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Anushay completed her BSc Psychology from UCL, where she also started her master’s in Developmental Neuroscience and Psychopathology. She was based at Yale University for her master’s thesis, where she worked with Dr Craig Bailey at the Yale Center for Emotional Intelligence to understand children’s emotion development. Anushay’s research interests include understanding child development across different cultures, factors that might be affecting it, and devising culture-specific ways to support children’s holistic development through the educational system. She is also keen on improving the research scope in Pakistan by working with Pakistani researchers, practitioners, and families.

Anushay balances her research with her position as the founder of a non-profit, Resources for Children, which aims to understand and support children’s development in Pakistan.

Publications

  1. Mazhar, A. (2022, April). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Spring Preview, New Haven, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2021, December). Does an extended family improve mentalising in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK & Pakistan. 2nd International Foundation University Conference of Psychology, Rawalpindi, Pakistan.
  3. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Theory of Mind in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK and Pakistan. Harvard Trends in Psychology Summit, Cambridge, United States.
  1. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Research Rounds, New Haven, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2020, October). Developing a non-profit to advance autism research in Pakistan. Anna Freud Centre Seminar Series, London, United Kingdom

 

Núria is a Professor of Mathematics Education at Autonomous University of Barcelona. Her research is about language and mathematics in secondary school classrooms and professional development contexts with mathematics teachers.

Her first degree was in Mathematics at University of Barcelona (1995). Soon after her initiation as a secondary school mathematics teacher in highly multilingual classrooms of Barcelona, she started her PhD at the UAB Division of Mathematics Education. She wanted to understand the critical factors behind the under-performance in school mathematics of many learners from poor urban backgrounds and recent histories of migration. Since then, she has been committed to classroom and teacher education research grounded on community work with schools and mathematics teachers in urban areas of poverty. Her years as a school teacher have provided her with greater insights into her work as a researcher and have strongly influenced the adoption of sociocultural and sociopolitical approaches to mathematics teaching and learning.

Núria was given the ICREA Academia Award of the Catalan Institution for Research and Advanced Studies in 2013, in recognition of her contributions to research on multilingual mathematics teaching and learning. She was elected to the Executive Committee of the International Commission on Mathematical Instruction as Member-at-Large in 2021, and to the International Committee of the International Group for the Psychology of Mathematics Education from 2010 to 2014. She served as Extraordinarious Professor of Mathematics Education at the University of South Africa from 2013 to 2020. She was Visiting Scholar at London South Bank University, University of Arizona, and University of North Carolina at Chapel-Hill.

Núria is currently on the editorial board of the international journal Mathematics Education Research Journal and Journal of Mathematics Teacher Education. Till 2021 she was the editor-in-chief of the Advances of Research in Mathematics Education, the official journal of the Spanish Society of Research in Mathematics Education. She is the leading co-editor of a 2018 special issue on language research in mathematics education published in ZDM-Mathematics Education, and the leading co-editor of a special issue on decentring mathematics teaching education, to be published in the Journal of Mathematics Teacher Education, February 2024.

She chaired the 7th Topic Conference of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education on Language and Mathematics (Dresden, 2018), and the ERME Topic Working Group on Language and Mathematics from 2015 to 2020. The collaborations established in the ERME context enabled for a broad range of experts to come together and move forward the research field in the form of an co-edited Routledge volume entitled ‘Classroom research on mathematics and language: Seeing learners and teachers differently’ in 2021, with Núria as the leading co-editor. She has also been co-editor of the Springer volume resulting from the 21st ICMI Study on Language Diversity and Mathematics Education in 2016, and of the Brill volume entitled ‘Mathematical discourse that breaks barriers and creates space for marginalized learners’ in 2018.

Núria’s motivation for coming to the Oxford Department of Education is her research collaboration in projects co-coordinated with Jenni Ingram on establishing an international network for research on supporting school mathematics teaching with linguistically disadvantaged learners. From her years as a secondary school in the 1990s, important challenges posed to mathematics education practice remain. Learners of mathematics who are linguistically disadvantaged for a variety of reasons, including impoverished socioeconomic status, continue to be educationally disadvantaged at a considerable risk of school failure and early dropout. More research will hopefully shed light on how to identify and develop improved practices to enable greater access to school mathematics for all learners.

Publications

SELECTION OF 10 LAST-DECADE PUBLICATIONS
[For more publications and research details, see https://orcid.org/0000-0001-5199-6336]
– Planas, N., & Chronaki, A. (2021). Multilingual mathematics learning from a dialogic-translanguaging perspective. In N. Planas, C. Morgan, & M. Schütte (Eds.), Classroom research on mathematics and language: Seeing learners and teachers differently (pp. 151-166). Routledge.
– Planas, N. (2021). How specific can language as resource become for the teaching of algebraic concepts? ZDM-Mathematics Education, 53(2), 277-288.
– Planas, N. (2021). Challenges and opportunities from translingual research on multilingual mathematics classrooms. In A. A. Essien, & A. Msimanga (Eds.), Multilingual education yearbook 2021. Policy and practice in STEM multilingual contexts (pp. 1-18). Springer.
– Planas, N., & Ngoepe, M. (2019). Right to learn mathematics: From language as right to language as resource. In C. Xenofontos (Ed.), Equity in mathematics education. Addressing a changing world (pp. 93-110). Information Age Publishing.
– Planas, N., & Schütte, M. (2018). Research frameworks for the study of language in mathematics education, ZDM-Mathematics Education, 50(6), 965-974.
– Planas, N. (2018). Language as resource: A key notion for understanding the complexity of mathematics learning. Educational Studies in Mathematics, 98(3), 215-229.
– Planas, N., Morgan, C., & Schütte, M. (2018). Mathematics education and language. Lessons and directions from two decades of research. In T. Dreyfus, M. Artigue, S. Prediger, D. Potari, & Ruthven (Eds.), Developing research in mathematics education. Twenty years of communication, cooperation and collaboration in Europe (pp. 196-210). Routledge.
– Planas, N. (2014). One speaker, two languages: Learning opportunities in the mathematics classroom. Educational Studies in Mathematics, 87(1), 51-66.
– Planas, N., & Setati Phakeng, M. (2014). On the process of gaining language as a resource in mathematics education. ZDM-Mathematics Education, 46(6), 883-893.
– Planas, N., & Civil, M. (2013). Language-as-resource and language-as-political. Tensions in the bilingual mathematics classroom. Mathematics Education Research Journal, 25(3), 361-378.

 

https://portalrecerca.uab.cat/en/persons/nuria-planas-raig-3

https://orcid.org/0000-0001-5199-6336

 

Cindy works at the intersection of learning, design, and technology, with a keen interest in the orchestration of future-ready tech-enabled learning.

She is curious how the deployment of adaptive learning systems to schools will impact classroom learning and hopes to learn more about the human-machine partnership in education. Specifically, her research is concerned with the implications that the use of such systems has on teacher-student interactions, as teachers grapple with balancing personalised learning and learning in community, as well as curriculum demands and student interests. These are some tensions which could potentially be exacerbated by affordances of adaptive learning systems.

Prior to embarking on the DPhil in Education at Oxford, Cindy worked as the Lead Specialist in Technologies for Learning at the Educational Technology Division of Ministry of Education, Singapore. She had previously completed graduate studies at the National University of Singapore and Stanford University where she was awarded Master of Arts in English Studies and Master of Arts in Education.

Reem is DPhil student from Saudi Arabia.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she worked as a Teacher, Professional Developer, then, became a Supervisor and Researcher in the Ministry of Education where she received a scholarship to pursue her DPhil education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests lie in the area of Teacher Education and Professional Learning Policy and Practice.

Publications
  • Alqahtani, Reem (2020). Saudi Universities Role in Developing Teacher Professional Development Programs: Elite Universities Experience. Journal of Educational Sciences. King Saud University.
  • Alqahtani, Reem. (2020). The effect of implementing UDL-based activities in improving EFL learners’ academic achievement and attitudes towards L2. In L. Salas, & E. Ager, Creating Quiet reflective Spaces: Language Teacher Researches Professional Development (pp. 61-62). IATEFL publications.

Lena Zlock is researching the integration of digital technology into structures of teaching, learning, and education in higher education. Her particular focus is on the digital humanities and the potential for digital methods to transform humanistic study. She works with Professor Niall Winters and Dr. James Robson.

Lena’s research interests stem from her education as an M.St. student and Ertegun Graduate Scholar in Modern Languages at the University of Oxford, and as a B.A. student in History at Stanford University. As an undergraduate, she started the Voltaire Library Project, a digitally and data-driven study of the 6,763-book collection of French Enlightenment philosopher Voltaire (you can read more about the project here and here). She has been interested in the application of digital technology to humanistic teaching since her days in Princeton Day School, where she developed an interdisciplinary curriculum on Mexico City (visit the course website here).

Her research on Voltaire led her to think more broadly about the place of digital methods in the humanities classroom, and how new technologies will revolutionise the liberal arts and higher education. As a DPhil candidate, Lena will examine the negotiation and implementation of new learning technologies within the University of Oxford at undergraduate and graduate levels.

Lena is involved in a number of digital humanities initiatives in Oxford. She previously served as the inaugural fellow of the Voltaire Lab at Oxford’s Voltaire Foundation. As a master’s student, Lena co-formulated the convergence agenda for Oxford digital humanities with Professor Howard Hotson, and is currently employed by the Humanities Division to assist with the development of an M.St. degree in Digital Scholarship (read more here). Lena set up and helps to run the History of the Book blog for the Faculty of Medieval and Modern Languages and the Oxford Book History Twitter account.

Lena welcomes inquiries from undergraduate and postgraduate students from Oxford and beyond seeking to get involved with the digital humanities in any capacity. The History of the Book blog also welcomes inquiries from prospective contributors.

 

Abbey is a Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education, in collaboration with the Department of Engineering.

Before joining the DPhil program, Abbey obtained a B.A. in Applied Linguistics with minors in Russian and Chinese from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford. She was the recipient of a Benjamin A. Gilman International Scholarship through U.S. Department of State for study in Russia and was awarded two Foreign Language and Area Studies (FLAS) Fellowships for study in both Russia and China. She holds both TESOL and TEFL certificates and has taught English as a Second Language in various contexts to a wide variety of learner populations.

Abbey’s main research interests lie in the use of technology to facilitate language learning. Her DPhil research focuses on the development of a virtual reality program to bridge the gaps that students face when learning languages through distance learning.

Julie Chia-Yi Lin is a Doctoral student at the University of Oxford, funded by the Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholarship. Her research focus on Internationalization, Policy, Management and Institutional Strategy is rooted in her professional experience in publishing and higher education, as well as from her observations regarding the continuous change in global educational dynamics.

Julie completed her B.A. at National Taiwan University, and earned a joint M.A. from the University of Vienna and the University of Wroclaw. She was previously employed as an officer for the Office of International Affairs at National Taiwan University, and then as a Publisher at Emerald Publishing.

She focuses on the development of higher education, particularly in the processes of internationalization and globalization, and tries to deliver perspectives from different Institutional sectors, and a wide array of participants. She is mindful of the influence that culture has on the development and reception of these processes, and has a special interest in the East Asia region, and Confucian-influenced higher education systems. In her doctoral research, she investigates higher ed institutional strategy, and the relationship it has with real-world policy. This includes delving into the specific interpretation and implementation of official policy by different stakeholders within the institution- faculty, administration, and management.

Publications

Lin, J. (2015). The Impact of Globalization on Taiwan’s Education Policy: The International Student. In A. Lipinsky. (Ed), Vienna Taiwan Studies Series: Immigration societies, Taiwan and Beyond. (pp. 129-151). Vienna: LIT VERLAG GmbH & Co. KG

Yibo Wang has an MA in International Marketing from the Coventry University (UK) and a Master’s in Management: Leadership and Organizational Change from the University of Birmingham (UK).

His doctoral research focuses on ‘knowledge hiding’, ‘leadership style’ and ‘Confucian culture’ in Chinese education and training institutions.

As empirical studies on ‘knowledge hiding’ in the Chinese context are scarce, Yibo hopes to uncover underlying mechanism of knowledge hiding and find its potential influence factors.

Prior to coming to Oxford, he worked as a CEO in an educational consultancy based in Beijing that advised the investment and marketing analyses on education and training industry.

Riziki’s current DPhil research focuses on emergent literacy of refugee children within multilingual settings.

Prior to commencing her DPhil research, Riziki completed an MSc in Child Development at the University of Oxford, looking at the role of teacher behavioural and cognitive judgments on the learning trajectories of Black primary school students in England.

Her research interests are education access and wellbeing of children in resettlement and asylum contexts. In line with this, her research in the past has focused on integration and resettlement processes of refugees and immigrants within Canada.

Publications

Bhattacharyya, P., Ogoe, S., Riziki, A., & Wilkinson, L. (2020). In search of a “home”: comparing the housing challenges experienced by recently arrived Yazidi and Syrian Refugees in Canada. Manuscript submitted for publication.

Bhattacharyya, P., Riziki, A., Songose, L., Ogoe, S., & Wilkinson, L. (2020). Understanding the link between pre-arrival education and trauma and language learning: A case study of Yazidi women in Canada. Canadian Diversity, 17(2).

Bhattacharyya, P., Riziki, A., & Wilkinson, L. (2018). “Settlement Service Use among Syrian Refugees in Canada” Canadian Diversity 15(1).

Wilkinson, L., Bhattacharya, P., Garcea, J., Abdul-Karim, A., Riziki, A., & Schnieders, M. (2017). Finding home: Some housing considerations for refugee families with children. Canadian Diversity, 14 (3), 31-35

Wilkinson, L., Bhattacharyya, P., Riziki, A., & Abdul-Karim, A. (2018).Yazidi Refugee Resettlement in Canada. Calgary: Immigration Refugees and Citizenship Canada-Integration Branch (Prairies and Territories Region).

Wilkinson, L., Garcea, J., Bhattacharyya, P., Riziki, A., Abdul Karim, A. (2017). Resettling on the Canadian Prairies: Integration of Syrian refugees. Calgary: Immigration Refugees and Citizenship Canada, Integration Branch-Prairies., Northwest Territories Division., & Alberta Association of Immigrant Serving Agencies

Anushay completed her BSc Psychology from UCL, where she also started her master’s in Developmental Neuroscience and Psychopathology. She was based at Yale University for her master’s thesis, where she worked with Dr Craig Bailey at the Yale Center for Emotional Intelligence to understand children’s emotion development. Anushay’s research interests include understanding child development across different cultures, factors that might be affecting it, and devising culture-specific ways to support children’s holistic development through the educational system. She is also keen on improving the research scope in Pakistan by working with Pakistani researchers, practitioners, and families.

Anushay balances her research with her position as the founder of a non-profit, Resources for Children, which aims to understand and support children’s development in Pakistan.

Publications

  1. Mazhar, A. (2022, April). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Spring Preview, New Haven, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2021, December). Does an extended family improve mentalising in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK & Pakistan. 2nd International Foundation University Conference of Psychology, Rawalpindi, Pakistan.
  3. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Theory of Mind in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK and Pakistan. Harvard Trends in Psychology Summit, Cambridge, United States.
  1. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Research Rounds, New Haven, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2020, October). Developing a non-profit to advance autism research in Pakistan. Anna Freud Centre Seminar Series, London, United Kingdom

 

Núria is a Professor of Mathematics Education at Autonomous University of Barcelona. Her research is about language and mathematics in secondary school classrooms and professional development contexts with mathematics teachers.

Her first degree was in Mathematics at University of Barcelona (1995). Soon after her initiation as a secondary school mathematics teacher in highly multilingual classrooms of Barcelona, she started her PhD at the UAB Division of Mathematics Education. She wanted to understand the critical factors behind the under-performance in school mathematics of many learners from poor urban backgrounds and recent histories of migration. Since then, she has been committed to classroom and teacher education research grounded on community work with schools and mathematics teachers in urban areas of poverty. Her years as a school teacher have provided her with greater insights into her work as a researcher and have strongly influenced the adoption of sociocultural and sociopolitical approaches to mathematics teaching and learning.

Núria was given the ICREA Academia Award of the Catalan Institution for Research and Advanced Studies in 2013, in recognition of her contributions to research on multilingual mathematics teaching and learning. She was elected to the Executive Committee of the International Commission on Mathematical Instruction as Member-at-Large in 2021, and to the International Committee of the International Group for the Psychology of Mathematics Education from 2010 to 2014. She served as Extraordinarious Professor of Mathematics Education at the University of South Africa from 2013 to 2020. She was Visiting Scholar at London South Bank University, University of Arizona, and University of North Carolina at Chapel-Hill.

Núria is currently on the editorial board of the international journal Mathematics Education Research Journal and Journal of Mathematics Teacher Education. Till 2021 she was the editor-in-chief of the Advances of Research in Mathematics Education, the official journal of the Spanish Society of Research in Mathematics Education. She is the leading co-editor of a 2018 special issue on language research in mathematics education published in ZDM-Mathematics Education, and the leading co-editor of a special issue on decentring mathematics teaching education, to be published in the Journal of Mathematics Teacher Education, February 2024.

She chaired the 7th Topic Conference of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education on Language and Mathematics (Dresden, 2018), and the ERME Topic Working Group on Language and Mathematics from 2015 to 2020. The collaborations established in the ERME context enabled for a broad range of experts to come together and move forward the research field in the form of an co-edited Routledge volume entitled ‘Classroom research on mathematics and language: Seeing learners and teachers differently’ in 2021, with Núria as the leading co-editor. She has also been co-editor of the Springer volume resulting from the 21st ICMI Study on Language Diversity and Mathematics Education in 2016, and of the Brill volume entitled ‘Mathematical discourse that breaks barriers and creates space for marginalized learners’ in 2018.

Núria’s motivation for coming to the Oxford Department of Education is her research collaboration in projects co-coordinated with Jenni Ingram on establishing an international network for research on supporting school mathematics teaching with linguistically disadvantaged learners. From her years as a secondary school in the 1990s, important challenges posed to mathematics education practice remain. Learners of mathematics who are linguistically disadvantaged for a variety of reasons, including impoverished socioeconomic status, continue to be educationally disadvantaged at a considerable risk of school failure and early dropout. More research will hopefully shed light on how to identify and develop improved practices to enable greater access to school mathematics for all learners.

Publications

SELECTION OF 10 LAST-DECADE PUBLICATIONS
[For more publications and research details, see https://orcid.org/0000-0001-5199-6336]
– Planas, N., & Chronaki, A. (2021). Multilingual mathematics learning from a dialogic-translanguaging perspective. In N. Planas, C. Morgan, & M. Schütte (Eds.), Classroom research on mathematics and language: Seeing learners and teachers differently (pp. 151-166). Routledge.
– Planas, N. (2021). How specific can language as resource become for the teaching of algebraic concepts? ZDM-Mathematics Education, 53(2), 277-288.
– Planas, N. (2021). Challenges and opportunities from translingual research on multilingual mathematics classrooms. In A. A. Essien, & A. Msimanga (Eds.), Multilingual education yearbook 2021. Policy and practice in STEM multilingual contexts (pp. 1-18). Springer.
– Planas, N., & Ngoepe, M. (2019). Right to learn mathematics: From language as right to language as resource. In C. Xenofontos (Ed.), Equity in mathematics education. Addressing a changing world (pp. 93-110). Information Age Publishing.
– Planas, N., & Schütte, M. (2018). Research frameworks for the study of language in mathematics education, ZDM-Mathematics Education, 50(6), 965-974.
– Planas, N. (2018). Language as resource: A key notion for understanding the complexity of mathematics learning. Educational Studies in Mathematics, 98(3), 215-229.
– Planas, N., Morgan, C., & Schütte, M. (2018). Mathematics education and language. Lessons and directions from two decades of research. In T. Dreyfus, M. Artigue, S. Prediger, D. Potari, & Ruthven (Eds.), Developing research in mathematics education. Twenty years of communication, cooperation and collaboration in Europe (pp. 196-210). Routledge.
– Planas, N. (2014). One speaker, two languages: Learning opportunities in the mathematics classroom. Educational Studies in Mathematics, 87(1), 51-66.
– Planas, N., & Setati Phakeng, M. (2014). On the process of gaining language as a resource in mathematics education. ZDM-Mathematics Education, 46(6), 883-893.
– Planas, N., & Civil, M. (2013). Language-as-resource and language-as-political. Tensions in the bilingual mathematics classroom. Mathematics Education Research Journal, 25(3), 361-378.

 

https://portalrecerca.uab.cat/en/persons/nuria-planas-raig-3

https://orcid.org/0000-0001-5199-6336

 

Cindy works at the intersection of learning, design, and technology, with a keen interest in the orchestration of future-ready tech-enabled learning.

She is curious how the deployment of adaptive learning systems to schools will impact classroom learning and hopes to learn more about the human-machine partnership in education. Specifically, her research is concerned with the implications that the use of such systems has on teacher-student interactions, as teachers grapple with balancing personalised learning and learning in community, as well as curriculum demands and student interests. These are some tensions which could potentially be exacerbated by affordances of adaptive learning systems.

Prior to embarking on the DPhil in Education at Oxford, Cindy worked as the Lead Specialist in Technologies for Learning at the Educational Technology Division of Ministry of Education, Singapore. She had previously completed graduate studies at the National University of Singapore and Stanford University where she was awarded Master of Arts in English Studies and Master of Arts in Education.

Reem is DPhil student from Saudi Arabia.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she worked as a Teacher, Professional Developer, then, became a Supervisor and Researcher in the Ministry of Education where she received a scholarship to pursue her DPhil education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests lie in the area of Teacher Education and Professional Learning Policy and Practice.

Publications
  • Alqahtani, Reem (2020). Saudi Universities Role in Developing Teacher Professional Development Programs: Elite Universities Experience. Journal of Educational Sciences. King Saud University.
  • Alqahtani, Reem. (2020). The effect of implementing UDL-based activities in improving EFL learners’ academic achievement and attitudes towards L2. In L. Salas, & E. Ager, Creating Quiet reflective Spaces: Language Teacher Researches Professional Development (pp. 61-62). IATEFL publications.

Lena Zlock is researching the integration of digital technology into structures of teaching, learning, and education in higher education. Her particular focus is on the digital humanities and the potential for digital methods to transform humanistic study. She works with Professor Niall Winters and Dr. James Robson.

Lena’s research interests stem from her education as an M.St. student and Ertegun Graduate Scholar in Modern Languages at the University of Oxford, and as a B.A. student in History at Stanford University. As an undergraduate, she started the Voltaire Library Project, a digitally and data-driven study of the 6,763-book collection of French Enlightenment philosopher Voltaire (you can read more about the project here and here). She has been interested in the application of digital technology to humanistic teaching since her days in Princeton Day School, where she developed an interdisciplinary curriculum on Mexico City (visit the course website here).

Her research on Voltaire led her to think more broadly about the place of digital methods in the humanities classroom, and how new technologies will revolutionise the liberal arts and higher education. As a DPhil candidate, Lena will examine the negotiation and implementation of new learning technologies within the University of Oxford at undergraduate and graduate levels.

Lena is involved in a number of digital humanities initiatives in Oxford. She previously served as the inaugural fellow of the Voltaire Lab at Oxford’s Voltaire Foundation. As a master’s student, Lena co-formulated the convergence agenda for Oxford digital humanities with Professor Howard Hotson, and is currently employed by the Humanities Division to assist with the development of an M.St. degree in Digital Scholarship (read more here). Lena set up and helps to run the History of the Book blog for the Faculty of Medieval and Modern Languages and the Oxford Book History Twitter account.

Lena welcomes inquiries from undergraduate and postgraduate students from Oxford and beyond seeking to get involved with the digital humanities in any capacity. The History of the Book blog also welcomes inquiries from prospective contributors.

 

Abbey is a Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education, in collaboration with the Department of Engineering.

Before joining the DPhil program, Abbey obtained a B.A. in Applied Linguistics with minors in Russian and Chinese from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford. She was the recipient of a Benjamin A. Gilman International Scholarship through U.S. Department of State for study in Russia and was awarded two Foreign Language and Area Studies (FLAS) Fellowships for study in both Russia and China. She holds both TESOL and TEFL certificates and has taught English as a Second Language in various contexts to a wide variety of learner populations.

Abbey’s main research interests lie in the use of technology to facilitate language learning. Her DPhil research focuses on the development of a virtual reality program to bridge the gaps that students face when learning languages through distance learning.

Julie Chia-Yi Lin is a Doctoral student at the University of Oxford, funded by the Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholarship. Her research focus on Internationalization, Policy, Management and Institutional Strategy is rooted in her professional experience in publishing and higher education, as well as from her observations regarding the continuous change in global educational dynamics.

Julie completed her B.A. at National Taiwan University, and earned a joint M.A. from the University of Vienna and the University of Wroclaw. She was previously employed as an officer for the Office of International Affairs at National Taiwan University, and then as a Publisher at Emerald Publishing.

She focuses on the development of higher education, particularly in the processes of internationalization and globalization, and tries to deliver perspectives from different Institutional sectors, and a wide array of participants. She is mindful of the influence that culture has on the development and reception of these processes, and has a special interest in the East Asia region, and Confucian-influenced higher education systems. In her doctoral research, she investigates higher ed institutional strategy, and the relationship it has with real-world policy. This includes delving into the specific interpretation and implementation of official policy by different stakeholders within the institution- faculty, administration, and management.

Publications

Lin, J. (2015). The Impact of Globalization on Taiwan’s Education Policy: The International Student. In A. Lipinsky. (Ed), Vienna Taiwan Studies Series: Immigration societies, Taiwan and Beyond. (pp. 129-151). Vienna: LIT VERLAG GmbH & Co. KG

Yibo Wang has an MA in International Marketing from the Coventry University (UK) and a Master’s in Management: Leadership and Organizational Change from the University of Birmingham (UK).

His doctoral research focuses on ‘knowledge hiding’, ‘leadership style’ and ‘Confucian culture’ in Chinese education and training institutions.

As empirical studies on ‘knowledge hiding’ in the Chinese context are scarce, Yibo hopes to uncover underlying mechanism of knowledge hiding and find its potential influence factors.

Prior to coming to Oxford, he worked as a CEO in an educational consultancy based in Beijing that advised the investment and marketing analyses on education and training industry.

Riziki’s current DPhil research focuses on emergent literacy of refugee children within multilingual settings.

Prior to commencing her DPhil research, Riziki completed an MSc in Child Development at the University of Oxford, looking at the role of teacher behavioural and cognitive judgments on the learning trajectories of Black primary school students in England.

Her research interests are education access and wellbeing of children in resettlement and asylum contexts. In line with this, her research in the past has focused on integration and resettlement processes of refugees and immigrants within Canada.

Publications

Bhattacharyya, P., Ogoe, S., Riziki, A., & Wilkinson, L. (2020). In search of a “home”: comparing the housing challenges experienced by recently arrived Yazidi and Syrian Refugees in Canada. Manuscript submitted for publication.

Bhattacharyya, P., Riziki, A., Songose, L., Ogoe, S., & Wilkinson, L. (2020). Understanding the link between pre-arrival education and trauma and language learning: A case study of Yazidi women in Canada. Canadian Diversity, 17(2).

Bhattacharyya, P., Riziki, A., & Wilkinson, L. (2018). “Settlement Service Use among Syrian Refugees in Canada” Canadian Diversity 15(1).

Wilkinson, L., Bhattacharya, P., Garcea, J., Abdul-Karim, A., Riziki, A., & Schnieders, M. (2017). Finding home: Some housing considerations for refugee families with children. Canadian Diversity, 14 (3), 31-35

Wilkinson, L., Bhattacharyya, P., Riziki, A., & Abdul-Karim, A. (2018).Yazidi Refugee Resettlement in Canada. Calgary: Immigration Refugees and Citizenship Canada-Integration Branch (Prairies and Territories Region).

Wilkinson, L., Garcea, J., Bhattacharyya, P., Riziki, A., Abdul Karim, A. (2017). Resettling on the Canadian Prairies: Integration of Syrian refugees. Calgary: Immigration Refugees and Citizenship Canada, Integration Branch-Prairies., Northwest Territories Division., & Alberta Association of Immigrant Serving Agencies

Anushay completed her BSc Psychology from UCL, where she also started her master’s in Developmental Neuroscience and Psychopathology. She was based at Yale University for her master’s thesis, where she worked with Dr Craig Bailey at the Yale Center for Emotional Intelligence to understand children’s emotion development. Anushay’s research interests include understanding child development across different cultures, factors that might be affecting it, and devising culture-specific ways to support children’s holistic development through the educational system. She is also keen on improving the research scope in Pakistan by working with Pakistani researchers, practitioners, and families.

Anushay balances her research with her position as the founder of a non-profit, Resources for Children, which aims to understand and support children’s development in Pakistan.

Publications

  1. Mazhar, A. (2022, April). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Spring Preview, New Haven, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2021, December). Does an extended family improve mentalising in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK & Pakistan. 2nd International Foundation University Conference of Psychology, Rawalpindi, Pakistan.
  3. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Theory of Mind in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK and Pakistan. Harvard Trends in Psychology Summit, Cambridge, United States.
  1. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Research Rounds, New Haven, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2020, October). Developing a non-profit to advance autism research in Pakistan. Anna Freud Centre Seminar Series, London, United Kingdom

 

Núria is a Professor of Mathematics Education at Autonomous University of Barcelona. Her research is about language and mathematics in secondary school classrooms and professional development contexts with mathematics teachers.

Her first degree was in Mathematics at University of Barcelona (1995). Soon after her initiation as a secondary school mathematics teacher in highly multilingual classrooms of Barcelona, she started her PhD at the UAB Division of Mathematics Education. She wanted to understand the critical factors behind the under-performance in school mathematics of many learners from poor urban backgrounds and recent histories of migration. Since then, she has been committed to classroom and teacher education research grounded on community work with schools and mathematics teachers in urban areas of poverty. Her years as a school teacher have provided her with greater insights into her work as a researcher and have strongly influenced the adoption of sociocultural and sociopolitical approaches to mathematics teaching and learning.

Núria was given the ICREA Academia Award of the Catalan Institution for Research and Advanced Studies in 2013, in recognition of her contributions to research on multilingual mathematics teaching and learning. She was elected to the Executive Committee of the International Commission on Mathematical Instruction as Member-at-Large in 2021, and to the International Committee of the International Group for the Psychology of Mathematics Education from 2010 to 2014. She served as Extraordinarious Professor of Mathematics Education at the University of South Africa from 2013 to 2020. She was Visiting Scholar at London South Bank University, University of Arizona, and University of North Carolina at Chapel-Hill.

Núria is currently on the editorial board of the international journal Mathematics Education Research Journal and Journal of Mathematics Teacher Education. Till 2021 she was the editor-in-chief of the Advances of Research in Mathematics Education, the official journal of the Spanish Society of Research in Mathematics Education. She is the leading co-editor of a 2018 special issue on language research in mathematics education published in ZDM-Mathematics Education, and the leading co-editor of a special issue on decentring mathematics teaching education, to be published in the Journal of Mathematics Teacher Education, February 2024.

She chaired the 7th Topic Conference of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education on Language and Mathematics (Dresden, 2018), and the ERME Topic Working Group on Language and Mathematics from 2015 to 2020. The collaborations established in the ERME context enabled for a broad range of experts to come together and move forward the research field in the form of an co-edited Routledge volume entitled ‘Classroom research on mathematics and language: Seeing learners and teachers differently’ in 2021, with Núria as the leading co-editor. She has also been co-editor of the Springer volume resulting from the 21st ICMI Study on Language Diversity and Mathematics Education in 2016, and of the Brill volume entitled ‘Mathematical discourse that breaks barriers and creates space for marginalized learners’ in 2018.

Núria’s motivation for coming to the Oxford Department of Education is her research collaboration in projects co-coordinated with Jenni Ingram on establishing an international network for research on supporting school mathematics teaching with linguistically disadvantaged learners. From her years as a secondary school in the 1990s, important challenges posed to mathematics education practice remain. Learners of mathematics who are linguistically disadvantaged for a variety of reasons, including impoverished socioeconomic status, continue to be educationally disadvantaged at a considerable risk of school failure and early dropout. More research will hopefully shed light on how to identify and develop improved practices to enable greater access to school mathematics for all learners.

Publications

SELECTION OF 10 LAST-DECADE PUBLICATIONS
[For more publications and research details, see https://orcid.org/0000-0001-5199-6336]
– Planas, N., & Chronaki, A. (2021). Multilingual mathematics learning from a dialogic-translanguaging perspective. In N. Planas, C. Morgan, & M. Schütte (Eds.), Classroom research on mathematics and language: Seeing learners and teachers differently (pp. 151-166). Routledge.
– Planas, N. (2021). How specific can language as resource become for the teaching of algebraic concepts? ZDM-Mathematics Education, 53(2), 277-288.
– Planas, N. (2021). Challenges and opportunities from translingual research on multilingual mathematics classrooms. In A. A. Essien, & A. Msimanga (Eds.), Multilingual education yearbook 2021. Policy and practice in STEM multilingual contexts (pp. 1-18). Springer.
– Planas, N., & Ngoepe, M. (2019). Right to learn mathematics: From language as right to language as resource. In C. Xenofontos (Ed.), Equity in mathematics education. Addressing a changing world (pp. 93-110). Information Age Publishing.
– Planas, N., & Schütte, M. (2018). Research frameworks for the study of language in mathematics education, ZDM-Mathematics Education, 50(6), 965-974.
– Planas, N. (2018). Language as resource: A key notion for understanding the complexity of mathematics learning. Educational Studies in Mathematics, 98(3), 215-229.
– Planas, N., Morgan, C., & Schütte, M. (2018). Mathematics education and language. Lessons and directions from two decades of research. In T. Dreyfus, M. Artigue, S. Prediger, D. Potari, & Ruthven (Eds.), Developing research in mathematics education. Twenty years of communication, cooperation and collaboration in Europe (pp. 196-210). Routledge.
– Planas, N. (2014). One speaker, two languages: Learning opportunities in the mathematics classroom. Educational Studies in Mathematics, 87(1), 51-66.
– Planas, N., & Setati Phakeng, M. (2014). On the process of gaining language as a resource in mathematics education. ZDM-Mathematics Education, 46(6), 883-893.
– Planas, N., & Civil, M. (2013). Language-as-resource and language-as-political. Tensions in the bilingual mathematics classroom. Mathematics Education Research Journal, 25(3), 361-378.

 

https://portalrecerca.uab.cat/en/persons/nuria-planas-raig-3

https://orcid.org/0000-0001-5199-6336

 

Cindy works at the intersection of learning, design, and technology, with a keen interest in the orchestration of future-ready tech-enabled learning.

She is curious how the deployment of adaptive learning systems to schools will impact classroom learning and hopes to learn more about the human-machine partnership in education. Specifically, her research is concerned with the implications that the use of such systems has on teacher-student interactions, as teachers grapple with balancing personalised learning and learning in community, as well as curriculum demands and student interests. These are some tensions which could potentially be exacerbated by affordances of adaptive learning systems.

Prior to embarking on the DPhil in Education at Oxford, Cindy worked as the Lead Specialist in Technologies for Learning at the Educational Technology Division of Ministry of Education, Singapore. She had previously completed graduate studies at the National University of Singapore and Stanford University where she was awarded Master of Arts in English Studies and Master of Arts in Education.

Reem is DPhil student from Saudi Arabia.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she worked as a Teacher, Professional Developer, then, became a Supervisor and Researcher in the Ministry of Education where she received a scholarship to pursue her DPhil education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests lie in the area of Teacher Education and Professional Learning Policy and Practice.

Publications
  • Alqahtani, Reem (2020). Saudi Universities Role in Developing Teacher Professional Development Programs: Elite Universities Experience. Journal of Educational Sciences. King Saud University.
  • Alqahtani, Reem. (2020). The effect of implementing UDL-based activities in improving EFL learners’ academic achievement and attitudes towards L2. In L. Salas, & E. Ager, Creating Quiet reflective Spaces: Language Teacher Researches Professional Development (pp. 61-62). IATEFL publications.

Lena Zlock is researching the integration of digital technology into structures of teaching, learning, and education in higher education. Her particular focus is on the digital humanities and the potential for digital methods to transform humanistic study. She works with Professor Niall Winters and Dr. James Robson.

Lena’s research interests stem from her education as an M.St. student and Ertegun Graduate Scholar in Modern Languages at the University of Oxford, and as a B.A. student in History at Stanford University. As an undergraduate, she started the Voltaire Library Project, a digitally and data-driven study of the 6,763-book collection of French Enlightenment philosopher Voltaire (you can read more about the project here and here). She has been interested in the application of digital technology to humanistic teaching since her days in Princeton Day School, where she developed an interdisciplinary curriculum on Mexico City (visit the course website here).

Her research on Voltaire led her to think more broadly about the place of digital methods in the humanities classroom, and how new technologies will revolutionise the liberal arts and higher education. As a DPhil candidate, Lena will examine the negotiation and implementation of new learning technologies within the University of Oxford at undergraduate and graduate levels.

Lena is involved in a number of digital humanities initiatives in Oxford. She previously served as the inaugural fellow of the Voltaire Lab at Oxford’s Voltaire Foundation. As a master’s student, Lena co-formulated the convergence agenda for Oxford digital humanities with Professor Howard Hotson, and is currently employed by the Humanities Division to assist with the development of an M.St. degree in Digital Scholarship (read more here). Lena set up and helps to run the History of the Book blog for the Faculty of Medieval and Modern Languages and the Oxford Book History Twitter account.

Lena welcomes inquiries from undergraduate and postgraduate students from Oxford and beyond seeking to get involved with the digital humanities in any capacity. The History of the Book blog also welcomes inquiries from prospective contributors.

