.

A qualified accountant, she is accountable to the Corporation Board for the Group’s Estate, sustainability and for maintaining the Group’s outstanding financial health grade. Her specialisms include Leadership and Management, Identification and Application of Funding Streams as well as leading the Group in new acquisitions, ventures and developments. Pat is using her vast experience of public sector finances to explore the intersection of accounting, leadership and purpose.

Supervisors

James Robson and Ariel Lindorff

Alice received her Master’s in Child Study and Education from the Institute of Child Study at the University of Toronto. She has taught preschool through higher education as a teacher and principal in public and private schools in North America and Europe. Deeply committed to enhancing education, she believes in learning that connects students and teachers to the natural world and to their communities. She is actively involved in community organisations that promote intercultural, interracial, and interfaith understanding and allyship.

Supervisors

Steve Puttick

Victoria is an educational researcher and practitioner, specialising in educational support and methodology of teaching mathematics to low-achieving students. For over 9 years she has been working at Big Change Educational Centre (Moscow) which provides support to looked-after children.

Before joining the DPhil programme, she completed her undergraduate degree in Finance at Financial University in Moscow and then gained a MSc in Psychology of Education from the University of Bristol.

Victoria’s current research focuses on educational issues of care-experienced children and teaching mathematics to students of low achievement and motivation.

Supervisors

Karen Skilling and Gabriel Stylianides

Louise was born and raised in Glasgow and moved to Oxford to pursue a DPhil in Education.

Louise’s research interests are education policy, particularly higher education policy, as well as qualitative research into the experiences of students in higher education and reducing inequalities in access to higher education. Louise is also interested in educational capabilities, educational purpose, aspirations and philosophical debates about knowledge construction and co-construction. Louise has a First Class BA (Joint Honours) in Social Policy and Education from the University of Strathclyde, and two Masters degrees with Distinction also from the University of Strathclyde in Applied Educational and Social Research and Social Policy (Research Methods). Louise also participated in the University of Oxford’s UNIQ+ Graduate Access Programme in the summer of 2022, where she worked at the Department of Sociology with Melinda Mills, Bo Zhao and Evelina Akimova on research into the impact of socio-economic status on inequalities in access to veterinary care in Scotland. Louise’s DPhil thesis is interested in evaluating Lorella Terzi’s educational capabilities framework through the lens of contemporary higher education in order to gain an understanding of what graduate capabilities are identified by students and stakeholders as being necessary for enabling graduates to successfully thrive and adapt in a post-pandemic society.

 

Supervisors

Alis Oancea and Kelsey Inouye

Motema studied Neuroscience as an undergraduate at Dartmouth College in the USA and it is one of its courses, found interest in Education.

Motema then worked for various non-profit organisations in Lesotho and South Africa focusing on helping high school students from low SES backgrounds access opportunities to study in HE. In her Masters’ project Motema analysed Lesotho’s 2009 Curriculum and Assessment Policy. This analysis’ findings brought Motema to her current research interests which include gendered STEM education and decolonisation of education policies and curricula in Lesotho. For her DPhil project, Motema is interested in finding out the lived experiences of female Science teachers in Lesotho Secondary Schools especially focusing on the major changes in the Secondary school education system in Lesotho that have happened in the past five years as unique meeting points.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Judith Hillier

Danielle is a DPhil student researching how Black-British doctoral students navigate the spaces of the elite, providing a new theoretical framework to understand their agency better.

Her main interests are in Human Flourishing, Cultural Geography, Psychology, and Justice, and her work aims to inform and reform educational frameworks and practices.

Following Danielle’s BSc in Psychology and MRes in Research Methods in Psychology, she founded a social enterprise that merges psychological and academic strategies to guide undergraduate and master’s students study practices. In addition to this, Danielle provided pedagogical and behavioural support across SEN college, secondary and primary schools.

Some of Danielle’s notable work includes her research introducing a new University-wide EDI strategy at her former Higher Education institution, presenting insights and way-forwards on youth homelessness to HRH Prince Williams, and providing discipleship to next-gen leaders.

Dan is a part-time DPhil Education student whose research focuses on investigating reasons why individuals choose to study and then teach physics as a subject discipline and how these relate to issues of equity and power. He previously worked as a secondary school physics teacher in the West Midlands of England for around 15 years before taking up his current post as Associate Professor of Physics Education at the University of Birmingham where he works in widening participation in physics and teacher education.

Publications
  • Cottle, D 2022, ‘Harnessing the potential of recently retired physics teachers to mentor new physics teachers’, Physics Education, vol. 57, no. 1, 015020. https://doi.org/10.1088/1361-6552/ac3931
  • Cottle, D 2021, ‘Improving students’ mathematical skills in secondary science: ideas from mathematics pedagogy’, School Science Review, vol. 102, no. 381, pp. 61-64. <https://www.ase.org.uk/resources/school-science-review/issue-381/improving-students-mathematical-skills-in-secondary>
  • Cottle, D 2021, ‘The effects of Covid-19 on student transition from school to university in STEM subjects’, New Directions in the Teaching of Physical Sciences, vol. 16, no. 1, 3847, pp. 1-4. https://doi.org/10.29311/ndtps.v0i14.3847 
  • Cottle, D & Marshall, R 2016, ‘Exploring electrical resistance: a novel kinesthetic model helps to resolve some misconceptions’, Physics Education, vol. 51, no. 5. https://doi.org/10.1088/0031-9120/51/5/054004 

Chris is a third-year part time DPhil student. He is an experienced Director of Children’s Services working in London. He is interested in path dependence and whether it is a helpful concept to understand how children’s services work.

Yaoyao is a DPhil student in Education at Oxford.

Her research interest lies in Aptitude-Instruction-Interaction (ATI) in second language acquisition (SLA).

Yaoyao’s research investigates the mediating effects of individual differences in learners’ domain-general perceptual-cognitive abilities in instructed foreign language pronunciation acquisition in adulthood. She aims to further explore how aptitude hinders instructional effectiveness and help all students make the most of instruction regardless of aptitude profiles.

Yaoyao started her BA in the Japanese Language and Literature at Sun Yat-Sen University (中山大学) in China. She then moved to the University of Queensland to finish her BA with double majors in Japanese and Translation. After her BA, she worked as an English teacher in China for three years. Prior to her DPhil studies at Oxford, Yaoyao completed her Master’s degree in TESOL at Institute of Education, University College London. Her Master’s dissertation was supervised by Dr Kazuya Saito.

Pat is the Deputy Chief Executive of a large College Group.

A qualified accountant, she is accountable to the Corporation Board for the Group’s Estate, sustainability and for maintaining the Group’s outstanding financial health grade. Her specialisms include Leadership and Management, Identification and Application of Funding Streams as well as leading the Group in new acquisitions, ventures and developments. Pat is using her vast experience of public sector finances to explore the intersection of accounting, leadership and purpose.

Supervisors

James Robson and Ariel Lindorff

Alice received her Master’s in Child Study and Education from the Institute of Child Study at the University of Toronto. She has taught preschool through higher education as a teacher and principal in public and private schools in North America and Europe. Deeply committed to enhancing education, she believes in learning that connects students and teachers to the natural world and to their communities. She is actively involved in community organisations that promote intercultural, interracial, and interfaith understanding and allyship.

Supervisors

Steve Puttick

Victoria is an educational researcher and practitioner, specialising in educational support and methodology of teaching mathematics to low-achieving students. For over 9 years she has been working at Big Change Educational Centre (Moscow) which provides support to looked-after children.

Before joining the DPhil programme, she completed her undergraduate degree in Finance at Financial University in Moscow and then gained a MSc in Psychology of Education from the University of Bristol.

Victoria’s current research focuses on educational issues of care-experienced children and teaching mathematics to students of low achievement and motivation.

Supervisors

Karen Skilling and Gabriel Stylianides

Louise was born and raised in Glasgow and moved to Oxford to pursue a DPhil in Education.

Louise’s research interests are education policy, particularly higher education policy, as well as qualitative research into the experiences of students in higher education and reducing inequalities in access to higher education. Louise is also interested in educational capabilities, educational purpose, aspirations and philosophical debates about knowledge construction and co-construction. Louise has a First Class BA (Joint Honours) in Social Policy and Education from the University of Strathclyde, and two Masters degrees with Distinction also from the University of Strathclyde in Applied Educational and Social Research and Social Policy (Research Methods). Louise also participated in the University of Oxford’s UNIQ+ Graduate Access Programme in the summer of 2022, where she worked at the Department of Sociology with Melinda Mills, Bo Zhao and Evelina Akimova on research into the impact of socio-economic status on inequalities in access to veterinary care in Scotland. Louise’s DPhil thesis is interested in evaluating Lorella Terzi’s educational capabilities framework through the lens of contemporary higher education in order to gain an understanding of what graduate capabilities are identified by students and stakeholders as being necessary for enabling graduates to successfully thrive and adapt in a post-pandemic society.

 

Supervisors

Alis Oancea and Kelsey Inouye

Motema studied Neuroscience as an undergraduate at Dartmouth College in the USA and it is one of its courses, found interest in Education.

Motema then worked for various non-profit organisations in Lesotho and South Africa focusing on helping high school students from low SES backgrounds access opportunities to study in HE. In her Masters’ project Motema analysed Lesotho’s 2009 Curriculum and Assessment Policy. This analysis’ findings brought Motema to her current research interests which include gendered STEM education and decolonisation of education policies and curricula in Lesotho. For her DPhil project, Motema is interested in finding out the lived experiences of female Science teachers in Lesotho Secondary Schools especially focusing on the major changes in the Secondary school education system in Lesotho that have happened in the past five years as unique meeting points.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Judith Hillier

Danielle is a DPhil student researching how Black-British doctoral students navigate the spaces of the elite, providing a new theoretical framework to understand their agency better.

Her main interests are in Human Flourishing, Cultural Geography, Psychology, and Justice, and her work aims to inform and reform educational frameworks and practices.

Following Danielle’s BSc in Psychology and MRes in Research Methods in Psychology, she founded a social enterprise that merges psychological and academic strategies to guide undergraduate and master’s students study practices. In addition to this, Danielle provided pedagogical and behavioural support across SEN college, secondary and primary schools.

Some of Danielle’s notable work includes her research introducing a new University-wide EDI strategy at her former Higher Education institution, presenting insights and way-forwards on youth homelessness to HRH Prince Williams, and providing discipleship to next-gen leaders.

Dan is a part-time DPhil Education student whose research focuses on investigating reasons why individuals choose to study and then teach physics as a subject discipline and how these relate to issues of equity and power. He previously worked as a secondary school physics teacher in the West Midlands of England for around 15 years before taking up his current post as Associate Professor of Physics Education at the University of Birmingham where he works in widening participation in physics and teacher education.

Publications
  • Cottle, D 2022, ‘Harnessing the potential of recently retired physics teachers to mentor new physics teachers’, Physics Education, vol. 57, no. 1, 015020. https://doi.org/10.1088/1361-6552/ac3931
  • Cottle, D 2021, ‘Improving students’ mathematical skills in secondary science: ideas from mathematics pedagogy’, School Science Review, vol. 102, no. 381, pp. 61-64. <https://www.ase.org.uk/resources/school-science-review/issue-381/improving-students-mathematical-skills-in-secondary>
  • Cottle, D 2021, ‘The effects of Covid-19 on student transition from school to university in STEM subjects’, New Directions in the Teaching of Physical Sciences, vol. 16, no. 1, 3847, pp. 1-4. https://doi.org/10.29311/ndtps.v0i14.3847 
  • Cottle, D & Marshall, R 2016, ‘Exploring electrical resistance: a novel kinesthetic model helps to resolve some misconceptions’, Physics Education, vol. 51, no. 5. https://doi.org/10.1088/0031-9120/51/5/054004 

Chris is a third-year part time DPhil student. He is an experienced Director of Children’s Services working in London. He is interested in path dependence and whether it is a helpful concept to understand how children’s services work.

Yaoyao is a DPhil student in Education at Oxford.

Her research interest lies in Aptitude-Instruction-Interaction (ATI) in second language acquisition (SLA).

Yaoyao’s research investigates the mediating effects of individual differences in learners’ domain-general perceptual-cognitive abilities in instructed foreign language pronunciation acquisition in adulthood. She aims to further explore how aptitude hinders instructional effectiveness and help all students make the most of instruction regardless of aptitude profiles.

Yaoyao started her BA in the Japanese Language and Literature at Sun Yat-Sen University (中山大学) in China. She then moved to the University of Queensland to finish her BA with double majors in Japanese and Translation. After her BA, she worked as an English teacher in China for three years. Prior to her DPhil studies at Oxford, Yaoyao completed her Master’s degree in TESOL at Institute of Education, University College London. Her Master’s dissertation was supervised by Dr Kazuya Saito.

Pat is the Deputy Chief Executive of a large College Group.

A qualified accountant, she is accountable to the Corporation Board for the Group’s Estate, sustainability and for maintaining the Group’s outstanding financial health grade. Her specialisms include Leadership and Management, Identification and Application of Funding Streams as well as leading the Group in new acquisitions, ventures and developments. Pat is using her vast experience of public sector finances to explore the intersection of accounting, leadership and purpose.

Supervisors

James Robson and Ariel Lindorff

Alice received her Master’s in Child Study and Education from the Institute of Child Study at the University of Toronto. She has taught preschool through higher education as a teacher and principal in public and private schools in North America and Europe. Deeply committed to enhancing education, she believes in learning that connects students and teachers to the natural world and to their communities. She is actively involved in community organisations that promote intercultural, interracial, and interfaith understanding and allyship.

Supervisors

Steve Puttick

Victoria is an educational researcher and practitioner, specialising in educational support and methodology of teaching mathematics to low-achieving students. For over 9 years she has been working at Big Change Educational Centre (Moscow) which provides support to looked-after children.

Before joining the DPhil programme, she completed her undergraduate degree in Finance at Financial University in Moscow and then gained a MSc in Psychology of Education from the University of Bristol.

Victoria’s current research focuses on educational issues of care-experienced children and teaching mathematics to students of low achievement and motivation.

Supervisors

Karen Skilling and Gabriel Stylianides

Louise was born and raised in Glasgow and moved to Oxford to pursue a DPhil in Education.

Louise’s research interests are education policy, particularly higher education policy, as well as qualitative research into the experiences of students in higher education and reducing inequalities in access to higher education. Louise is also interested in educational capabilities, educational purpose, aspirations and philosophical debates about knowledge construction and co-construction. Louise has a First Class BA (Joint Honours) in Social Policy and Education from the University of Strathclyde, and two Masters degrees with Distinction also from the University of Strathclyde in Applied Educational and Social Research and Social Policy (Research Methods). Louise also participated in the University of Oxford’s UNIQ+ Graduate Access Programme in the summer of 2022, where she worked at the Department of Sociology with Melinda Mills, Bo Zhao and Evelina Akimova on research into the impact of socio-economic status on inequalities in access to veterinary care in Scotland. Louise’s DPhil thesis is interested in evaluating Lorella Terzi’s educational capabilities framework through the lens of contemporary higher education in order to gain an understanding of what graduate capabilities are identified by students and stakeholders as being necessary for enabling graduates to successfully thrive and adapt in a post-pandemic society.

 

Supervisors

Alis Oancea and Kelsey Inouye

Motema studied Neuroscience as an undergraduate at Dartmouth College in the USA and it is one of its courses, found interest in Education.

Motema then worked for various non-profit organisations in Lesotho and South Africa focusing on helping high school students from low SES backgrounds access opportunities to study in HE. In her Masters’ project Motema analysed Lesotho’s 2009 Curriculum and Assessment Policy. This analysis’ findings brought Motema to her current research interests which include gendered STEM education and decolonisation of education policies and curricula in Lesotho. For her DPhil project, Motema is interested in finding out the lived experiences of female Science teachers in Lesotho Secondary Schools especially focusing on the major changes in the Secondary school education system in Lesotho that have happened in the past five years as unique meeting points.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Judith Hillier

Danielle is a DPhil student researching how Black-British doctoral students navigate the spaces of the elite, providing a new theoretical framework to understand their agency better.

Her main interests are in Human Flourishing, Cultural Geography, Psychology, and Justice, and her work aims to inform and reform educational frameworks and practices.

Following Danielle’s BSc in Psychology and MRes in Research Methods in Psychology, she founded a social enterprise that merges psychological and academic strategies to guide undergraduate and master’s students study practices. In addition to this, Danielle provided pedagogical and behavioural support across SEN college, secondary and primary schools.

Some of Danielle’s notable work includes her research introducing a new University-wide EDI strategy at her former Higher Education institution, presenting insights and way-forwards on youth homelessness to HRH Prince Williams, and providing discipleship to next-gen leaders.

Dan is a part-time DPhil Education student whose research focuses on investigating reasons why individuals choose to study and then teach physics as a subject discipline and how these relate to issues of equity and power. He previously worked as a secondary school physics teacher in the West Midlands of England for around 15 years before taking up his current post as Associate Professor of Physics Education at the University of Birmingham where he works in widening participation in physics and teacher education.

Publications
  • Cottle, D 2022, ‘Harnessing the potential of recently retired physics teachers to mentor new physics teachers’, Physics Education, vol. 57, no. 1, 015020. https://doi.org/10.1088/1361-6552/ac3931
  • Cottle, D 2021, ‘Improving students’ mathematical skills in secondary science: ideas from mathematics pedagogy’, School Science Review, vol. 102, no. 381, pp. 61-64. <https://www.ase.org.uk/resources/school-science-review/issue-381/improving-students-mathematical-skills-in-secondary>
  • Cottle, D 2021, ‘The effects of Covid-19 on student transition from school to university in STEM subjects’, New Directions in the Teaching of Physical Sciences, vol. 16, no. 1, 3847, pp. 1-4. https://doi.org/10.29311/ndtps.v0i14.3847 
  • Cottle, D & Marshall, R 2016, ‘Exploring electrical resistance: a novel kinesthetic model helps to resolve some misconceptions’, Physics Education, vol. 51, no. 5. https://doi.org/10.1088/0031-9120/51/5/054004 

Chris is a third-year part time DPhil student. He is an experienced Director of Children’s Services working in London. He is interested in path dependence and whether it is a helpful concept to understand how children’s services work.

Yaoyao is a DPhil student in Education at Oxford.

Her research interest lies in Aptitude-Instruction-Interaction (ATI) in second language acquisition (SLA).

Yaoyao’s research investigates the mediating effects of individual differences in learners’ domain-general perceptual-cognitive abilities in instructed foreign language pronunciation acquisition in adulthood. She aims to further explore how aptitude hinders instructional effectiveness and help all students make the most of instruction regardless of aptitude profiles.

Yaoyao started her BA in the Japanese Language and Literature at Sun Yat-Sen University (中山大学) in China. She then moved to the University of Queensland to finish her BA with double majors in Japanese and Translation. After her BA, she worked as an English teacher in China for three years. Prior to her DPhil studies at Oxford, Yaoyao completed her Master’s degree in TESOL at Institute of Education, University College London. Her Master’s dissertation was supervised by Dr Kazuya Saito.

Pat is the Deputy Chief Executive of a large College Group.

A qualified accountant, she is accountable to the Corporation Board for the Group’s Estate, sustainability and for maintaining the Group’s outstanding financial health grade. Her specialisms include Leadership and Management, Identification and Application of Funding Streams as well as leading the Group in new acquisitions, ventures and developments. Pat is using her vast experience of public sector finances to explore the intersection of accounting, leadership and purpose.

Supervisors

James Robson and Ariel Lindorff

Alice received her Master’s in Child Study and Education from the Institute of Child Study at the University of Toronto. She has taught preschool through higher education as a teacher and principal in public and private schools in North America and Europe. Deeply committed to enhancing education, she believes in learning that connects students and teachers to the natural world and to their communities. She is actively involved in community organisations that promote intercultural, interracial, and interfaith understanding and allyship.

Supervisors

Steve Puttick

Victoria is an educational researcher and practitioner, specialising in educational support and methodology of teaching mathematics to low-achieving students. For over 9 years she has been working at Big Change Educational Centre (Moscow) which provides support to looked-after children.

Before joining the DPhil programme, she completed her undergraduate degree in Finance at Financial University in Moscow and then gained a MSc in Psychology of Education from the University of Bristol.

Victoria’s current research focuses on educational issues of care-experienced children and teaching mathematics to students of low achievement and motivation.

Supervisors

Karen Skilling and Gabriel Stylianides

Louise was born and raised in Glasgow and moved to Oxford to pursue a DPhil in Education.

Louise’s research interests are education policy, particularly higher education policy, as well as qualitative research into the experiences of students in higher education and reducing inequalities in access to higher education. Louise is also interested in educational capabilities, educational purpose, aspirations and philosophical debates about knowledge construction and co-construction. Louise has a First Class BA (Joint Honours) in Social Policy and Education from the University of Strathclyde, and two Masters degrees with Distinction also from the University of Strathclyde in Applied Educational and Social Research and Social Policy (Research Methods). Louise also participated in the University of Oxford’s UNIQ+ Graduate Access Programme in the summer of 2022, where she worked at the Department of Sociology with Melinda Mills, Bo Zhao and Evelina Akimova on research into the impact of socio-economic status on inequalities in access to veterinary care in Scotland. Louise’s DPhil thesis is interested in evaluating Lorella Terzi’s educational capabilities framework through the lens of contemporary higher education in order to gain an understanding of what graduate capabilities are identified by students and stakeholders as being necessary for enabling graduates to successfully thrive and adapt in a post-pandemic society.

 

Supervisors

Alis Oancea and Kelsey Inouye

Motema studied Neuroscience as an undergraduate at Dartmouth College in the USA and it is one of its courses, found interest in Education.

Motema then worked for various non-profit organisations in Lesotho and South Africa focusing on helping high school students from low SES backgrounds access opportunities to study in HE. In her Masters’ project Motema analysed Lesotho’s 2009 Curriculum and Assessment Policy. This analysis’ findings brought Motema to her current research interests which include gendered STEM education and decolonisation of education policies and curricula in Lesotho. For her DPhil project, Motema is interested in finding out the lived experiences of female Science teachers in Lesotho Secondary Schools especially focusing on the major changes in the Secondary school education system in Lesotho that have happened in the past five years as unique meeting points.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Judith Hillier

Danielle is a DPhil student researching how Black-British doctoral students navigate the spaces of the elite, providing a new theoretical framework to understand their agency better.

Her main interests are in Human Flourishing, Cultural Geography, Psychology, and Justice, and her work aims to inform and reform educational frameworks and practices.

Following Danielle’s BSc in Psychology and MRes in Research Methods in Psychology, she founded a social enterprise that merges psychological and academic strategies to guide undergraduate and master’s students study practices. In addition to this, Danielle provided pedagogical and behavioural support across SEN college, secondary and primary schools.

Some of Danielle’s notable work includes her research introducing a new University-wide EDI strategy at her former Higher Education institution, presenting insights and way-forwards on youth homelessness to HRH Prince Williams, and providing discipleship to next-gen leaders.

Dan is a part-time DPhil Education student whose research focuses on investigating reasons why individuals choose to study and then teach physics as a subject discipline and how these relate to issues of equity and power. He previously worked as a secondary school physics teacher in the West Midlands of England for around 15 years before taking up his current post as Associate Professor of Physics Education at the University of Birmingham where he works in widening participation in physics and teacher education.

Publications
  • Cottle, D 2022, ‘Harnessing the potential of recently retired physics teachers to mentor new physics teachers’, Physics Education, vol. 57, no. 1, 015020. https://doi.org/10.1088/1361-6552/ac3931
  • Cottle, D 2021, ‘Improving students’ mathematical skills in secondary science: ideas from mathematics pedagogy’, School Science Review, vol. 102, no. 381, pp. 61-64. <https://www.ase.org.uk/resources/school-science-review/issue-381/improving-students-mathematical-skills-in-secondary>
  • Cottle, D 2021, ‘The effects of Covid-19 on student transition from school to university in STEM subjects’, New Directions in the Teaching of Physical Sciences, vol. 16, no. 1, 3847, pp. 1-4. https://doi.org/10.29311/ndtps.v0i14.3847 
  • Cottle, D & Marshall, R 2016, ‘Exploring electrical resistance: a novel kinesthetic model helps to resolve some misconceptions’, Physics Education, vol. 51, no. 5. https://doi.org/10.1088/0031-9120/51/5/054004 

Chris is a third-year part time DPhil student. He is an experienced Director of Children’s Services working in London. He is interested in path dependence and whether it is a helpful concept to understand how children’s services work.

Yaoyao is a DPhil student in Education at Oxford.

Her research interest lies in Aptitude-Instruction-Interaction (ATI) in second language acquisition (SLA).

Yaoyao’s research investigates the mediating effects of individual differences in learners’ domain-general perceptual-cognitive abilities in instructed foreign language pronunciation acquisition in adulthood. She aims to further explore how aptitude hinders instructional effectiveness and help all students make the most of instruction regardless of aptitude profiles.

Yaoyao started her BA in the Japanese Language and Literature at Sun Yat-Sen University (中山大学) in China. She then moved to the University of Queensland to finish her BA with double majors in Japanese and Translation. After her BA, she worked as an English teacher in China for three years. Prior to her DPhil studies at Oxford, Yaoyao completed her Master’s degree in TESOL at Institute of Education, University College London. Her Master’s dissertation was supervised by Dr Kazuya Saito.

Pat is the Deputy Chief Executive of a large College Group.

A qualified accountant, she is accountable to the Corporation Board for the Group’s Estate, sustainability and for maintaining the Group’s outstanding financial health grade. Her specialisms include Leadership and Management, Identification and Application of Funding Streams as well as leading the Group in new acquisitions, ventures and developments. Pat is using her vast experience of public sector finances to explore the intersection of accounting, leadership and purpose.

Supervisors

James Robson and Ariel Lindorff

Alice received her Master’s in Child Study and Education from the Institute of Child Study at the University of Toronto. She has taught preschool through higher education as a teacher and principal in public and private schools in North America and Europe. Deeply committed to enhancing education, she believes in learning that connects students and teachers to the natural world and to their communities. She is actively involved in community organisations that promote intercultural, interracial, and interfaith understanding and allyship.

Supervisors

Steve Puttick

Victoria is an educational researcher and practitioner, specialising in educational support and methodology of teaching mathematics to low-achieving students. For over 9 years she has been working at Big Change Educational Centre (Moscow) which provides support to looked-after children.

Before joining the DPhil programme, she completed her undergraduate degree in Finance at Financial University in Moscow and then gained a MSc in Psychology of Education from the University of Bristol.

Victoria’s current research focuses on educational issues of care-experienced children and teaching mathematics to students of low achievement and motivation.

Supervisors

Karen Skilling and Gabriel Stylianides

Louise was born and raised in Glasgow and moved to Oxford to pursue a DPhil in Education.

Louise’s research interests are education policy, particularly higher education policy, as well as qualitative research into the experiences of students in higher education and reducing inequalities in access to higher education. Louise is also interested in educational capabilities, educational purpose, aspirations and philosophical debates about knowledge construction and co-construction. Louise has a First Class BA (Joint Honours) in Social Policy and Education from the University of Strathclyde, and two Masters degrees with Distinction also from the University of Strathclyde in Applied Educational and Social Research and Social Policy (Research Methods). Louise also participated in the University of Oxford’s UNIQ+ Graduate Access Programme in the summer of 2022, where she worked at the Department of Sociology with Melinda Mills, Bo Zhao and Evelina Akimova on research into the impact of socio-economic status on inequalities in access to veterinary care in Scotland. Louise’s DPhil thesis is interested in evaluating Lorella Terzi’s educational capabilities framework through the lens of contemporary higher education in order to gain an understanding of what graduate capabilities are identified by students and stakeholders as being necessary for enabling graduates to successfully thrive and adapt in a post-pandemic society.

 

Supervisors

Alis Oancea and Kelsey Inouye

Motema studied Neuroscience as an undergraduate at Dartmouth College in the USA and it is one of its courses, found interest in Education.

Motema then worked for various non-profit organisations in Lesotho and South Africa focusing on helping high school students from low SES backgrounds access opportunities to study in HE. In her Masters’ project Motema analysed Lesotho’s 2009 Curriculum and Assessment Policy. This analysis’ findings brought Motema to her current research interests which include gendered STEM education and decolonisation of education policies and curricula in Lesotho. For her DPhil project, Motema is interested in finding out the lived experiences of female Science teachers in Lesotho Secondary Schools especially focusing on the major changes in the Secondary school education system in Lesotho that have happened in the past five years as unique meeting points.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Judith Hillier

Danielle is a DPhil student researching how Black-British doctoral students navigate the spaces of the elite, providing a new theoretical framework to understand their agency better.

Her main interests are in Human Flourishing, Cultural Geography, Psychology, and Justice, and her work aims to inform and reform educational frameworks and practices.

Following Danielle’s BSc in Psychology and MRes in Research Methods in Psychology, she founded a social enterprise that merges psychological and academic strategies to guide undergraduate and master’s students study practices. In addition to this, Danielle provided pedagogical and behavioural support across SEN college, secondary and primary schools.

Some of Danielle’s notable work includes her research introducing a new University-wide EDI strategy at her former Higher Education institution, presenting insights and way-forwards on youth homelessness to HRH Prince Williams, and providing discipleship to next-gen leaders.

Dan is a part-time DPhil Education student whose research focuses on investigating reasons why individuals choose to study and then teach physics as a subject discipline and how these relate to issues of equity and power. He previously worked as a secondary school physics teacher in the West Midlands of England for around 15 years before taking up his current post as Associate Professor of Physics Education at the University of Birmingham where he works in widening participation in physics and teacher education.

Publications
  • Cottle, D 2022, ‘Harnessing the potential of recently retired physics teachers to mentor new physics teachers’, Physics Education, vol. 57, no. 1, 015020. https://doi.org/10.1088/1361-6552/ac3931
  • Cottle, D 2021, ‘Improving students’ mathematical skills in secondary science: ideas from mathematics pedagogy’, School Science Review, vol. 102, no. 381, pp. 61-64. <https://www.ase.org.uk/resources/school-science-review/issue-381/improving-students-mathematical-skills-in-secondary>
  • Cottle, D 2021, ‘The effects of Covid-19 on student transition from school to university in STEM subjects’, New Directions in the Teaching of Physical Sciences, vol. 16, no. 1, 3847, pp. 1-4. https://doi.org/10.29311/ndtps.v0i14.3847 
  • Cottle, D & Marshall, R 2016, ‘Exploring electrical resistance: a novel kinesthetic model helps to resolve some misconceptions’, Physics Education, vol. 51, no. 5. https://doi.org/10.1088/0031-9120/51/5/054004 

Chris is a third-year part time DPhil student. He is an experienced Director of Children’s Services working in London. He is interested in path dependence and whether it is a helpful concept to understand how children’s services work.

Yaoyao is a DPhil student in Education at Oxford.

Her research interest lies in Aptitude-Instruction-Interaction (ATI) in second language acquisition (SLA).

Yaoyao’s research investigates the mediating effects of individual differences in learners’ domain-general perceptual-cognitive abilities in instructed foreign language pronunciation acquisition in adulthood. She aims to further explore how aptitude hinders instructional effectiveness and help all students make the most of instruction regardless of aptitude profiles.

Yaoyao started her BA in the Japanese Language and Literature at Sun Yat-Sen University (中山大学) in China. She then moved to the University of Queensland to finish her BA with double majors in Japanese and Translation. After her BA, she worked as an English teacher in China for three years. Prior to her DPhil studies at Oxford, Yaoyao completed her Master’s degree in TESOL at Institute of Education, University College London. Her Master’s dissertation was supervised by Dr Kazuya Saito.

Pat is the Deputy Chief Executive of a large College Group.

A qualified accountant, she is accountable to the Corporation Board for the Group’s Estate, sustainability and for maintaining the Group’s outstanding financial health grade. Her specialisms include Leadership and Management, Identification and Application of Funding Streams as well as leading the Group in new acquisitions, ventures and developments. Pat is using her vast experience of public sector finances to explore the intersection of accounting, leadership and purpose.

Supervisors

James Robson and Ariel Lindorff

Alice received her Master’s in Child Study and Education from the Institute of Child Study at the University of Toronto. She has taught preschool through higher education as a teacher and principal in public and private schools in North America and Europe. Deeply committed to enhancing education, she believes in learning that connects students and teachers to the natural world and to their communities. She is actively involved in community organisations that promote intercultural, interracial, and interfaith understanding and allyship.

Supervisors

Steve Puttick

Victoria is an educational researcher and practitioner, specialising in educational support and methodology of teaching mathematics to low-achieving students. For over 9 years she has been working at Big Change Educational Centre (Moscow) which provides support to looked-after children.

Before joining the DPhil programme, she completed her undergraduate degree in Finance at Financial University in Moscow and then gained a MSc in Psychology of Education from the University of Bristol.

Victoria’s current research focuses on educational issues of care-experienced children and teaching mathematics to students of low achievement and motivation.

Supervisors

Karen Skilling and Gabriel Stylianides

Louise was born and raised in Glasgow and moved to Oxford to pursue a DPhil in Education.

Louise’s research interests are education policy, particularly higher education policy, as well as qualitative research into the experiences of students in higher education and reducing inequalities in access to higher education. Louise is also interested in educational capabilities, educational purpose, aspirations and philosophical debates about knowledge construction and co-construction. Louise has a First Class BA (Joint Honours) in Social Policy and Education from the University of Strathclyde, and two Masters degrees with Distinction also from the University of Strathclyde in Applied Educational and Social Research and Social Policy (Research Methods). Louise also participated in the University of Oxford’s UNIQ+ Graduate Access Programme in the summer of 2022, where she worked at the Department of Sociology with Melinda Mills, Bo Zhao and Evelina Akimova on research into the impact of socio-economic status on inequalities in access to veterinary care in Scotland. Louise’s DPhil thesis is interested in evaluating Lorella Terzi’s educational capabilities framework through the lens of contemporary higher education in order to gain an understanding of what graduate capabilities are identified by students and stakeholders as being necessary for enabling graduates to successfully thrive and adapt in a post-pandemic society.

 

Supervisors

Alis Oancea and Kelsey Inouye

Motema studied Neuroscience as an undergraduate at Dartmouth College in the USA and it is one of its courses, found interest in Education.

Motema then worked for various non-profit organisations in Lesotho and South Africa focusing on helping high school students from low SES backgrounds access opportunities to study in HE. In her Masters’ project Motema analysed Lesotho’s 2009 Curriculum and Assessment Policy. This analysis’ findings brought Motema to her current research interests which include gendered STEM education and decolonisation of education policies and curricula in Lesotho. For her DPhil project, Motema is interested in finding out the lived experiences of female Science teachers in Lesotho Secondary Schools especially focusing on the major changes in the Secondary school education system in Lesotho that have happened in the past five years as unique meeting points.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Judith Hillier

Danielle is a DPhil student researching how Black-British doctoral students navigate the spaces of the elite, providing a new theoretical framework to understand their agency better.

Her main interests are in Human Flourishing, Cultural Geography, Psychology, and Justice, and her work aims to inform and reform educational frameworks and practices.

Following Danielle’s BSc in Psychology and MRes in Research Methods in Psychology, she founded a social enterprise that merges psychological and academic strategies to guide undergraduate and master’s students study practices. In addition to this, Danielle provided pedagogical and behavioural support across SEN college, secondary and primary schools.

Some of Danielle’s notable work includes her research introducing a new University-wide EDI strategy at her former Higher Education institution, presenting insights and way-forwards on youth homelessness to HRH Prince Williams, and providing discipleship to next-gen leaders.

Dan is a part-time DPhil Education student whose research focuses on investigating reasons why individuals choose to study and then teach physics as a subject discipline and how these relate to issues of equity and power. He previously worked as a secondary school physics teacher in the West Midlands of England for around 15 years before taking up his current post as Associate Professor of Physics Education at the University of Birmingham where he works in widening participation in physics and teacher education.

Publications
  • Cottle, D 2022, ‘Harnessing the potential of recently retired physics teachers to mentor new physics teachers’, Physics Education, vol. 57, no. 1, 015020. https://doi.org/10.1088/1361-6552/ac3931
  • Cottle, D 2021, ‘Improving students’ mathematical skills in secondary science: ideas from mathematics pedagogy’, School Science Review, vol. 102, no. 381, pp. 61-64. <https://www.ase.org.uk/resources/school-science-review/issue-381/improving-students-mathematical-skills-in-secondary>
  • Cottle, D 2021, ‘The effects of Covid-19 on student transition from school to university in STEM subjects’, New Directions in the Teaching of Physical Sciences, vol. 16, no. 1, 3847, pp. 1-4. https://doi.org/10.29311/ndtps.v0i14.3847 
  • Cottle, D & Marshall, R 2016, ‘Exploring electrical resistance: a novel kinesthetic model helps to resolve some misconceptions’, Physics Education, vol. 51, no. 5. https://doi.org/10.1088/0031-9120/51/5/054004 

Chris is a third-year part time DPhil student. He is an experienced Director of Children’s Services working in London. He is interested in path dependence and whether it is a helpful concept to understand how children’s services work.

Yaoyao is a DPhil student in Education at Oxford.

Her research interest lies in Aptitude-Instruction-Interaction (ATI) in second language acquisition (SLA).

Yaoyao’s research investigates the mediating effects of individual differences in learners’ domain-general perceptual-cognitive abilities in instructed foreign language pronunciation acquisition in adulthood. She aims to further explore how aptitude hinders instructional effectiveness and help all students make the most of instruction regardless of aptitude profiles.

Yaoyao started her BA in the Japanese Language and Literature at Sun Yat-Sen University (中山大学) in China. She then moved to the University of Queensland to finish her BA with double majors in Japanese and Translation. After her BA, she worked as an English teacher in China for three years. Prior to her DPhil studies at Oxford, Yaoyao completed her Master’s degree in TESOL at Institute of Education, University College London. Her Master’s dissertation was supervised by Dr Kazuya Saito.

Pat is the Deputy Chief Executive of a large College Group.

A qualified accountant, she is accountable to the Corporation Board for the Group’s Estate, sustainability and for maintaining the Group’s outstanding financial health grade. Her specialisms include Leadership and Management, Identification and Application of Funding Streams as well as leading the Group in new acquisitions, ventures and developments. Pat is using her vast experience of public sector finances to explore the intersection of accounting, leadership and purpose.

Supervisors

James Robson and Ariel Lindorff

Alice received her Master’s in Child Study and Education from the Institute of Child Study at the University of Toronto. She has taught preschool through higher education as a teacher and principal in public and private schools in North America and Europe. Deeply committed to enhancing education, she believes in learning that connects students and teachers to the natural world and to their communities. She is actively involved in community organisations that promote intercultural, interracial, and interfaith understanding and allyship.

Supervisors

Steve Puttick

Victoria is an educational researcher and practitioner, specialising in educational support and methodology of teaching mathematics to low-achieving students. For over 9 years she has been working at Big Change Educational Centre (Moscow) which provides support to looked-after children.

Before joining the DPhil programme, she completed her undergraduate degree in Finance at Financial University in Moscow and then gained a MSc in Psychology of Education from the University of Bristol.

Victoria’s current research focuses on educational issues of care-experienced children and teaching mathematics to students of low achievement and motivation.

Supervisors

Karen Skilling and Gabriel Stylianides

Louise was born and raised in Glasgow and moved to Oxford to pursue a DPhil in Education.

Louise’s research interests are education policy, particularly higher education policy, as well as qualitative research into the experiences of students in higher education and reducing inequalities in access to higher education. Louise is also interested in educational capabilities, educational purpose, aspirations and philosophical debates about knowledge construction and co-construction. Louise has a First Class BA (Joint Honours) in Social Policy and Education from the University of Strathclyde, and two Masters degrees with Distinction also from the University of Strathclyde in Applied Educational and Social Research and Social Policy (Research Methods). Louise also participated in the University of Oxford’s UNIQ+ Graduate Access Programme in the summer of 2022, where she worked at the Department of Sociology with Melinda Mills, Bo Zhao and Evelina Akimova on research into the impact of socio-economic status on inequalities in access to veterinary care in Scotland. Louise’s DPhil thesis is interested in evaluating Lorella Terzi’s educational capabilities framework through the lens of contemporary higher education in order to gain an understanding of what graduate capabilities are identified by students and stakeholders as being necessary for enabling graduates to successfully thrive and adapt in a post-pandemic society.

 

Supervisors

Alis Oancea and Kelsey Inouye

Motema studied Neuroscience as an undergraduate at Dartmouth College in the USA and it is one of its courses, found interest in Education.

Motema then worked for various non-profit organisations in Lesotho and South Africa focusing on helping high school students from low SES backgrounds access opportunities to study in HE. In her Masters’ project Motema analysed Lesotho’s 2009 Curriculum and Assessment Policy. This analysis’ findings brought Motema to her current research interests which include gendered STEM education and decolonisation of education policies and curricula in Lesotho. For her DPhil project, Motema is interested in finding out the lived experiences of female Science teachers in Lesotho Secondary Schools especially focusing on the major changes in the Secondary school education system in Lesotho that have happened in the past five years as unique meeting points.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Judith Hillier

Danielle is a DPhil student researching how Black-British doctoral students navigate the spaces of the elite, providing a new theoretical framework to understand their agency better.

Her main interests are in Human Flourishing, Cultural Geography, Psychology, and Justice, and her work aims to inform and reform educational frameworks and practices.

Following Danielle’s BSc in Psychology and MRes in Research Methods in Psychology, she founded a social enterprise that merges psychological and academic strategies to guide undergraduate and master’s students study practices. In addition to this, Danielle provided pedagogical and behavioural support across SEN college, secondary and primary schools.

Some of Danielle’s notable work includes her research introducing a new University-wide EDI strategy at her former Higher Education institution, presenting insights and way-forwards on youth homelessness to HRH Prince Williams, and providing discipleship to next-gen leaders.

Dan is a part-time DPhil Education student whose research focuses on investigating reasons why individuals choose to study and then teach physics as a subject discipline and how these relate to issues of equity and power. He previously worked as a secondary school physics teacher in the West Midlands of England for around 15 years before taking up his current post as Associate Professor of Physics Education at the University of Birmingham where he works in widening participation in physics and teacher education.

Publications
  • Cottle, D 2022, ‘Harnessing the potential of recently retired physics teachers to mentor new physics teachers’, Physics Education, vol. 57, no. 1, 015020. https://doi.org/10.1088/1361-6552/ac3931
  • Cottle, D 2021, ‘Improving students’ mathematical skills in secondary science: ideas from mathematics pedagogy’, School Science Review, vol. 102, no. 381, pp. 61-64. <https://www.ase.org.uk/resources/school-science-review/issue-381/improving-students-mathematical-skills-in-secondary>
  • Cottle, D 2021, ‘The effects of Covid-19 on student transition from school to university in STEM subjects’, New Directions in the Teaching of Physical Sciences, vol. 16, no. 1, 3847, pp. 1-4. https://doi.org/10.29311/ndtps.v0i14.3847 
  • Cottle, D & Marshall, R 2016, ‘Exploring electrical resistance: a novel kinesthetic model helps to resolve some misconceptions’, Physics Education, vol. 51, no. 5. https://doi.org/10.1088/0031-9120/51/5/054004 

Chris is a third-year part time DPhil student. He is an experienced Director of Children’s Services working in London. He is interested in path dependence and whether it is a helpful concept to understand how children’s services work.

Yaoyao is a DPhil student in Education at Oxford.

Her research interest lies in Aptitude-Instruction-Interaction (ATI) in second language acquisition (SLA).

Yaoyao’s research investigates the mediating effects of individual differences in learners’ domain-general perceptual-cognitive abilities in instructed foreign language pronunciation acquisition in adulthood. She aims to further explore how aptitude hinders instructional effectiveness and help all students make the most of instruction regardless of aptitude profiles.

Yaoyao started her BA in the Japanese Language and Literature at Sun Yat-Sen University (中山大学) in China. She then moved to the University of Queensland to finish her BA with double majors in Japanese and Translation. After her BA, she worked as an English teacher in China for three years. Prior to her DPhil studies at Oxford, Yaoyao completed her Master’s degree in TESOL at Institute of Education, University College London. Her Master’s dissertation was supervised by Dr Kazuya Saito.

Pat is the Deputy Chief Executive of a large College Group.

A qualified accountant, she is accountable to the Corporation Board for the Group’s Estate, sustainability and for maintaining the Group’s outstanding financial health grade. Her specialisms include Leadership and Management, Identification and Application of Funding Streams as well as leading the Group in new acquisitions, ventures and developments. Pat is using her vast experience of public sector finances to explore the intersection of accounting, leadership and purpose.

Supervisors

James Robson and Ariel Lindorff

Alice received her Master’s in Child Study and Education from the Institute of Child Study at the University of Toronto. She has taught preschool through higher education as a teacher and principal in public and private schools in North America and Europe. Deeply committed to enhancing education, she believes in learning that connects students and teachers to the natural world and to their communities. She is actively involved in community organisations that promote intercultural, interracial, and interfaith understanding and allyship.

Supervisors

Steve Puttick

Victoria is an educational researcher and practitioner, specialising in educational support and methodology of teaching mathematics to low-achieving students. For over 9 years she has been working at Big Change Educational Centre (Moscow) which provides support to looked-after children.

Before joining the DPhil programme, she completed her undergraduate degree in Finance at Financial University in Moscow and then gained a MSc in Psychology of Education from the University of Bristol.

Victoria’s current research focuses on educational issues of care-experienced children and teaching mathematics to students of low achievement and motivation.

Supervisors

Karen Skilling and Gabriel Stylianides

Louise was born and raised in Glasgow and moved to Oxford to pursue a DPhil in Education.

Louise’s research interests are education policy, particularly higher education policy, as well as qualitative research into the experiences of students in higher education and reducing inequalities in access to higher education. Louise is also interested in educational capabilities, educational purpose, aspirations and philosophical debates about knowledge construction and co-construction. Louise has a First Class BA (Joint Honours) in Social Policy and Education from the University of Strathclyde, and two Masters degrees with Distinction also from the University of Strathclyde in Applied Educational and Social Research and Social Policy (Research Methods). Louise also participated in the University of Oxford’s UNIQ+ Graduate Access Programme in the summer of 2022, where she worked at the Department of Sociology with Melinda Mills, Bo Zhao and Evelina Akimova on research into the impact of socio-economic status on inequalities in access to veterinary care in Scotland. Louise’s DPhil thesis is interested in evaluating Lorella Terzi’s educational capabilities framework through the lens of contemporary higher education in order to gain an understanding of what graduate capabilities are identified by students and stakeholders as being necessary for enabling graduates to successfully thrive and adapt in a post-pandemic society.

 

Supervisors

Alis Oancea and Kelsey Inouye

Motema studied Neuroscience as an undergraduate at Dartmouth College in the USA and it is one of its courses, found interest in Education.

Motema then worked for various non-profit organisations in Lesotho and South Africa focusing on helping high school students from low SES backgrounds access opportunities to study in HE. In her Masters’ project Motema analysed Lesotho’s 2009 Curriculum and Assessment Policy. This analysis’ findings brought Motema to her current research interests which include gendered STEM education and decolonisation of education policies and curricula in Lesotho. For her DPhil project, Motema is interested in finding out the lived experiences of female Science teachers in Lesotho Secondary Schools especially focusing on the major changes in the Secondary school education system in Lesotho that have happened in the past five years as unique meeting points.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Judith Hillier

Danielle is a DPhil student researching how Black-British doctoral students navigate the spaces of the elite, providing a new theoretical framework to understand their agency better.

Her main interests are in Human Flourishing, Cultural Geography, Psychology, and Justice, and her work aims to inform and reform educational frameworks and practices.

Following Danielle’s BSc in Psychology and MRes in Research Methods in Psychology, she founded a social enterprise that merges psychological and academic strategies to guide undergraduate and master’s students study practices. In addition to this, Danielle provided pedagogical and behavioural support across SEN college, secondary and primary schools.

Some of Danielle’s notable work includes her research introducing a new University-wide EDI strategy at her former Higher Education institution, presenting insights and way-forwards on youth homelessness to HRH Prince Williams, and providing discipleship to next-gen leaders.

Dan is a part-time DPhil Education student whose research focuses on investigating reasons why individuals choose to study and then teach physics as a subject discipline and how these relate to issues of equity and power. He previously worked as a secondary school physics teacher in the West Midlands of England for around 15 years before taking up his current post as Associate Professor of Physics Education at the University of Birmingham where he works in widening participation in physics and teacher education.

Publications
  • Cottle, D 2022, ‘Harnessing the potential of recently retired physics teachers to mentor new physics teachers’, Physics Education, vol. 57, no. 1, 015020. https://doi.org/10.1088/1361-6552/ac3931
  • Cottle, D 2021, ‘Improving students’ mathematical skills in secondary science: ideas from mathematics pedagogy’, School Science Review, vol. 102, no. 381, pp. 61-64. <https://www.ase.org.uk/resources/school-science-review/issue-381/improving-students-mathematical-skills-in-secondary>
  • Cottle, D 2021, ‘The effects of Covid-19 on student transition from school to university in STEM subjects’, New Directions in the Teaching of Physical Sciences, vol. 16, no. 1, 3847, pp. 1-4. https://doi.org/10.29311/ndtps.v0i14.3847 
  • Cottle, D & Marshall, R 2016, ‘Exploring electrical resistance: a novel kinesthetic model helps to resolve some misconceptions’, Physics Education, vol. 51, no. 5. https://doi.org/10.1088/0031-9120/51/5/054004 

Chris is a third-year part time DPhil student. He is an experienced Director of Children’s Services working in London. He is interested in path dependence and whether it is a helpful concept to understand how children’s services work.

Yaoyao is a DPhil student in Education at Oxford.

Her research interest lies in Aptitude-Instruction-Interaction (ATI) in second language acquisition (SLA).

Yaoyao’s research investigates the mediating effects of individual differences in learners’ domain-general perceptual-cognitive abilities in instructed foreign language pronunciation acquisition in adulthood. She aims to further explore how aptitude hinders instructional effectiveness and help all students make the most of instruction regardless of aptitude profiles.

Yaoyao started her BA in the Japanese Language and Literature at Sun Yat-Sen University (中山大学) in China. She then moved to the University of Queensland to finish her BA with double majors in Japanese and Translation. After her BA, she worked as an English teacher in China for three years. Prior to her DPhil studies at Oxford, Yaoyao completed her Master’s degree in TESOL at Institute of Education, University College London. Her Master’s dissertation was supervised by Dr Kazuya Saito.

Pat is the Deputy Chief Executive of a large College Group.

A qualified accountant, she is accountable to the Corporation Board for the Group’s Estate, sustainability and for maintaining the Group’s outstanding financial health grade. Her specialisms include Leadership and Management, Identification and Application of Funding Streams as well as leading the Group in new acquisitions, ventures and developments. Pat is using her vast experience of public sector finances to explore the intersection of accounting, leadership and purpose.

Supervisors

James Robson and Ariel Lindorff

Alice received her Master’s in Child Study and Education from the Institute of Child Study at the University of Toronto. She has taught preschool through higher education as a teacher and principal in public and private schools in North America and Europe. Deeply committed to enhancing education, she believes in learning that connects students and teachers to the natural world and to their communities. She is actively involved in community organisations that promote intercultural, interracial, and interfaith understanding and allyship.

Supervisors

Steve Puttick

Victoria is an educational researcher and practitioner, specialising in educational support and methodology of teaching mathematics to low-achieving students. For over 9 years she has been working at Big Change Educational Centre (Moscow) which provides support to looked-after children.

Before joining the DPhil programme, she completed her undergraduate degree in Finance at Financial University in Moscow and then gained a MSc in Psychology of Education from the University of Bristol.

Victoria’s current research focuses on educational issues of care-experienced children and teaching mathematics to students of low achievement and motivation.

Supervisors

Karen Skilling and Gabriel Stylianides

Louise was born and raised in Glasgow and moved to Oxford to pursue a DPhil in Education.

Louise’s research interests are education policy, particularly higher education policy, as well as qualitative research into the experiences of students in higher education and reducing inequalities in access to higher education. Louise is also interested in educational capabilities, educational purpose, aspirations and philosophical debates about knowledge construction and co-construction. Louise has a First Class BA (Joint Honours) in Social Policy and Education from the University of Strathclyde, and two Masters degrees with Distinction also from the University of Strathclyde in Applied Educational and Social Research and Social Policy (Research Methods). Louise also participated in the University of Oxford’s UNIQ+ Graduate Access Programme in the summer of 2022, where she worked at the Department of Sociology with Melinda Mills, Bo Zhao and Evelina Akimova on research into the impact of socio-economic status on inequalities in access to veterinary care in Scotland. Louise’s DPhil thesis is interested in evaluating Lorella Terzi’s educational capabilities framework through the lens of contemporary higher education in order to gain an understanding of what graduate capabilities are identified by students and stakeholders as being necessary for enabling graduates to successfully thrive and adapt in a post-pandemic society.

 

Supervisors

Alis Oancea and Kelsey Inouye

Motema studied Neuroscience as an undergraduate at Dartmouth College in the USA and it is one of its courses, found interest in Education.

Motema then worked for various non-profit organisations in Lesotho and South Africa focusing on helping high school students from low SES backgrounds access opportunities to study in HE. In her Masters’ project Motema analysed Lesotho’s 2009 Curriculum and Assessment Policy. This analysis’ findings brought Motema to her current research interests which include gendered STEM education and decolonisation of education policies and curricula in Lesotho. For her DPhil project, Motema is interested in finding out the lived experiences of female Science teachers in Lesotho Secondary Schools especially focusing on the major changes in the Secondary school education system in Lesotho that have happened in the past five years as unique meeting points.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Judith Hillier

Danielle is a DPhil student researching how Black-British doctoral students navigate the spaces of the elite, providing a new theoretical framework to understand their agency better.

Her main interests are in Human Flourishing, Cultural Geography, Psychology, and Justice, and her work aims to inform and reform educational frameworks and practices.

Following Danielle’s BSc in Psychology and MRes in Research Methods in Psychology, she founded a social enterprise that merges psychological and academic strategies to guide undergraduate and master’s students study practices. In addition to this, Danielle provided pedagogical and behavioural support across SEN college, secondary and primary schools.

Some of Danielle’s notable work includes her research introducing a new University-wide EDI strategy at her former Higher Education institution, presenting insights and way-forwards on youth homelessness to HRH Prince Williams, and providing discipleship to next-gen leaders.

Dan is a part-time DPhil Education student whose research focuses on investigating reasons why individuals choose to study and then teach physics as a subject discipline and how these relate to issues of equity and power. He previously worked as a secondary school physics teacher in the West Midlands of England for around 15 years before taking up his current post as Associate Professor of Physics Education at the University of Birmingham where he works in widening participation in physics and teacher education.

Publications
  • Cottle, D 2022, ‘Harnessing the potential of recently retired physics teachers to mentor new physics teachers’, Physics Education, vol. 57, no. 1, 015020. https://doi.org/10.1088/1361-6552/ac3931
  • Cottle, D 2021, ‘Improving students’ mathematical skills in secondary science: ideas from mathematics pedagogy’, School Science Review, vol. 102, no. 381, pp. 61-64. <https://www.ase.org.uk/resources/school-science-review/issue-381/improving-students-mathematical-skills-in-secondary>
  • Cottle, D 2021, ‘The effects of Covid-19 on student transition from school to university in STEM subjects’, New Directions in the Teaching of Physical Sciences, vol. 16, no. 1, 3847, pp. 1-4. https://doi.org/10.29311/ndtps.v0i14.3847 
  • Cottle, D & Marshall, R 2016, ‘Exploring electrical resistance: a novel kinesthetic model helps to resolve some misconceptions’, Physics Education, vol. 51, no. 5. https://doi.org/10.1088/0031-9120/51/5/054004 

Chris is a third-year part time DPhil student. He is an experienced Director of Children’s Services working in London. He is interested in path dependence and whether it is a helpful concept to understand how children’s services work.

Yaoyao is a DPhil student in Education at Oxford.

Her research interest lies in Aptitude-Instruction-Interaction (ATI) in second language acquisition (SLA).

Yaoyao’s research investigates the mediating effects of individual differences in learners’ domain-general perceptual-cognitive abilities in instructed foreign language pronunciation acquisition in adulthood. She aims to further explore how aptitude hinders instructional effectiveness and help all students make the most of instruction regardless of aptitude profiles.

Yaoyao started her BA in the Japanese Language and Literature at Sun Yat-Sen University (中山大学) in China. She then moved to the University of Queensland to finish her BA with double majors in Japanese and Translation. After her BA, she worked as an English teacher in China for three years. Prior to her DPhil studies at Oxford, Yaoyao completed her Master’s degree in TESOL at Institute of Education, University College London. Her Master’s dissertation was supervised by Dr Kazuya Saito.

Pat is the Deputy Chief Executive of a large College Group.

A qualified accountant, she is accountable to the Corporation Board for the Group’s Estate, sustainability and for maintaining the Group’s outstanding financial health grade. Her specialisms include Leadership and Management, Identification and Application of Funding Streams as well as leading the Group in new acquisitions, ventures and developments. Pat is using her vast experience of public sector finances to explore the intersection of accounting, leadership and purpose.

Supervisors

James Robson and Ariel Lindorff

Alice received her Master’s in Child Study and Education from the Institute of Child Study at the University of Toronto. She has taught preschool through higher education as a teacher and principal in public and private schools in North America and Europe. Deeply committed to enhancing education, she believes in learning that connects students and teachers to the natural world and to their communities. She is actively involved in community organisations that promote intercultural, interracial, and interfaith understanding and allyship.

Supervisors

Steve Puttick

Victoria is an educational researcher and practitioner, specialising in educational support and methodology of teaching mathematics to low-achieving students. For over 9 years she has been working at Big Change Educational Centre (Moscow) which provides support to looked-after children.

Before joining the DPhil programme, she completed her undergraduate degree in Finance at Financial University in Moscow and then gained a MSc in Psychology of Education from the University of Bristol.

Victoria’s current research focuses on educational issues of care-experienced children and teaching mathematics to students of low achievement and motivation.

Supervisors

Karen Skilling and Gabriel Stylianides

Louise was born and raised in Glasgow and moved to Oxford to pursue a DPhil in Education.

Louise’s research interests are education policy, particularly higher education policy, as well as qualitative research into the experiences of students in higher education and reducing inequalities in access to higher education. Louise is also interested in educational capabilities, educational purpose, aspirations and philosophical debates about knowledge construction and co-construction. Louise has a First Class BA (Joint Honours) in Social Policy and Education from the University of Strathclyde, and two Masters degrees with Distinction also from the University of Strathclyde in Applied Educational and Social Research and Social Policy (Research Methods). Louise also participated in the University of Oxford’s UNIQ+ Graduate Access Programme in the summer of 2022, where she worked at the Department of Sociology with Melinda Mills, Bo Zhao and Evelina Akimova on research into the impact of socio-economic status on inequalities in access to veterinary care in Scotland. Louise’s DPhil thesis is interested in evaluating Lorella Terzi’s educational capabilities framework through the lens of contemporary higher education in order to gain an understanding of what graduate capabilities are identified by students and stakeholders as being necessary for enabling graduates to successfully thrive and adapt in a post-pandemic society.

 

Supervisors

Alis Oancea and Kelsey Inouye

Motema studied Neuroscience as an undergraduate at Dartmouth College in the USA and it is one of its courses, found interest in Education.

Motema then worked for various non-profit organisations in Lesotho and South Africa focusing on helping high school students from low SES backgrounds access opportunities to study in HE. In her Masters’ project Motema analysed Lesotho’s 2009 Curriculum and Assessment Policy. This analysis’ findings brought Motema to her current research interests which include gendered STEM education and decolonisation of education policies and curricula in Lesotho. For her DPhil project, Motema is interested in finding out the lived experiences of female Science teachers in Lesotho Secondary Schools especially focusing on the major changes in the Secondary school education system in Lesotho that have happened in the past five years as unique meeting points.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Judith Hillier

Danielle is a DPhil student researching how Black-British doctoral students navigate the spaces of the elite, providing a new theoretical framework to understand their agency better.

Her main interests are in Human Flourishing, Cultural Geography, Psychology, and Justice, and her work aims to inform and reform educational frameworks and practices.

Following Danielle’s BSc in Psychology and MRes in Research Methods in Psychology, she founded a social enterprise that merges psychological and academic strategies to guide undergraduate and master’s students study practices. In addition to this, Danielle provided pedagogical and behavioural support across SEN college, secondary and primary schools.

Some of Danielle’s notable work includes her research introducing a new University-wide EDI strategy at her former Higher Education institution, presenting insights and way-forwards on youth homelessness to HRH Prince Williams, and providing discipleship to next-gen leaders.

Dan is a part-time DPhil Education student whose research focuses on investigating reasons why individuals choose to study and then teach physics as a subject discipline and how these relate to issues of equity and power. He previously worked as a secondary school physics teacher in the West Midlands of England for around 15 years before taking up his current post as Associate Professor of Physics Education at the University of Birmingham where he works in widening participation in physics and teacher education.

Publications
  • Cottle, D 2022, ‘Harnessing the potential of recently retired physics teachers to mentor new physics teachers’, Physics Education, vol. 57, no. 1, 015020. https://doi.org/10.1088/1361-6552/ac3931
  • Cottle, D 2021, ‘Improving students’ mathematical skills in secondary science: ideas from mathematics pedagogy’, School Science Review, vol. 102, no. 381, pp. 61-64. <https://www.ase.org.uk/resources/school-science-review/issue-381/improving-students-mathematical-skills-in-secondary>
  • Cottle, D 2021, ‘The effects of Covid-19 on student transition from school to university in STEM subjects’, New Directions in the Teaching of Physical Sciences, vol. 16, no. 1, 3847, pp. 1-4. https://doi.org/10.29311/ndtps.v0i14.3847 
  • Cottle, D & Marshall, R 2016, ‘Exploring electrical resistance: a novel kinesthetic model helps to resolve some misconceptions’, Physics Education, vol. 51, no. 5. https://doi.org/10.1088/0031-9120/51/5/054004 

Chris is a third-year part time DPhil student. He is an experienced Director of Children’s Services working in London. He is interested in path dependence and whether it is a helpful concept to understand how children’s services work.