 

Abbey is a Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education, in collaboration with the Department of Engineering.

Before joining the DPhil program, Abbey obtained a B.A. in Applied Linguistics with minors in Russian and Chinese from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford. She was the recipient of a Benjamin A. Gilman International Scholarship through U.S. Department of State for study in Russia and was awarded two Foreign Language and Area Studies (FLAS) Fellowships for study in both Russia and China. She holds both TESOL and TEFL certificates and has taught English as a Second Language in various contexts to a wide variety of learner populations.

Abbey’s main research interests lie in the use of technology to facilitate language learning. Her DPhil research focuses on the development of a virtual reality program to bridge the gaps that students face when learning languages through distance learning.

Julie Chia-Yi Lin is a Doctoral student at the University of Oxford, funded by the Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholarship. Her research focus on Internationalization, Policy, Management and Institutional Strategy is rooted in her professional experience in publishing and higher education, as well as from her observations regarding the continuous change in global educational dynamics.

Julie completed her B.A. at National Taiwan University, and earned a joint M.A. from the University of Vienna and the University of Wroclaw. She was previously employed as an officer for the Office of International Affairs at National Taiwan University, and then as a Publisher at Emerald Publishing.

She focuses on the development of higher education, particularly in the processes of internationalization and globalization, and tries to deliver perspectives from different Institutional sectors, and a wide array of participants. She is mindful of the influence that culture has on the development and reception of these processes, and has a special interest in the East Asia region, and Confucian-influenced higher education systems. In her doctoral research, she investigates higher ed institutional strategy, and the relationship it has with real-world policy. This includes delving into the specific interpretation and implementation of official policy by different stakeholders within the institution- faculty, administration, and management.

Publications

Lin, J. (2015). The Impact of Globalization on Taiwan’s Education Policy: The International Student. In A. Lipinsky. (Ed), Vienna Taiwan Studies Series: Immigration societies, Taiwan and Beyond. (pp. 129-151). Vienna: LIT VERLAG GmbH & Co. KG

Yibo Wang has an MA in International Marketing from the Coventry University (UK) and a Master’s in Management: Leadership and Organizational Change from the University of Birmingham (UK).

His doctoral research focuses on ‘knowledge hiding’, ‘leadership style’ and ‘Confucian culture’ in Chinese education and training institutions.

As empirical studies on ‘knowledge hiding’ in the Chinese context are scarce, Yibo hopes to uncover underlying mechanism of knowledge hiding and find its potential influence factors.

Prior to coming to Oxford, he worked as a CEO in an educational consultancy based in Beijing that advised the investment and marketing analyses on education and training industry.

Riziki’s current DPhil research focuses on emergent literacy of refugee children within multilingual settings.

Prior to commencing her DPhil research, Riziki completed an MSc in Child Development at the University of Oxford, looking at the role of teacher behavioural and cognitive judgments on the learning trajectories of Black primary school students in England.

Her research interests are education access and wellbeing of children in resettlement and asylum contexts. In line with this, her research in the past has focused on integration and resettlement processes of refugees and immigrants within Canada.

Publications

Bhattacharyya, P., Ogoe, S., Riziki, A., & Wilkinson, L. (2020). In search of a “home”: comparing the housing challenges experienced by recently arrived Yazidi and Syrian Refugees in Canada. Manuscript submitted for publication.

Bhattacharyya, P., Riziki, A., Songose, L., Ogoe, S., & Wilkinson, L. (2020). Understanding the link between pre-arrival education and trauma and language learning: A case study of Yazidi women in Canada. Canadian Diversity, 17(2).

Bhattacharyya, P., Riziki, A., & Wilkinson, L. (2018). “Settlement Service Use among Syrian Refugees in Canada” Canadian Diversity 15(1).

Wilkinson, L., Bhattacharya, P., Garcea, J., Abdul-Karim, A., Riziki, A., & Schnieders, M. (2017). Finding home: Some housing considerations for refugee families with children. Canadian Diversity, 14 (3), 31-35

Wilkinson, L., Bhattacharyya, P., Riziki, A., & Abdul-Karim, A. (2018).Yazidi Refugee Resettlement in Canada. Calgary: Immigration Refugees and Citizenship Canada-Integration Branch (Prairies and Territories Region).

Wilkinson, L., Garcea, J., Bhattacharyya, P., Riziki, A., Abdul Karim, A. (2017). Resettling on the Canadian Prairies: Integration of Syrian refugees. Calgary: Immigration Refugees and Citizenship Canada, Integration Branch-Prairies., Northwest Territories Division., & Alberta Association of Immigrant Serving Agencies

Anushay completed her BSc Psychology from UCL, where she also started her master’s in Developmental Neuroscience and Psychopathology. She was based at Yale University for her master’s thesis, where she worked with Dr Craig Bailey at the Yale Center for Emotional Intelligence to understand children’s emotion development. Anushay’s research interests include understanding child development across different cultures, factors that might be affecting it, and devising culture-specific ways to support children’s holistic development through the educational system. She is also keen on improving the research scope in Pakistan by working with Pakistani researchers, practitioners, and families.

Anushay balances her research with her position as the founder of a non-profit, Resources for Children, which aims to understand and support children’s development in Pakistan.

Publications

  1. Mazhar, A. (2022, April). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Spring Preview, New Haven, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2021, December). Does an extended family improve mentalising in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK & Pakistan. 2nd International Foundation University Conference of Psychology, Rawalpindi, Pakistan.
  3. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Theory of Mind in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK and Pakistan. Harvard Trends in Psychology Summit, Cambridge, United States.
  1. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Research Rounds, New Haven, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2020, October). Developing a non-profit to advance autism research in Pakistan. Anna Freud Centre Seminar Series, London, United Kingdom

 

Núria is a Professor of Mathematics Education at Autonomous University of Barcelona. Her research is about language and mathematics in secondary school classrooms and professional development contexts with mathematics teachers.

Her first degree was in Mathematics at University of Barcelona (1995). Soon after her initiation as a secondary school mathematics teacher in highly multilingual classrooms of Barcelona, she started her PhD at the UAB Division of Mathematics Education. She wanted to understand the critical factors behind the under-performance in school mathematics of many learners from poor urban backgrounds and recent histories of migration. Since then, she has been committed to classroom and teacher education research grounded on community work with schools and mathematics teachers in urban areas of poverty. Her years as a school teacher have provided her with greater insights into her work as a researcher and have strongly influenced the adoption of sociocultural and sociopolitical approaches to mathematics teaching and learning.

Núria was given the ICREA Academia Award of the Catalan Institution for Research and Advanced Studies in 2013, in recognition of her contributions to research on multilingual mathematics teaching and learning. She was elected to the Executive Committee of the International Commission on Mathematical Instruction as Member-at-Large in 2021, and to the International Committee of the International Group for the Psychology of Mathematics Education from 2010 to 2014. She served as Extraordinarious Professor of Mathematics Education at the University of South Africa from 2013 to 2020. She was Visiting Scholar at London South Bank University, University of Arizona, and University of North Carolina at Chapel-Hill.

Núria is currently on the editorial board of the international journal Mathematics Education Research Journal and Journal of Mathematics Teacher Education. Till 2021 she was the editor-in-chief of the Advances of Research in Mathematics Education, the official journal of the Spanish Society of Research in Mathematics Education. She is the leading co-editor of a 2018 special issue on language research in mathematics education published in ZDM-Mathematics Education, and the leading co-editor of a special issue on decentring mathematics teaching education, to be published in the Journal of Mathematics Teacher Education, February 2024.

She chaired the 7th Topic Conference of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education on Language and Mathematics (Dresden, 2018), and the ERME Topic Working Group on Language and Mathematics from 2015 to 2020. The collaborations established in the ERME context enabled for a broad range of experts to come together and move forward the research field in the form of an co-edited Routledge volume entitled ‘Classroom research on mathematics and language: Seeing learners and teachers differently’ in 2021, with Núria as the leading co-editor. She has also been co-editor of the Springer volume resulting from the 21st ICMI Study on Language Diversity and Mathematics Education in 2016, and of the Brill volume entitled ‘Mathematical discourse that breaks barriers and creates space for marginalized learners’ in 2018.

Núria’s motivation for coming to the Oxford Department of Education is her research collaboration in projects co-coordinated with Jenni Ingram on establishing an international network for research on supporting school mathematics teaching with linguistically disadvantaged learners. From her years as a secondary school in the 1990s, important challenges posed to mathematics education practice remain. Learners of mathematics who are linguistically disadvantaged for a variety of reasons, including impoverished socioeconomic status, continue to be educationally disadvantaged at a considerable risk of school failure and early dropout. More research will hopefully shed light on how to identify and develop improved practices to enable greater access to school mathematics for all learners.

Publications

SELECTION OF 10 LAST-DECADE PUBLICATIONS
[For more publications and research details, see https://orcid.org/0000-0001-5199-6336]
– Planas, N., & Chronaki, A. (2021). Multilingual mathematics learning from a dialogic-translanguaging perspective. In N. Planas, C. Morgan, & M. Schütte (Eds.), Classroom research on mathematics and language: Seeing learners and teachers differently (pp. 151-166). Routledge.
– Planas, N. (2021). How specific can language as resource become for the teaching of algebraic concepts? ZDM-Mathematics Education, 53(2), 277-288.
– Planas, N. (2021). Challenges and opportunities from translingual research on multilingual mathematics classrooms. In A. A. Essien, & A. Msimanga (Eds.), Multilingual education yearbook 2021. Policy and practice in STEM multilingual contexts (pp. 1-18). Springer.
– Planas, N., & Ngoepe, M. (2019). Right to learn mathematics: From language as right to language as resource. In C. Xenofontos (Ed.), Equity in mathematics education. Addressing a changing world (pp. 93-110). Information Age Publishing.
– Planas, N., & Schütte, M. (2018). Research frameworks for the study of language in mathematics education, ZDM-Mathematics Education, 50(6), 965-974.
– Planas, N. (2018). Language as resource: A key notion for understanding the complexity of mathematics learning. Educational Studies in Mathematics, 98(3), 215-229.
– Planas, N., Morgan, C., & Schütte, M. (2018). Mathematics education and language. Lessons and directions from two decades of research. In T. Dreyfus, M. Artigue, S. Prediger, D. Potari, & Ruthven (Eds.), Developing research in mathematics education. Twenty years of communication, cooperation and collaboration in Europe (pp. 196-210). Routledge.
– Planas, N. (2014). One speaker, two languages: Learning opportunities in the mathematics classroom. Educational Studies in Mathematics, 87(1), 51-66.
– Planas, N., & Setati Phakeng, M. (2014). On the process of gaining language as a resource in mathematics education. ZDM-Mathematics Education, 46(6), 883-893.
– Planas, N., & Civil, M. (2013). Language-as-resource and language-as-political. Tensions in the bilingual mathematics classroom. Mathematics Education Research Journal, 25(3), 361-378.

 

https://portalrecerca.uab.cat/en/persons/nuria-planas-raig-3

https://orcid.org/0000-0001-5199-6336

 

Cindy works at the intersection of learning, design, and technology, with a keen interest in the orchestration of future-ready tech-enabled learning.

She is curious how the deployment of adaptive learning systems to schools will impact classroom learning and hopes to learn more about the human-machine partnership in education. Specifically, her research is concerned with the implications that the use of such systems has on teacher-student interactions, as teachers grapple with balancing personalised learning and learning in community, as well as curriculum demands and student interests. These are some tensions which could potentially be exacerbated by affordances of adaptive learning systems.

Prior to embarking on the DPhil in Education at Oxford, Cindy worked as the Lead Specialist in Technologies for Learning at the Educational Technology Division of Ministry of Education, Singapore. She had previously completed graduate studies at the National University of Singapore and Stanford University where she was awarded Master of Arts in English Studies and Master of Arts in Education.

Reem is DPhil student from Saudi Arabia.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she worked as a Teacher, Professional Developer, then, became a Supervisor and Researcher in the Ministry of Education where she received a scholarship to pursue her DPhil education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests lie in the area of Teacher Education and Professional Learning Policy and Practice.

Publications
  • Alqahtani, Reem (2020). Saudi Universities Role in Developing Teacher Professional Development Programs: Elite Universities Experience. Journal of Educational Sciences. King Saud University.
  • Alqahtani, Reem. (2020). The effect of implementing UDL-based activities in improving EFL learners’ academic achievement and attitudes towards L2. In L. Salas, & E. Ager, Creating Quiet reflective Spaces: Language Teacher Researches Professional Development (pp. 61-62). IATEFL publications.

Lena Zlock is researching the integration of digital technology into structures of teaching, learning, and education in higher education. Her particular focus is on the digital humanities and the potential for digital methods to transform humanistic study. She works with Professor Niall Winters and Dr. James Robson.

Lena’s research interests stem from her education as an M.St. student and Ertegun Graduate Scholar in Modern Languages at the University of Oxford, and as a B.A. student in History at Stanford University. As an undergraduate, she started the Voltaire Library Project, a digitally and data-driven study of the 6,763-book collection of French Enlightenment philosopher Voltaire (you can read more about the project here and here). She has been interested in the application of digital technology to humanistic teaching since her days in Princeton Day School, where she developed an interdisciplinary curriculum on Mexico City (visit the course website here).

Her research on Voltaire led her to think more broadly about the place of digital methods in the humanities classroom, and how new technologies will revolutionise the liberal arts and higher education. As a DPhil candidate, Lena will examine the negotiation and implementation of new learning technologies within the University of Oxford at undergraduate and graduate levels.

Lena is involved in a number of digital humanities initiatives in Oxford. She previously served as the inaugural fellow of the Voltaire Lab at Oxford’s Voltaire Foundation. As a master’s student, Lena co-formulated the convergence agenda for Oxford digital humanities with Professor Howard Hotson, and is currently employed by the Humanities Division to assist with the development of an M.St. degree in Digital Scholarship (read more here). Lena set up and helps to run the History of the Book blog for the Faculty of Medieval and Modern Languages and the Oxford Book History Twitter account.

Lena welcomes inquiries from undergraduate and postgraduate students from Oxford and beyond seeking to get involved with the digital humanities in any capacity. The History of the Book blog also welcomes inquiries from prospective contributors.

 

Abbey is a Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education, in collaboration with the Department of Engineering.

Before joining the DPhil program, Abbey obtained a B.A. in Applied Linguistics with minors in Russian and Chinese from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford. She was the recipient of a Benjamin A. Gilman International Scholarship through U.S. Department of State for study in Russia and was awarded two Foreign Language and Area Studies (FLAS) Fellowships for study in both Russia and China. She holds both TESOL and TEFL certificates and has taught English as a Second Language in various contexts to a wide variety of learner populations.

Abbey’s main research interests lie in the use of technology to facilitate language learning. Her DPhil research focuses on the development of a virtual reality program to bridge the gaps that students face when learning languages through distance learning.

Julie Chia-Yi Lin is a Doctoral student at the University of Oxford, funded by the Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholarship. Her research focus on Internationalization, Policy, Management and Institutional Strategy is rooted in her professional experience in publishing and higher education, as well as from her observations regarding the continuous change in global educational dynamics.

Julie completed her B.A. at National Taiwan University, and earned a joint M.A. from the University of Vienna and the University of Wroclaw. She was previously employed as an officer for the Office of International Affairs at National Taiwan University, and then as a Publisher at Emerald Publishing.

She focuses on the development of higher education, particularly in the processes of internationalization and globalization, and tries to deliver perspectives from different Institutional sectors, and a wide array of participants. She is mindful of the influence that culture has on the development and reception of these processes, and has a special interest in the East Asia region, and Confucian-influenced higher education systems. In her doctoral research, she investigates higher ed institutional strategy, and the relationship it has with real-world policy. This includes delving into the specific interpretation and implementation of official policy by different stakeholders within the institution- faculty, administration, and management.

Publications

Lin, J. (2015). The Impact of Globalization on Taiwan’s Education Policy: The International Student. In A. Lipinsky. (Ed), Vienna Taiwan Studies Series: Immigration societies, Taiwan and Beyond. (pp. 129-151). Vienna: LIT VERLAG GmbH & Co. KG

Yibo Wang has an MA in International Marketing from the Coventry University (UK) and a Master’s in Management: Leadership and Organizational Change from the University of Birmingham (UK).

His doctoral research focuses on ‘knowledge hiding’, ‘leadership style’ and ‘Confucian culture’ in Chinese education and training institutions.

As empirical studies on ‘knowledge hiding’ in the Chinese context are scarce, Yibo hopes to uncover underlying mechanism of knowledge hiding and find its potential influence factors.

Prior to coming to Oxford, he worked as a CEO in an educational consultancy based in Beijing that advised the investment and marketing analyses on education and training industry.

Riziki’s current DPhil research focuses on emergent literacy of refugee children within multilingual settings.

Prior to commencing her DPhil research, Riziki completed an MSc in Child Development at the University of Oxford, looking at the role of teacher behavioural and cognitive judgments on the learning trajectories of Black primary school students in England.

Her research interests are education access and wellbeing of children in resettlement and asylum contexts. In line with this, her research in the past has focused on integration and resettlement processes of refugees and immigrants within Canada.

Publications

Bhattacharyya, P., Ogoe, S., Riziki, A., & Wilkinson, L. (2020). In search of a “home”: comparing the housing challenges experienced by recently arrived Yazidi and Syrian Refugees in Canada. Manuscript submitted for publication.

Bhattacharyya, P., Riziki, A., Songose, L., Ogoe, S., & Wilkinson, L. (2020). Understanding the link between pre-arrival education and trauma and language learning: A case study of Yazidi women in Canada. Canadian Diversity, 17(2).

Bhattacharyya, P., Riziki, A., & Wilkinson, L. (2018). “Settlement Service Use among Syrian Refugees in Canada” Canadian Diversity 15(1).

Wilkinson, L., Bhattacharya, P., Garcea, J., Abdul-Karim, A., Riziki, A., & Schnieders, M. (2017). Finding home: Some housing considerations for refugee families with children. Canadian Diversity, 14 (3), 31-35

Wilkinson, L., Bhattacharyya, P., Riziki, A., & Abdul-Karim, A. (2018).Yazidi Refugee Resettlement in Canada. Calgary: Immigration Refugees and Citizenship Canada-Integration Branch (Prairies and Territories Region).

Wilkinson, L., Garcea, J., Bhattacharyya, P., Riziki, A., Abdul Karim, A. (2017). Resettling on the Canadian Prairies: Integration of Syrian refugees. Calgary: Immigration Refugees and Citizenship Canada, Integration Branch-Prairies., Northwest Territories Division., & Alberta Association of Immigrant Serving Agencies

Anushay completed her BSc Psychology from UCL, where she also started her master’s in Developmental Neuroscience and Psychopathology. She was based at Yale University for her master’s thesis, where she worked with Dr Craig Bailey at the Yale Center for Emotional Intelligence to understand children’s emotion development. Anushay’s research interests include understanding child development across different cultures, factors that might be affecting it, and devising culture-specific ways to support children’s holistic development through the educational system. She is also keen on improving the research scope in Pakistan by working with Pakistani researchers, practitioners, and families.

Anushay balances her research with her position as the founder of a non-profit, Resources for Children, which aims to understand and support children’s development in Pakistan.

Publications

  1. Mazhar, A. (2022, April). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Spring Preview, New Haven, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2021, December). Does an extended family improve mentalising in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK & Pakistan. 2nd International Foundation University Conference of Psychology, Rawalpindi, Pakistan.
  3. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Theory of Mind in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK and Pakistan. Harvard Trends in Psychology Summit, Cambridge, United States.
  1. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Research Rounds, New Haven, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2020, October). Developing a non-profit to advance autism research in Pakistan. Anna Freud Centre Seminar Series, London, United Kingdom

 

Núria is a Professor of Mathematics Education at Autonomous University of Barcelona. Her research is about language and mathematics in secondary school classrooms and professional development contexts with mathematics teachers.

Her first degree was in Mathematics at University of Barcelona (1995). Soon after her initiation as a secondary school mathematics teacher in highly multilingual classrooms of Barcelona, she started her PhD at the UAB Division of Mathematics Education. She wanted to understand the critical factors behind the under-performance in school mathematics of many learners from poor urban backgrounds and recent histories of migration. Since then, she has been committed to classroom and teacher education research grounded on community work with schools and mathematics teachers in urban areas of poverty. Her years as a school teacher have provided her with greater insights into her work as a researcher and have strongly influenced the adoption of sociocultural and sociopolitical approaches to mathematics teaching and learning.

Núria was given the ICREA Academia Award of the Catalan Institution for Research and Advanced Studies in 2013, in recognition of her contributions to research on multilingual mathematics teaching and learning. She was elected to the Executive Committee of the International Commission on Mathematical Instruction as Member-at-Large in 2021, and to the International Committee of the International Group for the Psychology of Mathematics Education from 2010 to 2014. She served as Extraordinarious Professor of Mathematics Education at the University of South Africa from 2013 to 2020. She was Visiting Scholar at London South Bank University, University of Arizona, and University of North Carolina at Chapel-Hill.

Núria is currently on the editorial board of the international journal Mathematics Education Research Journal and Journal of Mathematics Teacher Education. Till 2021 she was the editor-in-chief of the Advances of Research in Mathematics Education, the official journal of the Spanish Society of Research in Mathematics Education. She is the leading co-editor of a 2018 special issue on language research in mathematics education published in ZDM-Mathematics Education, and the leading co-editor of a special issue on decentring mathematics teaching education, to be published in the Journal of Mathematics Teacher Education, February 2024.

She chaired the 7th Topic Conference of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education on Language and Mathematics (Dresden, 2018), and the ERME Topic Working Group on Language and Mathematics from 2015 to 2020. The collaborations established in the ERME context enabled for a broad range of experts to come together and move forward the research field in the form of an co-edited Routledge volume entitled ‘Classroom research on mathematics and language: Seeing learners and teachers differently’ in 2021, with Núria as the leading co-editor. She has also been co-editor of the Springer volume resulting from the 21st ICMI Study on Language Diversity and Mathematics Education in 2016, and of the Brill volume entitled ‘Mathematical discourse that breaks barriers and creates space for marginalized learners’ in 2018.

Núria’s motivation for coming to the Oxford Department of Education is her research collaboration in projects co-coordinated with Jenni Ingram on establishing an international network for research on supporting school mathematics teaching with linguistically disadvantaged learners. From her years as a secondary school in the 1990s, important challenges posed to mathematics education practice remain. Learners of mathematics who are linguistically disadvantaged for a variety of reasons, including impoverished socioeconomic status, continue to be educationally disadvantaged at a considerable risk of school failure and early dropout. More research will hopefully shed light on how to identify and develop improved practices to enable greater access to school mathematics for all learners.

Publications

SELECTION OF 10 LAST-DECADE PUBLICATIONS
[For more publications and research details, see https://orcid.org/0000-0001-5199-6336]
– Planas, N., & Chronaki, A. (2021). Multilingual mathematics learning from a dialogic-translanguaging perspective. In N. Planas, C. Morgan, & M. Schütte (Eds.), Classroom research on mathematics and language: Seeing learners and teachers differently (pp. 151-166). Routledge.
– Planas, N. (2021). How specific can language as resource become for the teaching of algebraic concepts? ZDM-Mathematics Education, 53(2), 277-288.
– Planas, N. (2021). Challenges and opportunities from translingual research on multilingual mathematics classrooms. In A. A. Essien, & A. Msimanga (Eds.), Multilingual education yearbook 2021. Policy and practice in STEM multilingual contexts (pp. 1-18). Springer.
– Planas, N., & Ngoepe, M. (2019). Right to learn mathematics: From language as right to language as resource. In C. Xenofontos (Ed.), Equity in mathematics education. Addressing a changing world (pp. 93-110). Information Age Publishing.
– Planas, N., & Schütte, M. (2018). Research frameworks for the study of language in mathematics education, ZDM-Mathematics Education, 50(6), 965-974.
– Planas, N. (2018). Language as resource: A key notion for understanding the complexity of mathematics learning. Educational Studies in Mathematics, 98(3), 215-229.
– Planas, N., Morgan, C., & Schütte, M. (2018). Mathematics education and language. Lessons and directions from two decades of research. In T. Dreyfus, M. Artigue, S. Prediger, D. Potari, & Ruthven (Eds.), Developing research in mathematics education. Twenty years of communication, cooperation and collaboration in Europe (pp. 196-210). Routledge.
– Planas, N. (2014). One speaker, two languages: Learning opportunities in the mathematics classroom. Educational Studies in Mathematics, 87(1), 51-66.
– Planas, N., & Setati Phakeng, M. (2014). On the process of gaining language as a resource in mathematics education. ZDM-Mathematics Education, 46(6), 883-893.
– Planas, N., & Civil, M. (2013). Language-as-resource and language-as-political. Tensions in the bilingual mathematics classroom. Mathematics Education Research Journal, 25(3), 361-378.

 

https://portalrecerca.uab.cat/en/persons/nuria-planas-raig-3

https://orcid.org/0000-0001-5199-6336

 

Cindy works at the intersection of learning, design, and technology, with a keen interest in the orchestration of future-ready tech-enabled learning.

She is curious how the deployment of adaptive learning systems to schools will impact classroom learning and hopes to learn more about the human-machine partnership in education. Specifically, her research is concerned with the implications that the use of such systems has on teacher-student interactions, as teachers grapple with balancing personalised learning and learning in community, as well as curriculum demands and student interests. These are some tensions which could potentially be exacerbated by affordances of adaptive learning systems.

Prior to embarking on the DPhil in Education at Oxford, Cindy worked as the Lead Specialist in Technologies for Learning at the Educational Technology Division of Ministry of Education, Singapore. She had previously completed graduate studies at the National University of Singapore and Stanford University where she was awarded Master of Arts in English Studies and Master of Arts in Education.

Reem is DPhil student from Saudi Arabia.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she worked as a Teacher, Professional Developer, then, became a Supervisor and Researcher in the Ministry of Education where she received a scholarship to pursue her DPhil education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests lie in the area of Teacher Education and Professional Learning Policy and Practice.

Publications
  • Alqahtani, Reem (2020). Saudi Universities Role in Developing Teacher Professional Development Programs: Elite Universities Experience. Journal of Educational Sciences. King Saud University.
  • Alqahtani, Reem. (2020). The effect of implementing UDL-based activities in improving EFL learners’ academic achievement and attitudes towards L2. In L. Salas, & E. Ager, Creating Quiet reflective Spaces: Language Teacher Researches Professional Development (pp. 61-62). IATEFL publications.

Lena Zlock is researching the integration of digital technology into structures of teaching, learning, and education in higher education. Her particular focus is on the digital humanities and the potential for digital methods to transform humanistic study. She works with Professor Niall Winters and Dr. James Robson.

Lena’s research interests stem from her education as an M.St. student and Ertegun Graduate Scholar in Modern Languages at the University of Oxford, and as a B.A. student in History at Stanford University. As an undergraduate, she started the Voltaire Library Project, a digitally and data-driven study of the 6,763-book collection of French Enlightenment philosopher Voltaire (you can read more about the project here and here). She has been interested in the application of digital technology to humanistic teaching since her days in Princeton Day School, where she developed an interdisciplinary curriculum on Mexico City (visit the course website here).

Her research on Voltaire led her to think more broadly about the place of digital methods in the humanities classroom, and how new technologies will revolutionise the liberal arts and higher education. As a DPhil candidate, Lena will examine the negotiation and implementation of new learning technologies within the University of Oxford at undergraduate and graduate levels.

Lena is involved in a number of digital humanities initiatives in Oxford. She previously served as the inaugural fellow of the Voltaire Lab at Oxford’s Voltaire Foundation. As a master’s student, Lena co-formulated the convergence agenda for Oxford digital humanities with Professor Howard Hotson, and is currently employed by the Humanities Division to assist with the development of an M.St. degree in Digital Scholarship (read more here). Lena set up and helps to run the History of the Book blog for the Faculty of Medieval and Modern Languages and the Oxford Book History Twitter account.

Lena welcomes inquiries from undergraduate and postgraduate students from Oxford and beyond seeking to get involved with the digital humanities in any capacity. The History of the Book blog also welcomes inquiries from prospective contributors.

 

Abbey is a Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education, in collaboration with the Department of Engineering.

Before joining the DPhil program, Abbey obtained a B.A. in Applied Linguistics with minors in Russian and Chinese from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford. She was the recipient of a Benjamin A. Gilman International Scholarship through U.S. Department of State for study in Russia and was awarded two Foreign Language and Area Studies (FLAS) Fellowships for study in both Russia and China. She holds both TESOL and TEFL certificates and has taught English as a Second Language in various contexts to a wide variety of learner populations.

Abbey’s main research interests lie in the use of technology to facilitate language learning. Her DPhil research focuses on the development of a virtual reality program to bridge the gaps that students face when learning languages through distance learning.

Julie Chia-Yi Lin is a Doctoral student at the University of Oxford, funded by the Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholarship. Her research focus on Internationalization, Policy, Management and Institutional Strategy is rooted in her professional experience in publishing and higher education, as well as from her observations regarding the continuous change in global educational dynamics.

Julie completed her B.A. at National Taiwan University, and earned a joint M.A. from the University of Vienna and the University of Wroclaw. She was previously employed as an officer for the Office of International Affairs at National Taiwan University, and then as a Publisher at Emerald Publishing.

She focuses on the development of higher education, particularly in the processes of internationalization and globalization, and tries to deliver perspectives from different Institutional sectors, and a wide array of participants. She is mindful of the influence that culture has on the development and reception of these processes, and has a special interest in the East Asia region, and Confucian-influenced higher education systems. In her doctoral research, she investigates higher ed institutional strategy, and the relationship it has with real-world policy. This includes delving into the specific interpretation and implementation of official policy by different stakeholders within the institution- faculty, administration, and management.

Publications

Lin, J. (2015). The Impact of Globalization on Taiwan’s Education Policy: The International Student. In A. Lipinsky. (Ed), Vienna Taiwan Studies Series: Immigration societies, Taiwan and Beyond. (pp. 129-151). Vienna: LIT VERLAG GmbH & Co. KG

Yibo Wang has an MA in International Marketing from the Coventry University (UK) and a Master’s in Management: Leadership and Organizational Change from the University of Birmingham (UK).

His doctoral research focuses on ‘knowledge hiding’, ‘leadership style’ and ‘Confucian culture’ in Chinese education and training institutions.

As empirical studies on ‘knowledge hiding’ in the Chinese context are scarce, Yibo hopes to uncover underlying mechanism of knowledge hiding and find its potential influence factors.

Prior to coming to Oxford, he worked as a CEO in an educational consultancy based in Beijing that advised the investment and marketing analyses on education and training industry.

Riziki’s current DPhil research focuses on emergent literacy of refugee children within multilingual settings.

Prior to commencing her DPhil research, Riziki completed an MSc in Child Development at the University of Oxford, looking at the role of teacher behavioural and cognitive judgments on the learning trajectories of Black primary school students in England.

Her research interests are education access and wellbeing of children in resettlement and asylum contexts. In line with this, her research in the past has focused on integration and resettlement processes of refugees and immigrants within Canada.

Publications

Bhattacharyya, P., Ogoe, S., Riziki, A., & Wilkinson, L. (2020). In search of a “home”: comparing the housing challenges experienced by recently arrived Yazidi and Syrian Refugees in Canada. Manuscript submitted for publication.

Bhattacharyya, P., Riziki, A., Songose, L., Ogoe, S., & Wilkinson, L. (2020). Understanding the link between pre-arrival education and trauma and language learning: A case study of Yazidi women in Canada. Canadian Diversity, 17(2).

Bhattacharyya, P., Riziki, A., & Wilkinson, L. (2018). “Settlement Service Use among Syrian Refugees in Canada” Canadian Diversity 15(1).

Wilkinson, L., Bhattacharya, P., Garcea, J., Abdul-Karim, A., Riziki, A., & Schnieders, M. (2017). Finding home: Some housing considerations for refugee families with children. Canadian Diversity, 14 (3), 31-35

Wilkinson, L., Bhattacharyya, P., Riziki, A., & Abdul-Karim, A. (2018).Yazidi Refugee Resettlement in Canada. Calgary: Immigration Refugees and Citizenship Canada-Integration Branch (Prairies and Territories Region).

Wilkinson, L., Garcea, J., Bhattacharyya, P., Riziki, A., Abdul Karim, A. (2017). Resettling on the Canadian Prairies: Integration of Syrian refugees. Calgary: Immigration Refugees and Citizenship Canada, Integration Branch-Prairies., Northwest Territories Division., & Alberta Association of Immigrant Serving Agencies

Anushay completed her BSc Psychology from UCL, where she also started her master’s in Developmental Neuroscience and Psychopathology. She was based at Yale University for her master’s thesis, where she worked with Dr Craig Bailey at the Yale Center for Emotional Intelligence to understand children’s emotion development. Anushay’s research interests include understanding child development across different cultures, factors that might be affecting it, and devising culture-specific ways to support children’s holistic development through the educational system. She is also keen on improving the research scope in Pakistan by working with Pakistani researchers, practitioners, and families.

Anushay balances her research with her position as the founder of a non-profit, Resources for Children, which aims to understand and support children’s development in Pakistan.

Publications

  1. Mazhar, A. (2022, April). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Spring Preview, New Haven, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2021, December). Does an extended family improve mentalising in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK & Pakistan. 2nd International Foundation University Conference of Psychology, Rawalpindi, Pakistan.
  3. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Theory of Mind in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK and Pakistan. Harvard Trends in Psychology Summit, Cambridge, United States.
  1. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Research Rounds, New Haven, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2020, October). Developing a non-profit to advance autism research in Pakistan. Anna Freud Centre Seminar Series, London, United Kingdom

 

Núria is a Professor of Mathematics Education at Autonomous University of Barcelona. Her research is about language and mathematics in secondary school classrooms and professional development contexts with mathematics teachers.

Her first degree was in Mathematics at University of Barcelona (1995). Soon after her initiation as a secondary school mathematics teacher in highly multilingual classrooms of Barcelona, she started her PhD at the UAB Division of Mathematics Education. She wanted to understand the critical factors behind the under-performance in school mathematics of many learners from poor urban backgrounds and recent histories of migration. Since then, she has been committed to classroom and teacher education research grounded on community work with schools and mathematics teachers in urban areas of poverty. Her years as a school teacher have provided her with greater insights into her work as a researcher and have strongly influenced the adoption of sociocultural and sociopolitical approaches to mathematics teaching and learning.

Núria was given the ICREA Academia Award of the Catalan Institution for Research and Advanced Studies in 2013, in recognition of her contributions to research on multilingual mathematics teaching and learning. She was elected to the Executive Committee of the International Commission on Mathematical Instruction as Member-at-Large in 2021, and to the International Committee of the International Group for the Psychology of Mathematics Education from 2010 to 2014. She served as Extraordinarious Professor of Mathematics Education at the University of South Africa from 2013 to 2020. She was Visiting Scholar at London South Bank University, University of Arizona, and University of North Carolina at Chapel-Hill.

Núria is currently on the editorial board of the international journal Mathematics Education Research Journal and Journal of Mathematics Teacher Education. Till 2021 she was the editor-in-chief of the Advances of Research in Mathematics Education, the official journal of the Spanish Society of Research in Mathematics Education. She is the leading co-editor of a 2018 special issue on language research in mathematics education published in ZDM-Mathematics Education, and the leading co-editor of a special issue on decentring mathematics teaching education, to be published in the Journal of Mathematics Teacher Education, February 2024.

She chaired the 7th Topic Conference of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education on Language and Mathematics (Dresden, 2018), and the ERME Topic Working Group on Language and Mathematics from 2015 to 2020. The collaborations established in the ERME context enabled for a broad range of experts to come together and move forward the research field in the form of an co-edited Routledge volume entitled ‘Classroom research on mathematics and language: Seeing learners and teachers differently’ in 2021, with Núria as the leading co-editor. She has also been co-editor of the Springer volume resulting from the 21st ICMI Study on Language Diversity and Mathematics Education in 2016, and of the Brill volume entitled ‘Mathematical discourse that breaks barriers and creates space for marginalized learners’ in 2018.

Núria’s motivation for coming to the Oxford Department of Education is her research collaboration in projects co-coordinated with Jenni Ingram on establishing an international network for research on supporting school mathematics teaching with linguistically disadvantaged learners. From her years as a secondary school in the 1990s, important challenges posed to mathematics education practice remain. Learners of mathematics who are linguistically disadvantaged for a variety of reasons, including impoverished socioeconomic status, continue to be educationally disadvantaged at a considerable risk of school failure and early dropout. More research will hopefully shed light on how to identify and develop improved practices to enable greater access to school mathematics for all learners.