Yaoyao is a DPhil student in Education at Oxford.

Her research interest lies in Aptitude-Instruction-Interaction (ATI) in second language acquisition (SLA).

Yaoyao’s research investigates the mediating effects of individual differences in learners’ domain-general perceptual-cognitive abilities in instructed foreign language pronunciation acquisition in adulthood. She aims to further explore how aptitude hinders instructional effectiveness and help all students make the most of instruction regardless of aptitude profiles.

Yaoyao started her BA in the Japanese Language and Literature at Sun Yat-Sen University (中山大学) in China. She then moved to the University of Queensland to finish her BA with double majors in Japanese and Translation. After her BA, she worked as an English teacher in China for three years. Prior to her DPhil studies at Oxford, Yaoyao completed her Master’s degree in TESOL at Institute of Education, University College London. Her Master’s dissertation was supervised by Dr Kazuya Saito.

Pat is the Deputy Chief Executive of a large College Group.

A qualified accountant, she is accountable to the Corporation Board for the Group’s Estate, sustainability and for maintaining the Group’s outstanding financial health grade. Her specialisms include Leadership and Management, Identification and Application of Funding Streams as well as leading the Group in new acquisitions, ventures and developments. Pat is using her vast experience of public sector finances to explore the intersection of accounting, leadership and purpose.

Supervisors

James Robson and Ariel Lindorff

Alice received her Master’s in Child Study and Education from the Institute of Child Study at the University of Toronto. She has taught preschool through higher education as a teacher and principal in public and private schools in North America and Europe. Deeply committed to enhancing education, she believes in learning that connects students and teachers to the natural world and to their communities. She is actively involved in community organisations that promote intercultural, interracial, and interfaith understanding and allyship.

Supervisors

Steve Puttick

Victoria is an educational researcher and practitioner, specialising in educational support and methodology of teaching mathematics to low-achieving students. For over 9 years she has been working at Big Change Educational Centre (Moscow) which provides support to looked-after children.

Before joining the DPhil programme, she completed her undergraduate degree in Finance at Financial University in Moscow and then gained a MSc in Psychology of Education from the University of Bristol.

Victoria’s current research focuses on educational issues of care-experienced children and teaching mathematics to students of low achievement and motivation.

Supervisors

Karen Skilling and Gabriel Stylianides

Louise was born and raised in Glasgow and moved to Oxford to pursue a DPhil in Education.

Louise’s research interests are education policy, particularly higher education policy, as well as qualitative research into the experiences of students in higher education and reducing inequalities in access to higher education. Louise is also interested in educational capabilities, educational purpose, aspirations and philosophical debates about knowledge construction and co-construction. Louise has a First Class BA (Joint Honours) in Social Policy and Education from the University of Strathclyde, and two Masters degrees with Distinction also from the University of Strathclyde in Applied Educational and Social Research and Social Policy (Research Methods). Louise also participated in the University of Oxford’s UNIQ+ Graduate Access Programme in the summer of 2022, where she worked at the Department of Sociology with Melinda Mills, Bo Zhao and Evelina Akimova on research into the impact of socio-economic status on inequalities in access to veterinary care in Scotland. Louise’s DPhil thesis is interested in evaluating Lorella Terzi’s educational capabilities framework through the lens of contemporary higher education in order to gain an understanding of what graduate capabilities are identified by students and stakeholders as being necessary for enabling graduates to successfully thrive and adapt in a post-pandemic society.

 

Supervisors

Alis Oancea and Kelsey Inouye

Motema studied Neuroscience as an undergraduate at Dartmouth College in the USA and it is one of its courses, found interest in Education.

Motema then worked for various non-profit organisations in Lesotho and South Africa focusing on helping high school students from low SES backgrounds access opportunities to study in HE. In her Masters’ project Motema analysed Lesotho’s 2009 Curriculum and Assessment Policy. This analysis’ findings brought Motema to her current research interests which include gendered STEM education and decolonisation of education policies and curricula in Lesotho. For her DPhil project, Motema is interested in finding out the lived experiences of female Science teachers in Lesotho Secondary Schools especially focusing on the major changes in the Secondary school education system in Lesotho that have happened in the past five years as unique meeting points.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Judith Hillier

Danielle is a DPhil student researching how Black-British doctoral students navigate the spaces of the elite, providing a new theoretical framework to understand their agency better.

Her main interests are in Human Flourishing, Cultural Geography, Psychology, and Justice, and her work aims to inform and reform educational frameworks and practices.

Following Danielle’s BSc in Psychology and MRes in Research Methods in Psychology, she founded a social enterprise that merges psychological and academic strategies to guide undergraduate and master’s students study practices. In addition to this, Danielle provided pedagogical and behavioural support across SEN college, secondary and primary schools.

Some of Danielle’s notable work includes her research introducing a new University-wide EDI strategy at her former Higher Education institution, presenting insights and way-forwards on youth homelessness to HRH Prince Williams, and providing discipleship to next-gen leaders.

Dan is a part-time DPhil Education student whose research focuses on investigating reasons why individuals choose to study and then teach physics as a subject discipline and how these relate to issues of equity and power. He previously worked as a secondary school physics teacher in the West Midlands of England for around 15 years before taking up his current post as Associate Professor of Physics Education at the University of Birmingham where he works in widening participation in physics and teacher education.

Publications
  • Cottle, D 2022, ‘Harnessing the potential of recently retired physics teachers to mentor new physics teachers’, Physics Education, vol. 57, no. 1, 015020. https://doi.org/10.1088/1361-6552/ac3931
  • Cottle, D 2021, ‘Improving students’ mathematical skills in secondary science: ideas from mathematics pedagogy’, School Science Review, vol. 102, no. 381, pp. 61-64. <https://www.ase.org.uk/resources/school-science-review/issue-381/improving-students-mathematical-skills-in-secondary>
  • Cottle, D 2021, ‘The effects of Covid-19 on student transition from school to university in STEM subjects’, New Directions in the Teaching of Physical Sciences, vol. 16, no. 1, 3847, pp. 1-4. https://doi.org/10.29311/ndtps.v0i14.3847 
  • Cottle, D & Marshall, R 2016, ‘Exploring electrical resistance: a novel kinesthetic model helps to resolve some misconceptions’, Physics Education, vol. 51, no. 5. https://doi.org/10.1088/0031-9120/51/5/054004 

Chris is a third-year part time DPhil student. He is an experienced Director of Children’s Services working in London. He is interested in path dependence and whether it is a helpful concept to understand how children’s services work.

Yaoyao is a DPhil student in Education at Oxford.

Her research interest lies in Aptitude-Instruction-Interaction (ATI) in second language acquisition (SLA).

Yaoyao’s research investigates the mediating effects of individual differences in learners’ domain-general perceptual-cognitive abilities in instructed foreign language pronunciation acquisition in adulthood. She aims to further explore how aptitude hinders instructional effectiveness and help all students make the most of instruction regardless of aptitude profiles.

Yaoyao started her BA in the Japanese Language and Literature at Sun Yat-Sen University (中山大学) in China. She then moved to the University of Queensland to finish her BA with double majors in Japanese and Translation. After her BA, she worked as an English teacher in China for three years. Prior to her DPhil studies at Oxford, Yaoyao completed her Master’s degree in TESOL at Institute of Education, University College London. Her Master’s dissertation was supervised by Dr Kazuya Saito.

Pat is the Deputy Chief Executive of a large College Group.

A qualified accountant, she is accountable to the Corporation Board for the Group’s Estate, sustainability and for maintaining the Group’s outstanding financial health grade. Her specialisms include Leadership and Management, Identification and Application of Funding Streams as well as leading the Group in new acquisitions, ventures and developments. Pat is using her vast experience of public sector finances to explore the intersection of accounting, leadership and purpose.

Supervisors

James Robson and Ariel Lindorff

Alice received her Master’s in Child Study and Education from the Institute of Child Study at the University of Toronto. She has taught preschool through higher education as a teacher and principal in public and private schools in North America and Europe. Deeply committed to enhancing education, she believes in learning that connects students and teachers to the natural world and to their communities. She is actively involved in community organisations that promote intercultural, interracial, and interfaith understanding and allyship.

Supervisors

Steve Puttick

Victoria is an educational researcher and practitioner, specialising in educational support and methodology of teaching mathematics to low-achieving students. For over 9 years she has been working at Big Change Educational Centre (Moscow) which provides support to looked-after children.

Before joining the DPhil programme, she completed her undergraduate degree in Finance at Financial University in Moscow and then gained a MSc in Psychology of Education from the University of Bristol.

Victoria’s current research focuses on educational issues of care-experienced children and teaching mathematics to students of low achievement and motivation.

Supervisors

Karen Skilling and Gabriel Stylianides

Louise was born and raised in Glasgow and moved to Oxford to pursue a DPhil in Education.

Louise’s research interests are education policy, particularly higher education policy, as well as qualitative research into the experiences of students in higher education and reducing inequalities in access to higher education. Louise is also interested in educational capabilities, educational purpose, aspirations and philosophical debates about knowledge construction and co-construction. Louise has a First Class BA (Joint Honours) in Social Policy and Education from the University of Strathclyde, and two Masters degrees with Distinction also from the University of Strathclyde in Applied Educational and Social Research and Social Policy (Research Methods). Louise also participated in the University of Oxford’s UNIQ+ Graduate Access Programme in the summer of 2022, where she worked at the Department of Sociology with Melinda Mills, Bo Zhao and Evelina Akimova on research into the impact of socio-economic status on inequalities in access to veterinary care in Scotland. Louise’s DPhil thesis is interested in evaluating Lorella Terzi’s educational capabilities framework through the lens of contemporary higher education in order to gain an understanding of what graduate capabilities are identified by students and stakeholders as being necessary for enabling graduates to successfully thrive and adapt in a post-pandemic society.

 

Supervisors

Alis Oancea and Kelsey Inouye

Motema studied Neuroscience as an undergraduate at Dartmouth College in the USA and it is one of its courses, found interest in Education.

Motema then worked for various non-profit organisations in Lesotho and South Africa focusing on helping high school students from low SES backgrounds access opportunities to study in HE. In her Masters’ project Motema analysed Lesotho’s 2009 Curriculum and Assessment Policy. This analysis’ findings brought Motema to her current research interests which include gendered STEM education and decolonisation of education policies and curricula in Lesotho. For her DPhil project, Motema is interested in finding out the lived experiences of female Science teachers in Lesotho Secondary Schools especially focusing on the major changes in the Secondary school education system in Lesotho that have happened in the past five years as unique meeting points.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Judith Hillier

Danielle is a DPhil student researching how Black-British doctoral students navigate the spaces of the elite, providing a new theoretical framework to understand their agency better.

Her main interests are in Human Flourishing, Cultural Geography, Psychology, and Justice, and her work aims to inform and reform educational frameworks and practices.

Following Danielle’s BSc in Psychology and MRes in Research Methods in Psychology, she founded a social enterprise that merges psychological and academic strategies to guide undergraduate and master’s students study practices. In addition to this, Danielle provided pedagogical and behavioural support across SEN college, secondary and primary schools.

Some of Danielle’s notable work includes her research introducing a new University-wide EDI strategy at her former Higher Education institution, presenting insights and way-forwards on youth homelessness to HRH Prince Williams, and providing discipleship to next-gen leaders.

Dan is a part-time DPhil Education student whose research focuses on investigating reasons why individuals choose to study and then teach physics as a subject discipline and how these relate to issues of equity and power. He previously worked as a secondary school physics teacher in the West Midlands of England for around 15 years before taking up his current post as Associate Professor of Physics Education at the University of Birmingham where he works in widening participation in physics and teacher education.

Publications
  • Cottle, D 2022, ‘Harnessing the potential of recently retired physics teachers to mentor new physics teachers’, Physics Education, vol. 57, no. 1, 015020. https://doi.org/10.1088/1361-6552/ac3931
  • Cottle, D 2021, ‘Improving students’ mathematical skills in secondary science: ideas from mathematics pedagogy’, School Science Review, vol. 102, no. 381, pp. 61-64. <https://www.ase.org.uk/resources/school-science-review/issue-381/improving-students-mathematical-skills-in-secondary>
  • Cottle, D 2021, ‘The effects of Covid-19 on student transition from school to university in STEM subjects’, New Directions in the Teaching of Physical Sciences, vol. 16, no. 1, 3847, pp. 1-4. https://doi.org/10.29311/ndtps.v0i14.3847 
  • Cottle, D & Marshall, R 2016, ‘Exploring electrical resistance: a novel kinesthetic model helps to resolve some misconceptions’, Physics Education, vol. 51, no. 5. https://doi.org/10.1088/0031-9120/51/5/054004 

Chris is a third-year part time DPhil student. He is an experienced Director of Children’s Services working in London. He is interested in path dependence and whether it is a helpful concept to understand how children’s services work.

Yaoyao is a DPhil student in Education at Oxford.

Her research interest lies in Aptitude-Instruction-Interaction (ATI) in second language acquisition (SLA).

Yaoyao’s research investigates the mediating effects of individual differences in learners’ domain-general perceptual-cognitive abilities in instructed foreign language pronunciation acquisition in adulthood. She aims to further explore how aptitude hinders instructional effectiveness and help all students make the most of instruction regardless of aptitude profiles.

Yaoyao started her BA in the Japanese Language and Literature at Sun Yat-Sen University (中山大学) in China. She then moved to the University of Queensland to finish her BA with double majors in Japanese and Translation. After her BA, she worked as an English teacher in China for three years. Prior to her DPhil studies at Oxford, Yaoyao completed her Master’s degree in TESOL at Institute of Education, University College London. Her Master’s dissertation was supervised by Dr Kazuya Saito.

Pat is the Deputy Chief Executive of a large College Group.

A qualified accountant, she is accountable to the Corporation Board for the Group’s Estate, sustainability and for maintaining the Group’s outstanding financial health grade. Her specialisms include Leadership and Management, Identification and Application of Funding Streams as well as leading the Group in new acquisitions, ventures and developments. Pat is using her vast experience of public sector finances to explore the intersection of accounting, leadership and purpose.

Supervisors

James Robson and Ariel Lindorff

Alice received her Master’s in Child Study and Education from the Institute of Child Study at the University of Toronto. She has taught preschool through higher education as a teacher and principal in public and private schools in North America and Europe. Deeply committed to enhancing education, she believes in learning that connects students and teachers to the natural world and to their communities. She is actively involved in community organisations that promote intercultural, interracial, and interfaith understanding and allyship.

Supervisors

Steve Puttick

Victoria is an educational researcher and practitioner, specialising in educational support and methodology of teaching mathematics to low-achieving students. For over 9 years she has been working at Big Change Educational Centre (Moscow) which provides support to looked-after children.

Before joining the DPhil programme, she completed her undergraduate degree in Finance at Financial University in Moscow and then gained a MSc in Psychology of Education from the University of Bristol.

Victoria’s current research focuses on educational issues of care-experienced children and teaching mathematics to students of low achievement and motivation.

Supervisors

Karen Skilling and Gabriel Stylianides

Louise was born and raised in Glasgow and moved to Oxford to pursue a DPhil in Education.

Louise’s research interests are education policy, particularly higher education policy, as well as qualitative research into the experiences of students in higher education and reducing inequalities in access to higher education. Louise is also interested in educational capabilities, educational purpose, aspirations and philosophical debates about knowledge construction and co-construction. Louise has a First Class BA (Joint Honours) in Social Policy and Education from the University of Strathclyde, and two Masters degrees with Distinction also from the University of Strathclyde in Applied Educational and Social Research and Social Policy (Research Methods). Louise also participated in the University of Oxford’s UNIQ+ Graduate Access Programme in the summer of 2022, where she worked at the Department of Sociology with Melinda Mills, Bo Zhao and Evelina Akimova on research into the impact of socio-economic status on inequalities in access to veterinary care in Scotland. Louise’s DPhil thesis is interested in evaluating Lorella Terzi’s educational capabilities framework through the lens of contemporary higher education in order to gain an understanding of what graduate capabilities are identified by students and stakeholders as being necessary for enabling graduates to successfully thrive and adapt in a post-pandemic society.

 

Supervisors

Alis Oancea and Kelsey Inouye

Motema studied Neuroscience as an undergraduate at Dartmouth College in the USA and it is one of its courses, found interest in Education.

Motema then worked for various non-profit organisations in Lesotho and South Africa focusing on helping high school students from low SES backgrounds access opportunities to study in HE. In her Masters’ project Motema analysed Lesotho’s 2009 Curriculum and Assessment Policy. This analysis’ findings brought Motema to her current research interests which include gendered STEM education and decolonisation of education policies and curricula in Lesotho. For her DPhil project, Motema is interested in finding out the lived experiences of female Science teachers in Lesotho Secondary Schools especially focusing on the major changes in the Secondary school education system in Lesotho that have happened in the past five years as unique meeting points.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Judith Hillier

Danielle is a DPhil student researching how Black-British doctoral students navigate the spaces of the elite, providing a new theoretical framework to understand their agency better.

Her main interests are in Human Flourishing, Cultural Geography, Psychology, and Justice, and her work aims to inform and reform educational frameworks and practices.

Following Danielle’s BSc in Psychology and MRes in Research Methods in Psychology, she founded a social enterprise that merges psychological and academic strategies to guide undergraduate and master’s students study practices. In addition to this, Danielle provided pedagogical and behavioural support across SEN college, secondary and primary schools.

Some of Danielle’s notable work includes her research introducing a new University-wide EDI strategy at her former Higher Education institution, presenting insights and way-forwards on youth homelessness to HRH Prince Williams, and providing discipleship to next-gen leaders.

Dan is a part-time DPhil Education student whose research focuses on investigating reasons why individuals choose to study and then teach physics as a subject discipline and how these relate to issues of equity and power. He previously worked as a secondary school physics teacher in the West Midlands of England for around 15 years before taking up his current post as Associate Professor of Physics Education at the University of Birmingham where he works in widening participation in physics and teacher education.

Publications
  • Cottle, D 2022, ‘Harnessing the potential of recently retired physics teachers to mentor new physics teachers’, Physics Education, vol. 57, no. 1, 015020. https://doi.org/10.1088/1361-6552/ac3931
  • Cottle, D 2021, ‘Improving students’ mathematical skills in secondary science: ideas from mathematics pedagogy’, School Science Review, vol. 102, no. 381, pp. 61-64. <https://www.ase.org.uk/resources/school-science-review/issue-381/improving-students-mathematical-skills-in-secondary>
  • Cottle, D 2021, ‘The effects of Covid-19 on student transition from school to university in STEM subjects’, New Directions in the Teaching of Physical Sciences, vol. 16, no. 1, 3847, pp. 1-4. https://doi.org/10.29311/ndtps.v0i14.3847 
  • Cottle, D & Marshall, R 2016, ‘Exploring electrical resistance: a novel kinesthetic model helps to resolve some misconceptions’, Physics Education, vol. 51, no. 5. https://doi.org/10.1088/0031-9120/51/5/054004 

Chris is a third-year part time DPhil student. He is an experienced Director of Children’s Services working in London. He is interested in path dependence and whether it is a helpful concept to understand how children’s services work.

Yaoyao is a DPhil student in Education at Oxford.

Her research interest lies in Aptitude-Instruction-Interaction (ATI) in second language acquisition (SLA).

Yaoyao’s research investigates the mediating effects of individual differences in learners’ domain-general perceptual-cognitive abilities in instructed foreign language pronunciation acquisition in adulthood. She aims to further explore how aptitude hinders instructional effectiveness and help all students make the most of instruction regardless of aptitude profiles.

Yaoyao started her BA in the Japanese Language and Literature at Sun Yat-Sen University (中山大学) in China. She then moved to the University of Queensland to finish her BA with double majors in Japanese and Translation. After her BA, she worked as an English teacher in China for three years. Prior to her DPhil studies at Oxford, Yaoyao completed her Master’s degree in TESOL at Institute of Education, University College London. Her Master’s dissertation was supervised by Dr Kazuya Saito.

Pat is the Deputy Chief Executive of a large College Group.

A qualified accountant, she is accountable to the Corporation Board for the Group’s Estate, sustainability and for maintaining the Group’s outstanding financial health grade. Her specialisms include Leadership and Management, Identification and Application of Funding Streams as well as leading the Group in new acquisitions, ventures and developments. Pat is using her vast experience of public sector finances to explore the intersection of accounting, leadership and purpose.

Supervisors

James Robson and Ariel Lindorff

Alice received her Master’s in Child Study and Education from the Institute of Child Study at the University of Toronto. She has taught preschool through higher education as a teacher and principal in public and private schools in North America and Europe. Deeply committed to enhancing education, she believes in learning that connects students and teachers to the natural world and to their communities. She is actively involved in community organisations that promote intercultural, interracial, and interfaith understanding and allyship.

Supervisors

Steve Puttick

Victoria is an educational researcher and practitioner, specialising in educational support and methodology of teaching mathematics to low-achieving students. For over 9 years she has been working at Big Change Educational Centre (Moscow) which provides support to looked-after children.

Before joining the DPhil programme, she completed her undergraduate degree in Finance at Financial University in Moscow and then gained a MSc in Psychology of Education from the University of Bristol.

Victoria’s current research focuses on educational issues of care-experienced children and teaching mathematics to students of low achievement and motivation.

Supervisors

Karen Skilling and Gabriel Stylianides

Louise was born and raised in Glasgow and moved to Oxford to pursue a DPhil in Education.

Louise’s research interests are education policy, particularly higher education policy, as well as qualitative research into the experiences of students in higher education and reducing inequalities in access to higher education. Louise is also interested in educational capabilities, educational purpose, aspirations and philosophical debates about knowledge construction and co-construction. Louise has a First Class BA (Joint Honours) in Social Policy and Education from the University of Strathclyde, and two Masters degrees with Distinction also from the University of Strathclyde in Applied Educational and Social Research and Social Policy (Research Methods). Louise also participated in the University of Oxford’s UNIQ+ Graduate Access Programme in the summer of 2022, where she worked at the Department of Sociology with Melinda Mills, Bo Zhao and Evelina Akimova on research into the impact of socio-economic status on inequalities in access to veterinary care in Scotland. Louise’s DPhil thesis is interested in evaluating Lorella Terzi’s educational capabilities framework through the lens of contemporary higher education in order to gain an understanding of what graduate capabilities are identified by students and stakeholders as being necessary for enabling graduates to successfully thrive and adapt in a post-pandemic society.

 

Supervisors

Alis Oancea and Kelsey Inouye

Motema studied Neuroscience as an undergraduate at Dartmouth College in the USA and it is one of its courses, found interest in Education.

Motema then worked for various non-profit organisations in Lesotho and South Africa focusing on helping high school students from low SES backgrounds access opportunities to study in HE. In her Masters’ project Motema analysed Lesotho’s 2009 Curriculum and Assessment Policy. This analysis’ findings brought Motema to her current research interests which include gendered STEM education and decolonisation of education policies and curricula in Lesotho. For her DPhil project, Motema is interested in finding out the lived experiences of female Science teachers in Lesotho Secondary Schools especially focusing on the major changes in the Secondary school education system in Lesotho that have happened in the past five years as unique meeting points.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Judith Hillier

Danielle is a DPhil student researching how Black-British doctoral students navigate the spaces of the elite, providing a new theoretical framework to understand their agency better.

Her main interests are in Human Flourishing, Cultural Geography, Psychology, and Justice, and her work aims to inform and reform educational frameworks and practices.

Following Danielle’s BSc in Psychology and MRes in Research Methods in Psychology, she founded a social enterprise that merges psychological and academic strategies to guide undergraduate and master’s students study practices. In addition to this, Danielle provided pedagogical and behavioural support across SEN college, secondary and primary schools.

Some of Danielle’s notable work includes her research introducing a new University-wide EDI strategy at her former Higher Education institution, presenting insights and way-forwards on youth homelessness to HRH Prince Williams, and providing discipleship to next-gen leaders.

Dan is a part-time DPhil Education student whose research focuses on investigating reasons why individuals choose to study and then teach physics as a subject discipline and how these relate to issues of equity and power. He previously worked as a secondary school physics teacher in the West Midlands of England for around 15 years before taking up his current post as Associate Professor of Physics Education at the University of Birmingham where he works in widening participation in physics and teacher education.

Publications
  • Cottle, D 2022, ‘Harnessing the potential of recently retired physics teachers to mentor new physics teachers’, Physics Education, vol. 57, no. 1, 015020. https://doi.org/10.1088/1361-6552/ac3931
  • Cottle, D 2021, ‘Improving students’ mathematical skills in secondary science: ideas from mathematics pedagogy’, School Science Review, vol. 102, no. 381, pp. 61-64. <https://www.ase.org.uk/resources/school-science-review/issue-381/improving-students-mathematical-skills-in-secondary>
  • Cottle, D 2021, ‘The effects of Covid-19 on student transition from school to university in STEM subjects’, New Directions in the Teaching of Physical Sciences, vol. 16, no. 1, 3847, pp. 1-4. https://doi.org/10.29311/ndtps.v0i14.3847 
  • Cottle, D & Marshall, R 2016, ‘Exploring electrical resistance: a novel kinesthetic model helps to resolve some misconceptions’, Physics Education, vol. 51, no. 5. https://doi.org/10.1088/0031-9120/51/5/054004 

Chris is a third-year part time DPhil student. He is an experienced Director of Children’s Services working in London. He is interested in path dependence and whether it is a helpful concept to understand how children’s services work.

Yaoyao is a DPhil student in Education at Oxford.

Her research interest lies in Aptitude-Instruction-Interaction (ATI) in second language acquisition (SLA).

Yaoyao’s research investigates the mediating effects of individual differences in learners’ domain-general perceptual-cognitive abilities in instructed foreign language pronunciation acquisition in adulthood. She aims to further explore how aptitude hinders instructional effectiveness and help all students make the most of instruction regardless of aptitude profiles.

Yaoyao started her BA in the Japanese Language and Literature at Sun Yat-Sen University (中山大学) in China. She then moved to the University of Queensland to finish her BA with double majors in Japanese and Translation. After her BA, she worked as an English teacher in China for three years. Prior to her DPhil studies at Oxford, Yaoyao completed her Master’s degree in TESOL at Institute of Education, University College London. Her Master’s dissertation was supervised by Dr Kazuya Saito.

Pat is the Deputy Chief Executive of a large College Group.

A qualified accountant, she is accountable to the Corporation Board for the Group’s Estate, sustainability and for maintaining the Group’s outstanding financial health grade. Her specialisms include Leadership and Management, Identification and Application of Funding Streams as well as leading the Group in new acquisitions, ventures and developments. Pat is using her vast experience of public sector finances to explore the intersection of accounting, leadership and purpose.

Supervisors

James Robson and Ariel Lindorff

Alice received her Master’s in Child Study and Education from the Institute of Child Study at the University of Toronto. She has taught preschool through higher education as a teacher and principal in public and private schools in North America and Europe. Deeply committed to enhancing education, she believes in learning that connects students and teachers to the natural world and to their communities. She is actively involved in community organisations that promote intercultural, interracial, and interfaith understanding and allyship.

Supervisors

Steve Puttick

Victoria is an educational researcher and practitioner, specialising in educational support and methodology of teaching mathematics to low-achieving students. For over 9 years she has been working at Big Change Educational Centre (Moscow) which provides support to looked-after children.

Before joining the DPhil programme, she completed her undergraduate degree in Finance at Financial University in Moscow and then gained a MSc in Psychology of Education from the University of Bristol.

Victoria’s current research focuses on educational issues of care-experienced children and teaching mathematics to students of low achievement and motivation.

Supervisors

Karen Skilling and Gabriel Stylianides

Louise was born and raised in Glasgow and moved to Oxford to pursue a DPhil in Education.

Louise’s research interests are education policy, particularly higher education policy, as well as qualitative research into the experiences of students in higher education and reducing inequalities in access to higher education. Louise is also interested in educational capabilities, educational purpose, aspirations and philosophical debates about knowledge construction and co-construction. Louise has a First Class BA (Joint Honours) in Social Policy and Education from the University of Strathclyde, and two Masters degrees with Distinction also from the University of Strathclyde in Applied Educational and Social Research and Social Policy (Research Methods). Louise also participated in the University of Oxford’s UNIQ+ Graduate Access Programme in the summer of 2022, where she worked at the Department of Sociology with Melinda Mills, Bo Zhao and Evelina Akimova on research into the impact of socio-economic status on inequalities in access to veterinary care in Scotland. Louise’s DPhil thesis is interested in evaluating Lorella Terzi’s educational capabilities framework through the lens of contemporary higher education in order to gain an understanding of what graduate capabilities are identified by students and stakeholders as being necessary for enabling graduates to successfully thrive and adapt in a post-pandemic society.

 

Supervisors

Alis Oancea and Kelsey Inouye

Motema studied Neuroscience as an undergraduate at Dartmouth College in the USA and it is one of its courses, found interest in Education.

Motema then worked for various non-profit organisations in Lesotho and South Africa focusing on helping high school students from low SES backgrounds access opportunities to study in HE. In her Masters’ project Motema analysed Lesotho’s 2009 Curriculum and Assessment Policy. This analysis’ findings brought Motema to her current research interests which include gendered STEM education and decolonisation of education policies and curricula in Lesotho. For her DPhil project, Motema is interested in finding out the lived experiences of female Science teachers in Lesotho Secondary Schools especially focusing on the major changes in the Secondary school education system in Lesotho that have happened in the past five years as unique meeting points.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Judith Hillier

Danielle is a DPhil student researching how Black-British doctoral students navigate the spaces of the elite, providing a new theoretical framework to understand their agency better.

Her main interests are in Human Flourishing, Cultural Geography, Psychology, and Justice, and her work aims to inform and reform educational frameworks and practices.

Following Danielle’s BSc in Psychology and MRes in Research Methods in Psychology, she founded a social enterprise that merges psychological and academic strategies to guide undergraduate and master’s students study practices. In addition to this, Danielle provided pedagogical and behavioural support across SEN college, secondary and primary schools.

Some of Danielle’s notable work includes her research introducing a new University-wide EDI strategy at her former Higher Education institution, presenting insights and way-forwards on youth homelessness to HRH Prince Williams, and providing discipleship to next-gen leaders.

Dan is a part-time DPhil Education student whose research focuses on investigating reasons why individuals choose to study and then teach physics as a subject discipline and how these relate to issues of equity and power. He previously worked as a secondary school physics teacher in the West Midlands of England for around 15 years before taking up his current post as Associate Professor of Physics Education at the University of Birmingham where he works in widening participation in physics and teacher education.

Publications
  • Cottle, D 2022, ‘Harnessing the potential of recently retired physics teachers to mentor new physics teachers’, Physics Education, vol. 57, no. 1, 015020. https://doi.org/10.1088/1361-6552/ac3931
  • Cottle, D 2021, ‘Improving students’ mathematical skills in secondary science: ideas from mathematics pedagogy’, School Science Review, vol. 102, no. 381, pp. 61-64. <https://www.ase.org.uk/resources/school-science-review/issue-381/improving-students-mathematical-skills-in-secondary>
  • Cottle, D 2021, ‘The effects of Covid-19 on student transition from school to university in STEM subjects’, New Directions in the Teaching of Physical Sciences, vol. 16, no. 1, 3847, pp. 1-4. https://doi.org/10.29311/ndtps.v0i14.3847 
  • Cottle, D & Marshall, R 2016, ‘Exploring electrical resistance: a novel kinesthetic model helps to resolve some misconceptions’, Physics Education, vol. 51, no. 5. https://doi.org/10.1088/0031-9120/51/5/054004 

Chris is a third-year part time DPhil student. He is an experienced Director of Children’s Services working in London. He is interested in path dependence and whether it is a helpful concept to understand how children’s services work.

Yaoyao is a DPhil student in Education at Oxford.

Her research interest lies in Aptitude-Instruction-Interaction (ATI) in second language acquisition (SLA).

Yaoyao’s research investigates the mediating effects of individual differences in learners’ domain-general perceptual-cognitive abilities in instructed foreign language pronunciation acquisition in adulthood. She aims to further explore how aptitude hinders instructional effectiveness and help all students make the most of instruction regardless of aptitude profiles.

Yaoyao started her BA in the Japanese Language and Literature at Sun Yat-Sen University (中山大学) in China. She then moved to the University of Queensland to finish her BA with double majors in Japanese and Translation. After her BA, she worked as an English teacher in China for three years. Prior to her DPhil studies at Oxford, Yaoyao completed her Master’s degree in TESOL at Institute of Education, University College London. Her Master’s dissertation was supervised by Dr Kazuya Saito.

Pat is the Deputy Chief Executive of a large College Group.

A qualified accountant, she is accountable to the Corporation Board for the Group’s Estate, sustainability and for maintaining the Group’s outstanding financial health grade. Her specialisms include Leadership and Management, Identification and Application of Funding Streams as well as leading the Group in new acquisitions, ventures and developments. Pat is using her vast experience of public sector finances to explore the intersection of accounting, leadership and purpose.

Supervisors

James Robson and Ariel Lindorff

Alice received her Master’s in Child Study and Education from the Institute of Child Study at the University of Toronto. She has taught preschool through higher education as a teacher and principal in public and private schools in North America and Europe. Deeply committed to enhancing education, she believes in learning that connects students and teachers to the natural world and to their communities. She is actively involved in community organisations that promote intercultural, interracial, and interfaith understanding and allyship.

Supervisors

Steve Puttick

Victoria is an educational researcher and practitioner, specialising in educational support and methodology of teaching mathematics to low-achieving students. For over 9 years she has been working at Big Change Educational Centre (Moscow) which provides support to looked-after children.

Before joining the DPhil programme, she completed her undergraduate degree in Finance at Financial University in Moscow and then gained a MSc in Psychology of Education from the University of Bristol.

Victoria’s current research focuses on educational issues of care-experienced children and teaching mathematics to students of low achievement and motivation.

Supervisors

Karen Skilling and Gabriel Stylianides

Louise was born and raised in Glasgow and moved to Oxford to pursue a DPhil in Education.

Louise’s research interests are education policy, particularly higher education policy, as well as qualitative research into the experiences of students in higher education and reducing inequalities in access to higher education. Louise is also interested in educational capabilities, educational purpose, aspirations and philosophical debates about knowledge construction and co-construction. Louise has a First Class BA (Joint Honours) in Social Policy and Education from the University of Strathclyde, and two Masters degrees with Distinction also from the University of Strathclyde in Applied Educational and Social Research and Social Policy (Research Methods). Louise also participated in the University of Oxford’s UNIQ+ Graduate Access Programme in the summer of 2022, where she worked at the Department of Sociology with Melinda Mills, Bo Zhao and Evelina Akimova on research into the impact of socio-economic status on inequalities in access to veterinary care in Scotland. Louise’s DPhil thesis is interested in evaluating Lorella Terzi’s educational capabilities framework through the lens of contemporary higher education in order to gain an understanding of what graduate capabilities are identified by students and stakeholders as being necessary for enabling graduates to successfully thrive and adapt in a post-pandemic society.

 

Supervisors

Alis Oancea and Kelsey Inouye

Motema studied Neuroscience as an undergraduate at Dartmouth College in the USA and it is one of its courses, found interest in Education.

Motema then worked for various non-profit organisations in Lesotho and South Africa focusing on helping high school students from low SES backgrounds access opportunities to study in HE. In her Masters’ project Motema analysed Lesotho’s 2009 Curriculum and Assessment Policy. This analysis’ findings brought Motema to her current research interests which include gendered STEM education and decolonisation of education policies and curricula in Lesotho. For her DPhil project, Motema is interested in finding out the lived experiences of female Science teachers in Lesotho Secondary Schools especially focusing on the major changes in the Secondary school education system in Lesotho that have happened in the past five years as unique meeting points.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Judith Hillier

Danielle is a DPhil student researching how Black-British doctoral students navigate the spaces of the elite, providing a new theoretical framework to understand their agency better.

Her main interests are in Human Flourishing, Cultural Geography, Psychology, and Justice, and her work aims to inform and reform educational frameworks and practices.

Following Danielle’s BSc in Psychology and MRes in Research Methods in Psychology, she founded a social enterprise that merges psychological and academic strategies to guide undergraduate and master’s students study practices. In addition to this, Danielle provided pedagogical and behavioural support across SEN college, secondary and primary schools.

Some of Danielle’s notable work includes her research introducing a new University-wide EDI strategy at her former Higher Education institution, presenting insights and way-forwards on youth homelessness to HRH Prince Williams, and providing discipleship to next-gen leaders.

Dan is a part-time DPhil Education student whose research focuses on investigating reasons why individuals choose to study and then teach physics as a subject discipline and how these relate to issues of equity and power. He previously worked as a secondary school physics teacher in the West Midlands of England for around 15 years before taking up his current post as Associate Professor of Physics Education at the University of Birmingham where he works in widening participation in physics and teacher education.

Publications
  • Cottle, D 2022, ‘Harnessing the potential of recently retired physics teachers to mentor new physics teachers’, Physics Education, vol. 57, no. 1, 015020. https://doi.org/10.1088/1361-6552/ac3931
  • Cottle, D 2021, ‘Improving students’ mathematical skills in secondary science: ideas from mathematics pedagogy’, School Science Review, vol. 102, no. 381, pp. 61-64. <https://www.ase.org.uk/resources/school-science-review/issue-381/improving-students-mathematical-skills-in-secondary>
  • Cottle, D 2021, ‘The effects of Covid-19 on student transition from school to university in STEM subjects’, New Directions in the Teaching of Physical Sciences, vol. 16, no. 1, 3847, pp. 1-4. https://doi.org/10.29311/ndtps.v0i14.3847 
  • Cottle, D & Marshall, R 2016, ‘Exploring electrical resistance: a novel kinesthetic model helps to resolve some misconceptions’, Physics Education, vol. 51, no. 5. https://doi.org/10.1088/0031-9120/51/5/054004 

Chris is a third-year part time DPhil student. He is an experienced Director of Children’s Services working in London. He is interested in path dependence and whether it is a helpful concept to understand how children’s services work.

Yaoyao is a DPhil student in Education at Oxford.

Her research interest lies in Aptitude-Instruction-Interaction (ATI) in second language acquisition (SLA).

Yaoyao’s research investigates the mediating effects of individual differences in learners’ domain-general perceptual-cognitive abilities in instructed foreign language pronunciation acquisition in adulthood. She aims to further explore how aptitude hinders instructional effectiveness and help all students make the most of instruction regardless of aptitude profiles.

Yaoyao started her BA in the Japanese Language and Literature at Sun Yat-Sen University (中山大学) in China. She then moved to the University of Queensland to finish her BA with double majors in Japanese and Translation. After her BA, she worked as an English teacher in China for three years. Prior to her DPhil studies at Oxford, Yaoyao completed her Master’s degree in TESOL at Institute of Education, University College London. Her Master’s dissertation was supervised by Dr Kazuya Saito.

Pat is the Deputy Chief Executive of a large College Group.

A qualified accountant, she is accountable to the Corporation Board for the Group’s Estate, sustainability and for maintaining the Group’s outstanding financial health grade. Her specialisms include Leadership and Management, Identification and Application of Funding Streams as well as leading the Group in new acquisitions, ventures and developments. Pat is using her vast experience of public sector finances to explore the intersection of accounting, leadership and purpose.

Supervisors

James Robson and Ariel Lindorff

Alice received her Master’s in Child Study and Education from the Institute of Child Study at the University of Toronto. She has taught preschool through higher education as a teacher and principal in public and private schools in North America and Europe. Deeply committed to enhancing education, she believes in learning that connects students and teachers to the natural world and to their communities. She is actively involved in community organisations that promote intercultural, interracial, and interfaith understanding and allyship.

Supervisors

Steve Puttick

Victoria is an educational researcher and practitioner, specialising in educational support and methodology of teaching mathematics to low-achieving students. For over 9 years she has been working at Big Change Educational Centre (Moscow) which provides support to looked-after children.

Before joining the DPhil programme, she completed her undergraduate degree in Finance at Financial University in Moscow and then gained a MSc in Psychology of Education from the University of Bristol.

Victoria’s current research focuses on educational issues of care-experienced children and teaching mathematics to students of low achievement and motivation.

Supervisors

Karen Skilling and Gabriel Stylianides

Louise was born and raised in Glasgow and moved to Oxford to pursue a DPhil in Education.

Louise’s research interests are education policy, particularly higher education policy, as well as qualitative research into the experiences of students in higher education and reducing inequalities in access to higher education. Louise is also interested in educational capabilities, educational purpose, aspirations and philosophical debates about knowledge construction and co-construction. Louise has a First Class BA (Joint Honours) in Social Policy and Education from the University of Strathclyde, and two Masters degrees with Distinction also from the University of Strathclyde in Applied Educational and Social Research and Social Policy (Research Methods). Louise also participated in the University of Oxford’s UNIQ+ Graduate Access Programme in the summer of 2022, where she worked at the Department of Sociology with Melinda Mills, Bo Zhao and Evelina Akimova on research into the impact of socio-economic status on inequalities in access to veterinary care in Scotland. Louise’s DPhil thesis is interested in evaluating Lorella Terzi’s educational capabilities framework through the lens of contemporary higher education in order to gain an understanding of what graduate capabilities are identified by students and stakeholders as being necessary for enabling graduates to successfully thrive and adapt in a post-pandemic society.

 

Supervisors

Alis Oancea and Kelsey Inouye

Motema studied Neuroscience as an undergraduate at Dartmouth College in the USA and it is one of its courses, found interest in Education.

Motema then worked for various non-profit organisations in Lesotho and South Africa focusing on helping high school students from low SES backgrounds access opportunities to study in HE. In her Masters’ project Motema analysed Lesotho’s 2009 Curriculum and Assessment Policy. This analysis’ findings brought Motema to her current research interests which include gendered STEM education and decolonisation of education policies and curricula in Lesotho. For her DPhil project, Motema is interested in finding out the lived experiences of female Science teachers in Lesotho Secondary Schools especially focusing on the major changes in the Secondary school education system in Lesotho that have happened in the past five years as unique meeting points.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Judith Hillier

Danielle is a DPhil student researching how Black-British doctoral students navigate the spaces of the elite, providing a new theoretical framework to understand their agency better.

Her main interests are in Human Flourishing, Cultural Geography, Psychology, and Justice, and her work aims to inform and reform educational frameworks and practices.

Following Danielle’s BSc in Psychology and MRes in Research Methods in Psychology, she founded a social enterprise that merges psychological and academic strategies to guide undergraduate and master’s students study practices. In addition to this, Danielle provided pedagogical and behavioural support across SEN college, secondary and primary schools.

Some of Danielle’s notable work includes her research introducing a new University-wide EDI strategy at her former Higher Education institution, presenting insights and way-forwards on youth homelessness to HRH Prince Williams, and providing discipleship to next-gen leaders.

Dan is a part-time DPhil Education student whose research focuses on investigating reasons why individuals choose to study and then teach physics as a subject discipline and how these relate to issues of equity and power. He previously worked as a secondary school physics teacher in the West Midlands of England for around 15 years before taking up his current post as Associate Professor of Physics Education at the University of Birmingham where he works in widening participation in physics and teacher education.

Publications
  • Cottle, D 2022, ‘Harnessing the potential of recently retired physics teachers to mentor new physics teachers’, Physics Education, vol. 57, no. 1, 015020. https://doi.org/10.1088/1361-6552/ac3931
  • Cottle, D 2021, ‘Improving students’ mathematical skills in secondary science: ideas from mathematics pedagogy’, School Science Review, vol. 102, no. 381, pp. 61-64. <https://www.ase.org.uk/resources/school-science-review/issue-381/improving-students-mathematical-skills-in-secondary>
  • Cottle, D 2021, ‘The effects of Covid-19 on student transition from school to university in STEM subjects’, New Directions in the Teaching of Physical Sciences, vol. 16, no. 1, 3847, pp. 1-4. https://doi.org/10.29311/ndtps.v0i14.3847 
  • Cottle, D & Marshall, R 2016, ‘Exploring electrical resistance: a novel kinesthetic model helps to resolve some misconceptions’, Physics Education, vol. 51, no. 5. https://doi.org/10.1088/0031-9120/51/5/054004 

Chris is a third-year part time DPhil student. He is an experienced Director of Children’s Services working in London. He is interested in path dependence and whether it is a helpful concept to understand how children’s services work.

Yaoyao is a DPhil student in Education at Oxford.

Her research interest lies in Aptitude-Instruction-Interaction (ATI) in second language acquisition (SLA).

Yaoyao’s research investigates the mediating effects of individual differences in learners’ domain-general perceptual-cognitive abilities in instructed foreign language pronunciation acquisition in adulthood. She aims to further explore how aptitude hinders instructional effectiveness and help all students make the most of instruction regardless of aptitude profiles.

Yaoyao started her BA in the Japanese Language and Literature at Sun Yat-Sen University (中山大学) in China. She then moved to the University of Queensland to finish her BA with double majors in Japanese and Translation. After her BA, she worked as an English teacher in China for three years. Prior to her DPhil studies at Oxford, Yaoyao completed her Master’s degree in TESOL at Institute of Education, University College London. Her Master’s dissertation was supervised by Dr Kazuya Saito.

Pat is the Deputy Chief Executive of a large College Group.

A qualified accountant, she is accountable to the Corporation Board for the Group’s Estate, sustainability and for maintaining the Group’s outstanding financial health grade. Her specialisms include Leadership and Management, Identification and Application of Funding Streams as well as leading the Group in new acquisitions, ventures and developments. Pat is using her vast experience of public sector finances to explore the intersection of accounting, leadership and purpose.

Supervisors

James Robson and Ariel Lindorff

Alice received her Master’s in Child Study and Education from the Institute of Child Study at the University of Toronto. She has taught preschool through higher education as a teacher and principal in public and private schools in North America and Europe. Deeply committed to enhancing education, she believes in learning that connects students and teachers to the natural world and to their communities. She is actively involved in community organisations that promote intercultural, interracial, and interfaith understanding and allyship.

Supervisors

Steve Puttick

Victoria is an educational researcher and practitioner, specialising in educational support and methodology of teaching mathematics to low-achieving students. For over 9 years she has been working at Big Change Educational Centre (Moscow) which provides support to looked-after children.

Before joining the DPhil programme, she completed her undergraduate degree in Finance at Financial University in Moscow and then gained a MSc in Psychology of Education from the University of Bristol.

Victoria’s current research focuses on educational issues of care-experienced children and teaching mathematics to students of low achievement and motivation.

Supervisors

Karen Skilling and Gabriel Stylianides

Louise was born and raised in Glasgow and moved to Oxford to pursue a DPhil in Education.

Louise’s research interests are education policy, particularly higher education policy, as well as qualitative research into the experiences of students in higher education and reducing inequalities in access to higher education. Louise is also interested in educational capabilities, educational purpose, aspirations and philosophical debates about knowledge construction and co-construction. Louise has a First Class BA (Joint Honours) in Social Policy and Education from the University of Strathclyde, and two Masters degrees with Distinction also from the University of Strathclyde in Applied Educational and Social Research and Social Policy (Research Methods). Louise also participated in the University of Oxford’s UNIQ+ Graduate Access Programme in the summer of 2022, where she worked at the Department of Sociology with Melinda Mills, Bo Zhao and Evelina Akimova on research into the impact of socio-economic status on inequalities in access to veterinary care in Scotland. Louise’s DPhil thesis is interested in evaluating Lorella Terzi’s educational capabilities framework through the lens of contemporary higher education in order to gain an understanding of what graduate capabilities are identified by students and stakeholders as being necessary for enabling graduates to successfully thrive and adapt in a post-pandemic society.

 

Supervisors

Alis Oancea and Kelsey Inouye

Motema studied Neuroscience as an undergraduate at Dartmouth College in the USA and it is one of its courses, found interest in Education.

Motema then worked for various non-profit organisations in Lesotho and South Africa focusing on helping high school students from low SES backgrounds access opportunities to study in HE. In her Masters’ project Motema analysed Lesotho’s 2009 Curriculum and Assessment Policy. This analysis’ findings brought Motema to her current research interests which include gendered STEM education and decolonisation of education policies and curricula in Lesotho. For her DPhil project, Motema is interested in finding out the lived experiences of female Science teachers in Lesotho Secondary Schools especially focusing on the major changes in the Secondary school education system in Lesotho that have happened in the past five years as unique meeting points.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Judith Hillier

Danielle is a DPhil student researching how Black-British doctoral students navigate the spaces of the elite, providing a new theoretical framework to understand their agency better.

Her main interests are in Human Flourishing, Cultural Geography, Psychology, and Justice, and her work aims to inform and reform educational frameworks and practices.

Following Danielle’s BSc in Psychology and MRes in Research Methods in Psychology, she founded a social enterprise that merges psychological and academic strategies to guide undergraduate and master’s students study practices. In addition to this, Danielle provided pedagogical and behavioural support across SEN college, secondary and primary schools.

Some of Danielle’s notable work includes her research introducing a new University-wide EDI strategy at her former Higher Education institution, presenting insights and way-forwards on youth homelessness to HRH Prince Williams, and providing discipleship to next-gen leaders.

Dan is a part-time DPhil Education student whose research focuses on investigating reasons why individuals choose to study and then teach physics as a subject discipline and how these relate to issues of equity and power. He previously worked as a secondary school physics teacher in the West Midlands of England for around 15 years before taking up his current post as Associate Professor of Physics Education at the University of Birmingham where he works in widening participation in physics and teacher education.

Publications
  • Cottle, D 2022, ‘Harnessing the potential of recently retired physics teachers to mentor new physics teachers’, Physics Education, vol. 57, no. 1, 015020. https://doi.org/10.1088/1361-6552/ac3931
  • Cottle, D 2021, ‘Improving students’ mathematical skills in secondary science: ideas from mathematics pedagogy’, School Science Review, vol. 102, no. 381, pp. 61-64. <https://www.ase.org.uk/resources/school-science-review/issue-381/improving-students-mathematical-skills-in-secondary>
  • Cottle, D 2021, ‘The effects of Covid-19 on student transition from school to university in STEM subjects’, New Directions in the Teaching of Physical Sciences, vol. 16, no. 1, 3847, pp. 1-4. https://doi.org/10.29311/ndtps.v0i14.3847 
  • Cottle, D & Marshall, R 2016, ‘Exploring electrical resistance: a novel kinesthetic model helps to resolve some misconceptions’, Physics Education, vol. 51, no. 5. https://doi.org/10.1088/0031-9120/51/5/054004 

Chris is a third-year part time DPhil student. He is an experienced Director of Children’s Services working in London. He is interested in path dependence and whether it is a helpful concept to understand how children’s services work.

Yaoyao is a DPhil student in Education at Oxford.

Her research interest lies in Aptitude-Instruction-Interaction (ATI) in second language acquisition (SLA).

Yaoyao’s research investigates the mediating effects of individual differences in learners’ domain-general perceptual-cognitive abilities in instructed foreign language pronunciation acquisition in adulthood. She aims to further explore how aptitude hinders instructional effectiveness and help all students make the most of instruction regardless of aptitude profiles.

Yaoyao started her BA in the Japanese Language and Literature at Sun Yat-Sen University (中山大学) in China. She then moved to the University of Queensland to finish her BA with double majors in Japanese and Translation. After her BA, she worked as an English teacher in China for three years. Prior to her DPhil studies at Oxford, Yaoyao completed her Master’s degree in TESOL at Institute of Education, University College London. Her Master’s dissertation was supervised by Dr Kazuya Saito.

Pat is the Deputy Chief Executive of a large College Group.

A qualified accountant, she is accountable to the Corporation Board for the Group’s Estate, sustainability and for maintaining the Group’s outstanding financial health grade. Her specialisms include Leadership and Management, Identification and Application of Funding Streams as well as leading the Group in new acquisitions, ventures and developments. Pat is using her vast experience of public sector finances to explore the intersection of accounting, leadership and purpose.

Supervisors

James Robson and Ariel Lindorff

Alice received her Master’s in Child Study and Education from the Institute of Child Study at the University of Toronto. She has taught preschool through higher education as a teacher and principal in public and private schools in North America and Europe. Deeply committed to enhancing education, she believes in learning that connects students and teachers to the natural world and to their communities. She is actively involved in community organisations that promote intercultural, interracial, and interfaith understanding and allyship.

Supervisors

Steve Puttick

Victoria is an educational researcher and practitioner, specialising in educational support and methodology of teaching mathematics to low-achieving students. For over 9 years she has been working at Big Change Educational Centre (Moscow) which provides support to looked-after children.

Before joining the DPhil programme, she completed her undergraduate degree in Finance at Financial University in Moscow and then gained a MSc in Psychology of Education from the University of Bristol.

Victoria’s current research focuses on educational issues of care-experienced children and teaching mathematics to students of low achievement and motivation.

Supervisors

Karen Skilling and Gabriel Stylianides

Louise was born and raised in Glasgow and moved to Oxford to pursue a DPhil in Education.

Louise’s research interests are education policy, particularly higher education policy, as well as qualitative research into the experiences of students in higher education and reducing inequalities in access to higher education. Louise is also interested in educational capabilities, educational purpose, aspirations and philosophical debates about knowledge construction and co-construction. Louise has a First Class BA (Joint Honours) in Social Policy and Education from the University of Strathclyde, and two Masters degrees with Distinction also from the University of Strathclyde in Applied Educational and Social Research and Social Policy (Research Methods). Louise also participated in the University of Oxford’s UNIQ+ Graduate Access Programme in the summer of 2022, where she worked at the Department of Sociology with Melinda Mills, Bo Zhao and Evelina Akimova on research into the impact of socio-economic status on inequalities in access to veterinary care in Scotland. Louise’s DPhil thesis is interested in evaluating Lorella Terzi’s educational capabilities framework through the lens of contemporary higher education in order to gain an understanding of what graduate capabilities are identified by students and stakeholders as being necessary for enabling graduates to successfully thrive and adapt in a post-pandemic society.

 

Supervisors

Alis Oancea and Kelsey Inouye

Motema studied Neuroscience as an undergraduate at Dartmouth College in the USA and it is one of its courses, found interest in Education.

Motema then worked for various non-profit organisations in Lesotho and South Africa focusing on helping high school students from low SES backgrounds access opportunities to study in HE. In her Masters’ project Motema analysed Lesotho’s 2009 Curriculum and Assessment Policy. This analysis’ findings brought Motema to her current research interests which include gendered STEM education and decolonisation of education policies and curricula in Lesotho. For her DPhil project, Motema is interested in finding out the lived experiences of female Science teachers in Lesotho Secondary Schools especially focusing on the major changes in the Secondary school education system in Lesotho that have happened in the past five years as unique meeting points.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Judith Hillier

Danielle is a DPhil student researching how Black-British doctoral students navigate the spaces of the elite, providing a new theoretical framework to understand their agency better.

Her main interests are in Human Flourishing, Cultural Geography, Psychology, and Justice, and her work aims to inform and reform educational frameworks and practices.

Following Danielle’s BSc in Psychology and MRes in Research Methods in Psychology, she founded a social enterprise that merges psychological and academic strategies to guide undergraduate and master’s students study practices. In addition to this, Danielle provided pedagogical and behavioural support across SEN college, secondary and primary schools.

Some of Danielle’s notable work includes her research introducing a new University-wide EDI strategy at her former Higher Education institution, presenting insights and way-forwards on youth homelessness to HRH Prince Williams, and providing discipleship to next-gen leaders.

Dan is a part-time DPhil Education student whose research focuses on investigating reasons why individuals choose to study and then teach physics as a subject discipline and how these relate to issues of equity and power. He previously worked as a secondary school physics teacher in the West Midlands of England for around 15 years before taking up his current post as Associate Professor of Physics Education at the University of Birmingham where he works in widening participation in physics and teacher education.

Publications
  • Cottle, D 2022, ‘Harnessing the potential of recently retired physics teachers to mentor new physics teachers’, Physics Education, vol. 57, no. 1, 015020. https://doi.org/10.1088/1361-6552/ac3931
  • Cottle, D 2021, ‘Improving students’ mathematical skills in secondary science: ideas from mathematics pedagogy’, School Science Review, vol. 102, no. 381, pp. 61-64. <https://www.ase.org.uk/resources/school-science-review/issue-381/improving-students-mathematical-skills-in-secondary>
  • Cottle, D 2021, ‘The effects of Covid-19 on student transition from school to university in STEM subjects’, New Directions in the Teaching of Physical Sciences, vol. 16, no. 1, 3847, pp. 1-4. https://doi.org/10.29311/ndtps.v0i14.3847 
  • Cottle, D & Marshall, R 2016, ‘Exploring electrical resistance: a novel kinesthetic model helps to resolve some misconceptions’, Physics Education, vol. 51, no. 5. https://doi.org/10.1088/0031-9120/51/5/054004 

Chris is a third-year part time DPhil student. He is an experienced Director of Children’s Services working in London. He is interested in path dependence and whether it is a helpful concept to understand how children’s services work.

Yaoyao is a DPhil student in Education at Oxford.

Her research interest lies in Aptitude-Instruction-Interaction (ATI) in second language acquisition (SLA).

Yaoyao’s research investigates the mediating effects of individual differences in learners’ domain-general perceptual-cognitive abilities in instructed foreign language pronunciation acquisition in adulthood. She aims to further explore how aptitude hinders instructional effectiveness and help all students make the most of instruction regardless of aptitude profiles.

Yaoyao started her BA in the Japanese Language and Literature at Sun Yat-Sen University (中山大学) in China. She then moved to the University of Queensland to finish her BA with double majors in Japanese and Translation. After her BA, she worked as an English teacher in China for three years. Prior to her DPhil studies at Oxford, Yaoyao completed her Master’s degree in TESOL at Institute of Education, University College London. Her Master’s dissertation was supervised by Dr Kazuya Saito.

Pat is the Deputy Chief Executive of a large College Group.

A qualified accountant, she is accountable to the Corporation Board for the Group’s Estate, sustainability and for maintaining the Group’s outstanding financial health grade. Her specialisms include Leadership and Management, Identification and Application of Funding Streams as well as leading the Group in new acquisitions, ventures and developments. Pat is using her vast experience of public sector finances to explore the intersection of accounting, leadership and purpose.

Supervisors

James Robson and Ariel Lindorff

Alice received her Master’s in Child Study and Education from the Institute of Child Study at the University of Toronto. She has taught preschool through higher education as a teacher and principal in public and private schools in North America and Europe. Deeply committed to enhancing education, she believes in learning that connects students and teachers to the natural world and to their communities. She is actively involved in community organisations that promote intercultural, interracial, and interfaith understanding and allyship.

Supervisors

Steve Puttick

Victoria is an educational researcher and practitioner, specialising in educational support and methodology of teaching mathematics to low-achieving students. For over 9 years she has been working at Big Change Educational Centre (Moscow) which provides support to looked-after children.

Before joining the DPhil programme, she completed her undergraduate degree in Finance at Financial University in Moscow and then gained a MSc in Psychology of Education from the University of Bristol.

Victoria’s current research focuses on educational issues of care-experienced children and teaching mathematics to students of low achievement and motivation.

Supervisors

Karen Skilling and Gabriel Stylianides

Louise was born and raised in Glasgow and moved to Oxford to pursue a DPhil in Education.

Louise’s research interests are education policy, particularly higher education policy, as well as qualitative research into the experiences of students in higher education and reducing inequalities in access to higher education. Louise is also interested in educational capabilities, educational purpose, aspirations and philosophical debates about knowledge construction and co-construction. Louise has a First Class BA (Joint Honours) in Social Policy and Education from the University of Strathclyde, and two Masters degrees with Distinction also from the University of Strathclyde in Applied Educational and Social Research and Social Policy (Research Methods). Louise also participated in the University of Oxford’s UNIQ+ Graduate Access Programme in the summer of 2022, where she worked at the Department of Sociology with Melinda Mills, Bo Zhao and Evelina Akimova on research into the impact of socio-economic status on inequalities in access to veterinary care in Scotland. Louise’s DPhil thesis is interested in evaluating Lorella Terzi’s educational capabilities framework through the lens of contemporary higher education in order to gain an understanding of what graduate capabilities are identified by students and stakeholders as being necessary for enabling graduates to successfully thrive and adapt in a post-pandemic society.

 

Supervisors

Alis Oancea and Kelsey Inouye

Motema studied Neuroscience as an undergraduate at Dartmouth College in the USA and it is one of its courses, found interest in Education.

Motema then worked for various non-profit organisations in Lesotho and South Africa focusing on helping high school students from low SES backgrounds access opportunities to study in HE. In her Masters’ project Motema analysed Lesotho’s 2009 Curriculum and Assessment Policy. This analysis’ findings brought Motema to her current research interests which include gendered STEM education and decolonisation of education policies and curricula in Lesotho. For her DPhil project, Motema is interested in finding out the lived experiences of female Science teachers in Lesotho Secondary Schools especially focusing on the major changes in the Secondary school education system in Lesotho that have happened in the past five years as unique meeting points.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Judith Hillier

Danielle is a DPhil student researching how Black-British doctoral students navigate the spaces of the elite, providing a new theoretical framework to understand their agency better.

Her main interests are in Human Flourishing, Cultural Geography, Psychology, and Justice, and her work aims to inform and reform educational frameworks and practices.

Following Danielle’s BSc in Psychology and MRes in Research Methods in Psychology, she founded a social enterprise that merges psychological and academic strategies to guide undergraduate and master’s students study practices. In addition to this, Danielle provided pedagogical and behavioural support across SEN college, secondary and primary schools.

Some of Danielle’s notable work includes her research introducing a new University-wide EDI strategy at her former Higher Education institution, presenting insights and way-forwards on youth homelessness to HRH Prince Williams, and providing discipleship to next-gen leaders.

Dan is a part-time DPhil Education student whose research focuses on investigating reasons why individuals choose to study and then teach physics as a subject discipline and how these relate to issues of equity and power. He previously worked as a secondary school physics teacher in the West Midlands of England for around 15 years before taking up his current post as Associate Professor of Physics Education at the University of Birmingham where he works in widening participation in physics and teacher education.

Publications
  • Cottle, D 2022, ‘Harnessing the potential of recently retired physics teachers to mentor new physics teachers’, Physics Education, vol. 57, no. 1, 015020. https://doi.org/10.1088/1361-6552/ac3931
  • Cottle, D 2021, ‘Improving students’ mathematical skills in secondary science: ideas from mathematics pedagogy’, School Science Review, vol. 102, no. 381, pp. 61-64. <https://www.ase.org.uk/resources/school-science-review/issue-381/improving-students-mathematical-skills-in-secondary>
  • Cottle, D 2021, ‘The effects of Covid-19 on student transition from school to university in STEM subjects’, New Directions in the Teaching of Physical Sciences, vol. 16, no. 1, 3847, pp. 1-4. https://doi.org/10.29311/ndtps.v0i14.3847 
  • Cottle, D & Marshall, R 2016, ‘Exploring electrical resistance: a novel kinesthetic model helps to resolve some misconceptions’, Physics Education, vol. 51, no. 5. https://doi.org/10.1088/0031-9120/51/5/054004 

Chris is a third-year part time DPhil student. He is an experienced Director of Children’s Services working in London. He is interested in path dependence and whether it is a helpful concept to understand how children’s services work.

Yaoyao is a DPhil student in Education at Oxford.

Her research interest lies in Aptitude-Instruction-Interaction (ATI) in second language acquisition (SLA).

Yaoyao’s research investigates the mediating effects of individual differences in learners’ domain-general perceptual-cognitive abilities in instructed foreign language pronunciation acquisition in adulthood. She aims to further explore how aptitude hinders instructional effectiveness and help all students make the most of instruction regardless of aptitude profiles.

Yaoyao started her BA in the Japanese Language and Literature at Sun Yat-Sen University (中山大学) in China. She then moved to the University of Queensland to finish her BA with double majors in Japanese and Translation. After her BA, she worked as an English teacher in China for three years. Prior to her DPhil studies at Oxford, Yaoyao completed her Master’s degree in TESOL at Institute of Education, University College London. Her Master’s dissertation was supervised by Dr Kazuya Saito.

Pat is the Deputy Chief Executive of a large College Group.

A qualified accountant, she is accountable to the Corporation Board for the Group’s Estate, sustainability and for maintaining the Group’s outstanding financial health grade. Her specialisms include Leadership and Management, Identification and Application of Funding Streams as well as leading the Group in new acquisitions, ventures and developments. Pat is using her vast experience of public sector finances to explore the intersection of accounting, leadership and purpose.

Supervisors

James Robson and Ariel Lindorff

Alice received her Master’s in Child Study and Education from the Institute of Child Study at the University of Toronto. She has taught preschool through higher education as a teacher and principal in public and private schools in North America and Europe. Deeply committed to enhancing education, she believes in learning that connects students and teachers to the natural world and to their communities. She is actively involved in community organisations that promote intercultural, interracial, and interfaith understanding and allyship.

Supervisors

Steve Puttick

Victoria is an educational researcher and practitioner, specialising in educational support and methodology of teaching mathematics to low-achieving students. For over 9 years she has been working at Big Change Educational Centre (Moscow) which provides support to looked-after children.

Before joining the DPhil programme, she completed her undergraduate degree in Finance at Financial University in Moscow and then gained a MSc in Psychology of Education from the University of Bristol.

Victoria’s current research focuses on educational issues of care-experienced children and teaching mathematics to students of low achievement and motivation.

Supervisors

Karen Skilling and Gabriel Stylianides

Louise was born and raised in Glasgow and moved to Oxford to pursue a DPhil in Education.

Louise’s research interests are education policy, particularly higher education policy, as well as qualitative research into the experiences of students in higher education and reducing inequalities in access to higher education. Louise is also interested in educational capabilities, educational purpose, aspirations and philosophical debates about knowledge construction and co-construction. Louise has a First Class BA (Joint Honours) in Social Policy and Education from the University of Strathclyde, and two Masters degrees with Distinction also from the University of Strathclyde in Applied Educational and Social Research and Social Policy (Research Methods). Louise also participated in the University of Oxford’s UNIQ+ Graduate Access Programme in the summer of 2022, where she worked at the Department of Sociology with Melinda Mills, Bo Zhao and Evelina Akimova on research into the impact of socio-economic status on inequalities in access to veterinary care in Scotland. Louise’s DPhil thesis is interested in evaluating Lorella Terzi’s educational capabilities framework through the lens of contemporary higher education in order to gain an understanding of what graduate capabilities are identified by students and stakeholders as being necessary for enabling graduates to successfully thrive and adapt in a post-pandemic society.

 

Supervisors

Alis Oancea and Kelsey Inouye

Motema studied Neuroscience as an undergraduate at Dartmouth College in the USA and it is one of its courses, found interest in Education.

Motema then worked for various non-profit organisations in Lesotho and South Africa focusing on helping high school students from low SES backgrounds access opportunities to study in HE. In her Masters’ project Motema analysed Lesotho’s 2009 Curriculum and Assessment Policy. This analysis’ findings brought Motema to her current research interests which include gendered STEM education and decolonisation of education policies and curricula in Lesotho. For her DPhil project, Motema is interested in finding out the lived experiences of female Science teachers in Lesotho Secondary Schools especially focusing on the major changes in the Secondary school education system in Lesotho that have happened in the past five years as unique meeting points.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Judith Hillier

Danielle is a DPhil student researching how Black-British doctoral students navigate the spaces of the elite, providing a new theoretical framework to understand their agency better.

Her main interests are in Human Flourishing, Cultural Geography, Psychology, and Justice, and her work aims to inform and reform educational frameworks and practices.

Following Danielle’s BSc in Psychology and MRes in Research Methods in Psychology, she founded a social enterprise that merges psychological and academic strategies to guide undergraduate and master’s students study practices. In addition to this, Danielle provided pedagogical and behavioural support across SEN college, secondary and primary schools.

Some of Danielle’s notable work includes her research introducing a new University-wide EDI strategy at her former Higher Education institution, presenting insights and way-forwards on youth homelessness to HRH Prince Williams, and providing discipleship to next-gen leaders.

Dan is a part-time DPhil Education student whose research focuses on investigating reasons why individuals choose to study and then teach physics as a subject discipline and how these relate to issues of equity and power. He previously worked as a secondary school physics teacher in the West Midlands of England for around 15 years before taking up his current post as Associate Professor of Physics Education at the University of Birmingham where he works in widening participation in physics and teacher education.

Publications
  • Cottle, D 2022, ‘Harnessing the potential of recently retired physics teachers to mentor new physics teachers’, Physics Education, vol. 57, no. 1, 015020. https://doi.org/10.1088/1361-6552/ac3931
  • Cottle, D 2021, ‘Improving students’ mathematical skills in secondary science: ideas from mathematics pedagogy’, School Science Review, vol. 102, no. 381, pp. 61-64. <https://www.ase.org.uk/resources/school-science-review/issue-381/improving-students-mathematical-skills-in-secondary>
  • Cottle, D 2021, ‘The effects of Covid-19 on student transition from school to university in STEM subjects’, New Directions in the Teaching of Physical Sciences, vol. 16, no. 1, 3847, pp. 1-4. https://doi.org/10.29311/ndtps.v0i14.3847 
  • Cottle, D & Marshall, R 2016, ‘Exploring electrical resistance: a novel kinesthetic model helps to resolve some misconceptions’, Physics Education, vol. 51, no. 5. https://doi.org/10.1088/0031-9120/51/5/054004 

Chris is a third-year part time DPhil student. He is an experienced Director of Children’s Services working in London. He is interested in path dependence and whether it is a helpful concept to understand how children’s services work.

Yaoyao is a DPhil student in Education at Oxford.

Her research interest lies in Aptitude-Instruction-Interaction (ATI) in second language acquisition (SLA).

Yaoyao’s research investigates the mediating effects of individual differences in learners’ domain-general perceptual-cognitive abilities in instructed foreign language pronunciation acquisition in adulthood. She aims to further explore how aptitude hinders instructional effectiveness and help all students make the most of instruction regardless of aptitude profiles.

Yaoyao started her BA in the Japanese Language and Literature at Sun Yat-Sen University (中山大学) in China. She then moved to the University of Queensland to finish her BA with double majors in Japanese and Translation. After her BA, she worked as an English teacher in China for three years. Prior to her DPhil studies at Oxford, Yaoyao completed her Master’s degree in TESOL at Institute of Education, University College London. Her Master’s dissertation was supervised by Dr Kazuya Saito.

Pat is the Deputy Chief Executive of a large College Group.

A qualified accountant, she is accountable to the Corporation Board for the Group’s Estate, sustainability and for maintaining the Group’s outstanding financial health grade. Her specialisms include Leadership and Management, Identification and Application of Funding Streams as well as leading the Group in new acquisitions, ventures and developments. Pat is using her vast experience of public sector finances to explore the intersection of accounting, leadership and purpose.

Supervisors

James Robson and Ariel Lindorff

Alice received her Master’s in Child Study and Education from the Institute of Child Study at the University of Toronto. She has taught preschool through higher education as a teacher and principal in public and private schools in North America and Europe. Deeply committed to enhancing education, she believes in learning that connects students and teachers to the natural world and to their communities. She is actively involved in community organisations that promote intercultural, interracial, and interfaith understanding and allyship.

Supervisors

Steve Puttick

Victoria is an educational researcher and practitioner, specialising in educational support and methodology of teaching mathematics to low-achieving students. For over 9 years she has been working at Big Change Educational Centre (Moscow) which provides support to looked-after children.

Before joining the DPhil programme, she completed her undergraduate degree in Finance at Financial University in Moscow and then gained a MSc in Psychology of Education from the University of Bristol.

Victoria’s current research focuses on educational issues of care-experienced children and teaching mathematics to students of low achievement and motivation.

Supervisors

Karen Skilling and Gabriel Stylianides

Louise was born and raised in Glasgow and moved to Oxford to pursue a DPhil in Education.

Louise’s research interests are education policy, particularly higher education policy, as well as qualitative research into the experiences of students in higher education and reducing inequalities in access to higher education. Louise is also interested in educational capabilities, educational purpose, aspirations and philosophical debates about knowledge construction and co-construction. Louise has a First Class BA (Joint Honours) in Social Policy and Education from the University of Strathclyde, and two Masters degrees with Distinction also from the University of Strathclyde in Applied Educational and Social Research and Social Policy (Research Methods). Louise also participated in the University of Oxford’s UNIQ+ Graduate Access Programme in the summer of 2022, where she worked at the Department of Sociology with Melinda Mills, Bo Zhao and Evelina Akimova on research into the impact of socio-economic status on inequalities in access to veterinary care in Scotland. Louise’s DPhil thesis is interested in evaluating Lorella Terzi’s educational capabilities framework through the lens of contemporary higher education in order to gain an understanding of what graduate capabilities are identified by students and stakeholders as being necessary for enabling graduates to successfully thrive and adapt in a post-pandemic society.

 

Supervisors

Alis Oancea and Kelsey Inouye

Motema studied Neuroscience as an undergraduate at Dartmouth College in the USA and it is one of its courses, found interest in Education.

Motema then worked for various non-profit organisations in Lesotho and South Africa focusing on helping high school students from low SES backgrounds access opportunities to study in HE. In her Masters’ project Motema analysed Lesotho’s 2009 Curriculum and Assessment Policy. This analysis’ findings brought Motema to her current research interests which include gendered STEM education and decolonisation of education policies and curricula in Lesotho. For her DPhil project, Motema is interested in finding out the lived experiences of female Science teachers in Lesotho Secondary Schools especially focusing on the major changes in the Secondary school education system in Lesotho that have happened in the past five years as unique meeting points.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Judith Hillier

Danielle is a DPhil student researching how Black-British doctoral students navigate the spaces of the elite, providing a new theoretical framework to understand their agency better.

Her main interests are in Human Flourishing, Cultural Geography, Psychology, and Justice, and her work aims to inform and reform educational frameworks and practices.

Following Danielle’s BSc in Psychology and MRes in Research Methods in Psychology, she founded a social enterprise that merges psychological and academic strategies to guide undergraduate and master’s students study practices. In addition to this, Danielle provided pedagogical and behavioural support across SEN college, secondary and primary schools.

Some of Danielle’s notable work includes her research introducing a new University-wide EDI strategy at her former Higher Education institution, presenting insights and way-forwards on youth homelessness to HRH Prince Williams, and providing discipleship to next-gen leaders.

Dan is a part-time DPhil Education student whose research focuses on investigating reasons why individuals choose to study and then teach physics as a subject discipline and how these relate to issues of equity and power. He previously worked as a secondary school physics teacher in the West Midlands of England for around 15 years before taking up his current post as Associate Professor of Physics Education at the University of Birmingham where he works in widening participation in physics and teacher education.

Publications
  • Cottle, D 2022, ‘Harnessing the potential of recently retired physics teachers to mentor new physics teachers’, Physics Education, vol. 57, no. 1, 015020. https://doi.org/10.1088/1361-6552/ac3931
  • Cottle, D 2021, ‘Improving students’ mathematical skills in secondary science: ideas from mathematics pedagogy’, School Science Review, vol. 102, no. 381, pp. 61-64. <https://www.ase.org.uk/resources/school-science-review/issue-381/improving-students-mathematical-skills-in-secondary>
  • Cottle, D 2021, ‘The effects of Covid-19 on student transition from school to university in STEM subjects’, New Directions in the Teaching of Physical Sciences, vol. 16, no. 1, 3847, pp. 1-4. https://doi.org/10.29311/ndtps.v0i14.3847 
  • Cottle, D & Marshall, R 2016, ‘Exploring electrical resistance: a novel kinesthetic model helps to resolve some misconceptions’, Physics Education, vol. 51, no. 5. https://doi.org/10.1088/0031-9120/51/5/054004 

Chris is a third-year part time DPhil student. He is an experienced Director of Children’s Services working in London. He is interested in path dependence and whether it is a helpful concept to understand how children’s services work.

Yaoyao is a DPhil student in Education at Oxford.

Her research interest lies in Aptitude-Instruction-Interaction (ATI) in second language acquisition (SLA).

Yaoyao’s research investigates the mediating effects of individual differences in learners’ domain-general perceptual-cognitive abilities in instructed foreign language pronunciation acquisition in adulthood. She aims to further explore how aptitude hinders instructional effectiveness and help all students make the most of instruction regardless of aptitude profiles.

Yaoyao started her BA in the Japanese Language and Literature at Sun Yat-Sen University (中山大学) in China. She then moved to the University of Queensland to finish her BA with double majors in Japanese and Translation. After her BA, she worked as an English teacher in China for three years. Prior to her DPhil studies at Oxford, Yaoyao completed her Master’s degree in TESOL at Institute of Education, University College London. Her Master’s dissertation was supervised by Dr Kazuya Saito.

Pat is the Deputy Chief Executive of a large College Group.

A qualified accountant, she is accountable to the Corporation Board for the Group’s Estate, sustainability and for maintaining the Group’s outstanding financial health grade. Her specialisms include Leadership and Management, Identification and Application of Funding Streams as well as leading the Group in new acquisitions, ventures and developments. Pat is using her vast experience of public sector finances to explore the intersection of accounting, leadership and purpose.

Supervisors

James Robson and Ariel Lindorff

Alice received her Master’s in Child Study and Education from the Institute of Child Study at the University of Toronto. She has taught preschool through higher education as a teacher and principal in public and private schools in North America and Europe. Deeply committed to enhancing education, she believes in learning that connects students and teachers to the natural world and to their communities. She is actively involved in community organisations that promote intercultural, interracial, and interfaith understanding and allyship.

Supervisors

Steve Puttick

Victoria is an educational researcher and practitioner, specialising in educational support and methodology of teaching mathematics to low-achieving students. For over 9 years she has been working at Big Change Educational Centre (Moscow) which provides support to looked-after children.

Before joining the DPhil programme, she completed her undergraduate degree in Finance at Financial University in Moscow and then gained a MSc in Psychology of Education from the University of Bristol.

Victoria’s current research focuses on educational issues of care-experienced children and teaching mathematics to students of low achievement and motivation.

Supervisors

Karen Skilling and Gabriel Stylianides

Louise was born and raised in Glasgow and moved to Oxford to pursue a DPhil in Education.

Louise’s research interests are education policy, particularly higher education policy, as well as qualitative research into the experiences of students in higher education and reducing inequalities in access to higher education. Louise is also interested in educational capabilities, educational purpose, aspirations and philosophical debates about knowledge construction and co-construction. Louise has a First Class BA (Joint Honours) in Social Policy and Education from the University of Strathclyde, and two Masters degrees with Distinction also from the University of Strathclyde in Applied Educational and Social Research and Social Policy (Research Methods). Louise also participated in the University of Oxford’s UNIQ+ Graduate Access Programme in the summer of 2022, where she worked at the Department of Sociology with Melinda Mills, Bo Zhao and Evelina Akimova on research into the impact of socio-economic status on inequalities in access to veterinary care in Scotland. Louise’s DPhil thesis is interested in evaluating Lorella Terzi’s educational capabilities framework through the lens of contemporary higher education in order to gain an understanding of what graduate capabilities are identified by students and stakeholders as being necessary for enabling graduates to successfully thrive and adapt in a post-pandemic society.

 

Supervisors

Alis Oancea and Kelsey Inouye

Motema studied Neuroscience as an undergraduate at Dartmouth College in the USA and it is one of its courses, found interest in Education.

Motema then worked for various non-profit organisations in Lesotho and South Africa focusing on helping high school students from low SES backgrounds access opportunities to study in HE. In her Masters’ project Motema analysed Lesotho’s 2009 Curriculum and Assessment Policy. This analysis’ findings brought Motema to her current research interests which include gendered STEM education and decolonisation of education policies and curricula in Lesotho. For her DPhil project, Motema is interested in finding out the lived experiences of female Science teachers in Lesotho Secondary Schools especially focusing on the major changes in the Secondary school education system in Lesotho that have happened in the past five years as unique meeting points.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Judith Hillier

Danielle is a DPhil student researching how Black-British doctoral students navigate the spaces of the elite, providing a new theoretical framework to understand their agency better.

Her main interests are in Human Flourishing, Cultural Geography, Psychology, and Justice, and her work aims to inform and reform educational frameworks and practices.

Following Danielle’s BSc in Psychology and MRes in Research Methods in Psychology, she founded a social enterprise that merges psychological and academic strategies to guide undergraduate and master’s students study practices. In addition to this, Danielle provided pedagogical and behavioural support across SEN college, secondary and primary schools.

Some of Danielle’s notable work includes her research introducing a new University-wide EDI strategy at her former Higher Education institution, presenting insights and way-forwards on youth homelessness to HRH Prince Williams, and providing discipleship to next-gen leaders.

Dan is a part-time DPhil Education student whose research focuses on investigating reasons why individuals choose to study and then teach physics as a subject discipline and how these relate to issues of equity and power. He previously worked as a secondary school physics teacher in the West Midlands of England for around 15 years before taking up his current post as Associate Professor of Physics Education at the University of Birmingham where he works in widening participation in physics and teacher education.

Publications
  • Cottle, D 2022, ‘Harnessing the potential of recently retired physics teachers to mentor new physics teachers’, Physics Education, vol. 57, no. 1, 015020. https://doi.org/10.1088/1361-6552/ac3931
  • Cottle, D 2021, ‘Improving students’ mathematical skills in secondary science: ideas from mathematics pedagogy’, School Science Review, vol. 102, no. 381, pp. 61-64. <https://www.ase.org.uk/resources/school-science-review/issue-381/improving-students-mathematical-skills-in-secondary>
  • Cottle, D 2021, ‘The effects of Covid-19 on student transition from school to university in STEM subjects’, New Directions in the Teaching of Physical Sciences, vol. 16, no. 1, 3847, pp. 1-4. https://doi.org/10.29311/ndtps.v0i14.3847 
  • Cottle, D & Marshall, R 2016, ‘Exploring electrical resistance: a novel kinesthetic model helps to resolve some misconceptions’, Physics Education, vol. 51, no. 5. https://doi.org/10.1088/0031-9120/51/5/054004 

Chris is a third-year part time DPhil student. He is an experienced Director of Children’s Services working in London. He is interested in path dependence and whether it is a helpful concept to understand how children’s services work.

Yaoyao is a DPhil student in Education at Oxford.

Her research interest lies in Aptitude-Instruction-Interaction (ATI) in second language acquisition (SLA).

Yaoyao’s research investigates the mediating effects of individual differences in learners’ domain-general perceptual-cognitive abilities in instructed foreign language pronunciation acquisition in adulthood. She aims to further explore how aptitude hinders instructional effectiveness and help all students make the most of instruction regardless of aptitude profiles.

Yaoyao started her BA in the Japanese Language and Literature at Sun Yat-Sen University (中山大学) in China. She then moved to the University of Queensland to finish her BA with double majors in Japanese and Translation. After her BA, she worked as an English teacher in China for three years. Prior to her DPhil studies at Oxford, Yaoyao completed her Master’s degree in TESOL at Institute of Education, University College London. Her Master’s dissertation was supervised by Dr Kazuya Saito.

Pat is the Deputy Chief Executive of a large College Group.

A qualified accountant, she is accountable to the Corporation Board for the Group’s Estate, sustainability and for maintaining the Group’s outstanding financial health grade. Her specialisms include Leadership and Management, Identification and Application of Funding Streams as well as leading the Group in new acquisitions, ventures and developments. Pat is using her vast experience of public sector finances to explore the intersection of accounting, leadership and purpose.

Supervisors

James Robson and Ariel Lindorff

Alice received her Master’s in Child Study and Education from the Institute of Child Study at the University of Toronto. She has taught preschool through higher education as a teacher and principal in public and private schools in North America and Europe. Deeply committed to enhancing education, she believes in learning that connects students and teachers to the natural world and to their communities. She is actively involved in community organisations that promote intercultural, interracial, and interfaith understanding and allyship.

Supervisors

Steve Puttick

Victoria is an educational researcher and practitioner, specialising in educational support and methodology of teaching mathematics to low-achieving students. For over 9 years she has been working at Big Change Educational Centre (Moscow) which provides support to looked-after children.

Before joining the DPhil programme, she completed her undergraduate degree in Finance at Financial University in Moscow and then gained a MSc in Psychology of Education from the University of Bristol.

Victoria’s current research focuses on educational issues of care-experienced children and teaching mathematics to students of low achievement and motivation.

Supervisors

Karen Skilling and Gabriel Stylianides

Louise was born and raised in Glasgow and moved to Oxford to pursue a DPhil in Education.

Louise’s research interests are education policy, particularly higher education policy, as well as qualitative research into the experiences of students in higher education and reducing inequalities in access to higher education. Louise is also interested in educational capabilities, educational purpose, aspirations and philosophical debates about knowledge construction and co-construction. Louise has a First Class BA (Joint Honours) in Social Policy and Education from the University of Strathclyde, and two Masters degrees with Distinction also from the University of Strathclyde in Applied Educational and Social Research and Social Policy (Research Methods). Louise also participated in the University of Oxford’s UNIQ+ Graduate Access Programme in the summer of 2022, where she worked at the Department of Sociology with Melinda Mills, Bo Zhao and Evelina Akimova on research into the impact of socio-economic status on inequalities in access to veterinary care in Scotland. Louise’s DPhil thesis is interested in evaluating Lorella Terzi’s educational capabilities framework through the lens of contemporary higher education in order to gain an understanding of what graduate capabilities are identified by students and stakeholders as being necessary for enabling graduates to successfully thrive and adapt in a post-pandemic society.

 

Supervisors

Alis Oancea and Kelsey Inouye

Motema studied Neuroscience as an undergraduate at Dartmouth College in the USA and it is one of its courses, found interest in Education.

Motema then worked for various non-profit organisations in Lesotho and South Africa focusing on helping high school students from low SES backgrounds access opportunities to study in HE. In her Masters’ project Motema analysed Lesotho’s 2009 Curriculum and Assessment Policy. This analysis’ findings brought Motema to her current research interests which include gendered STEM education and decolonisation of education policies and curricula in Lesotho. For her DPhil project, Motema is interested in finding out the lived experiences of female Science teachers in Lesotho Secondary Schools especially focusing on the major changes in the Secondary school education system in Lesotho that have happened in the past five years as unique meeting points.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Judith Hillier

Danielle is a DPhil student researching how Black-British doctoral students navigate the spaces of the elite, providing a new theoretical framework to understand their agency better.

Her main interests are in Human Flourishing, Cultural Geography, Psychology, and Justice, and her work aims to inform and reform educational frameworks and practices.

Following Danielle’s BSc in Psychology and MRes in Research Methods in Psychology, she founded a social enterprise that merges psychological and academic strategies to guide undergraduate and master’s students study practices. In addition to this, Danielle provided pedagogical and behavioural support across SEN college, secondary and primary schools.

Some of Danielle’s notable work includes her research introducing a new University-wide EDI strategy at her former Higher Education institution, presenting insights and way-forwards on youth homelessness to HRH Prince Williams, and providing discipleship to next-gen leaders.

Dan is a part-time DPhil Education student whose research focuses on investigating reasons why individuals choose to study and then teach physics as a subject discipline and how these relate to issues of equity and power. He previously worked as a secondary school physics teacher in the West Midlands of England for around 15 years before taking up his current post as Associate Professor of Physics Education at the University of Birmingham where he works in widening participation in physics and teacher education.

Publications
  • Cottle, D 2022, ‘Harnessing the potential of recently retired physics teachers to mentor new physics teachers’, Physics Education, vol. 57, no. 1, 015020. https://doi.org/10.1088/1361-6552/ac3931
  • Cottle, D 2021, ‘Improving students’ mathematical skills in secondary science: ideas from mathematics pedagogy’, School Science Review, vol. 102, no. 381, pp. 61-64. <https://www.ase.org.uk/resources/school-science-review/issue-381/improving-students-mathematical-skills-in-secondary>
  • Cottle, D 2021, ‘The effects of Covid-19 on student transition from school to university in STEM subjects’, New Directions in the Teaching of Physical Sciences, vol. 16, no. 1, 3847, pp. 1-4. https://doi.org/10.29311/ndtps.v0i14.3847 
  • Cottle, D & Marshall, R 2016, ‘Exploring electrical resistance: a novel kinesthetic model helps to resolve some misconceptions’, Physics Education, vol. 51, no. 5. https://doi.org/10.1088/0031-9120/51/5/054004 

Chris is a third-year part time DPhil student. He is an experienced Director of Children’s Services working in London. He is interested in path dependence and whether it is a helpful concept to understand how children’s services work.

Yaoyao is a DPhil student in Education at Oxford.

Her research interest lies in Aptitude-Instruction-Interaction (ATI) in second language acquisition (SLA).

Yaoyao’s research investigates the mediating effects of individual differences in learners’ domain-general perceptual-cognitive abilities in instructed foreign language pronunciation acquisition in adulthood. She aims to further explore how aptitude hinders instructional effectiveness and help all students make the most of instruction regardless of aptitude profiles.

Yaoyao started her BA in the Japanese Language and Literature at Sun Yat-Sen University (中山大学) in China. She then moved to the University of Queensland to finish her BA with double majors in Japanese and Translation. After her BA, she worked as an English teacher in China for three years. Prior to her DPhil studies at Oxford, Yaoyao completed her Master’s degree in TESOL at Institute of Education, University College London. Her Master’s dissertation was supervised by Dr Kazuya Saito.

Pat is the Deputy Chief Executive of a large College Group.

A qualified accountant, she is accountable to the Corporation Board for the Group’s Estate, sustainability and for maintaining the Group’s outstanding financial health grade. Her specialisms include Leadership and Management, Identification and Application of Funding Streams as well as leading the Group in new acquisitions, ventures and developments. Pat is using her vast experience of public sector finances to explore the intersection of accounting, leadership and purpose.

Supervisors

James Robson and Ariel Lindorff

Alice received her Master’s in Child Study and Education from the Institute of Child Study at the University of Toronto. She has taught preschool through higher education as a teacher and principal in public and private schools in North America and Europe. Deeply committed to enhancing education, she believes in learning that connects students and teachers to the natural world and to their communities. She is actively involved in community organisations that promote intercultural, interracial, and interfaith understanding and allyship.

Supervisors

Steve Puttick

Victoria is an educational researcher and practitioner, specialising in educational support and methodology of teaching mathematics to low-achieving students. For over 9 years she has been working at Big Change Educational Centre (Moscow) which provides support to looked-after children.

Before joining the DPhil programme, she completed her undergraduate degree in Finance at Financial University in Moscow and then gained a MSc in Psychology of Education from the University of Bristol.

Victoria’s current research focuses on educational issues of care-experienced children and teaching mathematics to students of low achievement and motivation.

Supervisors

Karen Skilling and Gabriel Stylianides

Louise was born and raised in Glasgow and moved to Oxford to pursue a DPhil in Education.

Louise’s research interests are education policy, particularly higher education policy, as well as qualitative research into the experiences of students in higher education and reducing inequalities in access to higher education. Louise is also interested in educational capabilities, educational purpose, aspirations and philosophical debates about knowledge construction and co-construction. Louise has a First Class BA (Joint Honours) in Social Policy and Education from the University of Strathclyde, and two Masters degrees with Distinction also from the University of Strathclyde in Applied Educational and Social Research and Social Policy (Research Methods). Louise also participated in the University of Oxford’s UNIQ+ Graduate Access Programme in the summer of 2022, where she worked at the Department of Sociology with Melinda Mills, Bo Zhao and Evelina Akimova on research into the impact of socio-economic status on inequalities in access to veterinary care in Scotland. Louise’s DPhil thesis is interested in evaluating Lorella Terzi’s educational capabilities framework through the lens of contemporary higher education in order to gain an understanding of what graduate capabilities are identified by students and stakeholders as being necessary for enabling graduates to successfully thrive and adapt in a post-pandemic society.

 

Supervisors

Alis Oancea and Kelsey Inouye

Motema studied Neuroscience as an undergraduate at Dartmouth College in the USA and it is one of its courses, found interest in Education.

Motema then worked for various non-profit organisations in Lesotho and South Africa focusing on helping high school students from low SES backgrounds access opportunities to study in HE. In her Masters’ project Motema analysed Lesotho’s 2009 Curriculum and Assessment Policy. This analysis’ findings brought Motema to her current research interests which include gendered STEM education and decolonisation of education policies and curricula in Lesotho. For her DPhil project, Motema is interested in finding out the lived experiences of female Science teachers in Lesotho Secondary Schools especially focusing on the major changes in the Secondary school education system in Lesotho that have happened in the past five years as unique meeting points.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Judith Hillier

Danielle is a DPhil student researching how Black-British doctoral students navigate the spaces of the elite, providing a new theoretical framework to understand their agency better.

Her main interests are in Human Flourishing, Cultural Geography, Psychology, and Justice, and her work aims to inform and reform educational frameworks and practices.

Following Danielle’s BSc in Psychology and MRes in Research Methods in Psychology, she founded a social enterprise that merges psychological and academic strategies to guide undergraduate and master’s students study practices. In addition to this, Danielle provided pedagogical and behavioural support across SEN college, secondary and primary schools.

Some of Danielle’s notable work includes her research introducing a new University-wide EDI strategy at her former Higher Education institution, presenting insights and way-forwards on youth homelessness to HRH Prince Williams, and providing discipleship to next-gen leaders.

Dan is a part-time DPhil Education student whose research focuses on investigating reasons why individuals choose to study and then teach physics as a subject discipline and how these relate to issues of equity and power. He previously worked as a secondary school physics teacher in the West Midlands of England for around 15 years before taking up his current post as Associate Professor of Physics Education at the University of Birmingham where he works in widening participation in physics and teacher education.

Publications
  • Cottle, D 2022, ‘Harnessing the potential of recently retired physics teachers to mentor new physics teachers’, Physics Education, vol. 57, no. 1, 015020. https://doi.org/10.1088/1361-6552/ac3931
  • Cottle, D 2021, ‘Improving students’ mathematical skills in secondary science: ideas from mathematics pedagogy’, School Science Review, vol. 102, no. 381, pp. 61-64. <https://www.ase.org.uk/resources/school-science-review/issue-381/improving-students-mathematical-skills-in-secondary>
  • Cottle, D 2021, ‘The effects of Covid-19 on student transition from school to university in STEM subjects’, New Directions in the Teaching of Physical Sciences, vol. 16, no. 1, 3847, pp. 1-4. https://doi.org/10.29311/ndtps.v0i14.3847 
  • Cottle, D & Marshall, R 2016, ‘Exploring electrical resistance: a novel kinesthetic model helps to resolve some misconceptions’, Physics Education, vol. 51, no. 5. https://doi.org/10.1088/0031-9120/51/5/054004 

Chris is a third-year part time DPhil student. He is an experienced Director of Children’s Services working in London. He is interested in path dependence and whether it is a helpful concept to understand how children’s services work.

Yaoyao is a DPhil student in Education at Oxford.

Her research interest lies in Aptitude-Instruction-Interaction (ATI) in second language acquisition (SLA).

Yaoyao’s research investigates the mediating effects of individual differences in learners’ domain-general perceptual-cognitive abilities in instructed foreign language pronunciation acquisition in adulthood. She aims to further explore how aptitude hinders instructional effectiveness and help all students make the most of instruction regardless of aptitude profiles.

Yaoyao started her BA in the Japanese Language and Literature at Sun Yat-Sen University (中山大学) in China. She then moved to the University of Queensland to finish her BA with double majors in Japanese and Translation. After her BA, she worked as an English teacher in China for three years. Prior to her DPhil studies at Oxford, Yaoyao completed her Master’s degree in TESOL at Institute of Education, University College London. Her Master’s dissertation was supervised by Dr Kazuya Saito.

Pat is the Deputy Chief Executive of a large College Group.

A qualified accountant, she is accountable to the Corporation Board for the Group’s Estate, sustainability and for maintaining the Group’s outstanding financial health grade. Her specialisms include Leadership and Management, Identification and Application of Funding Streams as well as leading the Group in new acquisitions, ventures and developments. Pat is using her vast experience of public sector finances to explore the intersection of accounting, leadership and purpose.

Supervisors

James Robson and Ariel Lindorff

Alice received her Master’s in Child Study and Education from the Institute of Child Study at the University of Toronto. She has taught preschool through higher education as a teacher and principal in public and private schools in North America and Europe. Deeply committed to enhancing education, she believes in learning that connects students and teachers to the natural world and to their communities. She is actively involved in community organisations that promote intercultural, interracial, and interfaith understanding and allyship.

Supervisors

Steve Puttick

Victoria is an educational researcher and practitioner, specialising in educational support and methodology of teaching mathematics to low-achieving students. For over 9 years she has been working at Big Change Educational Centre (Moscow) which provides support to looked-after children.

Before joining the DPhil programme, she completed her undergraduate degree in Finance at Financial University in Moscow and then gained a MSc in Psychology of Education from the University of Bristol.

Victoria’s current research focuses on educational issues of care-experienced children and teaching mathematics to students of low achievement and motivation.

Supervisors

Karen Skilling and Gabriel Stylianides

Louise was born and raised in Glasgow and moved to Oxford to pursue a DPhil in Education.

Louise’s research interests are education policy, particularly higher education policy, as well as qualitative research into the experiences of students in higher education and reducing inequalities in access to higher education. Louise is also interested in educational capabilities, educational purpose, aspirations and philosophical debates about knowledge construction and co-construction. Louise has a First Class BA (Joint Honours) in Social Policy and Education from the University of Strathclyde, and two Masters degrees with Distinction also from the University of Strathclyde in Applied Educational and Social Research and Social Policy (Research Methods). Louise also participated in the University of Oxford’s UNIQ+ Graduate Access Programme in the summer of 2022, where she worked at the Department of Sociology with Melinda Mills, Bo Zhao and Evelina Akimova on research into the impact of socio-economic status on inequalities in access to veterinary care in Scotland. Louise’s DPhil thesis is interested in evaluating Lorella Terzi’s educational capabilities framework through the lens of contemporary higher education in order to gain an understanding of what graduate capabilities are identified by students and stakeholders as being necessary for enabling graduates to successfully thrive and adapt in a post-pandemic society.

 

Supervisors

Alis Oancea and Kelsey Inouye

Motema studied Neuroscience as an undergraduate at Dartmouth College in the USA and it is one of its courses, found interest in Education.

Motema then worked for various non-profit organisations in Lesotho and South Africa focusing on helping high school students from low SES backgrounds access opportunities to study in HE. In her Masters’ project Motema analysed Lesotho’s 2009 Curriculum and Assessment Policy. This analysis’ findings brought Motema to her current research interests which include gendered STEM education and decolonisation of education policies and curricula in Lesotho. For her DPhil project, Motema is interested in finding out the lived experiences of female Science teachers in Lesotho Secondary Schools especially focusing on the major changes in the Secondary school education system in Lesotho that have happened in the past five years as unique meeting points.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Judith Hillier

Danielle is a DPhil student researching how Black-British doctoral students navigate the spaces of the elite, providing a new theoretical framework to understand their agency better.

Her main interests are in Human Flourishing, Cultural Geography, Psychology, and Justice, and her work aims to inform and reform educational frameworks and practices.

Following Danielle’s BSc in Psychology and MRes in Research Methods in Psychology, she founded a social enterprise that merges psychological and academic strategies to guide undergraduate and master’s students study practices. In addition to this, Danielle provided pedagogical and behavioural support across SEN college, secondary and primary schools.

Some of Danielle’s notable work includes her research introducing a new University-wide EDI strategy at her former Higher Education institution, presenting insights and way-forwards on youth homelessness to HRH Prince Williams, and providing discipleship to next-gen leaders.

Dan is a part-time DPhil Education student whose research focuses on investigating reasons why individuals choose to study and then teach physics as a subject discipline and how these relate to issues of equity and power. He previously worked as a secondary school physics teacher in the West Midlands of England for around 15 years before taking up his current post as Associate Professor of Physics Education at the University of Birmingham where he works in widening participation in physics and teacher education.

Publications
  • Cottle, D 2022, ‘Harnessing the potential of recently retired physics teachers to mentor new physics teachers’, Physics Education, vol. 57, no. 1, 015020. https://doi.org/10.1088/1361-6552/ac3931
  • Cottle, D 2021, ‘Improving students’ mathematical skills in secondary science: ideas from mathematics pedagogy’, School Science Review, vol. 102, no. 381, pp. 61-64. <https://www.ase.org.uk/resources/school-science-review/issue-381/improving-students-mathematical-skills-in-secondary>
  • Cottle, D 2021, ‘The effects of Covid-19 on student transition from school to university in STEM subjects’, New Directions in the Teaching of Physical Sciences, vol. 16, no. 1, 3847, pp. 1-4. https://doi.org/10.29311/ndtps.v0i14.3847 
  • Cottle, D & Marshall, R 2016, ‘Exploring electrical resistance: a novel kinesthetic model helps to resolve some misconceptions’, Physics Education, vol. 51, no. 5. https://doi.org/10.1088/0031-9120/51/5/054004 

Chris is a third-year part time DPhil student. He is an experienced Director of Children’s Services working in London. He is interested in path dependence and whether it is a helpful concept to understand how children’s services work.

Yaoyao is a DPhil student in Education at Oxford.

Her research interest lies in Aptitude-Instruction-Interaction (ATI) in second language acquisition (SLA).

Yaoyao’s research investigates the mediating effects of individual differences in learners’ domain-general perceptual-cognitive abilities in instructed foreign language pronunciation acquisition in adulthood. She aims to further explore how aptitude hinders instructional effectiveness and help all students make the most of instruction regardless of aptitude profiles.

Yaoyao started her BA in the Japanese Language and Literature at Sun Yat-Sen University (中山大学) in China. She then moved to the University of Queensland to finish her BA with double majors in Japanese and Translation. After her BA, she worked as an English teacher in China for three years. Prior to her DPhil studies at Oxford, Yaoyao completed her Master’s degree in TESOL at Institute of Education, University College London. Her Master’s dissertation was supervised by Dr Kazuya Saito.

Pat is the Deputy Chief Executive of a large College Group.

A qualified accountant, she is accountable to the Corporation Board for the Group’s Estate, sustainability and for maintaining the Group’s outstanding financial health grade. Her specialisms include Leadership and Management, Identification and Application of Funding Streams as well as leading the Group in new acquisitions, ventures and developments. Pat is using her vast experience of public sector finances to explore the intersection of accounting, leadership and purpose.

Supervisors

James Robson and Ariel Lindorff

Alice received her Master’s in Child Study and Education from the Institute of Child Study at the University of Toronto. She has taught preschool through higher education as a teacher and principal in public and private schools in North America and Europe. Deeply committed to enhancing education, she believes in learning that connects students and teachers to the natural world and to their communities. She is actively involved in community organisations that promote intercultural, interracial, and interfaith understanding and allyship.

Supervisors

Steve Puttick

Victoria is an educational researcher and practitioner, specialising in educational support and methodology of teaching mathematics to low-achieving students. For over 9 years she has been working at Big Change Educational Centre (Moscow) which provides support to looked-after children.

Before joining the DPhil programme, she completed her undergraduate degree in Finance at Financial University in Moscow and then gained a MSc in Psychology of Education from the University of Bristol.

Victoria’s current research focuses on educational issues of care-experienced children and teaching mathematics to students of low achievement and motivation.

Supervisors

Karen Skilling and Gabriel Stylianides

Louise was born and raised in Glasgow and moved to Oxford to pursue a DPhil in Education.

Louise’s research interests are education policy, particularly higher education policy, as well as qualitative research into the experiences of students in higher education and reducing inequalities in access to higher education. Louise is also interested in educational capabilities, educational purpose, aspirations and philosophical debates about knowledge construction and co-construction. Louise has a First Class BA (Joint Honours) in Social Policy and Education from the University of Strathclyde, and two Masters degrees with Distinction also from the University of Strathclyde in Applied Educational and Social Research and Social Policy (Research Methods). Louise also participated in the University of Oxford’s UNIQ+ Graduate Access Programme in the summer of 2022, where she worked at the Department of Sociology with Melinda Mills, Bo Zhao and Evelina Akimova on research into the impact of socio-economic status on inequalities in access to veterinary care in Scotland. Louise’s DPhil thesis is interested in evaluating Lorella Terzi’s educational capabilities framework through the lens of contemporary higher education in order to gain an understanding of what graduate capabilities are identified by students and stakeholders as being necessary for enabling graduates to successfully thrive and adapt in a post-pandemic society.

 

Supervisors

Alis Oancea and Kelsey Inouye

Motema studied Neuroscience as an undergraduate at Dartmouth College in the USA and it is one of its courses, found interest in Education.

Motema then worked for various non-profit organisations in Lesotho and South Africa focusing on helping high school students from low SES backgrounds access opportunities to study in HE. In her Masters’ project Motema analysed Lesotho’s 2009 Curriculum and Assessment Policy. This analysis’ findings brought Motema to her current research interests which include gendered STEM education and decolonisation of education policies and curricula in Lesotho. For her DPhil project, Motema is interested in finding out the lived experiences of female Science teachers in Lesotho Secondary Schools especially focusing on the major changes in the Secondary school education system in Lesotho that have happened in the past five years as unique meeting points.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Judith Hillier

Danielle is a DPhil student researching how Black-British doctoral students navigate the spaces of the elite, providing a new theoretical framework to understand their agency better.

Her main interests are in Human Flourishing, Cultural Geography, Psychology, and Justice, and her work aims to inform and reform educational frameworks and practices.

Following Danielle’s BSc in Psychology and MRes in Research Methods in Psychology, she founded a social enterprise that merges psychological and academic strategies to guide undergraduate and master’s students study practices. In addition to this, Danielle provided pedagogical and behavioural support across SEN college, secondary and primary schools.

Some of Danielle’s notable work includes her research introducing a new University-wide EDI strategy at her former Higher Education institution, presenting insights and way-forwards on youth homelessness to HRH Prince Williams, and providing discipleship to next-gen leaders.

Dan is a part-time DPhil Education student whose research focuses on investigating reasons why individuals choose to study and then teach physics as a subject discipline and how these relate to issues of equity and power. He previously worked as a secondary school physics teacher in the West Midlands of England for around 15 years before taking up his current post as Associate Professor of Physics Education at the University of Birmingham where he works in widening participation in physics and teacher education.

Publications
  • Cottle, D 2022, ‘Harnessing the potential of recently retired physics teachers to mentor new physics teachers’, Physics Education, vol. 57, no. 1, 015020. https://doi.org/10.1088/1361-6552/ac3931
  • Cottle, D 2021, ‘Improving students’ mathematical skills in secondary science: ideas from mathematics pedagogy’, School Science Review, vol. 102, no. 381, pp. 61-64. <https://www.ase.org.uk/resources/school-science-review/issue-381/improving-students-mathematical-skills-in-secondary>
  • Cottle, D 2021, ‘The effects of Covid-19 on student transition from school to university in STEM subjects’, New Directions in the Teaching of Physical Sciences, vol. 16, no. 1, 3847, pp. 1-4. https://doi.org/10.29311/ndtps.v0i14.3847 
  • Cottle, D & Marshall, R 2016, ‘Exploring electrical resistance: a novel kinesthetic model helps to resolve some misconceptions’, Physics Education, vol. 51, no. 5. https://doi.org/10.1088/0031-9120/51/5/054004 

Chris is a third-year part time DPhil student. He is an experienced Director of Children’s Services working in London. He is interested in path dependence and whether it is a helpful concept to understand how children’s services work.

Yaoyao is a DPhil student in Education at Oxford.

Her research interest lies in Aptitude-Instruction-Interaction (ATI) in second language acquisition (SLA).

Yaoyao’s research investigates the mediating effects of individual differences in learners’ domain-general perceptual-cognitive abilities in instructed foreign language pronunciation acquisition in adulthood. She aims to further explore how aptitude hinders instructional effectiveness and help all students make the most of instruction regardless of aptitude profiles.

Yaoyao started her BA in the Japanese Language and Literature at Sun Yat-Sen University (中山大学) in China. She then moved to the University of Queensland to finish her BA with double majors in Japanese and Translation. After her BA, she worked as an English teacher in China for three years. Prior to her DPhil studies at Oxford, Yaoyao completed her Master’s degree in TESOL at Institute of Education, University College London. Her Master’s dissertation was supervised by Dr Kazuya Saito.

Pat is the Deputy Chief Executive of a large College Group.

A qualified accountant, she is accountable to the Corporation Board for the Group’s Estate, sustainability and for maintaining the Group’s outstanding financial health grade. Her specialisms include Leadership and Management, Identification and Application of Funding Streams as well as leading the Group in new acquisitions, ventures and developments. Pat is using her vast experience of public sector finances to explore the intersection of accounting, leadership and purpose.

Supervisors

James Robson and Ariel Lindorff

Alice received her Master’s in Child Study and Education from the Institute of Child Study at the University of Toronto. She has taught preschool through higher education as a teacher and principal in public and private schools in North America and Europe. Deeply committed to enhancing education, she believes in learning that connects students and teachers to the natural world and to their communities. She is actively involved in community organisations that promote intercultural, interracial, and interfaith understanding and allyship.

Supervisors

Steve Puttick

Victoria is an educational researcher and practitioner, specialising in educational support and methodology of teaching mathematics to low-achieving students. For over 9 years she has been working at Big Change Educational Centre (Moscow) which provides support to looked-after children.

Before joining the DPhil programme, she completed her undergraduate degree in Finance at Financial University in Moscow and then gained a MSc in Psychology of Education from the University of Bristol.

Victoria’s current research focuses on educational issues of care-experienced children and teaching mathematics to students of low achievement and motivation.

Supervisors

Karen Skilling and Gabriel Stylianides

Louise was born and raised in Glasgow and moved to Oxford to pursue a DPhil in Education.

Louise’s research interests are education policy, particularly higher education policy, as well as qualitative research into the experiences of students in higher education and reducing inequalities in access to higher education. Louise is also interested in educational capabilities, educational purpose, aspirations and philosophical debates about knowledge construction and co-construction. Louise has a First Class BA (Joint Honours) in Social Policy and Education from the University of Strathclyde, and two Masters degrees with Distinction also from the University of Strathclyde in Applied Educational and Social Research and Social Policy (Research Methods). Louise also participated in the University of Oxford’s UNIQ+ Graduate Access Programme in the summer of 2022, where she worked at the Department of Sociology with Melinda Mills, Bo Zhao and Evelina Akimova on research into the impact of socio-economic status on inequalities in access to veterinary care in Scotland. Louise’s DPhil thesis is interested in evaluating Lorella Terzi’s educational capabilities framework through the lens of contemporary higher education in order to gain an understanding of what graduate capabilities are identified by students and stakeholders as being necessary for enabling graduates to successfully thrive and adapt in a post-pandemic society.

 

Supervisors

Alis Oancea and Kelsey Inouye

Motema studied Neuroscience as an undergraduate at Dartmouth College in the USA and it is one of its courses, found interest in Education.

Motema then worked for various non-profit organisations in Lesotho and South Africa focusing on helping high school students from low SES backgrounds access opportunities to study in HE. In her Masters’ project Motema analysed Lesotho’s 2009 Curriculum and Assessment Policy. This analysis’ findings brought Motema to her current research interests which include gendered STEM education and decolonisation of education policies and curricula in Lesotho. For her DPhil project, Motema is interested in finding out the lived experiences of female Science teachers in Lesotho Secondary Schools especially focusing on the major changes in the Secondary school education system in Lesotho that have happened in the past five years as unique meeting points.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Judith Hillier

Danielle is a DPhil student researching how Black-British doctoral students navigate the spaces of the elite, providing a new theoretical framework to understand their agency better.

Her main interests are in Human Flourishing, Cultural Geography, Psychology, and Justice, and her work aims to inform and reform educational frameworks and practices.

Following Danielle’s BSc in Psychology and MRes in Research Methods in Psychology, she founded a social enterprise that merges psychological and academic strategies to guide undergraduate and master’s students study practices. In addition to this, Danielle provided pedagogical and behavioural support across SEN college, secondary and primary schools.

Some of Danielle’s notable work includes her research introducing a new University-wide EDI strategy at her former Higher Education institution, presenting insights and way-forwards on youth homelessness to HRH Prince Williams, and providing discipleship to next-gen leaders.

Dan is a part-time DPhil Education student whose research focuses on investigating reasons why individuals choose to study and then teach physics as a subject discipline and how these relate to issues of equity and power. He previously worked as a secondary school physics teacher in the West Midlands of England for around 15 years before taking up his current post as Associate Professor of Physics Education at the University of Birmingham where he works in widening participation in physics and teacher education.

Publications
  • Cottle, D 2022, ‘Harnessing the potential of recently retired physics teachers to mentor new physics teachers’, Physics Education, vol. 57, no. 1, 015020. https://doi.org/10.1088/1361-6552/ac3931
  • Cottle, D 2021, ‘Improving students’ mathematical skills in secondary science: ideas from mathematics pedagogy’, School Science Review, vol. 102, no. 381, pp. 61-64. <https://www.ase.org.uk/resources/school-science-review/issue-381/improving-students-mathematical-skills-in-secondary>
  • Cottle, D 2021, ‘The effects of Covid-19 on student transition from school to university in STEM subjects’, New Directions in the Teaching of Physical Sciences, vol. 16, no. 1, 3847, pp. 1-4. https://doi.org/10.29311/ndtps.v0i14.3847 
  • Cottle, D & Marshall, R 2016, ‘Exploring electrical resistance: a novel kinesthetic model helps to resolve some misconceptions’, Physics Education, vol. 51, no. 5. https://doi.org/10.1088/0031-9120/51/5/054004 

Chris is a third-year part time DPhil student. He is an experienced Director of Children’s Services working in London. He is interested in path dependence and whether it is a helpful concept to understand how children’s services work.

Yaoyao is a DPhil student in Education at Oxford.

Her research interest lies in Aptitude-Instruction-Interaction (ATI) in second language acquisition (SLA).

Yaoyao’s research investigates the mediating effects of individual differences in learners’ domain-general perceptual-cognitive abilities in instructed foreign language pronunciation acquisition in adulthood. She aims to further explore how aptitude hinders instructional effectiveness and help all students make the most of instruction regardless of aptitude profiles.

Yaoyao started her BA in the Japanese Language and Literature at Sun Yat-Sen University (中山大学) in China. She then moved to the University of Queensland to finish her BA with double majors in Japanese and Translation. After her BA, she worked as an English teacher in China for three years. Prior to her DPhil studies at Oxford, Yaoyao completed her Master’s degree in TESOL at Institute of Education, University College London. Her Master’s dissertation was supervised by Dr Kazuya Saito.

Pat is the Deputy Chief Executive of a large College Group.

A qualified accountant, she is accountable to the Corporation Board for the Group’s Estate, sustainability and for maintaining the Group’s outstanding financial health grade. Her specialisms include Leadership and Management, Identification and Application of Funding Streams as well as leading the Group in new acquisitions, ventures and developments. Pat is using her vast experience of public sector finances to explore the intersection of accounting, leadership and purpose.

Supervisors

James Robson and Ariel Lindorff

Alice received her Master’s in Child Study and Education from the Institute of Child Study at the University of Toronto. She has taught preschool through higher education as a teacher and principal in public and private schools in North America and Europe. Deeply committed to enhancing education, she believes in learning that connects students and teachers to the natural world and to their communities. She is actively involved in community organisations that promote intercultural, interracial, and interfaith understanding and allyship.

Supervisors

Steve Puttick

Victoria is an educational researcher and practitioner, specialising in educational support and methodology of teaching mathematics to low-achieving students. For over 9 years she has been working at Big Change Educational Centre (Moscow) which provides support to looked-after children.

Before joining the DPhil programme, she completed her undergraduate degree in Finance at Financial University in Moscow and then gained a MSc in Psychology of Education from the University of Bristol.

Victoria’s current research focuses on educational issues of care-experienced children and teaching mathematics to students of low achievement and motivation.

Supervisors

Karen Skilling and Gabriel Stylianides

Louise was born and raised in Glasgow and moved to Oxford to pursue a DPhil in Education.

Louise’s research interests are education policy, particularly higher education policy, as well as qualitative research into the experiences of students in higher education and reducing inequalities in access to higher education. Louise is also interested in educational capabilities, educational purpose, aspirations and philosophical debates about knowledge construction and co-construction. Louise has a First Class BA (Joint Honours) in Social Policy and Education from the University of Strathclyde, and two Masters degrees with Distinction also from the University of Strathclyde in Applied Educational and Social Research and Social Policy (Research Methods). Louise also participated in the University of Oxford’s UNIQ+ Graduate Access Programme in the summer of 2022, where she worked at the Department of Sociology with Melinda Mills, Bo Zhao and Evelina Akimova on research into the impact of socio-economic status on inequalities in access to veterinary care in Scotland. Louise’s DPhil thesis is interested in evaluating Lorella Terzi’s educational capabilities framework through the lens of contemporary higher education in order to gain an understanding of what graduate capabilities are identified by students and stakeholders as being necessary for enabling graduates to successfully thrive and adapt in a post-pandemic society.

 

Supervisors

Alis Oancea and Kelsey Inouye

Motema studied Neuroscience as an undergraduate at Dartmouth College in the USA and it is one of its courses, found interest in Education.

Motema then worked for various non-profit organisations in Lesotho and South Africa focusing on helping high school students from low SES backgrounds access opportunities to study in HE. In her Masters’ project Motema analysed Lesotho’s 2009 Curriculum and Assessment Policy. This analysis’ findings brought Motema to her current research interests which include gendered STEM education and decolonisation of education policies and curricula in Lesotho. For her DPhil project, Motema is interested in finding out the lived experiences of female Science teachers in Lesotho Secondary Schools especially focusing on the major changes in the Secondary school education system in Lesotho that have happened in the past five years as unique meeting points.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Judith Hillier

Danielle is a DPhil student researching how Black-British doctoral students navigate the spaces of the elite, providing a new theoretical framework to understand their agency better.

Her main interests are in Human Flourishing, Cultural Geography, Psychology, and Justice, and her work aims to inform and reform educational frameworks and practices.

Following Danielle’s BSc in Psychology and MRes in Research Methods in Psychology, she founded a social enterprise that merges psychological and academic strategies to guide undergraduate and master’s students study practices. In addition to this, Danielle provided pedagogical and behavioural support across SEN college, secondary and primary schools.

Some of Danielle’s notable work includes her research introducing a new University-wide EDI strategy at her former Higher Education institution, presenting insights and way-forwards on youth homelessness to HRH Prince Williams, and providing discipleship to next-gen leaders.

Dan is a part-time DPhil Education student whose research focuses on investigating reasons why individuals choose to study and then teach physics as a subject discipline and how these relate to issues of equity and power. He previously worked as a secondary school physics teacher in the West Midlands of England for around 15 years before taking up his current post as Associate Professor of Physics Education at the University of Birmingham where he works in widening participation in physics and teacher education.

Publications
  • Cottle, D 2022, ‘Harnessing the potential of recently retired physics teachers to mentor new physics teachers’, Physics Education, vol. 57, no. 1, 015020. https://doi.org/10.1088/1361-6552/ac3931
  • Cottle, D 2021, ‘Improving students’ mathematical skills in secondary science: ideas from mathematics pedagogy’, School Science Review, vol. 102, no. 381, pp. 61-64. <https://www.ase.org.uk/resources/school-science-review/issue-381/improving-students-mathematical-skills-in-secondary>
  • Cottle, D 2021, ‘The effects of Covid-19 on student transition from school to university in STEM subjects’, New Directions in the Teaching of Physical Sciences, vol. 16, no. 1, 3847, pp. 1-4. https://doi.org/10.29311/ndtps.v0i14.3847 
  • Cottle, D & Marshall, R 2016, ‘Exploring electrical resistance: a novel kinesthetic model helps to resolve some misconceptions’, Physics Education, vol. 51, no. 5. https://doi.org/10.1088/0031-9120/51/5/054004 

Chris is a third-year part time DPhil student. He is an experienced Director of Children’s Services working in London. He is interested in path dependence and whether it is a helpful concept to understand how children’s services work.

Yaoyao is a DPhil student in Education at Oxford.

Her research interest lies in Aptitude-Instruction-Interaction (ATI) in second language acquisition (SLA).

Yaoyao’s research investigates the mediating effects of individual differences in learners’ domain-general perceptual-cognitive abilities in instructed foreign language pronunciation acquisition in adulthood. She aims to further explore how aptitude hinders instructional effectiveness and help all students make the most of instruction regardless of aptitude profiles.

Yaoyao started her BA in the Japanese Language and Literature at Sun Yat-Sen University (中山大学) in China. She then moved to the University of Queensland to finish her BA with double majors in Japanese and Translation. After her BA, she worked as an English teacher in China for three years. Prior to her DPhil studies at Oxford, Yaoyao completed her Master’s degree in TESOL at Institute of Education, University College London. Her Master’s dissertation was supervised by Dr Kazuya Saito.

Pat is the Deputy Chief Executive of a large College Group.

A qualified accountant, she is accountable to the Corporation Board for the Group’s Estate, sustainability and for maintaining the Group’s outstanding financial health grade. Her specialisms include Leadership and Management, Identification and Application of Funding Streams as well as leading the Group in new acquisitions, ventures and developments. Pat is using her vast experience of public sector finances to explore the intersection of accounting, leadership and purpose.

Supervisors

James Robson and Ariel Lindorff

Alice received her Master’s in Child Study and Education from the Institute of Child Study at the University of Toronto. She has taught preschool through higher education as a teacher and principal in public and private schools in North America and Europe. Deeply committed to enhancing education, she believes in learning that connects students and teachers to the natural world and to their communities. She is actively involved in community organisations that promote intercultural, interracial, and interfaith understanding and allyship.

Supervisors

Steve Puttick

Victoria is an educational researcher and practitioner, specialising in educational support and methodology of teaching mathematics to low-achieving students. For over 9 years she has been working at Big Change Educational Centre (Moscow) which provides support to looked-after children.

Before joining the DPhil programme, she completed her undergraduate degree in Finance at Financial University in Moscow and then gained a MSc in Psychology of Education from the University of Bristol.

Victoria’s current research focuses on educational issues of care-experienced children and teaching mathematics to students of low achievement and motivation.

Supervisors

Karen Skilling and Gabriel Stylianides

Louise was born and raised in Glasgow and moved to Oxford to pursue a DPhil in Education.

Louise’s research interests are education policy, particularly higher education policy, as well as qualitative research into the experiences of students in higher education and reducing inequalities in access to higher education. Louise is also interested in educational capabilities, educational purpose, aspirations and philosophical debates about knowledge construction and co-construction. Louise has a First Class BA (Joint Honours) in Social Policy and Education from the University of Strathclyde, and two Masters degrees with Distinction also from the University of Strathclyde in Applied Educational and Social Research and Social Policy (Research Methods). Louise also participated in the University of Oxford’s UNIQ+ Graduate Access Programme in the summer of 2022, where she worked at the Department of Sociology with Melinda Mills, Bo Zhao and Evelina Akimova on research into the impact of socio-economic status on inequalities in access to veterinary care in Scotland. Louise’s DPhil thesis is interested in evaluating Lorella Terzi’s educational capabilities framework through the lens of contemporary higher education in order to gain an understanding of what graduate capabilities are identified by students and stakeholders as being necessary for enabling graduates to successfully thrive and adapt in a post-pandemic society.