Publications

SELECTION OF 10 LAST-DECADE PUBLICATIONS
[For more publications and research details, see https://orcid.org/0000-0001-5199-6336]
– Planas, N., & Chronaki, A. (2021). Multilingual mathematics learning from a dialogic-translanguaging perspective. In N. Planas, C. Morgan, & M. Schütte (Eds.), Classroom research on mathematics and language: Seeing learners and teachers differently (pp. 151-166). Routledge.
– Planas, N. (2021). How specific can language as resource become for the teaching of algebraic concepts? ZDM-Mathematics Education, 53(2), 277-288.
– Planas, N. (2021). Challenges and opportunities from translingual research on multilingual mathematics classrooms. In A. A. Essien, & A. Msimanga (Eds.), Multilingual education yearbook 2021. Policy and practice in STEM multilingual contexts (pp. 1-18). Springer.
– Planas, N., & Ngoepe, M. (2019). Right to learn mathematics: From language as right to language as resource. In C. Xenofontos (Ed.), Equity in mathematics education. Addressing a changing world (pp. 93-110). Information Age Publishing.
– Planas, N., & Schütte, M. (2018). Research frameworks for the study of language in mathematics education, ZDM-Mathematics Education, 50(6), 965-974.
– Planas, N. (2018). Language as resource: A key notion for understanding the complexity of mathematics learning. Educational Studies in Mathematics, 98(3), 215-229.
– Planas, N., Morgan, C., & Schütte, M. (2018). Mathematics education and language. Lessons and directions from two decades of research. In T. Dreyfus, M. Artigue, S. Prediger, D. Potari, & Ruthven (Eds.), Developing research in mathematics education. Twenty years of communication, cooperation and collaboration in Europe (pp. 196-210). Routledge.
– Planas, N. (2014). One speaker, two languages: Learning opportunities in the mathematics classroom. Educational Studies in Mathematics, 87(1), 51-66.
– Planas, N., & Setati Phakeng, M. (2014). On the process of gaining language as a resource in mathematics education. ZDM-Mathematics Education, 46(6), 883-893.
– Planas, N., & Civil, M. (2013). Language-as-resource and language-as-political. Tensions in the bilingual mathematics classroom. Mathematics Education Research Journal, 25(3), 361-378.

 

https://portalrecerca.uab.cat/en/persons/nuria-planas-raig-3

https://orcid.org/0000-0001-5199-6336

 

Cindy works at the intersection of learning, design, and technology, with a keen interest in the orchestration of future-ready tech-enabled learning.

She is curious how the deployment of adaptive learning systems to schools will impact classroom learning and hopes to learn more about the human-machine partnership in education. Specifically, her research is concerned with the implications that the use of such systems has on teacher-student interactions, as teachers grapple with balancing personalised learning and learning in community, as well as curriculum demands and student interests. These are some tensions which could potentially be exacerbated by affordances of adaptive learning systems.

Prior to embarking on the DPhil in Education at Oxford, Cindy worked as the Lead Specialist in Technologies for Learning at the Educational Technology Division of Ministry of Education, Singapore. She had previously completed graduate studies at the National University of Singapore and Stanford University where she was awarded Master of Arts in English Studies and Master of Arts in Education.

Reem is DPhil student from Saudi Arabia.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she worked as a Teacher, Professional Developer, then, became a Supervisor and Researcher in the Ministry of Education where she received a scholarship to pursue her DPhil education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests lie in the area of Teacher Education and Professional Learning Policy and Practice.

Publications
  • Alqahtani, Reem (2020). Saudi Universities Role in Developing Teacher Professional Development Programs: Elite Universities Experience. Journal of Educational Sciences. King Saud University.
  • Alqahtani, Reem. (2020). The effect of implementing UDL-based activities in improving EFL learners’ academic achievement and attitudes towards L2. In L. Salas, & E. Ager, Creating Quiet reflective Spaces: Language Teacher Researches Professional Development (pp. 61-62). IATEFL publications.

Lena Zlock is researching the integration of digital technology into structures of teaching, learning, and education in higher education. Her particular focus is on the digital humanities and the potential for digital methods to transform humanistic study. She works with Professor Niall Winters and Dr. James Robson.

Lena’s research interests stem from her education as an M.St. student and Ertegun Graduate Scholar in Modern Languages at the University of Oxford, and as a B.A. student in History at Stanford University. As an undergraduate, she started the Voltaire Library Project, a digitally and data-driven study of the 6,763-book collection of French Enlightenment philosopher Voltaire (you can read more about the project here and here). She has been interested in the application of digital technology to humanistic teaching since her days in Princeton Day School, where she developed an interdisciplinary curriculum on Mexico City (visit the course website here).

Her research on Voltaire led her to think more broadly about the place of digital methods in the humanities classroom, and how new technologies will revolutionise the liberal arts and higher education. As a DPhil candidate, Lena will examine the negotiation and implementation of new learning technologies within the University of Oxford at undergraduate and graduate levels.

Lena is involved in a number of digital humanities initiatives in Oxford. She previously served as the inaugural fellow of the Voltaire Lab at Oxford’s Voltaire Foundation. As a master’s student, Lena co-formulated the convergence agenda for Oxford digital humanities with Professor Howard Hotson, and is currently employed by the Humanities Division to assist with the development of an M.St. degree in Digital Scholarship (read more here). Lena set up and helps to run the History of the Book blog for the Faculty of Medieval and Modern Languages and the Oxford Book History Twitter account.

Lena welcomes inquiries from undergraduate and postgraduate students from Oxford and beyond seeking to get involved with the digital humanities in any capacity. The History of the Book blog also welcomes inquiries from prospective contributors.

 

Abbey is a Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education, in collaboration with the Department of Engineering.

Before joining the DPhil program, Abbey obtained a B.A. in Applied Linguistics with minors in Russian and Chinese from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford. She was the recipient of a Benjamin A. Gilman International Scholarship through U.S. Department of State for study in Russia and was awarded two Foreign Language and Area Studies (FLAS) Fellowships for study in both Russia and China. She holds both TESOL and TEFL certificates and has taught English as a Second Language in various contexts to a wide variety of learner populations.

Abbey’s main research interests lie in the use of technology to facilitate language learning. Her DPhil research focuses on the development of a virtual reality program to bridge the gaps that students face when learning languages through distance learning.

Julie Chia-Yi Lin is a Doctoral student at the University of Oxford, funded by the Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholarship. Her research focus on Internationalization, Policy, Management and Institutional Strategy is rooted in her professional experience in publishing and higher education, as well as from her observations regarding the continuous change in global educational dynamics.

Julie completed her B.A. at National Taiwan University, and earned a joint M.A. from the University of Vienna and the University of Wroclaw. She was previously employed as an officer for the Office of International Affairs at National Taiwan University, and then as a Publisher at Emerald Publishing.

She focuses on the development of higher education, particularly in the processes of internationalization and globalization, and tries to deliver perspectives from different Institutional sectors, and a wide array of participants. She is mindful of the influence that culture has on the development and reception of these processes, and has a special interest in the East Asia region, and Confucian-influenced higher education systems. In her doctoral research, she investigates higher ed institutional strategy, and the relationship it has with real-world policy. This includes delving into the specific interpretation and implementation of official policy by different stakeholders within the institution- faculty, administration, and management.

Publications

Lin, J. (2015). The Impact of Globalization on Taiwan’s Education Policy: The International Student. In A. Lipinsky. (Ed), Vienna Taiwan Studies Series: Immigration societies, Taiwan and Beyond. (pp. 129-151). Vienna: LIT VERLAG GmbH & Co. KG

Yibo Wang has an MA in International Marketing from the Coventry University (UK) and a Master’s in Management: Leadership and Organizational Change from the University of Birmingham (UK).

His doctoral research focuses on ‘knowledge hiding’, ‘leadership style’ and ‘Confucian culture’ in Chinese education and training institutions.

As empirical studies on ‘knowledge hiding’ in the Chinese context are scarce, Yibo hopes to uncover underlying mechanism of knowledge hiding and find its potential influence factors.

Prior to coming to Oxford, he worked as a CEO in an educational consultancy based in Beijing that advised the investment and marketing analyses on education and training industry.

Riziki’s current DPhil research focuses on emergent literacy of refugee children within multilingual settings.

Prior to commencing her DPhil research, Riziki completed an MSc in Child Development at the University of Oxford, looking at the role of teacher behavioural and cognitive judgments on the learning trajectories of Black primary school students in England.

Her research interests are education access and wellbeing of children in resettlement and asylum contexts. In line with this, her research in the past has focused on integration and resettlement processes of refugees and immigrants within Canada.

Publications

Bhattacharyya, P., Ogoe, S., Riziki, A., & Wilkinson, L. (2020). In search of a “home”: comparing the housing challenges experienced by recently arrived Yazidi and Syrian Refugees in Canada. Manuscript submitted for publication.

Bhattacharyya, P., Riziki, A., Songose, L., Ogoe, S., & Wilkinson, L. (2020). Understanding the link between pre-arrival education and trauma and language learning: A case study of Yazidi women in Canada. Canadian Diversity, 17(2).

Bhattacharyya, P., Riziki, A., & Wilkinson, L. (2018). “Settlement Service Use among Syrian Refugees in Canada” Canadian Diversity 15(1).

Wilkinson, L., Bhattacharya, P., Garcea, J., Abdul-Karim, A., Riziki, A., & Schnieders, M. (2017). Finding home: Some housing considerations for refugee families with children. Canadian Diversity, 14 (3), 31-35

Wilkinson, L., Bhattacharyya, P., Riziki, A., & Abdul-Karim, A. (2018).Yazidi Refugee Resettlement in Canada. Calgary: Immigration Refugees and Citizenship Canada-Integration Branch (Prairies and Territories Region).

Wilkinson, L., Garcea, J., Bhattacharyya, P., Riziki, A., Abdul Karim, A. (2017). Resettling on the Canadian Prairies: Integration of Syrian refugees. Calgary: Immigration Refugees and Citizenship Canada, Integration Branch-Prairies., Northwest Territories Division., & Alberta Association of Immigrant Serving Agencies

Anushay completed her BSc Psychology from UCL, where she also started her master’s in Developmental Neuroscience and Psychopathology. She was based at Yale University for her master’s thesis, where she worked with Dr Craig Bailey at the Yale Center for Emotional Intelligence to understand children’s emotion development. Anushay’s research interests include understanding child development across different cultures, factors that might be affecting it, and devising culture-specific ways to support children’s holistic development through the educational system. She is also keen on improving the research scope in Pakistan by working with Pakistani researchers, practitioners, and families.

Anushay balances her research with her position as the founder of a non-profit, Resources for Children, which aims to understand and support children’s development in Pakistan.

Publications

  1. Mazhar, A. (2022, April). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Spring Preview, New Haven, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2021, December). Does an extended family improve mentalising in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK & Pakistan. 2nd International Foundation University Conference of Psychology, Rawalpindi, Pakistan.
  3. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Theory of Mind in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK and Pakistan. Harvard Trends in Psychology Summit, Cambridge, United States.
  1. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Research Rounds, New Haven, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2020, October). Developing a non-profit to advance autism research in Pakistan. Anna Freud Centre Seminar Series, London, United Kingdom

 

Núria is a Professor of Mathematics Education at Autonomous University of Barcelona. Her research is about language and mathematics in secondary school classrooms and professional development contexts with mathematics teachers.

Her first degree was in Mathematics at University of Barcelona (1995). Soon after her initiation as a secondary school mathematics teacher in highly multilingual classrooms of Barcelona, she started her PhD at the UAB Division of Mathematics Education. She wanted to understand the critical factors behind the under-performance in school mathematics of many learners from poor urban backgrounds and recent histories of migration. Since then, she has been committed to classroom and teacher education research grounded on community work with schools and mathematics teachers in urban areas of poverty. Her years as a school teacher have provided her with greater insights into her work as a researcher and have strongly influenced the adoption of sociocultural and sociopolitical approaches to mathematics teaching and learning.

Núria was given the ICREA Academia Award of the Catalan Institution for Research and Advanced Studies in 2013, in recognition of her contributions to research on multilingual mathematics teaching and learning. She was elected to the Executive Committee of the International Commission on Mathematical Instruction as Member-at-Large in 2021, and to the International Committee of the International Group for the Psychology of Mathematics Education from 2010 to 2014. She served as Extraordinarious Professor of Mathematics Education at the University of South Africa from 2013 to 2020. She was Visiting Scholar at London South Bank University, University of Arizona, and University of North Carolina at Chapel-Hill.

Núria is currently on the editorial board of the international journal Mathematics Education Research Journal and Journal of Mathematics Teacher Education. Till 2021 she was the editor-in-chief of the Advances of Research in Mathematics Education, the official journal of the Spanish Society of Research in Mathematics Education. She is the leading co-editor of a 2018 special issue on language research in mathematics education published in ZDM-Mathematics Education, and the leading co-editor of a special issue on decentring mathematics teaching education, to be published in the Journal of Mathematics Teacher Education, February 2024.

She chaired the 7th Topic Conference of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education on Language and Mathematics (Dresden, 2018), and the ERME Topic Working Group on Language and Mathematics from 2015 to 2020. The collaborations established in the ERME context enabled for a broad range of experts to come together and move forward the research field in the form of an co-edited Routledge volume entitled ‘Classroom research on mathematics and language: Seeing learners and teachers differently’ in 2021, with Núria as the leading co-editor. She has also been co-editor of the Springer volume resulting from the 21st ICMI Study on Language Diversity and Mathematics Education in 2016, and of the Brill volume entitled ‘Mathematical discourse that breaks barriers and creates space for marginalized learners’ in 2018.

Núria’s motivation for coming to the Oxford Department of Education is her research collaboration in projects co-coordinated with Jenni Ingram on establishing an international network for research on supporting school mathematics teaching with linguistically disadvantaged learners. From her years as a secondary school in the 1990s, important challenges posed to mathematics education practice remain. Learners of mathematics who are linguistically disadvantaged for a variety of reasons, including impoverished socioeconomic status, continue to be educationally disadvantaged at a considerable risk of school failure and early dropout. More research will hopefully shed light on how to identify and develop improved practices to enable greater access to school mathematics for all learners.

Publications

SELECTION OF 10 LAST-DECADE PUBLICATIONS
[For more publications and research details, see https://orcid.org/0000-0001-5199-6336]
– Planas, N., & Chronaki, A. (2021). Multilingual mathematics learning from a dialogic-translanguaging perspective. In N. Planas, C. Morgan, & M. Schütte (Eds.), Classroom research on mathematics and language: Seeing learners and teachers differently (pp. 151-166). Routledge.
– Planas, N. (2021). How specific can language as resource become for the teaching of algebraic concepts? ZDM-Mathematics Education, 53(2), 277-288.
– Planas, N. (2021). Challenges and opportunities from translingual research on multilingual mathematics classrooms. In A. A. Essien, & A. Msimanga (Eds.), Multilingual education yearbook 2021. Policy and practice in STEM multilingual contexts (pp. 1-18). Springer.
– Planas, N., & Ngoepe, M. (2019). Right to learn mathematics: From language as right to language as resource. In C. Xenofontos (Ed.), Equity in mathematics education. Addressing a changing world (pp. 93-110). Information Age Publishing.
– Planas, N., & Schütte, M. (2018). Research frameworks for the study of language in mathematics education, ZDM-Mathematics Education, 50(6), 965-974.
– Planas, N. (2018). Language as resource: A key notion for understanding the complexity of mathematics learning. Educational Studies in Mathematics, 98(3), 215-229.
– Planas, N., Morgan, C., & Schütte, M. (2018). Mathematics education and language. Lessons and directions from two decades of research. In T. Dreyfus, M. Artigue, S. Prediger, D. Potari, & Ruthven (Eds.), Developing research in mathematics education. Twenty years of communication, cooperation and collaboration in Europe (pp. 196-210). Routledge.
– Planas, N. (2014). One speaker, two languages: Learning opportunities in the mathematics classroom. Educational Studies in Mathematics, 87(1), 51-66.
– Planas, N., & Setati Phakeng, M. (2014). On the process of gaining language as a resource in mathematics education. ZDM-Mathematics Education, 46(6), 883-893.
– Planas, N., & Civil, M. (2013). Language-as-resource and language-as-political. Tensions in the bilingual mathematics classroom. Mathematics Education Research Journal, 25(3), 361-378.

 

https://portalrecerca.uab.cat/en/persons/nuria-planas-raig-3

https://orcid.org/0000-0001-5199-6336

 

Cindy works at the intersection of learning, design, and technology, with a keen interest in the orchestration of future-ready tech-enabled learning.

She is curious how the deployment of adaptive learning systems to schools will impact classroom learning and hopes to learn more about the human-machine partnership in education. Specifically, her research is concerned with the implications that the use of such systems has on teacher-student interactions, as teachers grapple with balancing personalised learning and learning in community, as well as curriculum demands and student interests. These are some tensions which could potentially be exacerbated by affordances of adaptive learning systems.

Prior to embarking on the DPhil in Education at Oxford, Cindy worked as the Lead Specialist in Technologies for Learning at the Educational Technology Division of Ministry of Education, Singapore. She had previously completed graduate studies at the National University of Singapore and Stanford University where she was awarded Master of Arts in English Studies and Master of Arts in Education.

Reem is DPhil student from Saudi Arabia.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she worked as a Teacher, Professional Developer, then, became a Supervisor and Researcher in the Ministry of Education where she received a scholarship to pursue her DPhil education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests lie in the area of Teacher Education and Professional Learning Policy and Practice.

Publications
  • Alqahtani, Reem (2020). Saudi Universities Role in Developing Teacher Professional Development Programs: Elite Universities Experience. Journal of Educational Sciences. King Saud University.
  • Alqahtani, Reem. (2020). The effect of implementing UDL-based activities in improving EFL learners’ academic achievement and attitudes towards L2. In L. Salas, & E. Ager, Creating Quiet reflective Spaces: Language Teacher Researches Professional Development (pp. 61-62). IATEFL publications.

Lena Zlock is researching the integration of digital technology into structures of teaching, learning, and education in higher education. Her particular focus is on the digital humanities and the potential for digital methods to transform humanistic study. She works with Professor Niall Winters and Dr. James Robson.

Lena’s research interests stem from her education as an M.St. student and Ertegun Graduate Scholar in Modern Languages at the University of Oxford, and as a B.A. student in History at Stanford University. As an undergraduate, she started the Voltaire Library Project, a digitally and data-driven study of the 6,763-book collection of French Enlightenment philosopher Voltaire (you can read more about the project here and here). She has been interested in the application of digital technology to humanistic teaching since her days in Princeton Day School, where she developed an interdisciplinary curriculum on Mexico City (visit the course website here).

Her research on Voltaire led her to think more broadly about the place of digital methods in the humanities classroom, and how new technologies will revolutionise the liberal arts and higher education. As a DPhil candidate, Lena will examine the negotiation and implementation of new learning technologies within the University of Oxford at undergraduate and graduate levels.

Lena is involved in a number of digital humanities initiatives in Oxford. She previously served as the inaugural fellow of the Voltaire Lab at Oxford’s Voltaire Foundation. As a master’s student, Lena co-formulated the convergence agenda for Oxford digital humanities with Professor Howard Hotson, and is currently employed by the Humanities Division to assist with the development of an M.St. degree in Digital Scholarship (read more here). Lena set up and helps to run the History of the Book blog for the Faculty of Medieval and Modern Languages and the Oxford Book History Twitter account.

Lena welcomes inquiries from undergraduate and postgraduate students from Oxford and beyond seeking to get involved with the digital humanities in any capacity. The History of the Book blog also welcomes inquiries from prospective contributors.

 

Abbey is a Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education, in collaboration with the Department of Engineering.

Before joining the DPhil program, Abbey obtained a B.A. in Applied Linguistics with minors in Russian and Chinese from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford. She was the recipient of a Benjamin A. Gilman International Scholarship through U.S. Department of State for study in Russia and was awarded two Foreign Language and Area Studies (FLAS) Fellowships for study in both Russia and China. She holds both TESOL and TEFL certificates and has taught English as a Second Language in various contexts to a wide variety of learner populations.

Abbey’s main research interests lie in the use of technology to facilitate language learning. Her DPhil research focuses on the development of a virtual reality program to bridge the gaps that students face when learning languages through distance learning.

Julie Chia-Yi Lin is a Doctoral student at the University of Oxford, funded by the Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholarship. Her research focus on Internationalization, Policy, Management and Institutional Strategy is rooted in her professional experience in publishing and higher education, as well as from her observations regarding the continuous change in global educational dynamics.

Julie completed her B.A. at National Taiwan University, and earned a joint M.A. from the University of Vienna and the University of Wroclaw. She was previously employed as an officer for the Office of International Affairs at National Taiwan University, and then as a Publisher at Emerald Publishing.

She focuses on the development of higher education, particularly in the processes of internationalization and globalization, and tries to deliver perspectives from different Institutional sectors, and a wide array of participants. She is mindful of the influence that culture has on the development and reception of these processes, and has a special interest in the East Asia region, and Confucian-influenced higher education systems. In her doctoral research, she investigates higher ed institutional strategy, and the relationship it has with real-world policy. This includes delving into the specific interpretation and implementation of official policy by different stakeholders within the institution- faculty, administration, and management.

Publications

Lin, J. (2015). The Impact of Globalization on Taiwan’s Education Policy: The International Student. In A. Lipinsky. (Ed), Vienna Taiwan Studies Series: Immigration societies, Taiwan and Beyond. (pp. 129-151). Vienna: LIT VERLAG GmbH & Co. KG

Yibo Wang has an MA in International Marketing from the Coventry University (UK) and a Master’s in Management: Leadership and Organizational Change from the University of Birmingham (UK).

His doctoral research focuses on ‘knowledge hiding’, ‘leadership style’ and ‘Confucian culture’ in Chinese education and training institutions.

As empirical studies on ‘knowledge hiding’ in the Chinese context are scarce, Yibo hopes to uncover underlying mechanism of knowledge hiding and find its potential influence factors.

Prior to coming to Oxford, he worked as a CEO in an educational consultancy based in Beijing that advised the investment and marketing analyses on education and training industry.

Riziki’s current DPhil research focuses on emergent literacy of refugee children within multilingual settings.

Prior to commencing her DPhil research, Riziki completed an MSc in Child Development at the University of Oxford, looking at the role of teacher behavioural and cognitive judgments on the learning trajectories of Black primary school students in England.

Her research interests are education access and wellbeing of children in resettlement and asylum contexts. In line with this, her research in the past has focused on integration and resettlement processes of refugees and immigrants within Canada.

Publications

Bhattacharyya, P., Ogoe, S., Riziki, A., & Wilkinson, L. (2020). In search of a “home”: comparing the housing challenges experienced by recently arrived Yazidi and Syrian Refugees in Canada. Manuscript submitted for publication.

Bhattacharyya, P., Riziki, A., Songose, L., Ogoe, S., & Wilkinson, L. (2020). Understanding the link between pre-arrival education and trauma and language learning: A case study of Yazidi women in Canada. Canadian Diversity, 17(2).

Bhattacharyya, P., Riziki, A., & Wilkinson, L. (2018). “Settlement Service Use among Syrian Refugees in Canada” Canadian Diversity 15(1).

Wilkinson, L., Bhattacharya, P., Garcea, J., Abdul-Karim, A., Riziki, A., & Schnieders, M. (2017). Finding home: Some housing considerations for refugee families with children. Canadian Diversity, 14 (3), 31-35

Wilkinson, L., Bhattacharyya, P., Riziki, A., & Abdul-Karim, A. (2018).Yazidi Refugee Resettlement in Canada. Calgary: Immigration Refugees and Citizenship Canada-Integration Branch (Prairies and Territories Region).

Wilkinson, L., Garcea, J., Bhattacharyya, P., Riziki, A., Abdul Karim, A. (2017). Resettling on the Canadian Prairies: Integration of Syrian refugees. Calgary: Immigration Refugees and Citizenship Canada, Integration Branch-Prairies., Northwest Territories Division., & Alberta Association of Immigrant Serving Agencies

Anushay completed her BSc Psychology from UCL, where she also started her master’s in Developmental Neuroscience and Psychopathology. She was based at Yale University for her master’s thesis, where she worked with Dr Craig Bailey at the Yale Center for Emotional Intelligence to understand children’s emotion development. Anushay’s research interests include understanding child development across different cultures, factors that might be affecting it, and devising culture-specific ways to support children’s holistic development through the educational system. She is also keen on improving the research scope in Pakistan by working with Pakistani researchers, practitioners, and families.

Anushay balances her research with her position as the founder of a non-profit, Resources for Children, which aims to understand and support children’s development in Pakistan.

Publications

  1. Mazhar, A. (2022, April). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Spring Preview, New Haven, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2021, December). Does an extended family improve mentalising in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK & Pakistan. 2nd International Foundation University Conference of Psychology, Rawalpindi, Pakistan.
  3. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Theory of Mind in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK and Pakistan. Harvard Trends in Psychology Summit, Cambridge, United States.
  1. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Research Rounds, New Haven, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2020, October). Developing a non-profit to advance autism research in Pakistan. Anna Freud Centre Seminar Series, London, United Kingdom

 

Núria is a Professor of Mathematics Education at Autonomous University of Barcelona. Her research is about language and mathematics in secondary school classrooms and professional development contexts with mathematics teachers.

Her first degree was in Mathematics at University of Barcelona (1995). Soon after her initiation as a secondary school mathematics teacher in highly multilingual classrooms of Barcelona, she started her PhD at the UAB Division of Mathematics Education. She wanted to understand the critical factors behind the under-performance in school mathematics of many learners from poor urban backgrounds and recent histories of migration. Since then, she has been committed to classroom and teacher education research grounded on community work with schools and mathematics teachers in urban areas of poverty. Her years as a school teacher have provided her with greater insights into her work as a researcher and have strongly influenced the adoption of sociocultural and sociopolitical approaches to mathematics teaching and learning.

Núria was given the ICREA Academia Award of the Catalan Institution for Research and Advanced Studies in 2013, in recognition of her contributions to research on multilingual mathematics teaching and learning. She was elected to the Executive Committee of the International Commission on Mathematical Instruction as Member-at-Large in 2021, and to the International Committee of the International Group for the Psychology of Mathematics Education from 2010 to 2014. She served as Extraordinarious Professor of Mathematics Education at the University of South Africa from 2013 to 2020. She was Visiting Scholar at London South Bank University, University of Arizona, and University of North Carolina at Chapel-Hill.

Núria is currently on the editorial board of the international journal Mathematics Education Research Journal and Journal of Mathematics Teacher Education. Till 2021 she was the editor-in-chief of the Advances of Research in Mathematics Education, the official journal of the Spanish Society of Research in Mathematics Education. She is the leading co-editor of a 2018 special issue on language research in mathematics education published in ZDM-Mathematics Education, and the leading co-editor of a special issue on decentring mathematics teaching education, to be published in the Journal of Mathematics Teacher Education, February 2024.

She chaired the 7th Topic Conference of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education on Language and Mathematics (Dresden, 2018), and the ERME Topic Working Group on Language and Mathematics from 2015 to 2020. The collaborations established in the ERME context enabled for a broad range of experts to come together and move forward the research field in the form of an co-edited Routledge volume entitled ‘Classroom research on mathematics and language: Seeing learners and teachers differently’ in 2021, with Núria as the leading co-editor. She has also been co-editor of the Springer volume resulting from the 21st ICMI Study on Language Diversity and Mathematics Education in 2016, and of the Brill volume entitled ‘Mathematical discourse that breaks barriers and creates space for marginalized learners’ in 2018.

Núria’s motivation for coming to the Oxford Department of Education is her research collaboration in projects co-coordinated with Jenni Ingram on establishing an international network for research on supporting school mathematics teaching with linguistically disadvantaged learners. From her years as a secondary school in the 1990s, important challenges posed to mathematics education practice remain. Learners of mathematics who are linguistically disadvantaged for a variety of reasons, including impoverished socioeconomic status, continue to be educationally disadvantaged at a considerable risk of school failure and early dropout. More research will hopefully shed light on how to identify and develop improved practices to enable greater access to school mathematics for all learners.

Publications

SELECTION OF 10 LAST-DECADE PUBLICATIONS
[For more publications and research details, see https://orcid.org/0000-0001-5199-6336]
– Planas, N., & Chronaki, A. (2021). Multilingual mathematics learning from a dialogic-translanguaging perspective. In N. Planas, C. Morgan, & M. Schütte (Eds.), Classroom research on mathematics and language: Seeing learners and teachers differently (pp. 151-166). Routledge.
– Planas, N. (2021). How specific can language as resource become for the teaching of algebraic concepts? ZDM-Mathematics Education, 53(2), 277-288.
– Planas, N. (2021). Challenges and opportunities from translingual research on multilingual mathematics classrooms. In A. A. Essien, & A. Msimanga (Eds.), Multilingual education yearbook 2021. Policy and practice in STEM multilingual contexts (pp. 1-18). Springer.
– Planas, N., & Ngoepe, M. (2019). Right to learn mathematics: From language as right to language as resource. In C. Xenofontos (Ed.), Equity in mathematics education. Addressing a changing world (pp. 93-110). Information Age Publishing.
– Planas, N., & Schütte, M. (2018). Research frameworks for the study of language in mathematics education, ZDM-Mathematics Education, 50(6), 965-974.
– Planas, N. (2018). Language as resource: A key notion for understanding the complexity of mathematics learning. Educational Studies in Mathematics, 98(3), 215-229.
– Planas, N., Morgan, C., & Schütte, M. (2018). Mathematics education and language. Lessons and directions from two decades of research. In T. Dreyfus, M. Artigue, S. Prediger, D. Potari, & Ruthven (Eds.), Developing research in mathematics education. Twenty years of communication, cooperation and collaboration in Europe (pp. 196-210). Routledge.
– Planas, N. (2014). One speaker, two languages: Learning opportunities in the mathematics classroom. Educational Studies in Mathematics, 87(1), 51-66.
– Planas, N., & Setati Phakeng, M. (2014). On the process of gaining language as a resource in mathematics education. ZDM-Mathematics Education, 46(6), 883-893.
– Planas, N., & Civil, M. (2013). Language-as-resource and language-as-political. Tensions in the bilingual mathematics classroom. Mathematics Education Research Journal, 25(3), 361-378.

 

https://portalrecerca.uab.cat/en/persons/nuria-planas-raig-3

https://orcid.org/0000-0001-5199-6336

 

Cindy works at the intersection of learning, design, and technology, with a keen interest in the orchestration of future-ready tech-enabled learning.

She is curious how the deployment of adaptive learning systems to schools will impact classroom learning and hopes to learn more about the human-machine partnership in education. Specifically, her research is concerned with the implications that the use of such systems has on teacher-student interactions, as teachers grapple with balancing personalised learning and learning in community, as well as curriculum demands and student interests. These are some tensions which could potentially be exacerbated by affordances of adaptive learning systems.

Prior to embarking on the DPhil in Education at Oxford, Cindy worked as the Lead Specialist in Technologies for Learning at the Educational Technology Division of Ministry of Education, Singapore. She had previously completed graduate studies at the National University of Singapore and Stanford University where she was awarded Master of Arts in English Studies and Master of Arts in Education.

Reem is DPhil student from Saudi Arabia.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she worked as a Teacher, Professional Developer, then, became a Supervisor and Researcher in the Ministry of Education where she received a scholarship to pursue her DPhil education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests lie in the area of Teacher Education and Professional Learning Policy and Practice.

Publications
  • Alqahtani, Reem (2020). Saudi Universities Role in Developing Teacher Professional Development Programs: Elite Universities Experience. Journal of Educational Sciences. King Saud University.
  • Alqahtani, Reem. (2020). The effect of implementing UDL-based activities in improving EFL learners’ academic achievement and attitudes towards L2. In L. Salas, & E. Ager, Creating Quiet reflective Spaces: Language Teacher Researches Professional Development (pp. 61-62). IATEFL publications.

Lena Zlock is researching the integration of digital technology into structures of teaching, learning, and education in higher education. Her particular focus is on the digital humanities and the potential for digital methods to transform humanistic study. She works with Professor Niall Winters and Dr. James Robson.

Lena’s research interests stem from her education as an M.St. student and Ertegun Graduate Scholar in Modern Languages at the University of Oxford, and as a B.A. student in History at Stanford University. As an undergraduate, she started the Voltaire Library Project, a digitally and data-driven study of the 6,763-book collection of French Enlightenment philosopher Voltaire (you can read more about the project here and here). She has been interested in the application of digital technology to humanistic teaching since her days in Princeton Day School, where she developed an interdisciplinary curriculum on Mexico City (visit the course website here).

Her research on Voltaire led her to think more broadly about the place of digital methods in the humanities classroom, and how new technologies will revolutionise the liberal arts and higher education. As a DPhil candidate, Lena will examine the negotiation and implementation of new learning technologies within the University of Oxford at undergraduate and graduate levels.

Lena is involved in a number of digital humanities initiatives in Oxford. She previously served as the inaugural fellow of the Voltaire Lab at Oxford’s Voltaire Foundation. As a master’s student, Lena co-formulated the convergence agenda for Oxford digital humanities with Professor Howard Hotson, and is currently employed by the Humanities Division to assist with the development of an M.St. degree in Digital Scholarship (read more here). Lena set up and helps to run the History of the Book blog for the Faculty of Medieval and Modern Languages and the Oxford Book History Twitter account.

Lena welcomes inquiries from undergraduate and postgraduate students from Oxford and beyond seeking to get involved with the digital humanities in any capacity. The History of the Book blog also welcomes inquiries from prospective contributors.

 

Abbey is a Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education, in collaboration with the Department of Engineering.

Before joining the DPhil program, Abbey obtained a B.A. in Applied Linguistics with minors in Russian and Chinese from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford. She was the recipient of a Benjamin A. Gilman International Scholarship through U.S. Department of State for study in Russia and was awarded two Foreign Language and Area Studies (FLAS) Fellowships for study in both Russia and China. She holds both TESOL and TEFL certificates and has taught English as a Second Language in various contexts to a wide variety of learner populations.

Abbey’s main research interests lie in the use of technology to facilitate language learning. Her DPhil research focuses on the development of a virtual reality program to bridge the gaps that students face when learning languages through distance learning.

Julie Chia-Yi Lin is a Doctoral student at the University of Oxford, funded by the Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholarship. Her research focus on Internationalization, Policy, Management and Institutional Strategy is rooted in her professional experience in publishing and higher education, as well as from her observations regarding the continuous change in global educational dynamics.

Julie completed her B.A. at National Taiwan University, and earned a joint M.A. from the University of Vienna and the University of Wroclaw. She was previously employed as an officer for the Office of International Affairs at National Taiwan University, and then as a Publisher at Emerald Publishing.

She focuses on the development of higher education, particularly in the processes of internationalization and globalization, and tries to deliver perspectives from different Institutional sectors, and a wide array of participants. She is mindful of the influence that culture has on the development and reception of these processes, and has a special interest in the East Asia region, and Confucian-influenced higher education systems. In her doctoral research, she investigates higher ed institutional strategy, and the relationship it has with real-world policy. This includes delving into the specific interpretation and implementation of official policy by different stakeholders within the institution- faculty, administration, and management.

Publications

Lin, J. (2015). The Impact of Globalization on Taiwan’s Education Policy: The International Student. In A. Lipinsky. (Ed), Vienna Taiwan Studies Series: Immigration societies, Taiwan and Beyond. (pp. 129-151). Vienna: LIT VERLAG GmbH & Co. KG

Yibo Wang has an MA in International Marketing from the Coventry University (UK) and a Master’s in Management: Leadership and Organizational Change from the University of Birmingham (UK).

His doctoral research focuses on ‘knowledge hiding’, ‘leadership style’ and ‘Confucian culture’ in Chinese education and training institutions.

As empirical studies on ‘knowledge hiding’ in the Chinese context are scarce, Yibo hopes to uncover underlying mechanism of knowledge hiding and find its potential influence factors.

Prior to coming to Oxford, he worked as a CEO in an educational consultancy based in Beijing that advised the investment and marketing analyses on education and training industry.

Riziki’s current DPhil research focuses on emergent literacy of refugee children within multilingual settings.

Prior to commencing her DPhil research, Riziki completed an MSc in Child Development at the University of Oxford, looking at the role of teacher behavioural and cognitive judgments on the learning trajectories of Black primary school students in England.

Her research interests are education access and wellbeing of children in resettlement and asylum contexts. In line with this, her research in the past has focused on integration and resettlement processes of refugees and immigrants within Canada.

Publications

Bhattacharyya, P., Ogoe, S., Riziki, A., & Wilkinson, L. (2020). In search of a “home”: comparing the housing challenges experienced by recently arrived Yazidi and Syrian Refugees in Canada. Manuscript submitted for publication.

Bhattacharyya, P., Riziki, A., Songose, L., Ogoe, S., & Wilkinson, L. (2020). Understanding the link between pre-arrival education and trauma and language learning: A case study of Yazidi women in Canada. Canadian Diversity, 17(2).

Bhattacharyya, P., Riziki, A., & Wilkinson, L. (2018). “Settlement Service Use among Syrian Refugees in Canada” Canadian Diversity 15(1).

Wilkinson, L., Bhattacharya, P., Garcea, J., Abdul-Karim, A., Riziki, A., & Schnieders, M. (2017). Finding home: Some housing considerations for refugee families with children. Canadian Diversity, 14 (3), 31-35

Wilkinson, L., Bhattacharyya, P., Riziki, A., & Abdul-Karim, A. (2018).Yazidi Refugee Resettlement in Canada. Calgary: Immigration Refugees and Citizenship Canada-Integration Branch (Prairies and Territories Region).

Wilkinson, L., Garcea, J., Bhattacharyya, P., Riziki, A., Abdul Karim, A. (2017). Resettling on the Canadian Prairies: Integration of Syrian refugees. Calgary: Immigration Refugees and Citizenship Canada, Integration Branch-Prairies., Northwest Territories Division., & Alberta Association of Immigrant Serving Agencies

Anushay completed her BSc Psychology from UCL, where she also started her master’s in Developmental Neuroscience and Psychopathology. She was based at Yale University for her master’s thesis, where she worked with Dr Craig Bailey at the Yale Center for Emotional Intelligence to understand children’s emotion development. Anushay’s research interests include understanding child development across different cultures, factors that might be affecting it, and devising culture-specific ways to support children’s holistic development through the educational system. She is also keen on improving the research scope in Pakistan by working with Pakistani researchers, practitioners, and families.

Anushay balances her research with her position as the founder of a non-profit, Resources for Children, which aims to understand and support children’s development in Pakistan.