 

Supervisors

Alis Oancea and Kelsey Inouye

Motema studied Neuroscience as an undergraduate at Dartmouth College in the USA and it is one of its courses, found interest in Education.

Motema then worked for various non-profit organisations in Lesotho and South Africa focusing on helping high school students from low SES backgrounds access opportunities to study in HE. In her Masters’ project Motema analysed Lesotho’s 2009 Curriculum and Assessment Policy. This analysis’ findings brought Motema to her current research interests which include gendered STEM education and decolonisation of education policies and curricula in Lesotho. For her DPhil project, Motema is interested in finding out the lived experiences of female Science teachers in Lesotho Secondary Schools especially focusing on the major changes in the Secondary school education system in Lesotho that have happened in the past five years as unique meeting points.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Judith Hillier

Danielle is a DPhil student researching how Black-British doctoral students navigate the spaces of the elite, providing a new theoretical framework to understand their agency better.

Her main interests are in Human Flourishing, Cultural Geography, Psychology, and Justice, and her work aims to inform and reform educational frameworks and practices.

Following Danielle’s BSc in Psychology and MRes in Research Methods in Psychology, she founded a social enterprise that merges psychological and academic strategies to guide undergraduate and master’s students study practices. In addition to this, Danielle provided pedagogical and behavioural support across SEN college, secondary and primary schools.

Some of Danielle’s notable work includes her research introducing a new University-wide EDI strategy at her former Higher Education institution, presenting insights and way-forwards on youth homelessness to HRH Prince Williams, and providing discipleship to next-gen leaders.

Dan is a part-time DPhil Education student whose research focuses on investigating reasons why individuals choose to study and then teach physics as a subject discipline and how these relate to issues of equity and power. He previously worked as a secondary school physics teacher in the West Midlands of England for around 15 years before taking up his current post as Associate Professor of Physics Education at the University of Birmingham where he works in widening participation in physics and teacher education.

Publications
  • Cottle, D 2022, ‘Harnessing the potential of recently retired physics teachers to mentor new physics teachers’, Physics Education, vol. 57, no. 1, 015020. https://doi.org/10.1088/1361-6552/ac3931
  • Cottle, D 2021, ‘Improving students’ mathematical skills in secondary science: ideas from mathematics pedagogy’, School Science Review, vol. 102, no. 381, pp. 61-64. <https://www.ase.org.uk/resources/school-science-review/issue-381/improving-students-mathematical-skills-in-secondary>
  • Cottle, D 2021, ‘The effects of Covid-19 on student transition from school to university in STEM subjects’, New Directions in the Teaching of Physical Sciences, vol. 16, no. 1, 3847, pp. 1-4. https://doi.org/10.29311/ndtps.v0i14.3847 
  • Cottle, D & Marshall, R 2016, ‘Exploring electrical resistance: a novel kinesthetic model helps to resolve some misconceptions’, Physics Education, vol. 51, no. 5. https://doi.org/10.1088/0031-9120/51/5/054004 

Chris is a third-year part time DPhil student. He is an experienced Director of Children’s Services working in London. He is interested in path dependence and whether it is a helpful concept to understand how children’s services work.

Yaoyao is a DPhil student in Education at Oxford.

Her research interest lies in Aptitude-Instruction-Interaction (ATI) in second language acquisition (SLA).

Yaoyao’s research investigates the mediating effects of individual differences in learners’ domain-general perceptual-cognitive abilities in instructed foreign language pronunciation acquisition in adulthood. She aims to further explore how aptitude hinders instructional effectiveness and help all students make the most of instruction regardless of aptitude profiles.

Yaoyao started her BA in the Japanese Language and Literature at Sun Yat-Sen University (中山大学) in China. She then moved to the University of Queensland to finish her BA with double majors in Japanese and Translation. After her BA, she worked as an English teacher in China for three years. Prior to her DPhil studies at Oxford, Yaoyao completed her Master’s degree in TESOL at Institute of Education, University College London. Her Master’s dissertation was supervised by Dr Kazuya Saito.

Pat is the Deputy Chief Executive of a large College Group.

A qualified accountant, she is accountable to the Corporation Board for the Group’s Estate, sustainability and for maintaining the Group’s outstanding financial health grade. Her specialisms include Leadership and Management, Identification and Application of Funding Streams as well as leading the Group in new acquisitions, ventures and developments. Pat is using her vast experience of public sector finances to explore the intersection of accounting, leadership and purpose.

Supervisors

James Robson and Ariel Lindorff

Alice received her Master’s in Child Study and Education from the Institute of Child Study at the University of Toronto. She has taught preschool through higher education as a teacher and principal in public and private schools in North America and Europe. Deeply committed to enhancing education, she believes in learning that connects students and teachers to the natural world and to their communities. She is actively involved in community organisations that promote intercultural, interracial, and interfaith understanding and allyship.

Supervisors

Steve Puttick

Victoria is an educational researcher and practitioner, specialising in educational support and methodology of teaching mathematics to low-achieving students. For over 9 years she has been working at Big Change Educational Centre (Moscow) which provides support to looked-after children.

Before joining the DPhil programme, she completed her undergraduate degree in Finance at Financial University in Moscow and then gained a MSc in Psychology of Education from the University of Bristol.

Victoria’s current research focuses on educational issues of care-experienced children and teaching mathematics to students of low achievement and motivation.

Supervisors

Karen Skilling and Gabriel Stylianides

Louise was born and raised in Glasgow and moved to Oxford to pursue a DPhil in Education.

Louise’s research interests are education policy, particularly higher education policy, as well as qualitative research into the experiences of students in higher education and reducing inequalities in access to higher education. Louise is also interested in educational capabilities, educational purpose, aspirations and philosophical debates about knowledge construction and co-construction. Louise has a First Class BA (Joint Honours) in Social Policy and Education from the University of Strathclyde, and two Masters degrees with Distinction also from the University of Strathclyde in Applied Educational and Social Research and Social Policy (Research Methods). Louise also participated in the University of Oxford’s UNIQ+ Graduate Access Programme in the summer of 2022, where she worked at the Department of Sociology with Melinda Mills, Bo Zhao and Evelina Akimova on research into the impact of socio-economic status on inequalities in access to veterinary care in Scotland. Louise’s DPhil thesis is interested in evaluating Lorella Terzi’s educational capabilities framework through the lens of contemporary higher education in order to gain an understanding of what graduate capabilities are identified by students and stakeholders as being necessary for enabling graduates to successfully thrive and adapt in a post-pandemic society.

 

Supervisors

Alis Oancea and Kelsey Inouye

Motema studied Neuroscience as an undergraduate at Dartmouth College in the USA and it is one of its courses, found interest in Education.

Motema then worked for various non-profit organisations in Lesotho and South Africa focusing on helping high school students from low SES backgrounds access opportunities to study in HE. In her Masters’ project Motema analysed Lesotho’s 2009 Curriculum and Assessment Policy. This analysis’ findings brought Motema to her current research interests which include gendered STEM education and decolonisation of education policies and curricula in Lesotho. For her DPhil project, Motema is interested in finding out the lived experiences of female Science teachers in Lesotho Secondary Schools especially focusing on the major changes in the Secondary school education system in Lesotho that have happened in the past five years as unique meeting points.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Judith Hillier

Danielle is a DPhil student researching how Black-British doctoral students navigate the spaces of the elite, providing a new theoretical framework to understand their agency better.

Her main interests are in Human Flourishing, Cultural Geography, Psychology, and Justice, and her work aims to inform and reform educational frameworks and practices.

Following Danielle’s BSc in Psychology and MRes in Research Methods in Psychology, she founded a social enterprise that merges psychological and academic strategies to guide undergraduate and master’s students study practices. In addition to this, Danielle provided pedagogical and behavioural support across SEN college, secondary and primary schools.

Some of Danielle’s notable work includes her research introducing a new University-wide EDI strategy at her former Higher Education institution, presenting insights and way-forwards on youth homelessness to HRH Prince Williams, and providing discipleship to next-gen leaders.

Dan is a part-time DPhil Education student whose research focuses on investigating reasons why individuals choose to study and then teach physics as a subject discipline and how these relate to issues of equity and power. He previously worked as a secondary school physics teacher in the West Midlands of England for around 15 years before taking up his current post as Associate Professor of Physics Education at the University of Birmingham where he works in widening participation in physics and teacher education.

Publications
  • Cottle, D 2022, ‘Harnessing the potential of recently retired physics teachers to mentor new physics teachers’, Physics Education, vol. 57, no. 1, 015020. https://doi.org/10.1088/1361-6552/ac3931
  • Cottle, D 2021, ‘Improving students’ mathematical skills in secondary science: ideas from mathematics pedagogy’, School Science Review, vol. 102, no. 381, pp. 61-64. <https://www.ase.org.uk/resources/school-science-review/issue-381/improving-students-mathematical-skills-in-secondary>
  • Cottle, D 2021, ‘The effects of Covid-19 on student transition from school to university in STEM subjects’, New Directions in the Teaching of Physical Sciences, vol. 16, no. 1, 3847, pp. 1-4. https://doi.org/10.29311/ndtps.v0i14.3847 
  • Cottle, D & Marshall, R 2016, ‘Exploring electrical resistance: a novel kinesthetic model helps to resolve some misconceptions’, Physics Education, vol. 51, no. 5. https://doi.org/10.1088/0031-9120/51/5/054004 

Chris is a third-year part time DPhil student. He is an experienced Director of Children’s Services working in London. He is interested in path dependence and whether it is a helpful concept to understand how children’s services work.

Yaoyao is a DPhil student in Education at Oxford.

Her research interest lies in Aptitude-Instruction-Interaction (ATI) in second language acquisition (SLA).

Yaoyao’s research investigates the mediating effects of individual differences in learners’ domain-general perceptual-cognitive abilities in instructed foreign language pronunciation acquisition in adulthood. She aims to further explore how aptitude hinders instructional effectiveness and help all students make the most of instruction regardless of aptitude profiles.

Yaoyao started her BA in the Japanese Language and Literature at Sun Yat-Sen University (中山大学) in China. She then moved to the University of Queensland to finish her BA with double majors in Japanese and Translation. After her BA, she worked as an English teacher in China for three years. Prior to her DPhil studies at Oxford, Yaoyao completed her Master’s degree in TESOL at Institute of Education, University College London. Her Master’s dissertation was supervised by Dr Kazuya Saito.

Pat is the Deputy Chief Executive of a large College Group.

A qualified accountant, she is accountable to the Corporation Board for the Group’s Estate, sustainability and for maintaining the Group’s outstanding financial health grade. Her specialisms include Leadership and Management, Identification and Application of Funding Streams as well as leading the Group in new acquisitions, ventures and developments. Pat is using her vast experience of public sector finances to explore the intersection of accounting, leadership and purpose.

Supervisors

James Robson and Ariel Lindorff

Alice received her Master’s in Child Study and Education from the Institute of Child Study at the University of Toronto. She has taught preschool through higher education as a teacher and principal in public and private schools in North America and Europe. Deeply committed to enhancing education, she believes in learning that connects students and teachers to the natural world and to their communities. She is actively involved in community organisations that promote intercultural, interracial, and interfaith understanding and allyship.

Supervisors

Steve Puttick

Victoria is an educational researcher and practitioner, specialising in educational support and methodology of teaching mathematics to low-achieving students. For over 9 years she has been working at Big Change Educational Centre (Moscow) which provides support to looked-after children.

Before joining the DPhil programme, she completed her undergraduate degree in Finance at Financial University in Moscow and then gained a MSc in Psychology of Education from the University of Bristol.

Victoria’s current research focuses on educational issues of care-experienced children and teaching mathematics to students of low achievement and motivation.

Supervisors

Karen Skilling and Gabriel Stylianides

Louise was born and raised in Glasgow and moved to Oxford to pursue a DPhil in Education.

Louise’s research interests are education policy, particularly higher education policy, as well as qualitative research into the experiences of students in higher education and reducing inequalities in access to higher education. Louise is also interested in educational capabilities, educational purpose, aspirations and philosophical debates about knowledge construction and co-construction. Louise has a First Class BA (Joint Honours) in Social Policy and Education from the University of Strathclyde, and two Masters degrees with Distinction also from the University of Strathclyde in Applied Educational and Social Research and Social Policy (Research Methods). Louise also participated in the University of Oxford’s UNIQ+ Graduate Access Programme in the summer of 2022, where she worked at the Department of Sociology with Melinda Mills, Bo Zhao and Evelina Akimova on research into the impact of socio-economic status on inequalities in access to veterinary care in Scotland. Louise’s DPhil thesis is interested in evaluating Lorella Terzi’s educational capabilities framework through the lens of contemporary higher education in order to gain an understanding of what graduate capabilities are identified by students and stakeholders as being necessary for enabling graduates to successfully thrive and adapt in a post-pandemic society.

 

Supervisors

Alis Oancea and Kelsey Inouye

Motema studied Neuroscience as an undergraduate at Dartmouth College in the USA and it is one of its courses, found interest in Education.

Motema then worked for various non-profit organisations in Lesotho and South Africa focusing on helping high school students from low SES backgrounds access opportunities to study in HE. In her Masters’ project Motema analysed Lesotho’s 2009 Curriculum and Assessment Policy. This analysis’ findings brought Motema to her current research interests which include gendered STEM education and decolonisation of education policies and curricula in Lesotho. For her DPhil project, Motema is interested in finding out the lived experiences of female Science teachers in Lesotho Secondary Schools especially focusing on the major changes in the Secondary school education system in Lesotho that have happened in the past five years as unique meeting points.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Judith Hillier

Danielle is a DPhil student researching how Black-British doctoral students navigate the spaces of the elite, providing a new theoretical framework to understand their agency better.

Her main interests are in Human Flourishing, Cultural Geography, Psychology, and Justice, and her work aims to inform and reform educational frameworks and practices.

Following Danielle’s BSc in Psychology and MRes in Research Methods in Psychology, she founded a social enterprise that merges psychological and academic strategies to guide undergraduate and master’s students study practices. In addition to this, Danielle provided pedagogical and behavioural support across SEN college, secondary and primary schools.

Some of Danielle’s notable work includes her research introducing a new University-wide EDI strategy at her former Higher Education institution, presenting insights and way-forwards on youth homelessness to HRH Prince Williams, and providing discipleship to next-gen leaders.

Dan is a part-time DPhil Education student whose research focuses on investigating reasons why individuals choose to study and then teach physics as a subject discipline and how these relate to issues of equity and power. He previously worked as a secondary school physics teacher in the West Midlands of England for around 15 years before taking up his current post as Associate Professor of Physics Education at the University of Birmingham where he works in widening participation in physics and teacher education.

Publications
  • Cottle, D 2022, ‘Harnessing the potential of recently retired physics teachers to mentor new physics teachers’, Physics Education, vol. 57, no. 1, 015020. https://doi.org/10.1088/1361-6552/ac3931
  • Cottle, D 2021, ‘Improving students’ mathematical skills in secondary science: ideas from mathematics pedagogy’, School Science Review, vol. 102, no. 381, pp. 61-64. <https://www.ase.org.uk/resources/school-science-review/issue-381/improving-students-mathematical-skills-in-secondary>
  • Cottle, D 2021, ‘The effects of Covid-19 on student transition from school to university in STEM subjects’, New Directions in the Teaching of Physical Sciences, vol. 16, no. 1, 3847, pp. 1-4. https://doi.org/10.29311/ndtps.v0i14.3847 
  • Cottle, D & Marshall, R 2016, ‘Exploring electrical resistance: a novel kinesthetic model helps to resolve some misconceptions’, Physics Education, vol. 51, no. 5. https://doi.org/10.1088/0031-9120/51/5/054004 

Chris is a third-year part time DPhil student. He is an experienced Director of Children’s Services working in London. He is interested in path dependence and whether it is a helpful concept to understand how children’s services work.

Yaoyao is a DPhil student in Education at Oxford.

Her research interest lies in Aptitude-Instruction-Interaction (ATI) in second language acquisition (SLA).

Yaoyao’s research investigates the mediating effects of individual differences in learners’ domain-general perceptual-cognitive abilities in instructed foreign language pronunciation acquisition in adulthood. She aims to further explore how aptitude hinders instructional effectiveness and help all students make the most of instruction regardless of aptitude profiles.

Yaoyao started her BA in the Japanese Language and Literature at Sun Yat-Sen University (中山大学) in China. She then moved to the University of Queensland to finish her BA with double majors in Japanese and Translation. After her BA, she worked as an English teacher in China for three years. Prior to her DPhil studies at Oxford, Yaoyao completed her Master’s degree in TESOL at Institute of Education, University College London. Her Master’s dissertation was supervised by Dr Kazuya Saito.

Pat is the Deputy Chief Executive of a large College Group.

A qualified accountant, she is accountable to the Corporation Board for the Group’s Estate, sustainability and for maintaining the Group’s outstanding financial health grade. Her specialisms include Leadership and Management, Identification and Application of Funding Streams as well as leading the Group in new acquisitions, ventures and developments. Pat is using her vast experience of public sector finances to explore the intersection of accounting, leadership and purpose.

Supervisors

James Robson and Ariel Lindorff

Alice received her Master’s in Child Study and Education from the Institute of Child Study at the University of Toronto. She has taught preschool through higher education as a teacher and principal in public and private schools in North America and Europe. Deeply committed to enhancing education, she believes in learning that connects students and teachers to the natural world and to their communities. She is actively involved in community organisations that promote intercultural, interracial, and interfaith understanding and allyship.

Supervisors

Steve Puttick

Victoria is an educational researcher and practitioner, specialising in educational support and methodology of teaching mathematics to low-achieving students. For over 9 years she has been working at Big Change Educational Centre (Moscow) which provides support to looked-after children.

Before joining the DPhil programme, she completed her undergraduate degree in Finance at Financial University in Moscow and then gained a MSc in Psychology of Education from the University of Bristol.

Victoria’s current research focuses on educational issues of care-experienced children and teaching mathematics to students of low achievement and motivation.

Supervisors

Karen Skilling and Gabriel Stylianides

Louise was born and raised in Glasgow and moved to Oxford to pursue a DPhil in Education.

Louise’s research interests are education policy, particularly higher education policy, as well as qualitative research into the experiences of students in higher education and reducing inequalities in access to higher education. Louise is also interested in educational capabilities, educational purpose, aspirations and philosophical debates about knowledge construction and co-construction. Louise has a First Class BA (Joint Honours) in Social Policy and Education from the University of Strathclyde, and two Masters degrees with Distinction also from the University of Strathclyde in Applied Educational and Social Research and Social Policy (Research Methods). Louise also participated in the University of Oxford’s UNIQ+ Graduate Access Programme in the summer of 2022, where she worked at the Department of Sociology with Melinda Mills, Bo Zhao and Evelina Akimova on research into the impact of socio-economic status on inequalities in access to veterinary care in Scotland. Louise’s DPhil thesis is interested in evaluating Lorella Terzi’s educational capabilities framework through the lens of contemporary higher education in order to gain an understanding of what graduate capabilities are identified by students and stakeholders as being necessary for enabling graduates to successfully thrive and adapt in a post-pandemic society.

 

Supervisors

Alis Oancea and Kelsey Inouye

Motema studied Neuroscience as an undergraduate at Dartmouth College in the USA and it is one of its courses, found interest in Education.

Motema then worked for various non-profit organisations in Lesotho and South Africa focusing on helping high school students from low SES backgrounds access opportunities to study in HE. In her Masters’ project Motema analysed Lesotho’s 2009 Curriculum and Assessment Policy. This analysis’ findings brought Motema to her current research interests which include gendered STEM education and decolonisation of education policies and curricula in Lesotho. For her DPhil project, Motema is interested in finding out the lived experiences of female Science teachers in Lesotho Secondary Schools especially focusing on the major changes in the Secondary school education system in Lesotho that have happened in the past five years as unique meeting points.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Judith Hillier

Danielle is a DPhil student researching how Black-British doctoral students navigate the spaces of the elite, providing a new theoretical framework to understand their agency better.

Her main interests are in Human Flourishing, Cultural Geography, Psychology, and Justice, and her work aims to inform and reform educational frameworks and practices.

Following Danielle’s BSc in Psychology and MRes in Research Methods in Psychology, she founded a social enterprise that merges psychological and academic strategies to guide undergraduate and master’s students study practices. In addition to this, Danielle provided pedagogical and behavioural support across SEN college, secondary and primary schools.

Some of Danielle’s notable work includes her research introducing a new University-wide EDI strategy at her former Higher Education institution, presenting insights and way-forwards on youth homelessness to HRH Prince Williams, and providing discipleship to next-gen leaders.

Dan is a part-time DPhil Education student whose research focuses on investigating reasons why individuals choose to study and then teach physics as a subject discipline and how these relate to issues of equity and power. He previously worked as a secondary school physics teacher in the West Midlands of England for around 15 years before taking up his current post as Associate Professor of Physics Education at the University of Birmingham where he works in widening participation in physics and teacher education.

Publications
  • Cottle, D 2022, ‘Harnessing the potential of recently retired physics teachers to mentor new physics teachers’, Physics Education, vol. 57, no. 1, 015020. https://doi.org/10.1088/1361-6552/ac3931
  • Cottle, D 2021, ‘Improving students’ mathematical skills in secondary science: ideas from mathematics pedagogy’, School Science Review, vol. 102, no. 381, pp. 61-64. <https://www.ase.org.uk/resources/school-science-review/issue-381/improving-students-mathematical-skills-in-secondary>
  • Cottle, D 2021, ‘The effects of Covid-19 on student transition from school to university in STEM subjects’, New Directions in the Teaching of Physical Sciences, vol. 16, no. 1, 3847, pp. 1-4. https://doi.org/10.29311/ndtps.v0i14.3847 
  • Cottle, D & Marshall, R 2016, ‘Exploring electrical resistance: a novel kinesthetic model helps to resolve some misconceptions’, Physics Education, vol. 51, no. 5. https://doi.org/10.1088/0031-9120/51/5/054004 

Chris is a third-year part time DPhil student. He is an experienced Director of Children’s Services working in London. He is interested in path dependence and whether it is a helpful concept to understand how children’s services work.

Yaoyao is a DPhil student in Education at Oxford.

Her research interest lies in Aptitude-Instruction-Interaction (ATI) in second language acquisition (SLA).

Yaoyao’s research investigates the mediating effects of individual differences in learners’ domain-general perceptual-cognitive abilities in instructed foreign language pronunciation acquisition in adulthood. She aims to further explore how aptitude hinders instructional effectiveness and help all students make the most of instruction regardless of aptitude profiles.

Yaoyao started her BA in the Japanese Language and Literature at Sun Yat-Sen University (中山大学) in China. She then moved to the University of Queensland to finish her BA with double majors in Japanese and Translation. After her BA, she worked as an English teacher in China for three years. Prior to her DPhil studies at Oxford, Yaoyao completed her Master’s degree in TESOL at Institute of Education, University College London. Her Master’s dissertation was supervised by Dr Kazuya Saito.

Pat is the Deputy Chief Executive of a large College Group.

A qualified accountant, she is accountable to the Corporation Board for the Group’s Estate, sustainability and for maintaining the Group’s outstanding financial health grade. Her specialisms include Leadership and Management, Identification and Application of Funding Streams as well as leading the Group in new acquisitions, ventures and developments. Pat is using her vast experience of public sector finances to explore the intersection of accounting, leadership and purpose.

Supervisors

James Robson and Ariel Lindorff

Alice received her Master’s in Child Study and Education from the Institute of Child Study at the University of Toronto. She has taught preschool through higher education as a teacher and principal in public and private schools in North America and Europe. Deeply committed to enhancing education, she believes in learning that connects students and teachers to the natural world and to their communities. She is actively involved in community organisations that promote intercultural, interracial, and interfaith understanding and allyship.

Supervisors

Steve Puttick

Victoria is an educational researcher and practitioner, specialising in educational support and methodology of teaching mathematics to low-achieving students. For over 9 years she has been working at Big Change Educational Centre (Moscow) which provides support to looked-after children.

Before joining the DPhil programme, she completed her undergraduate degree in Finance at Financial University in Moscow and then gained a MSc in Psychology of Education from the University of Bristol.

Victoria’s current research focuses on educational issues of care-experienced children and teaching mathematics to students of low achievement and motivation.

Supervisors

Karen Skilling and Gabriel Stylianides

Louise was born and raised in Glasgow and moved to Oxford to pursue a DPhil in Education.

Louise’s research interests are education policy, particularly higher education policy, as well as qualitative research into the experiences of students in higher education and reducing inequalities in access to higher education. Louise is also interested in educational capabilities, educational purpose, aspirations and philosophical debates about knowledge construction and co-construction. Louise has a First Class BA (Joint Honours) in Social Policy and Education from the University of Strathclyde, and two Masters degrees with Distinction also from the University of Strathclyde in Applied Educational and Social Research and Social Policy (Research Methods). Louise also participated in the University of Oxford’s UNIQ+ Graduate Access Programme in the summer of 2022, where she worked at the Department of Sociology with Melinda Mills, Bo Zhao and Evelina Akimova on research into the impact of socio-economic status on inequalities in access to veterinary care in Scotland. Louise’s DPhil thesis is interested in evaluating Lorella Terzi’s educational capabilities framework through the lens of contemporary higher education in order to gain an understanding of what graduate capabilities are identified by students and stakeholders as being necessary for enabling graduates to successfully thrive and adapt in a post-pandemic society.

 

Supervisors

Alis Oancea and Kelsey Inouye

Motema studied Neuroscience as an undergraduate at Dartmouth College in the USA and it is one of its courses, found interest in Education.

Motema then worked for various non-profit organisations in Lesotho and South Africa focusing on helping high school students from low SES backgrounds access opportunities to study in HE. In her Masters’ project Motema analysed Lesotho’s 2009 Curriculum and Assessment Policy. This analysis’ findings brought Motema to her current research interests which include gendered STEM education and decolonisation of education policies and curricula in Lesotho. For her DPhil project, Motema is interested in finding out the lived experiences of female Science teachers in Lesotho Secondary Schools especially focusing on the major changes in the Secondary school education system in Lesotho that have happened in the past five years as unique meeting points.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Judith Hillier

Danielle is a DPhil student researching how Black-British doctoral students navigate the spaces of the elite, providing a new theoretical framework to understand their agency better.

Her main interests are in Human Flourishing, Cultural Geography, Psychology, and Justice, and her work aims to inform and reform educational frameworks and practices.

Following Danielle’s BSc in Psychology and MRes in Research Methods in Psychology, she founded a social enterprise that merges psychological and academic strategies to guide undergraduate and master’s students study practices. In addition to this, Danielle provided pedagogical and behavioural support across SEN college, secondary and primary schools.

Some of Danielle’s notable work includes her research introducing a new University-wide EDI strategy at her former Higher Education institution, presenting insights and way-forwards on youth homelessness to HRH Prince Williams, and providing discipleship to next-gen leaders.

Dan is a part-time DPhil Education student whose research focuses on investigating reasons why individuals choose to study and then teach physics as a subject discipline and how these relate to issues of equity and power. He previously worked as a secondary school physics teacher in the West Midlands of England for around 15 years before taking up his current post as Associate Professor of Physics Education at the University of Birmingham where he works in widening participation in physics and teacher education.

Publications
  • Cottle, D 2022, ‘Harnessing the potential of recently retired physics teachers to mentor new physics teachers’, Physics Education, vol. 57, no. 1, 015020. https://doi.org/10.1088/1361-6552/ac3931
  • Cottle, D 2021, ‘Improving students’ mathematical skills in secondary science: ideas from mathematics pedagogy’, School Science Review, vol. 102, no. 381, pp. 61-64. <https://www.ase.org.uk/resources/school-science-review/issue-381/improving-students-mathematical-skills-in-secondary>
  • Cottle, D 2021, ‘The effects of Covid-19 on student transition from school to university in STEM subjects’, New Directions in the Teaching of Physical Sciences, vol. 16, no. 1, 3847, pp. 1-4. https://doi.org/10.29311/ndtps.v0i14.3847 
  • Cottle, D & Marshall, R 2016, ‘Exploring electrical resistance: a novel kinesthetic model helps to resolve some misconceptions’, Physics Education, vol. 51, no. 5. https://doi.org/10.1088/0031-9120/51/5/054004 

Chris is a third-year part time DPhil student. He is an experienced Director of Children’s Services working in London. He is interested in path dependence and whether it is a helpful concept to understand how children’s services work.

Yaoyao is a DPhil student in Education at Oxford.

Her research interest lies in Aptitude-Instruction-Interaction (ATI) in second language acquisition (SLA).

Yaoyao’s research investigates the mediating effects of individual differences in learners’ domain-general perceptual-cognitive abilities in instructed foreign language pronunciation acquisition in adulthood. She aims to further explore how aptitude hinders instructional effectiveness and help all students make the most of instruction regardless of aptitude profiles.

Yaoyao started her BA in the Japanese Language and Literature at Sun Yat-Sen University (中山大学) in China. She then moved to the University of Queensland to finish her BA with double majors in Japanese and Translation. After her BA, she worked as an English teacher in China for three years. Prior to her DPhil studies at Oxford, Yaoyao completed her Master’s degree in TESOL at Institute of Education, University College London. Her Master’s dissertation was supervised by Dr Kazuya Saito.

Pat is the Deputy Chief Executive of a large College Group.

A qualified accountant, she is accountable to the Corporation Board for the Group’s Estate, sustainability and for maintaining the Group’s outstanding financial health grade. Her specialisms include Leadership and Management, Identification and Application of Funding Streams as well as leading the Group in new acquisitions, ventures and developments. Pat is using her vast experience of public sector finances to explore the intersection of accounting, leadership and purpose.

Supervisors

James Robson and Ariel Lindorff

Alice received her Master’s in Child Study and Education from the Institute of Child Study at the University of Toronto. She has taught preschool through higher education as a teacher and principal in public and private schools in North America and Europe. Deeply committed to enhancing education, she believes in learning that connects students and teachers to the natural world and to their communities. She is actively involved in community organisations that promote intercultural, interracial, and interfaith understanding and allyship.

Supervisors

Steve Puttick

Victoria is an educational researcher and practitioner, specialising in educational support and methodology of teaching mathematics to low-achieving students. For over 9 years she has been working at Big Change Educational Centre (Moscow) which provides support to looked-after children.

Before joining the DPhil programme, she completed her undergraduate degree in Finance at Financial University in Moscow and then gained a MSc in Psychology of Education from the University of Bristol.

Victoria’s current research focuses on educational issues of care-experienced children and teaching mathematics to students of low achievement and motivation.

Supervisors

Karen Skilling and Gabriel Stylianides

Louise was born and raised in Glasgow and moved to Oxford to pursue a DPhil in Education.

Louise’s research interests are education policy, particularly higher education policy, as well as qualitative research into the experiences of students in higher education and reducing inequalities in access to higher education. Louise is also interested in educational capabilities, educational purpose, aspirations and philosophical debates about knowledge construction and co-construction. Louise has a First Class BA (Joint Honours) in Social Policy and Education from the University of Strathclyde, and two Masters degrees with Distinction also from the University of Strathclyde in Applied Educational and Social Research and Social Policy (Research Methods). Louise also participated in the University of Oxford’s UNIQ+ Graduate Access Programme in the summer of 2022, where she worked at the Department of Sociology with Melinda Mills, Bo Zhao and Evelina Akimova on research into the impact of socio-economic status on inequalities in access to veterinary care in Scotland. Louise’s DPhil thesis is interested in evaluating Lorella Terzi’s educational capabilities framework through the lens of contemporary higher education in order to gain an understanding of what graduate capabilities are identified by students and stakeholders as being necessary for enabling graduates to successfully thrive and adapt in a post-pandemic society.

 

Supervisors

Alis Oancea and Kelsey Inouye

Motema studied Neuroscience as an undergraduate at Dartmouth College in the USA and it is one of its courses, found interest in Education.

Motema then worked for various non-profit organisations in Lesotho and South Africa focusing on helping high school students from low SES backgrounds access opportunities to study in HE. In her Masters’ project Motema analysed Lesotho’s 2009 Curriculum and Assessment Policy. This analysis’ findings brought Motema to her current research interests which include gendered STEM education and decolonisation of education policies and curricula in Lesotho. For her DPhil project, Motema is interested in finding out the lived experiences of female Science teachers in Lesotho Secondary Schools especially focusing on the major changes in the Secondary school education system in Lesotho that have happened in the past five years as unique meeting points.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Judith Hillier

Danielle is a DPhil student researching how Black-British doctoral students navigate the spaces of the elite, providing a new theoretical framework to understand their agency better.

Her main interests are in Human Flourishing, Cultural Geography, Psychology, and Justice, and her work aims to inform and reform educational frameworks and practices.

Following Danielle’s BSc in Psychology and MRes in Research Methods in Psychology, she founded a social enterprise that merges psychological and academic strategies to guide undergraduate and master’s students study practices. In addition to this, Danielle provided pedagogical and behavioural support across SEN college, secondary and primary schools.

Some of Danielle’s notable work includes her research introducing a new University-wide EDI strategy at her former Higher Education institution, presenting insights and way-forwards on youth homelessness to HRH Prince Williams, and providing discipleship to next-gen leaders.

Dan is a part-time DPhil Education student whose research focuses on investigating reasons why individuals choose to study and then teach physics as a subject discipline and how these relate to issues of equity and power. He previously worked as a secondary school physics teacher in the West Midlands of England for around 15 years before taking up his current post as Associate Professor of Physics Education at the University of Birmingham where he works in widening participation in physics and teacher education.

Publications
  • Cottle, D 2022, ‘Harnessing the potential of recently retired physics teachers to mentor new physics teachers’, Physics Education, vol. 57, no. 1, 015020. https://doi.org/10.1088/1361-6552/ac3931
  • Cottle, D 2021, ‘Improving students’ mathematical skills in secondary science: ideas from mathematics pedagogy’, School Science Review, vol. 102, no. 381, pp. 61-64. <https://www.ase.org.uk/resources/school-science-review/issue-381/improving-students-mathematical-skills-in-secondary>
  • Cottle, D 2021, ‘The effects of Covid-19 on student transition from school to university in STEM subjects’, New Directions in the Teaching of Physical Sciences, vol. 16, no. 1, 3847, pp. 1-4. https://doi.org/10.29311/ndtps.v0i14.3847 
  • Cottle, D & Marshall, R 2016, ‘Exploring electrical resistance: a novel kinesthetic model helps to resolve some misconceptions’, Physics Education, vol. 51, no. 5. https://doi.org/10.1088/0031-9120/51/5/054004 

Chris is a third-year part time DPhil student. He is an experienced Director of Children’s Services working in London. He is interested in path dependence and whether it is a helpful concept to understand how children’s services work.

Yaoyao is a DPhil student in Education at Oxford.

Her research interest lies in Aptitude-Instruction-Interaction (ATI) in second language acquisition (SLA).

Yaoyao’s research investigates the mediating effects of individual differences in learners’ domain-general perceptual-cognitive abilities in instructed foreign language pronunciation acquisition in adulthood. She aims to further explore how aptitude hinders instructional effectiveness and help all students make the most of instruction regardless of aptitude profiles.

Yaoyao started her BA in the Japanese Language and Literature at Sun Yat-Sen University (中山大学) in China. She then moved to the University of Queensland to finish her BA with double majors in Japanese and Translation. After her BA, she worked as an English teacher in China for three years. Prior to her DPhil studies at Oxford, Yaoyao completed her Master’s degree in TESOL at Institute of Education, University College London. Her Master’s dissertation was supervised by Dr Kazuya Saito.

Pat is the Deputy Chief Executive of a large College Group.

A qualified accountant, she is accountable to the Corporation Board for the Group’s Estate, sustainability and for maintaining the Group’s outstanding financial health grade. Her specialisms include Leadership and Management, Identification and Application of Funding Streams as well as leading the Group in new acquisitions, ventures and developments. Pat is using her vast experience of public sector finances to explore the intersection of accounting, leadership and purpose.

Supervisors

James Robson and Ariel Lindorff

Alice received her Master’s in Child Study and Education from the Institute of Child Study at the University of Toronto. She has taught preschool through higher education as a teacher and principal in public and private schools in North America and Europe. Deeply committed to enhancing education, she believes in learning that connects students and teachers to the natural world and to their communities. She is actively involved in community organisations that promote intercultural, interracial, and interfaith understanding and allyship.

Supervisors

Steve Puttick

Victoria is an educational researcher and practitioner, specialising in educational support and methodology of teaching mathematics to low-achieving students. For over 9 years she has been working at Big Change Educational Centre (Moscow) which provides support to looked-after children.

Before joining the DPhil programme, she completed her undergraduate degree in Finance at Financial University in Moscow and then gained a MSc in Psychology of Education from the University of Bristol.

Victoria’s current research focuses on educational issues of care-experienced children and teaching mathematics to students of low achievement and motivation.

Supervisors

Karen Skilling and Gabriel Stylianides

Louise was born and raised in Glasgow and moved to Oxford to pursue a DPhil in Education.

Louise’s research interests are education policy, particularly higher education policy, as well as qualitative research into the experiences of students in higher education and reducing inequalities in access to higher education. Louise is also interested in educational capabilities, educational purpose, aspirations and philosophical debates about knowledge construction and co-construction. Louise has a First Class BA (Joint Honours) in Social Policy and Education from the University of Strathclyde, and two Masters degrees with Distinction also from the University of Strathclyde in Applied Educational and Social Research and Social Policy (Research Methods). Louise also participated in the University of Oxford’s UNIQ+ Graduate Access Programme in the summer of 2022, where she worked at the Department of Sociology with Melinda Mills, Bo Zhao and Evelina Akimova on research into the impact of socio-economic status on inequalities in access to veterinary care in Scotland. Louise’s DPhil thesis is interested in evaluating Lorella Terzi’s educational capabilities framework through the lens of contemporary higher education in order to gain an understanding of what graduate capabilities are identified by students and stakeholders as being necessary for enabling graduates to successfully thrive and adapt in a post-pandemic society.

 

Supervisors

Alis Oancea and Kelsey Inouye

Motema studied Neuroscience as an undergraduate at Dartmouth College in the USA and it is one of its courses, found interest in Education.

Motema then worked for various non-profit organisations in Lesotho and South Africa focusing on helping high school students from low SES backgrounds access opportunities to study in HE. In her Masters’ project Motema analysed Lesotho’s 2009 Curriculum and Assessment Policy. This analysis’ findings brought Motema to her current research interests which include gendered STEM education and decolonisation of education policies and curricula in Lesotho. For her DPhil project, Motema is interested in finding out the lived experiences of female Science teachers in Lesotho Secondary Schools especially focusing on the major changes in the Secondary school education system in Lesotho that have happened in the past five years as unique meeting points.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Judith Hillier

Danielle is a DPhil student researching how Black-British doctoral students navigate the spaces of the elite, providing a new theoretical framework to understand their agency better.

Her main interests are in Human Flourishing, Cultural Geography, Psychology, and Justice, and her work aims to inform and reform educational frameworks and practices.

Following Danielle’s BSc in Psychology and MRes in Research Methods in Psychology, she founded a social enterprise that merges psychological and academic strategies to guide undergraduate and master’s students study practices. In addition to this, Danielle provided pedagogical and behavioural support across SEN college, secondary and primary schools.

Some of Danielle’s notable work includes her research introducing a new University-wide EDI strategy at her former Higher Education institution, presenting insights and way-forwards on youth homelessness to HRH Prince Williams, and providing discipleship to next-gen leaders.

Dan is a part-time DPhil Education student whose research focuses on investigating reasons why individuals choose to study and then teach physics as a subject discipline and how these relate to issues of equity and power. He previously worked as a secondary school physics teacher in the West Midlands of England for around 15 years before taking up his current post as Associate Professor of Physics Education at the University of Birmingham where he works in widening participation in physics and teacher education.

Publications
  • Cottle, D 2022, ‘Harnessing the potential of recently retired physics teachers to mentor new physics teachers’, Physics Education, vol. 57, no. 1, 015020. https://doi.org/10.1088/1361-6552/ac3931
  • Cottle, D 2021, ‘Improving students’ mathematical skills in secondary science: ideas from mathematics pedagogy’, School Science Review, vol. 102, no. 381, pp. 61-64. <https://www.ase.org.uk/resources/school-science-review/issue-381/improving-students-mathematical-skills-in-secondary>
  • Cottle, D 2021, ‘The effects of Covid-19 on student transition from school to university in STEM subjects’, New Directions in the Teaching of Physical Sciences, vol. 16, no. 1, 3847, pp. 1-4. https://doi.org/10.29311/ndtps.v0i14.3847 
  • Cottle, D & Marshall, R 2016, ‘Exploring electrical resistance: a novel kinesthetic model helps to resolve some misconceptions’, Physics Education, vol. 51, no. 5. https://doi.org/10.1088/0031-9120/51/5/054004 

Chris is a third-year part time DPhil student. He is an experienced Director of Children’s Services working in London. He is interested in path dependence and whether it is a helpful concept to understand how children’s services work.

Yaoyao is a DPhil student in Education at Oxford.

Her research interest lies in Aptitude-Instruction-Interaction (ATI) in second language acquisition (SLA).

Yaoyao’s research investigates the mediating effects of individual differences in learners’ domain-general perceptual-cognitive abilities in instructed foreign language pronunciation acquisition in adulthood. She aims to further explore how aptitude hinders instructional effectiveness and help all students make the most of instruction regardless of aptitude profiles.

Yaoyao started her BA in the Japanese Language and Literature at Sun Yat-Sen University (中山大学) in China. She then moved to the University of Queensland to finish her BA with double majors in Japanese and Translation. After her BA, she worked as an English teacher in China for three years. Prior to her DPhil studies at Oxford, Yaoyao completed her Master’s degree in TESOL at Institute of Education, University College London. Her Master’s dissertation was supervised by Dr Kazuya Saito.

Pat is the Deputy Chief Executive of a large College Group.

A qualified accountant, she is accountable to the Corporation Board for the Group’s Estate, sustainability and for maintaining the Group’s outstanding financial health grade. Her specialisms include Leadership and Management, Identification and Application of Funding Streams as well as leading the Group in new acquisitions, ventures and developments. Pat is using her vast experience of public sector finances to explore the intersection of accounting, leadership and purpose.

Supervisors

James Robson and Ariel Lindorff

Alice received her Master’s in Child Study and Education from the Institute of Child Study at the University of Toronto. She has taught preschool through higher education as a teacher and principal in public and private schools in North America and Europe. Deeply committed to enhancing education, she believes in learning that connects students and teachers to the natural world and to their communities. She is actively involved in community organisations that promote intercultural, interracial, and interfaith understanding and allyship.

Supervisors

Steve Puttick

Victoria is an educational researcher and practitioner, specialising in educational support and methodology of teaching mathematics to low-achieving students. For over 9 years she has been working at Big Change Educational Centre (Moscow) which provides support to looked-after children.

Before joining the DPhil programme, she completed her undergraduate degree in Finance at Financial University in Moscow and then gained a MSc in Psychology of Education from the University of Bristol.

Victoria’s current research focuses on educational issues of care-experienced children and teaching mathematics to students of low achievement and motivation.

Supervisors

Karen Skilling and Gabriel Stylianides

Louise was born and raised in Glasgow and moved to Oxford to pursue a DPhil in Education.

Louise’s research interests are education policy, particularly higher education policy, as well as qualitative research into the experiences of students in higher education and reducing inequalities in access to higher education. Louise is also interested in educational capabilities, educational purpose, aspirations and philosophical debates about knowledge construction and co-construction. Louise has a First Class BA (Joint Honours) in Social Policy and Education from the University of Strathclyde, and two Masters degrees with Distinction also from the University of Strathclyde in Applied Educational and Social Research and Social Policy (Research Methods). Louise also participated in the University of Oxford’s UNIQ+ Graduate Access Programme in the summer of 2022, where she worked at the Department of Sociology with Melinda Mills, Bo Zhao and Evelina Akimova on research into the impact of socio-economic status on inequalities in access to veterinary care in Scotland. Louise’s DPhil thesis is interested in evaluating Lorella Terzi’s educational capabilities framework through the lens of contemporary higher education in order to gain an understanding of what graduate capabilities are identified by students and stakeholders as being necessary for enabling graduates to successfully thrive and adapt in a post-pandemic society.

 

Supervisors

Alis Oancea and Kelsey Inouye

Motema studied Neuroscience as an undergraduate at Dartmouth College in the USA and it is one of its courses, found interest in Education.

Motema then worked for various non-profit organisations in Lesotho and South Africa focusing on helping high school students from low SES backgrounds access opportunities to study in HE. In her Masters’ project Motema analysed Lesotho’s 2009 Curriculum and Assessment Policy. This analysis’ findings brought Motema to her current research interests which include gendered STEM education and decolonisation of education policies and curricula in Lesotho. For her DPhil project, Motema is interested in finding out the lived experiences of female Science teachers in Lesotho Secondary Schools especially focusing on the major changes in the Secondary school education system in Lesotho that have happened in the past five years as unique meeting points.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Judith Hillier

Danielle is a DPhil student researching how Black-British doctoral students navigate the spaces of the elite, providing a new theoretical framework to understand their agency better.

Her main interests are in Human Flourishing, Cultural Geography, Psychology, and Justice, and her work aims to inform and reform educational frameworks and practices.

Following Danielle’s BSc in Psychology and MRes in Research Methods in Psychology, she founded a social enterprise that merges psychological and academic strategies to guide undergraduate and master’s students study practices. In addition to this, Danielle provided pedagogical and behavioural support across SEN college, secondary and primary schools.

Some of Danielle’s notable work includes her research introducing a new University-wide EDI strategy at her former Higher Education institution, presenting insights and way-forwards on youth homelessness to HRH Prince Williams, and providing discipleship to next-gen leaders.

Dan is a part-time DPhil Education student whose research focuses on investigating reasons why individuals choose to study and then teach physics as a subject discipline and how these relate to issues of equity and power. He previously worked as a secondary school physics teacher in the West Midlands of England for around 15 years before taking up his current post as Associate Professor of Physics Education at the University of Birmingham where he works in widening participation in physics and teacher education.

Publications
  • Cottle, D 2022, ‘Harnessing the potential of recently retired physics teachers to mentor new physics teachers’, Physics Education, vol. 57, no. 1, 015020. https://doi.org/10.1088/1361-6552/ac3931
  • Cottle, D 2021, ‘Improving students’ mathematical skills in secondary science: ideas from mathematics pedagogy’, School Science Review, vol. 102, no. 381, pp. 61-64. <https://www.ase.org.uk/resources/school-science-review/issue-381/improving-students-mathematical-skills-in-secondary>
  • Cottle, D 2021, ‘The effects of Covid-19 on student transition from school to university in STEM subjects’, New Directions in the Teaching of Physical Sciences, vol. 16, no. 1, 3847, pp. 1-4. https://doi.org/10.29311/ndtps.v0i14.3847 
  • Cottle, D & Marshall, R 2016, ‘Exploring electrical resistance: a novel kinesthetic model helps to resolve some misconceptions’, Physics Education, vol. 51, no. 5. https://doi.org/10.1088/0031-9120/51/5/054004 

Chris is a third-year part time DPhil student. He is an experienced Director of Children’s Services working in London. He is interested in path dependence and whether it is a helpful concept to understand how children’s services work.

Yaoyao is a DPhil student in Education at Oxford.

Her research interest lies in Aptitude-Instruction-Interaction (ATI) in second language acquisition (SLA).

Yaoyao’s research investigates the mediating effects of individual differences in learners’ domain-general perceptual-cognitive abilities in instructed foreign language pronunciation acquisition in adulthood. She aims to further explore how aptitude hinders instructional effectiveness and help all students make the most of instruction regardless of aptitude profiles.

Yaoyao started her BA in the Japanese Language and Literature at Sun Yat-Sen University (中山大学) in China. She then moved to the University of Queensland to finish her BA with double majors in Japanese and Translation. After her BA, she worked as an English teacher in China for three years. Prior to her DPhil studies at Oxford, Yaoyao completed her Master’s degree in TESOL at Institute of Education, University College London. Her Master’s dissertation was supervised by Dr Kazuya Saito.

Pat is the Deputy Chief Executive of a large College Group.

A qualified accountant, she is accountable to the Corporation Board for the Group’s Estate, sustainability and for maintaining the Group’s outstanding financial health grade. Her specialisms include Leadership and Management, Identification and Application of Funding Streams as well as leading the Group in new acquisitions, ventures and developments. Pat is using her vast experience of public sector finances to explore the intersection of accounting, leadership and purpose.

Supervisors

James Robson and Ariel Lindorff

Alice received her Master’s in Child Study and Education from the Institute of Child Study at the University of Toronto. She has taught preschool through higher education as a teacher and principal in public and private schools in North America and Europe. Deeply committed to enhancing education, she believes in learning that connects students and teachers to the natural world and to their communities. She is actively involved in community organisations that promote intercultural, interracial, and interfaith understanding and allyship.

Supervisors

Steve Puttick

Victoria is an educational researcher and practitioner, specialising in educational support and methodology of teaching mathematics to low-achieving students. For over 9 years she has been working at Big Change Educational Centre (Moscow) which provides support to looked-after children.

Before joining the DPhil programme, she completed her undergraduate degree in Finance at Financial University in Moscow and then gained a MSc in Psychology of Education from the University of Bristol.

Victoria’s current research focuses on educational issues of care-experienced children and teaching mathematics to students of low achievement and motivation.

Supervisors

Karen Skilling and Gabriel Stylianides

Louise was born and raised in Glasgow and moved to Oxford to pursue a DPhil in Education.

Louise’s research interests are education policy, particularly higher education policy, as well as qualitative research into the experiences of students in higher education and reducing inequalities in access to higher education. Louise is also interested in educational capabilities, educational purpose, aspirations and philosophical debates about knowledge construction and co-construction. Louise has a First Class BA (Joint Honours) in Social Policy and Education from the University of Strathclyde, and two Masters degrees with Distinction also from the University of Strathclyde in Applied Educational and Social Research and Social Policy (Research Methods). Louise also participated in the University of Oxford’s UNIQ+ Graduate Access Programme in the summer of 2022, where she worked at the Department of Sociology with Melinda Mills, Bo Zhao and Evelina Akimova on research into the impact of socio-economic status on inequalities in access to veterinary care in Scotland. Louise’s DPhil thesis is interested in evaluating Lorella Terzi’s educational capabilities framework through the lens of contemporary higher education in order to gain an understanding of what graduate capabilities are identified by students and stakeholders as being necessary for enabling graduates to successfully thrive and adapt in a post-pandemic society.

 

Supervisors

Alis Oancea and Kelsey Inouye

Motema studied Neuroscience as an undergraduate at Dartmouth College in the USA and it is one of its courses, found interest in Education.

Motema then worked for various non-profit organisations in Lesotho and South Africa focusing on helping high school students from low SES backgrounds access opportunities to study in HE. In her Masters’ project Motema analysed Lesotho’s 2009 Curriculum and Assessment Policy. This analysis’ findings brought Motema to her current research interests which include gendered STEM education and decolonisation of education policies and curricula in Lesotho. For her DPhil project, Motema is interested in finding out the lived experiences of female Science teachers in Lesotho Secondary Schools especially focusing on the major changes in the Secondary school education system in Lesotho that have happened in the past five years as unique meeting points.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Judith Hillier

Danielle is a DPhil student researching how Black-British doctoral students navigate the spaces of the elite, providing a new theoretical framework to understand their agency better.

Her main interests are in Human Flourishing, Cultural Geography, Psychology, and Justice, and her work aims to inform and reform educational frameworks and practices.

Following Danielle’s BSc in Psychology and MRes in Research Methods in Psychology, she founded a social enterprise that merges psychological and academic strategies to guide undergraduate and master’s students study practices. In addition to this, Danielle provided pedagogical and behavioural support across SEN college, secondary and primary schools.

Some of Danielle’s notable work includes her research introducing a new University-wide EDI strategy at her former Higher Education institution, presenting insights and way-forwards on youth homelessness to HRH Prince Williams, and providing discipleship to next-gen leaders.

Dan is a part-time DPhil Education student whose research focuses on investigating reasons why individuals choose to study and then teach physics as a subject discipline and how these relate to issues of equity and power. He previously worked as a secondary school physics teacher in the West Midlands of England for around 15 years before taking up his current post as Associate Professor of Physics Education at the University of Birmingham where he works in widening participation in physics and teacher education.

Publications
  • Cottle, D 2022, ‘Harnessing the potential of recently retired physics teachers to mentor new physics teachers’, Physics Education, vol. 57, no. 1, 015020. https://doi.org/10.1088/1361-6552/ac3931
  • Cottle, D 2021, ‘Improving students’ mathematical skills in secondary science: ideas from mathematics pedagogy’, School Science Review, vol. 102, no. 381, pp. 61-64. <https://www.ase.org.uk/resources/school-science-review/issue-381/improving-students-mathematical-skills-in-secondary>
  • Cottle, D 2021, ‘The effects of Covid-19 on student transition from school to university in STEM subjects’, New Directions in the Teaching of Physical Sciences, vol. 16, no. 1, 3847, pp. 1-4. https://doi.org/10.29311/ndtps.v0i14.3847 
  • Cottle, D & Marshall, R 2016, ‘Exploring electrical resistance: a novel kinesthetic model helps to resolve some misconceptions’, Physics Education, vol. 51, no. 5. https://doi.org/10.1088/0031-9120/51/5/054004 

Chris is a third-year part time DPhil student. He is an experienced Director of Children’s Services working in London. He is interested in path dependence and whether it is a helpful concept to understand how children’s services work.

Yaoyao is a DPhil student in Education at Oxford.

Her research interest lies in Aptitude-Instruction-Interaction (ATI) in second language acquisition (SLA).

Yaoyao’s research investigates the mediating effects of individual differences in learners’ domain-general perceptual-cognitive abilities in instructed foreign language pronunciation acquisition in adulthood. She aims to further explore how aptitude hinders instructional effectiveness and help all students make the most of instruction regardless of aptitude profiles.

Yaoyao started her BA in the Japanese Language and Literature at Sun Yat-Sen University (中山大学) in China. She then moved to the University of Queensland to finish her BA with double majors in Japanese and Translation. After her BA, she worked as an English teacher in China for three years. Prior to her DPhil studies at Oxford, Yaoyao completed her Master’s degree in TESOL at Institute of Education, University College London. Her Master’s dissertation was supervised by Dr Kazuya Saito.

Pat is the Deputy Chief Executive of a large College Group.

A qualified accountant, she is accountable to the Corporation Board for the Group’s Estate, sustainability and for maintaining the Group’s outstanding financial health grade. Her specialisms include Leadership and Management, Identification and Application of Funding Streams as well as leading the Group in new acquisitions, ventures and developments. Pat is using her vast experience of public sector finances to explore the intersection of accounting, leadership and purpose.

Supervisors

James Robson and Ariel Lindorff

Alice received her Master’s in Child Study and Education from the Institute of Child Study at the University of Toronto. She has taught preschool through higher education as a teacher and principal in public and private schools in North America and Europe. Deeply committed to enhancing education, she believes in learning that connects students and teachers to the natural world and to their communities. She is actively involved in community organisations that promote intercultural, interracial, and interfaith understanding and allyship.

Supervisors

Steve Puttick

Victoria is an educational researcher and practitioner, specialising in educational support and methodology of teaching mathematics to low-achieving students. For over 9 years she has been working at Big Change Educational Centre (Moscow) which provides support to looked-after children.

Before joining the DPhil programme, she completed her undergraduate degree in Finance at Financial University in Moscow and then gained a MSc in Psychology of Education from the University of Bristol.

Victoria’s current research focuses on educational issues of care-experienced children and teaching mathematics to students of low achievement and motivation.

Supervisors

Karen Skilling and Gabriel Stylianides

Louise was born and raised in Glasgow and moved to Oxford to pursue a DPhil in Education.

Louise’s research interests are education policy, particularly higher education policy, as well as qualitative research into the experiences of students in higher education and reducing inequalities in access to higher education. Louise is also interested in educational capabilities, educational purpose, aspirations and philosophical debates about knowledge construction and co-construction. Louise has a First Class BA (Joint Honours) in Social Policy and Education from the University of Strathclyde, and two Masters degrees with Distinction also from the University of Strathclyde in Applied Educational and Social Research and Social Policy (Research Methods). Louise also participated in the University of Oxford’s UNIQ+ Graduate Access Programme in the summer of 2022, where she worked at the Department of Sociology with Melinda Mills, Bo Zhao and Evelina Akimova on research into the impact of socio-economic status on inequalities in access to veterinary care in Scotland. Louise’s DPhil thesis is interested in evaluating Lorella Terzi’s educational capabilities framework through the lens of contemporary higher education in order to gain an understanding of what graduate capabilities are identified by students and stakeholders as being necessary for enabling graduates to successfully thrive and adapt in a post-pandemic society.

 

Supervisors

Alis Oancea and Kelsey Inouye

Motema studied Neuroscience as an undergraduate at Dartmouth College in the USA and it is one of its courses, found interest in Education.

Motema then worked for various non-profit organisations in Lesotho and South Africa focusing on helping high school students from low SES backgrounds access opportunities to study in HE. In her Masters’ project Motema analysed Lesotho’s 2009 Curriculum and Assessment Policy. This analysis’ findings brought Motema to her current research interests which include gendered STEM education and decolonisation of education policies and curricula in Lesotho. For her DPhil project, Motema is interested in finding out the lived experiences of female Science teachers in Lesotho Secondary Schools especially focusing on the major changes in the Secondary school education system in Lesotho that have happened in the past five years as unique meeting points.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Judith Hillier

Danielle is a DPhil student researching how Black-British doctoral students navigate the spaces of the elite, providing a new theoretical framework to understand their agency better.

Her main interests are in Human Flourishing, Cultural Geography, Psychology, and Justice, and her work aims to inform and reform educational frameworks and practices.

Following Danielle’s BSc in Psychology and MRes in Research Methods in Psychology, she founded a social enterprise that merges psychological and academic strategies to guide undergraduate and master’s students study practices. In addition to this, Danielle provided pedagogical and behavioural support across SEN college, secondary and primary schools.

Some of Danielle’s notable work includes her research introducing a new University-wide EDI strategy at her former Higher Education institution, presenting insights and way-forwards on youth homelessness to HRH Prince Williams, and providing discipleship to next-gen leaders.

Dan is a part-time DPhil Education student whose research focuses on investigating reasons why individuals choose to study and then teach physics as a subject discipline and how these relate to issues of equity and power. He previously worked as a secondary school physics teacher in the West Midlands of England for around 15 years before taking up his current post as Associate Professor of Physics Education at the University of Birmingham where he works in widening participation in physics and teacher education.

Publications
  • Cottle, D 2022, ‘Harnessing the potential of recently retired physics teachers to mentor new physics teachers’, Physics Education, vol. 57, no. 1, 015020. https://doi.org/10.1088/1361-6552/ac3931
  • Cottle, D 2021, ‘Improving students’ mathematical skills in secondary science: ideas from mathematics pedagogy’, School Science Review, vol. 102, no. 381, pp. 61-64. <https://www.ase.org.uk/resources/school-science-review/issue-381/improving-students-mathematical-skills-in-secondary>
  • Cottle, D 2021, ‘The effects of Covid-19 on student transition from school to university in STEM subjects’, New Directions in the Teaching of Physical Sciences, vol. 16, no. 1, 3847, pp. 1-4. https://doi.org/10.29311/ndtps.v0i14.3847 
  • Cottle, D & Marshall, R 2016, ‘Exploring electrical resistance: a novel kinesthetic model helps to resolve some misconceptions’, Physics Education, vol. 51, no. 5. https://doi.org/10.1088/0031-9120/51/5/054004 

Chris is a third-year part time DPhil student. He is an experienced Director of Children’s Services working in London. He is interested in path dependence and whether it is a helpful concept to understand how children’s services work.

Yaoyao is a DPhil student in Education at Oxford.

Her research interest lies in Aptitude-Instruction-Interaction (ATI) in second language acquisition (SLA).

Yaoyao’s research investigates the mediating effects of individual differences in learners’ domain-general perceptual-cognitive abilities in instructed foreign language pronunciation acquisition in adulthood. She aims to further explore how aptitude hinders instructional effectiveness and help all students make the most of instruction regardless of aptitude profiles.

Yaoyao started her BA in the Japanese Language and Literature at Sun Yat-Sen University (中山大学) in China. She then moved to the University of Queensland to finish her BA with double majors in Japanese and Translation. After her BA, she worked as an English teacher in China for three years. Prior to her DPhil studies at Oxford, Yaoyao completed her Master’s degree in TESOL at Institute of Education, University College London. Her Master’s dissertation was supervised by Dr Kazuya Saito.

Pat is the Deputy Chief Executive of a large College Group.

A qualified accountant, she is accountable to the Corporation Board for the Group’s Estate, sustainability and for maintaining the Group’s outstanding financial health grade. Her specialisms include Leadership and Management, Identification and Application of Funding Streams as well as leading the Group in new acquisitions, ventures and developments. Pat is using her vast experience of public sector finances to explore the intersection of accounting, leadership and purpose.

Supervisors

James Robson and Ariel Lindorff

Alice received her Master’s in Child Study and Education from the Institute of Child Study at the University of Toronto. She has taught preschool through higher education as a teacher and principal in public and private schools in North America and Europe. Deeply committed to enhancing education, she believes in learning that connects students and teachers to the natural world and to their communities. She is actively involved in community organisations that promote intercultural, interracial, and interfaith understanding and allyship.

Supervisors

Steve Puttick

Victoria is an educational researcher and practitioner, specialising in educational support and methodology of teaching mathematics to low-achieving students. For over 9 years she has been working at Big Change Educational Centre (Moscow) which provides support to looked-after children.