Publications

  1. Mazhar, A. (2022, April). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Spring Preview, New Haven, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2021, December). Does an extended family improve mentalising in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK & Pakistan. 2nd International Foundation University Conference of Psychology, Rawalpindi, Pakistan.
  3. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Theory of Mind in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK and Pakistan. Harvard Trends in Psychology Summit, Cambridge, United States.
  1. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Research Rounds, New Haven, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2020, October). Developing a non-profit to advance autism research in Pakistan. Anna Freud Centre Seminar Series, London, United Kingdom

 

Núria is a Professor of Mathematics Education at Autonomous University of Barcelona. Her research is about language and mathematics in secondary school classrooms and professional development contexts with mathematics teachers.

Her first degree was in Mathematics at University of Barcelona (1995). Soon after her initiation as a secondary school mathematics teacher in highly multilingual classrooms of Barcelona, she started her PhD at the UAB Division of Mathematics Education. She wanted to understand the critical factors behind the under-performance in school mathematics of many learners from poor urban backgrounds and recent histories of migration. Since then, she has been committed to classroom and teacher education research grounded on community work with schools and mathematics teachers in urban areas of poverty. Her years as a school teacher have provided her with greater insights into her work as a researcher and have strongly influenced the adoption of sociocultural and sociopolitical approaches to mathematics teaching and learning.

Núria was given the ICREA Academia Award of the Catalan Institution for Research and Advanced Studies in 2013, in recognition of her contributions to research on multilingual mathematics teaching and learning. She was elected to the Executive Committee of the International Commission on Mathematical Instruction as Member-at-Large in 2021, and to the International Committee of the International Group for the Psychology of Mathematics Education from 2010 to 2014. She served as Extraordinarious Professor of Mathematics Education at the University of South Africa from 2013 to 2020. She was Visiting Scholar at London South Bank University, University of Arizona, and University of North Carolina at Chapel-Hill.

Núria is currently on the editorial board of the international journal Mathematics Education Research Journal and Journal of Mathematics Teacher Education. Till 2021 she was the editor-in-chief of the Advances of Research in Mathematics Education, the official journal of the Spanish Society of Research in Mathematics Education. She is the leading co-editor of a 2018 special issue on language research in mathematics education published in ZDM-Mathematics Education, and the leading co-editor of a special issue on decentring mathematics teaching education, to be published in the Journal of Mathematics Teacher Education, February 2024.

She chaired the 7th Topic Conference of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education on Language and Mathematics (Dresden, 2018), and the ERME Topic Working Group on Language and Mathematics from 2015 to 2020. The collaborations established in the ERME context enabled for a broad range of experts to come together and move forward the research field in the form of an co-edited Routledge volume entitled ‘Classroom research on mathematics and language: Seeing learners and teachers differently’ in 2021, with Núria as the leading co-editor. She has also been co-editor of the Springer volume resulting from the 21st ICMI Study on Language Diversity and Mathematics Education in 2016, and of the Brill volume entitled ‘Mathematical discourse that breaks barriers and creates space for marginalized learners’ in 2018.

Núria’s motivation for coming to the Oxford Department of Education is her research collaboration in projects co-coordinated with Jenni Ingram on establishing an international network for research on supporting school mathematics teaching with linguistically disadvantaged learners. From her years as a secondary school in the 1990s, important challenges posed to mathematics education practice remain. Learners of mathematics who are linguistically disadvantaged for a variety of reasons, including impoverished socioeconomic status, continue to be educationally disadvantaged at a considerable risk of school failure and early dropout. More research will hopefully shed light on how to identify and develop improved practices to enable greater access to school mathematics for all learners.

Publications

SELECTION OF 10 LAST-DECADE PUBLICATIONS
[For more publications and research details, see https://orcid.org/0000-0001-5199-6336]
– Planas, N., & Chronaki, A. (2021). Multilingual mathematics learning from a dialogic-translanguaging perspective. In N. Planas, C. Morgan, & M. Schütte (Eds.), Classroom research on mathematics and language: Seeing learners and teachers differently (pp. 151-166). Routledge.
– Planas, N. (2021). How specific can language as resource become for the teaching of algebraic concepts? ZDM-Mathematics Education, 53(2), 277-288.
– Planas, N. (2021). Challenges and opportunities from translingual research on multilingual mathematics classrooms. In A. A. Essien, & A. Msimanga (Eds.), Multilingual education yearbook 2021. Policy and practice in STEM multilingual contexts (pp. 1-18). Springer.
– Planas, N., & Ngoepe, M. (2019). Right to learn mathematics: From language as right to language as resource. In C. Xenofontos (Ed.), Equity in mathematics education. Addressing a changing world (pp. 93-110). Information Age Publishing.
– Planas, N., & Schütte, M. (2018). Research frameworks for the study of language in mathematics education, ZDM-Mathematics Education, 50(6), 965-974.
– Planas, N. (2018). Language as resource: A key notion for understanding the complexity of mathematics learning. Educational Studies in Mathematics, 98(3), 215-229.
– Planas, N., Morgan, C., & Schütte, M. (2018). Mathematics education and language. Lessons and directions from two decades of research. In T. Dreyfus, M. Artigue, S. Prediger, D. Potari, & Ruthven (Eds.), Developing research in mathematics education. Twenty years of communication, cooperation and collaboration in Europe (pp. 196-210). Routledge.
– Planas, N. (2014). One speaker, two languages: Learning opportunities in the mathematics classroom. Educational Studies in Mathematics, 87(1), 51-66.
– Planas, N., & Setati Phakeng, M. (2014). On the process of gaining language as a resource in mathematics education. ZDM-Mathematics Education, 46(6), 883-893.
– Planas, N., & Civil, M. (2013). Language-as-resource and language-as-political. Tensions in the bilingual mathematics classroom. Mathematics Education Research Journal, 25(3), 361-378.

 

https://portalrecerca.uab.cat/en/persons/nuria-planas-raig-3

https://orcid.org/0000-0001-5199-6336

 

Cindy works at the intersection of learning, design, and technology, with a keen interest in the orchestration of future-ready tech-enabled learning.

She is curious how the deployment of adaptive learning systems to schools will impact classroom learning and hopes to learn more about the human-machine partnership in education. Specifically, her research is concerned with the implications that the use of such systems has on teacher-student interactions, as teachers grapple with balancing personalised learning and learning in community, as well as curriculum demands and student interests. These are some tensions which could potentially be exacerbated by affordances of adaptive learning systems.

Prior to embarking on the DPhil in Education at Oxford, Cindy worked as the Lead Specialist in Technologies for Learning at the Educational Technology Division of Ministry of Education, Singapore. She had previously completed graduate studies at the National University of Singapore and Stanford University where she was awarded Master of Arts in English Studies and Master of Arts in Education.

Reem is DPhil student from Saudi Arabia.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she worked as a Teacher, Professional Developer, then, became a Supervisor and Researcher in the Ministry of Education where she received a scholarship to pursue her DPhil education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests lie in the area of Teacher Education and Professional Learning Policy and Practice.

Publications
  • Alqahtani, Reem (2020). Saudi Universities Role in Developing Teacher Professional Development Programs: Elite Universities Experience. Journal of Educational Sciences. King Saud University.
  • Alqahtani, Reem. (2020). The effect of implementing UDL-based activities in improving EFL learners’ academic achievement and attitudes towards L2. In L. Salas, & E. Ager, Creating Quiet reflective Spaces: Language Teacher Researches Professional Development (pp. 61-62). IATEFL publications.

Lena Zlock is researching the integration of digital technology into structures of teaching, learning, and education in higher education. Her particular focus is on the digital humanities and the potential for digital methods to transform humanistic study. She works with Professor Niall Winters and Dr. James Robson.

Lena’s research interests stem from her education as an M.St. student and Ertegun Graduate Scholar in Modern Languages at the University of Oxford, and as a B.A. student in History at Stanford University. As an undergraduate, she started the Voltaire Library Project, a digitally and data-driven study of the 6,763-book collection of French Enlightenment philosopher Voltaire (you can read more about the project here and here). She has been interested in the application of digital technology to humanistic teaching since her days in Princeton Day School, where she developed an interdisciplinary curriculum on Mexico City (visit the course website here).

Her research on Voltaire led her to think more broadly about the place of digital methods in the humanities classroom, and how new technologies will revolutionise the liberal arts and higher education. As a DPhil candidate, Lena will examine the negotiation and implementation of new learning technologies within the University of Oxford at undergraduate and graduate levels.

Lena is involved in a number of digital humanities initiatives in Oxford. She previously served as the inaugural fellow of the Voltaire Lab at Oxford’s Voltaire Foundation. As a master’s student, Lena co-formulated the convergence agenda for Oxford digital humanities with Professor Howard Hotson, and is currently employed by the Humanities Division to assist with the development of an M.St. degree in Digital Scholarship (read more here). Lena set up and helps to run the History of the Book blog for the Faculty of Medieval and Modern Languages and the Oxford Book History Twitter account.

Lena welcomes inquiries from undergraduate and postgraduate students from Oxford and beyond seeking to get involved with the digital humanities in any capacity. The History of the Book blog also welcomes inquiries from prospective contributors.

 

Abbey is a Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education, in collaboration with the Department of Engineering.

Before joining the DPhil program, Abbey obtained a B.A. in Applied Linguistics with minors in Russian and Chinese from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford. She was the recipient of a Benjamin A. Gilman International Scholarship through U.S. Department of State for study in Russia and was awarded two Foreign Language and Area Studies (FLAS) Fellowships for study in both Russia and China. She holds both TESOL and TEFL certificates and has taught English as a Second Language in various contexts to a wide variety of learner populations.

Abbey’s main research interests lie in the use of technology to facilitate language learning. Her DPhil research focuses on the development of a virtual reality program to bridge the gaps that students face when learning languages through distance learning.

Julie Chia-Yi Lin is a Doctoral student at the University of Oxford, funded by the Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholarship. Her research focus on Internationalization, Policy, Management and Institutional Strategy is rooted in her professional experience in publishing and higher education, as well as from her observations regarding the continuous change in global educational dynamics.

Julie completed her B.A. at National Taiwan University, and earned a joint M.A. from the University of Vienna and the University of Wroclaw. She was previously employed as an officer for the Office of International Affairs at National Taiwan University, and then as a Publisher at Emerald Publishing.

She focuses on the development of higher education, particularly in the processes of internationalization and globalization, and tries to deliver perspectives from different Institutional sectors, and a wide array of participants. She is mindful of the influence that culture has on the development and reception of these processes, and has a special interest in the East Asia region, and Confucian-influenced higher education systems. In her doctoral research, she investigates higher ed institutional strategy, and the relationship it has with real-world policy. This includes delving into the specific interpretation and implementation of official policy by different stakeholders within the institution- faculty, administration, and management.

Publications

Lin, J. (2015). The Impact of Globalization on Taiwan’s Education Policy: The International Student. In A. Lipinsky. (Ed), Vienna Taiwan Studies Series: Immigration societies, Taiwan and Beyond. (pp. 129-151). Vienna: LIT VERLAG GmbH & Co. KG

Yibo Wang has an MA in International Marketing from the Coventry University (UK) and a Master’s in Management: Leadership and Organizational Change from the University of Birmingham (UK).

His doctoral research focuses on ‘knowledge hiding’, ‘leadership style’ and ‘Confucian culture’ in Chinese education and training institutions.

As empirical studies on ‘knowledge hiding’ in the Chinese context are scarce, Yibo hopes to uncover underlying mechanism of knowledge hiding and find its potential influence factors.

Prior to coming to Oxford, he worked as a CEO in an educational consultancy based in Beijing that advised the investment and marketing analyses on education and training industry.

Riziki’s current DPhil research focuses on emergent literacy of refugee children within multilingual settings.

Prior to commencing her DPhil research, Riziki completed an MSc in Child Development at the University of Oxford, looking at the role of teacher behavioural and cognitive judgments on the learning trajectories of Black primary school students in England.

Her research interests are education access and wellbeing of children in resettlement and asylum contexts. In line with this, her research in the past has focused on integration and resettlement processes of refugees and immigrants within Canada.

Publications

Bhattacharyya, P., Ogoe, S., Riziki, A., & Wilkinson, L. (2020). In search of a “home”: comparing the housing challenges experienced by recently arrived Yazidi and Syrian Refugees in Canada. Manuscript submitted for publication.

Bhattacharyya, P., Riziki, A., Songose, L., Ogoe, S., & Wilkinson, L. (2020). Understanding the link between pre-arrival education and trauma and language learning: A case study of Yazidi women in Canada. Canadian Diversity, 17(2).

Bhattacharyya, P., Riziki, A., & Wilkinson, L. (2018). “Settlement Service Use among Syrian Refugees in Canada” Canadian Diversity 15(1).

Wilkinson, L., Bhattacharya, P., Garcea, J., Abdul-Karim, A., Riziki, A., & Schnieders, M. (2017). Finding home: Some housing considerations for refugee families with children. Canadian Diversity, 14 (3), 31-35

Wilkinson, L., Bhattacharyya, P., Riziki, A., & Abdul-Karim, A. (2018).Yazidi Refugee Resettlement in Canada. Calgary: Immigration Refugees and Citizenship Canada-Integration Branch (Prairies and Territories Region).

Wilkinson, L., Garcea, J., Bhattacharyya, P., Riziki, A., Abdul Karim, A. (2017). Resettling on the Canadian Prairies: Integration of Syrian refugees. Calgary: Immigration Refugees and Citizenship Canada, Integration Branch-Prairies., Northwest Territories Division., & Alberta Association of Immigrant Serving Agencies

Anushay completed her BSc Psychology from UCL, where she also started her master’s in Developmental Neuroscience and Psychopathology. She was based at Yale University for her master’s thesis, where she worked with Dr Craig Bailey at the Yale Center for Emotional Intelligence to understand children’s emotion development. Anushay’s research interests include understanding child development across different cultures, factors that might be affecting it, and devising culture-specific ways to support children’s holistic development through the educational system. She is also keen on improving the research scope in Pakistan by working with Pakistani researchers, practitioners, and families.

Anushay balances her research with her position as the founder of a non-profit, Resources for Children, which aims to understand and support children’s development in Pakistan.

Publications

  1. Mazhar, A. (2022, April). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Spring Preview, New Haven, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2021, December). Does an extended family improve mentalising in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK & Pakistan. 2nd International Foundation University Conference of Psychology, Rawalpindi, Pakistan.
  3. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Theory of Mind in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK and Pakistan. Harvard Trends in Psychology Summit, Cambridge, United States.
  1. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Research Rounds, New Haven, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2020, October). Developing a non-profit to advance autism research in Pakistan. Anna Freud Centre Seminar Series, London, United Kingdom

 

Núria is a Professor of Mathematics Education at Autonomous University of Barcelona. Her research is about language and mathematics in secondary school classrooms and professional development contexts with mathematics teachers.

Her first degree was in Mathematics at University of Barcelona (1995). Soon after her initiation as a secondary school mathematics teacher in highly multilingual classrooms of Barcelona, she started her PhD at the UAB Division of Mathematics Education. She wanted to understand the critical factors behind the under-performance in school mathematics of many learners from poor urban backgrounds and recent histories of migration. Since then, she has been committed to classroom and teacher education research grounded on community work with schools and mathematics teachers in urban areas of poverty. Her years as a school teacher have provided her with greater insights into her work as a researcher and have strongly influenced the adoption of sociocultural and sociopolitical approaches to mathematics teaching and learning.

Núria was given the ICREA Academia Award of the Catalan Institution for Research and Advanced Studies in 2013, in recognition of her contributions to research on multilingual mathematics teaching and learning. She was elected to the Executive Committee of the International Commission on Mathematical Instruction as Member-at-Large in 2021, and to the International Committee of the International Group for the Psychology of Mathematics Education from 2010 to 2014. She served as Extraordinarious Professor of Mathematics Education at the University of South Africa from 2013 to 2020. She was Visiting Scholar at London South Bank University, University of Arizona, and University of North Carolina at Chapel-Hill.

Núria is currently on the editorial board of the international journal Mathematics Education Research Journal and Journal of Mathematics Teacher Education. Till 2021 she was the editor-in-chief of the Advances of Research in Mathematics Education, the official journal of the Spanish Society of Research in Mathematics Education. She is the leading co-editor of a 2018 special issue on language research in mathematics education published in ZDM-Mathematics Education, and the leading co-editor of a special issue on decentring mathematics teaching education, to be published in the Journal of Mathematics Teacher Education, February 2024.

She chaired the 7th Topic Conference of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education on Language and Mathematics (Dresden, 2018), and the ERME Topic Working Group on Language and Mathematics from 2015 to 2020. The collaborations established in the ERME context enabled for a broad range of experts to come together and move forward the research field in the form of an co-edited Routledge volume entitled ‘Classroom research on mathematics and language: Seeing learners and teachers differently’ in 2021, with Núria as the leading co-editor. She has also been co-editor of the Springer volume resulting from the 21st ICMI Study on Language Diversity and Mathematics Education in 2016, and of the Brill volume entitled ‘Mathematical discourse that breaks barriers and creates space for marginalized learners’ in 2018.

Núria’s motivation for coming to the Oxford Department of Education is her research collaboration in projects co-coordinated with Jenni Ingram on establishing an international network for research on supporting school mathematics teaching with linguistically disadvantaged learners. From her years as a secondary school in the 1990s, important challenges posed to mathematics education practice remain. Learners of mathematics who are linguistically disadvantaged for a variety of reasons, including impoverished socioeconomic status, continue to be educationally disadvantaged at a considerable risk of school failure and early dropout. More research will hopefully shed light on how to identify and develop improved practices to enable greater access to school mathematics for all learners.

Publications

SELECTION OF 10 LAST-DECADE PUBLICATIONS
[For more publications and research details, see https://orcid.org/0000-0001-5199-6336]
– Planas, N., & Chronaki, A. (2021). Multilingual mathematics learning from a dialogic-translanguaging perspective. In N. Planas, C. Morgan, & M. Schütte (Eds.), Classroom research on mathematics and language: Seeing learners and teachers differently (pp. 151-166). Routledge.
– Planas, N. (2021). How specific can language as resource become for the teaching of algebraic concepts? ZDM-Mathematics Education, 53(2), 277-288.
– Planas, N. (2021). Challenges and opportunities from translingual research on multilingual mathematics classrooms. In A. A. Essien, & A. Msimanga (Eds.), Multilingual education yearbook 2021. Policy and practice in STEM multilingual contexts (pp. 1-18). Springer.
– Planas, N., & Ngoepe, M. (2019). Right to learn mathematics: From language as right to language as resource. In C. Xenofontos (Ed.), Equity in mathematics education. Addressing a changing world (pp. 93-110). Information Age Publishing.
– Planas, N., & Schütte, M. (2018). Research frameworks for the study of language in mathematics education, ZDM-Mathematics Education, 50(6), 965-974.
– Planas, N. (2018). Language as resource: A key notion for understanding the complexity of mathematics learning. Educational Studies in Mathematics, 98(3), 215-229.
– Planas, N., Morgan, C., & Schütte, M. (2018). Mathematics education and language. Lessons and directions from two decades of research. In T. Dreyfus, M. Artigue, S. Prediger, D. Potari, & Ruthven (Eds.), Developing research in mathematics education. Twenty years of communication, cooperation and collaboration in Europe (pp. 196-210). Routledge.
– Planas, N. (2014). One speaker, two languages: Learning opportunities in the mathematics classroom. Educational Studies in Mathematics, 87(1), 51-66.
– Planas, N., & Setati Phakeng, M. (2014). On the process of gaining language as a resource in mathematics education. ZDM-Mathematics Education, 46(6), 883-893.
– Planas, N., & Civil, M. (2013). Language-as-resource and language-as-political. Tensions in the bilingual mathematics classroom. Mathematics Education Research Journal, 25(3), 361-378.

 

https://portalrecerca.uab.cat/en/persons/nuria-planas-raig-3

https://orcid.org/0000-0001-5199-6336

 

Cindy works at the intersection of learning, design, and technology, with a keen interest in the orchestration of future-ready tech-enabled learning.

She is curious how the deployment of adaptive learning systems to schools will impact classroom learning and hopes to learn more about the human-machine partnership in education. Specifically, her research is concerned with the implications that the use of such systems has on teacher-student interactions, as teachers grapple with balancing personalised learning and learning in community, as well as curriculum demands and student interests. These are some tensions which could potentially be exacerbated by affordances of adaptive learning systems.

Prior to embarking on the DPhil in Education at Oxford, Cindy worked as the Lead Specialist in Technologies for Learning at the Educational Technology Division of Ministry of Education, Singapore. She had previously completed graduate studies at the National University of Singapore and Stanford University where she was awarded Master of Arts in English Studies and Master of Arts in Education.

Reem is DPhil student from Saudi Arabia.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she worked as a Teacher, Professional Developer, then, became a Supervisor and Researcher in the Ministry of Education where she received a scholarship to pursue her DPhil education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests lie in the area of Teacher Education and Professional Learning Policy and Practice.

Publications
  • Alqahtani, Reem (2020). Saudi Universities Role in Developing Teacher Professional Development Programs: Elite Universities Experience. Journal of Educational Sciences. King Saud University.
  • Alqahtani, Reem. (2020). The effect of implementing UDL-based activities in improving EFL learners’ academic achievement and attitudes towards L2. In L. Salas, & E. Ager, Creating Quiet reflective Spaces: Language Teacher Researches Professional Development (pp. 61-62). IATEFL publications.

Lena Zlock is researching the integration of digital technology into structures of teaching, learning, and education in higher education. Her particular focus is on the digital humanities and the potential for digital methods to transform humanistic study. She works with Professor Niall Winters and Dr. James Robson.

Lena’s research interests stem from her education as an M.St. student and Ertegun Graduate Scholar in Modern Languages at the University of Oxford, and as a B.A. student in History at Stanford University. As an undergraduate, she started the Voltaire Library Project, a digitally and data-driven study of the 6,763-book collection of French Enlightenment philosopher Voltaire (you can read more about the project here and here). She has been interested in the application of digital technology to humanistic teaching since her days in Princeton Day School, where she developed an interdisciplinary curriculum on Mexico City (visit the course website here).

Her research on Voltaire led her to think more broadly about the place of digital methods in the humanities classroom, and how new technologies will revolutionise the liberal arts and higher education. As a DPhil candidate, Lena will examine the negotiation and implementation of new learning technologies within the University of Oxford at undergraduate and graduate levels.

Lena is involved in a number of digital humanities initiatives in Oxford. She previously served as the inaugural fellow of the Voltaire Lab at Oxford’s Voltaire Foundation. As a master’s student, Lena co-formulated the convergence agenda for Oxford digital humanities with Professor Howard Hotson, and is currently employed by the Humanities Division to assist with the development of an M.St. degree in Digital Scholarship (read more here). Lena set up and helps to run the History of the Book blog for the Faculty of Medieval and Modern Languages and the Oxford Book History Twitter account.

Lena welcomes inquiries from undergraduate and postgraduate students from Oxford and beyond seeking to get involved with the digital humanities in any capacity. The History of the Book blog also welcomes inquiries from prospective contributors.

 

Abbey is a Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education, in collaboration with the Department of Engineering.

Before joining the DPhil program, Abbey obtained a B.A. in Applied Linguistics with minors in Russian and Chinese from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford. She was the recipient of a Benjamin A. Gilman International Scholarship through U.S. Department of State for study in Russia and was awarded two Foreign Language and Area Studies (FLAS) Fellowships for study in both Russia and China. She holds both TESOL and TEFL certificates and has taught English as a Second Language in various contexts to a wide variety of learner populations.

Abbey’s main research interests lie in the use of technology to facilitate language learning. Her DPhil research focuses on the development of a virtual reality program to bridge the gaps that students face when learning languages through distance learning.

Julie Chia-Yi Lin is a Doctoral student at the University of Oxford, funded by the Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholarship. Her research focus on Internationalization, Policy, Management and Institutional Strategy is rooted in her professional experience in publishing and higher education, as well as from her observations regarding the continuous change in global educational dynamics.

Julie completed her B.A. at National Taiwan University, and earned a joint M.A. from the University of Vienna and the University of Wroclaw. She was previously employed as an officer for the Office of International Affairs at National Taiwan University, and then as a Publisher at Emerald Publishing.

She focuses on the development of higher education, particularly in the processes of internationalization and globalization, and tries to deliver perspectives from different Institutional sectors, and a wide array of participants. She is mindful of the influence that culture has on the development and reception of these processes, and has a special interest in the East Asia region, and Confucian-influenced higher education systems. In her doctoral research, she investigates higher ed institutional strategy, and the relationship it has with real-world policy. This includes delving into the specific interpretation and implementation of official policy by different stakeholders within the institution- faculty, administration, and management.

Publications

Lin, J. (2015). The Impact of Globalization on Taiwan’s Education Policy: The International Student. In A. Lipinsky. (Ed), Vienna Taiwan Studies Series: Immigration societies, Taiwan and Beyond. (pp. 129-151). Vienna: LIT VERLAG GmbH & Co. KG

Yibo Wang has an MA in International Marketing from the Coventry University (UK) and a Master’s in Management: Leadership and Organizational Change from the University of Birmingham (UK).

His doctoral research focuses on ‘knowledge hiding’, ‘leadership style’ and ‘Confucian culture’ in Chinese education and training institutions.

As empirical studies on ‘knowledge hiding’ in the Chinese context are scarce, Yibo hopes to uncover underlying mechanism of knowledge hiding and find its potential influence factors.

Prior to coming to Oxford, he worked as a CEO in an educational consultancy based in Beijing that advised the investment and marketing analyses on education and training industry.

Riziki’s current DPhil research focuses on emergent literacy of refugee children within multilingual settings.

Prior to commencing her DPhil research, Riziki completed an MSc in Child Development at the University of Oxford, looking at the role of teacher behavioural and cognitive judgments on the learning trajectories of Black primary school students in England.

Her research interests are education access and wellbeing of children in resettlement and asylum contexts. In line with this, her research in the past has focused on integration and resettlement processes of refugees and immigrants within Canada.

Publications

Bhattacharyya, P., Ogoe, S., Riziki, A., & Wilkinson, L. (2020). In search of a “home”: comparing the housing challenges experienced by recently arrived Yazidi and Syrian Refugees in Canada. Manuscript submitted for publication.

Bhattacharyya, P., Riziki, A., Songose, L., Ogoe, S., & Wilkinson, L. (2020). Understanding the link between pre-arrival education and trauma and language learning: A case study of Yazidi women in Canada. Canadian Diversity, 17(2).

Bhattacharyya, P., Riziki, A., & Wilkinson, L. (2018). “Settlement Service Use among Syrian Refugees in Canada” Canadian Diversity 15(1).

Wilkinson, L., Bhattacharya, P., Garcea, J., Abdul-Karim, A., Riziki, A., & Schnieders, M. (2017). Finding home: Some housing considerations for refugee families with children. Canadian Diversity, 14 (3), 31-35

Wilkinson, L., Bhattacharyya, P., Riziki, A., & Abdul-Karim, A. (2018).Yazidi Refugee Resettlement in Canada. Calgary: Immigration Refugees and Citizenship Canada-Integration Branch (Prairies and Territories Region).

Wilkinson, L., Garcea, J., Bhattacharyya, P., Riziki, A., Abdul Karim, A. (2017). Resettling on the Canadian Prairies: Integration of Syrian refugees. Calgary: Immigration Refugees and Citizenship Canada, Integration Branch-Prairies., Northwest Territories Division., & Alberta Association of Immigrant Serving Agencies

Anushay completed her BSc Psychology from UCL, where she also started her master’s in Developmental Neuroscience and Psychopathology. She was based at Yale University for her master’s thesis, where she worked with Dr Craig Bailey at the Yale Center for Emotional Intelligence to understand children’s emotion development. Anushay’s research interests include understanding child development across different cultures, factors that might be affecting it, and devising culture-specific ways to support children’s holistic development through the educational system. She is also keen on improving the research scope in Pakistan by working with Pakistani researchers, practitioners, and families.

Anushay balances her research with her position as the founder of a non-profit, Resources for Children, which aims to understand and support children’s development in Pakistan.

Publications

  1. Mazhar, A. (2022, April). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Spring Preview, New Haven, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2021, December). Does an extended family improve mentalising in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK & Pakistan. 2nd International Foundation University Conference of Psychology, Rawalpindi, Pakistan.
  3. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Theory of Mind in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK and Pakistan. Harvard Trends in Psychology Summit, Cambridge, United States.
  1. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Research Rounds, New Haven, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2020, October). Developing a non-profit to advance autism research in Pakistan. Anna Freud Centre Seminar Series, London, United Kingdom

 

Núria is a Professor of Mathematics Education at Autonomous University of Barcelona. Her research is about language and mathematics in secondary school classrooms and professional development contexts with mathematics teachers.

Her first degree was in Mathematics at University of Barcelona (1995). Soon after her initiation as a secondary school mathematics teacher in highly multilingual classrooms of Barcelona, she started her PhD at the UAB Division of Mathematics Education. She wanted to understand the critical factors behind the under-performance in school mathematics of many learners from poor urban backgrounds and recent histories of migration. Since then, she has been committed to classroom and teacher education research grounded on community work with schools and mathematics teachers in urban areas of poverty. Her years as a school teacher have provided her with greater insights into her work as a researcher and have strongly influenced the adoption of sociocultural and sociopolitical approaches to mathematics teaching and learning.

Núria was given the ICREA Academia Award of the Catalan Institution for Research and Advanced Studies in 2013, in recognition of her contributions to research on multilingual mathematics teaching and learning. She was elected to the Executive Committee of the International Commission on Mathematical Instruction as Member-at-Large in 2021, and to the International Committee of the International Group for the Psychology of Mathematics Education from 2010 to 2014. She served as Extraordinarious Professor of Mathematics Education at the University of South Africa from 2013 to 2020. She was Visiting Scholar at London South Bank University, University of Arizona, and University of North Carolina at Chapel-Hill.

Núria is currently on the editorial board of the international journal Mathematics Education Research Journal and Journal of Mathematics Teacher Education. Till 2021 she was the editor-in-chief of the Advances of Research in Mathematics Education, the official journal of the Spanish Society of Research in Mathematics Education. She is the leading co-editor of a 2018 special issue on language research in mathematics education published in ZDM-Mathematics Education, and the leading co-editor of a special issue on decentring mathematics teaching education, to be published in the Journal of Mathematics Teacher Education, February 2024.

She chaired the 7th Topic Conference of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education on Language and Mathematics (Dresden, 2018), and the ERME Topic Working Group on Language and Mathematics from 2015 to 2020. The collaborations established in the ERME context enabled for a broad range of experts to come together and move forward the research field in the form of an co-edited Routledge volume entitled ‘Classroom research on mathematics and language: Seeing learners and teachers differently’ in 2021, with Núria as the leading co-editor. She has also been co-editor of the Springer volume resulting from the 21st ICMI Study on Language Diversity and Mathematics Education in 2016, and of the Brill volume entitled ‘Mathematical discourse that breaks barriers and creates space for marginalized learners’ in 2018.

Núria’s motivation for coming to the Oxford Department of Education is her research collaboration in projects co-coordinated with Jenni Ingram on establishing an international network for research on supporting school mathematics teaching with linguistically disadvantaged learners. From her years as a secondary school in the 1990s, important challenges posed to mathematics education practice remain. Learners of mathematics who are linguistically disadvantaged for a variety of reasons, including impoverished socioeconomic status, continue to be educationally disadvantaged at a considerable risk of school failure and early dropout. More research will hopefully shed light on how to identify and develop improved practices to enable greater access to school mathematics for all learners.

Publications

SELECTION OF 10 LAST-DECADE PUBLICATIONS
[For more publications and research details, see https://orcid.org/0000-0001-5199-6336]
– Planas, N., & Chronaki, A. (2021). Multilingual mathematics learning from a dialogic-translanguaging perspective. In N. Planas, C. Morgan, & M. Schütte (Eds.), Classroom research on mathematics and language: Seeing learners and teachers differently (pp. 151-166). Routledge.
– Planas, N. (2021). How specific can language as resource become for the teaching of algebraic concepts? ZDM-Mathematics Education, 53(2), 277-288.
– Planas, N. (2021). Challenges and opportunities from translingual research on multilingual mathematics classrooms. In A. A. Essien, & A. Msimanga (Eds.), Multilingual education yearbook 2021. Policy and practice in STEM multilingual contexts (pp. 1-18). Springer.
– Planas, N., & Ngoepe, M. (2019). Right to learn mathematics: From language as right to language as resource. In C. Xenofontos (Ed.), Equity in mathematics education. Addressing a changing world (pp. 93-110). Information Age Publishing.
– Planas, N., & Schütte, M. (2018). Research frameworks for the study of language in mathematics education, ZDM-Mathematics Education, 50(6), 965-974.
– Planas, N. (2018). Language as resource: A key notion for understanding the complexity of mathematics learning. Educational Studies in Mathematics, 98(3), 215-229.
– Planas, N., Morgan, C., & Schütte, M. (2018). Mathematics education and language. Lessons and directions from two decades of research. In T. Dreyfus, M. Artigue, S. Prediger, D. Potari, & Ruthven (Eds.), Developing research in mathematics education. Twenty years of communication, cooperation and collaboration in Europe (pp. 196-210). Routledge.
– Planas, N. (2014). One speaker, two languages: Learning opportunities in the mathematics classroom. Educational Studies in Mathematics, 87(1), 51-66.
– Planas, N., & Setati Phakeng, M. (2014). On the process of gaining language as a resource in mathematics education. ZDM-Mathematics Education, 46(6), 883-893.
– Planas, N., & Civil, M. (2013). Language-as-resource and language-as-political. Tensions in the bilingual mathematics classroom. Mathematics Education Research Journal, 25(3), 361-378.

 

https://portalrecerca.uab.cat/en/persons/nuria-planas-raig-3

https://orcid.org/0000-0001-5199-6336

 

Cindy works at the intersection of learning, design, and technology, with a keen interest in the orchestration of future-ready tech-enabled learning.

She is curious how the deployment of adaptive learning systems to schools will impact classroom learning and hopes to learn more about the human-machine partnership in education. Specifically, her research is concerned with the implications that the use of such systems has on teacher-student interactions, as teachers grapple with balancing personalised learning and learning in community, as well as curriculum demands and student interests. These are some tensions which could potentially be exacerbated by affordances of adaptive learning systems.

Prior to embarking on the DPhil in Education at Oxford, Cindy worked as the Lead Specialist in Technologies for Learning at the Educational Technology Division of Ministry of Education, Singapore. She had previously completed graduate studies at the National University of Singapore and Stanford University where she was awarded Master of Arts in English Studies and Master of Arts in Education.

Reem is DPhil student from Saudi Arabia.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she worked as a Teacher, Professional Developer, then, became a Supervisor and Researcher in the Ministry of Education where she received a scholarship to pursue her DPhil education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests lie in the area of Teacher Education and Professional Learning Policy and Practice.

Publications
  • Alqahtani, Reem (2020). Saudi Universities Role in Developing Teacher Professional Development Programs: Elite Universities Experience. Journal of Educational Sciences. King Saud University.
  • Alqahtani, Reem. (2020). The effect of implementing UDL-based activities in improving EFL learners’ academic achievement and attitudes towards L2. In L. Salas, & E. Ager, Creating Quiet reflective Spaces: Language Teacher Researches Professional Development (pp. 61-62). IATEFL publications.

Lena Zlock is researching the integration of digital technology into structures of teaching, learning, and education in higher education. Her particular focus is on the digital humanities and the potential for digital methods to transform humanistic study. She works with Professor Niall Winters and Dr. James Robson.

Lena’s research interests stem from her education as an M.St. student and Ertegun Graduate Scholar in Modern Languages at the University of Oxford, and as a B.A. student in History at Stanford University. As an undergraduate, she started the Voltaire Library Project, a digitally and data-driven study of the 6,763-book collection of French Enlightenment philosopher Voltaire (you can read more about the project here and here). She has been interested in the application of digital technology to humanistic teaching since her days in Princeton Day School, where she developed an interdisciplinary curriculum on Mexico City (visit the course website here).

Her research on Voltaire led her to think more broadly about the place of digital methods in the humanities classroom, and how new technologies will revolutionise the liberal arts and higher education. As a DPhil candidate, Lena will examine the negotiation and implementation of new learning technologies within the University of Oxford at undergraduate and graduate levels.

Lena is involved in a number of digital humanities initiatives in Oxford. She previously served as the inaugural fellow of the Voltaire Lab at Oxford’s Voltaire Foundation. As a master’s student, Lena co-formulated the convergence agenda for Oxford digital humanities with Professor Howard Hotson, and is currently employed by the Humanities Division to assist with the development of an M.St. degree in Digital Scholarship (read more here). Lena set up and helps to run the History of the Book blog for the Faculty of Medieval and Modern Languages and the Oxford Book History Twitter account.

Lena welcomes inquiries from undergraduate and postgraduate students from Oxford and beyond seeking to get involved with the digital humanities in any capacity. The History of the Book blog also welcomes inquiries from prospective contributors.

 

Abbey is a Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education, in collaboration with the Department of Engineering.

Before joining the DPhil program, Abbey obtained a B.A. in Applied Linguistics with minors in Russian and Chinese from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford. She was the recipient of a Benjamin A. Gilman International Scholarship through U.S. Department of State for study in Russia and was awarded two Foreign Language and Area Studies (FLAS) Fellowships for study in both Russia and China. She holds both TESOL and TEFL certificates and has taught English as a Second Language in various contexts to a wide variety of learner populations.

Abbey’s main research interests lie in the use of technology to facilitate language learning. Her DPhil research focuses on the development of a virtual reality program to bridge the gaps that students face when learning languages through distance learning.

Julie Chia-Yi Lin is a Doctoral student at the University of Oxford, funded by the Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholarship. Her research focus on Internationalization, Policy, Management and Institutional Strategy is rooted in her professional experience in publishing and higher education, as well as from her observations regarding the continuous change in global educational dynamics.

Julie completed her B.A. at National Taiwan University, and earned a joint M.A. from the University of Vienna and the University of Wroclaw. She was previously employed as an officer for the Office of International Affairs at National Taiwan University, and then as a Publisher at Emerald Publishing.

She focuses on the development of higher education, particularly in the processes of internationalization and globalization, and tries to deliver perspectives from different Institutional sectors, and a wide array of participants. She is mindful of the influence that culture has on the development and reception of these processes, and has a special interest in the East Asia region, and Confucian-influenced higher education systems. In her doctoral research, she investigates higher ed institutional strategy, and the relationship it has with real-world policy. This includes delving into the specific interpretation and implementation of official policy by different stakeholders within the institution- faculty, administration, and management.

Publications

Lin, J. (2015). The Impact of Globalization on Taiwan’s Education Policy: The International Student. In A. Lipinsky. (Ed), Vienna Taiwan Studies Series: Immigration societies, Taiwan and Beyond. (pp. 129-151). Vienna: LIT VERLAG GmbH & Co. KG

Yibo Wang has an MA in International Marketing from the Coventry University (UK) and a Master’s in Management: Leadership and Organizational Change from the University of Birmingham (UK).

His doctoral research focuses on ‘knowledge hiding’, ‘leadership style’ and ‘Confucian culture’ in Chinese education and training institutions.

As empirical studies on ‘knowledge hiding’ in the Chinese context are scarce, Yibo hopes to uncover underlying mechanism of knowledge hiding and find its potential influence factors.

Prior to coming to Oxford, he worked as a CEO in an educational consultancy based in Beijing that advised the investment and marketing analyses on education and training industry.

Riziki’s current DPhil research focuses on emergent literacy of refugee children within multilingual settings.

Prior to commencing her DPhil research, Riziki completed an MSc in Child Development at the University of Oxford, looking at the role of teacher behavioural and cognitive judgments on the learning trajectories of Black primary school students in England.

Her research interests are education access and wellbeing of children in resettlement and asylum contexts. In line with this, her research in the past has focused on integration and resettlement processes of refugees and immigrants within Canada.

Publications

Bhattacharyya, P., Ogoe, S., Riziki, A., & Wilkinson, L. (2020). In search of a “home”: comparing the housing challenges experienced by recently arrived Yazidi and Syrian Refugees in Canada. Manuscript submitted for publication.

Bhattacharyya, P., Riziki, A., Songose, L., Ogoe, S., & Wilkinson, L. (2020). Understanding the link between pre-arrival education and trauma and language learning: A case study of Yazidi women in Canada. Canadian Diversity, 17(2).

Bhattacharyya, P., Riziki, A., & Wilkinson, L. (2018). “Settlement Service Use among Syrian Refugees in Canada” Canadian Diversity 15(1).

Wilkinson, L., Bhattacharya, P., Garcea, J., Abdul-Karim, A., Riziki, A., & Schnieders, M. (2017). Finding home: Some housing considerations for refugee families with children. Canadian Diversity, 14 (3), 31-35

Wilkinson, L., Bhattacharyya, P., Riziki, A., & Abdul-Karim, A. (2018).Yazidi Refugee Resettlement in Canada. Calgary: Immigration Refugees and Citizenship Canada-Integration Branch (Prairies and Territories Region).

Wilkinson, L., Garcea, J., Bhattacharyya, P., Riziki, A., Abdul Karim, A. (2017). Resettling on the Canadian Prairies: Integration of Syrian refugees. Calgary: Immigration Refugees and Citizenship Canada, Integration Branch-Prairies., Northwest Territories Division., & Alberta Association of Immigrant Serving Agencies

Anushay completed her BSc Psychology from UCL, where she also started her master’s in Developmental Neuroscience and Psychopathology. She was based at Yale University for her master’s thesis, where she worked with Dr Craig Bailey at the Yale Center for Emotional Intelligence to understand children’s emotion development. Anushay’s research interests include understanding child development across different cultures, factors that might be affecting it, and devising culture-specific ways to support children’s holistic development through the educational system. She is also keen on improving the research scope in Pakistan by working with Pakistani researchers, practitioners, and families.

Anushay balances her research with her position as the founder of a non-profit, Resources for Children, which aims to understand and support children’s development in Pakistan.

Publications

  1. Mazhar, A. (2022, April). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Spring Preview, New Haven, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2021, December). Does an extended family improve mentalising in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK & Pakistan. 2nd International Foundation University Conference of Psychology, Rawalpindi, Pakistan.
  3. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Theory of Mind in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK and Pakistan. Harvard Trends in Psychology Summit, Cambridge, United States.
  1. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Research Rounds, New Haven, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2020, October). Developing a non-profit to advance autism research in Pakistan. Anna Freud Centre Seminar Series, London, United Kingdom

 

Núria is a Professor of Mathematics Education at Autonomous University of Barcelona. Her research is about language and mathematics in secondary school classrooms and professional development contexts with mathematics teachers.

Her first degree was in Mathematics at University of Barcelona (1995). Soon after her initiation as a secondary school mathematics teacher in highly multilingual classrooms of Barcelona, she started her PhD at the UAB Division of Mathematics Education. She wanted to understand the critical factors behind the under-performance in school mathematics of many learners from poor urban backgrounds and recent histories of migration. Since then, she has been committed to classroom and teacher education research grounded on community work with schools and mathematics teachers in urban areas of poverty. Her years as a school teacher have provided her with greater insights into her work as a researcher and have strongly influenced the adoption of sociocultural and sociopolitical approaches to mathematics teaching and learning.

Núria was given the ICREA Academia Award of the Catalan Institution for Research and Advanced Studies in 2013, in recognition of her contributions to research on multilingual mathematics teaching and learning. She was elected to the Executive Committee of the International Commission on Mathematical Instruction as Member-at-Large in 2021, and to the International Committee of the International Group for the Psychology of Mathematics Education from 2010 to 2014. She served as Extraordinarious Professor of Mathematics Education at the University of South Africa from 2013 to 2020. She was Visiting Scholar at London South Bank University, University of Arizona, and University of North Carolina at Chapel-Hill.

Núria is currently on the editorial board of the international journal Mathematics Education Research Journal and Journal of Mathematics Teacher Education. Till 2021 she was the editor-in-chief of the Advances of Research in Mathematics Education, the official journal of the Spanish Society of Research in Mathematics Education. She is the leading co-editor of a 2018 special issue on language research in mathematics education published in ZDM-Mathematics Education, and the leading co-editor of a special issue on decentring mathematics teaching education, to be published in the Journal of Mathematics Teacher Education, February 2024.

She chaired the 7th Topic Conference of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education on Language and Mathematics (Dresden, 2018), and the ERME Topic Working Group on Language and Mathematics from 2015 to 2020. The collaborations established in the ERME context enabled for a broad range of experts to come together and move forward the research field in the form of an co-edited Routledge volume entitled ‘Classroom research on mathematics and language: Seeing learners and teachers differently’ in 2021, with Núria as the leading co-editor. She has also been co-editor of the Springer volume resulting from the 21st ICMI Study on Language Diversity and Mathematics Education in 2016, and of the Brill volume entitled ‘Mathematical discourse that breaks barriers and creates space for marginalized learners’ in 2018.

Núria’s motivation for coming to the Oxford Department of Education is her research collaboration in projects co-coordinated with Jenni Ingram on establishing an international network for research on supporting school mathematics teaching with linguistically disadvantaged learners. From her years as a secondary school in the 1990s, important challenges posed to mathematics education practice remain. Learners of mathematics who are linguistically disadvantaged for a variety of reasons, including impoverished socioeconomic status, continue to be educationally disadvantaged at a considerable risk of school failure and early dropout. More research will hopefully shed light on how to identify and develop improved practices to enable greater access to school mathematics for all learners.

Publications

SELECTION OF 10 LAST-DECADE PUBLICATIONS
[For more publications and research details, see https://orcid.org/0000-0001-5199-6336]
– Planas, N., & Chronaki, A. (2021). Multilingual mathematics learning from a dialogic-translanguaging perspective. In N. Planas, C. Morgan, & M. Schütte (Eds.), Classroom research on mathematics and language: Seeing learners and teachers differently (pp. 151-166). Routledge.
– Planas, N. (2021). How specific can language as resource become for the teaching of algebraic concepts? ZDM-Mathematics Education, 53(2), 277-288.
– Planas, N. (2021). Challenges and opportunities from translingual research on multilingual mathematics classrooms. In A. A. Essien, & A. Msimanga (Eds.), Multilingual education yearbook 2021. Policy and practice in STEM multilingual contexts (pp. 1-18). Springer.
– Planas, N., & Ngoepe, M. (2019). Right to learn mathematics: From language as right to language as resource. In C. Xenofontos (Ed.), Equity in mathematics education. Addressing a changing world (pp. 93-110). Information Age Publishing.
– Planas, N., & Schütte, M. (2018). Research frameworks for the study of language in mathematics education, ZDM-Mathematics Education, 50(6), 965-974.
– Planas, N. (2018). Language as resource: A key notion for understanding the complexity of mathematics learning. Educational Studies in Mathematics, 98(3), 215-229.
– Planas, N., Morgan, C., & Schütte, M. (2018). Mathematics education and language. Lessons and directions from two decades of research. In T. Dreyfus, M. Artigue, S. Prediger, D. Potari, & Ruthven (Eds.), Developing research in mathematics education. Twenty years of communication, cooperation and collaboration in Europe (pp. 196-210). Routledge.
– Planas, N. (2014). One speaker, two languages: Learning opportunities in the mathematics classroom. Educational Studies in Mathematics, 87(1), 51-66.
– Planas, N., & Setati Phakeng, M. (2014). On the process of gaining language as a resource in mathematics education. ZDM-Mathematics Education, 46(6), 883-893.
– Planas, N., & Civil, M. (2013). Language-as-resource and language-as-political. Tensions in the bilingual mathematics classroom. Mathematics Education Research Journal, 25(3), 361-378.

 

https://portalrecerca.uab.cat/en/persons/nuria-planas-raig-3

https://orcid.org/0000-0001-5199-6336

 

Cindy works at the intersection of learning, design, and technology, with a keen interest in the orchestration of future-ready tech-enabled learning.

She is curious how the deployment of adaptive learning systems to schools will impact classroom learning and hopes to learn more about the human-machine partnership in education. Specifically, her research is concerned with the implications that the use of such systems has on teacher-student interactions, as teachers grapple with balancing personalised learning and learning in community, as well as curriculum demands and student interests. These are some tensions which could potentially be exacerbated by affordances of adaptive learning systems.

Prior to embarking on the DPhil in Education at Oxford, Cindy worked as the Lead Specialist in Technologies for Learning at the Educational Technology Division of Ministry of Education, Singapore. She had previously completed graduate studies at the National University of Singapore and Stanford University where she was awarded Master of Arts in English Studies and Master of Arts in Education.

Reem is DPhil student from Saudi Arabia.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she worked as a Teacher, Professional Developer, then, became a Supervisor and Researcher in the Ministry of Education where she received a scholarship to pursue her DPhil education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests lie in the area of Teacher Education and Professional Learning Policy and Practice.

Publications
  • Alqahtani, Reem (2020). Saudi Universities Role in Developing Teacher Professional Development Programs: Elite Universities Experience. Journal of Educational Sciences. King Saud University.
  • Alqahtani, Reem. (2020). The effect of implementing UDL-based activities in improving EFL learners’ academic achievement and attitudes towards L2. In L. Salas, & E. Ager, Creating Quiet reflective Spaces: Language Teacher Researches Professional Development (pp. 61-62). IATEFL publications.

Lena Zlock is researching the integration of digital technology into structures of teaching, learning, and education in higher education. Her particular focus is on the digital humanities and the potential for digital methods to transform humanistic study. She works with Professor Niall Winters and Dr. James Robson.

Lena’s research interests stem from her education as an M.St. student and Ertegun Graduate Scholar in Modern Languages at the University of Oxford, and as a B.A. student in History at Stanford University. As an undergraduate, she started the Voltaire Library Project, a digitally and data-driven study of the 6,763-book collection of French Enlightenment philosopher Voltaire (you can read more about the project here and here). She has been interested in the application of digital technology to humanistic teaching since her days in Princeton Day School, where she developed an interdisciplinary curriculum on Mexico City (visit the course website here).

Her research on Voltaire led her to think more broadly about the place of digital methods in the humanities classroom, and how new technologies will revolutionise the liberal arts and higher education. As a DPhil candidate, Lena will examine the negotiation and implementation of new learning technologies within the University of Oxford at undergraduate and graduate levels.

Lena is involved in a number of digital humanities initiatives in Oxford. She previously served as the inaugural fellow of the Voltaire Lab at Oxford’s Voltaire Foundation. As a master’s student, Lena co-formulated the convergence agenda for Oxford digital humanities with Professor Howard Hotson, and is currently employed by the Humanities Division to assist with the development of an M.St. degree in Digital Scholarship (read more here). Lena set up and helps to run the History of the Book blog for the Faculty of Medieval and Modern Languages and the Oxford Book History Twitter account.

Lena welcomes inquiries from undergraduate and postgraduate students from Oxford and beyond seeking to get involved with the digital humanities in any capacity. The History of the Book blog also welcomes inquiries from prospective contributors.

 

Abbey is a Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education, in collaboration with the Department of Engineering.

Before joining the DPhil program, Abbey obtained a B.A. in Applied Linguistics with minors in Russian and Chinese from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford. She was the recipient of a Benjamin A. Gilman International Scholarship through U.S. Department of State for study in Russia and was awarded two Foreign Language and Area Studies (FLAS) Fellowships for study in both Russia and China. She holds both TESOL and TEFL certificates and has taught English as a Second Language in various contexts to a wide variety of learner populations.

Abbey’s main research interests lie in the use of technology to facilitate language learning. Her DPhil research focuses on the development of a virtual reality program to bridge the gaps that students face when learning languages through distance learning.

Julie Chia-Yi Lin is a Doctoral student at the University of Oxford, funded by the Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholarship. Her research focus on Internationalization, Policy, Management and Institutional Strategy is rooted in her professional experience in publishing and higher education, as well as from her observations regarding the continuous change in global educational dynamics.

Julie completed her B.A. at National Taiwan University, and earned a joint M.A. from the University of Vienna and the University of Wroclaw. She was previously employed as an officer for the Office of International Affairs at National Taiwan University, and then as a Publisher at Emerald Publishing.

She focuses on the development of higher education, particularly in the processes of internationalization and globalization, and tries to deliver perspectives from different Institutional sectors, and a wide array of participants. She is mindful of the influence that culture has on the development and reception of these processes, and has a special interest in the East Asia region, and Confucian-influenced higher education systems. In her doctoral research, she investigates higher ed institutional strategy, and the relationship it has with real-world policy. This includes delving into the specific interpretation and implementation of official policy by different stakeholders within the institution- faculty, administration, and management.

Publications

Lin, J. (2015). The Impact of Globalization on Taiwan’s Education Policy: The International Student. In A. Lipinsky. (Ed), Vienna Taiwan Studies Series: Immigration societies, Taiwan and Beyond. (pp. 129-151). Vienna: LIT VERLAG GmbH & Co. KG

Yibo Wang has an MA in International Marketing from the Coventry University (UK) and a Master’s in Management: Leadership and Organizational Change from the University of Birmingham (UK).

His doctoral research focuses on ‘knowledge hiding’, ‘leadership style’ and ‘Confucian culture’ in Chinese education and training institutions.

As empirical studies on ‘knowledge hiding’ in the Chinese context are scarce, Yibo hopes to uncover underlying mechanism of knowledge hiding and find its potential influence factors.

Prior to coming to Oxford, he worked as a CEO in an educational consultancy based in Beijing that advised the investment and marketing analyses on education and training industry.

Riziki’s current DPhil research focuses on emergent literacy of refugee children within multilingual settings.

Prior to commencing her DPhil research, Riziki completed an MSc in Child Development at the University of Oxford, looking at the role of teacher behavioural and cognitive judgments on the learning trajectories of Black primary school students in England.

Her research interests are education access and wellbeing of children in resettlement and asylum contexts. In line with this, her research in the past has focused on integration and resettlement processes of refugees and immigrants within Canada.

Publications

Bhattacharyya, P., Ogoe, S., Riziki, A., & Wilkinson, L. (2020). In search of a “home”: comparing the housing challenges experienced by recently arrived Yazidi and Syrian Refugees in Canada. Manuscript submitted for publication.

Bhattacharyya, P., Riziki, A., Songose, L., Ogoe, S., & Wilkinson, L. (2020). Understanding the link between pre-arrival education and trauma and language learning: A case study of Yazidi women in Canada. Canadian Diversity, 17(2).

Bhattacharyya, P., Riziki, A., & Wilkinson, L. (2018). “Settlement Service Use among Syrian Refugees in Canada” Canadian Diversity 15(1).

Wilkinson, L., Bhattacharya, P., Garcea, J., Abdul-Karim, A., Riziki, A., & Schnieders, M. (2017). Finding home: Some housing considerations for refugee families with children. Canadian Diversity, 14 (3), 31-35

Wilkinson, L., Bhattacharyya, P., Riziki, A., & Abdul-Karim, A. (2018).Yazidi Refugee Resettlement in Canada. Calgary: Immigration Refugees and Citizenship Canada-Integration Branch (Prairies and Territories Region).

Wilkinson, L., Garcea, J., Bhattacharyya, P., Riziki, A., Abdul Karim, A. (2017). Resettling on the Canadian Prairies: Integration of Syrian refugees. Calgary: Immigration Refugees and Citizenship Canada, Integration Branch-Prairies., Northwest Territories Division., & Alberta Association of Immigrant Serving Agencies

Anushay completed her BSc Psychology from UCL, where she also started her master’s in Developmental Neuroscience and Psychopathology. She was based at Yale University for her master’s thesis, where she worked with Dr Craig Bailey at the Yale Center for Emotional Intelligence to understand children’s emotion development. Anushay’s research interests include understanding child development across different cultures, factors that might be affecting it, and devising culture-specific ways to support children’s holistic development through the educational system. She is also keen on improving the research scope in Pakistan by working with Pakistani researchers, practitioners, and families.

Anushay balances her research with her position as the founder of a non-profit, Resources for Children, which aims to understand and support children’s development in Pakistan.

Publications

  1. Mazhar, A. (2022, April). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Spring Preview, New Haven, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2021, December). Does an extended family improve mentalising in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK & Pakistan. 2nd International Foundation University Conference of Psychology, Rawalpindi, Pakistan.
  3. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Theory of Mind in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK and Pakistan. Harvard Trends in Psychology Summit, Cambridge, United States.
  1. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Research Rounds, New Haven, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2020, October). Developing a non-profit to advance autism research in Pakistan. Anna Freud Centre Seminar Series, London, United Kingdom

 

Núria is a Professor of Mathematics Education at Autonomous University of Barcelona. Her research is about language and mathematics in secondary school classrooms and professional development contexts with mathematics teachers.

Her first degree was in Mathematics at University of Barcelona (1995). Soon after her initiation as a secondary school mathematics teacher in highly multilingual classrooms of Barcelona, she started her PhD at the UAB Division of Mathematics Education. She wanted to understand the critical factors behind the under-performance in school mathematics of many learners from poor urban backgrounds and recent histories of migration. Since then, she has been committed to classroom and teacher education research grounded on community work with schools and mathematics teachers in urban areas of poverty. Her years as a school teacher have provided her with greater insights into her work as a researcher and have strongly influenced the adoption of sociocultural and sociopolitical approaches to mathematics teaching and learning.

Núria was given the ICREA Academia Award of the Catalan Institution for Research and Advanced Studies in 2013, in recognition of her contributions to research on multilingual mathematics teaching and learning. She was elected to the Executive Committee of the International Commission on Mathematical Instruction as Member-at-Large in 2021, and to the International Committee of the International Group for the Psychology of Mathematics Education from 2010 to 2014. She served as Extraordinarious Professor of Mathematics Education at the University of South Africa from 2013 to 2020. She was Visiting Scholar at London South Bank University, University of Arizona, and University of North Carolina at Chapel-Hill.

Núria is currently on the editorial board of the international journal Mathematics Education Research Journal and Journal of Mathematics Teacher Education. Till 2021 she was the editor-in-chief of the Advances of Research in Mathematics Education, the official journal of the Spanish Society of Research in Mathematics Education. She is the leading co-editor of a 2018 special issue on language research in mathematics education published in ZDM-Mathematics Education, and the leading co-editor of a special issue on decentring mathematics teaching education, to be published in the Journal of Mathematics Teacher Education, February 2024.

She chaired the 7th Topic Conference of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education on Language and Mathematics (Dresden, 2018), and the ERME Topic Working Group on Language and Mathematics from 2015 to 2020. The collaborations established in the ERME context enabled for a broad range of experts to come together and move forward the research field in the form of an co-edited Routledge volume entitled ‘Classroom research on mathematics and language: Seeing learners and teachers differently’ in 2021, with Núria as the leading co-editor. She has also been co-editor of the Springer volume resulting from the 21st ICMI Study on Language Diversity and Mathematics Education in 2016, and of the Brill volume entitled ‘Mathematical discourse that breaks barriers and creates space for marginalized learners’ in 2018.

Núria’s motivation for coming to the Oxford Department of Education is her research collaboration in projects co-coordinated with Jenni Ingram on establishing an international network for research on supporting school mathematics teaching with linguistically disadvantaged learners. From her years as a secondary school in the 1990s, important challenges posed to mathematics education practice remain. Learners of mathematics who are linguistically disadvantaged for a variety of reasons, including impoverished socioeconomic status, continue to be educationally disadvantaged at a considerable risk of school failure and early dropout. More research will hopefully shed light on how to identify and develop improved practices to enable greater access to school mathematics for all learners.

Publications

SELECTION OF 10 LAST-DECADE PUBLICATIONS
[For more publications and research details, see https://orcid.org/0000-0001-5199-6336]
– Planas, N., & Chronaki, A. (2021). Multilingual mathematics learning from a dialogic-translanguaging perspective. In N. Planas, C. Morgan, & M. Schütte (Eds.), Classroom research on mathematics and language: Seeing learners and teachers differently (pp. 151-166). Routledge.
– Planas, N. (2021). How specific can language as resource become for the teaching of algebraic concepts? ZDM-Mathematics Education, 53(2), 277-288.
– Planas, N. (2021). Challenges and opportunities from translingual research on multilingual mathematics classrooms. In A. A. Essien, & A. Msimanga (Eds.), Multilingual education yearbook 2021. Policy and practice in STEM multilingual contexts (pp. 1-18). Springer.
– Planas, N., & Ngoepe, M. (2019). Right to learn mathematics: From language as right to language as resource. In C. Xenofontos (Ed.), Equity in mathematics education. Addressing a changing world (pp. 93-110). Information Age Publishing.
– Planas, N., & Schütte, M. (2018). Research frameworks for the study of language in mathematics education, ZDM-Mathematics Education, 50(6), 965-974.
– Planas, N. (2018). Language as resource: A key notion for understanding the complexity of mathematics learning. Educational Studies in Mathematics, 98(3), 215-229.
– Planas, N., Morgan, C., & Schütte, M. (2018). Mathematics education and language. Lessons and directions from two decades of research. In T. Dreyfus, M. Artigue, S. Prediger, D. Potari, & Ruthven (Eds.), Developing research in mathematics education. Twenty years of communication, cooperation and collaboration in Europe (pp. 196-210). Routledge.
– Planas, N. (2014). One speaker, two languages: Learning opportunities in the mathematics classroom. Educational Studies in Mathematics, 87(1), 51-66.
– Planas, N., & Setati Phakeng, M. (2014). On the process of gaining language as a resource in mathematics education. ZDM-Mathematics Education, 46(6), 883-893.
– Planas, N., & Civil, M. (2013). Language-as-resource and language-as-political. Tensions in the bilingual mathematics classroom. Mathematics Education Research Journal, 25(3), 361-378.

 

https://portalrecerca.uab.cat/en/persons/nuria-planas-raig-3

https://orcid.org/0000-0001-5199-6336

 

Cindy works at the intersection of learning, design, and technology, with a keen interest in the orchestration of future-ready tech-enabled learning.

She is curious how the deployment of adaptive learning systems to schools will impact classroom learning and hopes to learn more about the human-machine partnership in education. Specifically, her research is concerned with the implications that the use of such systems has on teacher-student interactions, as teachers grapple with balancing personalised learning and learning in community, as well as curriculum demands and student interests. These are some tensions which could potentially be exacerbated by affordances of adaptive learning systems.

Prior to embarking on the DPhil in Education at Oxford, Cindy worked as the Lead Specialist in Technologies for Learning at the Educational Technology Division of Ministry of Education, Singapore. She had previously completed graduate studies at the National University of Singapore and Stanford University where she was awarded Master of Arts in English Studies and Master of Arts in Education.

Reem is DPhil student from Saudi Arabia.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she worked as a Teacher, Professional Developer, then, became a Supervisor and Researcher in the Ministry of Education where she received a scholarship to pursue her DPhil education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests lie in the area of Teacher Education and Professional Learning Policy and Practice.

Publications
  • Alqahtani, Reem (2020). Saudi Universities Role in Developing Teacher Professional Development Programs: Elite Universities Experience. Journal of Educational Sciences. King Saud University.
  • Alqahtani, Reem. (2020). The effect of implementing UDL-based activities in improving EFL learners’ academic achievement and attitudes towards L2. In L. Salas, & E. Ager, Creating Quiet reflective Spaces: Language Teacher Researches Professional Development (pp. 61-62). IATEFL publications.

Lena Zlock is researching the integration of digital technology into structures of teaching, learning, and education in higher education. Her particular focus is on the digital humanities and the potential for digital methods to transform humanistic study. She works with Professor Niall Winters and Dr. James Robson.

Lena’s research interests stem from her education as an M.St. student and Ertegun Graduate Scholar in Modern Languages at the University of Oxford, and as a B.A. student in History at Stanford University. As an undergraduate, she started the Voltaire Library Project, a digitally and data-driven study of the 6,763-book collection of French Enlightenment philosopher Voltaire (you can read more about the project here and here). She has been interested in the application of digital technology to humanistic teaching since her days in Princeton Day School, where she developed an interdisciplinary curriculum on Mexico City (visit the course website here).

Her research on Voltaire led her to think more broadly about the place of digital methods in the humanities classroom, and how new technologies will revolutionise the liberal arts and higher education. As a DPhil candidate, Lena will examine the negotiation and implementation of new learning technologies within the University of Oxford at undergraduate and graduate levels.

Lena is involved in a number of digital humanities initiatives in Oxford. She previously served as the inaugural fellow of the Voltaire Lab at Oxford’s Voltaire Foundation. As a master’s student, Lena co-formulated the convergence agenda for Oxford digital humanities with Professor Howard Hotson, and is currently employed by the Humanities Division to assist with the development of an M.St. degree in Digital Scholarship (read more here). Lena set up and helps to run the History of the Book blog for the Faculty of Medieval and Modern Languages and the Oxford Book History Twitter account.

Lena welcomes inquiries from undergraduate and postgraduate students from Oxford and beyond seeking to get involved with the digital humanities in any capacity. The History of the Book blog also welcomes inquiries from prospective contributors.

 

Abbey is a Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education, in collaboration with the Department of Engineering.

Before joining the DPhil program, Abbey obtained a B.A. in Applied Linguistics with minors in Russian and Chinese from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford. She was the recipient of a Benjamin A. Gilman International Scholarship through U.S. Department of State for study in Russia and was awarded two Foreign Language and Area Studies (FLAS) Fellowships for study in both Russia and China. She holds both TESOL and TEFL certificates and has taught English as a Second Language in various contexts to a wide variety of learner populations.

Abbey’s main research interests lie in the use of technology to facilitate language learning. Her DPhil research focuses on the development of a virtual reality program to bridge the gaps that students face when learning languages through distance learning.

Julie Chia-Yi Lin is a Doctoral student at the University of Oxford, funded by the Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholarship. Her research focus on Internationalization, Policy, Management and Institutional Strategy is rooted in her professional experience in publishing and higher education, as well as from her observations regarding the continuous change in global educational dynamics.

Julie completed her B.A. at National Taiwan University, and earned a joint M.A. from the University of Vienna and the University of Wroclaw. She was previously employed as an officer for the Office of International Affairs at National Taiwan University, and then as a Publisher at Emerald Publishing.

She focuses on the development of higher education, particularly in the processes of internationalization and globalization, and tries to deliver perspectives from different Institutional sectors, and a wide array of participants. She is mindful of the influence that culture has on the development and reception of these processes, and has a special interest in the East Asia region, and Confucian-influenced higher education systems. In her doctoral research, she investigates higher ed institutional strategy, and the relationship it has with real-world policy. This includes delving into the specific interpretation and implementation of official policy by different stakeholders within the institution- faculty, administration, and management.

Publications

Lin, J. (2015). The Impact of Globalization on Taiwan’s Education Policy: The International Student. In A. Lipinsky. (Ed), Vienna Taiwan Studies Series: Immigration societies, Taiwan and Beyond. (pp. 129-151). Vienna: LIT VERLAG GmbH & Co. KG

Yibo Wang has an MA in International Marketing from the Coventry University (UK) and a Master’s in Management: Leadership and Organizational Change from the University of Birmingham (UK).

His doctoral research focuses on ‘knowledge hiding’, ‘leadership style’ and ‘Confucian culture’ in Chinese education and training institutions.

As empirical studies on ‘knowledge hiding’ in the Chinese context are scarce, Yibo hopes to uncover underlying mechanism of knowledge hiding and find its potential influence factors.

Prior to coming to Oxford, he worked as a CEO in an educational consultancy based in Beijing that advised the investment and marketing analyses on education and training industry.

Riziki’s current DPhil research focuses on emergent literacy of refugee children within multilingual settings.

Prior to commencing her DPhil research, Riziki completed an MSc in Child Development at the University of Oxford, looking at the role of teacher behavioural and cognitive judgments on the learning trajectories of Black primary school students in England.

Her research interests are education access and wellbeing of children in resettlement and asylum contexts. In line with this, her research in the past has focused on integration and resettlement processes of refugees and immigrants within Canada.

Publications

Bhattacharyya, P., Ogoe, S., Riziki, A., & Wilkinson, L. (2020). In search of a “home”: comparing the housing challenges experienced by recently arrived Yazidi and Syrian Refugees in Canada. Manuscript submitted for publication.

Bhattacharyya, P., Riziki, A., Songose, L., Ogoe, S., & Wilkinson, L. (2020). Understanding the link between pre-arrival education and trauma and language learning: A case study of Yazidi women in Canada. Canadian Diversity, 17(2).

Bhattacharyya, P., Riziki, A., & Wilkinson, L. (2018). “Settlement Service Use among Syrian Refugees in Canada” Canadian Diversity 15(1).

Wilkinson, L., Bhattacharya, P., Garcea, J., Abdul-Karim, A., Riziki, A., & Schnieders, M. (2017). Finding home: Some housing considerations for refugee families with children. Canadian Diversity, 14 (3), 31-35

Wilkinson, L., Bhattacharyya, P., Riziki, A., & Abdul-Karim, A. (2018).Yazidi Refugee Resettlement in Canada. Calgary: Immigration Refugees and Citizenship Canada-Integration Branch (Prairies and Territories Region).

Wilkinson, L., Garcea, J., Bhattacharyya, P., Riziki, A., Abdul Karim, A. (2017). Resettling on the Canadian Prairies: Integration of Syrian refugees. Calgary: Immigration Refugees and Citizenship Canada, Integration Branch-Prairies., Northwest Territories Division., & Alberta Association of Immigrant Serving Agencies

Anushay completed her BSc Psychology from UCL, where she also started her master’s in Developmental Neuroscience and Psychopathology. She was based at Yale University for her master’s thesis, where she worked with Dr Craig Bailey at the Yale Center for Emotional Intelligence to understand children’s emotion development. Anushay’s research interests include understanding child development across different cultures, factors that might be affecting it, and devising culture-specific ways to support children’s holistic development through the educational system. She is also keen on improving the research scope in Pakistan by working with Pakistani researchers, practitioners, and families.

Anushay balances her research with her position as the founder of a non-profit, Resources for Children, which aims to understand and support children’s development in Pakistan.

Publications

  1. Mazhar, A. (2022, April). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Spring Preview, New Haven, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2021, December). Does an extended family improve mentalising in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK & Pakistan. 2nd International Foundation University Conference of Psychology, Rawalpindi, Pakistan.
  3. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Theory of Mind in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK and Pakistan. Harvard Trends in Psychology Summit, Cambridge, United States.
  1. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Research Rounds, New Haven, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2020, October). Developing a non-profit to advance autism research in Pakistan. Anna Freud Centre Seminar Series, London, United Kingdom

 

Núria is a Professor of Mathematics Education at Autonomous University of Barcelona. Her research is about language and mathematics in secondary school classrooms and professional development contexts with mathematics teachers.

Her first degree was in Mathematics at University of Barcelona (1995). Soon after her initiation as a secondary school mathematics teacher in highly multilingual classrooms of Barcelona, she started her PhD at the UAB Division of Mathematics Education. She wanted to understand the critical factors behind the under-performance in school mathematics of many learners from poor urban backgrounds and recent histories of migration. Since then, she has been committed to classroom and teacher education research grounded on community work with schools and mathematics teachers in urban areas of poverty. Her years as a school teacher have provided her with greater insights into her work as a researcher and have strongly influenced the adoption of sociocultural and sociopolitical approaches to mathematics teaching and learning.

Núria was given the ICREA Academia Award of the Catalan Institution for Research and Advanced Studies in 2013, in recognition of her contributions to research on multilingual mathematics teaching and learning. She was elected to the Executive Committee of the International Commission on Mathematical Instruction as Member-at-Large in 2021, and to the International Committee of the International Group for the Psychology of Mathematics Education from 2010 to 2014. She served as Extraordinarious Professor of Mathematics Education at the University of South Africa from 2013 to 2020. She was Visiting Scholar at London South Bank University, University of Arizona, and University of North Carolina at Chapel-Hill.

Núria is currently on the editorial board of the international journal Mathematics Education Research Journal and Journal of Mathematics Teacher Education. Till 2021 she was the editor-in-chief of the Advances of Research in Mathematics Education, the official journal of the Spanish Society of Research in Mathematics Education. She is the leading co-editor of a 2018 special issue on language research in mathematics education published in ZDM-Mathematics Education, and the leading co-editor of a special issue on decentring mathematics teaching education, to be published in the Journal of Mathematics Teacher Education, February 2024.

She chaired the 7th Topic Conference of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education on Language and Mathematics (Dresden, 2018), and the ERME Topic Working Group on Language and Mathematics from 2015 to 2020. The collaborations established in the ERME context enabled for a broad range of experts to come together and move forward the research field in the form of an co-edited Routledge volume entitled ‘Classroom research on mathematics and language: Seeing learners and teachers differently’ in 2021, with Núria as the leading co-editor. She has also been co-editor of the Springer volume resulting from the 21st ICMI Study on Language Diversity and Mathematics Education in 2016, and of the Brill volume entitled ‘Mathematical discourse that breaks barriers and creates space for marginalized learners’ in 2018.

Núria’s motivation for coming to the Oxford Department of Education is her research collaboration in projects co-coordinated with Jenni Ingram on establishing an international network for research on supporting school mathematics teaching with linguistically disadvantaged learners. From her years as a secondary school in the 1990s, important challenges posed to mathematics education practice remain. Learners of mathematics who are linguistically disadvantaged for a variety of reasons, including impoverished socioeconomic status, continue to be educationally disadvantaged at a considerable risk of school failure and early dropout. More research will hopefully shed light on how to identify and develop improved practices to enable greater access to school mathematics for all learners.

Publications

SELECTION OF 10 LAST-DECADE PUBLICATIONS
[For more publications and research details, see https://orcid.org/0000-0001-5199-6336]
– Planas, N., & Chronaki, A. (2021). Multilingual mathematics learning from a dialogic-translanguaging perspective. In N. Planas, C. Morgan, & M. Schütte (Eds.), Classroom research on mathematics and language: Seeing learners and teachers differently (pp. 151-166). Routledge.
– Planas, N. (2021). How specific can language as resource become for the teaching of algebraic concepts? ZDM-Mathematics Education, 53(2), 277-288.
– Planas, N. (2021). Challenges and opportunities from translingual research on multilingual mathematics classrooms. In A. A. Essien, & A. Msimanga (Eds.), Multilingual education yearbook 2021. Policy and practice in STEM multilingual contexts (pp. 1-18). Springer.
– Planas, N., & Ngoepe, M. (2019). Right to learn mathematics: From language as right to language as resource. In C. Xenofontos (Ed.), Equity in mathematics education. Addressing a changing world (pp. 93-110). Information Age Publishing.
– Planas, N., & Schütte, M. (2018). Research frameworks for the study of language in mathematics education, ZDM-Mathematics Education, 50(6), 965-974.
– Planas, N. (2018). Language as resource: A key notion for understanding the complexity of mathematics learning. Educational Studies in Mathematics, 98(3), 215-229.
– Planas, N., Morgan, C., & Schütte, M. (2018). Mathematics education and language. Lessons and directions from two decades of research. In T. Dreyfus, M. Artigue, S. Prediger, D. Potari, & Ruthven (Eds.), Developing research in mathematics education. Twenty years of communication, cooperation and collaboration in Europe (pp. 196-210). Routledge.
– Planas, N. (2014). One speaker, two languages: Learning opportunities in the mathematics classroom. Educational Studies in Mathematics, 87(1), 51-66.
– Planas, N., & Setati Phakeng, M. (2014). On the process of gaining language as a resource in mathematics education. ZDM-Mathematics Education, 46(6), 883-893.
– Planas, N., & Civil, M. (2013). Language-as-resource and language-as-political. Tensions in the bilingual mathematics classroom. Mathematics Education Research Journal, 25(3), 361-378.