Before joining the DPhil programme, she completed her undergraduate degree in Finance at Financial University in Moscow and then gained a MSc in Psychology of Education from the University of Bristol.

Victoria’s current research focuses on educational issues of care-experienced children and teaching mathematics to students of low achievement and motivation.

Supervisors

Karen Skilling and Gabriel Stylianides

Louise was born and raised in Glasgow and moved to Oxford to pursue a DPhil in Education.

Louise’s research interests are education policy, particularly higher education policy, as well as qualitative research into the experiences of students in higher education and reducing inequalities in access to higher education. Louise is also interested in educational capabilities, educational purpose, aspirations and philosophical debates about knowledge construction and co-construction. Louise has a First Class BA (Joint Honours) in Social Policy and Education from the University of Strathclyde, and two Masters degrees with Distinction also from the University of Strathclyde in Applied Educational and Social Research and Social Policy (Research Methods). Louise also participated in the University of Oxford’s UNIQ+ Graduate Access Programme in the summer of 2022, where she worked at the Department of Sociology with Melinda Mills, Bo Zhao and Evelina Akimova on research into the impact of socio-economic status on inequalities in access to veterinary care in Scotland. Louise’s DPhil thesis is interested in evaluating Lorella Terzi’s educational capabilities framework through the lens of contemporary higher education in order to gain an understanding of what graduate capabilities are identified by students and stakeholders as being necessary for enabling graduates to successfully thrive and adapt in a post-pandemic society.

 

Supervisors

Alis Oancea and Kelsey Inouye

Motema studied Neuroscience as an undergraduate at Dartmouth College in the USA and it is one of its courses, found interest in Education.

Motema then worked for various non-profit organisations in Lesotho and South Africa focusing on helping high school students from low SES backgrounds access opportunities to study in HE. In her Masters’ project Motema analysed Lesotho’s 2009 Curriculum and Assessment Policy. This analysis’ findings brought Motema to her current research interests which include gendered STEM education and decolonisation of education policies and curricula in Lesotho. For her DPhil project, Motema is interested in finding out the lived experiences of female Science teachers in Lesotho Secondary Schools especially focusing on the major changes in the Secondary school education system in Lesotho that have happened in the past five years as unique meeting points.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Judith Hillier

Danielle is a DPhil student researching how Black-British doctoral students navigate the spaces of the elite, providing a new theoretical framework to understand their agency better.

Her main interests are in Human Flourishing, Cultural Geography, Psychology, and Justice, and her work aims to inform and reform educational frameworks and practices.

Following Danielle’s BSc in Psychology and MRes in Research Methods in Psychology, she founded a social enterprise that merges psychological and academic strategies to guide undergraduate and master’s students study practices. In addition to this, Danielle provided pedagogical and behavioural support across SEN college, secondary and primary schools.

Some of Danielle’s notable work includes her research introducing a new University-wide EDI strategy at her former Higher Education institution, presenting insights and way-forwards on youth homelessness to HRH Prince Williams, and providing discipleship to next-gen leaders.

Dan is a part-time DPhil Education student whose research focuses on investigating reasons why individuals choose to study and then teach physics as a subject discipline and how these relate to issues of equity and power. He previously worked as a secondary school physics teacher in the West Midlands of England for around 15 years before taking up his current post as Associate Professor of Physics Education at the University of Birmingham where he works in widening participation in physics and teacher education.

Publications
  • Cottle, D 2022, ‘Harnessing the potential of recently retired physics teachers to mentor new physics teachers’, Physics Education, vol. 57, no. 1, 015020. https://doi.org/10.1088/1361-6552/ac3931
  • Cottle, D 2021, ‘Improving students’ mathematical skills in secondary science: ideas from mathematics pedagogy’, School Science Review, vol. 102, no. 381, pp. 61-64. <https://www.ase.org.uk/resources/school-science-review/issue-381/improving-students-mathematical-skills-in-secondary>
  • Cottle, D 2021, ‘The effects of Covid-19 on student transition from school to university in STEM subjects’, New Directions in the Teaching of Physical Sciences, vol. 16, no. 1, 3847, pp. 1-4. https://doi.org/10.29311/ndtps.v0i14.3847 
  • Cottle, D & Marshall, R 2016, ‘Exploring electrical resistance: a novel kinesthetic model helps to resolve some misconceptions’, Physics Education, vol. 51, no. 5. https://doi.org/10.1088/0031-9120/51/5/054004 

Chris is a third-year part time DPhil student. He is an experienced Director of Children’s Services working in London. He is interested in path dependence and whether it is a helpful concept to understand how children’s services work.

Yaoyao is a DPhil student in Education at Oxford.

Her research interest lies in Aptitude-Instruction-Interaction (ATI) in second language acquisition (SLA).

Yaoyao’s research investigates the mediating effects of individual differences in learners’ domain-general perceptual-cognitive abilities in instructed foreign language pronunciation acquisition in adulthood. She aims to further explore how aptitude hinders instructional effectiveness and help all students make the most of instruction regardless of aptitude profiles.

Yaoyao started her BA in the Japanese Language and Literature at Sun Yat-Sen University (中山大学) in China. She then moved to the University of Queensland to finish her BA with double majors in Japanese and Translation. After her BA, she worked as an English teacher in China for three years. Prior to her DPhil studies at Oxford, Yaoyao completed her Master’s degree in TESOL at Institute of Education, University College London. Her Master’s dissertation was supervised by Dr Kazuya Saito.

Pat is the Deputy Chief Executive of a large College Group.

A qualified accountant, she is accountable to the Corporation Board for the Group’s Estate, sustainability and for maintaining the Group’s outstanding financial health grade. Her specialisms include Leadership and Management, Identification and Application of Funding Streams as well as leading the Group in new acquisitions, ventures and developments. Pat is using her vast experience of public sector finances to explore the intersection of accounting, leadership and purpose.

Supervisors

James Robson and Ariel Lindorff

Alice received her Master’s in Child Study and Education from the Institute of Child Study at the University of Toronto. She has taught preschool through higher education as a teacher and principal in public and private schools in North America and Europe. Deeply committed to enhancing education, she believes in learning that connects students and teachers to the natural world and to their communities. She is actively involved in community organisations that promote intercultural, interracial, and interfaith understanding and allyship.

Supervisors

Steve Puttick

Victoria is an educational researcher and practitioner, specialising in educational support and methodology of teaching mathematics to low-achieving students. For over 9 years she has been working at Big Change Educational Centre (Moscow) which provides support to looked-after children.

Before joining the DPhil programme, she completed her undergraduate degree in Finance at Financial University in Moscow and then gained a MSc in Psychology of Education from the University of Bristol.

Victoria’s current research focuses on educational issues of care-experienced children and teaching mathematics to students of low achievement and motivation.

Supervisors

Karen Skilling and Gabriel Stylianides

Louise was born and raised in Glasgow and moved to Oxford to pursue a DPhil in Education.

Louise’s research interests are education policy, particularly higher education policy, as well as qualitative research into the experiences of students in higher education and reducing inequalities in access to higher education. Louise is also interested in educational capabilities, educational purpose, aspirations and philosophical debates about knowledge construction and co-construction. Louise has a First Class BA (Joint Honours) in Social Policy and Education from the University of Strathclyde, and two Masters degrees with Distinction also from the University of Strathclyde in Applied Educational and Social Research and Social Policy (Research Methods). Louise also participated in the University of Oxford’s UNIQ+ Graduate Access Programme in the summer of 2022, where she worked at the Department of Sociology with Melinda Mills, Bo Zhao and Evelina Akimova on research into the impact of socio-economic status on inequalities in access to veterinary care in Scotland. Louise’s DPhil thesis is interested in evaluating Lorella Terzi’s educational capabilities framework through the lens of contemporary higher education in order to gain an understanding of what graduate capabilities are identified by students and stakeholders as being necessary for enabling graduates to successfully thrive and adapt in a post-pandemic society.

 

Supervisors

Alis Oancea and Kelsey Inouye

Motema studied Neuroscience as an undergraduate at Dartmouth College in the USA and it is one of its courses, found interest in Education.

Motema then worked for various non-profit organisations in Lesotho and South Africa focusing on helping high school students from low SES backgrounds access opportunities to study in HE. In her Masters’ project Motema analysed Lesotho’s 2009 Curriculum and Assessment Policy. This analysis’ findings brought Motema to her current research interests which include gendered STEM education and decolonisation of education policies and curricula in Lesotho. For her DPhil project, Motema is interested in finding out the lived experiences of female Science teachers in Lesotho Secondary Schools especially focusing on the major changes in the Secondary school education system in Lesotho that have happened in the past five years as unique meeting points.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Judith Hillier

Danielle is a DPhil student researching how Black-British doctoral students navigate the spaces of the elite, providing a new theoretical framework to understand their agency better.

Her main interests are in Human Flourishing, Cultural Geography, Psychology, and Justice, and her work aims to inform and reform educational frameworks and practices.

Following Danielle’s BSc in Psychology and MRes in Research Methods in Psychology, she founded a social enterprise that merges psychological and academic strategies to guide undergraduate and master’s students study practices. In addition to this, Danielle provided pedagogical and behavioural support across SEN college, secondary and primary schools.

Some of Danielle’s notable work includes her research introducing a new University-wide EDI strategy at her former Higher Education institution, presenting insights and way-forwards on youth homelessness to HRH Prince Williams, and providing discipleship to next-gen leaders.

Dan is a part-time DPhil Education student whose research focuses on investigating reasons why individuals choose to study and then teach physics as a subject discipline and how these relate to issues of equity and power. He previously worked as a secondary school physics teacher in the West Midlands of England for around 15 years before taking up his current post as Associate Professor of Physics Education at the University of Birmingham where he works in widening participation in physics and teacher education.

Publications
  • Cottle, D 2022, ‘Harnessing the potential of recently retired physics teachers to mentor new physics teachers’, Physics Education, vol. 57, no. 1, 015020. https://doi.org/10.1088/1361-6552/ac3931
  • Cottle, D 2021, ‘Improving students’ mathematical skills in secondary science: ideas from mathematics pedagogy’, School Science Review, vol. 102, no. 381, pp. 61-64. <https://www.ase.org.uk/resources/school-science-review/issue-381/improving-students-mathematical-skills-in-secondary>
  • Cottle, D 2021, ‘The effects of Covid-19 on student transition from school to university in STEM subjects’, New Directions in the Teaching of Physical Sciences, vol. 16, no. 1, 3847, pp. 1-4. https://doi.org/10.29311/ndtps.v0i14.3847 
  • Cottle, D & Marshall, R 2016, ‘Exploring electrical resistance: a novel kinesthetic model helps to resolve some misconceptions’, Physics Education, vol. 51, no. 5. https://doi.org/10.1088/0031-9120/51/5/054004 

Chris is a third-year part time DPhil student. He is an experienced Director of Children’s Services working in London. He is interested in path dependence and whether it is a helpful concept to understand how children’s services work.

Yaoyao is a DPhil student in Education at Oxford.

Her research interest lies in Aptitude-Instruction-Interaction (ATI) in second language acquisition (SLA).

Yaoyao’s research investigates the mediating effects of individual differences in learners’ domain-general perceptual-cognitive abilities in instructed foreign language pronunciation acquisition in adulthood. She aims to further explore how aptitude hinders instructional effectiveness and help all students make the most of instruction regardless of aptitude profiles.

Yaoyao started her BA in the Japanese Language and Literature at Sun Yat-Sen University (中山大学) in China. She then moved to the University of Queensland to finish her BA with double majors in Japanese and Translation. After her BA, she worked as an English teacher in China for three years. Prior to her DPhil studies at Oxford, Yaoyao completed her Master’s degree in TESOL at Institute of Education, University College London. Her Master’s dissertation was supervised by Dr Kazuya Saito.

Pat is the Deputy Chief Executive of a large College Group.

A qualified accountant, she is accountable to the Corporation Board for the Group’s Estate, sustainability and for maintaining the Group’s outstanding financial health grade. Her specialisms include Leadership and Management, Identification and Application of Funding Streams as well as leading the Group in new acquisitions, ventures and developments. Pat is using her vast experience of public sector finances to explore the intersection of accounting, leadership and purpose.

Supervisors

James Robson and Ariel Lindorff

Alice received her Master’s in Child Study and Education from the Institute of Child Study at the University of Toronto. She has taught preschool through higher education as a teacher and principal in public and private schools in North America and Europe. Deeply committed to enhancing education, she believes in learning that connects students and teachers to the natural world and to their communities. She is actively involved in community organisations that promote intercultural, interracial, and interfaith understanding and allyship.

Supervisors

Steve Puttick

Victoria is an educational researcher and practitioner, specialising in educational support and methodology of teaching mathematics to low-achieving students. For over 9 years she has been working at Big Change Educational Centre (Moscow) which provides support to looked-after children.

Before joining the DPhil programme, she completed her undergraduate degree in Finance at Financial University in Moscow and then gained a MSc in Psychology of Education from the University of Bristol.

Victoria’s current research focuses on educational issues of care-experienced children and teaching mathematics to students of low achievement and motivation.

Supervisors

Karen Skilling and Gabriel Stylianides

Louise was born and raised in Glasgow and moved to Oxford to pursue a DPhil in Education.

Louise’s research interests are education policy, particularly higher education policy, as well as qualitative research into the experiences of students in higher education and reducing inequalities in access to higher education. Louise is also interested in educational capabilities, educational purpose, aspirations and philosophical debates about knowledge construction and co-construction. Louise has a First Class BA (Joint Honours) in Social Policy and Education from the University of Strathclyde, and two Masters degrees with Distinction also from the University of Strathclyde in Applied Educational and Social Research and Social Policy (Research Methods). Louise also participated in the University of Oxford’s UNIQ+ Graduate Access Programme in the summer of 2022, where she worked at the Department of Sociology with Melinda Mills, Bo Zhao and Evelina Akimova on research into the impact of socio-economic status on inequalities in access to veterinary care in Scotland. Louise’s DPhil thesis is interested in evaluating Lorella Terzi’s educational capabilities framework through the lens of contemporary higher education in order to gain an understanding of what graduate capabilities are identified by students and stakeholders as being necessary for enabling graduates to successfully thrive and adapt in a post-pandemic society.

 

Supervisors

Alis Oancea and Kelsey Inouye

Motema studied Neuroscience as an undergraduate at Dartmouth College in the USA and it is one of its courses, found interest in Education.

Motema then worked for various non-profit organisations in Lesotho and South Africa focusing on helping high school students from low SES backgrounds access opportunities to study in HE. In her Masters’ project Motema analysed Lesotho’s 2009 Curriculum and Assessment Policy. This analysis’ findings brought Motema to her current research interests which include gendered STEM education and decolonisation of education policies and curricula in Lesotho. For her DPhil project, Motema is interested in finding out the lived experiences of female Science teachers in Lesotho Secondary Schools especially focusing on the major changes in the Secondary school education system in Lesotho that have happened in the past five years as unique meeting points.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Judith Hillier

Danielle is a DPhil student researching how Black-British doctoral students navigate the spaces of the elite, providing a new theoretical framework to understand their agency better.

Her main interests are in Human Flourishing, Cultural Geography, Psychology, and Justice, and her work aims to inform and reform educational frameworks and practices.

Following Danielle’s BSc in Psychology and MRes in Research Methods in Psychology, she founded a social enterprise that merges psychological and academic strategies to guide undergraduate and master’s students study practices. In addition to this, Danielle provided pedagogical and behavioural support across SEN college, secondary and primary schools.

Some of Danielle’s notable work includes her research introducing a new University-wide EDI strategy at her former Higher Education institution, presenting insights and way-forwards on youth homelessness to HRH Prince Williams, and providing discipleship to next-gen leaders.

Dan is a part-time DPhil Education student whose research focuses on investigating reasons why individuals choose to study and then teach physics as a subject discipline and how these relate to issues of equity and power. He previously worked as a secondary school physics teacher in the West Midlands of England for around 15 years before taking up his current post as Associate Professor of Physics Education at the University of Birmingham where he works in widening participation in physics and teacher education.

Publications
  • Cottle, D 2022, ‘Harnessing the potential of recently retired physics teachers to mentor new physics teachers’, Physics Education, vol. 57, no. 1, 015020. https://doi.org/10.1088/1361-6552/ac3931
  • Cottle, D 2021, ‘Improving students’ mathematical skills in secondary science: ideas from mathematics pedagogy’, School Science Review, vol. 102, no. 381, pp. 61-64. <https://www.ase.org.uk/resources/school-science-review/issue-381/improving-students-mathematical-skills-in-secondary>
  • Cottle, D 2021, ‘The effects of Covid-19 on student transition from school to university in STEM subjects’, New Directions in the Teaching of Physical Sciences, vol. 16, no. 1, 3847, pp. 1-4. https://doi.org/10.29311/ndtps.v0i14.3847 
  • Cottle, D & Marshall, R 2016, ‘Exploring electrical resistance: a novel kinesthetic model helps to resolve some misconceptions’, Physics Education, vol. 51, no. 5. https://doi.org/10.1088/0031-9120/51/5/054004 

Chris is a third-year part time DPhil student. He is an experienced Director of Children’s Services working in London. He is interested in path dependence and whether it is a helpful concept to understand how children’s services work.

Yaoyao is a DPhil student in Education at Oxford.

Her research interest lies in Aptitude-Instruction-Interaction (ATI) in second language acquisition (SLA).

Yaoyao’s research investigates the mediating effects of individual differences in learners’ domain-general perceptual-cognitive abilities in instructed foreign language pronunciation acquisition in adulthood. She aims to further explore how aptitude hinders instructional effectiveness and help all students make the most of instruction regardless of aptitude profiles.

Yaoyao started her BA in the Japanese Language and Literature at Sun Yat-Sen University (中山大学) in China. She then moved to the University of Queensland to finish her BA with double majors in Japanese and Translation. After her BA, she worked as an English teacher in China for three years. Prior to her DPhil studies at Oxford, Yaoyao completed her Master’s degree in TESOL at Institute of Education, University College London. Her Master’s dissertation was supervised by Dr Kazuya Saito.

Pat is the Deputy Chief Executive of a large College Group.

A qualified accountant, she is accountable to the Corporation Board for the Group’s Estate, sustainability and for maintaining the Group’s outstanding financial health grade. Her specialisms include Leadership and Management, Identification and Application of Funding Streams as well as leading the Group in new acquisitions, ventures and developments. Pat is using her vast experience of public sector finances to explore the intersection of accounting, leadership and purpose.

Supervisors

James Robson and Ariel Lindorff

Alice received her Master’s in Child Study and Education from the Institute of Child Study at the University of Toronto. She has taught preschool through higher education as a teacher and principal in public and private schools in North America and Europe. Deeply committed to enhancing education, she believes in learning that connects students and teachers to the natural world and to their communities. She is actively involved in community organisations that promote intercultural, interracial, and interfaith understanding and allyship.

Supervisors

Steve Puttick

Victoria is an educational researcher and practitioner, specialising in educational support and methodology of teaching mathematics to low-achieving students. For over 9 years she has been working at Big Change Educational Centre (Moscow) which provides support to looked-after children.

Before joining the DPhil programme, she completed her undergraduate degree in Finance at Financial University in Moscow and then gained a MSc in Psychology of Education from the University of Bristol.

Victoria’s current research focuses on educational issues of care-experienced children and teaching mathematics to students of low achievement and motivation.

Supervisors

Karen Skilling and Gabriel Stylianides

Louise was born and raised in Glasgow and moved to Oxford to pursue a DPhil in Education.

Louise’s research interests are education policy, particularly higher education policy, as well as qualitative research into the experiences of students in higher education and reducing inequalities in access to higher education. Louise is also interested in educational capabilities, educational purpose, aspirations and philosophical debates about knowledge construction and co-construction. Louise has a First Class BA (Joint Honours) in Social Policy and Education from the University of Strathclyde, and two Masters degrees with Distinction also from the University of Strathclyde in Applied Educational and Social Research and Social Policy (Research Methods). Louise also participated in the University of Oxford’s UNIQ+ Graduate Access Programme in the summer of 2022, where she worked at the Department of Sociology with Melinda Mills, Bo Zhao and Evelina Akimova on research into the impact of socio-economic status on inequalities in access to veterinary care in Scotland. Louise’s DPhil thesis is interested in evaluating Lorella Terzi’s educational capabilities framework through the lens of contemporary higher education in order to gain an understanding of what graduate capabilities are identified by students and stakeholders as being necessary for enabling graduates to successfully thrive and adapt in a post-pandemic society.

 

Supervisors

Alis Oancea and Kelsey Inouye

Motema studied Neuroscience as an undergraduate at Dartmouth College in the USA and it is one of its courses, found interest in Education.

Motema then worked for various non-profit organisations in Lesotho and South Africa focusing on helping high school students from low SES backgrounds access opportunities to study in HE. In her Masters’ project Motema analysed Lesotho’s 2009 Curriculum and Assessment Policy. This analysis’ findings brought Motema to her current research interests which include gendered STEM education and decolonisation of education policies and curricula in Lesotho. For her DPhil project, Motema is interested in finding out the lived experiences of female Science teachers in Lesotho Secondary Schools especially focusing on the major changes in the Secondary school education system in Lesotho that have happened in the past five years as unique meeting points.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Judith Hillier

Danielle is a DPhil student researching how Black-British doctoral students navigate the spaces of the elite, providing a new theoretical framework to understand their agency better.

Her main interests are in Human Flourishing, Cultural Geography, Psychology, and Justice, and her work aims to inform and reform educational frameworks and practices.

Following Danielle’s BSc in Psychology and MRes in Research Methods in Psychology, she founded a social enterprise that merges psychological and academic strategies to guide undergraduate and master’s students study practices. In addition to this, Danielle provided pedagogical and behavioural support across SEN college, secondary and primary schools.

Some of Danielle’s notable work includes her research introducing a new University-wide EDI strategy at her former Higher Education institution, presenting insights and way-forwards on youth homelessness to HRH Prince Williams, and providing discipleship to next-gen leaders.

Dan is a part-time DPhil Education student whose research focuses on investigating reasons why individuals choose to study and then teach physics as a subject discipline and how these relate to issues of equity and power. He previously worked as a secondary school physics teacher in the West Midlands of England for around 15 years before taking up his current post as Associate Professor of Physics Education at the University of Birmingham where he works in widening participation in physics and teacher education.

Publications
  • Cottle, D 2022, ‘Harnessing the potential of recently retired physics teachers to mentor new physics teachers’, Physics Education, vol. 57, no. 1, 015020. https://doi.org/10.1088/1361-6552/ac3931
  • Cottle, D 2021, ‘Improving students’ mathematical skills in secondary science: ideas from mathematics pedagogy’, School Science Review, vol. 102, no. 381, pp. 61-64. <https://www.ase.org.uk/resources/school-science-review/issue-381/improving-students-mathematical-skills-in-secondary>
  • Cottle, D 2021, ‘The effects of Covid-19 on student transition from school to university in STEM subjects’, New Directions in the Teaching of Physical Sciences, vol. 16, no. 1, 3847, pp. 1-4. https://doi.org/10.29311/ndtps.v0i14.3847 
  • Cottle, D & Marshall, R 2016, ‘Exploring electrical resistance: a novel kinesthetic model helps to resolve some misconceptions’, Physics Education, vol. 51, no. 5. https://doi.org/10.1088/0031-9120/51/5/054004 

Chris is a third-year part time DPhil student. He is an experienced Director of Children’s Services working in London. He is interested in path dependence and whether it is a helpful concept to understand how children’s services work.

Yaoyao is a DPhil student in Education at Oxford.

Her research interest lies in Aptitude-Instruction-Interaction (ATI) in second language acquisition (SLA).

Yaoyao’s research investigates the mediating effects of individual differences in learners’ domain-general perceptual-cognitive abilities in instructed foreign language pronunciation acquisition in adulthood. She aims to further explore how aptitude hinders instructional effectiveness and help all students make the most of instruction regardless of aptitude profiles.

Yaoyao started her BA in the Japanese Language and Literature at Sun Yat-Sen University (中山大学) in China. She then moved to the University of Queensland to finish her BA with double majors in Japanese and Translation. After her BA, she worked as an English teacher in China for three years. Prior to her DPhil studies at Oxford, Yaoyao completed her Master’s degree in TESOL at Institute of Education, University College London. Her Master’s dissertation was supervised by Dr Kazuya Saito.

Pat is the Deputy Chief Executive of a large College Group.

A qualified accountant, she is accountable to the Corporation Board for the Group’s Estate, sustainability and for maintaining the Group’s outstanding financial health grade. Her specialisms include Leadership and Management, Identification and Application of Funding Streams as well as leading the Group in new acquisitions, ventures and developments. Pat is using her vast experience of public sector finances to explore the intersection of accounting, leadership and purpose.

Supervisors

James Robson and Ariel Lindorff

Alice received her Master’s in Child Study and Education from the Institute of Child Study at the University of Toronto. She has taught preschool through higher education as a teacher and principal in public and private schools in North America and Europe. Deeply committed to enhancing education, she believes in learning that connects students and teachers to the natural world and to their communities. She is actively involved in community organisations that promote intercultural, interracial, and interfaith understanding and allyship.

Supervisors

Steve Puttick

Victoria is an educational researcher and practitioner, specialising in educational support and methodology of teaching mathematics to low-achieving students. For over 9 years she has been working at Big Change Educational Centre (Moscow) which provides support to looked-after children.

Before joining the DPhil programme, she completed her undergraduate degree in Finance at Financial University in Moscow and then gained a MSc in Psychology of Education from the University of Bristol.

Victoria’s current research focuses on educational issues of care-experienced children and teaching mathematics to students of low achievement and motivation.

Supervisors

Karen Skilling and Gabriel Stylianides

Louise was born and raised in Glasgow and moved to Oxford to pursue a DPhil in Education.

Louise’s research interests are education policy, particularly higher education policy, as well as qualitative research into the experiences of students in higher education and reducing inequalities in access to higher education. Louise is also interested in educational capabilities, educational purpose, aspirations and philosophical debates about knowledge construction and co-construction. Louise has a First Class BA (Joint Honours) in Social Policy and Education from the University of Strathclyde, and two Masters degrees with Distinction also from the University of Strathclyde in Applied Educational and Social Research and Social Policy (Research Methods). Louise also participated in the University of Oxford’s UNIQ+ Graduate Access Programme in the summer of 2022, where she worked at the Department of Sociology with Melinda Mills, Bo Zhao and Evelina Akimova on research into the impact of socio-economic status on inequalities in access to veterinary care in Scotland. Louise’s DPhil thesis is interested in evaluating Lorella Terzi’s educational capabilities framework through the lens of contemporary higher education in order to gain an understanding of what graduate capabilities are identified by students and stakeholders as being necessary for enabling graduates to successfully thrive and adapt in a post-pandemic society.

 

Supervisors

Alis Oancea and Kelsey Inouye

Motema studied Neuroscience as an undergraduate at Dartmouth College in the USA and it is one of its courses, found interest in Education.

Motema then worked for various non-profit organisations in Lesotho and South Africa focusing on helping high school students from low SES backgrounds access opportunities to study in HE. In her Masters’ project Motema analysed Lesotho’s 2009 Curriculum and Assessment Policy. This analysis’ findings brought Motema to her current research interests which include gendered STEM education and decolonisation of education policies and curricula in Lesotho. For her DPhil project, Motema is interested in finding out the lived experiences of female Science teachers in Lesotho Secondary Schools especially focusing on the major changes in the Secondary school education system in Lesotho that have happened in the past five years as unique meeting points.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Judith Hillier

Danielle is a DPhil student researching how Black-British doctoral students navigate the spaces of the elite, providing a new theoretical framework to understand their agency better.

Her main interests are in Human Flourishing, Cultural Geography, Psychology, and Justice, and her work aims to inform and reform educational frameworks and practices.

Following Danielle’s BSc in Psychology and MRes in Research Methods in Psychology, she founded a social enterprise that merges psychological and academic strategies to guide undergraduate and master’s students study practices. In addition to this, Danielle provided pedagogical and behavioural support across SEN college, secondary and primary schools.

Some of Danielle’s notable work includes her research introducing a new University-wide EDI strategy at her former Higher Education institution, presenting insights and way-forwards on youth homelessness to HRH Prince Williams, and providing discipleship to next-gen leaders.

Dan is a part-time DPhil Education student whose research focuses on investigating reasons why individuals choose to study and then teach physics as a subject discipline and how these relate to issues of equity and power. He previously worked as a secondary school physics teacher in the West Midlands of England for around 15 years before taking up his current post as Associate Professor of Physics Education at the University of Birmingham where he works in widening participation in physics and teacher education.

Publications
  • Cottle, D 2022, ‘Harnessing the potential of recently retired physics teachers to mentor new physics teachers’, Physics Education, vol. 57, no. 1, 015020. https://doi.org/10.1088/1361-6552/ac3931
  • Cottle, D 2021, ‘Improving students’ mathematical skills in secondary science: ideas from mathematics pedagogy’, School Science Review, vol. 102, no. 381, pp. 61-64. <https://www.ase.org.uk/resources/school-science-review/issue-381/improving-students-mathematical-skills-in-secondary>
  • Cottle, D 2021, ‘The effects of Covid-19 on student transition from school to university in STEM subjects’, New Directions in the Teaching of Physical Sciences, vol. 16, no. 1, 3847, pp. 1-4. https://doi.org/10.29311/ndtps.v0i14.3847 
  • Cottle, D & Marshall, R 2016, ‘Exploring electrical resistance: a novel kinesthetic model helps to resolve some misconceptions’, Physics Education, vol. 51, no. 5. https://doi.org/10.1088/0031-9120/51/5/054004 

Chris is a third-year part time DPhil student. He is an experienced Director of Children’s Services working in London. He is interested in path dependence and whether it is a helpful concept to understand how children’s services work.

Yaoyao is a DPhil student in Education at Oxford.

Her research interest lies in Aptitude-Instruction-Interaction (ATI) in second language acquisition (SLA).

Yaoyao’s research investigates the mediating effects of individual differences in learners’ domain-general perceptual-cognitive abilities in instructed foreign language pronunciation acquisition in adulthood. She aims to further explore how aptitude hinders instructional effectiveness and help all students make the most of instruction regardless of aptitude profiles.

Yaoyao started her BA in the Japanese Language and Literature at Sun Yat-Sen University (中山大学) in China. She then moved to the University of Queensland to finish her BA with double majors in Japanese and Translation. After her BA, she worked as an English teacher in China for three years. Prior to her DPhil studies at Oxford, Yaoyao completed her Master’s degree in TESOL at Institute of Education, University College London. Her Master’s dissertation was supervised by Dr Kazuya Saito.

Pat is the Deputy Chief Executive of a large College Group.

A qualified accountant, she is accountable to the Corporation Board for the Group’s Estate, sustainability and for maintaining the Group’s outstanding financial health grade. Her specialisms include Leadership and Management, Identification and Application of Funding Streams as well as leading the Group in new acquisitions, ventures and developments. Pat is using her vast experience of public sector finances to explore the intersection of accounting, leadership and purpose.

Supervisors

James Robson and Ariel Lindorff

Alice received her Master’s in Child Study and Education from the Institute of Child Study at the University of Toronto. She has taught preschool through higher education as a teacher and principal in public and private schools in North America and Europe. Deeply committed to enhancing education, she believes in learning that connects students and teachers to the natural world and to their communities. She is actively involved in community organisations that promote intercultural, interracial, and interfaith understanding and allyship.

Supervisors

Steve Puttick

Victoria is an educational researcher and practitioner, specialising in educational support and methodology of teaching mathematics to low-achieving students. For over 9 years she has been working at Big Change Educational Centre (Moscow) which provides support to looked-after children.

Before joining the DPhil programme, she completed her undergraduate degree in Finance at Financial University in Moscow and then gained a MSc in Psychology of Education from the University of Bristol.

Victoria’s current research focuses on educational issues of care-experienced children and teaching mathematics to students of low achievement and motivation.

Supervisors

Karen Skilling and Gabriel Stylianides

Louise was born and raised in Glasgow and moved to Oxford to pursue a DPhil in Education.

Louise’s research interests are education policy, particularly higher education policy, as well as qualitative research into the experiences of students in higher education and reducing inequalities in access to higher education. Louise is also interested in educational capabilities, educational purpose, aspirations and philosophical debates about knowledge construction and co-construction. Louise has a First Class BA (Joint Honours) in Social Policy and Education from the University of Strathclyde, and two Masters degrees with Distinction also from the University of Strathclyde in Applied Educational and Social Research and Social Policy (Research Methods). Louise also participated in the University of Oxford’s UNIQ+ Graduate Access Programme in the summer of 2022, where she worked at the Department of Sociology with Melinda Mills, Bo Zhao and Evelina Akimova on research into the impact of socio-economic status on inequalities in access to veterinary care in Scotland. Louise’s DPhil thesis is interested in evaluating Lorella Terzi’s educational capabilities framework through the lens of contemporary higher education in order to gain an understanding of what graduate capabilities are identified by students and stakeholders as being necessary for enabling graduates to successfully thrive and adapt in a post-pandemic society.

 

Supervisors

Alis Oancea and Kelsey Inouye

Motema studied Neuroscience as an undergraduate at Dartmouth College in the USA and it is one of its courses, found interest in Education.

Motema then worked for various non-profit organisations in Lesotho and South Africa focusing on helping high school students from low SES backgrounds access opportunities to study in HE. In her Masters’ project Motema analysed Lesotho’s 2009 Curriculum and Assessment Policy. This analysis’ findings brought Motema to her current research interests which include gendered STEM education and decolonisation of education policies and curricula in Lesotho. For her DPhil project, Motema is interested in finding out the lived experiences of female Science teachers in Lesotho Secondary Schools especially focusing on the major changes in the Secondary school education system in Lesotho that have happened in the past five years as unique meeting points.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Judith Hillier

Danielle is a DPhil student researching how Black-British doctoral students navigate the spaces of the elite, providing a new theoretical framework to understand their agency better.

Her main interests are in Human Flourishing, Cultural Geography, Psychology, and Justice, and her work aims to inform and reform educational frameworks and practices.

Following Danielle’s BSc in Psychology and MRes in Research Methods in Psychology, she founded a social enterprise that merges psychological and academic strategies to guide undergraduate and master’s students study practices. In addition to this, Danielle provided pedagogical and behavioural support across SEN college, secondary and primary schools.

Some of Danielle’s notable work includes her research introducing a new University-wide EDI strategy at her former Higher Education institution, presenting insights and way-forwards on youth homelessness to HRH Prince Williams, and providing discipleship to next-gen leaders.

Dan is a part-time DPhil Education student whose research focuses on investigating reasons why individuals choose to study and then teach physics as a subject discipline and how these relate to issues of equity and power. He previously worked as a secondary school physics teacher in the West Midlands of England for around 15 years before taking up his current post as Associate Professor of Physics Education at the University of Birmingham where he works in widening participation in physics and teacher education.

Publications
  • Cottle, D 2022, ‘Harnessing the potential of recently retired physics teachers to mentor new physics teachers’, Physics Education, vol. 57, no. 1, 015020. https://doi.org/10.1088/1361-6552/ac3931
  • Cottle, D 2021, ‘Improving students’ mathematical skills in secondary science: ideas from mathematics pedagogy’, School Science Review, vol. 102, no. 381, pp. 61-64. <https://www.ase.org.uk/resources/school-science-review/issue-381/improving-students-mathematical-skills-in-secondary>
  • Cottle, D 2021, ‘The effects of Covid-19 on student transition from school to university in STEM subjects’, New Directions in the Teaching of Physical Sciences, vol. 16, no. 1, 3847, pp. 1-4. https://doi.org/10.29311/ndtps.v0i14.3847 
  • Cottle, D & Marshall, R 2016, ‘Exploring electrical resistance: a novel kinesthetic model helps to resolve some misconceptions’, Physics Education, vol. 51, no. 5. https://doi.org/10.1088/0031-9120/51/5/054004 

Chris is a third-year part time DPhil student. He is an experienced Director of Children’s Services working in London. He is interested in path dependence and whether it is a helpful concept to understand how children’s services work.

Yaoyao is a DPhil student in Education at Oxford.

Her research interest lies in Aptitude-Instruction-Interaction (ATI) in second language acquisition (SLA).

Yaoyao’s research investigates the mediating effects of individual differences in learners’ domain-general perceptual-cognitive abilities in instructed foreign language pronunciation acquisition in adulthood. She aims to further explore how aptitude hinders instructional effectiveness and help all students make the most of instruction regardless of aptitude profiles.

Yaoyao started her BA in the Japanese Language and Literature at Sun Yat-Sen University (中山大学) in China. She then moved to the University of Queensland to finish her BA with double majors in Japanese and Translation. After her BA, she worked as an English teacher in China for three years. Prior to her DPhil studies at Oxford, Yaoyao completed her Master’s degree in TESOL at Institute of Education, University College London. Her Master’s dissertation was supervised by Dr Kazuya Saito.

Pat is the Deputy Chief Executive of a large College Group.

A qualified accountant, she is accountable to the Corporation Board for the Group’s Estate, sustainability and for maintaining the Group’s outstanding financial health grade. Her specialisms include Leadership and Management, Identification and Application of Funding Streams as well as leading the Group in new acquisitions, ventures and developments. Pat is using her vast experience of public sector finances to explore the intersection of accounting, leadership and purpose.

Supervisors

James Robson and Ariel Lindorff

Alice received her Master’s in Child Study and Education from the Institute of Child Study at the University of Toronto. She has taught preschool through higher education as a teacher and principal in public and private schools in North America and Europe. Deeply committed to enhancing education, she believes in learning that connects students and teachers to the natural world and to their communities. She is actively involved in community organisations that promote intercultural, interracial, and interfaith understanding and allyship.

Supervisors

Steve Puttick

Victoria is an educational researcher and practitioner, specialising in educational support and methodology of teaching mathematics to low-achieving students. For over 9 years she has been working at Big Change Educational Centre (Moscow) which provides support to looked-after children.

Before joining the DPhil programme, she completed her undergraduate degree in Finance at Financial University in Moscow and then gained a MSc in Psychology of Education from the University of Bristol.

Victoria’s current research focuses on educational issues of care-experienced children and teaching mathematics to students of low achievement and motivation.

Supervisors

Karen Skilling and Gabriel Stylianides

Louise was born and raised in Glasgow and moved to Oxford to pursue a DPhil in Education.

Louise’s research interests are education policy, particularly higher education policy, as well as qualitative research into the experiences of students in higher education and reducing inequalities in access to higher education. Louise is also interested in educational capabilities, educational purpose, aspirations and philosophical debates about knowledge construction and co-construction. Louise has a First Class BA (Joint Honours) in Social Policy and Education from the University of Strathclyde, and two Masters degrees with Distinction also from the University of Strathclyde in Applied Educational and Social Research and Social Policy (Research Methods). Louise also participated in the University of Oxford’s UNIQ+ Graduate Access Programme in the summer of 2022, where she worked at the Department of Sociology with Melinda Mills, Bo Zhao and Evelina Akimova on research into the impact of socio-economic status on inequalities in access to veterinary care in Scotland. Louise’s DPhil thesis is interested in evaluating Lorella Terzi’s educational capabilities framework through the lens of contemporary higher education in order to gain an understanding of what graduate capabilities are identified by students and stakeholders as being necessary for enabling graduates to successfully thrive and adapt in a post-pandemic society.

 

Supervisors

Alis Oancea and Kelsey Inouye

Motema studied Neuroscience as an undergraduate at Dartmouth College in the USA and it is one of its courses, found interest in Education.

Motema then worked for various non-profit organisations in Lesotho and South Africa focusing on helping high school students from low SES backgrounds access opportunities to study in HE. In her Masters’ project Motema analysed Lesotho’s 2009 Curriculum and Assessment Policy. This analysis’ findings brought Motema to her current research interests which include gendered STEM education and decolonisation of education policies and curricula in Lesotho. For her DPhil project, Motema is interested in finding out the lived experiences of female Science teachers in Lesotho Secondary Schools especially focusing on the major changes in the Secondary school education system in Lesotho that have happened in the past five years as unique meeting points.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Judith Hillier

Danielle is a DPhil student researching how Black-British doctoral students navigate the spaces of the elite, providing a new theoretical framework to understand their agency better.

Her main interests are in Human Flourishing, Cultural Geography, Psychology, and Justice, and her work aims to inform and reform educational frameworks and practices.

Following Danielle’s BSc in Psychology and MRes in Research Methods in Psychology, she founded a social enterprise that merges psychological and academic strategies to guide undergraduate and master’s students study practices. In addition to this, Danielle provided pedagogical and behavioural support across SEN college, secondary and primary schools.

Some of Danielle’s notable work includes her research introducing a new University-wide EDI strategy at her former Higher Education institution, presenting insights and way-forwards on youth homelessness to HRH Prince Williams, and providing discipleship to next-gen leaders.

Dan is a part-time DPhil Education student whose research focuses on investigating reasons why individuals choose to study and then teach physics as a subject discipline and how these relate to issues of equity and power. He previously worked as a secondary school physics teacher in the West Midlands of England for around 15 years before taking up his current post as Associate Professor of Physics Education at the University of Birmingham where he works in widening participation in physics and teacher education.

Publications
  • Cottle, D 2022, ‘Harnessing the potential of recently retired physics teachers to mentor new physics teachers’, Physics Education, vol. 57, no. 1, 015020. https://doi.org/10.1088/1361-6552/ac3931
  • Cottle, D 2021, ‘Improving students’ mathematical skills in secondary science: ideas from mathematics pedagogy’, School Science Review, vol. 102, no. 381, pp. 61-64. <https://www.ase.org.uk/resources/school-science-review/issue-381/improving-students-mathematical-skills-in-secondary>
  • Cottle, D 2021, ‘The effects of Covid-19 on student transition from school to university in STEM subjects’, New Directions in the Teaching of Physical Sciences, vol. 16, no. 1, 3847, pp. 1-4. https://doi.org/10.29311/ndtps.v0i14.3847 
  • Cottle, D & Marshall, R 2016, ‘Exploring electrical resistance: a novel kinesthetic model helps to resolve some misconceptions’, Physics Education, vol. 51, no. 5. https://doi.org/10.1088/0031-9120/51/5/054004 

Chris is a third-year part time DPhil student. He is an experienced Director of Children’s Services working in London. He is interested in path dependence and whether it is a helpful concept to understand how children’s services work.

Yaoyao is a DPhil student in Education at Oxford.

Her research interest lies in Aptitude-Instruction-Interaction (ATI) in second language acquisition (SLA).

Yaoyao’s research investigates the mediating effects of individual differences in learners’ domain-general perceptual-cognitive abilities in instructed foreign language pronunciation acquisition in adulthood. She aims to further explore how aptitude hinders instructional effectiveness and help all students make the most of instruction regardless of aptitude profiles.

Yaoyao started her BA in the Japanese Language and Literature at Sun Yat-Sen University (中山大学) in China. She then moved to the University of Queensland to finish her BA with double majors in Japanese and Translation. After her BA, she worked as an English teacher in China for three years. Prior to her DPhil studies at Oxford, Yaoyao completed her Master’s degree in TESOL at Institute of Education, University College London. Her Master’s dissertation was supervised by Dr Kazuya Saito.

Pat is the Deputy Chief Executive of a large College Group.

A qualified accountant, she is accountable to the Corporation Board for the Group’s Estate, sustainability and for maintaining the Group’s outstanding financial health grade. Her specialisms include Leadership and Management, Identification and Application of Funding Streams as well as leading the Group in new acquisitions, ventures and developments. Pat is using her vast experience of public sector finances to explore the intersection of accounting, leadership and purpose.

Supervisors

James Robson and Ariel Lindorff

Alice received her Master’s in Child Study and Education from the Institute of Child Study at the University of Toronto. She has taught preschool through higher education as a teacher and principal in public and private schools in North America and Europe. Deeply committed to enhancing education, she believes in learning that connects students and teachers to the natural world and to their communities. She is actively involved in community organisations that promote intercultural, interracial, and interfaith understanding and allyship.

Supervisors

Steve Puttick

Victoria is an educational researcher and practitioner, specialising in educational support and methodology of teaching mathematics to low-achieving students. For over 9 years she has been working at Big Change Educational Centre (Moscow) which provides support to looked-after children.

Before joining the DPhil programme, she completed her undergraduate degree in Finance at Financial University in Moscow and then gained a MSc in Psychology of Education from the University of Bristol.

Victoria’s current research focuses on educational issues of care-experienced children and teaching mathematics to students of low achievement and motivation.

Supervisors

Karen Skilling and Gabriel Stylianides

Louise was born and raised in Glasgow and moved to Oxford to pursue a DPhil in Education.

Louise’s research interests are education policy, particularly higher education policy, as well as qualitative research into the experiences of students in higher education and reducing inequalities in access to higher education. Louise is also interested in educational capabilities, educational purpose, aspirations and philosophical debates about knowledge construction and co-construction. Louise has a First Class BA (Joint Honours) in Social Policy and Education from the University of Strathclyde, and two Masters degrees with Distinction also from the University of Strathclyde in Applied Educational and Social Research and Social Policy (Research Methods). Louise also participated in the University of Oxford’s UNIQ+ Graduate Access Programme in the summer of 2022, where she worked at the Department of Sociology with Melinda Mills, Bo Zhao and Evelina Akimova on research into the impact of socio-economic status on inequalities in access to veterinary care in Scotland. Louise’s DPhil thesis is interested in evaluating Lorella Terzi’s educational capabilities framework through the lens of contemporary higher education in order to gain an understanding of what graduate capabilities are identified by students and stakeholders as being necessary for enabling graduates to successfully thrive and adapt in a post-pandemic society.

 

Supervisors

Alis Oancea and Kelsey Inouye

Motema studied Neuroscience as an undergraduate at Dartmouth College in the USA and it is one of its courses, found interest in Education.

Motema then worked for various non-profit organisations in Lesotho and South Africa focusing on helping high school students from low SES backgrounds access opportunities to study in HE. In her Masters’ project Motema analysed Lesotho’s 2009 Curriculum and Assessment Policy. This analysis’ findings brought Motema to her current research interests which include gendered STEM education and decolonisation of education policies and curricula in Lesotho. For her DPhil project, Motema is interested in finding out the lived experiences of female Science teachers in Lesotho Secondary Schools especially focusing on the major changes in the Secondary school education system in Lesotho that have happened in the past five years as unique meeting points.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Judith Hillier

Danielle is a DPhil student researching how Black-British doctoral students navigate the spaces of the elite, providing a new theoretical framework to understand their agency better.

Her main interests are in Human Flourishing, Cultural Geography, Psychology, and Justice, and her work aims to inform and reform educational frameworks and practices.

Following Danielle’s BSc in Psychology and MRes in Research Methods in Psychology, she founded a social enterprise that merges psychological and academic strategies to guide undergraduate and master’s students study practices. In addition to this, Danielle provided pedagogical and behavioural support across SEN college, secondary and primary schools.

Some of Danielle’s notable work includes her research introducing a new University-wide EDI strategy at her former Higher Education institution, presenting insights and way-forwards on youth homelessness to HRH Prince Williams, and providing discipleship to next-gen leaders.

Dan is a part-time DPhil Education student whose research focuses on investigating reasons why individuals choose to study and then teach physics as a subject discipline and how these relate to issues of equity and power. He previously worked as a secondary school physics teacher in the West Midlands of England for around 15 years before taking up his current post as Associate Professor of Physics Education at the University of Birmingham where he works in widening participation in physics and teacher education.

Publications
  • Cottle, D 2022, ‘Harnessing the potential of recently retired physics teachers to mentor new physics teachers’, Physics Education, vol. 57, no. 1, 015020. https://doi.org/10.1088/1361-6552/ac3931
  • Cottle, D 2021, ‘Improving students’ mathematical skills in secondary science: ideas from mathematics pedagogy’, School Science Review, vol. 102, no. 381, pp. 61-64. <https://www.ase.org.uk/resources/school-science-review/issue-381/improving-students-mathematical-skills-in-secondary>
  • Cottle, D 2021, ‘The effects of Covid-19 on student transition from school to university in STEM subjects’, New Directions in the Teaching of Physical Sciences, vol. 16, no. 1, 3847, pp. 1-4. https://doi.org/10.29311/ndtps.v0i14.3847 
  • Cottle, D & Marshall, R 2016, ‘Exploring electrical resistance: a novel kinesthetic model helps to resolve some misconceptions’, Physics Education, vol. 51, no. 5. https://doi.org/10.1088/0031-9120/51/5/054004 

Chris is a third-year part time DPhil student. He is an experienced Director of Children’s Services working in London. He is interested in path dependence and whether it is a helpful concept to understand how children’s services work.

Yaoyao is a DPhil student in Education at Oxford.

Her research interest lies in Aptitude-Instruction-Interaction (ATI) in second language acquisition (SLA).

Yaoyao’s research investigates the mediating effects of individual differences in learners’ domain-general perceptual-cognitive abilities in instructed foreign language pronunciation acquisition in adulthood. She aims to further explore how aptitude hinders instructional effectiveness and help all students make the most of instruction regardless of aptitude profiles.

Yaoyao started her BA in the Japanese Language and Literature at Sun Yat-Sen University (中山大学) in China. She then moved to the University of Queensland to finish her BA with double majors in Japanese and Translation. After her BA, she worked as an English teacher in China for three years. Prior to her DPhil studies at Oxford, Yaoyao completed her Master’s degree in TESOL at Institute of Education, University College London. Her Master’s dissertation was supervised by Dr Kazuya Saito.

Pat is the Deputy Chief Executive of a large College Group.

A qualified accountant, she is accountable to the Corporation Board for the Group’s Estate, sustainability and for maintaining the Group’s outstanding financial health grade. Her specialisms include Leadership and Management, Identification and Application of Funding Streams as well as leading the Group in new acquisitions, ventures and developments. Pat is using her vast experience of public sector finances to explore the intersection of accounting, leadership and purpose.

Supervisors

James Robson and Ariel Lindorff

Alice received her Master’s in Child Study and Education from the Institute of Child Study at the University of Toronto. She has taught preschool through higher education as a teacher and principal in public and private schools in North America and Europe. Deeply committed to enhancing education, she believes in learning that connects students and teachers to the natural world and to their communities. She is actively involved in community organisations that promote intercultural, interracial, and interfaith understanding and allyship.

Supervisors

Steve Puttick

Victoria is an educational researcher and practitioner, specialising in educational support and methodology of teaching mathematics to low-achieving students. For over 9 years she has been working at Big Change Educational Centre (Moscow) which provides support to looked-after children.

Before joining the DPhil programme, she completed her undergraduate degree in Finance at Financial University in Moscow and then gained a MSc in Psychology of Education from the University of Bristol.

Victoria’s current research focuses on educational issues of care-experienced children and teaching mathematics to students of low achievement and motivation.

Supervisors

Karen Skilling and Gabriel Stylianides

Louise was born and raised in Glasgow and moved to Oxford to pursue a DPhil in Education.

Louise’s research interests are education policy, particularly higher education policy, as well as qualitative research into the experiences of students in higher education and reducing inequalities in access to higher education. Louise is also interested in educational capabilities, educational purpose, aspirations and philosophical debates about knowledge construction and co-construction. Louise has a First Class BA (Joint Honours) in Social Policy and Education from the University of Strathclyde, and two Masters degrees with Distinction also from the University of Strathclyde in Applied Educational and Social Research and Social Policy (Research Methods). Louise also participated in the University of Oxford’s UNIQ+ Graduate Access Programme in the summer of 2022, where she worked at the Department of Sociology with Melinda Mills, Bo Zhao and Evelina Akimova on research into the impact of socio-economic status on inequalities in access to veterinary care in Scotland. Louise’s DPhil thesis is interested in evaluating Lorella Terzi’s educational capabilities framework through the lens of contemporary higher education in order to gain an understanding of what graduate capabilities are identified by students and stakeholders as being necessary for enabling graduates to successfully thrive and adapt in a post-pandemic society.

 

Supervisors

Alis Oancea and Kelsey Inouye

Motema studied Neuroscience as an undergraduate at Dartmouth College in the USA and it is one of its courses, found interest in Education.

Motema then worked for various non-profit organisations in Lesotho and South Africa focusing on helping high school students from low SES backgrounds access opportunities to study in HE. In her Masters’ project Motema analysed Lesotho’s 2009 Curriculum and Assessment Policy. This analysis’ findings brought Motema to her current research interests which include gendered STEM education and decolonisation of education policies and curricula in Lesotho. For her DPhil project, Motema is interested in finding out the lived experiences of female Science teachers in Lesotho Secondary Schools especially focusing on the major changes in the Secondary school education system in Lesotho that have happened in the past five years as unique meeting points.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Judith Hillier

Danielle is a DPhil student researching how Black-British doctoral students navigate the spaces of the elite, providing a new theoretical framework to understand their agency better.

Her main interests are in Human Flourishing, Cultural Geography, Psychology, and Justice, and her work aims to inform and reform educational frameworks and practices.

Following Danielle’s BSc in Psychology and MRes in Research Methods in Psychology, she founded a social enterprise that merges psychological and academic strategies to guide undergraduate and master’s students study practices. In addition to this, Danielle provided pedagogical and behavioural support across SEN college, secondary and primary schools.

Some of Danielle’s notable work includes her research introducing a new University-wide EDI strategy at her former Higher Education institution, presenting insights and way-forwards on youth homelessness to HRH Prince Williams, and providing discipleship to next-gen leaders.

Dan is a part-time DPhil Education student whose research focuses on investigating reasons why individuals choose to study and then teach physics as a subject discipline and how these relate to issues of equity and power. He previously worked as a secondary school physics teacher in the West Midlands of England for around 15 years before taking up his current post as Associate Professor of Physics Education at the University of Birmingham where he works in widening participation in physics and teacher education.

Publications
  • Cottle, D 2022, ‘Harnessing the potential of recently retired physics teachers to mentor new physics teachers’, Physics Education, vol. 57, no. 1, 015020. https://doi.org/10.1088/1361-6552/ac3931
  • Cottle, D 2021, ‘Improving students’ mathematical skills in secondary science: ideas from mathematics pedagogy’, School Science Review, vol. 102, no. 381, pp. 61-64. <https://www.ase.org.uk/resources/school-science-review/issue-381/improving-students-mathematical-skills-in-secondary>
  • Cottle, D 2021, ‘The effects of Covid-19 on student transition from school to university in STEM subjects’, New Directions in the Teaching of Physical Sciences, vol. 16, no. 1, 3847, pp. 1-4. https://doi.org/10.29311/ndtps.v0i14.3847 
  • Cottle, D & Marshall, R 2016, ‘Exploring electrical resistance: a novel kinesthetic model helps to resolve some misconceptions’, Physics Education, vol. 51, no. 5. https://doi.org/10.1088/0031-9120/51/5/054004 

Chris is a third-year part time DPhil student. He is an experienced Director of Children’s Services working in London. He is interested in path dependence and whether it is a helpful concept to understand how children’s services work.

Yaoyao is a DPhil student in Education at Oxford.

Her research interest lies in Aptitude-Instruction-Interaction (ATI) in second language acquisition (SLA).

Yaoyao’s research investigates the mediating effects of individual differences in learners’ domain-general perceptual-cognitive abilities in instructed foreign language pronunciation acquisition in adulthood. She aims to further explore how aptitude hinders instructional effectiveness and help all students make the most of instruction regardless of aptitude profiles.

Yaoyao started her BA in the Japanese Language and Literature at Sun Yat-Sen University (中山大学) in China. She then moved to the University of Queensland to finish her BA with double majors in Japanese and Translation. After her BA, she worked as an English teacher in China for three years. Prior to her DPhil studies at Oxford, Yaoyao completed her Master’s degree in TESOL at Institute of Education, University College London. Her Master’s dissertation was supervised by Dr Kazuya Saito.

Pat is the Deputy Chief Executive of a large College Group.

A qualified accountant, she is accountable to the Corporation Board for the Group’s Estate, sustainability and for maintaining the Group’s outstanding financial health grade. Her specialisms include Leadership and Management, Identification and Application of Funding Streams as well as leading the Group in new acquisitions, ventures and developments. Pat is using her vast experience of public sector finances to explore the intersection of accounting, leadership and purpose.

Supervisors

James Robson and Ariel Lindorff

Alice received her Master’s in Child Study and Education from the Institute of Child Study at the University of Toronto. She has taught preschool through higher education as a teacher and principal in public and private schools in North America and Europe. Deeply committed to enhancing education, she believes in learning that connects students and teachers to the natural world and to their communities. She is actively involved in community organisations that promote intercultural, interracial, and interfaith understanding and allyship.

Supervisors

Steve Puttick

Victoria is an educational researcher and practitioner, specialising in educational support and methodology of teaching mathematics to low-achieving students. For over 9 years she has been working at Big Change Educational Centre (Moscow) which provides support to looked-after children.

Before joining the DPhil programme, she completed her undergraduate degree in Finance at Financial University in Moscow and then gained a MSc in Psychology of Education from the University of Bristol.

Victoria’s current research focuses on educational issues of care-experienced children and teaching mathematics to students of low achievement and motivation.

Supervisors

Karen Skilling and Gabriel Stylianides

Louise was born and raised in Glasgow and moved to Oxford to pursue a DPhil in Education.

Louise’s research interests are education policy, particularly higher education policy, as well as qualitative research into the experiences of students in higher education and reducing inequalities in access to higher education. Louise is also interested in educational capabilities, educational purpose, aspirations and philosophical debates about knowledge construction and co-construction. Louise has a First Class BA (Joint Honours) in Social Policy and Education from the University of Strathclyde, and two Masters degrees with Distinction also from the University of Strathclyde in Applied Educational and Social Research and Social Policy (Research Methods). Louise also participated in the University of Oxford’s UNIQ+ Graduate Access Programme in the summer of 2022, where she worked at the Department of Sociology with Melinda Mills, Bo Zhao and Evelina Akimova on research into the impact of socio-economic status on inequalities in access to veterinary care in Scotland. Louise’s DPhil thesis is interested in evaluating Lorella Terzi’s educational capabilities framework through the lens of contemporary higher education in order to gain an understanding of what graduate capabilities are identified by students and stakeholders as being necessary for enabling graduates to successfully thrive and adapt in a post-pandemic society.

 

Supervisors

Alis Oancea and Kelsey Inouye

Motema studied Neuroscience as an undergraduate at Dartmouth College in the USA and it is one of its courses, found interest in Education.

Motema then worked for various non-profit organisations in Lesotho and South Africa focusing on helping high school students from low SES backgrounds access opportunities to study in HE. In her Masters’ project Motema analysed Lesotho’s 2009 Curriculum and Assessment Policy. This analysis’ findings brought Motema to her current research interests which include gendered STEM education and decolonisation of education policies and curricula in Lesotho. For her DPhil project, Motema is interested in finding out the lived experiences of female Science teachers in Lesotho Secondary Schools especially focusing on the major changes in the Secondary school education system in Lesotho that have happened in the past five years as unique meeting points.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Judith Hillier

Danielle is a DPhil student researching how Black-British doctoral students navigate the spaces of the elite, providing a new theoretical framework to understand their agency better.

Her main interests are in Human Flourishing, Cultural Geography, Psychology, and Justice, and her work aims to inform and reform educational frameworks and practices.

Following Danielle’s BSc in Psychology and MRes in Research Methods in Psychology, she founded a social enterprise that merges psychological and academic strategies to guide undergraduate and master’s students study practices. In addition to this, Danielle provided pedagogical and behavioural support across SEN college, secondary and primary schools.

Some of Danielle’s notable work includes her research introducing a new University-wide EDI strategy at her former Higher Education institution, presenting insights and way-forwards on youth homelessness to HRH Prince Williams, and providing discipleship to next-gen leaders.

Dan is a part-time DPhil Education student whose research focuses on investigating reasons why individuals choose to study and then teach physics as a subject discipline and how these relate to issues of equity and power. He previously worked as a secondary school physics teacher in the West Midlands of England for around 15 years before taking up his current post as Associate Professor of Physics Education at the University of Birmingham where he works in widening participation in physics and teacher education.

Publications
  • Cottle, D 2022, ‘Harnessing the potential of recently retired physics teachers to mentor new physics teachers’, Physics Education, vol. 57, no. 1, 015020. https://doi.org/10.1088/1361-6552/ac3931
  • Cottle, D 2021, ‘Improving students’ mathematical skills in secondary science: ideas from mathematics pedagogy’, School Science Review, vol. 102, no. 381, pp. 61-64. <https://www.ase.org.uk/resources/school-science-review/issue-381/improving-students-mathematical-skills-in-secondary>
  • Cottle, D 2021, ‘The effects of Covid-19 on student transition from school to university in STEM subjects’, New Directions in the Teaching of Physical Sciences, vol. 16, no. 1, 3847, pp. 1-4. https://doi.org/10.29311/ndtps.v0i14.3847 
  • Cottle, D & Marshall, R 2016, ‘Exploring electrical resistance: a novel kinesthetic model helps to resolve some misconceptions’, Physics Education, vol. 51, no. 5. https://doi.org/10.1088/0031-9120/51/5/054004 

Chris is a third-year part time DPhil student. He is an experienced Director of Children’s Services working in London. He is interested in path dependence and whether it is a helpful concept to understand how children’s services work.

Yaoyao is a DPhil student in Education at Oxford.

Her research interest lies in Aptitude-Instruction-Interaction (ATI) in second language acquisition (SLA).

Yaoyao’s research investigates the mediating effects of individual differences in learners’ domain-general perceptual-cognitive abilities in instructed foreign language pronunciation acquisition in adulthood. She aims to further explore how aptitude hinders instructional effectiveness and help all students make the most of instruction regardless of aptitude profiles.