 

https://portalrecerca.uab.cat/en/persons/nuria-planas-raig-3

https://orcid.org/0000-0001-5199-6336

 

Cindy works at the intersection of learning, design, and technology, with a keen interest in the orchestration of future-ready tech-enabled learning.

She is curious how the deployment of adaptive learning systems to schools will impact classroom learning and hopes to learn more about the human-machine partnership in education. Specifically, her research is concerned with the implications that the use of such systems has on teacher-student interactions, as teachers grapple with balancing personalised learning and learning in community, as well as curriculum demands and student interests. These are some tensions which could potentially be exacerbated by affordances of adaptive learning systems.

Prior to embarking on the DPhil in Education at Oxford, Cindy worked as the Lead Specialist in Technologies for Learning at the Educational Technology Division of Ministry of Education, Singapore. She had previously completed graduate studies at the National University of Singapore and Stanford University where she was awarded Master of Arts in English Studies and Master of Arts in Education.

Reem is DPhil student from Saudi Arabia.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she worked as a Teacher, Professional Developer, then, became a Supervisor and Researcher in the Ministry of Education where she received a scholarship to pursue her DPhil education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests lie in the area of Teacher Education and Professional Learning Policy and Practice.

Publications
  • Alqahtani, Reem (2020). Saudi Universities Role in Developing Teacher Professional Development Programs: Elite Universities Experience. Journal of Educational Sciences. King Saud University.
  • Alqahtani, Reem. (2020). The effect of implementing UDL-based activities in improving EFL learners’ academic achievement and attitudes towards L2. In L. Salas, & E. Ager, Creating Quiet reflective Spaces: Language Teacher Researches Professional Development (pp. 61-62). IATEFL publications.

Lena Zlock is researching the integration of digital technology into structures of teaching, learning, and education in higher education. Her particular focus is on the digital humanities and the potential for digital methods to transform humanistic study. She works with Professor Niall Winters and Dr. James Robson.

Lena’s research interests stem from her education as an M.St. student and Ertegun Graduate Scholar in Modern Languages at the University of Oxford, and as a B.A. student in History at Stanford University. As an undergraduate, she started the Voltaire Library Project, a digitally and data-driven study of the 6,763-book collection of French Enlightenment philosopher Voltaire (you can read more about the project here and here). She has been interested in the application of digital technology to humanistic teaching since her days in Princeton Day School, where she developed an interdisciplinary curriculum on Mexico City (visit the course website here).

Her research on Voltaire led her to think more broadly about the place of digital methods in the humanities classroom, and how new technologies will revolutionise the liberal arts and higher education. As a DPhil candidate, Lena will examine the negotiation and implementation of new learning technologies within the University of Oxford at undergraduate and graduate levels.

Lena is involved in a number of digital humanities initiatives in Oxford. She previously served as the inaugural fellow of the Voltaire Lab at Oxford’s Voltaire Foundation. As a master’s student, Lena co-formulated the convergence agenda for Oxford digital humanities with Professor Howard Hotson, and is currently employed by the Humanities Division to assist with the development of an M.St. degree in Digital Scholarship (read more here). Lena set up and helps to run the History of the Book blog for the Faculty of Medieval and Modern Languages and the Oxford Book History Twitter account.

Lena welcomes inquiries from undergraduate and postgraduate students from Oxford and beyond seeking to get involved with the digital humanities in any capacity. The History of the Book blog also welcomes inquiries from prospective contributors.

 

Abbey is a Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education, in collaboration with the Department of Engineering.

Before joining the DPhil program, Abbey obtained a B.A. in Applied Linguistics with minors in Russian and Chinese from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford. She was the recipient of a Benjamin A. Gilman International Scholarship through U.S. Department of State for study in Russia and was awarded two Foreign Language and Area Studies (FLAS) Fellowships for study in both Russia and China. She holds both TESOL and TEFL certificates and has taught English as a Second Language in various contexts to a wide variety of learner populations.

Abbey’s main research interests lie in the use of technology to facilitate language learning. Her DPhil research focuses on the development of a virtual reality program to bridge the gaps that students face when learning languages through distance learning.

Julie Chia-Yi Lin is a Doctoral student at the University of Oxford, funded by the Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholarship. Her research focus on Internationalization, Policy, Management and Institutional Strategy is rooted in her professional experience in publishing and higher education, as well as from her observations regarding the continuous change in global educational dynamics.

Julie completed her B.A. at National Taiwan University, and earned a joint M.A. from the University of Vienna and the University of Wroclaw. She was previously employed as an officer for the Office of International Affairs at National Taiwan University, and then as a Publisher at Emerald Publishing.

She focuses on the development of higher education, particularly in the processes of internationalization and globalization, and tries to deliver perspectives from different Institutional sectors, and a wide array of participants. She is mindful of the influence that culture has on the development and reception of these processes, and has a special interest in the East Asia region, and Confucian-influenced higher education systems. In her doctoral research, she investigates higher ed institutional strategy, and the relationship it has with real-world policy. This includes delving into the specific interpretation and implementation of official policy by different stakeholders within the institution- faculty, administration, and management.

Publications

Lin, J. (2015). The Impact of Globalization on Taiwan’s Education Policy: The International Student. In A. Lipinsky. (Ed), Vienna Taiwan Studies Series: Immigration societies, Taiwan and Beyond. (pp. 129-151). Vienna: LIT VERLAG GmbH & Co. KG

Yibo Wang has an MA in International Marketing from the Coventry University (UK) and a Master’s in Management: Leadership and Organizational Change from the University of Birmingham (UK).

His doctoral research focuses on ‘knowledge hiding’, ‘leadership style’ and ‘Confucian culture’ in Chinese education and training institutions.

As empirical studies on ‘knowledge hiding’ in the Chinese context are scarce, Yibo hopes to uncover underlying mechanism of knowledge hiding and find its potential influence factors.

Prior to coming to Oxford, he worked as a CEO in an educational consultancy based in Beijing that advised the investment and marketing analyses on education and training industry.

Riziki’s current DPhil research focuses on emergent literacy of refugee children within multilingual settings.

Prior to commencing her DPhil research, Riziki completed an MSc in Child Development at the University of Oxford, looking at the role of teacher behavioural and cognitive judgments on the learning trajectories of Black primary school students in England.

Her research interests are education access and wellbeing of children in resettlement and asylum contexts. In line with this, her research in the past has focused on integration and resettlement processes of refugees and immigrants within Canada.

Publications

Bhattacharyya, P., Ogoe, S., Riziki, A., & Wilkinson, L. (2020). In search of a “home”: comparing the housing challenges experienced by recently arrived Yazidi and Syrian Refugees in Canada. Manuscript submitted for publication.

Bhattacharyya, P., Riziki, A., Songose, L., Ogoe, S., & Wilkinson, L. (2020). Understanding the link between pre-arrival education and trauma and language learning: A case study of Yazidi women in Canada. Canadian Diversity, 17(2).

Bhattacharyya, P., Riziki, A., & Wilkinson, L. (2018). “Settlement Service Use among Syrian Refugees in Canada” Canadian Diversity 15(1).

Wilkinson, L., Bhattacharya, P., Garcea, J., Abdul-Karim, A., Riziki, A., & Schnieders, M. (2017). Finding home: Some housing considerations for refugee families with children. Canadian Diversity, 14 (3), 31-35

Wilkinson, L., Bhattacharyya, P., Riziki, A., & Abdul-Karim, A. (2018).Yazidi Refugee Resettlement in Canada. Calgary: Immigration Refugees and Citizenship Canada-Integration Branch (Prairies and Territories Region).

Wilkinson, L., Garcea, J., Bhattacharyya, P., Riziki, A., Abdul Karim, A. (2017). Resettling on the Canadian Prairies: Integration of Syrian refugees. Calgary: Immigration Refugees and Citizenship Canada, Integration Branch-Prairies., Northwest Territories Division., & Alberta Association of Immigrant Serving Agencies

Anushay completed her BSc Psychology from UCL, where she also started her master’s in Developmental Neuroscience and Psychopathology. She was based at Yale University for her master’s thesis, where she worked with Dr Craig Bailey at the Yale Center for Emotional Intelligence to understand children’s emotion development. Anushay’s research interests include understanding child development across different cultures, factors that might be affecting it, and devising culture-specific ways to support children’s holistic development through the educational system. She is also keen on improving the research scope in Pakistan by working with Pakistani researchers, practitioners, and families.

Anushay balances her research with her position as the founder of a non-profit, Resources for Children, which aims to understand and support children’s development in Pakistan.

Publications

  1. Mazhar, A. (2022, April). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Spring Preview, New Haven, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2021, December). Does an extended family improve mentalising in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK & Pakistan. 2nd International Foundation University Conference of Psychology, Rawalpindi, Pakistan.
  3. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Theory of Mind in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK and Pakistan. Harvard Trends in Psychology Summit, Cambridge, United States.
  1. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Research Rounds, New Haven, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2020, October). Developing a non-profit to advance autism research in Pakistan. Anna Freud Centre Seminar Series, London, United Kingdom

 

Núria is a Professor of Mathematics Education at Autonomous University of Barcelona. Her research is about language and mathematics in secondary school classrooms and professional development contexts with mathematics teachers.

Her first degree was in Mathematics at University of Barcelona (1995). Soon after her initiation as a secondary school mathematics teacher in highly multilingual classrooms of Barcelona, she started her PhD at the UAB Division of Mathematics Education. She wanted to understand the critical factors behind the under-performance in school mathematics of many learners from poor urban backgrounds and recent histories of migration. Since then, she has been committed to classroom and teacher education research grounded on community work with schools and mathematics teachers in urban areas of poverty. Her years as a school teacher have provided her with greater insights into her work as a researcher and have strongly influenced the adoption of sociocultural and sociopolitical approaches to mathematics teaching and learning.

Núria was given the ICREA Academia Award of the Catalan Institution for Research and Advanced Studies in 2013, in recognition of her contributions to research on multilingual mathematics teaching and learning. She was elected to the Executive Committee of the International Commission on Mathematical Instruction as Member-at-Large in 2021, and to the International Committee of the International Group for the Psychology of Mathematics Education from 2010 to 2014. She served as Extraordinarious Professor of Mathematics Education at the University of South Africa from 2013 to 2020. She was Visiting Scholar at London South Bank University, University of Arizona, and University of North Carolina at Chapel-Hill.

Núria is currently on the editorial board of the international journal Mathematics Education Research Journal and Journal of Mathematics Teacher Education. Till 2021 she was the editor-in-chief of the Advances of Research in Mathematics Education, the official journal of the Spanish Society of Research in Mathematics Education. She is the leading co-editor of a 2018 special issue on language research in mathematics education published in ZDM-Mathematics Education, and the leading co-editor of a special issue on decentring mathematics teaching education, to be published in the Journal of Mathematics Teacher Education, February 2024.

She chaired the 7th Topic Conference of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education on Language and Mathematics (Dresden, 2018), and the ERME Topic Working Group on Language and Mathematics from 2015 to 2020. The collaborations established in the ERME context enabled for a broad range of experts to come together and move forward the research field in the form of an co-edited Routledge volume entitled ‘Classroom research on mathematics and language: Seeing learners and teachers differently’ in 2021, with Núria as the leading co-editor. She has also been co-editor of the Springer volume resulting from the 21st ICMI Study on Language Diversity and Mathematics Education in 2016, and of the Brill volume entitled ‘Mathematical discourse that breaks barriers and creates space for marginalized learners’ in 2018.

Núria’s motivation for coming to the Oxford Department of Education is her research collaboration in projects co-coordinated with Jenni Ingram on establishing an international network for research on supporting school mathematics teaching with linguistically disadvantaged learners. From her years as a secondary school in the 1990s, important challenges posed to mathematics education practice remain. Learners of mathematics who are linguistically disadvantaged for a variety of reasons, including impoverished socioeconomic status, continue to be educationally disadvantaged at a considerable risk of school failure and early dropout. More research will hopefully shed light on how to identify and develop improved practices to enable greater access to school mathematics for all learners.

Publications

SELECTION OF 10 LAST-DECADE PUBLICATIONS
[For more publications and research details, see https://orcid.org/0000-0001-5199-6336]
– Planas, N., & Chronaki, A. (2021). Multilingual mathematics learning from a dialogic-translanguaging perspective. In N. Planas, C. Morgan, & M. Schütte (Eds.), Classroom research on mathematics and language: Seeing learners and teachers differently (pp. 151-166). Routledge.
– Planas, N. (2021). How specific can language as resource become for the teaching of algebraic concepts? ZDM-Mathematics Education, 53(2), 277-288.
– Planas, N. (2021). Challenges and opportunities from translingual research on multilingual mathematics classrooms. In A. A. Essien, & A. Msimanga (Eds.), Multilingual education yearbook 2021. Policy and practice in STEM multilingual contexts (pp. 1-18). Springer.
– Planas, N., & Ngoepe, M. (2019). Right to learn mathematics: From language as right to language as resource. In C. Xenofontos (Ed.), Equity in mathematics education. Addressing a changing world (pp. 93-110). Information Age Publishing.
– Planas, N., & Schütte, M. (2018). Research frameworks for the study of language in mathematics education, ZDM-Mathematics Education, 50(6), 965-974.
– Planas, N. (2018). Language as resource: A key notion for understanding the complexity of mathematics learning. Educational Studies in Mathematics, 98(3), 215-229.
– Planas, N., Morgan, C., & Schütte, M. (2018). Mathematics education and language. Lessons and directions from two decades of research. In T. Dreyfus, M. Artigue, S. Prediger, D. Potari, & Ruthven (Eds.), Developing research in mathematics education. Twenty years of communication, cooperation and collaboration in Europe (pp. 196-210). Routledge.
– Planas, N. (2014). One speaker, two languages: Learning opportunities in the mathematics classroom. Educational Studies in Mathematics, 87(1), 51-66.
– Planas, N., & Setati Phakeng, M. (2014). On the process of gaining language as a resource in mathematics education. ZDM-Mathematics Education, 46(6), 883-893.
– Planas, N., & Civil, M. (2013). Language-as-resource and language-as-political. Tensions in the bilingual mathematics classroom. Mathematics Education Research Journal, 25(3), 361-378.

 

https://portalrecerca.uab.cat/en/persons/nuria-planas-raig-3

https://orcid.org/0000-0001-5199-6336

 

Cindy works at the intersection of learning, design, and technology, with a keen interest in the orchestration of future-ready tech-enabled learning.

She is curious how the deployment of adaptive learning systems to schools will impact classroom learning and hopes to learn more about the human-machine partnership in education. Specifically, her research is concerned with the implications that the use of such systems has on teacher-student interactions, as teachers grapple with balancing personalised learning and learning in community, as well as curriculum demands and student interests. These are some tensions which could potentially be exacerbated by affordances of adaptive learning systems.

Prior to embarking on the DPhil in Education at Oxford, Cindy worked as the Lead Specialist in Technologies for Learning at the Educational Technology Division of Ministry of Education, Singapore. She had previously completed graduate studies at the National University of Singapore and Stanford University where she was awarded Master of Arts in English Studies and Master of Arts in Education.

Reem is DPhil student from Saudi Arabia.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she worked as a Teacher, Professional Developer, then, became a Supervisor and Researcher in the Ministry of Education where she received a scholarship to pursue her DPhil education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests lie in the area of Teacher Education and Professional Learning Policy and Practice.

Publications
  • Alqahtani, Reem (2020). Saudi Universities Role in Developing Teacher Professional Development Programs: Elite Universities Experience. Journal of Educational Sciences. King Saud University.
  • Alqahtani, Reem. (2020). The effect of implementing UDL-based activities in improving EFL learners’ academic achievement and attitudes towards L2. In L. Salas, & E. Ager, Creating Quiet reflective Spaces: Language Teacher Researches Professional Development (pp. 61-62). IATEFL publications.

Lena Zlock is researching the integration of digital technology into structures of teaching, learning, and education in higher education. Her particular focus is on the digital humanities and the potential for digital methods to transform humanistic study. She works with Professor Niall Winters and Dr. James Robson.

Lena’s research interests stem from her education as an M.St. student and Ertegun Graduate Scholar in Modern Languages at the University of Oxford, and as a B.A. student in History at Stanford University. As an undergraduate, she started the Voltaire Library Project, a digitally and data-driven study of the 6,763-book collection of French Enlightenment philosopher Voltaire (you can read more about the project here and here). She has been interested in the application of digital technology to humanistic teaching since her days in Princeton Day School, where she developed an interdisciplinary curriculum on Mexico City (visit the course website here).

Her research on Voltaire led her to think more broadly about the place of digital methods in the humanities classroom, and how new technologies will revolutionise the liberal arts and higher education. As a DPhil candidate, Lena will examine the negotiation and implementation of new learning technologies within the University of Oxford at undergraduate and graduate levels.

Lena is involved in a number of digital humanities initiatives in Oxford. She previously served as the inaugural fellow of the Voltaire Lab at Oxford’s Voltaire Foundation. As a master’s student, Lena co-formulated the convergence agenda for Oxford digital humanities with Professor Howard Hotson, and is currently employed by the Humanities Division to assist with the development of an M.St. degree in Digital Scholarship (read more here). Lena set up and helps to run the History of the Book blog for the Faculty of Medieval and Modern Languages and the Oxford Book History Twitter account.

Lena welcomes inquiries from undergraduate and postgraduate students from Oxford and beyond seeking to get involved with the digital humanities in any capacity. The History of the Book blog also welcomes inquiries from prospective contributors.

 

Abbey is a Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education, in collaboration with the Department of Engineering.

Before joining the DPhil program, Abbey obtained a B.A. in Applied Linguistics with minors in Russian and Chinese from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford. She was the recipient of a Benjamin A. Gilman International Scholarship through U.S. Department of State for study in Russia and was awarded two Foreign Language and Area Studies (FLAS) Fellowships for study in both Russia and China. She holds both TESOL and TEFL certificates and has taught English as a Second Language in various contexts to a wide variety of learner populations.

Abbey’s main research interests lie in the use of technology to facilitate language learning. Her DPhil research focuses on the development of a virtual reality program to bridge the gaps that students face when learning languages through distance learning.

Julie Chia-Yi Lin is a Doctoral student at the University of Oxford, funded by the Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholarship. Her research focus on Internationalization, Policy, Management and Institutional Strategy is rooted in her professional experience in publishing and higher education, as well as from her observations regarding the continuous change in global educational dynamics.

Julie completed her B.A. at National Taiwan University, and earned a joint M.A. from the University of Vienna and the University of Wroclaw. She was previously employed as an officer for the Office of International Affairs at National Taiwan University, and then as a Publisher at Emerald Publishing.

She focuses on the development of higher education, particularly in the processes of internationalization and globalization, and tries to deliver perspectives from different Institutional sectors, and a wide array of participants. She is mindful of the influence that culture has on the development and reception of these processes, and has a special interest in the East Asia region, and Confucian-influenced higher education systems. In her doctoral research, she investigates higher ed institutional strategy, and the relationship it has with real-world policy. This includes delving into the specific interpretation and implementation of official policy by different stakeholders within the institution- faculty, administration, and management.

Publications

Lin, J. (2015). The Impact of Globalization on Taiwan’s Education Policy: The International Student. In A. Lipinsky. (Ed), Vienna Taiwan Studies Series: Immigration societies, Taiwan and Beyond. (pp. 129-151). Vienna: LIT VERLAG GmbH & Co. KG

Yibo Wang has an MA in International Marketing from the Coventry University (UK) and a Master’s in Management: Leadership and Organizational Change from the University of Birmingham (UK).

His doctoral research focuses on ‘knowledge hiding’, ‘leadership style’ and ‘Confucian culture’ in Chinese education and training institutions.

As empirical studies on ‘knowledge hiding’ in the Chinese context are scarce, Yibo hopes to uncover underlying mechanism of knowledge hiding and find its potential influence factors.

Prior to coming to Oxford, he worked as a CEO in an educational consultancy based in Beijing that advised the investment and marketing analyses on education and training industry.

Riziki’s current DPhil research focuses on emergent literacy of refugee children within multilingual settings.

Prior to commencing her DPhil research, Riziki completed an MSc in Child Development at the University of Oxford, looking at the role of teacher behavioural and cognitive judgments on the learning trajectories of Black primary school students in England.

Her research interests are education access and wellbeing of children in resettlement and asylum contexts. In line with this, her research in the past has focused on integration and resettlement processes of refugees and immigrants within Canada.

Publications

Bhattacharyya, P., Ogoe, S., Riziki, A., & Wilkinson, L. (2020). In search of a “home”: comparing the housing challenges experienced by recently arrived Yazidi and Syrian Refugees in Canada. Manuscript submitted for publication.

Bhattacharyya, P., Riziki, A., Songose, L., Ogoe, S., & Wilkinson, L. (2020). Understanding the link between pre-arrival education and trauma and language learning: A case study of Yazidi women in Canada. Canadian Diversity, 17(2).

Bhattacharyya, P., Riziki, A., & Wilkinson, L. (2018). “Settlement Service Use among Syrian Refugees in Canada” Canadian Diversity 15(1).

Wilkinson, L., Bhattacharya, P., Garcea, J., Abdul-Karim, A., Riziki, A., & Schnieders, M. (2017). Finding home: Some housing considerations for refugee families with children. Canadian Diversity, 14 (3), 31-35

Wilkinson, L., Bhattacharyya, P., Riziki, A., & Abdul-Karim, A. (2018).Yazidi Refugee Resettlement in Canada. Calgary: Immigration Refugees and Citizenship Canada-Integration Branch (Prairies and Territories Region).

Wilkinson, L., Garcea, J., Bhattacharyya, P., Riziki, A., Abdul Karim, A. (2017). Resettling on the Canadian Prairies: Integration of Syrian refugees. Calgary: Immigration Refugees and Citizenship Canada, Integration Branch-Prairies., Northwest Territories Division., & Alberta Association of Immigrant Serving Agencies

Anushay completed her BSc Psychology from UCL, where she also started her master’s in Developmental Neuroscience and Psychopathology. She was based at Yale University for her master’s thesis, where she worked with Dr Craig Bailey at the Yale Center for Emotional Intelligence to understand children’s emotion development. Anushay’s research interests include understanding child development across different cultures, factors that might be affecting it, and devising culture-specific ways to support children’s holistic development through the educational system. She is also keen on improving the research scope in Pakistan by working with Pakistani researchers, practitioners, and families.

Anushay balances her research with her position as the founder of a non-profit, Resources for Children, which aims to understand and support children’s development in Pakistan.

Publications

  1. Mazhar, A. (2022, April). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Spring Preview, New Haven, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2021, December). Does an extended family improve mentalising in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK & Pakistan. 2nd International Foundation University Conference of Psychology, Rawalpindi, Pakistan.
  3. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Theory of Mind in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK and Pakistan. Harvard Trends in Psychology Summit, Cambridge, United States.
  1. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Research Rounds, New Haven, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2020, October). Developing a non-profit to advance autism research in Pakistan. Anna Freud Centre Seminar Series, London, United Kingdom

 

Núria is a Professor of Mathematics Education at Autonomous University of Barcelona. Her research is about language and mathematics in secondary school classrooms and professional development contexts with mathematics teachers.

Her first degree was in Mathematics at University of Barcelona (1995). Soon after her initiation as a secondary school mathematics teacher in highly multilingual classrooms of Barcelona, she started her PhD at the UAB Division of Mathematics Education. She wanted to understand the critical factors behind the under-performance in school mathematics of many learners from poor urban backgrounds and recent histories of migration. Since then, she has been committed to classroom and teacher education research grounded on community work with schools and mathematics teachers in urban areas of poverty. Her years as a school teacher have provided her with greater insights into her work as a researcher and have strongly influenced the adoption of sociocultural and sociopolitical approaches to mathematics teaching and learning.

Núria was given the ICREA Academia Award of the Catalan Institution for Research and Advanced Studies in 2013, in recognition of her contributions to research on multilingual mathematics teaching and learning. She was elected to the Executive Committee of the International Commission on Mathematical Instruction as Member-at-Large in 2021, and to the International Committee of the International Group for the Psychology of Mathematics Education from 2010 to 2014. She served as Extraordinarious Professor of Mathematics Education at the University of South Africa from 2013 to 2020. She was Visiting Scholar at London South Bank University, University of Arizona, and University of North Carolina at Chapel-Hill.

Núria is currently on the editorial board of the international journal Mathematics Education Research Journal and Journal of Mathematics Teacher Education. Till 2021 she was the editor-in-chief of the Advances of Research in Mathematics Education, the official journal of the Spanish Society of Research in Mathematics Education. She is the leading co-editor of a 2018 special issue on language research in mathematics education published in ZDM-Mathematics Education, and the leading co-editor of a special issue on decentring mathematics teaching education, to be published in the Journal of Mathematics Teacher Education, February 2024.

She chaired the 7th Topic Conference of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education on Language and Mathematics (Dresden, 2018), and the ERME Topic Working Group on Language and Mathematics from 2015 to 2020. The collaborations established in the ERME context enabled for a broad range of experts to come together and move forward the research field in the form of an co-edited Routledge volume entitled ‘Classroom research on mathematics and language: Seeing learners and teachers differently’ in 2021, with Núria as the leading co-editor. She has also been co-editor of the Springer volume resulting from the 21st ICMI Study on Language Diversity and Mathematics Education in 2016, and of the Brill volume entitled ‘Mathematical discourse that breaks barriers and creates space for marginalized learners’ in 2018.

Núria’s motivation for coming to the Oxford Department of Education is her research collaboration in projects co-coordinated with Jenni Ingram on establishing an international network for research on supporting school mathematics teaching with linguistically disadvantaged learners. From her years as a secondary school in the 1990s, important challenges posed to mathematics education practice remain. Learners of mathematics who are linguistically disadvantaged for a variety of reasons, including impoverished socioeconomic status, continue to be educationally disadvantaged at a considerable risk of school failure and early dropout. More research will hopefully shed light on how to identify and develop improved practices to enable greater access to school mathematics for all learners.

Publications

SELECTION OF 10 LAST-DECADE PUBLICATIONS
[For more publications and research details, see https://orcid.org/0000-0001-5199-6336]
– Planas, N., & Chronaki, A. (2021). Multilingual mathematics learning from a dialogic-translanguaging perspective. In N. Planas, C. Morgan, & M. Schütte (Eds.), Classroom research on mathematics and language: Seeing learners and teachers differently (pp. 151-166). Routledge.
– Planas, N. (2021). How specific can language as resource become for the teaching of algebraic concepts? ZDM-Mathematics Education, 53(2), 277-288.
– Planas, N. (2021). Challenges and opportunities from translingual research on multilingual mathematics classrooms. In A. A. Essien, & A. Msimanga (Eds.), Multilingual education yearbook 2021. Policy and practice in STEM multilingual contexts (pp. 1-18). Springer.
– Planas, N., & Ngoepe, M. (2019). Right to learn mathematics: From language as right to language as resource. In C. Xenofontos (Ed.), Equity in mathematics education. Addressing a changing world (pp. 93-110). Information Age Publishing.
– Planas, N., & Schütte, M. (2018). Research frameworks for the study of language in mathematics education, ZDM-Mathematics Education, 50(6), 965-974.
– Planas, N. (2018). Language as resource: A key notion for understanding the complexity of mathematics learning. Educational Studies in Mathematics, 98(3), 215-229.
– Planas, N., Morgan, C., & Schütte, M. (2018). Mathematics education and language. Lessons and directions from two decades of research. In T. Dreyfus, M. Artigue, S. Prediger, D. Potari, & Ruthven (Eds.), Developing research in mathematics education. Twenty years of communication, cooperation and collaboration in Europe (pp. 196-210). Routledge.
– Planas, N. (2014). One speaker, two languages: Learning opportunities in the mathematics classroom. Educational Studies in Mathematics, 87(1), 51-66.
– Planas, N., & Setati Phakeng, M. (2014). On the process of gaining language as a resource in mathematics education. ZDM-Mathematics Education, 46(6), 883-893.
– Planas, N., & Civil, M. (2013). Language-as-resource and language-as-political. Tensions in the bilingual mathematics classroom. Mathematics Education Research Journal, 25(3), 361-378.

 

https://portalrecerca.uab.cat/en/persons/nuria-planas-raig-3

https://orcid.org/0000-0001-5199-6336

 

Cindy works at the intersection of learning, design, and technology, with a keen interest in the orchestration of future-ready tech-enabled learning.

She is curious how the deployment of adaptive learning systems to schools will impact classroom learning and hopes to learn more about the human-machine partnership in education. Specifically, her research is concerned with the implications that the use of such systems has on teacher-student interactions, as teachers grapple with balancing personalised learning and learning in community, as well as curriculum demands and student interests. These are some tensions which could potentially be exacerbated by affordances of adaptive learning systems.

Prior to embarking on the DPhil in Education at Oxford, Cindy worked as the Lead Specialist in Technologies for Learning at the Educational Technology Division of Ministry of Education, Singapore. She had previously completed graduate studies at the National University of Singapore and Stanford University where she was awarded Master of Arts in English Studies and Master of Arts in Education.

Reem is DPhil student from Saudi Arabia.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she worked as a Teacher, Professional Developer, then, became a Supervisor and Researcher in the Ministry of Education where she received a scholarship to pursue her DPhil education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests lie in the area of Teacher Education and Professional Learning Policy and Practice.

Publications
  • Alqahtani, Reem (2020). Saudi Universities Role in Developing Teacher Professional Development Programs: Elite Universities Experience. Journal of Educational Sciences. King Saud University.
  • Alqahtani, Reem. (2020). The effect of implementing UDL-based activities in improving EFL learners’ academic achievement and attitudes towards L2. In L. Salas, & E. Ager, Creating Quiet reflective Spaces: Language Teacher Researches Professional Development (pp. 61-62). IATEFL publications.

Lena Zlock is researching the integration of digital technology into structures of teaching, learning, and education in higher education. Her particular focus is on the digital humanities and the potential for digital methods to transform humanistic study. She works with Professor Niall Winters and Dr. James Robson.

Lena’s research interests stem from her education as an M.St. student and Ertegun Graduate Scholar in Modern Languages at the University of Oxford, and as a B.A. student in History at Stanford University. As an undergraduate, she started the Voltaire Library Project, a digitally and data-driven study of the 6,763-book collection of French Enlightenment philosopher Voltaire (you can read more about the project here and here). She has been interested in the application of digital technology to humanistic teaching since her days in Princeton Day School, where she developed an interdisciplinary curriculum on Mexico City (visit the course website here).

Her research on Voltaire led her to think more broadly about the place of digital methods in the humanities classroom, and how new technologies will revolutionise the liberal arts and higher education. As a DPhil candidate, Lena will examine the negotiation and implementation of new learning technologies within the University of Oxford at undergraduate and graduate levels.

Lena is involved in a number of digital humanities initiatives in Oxford. She previously served as the inaugural fellow of the Voltaire Lab at Oxford’s Voltaire Foundation. As a master’s student, Lena co-formulated the convergence agenda for Oxford digital humanities with Professor Howard Hotson, and is currently employed by the Humanities Division to assist with the development of an M.St. degree in Digital Scholarship (read more here). Lena set up and helps to run the History of the Book blog for the Faculty of Medieval and Modern Languages and the Oxford Book History Twitter account.

Lena welcomes inquiries from undergraduate and postgraduate students from Oxford and beyond seeking to get involved with the digital humanities in any capacity. The History of the Book blog also welcomes inquiries from prospective contributors.

 

Abbey is a Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education, in collaboration with the Department of Engineering.

Before joining the DPhil program, Abbey obtained a B.A. in Applied Linguistics with minors in Russian and Chinese from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford. She was the recipient of a Benjamin A. Gilman International Scholarship through U.S. Department of State for study in Russia and was awarded two Foreign Language and Area Studies (FLAS) Fellowships for study in both Russia and China. She holds both TESOL and TEFL certificates and has taught English as a Second Language in various contexts to a wide variety of learner populations.

Abbey’s main research interests lie in the use of technology to facilitate language learning. Her DPhil research focuses on the development of a virtual reality program to bridge the gaps that students face when learning languages through distance learning.

Julie Chia-Yi Lin is a Doctoral student at the University of Oxford, funded by the Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholarship. Her research focus on Internationalization, Policy, Management and Institutional Strategy is rooted in her professional experience in publishing and higher education, as well as from her observations regarding the continuous change in global educational dynamics.

Julie completed her B.A. at National Taiwan University, and earned a joint M.A. from the University of Vienna and the University of Wroclaw. She was previously employed as an officer for the Office of International Affairs at National Taiwan University, and then as a Publisher at Emerald Publishing.

She focuses on the development of higher education, particularly in the processes of internationalization and globalization, and tries to deliver perspectives from different Institutional sectors, and a wide array of participants. She is mindful of the influence that culture has on the development and reception of these processes, and has a special interest in the East Asia region, and Confucian-influenced higher education systems. In her doctoral research, she investigates higher ed institutional strategy, and the relationship it has with real-world policy. This includes delving into the specific interpretation and implementation of official policy by different stakeholders within the institution- faculty, administration, and management.

Publications

Lin, J. (2015). The Impact of Globalization on Taiwan’s Education Policy: The International Student. In A. Lipinsky. (Ed), Vienna Taiwan Studies Series: Immigration societies, Taiwan and Beyond. (pp. 129-151). Vienna: LIT VERLAG GmbH & Co. KG

Yibo Wang has an MA in International Marketing from the Coventry University (UK) and a Master’s in Management: Leadership and Organizational Change from the University of Birmingham (UK).

His doctoral research focuses on ‘knowledge hiding’, ‘leadership style’ and ‘Confucian culture’ in Chinese education and training institutions.

As empirical studies on ‘knowledge hiding’ in the Chinese context are scarce, Yibo hopes to uncover underlying mechanism of knowledge hiding and find its potential influence factors.

Prior to coming to Oxford, he worked as a CEO in an educational consultancy based in Beijing that advised the investment and marketing analyses on education and training industry.

Riziki’s current DPhil research focuses on emergent literacy of refugee children within multilingual settings.

Prior to commencing her DPhil research, Riziki completed an MSc in Child Development at the University of Oxford, looking at the role of teacher behavioural and cognitive judgments on the learning trajectories of Black primary school students in England.

Her research interests are education access and wellbeing of children in resettlement and asylum contexts. In line with this, her research in the past has focused on integration and resettlement processes of refugees and immigrants within Canada.

Publications

Bhattacharyya, P., Ogoe, S., Riziki, A., & Wilkinson, L. (2020). In search of a “home”: comparing the housing challenges experienced by recently arrived Yazidi and Syrian Refugees in Canada. Manuscript submitted for publication.

Bhattacharyya, P., Riziki, A., Songose, L., Ogoe, S., & Wilkinson, L. (2020). Understanding the link between pre-arrival education and trauma and language learning: A case study of Yazidi women in Canada. Canadian Diversity, 17(2).

Bhattacharyya, P., Riziki, A., & Wilkinson, L. (2018). “Settlement Service Use among Syrian Refugees in Canada” Canadian Diversity 15(1).

Wilkinson, L., Bhattacharya, P., Garcea, J., Abdul-Karim, A., Riziki, A., & Schnieders, M. (2017). Finding home: Some housing considerations for refugee families with children. Canadian Diversity, 14 (3), 31-35

Wilkinson, L., Bhattacharyya, P., Riziki, A., & Abdul-Karim, A. (2018).Yazidi Refugee Resettlement in Canada. Calgary: Immigration Refugees and Citizenship Canada-Integration Branch (Prairies and Territories Region).

Wilkinson, L., Garcea, J., Bhattacharyya, P., Riziki, A., Abdul Karim, A. (2017). Resettling on the Canadian Prairies: Integration of Syrian refugees. Calgary: Immigration Refugees and Citizenship Canada, Integration Branch-Prairies., Northwest Territories Division., & Alberta Association of Immigrant Serving Agencies

Anushay completed her BSc Psychology from UCL, where she also started her master’s in Developmental Neuroscience and Psychopathology. She was based at Yale University for her master’s thesis, where she worked with Dr Craig Bailey at the Yale Center for Emotional Intelligence to understand children’s emotion development. Anushay’s research interests include understanding child development across different cultures, factors that might be affecting it, and devising culture-specific ways to support children’s holistic development through the educational system. She is also keen on improving the research scope in Pakistan by working with Pakistani researchers, practitioners, and families.

Anushay balances her research with her position as the founder of a non-profit, Resources for Children, which aims to understand and support children’s development in Pakistan.

Publications

  1. Mazhar, A. (2022, April). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Spring Preview, New Haven, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2021, December). Does an extended family improve mentalising in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK & Pakistan. 2nd International Foundation University Conference of Psychology, Rawalpindi, Pakistan.
  3. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Theory of Mind in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK and Pakistan. Harvard Trends in Psychology Summit, Cambridge, United States.
  1. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Research Rounds, New Haven, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2020, October). Developing a non-profit to advance autism research in Pakistan. Anna Freud Centre Seminar Series, London, United Kingdom

 

Núria is a Professor of Mathematics Education at Autonomous University of Barcelona. Her research is about language and mathematics in secondary school classrooms and professional development contexts with mathematics teachers.

Her first degree was in Mathematics at University of Barcelona (1995). Soon after her initiation as a secondary school mathematics teacher in highly multilingual classrooms of Barcelona, she started her PhD at the UAB Division of Mathematics Education. She wanted to understand the critical factors behind the under-performance in school mathematics of many learners from poor urban backgrounds and recent histories of migration. Since then, she has been committed to classroom and teacher education research grounded on community work with schools and mathematics teachers in urban areas of poverty. Her years as a school teacher have provided her with greater insights into her work as a researcher and have strongly influenced the adoption of sociocultural and sociopolitical approaches to mathematics teaching and learning.

Núria was given the ICREA Academia Award of the Catalan Institution for Research and Advanced Studies in 2013, in recognition of her contributions to research on multilingual mathematics teaching and learning. She was elected to the Executive Committee of the International Commission on Mathematical Instruction as Member-at-Large in 2021, and to the International Committee of the International Group for the Psychology of Mathematics Education from 2010 to 2014. She served as Extraordinarious Professor of Mathematics Education at the University of South Africa from 2013 to 2020. She was Visiting Scholar at London South Bank University, University of Arizona, and University of North Carolina at Chapel-Hill.

Núria is currently on the editorial board of the international journal Mathematics Education Research Journal and Journal of Mathematics Teacher Education. Till 2021 she was the editor-in-chief of the Advances of Research in Mathematics Education, the official journal of the Spanish Society of Research in Mathematics Education. She is the leading co-editor of a 2018 special issue on language research in mathematics education published in ZDM-Mathematics Education, and the leading co-editor of a special issue on decentring mathematics teaching education, to be published in the Journal of Mathematics Teacher Education, February 2024.

She chaired the 7th Topic Conference of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education on Language and Mathematics (Dresden, 2018), and the ERME Topic Working Group on Language and Mathematics from 2015 to 2020. The collaborations established in the ERME context enabled for a broad range of experts to come together and move forward the research field in the form of an co-edited Routledge volume entitled ‘Classroom research on mathematics and language: Seeing learners and teachers differently’ in 2021, with Núria as the leading co-editor. She has also been co-editor of the Springer volume resulting from the 21st ICMI Study on Language Diversity and Mathematics Education in 2016, and of the Brill volume entitled ‘Mathematical discourse that breaks barriers and creates space for marginalized learners’ in 2018.

Núria’s motivation for coming to the Oxford Department of Education is her research collaboration in projects co-coordinated with Jenni Ingram on establishing an international network for research on supporting school mathematics teaching with linguistically disadvantaged learners. From her years as a secondary school in the 1990s, important challenges posed to mathematics education practice remain. Learners of mathematics who are linguistically disadvantaged for a variety of reasons, including impoverished socioeconomic status, continue to be educationally disadvantaged at a considerable risk of school failure and early dropout. More research will hopefully shed light on how to identify and develop improved practices to enable greater access to school mathematics for all learners.

Publications

SELECTION OF 10 LAST-DECADE PUBLICATIONS
[For more publications and research details, see https://orcid.org/0000-0001-5199-6336]
– Planas, N., & Chronaki, A. (2021). Multilingual mathematics learning from a dialogic-translanguaging perspective. In N. Planas, C. Morgan, & M. Schütte (Eds.), Classroom research on mathematics and language: Seeing learners and teachers differently (pp. 151-166). Routledge.
– Planas, N. (2021). How specific can language as resource become for the teaching of algebraic concepts? ZDM-Mathematics Education, 53(2), 277-288.
– Planas, N. (2021). Challenges and opportunities from translingual research on multilingual mathematics classrooms. In A. A. Essien, & A. Msimanga (Eds.), Multilingual education yearbook 2021. Policy and practice in STEM multilingual contexts (pp. 1-18). Springer.
– Planas, N., & Ngoepe, M. (2019). Right to learn mathematics: From language as right to language as resource. In C. Xenofontos (Ed.), Equity in mathematics education. Addressing a changing world (pp. 93-110). Information Age Publishing.
– Planas, N., & Schütte, M. (2018). Research frameworks for the study of language in mathematics education, ZDM-Mathematics Education, 50(6), 965-974.
– Planas, N. (2018). Language as resource: A key notion for understanding the complexity of mathematics learning. Educational Studies in Mathematics, 98(3), 215-229.
– Planas, N., Morgan, C., & Schütte, M. (2018). Mathematics education and language. Lessons and directions from two decades of research. In T. Dreyfus, M. Artigue, S. Prediger, D. Potari, & Ruthven (Eds.), Developing research in mathematics education. Twenty years of communication, cooperation and collaboration in Europe (pp. 196-210). Routledge.
– Planas, N. (2014). One speaker, two languages: Learning opportunities in the mathematics classroom. Educational Studies in Mathematics, 87(1), 51-66.
– Planas, N., & Setati Phakeng, M. (2014). On the process of gaining language as a resource in mathematics education. ZDM-Mathematics Education, 46(6), 883-893.
– Planas, N., & Civil, M. (2013). Language-as-resource and language-as-political. Tensions in the bilingual mathematics classroom. Mathematics Education Research Journal, 25(3), 361-378.

 

https://portalrecerca.uab.cat/en/persons/nuria-planas-raig-3

https://orcid.org/0000-0001-5199-6336

 

Cindy works at the intersection of learning, design, and technology, with a keen interest in the orchestration of future-ready tech-enabled learning.

She is curious how the deployment of adaptive learning systems to schools will impact classroom learning and hopes to learn more about the human-machine partnership in education. Specifically, her research is concerned with the implications that the use of such systems has on teacher-student interactions, as teachers grapple with balancing personalised learning and learning in community, as well as curriculum demands and student interests. These are some tensions which could potentially be exacerbated by affordances of adaptive learning systems.

Prior to embarking on the DPhil in Education at Oxford, Cindy worked as the Lead Specialist in Technologies for Learning at the Educational Technology Division of Ministry of Education, Singapore. She had previously completed graduate studies at the National University of Singapore and Stanford University where she was awarded Master of Arts in English Studies and Master of Arts in Education.

Reem is DPhil student from Saudi Arabia.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she worked as a Teacher, Professional Developer, then, became a Supervisor and Researcher in the Ministry of Education where she received a scholarship to pursue her DPhil education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests lie in the area of Teacher Education and Professional Learning Policy and Practice.

Publications
  • Alqahtani, Reem (2020). Saudi Universities Role in Developing Teacher Professional Development Programs: Elite Universities Experience. Journal of Educational Sciences. King Saud University.
  • Alqahtani, Reem. (2020). The effect of implementing UDL-based activities in improving EFL learners’ academic achievement and attitudes towards L2. In L. Salas, & E. Ager, Creating Quiet reflective Spaces: Language Teacher Researches Professional Development (pp. 61-62). IATEFL publications.

Lena Zlock is researching the integration of digital technology into structures of teaching, learning, and education in higher education. Her particular focus is on the digital humanities and the potential for digital methods to transform humanistic study. She works with Professor Niall Winters and Dr. James Robson.

Lena’s research interests stem from her education as an M.St. student and Ertegun Graduate Scholar in Modern Languages at the University of Oxford, and as a B.A. student in History at Stanford University. As an undergraduate, she started the Voltaire Library Project, a digitally and data-driven study of the 6,763-book collection of French Enlightenment philosopher Voltaire (you can read more about the project here and here). She has been interested in the application of digital technology to humanistic teaching since her days in Princeton Day School, where she developed an interdisciplinary curriculum on Mexico City (visit the course website here).

Her research on Voltaire led her to think more broadly about the place of digital methods in the humanities classroom, and how new technologies will revolutionise the liberal arts and higher education. As a DPhil candidate, Lena will examine the negotiation and implementation of new learning technologies within the University of Oxford at undergraduate and graduate levels.

Lena is involved in a number of digital humanities initiatives in Oxford. She previously served as the inaugural fellow of the Voltaire Lab at Oxford’s Voltaire Foundation. As a master’s student, Lena co-formulated the convergence agenda for Oxford digital humanities with Professor Howard Hotson, and is currently employed by the Humanities Division to assist with the development of an M.St. degree in Digital Scholarship (read more here). Lena set up and helps to run the History of the Book blog for the Faculty of Medieval and Modern Languages and the Oxford Book History Twitter account.

Lena welcomes inquiries from undergraduate and postgraduate students from Oxford and beyond seeking to get involved with the digital humanities in any capacity. The History of the Book blog also welcomes inquiries from prospective contributors.

 

Abbey is a Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education, in collaboration with the Department of Engineering.

Before joining the DPhil program, Abbey obtained a B.A. in Applied Linguistics with minors in Russian and Chinese from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford. She was the recipient of a Benjamin A. Gilman International Scholarship through U.S. Department of State for study in Russia and was awarded two Foreign Language and Area Studies (FLAS) Fellowships for study in both Russia and China. She holds both TESOL and TEFL certificates and has taught English as a Second Language in various contexts to a wide variety of learner populations.

Abbey’s main research interests lie in the use of technology to facilitate language learning. Her DPhil research focuses on the development of a virtual reality program to bridge the gaps that students face when learning languages through distance learning.

Julie Chia-Yi Lin is a Doctoral student at the University of Oxford, funded by the Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholarship. Her research focus on Internationalization, Policy, Management and Institutional Strategy is rooted in her professional experience in publishing and higher education, as well as from her observations regarding the continuous change in global educational dynamics.

Julie completed her B.A. at National Taiwan University, and earned a joint M.A. from the University of Vienna and the University of Wroclaw. She was previously employed as an officer for the Office of International Affairs at National Taiwan University, and then as a Publisher at Emerald Publishing.

She focuses on the development of higher education, particularly in the processes of internationalization and globalization, and tries to deliver perspectives from different Institutional sectors, and a wide array of participants. She is mindful of the influence that culture has on the development and reception of these processes, and has a special interest in the East Asia region, and Confucian-influenced higher education systems. In her doctoral research, she investigates higher ed institutional strategy, and the relationship it has with real-world policy. This includes delving into the specific interpretation and implementation of official policy by different stakeholders within the institution- faculty, administration, and management.

Publications

Lin, J. (2015). The Impact of Globalization on Taiwan’s Education Policy: The International Student. In A. Lipinsky. (Ed), Vienna Taiwan Studies Series: Immigration societies, Taiwan and Beyond. (pp. 129-151). Vienna: LIT VERLAG GmbH & Co. KG

Yibo Wang has an MA in International Marketing from the Coventry University (UK) and a Master’s in Management: Leadership and Organizational Change from the University of Birmingham (UK).

His doctoral research focuses on ‘knowledge hiding’, ‘leadership style’ and ‘Confucian culture’ in Chinese education and training institutions.

As empirical studies on ‘knowledge hiding’ in the Chinese context are scarce, Yibo hopes to uncover underlying mechanism of knowledge hiding and find its potential influence factors.

Prior to coming to Oxford, he worked as a CEO in an educational consultancy based in Beijing that advised the investment and marketing analyses on education and training industry.

Riziki’s current DPhil research focuses on emergent literacy of refugee children within multilingual settings.

Prior to commencing her DPhil research, Riziki completed an MSc in Child Development at the University of Oxford, looking at the role of teacher behavioural and cognitive judgments on the learning trajectories of Black primary school students in England.

Her research interests are education access and wellbeing of children in resettlement and asylum contexts. In line with this, her research in the past has focused on integration and resettlement processes of refugees and immigrants within Canada.

Publications

Bhattacharyya, P., Ogoe, S., Riziki, A., & Wilkinson, L. (2020). In search of a “home”: comparing the housing challenges experienced by recently arrived Yazidi and Syrian Refugees in Canada. Manuscript submitted for publication.

Bhattacharyya, P., Riziki, A., Songose, L., Ogoe, S., & Wilkinson, L. (2020). Understanding the link between pre-arrival education and trauma and language learning: A case study of Yazidi women in Canada. Canadian Diversity, 17(2).

Bhattacharyya, P., Riziki, A., & Wilkinson, L. (2018). “Settlement Service Use among Syrian Refugees in Canada” Canadian Diversity 15(1).

Wilkinson, L., Bhattacharya, P., Garcea, J., Abdul-Karim, A., Riziki, A., & Schnieders, M. (2017). Finding home: Some housing considerations for refugee families with children. Canadian Diversity, 14 (3), 31-35

Wilkinson, L., Bhattacharyya, P., Riziki, A., & Abdul-Karim, A. (2018).Yazidi Refugee Resettlement in Canada. Calgary: Immigration Refugees and Citizenship Canada-Integration Branch (Prairies and Territories Region).

Wilkinson, L., Garcea, J., Bhattacharyya, P., Riziki, A., Abdul Karim, A. (2017). Resettling on the Canadian Prairies: Integration of Syrian refugees. Calgary: Immigration Refugees and Citizenship Canada, Integration Branch-Prairies., Northwest Territories Division., & Alberta Association of Immigrant Serving Agencies

Anushay completed her BSc Psychology from UCL, where she also started her master’s in Developmental Neuroscience and Psychopathology. She was based at Yale University for her master’s thesis, where she worked with Dr Craig Bailey at the Yale Center for Emotional Intelligence to understand children’s emotion development. Anushay’s research interests include understanding child development across different cultures, factors that might be affecting it, and devising culture-specific ways to support children’s holistic development through the educational system. She is also keen on improving the research scope in Pakistan by working with Pakistani researchers, practitioners, and families.

Anushay balances her research with her position as the founder of a non-profit, Resources for Children, which aims to understand and support children’s development in Pakistan.

Publications

  1. Mazhar, A. (2022, April). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Spring Preview, New Haven, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2021, December). Does an extended family improve mentalising in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK & Pakistan. 2nd International Foundation University Conference of Psychology, Rawalpindi, Pakistan.
  3. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Theory of Mind in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK and Pakistan. Harvard Trends in Psychology Summit, Cambridge, United States.
  1. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Research Rounds, New Haven, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2020, October). Developing a non-profit to advance autism research in Pakistan. Anna Freud Centre Seminar Series, London, United Kingdom

 

Núria is a Professor of Mathematics Education at Autonomous University of Barcelona. Her research is about language and mathematics in secondary school classrooms and professional development contexts with mathematics teachers.

Her first degree was in Mathematics at University of Barcelona (1995). Soon after her initiation as a secondary school mathematics teacher in highly multilingual classrooms of Barcelona, she started her PhD at the UAB Division of Mathematics Education. She wanted to understand the critical factors behind the under-performance in school mathematics of many learners from poor urban backgrounds and recent histories of migration. Since then, she has been committed to classroom and teacher education research grounded on community work with schools and mathematics teachers in urban areas of poverty. Her years as a school teacher have provided her with greater insights into her work as a researcher and have strongly influenced the adoption of sociocultural and sociopolitical approaches to mathematics teaching and learning.

Núria was given the ICREA Academia Award of the Catalan Institution for Research and Advanced Studies in 2013, in recognition of her contributions to research on multilingual mathematics teaching and learning. She was elected to the Executive Committee of the International Commission on Mathematical Instruction as Member-at-Large in 2021, and to the International Committee of the International Group for the Psychology of Mathematics Education from 2010 to 2014. She served as Extraordinarious Professor of Mathematics Education at the University of South Africa from 2013 to 2020. She was Visiting Scholar at London South Bank University, University of Arizona, and University of North Carolina at Chapel-Hill.

Núria is currently on the editorial board of the international journal Mathematics Education Research Journal and Journal of Mathematics Teacher Education. Till 2021 she was the editor-in-chief of the Advances of Research in Mathematics Education, the official journal of the Spanish Society of Research in Mathematics Education. She is the leading co-editor of a 2018 special issue on language research in mathematics education published in ZDM-Mathematics Education, and the leading co-editor of a special issue on decentring mathematics teaching education, to be published in the Journal of Mathematics Teacher Education, February 2024.

She chaired the 7th Topic Conference of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education on Language and Mathematics (Dresden, 2018), and the ERME Topic Working Group on Language and Mathematics from 2015 to 2020. The collaborations established in the ERME context enabled for a broad range of experts to come together and move forward the research field in the form of an co-edited Routledge volume entitled ‘Classroom research on mathematics and language: Seeing learners and teachers differently’ in 2021, with Núria as the leading co-editor. She has also been co-editor of the Springer volume resulting from the 21st ICMI Study on Language Diversity and Mathematics Education in 2016, and of the Brill volume entitled ‘Mathematical discourse that breaks barriers and creates space for marginalized learners’ in 2018.

Núria’s motivation for coming to the Oxford Department of Education is her research collaboration in projects co-coordinated with Jenni Ingram on establishing an international network for research on supporting school mathematics teaching with linguistically disadvantaged learners. From her years as a secondary school in the 1990s, important challenges posed to mathematics education practice remain. Learners of mathematics who are linguistically disadvantaged for a variety of reasons, including impoverished socioeconomic status, continue to be educationally disadvantaged at a considerable risk of school failure and early dropout. More research will hopefully shed light on how to identify and develop improved practices to enable greater access to school mathematics for all learners.

Publications

SELECTION OF 10 LAST-DECADE PUBLICATIONS
[For more publications and research details, see https://orcid.org/0000-0001-5199-6336]
– Planas, N., & Chronaki, A. (2021). Multilingual mathematics learning from a dialogic-translanguaging perspective. In N. Planas, C. Morgan, & M. Schütte (Eds.), Classroom research on mathematics and language: Seeing learners and teachers differently (pp. 151-166). Routledge.
– Planas, N. (2021). How specific can language as resource become for the teaching of algebraic concepts? ZDM-Mathematics Education, 53(2), 277-288.
– Planas, N. (2021). Challenges and opportunities from translingual research on multilingual mathematics classrooms. In A. A. Essien, & A. Msimanga (Eds.), Multilingual education yearbook 2021. Policy and practice in STEM multilingual contexts (pp. 1-18). Springer.
– Planas, N., & Ngoepe, M. (2019). Right to learn mathematics: From language as right to language as resource. In C. Xenofontos (Ed.), Equity in mathematics education. Addressing a changing world (pp. 93-110). Information Age Publishing.
– Planas, N., & Schütte, M. (2018). Research frameworks for the study of language in mathematics education, ZDM-Mathematics Education, 50(6), 965-974.
– Planas, N. (2018). Language as resource: A key notion for understanding the complexity of mathematics learning. Educational Studies in Mathematics, 98(3), 215-229.
– Planas, N., Morgan, C., & Schütte, M. (2018). Mathematics education and language. Lessons and directions from two decades of research. In T. Dreyfus, M. Artigue, S. Prediger, D. Potari, & Ruthven (Eds.), Developing research in mathematics education. Twenty years of communication, cooperation and collaboration in Europe (pp. 196-210). Routledge.
– Planas, N. (2014). One speaker, two languages: Learning opportunities in the mathematics classroom. Educational Studies in Mathematics, 87(1), 51-66.
– Planas, N., & Setati Phakeng, M. (2014). On the process of gaining language as a resource in mathematics education. ZDM-Mathematics Education, 46(6), 883-893.
– Planas, N., & Civil, M. (2013). Language-as-resource and language-as-political. Tensions in the bilingual mathematics classroom. Mathematics Education Research Journal, 25(3), 361-378.

 

https://portalrecerca.uab.cat/en/persons/nuria-planas-raig-3

https://orcid.org/0000-0001-5199-6336

 

Cindy works at the intersection of learning, design, and technology, with a keen interest in the orchestration of future-ready tech-enabled learning.

She is curious how the deployment of adaptive learning systems to schools will impact classroom learning and hopes to learn more about the human-machine partnership in education. Specifically, her research is concerned with the implications that the use of such systems has on teacher-student interactions, as teachers grapple with balancing personalised learning and learning in community, as well as curriculum demands and student interests. These are some tensions which could potentially be exacerbated by affordances of adaptive learning systems.

Prior to embarking on the DPhil in Education at Oxford, Cindy worked as the Lead Specialist in Technologies for Learning at the Educational Technology Division of Ministry of Education, Singapore. She had previously completed graduate studies at the National University of Singapore and Stanford University where she was awarded Master of Arts in English Studies and Master of Arts in Education.

Reem is DPhil student from Saudi Arabia.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she worked as a Teacher, Professional Developer, then, became a Supervisor and Researcher in the Ministry of Education where she received a scholarship to pursue her DPhil education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests lie in the area of Teacher Education and Professional Learning Policy and Practice.

Publications
  • Alqahtani, Reem (2020). Saudi Universities Role in Developing Teacher Professional Development Programs: Elite Universities Experience. Journal of Educational Sciences. King Saud University.
  • Alqahtani, Reem. (2020). The effect of implementing UDL-based activities in improving EFL learners’ academic achievement and attitudes towards L2. In L. Salas, & E. Ager, Creating Quiet reflective Spaces: Language Teacher Researches Professional Development (pp. 61-62). IATEFL publications.

Lena Zlock is researching the integration of digital technology into structures of teaching, learning, and education in higher education. Her particular focus is on the digital humanities and the potential for digital methods to transform humanistic study. She works with Professor Niall Winters and Dr. James Robson.

Lena’s research interests stem from her education as an M.St. student and Ertegun Graduate Scholar in Modern Languages at the University of Oxford, and as a B.A. student in History at Stanford University. As an undergraduate, she started the Voltaire Library Project, a digitally and data-driven study of the 6,763-book collection of French Enlightenment philosopher Voltaire (you can read more about the project here and here). She has been interested in the application of digital technology to humanistic teaching since her days in Princeton Day School, where she developed an interdisciplinary curriculum on Mexico City (visit the course website here).

Her research on Voltaire led her to think more broadly about the place of digital methods in the humanities classroom, and how new technologies will revolutionise the liberal arts and higher education. As a DPhil candidate, Lena will examine the negotiation and implementation of new learning technologies within the University of Oxford at undergraduate and graduate levels.

Lena is involved in a number of digital humanities initiatives in Oxford. She previously served as the inaugural fellow of the Voltaire Lab at Oxford’s Voltaire Foundation. As a master’s student, Lena co-formulated the convergence agenda for Oxford digital humanities with Professor Howard Hotson, and is currently employed by the Humanities Division to assist with the development of an M.St. degree in Digital Scholarship (read more here). Lena set up and helps to run the History of the Book blog for the Faculty of Medieval and Modern Languages and the Oxford Book History Twitter account.

Lena welcomes inquiries from undergraduate and postgraduate students from Oxford and beyond seeking to get involved with the digital humanities in any capacity. The History of the Book blog also welcomes inquiries from prospective contributors.

 

Abbey is a Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education, in collaboration with the Department of Engineering.

Before joining the DPhil program, Abbey obtained a B.A. in Applied Linguistics with minors in Russian and Chinese from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford. She was the recipient of a Benjamin A. Gilman International Scholarship through U.S. Department of State for study in Russia and was awarded two Foreign Language and Area Studies (FLAS) Fellowships for study in both Russia and China. She holds both TESOL and TEFL certificates and has taught English as a Second Language in various contexts to a wide variety of learner populations.

Abbey’s main research interests lie in the use of technology to facilitate language learning. Her DPhil research focuses on the development of a virtual reality program to bridge the gaps that students face when learning languages through distance learning.

Julie Chia-Yi Lin is a Doctoral student at the University of Oxford, funded by the Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholarship. Her research focus on Internationalization, Policy, Management and Institutional Strategy is rooted in her professional experience in publishing and higher education, as well as from her observations regarding the continuous change in global educational dynamics.

Julie completed her B.A. at National Taiwan University, and earned a joint M.A. from the University of Vienna and the University of Wroclaw. She was previously employed as an officer for the Office of International Affairs at National Taiwan University, and then as a Publisher at Emerald Publishing.

She focuses on the development of higher education, particularly in the processes of internationalization and globalization, and tries to deliver perspectives from different Institutional sectors, and a wide array of participants. She is mindful of the influence that culture has on the development and reception of these processes, and has a special interest in the East Asia region, and Confucian-influenced higher education systems. In her doctoral research, she investigates higher ed institutional strategy, and the relationship it has with real-world policy. This includes delving into the specific interpretation and implementation of official policy by different stakeholders within the institution- faculty, administration, and management.

Publications

Lin, J. (2015). The Impact of Globalization on Taiwan’s Education Policy: The International Student. In A. Lipinsky. (Ed), Vienna Taiwan Studies Series: Immigration societies, Taiwan and Beyond. (pp. 129-151). Vienna: LIT VERLAG GmbH & Co. KG

Yibo Wang has an MA in International Marketing from the Coventry University (UK) and a Master’s in Management: Leadership and Organizational Change from the University of Birmingham (UK).

His doctoral research focuses on ‘knowledge hiding’, ‘leadership style’ and ‘Confucian culture’ in Chinese education and training institutions.

As empirical studies on ‘knowledge hiding’ in the Chinese context are scarce, Yibo hopes to uncover underlying mechanism of knowledge hiding and find its potential influence factors.

Prior to coming to Oxford, he worked as a CEO in an educational consultancy based in Beijing that advised the investment and marketing analyses on education and training industry.

Riziki’s current DPhil research focuses on emergent literacy of refugee children within multilingual settings.

Prior to commencing her DPhil research, Riziki completed an MSc in Child Development at the University of Oxford, looking at the role of teacher behavioural and cognitive judgments on the learning trajectories of Black primary school students in England.

Her research interests are education access and wellbeing of children in resettlement and asylum contexts. In line with this, her research in the past has focused on integration and resettlement processes of refugees and immigrants within Canada.

Publications

Bhattacharyya, P., Ogoe, S., Riziki, A., & Wilkinson, L. (2020). In search of a “home”: comparing the housing challenges experienced by recently arrived Yazidi and Syrian Refugees in Canada. Manuscript submitted for publication.

Bhattacharyya, P., Riziki, A., Songose, L., Ogoe, S., & Wilkinson, L. (2020). Understanding the link between pre-arrival education and trauma and language learning: A case study of Yazidi women in Canada. Canadian Diversity, 17(2).

Bhattacharyya, P., Riziki, A., & Wilkinson, L. (2018). “Settlement Service Use among Syrian Refugees in Canada” Canadian Diversity 15(1).

Wilkinson, L., Bhattacharya, P., Garcea, J., Abdul-Karim, A., Riziki, A., & Schnieders, M. (2017). Finding home: Some housing considerations for refugee families with children. Canadian Diversity, 14 (3), 31-35

Wilkinson, L., Bhattacharyya, P., Riziki, A., & Abdul-Karim, A. (2018).Yazidi Refugee Resettlement in Canada. Calgary: Immigration Refugees and Citizenship Canada-Integration Branch (Prairies and Territories Region).

Wilkinson, L., Garcea, J., Bhattacharyya, P., Riziki, A., Abdul Karim, A. (2017). Resettling on the Canadian Prairies: Integration of Syrian refugees. Calgary: Immigration Refugees and Citizenship Canada, Integration Branch-Prairies., Northwest Territories Division., & Alberta Association of Immigrant Serving Agencies

Anushay completed her BSc Psychology from UCL, where she also started her master’s in Developmental Neuroscience and Psychopathology. She was based at Yale University for her master’s thesis, where she worked with Dr Craig Bailey at the Yale Center for Emotional Intelligence to understand children’s emotion development. Anushay’s research interests include understanding child development across different cultures, factors that might be affecting it, and devising culture-specific ways to support children’s holistic development through the educational system. She is also keen on improving the research scope in Pakistan by working with Pakistani researchers, practitioners, and families.

Anushay balances her research with her position as the founder of a non-profit, Resources for Children, which aims to understand and support children’s development in Pakistan.

Publications

  1. Mazhar, A. (2022, April). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Spring Preview, New Haven, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2021, December). Does an extended family improve mentalising in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK & Pakistan. 2nd International Foundation University Conference of Psychology, Rawalpindi, Pakistan.
  3. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Theory of Mind in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK and Pakistan. Harvard Trends in Psychology Summit, Cambridge, United States.
  1. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Research Rounds, New Haven, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2020, October). Developing a non-profit to advance autism research in Pakistan. Anna Freud Centre Seminar Series, London, United Kingdom

 

Núria is a Professor of Mathematics Education at Autonomous University of Barcelona. Her research is about language and mathematics in secondary school classrooms and professional development contexts with mathematics teachers.

Her first degree was in Mathematics at University of Barcelona (1995). Soon after her initiation as a secondary school mathematics teacher in highly multilingual classrooms of Barcelona, she started her PhD at the UAB Division of Mathematics Education. She wanted to understand the critical factors behind the under-performance in school mathematics of many learners from poor urban backgrounds and recent histories of migration. Since then, she has been committed to classroom and teacher education research grounded on community work with schools and mathematics teachers in urban areas of poverty. Her years as a school teacher have provided her with greater insights into her work as a researcher and have strongly influenced the adoption of sociocultural and sociopolitical approaches to mathematics teaching and learning.

Núria was given the ICREA Academia Award of the Catalan Institution for Research and Advanced Studies in 2013, in recognition of her contributions to research on multilingual mathematics teaching and learning. She was elected to the Executive Committee of the International Commission on Mathematical Instruction as Member-at-Large in 2021, and to the International Committee of the International Group for the Psychology of Mathematics Education from 2010 to 2014. She served as Extraordinarious Professor of Mathematics Education at the University of South Africa from 2013 to 2020. She was Visiting Scholar at London South Bank University, University of Arizona, and University of North Carolina at Chapel-Hill.

Núria is currently on the editorial board of the international journal Mathematics Education Research Journal and Journal of Mathematics Teacher Education. Till 2021 she was the editor-in-chief of the Advances of Research in Mathematics Education, the official journal of the Spanish Society of Research in Mathematics Education. She is the leading co-editor of a 2018 special issue on language research in mathematics education published in ZDM-Mathematics Education, and the leading co-editor of a special issue on decentring mathematics teaching education, to be published in the Journal of Mathematics Teacher Education, February 2024.

She chaired the 7th Topic Conference of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education on Language and Mathematics (Dresden, 2018), and the ERME Topic Working Group on Language and Mathematics from 2015 to 2020. The collaborations established in the ERME context enabled for a broad range of experts to come together and move forward the research field in the form of an co-edited Routledge volume entitled ‘Classroom research on mathematics and language: Seeing learners and teachers differently’ in 2021, with Núria as the leading co-editor. She has also been co-editor of the Springer volume resulting from the 21st ICMI Study on Language Diversity and Mathematics Education in 2016, and of the Brill volume entitled ‘Mathematical discourse that breaks barriers and creates space for marginalized learners’ in 2018.

Núria’s motivation for coming to the Oxford Department of Education is her research collaboration in projects co-coordinated with Jenni Ingram on establishing an international network for research on supporting school mathematics teaching with linguistically disadvantaged learners. From her years as a secondary school in the 1990s, important challenges posed to mathematics education practice remain. Learners of mathematics who are linguistically disadvantaged for a variety of reasons, including impoverished socioeconomic status, continue to be educationally disadvantaged at a considerable risk of school failure and early dropout. More research will hopefully shed light on how to identify and develop improved practices to enable greater access to school mathematics for all learners.

Publications

SELECTION OF 10 LAST-DECADE PUBLICATIONS
[For more publications and research details, see https://orcid.org/0000-0001-5199-6336]
– Planas, N., & Chronaki, A. (2021). Multilingual mathematics learning from a dialogic-translanguaging perspective. In N. Planas, C. Morgan, & M. Schütte (Eds.), Classroom research on mathematics and language: Seeing learners and teachers differently (pp. 151-166). Routledge.
– Planas, N. (2021). How specific can language as resource become for the teaching of algebraic concepts? ZDM-Mathematics Education, 53(2), 277-288.
– Planas, N. (2021). Challenges and opportunities from translingual research on multilingual mathematics classrooms. In A. A. Essien, & A. Msimanga (Eds.), Multilingual education yearbook 2021. Policy and practice in STEM multilingual contexts (pp. 1-18). Springer.
– Planas, N., & Ngoepe, M. (2019). Right to learn mathematics: From language as right to language as resource. In C. Xenofontos (Ed.), Equity in mathematics education. Addressing a changing world (pp. 93-110). Information Age Publishing.
– Planas, N., & Schütte, M. (2018). Research frameworks for the study of language in mathematics education, ZDM-Mathematics Education, 50(6), 965-974.
– Planas, N. (2018). Language as resource: A key notion for understanding the complexity of mathematics learning. Educational Studies in Mathematics, 98(3), 215-229.
– Planas, N., Morgan, C., & Schütte, M. (2018). Mathematics education and language. Lessons and directions from two decades of research. In T. Dreyfus, M. Artigue, S. Prediger, D. Potari, & Ruthven (Eds.), Developing research in mathematics education. Twenty years of communication, cooperation and collaboration in Europe (pp. 196-210). Routledge.
– Planas, N. (2014). One speaker, two languages: Learning opportunities in the mathematics classroom. Educational Studies in Mathematics, 87(1), 51-66.
– Planas, N., & Setati Phakeng, M. (2014). On the process of gaining language as a resource in mathematics education. ZDM-Mathematics Education, 46(6), 883-893.
– Planas, N., & Civil, M. (2013). Language-as-resource and language-as-political. Tensions in the bilingual mathematics classroom. Mathematics Education Research Journal, 25(3), 361-378.

 

https://portalrecerca.uab.cat/en/persons/nuria-planas-raig-3

https://orcid.org/0000-0001-5199-6336

 

Cindy works at the intersection of learning, design, and technology, with a keen interest in the orchestration of future-ready tech-enabled learning.

She is curious how the deployment of adaptive learning systems to schools will impact classroom learning and hopes to learn more about the human-machine partnership in education. Specifically, her research is concerned with the implications that the use of such systems has on teacher-student interactions, as teachers grapple with balancing personalised learning and learning in community, as well as curriculum demands and student interests. These are some tensions which could potentially be exacerbated by affordances of adaptive learning systems.

Prior to embarking on the DPhil in Education at Oxford, Cindy worked as the Lead Specialist in Technologies for Learning at the Educational Technology Division of Ministry of Education, Singapore. She had previously completed graduate studies at the National University of Singapore and Stanford University where she was awarded Master of Arts in English Studies and Master of Arts in Education.

Reem is DPhil student from Saudi Arabia.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she worked as a Teacher, Professional Developer, then, became a Supervisor and Researcher in the Ministry of Education where she received a scholarship to pursue her DPhil education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests lie in the area of Teacher Education and Professional Learning Policy and Practice.

Publications
  • Alqahtani, Reem (2020). Saudi Universities Role in Developing Teacher Professional Development Programs: Elite Universities Experience. Journal of Educational Sciences. King Saud University.
  • Alqahtani, Reem. (2020). The effect of implementing UDL-based activities in improving EFL learners’ academic achievement and attitudes towards L2. In L. Salas, & E. Ager, Creating Quiet reflective Spaces: Language Teacher Researches Professional Development (pp. 61-62). IATEFL publications.

Lena Zlock is researching the integration of digital technology into structures of teaching, learning, and education in higher education. Her particular focus is on the digital humanities and the potential for digital methods to transform humanistic study. She works with Professor Niall Winters and Dr. James Robson.

Lena’s research interests stem from her education as an M.St. student and Ertegun Graduate Scholar in Modern Languages at the University of Oxford, and as a B.A. student in History at Stanford University. As an undergraduate, she started the Voltaire Library Project, a digitally and data-driven study of the 6,763-book collection of French Enlightenment philosopher Voltaire (you can read more about the project here and here). She has been interested in the application of digital technology to humanistic teaching since her days in Princeton Day School, where she developed an interdisciplinary curriculum on Mexico City (visit the course website here).

Her research on Voltaire led her to think more broadly about the place of digital methods in the humanities classroom, and how new technologies will revolutionise the liberal arts and higher education. As a DPhil candidate, Lena will examine the negotiation and implementation of new learning technologies within the University of Oxford at undergraduate and graduate levels.

Lena is involved in a number of digital humanities initiatives in Oxford. She previously served as the inaugural fellow of the Voltaire Lab at Oxford’s Voltaire Foundation. As a master’s student, Lena co-formulated the convergence agenda for Oxford digital humanities with Professor Howard Hotson, and is currently employed by the Humanities Division to assist with the development of an M.St. degree in Digital Scholarship (read more here). Lena set up and helps to run the History of the Book blog for the Faculty of Medieval and Modern Languages and the Oxford Book History Twitter account.

Lena welcomes inquiries from undergraduate and postgraduate students from Oxford and beyond seeking to get involved with the digital humanities in any capacity. The History of the Book blog also welcomes inquiries from prospective contributors.

 

Abbey is a Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education, in collaboration with the Department of Engineering.

Before joining the DPhil program, Abbey obtained a B.A. in Applied Linguistics with minors in Russian and Chinese from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford. She was the recipient of a Benjamin A. Gilman International Scholarship through U.S. Department of State for study in Russia and was awarded two Foreign Language and Area Studies (FLAS) Fellowships for study in both Russia and China. She holds both TESOL and TEFL certificates and has taught English as a Second Language in various contexts to a wide variety of learner populations.

Abbey’s main research interests lie in the use of technology to facilitate language learning. Her DPhil research focuses on the development of a virtual reality program to bridge the gaps that students face when learning languages through distance learning.

Julie Chia-Yi Lin is a Doctoral student at the University of Oxford, funded by the Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholarship. Her research focus on Internationalization, Policy, Management and Institutional Strategy is rooted in her professional experience in publishing and higher education, as well as from her observations regarding the continuous change in global educational dynamics.

Julie completed her B.A. at National Taiwan University, and earned a joint M.A. from the University of Vienna and the University of Wroclaw. She was previously employed as an officer for the Office of International Affairs at National Taiwan University, and then as a Publisher at Emerald Publishing.

She focuses on the development of higher education, particularly in the processes of internationalization and globalization, and tries to deliver perspectives from different Institutional sectors, and a wide array of participants. She is mindful of the influence that culture has on the development and reception of these processes, and has a special interest in the East Asia region, and Confucian-influenced higher education systems. In her doctoral research, she investigates higher ed institutional strategy, and the relationship it has with real-world policy. This includes delving into the specific interpretation and implementation of official policy by different stakeholders within the institution- faculty, administration, and management.