Yaoyao started her BA in the Japanese Language and Literature at Sun Yat-Sen University (中山大学) in China. She then moved to the University of Queensland to finish her BA with double majors in Japanese and Translation. After her BA, she worked as an English teacher in China for three years. Prior to her DPhil studies at Oxford, Yaoyao completed her Master’s degree in TESOL at Institute of Education, University College London. Her Master’s dissertation was supervised by Dr Kazuya Saito.

Pat is the Deputy Chief Executive of a large College Group.

A qualified accountant, she is accountable to the Corporation Board for the Group’s Estate, sustainability and for maintaining the Group’s outstanding financial health grade. Her specialisms include Leadership and Management, Identification and Application of Funding Streams as well as leading the Group in new acquisitions, ventures and developments. Pat is using her vast experience of public sector finances to explore the intersection of accounting, leadership and purpose.

Supervisors

James Robson and Ariel Lindorff

Alice received her Master’s in Child Study and Education from the Institute of Child Study at the University of Toronto. She has taught preschool through higher education as a teacher and principal in public and private schools in North America and Europe. Deeply committed to enhancing education, she believes in learning that connects students and teachers to the natural world and to their communities. She is actively involved in community organisations that promote intercultural, interracial, and interfaith understanding and allyship.

Supervisors

Steve Puttick

Victoria is an educational researcher and practitioner, specialising in educational support and methodology of teaching mathematics to low-achieving students. For over 9 years she has been working at Big Change Educational Centre (Moscow) which provides support to looked-after children.

Before joining the DPhil programme, she completed her undergraduate degree in Finance at Financial University in Moscow and then gained a MSc in Psychology of Education from the University of Bristol.

Victoria’s current research focuses on educational issues of care-experienced children and teaching mathematics to students of low achievement and motivation.

Supervisors

Karen Skilling and Gabriel Stylianides

Louise was born and raised in Glasgow and moved to Oxford to pursue a DPhil in Education.

Louise’s research interests are education policy, particularly higher education policy, as well as qualitative research into the experiences of students in higher education and reducing inequalities in access to higher education. Louise is also interested in educational capabilities, educational purpose, aspirations and philosophical debates about knowledge construction and co-construction. Louise has a First Class BA (Joint Honours) in Social Policy and Education from the University of Strathclyde, and two Masters degrees with Distinction also from the University of Strathclyde in Applied Educational and Social Research and Social Policy (Research Methods). Louise also participated in the University of Oxford’s UNIQ+ Graduate Access Programme in the summer of 2022, where she worked at the Department of Sociology with Melinda Mills, Bo Zhao and Evelina Akimova on research into the impact of socio-economic status on inequalities in access to veterinary care in Scotland. Louise’s DPhil thesis is interested in evaluating Lorella Terzi’s educational capabilities framework through the lens of contemporary higher education in order to gain an understanding of what graduate capabilities are identified by students and stakeholders as being necessary for enabling graduates to successfully thrive and adapt in a post-pandemic society.

 

Supervisors

Alis Oancea and Kelsey Inouye

Motema studied Neuroscience as an undergraduate at Dartmouth College in the USA and it is one of its courses, found interest in Education.

Motema then worked for various non-profit organisations in Lesotho and South Africa focusing on helping high school students from low SES backgrounds access opportunities to study in HE. In her Masters’ project Motema analysed Lesotho’s 2009 Curriculum and Assessment Policy. This analysis’ findings brought Motema to her current research interests which include gendered STEM education and decolonisation of education policies and curricula in Lesotho. For her DPhil project, Motema is interested in finding out the lived experiences of female Science teachers in Lesotho Secondary Schools especially focusing on the major changes in the Secondary school education system in Lesotho that have happened in the past five years as unique meeting points.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Judith Hillier

Danielle is a DPhil student researching how Black-British doctoral students navigate the spaces of the elite, providing a new theoretical framework to understand their agency better.

Her main interests are in Human Flourishing, Cultural Geography, Psychology, and Justice, and her work aims to inform and reform educational frameworks and practices.

Following Danielle’s BSc in Psychology and MRes in Research Methods in Psychology, she founded a social enterprise that merges psychological and academic strategies to guide undergraduate and master’s students study practices. In addition to this, Danielle provided pedagogical and behavioural support across SEN college, secondary and primary schools.

Some of Danielle’s notable work includes her research introducing a new University-wide EDI strategy at her former Higher Education institution, presenting insights and way-forwards on youth homelessness to HRH Prince Williams, and providing discipleship to next-gen leaders.

Dan is a part-time DPhil Education student whose research focuses on investigating reasons why individuals choose to study and then teach physics as a subject discipline and how these relate to issues of equity and power. He previously worked as a secondary school physics teacher in the West Midlands of England for around 15 years before taking up his current post as Associate Professor of Physics Education at the University of Birmingham where he works in widening participation in physics and teacher education.

Publications
  • Cottle, D 2022, ‘Harnessing the potential of recently retired physics teachers to mentor new physics teachers’, Physics Education, vol. 57, no. 1, 015020. https://doi.org/10.1088/1361-6552/ac3931
  • Cottle, D 2021, ‘Improving students’ mathematical skills in secondary science: ideas from mathematics pedagogy’, School Science Review, vol. 102, no. 381, pp. 61-64. <https://www.ase.org.uk/resources/school-science-review/issue-381/improving-students-mathematical-skills-in-secondary>
  • Cottle, D 2021, ‘The effects of Covid-19 on student transition from school to university in STEM subjects’, New Directions in the Teaching of Physical Sciences, vol. 16, no. 1, 3847, pp. 1-4. https://doi.org/10.29311/ndtps.v0i14.3847 
  • Cottle, D & Marshall, R 2016, ‘Exploring electrical resistance: a novel kinesthetic model helps to resolve some misconceptions’, Physics Education, vol. 51, no. 5. https://doi.org/10.1088/0031-9120/51/5/054004 

Chris is a third-year part time DPhil student. He is an experienced Director of Children’s Services working in London. He is interested in path dependence and whether it is a helpful concept to understand how children’s services work.

Yaoyao is a DPhil student in Education at Oxford.

Her research interest lies in Aptitude-Instruction-Interaction (ATI) in second language acquisition (SLA).

Yaoyao’s research investigates the mediating effects of individual differences in learners’ domain-general perceptual-cognitive abilities in instructed foreign language pronunciation acquisition in adulthood. She aims to further explore how aptitude hinders instructional effectiveness and help all students make the most of instruction regardless of aptitude profiles.

Yaoyao started her BA in the Japanese Language and Literature at Sun Yat-Sen University (中山大学) in China. She then moved to the University of Queensland to finish her BA with double majors in Japanese and Translation. After her BA, she worked as an English teacher in China for three years. Prior to her DPhil studies at Oxford, Yaoyao completed her Master’s degree in TESOL at Institute of Education, University College London. Her Master’s dissertation was supervised by Dr Kazuya Saito.

Pat is the Deputy Chief Executive of a large College Group.

A qualified accountant, she is accountable to the Corporation Board for the Group’s Estate, sustainability and for maintaining the Group’s outstanding financial health grade. Her specialisms include Leadership and Management, Identification and Application of Funding Streams as well as leading the Group in new acquisitions, ventures and developments. Pat is using her vast experience of public sector finances to explore the intersection of accounting, leadership and purpose.

Supervisors

James Robson and Ariel Lindorff

Alice received her Master’s in Child Study and Education from the Institute of Child Study at the University of Toronto. She has taught preschool through higher education as a teacher and principal in public and private schools in North America and Europe. Deeply committed to enhancing education, she believes in learning that connects students and teachers to the natural world and to their communities. She is actively involved in community organisations that promote intercultural, interracial, and interfaith understanding and allyship.

Supervisors

Steve Puttick

Victoria is an educational researcher and practitioner, specialising in educational support and methodology of teaching mathematics to low-achieving students. For over 9 years she has been working at Big Change Educational Centre (Moscow) which provides support to looked-after children.

Before joining the DPhil programme, she completed her undergraduate degree in Finance at Financial University in Moscow and then gained a MSc in Psychology of Education from the University of Bristol.

Victoria’s current research focuses on educational issues of care-experienced children and teaching mathematics to students of low achievement and motivation.

Supervisors

Karen Skilling and Gabriel Stylianides

Louise was born and raised in Glasgow and moved to Oxford to pursue a DPhil in Education.

Louise’s research interests are education policy, particularly higher education policy, as well as qualitative research into the experiences of students in higher education and reducing inequalities in access to higher education. Louise is also interested in educational capabilities, educational purpose, aspirations and philosophical debates about knowledge construction and co-construction. Louise has a First Class BA (Joint Honours) in Social Policy and Education from the University of Strathclyde, and two Masters degrees with Distinction also from the University of Strathclyde in Applied Educational and Social Research and Social Policy (Research Methods). Louise also participated in the University of Oxford’s UNIQ+ Graduate Access Programme in the summer of 2022, where she worked at the Department of Sociology with Melinda Mills, Bo Zhao and Evelina Akimova on research into the impact of socio-economic status on inequalities in access to veterinary care in Scotland. Louise’s DPhil thesis is interested in evaluating Lorella Terzi’s educational capabilities framework through the lens of contemporary higher education in order to gain an understanding of what graduate capabilities are identified by students and stakeholders as being necessary for enabling graduates to successfully thrive and adapt in a post-pandemic society.

 

Supervisors

Alis Oancea and Kelsey Inouye

Motema studied Neuroscience as an undergraduate at Dartmouth College in the USA and it is one of its courses, found interest in Education.

Motema then worked for various non-profit organisations in Lesotho and South Africa focusing on helping high school students from low SES backgrounds access opportunities to study in HE. In her Masters’ project Motema analysed Lesotho’s 2009 Curriculum and Assessment Policy. This analysis’ findings brought Motema to her current research interests which include gendered STEM education and decolonisation of education policies and curricula in Lesotho. For her DPhil project, Motema is interested in finding out the lived experiences of female Science teachers in Lesotho Secondary Schools especially focusing on the major changes in the Secondary school education system in Lesotho that have happened in the past five years as unique meeting points.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Judith Hillier

Danielle is a DPhil student researching how Black-British doctoral students navigate the spaces of the elite, providing a new theoretical framework to understand their agency better.

Her main interests are in Human Flourishing, Cultural Geography, Psychology, and Justice, and her work aims to inform and reform educational frameworks and practices.

Following Danielle’s BSc in Psychology and MRes in Research Methods in Psychology, she founded a social enterprise that merges psychological and academic strategies to guide undergraduate and master’s students study practices. In addition to this, Danielle provided pedagogical and behavioural support across SEN college, secondary and primary schools.

Some of Danielle’s notable work includes her research introducing a new University-wide EDI strategy at her former Higher Education institution, presenting insights and way-forwards on youth homelessness to HRH Prince Williams, and providing discipleship to next-gen leaders.

Dan is a part-time DPhil Education student whose research focuses on investigating reasons why individuals choose to study and then teach physics as a subject discipline and how these relate to issues of equity and power. He previously worked as a secondary school physics teacher in the West Midlands of England for around 15 years before taking up his current post as Associate Professor of Physics Education at the University of Birmingham where he works in widening participation in physics and teacher education.

Publications
  • Cottle, D 2022, ‘Harnessing the potential of recently retired physics teachers to mentor new physics teachers’, Physics Education, vol. 57, no. 1, 015020. https://doi.org/10.1088/1361-6552/ac3931
  • Cottle, D 2021, ‘Improving students’ mathematical skills in secondary science: ideas from mathematics pedagogy’, School Science Review, vol. 102, no. 381, pp. 61-64. <https://www.ase.org.uk/resources/school-science-review/issue-381/improving-students-mathematical-skills-in-secondary>
  • Cottle, D 2021, ‘The effects of Covid-19 on student transition from school to university in STEM subjects’, New Directions in the Teaching of Physical Sciences, vol. 16, no. 1, 3847, pp. 1-4. https://doi.org/10.29311/ndtps.v0i14.3847 
  • Cottle, D & Marshall, R 2016, ‘Exploring electrical resistance: a novel kinesthetic model helps to resolve some misconceptions’, Physics Education, vol. 51, no. 5. https://doi.org/10.1088/0031-9120/51/5/054004 

Chris is a third-year part time DPhil student. He is an experienced Director of Children’s Services working in London. He is interested in path dependence and whether it is a helpful concept to understand how children’s services work.

Yaoyao is a DPhil student in Education at Oxford.

Her research interest lies in Aptitude-Instruction-Interaction (ATI) in second language acquisition (SLA).

Yaoyao’s research investigates the mediating effects of individual differences in learners’ domain-general perceptual-cognitive abilities in instructed foreign language pronunciation acquisition in adulthood. She aims to further explore how aptitude hinders instructional effectiveness and help all students make the most of instruction regardless of aptitude profiles.

Yaoyao started her BA in the Japanese Language and Literature at Sun Yat-Sen University (中山大学) in China. She then moved to the University of Queensland to finish her BA with double majors in Japanese and Translation. After her BA, she worked as an English teacher in China for three years. Prior to her DPhil studies at Oxford, Yaoyao completed her Master’s degree in TESOL at Institute of Education, University College London. Her Master’s dissertation was supervised by Dr Kazuya Saito.

Pat is the Deputy Chief Executive of a large College Group.

A qualified accountant, she is accountable to the Corporation Board for the Group’s Estate, sustainability and for maintaining the Group’s outstanding financial health grade. Her specialisms include Leadership and Management, Identification and Application of Funding Streams as well as leading the Group in new acquisitions, ventures and developments. Pat is using her vast experience of public sector finances to explore the intersection of accounting, leadership and purpose.

Supervisors

James Robson and Ariel Lindorff

Alice received her Master’s in Child Study and Education from the Institute of Child Study at the University of Toronto. She has taught preschool through higher education as a teacher and principal in public and private schools in North America and Europe. Deeply committed to enhancing education, she believes in learning that connects students and teachers to the natural world and to their communities. She is actively involved in community organisations that promote intercultural, interracial, and interfaith understanding and allyship.

Supervisors

Steve Puttick

Victoria is an educational researcher and practitioner, specialising in educational support and methodology of teaching mathematics to low-achieving students. For over 9 years she has been working at Big Change Educational Centre (Moscow) which provides support to looked-after children.

Before joining the DPhil programme, she completed her undergraduate degree in Finance at Financial University in Moscow and then gained a MSc in Psychology of Education from the University of Bristol.

Victoria’s current research focuses on educational issues of care-experienced children and teaching mathematics to students of low achievement and motivation.

Supervisors

Karen Skilling and Gabriel Stylianides

Louise was born and raised in Glasgow and moved to Oxford to pursue a DPhil in Education.

Louise’s research interests are education policy, particularly higher education policy, as well as qualitative research into the experiences of students in higher education and reducing inequalities in access to higher education. Louise is also interested in educational capabilities, educational purpose, aspirations and philosophical debates about knowledge construction and co-construction. Louise has a First Class BA (Joint Honours) in Social Policy and Education from the University of Strathclyde, and two Masters degrees with Distinction also from the University of Strathclyde in Applied Educational and Social Research and Social Policy (Research Methods). Louise also participated in the University of Oxford’s UNIQ+ Graduate Access Programme in the summer of 2022, where she worked at the Department of Sociology with Melinda Mills, Bo Zhao and Evelina Akimova on research into the impact of socio-economic status on inequalities in access to veterinary care in Scotland. Louise’s DPhil thesis is interested in evaluating Lorella Terzi’s educational capabilities framework through the lens of contemporary higher education in order to gain an understanding of what graduate capabilities are identified by students and stakeholders as being necessary for enabling graduates to successfully thrive and adapt in a post-pandemic society.

 

Supervisors

Alis Oancea and Kelsey Inouye

Motema studied Neuroscience as an undergraduate at Dartmouth College in the USA and it is one of its courses, found interest in Education.

Motema then worked for various non-profit organisations in Lesotho and South Africa focusing on helping high school students from low SES backgrounds access opportunities to study in HE. In her Masters’ project Motema analysed Lesotho’s 2009 Curriculum and Assessment Policy. This analysis’ findings brought Motema to her current research interests which include gendered STEM education and decolonisation of education policies and curricula in Lesotho. For her DPhil project, Motema is interested in finding out the lived experiences of female Science teachers in Lesotho Secondary Schools especially focusing on the major changes in the Secondary school education system in Lesotho that have happened in the past five years as unique meeting points.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Judith Hillier

Danielle is a DPhil student researching how Black-British doctoral students navigate the spaces of the elite, providing a new theoretical framework to understand their agency better.

Her main interests are in Human Flourishing, Cultural Geography, Psychology, and Justice, and her work aims to inform and reform educational frameworks and practices.

Following Danielle’s BSc in Psychology and MRes in Research Methods in Psychology, she founded a social enterprise that merges psychological and academic strategies to guide undergraduate and master’s students study practices. In addition to this, Danielle provided pedagogical and behavioural support across SEN college, secondary and primary schools.

Some of Danielle’s notable work includes her research introducing a new University-wide EDI strategy at her former Higher Education institution, presenting insights and way-forwards on youth homelessness to HRH Prince Williams, and providing discipleship to next-gen leaders.

Dan is a part-time DPhil Education student whose research focuses on investigating reasons why individuals choose to study and then teach physics as a subject discipline and how these relate to issues of equity and power. He previously worked as a secondary school physics teacher in the West Midlands of England for around 15 years before taking up his current post as Associate Professor of Physics Education at the University of Birmingham where he works in widening participation in physics and teacher education.

Publications
  • Cottle, D 2022, ‘Harnessing the potential of recently retired physics teachers to mentor new physics teachers’, Physics Education, vol. 57, no. 1, 015020. https://doi.org/10.1088/1361-6552/ac3931
  • Cottle, D 2021, ‘Improving students’ mathematical skills in secondary science: ideas from mathematics pedagogy’, School Science Review, vol. 102, no. 381, pp. 61-64. <https://www.ase.org.uk/resources/school-science-review/issue-381/improving-students-mathematical-skills-in-secondary>
  • Cottle, D 2021, ‘The effects of Covid-19 on student transition from school to university in STEM subjects’, New Directions in the Teaching of Physical Sciences, vol. 16, no. 1, 3847, pp. 1-4. https://doi.org/10.29311/ndtps.v0i14.3847 
  • Cottle, D & Marshall, R 2016, ‘Exploring electrical resistance: a novel kinesthetic model helps to resolve some misconceptions’, Physics Education, vol. 51, no. 5. https://doi.org/10.1088/0031-9120/51/5/054004 

Chris is a third-year part time DPhil student. He is an experienced Director of Children’s Services working in London. He is interested in path dependence and whether it is a helpful concept to understand how children’s services work.

Yaoyao is a DPhil student in Education at Oxford.

Her research interest lies in Aptitude-Instruction-Interaction (ATI) in second language acquisition (SLA).

Yaoyao’s research investigates the mediating effects of individual differences in learners’ domain-general perceptual-cognitive abilities in instructed foreign language pronunciation acquisition in adulthood. She aims to further explore how aptitude hinders instructional effectiveness and help all students make the most of instruction regardless of aptitude profiles.

Yaoyao started her BA in the Japanese Language and Literature at Sun Yat-Sen University (中山大学) in China. She then moved to the University of Queensland to finish her BA with double majors in Japanese and Translation. After her BA, she worked as an English teacher in China for three years. Prior to her DPhil studies at Oxford, Yaoyao completed her Master’s degree in TESOL at Institute of Education, University College London. Her Master’s dissertation was supervised by Dr Kazuya Saito.

Pat is the Deputy Chief Executive of a large College Group.

A qualified accountant, she is accountable to the Corporation Board for the Group’s Estate, sustainability and for maintaining the Group’s outstanding financial health grade. Her specialisms include Leadership and Management, Identification and Application of Funding Streams as well as leading the Group in new acquisitions, ventures and developments. Pat is using her vast experience of public sector finances to explore the intersection of accounting, leadership and purpose.

Supervisors

James Robson and Ariel Lindorff

Alice received her Master’s in Child Study and Education from the Institute of Child Study at the University of Toronto. She has taught preschool through higher education as a teacher and principal in public and private schools in North America and Europe. Deeply committed to enhancing education, she believes in learning that connects students and teachers to the natural world and to their communities. She is actively involved in community organisations that promote intercultural, interracial, and interfaith understanding and allyship.

Supervisors

Steve Puttick

Victoria is an educational researcher and practitioner, specialising in educational support and methodology of teaching mathematics to low-achieving students. For over 9 years she has been working at Big Change Educational Centre (Moscow) which provides support to looked-after children.

Before joining the DPhil programme, she completed her undergraduate degree in Finance at Financial University in Moscow and then gained a MSc in Psychology of Education from the University of Bristol.

Victoria’s current research focuses on educational issues of care-experienced children and teaching mathematics to students of low achievement and motivation.

Supervisors

Karen Skilling and Gabriel Stylianides

Louise was born and raised in Glasgow and moved to Oxford to pursue a DPhil in Education.

Louise’s research interests are education policy, particularly higher education policy, as well as qualitative research into the experiences of students in higher education and reducing inequalities in access to higher education. Louise is also interested in educational capabilities, educational purpose, aspirations and philosophical debates about knowledge construction and co-construction. Louise has a First Class BA (Joint Honours) in Social Policy and Education from the University of Strathclyde, and two Masters degrees with Distinction also from the University of Strathclyde in Applied Educational and Social Research and Social Policy (Research Methods). Louise also participated in the University of Oxford’s UNIQ+ Graduate Access Programme in the summer of 2022, where she worked at the Department of Sociology with Melinda Mills, Bo Zhao and Evelina Akimova on research into the impact of socio-economic status on inequalities in access to veterinary care in Scotland. Louise’s DPhil thesis is interested in evaluating Lorella Terzi’s educational capabilities framework through the lens of contemporary higher education in order to gain an understanding of what graduate capabilities are identified by students and stakeholders as being necessary for enabling graduates to successfully thrive and adapt in a post-pandemic society.

 

Supervisors

Alis Oancea and Kelsey Inouye

Motema studied Neuroscience as an undergraduate at Dartmouth College in the USA and it is one of its courses, found interest in Education.

Motema then worked for various non-profit organisations in Lesotho and South Africa focusing on helping high school students from low SES backgrounds access opportunities to study in HE. In her Masters’ project Motema analysed Lesotho’s 2009 Curriculum and Assessment Policy. This analysis’ findings brought Motema to her current research interests which include gendered STEM education and decolonisation of education policies and curricula in Lesotho. For her DPhil project, Motema is interested in finding out the lived experiences of female Science teachers in Lesotho Secondary Schools especially focusing on the major changes in the Secondary school education system in Lesotho that have happened in the past five years as unique meeting points.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Judith Hillier

Danielle is a DPhil student researching how Black-British doctoral students navigate the spaces of the elite, providing a new theoretical framework to understand their agency better.

Her main interests are in Human Flourishing, Cultural Geography, Psychology, and Justice, and her work aims to inform and reform educational frameworks and practices.

Following Danielle’s BSc in Psychology and MRes in Research Methods in Psychology, she founded a social enterprise that merges psychological and academic strategies to guide undergraduate and master’s students study practices. In addition to this, Danielle provided pedagogical and behavioural support across SEN college, secondary and primary schools.

Some of Danielle’s notable work includes her research introducing a new University-wide EDI strategy at her former Higher Education institution, presenting insights and way-forwards on youth homelessness to HRH Prince Williams, and providing discipleship to next-gen leaders.

Dan is a part-time DPhil Education student whose research focuses on investigating reasons why individuals choose to study and then teach physics as a subject discipline and how these relate to issues of equity and power. He previously worked as a secondary school physics teacher in the West Midlands of England for around 15 years before taking up his current post as Associate Professor of Physics Education at the University of Birmingham where he works in widening participation in physics and teacher education.

Publications
  • Cottle, D 2022, ‘Harnessing the potential of recently retired physics teachers to mentor new physics teachers’, Physics Education, vol. 57, no. 1, 015020. https://doi.org/10.1088/1361-6552/ac3931
  • Cottle, D 2021, ‘Improving students’ mathematical skills in secondary science: ideas from mathematics pedagogy’, School Science Review, vol. 102, no. 381, pp. 61-64. <https://www.ase.org.uk/resources/school-science-review/issue-381/improving-students-mathematical-skills-in-secondary>
  • Cottle, D 2021, ‘The effects of Covid-19 on student transition from school to university in STEM subjects’, New Directions in the Teaching of Physical Sciences, vol. 16, no. 1, 3847, pp. 1-4. https://doi.org/10.29311/ndtps.v0i14.3847 
  • Cottle, D & Marshall, R 2016, ‘Exploring electrical resistance: a novel kinesthetic model helps to resolve some misconceptions’, Physics Education, vol. 51, no. 5. https://doi.org/10.1088/0031-9120/51/5/054004 

Chris is a third-year part time DPhil student. He is an experienced Director of Children’s Services working in London. He is interested in path dependence and whether it is a helpful concept to understand how children’s services work.

Yaoyao is a DPhil student in Education at Oxford.

Her research interest lies in Aptitude-Instruction-Interaction (ATI) in second language acquisition (SLA).

Yaoyao’s research investigates the mediating effects of individual differences in learners’ domain-general perceptual-cognitive abilities in instructed foreign language pronunciation acquisition in adulthood. She aims to further explore how aptitude hinders instructional effectiveness and help all students make the most of instruction regardless of aptitude profiles.

Yaoyao started her BA in the Japanese Language and Literature at Sun Yat-Sen University (中山大学) in China. She then moved to the University of Queensland to finish her BA with double majors in Japanese and Translation. After her BA, she worked as an English teacher in China for three years. Prior to her DPhil studies at Oxford, Yaoyao completed her Master’s degree in TESOL at Institute of Education, University College London. Her Master’s dissertation was supervised by Dr Kazuya Saito.

Pat is the Deputy Chief Executive of a large College Group.

A qualified accountant, she is accountable to the Corporation Board for the Group’s Estate, sustainability and for maintaining the Group’s outstanding financial health grade. Her specialisms include Leadership and Management, Identification and Application of Funding Streams as well as leading the Group in new acquisitions, ventures and developments. Pat is using her vast experience of public sector finances to explore the intersection of accounting, leadership and purpose.

Supervisors

James Robson and Ariel Lindorff

Alice received her Master’s in Child Study and Education from the Institute of Child Study at the University of Toronto. She has taught preschool through higher education as a teacher and principal in public and private schools in North America and Europe. Deeply committed to enhancing education, she believes in learning that connects students and teachers to the natural world and to their communities. She is actively involved in community organisations that promote intercultural, interracial, and interfaith understanding and allyship.

Supervisors

Steve Puttick

Victoria is an educational researcher and practitioner, specialising in educational support and methodology of teaching mathematics to low-achieving students. For over 9 years she has been working at Big Change Educational Centre (Moscow) which provides support to looked-after children.

Before joining the DPhil programme, she completed her undergraduate degree in Finance at Financial University in Moscow and then gained a MSc in Psychology of Education from the University of Bristol.

Victoria’s current research focuses on educational issues of care-experienced children and teaching mathematics to students of low achievement and motivation.

Supervisors

Karen Skilling and Gabriel Stylianides

Louise was born and raised in Glasgow and moved to Oxford to pursue a DPhil in Education.

Louise’s research interests are education policy, particularly higher education policy, as well as qualitative research into the experiences of students in higher education and reducing inequalities in access to higher education. Louise is also interested in educational capabilities, educational purpose, aspirations and philosophical debates about knowledge construction and co-construction. Louise has a First Class BA (Joint Honours) in Social Policy and Education from the University of Strathclyde, and two Masters degrees with Distinction also from the University of Strathclyde in Applied Educational and Social Research and Social Policy (Research Methods). Louise also participated in the University of Oxford’s UNIQ+ Graduate Access Programme in the summer of 2022, where she worked at the Department of Sociology with Melinda Mills, Bo Zhao and Evelina Akimova on research into the impact of socio-economic status on inequalities in access to veterinary care in Scotland. Louise’s DPhil thesis is interested in evaluating Lorella Terzi’s educational capabilities framework through the lens of contemporary higher education in order to gain an understanding of what graduate capabilities are identified by students and stakeholders as being necessary for enabling graduates to successfully thrive and adapt in a post-pandemic society.

 

Supervisors

Alis Oancea and Kelsey Inouye

Motema studied Neuroscience as an undergraduate at Dartmouth College in the USA and it is one of its courses, found interest in Education.

Motema then worked for various non-profit organisations in Lesotho and South Africa focusing on helping high school students from low SES backgrounds access opportunities to study in HE. In her Masters’ project Motema analysed Lesotho’s 2009 Curriculum and Assessment Policy. This analysis’ findings brought Motema to her current research interests which include gendered STEM education and decolonisation of education policies and curricula in Lesotho. For her DPhil project, Motema is interested in finding out the lived experiences of female Science teachers in Lesotho Secondary Schools especially focusing on the major changes in the Secondary school education system in Lesotho that have happened in the past five years as unique meeting points.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Judith Hillier

Danielle is a DPhil student researching how Black-British doctoral students navigate the spaces of the elite, providing a new theoretical framework to understand their agency better.

Her main interests are in Human Flourishing, Cultural Geography, Psychology, and Justice, and her work aims to inform and reform educational frameworks and practices.

Following Danielle’s BSc in Psychology and MRes in Research Methods in Psychology, she founded a social enterprise that merges psychological and academic strategies to guide undergraduate and master’s students study practices. In addition to this, Danielle provided pedagogical and behavioural support across SEN college, secondary and primary schools.

Some of Danielle’s notable work includes her research introducing a new University-wide EDI strategy at her former Higher Education institution, presenting insights and way-forwards on youth homelessness to HRH Prince Williams, and providing discipleship to next-gen leaders.

Dan is a part-time DPhil Education student whose research focuses on investigating reasons why individuals choose to study and then teach physics as a subject discipline and how these relate to issues of equity and power. He previously worked as a secondary school physics teacher in the West Midlands of England for around 15 years before taking up his current post as Associate Professor of Physics Education at the University of Birmingham where he works in widening participation in physics and teacher education.

Publications
  • Cottle, D 2022, ‘Harnessing the potential of recently retired physics teachers to mentor new physics teachers’, Physics Education, vol. 57, no. 1, 015020. https://doi.org/10.1088/1361-6552/ac3931
  • Cottle, D 2021, ‘Improving students’ mathematical skills in secondary science: ideas from mathematics pedagogy’, School Science Review, vol. 102, no. 381, pp. 61-64. <https://www.ase.org.uk/resources/school-science-review/issue-381/improving-students-mathematical-skills-in-secondary>
  • Cottle, D 2021, ‘The effects of Covid-19 on student transition from school to university in STEM subjects’, New Directions in the Teaching of Physical Sciences, vol. 16, no. 1, 3847, pp. 1-4. https://doi.org/10.29311/ndtps.v0i14.3847 
  • Cottle, D & Marshall, R 2016, ‘Exploring electrical resistance: a novel kinesthetic model helps to resolve some misconceptions’, Physics Education, vol. 51, no. 5. https://doi.org/10.1088/0031-9120/51/5/054004 

Chris is a third-year part time DPhil student. He is an experienced Director of Children’s Services working in London. He is interested in path dependence and whether it is a helpful concept to understand how children’s services work.

Yaoyao is a DPhil student in Education at Oxford.

Her research interest lies in Aptitude-Instruction-Interaction (ATI) in second language acquisition (SLA).

Yaoyao’s research investigates the mediating effects of individual differences in learners’ domain-general perceptual-cognitive abilities in instructed foreign language pronunciation acquisition in adulthood. She aims to further explore how aptitude hinders instructional effectiveness and help all students make the most of instruction regardless of aptitude profiles.

Yaoyao started her BA in the Japanese Language and Literature at Sun Yat-Sen University (中山大学) in China. She then moved to the University of Queensland to finish her BA with double majors in Japanese and Translation. After her BA, she worked as an English teacher in China for three years. Prior to her DPhil studies at Oxford, Yaoyao completed her Master’s degree in TESOL at Institute of Education, University College London. Her Master’s dissertation was supervised by Dr Kazuya Saito.

Pat is the Deputy Chief Executive of a large College Group.

A qualified accountant, she is accountable to the Corporation Board for the Group’s Estate, sustainability and for maintaining the Group’s outstanding financial health grade. Her specialisms include Leadership and Management, Identification and Application of Funding Streams as well as leading the Group in new acquisitions, ventures and developments. Pat is using her vast experience of public sector finances to explore the intersection of accounting, leadership and purpose.

Supervisors

James Robson and Ariel Lindorff

Alice received her Master’s in Child Study and Education from the Institute of Child Study at the University of Toronto. She has taught preschool through higher education as a teacher and principal in public and private schools in North America and Europe. Deeply committed to enhancing education, she believes in learning that connects students and teachers to the natural world and to their communities. She is actively involved in community organisations that promote intercultural, interracial, and interfaith understanding and allyship.

Supervisors

Steve Puttick

Victoria is an educational researcher and practitioner, specialising in educational support and methodology of teaching mathematics to low-achieving students. For over 9 years she has been working at Big Change Educational Centre (Moscow) which provides support to looked-after children.

Before joining the DPhil programme, she completed her undergraduate degree in Finance at Financial University in Moscow and then gained a MSc in Psychology of Education from the University of Bristol.

Victoria’s current research focuses on educational issues of care-experienced children and teaching mathematics to students of low achievement and motivation.

Supervisors

Karen Skilling and Gabriel Stylianides

Louise was born and raised in Glasgow and moved to Oxford to pursue a DPhil in Education.

Louise’s research interests are education policy, particularly higher education policy, as well as qualitative research into the experiences of students in higher education and reducing inequalities in access to higher education. Louise is also interested in educational capabilities, educational purpose, aspirations and philosophical debates about knowledge construction and co-construction. Louise has a First Class BA (Joint Honours) in Social Policy and Education from the University of Strathclyde, and two Masters degrees with Distinction also from the University of Strathclyde in Applied Educational and Social Research and Social Policy (Research Methods). Louise also participated in the University of Oxford’s UNIQ+ Graduate Access Programme in the summer of 2022, where she worked at the Department of Sociology with Melinda Mills, Bo Zhao and Evelina Akimova on research into the impact of socio-economic status on inequalities in access to veterinary care in Scotland. Louise’s DPhil thesis is interested in evaluating Lorella Terzi’s educational capabilities framework through the lens of contemporary higher education in order to gain an understanding of what graduate capabilities are identified by students and stakeholders as being necessary for enabling graduates to successfully thrive and adapt in a post-pandemic society.

 

Supervisors

Alis Oancea and Kelsey Inouye

Motema studied Neuroscience as an undergraduate at Dartmouth College in the USA and it is one of its courses, found interest in Education.

Motema then worked for various non-profit organisations in Lesotho and South Africa focusing on helping high school students from low SES backgrounds access opportunities to study in HE. In her Masters’ project Motema analysed Lesotho’s 2009 Curriculum and Assessment Policy. This analysis’ findings brought Motema to her current research interests which include gendered STEM education and decolonisation of education policies and curricula in Lesotho. For her DPhil project, Motema is interested in finding out the lived experiences of female Science teachers in Lesotho Secondary Schools especially focusing on the major changes in the Secondary school education system in Lesotho that have happened in the past five years as unique meeting points.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Judith Hillier

Danielle is a DPhil student researching how Black-British doctoral students navigate the spaces of the elite, providing a new theoretical framework to understand their agency better.

Her main interests are in Human Flourishing, Cultural Geography, Psychology, and Justice, and her work aims to inform and reform educational frameworks and practices.

Following Danielle’s BSc in Psychology and MRes in Research Methods in Psychology, she founded a social enterprise that merges psychological and academic strategies to guide undergraduate and master’s students study practices. In addition to this, Danielle provided pedagogical and behavioural support across SEN college, secondary and primary schools.

Some of Danielle’s notable work includes her research introducing a new University-wide EDI strategy at her former Higher Education institution, presenting insights and way-forwards on youth homelessness to HRH Prince Williams, and providing discipleship to next-gen leaders.

Dan is a part-time DPhil Education student whose research focuses on investigating reasons why individuals choose to study and then teach physics as a subject discipline and how these relate to issues of equity and power. He previously worked as a secondary school physics teacher in the West Midlands of England for around 15 years before taking up his current post as Associate Professor of Physics Education at the University of Birmingham where he works in widening participation in physics and teacher education.

Publications
  • Cottle, D 2022, ‘Harnessing the potential of recently retired physics teachers to mentor new physics teachers’, Physics Education, vol. 57, no. 1, 015020. https://doi.org/10.1088/1361-6552/ac3931
  • Cottle, D 2021, ‘Improving students’ mathematical skills in secondary science: ideas from mathematics pedagogy’, School Science Review, vol. 102, no. 381, pp. 61-64. <https://www.ase.org.uk/resources/school-science-review/issue-381/improving-students-mathematical-skills-in-secondary>
  • Cottle, D 2021, ‘The effects of Covid-19 on student transition from school to university in STEM subjects’, New Directions in the Teaching of Physical Sciences, vol. 16, no. 1, 3847, pp. 1-4. https://doi.org/10.29311/ndtps.v0i14.3847 
  • Cottle, D & Marshall, R 2016, ‘Exploring electrical resistance: a novel kinesthetic model helps to resolve some misconceptions’, Physics Education, vol. 51, no. 5. https://doi.org/10.1088/0031-9120/51/5/054004 

Chris is a third-year part time DPhil student. He is an experienced Director of Children’s Services working in London. He is interested in path dependence and whether it is a helpful concept to understand how children’s services work.

Yaoyao is a DPhil student in Education at Oxford.

Her research interest lies in Aptitude-Instruction-Interaction (ATI) in second language acquisition (SLA).

Yaoyao’s research investigates the mediating effects of individual differences in learners’ domain-general perceptual-cognitive abilities in instructed foreign language pronunciation acquisition in adulthood. She aims to further explore how aptitude hinders instructional effectiveness and help all students make the most of instruction regardless of aptitude profiles.

Yaoyao started her BA in the Japanese Language and Literature at Sun Yat-Sen University (中山大学) in China. She then moved to the University of Queensland to finish her BA with double majors in Japanese and Translation. After her BA, she worked as an English teacher in China for three years. Prior to her DPhil studies at Oxford, Yaoyao completed her Master’s degree in TESOL at Institute of Education, University College London. Her Master’s dissertation was supervised by Dr Kazuya Saito.

Pat is the Deputy Chief Executive of a large College Group.

A qualified accountant, she is accountable to the Corporation Board for the Group’s Estate, sustainability and for maintaining the Group’s outstanding financial health grade. Her specialisms include Leadership and Management, Identification and Application of Funding Streams as well as leading the Group in new acquisitions, ventures and developments. Pat is using her vast experience of public sector finances to explore the intersection of accounting, leadership and purpose.

Supervisors

James Robson and Ariel Lindorff

Alice received her Master’s in Child Study and Education from the Institute of Child Study at the University of Toronto. She has taught preschool through higher education as a teacher and principal in public and private schools in North America and Europe. Deeply committed to enhancing education, she believes in learning that connects students and teachers to the natural world and to their communities. She is actively involved in community organisations that promote intercultural, interracial, and interfaith understanding and allyship.

Supervisors

Steve Puttick

Victoria is an educational researcher and practitioner, specialising in educational support and methodology of teaching mathematics to low-achieving students. For over 9 years she has been working at Big Change Educational Centre (Moscow) which provides support to looked-after children.

Before joining the DPhil programme, she completed her undergraduate degree in Finance at Financial University in Moscow and then gained a MSc in Psychology of Education from the University of Bristol.

Victoria’s current research focuses on educational issues of care-experienced children and teaching mathematics to students of low achievement and motivation.

Supervisors

Karen Skilling and Gabriel Stylianides

Louise was born and raised in Glasgow and moved to Oxford to pursue a DPhil in Education.

Louise’s research interests are education policy, particularly higher education policy, as well as qualitative research into the experiences of students in higher education and reducing inequalities in access to higher education. Louise is also interested in educational capabilities, educational purpose, aspirations and philosophical debates about knowledge construction and co-construction. Louise has a First Class BA (Joint Honours) in Social Policy and Education from the University of Strathclyde, and two Masters degrees with Distinction also from the University of Strathclyde in Applied Educational and Social Research and Social Policy (Research Methods). Louise also participated in the University of Oxford’s UNIQ+ Graduate Access Programme in the summer of 2022, where she worked at the Department of Sociology with Melinda Mills, Bo Zhao and Evelina Akimova on research into the impact of socio-economic status on inequalities in access to veterinary care in Scotland. Louise’s DPhil thesis is interested in evaluating Lorella Terzi’s educational capabilities framework through the lens of contemporary higher education in order to gain an understanding of what graduate capabilities are identified by students and stakeholders as being necessary for enabling graduates to successfully thrive and adapt in a post-pandemic society.

 

Supervisors

Alis Oancea and Kelsey Inouye

Motema studied Neuroscience as an undergraduate at Dartmouth College in the USA and it is one of its courses, found interest in Education.

Motema then worked for various non-profit organisations in Lesotho and South Africa focusing on helping high school students from low SES backgrounds access opportunities to study in HE. In her Masters’ project Motema analysed Lesotho’s 2009 Curriculum and Assessment Policy. This analysis’ findings brought Motema to her current research interests which include gendered STEM education and decolonisation of education policies and curricula in Lesotho. For her DPhil project, Motema is interested in finding out the lived experiences of female Science teachers in Lesotho Secondary Schools especially focusing on the major changes in the Secondary school education system in Lesotho that have happened in the past five years as unique meeting points.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Judith Hillier

Danielle is a DPhil student researching how Black-British doctoral students navigate the spaces of the elite, providing a new theoretical framework to understand their agency better.

Her main interests are in Human Flourishing, Cultural Geography, Psychology, and Justice, and her work aims to inform and reform educational frameworks and practices.

Following Danielle’s BSc in Psychology and MRes in Research Methods in Psychology, she founded a social enterprise that merges psychological and academic strategies to guide undergraduate and master’s students study practices. In addition to this, Danielle provided pedagogical and behavioural support across SEN college, secondary and primary schools.

Some of Danielle’s notable work includes her research introducing a new University-wide EDI strategy at her former Higher Education institution, presenting insights and way-forwards on youth homelessness to HRH Prince Williams, and providing discipleship to next-gen leaders.

Dan is a part-time DPhil Education student whose research focuses on investigating reasons why individuals choose to study and then teach physics as a subject discipline and how these relate to issues of equity and power. He previously worked as a secondary school physics teacher in the West Midlands of England for around 15 years before taking up his current post as Associate Professor of Physics Education at the University of Birmingham where he works in widening participation in physics and teacher education.

Publications
  • Cottle, D 2022, ‘Harnessing the potential of recently retired physics teachers to mentor new physics teachers’, Physics Education, vol. 57, no. 1, 015020. https://doi.org/10.1088/1361-6552/ac3931
  • Cottle, D 2021, ‘Improving students’ mathematical skills in secondary science: ideas from mathematics pedagogy’, School Science Review, vol. 102, no. 381, pp. 61-64. <https://www.ase.org.uk/resources/school-science-review/issue-381/improving-students-mathematical-skills-in-secondary>
  • Cottle, D 2021, ‘The effects of Covid-19 on student transition from school to university in STEM subjects’, New Directions in the Teaching of Physical Sciences, vol. 16, no. 1, 3847, pp. 1-4. https://doi.org/10.29311/ndtps.v0i14.3847 
  • Cottle, D & Marshall, R 2016, ‘Exploring electrical resistance: a novel kinesthetic model helps to resolve some misconceptions’, Physics Education, vol. 51, no. 5. https://doi.org/10.1088/0031-9120/51/5/054004 

Chris is a third-year part time DPhil student. He is an experienced Director of Children’s Services working in London. He is interested in path dependence and whether it is a helpful concept to understand how children’s services work.

Yaoyao is a DPhil student in Education at Oxford.

Her research interest lies in Aptitude-Instruction-Interaction (ATI) in second language acquisition (SLA).

Yaoyao’s research investigates the mediating effects of individual differences in learners’ domain-general perceptual-cognitive abilities in instructed foreign language pronunciation acquisition in adulthood. She aims to further explore how aptitude hinders instructional effectiveness and help all students make the most of instruction regardless of aptitude profiles.

Yaoyao started her BA in the Japanese Language and Literature at Sun Yat-Sen University (中山大学) in China. She then moved to the University of Queensland to finish her BA with double majors in Japanese and Translation. After her BA, she worked as an English teacher in China for three years. Prior to her DPhil studies at Oxford, Yaoyao completed her Master’s degree in TESOL at Institute of Education, University College London. Her Master’s dissertation was supervised by Dr Kazuya Saito.

Pat is the Deputy Chief Executive of a large College Group.

A qualified accountant, she is accountable to the Corporation Board for the Group’s Estate, sustainability and for maintaining the Group’s outstanding financial health grade. Her specialisms include Leadership and Management, Identification and Application of Funding Streams as well as leading the Group in new acquisitions, ventures and developments. Pat is using her vast experience of public sector finances to explore the intersection of accounting, leadership and purpose.

Supervisors

James Robson and Ariel Lindorff

Alice received her Master’s in Child Study and Education from the Institute of Child Study at the University of Toronto. She has taught preschool through higher education as a teacher and principal in public and private schools in North America and Europe. Deeply committed to enhancing education, she believes in learning that connects students and teachers to the natural world and to their communities. She is actively involved in community organisations that promote intercultural, interracial, and interfaith understanding and allyship.

Supervisors

Steve Puttick

Victoria is an educational researcher and practitioner, specialising in educational support and methodology of teaching mathematics to low-achieving students. For over 9 years she has been working at Big Change Educational Centre (Moscow) which provides support to looked-after children.

Before joining the DPhil programme, she completed her undergraduate degree in Finance at Financial University in Moscow and then gained a MSc in Psychology of Education from the University of Bristol.

Victoria’s current research focuses on educational issues of care-experienced children and teaching mathematics to students of low achievement and motivation.

Supervisors

Karen Skilling and Gabriel Stylianides

Louise was born and raised in Glasgow and moved to Oxford to pursue a DPhil in Education.

Louise’s research interests are education policy, particularly higher education policy, as well as qualitative research into the experiences of students in higher education and reducing inequalities in access to higher education. Louise is also interested in educational capabilities, educational purpose, aspirations and philosophical debates about knowledge construction and co-construction. Louise has a First Class BA (Joint Honours) in Social Policy and Education from the University of Strathclyde, and two Masters degrees with Distinction also from the University of Strathclyde in Applied Educational and Social Research and Social Policy (Research Methods). Louise also participated in the University of Oxford’s UNIQ+ Graduate Access Programme in the summer of 2022, where she worked at the Department of Sociology with Melinda Mills, Bo Zhao and Evelina Akimova on research into the impact of socio-economic status on inequalities in access to veterinary care in Scotland. Louise’s DPhil thesis is interested in evaluating Lorella Terzi’s educational capabilities framework through the lens of contemporary higher education in order to gain an understanding of what graduate capabilities are identified by students and stakeholders as being necessary for enabling graduates to successfully thrive and adapt in a post-pandemic society.

 

Supervisors

Alis Oancea and Kelsey Inouye

Motema studied Neuroscience as an undergraduate at Dartmouth College in the USA and it is one of its courses, found interest in Education.

Motema then worked for various non-profit organisations in Lesotho and South Africa focusing on helping high school students from low SES backgrounds access opportunities to study in HE. In her Masters’ project Motema analysed Lesotho’s 2009 Curriculum and Assessment Policy. This analysis’ findings brought Motema to her current research interests which include gendered STEM education and decolonisation of education policies and curricula in Lesotho. For her DPhil project, Motema is interested in finding out the lived experiences of female Science teachers in Lesotho Secondary Schools especially focusing on the major changes in the Secondary school education system in Lesotho that have happened in the past five years as unique meeting points.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Judith Hillier

Danielle is a DPhil student researching how Black-British doctoral students navigate the spaces of the elite, providing a new theoretical framework to understand their agency better.

Her main interests are in Human Flourishing, Cultural Geography, Psychology, and Justice, and her work aims to inform and reform educational frameworks and practices.

Following Danielle’s BSc in Psychology and MRes in Research Methods in Psychology, she founded a social enterprise that merges psychological and academic strategies to guide undergraduate and master’s students study practices. In addition to this, Danielle provided pedagogical and behavioural support across SEN college, secondary and primary schools.

Some of Danielle’s notable work includes her research introducing a new University-wide EDI strategy at her former Higher Education institution, presenting insights and way-forwards on youth homelessness to HRH Prince Williams, and providing discipleship to next-gen leaders.

Dan is a part-time DPhil Education student whose research focuses on investigating reasons why individuals choose to study and then teach physics as a subject discipline and how these relate to issues of equity and power. He previously worked as a secondary school physics teacher in the West Midlands of England for around 15 years before taking up his current post as Associate Professor of Physics Education at the University of Birmingham where he works in widening participation in physics and teacher education.

Publications
  • Cottle, D 2022, ‘Harnessing the potential of recently retired physics teachers to mentor new physics teachers’, Physics Education, vol. 57, no. 1, 015020. https://doi.org/10.1088/1361-6552/ac3931
  • Cottle, D 2021, ‘Improving students’ mathematical skills in secondary science: ideas from mathematics pedagogy’, School Science Review, vol. 102, no. 381, pp. 61-64. <https://www.ase.org.uk/resources/school-science-review/issue-381/improving-students-mathematical-skills-in-secondary>
  • Cottle, D 2021, ‘The effects of Covid-19 on student transition from school to university in STEM subjects’, New Directions in the Teaching of Physical Sciences, vol. 16, no. 1, 3847, pp. 1-4. https://doi.org/10.29311/ndtps.v0i14.3847 
  • Cottle, D & Marshall, R 2016, ‘Exploring electrical resistance: a novel kinesthetic model helps to resolve some misconceptions’, Physics Education, vol. 51, no. 5. https://doi.org/10.1088/0031-9120/51/5/054004 

Chris is a third-year part time DPhil student. He is an experienced Director of Children’s Services working in London. He is interested in path dependence and whether it is a helpful concept to understand how children’s services work.

Yaoyao is a DPhil student in Education at Oxford.

Her research interest lies in Aptitude-Instruction-Interaction (ATI) in second language acquisition (SLA).

Yaoyao’s research investigates the mediating effects of individual differences in learners’ domain-general perceptual-cognitive abilities in instructed foreign language pronunciation acquisition in adulthood. She aims to further explore how aptitude hinders instructional effectiveness and help all students make the most of instruction regardless of aptitude profiles.

Yaoyao started her BA in the Japanese Language and Literature at Sun Yat-Sen University (中山大学) in China. She then moved to the University of Queensland to finish her BA with double majors in Japanese and Translation. After her BA, she worked as an English teacher in China for three years. Prior to her DPhil studies at Oxford, Yaoyao completed her Master’s degree in TESOL at Institute of Education, University College London. Her Master’s dissertation was supervised by Dr Kazuya Saito.

Pat is the Deputy Chief Executive of a large College Group.

A qualified accountant, she is accountable to the Corporation Board for the Group’s Estate, sustainability and for maintaining the Group’s outstanding financial health grade. Her specialisms include Leadership and Management, Identification and Application of Funding Streams as well as leading the Group in new acquisitions, ventures and developments. Pat is using her vast experience of public sector finances to explore the intersection of accounting, leadership and purpose.

Supervisors

James Robson and Ariel Lindorff

Alice received her Master’s in Child Study and Education from the Institute of Child Study at the University of Toronto. She has taught preschool through higher education as a teacher and principal in public and private schools in North America and Europe. Deeply committed to enhancing education, she believes in learning that connects students and teachers to the natural world and to their communities. She is actively involved in community organisations that promote intercultural, interracial, and interfaith understanding and allyship.

Supervisors

Steve Puttick

Victoria is an educational researcher and practitioner, specialising in educational support and methodology of teaching mathematics to low-achieving students. For over 9 years she has been working at Big Change Educational Centre (Moscow) which provides support to looked-after children.

Before joining the DPhil programme, she completed her undergraduate degree in Finance at Financial University in Moscow and then gained a MSc in Psychology of Education from the University of Bristol.

Victoria’s current research focuses on educational issues of care-experienced children and teaching mathematics to students of low achievement and motivation.

Supervisors

Karen Skilling and Gabriel Stylianides

Louise was born and raised in Glasgow and moved to Oxford to pursue a DPhil in Education.

Louise’s research interests are education policy, particularly higher education policy, as well as qualitative research into the experiences of students in higher education and reducing inequalities in access to higher education. Louise is also interested in educational capabilities, educational purpose, aspirations and philosophical debates about knowledge construction and co-construction. Louise has a First Class BA (Joint Honours) in Social Policy and Education from the University of Strathclyde, and two Masters degrees with Distinction also from the University of Strathclyde in Applied Educational and Social Research and Social Policy (Research Methods). Louise also participated in the University of Oxford’s UNIQ+ Graduate Access Programme in the summer of 2022, where she worked at the Department of Sociology with Melinda Mills, Bo Zhao and Evelina Akimova on research into the impact of socio-economic status on inequalities in access to veterinary care in Scotland. Louise’s DPhil thesis is interested in evaluating Lorella Terzi’s educational capabilities framework through the lens of contemporary higher education in order to gain an understanding of what graduate capabilities are identified by students and stakeholders as being necessary for enabling graduates to successfully thrive and adapt in a post-pandemic society.

 

Supervisors

Alis Oancea and Kelsey Inouye

Motema studied Neuroscience as an undergraduate at Dartmouth College in the USA and it is one of its courses, found interest in Education.

Motema then worked for various non-profit organisations in Lesotho and South Africa focusing on helping high school students from low SES backgrounds access opportunities to study in HE. In her Masters’ project Motema analysed Lesotho’s 2009 Curriculum and Assessment Policy. This analysis’ findings brought Motema to her current research interests which include gendered STEM education and decolonisation of education policies and curricula in Lesotho. For her DPhil project, Motema is interested in finding out the lived experiences of female Science teachers in Lesotho Secondary Schools especially focusing on the major changes in the Secondary school education system in Lesotho that have happened in the past five years as unique meeting points.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Judith Hillier

Danielle is a DPhil student researching how Black-British doctoral students navigate the spaces of the elite, providing a new theoretical framework to understand their agency better.

Her main interests are in Human Flourishing, Cultural Geography, Psychology, and Justice, and her work aims to inform and reform educational frameworks and practices.

Following Danielle’s BSc in Psychology and MRes in Research Methods in Psychology, she founded a social enterprise that merges psychological and academic strategies to guide undergraduate and master’s students study practices. In addition to this, Danielle provided pedagogical and behavioural support across SEN college, secondary and primary schools.

Some of Danielle’s notable work includes her research introducing a new University-wide EDI strategy at her former Higher Education institution, presenting insights and way-forwards on youth homelessness to HRH Prince Williams, and providing discipleship to next-gen leaders.

Dan is a part-time DPhil Education student whose research focuses on investigating reasons why individuals choose to study and then teach physics as a subject discipline and how these relate to issues of equity and power. He previously worked as a secondary school physics teacher in the West Midlands of England for around 15 years before taking up his current post as Associate Professor of Physics Education at the University of Birmingham where he works in widening participation in physics and teacher education.

Publications
  • Cottle, D 2022, ‘Harnessing the potential of recently retired physics teachers to mentor new physics teachers’, Physics Education, vol. 57, no. 1, 015020. https://doi.org/10.1088/1361-6552/ac3931
  • Cottle, D 2021, ‘Improving students’ mathematical skills in secondary science: ideas from mathematics pedagogy’, School Science Review, vol. 102, no. 381, pp. 61-64. <https://www.ase.org.uk/resources/school-science-review/issue-381/improving-students-mathematical-skills-in-secondary>
  • Cottle, D 2021, ‘The effects of Covid-19 on student transition from school to university in STEM subjects’, New Directions in the Teaching of Physical Sciences, vol. 16, no. 1, 3847, pp. 1-4. https://doi.org/10.29311/ndtps.v0i14.3847 
  • Cottle, D & Marshall, R 2016, ‘Exploring electrical resistance: a novel kinesthetic model helps to resolve some misconceptions’, Physics Education, vol. 51, no. 5. https://doi.org/10.1088/0031-9120/51/5/054004 

Chris is a third-year part time DPhil student. He is an experienced Director of Children’s Services working in London. He is interested in path dependence and whether it is a helpful concept to understand how children’s services work.

Yaoyao is a DPhil student in Education at Oxford.

Her research interest lies in Aptitude-Instruction-Interaction (ATI) in second language acquisition (SLA).

Yaoyao’s research investigates the mediating effects of individual differences in learners’ domain-general perceptual-cognitive abilities in instructed foreign language pronunciation acquisition in adulthood. She aims to further explore how aptitude hinders instructional effectiveness and help all students make the most of instruction regardless of aptitude profiles.

Yaoyao started her BA in the Japanese Language and Literature at Sun Yat-Sen University (中山大学) in China. She then moved to the University of Queensland to finish her BA with double majors in Japanese and Translation. After her BA, she worked as an English teacher in China for three years. Prior to her DPhil studies at Oxford, Yaoyao completed her Master’s degree in TESOL at Institute of Education, University College London. Her Master’s dissertation was supervised by Dr Kazuya Saito.

Pat is the Deputy Chief Executive of a large College Group.

A qualified accountant, she is accountable to the Corporation Board for the Group’s Estate, sustainability and for maintaining the Group’s outstanding financial health grade. Her specialisms include Leadership and Management, Identification and Application of Funding Streams as well as leading the Group in new acquisitions, ventures and developments. Pat is using her vast experience of public sector finances to explore the intersection of accounting, leadership and purpose.

Supervisors

James Robson and Ariel Lindorff

Alice received her Master’s in Child Study and Education from the Institute of Child Study at the University of Toronto. She has taught preschool through higher education as a teacher and principal in public and private schools in North America and Europe. Deeply committed to enhancing education, she believes in learning that connects students and teachers to the natural world and to their communities. She is actively involved in community organisations that promote intercultural, interracial, and interfaith understanding and allyship.

Supervisors

Steve Puttick

Victoria is an educational researcher and practitioner, specialising in educational support and methodology of teaching mathematics to low-achieving students. For over 9 years she has been working at Big Change Educational Centre (Moscow) which provides support to looked-after children.

Before joining the DPhil programme, she completed her undergraduate degree in Finance at Financial University in Moscow and then gained a MSc in Psychology of Education from the University of Bristol.

Victoria’s current research focuses on educational issues of care-experienced children and teaching mathematics to students of low achievement and motivation.

Supervisors

Karen Skilling and Gabriel Stylianides

Louise was born and raised in Glasgow and moved to Oxford to pursue a DPhil in Education.

Louise’s research interests are education policy, particularly higher education policy, as well as qualitative research into the experiences of students in higher education and reducing inequalities in access to higher education. Louise is also interested in educational capabilities, educational purpose, aspirations and philosophical debates about knowledge construction and co-construction. Louise has a First Class BA (Joint Honours) in Social Policy and Education from the University of Strathclyde, and two Masters degrees with Distinction also from the University of Strathclyde in Applied Educational and Social Research and Social Policy (Research Methods). Louise also participated in the University of Oxford’s UNIQ+ Graduate Access Programme in the summer of 2022, where she worked at the Department of Sociology with Melinda Mills, Bo Zhao and Evelina Akimova on research into the impact of socio-economic status on inequalities in access to veterinary care in Scotland. Louise’s DPhil thesis is interested in evaluating Lorella Terzi’s educational capabilities framework through the lens of contemporary higher education in order to gain an understanding of what graduate capabilities are identified by students and stakeholders as being necessary for enabling graduates to successfully thrive and adapt in a post-pandemic society.

 

Supervisors

Alis Oancea and Kelsey Inouye

Motema studied Neuroscience as an undergraduate at Dartmouth College in the USA and it is one of its courses, found interest in Education.

Motema then worked for various non-profit organisations in Lesotho and South Africa focusing on helping high school students from low SES backgrounds access opportunities to study in HE. In her Masters’ project Motema analysed Lesotho’s 2009 Curriculum and Assessment Policy. This analysis’ findings brought Motema to her current research interests which include gendered STEM education and decolonisation of education policies and curricula in Lesotho. For her DPhil project, Motema is interested in finding out the lived experiences of female Science teachers in Lesotho Secondary Schools especially focusing on the major changes in the Secondary school education system in Lesotho that have happened in the past five years as unique meeting points.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Judith Hillier

Danielle is a DPhil student researching how Black-British doctoral students navigate the spaces of the elite, providing a new theoretical framework to understand their agency better.

Her main interests are in Human Flourishing, Cultural Geography, Psychology, and Justice, and her work aims to inform and reform educational frameworks and practices.

Following Danielle’s BSc in Psychology and MRes in Research Methods in Psychology, she founded a social enterprise that merges psychological and academic strategies to guide undergraduate and master’s students study practices. In addition to this, Danielle provided pedagogical and behavioural support across SEN college, secondary and primary schools.

Some of Danielle’s notable work includes her research introducing a new University-wide EDI strategy at her former Higher Education institution, presenting insights and way-forwards on youth homelessness to HRH Prince Williams, and providing discipleship to next-gen leaders.

Dan is a part-time DPhil Education student whose research focuses on investigating reasons why individuals choose to study and then teach physics as a subject discipline and how these relate to issues of equity and power. He previously worked as a secondary school physics teacher in the West Midlands of England for around 15 years before taking up his current post as Associate Professor of Physics Education at the University of Birmingham where he works in widening participation in physics and teacher education.

Publications
  • Cottle, D 2022, ‘Harnessing the potential of recently retired physics teachers to mentor new physics teachers’, Physics Education, vol. 57, no. 1, 015020. https://doi.org/10.1088/1361-6552/ac3931
  • Cottle, D 2021, ‘Improving students’ mathematical skills in secondary science: ideas from mathematics pedagogy’, School Science Review, vol. 102, no. 381, pp. 61-64. <https://www.ase.org.uk/resources/school-science-review/issue-381/improving-students-mathematical-skills-in-secondary>
  • Cottle, D 2021, ‘The effects of Covid-19 on student transition from school to university in STEM subjects’, New Directions in the Teaching of Physical Sciences, vol. 16, no. 1, 3847, pp. 1-4. https://doi.org/10.29311/ndtps.v0i14.3847 
  • Cottle, D & Marshall, R 2016, ‘Exploring electrical resistance: a novel kinesthetic model helps to resolve some misconceptions’, Physics Education, vol. 51, no. 5. https://doi.org/10.1088/0031-9120/51/5/054004 

Chris is a third-year part time DPhil student. He is an experienced Director of Children’s Services working in London. He is interested in path dependence and whether it is a helpful concept to understand how children’s services work.

Yaoyao is a DPhil student in Education at Oxford.

Her research interest lies in Aptitude-Instruction-Interaction (ATI) in second language acquisition (SLA).

Yaoyao’s research investigates the mediating effects of individual differences in learners’ domain-general perceptual-cognitive abilities in instructed foreign language pronunciation acquisition in adulthood. She aims to further explore how aptitude hinders instructional effectiveness and help all students make the most of instruction regardless of aptitude profiles.

Yaoyao started her BA in the Japanese Language and Literature at Sun Yat-Sen University (中山大学) in China. She then moved to the University of Queensland to finish her BA with double majors in Japanese and Translation. After her BA, she worked as an English teacher in China for three years. Prior to her DPhil studies at Oxford, Yaoyao completed her Master’s degree in TESOL at Institute of Education, University College London. Her Master’s dissertation was supervised by Dr Kazuya Saito.

Pat is the Deputy Chief Executive of a large College Group.

A qualified accountant, she is accountable to the Corporation Board for the Group’s Estate, sustainability and for maintaining the Group’s outstanding financial health grade. Her specialisms include Leadership and Management, Identification and Application of Funding Streams as well as leading the Group in new acquisitions, ventures and developments. Pat is using her vast experience of public sector finances to explore the intersection of accounting, leadership and purpose.

Supervisors

James Robson and Ariel Lindorff

Alice received her Master’s in Child Study and Education from the Institute of Child Study at the University of Toronto. She has taught preschool through higher education as a teacher and principal in public and private schools in North America and Europe. Deeply committed to enhancing education, she believes in learning that connects students and teachers to the natural world and to their communities. She is actively involved in community organisations that promote intercultural, interracial, and interfaith understanding and allyship.

Supervisors

Steve Puttick

Victoria is an educational researcher and practitioner, specialising in educational support and methodology of teaching mathematics to low-achieving students. For over 9 years she has been working at Big Change Educational Centre (Moscow) which provides support to looked-after children.

Before joining the DPhil programme, she completed her undergraduate degree in Finance at Financial University in Moscow and then gained a MSc in Psychology of Education from the University of Bristol.

Victoria’s current research focuses on educational issues of care-experienced children and teaching mathematics to students of low achievement and motivation.

Supervisors

Karen Skilling and Gabriel Stylianides

Louise was born and raised in Glasgow and moved to Oxford to pursue a DPhil in Education.

Louise’s research interests are education policy, particularly higher education policy, as well as qualitative research into the experiences of students in higher education and reducing inequalities in access to higher education. Louise is also interested in educational capabilities, educational purpose, aspirations and philosophical debates about knowledge construction and co-construction. Louise has a First Class BA (Joint Honours) in Social Policy and Education from the University of Strathclyde, and two Masters degrees with Distinction also from the University of Strathclyde in Applied Educational and Social Research and Social Policy (Research Methods). Louise also participated in the University of Oxford’s UNIQ+ Graduate Access Programme in the summer of 2022, where she worked at the Department of Sociology with Melinda Mills, Bo Zhao and Evelina Akimova on research into the impact of socio-economic status on inequalities in access to veterinary care in Scotland. Louise’s DPhil thesis is interested in evaluating Lorella Terzi’s educational capabilities framework through the lens of contemporary higher education in order to gain an understanding of what graduate capabilities are identified by students and stakeholders as being necessary for enabling graduates to successfully thrive and adapt in a post-pandemic society.

 

Supervisors

Alis Oancea and Kelsey Inouye

Motema studied Neuroscience as an undergraduate at Dartmouth College in the USA and it is one of its courses, found interest in Education.

Motema then worked for various non-profit organisations in Lesotho and South Africa focusing on helping high school students from low SES backgrounds access opportunities to study in HE. In her Masters’ project Motema analysed Lesotho’s 2009 Curriculum and Assessment Policy. This analysis’ findings brought Motema to her current research interests which include gendered STEM education and decolonisation of education policies and curricula in Lesotho. For her DPhil project, Motema is interested in finding out the lived experiences of female Science teachers in Lesotho Secondary Schools especially focusing on the major changes in the Secondary school education system in Lesotho that have happened in the past five years as unique meeting points.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Judith Hillier

Danielle is a DPhil student researching how Black-British doctoral students navigate the spaces of the elite, providing a new theoretical framework to understand their agency better.

Her main interests are in Human Flourishing, Cultural Geography, Psychology, and Justice, and her work aims to inform and reform educational frameworks and practices.

Following Danielle’s BSc in Psychology and MRes in Research Methods in Psychology, she founded a social enterprise that merges psychological and academic strategies to guide undergraduate and master’s students study practices. In addition to this, Danielle provided pedagogical and behavioural support across SEN college, secondary and primary schools.

Some of Danielle’s notable work includes her research introducing a new University-wide EDI strategy at her former Higher Education institution, presenting insights and way-forwards on youth homelessness to HRH Prince Williams, and providing discipleship to next-gen leaders.

Dan is a part-time DPhil Education student whose research focuses on investigating reasons why individuals choose to study and then teach physics as a subject discipline and how these relate to issues of equity and power. He previously worked as a secondary school physics teacher in the West Midlands of England for around 15 years before taking up his current post as Associate Professor of Physics Education at the University of Birmingham where he works in widening participation in physics and teacher education.

Publications
  • Cottle, D 2022, ‘Harnessing the potential of recently retired physics teachers to mentor new physics teachers’, Physics Education, vol. 57, no. 1, 015020. https://doi.org/10.1088/1361-6552/ac3931
  • Cottle, D 2021, ‘Improving students’ mathematical skills in secondary science: ideas from mathematics pedagogy’, School Science Review, vol. 102, no. 381, pp. 61-64. <https://www.ase.org.uk/resources/school-science-review/issue-381/improving-students-mathematical-skills-in-secondary>
  • Cottle, D 2021, ‘The effects of Covid-19 on student transition from school to university in STEM subjects’, New Directions in the Teaching of Physical Sciences, vol. 16, no. 1, 3847, pp. 1-4. https://doi.org/10.29311/ndtps.v0i14.3847 
  • Cottle, D & Marshall, R 2016, ‘Exploring electrical resistance: a novel kinesthetic model helps to resolve some misconceptions’, Physics Education, vol. 51, no. 5. https://doi.org/10.1088/0031-9120/51/5/054004 

Chris is a third-year part time DPhil student. He is an experienced Director of Children’s Services working in London. He is interested in path dependence and whether it is a helpful concept to understand how children’s services work.

Yaoyao is a DPhil student in Education at Oxford.

Her research interest lies in Aptitude-Instruction-Interaction (ATI) in second language acquisition (SLA).

Yaoyao’s research investigates the mediating effects of individual differences in learners’ domain-general perceptual-cognitive abilities in instructed foreign language pronunciation acquisition in adulthood. She aims to further explore how aptitude hinders instructional effectiveness and help all students make the most of instruction regardless of aptitude profiles.

Yaoyao started her BA in the Japanese Language and Literature at Sun Yat-Sen University (中山大学) in China. She then moved to the University of Queensland to finish her BA with double majors in Japanese and Translation. After her BA, she worked as an English teacher in China for three years. Prior to her DPhil studies at Oxford, Yaoyao completed her Master’s degree in TESOL at Institute of Education, University College London. Her Master’s dissertation was supervised by Dr Kazuya Saito.

Pat is the Deputy Chief Executive of a large College Group.

A qualified accountant, she is accountable to the Corporation Board for the Group’s Estate, sustainability and for maintaining the Group’s outstanding financial health grade. Her specialisms include Leadership and Management, Identification and Application of Funding Streams as well as leading the Group in new acquisitions, ventures and developments. Pat is using her vast experience of public sector finances to explore the intersection of accounting, leadership and purpose.

Supervisors

James Robson and Ariel Lindorff

Alice received her Master’s in Child Study and Education from the Institute of Child Study at the University of Toronto. She has taught preschool through higher education as a teacher and principal in public and private schools in North America and Europe. Deeply committed to enhancing education, she believes in learning that connects students and teachers to the natural world and to their communities. She is actively involved in community organisations that promote intercultural, interracial, and interfaith understanding and allyship.

Supervisors

Steve Puttick

Victoria is an educational researcher and practitioner, specialising in educational support and methodology of teaching mathematics to low-achieving students. For over 9 years she has been working at Big Change Educational Centre (Moscow) which provides support to looked-after children.

Before joining the DPhil programme, she completed her undergraduate degree in Finance at Financial University in Moscow and then gained a MSc in Psychology of Education from the University of Bristol.

Victoria’s current research focuses on educational issues of care-experienced children and teaching mathematics to students of low achievement and motivation.

Supervisors

Karen Skilling and Gabriel Stylianides

Louise was born and raised in Glasgow and moved to Oxford to pursue a DPhil in Education.

Louise’s research interests are education policy, particularly higher education policy, as well as qualitative research into the experiences of students in higher education and reducing inequalities in access to higher education. Louise is also interested in educational capabilities, educational purpose, aspirations and philosophical debates about knowledge construction and co-construction. Louise has a First Class BA (Joint Honours) in Social Policy and Education from the University of Strathclyde, and two Masters degrees with Distinction also from the University of Strathclyde in Applied Educational and Social Research and Social Policy (Research Methods). Louise also participated in the University of Oxford’s UNIQ+ Graduate Access Programme in the summer of 2022, where she worked at the Department of Sociology with Melinda Mills, Bo Zhao and Evelina Akimova on research into the impact of socio-economic status on inequalities in access to veterinary care in Scotland. Louise’s DPhil thesis is interested in evaluating Lorella Terzi’s educational capabilities framework through the lens of contemporary higher education in order to gain an understanding of what graduate capabilities are identified by students and stakeholders as being necessary for enabling graduates to successfully thrive and adapt in a post-pandemic society.

 

Supervisors

Alis Oancea and Kelsey Inouye

Motema studied Neuroscience as an undergraduate at Dartmouth College in the USA and it is one of its courses, found interest in Education.

Motema then worked for various non-profit organisations in Lesotho and South Africa focusing on helping high school students from low SES backgrounds access opportunities to study in HE. In her Masters’ project Motema analysed Lesotho’s 2009 Curriculum and Assessment Policy. This analysis’ findings brought Motema to her current research interests which include gendered STEM education and decolonisation of education policies and curricula in Lesotho. For her DPhil project, Motema is interested in finding out the lived experiences of female Science teachers in Lesotho Secondary Schools especially focusing on the major changes in the Secondary school education system in Lesotho that have happened in the past five years as unique meeting points.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Judith Hillier

Danielle is a DPhil student researching how Black-British doctoral students navigate the spaces of the elite, providing a new theoretical framework to understand their agency better.

Her main interests are in Human Flourishing, Cultural Geography, Psychology, and Justice, and her work aims to inform and reform educational frameworks and practices.

Following Danielle’s BSc in Psychology and MRes in Research Methods in Psychology, she founded a social enterprise that merges psychological and academic strategies to guide undergraduate and master’s students study practices. In addition to this, Danielle provided pedagogical and behavioural support across SEN college, secondary and primary schools.

Some of Danielle’s notable work includes her research introducing a new University-wide EDI strategy at her former Higher Education institution, presenting insights and way-forwards on youth homelessness to HRH Prince Williams, and providing discipleship to next-gen leaders.

Dan is a part-time DPhil Education student whose research focuses on investigating reasons why individuals choose to study and then teach physics as a subject discipline and how these relate to issues of equity and power. He previously worked as a secondary school physics teacher in the West Midlands of England for around 15 years before taking up his current post as Associate Professor of Physics Education at the University of Birmingham where he works in widening participation in physics and teacher education.

Publications
  • Cottle, D 2022, ‘Harnessing the potential of recently retired physics teachers to mentor new physics teachers’, Physics Education, vol. 57, no. 1, 015020. https://doi.org/10.1088/1361-6552/ac3931
  • Cottle, D 2021, ‘Improving students’ mathematical skills in secondary science: ideas from mathematics pedagogy’, School Science Review, vol. 102, no. 381, pp. 61-64. <https://www.ase.org.uk/resources/school-science-review/issue-381/improving-students-mathematical-skills-in-secondary>
  • Cottle, D 2021, ‘The effects of Covid-19 on student transition from school to university in STEM subjects’, New Directions in the Teaching of Physical Sciences, vol. 16, no. 1, 3847, pp. 1-4. https://doi.org/10.29311/ndtps.v0i14.3847 
  • Cottle, D & Marshall, R 2016, ‘Exploring electrical resistance: a novel kinesthetic model helps to resolve some misconceptions’, Physics Education, vol. 51, no. 5. https://doi.org/10.1088/0031-9120/51/5/054004 

Chris is a third-year part time DPhil student. He is an experienced Director of Children’s Services working in London. He is interested in path dependence and whether it is a helpful concept to understand how children’s services work.

Yaoyao is a DPhil student in Education at Oxford.

Her research interest lies in Aptitude-Instruction-Interaction (ATI) in second language acquisition (SLA).

Yaoyao’s research investigates the mediating effects of individual differences in learners’ domain-general perceptual-cognitive abilities in instructed foreign language pronunciation acquisition in adulthood. She aims to further explore how aptitude hinders instructional effectiveness and help all students make the most of instruction regardless of aptitude profiles.

Yaoyao started her BA in the Japanese Language and Literature at Sun Yat-Sen University (中山大学) in China. She then moved to the University of Queensland to finish her BA with double majors in Japanese and Translation. After her BA, she worked as an English teacher in China for three years. Prior to her DPhil studies at Oxford, Yaoyao completed her Master’s degree in TESOL at Institute of Education, University College London. Her Master’s dissertation was supervised by Dr Kazuya Saito.

Pat is the Deputy Chief Executive of a large College Group.

A qualified accountant, she is accountable to the Corporation Board for the Group’s Estate, sustainability and for maintaining the Group’s outstanding financial health grade. Her specialisms include Leadership and Management, Identification and Application of Funding Streams as well as leading the Group in new acquisitions, ventures and developments. Pat is using her vast experience of public sector finances to explore the intersection of accounting, leadership and purpose.

Supervisors

James Robson and Ariel Lindorff

Alice received her Master’s in Child Study and Education from the Institute of Child Study at the University of Toronto. She has taught preschool through higher education as a teacher and principal in public and private schools in North America and Europe. Deeply committed to enhancing education, she believes in learning that connects students and teachers to the natural world and to their communities. She is actively involved in community organisations that promote intercultural, interracial, and interfaith understanding and allyship.

Supervisors

Steve Puttick

Victoria is an educational researcher and practitioner, specialising in educational support and methodology of teaching mathematics to low-achieving students. For over 9 years she has been working at Big Change Educational Centre (Moscow) which provides support to looked-after children.

Before joining the DPhil programme, she completed her undergraduate degree in Finance at Financial University in Moscow and then gained a MSc in Psychology of Education from the University of Bristol.

Victoria’s current research focuses on educational issues of care-experienced children and teaching mathematics to students of low achievement and motivation.

Supervisors

Karen Skilling and Gabriel Stylianides

Louise was born and raised in Glasgow and moved to Oxford to pursue a DPhil in Education.

Louise’s research interests are education policy, particularly higher education policy, as well as qualitative research into the experiences of students in higher education and reducing inequalities in access to higher education. Louise is also interested in educational capabilities, educational purpose, aspirations and philosophical debates about knowledge construction and co-construction. Louise has a First Class BA (Joint Honours) in Social Policy and Education from the University of Strathclyde, and two Masters degrees with Distinction also from the University of Strathclyde in Applied Educational and Social Research and Social Policy (Research Methods). Louise also participated in the University of Oxford’s UNIQ+ Graduate Access Programme in the summer of 2022, where she worked at the Department of Sociology with Melinda Mills, Bo Zhao and Evelina Akimova on research into the impact of socio-economic status on inequalities in access to veterinary care in Scotland. Louise’s DPhil thesis is interested in evaluating Lorella Terzi’s educational capabilities framework through the lens of contemporary higher education in order to gain an understanding of what graduate capabilities are identified by students and stakeholders as being necessary for enabling graduates to successfully thrive and adapt in a post-pandemic society.

 

Supervisors

Alis Oancea and Kelsey Inouye

Motema studied Neuroscience as an undergraduate at Dartmouth College in the USA and it is one of its courses, found interest in Education.

Motema then worked for various non-profit organisations in Lesotho and South Africa focusing on helping high school students from low SES backgrounds access opportunities to study in HE. In her Masters’ project Motema analysed Lesotho’s 2009 Curriculum and Assessment Policy. This analysis’ findings brought Motema to her current research interests which include gendered STEM education and decolonisation of education policies and curricula in Lesotho. For her DPhil project, Motema is interested in finding out the lived experiences of female Science teachers in Lesotho Secondary Schools especially focusing on the major changes in the Secondary school education system in Lesotho that have happened in the past five years as unique meeting points.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Judith Hillier

Danielle is a DPhil student researching how Black-British doctoral students navigate the spaces of the elite, providing a new theoretical framework to understand their agency better.

Her main interests are in Human Flourishing, Cultural Geography, Psychology, and Justice, and her work aims to inform and reform educational frameworks and practices.

Following Danielle’s BSc in Psychology and MRes in Research Methods in Psychology, she founded a social enterprise that merges psychological and academic strategies to guide undergraduate and master’s students study practices. In addition to this, Danielle provided pedagogical and behavioural support across SEN college, secondary and primary schools.

Some of Danielle’s notable work includes her research introducing a new University-wide EDI strategy at her former Higher Education institution, presenting insights and way-forwards on youth homelessness to HRH Prince Williams, and providing discipleship to next-gen leaders.

Dan is a part-time DPhil Education student whose research focuses on investigating reasons why individuals choose to study and then teach physics as a subject discipline and how these relate to issues of equity and power. He previously worked as a secondary school physics teacher in the West Midlands of England for around 15 years before taking up his current post as Associate Professor of Physics Education at the University of Birmingham where he works in widening participation in physics and teacher education.

Publications
  • Cottle, D 2022, ‘Harnessing the potential of recently retired physics teachers to mentor new physics teachers’, Physics Education, vol. 57, no. 1, 015020. https://doi.org/10.1088/1361-6552/ac3931
  • Cottle, D 2021, ‘Improving students’ mathematical skills in secondary science: ideas from mathematics pedagogy’, School Science Review, vol. 102, no. 381, pp. 61-64. <https://www.ase.org.uk/resources/school-science-review/issue-381/improving-students-mathematical-skills-in-secondary>
  • Cottle, D 2021, ‘The effects of Covid-19 on student transition from school to university in STEM subjects’, New Directions in the Teaching of Physical Sciences, vol. 16, no. 1, 3847, pp. 1-4. https://doi.org/10.29311/ndtps.v0i14.3847 
  • Cottle, D & Marshall, R 2016, ‘Exploring electrical resistance: a novel kinesthetic model helps to resolve some misconceptions’, Physics Education, vol. 51, no. 5. https://doi.org/10.1088/0031-9120/51/5/054004 

Chris is a third-year part time DPhil student. He is an experienced Director of Children’s Services working in London. He is interested in path dependence and whether it is a helpful concept to understand how children’s services work.

Yaoyao is a DPhil student in Education at Oxford.

Her research interest lies in Aptitude-Instruction-Interaction (ATI) in second language acquisition (SLA).

Yaoyao’s research investigates the mediating effects of individual differences in learners’ domain-general perceptual-cognitive abilities in instructed foreign language pronunciation acquisition in adulthood. She aims to further explore how aptitude hinders instructional effectiveness and help all students make the most of instruction regardless of aptitude profiles.

Yaoyao started her BA in the Japanese Language and Literature at Sun Yat-Sen University (中山大学) in China. She then moved to the University of Queensland to finish her BA with double majors in Japanese and Translation. After her BA, she worked as an English teacher in China for three years. Prior to her DPhil studies at Oxford, Yaoyao completed her Master’s degree in TESOL at Institute of Education, University College London. Her Master’s dissertation was supervised by Dr Kazuya Saito.

Pat is the Deputy Chief Executive of a large College Group.

A qualified accountant, she is accountable to the Corporation Board for the Group’s Estate, sustainability and for maintaining the Group’s outstanding financial health grade. Her specialisms include Leadership and Management, Identification and Application of Funding Streams as well as leading the Group in new acquisitions, ventures and developments. Pat is using her vast experience of public sector finances to explore the intersection of accounting, leadership and purpose.

Supervisors

James Robson and Ariel Lindorff

Alice received her Master’s in Child Study and Education from the Institute of Child Study at the University of Toronto. She has taught preschool through higher education as a teacher and principal in public and private schools in North America and Europe. Deeply committed to enhancing education, she believes in learning that connects students and teachers to the natural world and to their communities. She is actively involved in community organisations that promote intercultural, interracial, and interfaith understanding and allyship.

Supervisors

Steve Puttick

Victoria is an educational researcher and practitioner, specialising in educational support and methodology of teaching mathematics to low-achieving students. For over 9 years she has been working at Big Change Educational Centre (Moscow) which provides support to looked-after children.

Before joining the DPhil programme, she completed her undergraduate degree in Finance at Financial University in Moscow and then gained a MSc in Psychology of Education from the University of Bristol.

Victoria’s current research focuses on educational issues of care-experienced children and teaching mathematics to students of low achievement and motivation.

Supervisors

Karen Skilling and Gabriel Stylianides

Louise was born and raised in Glasgow and moved to Oxford to pursue a DPhil in Education.

Louise’s research interests are education policy, particularly higher education policy, as well as qualitative research into the experiences of students in higher education and reducing inequalities in access to higher education. Louise is also interested in educational capabilities, educational purpose, aspirations and philosophical debates about knowledge construction and co-construction. Louise has a First Class BA (Joint Honours) in Social Policy and Education from the University of Strathclyde, and two Masters degrees with Distinction also from the University of Strathclyde in Applied Educational and Social Research and Social Policy (Research Methods). Louise also participated in the University of Oxford’s UNIQ+ Graduate Access Programme in the summer of 2022, where she worked at the Department of Sociology with Melinda Mills, Bo Zhao and Evelina Akimova on research into the impact of socio-economic status on inequalities in access to veterinary care in Scotland. Louise’s DPhil thesis is interested in evaluating Lorella Terzi’s educational capabilities framework through the lens of contemporary higher education in order to gain an understanding of what graduate capabilities are identified by students and stakeholders as being necessary for enabling graduates to successfully thrive and adapt in a post-pandemic society.

 

Supervisors

Alis Oancea and Kelsey Inouye

Motema studied Neuroscience as an undergraduate at Dartmouth College in the USA and it is one of its courses, found interest in Education.

Motema then worked for various non-profit organisations in Lesotho and South Africa focusing on helping high school students from low SES backgrounds access opportunities to study in HE. In her Masters’ project Motema analysed Lesotho’s 2009 Curriculum and Assessment Policy. This analysis’ findings brought Motema to her current research interests which include gendered STEM education and decolonisation of education policies and curricula in Lesotho. For her DPhil project, Motema is interested in finding out the lived experiences of female Science teachers in Lesotho Secondary Schools especially focusing on the major changes in the Secondary school education system in Lesotho that have happened in the past five years as unique meeting points.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Judith Hillier

Danielle is a DPhil student researching how Black-British doctoral students navigate the spaces of the elite, providing a new theoretical framework to understand their agency better.

Her main interests are in Human Flourishing, Cultural Geography, Psychology, and Justice, and her work aims to inform and reform educational frameworks and practices.

Following Danielle’s BSc in Psychology and MRes in Research Methods in Psychology, she founded a social enterprise that merges psychological and academic strategies to guide undergraduate and master’s students study practices. In addition to this, Danielle provided pedagogical and behavioural support across SEN college, secondary and primary schools.

Some of Danielle’s notable work includes her research introducing a new University-wide EDI strategy at her former Higher Education institution, presenting insights and way-forwards on youth homelessness to HRH Prince Williams, and providing discipleship to next-gen leaders.

Dan is a part-time DPhil Education student whose research focuses on investigating reasons why individuals choose to study and then teach physics as a subject discipline and how these relate to issues of equity and power. He previously worked as a secondary school physics teacher in the West Midlands of England for around 15 years before taking up his current post as Associate Professor of Physics Education at the University of Birmingham where he works in widening participation in physics and teacher education.

Publications
  • Cottle, D 2022, ‘Harnessing the potential of recently retired physics teachers to mentor new physics teachers’, Physics Education, vol. 57, no. 1, 015020. https://doi.org/10.1088/1361-6552/ac3931
  • Cottle, D 2021, ‘Improving students’ mathematical skills in secondary science: ideas from mathematics pedagogy’, School Science Review, vol. 102, no. 381, pp. 61-64. <https://www.ase.org.uk/resources/school-science-review/issue-381/improving-students-mathematical-skills-in-secondary>
  • Cottle, D 2021, ‘The effects of Covid-19 on student transition from school to university in STEM subjects’, New Directions in the Teaching of Physical Sciences, vol. 16, no. 1, 3847, pp. 1-4. https://doi.org/10.29311/ndtps.v0i14.3847 
  • Cottle, D & Marshall, R 2016, ‘Exploring electrical resistance: a novel kinesthetic model helps to resolve some misconceptions’, Physics Education, vol. 51, no. 5. https://doi.org/10.1088/0031-9120/51/5/054004 

Chris is a third-year part time DPhil student. He is an experienced Director of Children’s Services working in London. He is interested in path dependence and whether it is a helpful concept to understand how children’s services work.

Yaoyao is a DPhil student in Education at Oxford.

Her research interest lies in Aptitude-Instruction-Interaction (ATI) in second language acquisition (SLA).

Yaoyao’s research investigates the mediating effects of individual differences in learners’ domain-general perceptual-cognitive abilities in instructed foreign language pronunciation acquisition in adulthood. She aims to further explore how aptitude hinders instructional effectiveness and help all students make the most of instruction regardless of aptitude profiles.

Yaoyao started her BA in the Japanese Language and Literature at Sun Yat-Sen University (中山大学) in China. She then moved to the University of Queensland to finish her BA with double majors in Japanese and Translation. After her BA, she worked as an English teacher in China for three years. Prior to her DPhil studies at Oxford, Yaoyao completed her Master’s degree in TESOL at Institute of Education, University College London. Her Master’s dissertation was supervised by Dr Kazuya Saito.

Pat is the Deputy Chief Executive of a large College Group.

A qualified accountant, she is accountable to the Corporation Board for the Group’s Estate, sustainability and for maintaining the Group’s outstanding financial health grade. Her specialisms include Leadership and Management, Identification and Application of Funding Streams as well as leading the Group in new acquisitions, ventures and developments. Pat is using her vast experience of public sector finances to explore the intersection of accounting, leadership and purpose.

Supervisors

James Robson and Ariel Lindorff

Alice received her Master’s in Child Study and Education from the Institute of Child Study at the University of Toronto. She has taught preschool through higher education as a teacher and principal in public and private schools in North America and Europe. Deeply committed to enhancing education, she believes in learning that connects students and teachers to the natural world and to their communities. She is actively involved in community organisations that promote intercultural, interracial, and interfaith understanding and allyship.

Supervisors

Steve Puttick

Victoria is an educational researcher and practitioner, specialising in educational support and methodology of teaching mathematics to low-achieving students. For over 9 years she has been working at Big Change Educational Centre (Moscow) which provides support to looked-after children.

Before joining the DPhil programme, she completed her undergraduate degree in Finance at Financial University in Moscow and then gained a MSc in Psychology of Education from the University of Bristol.

Victoria’s current research focuses on educational issues of care-experienced children and teaching mathematics to students of low achievement and motivation.

Supervisors

Karen Skilling and Gabriel Stylianides

Louise was born and raised in Glasgow and moved to Oxford to pursue a DPhil in Education.

Louise’s research interests are education policy, particularly higher education policy, as well as qualitative research into the experiences of students in higher education and reducing inequalities in access to higher education. Louise is also interested in educational capabilities, educational purpose, aspirations and philosophical debates about knowledge construction and co-construction. Louise has a First Class BA (Joint Honours) in Social Policy and Education from the University of Strathclyde, and two Masters degrees with Distinction also from the University of Strathclyde in Applied Educational and Social Research and Social Policy (Research Methods). Louise also participated in the University of Oxford’s UNIQ+ Graduate Access Programme in the summer of 2022, where she worked at the Department of Sociology with Melinda Mills, Bo Zhao and Evelina Akimova on research into the impact of socio-economic status on inequalities in access to veterinary care in Scotland. Louise’s DPhil thesis is interested in evaluating Lorella Terzi’s educational capabilities framework through the lens of contemporary higher education in order to gain an understanding of what graduate capabilities are identified by students and stakeholders as being necessary for enabling graduates to successfully thrive and adapt in a post-pandemic society.

 

Supervisors

Alis Oancea and Kelsey Inouye

Motema studied Neuroscience as an undergraduate at Dartmouth College in the USA and it is one of its courses, found interest in Education.

Motema then worked for various non-profit organisations in Lesotho and South Africa focusing on helping high school students from low SES backgrounds access opportunities to study in HE. In her Masters’ project Motema analysed Lesotho’s 2009 Curriculum and Assessment Policy. This analysis’ findings brought Motema to her current research interests which include gendered STEM education and decolonisation of education policies and curricula in Lesotho. For her DPhil project, Motema is interested in finding out the lived experiences of female Science teachers in Lesotho Secondary Schools especially focusing on the major changes in the Secondary school education system in Lesotho that have happened in the past five years as unique meeting points.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Judith Hillier

Danielle is a DPhil student researching how Black-British doctoral students navigate the spaces of the elite, providing a new theoretical framework to understand their agency better.

Her main interests are in Human Flourishing, Cultural Geography, Psychology, and Justice, and her work aims to inform and reform educational frameworks and practices.

Following Danielle’s BSc in Psychology and MRes in Research Methods in Psychology, she founded a social enterprise that merges psychological and academic strategies to guide undergraduate and master’s students study practices. In addition to this, Danielle provided pedagogical and behavioural support across SEN college, secondary and primary schools.

Some of Danielle’s notable work includes her research introducing a new University-wide EDI strategy at her former Higher Education institution, presenting insights and way-forwards on youth homelessness to HRH Prince Williams, and providing discipleship to next-gen leaders.

Dan is a part-time DPhil Education student whose research focuses on investigating reasons why individuals choose to study and then teach physics as a subject discipline and how these relate to issues of equity and power. He previously worked as a secondary school physics teacher in the West Midlands of England for around 15 years before taking up his current post as Associate Professor of Physics Education at the University of Birmingham where he works in widening participation in physics and teacher education.

Publications
  • Cottle, D 2022, ‘Harnessing the potential of recently retired physics teachers to mentor new physics teachers’, Physics Education, vol. 57, no. 1, 015020. https://doi.org/10.1088/1361-6552/ac3931
  • Cottle, D 2021, ‘Improving students’ mathematical skills in secondary science: ideas from mathematics pedagogy’, School Science Review, vol. 102, no. 381, pp. 61-64. <https://www.ase.org.uk/resources/school-science-review/issue-381/improving-students-mathematical-skills-in-secondary>
  • Cottle, D 2021, ‘The effects of Covid-19 on student transition from school to university in STEM subjects’, New Directions in the Teaching of Physical Sciences, vol. 16, no. 1, 3847, pp. 1-4. https://doi.org/10.29311/ndtps.v0i14.3847 
  • Cottle, D & Marshall, R 2016, ‘Exploring electrical resistance: a novel kinesthetic model helps to resolve some misconceptions’, Physics Education, vol. 51, no. 5. https://doi.org/10.1088/0031-9120/51/5/054004 

Chris is a third-year part time DPhil student. He is an experienced Director of Children’s Services working in London. He is interested in path dependence and whether it is a helpful concept to understand how children’s services work.

Yaoyao is a DPhil student in Education at Oxford.

Her research interest lies in Aptitude-Instruction-Interaction (ATI) in second language acquisition (SLA).

Yaoyao’s research investigates the mediating effects of individual differences in learners’ domain-general perceptual-cognitive abilities in instructed foreign language pronunciation acquisition in adulthood. She aims to further explore how aptitude hinders instructional effectiveness and help all students make the most of instruction regardless of aptitude profiles.

Yaoyao started her BA in the Japanese Language and Literature at Sun Yat-Sen University (中山大学) in China. She then moved to the University of Queensland to finish her BA with double majors in Japanese and Translation. After her BA, she worked as an English teacher in China for three years. Prior to her DPhil studies at Oxford, Yaoyao completed her Master’s degree in TESOL at Institute of Education, University College London. Her Master’s dissertation was supervised by Dr Kazuya Saito.

Pat is the Deputy Chief Executive of a large College Group.

A qualified accountant, she is accountable to the Corporation Board for the Group’s Estate, sustainability and for maintaining the Group’s outstanding financial health grade. Her specialisms include Leadership and Management, Identification and Application of Funding Streams as well as leading the Group in new acquisitions, ventures and developments. Pat is using her vast experience of public sector finances to explore the intersection of accounting, leadership and purpose.

Supervisors

James Robson and Ariel Lindorff

Alice received her Master’s in Child Study and Education from the Institute of Child Study at the University of Toronto. She has taught preschool through higher education as a teacher and principal in public and private schools in North America and Europe. Deeply committed to enhancing education, she believes in learning that connects students and teachers to the natural world and to their communities. She is actively involved in community organisations that promote intercultural, interracial, and interfaith understanding and allyship.

Supervisors

Steve Puttick

Victoria is an educational researcher and practitioner, specialising in educational support and methodology of teaching mathematics to low-achieving students. For over 9 years she has been working at Big Change Educational Centre (Moscow) which provides support to looked-after children.

Before joining the DPhil programme, she completed her undergraduate degree in Finance at Financial University in Moscow and then gained a MSc in Psychology of Education from the University of Bristol.

Victoria’s current research focuses on educational issues of care-experienced children and teaching mathematics to students of low achievement and motivation.

Supervisors

Karen Skilling and Gabriel Stylianides

Louise was born and raised in Glasgow and moved to Oxford to pursue a DPhil in Education.

Louise’s research interests are education policy, particularly higher education policy, as well as qualitative research into the experiences of students in higher education and reducing inequalities in access to higher education. Louise is also interested in educational capabilities, educational purpose, aspirations and philosophical debates about knowledge construction and co-construction. Louise has a First Class BA (Joint Honours) in Social Policy and Education from the University of Strathclyde, and two Masters degrees with Distinction also from the University of Strathclyde in Applied Educational and Social Research and Social Policy (Research Methods). Louise also participated in the University of Oxford’s UNIQ+ Graduate Access Programme in the summer of 2022, where she worked at the Department of Sociology with Melinda Mills, Bo Zhao and Evelina Akimova on research into the impact of socio-economic status on inequalities in access to veterinary care in Scotland. Louise’s DPhil thesis is interested in evaluating Lorella Terzi’s educational capabilities framework through the lens of contemporary higher education in order to gain an understanding of what graduate capabilities are identified by students and stakeholders as being necessary for enabling graduates to successfully thrive and adapt in a post-pandemic society.

 

Supervisors

Alis Oancea and Kelsey Inouye

Motema studied Neuroscience as an undergraduate at Dartmouth College in the USA and it is one of its courses, found interest in Education.

Motema then worked for various non-profit organisations in Lesotho and South Africa focusing on helping high school students from low SES backgrounds access opportunities to study in HE. In her Masters’ project Motema analysed Lesotho’s 2009 Curriculum and Assessment Policy. This analysis’ findings brought Motema to her current research interests which include gendered STEM education and decolonisation of education policies and curricula in Lesotho. For her DPhil project, Motema is interested in finding out the lived experiences of female Science teachers in Lesotho Secondary Schools especially focusing on the major changes in the Secondary school education system in Lesotho that have happened in the past five years as unique meeting points.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Judith Hillier

Danielle is a DPhil student researching how Black-British doctoral students navigate the spaces of the elite, providing a new theoretical framework to understand their agency better.

Her main interests are in Human Flourishing, Cultural Geography, Psychology, and Justice, and her work aims to inform and reform educational frameworks and practices.

Following Danielle’s BSc in Psychology and MRes in Research Methods in Psychology, she founded a social enterprise that merges psychological and academic strategies to guide undergraduate and master’s students study practices. In addition to this, Danielle provided pedagogical and behavioural support across SEN college, secondary and primary schools.

Some of Danielle’s notable work includes her research introducing a new University-wide EDI strategy at her former Higher Education institution, presenting insights and way-forwards on youth homelessness to HRH Prince Williams, and providing discipleship to next-gen leaders.

Dan is a part-time DPhil Education student whose research focuses on investigating reasons why individuals choose to study and then teach physics as a subject discipline and how these relate to issues of equity and power. He previously worked as a secondary school physics teacher in the West Midlands of England for around 15 years before taking up his current post as Associate Professor of Physics Education at the University of Birmingham where he works in widening participation in physics and teacher education.

Publications
  • Cottle, D 2022, ‘Harnessing the potential of recently retired physics teachers to mentor new physics teachers’, Physics Education, vol. 57, no. 1, 015020. https://doi.org/10.1088/1361-6552/ac3931
  • Cottle, D 2021, ‘Improving students’ mathematical skills in secondary science: ideas from mathematics pedagogy’, School Science Review, vol. 102, no. 381, pp. 61-64. <https://www.ase.org.uk/resources/school-science-review/issue-381/improving-students-mathematical-skills-in-secondary>
  • Cottle, D 2021, ‘The effects of Covid-19 on student transition from school to university in STEM subjects’, New Directions in the Teaching of Physical Sciences, vol. 16, no. 1, 3847, pp. 1-4. https://doi.org/10.29311/ndtps.v0i14.3847 
  • Cottle, D & Marshall, R 2016, ‘Exploring electrical resistance: a novel kinesthetic model helps to resolve some misconceptions’, Physics Education, vol. 51, no. 5. https://doi.org/10.1088/0031-9120/51/5/054004 

Chris is a third-year part time DPhil student. He is an experienced Director of Children’s Services working in London. He is interested in path dependence and whether it is a helpful concept to understand how children’s services work.

Yaoyao is a DPhil student in Education at Oxford.

Her research interest lies in Aptitude-Instruction-Interaction (ATI) in second language acquisition (SLA).

Yaoyao’s research investigates the mediating effects of individual differences in learners’ domain-general perceptual-cognitive abilities in instructed foreign language pronunciation acquisition in adulthood. She aims to further explore how aptitude hinders instructional effectiveness and help all students make the most of instruction regardless of aptitude profiles.

Yaoyao started her BA in the Japanese Language and Literature at Sun Yat-Sen University (中山大学) in China. She then moved to the University of Queensland to finish her BA with double majors in Japanese and Translation. After her BA, she worked as an English teacher in China for three years. Prior to her DPhil studies at Oxford, Yaoyao completed her Master’s degree in TESOL at Institute of Education, University College London. Her Master’s dissertation was supervised by Dr Kazuya Saito.

Pat is the Deputy Chief Executive of a large College Group.

A qualified accountant, she is accountable to the Corporation Board for the Group’s Estate, sustainability and for maintaining the Group’s outstanding financial health grade. Her specialisms include Leadership and Management, Identification and Application of Funding Streams as well as leading the Group in new acquisitions, ventures and developments. Pat is using her vast experience of public sector finances to explore the intersection of accounting, leadership and purpose.

Supervisors

James Robson and Ariel Lindorff

Alice received her Master’s in Child Study and Education from the Institute of Child Study at the University of Toronto. She has taught preschool through higher education as a teacher and principal in public and private schools in North America and Europe. Deeply committed to enhancing education, she believes in learning that connects students and teachers to the natural world and to their communities. She is actively involved in community organisations that promote intercultural, interracial, and interfaith understanding and allyship.

Supervisors

Steve Puttick

Victoria is an educational researcher and practitioner, specialising in educational support and methodology of teaching mathematics to low-achieving students. For over 9 years she has been working at Big Change Educational Centre (Moscow) which provides support to looked-after children.

Before joining the DPhil programme, she completed her undergraduate degree in Finance at Financial University in Moscow and then gained a MSc in Psychology of Education from the University of Bristol.

Victoria’s current research focuses on educational issues of care-experienced children and teaching mathematics to students of low achievement and motivation.

Supervisors

Karen Skilling and Gabriel Stylianides

Louise was born and raised in Glasgow and moved to Oxford to pursue a DPhil in Education.

Louise’s research interests are education policy, particularly higher education policy, as well as qualitative research into the experiences of students in higher education and reducing inequalities in access to higher education. Louise is also interested in educational capabilities, educational purpose, aspirations and philosophical debates about knowledge construction and co-construction. Louise has a First Class BA (Joint Honours) in Social Policy and Education from the University of Strathclyde, and two Masters degrees with Distinction also from the University of Strathclyde in Applied Educational and Social Research and Social Policy (Research Methods). Louise also participated in the University of Oxford’s UNIQ+ Graduate Access Programme in the summer of 2022, where she worked at the Department of Sociology with Melinda Mills, Bo Zhao and Evelina Akimova on research into the impact of socio-economic status on inequalities in access to veterinary care in Scotland. Louise’s DPhil thesis is interested in evaluating Lorella Terzi’s educational capabilities framework through the lens of contemporary higher education in order to gain an understanding of what graduate capabilities are identified by students and stakeholders as being necessary for enabling graduates to successfully thrive and adapt in a post-pandemic society.

 

Supervisors

Alis Oancea and Kelsey Inouye

Motema studied Neuroscience as an undergraduate at Dartmouth College in the USA and it is one of its courses, found interest in Education.

Motema then worked for various non-profit organisations in Lesotho and South Africa focusing on helping high school students from low SES backgrounds access opportunities to study in HE. In her Masters’ project Motema analysed Lesotho’s 2009 Curriculum and Assessment Policy. This analysis’ findings brought Motema to her current research interests which include gendered STEM education and decolonisation of education policies and curricula in Lesotho. For her DPhil project, Motema is interested in finding out the lived experiences of female Science teachers in Lesotho Secondary Schools especially focusing on the major changes in the Secondary school education system in Lesotho that have happened in the past five years as unique meeting points.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Judith Hillier

Danielle is a DPhil student researching how Black-British doctoral students navigate the spaces of the elite, providing a new theoretical framework to understand their agency better.

Her main interests are in Human Flourishing, Cultural Geography, Psychology, and Justice, and her work aims to inform and reform educational frameworks and practices.

Following Danielle’s BSc in Psychology and MRes in Research Methods in Psychology, she founded a social enterprise that merges psychological and academic strategies to guide undergraduate and master’s students study practices. In addition to this, Danielle provided pedagogical and behavioural support across SEN college, secondary and primary schools.

Some of Danielle’s notable work includes her research introducing a new University-wide EDI strategy at her former Higher Education institution, presenting insights and way-forwards on youth homelessness to HRH Prince Williams, and providing discipleship to next-gen leaders.

Dan is a part-time DPhil Education student whose research focuses on investigating reasons why individuals choose to study and then teach physics as a subject discipline and how these relate to issues of equity and power. He previously worked as a secondary school physics teacher in the West Midlands of England for around 15 years before taking up his current post as Associate Professor of Physics Education at the University of Birmingham where he works in widening participation in physics and teacher education.

Publications
  • Cottle, D 2022, ‘Harnessing the potential of recently retired physics teachers to mentor new physics teachers’, Physics Education, vol. 57, no. 1, 015020. https://doi.org/10.1088/1361-6552/ac3931
  • Cottle, D 2021, ‘Improving students’ mathematical skills in secondary science: ideas from mathematics pedagogy’, School Science Review, vol. 102, no. 381, pp. 61-64. <https://www.ase.org.uk/resources/school-science-review/issue-381/improving-students-mathematical-skills-in-secondary>
  • Cottle, D 2021, ‘The effects of Covid-19 on student transition from school to university in STEM subjects’, New Directions in the Teaching of Physical Sciences, vol. 16, no. 1, 3847, pp. 1-4. https://doi.org/10.29311/ndtps.v0i14.3847 
  • Cottle, D & Marshall, R 2016, ‘Exploring electrical resistance: a novel kinesthetic model helps to resolve some misconceptions’, Physics Education, vol. 51, no. 5. https://doi.org/10.1088/0031-9120/51/5/054004 

Chris is a third-year part time DPhil student. He is an experienced Director of Children’s Services working in London. He is interested in path dependence and whether it is a helpful concept to understand how children’s services work.

Yaoyao is a DPhil student in Education at Oxford.

Her research interest lies in Aptitude-Instruction-Interaction (ATI) in second language acquisition (SLA).

Yaoyao’s research investigates the mediating effects of individual differences in learners’ domain-general perceptual-cognitive abilities in instructed foreign language pronunciation acquisition in adulthood. She aims to further explore how aptitude hinders instructional effectiveness and help all students make the most of instruction regardless of aptitude profiles.

Yaoyao started her BA in the Japanese Language and Literature at Sun Yat-Sen University (中山大学) in China. She then moved to the University of Queensland to finish her BA with double majors in Japanese and Translation. After her BA, she worked as an English teacher in China for three years. Prior to her DPhil studies at Oxford, Yaoyao completed her Master’s degree in TESOL at Institute of Education, University College London. Her Master’s dissertation was supervised by Dr Kazuya Saito.

Pat is the Deputy Chief Executive of a large College Group.

A qualified accountant, she is accountable to the Corporation Board for the Group’s Estate, sustainability and for maintaining the Group’s outstanding financial health grade. Her specialisms include Leadership and Management, Identification and Application of Funding Streams as well as leading the Group in new acquisitions, ventures and developments. Pat is using her vast experience of public sector finances to explore the intersection of accounting, leadership and purpose.

Supervisors

James Robson and Ariel Lindorff

Alice received her Master’s in Child Study and Education from the Institute of Child Study at the University of Toronto. She has taught preschool through higher education as a teacher and principal in public and private schools in North America and Europe. Deeply committed to enhancing education, she believes in learning that connects students and teachers to the natural world and to their communities. She is actively involved in community organisations that promote intercultural, interracial, and interfaith understanding and allyship.

Supervisors

Steve Puttick

Victoria is an educational researcher and practitioner, specialising in educational support and methodology of teaching mathematics to low-achieving students. For over 9 years she has been working at Big Change Educational Centre (Moscow) which provides support to looked-after children.

Before joining the DPhil programme, she completed her undergraduate degree in Finance at Financial University in Moscow and then gained a MSc in Psychology of Education from the University of Bristol.

Victoria’s current research focuses on educational issues of care-experienced children and teaching mathematics to students of low achievement and motivation.

Supervisors

Karen Skilling and Gabriel Stylianides

Louise was born and raised in Glasgow and moved to Oxford to pursue a DPhil in Education.

Louise’s research interests are education policy, particularly higher education policy, as well as qualitative research into the experiences of students in higher education and reducing inequalities in access to higher education. Louise is also interested in educational capabilities, educational purpose, aspirations and philosophical debates about knowledge construction and co-construction. Louise has a First Class BA (Joint Honours) in Social Policy and Education from the University of Strathclyde, and two Masters degrees with Distinction also from the University of Strathclyde in Applied Educational and Social Research and Social Policy (Research Methods). Louise also participated in the University of Oxford’s UNIQ+ Graduate Access Programme in the summer of 2022, where she worked at the Department of Sociology with Melinda Mills, Bo Zhao and Evelina Akimova on research into the impact of socio-economic status on inequalities in access to veterinary care in Scotland. Louise’s DPhil thesis is interested in evaluating Lorella Terzi’s educational capabilities framework through the lens of contemporary higher education in order to gain an understanding of what graduate capabilities are identified by students and stakeholders as being necessary for enabling graduates to successfully thrive and adapt in a post-pandemic society.

 

Supervisors

Alis Oancea and Kelsey Inouye

Motema studied Neuroscience as an undergraduate at Dartmouth College in the USA and it is one of its courses, found interest in Education.

Motema then worked for various non-profit organisations in Lesotho and South Africa focusing on helping high school students from low SES backgrounds access opportunities to study in HE. In her Masters’ project Motema analysed Lesotho’s 2009 Curriculum and Assessment Policy. This analysis’ findings brought Motema to her current research interests which include gendered STEM education and decolonisation of education policies and curricula in Lesotho. For her DPhil project, Motema is interested in finding out the lived experiences of female Science teachers in Lesotho Secondary Schools especially focusing on the major changes in the Secondary school education system in Lesotho that have happened in the past five years as unique meeting points.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Judith Hillier

Danielle is a DPhil student researching how Black-British doctoral students navigate the spaces of the elite, providing a new theoretical framework to understand their agency better.

Her main interests are in Human Flourishing, Cultural Geography, Psychology, and Justice, and her work aims to inform and reform educational frameworks and practices.

Following Danielle’s BSc in Psychology and MRes in Research Methods in Psychology, she founded a social enterprise that merges psychological and academic strategies to guide undergraduate and master’s students study practices. In addition to this, Danielle provided pedagogical and behavioural support across SEN college, secondary and primary schools.

Some of Danielle’s notable work includes her research introducing a new University-wide EDI strategy at her former Higher Education institution, presenting insights and way-forwards on youth homelessness to HRH Prince Williams, and providing discipleship to next-gen leaders.

Dan is a part-time DPhil Education student whose research focuses on investigating reasons why individuals choose to study and then teach physics as a subject discipline and how these relate to issues of equity and power. He previously worked as a secondary school physics teacher in the West Midlands of England for around 15 years before taking up his current post as Associate Professor of Physics Education at the University of Birmingham where he works in widening participation in physics and teacher education.

Publications
  • Cottle, D 2022, ‘Harnessing the potential of recently retired physics teachers to mentor new physics teachers’, Physics Education, vol. 57, no. 1, 015020. https://doi.org/10.1088/1361-6552/ac3931
  • Cottle, D 2021, ‘Improving students’ mathematical skills in secondary science: ideas from mathematics pedagogy’, School Science Review, vol. 102, no. 381, pp. 61-64. <https://www.ase.org.uk/resources/school-science-review/issue-381/improving-students-mathematical-skills-in-secondary>
  • Cottle, D 2021, ‘The effects of Covid-19 on student transition from school to university in STEM subjects’, New Directions in the Teaching of Physical Sciences, vol. 16, no. 1, 3847, pp. 1-4. https://doi.org/10.29311/ndtps.v0i14.3847 
  • Cottle, D & Marshall, R 2016, ‘Exploring electrical resistance: a novel kinesthetic model helps to resolve some misconceptions’, Physics Education, vol. 51, no. 5. https://doi.org/10.1088/0031-9120/51/5/054004 

Chris is a third-year part time DPhil student. He is an experienced Director of Children’s Services working in London. He is interested in path dependence and whether it is a helpful concept to understand how children’s services work.

Yaoyao is a DPhil student in Education at Oxford.

Her research interest lies in Aptitude-Instruction-Interaction (ATI) in second language acquisition (SLA).

Yaoyao’s research investigates the mediating effects of individual differences in learners’ domain-general perceptual-cognitive abilities in instructed foreign language pronunciation acquisition in adulthood. She aims to further explore how aptitude hinders instructional effectiveness and help all students make the most of instruction regardless of aptitude profiles.

Yaoyao started her BA in the Japanese Language and Literature at Sun Yat-Sen University (中山大学) in China. She then moved to the University of Queensland to finish her BA with double majors in Japanese and Translation. After her BA, she worked as an English teacher in China for three years. Prior to her DPhil studies at Oxford, Yaoyao completed her Master’s degree in TESOL at Institute of Education, University College London. Her Master’s dissertation was supervised by Dr Kazuya Saito.

Pat is the Deputy Chief Executive of a large College Group.

A qualified accountant, she is accountable to the Corporation Board for the Group’s Estate, sustainability and for maintaining the Group’s outstanding financial health grade. Her specialisms include Leadership and Management, Identification and Application of Funding Streams as well as leading the Group in new acquisitions, ventures and developments. Pat is using her vast experience of public sector finances to explore the intersection of accounting, leadership and purpose.

Supervisors

James Robson and Ariel Lindorff

Alice received her Master’s in Child Study and Education from the Institute of Child Study at the University of Toronto. She has taught preschool through higher education as a teacher and principal in public and private schools in North America and Europe. Deeply committed to enhancing education, she believes in learning that connects students and teachers to the natural world and to their communities. She is actively involved in community organisations that promote intercultural, interracial, and interfaith understanding and allyship.

Supervisors

Steve Puttick

Victoria is an educational researcher and practitioner, specialising in educational support and methodology of teaching mathematics to low-achieving students. For over 9 years she has been working at Big Change Educational Centre (Moscow) which provides support to looked-after children.

Before joining the DPhil programme, she completed her undergraduate degree in Finance at Financial University in Moscow and then gained a MSc in Psychology of Education from the University of Bristol.

Victoria’s current research focuses on educational issues of care-experienced children and teaching mathematics to students of low achievement and motivation.

Supervisors

Karen Skilling and Gabriel Stylianides

Louise was born and raised in Glasgow and moved to Oxford to pursue a DPhil in Education.

Louise’s research interests are education policy, particularly higher education policy, as well as qualitative research into the experiences of students in higher education and reducing inequalities in access to higher education. Louise is also interested in educational capabilities, educational purpose, aspirations and philosophical debates about knowledge construction and co-construction. Louise has a First Class BA (Joint Honours) in Social Policy and Education from the University of Strathclyde, and two Masters degrees with Distinction also from the University of Strathclyde in Applied Educational and Social Research and Social Policy (Research Methods). Louise also participated in the University of Oxford’s UNIQ+ Graduate Access Programme in the summer of 2022, where she worked at the Department of Sociology with Melinda Mills, Bo Zhao and Evelina Akimova on research into the impact of socio-economic status on inequalities in access to veterinary care in Scotland. Louise’s DPhil thesis is interested in evaluating Lorella Terzi’s educational capabilities framework through the lens of contemporary higher education in order to gain an understanding of what graduate capabilities are identified by students and stakeholders as being necessary for enabling graduates to successfully thrive and adapt in a post-pandemic society.

 

Supervisors

Alis Oancea and Kelsey Inouye

Motema studied Neuroscience as an undergraduate at Dartmouth College in the USA and it is one of its courses, found interest in Education.

Motema then worked for various non-profit organisations in Lesotho and South Africa focusing on helping high school students from low SES backgrounds access opportunities to study in HE. In her Masters’ project Motema analysed Lesotho’s 2009 Curriculum and Assessment Policy. This analysis’ findings brought Motema to her current research interests which include gendered STEM education and decolonisation of education policies and curricula in Lesotho. For her DPhil project, Motema is interested in finding out the lived experiences of female Science teachers in Lesotho Secondary Schools especially focusing on the major changes in the Secondary school education system in Lesotho that have happened in the past five years as unique meeting points.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Judith Hillier

Danielle is a DPhil student researching how Black-British doctoral students navigate the spaces of the elite, providing a new theoretical framework to understand their agency better.

Her main interests are in Human Flourishing, Cultural Geography, Psychology, and Justice, and her work aims to inform and reform educational frameworks and practices.

Following Danielle’s BSc in Psychology and MRes in Research Methods in Psychology, she founded a social enterprise that merges psychological and academic strategies to guide undergraduate and master’s students study practices. In addition to this, Danielle provided pedagogical and behavioural support across SEN college, secondary and primary schools.

Some of Danielle’s notable work includes her research introducing a new University-wide EDI strategy at her former Higher Education institution, presenting insights and way-forwards on youth homelessness to HRH Prince Williams, and providing discipleship to next-gen leaders.

Dan is a part-time DPhil Education student whose research focuses on investigating reasons why individuals choose to study and then teach physics as a subject discipline and how these relate to issues of equity and power. He previously worked as a secondary school physics teacher in the West Midlands of England for around 15 years before taking up his current post as Associate Professor of Physics Education at the University of Birmingham where he works in widening participation in physics and teacher education.

Publications
  • Cottle, D 2022, ‘Harnessing the potential of recently retired physics teachers to mentor new physics teachers’, Physics Education, vol. 57, no. 1, 015020. https://doi.org/10.1088/1361-6552/ac3931
  • Cottle, D 2021, ‘Improving students’ mathematical skills in secondary science: ideas from mathematics pedagogy’, School Science Review, vol. 102, no. 381, pp. 61-64. <https://www.ase.org.uk/resources/school-science-review/issue-381/improving-students-mathematical-skills-in-secondary>
  • Cottle, D 2021, ‘The effects of Covid-19 on student transition from school to university in STEM subjects’, New Directions in the Teaching of Physical Sciences, vol. 16, no. 1, 3847, pp. 1-4. https://doi.org/10.29311/ndtps.v0i14.3847 
  • Cottle, D & Marshall, R 2016, ‘Exploring electrical resistance: a novel kinesthetic model helps to resolve some misconceptions’, Physics Education, vol. 51, no. 5. https://doi.org/10.1088/0031-9120/51/5/054004 

Chris is a third-year part time DPhil student. He is an experienced Director of Children’s Services working in London. He is interested in path dependence and whether it is a helpful concept to understand how children’s services work.

Yaoyao is a DPhil student in Education at Oxford.

Her research interest lies in Aptitude-Instruction-Interaction (ATI) in second language acquisition (SLA).

Yaoyao’s research investigates the mediating effects of individual differences in learners’ domain-general perceptual-cognitive abilities in instructed foreign language pronunciation acquisition in adulthood. She aims to further explore how aptitude hinders instructional effectiveness and help all students make the most of instruction regardless of aptitude profiles.

Yaoyao started her BA in the Japanese Language and Literature at Sun Yat-Sen University (中山大学) in China. She then moved to the University of Queensland to finish her BA with double majors in Japanese and Translation. After her BA, she worked as an English teacher in China for three years. Prior to her DPhil studies at Oxford, Yaoyao completed her Master’s degree in TESOL at Institute of Education, University College London. Her Master’s dissertation was supervised by Dr Kazuya Saito.

Pat is the Deputy Chief Executive of a large College Group.

A qualified accountant, she is accountable to the Corporation Board for the Group’s Estate, sustainability and for maintaining the Group’s outstanding financial health grade. Her specialisms include Leadership and Management, Identification and Application of Funding Streams as well as leading the Group in new acquisitions, ventures and developments. Pat is using her vast experience of public sector finances to explore the intersection of accounting, leadership and purpose.

Supervisors

James Robson and Ariel Lindorff

Alice received her Master’s in Child Study and Education from the Institute of Child Study at the University of Toronto. She has taught preschool through higher education as a teacher and principal in public and private schools in North America and Europe. Deeply committed to enhancing education, she believes in learning that connects students and teachers to the natural world and to their communities. She is actively involved in community organisations that promote intercultural, interracial, and interfaith understanding and allyship.

Supervisors

Steve Puttick

Victoria is an educational researcher and practitioner, specialising in educational support and methodology of teaching mathematics to low-achieving students. For over 9 years she has been working at Big Change Educational Centre (Moscow) which provides support to looked-after children.

Before joining the DPhil programme, she completed her undergraduate degree in Finance at Financial University in Moscow and then gained a MSc in Psychology of Education from the University of Bristol.

Victoria’s current research focuses on educational issues of care-experienced children and teaching mathematics to students of low achievement and motivation.

Supervisors

Karen Skilling and Gabriel Stylianides

Louise was born and raised in Glasgow and moved to Oxford to pursue a DPhil in Education.

Louise’s research interests are education policy, particularly higher education policy, as well as qualitative research into the experiences of students in higher education and reducing inequalities in access to higher education. Louise is also interested in educational capabilities, educational purpose, aspirations and philosophical debates about knowledge construction and co-construction. Louise has a First Class BA (Joint Honours) in Social Policy and Education from the University of Strathclyde, and two Masters degrees with Distinction also from the University of Strathclyde in Applied Educational and Social Research and Social Policy (Research Methods). Louise also participated in the University of Oxford’s UNIQ+ Graduate Access Programme in the summer of 2022, where she worked at the Department of Sociology with Melinda Mills, Bo Zhao and Evelina Akimova on research into the impact of socio-economic status on inequalities in access to veterinary care in Scotland. Louise’s DPhil thesis is interested in evaluating Lorella Terzi’s educational capabilities framework through the lens of contemporary higher education in order to gain an understanding of what graduate capabilities are identified by students and stakeholders as being necessary for enabling graduates to successfully thrive and adapt in a post-pandemic society.

 

Supervisors

Alis Oancea and Kelsey Inouye

Motema studied Neuroscience as an undergraduate at Dartmouth College in the USA and it is one of its courses, found interest in Education.

Motema then worked for various non-profit organisations in Lesotho and South Africa focusing on helping high school students from low SES backgrounds access opportunities to study in HE. In her Masters’ project Motema analysed Lesotho’s 2009 Curriculum and Assessment Policy. This analysis’ findings brought Motema to her current research interests which include gendered STEM education and decolonisation of education policies and curricula in Lesotho. For her DPhil project, Motema is interested in finding out the lived experiences of female Science teachers in Lesotho Secondary Schools especially focusing on the major changes in the Secondary school education system in Lesotho that have happened in the past five years as unique meeting points.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Judith Hillier

Danielle is a DPhil student researching how Black-British doctoral students navigate the spaces of the elite, providing a new theoretical framework to understand their agency better.

Her main interests are in Human Flourishing, Cultural Geography, Psychology, and Justice, and her work aims to inform and reform educational frameworks and practices.

Following Danielle’s BSc in Psychology and MRes in Research Methods in Psychology, she founded a social enterprise that merges psychological and academic strategies to guide undergraduate and master’s students study practices. In addition to this, Danielle provided pedagogical and behavioural support across SEN college, secondary and primary schools.

Some of Danielle’s notable work includes her research introducing a new University-wide EDI strategy at her former Higher Education institution, presenting insights and way-forwards on youth homelessness to HRH Prince Williams, and providing discipleship to next-gen leaders.

Dan is a part-time DPhil Education student whose research focuses on investigating reasons why individuals choose to study and then teach physics as a subject discipline and how these relate to issues of equity and power. He previously worked as a secondary school physics teacher in the West Midlands of England for around 15 years before taking up his current post as Associate Professor of Physics Education at the University of Birmingham where he works in widening participation in physics and teacher education.

Publications
  • Cottle, D 2022, ‘Harnessing the potential of recently retired physics teachers to mentor new physics teachers’, Physics Education, vol. 57, no. 1, 015020. https://doi.org/10.1088/1361-6552/ac3931
  • Cottle, D 2021, ‘Improving students’ mathematical skills in secondary science: ideas from mathematics pedagogy’, School Science Review, vol. 102, no. 381, pp. 61-64. <https://www.ase.org.uk/resources/school-science-review/issue-381/improving-students-mathematical-skills-in-secondary>
  • Cottle, D 2021, ‘The effects of Covid-19 on student transition from school to university in STEM subjects’, New Directions in the Teaching of Physical Sciences, vol. 16, no. 1, 3847, pp. 1-4. https://doi.org/10.29311/ndtps.v0i14.3847 
  • Cottle, D & Marshall, R 2016, ‘Exploring electrical resistance: a novel kinesthetic model helps to resolve some misconceptions’, Physics Education, vol. 51, no. 5. https://doi.org/10.1088/0031-9120/51/5/054004 

Chris is a third-year part time DPhil student. He is an experienced Director of Children’s Services working in London. He is interested in path dependence and whether it is a helpful concept to understand how children’s services work.

Yaoyao is a DPhil student in Education at Oxford.

Her research interest lies in Aptitude-Instruction-Interaction (ATI) in second language acquisition (SLA).

Yaoyao’s research investigates the mediating effects of individual differences in learners’ domain-general perceptual-cognitive abilities in instructed foreign language pronunciation acquisition in adulthood. She aims to further explore how aptitude hinders instructional effectiveness and help all students make the most of instruction regardless of aptitude profiles.

Yaoyao started her BA in the Japanese Language and Literature at Sun Yat-Sen University (中山大学) in China. She then moved to the University of Queensland to finish her BA with double majors in Japanese and Translation. After her BA, she worked as an English teacher in China for three years. Prior to her DPhil studies at Oxford, Yaoyao completed her Master’s degree in TESOL at Institute of Education, University College London. Her Master’s dissertation was supervised by Dr Kazuya Saito.

Pat is the Deputy Chief Executive of a large College Group.

A qualified accountant, she is accountable to the Corporation Board for the Group’s Estate, sustainability and for maintaining the Group’s outstanding financial health grade. Her specialisms include Leadership and Management, Identification and Application of Funding Streams as well as leading the Group in new acquisitions, ventures and developments. Pat is using her vast experience of public sector finances to explore the intersection of accounting, leadership and purpose.

Supervisors

James Robson and Ariel Lindorff

Alice received her Master’s in Child Study and Education from the Institute of Child Study at the University of Toronto. She has taught preschool through higher education as a teacher and principal in public and private schools in North America and Europe. Deeply committed to enhancing education, she believes in learning that connects students and teachers to the natural world and to their communities. She is actively involved in community organisations that promote intercultural, interracial, and interfaith understanding and allyship.

Supervisors

Steve Puttick

Victoria is an educational researcher and practitioner, specialising in educational support and methodology of teaching mathematics to low-achieving students. For over 9 years she has been working at Big Change Educational Centre (Moscow) which provides support to looked-after children.

Before joining the DPhil programme, she completed her undergraduate degree in Finance at Financial University in Moscow and then gained a MSc in Psychology of Education from the University of Bristol.

Victoria’s current research focuses on educational issues of care-experienced children and teaching mathematics to students of low achievement and motivation.

Supervisors

Karen Skilling and Gabriel Stylianides

Louise was born and raised in Glasgow and moved to Oxford to pursue a DPhil in Education.

Louise’s research interests are education policy, particularly higher education policy, as well as qualitative research into the experiences of students in higher education and reducing inequalities in access to higher education. Louise is also interested in educational capabilities, educational purpose, aspirations and philosophical debates about knowledge construction and co-construction. Louise has a First Class BA (Joint Honours) in Social Policy and Education from the University of Strathclyde, and two Masters degrees with Distinction also from the University of Strathclyde in Applied Educational and Social Research and Social Policy (Research Methods). Louise also participated in the University of Oxford’s UNIQ+ Graduate Access Programme in the summer of 2022, where she worked at the Department of Sociology with Melinda Mills, Bo Zhao and Evelina Akimova on research into the impact of socio-economic status on inequalities in access to veterinary care in Scotland. Louise’s DPhil thesis is interested in evaluating Lorella Terzi’s educational capabilities framework through the lens of contemporary higher education in order to gain an understanding of what graduate capabilities are identified by students and stakeholders as being necessary for enabling graduates to successfully thrive and adapt in a post-pandemic society.

 

Supervisors

Alis Oancea and Kelsey Inouye

Motema studied Neuroscience as an undergraduate at Dartmouth College in the USA and it is one of its courses, found interest in Education.

Motema then worked for various non-profit organisations in Lesotho and South Africa focusing on helping high school students from low SES backgrounds access opportunities to study in HE. In her Masters’ project Motema analysed Lesotho’s 2009 Curriculum and Assessment Policy. This analysis’ findings brought Motema to her current research interests which include gendered STEM education and decolonisation of education policies and curricula in Lesotho. For her DPhil project, Motema is interested in finding out the lived experiences of female Science teachers in Lesotho Secondary Schools especially focusing on the major changes in the Secondary school education system in Lesotho that have happened in the past five years as unique meeting points.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Judith Hillier

Danielle is a DPhil student researching how Black-British doctoral students navigate the spaces of the elite, providing a new theoretical framework to understand their agency better.

Her main interests are in Human Flourishing, Cultural Geography, Psychology, and Justice, and her work aims to inform and reform educational frameworks and practices.

Following Danielle’s BSc in Psychology and MRes in Research Methods in Psychology, she founded a social enterprise that merges psychological and academic strategies to guide undergraduate and master’s students study practices. In addition to this, Danielle provided pedagogical and behavioural support across SEN college, secondary and primary schools.

Some of Danielle’s notable work includes her research introducing a new University-wide EDI strategy at her former Higher Education institution, presenting insights and way-forwards on youth homelessness to HRH Prince Williams, and providing discipleship to next-gen leaders.

Dan is a part-time DPhil Education student whose research focuses on investigating reasons why individuals choose to study and then teach physics as a subject discipline and how these relate to issues of equity and power. He previously worked as a secondary school physics teacher in the West Midlands of England for around 15 years before taking up his current post as Associate Professor of Physics Education at the University of Birmingham where he works in widening participation in physics and teacher education.

Publications
  • Cottle, D 2022, ‘Harnessing the potential of recently retired physics teachers to mentor new physics teachers’, Physics Education, vol. 57, no. 1, 015020. https://doi.org/10.1088/1361-6552/ac3931
  • Cottle, D 2021, ‘Improving students’ mathematical skills in secondary science: ideas from mathematics pedagogy’, School Science Review, vol. 102, no. 381, pp. 61-64. <https://www.ase.org.uk/resources/school-science-review/issue-381/improving-students-mathematical-skills-in-secondary>
  • Cottle, D 2021, ‘The effects of Covid-19 on student transition from school to university in STEM subjects’, New Directions in the Teaching of Physical Sciences, vol. 16, no. 1, 3847, pp. 1-4. https://doi.org/10.29311/ndtps.v0i14.3847 
  • Cottle, D & Marshall, R 2016, ‘Exploring electrical resistance: a novel kinesthetic model helps to resolve some misconceptions’, Physics Education, vol. 51, no. 5. https://doi.org/10.1088/0031-9120/51/5/054004 

Chris is a third-year part time DPhil student. He is an experienced Director of Children’s Services working in London. He is interested in path dependence and whether it is a helpful concept to understand how children’s services work.

Yaoyao is a DPhil student in Education at Oxford.

Her research interest lies in Aptitude-Instruction-Interaction (ATI) in second language acquisition (SLA).

Yaoyao’s research investigates the mediating effects of individual differences in learners’ domain-general perceptual-cognitive abilities in instructed foreign language pronunciation acquisition in adulthood. She aims to further explore how aptitude hinders instructional effectiveness and help all students make the most of instruction regardless of aptitude profiles.

Yaoyao started her BA in the Japanese Language and Literature at Sun Yat-Sen University (中山大学) in China. She then moved to the University of Queensland to finish her BA with double majors in Japanese and Translation. After her BA, she worked as an English teacher in China for three years. Prior to her DPhil studies at Oxford, Yaoyao completed her Master’s degree in TESOL at Institute of Education, University College London. Her Master’s dissertation was supervised by Dr Kazuya Saito.

Pat is the Deputy Chief Executive of a large College Group.

A qualified accountant, she is accountable to the Corporation Board for the Group’s Estate, sustainability and for maintaining the Group’s outstanding financial health grade. Her specialisms include Leadership and Management, Identification and Application of Funding Streams as well as leading the Group in new acquisitions, ventures and developments. Pat is using her vast experience of public sector finances to explore the intersection of accounting, leadership and purpose.

Supervisors

James Robson and Ariel Lindorff

Alice received her Master’s in Child Study and Education from the Institute of Child Study at the University of Toronto. She has taught preschool through higher education as a teacher and principal in public and private schools in North America and Europe. Deeply committed to enhancing education, she believes in learning that connects students and teachers to the natural world and to their communities. She is actively involved in community organisations that promote intercultural, interracial, and interfaith understanding and allyship.

Supervisors

Steve Puttick

Victoria is an educational researcher and practitioner, specialising in educational support and methodology of teaching mathematics to low-achieving students. For over 9 years she has been working at Big Change Educational Centre (Moscow) which provides support to looked-after children.

Before joining the DPhil programme, she completed her undergraduate degree in Finance at Financial University in Moscow and then gained a MSc in Psychology of Education from the University of Bristol.

Victoria’s current research focuses on educational issues of care-experienced children and teaching mathematics to students of low achievement and motivation.

Supervisors

Karen Skilling and Gabriel Stylianides

Louise was born and raised in Glasgow and moved to Oxford to pursue a DPhil in Education.

Louise’s research interests are education policy, particularly higher education policy, as well as qualitative research into the experiences of students in higher education and reducing inequalities in access to higher education. Louise is also interested in educational capabilities, educational purpose, aspirations and philosophical debates about knowledge construction and co-construction. Louise has a First Class BA (Joint Honours) in Social Policy and Education from the University of Strathclyde, and two Masters degrees with Distinction also from the University of Strathclyde in Applied Educational and Social Research and Social Policy (Research Methods). Louise also participated in the University of Oxford’s UNIQ+ Graduate Access Programme in the summer of 2022, where she worked at the Department of Sociology with Melinda Mills, Bo Zhao and Evelina Akimova on research into the impact of socio-economic status on inequalities in access to veterinary care in Scotland. Louise’s DPhil thesis is interested in evaluating Lorella Terzi’s educational capabilities framework through the lens of contemporary higher education in order to gain an understanding of what graduate capabilities are identified by students and stakeholders as being necessary for enabling graduates to successfully thrive and adapt in a post-pandemic society.

 

Supervisors

Alis Oancea and Kelsey Inouye

Motema studied Neuroscience as an undergraduate at Dartmouth College in the USA and it is one of its courses, found interest in Education.

Motema then worked for various non-profit organisations in Lesotho and South Africa focusing on helping high school students from low SES backgrounds access opportunities to study in HE. In her Masters’ project Motema analysed Lesotho’s 2009 Curriculum and Assessment Policy. This analysis’ findings brought Motema to her current research interests which include gendered STEM education and decolonisation of education policies and curricula in Lesotho. For her DPhil project, Motema is interested in finding out the lived experiences of female Science teachers in Lesotho Secondary Schools especially focusing on the major changes in the Secondary school education system in Lesotho that have happened in the past five years as unique meeting points.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Judith Hillier

Danielle is a DPhil student researching how Black-British doctoral students navigate the spaces of the elite, providing a new theoretical framework to understand their agency better.

Her main interests are in Human Flourishing, Cultural Geography, Psychology, and Justice, and her work aims to inform and reform educational frameworks and practices.

Following Danielle’s BSc in Psychology and MRes in Research Methods in Psychology, she founded a social enterprise that merges psychological and academic strategies to guide undergraduate and master’s students study practices. In addition to this, Danielle provided pedagogical and behavioural support across SEN college, secondary and primary schools.

Some of Danielle’s notable work includes her research introducing a new University-wide EDI strategy at her former Higher Education institution, presenting insights and way-forwards on youth homelessness to HRH Prince Williams, and providing discipleship to next-gen leaders.

Dan is a part-time DPhil Education student whose research focuses on investigating reasons why individuals choose to study and then teach physics as a subject discipline and how these relate to issues of equity and power. He previously worked as a secondary school physics teacher in the West Midlands of England for around 15 years before taking up his current post as Associate Professor of Physics Education at the University of Birmingham where he works in widening participation in physics and teacher education.

Publications
  • Cottle, D 2022, ‘Harnessing the potential of recently retired physics teachers to mentor new physics teachers’, Physics Education, vol. 57, no. 1, 015020. https://doi.org/10.1088/1361-6552/ac3931
  • Cottle, D 2021, ‘Improving students’ mathematical skills in secondary science: ideas from mathematics pedagogy’, School Science Review, vol. 102, no. 381, pp. 61-64. <https://www.ase.org.uk/resources/school-science-review/issue-381/improving-students-mathematical-skills-in-secondary>
  • Cottle, D 2021, ‘The effects of Covid-19 on student transition from school to university in STEM subjects’, New Directions in the Teaching of Physical Sciences, vol. 16, no. 1, 3847, pp. 1-4. https://doi.org/10.29311/ndtps.v0i14.3847 
  • Cottle, D & Marshall, R 2016, ‘Exploring electrical resistance: a novel kinesthetic model helps to resolve some misconceptions’, Physics Education, vol. 51, no. 5. https://doi.org/10.1088/0031-9120/51/5/054004 

Chris is a third-year part time DPhil student. He is an experienced Director of Children’s Services working in London. He is interested in path dependence and whether it is a helpful concept to understand how children’s services work.

Yaoyao is a DPhil student in Education at Oxford.

Her research interest lies in Aptitude-Instruction-Interaction (ATI) in second language acquisition (SLA).

Yaoyao’s research investigates the mediating effects of individual differences in learners’ domain-general perceptual-cognitive abilities in instructed foreign language pronunciation acquisition in adulthood. She aims to further explore how aptitude hinders instructional effectiveness and help all students make the most of instruction regardless of aptitude profiles.

Yaoyao started her BA in the Japanese Language and Literature at Sun Yat-Sen University (中山大学) in China. She then moved to the University of Queensland to finish her BA with double majors in Japanese and Translation. After her BA, she worked as an English teacher in China for three years. Prior to her DPhil studies at Oxford, Yaoyao completed her Master’s degree in TESOL at Institute of Education, University College London. Her Master’s dissertation was supervised by Dr Kazuya Saito.

Pat is the Deputy Chief Executive of a large College Group.

A qualified accountant, she is accountable to the Corporation Board for the Group’s Estate, sustainability and for maintaining the Group’s outstanding financial health grade. Her specialisms include Leadership and Management, Identification and Application of Funding Streams as well as leading the Group in new acquisitions, ventures and developments. Pat is using her vast experience of public sector finances to explore the intersection of accounting, leadership and purpose.

Supervisors

James Robson and Ariel Lindorff

Alice received her Master’s in Child Study and Education from the Institute of Child Study at the University of Toronto. She has taught preschool through higher education as a teacher and principal in public and private schools in North America and Europe. Deeply committed to enhancing education, she believes in learning that connects students and teachers to the natural world and to their communities. She is actively involved in community organisations that promote intercultural, interracial, and interfaith understanding and allyship.

Supervisors

Steve Puttick

Victoria is an educational researcher and practitioner, specialising in educational support and methodology of teaching mathematics to low-achieving students. For over 9 years she has been working at Big Change Educational Centre (Moscow) which provides support to looked-after children.

Before joining the DPhil programme, she completed her undergraduate degree in Finance at Financial University in Moscow and then gained a MSc in Psychology of Education from the University of Bristol.

Victoria’s current research focuses on educational issues of care-experienced children and teaching mathematics to students of low achievement and motivation.

Supervisors

Karen Skilling and Gabriel Stylianides

Louise was born and raised in Glasgow and moved to Oxford to pursue a DPhil in Education.

Louise’s research interests are education policy, particularly higher education policy, as well as qualitative research into the experiences of students in higher education and reducing inequalities in access to higher education. Louise is also interested in educational capabilities, educational purpose, aspirations and philosophical debates about knowledge construction and co-construction. Louise has a First Class BA (Joint Honours) in Social Policy and Education from the University of Strathclyde, and two Masters degrees with Distinction also from the University of Strathclyde in Applied Educational and Social Research and Social Policy (Research Methods). Louise also participated in the University of Oxford’s UNIQ+ Graduate Access Programme in the summer of 2022, where she worked at the Department of Sociology with Melinda Mills, Bo Zhao and Evelina Akimova on research into the impact of socio-economic status on inequalities in access to veterinary care in Scotland. Louise’s DPhil thesis is interested in evaluating Lorella Terzi’s educational capabilities framework through the lens of contemporary higher education in order to gain an understanding of what graduate capabilities are identified by students and stakeholders as being necessary for enabling graduates to successfully thrive and adapt in a post-pandemic society.

 

Supervisors

Alis Oancea and Kelsey Inouye

Motema studied Neuroscience as an undergraduate at Dartmouth College in the USA and it is one of its courses, found interest in Education.

Motema then worked for various non-profit organisations in Lesotho and South Africa focusing on helping high school students from low SES backgrounds access opportunities to study in HE. In her Masters’ project Motema analysed Lesotho’s 2009 Curriculum and Assessment Policy. This analysis’ findings brought Motema to her current research interests which include gendered STEM education and decolonisation of education policies and curricula in Lesotho. For her DPhil project, Motema is interested in finding out the lived experiences of female Science teachers in Lesotho Secondary Schools especially focusing on the major changes in the Secondary school education system in Lesotho that have happened in the past five years as unique meeting points.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Judith Hillier

Danielle is a DPhil student researching how Black-British doctoral students navigate the spaces of the elite, providing a new theoretical framework to understand their agency better.

Her main interests are in Human Flourishing, Cultural Geography, Psychology, and Justice, and her work aims to inform and reform educational frameworks and practices.

Following Danielle’s BSc in Psychology and MRes in Research Methods in Psychology, she founded a social enterprise that merges psychological and academic strategies to guide undergraduate and master’s students study practices. In addition to this, Danielle provided pedagogical and behavioural support across SEN college, secondary and primary schools.

Some of Danielle’s notable work includes her research introducing a new University-wide EDI strategy at her former Higher Education institution, presenting insights and way-forwards on youth homelessness to HRH Prince Williams, and providing discipleship to next-gen leaders.

Dan is a part-time DPhil Education student whose research focuses on investigating reasons why individuals choose to study and then teach physics as a subject discipline and how these relate to issues of equity and power. He previously worked as a secondary school physics teacher in the West Midlands of England for around 15 years before taking up his current post as Associate Professor of Physics Education at the University of Birmingham where he works in widening participation in physics and teacher education.

Publications
  • Cottle, D 2022, ‘Harnessing the potential of recently retired physics teachers to mentor new physics teachers’, Physics Education, vol. 57, no. 1, 015020. https://doi.org/10.1088/1361-6552/ac3931
  • Cottle, D 2021, ‘Improving students’ mathematical skills in secondary science: ideas from mathematics pedagogy’, School Science Review, vol. 102, no. 381, pp. 61-64. <https://www.ase.org.uk/resources/school-science-review/issue-381/improving-students-mathematical-skills-in-secondary>
  • Cottle, D 2021, ‘The effects of Covid-19 on student transition from school to university in STEM subjects’, New Directions in the Teaching of Physical Sciences, vol. 16, no. 1, 3847, pp. 1-4. https://doi.org/10.29311/ndtps.v0i14.3847 
  • Cottle, D & Marshall, R 2016, ‘Exploring electrical resistance: a novel kinesthetic model helps to resolve some misconceptions’, Physics Education, vol. 51, no. 5. https://doi.org/10.1088/0031-9120/51/5/054004 

Chris is a third-year part time DPhil student. He is an experienced Director of Children’s Services working in London. He is interested in path dependence and whether it is a helpful concept to understand how children’s services work.

Yaoyao is a DPhil student in Education at Oxford.

Her research interest lies in Aptitude-Instruction-Interaction (ATI) in second language acquisition (SLA).

Yaoyao’s research investigates the mediating effects of individual differences in learners’ domain-general perceptual-cognitive abilities in instructed foreign language pronunciation acquisition in adulthood. She aims to further explore how aptitude hinders instructional effectiveness and help all students make the most of instruction regardless of aptitude profiles.

Yaoyao started her BA in the Japanese Language and Literature at Sun Yat-Sen University (中山大学) in China. She then moved to the University of Queensland to finish her BA with double majors in Japanese and Translation. After her BA, she worked as an English teacher in China for three years. Prior to her DPhil studies at Oxford, Yaoyao completed her Master’s degree in TESOL at Institute of Education, University College London. Her Master’s dissertation was supervised by Dr Kazuya Saito.

Pat is the Deputy Chief Executive of a large College Group.

A qualified accountant, she is accountable to the Corporation Board for the Group’s Estate, sustainability and for maintaining the Group’s outstanding financial health grade. Her specialisms include Leadership and Management, Identification and Application of Funding Streams as well as leading the Group in new acquisitions, ventures and developments. Pat is using her vast experience of public sector finances to explore the intersection of accounting, leadership and purpose.

Supervisors

James Robson and Ariel Lindorff

Alice received her Master’s in Child Study and Education from the Institute of Child Study at the University of Toronto. She has taught preschool through higher education as a teacher and principal in public and private schools in North America and Europe. Deeply committed to enhancing education, she believes in learning that connects students and teachers to the natural world and to their communities. She is actively involved in community organisations that promote intercultural, interracial, and interfaith understanding and allyship.

Supervisors

Steve Puttick

Victoria is an educational researcher and practitioner, specialising in educational support and methodology of teaching mathematics to low-achieving students. For over 9 years she has been working at Big Change Educational Centre (Moscow) which provides support to looked-after children.

Before joining the DPhil programme, she completed her undergraduate degree in Finance at Financial University in Moscow and then gained a MSc in Psychology of Education from the University of Bristol.

Victoria’s current research focuses on educational issues of care-experienced children and teaching mathematics to students of low achievement and motivation.

Supervisors

Karen Skilling and Gabriel Stylianides

Louise was born and raised in Glasgow and moved to Oxford to pursue a DPhil in Education.

Louise’s research interests are education policy, particularly higher education policy, as well as qualitative research into the experiences of students in higher education and reducing inequalities in access to higher education. Louise is also interested in educational capabilities, educational purpose, aspirations and philosophical debates about knowledge construction and co-construction. Louise has a First Class BA (Joint Honours) in Social Policy and Education from the University of Strathclyde, and two Masters degrees with Distinction also from the University of Strathclyde in Applied Educational and Social Research and Social Policy (Research Methods). Louise also participated in the University of Oxford’s UNIQ+ Graduate Access Programme in the summer of 2022, where she worked at the Department of Sociology with Melinda Mills, Bo Zhao and Evelina Akimova on research into the impact of socio-economic status on inequalities in access to veterinary care in Scotland. Louise’s DPhil thesis is interested in evaluating Lorella Terzi’s educational capabilities framework through the lens of contemporary higher education in order to gain an understanding of what graduate capabilities are identified by students and stakeholders as being necessary for enabling graduates to successfully thrive and adapt in a post-pandemic society.

 

Supervisors

Alis Oancea and Kelsey Inouye

Motema studied Neuroscience as an undergraduate at Dartmouth College in the USA and it is one of its courses, found interest in Education.

Motema then worked for various non-profit organisations in Lesotho and South Africa focusing on helping high school students from low SES backgrounds access opportunities to study in HE. In her Masters’ project Motema analysed Lesotho’s 2009 Curriculum and Assessment Policy. This analysis’ findings brought Motema to her current research interests which include gendered STEM education and decolonisation of education policies and curricula in Lesotho. For her DPhil project, Motema is interested in finding out the lived experiences of female Science teachers in Lesotho Secondary Schools especially focusing on the major changes in the Secondary school education system in Lesotho that have happened in the past five years as unique meeting points.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Judith Hillier

Danielle is a DPhil student researching how Black-British doctoral students navigate the spaces of the elite, providing a new theoretical framework to understand their agency better.

Her main interests are in Human Flourishing, Cultural Geography, Psychology, and Justice, and her work aims to inform and reform educational frameworks and practices.

Following Danielle’s BSc in Psychology and MRes in Research Methods in Psychology, she founded a social enterprise that merges psychological and academic strategies to guide undergraduate and master’s students study practices. In addition to this, Danielle provided pedagogical and behavioural support across SEN college, secondary and primary schools.

Some of Danielle’s notable work includes her research introducing a new University-wide EDI strategy at her former Higher Education institution, presenting insights and way-forwards on youth homelessness to HRH Prince Williams, and providing discipleship to next-gen leaders.

Dan is a part-time DPhil Education student whose research focuses on investigating reasons why individuals choose to study and then teach physics as a subject discipline and how these relate to issues of equity and power. He previously worked as a secondary school physics teacher in the West Midlands of England for around 15 years before taking up his current post as Associate Professor of Physics Education at the University of Birmingham where he works in widening participation in physics and teacher education.

Publications
  • Cottle, D 2022, ‘Harnessing the potential of recently retired physics teachers to mentor new physics teachers’, Physics Education, vol. 57, no. 1, 015020. https://doi.org/10.1088/1361-6552/ac3931
  • Cottle, D 2021, ‘Improving students’ mathematical skills in secondary science: ideas from mathematics pedagogy’, School Science Review, vol. 102, no. 381, pp. 61-64. <https://www.ase.org.uk/resources/school-science-review/issue-381/improving-students-mathematical-skills-in-secondary>
  • Cottle, D 2021, ‘The effects of Covid-19 on student transition from school to university in STEM subjects’, New Directions in the Teaching of Physical Sciences, vol. 16, no. 1, 3847, pp. 1-4. https://doi.org/10.29311/ndtps.v0i14.3847 
  • Cottle, D & Marshall, R 2016, ‘Exploring electrical resistance: a novel kinesthetic model helps to resolve some misconceptions’, Physics Education, vol. 51, no. 5. https://doi.org/10.1088/0031-9120/51/5/054004 

Chris is a third-year part time DPhil student. He is an experienced Director of Children’s Services working in London. He is interested in path dependence and whether it is a helpful concept to understand how children’s services work.

Yaoyao is a DPhil student in Education at Oxford.

Her research interest lies in Aptitude-Instruction-Interaction (ATI) in second language acquisition (SLA).

Yaoyao’s research investigates the mediating effects of individual differences in learners’ domain-general perceptual-cognitive abilities in instructed foreign language pronunciation acquisition in adulthood. She aims to further explore how aptitude hinders instructional effectiveness and help all students make the most of instruction regardless of aptitude profiles.

Yaoyao started her BA in the Japanese Language and Literature at Sun Yat-Sen University (中山大学) in China. She then moved to the University of Queensland to finish her BA with double majors in Japanese and Translation. After her BA, she worked as an English teacher in China for three years. Prior to her DPhil studies at Oxford, Yaoyao completed her Master’s degree in TESOL at Institute of Education, University College London. Her Master’s dissertation was supervised by Dr Kazuya Saito.

Pat is the Deputy Chief Executive of a large College Group.

A qualified accountant, she is accountable to the Corporation Board for the Group’s Estate, sustainability and for maintaining the Group’s outstanding financial health grade. Her specialisms include Leadership and Management, Identification and Application of Funding Streams as well as leading the Group in new acquisitions, ventures and developments. Pat is using her vast experience of public sector finances to explore the intersection of accounting, leadership and purpose.

Supervisors

James Robson and Ariel Lindorff

Alice received her Master’s in Child Study and Education from the Institute of Child Study at the University of Toronto. She has taught preschool through higher education as a teacher and principal in public and private schools in North America and Europe. Deeply committed to enhancing education, she believes in learning that connects students and teachers to the natural world and to their communities. She is actively involved in community organisations that promote intercultural, interracial, and interfaith understanding and allyship.

Supervisors

Steve Puttick

Victoria is an educational researcher and practitioner, specialising in educational support and methodology of teaching mathematics to low-achieving students. For over 9 years she has been working at Big Change Educational Centre (Moscow) which provides support to looked-after children.

Before joining the DPhil programme, she completed her undergraduate degree in Finance at Financial University in Moscow and then gained a MSc in Psychology of Education from the University of Bristol.

Victoria’s current research focuses on educational issues of care-experienced children and teaching mathematics to students of low achievement and motivation.

Supervisors

Karen Skilling and Gabriel Stylianides

Louise was born and raised in Glasgow and moved to Oxford to pursue a DPhil in Education.

Louise’s research interests are education policy, particularly higher education policy, as well as qualitative research into the experiences of students in higher education and reducing inequalities in access to higher education. Louise is also interested in educational capabilities, educational purpose, aspirations and philosophical debates about knowledge construction and co-construction. Louise has a First Class BA (Joint Honours) in Social Policy and Education from the University of Strathclyde, and two Masters degrees with Distinction also from the University of Strathclyde in Applied Educational and Social Research and Social Policy (Research Methods). Louise also participated in the University of Oxford’s UNIQ+ Graduate Access Programme in the summer of 2022, where she worked at the Department of Sociology with Melinda Mills, Bo Zhao and Evelina Akimova on research into the impact of socio-economic status on inequalities in access to veterinary care in Scotland. Louise’s DPhil thesis is interested in evaluating Lorella Terzi’s educational capabilities framework through the lens of contemporary higher education in order to gain an understanding of what graduate capabilities are identified by students and stakeholders as being necessary for enabling graduates to successfully thrive and adapt in a post-pandemic society.

 

Supervisors

Alis Oancea and Kelsey Inouye

Motema studied Neuroscience as an undergraduate at Dartmouth College in the USA and it is one of its courses, found interest in Education.

Motema then worked for various non-profit organisations in Lesotho and South Africa focusing on helping high school students from low SES backgrounds access opportunities to study in HE. In her Masters’ project Motema analysed Lesotho’s 2009 Curriculum and Assessment Policy. This analysis’ findings brought Motema to her current research interests which include gendered STEM education and decolonisation of education policies and curricula in Lesotho. For her DPhil project, Motema is interested in finding out the lived experiences of female Science teachers in Lesotho Secondary Schools especially focusing on the major changes in the Secondary school education system in Lesotho that have happened in the past five years as unique meeting points.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Judith Hillier

Danielle is a DPhil student researching how Black-British doctoral students navigate the spaces of the elite, providing a new theoretical framework to understand their agency better.

Her main interests are in Human Flourishing, Cultural Geography, Psychology, and Justice, and her work aims to inform and reform educational frameworks and practices.

Following Danielle’s BSc in Psychology and MRes in Research Methods in Psychology, she founded a social enterprise that merges psychological and academic strategies to guide undergraduate and master’s students study practices. In addition to this, Danielle provided pedagogical and behavioural support across SEN college, secondary and primary schools.

Some of Danielle’s notable work includes her research introducing a new University-wide EDI strategy at her former Higher Education institution, presenting insights and way-forwards on youth homelessness to HRH Prince Williams, and providing discipleship to next-gen leaders.

Dan is a part-time DPhil Education student whose research focuses on investigating reasons why individuals choose to study and then teach physics as a subject discipline and how these relate to issues of equity and power. He previously worked as a secondary school physics teacher in the West Midlands of England for around 15 years before taking up his current post as Associate Professor of Physics Education at the University of Birmingham where he works in widening participation in physics and teacher education.

Publications
  • Cottle, D 2022, ‘Harnessing the potential of recently retired physics teachers to mentor new physics teachers’, Physics Education, vol. 57, no. 1, 015020. https://doi.org/10.1088/1361-6552/ac3931
  • Cottle, D 2021, ‘Improving students’ mathematical skills in secondary science: ideas from mathematics pedagogy’, School Science Review, vol. 102, no. 381, pp. 61-64. <https://www.ase.org.uk/resources/school-science-review/issue-381/improving-students-mathematical-skills-in-secondary>
  • Cottle, D 2021, ‘The effects of Covid-19 on student transition from school to university in STEM subjects’, New Directions in the Teaching of Physical Sciences, vol. 16, no. 1, 3847, pp. 1-4. https://doi.org/10.29311/ndtps.v0i14.3847 
  • Cottle, D & Marshall, R 2016, ‘Exploring electrical resistance: a novel kinesthetic model helps to resolve some misconceptions’, Physics Education, vol. 51, no. 5. https://doi.org/10.1088/0031-9120/51/5/054004 

Chris is a third-year part time DPhil student. He is an experienced Director of Children’s Services working in London. He is interested in path dependence and whether it is a helpful concept to understand how children’s services work.

Yaoyao is a DPhil student in Education at Oxford.

Her research interest lies in Aptitude-Instruction-Interaction (ATI) in second language acquisition (SLA).

Yaoyao’s research investigates the mediating effects of individual differences in learners’ domain-general perceptual-cognitive abilities in instructed foreign language pronunciation acquisition in adulthood. She aims to further explore how aptitude hinders instructional effectiveness and help all students make the most of instruction regardless of aptitude profiles.

Yaoyao started her BA in the Japanese Language and Literature at Sun Yat-Sen University (中山大学) in China. She then moved to the University of Queensland to finish her BA with double majors in Japanese and Translation. After her BA, she worked as an English teacher in China for three years. Prior to her DPhil studies at Oxford, Yaoyao completed her Master’s degree in TESOL at Institute of Education, University College London. Her Master’s dissertation was supervised by Dr Kazuya Saito.

Pat is the Deputy Chief Executive of a large College Group.

A qualified accountant, she is accountable to the Corporation Board for the Group’s Estate, sustainability and for maintaining the Group’s outstanding financial health grade. Her specialisms include Leadership and Management, Identification and Application of Funding Streams as well as leading the Group in new acquisitions, ventures and developments. Pat is using her vast experience of public sector finances to explore the intersection of accounting, leadership and purpose.

Supervisors

James Robson and Ariel Lindorff

Alice received her Master’s in Child Study and Education from the Institute of Child Study at the University of Toronto. She has taught preschool through higher education as a teacher and principal in public and private schools in North America and Europe. Deeply committed to enhancing education, she believes in learning that connects students and teachers to the natural world and to their communities. She is actively involved in community organisations that promote intercultural, interracial, and interfaith understanding and allyship.

Supervisors

Steve Puttick

Victoria is an educational researcher and practitioner, specialising in educational support and methodology of teaching mathematics to low-achieving students. For over 9 years she has been working at Big Change Educational Centre (Moscow) which provides support to looked-after children.

Before joining the DPhil programme, she completed her undergraduate degree in Finance at Financial University in Moscow and then gained a MSc in Psychology of Education from the University of Bristol.

Victoria’s current research focuses on educational issues of care-experienced children and teaching mathematics to students of low achievement and motivation.

Supervisors

Karen Skilling and Gabriel Stylianides

Louise was born and raised in Glasgow and moved to Oxford to pursue a DPhil in Education.

Louise’s research interests are education policy, particularly higher education policy, as well as qualitative research into the experiences of students in higher education and reducing inequalities in access to higher education. Louise is also interested in educational capabilities, educational purpose, aspirations and philosophical debates about knowledge construction and co-construction. Louise has a First Class BA (Joint Honours) in Social Policy and Education from the University of Strathclyde, and two Masters degrees with Distinction also from the University of Strathclyde in Applied Educational and Social Research and Social Policy (Research Methods). Louise also participated in the University of Oxford’s UNIQ+ Graduate Access Programme in the summer of 2022, where she worked at the Department of Sociology with Melinda Mills, Bo Zhao and Evelina Akimova on research into the impact of socio-economic status on inequalities in access to veterinary care in Scotland. Louise’s DPhil thesis is interested in evaluating Lorella Terzi’s educational capabilities framework through the lens of contemporary higher education in order to gain an understanding of what graduate capabilities are identified by students and stakeholders as being necessary for enabling graduates to successfully thrive and adapt in a post-pandemic society.

 

Supervisors

Alis Oancea and Kelsey Inouye

Motema studied Neuroscience as an undergraduate at Dartmouth College in the USA and it is one of its courses, found interest in Education.

Motema then worked for various non-profit organisations in Lesotho and South Africa focusing on helping high school students from low SES backgrounds access opportunities to study in HE. In her Masters’ project Motema analysed Lesotho’s 2009 Curriculum and Assessment Policy. This analysis’ findings brought Motema to her current research interests which include gendered STEM education and decolonisation of education policies and curricula in Lesotho. For her DPhil project, Motema is interested in finding out the lived experiences of female Science teachers in Lesotho Secondary Schools especially focusing on the major changes in the Secondary school education system in Lesotho that have happened in the past five years as unique meeting points.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Judith Hillier

Danielle is a DPhil student researching how Black-British doctoral students navigate the spaces of the elite, providing a new theoretical framework to understand their agency better.

Her main interests are in Human Flourishing, Cultural Geography, Psychology, and Justice, and her work aims to inform and reform educational frameworks and practices.

Following Danielle’s BSc in Psychology and MRes in Research Methods in Psychology, she founded a social enterprise that merges psychological and academic strategies to guide undergraduate and master’s students study practices. In addition to this, Danielle provided pedagogical and behavioural support across SEN college, secondary and primary schools.

Some of Danielle’s notable work includes her research introducing a new University-wide EDI strategy at her former Higher Education institution, presenting insights and way-forwards on youth homelessness to HRH Prince Williams, and providing discipleship to next-gen leaders.

Dan is a part-time DPhil Education student whose research focuses on investigating reasons why individuals choose to study and then teach physics as a subject discipline and how these relate to issues of equity and power. He previously worked as a secondary school physics teacher in the West Midlands of England for around 15 years before taking up his current post as Associate Professor of Physics Education at the University of Birmingham where he works in widening participation in physics and teacher education.

Publications
  • Cottle, D 2022, ‘Harnessing the potential of recently retired physics teachers to mentor new physics teachers’, Physics Education, vol. 57, no. 1, 015020. https://doi.org/10.1088/1361-6552/ac3931
  • Cottle, D 2021, ‘Improving students’ mathematical skills in secondary science: ideas from mathematics pedagogy’, School Science Review, vol. 102, no. 381, pp. 61-64. <https://www.ase.org.uk/resources/school-science-review/issue-381/improving-students-mathematical-skills-in-secondary>
  • Cottle, D 2021, ‘The effects of Covid-19 on student transition from school to university in STEM subjects’, New Directions in the Teaching of Physical Sciences, vol. 16, no. 1, 3847, pp. 1-4. https://doi.org/10.29311/ndtps.v0i14.3847 
  • Cottle, D & Marshall, R 2016, ‘Exploring electrical resistance: a novel kinesthetic model helps to resolve some misconceptions’, Physics Education, vol. 51, no. 5. https://doi.org/10.1088/0031-9120/51/5/054004 

Chris is a third-year part time DPhil student. He is an experienced Director of Children’s Services working in London. He is interested in path dependence and whether it is a helpful concept to understand how children’s services work.

Yaoyao is a DPhil student in Education at Oxford.

Her research interest lies in Aptitude-Instruction-Interaction (ATI) in second language acquisition (SLA).

Yaoyao’s research investigates the mediating effects of individual differences in learners’ domain-general perceptual-cognitive abilities in instructed foreign language pronunciation acquisition in adulthood. She aims to further explore how aptitude hinders instructional effectiveness and help all students make the most of instruction regardless of aptitude profiles.

Yaoyao started her BA in the Japanese Language and Literature at Sun Yat-Sen University (中山大学) in China. She then moved to the University of Queensland to finish her BA with double majors in Japanese and Translation. After her BA, she worked as an English teacher in China for three years. Prior to her DPhil studies at Oxford, Yaoyao completed her Master’s degree in TESOL at Institute of Education, University College London. Her Master’s dissertation was supervised by Dr Kazuya Saito.

Pat is the Deputy Chief Executive of a large College Group.

A qualified accountant, she is accountable to the Corporation Board for the Group’s Estate, sustainability and for maintaining the Group’s outstanding financial health grade. Her specialisms include Leadership and Management, Identification and Application of Funding Streams as well as leading the Group in new acquisitions, ventures and developments. Pat is using her vast experience of public sector finances to explore the intersection of accounting, leadership and purpose.

Supervisors

James Robson and Ariel Lindorff

Alice received her Master’s in Child Study and Education from the Institute of Child Study at the University of Toronto. She has taught preschool through higher education as a teacher and principal in public and private schools in North America and Europe. Deeply committed to enhancing education, she believes in learning that connects students and teachers to the natural world and to their communities. She is actively involved in community organisations that promote intercultural, interracial, and interfaith understanding and allyship.

Supervisors

Steve Puttick

Victoria is an educational researcher and practitioner, specialising in educational support and methodology of teaching mathematics to low-achieving students. For over 9 years she has been working at Big Change Educational Centre (Moscow) which provides support to looked-after children.

Before joining the DPhil programme, she completed her undergraduate degree in Finance at Financial University in Moscow and then gained a MSc in Psychology of Education from the University of Bristol.

Victoria’s current research focuses on educational issues of care-experienced children and teaching mathematics to students of low achievement and motivation.

Supervisors

Karen Skilling and Gabriel Stylianides

Louise was born and raised in Glasgow and moved to Oxford to pursue a DPhil in Education.

Louise’s research interests are education policy, particularly higher education policy, as well as qualitative research into the experiences of students in higher education and reducing inequalities in access to higher education. Louise is also interested in educational capabilities, educational purpose, aspirations and philosophical debates about knowledge construction and co-construction. Louise has a First Class BA (Joint Honours) in Social Policy and Education from the University of Strathclyde, and two Masters degrees with Distinction also from the University of Strathclyde in Applied Educational and Social Research and Social Policy (Research Methods). Louise also participated in the University of Oxford’s UNIQ+ Graduate Access Programme in the summer of 2022, where she worked at the Department of Sociology with Melinda Mills, Bo Zhao and Evelina Akimova on research into the impact of socio-economic status on inequalities in access to veterinary care in Scotland. Louise’s DPhil thesis is interested in evaluating Lorella Terzi’s educational capabilities framework through the lens of contemporary higher education in order to gain an understanding of what graduate capabilities are identified by students and stakeholders as being necessary for enabling graduates to successfully thrive and adapt in a post-pandemic society.

 

Supervisors

Alis Oancea and Kelsey Inouye

Motema studied Neuroscience as an undergraduate at Dartmouth College in the USA and it is one of its courses, found interest in Education.

Motema then worked for various non-profit organisations in Lesotho and South Africa focusing on helping high school students from low SES backgrounds access opportunities to study in HE. In her Masters’ project Motema analysed Lesotho’s 2009 Curriculum and Assessment Policy. This analysis’ findings brought Motema to her current research interests which include gendered STEM education and decolonisation of education policies and curricula in Lesotho. For her DPhil project, Motema is interested in finding out the lived experiences of female Science teachers in Lesotho Secondary Schools especially focusing on the major changes in the Secondary school education system in Lesotho that have happened in the past five years as unique meeting points.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Judith Hillier

Danielle is a DPhil student researching how Black-British doctoral students navigate the spaces of the elite, providing a new theoretical framework to understand their agency better.

Her main interests are in Human Flourishing, Cultural Geography, Psychology, and Justice, and her work aims to inform and reform educational frameworks and practices.

Following Danielle’s BSc in Psychology and MRes in Research Methods in Psychology, she founded a social enterprise that merges psychological and academic strategies to guide undergraduate and master’s students study practices. In addition to this, Danielle provided pedagogical and behavioural support across SEN college, secondary and primary schools.

Some of Danielle’s notable work includes her research introducing a new University-wide EDI strategy at her former Higher Education institution, presenting insights and way-forwards on youth homelessness to HRH Prince Williams, and providing discipleship to next-gen leaders.

Dan is a part-time DPhil Education student whose research focuses on investigating reasons why individuals choose to study and then teach physics as a subject discipline and how these relate to issues of equity and power. He previously worked as a secondary school physics teacher in the West Midlands of England for around 15 years before taking up his current post as Associate Professor of Physics Education at the University of Birmingham where he works in widening participation in physics and teacher education.

Publications
  • Cottle, D 2022, ‘Harnessing the potential of recently retired physics teachers to mentor new physics teachers’, Physics Education, vol. 57, no. 1, 015020. https://doi.org/10.1088/1361-6552/ac3931
  • Cottle, D 2021, ‘Improving students’ mathematical skills in secondary science: ideas from mathematics pedagogy’, School Science Review, vol. 102, no. 381, pp. 61-64. <https://www.ase.org.uk/resources/school-science-review/issue-381/improving-students-mathematical-skills-in-secondary>
  • Cottle, D 2021, ‘The effects of Covid-19 on student transition from school to university in STEM subjects’, New Directions in the Teaching of Physical Sciences, vol. 16, no. 1, 3847, pp. 1-4. https://doi.org/10.29311/ndtps.v0i14.3847 
  • Cottle, D & Marshall, R 2016, ‘Exploring electrical resistance: a novel kinesthetic model helps to resolve some misconceptions’, Physics Education, vol. 51, no. 5. https://doi.org/10.1088/0031-9120/51/5/054004 

Chris is a third-year part time DPhil student. He is an experienced Director of Children’s Services working in London. He is interested in path dependence and whether it is a helpful concept to understand how children’s services work.

Yaoyao is a DPhil student in Education at Oxford.

Her research interest lies in Aptitude-Instruction-Interaction (ATI) in second language acquisition (SLA).

Yaoyao’s research investigates the mediating effects of individual differences in learners’ domain-general perceptual-cognitive abilities in instructed foreign language pronunciation acquisition in adulthood. She aims to further explore how aptitude hinders instructional effectiveness and help all students make the most of instruction regardless of aptitude profiles.

Yaoyao started her BA in the Japanese Language and Literature at Sun Yat-Sen University (中山大学) in China. She then moved to the University of Queensland to finish her BA with double majors in Japanese and Translation. After her BA, she worked as an English teacher in China for three years. Prior to her DPhil studies at Oxford, Yaoyao completed her Master’s degree in TESOL at Institute of Education, University College London. Her Master’s dissertation was supervised by Dr Kazuya Saito.

Pat is the Deputy Chief Executive of a large College Group.

A qualified accountant, she is accountable to the Corporation Board for the Group’s Estate, sustainability and for maintaining the Group’s outstanding financial health grade. Her specialisms include Leadership and Management, Identification and Application of Funding Streams as well as leading the Group in new acquisitions, ventures and developments. Pat is using her vast experience of public sector finances to explore the intersection of accounting, leadership and purpose.

Supervisors

James Robson and Ariel Lindorff

Alice received her Master’s in Child Study and Education from the Institute of Child Study at the University of Toronto. She has taught preschool through higher education as a teacher and principal in public and private schools in North America and Europe. Deeply committed to enhancing education, she believes in learning that connects students and teachers to the natural world and to their communities. She is actively involved in community organisations that promote intercultural, interracial, and interfaith understanding and allyship.

Supervisors

Steve Puttick

Victoria is an educational researcher and practitioner, specialising in educational support and methodology of teaching mathematics to low-achieving students. For over 9 years she has been working at Big Change Educational Centre (Moscow) which provides support to looked-after children.

Before joining the DPhil programme, she completed her undergraduate degree in Finance at Financial University in Moscow and then gained a MSc in Psychology of Education from the University of Bristol.

Victoria’s current research focuses on educational issues of care-experienced children and teaching mathematics to students of low achievement and motivation.

Supervisors

Karen Skilling and Gabriel Stylianides

Louise was born and raised in Glasgow and moved to Oxford to pursue a DPhil in Education.

Louise’s research interests are education policy, particularly higher education policy, as well as qualitative research into the experiences of students in higher education and reducing inequalities in access to higher education. Louise is also interested in educational capabilities, educational purpose, aspirations and philosophical debates about knowledge construction and co-construction. Louise has a First Class BA (Joint Honours) in Social Policy and Education from the University of Strathclyde, and two Masters degrees with Distinction also from the University of Strathclyde in Applied Educational and Social Research and Social Policy (Research Methods). Louise also participated in the University of Oxford’s UNIQ+ Graduate Access Programme in the summer of 2022, where she worked at the Department of Sociology with Melinda Mills, Bo Zhao and Evelina Akimova on research into the impact of socio-economic status on inequalities in access to veterinary care in Scotland. Louise’s DPhil thesis is interested in evaluating Lorella Terzi’s educational capabilities framework through the lens of contemporary higher education in order to gain an understanding of what graduate capabilities are identified by students and stakeholders as being necessary for enabling graduates to successfully thrive and adapt in a post-pandemic society.

 

Supervisors

Alis Oancea and Kelsey Inouye

Motema studied Neuroscience as an undergraduate at Dartmouth College in the USA and it is one of its courses, found interest in Education.

Motema then worked for various non-profit organisations in Lesotho and South Africa focusing on helping high school students from low SES backgrounds access opportunities to study in HE. In her Masters’ project Motema analysed Lesotho’s 2009 Curriculum and Assessment Policy. This analysis’ findings brought Motema to her current research interests which include gendered STEM education and decolonisation of education policies and curricula in Lesotho. For her DPhil project, Motema is interested in finding out the lived experiences of female Science teachers in Lesotho Secondary Schools especially focusing on the major changes in the Secondary school education system in Lesotho that have happened in the past five years as unique meeting points.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Judith Hillier

Danielle is a DPhil student researching how Black-British doctoral students navigate the spaces of the elite, providing a new theoretical framework to understand their agency better.

Her main interests are in Human Flourishing, Cultural Geography, Psychology, and Justice, and her work aims to inform and reform educational frameworks and practices.

Following Danielle’s BSc in Psychology and MRes in Research Methods in Psychology, she founded a social enterprise that merges psychological and academic strategies to guide undergraduate and master’s students study practices. In addition to this, Danielle provided pedagogical and behavioural support across SEN college, secondary and primary schools.

Some of Danielle’s notable work includes her research introducing a new University-wide EDI strategy at her former Higher Education institution, presenting insights and way-forwards on youth homelessness to HRH Prince Williams, and providing discipleship to next-gen leaders.

Dan is a part-time DPhil Education student whose research focuses on investigating reasons why individuals choose to study and then teach physics as a subject discipline and how these relate to issues of equity and power. He previously worked as a secondary school physics teacher in the West Midlands of England for around 15 years before taking up his current post as Associate Professor of Physics Education at the University of Birmingham where he works in widening participation in physics and teacher education.

Publications
  • Cottle, D 2022, ‘Harnessing the potential of recently retired physics teachers to mentor new physics teachers’, Physics Education, vol. 57, no. 1, 015020. https://doi.org/10.1088/1361-6552/ac3931
  • Cottle, D 2021, ‘Improving students’ mathematical skills in secondary science: ideas from mathematics pedagogy’, School Science Review, vol. 102, no. 381, pp. 61-64. <https://www.ase.org.uk/resources/school-science-review/issue-381/improving-students-mathematical-skills-in-secondary>
  • Cottle, D 2021, ‘The effects of Covid-19 on student transition from school to university in STEM subjects’, New Directions in the Teaching of Physical Sciences, vol. 16, no. 1, 3847, pp. 1-4. https://doi.org/10.29311/ndtps.v0i14.3847 
  • Cottle, D & Marshall, R 2016, ‘Exploring electrical resistance: a novel kinesthetic model helps to resolve some misconceptions’, Physics Education, vol. 51, no. 5. https://doi.org/10.1088/0031-9120/51/5/054004 

Chris is a third-year part time DPhil student. He is an experienced Director of Children’s Services working in London. He is interested in path dependence and whether it is a helpful concept to understand how children’s services work.

Yaoyao is a DPhil student in Education at Oxford.

Her research interest lies in Aptitude-Instruction-Interaction (ATI) in second language acquisition (SLA).

Yaoyao’s research investigates the mediating effects of individual differences in learners’ domain-general perceptual-cognitive abilities in instructed foreign language pronunciation acquisition in adulthood. She aims to further explore how aptitude hinders instructional effectiveness and help all students make the most of instruction regardless of aptitude profiles.

Yaoyao started her BA in the Japanese Language and Literature at Sun Yat-Sen University (中山大学) in China. She then moved to the University of Queensland to finish her BA with double majors in Japanese and Translation. After her BA, she worked as an English teacher in China for three years. Prior to her DPhil studies at Oxford, Yaoyao completed her Master’s degree in TESOL at Institute of Education, University College London. Her Master’s dissertation was supervised by Dr Kazuya Saito.

Pat is the Deputy Chief Executive of a large College Group.

A qualified accountant, she is accountable to the Corporation Board for the Group’s Estate, sustainability and for maintaining the Group’s outstanding financial health grade. Her specialisms include Leadership and Management, Identification and Application of Funding Streams as well as leading the Group in new acquisitions, ventures and developments. Pat is using her vast experience of public sector finances to explore the intersection of accounting, leadership and purpose.

Supervisors

James Robson and Ariel Lindorff

Alice received her Master’s in Child Study and Education from the Institute of Child Study at the University of Toronto. She has taught preschool through higher education as a teacher and principal in public and private schools in North America and Europe. Deeply committed to enhancing education, she believes in learning that connects students and teachers to the natural world and to their communities. She is actively involved in community organisations that promote intercultural, interracial, and interfaith understanding and allyship.

Supervisors

Steve Puttick

Victoria is an educational researcher and practitioner, specialising in educational support and methodology of teaching mathematics to low-achieving students. For over 9 years she has been working at Big Change Educational Centre (Moscow) which provides support to looked-after children.

Before joining the DPhil programme, she completed her undergraduate degree in Finance at Financial University in Moscow and then gained a MSc in Psychology of Education from the University of Bristol.

Victoria’s current research focuses on educational issues of care-experienced children and teaching mathematics to students of low achievement and motivation.

Supervisors

Karen Skilling and Gabriel Stylianides

Louise was born and raised in Glasgow and moved to Oxford to pursue a DPhil in Education.

Louise’s research interests are education policy, particularly higher education policy, as well as qualitative research into the experiences of students in higher education and reducing inequalities in access to higher education. Louise is also interested in educational capabilities, educational purpose, aspirations and philosophical debates about knowledge construction and co-construction. Louise has a First Class BA (Joint Honours) in Social Policy and Education from the University of Strathclyde, and two Masters degrees with Distinction also from the University of Strathclyde in Applied Educational and Social Research and Social Policy (Research Methods). Louise also participated in the University of Oxford’s UNIQ+ Graduate Access Programme in the summer of 2022, where she worked at the Department of Sociology with Melinda Mills, Bo Zhao and Evelina Akimova on research into the impact of socio-economic status on inequalities in access to veterinary care in Scotland. Louise’s DPhil thesis is interested in evaluating Lorella Terzi’s educational capabilities framework through the lens of contemporary higher education in order to gain an understanding of what graduate capabilities are identified by students and stakeholders as being necessary for enabling graduates to successfully thrive and adapt in a post-pandemic society.

 

Supervisors

Alis Oancea and Kelsey Inouye

Motema studied Neuroscience as an undergraduate at Dartmouth College in the USA and it is one of its courses, found interest in Education.

Motema then worked for various non-profit organisations in Lesotho and South Africa focusing on helping high school students from low SES backgrounds access opportunities to study in HE. In her Masters’ project Motema analysed Lesotho’s 2009 Curriculum and Assessment Policy. This analysis’ findings brought Motema to her current research interests which include gendered STEM education and decolonisation of education policies and curricula in Lesotho. For her DPhil project, Motema is interested in finding out the lived experiences of female Science teachers in Lesotho Secondary Schools especially focusing on the major changes in the Secondary school education system in Lesotho that have happened in the past five years as unique meeting points.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Judith Hillier

Danielle is a DPhil student researching how Black-British doctoral students navigate the spaces of the elite, providing a new theoretical framework to understand their agency better.

Her main interests are in Human Flourishing, Cultural Geography, Psychology, and Justice, and her work aims to inform and reform educational frameworks and practices.

Following Danielle’s BSc in Psychology and MRes in Research Methods in Psychology, she founded a social enterprise that merges psychological and academic strategies to guide undergraduate and master’s students study practices. In addition to this, Danielle provided pedagogical and behavioural support across SEN college, secondary and primary schools.

Some of Danielle’s notable work includes her research introducing a new University-wide EDI strategy at her former Higher Education institution, presenting insights and way-forwards on youth homelessness to HRH Prince Williams, and providing discipleship to next-gen leaders.

Dan is a part-time DPhil Education student whose research focuses on investigating reasons why individuals choose to study and then teach physics as a subject discipline and how these relate to issues of equity and power. He previously worked as a secondary school physics teacher in the West Midlands of England for around 15 years before taking up his current post as Associate Professor of Physics Education at the University of Birmingham where he works in widening participation in physics and teacher education.

Publications
  • Cottle, D 2022, ‘Harnessing the potential of recently retired physics teachers to mentor new physics teachers’, Physics Education, vol. 57, no. 1, 015020. https://doi.org/10.1088/1361-6552/ac3931
  • Cottle, D 2021, ‘Improving students’ mathematical skills in secondary science: ideas from mathematics pedagogy’, School Science Review, vol. 102, no. 381, pp. 61-64. <https://www.ase.org.uk/resources/school-science-review/issue-381/improving-students-mathematical-skills-in-secondary>
  • Cottle, D 2021, ‘The effects of Covid-19 on student transition from school to university in STEM subjects’, New Directions in the Teaching of Physical Sciences, vol. 16, no. 1, 3847, pp. 1-4. https://doi.org/10.29311/ndtps.v0i14.3847 
  • Cottle, D & Marshall, R 2016, ‘Exploring electrical resistance: a novel kinesthetic model helps to resolve some misconceptions’, Physics Education, vol. 51, no. 5. https://doi.org/10.1088/0031-9120/51/5/054004 

Chris is a third-year part time DPhil student. He is an experienced Director of Children’s Services working in London. He is interested in path dependence and whether it is a helpful concept to understand how children’s services work.

Yaoyao is a DPhil student in Education at Oxford.

Her research interest lies in Aptitude-Instruction-Interaction (ATI) in second language acquisition (SLA).

Yaoyao’s research investigates the mediating effects of individual differences in learners’ domain-general perceptual-cognitive abilities in instructed foreign language pronunciation acquisition in adulthood. She aims to further explore how aptitude hinders instructional effectiveness and help all students make the most of instruction regardless of aptitude profiles.

Yaoyao started her BA in the Japanese Language and Literature at Sun Yat-Sen University (中山大学) in China. She then moved to the University of Queensland to finish her BA with double majors in Japanese and Translation. After her BA, she worked as an English teacher in China for three years. Prior to her DPhil studies at Oxford, Yaoyao completed her Master’s degree in TESOL at Institute of Education, University College London. Her Master’s dissertation was supervised by Dr Kazuya Saito.

Pat is the Deputy Chief Executive of a large College Group.

A qualified accountant, she is accountable to the Corporation Board for the Group’s Estate, sustainability and for maintaining the Group’s outstanding financial health grade. Her specialisms include Leadership and Management, Identification and Application of Funding Streams as well as leading the Group in new acquisitions, ventures and developments. Pat is using her vast experience of public sector finances to explore the intersection of accounting, leadership and purpose.

Supervisors

James Robson and Ariel Lindorff

Alice received her Master’s in Child Study and Education from the Institute of Child Study at the University of Toronto. She has taught preschool through higher education as a teacher and principal in public and private schools in North America and Europe. Deeply committed to enhancing education, she believes in learning that connects students and teachers to the natural world and to their communities. She is actively involved in community organisations that promote intercultural, interracial, and interfaith understanding and allyship.

Supervisors

Steve Puttick

Victoria is an educational researcher and practitioner, specialising in educational support and methodology of teaching mathematics to low-achieving students. For over 9 years she has been working at Big Change Educational Centre (Moscow) which provides support to looked-after children.

Before joining the DPhil programme, she completed her undergraduate degree in Finance at Financial University in Moscow and then gained a MSc in Psychology of Education from the University of Bristol.

Victoria’s current research focuses on educational issues of care-experienced children and teaching mathematics to students of low achievement and motivation.

Supervisors

Karen Skilling and Gabriel Stylianides

Louise was born and raised in Glasgow and moved to Oxford to pursue a DPhil in Education.

Louise’s research interests are education policy, particularly higher education policy, as well as qualitative research into the experiences of students in higher education and reducing inequalities in access to higher education. Louise is also interested in educational capabilities, educational purpose, aspirations and philosophical debates about knowledge construction and co-construction. Louise has a First Class BA (Joint Honours) in Social Policy and Education from the University of Strathclyde, and two Masters degrees with Distinction also from the University of Strathclyde in Applied Educational and Social Research and Social Policy (Research Methods). Louise also participated in the University of Oxford’s UNIQ+ Graduate Access Programme in the summer of 2022, where she worked at the Department of Sociology with Melinda Mills, Bo