Publications

Lin, J. (2015). The Impact of Globalization on Taiwan’s Education Policy: The International Student. In A. Lipinsky. (Ed), Vienna Taiwan Studies Series: Immigration societies, Taiwan and Beyond. (pp. 129-151). Vienna: LIT VERLAG GmbH & Co. KG

Yibo Wang has an MA in International Marketing from the Coventry University (UK) and a Master’s in Management: Leadership and Organizational Change from the University of Birmingham (UK).

His doctoral research focuses on ‘knowledge hiding’, ‘leadership style’ and ‘Confucian culture’ in Chinese education and training institutions.

As empirical studies on ‘knowledge hiding’ in the Chinese context are scarce, Yibo hopes to uncover underlying mechanism of knowledge hiding and find its potential influence factors.

Prior to coming to Oxford, he worked as a CEO in an educational consultancy based in Beijing that advised the investment and marketing analyses on education and training industry.

Riziki’s current DPhil research focuses on emergent literacy of refugee children within multilingual settings.

Prior to commencing her DPhil research, Riziki completed an MSc in Child Development at the University of Oxford, looking at the role of teacher behavioural and cognitive judgments on the learning trajectories of Black primary school students in England.

Her research interests are education access and wellbeing of children in resettlement and asylum contexts. In line with this, her research in the past has focused on integration and resettlement processes of refugees and immigrants within Canada.

Publications

Bhattacharyya, P., Ogoe, S., Riziki, A., & Wilkinson, L. (2020). In search of a “home”: comparing the housing challenges experienced by recently arrived Yazidi and Syrian Refugees in Canada. Manuscript submitted for publication.

Bhattacharyya, P., Riziki, A., Songose, L., Ogoe, S., & Wilkinson, L. (2020). Understanding the link between pre-arrival education and trauma and language learning: A case study of Yazidi women in Canada. Canadian Diversity, 17(2).

Bhattacharyya, P., Riziki, A., & Wilkinson, L. (2018). “Settlement Service Use among Syrian Refugees in Canada” Canadian Diversity 15(1).

Wilkinson, L., Bhattacharya, P., Garcea, J., Abdul-Karim, A., Riziki, A., & Schnieders, M. (2017). Finding home: Some housing considerations for refugee families with children. Canadian Diversity, 14 (3), 31-35

Wilkinson, L., Bhattacharyya, P., Riziki, A., & Abdul-Karim, A. (2018).Yazidi Refugee Resettlement in Canada. Calgary: Immigration Refugees and Citizenship Canada-Integration Branch (Prairies and Territories Region).

Wilkinson, L., Garcea, J., Bhattacharyya, P., Riziki, A., Abdul Karim, A. (2017). Resettling on the Canadian Prairies: Integration of Syrian refugees. Calgary: Immigration Refugees and Citizenship Canada, Integration Branch-Prairies., Northwest Territories Division., & Alberta Association of Immigrant Serving Agencies

Anushay completed her BSc Psychology from UCL, where she also started her master’s in Developmental Neuroscience and Psychopathology. She was based at Yale University for her master’s thesis, where she worked with Dr Craig Bailey at the Yale Center for Emotional Intelligence to understand children’s emotion development. Anushay’s research interests include understanding child development across different cultures, factors that might be affecting it, and devising culture-specific ways to support children’s holistic development through the educational system. She is also keen on improving the research scope in Pakistan by working with Pakistani researchers, practitioners, and families.

Anushay balances her research with her position as the founder of a non-profit, Resources for Children, which aims to understand and support children’s development in Pakistan.

Publications

  1. Mazhar, A. (2022, April). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Spring Preview, New Haven, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2021, December). Does an extended family improve mentalising in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK & Pakistan. 2nd International Foundation University Conference of Psychology, Rawalpindi, Pakistan.
  3. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Theory of Mind in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK and Pakistan. Harvard Trends in Psychology Summit, Cambridge, United States.
  1. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Research Rounds, New Haven, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2020, October). Developing a non-profit to advance autism research in Pakistan. Anna Freud Centre Seminar Series, London, United Kingdom

 

Núria is a Professor of Mathematics Education at Autonomous University of Barcelona. Her research is about language and mathematics in secondary school classrooms and professional development contexts with mathematics teachers.

Her first degree was in Mathematics at University of Barcelona (1995). Soon after her initiation as a secondary school mathematics teacher in highly multilingual classrooms of Barcelona, she started her PhD at the UAB Division of Mathematics Education. She wanted to understand the critical factors behind the under-performance in school mathematics of many learners from poor urban backgrounds and recent histories of migration. Since then, she has been committed to classroom and teacher education research grounded on community work with schools and mathematics teachers in urban areas of poverty. Her years as a school teacher have provided her with greater insights into her work as a researcher and have strongly influenced the adoption of sociocultural and sociopolitical approaches to mathematics teaching and learning.

Núria was given the ICREA Academia Award of the Catalan Institution for Research and Advanced Studies in 2013, in recognition of her contributions to research on multilingual mathematics teaching and learning. She was elected to the Executive Committee of the International Commission on Mathematical Instruction as Member-at-Large in 2021, and to the International Committee of the International Group for the Psychology of Mathematics Education from 2010 to 2014. She served as Extraordinarious Professor of Mathematics Education at the University of South Africa from 2013 to 2020. She was Visiting Scholar at London South Bank University, University of Arizona, and University of North Carolina at Chapel-Hill.

Núria is currently on the editorial board of the international journal Mathematics Education Research Journal and Journal of Mathematics Teacher Education. Till 2021 she was the editor-in-chief of the Advances of Research in Mathematics Education, the official journal of the Spanish Society of Research in Mathematics Education. She is the leading co-editor of a 2018 special issue on language research in mathematics education published in ZDM-Mathematics Education, and the leading co-editor of a special issue on decentring mathematics teaching education, to be published in the Journal of Mathematics Teacher Education, February 2024.

She chaired the 7th Topic Conference of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education on Language and Mathematics (Dresden, 2018), and the ERME Topic Working Group on Language and Mathematics from 2015 to 2020. The collaborations established in the ERME context enabled for a broad range of experts to come together and move forward the research field in the form of an co-edited Routledge volume entitled ‘Classroom research on mathematics and language: Seeing learners and teachers differently’ in 2021, with Núria as the leading co-editor. She has also been co-editor of the Springer volume resulting from the 21st ICMI Study on Language Diversity and Mathematics Education in 2016, and of the Brill volume entitled ‘Mathematical discourse that breaks barriers and creates space for marginalized learners’ in 2018.

Núria’s motivation for coming to the Oxford Department of Education is her research collaboration in projects co-coordinated with Jenni Ingram on establishing an international network for research on supporting school mathematics teaching with linguistically disadvantaged learners. From her years as a secondary school in the 1990s, important challenges posed to mathematics education practice remain. Learners of mathematics who are linguistically disadvantaged for a variety of reasons, including impoverished socioeconomic status, continue to be educationally disadvantaged at a considerable risk of school failure and early dropout. More research will hopefully shed light on how to identify and develop improved practices to enable greater access to school mathematics for all learners.

Publications

SELECTION OF 10 LAST-DECADE PUBLICATIONS
[For more publications and research details, see https://orcid.org/0000-0001-5199-6336]
– Planas, N., & Chronaki, A. (2021). Multilingual mathematics learning from a dialogic-translanguaging perspective. In N. Planas, C. Morgan, & M. Schütte (Eds.), Classroom research on mathematics and language: Seeing learners and teachers differently (pp. 151-166). Routledge.
– Planas, N. (2021). How specific can language as resource become for the teaching of algebraic concepts? ZDM-Mathematics Education, 53(2), 277-288.
– Planas, N. (2021). Challenges and opportunities from translingual research on multilingual mathematics classrooms. In A. A. Essien, & A. Msimanga (Eds.), Multilingual education yearbook 2021. Policy and practice in STEM multilingual contexts (pp. 1-18). Springer.
– Planas, N., & Ngoepe, M. (2019). Right to learn mathematics: From language as right to language as resource. In C. Xenofontos (Ed.), Equity in mathematics education. Addressing a changing world (pp. 93-110). Information Age Publishing.
– Planas, N., & Schütte, M. (2018). Research frameworks for the study of language in mathematics education, ZDM-Mathematics Education, 50(6), 965-974.
– Planas, N. (2018). Language as resource: A key notion for understanding the complexity of mathematics learning. Educational Studies in Mathematics, 98(3), 215-229.
– Planas, N., Morgan, C., & Schütte, M. (2018). Mathematics education and language. Lessons and directions from two decades of research. In T. Dreyfus, M. Artigue, S. Prediger, D. Potari, & Ruthven (Eds.), Developing research in mathematics education. Twenty years of communication, cooperation and collaboration in Europe (pp. 196-210). Routledge.
– Planas, N. (2014). One speaker, two languages: Learning opportunities in the mathematics classroom. Educational Studies in Mathematics, 87(1), 51-66.
– Planas, N., & Setati Phakeng, M. (2014). On the process of gaining language as a resource in mathematics education. ZDM-Mathematics Education, 46(6), 883-893.
– Planas, N., & Civil, M. (2013). Language-as-resource and language-as-political. Tensions in the bilingual mathematics classroom. Mathematics Education Research Journal, 25(3), 361-378.

 

https://portalrecerca.uab.cat/en/persons/nuria-planas-raig-3

https://orcid.org/0000-0001-5199-6336

 

Cindy works at the intersection of learning, design, and technology, with a keen interest in the orchestration of future-ready tech-enabled learning.

She is curious how the deployment of adaptive learning systems to schools will impact classroom learning and hopes to learn more about the human-machine partnership in education. Specifically, her research is concerned with the implications that the use of such systems has on teacher-student interactions, as teachers grapple with balancing personalised learning and learning in community, as well as curriculum demands and student interests. These are some tensions which could potentially be exacerbated by affordances of adaptive learning systems.

Prior to embarking on the DPhil in Education at Oxford, Cindy worked as the Lead Specialist in Technologies for Learning at the Educational Technology Division of Ministry of Education, Singapore. She had previously completed graduate studies at the National University of Singapore and Stanford University where she was awarded Master of Arts in English Studies and Master of Arts in Education.

Reem is DPhil student from Saudi Arabia.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she worked as a Teacher, Professional Developer, then, became a Supervisor and Researcher in the Ministry of Education where she received a scholarship to pursue her DPhil education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests lie in the area of Teacher Education and Professional Learning Policy and Practice.

Publications
  • Alqahtani, Reem (2020). Saudi Universities Role in Developing Teacher Professional Development Programs: Elite Universities Experience. Journal of Educational Sciences. King Saud University.
  • Alqahtani, Reem. (2020). The effect of implementing UDL-based activities in improving EFL learners’ academic achievement and attitudes towards L2. In L. Salas, & E. Ager, Creating Quiet reflective Spaces: Language Teacher Researches Professional Development (pp. 61-62). IATEFL publications.

Lena Zlock is researching the integration of digital technology into structures of teaching, learning, and education in higher education. Her particular focus is on the digital humanities and the potential for digital methods to transform humanistic study. She works with Professor Niall Winters and Dr. James Robson.

Lena’s research interests stem from her education as an M.St. student and Ertegun Graduate Scholar in Modern Languages at the University of Oxford, and as a B.A. student in History at Stanford University. As an undergraduate, she started the Voltaire Library Project, a digitally and data-driven study of the 6,763-book collection of French Enlightenment philosopher Voltaire (you can read more about the project here and here). She has been interested in the application of digital technology to humanistic teaching since her days in Princeton Day School, where she developed an interdisciplinary curriculum on Mexico City (visit the course website here).

Her research on Voltaire led her to think more broadly about the place of digital methods in the humanities classroom, and how new technologies will revolutionise the liberal arts and higher education. As a DPhil candidate, Lena will examine the negotiation and implementation of new learning technologies within the University of Oxford at undergraduate and graduate levels.

Lena is involved in a number of digital humanities initiatives in Oxford. She previously served as the inaugural fellow of the Voltaire Lab at Oxford’s Voltaire Foundation. As a master’s student, Lena co-formulated the convergence agenda for Oxford digital humanities with Professor Howard Hotson, and is currently employed by the Humanities Division to assist with the development of an M.St. degree in Digital Scholarship (read more here). Lena set up and helps to run the History of the Book blog for the Faculty of Medieval and Modern Languages and the Oxford Book History Twitter account.

Lena welcomes inquiries from undergraduate and postgraduate students from Oxford and beyond seeking to get involved with the digital humanities in any capacity. The History of the Book blog also welcomes inquiries from prospective contributors.

 

Abbey is a Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education, in collaboration with the Department of Engineering.

Before joining the DPhil program, Abbey obtained a B.A. in Applied Linguistics with minors in Russian and Chinese from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford. She was the recipient of a Benjamin A. Gilman International Scholarship through U.S. Department of State for study in Russia and was awarded two Foreign Language and Area Studies (FLAS) Fellowships for study in both Russia and China. She holds both TESOL and TEFL certificates and has taught English as a Second Language in various contexts to a wide variety of learner populations.

Abbey’s main research interests lie in the use of technology to facilitate language learning. Her DPhil research focuses on the development of a virtual reality program to bridge the gaps that students face when learning languages through distance learning.

Julie Chia-Yi Lin is a Doctoral student at the University of Oxford, funded by the Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholarship. Her research focus on Internationalization, Policy, Management and Institutional Strategy is rooted in her professional experience in publishing and higher education, as well as from her observations regarding the continuous change in global educational dynamics.

Julie completed her B.A. at National Taiwan University, and earned a joint M.A. from the University of Vienna and the University of Wroclaw. She was previously employed as an officer for the Office of International Affairs at National Taiwan University, and then as a Publisher at Emerald Publishing.

She focuses on the development of higher education, particularly in the processes of internationalization and globalization, and tries to deliver perspectives from different Institutional sectors, and a wide array of participants. She is mindful of the influence that culture has on the development and reception of these processes, and has a special interest in the East Asia region, and Confucian-influenced higher education systems. In her doctoral research, she investigates higher ed institutional strategy, and the relationship it has with real-world policy. This includes delving into the specific interpretation and implementation of official policy by different stakeholders within the institution- faculty, administration, and management.

Publications

Lin, J. (2015). The Impact of Globalization on Taiwan’s Education Policy: The International Student. In A. Lipinsky. (Ed), Vienna Taiwan Studies Series: Immigration societies, Taiwan and Beyond. (pp. 129-151). Vienna: LIT VERLAG GmbH & Co. KG

Yibo Wang has an MA in International Marketing from the Coventry University (UK) and a Master’s in Management: Leadership and Organizational Change from the University of Birmingham (UK).

His doctoral research focuses on ‘knowledge hiding’, ‘leadership style’ and ‘Confucian culture’ in Chinese education and training institutions.

As empirical studies on ‘knowledge hiding’ in the Chinese context are scarce, Yibo hopes to uncover underlying mechanism of knowledge hiding and find its potential influence factors.

Prior to coming to Oxford, he worked as a CEO in an educational consultancy based in Beijing that advised the investment and marketing analyses on education and training industry.

Riziki’s current DPhil research focuses on emergent literacy of refugee children within multilingual settings.

Prior to commencing her DPhil research, Riziki completed an MSc in Child Development at the University of Oxford, looking at the role of teacher behavioural and cognitive judgments on the learning trajectories of Black primary school students in England.

Her research interests are education access and wellbeing of children in resettlement and asylum contexts. In line with this, her research in the past has focused on integration and resettlement processes of refugees and immigrants within Canada.

Publications

Bhattacharyya, P., Ogoe, S., Riziki, A., & Wilkinson, L. (2020). In search of a “home”: comparing the housing challenges experienced by recently arrived Yazidi and Syrian Refugees in Canada. Manuscript submitted for publication.

Bhattacharyya, P., Riziki, A., Songose, L., Ogoe, S., & Wilkinson, L. (2020). Understanding the link between pre-arrival education and trauma and language learning: A case study of Yazidi women in Canada. Canadian Diversity, 17(2).

Bhattacharyya, P., Riziki, A., & Wilkinson, L. (2018). “Settlement Service Use among Syrian Refugees in Canada” Canadian Diversity 15(1).

Wilkinson, L., Bhattacharya, P., Garcea, J., Abdul-Karim, A., Riziki, A., & Schnieders, M. (2017). Finding home: Some housing considerations for refugee families with children. Canadian Diversity, 14 (3), 31-35

Wilkinson, L., Bhattacharyya, P., Riziki, A., & Abdul-Karim, A. (2018).Yazidi Refugee Resettlement in Canada. Calgary: Immigration Refugees and Citizenship Canada-Integration Branch (Prairies and Territories Region).

Wilkinson, L., Garcea, J., Bhattacharyya, P., Riziki, A., Abdul Karim, A. (2017). Resettling on the Canadian Prairies: Integration of Syrian refugees. Calgary: Immigration Refugees and Citizenship Canada, Integration Branch-Prairies., Northwest Territories Division., & Alberta Association of Immigrant Serving Agencies

Anushay completed her BSc Psychology from UCL, where she also started her master’s in Developmental Neuroscience and Psychopathology. She was based at Yale University for her master’s thesis, where she worked with Dr Craig Bailey at the Yale Center for Emotional Intelligence to understand children’s emotion development. Anushay’s research interests include understanding child development across different cultures, factors that might be affecting it, and devising culture-specific ways to support children’s holistic development through the educational system. She is also keen on improving the research scope in Pakistan by working with Pakistani researchers, practitioners, and families.

Anushay balances her research with her position as the founder of a non-profit, Resources for Children, which aims to understand and support children’s development in Pakistan.

Publications

  1. Mazhar, A. (2022, April). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Spring Preview, New Haven, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2021, December). Does an extended family improve mentalising in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK & Pakistan. 2nd International Foundation University Conference of Psychology, Rawalpindi, Pakistan.
  3. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Theory of Mind in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK and Pakistan. Harvard Trends in Psychology Summit, Cambridge, United States.
  1. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Research Rounds, New Haven, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2020, October). Developing a non-profit to advance autism research in Pakistan. Anna Freud Centre Seminar Series, London, United Kingdom

 

Núria is a Professor of Mathematics Education at Autonomous University of Barcelona. Her research is about language and mathematics in secondary school classrooms and professional development contexts with mathematics teachers.

Her first degree was in Mathematics at University of Barcelona (1995). Soon after her initiation as a secondary school mathematics teacher in highly multilingual classrooms of Barcelona, she started her PhD at the UAB Division of Mathematics Education. She wanted to understand the critical factors behind the under-performance in school mathematics of many learners from poor urban backgrounds and recent histories of migration. Since then, she has been committed to classroom and teacher education research grounded on community work with schools and mathematics teachers in urban areas of poverty. Her years as a school teacher have provided her with greater insights into her work as a researcher and have strongly influenced the adoption of sociocultural and sociopolitical approaches to mathematics teaching and learning.

Núria was given the ICREA Academia Award of the Catalan Institution for Research and Advanced Studies in 2013, in recognition of her contributions to research on multilingual mathematics teaching and learning. She was elected to the Executive Committee of the International Commission on Mathematical Instruction as Member-at-Large in 2021, and to the International Committee of the International Group for the Psychology of Mathematics Education from 2010 to 2014. She served as Extraordinarious Professor of Mathematics Education at the University of South Africa from 2013 to 2020. She was Visiting Scholar at London South Bank University, University of Arizona, and University of North Carolina at Chapel-Hill.

Núria is currently on the editorial board of the international journal Mathematics Education Research Journal and Journal of Mathematics Teacher Education. Till 2021 she was the editor-in-chief of the Advances of Research in Mathematics Education, the official journal of the Spanish Society of Research in Mathematics Education. She is the leading co-editor of a 2018 special issue on language research in mathematics education published in ZDM-Mathematics Education, and the leading co-editor of a special issue on decentring mathematics teaching education, to be published in the Journal of Mathematics Teacher Education, February 2024.

She chaired the 7th Topic Conference of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education on Language and Mathematics (Dresden, 2018), and the ERME Topic Working Group on Language and Mathematics from 2015 to 2020. The collaborations established in the ERME context enabled for a broad range of experts to come together and move forward the research field in the form of an co-edited Routledge volume entitled ‘Classroom research on mathematics and language: Seeing learners and teachers differently’ in 2021, with Núria as the leading co-editor. She has also been co-editor of the Springer volume resulting from the 21st ICMI Study on Language Diversity and Mathematics Education in 2016, and of the Brill volume entitled ‘Mathematical discourse that breaks barriers and creates space for marginalized learners’ in 2018.

Núria’s motivation for coming to the Oxford Department of Education is her research collaboration in projects co-coordinated with Jenni Ingram on establishing an international network for research on supporting school mathematics teaching with linguistically disadvantaged learners. From her years as a secondary school in the 1990s, important challenges posed to mathematics education practice remain. Learners of mathematics who are linguistically disadvantaged for a variety of reasons, including impoverished socioeconomic status, continue to be educationally disadvantaged at a considerable risk of school failure and early dropout. More research will hopefully shed light on how to identify and develop improved practices to enable greater access to school mathematics for all learners.

Publications

SELECTION OF 10 LAST-DECADE PUBLICATIONS
[For more publications and research details, see https://orcid.org/0000-0001-5199-6336]
– Planas, N., & Chronaki, A. (2021). Multilingual mathematics learning from a dialogic-translanguaging perspective. In N. Planas, C. Morgan, & M. Schütte (Eds.), Classroom research on mathematics and language: Seeing learners and teachers differently (pp. 151-166). Routledge.
– Planas, N. (2021). How specific can language as resource become for the teaching of algebraic concepts? ZDM-Mathematics Education, 53(2), 277-288.
– Planas, N. (2021). Challenges and opportunities from translingual research on multilingual mathematics classrooms. In A. A. Essien, & A. Msimanga (Eds.), Multilingual education yearbook 2021. Policy and practice in STEM multilingual contexts (pp. 1-18). Springer.
– Planas, N., & Ngoepe, M. (2019). Right to learn mathematics: From language as right to language as resource. In C. Xenofontos (Ed.), Equity in mathematics education. Addressing a changing world (pp. 93-110). Information Age Publishing.
– Planas, N., & Schütte, M. (2018). Research frameworks for the study of language in mathematics education, ZDM-Mathematics Education, 50(6), 965-974.
– Planas, N. (2018). Language as resource: A key notion for understanding the complexity of mathematics learning. Educational Studies in Mathematics, 98(3), 215-229.
– Planas, N., Morgan, C., & Schütte, M. (2018). Mathematics education and language. Lessons and directions from two decades of research. In T. Dreyfus, M. Artigue, S. Prediger, D. Potari, & Ruthven (Eds.), Developing research in mathematics education. Twenty years of communication, cooperation and collaboration in Europe (pp. 196-210). Routledge.
– Planas, N. (2014). One speaker, two languages: Learning opportunities in the mathematics classroom. Educational Studies in Mathematics, 87(1), 51-66.
– Planas, N., & Setati Phakeng, M. (2014). On the process of gaining language as a resource in mathematics education. ZDM-Mathematics Education, 46(6), 883-893.
– Planas, N., & Civil, M. (2013). Language-as-resource and language-as-political. Tensions in the bilingual mathematics classroom. Mathematics Education Research Journal, 25(3), 361-378.

 

https://portalrecerca.uab.cat/en/persons/nuria-planas-raig-3

https://orcid.org/0000-0001-5199-6336

 

Cindy works at the intersection of learning, design, and technology, with a keen interest in the orchestration of future-ready tech-enabled learning.

She is curious how the deployment of adaptive learning systems to schools will impact classroom learning and hopes to learn more about the human-machine partnership in education. Specifically, her research is concerned with the implications that the use of such systems has on teacher-student interactions, as teachers grapple with balancing personalised learning and learning in community, as well as curriculum demands and student interests. These are some tensions which could potentially be exacerbated by affordances of adaptive learning systems.

Prior to embarking on the DPhil in Education at Oxford, Cindy worked as the Lead Specialist in Technologies for Learning at the Educational Technology Division of Ministry of Education, Singapore. She had previously completed graduate studies at the National University of Singapore and Stanford University where she was awarded Master of Arts in English Studies and Master of Arts in Education.

Reem is DPhil student from Saudi Arabia.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she worked as a Teacher, Professional Developer, then, became a Supervisor and Researcher in the Ministry of Education where she received a scholarship to pursue her DPhil education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests lie in the area of Teacher Education and Professional Learning Policy and Practice.

Publications
  • Alqahtani, Reem (2020). Saudi Universities Role in Developing Teacher Professional Development Programs: Elite Universities Experience. Journal of Educational Sciences. King Saud University.
  • Alqahtani, Reem. (2020). The effect of implementing UDL-based activities in improving EFL learners’ academic achievement and attitudes towards L2. In L. Salas, & E. Ager, Creating Quiet reflective Spaces: Language Teacher Researches Professional Development (pp. 61-62). IATEFL publications.

Lena Zlock is researching the integration of digital technology into structures of teaching, learning, and education in higher education. Her particular focus is on the digital humanities and the potential for digital methods to transform humanistic study. She works with Professor Niall Winters and Dr. James Robson.

Lena’s research interests stem from her education as an M.St. student and Ertegun Graduate Scholar in Modern Languages at the University of Oxford, and as a B.A. student in History at Stanford University. As an undergraduate, she started the Voltaire Library Project, a digitally and data-driven study of the 6,763-book collection of French Enlightenment philosopher Voltaire (you can read more about the project here and here). She has been interested in the application of digital technology to humanistic teaching since her days in Princeton Day School, where she developed an interdisciplinary curriculum on Mexico City (visit the course website here).

Her research on Voltaire led her to think more broadly about the place of digital methods in the humanities classroom, and how new technologies will revolutionise the liberal arts and higher education. As a DPhil candidate, Lena will examine the negotiation and implementation of new learning technologies within the University of Oxford at undergraduate and graduate levels.

Lena is involved in a number of digital humanities initiatives in Oxford. She previously served as the inaugural fellow of the Voltaire Lab at Oxford’s Voltaire Foundation. As a master’s student, Lena co-formulated the convergence agenda for Oxford digital humanities with Professor Howard Hotson, and is currently employed by the Humanities Division to assist with the development of an M.St. degree in Digital Scholarship (read more here). Lena set up and helps to run the History of the Book blog for the Faculty of Medieval and Modern Languages and the Oxford Book History Twitter account.

Lena welcomes inquiries from undergraduate and postgraduate students from Oxford and beyond seeking to get involved with the digital humanities in any capacity. The History of the Book blog also welcomes inquiries from prospective contributors.

 

Abbey is a Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education, in collaboration with the Department of Engineering.

Before joining the DPhil program, Abbey obtained a B.A. in Applied Linguistics with minors in Russian and Chinese from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford. She was the recipient of a Benjamin A. Gilman International Scholarship through U.S. Department of State for study in Russia and was awarded two Foreign Language and Area Studies (FLAS) Fellowships for study in both Russia and China. She holds both TESOL and TEFL certificates and has taught English as a Second Language in various contexts to a wide variety of learner populations.

Abbey’s main research interests lie in the use of technology to facilitate language learning. Her DPhil research focuses on the development of a virtual reality program to bridge the gaps that students face when learning languages through distance learning.

Julie Chia-Yi Lin is a Doctoral student at the University of Oxford, funded by the Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholarship. Her research focus on Internationalization, Policy, Management and Institutional Strategy is rooted in her professional experience in publishing and higher education, as well as from her observations regarding the continuous change in global educational dynamics.

Julie completed her B.A. at National Taiwan University, and earned a joint M.A. from the University of Vienna and the University of Wroclaw. She was previously employed as an officer for the Office of International Affairs at National Taiwan University, and then as a Publisher at Emerald Publishing.

She focuses on the development of higher education, particularly in the processes of internationalization and globalization, and tries to deliver perspectives from different Institutional sectors, and a wide array of participants. She is mindful of the influence that culture has on the development and reception of these processes, and has a special interest in the East Asia region, and Confucian-influenced higher education systems. In her doctoral research, she investigates higher ed institutional strategy, and the relationship it has with real-world policy. This includes delving into the specific interpretation and implementation of official policy by different stakeholders within the institution- faculty, administration, and management.

Publications

Lin, J. (2015). The Impact of Globalization on Taiwan’s Education Policy: The International Student. In A. Lipinsky. (Ed), Vienna Taiwan Studies Series: Immigration societies, Taiwan and Beyond. (pp. 129-151). Vienna: LIT VERLAG GmbH & Co. KG

Yibo Wang has an MA in International Marketing from the Coventry University (UK) and a Master’s in Management: Leadership and Organizational Change from the University of Birmingham (UK).

His doctoral research focuses on ‘knowledge hiding’, ‘leadership style’ and ‘Confucian culture’ in Chinese education and training institutions.

As empirical studies on ‘knowledge hiding’ in the Chinese context are scarce, Yibo hopes to uncover underlying mechanism of knowledge hiding and find its potential influence factors.

Prior to coming to Oxford, he worked as a CEO in an educational consultancy based in Beijing that advised the investment and marketing analyses on education and training industry.

Riziki’s current DPhil research focuses on emergent literacy of refugee children within multilingual settings.

Prior to commencing her DPhil research, Riziki completed an MSc in Child Development at the University of Oxford, looking at the role of teacher behavioural and cognitive judgments on the learning trajectories of Black primary school students in England.

Her research interests are education access and wellbeing of children in resettlement and asylum contexts. In line with this, her research in the past has focused on integration and resettlement processes of refugees and immigrants within Canada.

Publications

Bhattacharyya, P., Ogoe, S., Riziki, A., & Wilkinson, L. (2020). In search of a “home”: comparing the housing challenges experienced by recently arrived Yazidi and Syrian Refugees in Canada. Manuscript submitted for publication.

Bhattacharyya, P., Riziki, A., Songose, L., Ogoe, S., & Wilkinson, L. (2020). Understanding the link between pre-arrival education and trauma and language learning: A case study of Yazidi women in Canada. Canadian Diversity, 17(2).

Bhattacharyya, P., Riziki, A., & Wilkinson, L. (2018). “Settlement Service Use among Syrian Refugees in Canada” Canadian Diversity 15(1).

Wilkinson, L., Bhattacharya, P., Garcea, J., Abdul-Karim, A., Riziki, A., & Schnieders, M. (2017). Finding home: Some housing considerations for refugee families with children. Canadian Diversity, 14 (3), 31-35

Wilkinson, L., Bhattacharyya, P., Riziki, A., & Abdul-Karim, A. (2018).Yazidi Refugee Resettlement in Canada. Calgary: Immigration Refugees and Citizenship Canada-Integration Branch (Prairies and Territories Region).

Wilkinson, L., Garcea, J., Bhattacharyya, P., Riziki, A., Abdul Karim, A. (2017). Resettling on the Canadian Prairies: Integration of Syrian refugees. Calgary: Immigration Refugees and Citizenship Canada, Integration Branch-Prairies., Northwest Territories Division., & Alberta Association of Immigrant Serving Agencies

Anushay completed her BSc Psychology from UCL, where she also started her master’s in Developmental Neuroscience and Psychopathology. She was based at Yale University for her master’s thesis, where she worked with Dr Craig Bailey at the Yale Center for Emotional Intelligence to understand children’s emotion development. Anushay’s research interests include understanding child development across different cultures, factors that might be affecting it, and devising culture-specific ways to support children’s holistic development through the educational system. She is also keen on improving the research scope in Pakistan by working with Pakistani researchers, practitioners, and families.

Anushay balances her research with her position as the founder of a non-profit, Resources for Children, which aims to understand and support children’s development in Pakistan.

Publications

  1. Mazhar, A. (2022, April). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Spring Preview, New Haven, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2021, December). Does an extended family improve mentalising in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK & Pakistan. 2nd International Foundation University Conference of Psychology, Rawalpindi, Pakistan.
  3. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Theory of Mind in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK and Pakistan. Harvard Trends in Psychology Summit, Cambridge, United States.
  1. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Research Rounds, New Haven, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2020, October). Developing a non-profit to advance autism research in Pakistan. Anna Freud Centre Seminar Series, London, United Kingdom

 

Núria is a Professor of Mathematics Education at Autonomous University of Barcelona. Her research is about language and mathematics in secondary school classrooms and professional development contexts with mathematics teachers.

Her first degree was in Mathematics at University of Barcelona (1995). Soon after her initiation as a secondary school mathematics teacher in highly multilingual classrooms of Barcelona, she started her PhD at the UAB Division of Mathematics Education. She wanted to understand the critical factors behind the under-performance in school mathematics of many learners from poor urban backgrounds and recent histories of migration. Since then, she has been committed to classroom and teacher education research grounded on community work with schools and mathematics teachers in urban areas of poverty. Her years as a school teacher have provided her with greater insights into her work as a researcher and have strongly influenced the adoption of sociocultural and sociopolitical approaches to mathematics teaching and learning.

Núria was given the ICREA Academia Award of the Catalan Institution for Research and Advanced Studies in 2013, in recognition of her contributions to research on multilingual mathematics teaching and learning. She was elected to the Executive Committee of the International Commission on Mathematical Instruction as Member-at-Large in 2021, and to the International Committee of the International Group for the Psychology of Mathematics Education from 2010 to 2014. She served as Extraordinarious Professor of Mathematics Education at the University of South Africa from 2013 to 2020. She was Visiting Scholar at London South Bank University, University of Arizona, and University of North Carolina at Chapel-Hill.

Núria is currently on the editorial board of the international journal Mathematics Education Research Journal and Journal of Mathematics Teacher Education. Till 2021 she was the editor-in-chief of the Advances of Research in Mathematics Education, the official journal of the Spanish Society of Research in Mathematics Education. She is the leading co-editor of a 2018 special issue on language research in mathematics education published in ZDM-Mathematics Education, and the leading co-editor of a special issue on decentring mathematics teaching education, to be published in the Journal of Mathematics Teacher Education, February 2024.

She chaired the 7th Topic Conference of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education on Language and Mathematics (Dresden, 2018), and the ERME Topic Working Group on Language and Mathematics from 2015 to 2020. The collaborations established in the ERME context enabled for a broad range of experts to come together and move forward the research field in the form of an co-edited Routledge volume entitled ‘Classroom research on mathematics and language: Seeing learners and teachers differently’ in 2021, with Núria as the leading co-editor. She has also been co-editor of the Springer volume resulting from the 21st ICMI Study on Language Diversity and Mathematics Education in 2016, and of the Brill volume entitled ‘Mathematical discourse that breaks barriers and creates space for marginalized learners’ in 2018.

Núria’s motivation for coming to the Oxford Department of Education is her research collaboration in projects co-coordinated with Jenni Ingram on establishing an international network for research on supporting school mathematics teaching with linguistically disadvantaged learners. From her years as a secondary school in the 1990s, important challenges posed to mathematics education practice remain. Learners of mathematics who are linguistically disadvantaged for a variety of reasons, including impoverished socioeconomic status, continue to be educationally disadvantaged at a considerable risk of school failure and early dropout. More research will hopefully shed light on how to identify and develop improved practices to enable greater access to school mathematics for all learners.

Publications

SELECTION OF 10 LAST-DECADE PUBLICATIONS
[For more publications and research details, see https://orcid.org/0000-0001-5199-6336]
– Planas, N., & Chronaki, A. (2021). Multilingual mathematics learning from a dialogic-translanguaging perspective. In N. Planas, C. Morgan, & M. Schütte (Eds.), Classroom research on mathematics and language: Seeing learners and teachers differently (pp. 151-166). Routledge.
– Planas, N. (2021). How specific can language as resource become for the teaching of algebraic concepts? ZDM-Mathematics Education, 53(2), 277-288.
– Planas, N. (2021). Challenges and opportunities from translingual research on multilingual mathematics classrooms. In A. A. Essien, & A. Msimanga (Eds.), Multilingual education yearbook 2021. Policy and practice in STEM multilingual contexts (pp. 1-18). Springer.
– Planas, N., & Ngoepe, M. (2019). Right to learn mathematics: From language as right to language as resource. In C. Xenofontos (Ed.), Equity in mathematics education. Addressing a changing world (pp. 93-110). Information Age Publishing.
– Planas, N., & Schütte, M. (2018). Research frameworks for the study of language in mathematics education, ZDM-Mathematics Education, 50(6), 965-974.
– Planas, N. (2018). Language as resource: A key notion for understanding the complexity of mathematics learning. Educational Studies in Mathematics, 98(3), 215-229.
– Planas, N., Morgan, C., & Schütte, M. (2018). Mathematics education and language. Lessons and directions from two decades of research. In T. Dreyfus, M. Artigue, S. Prediger, D. Potari, & Ruthven (Eds.), Developing research in mathematics education. Twenty years of communication, cooperation and collaboration in Europe (pp. 196-210). Routledge.
– Planas, N. (2014). One speaker, two languages: Learning opportunities in the mathematics classroom. Educational Studies in Mathematics, 87(1), 51-66.
– Planas, N., & Setati Phakeng, M. (2014). On the process of gaining language as a resource in mathematics education. ZDM-Mathematics Education, 46(6), 883-893.
– Planas, N., & Civil, M. (2013). Language-as-resource and language-as-political. Tensions in the bilingual mathematics classroom. Mathematics Education Research Journal, 25(3), 361-378.

 

https://portalrecerca.uab.cat/en/persons/nuria-planas-raig-3

https://orcid.org/0000-0001-5199-6336

 

Cindy works at the intersection of learning, design, and technology, with a keen interest in the orchestration of future-ready tech-enabled learning.

She is curious how the deployment of adaptive learning systems to schools will impact classroom learning and hopes to learn more about the human-machine partnership in education. Specifically, her research is concerned with the implications that the use of such systems has on teacher-student interactions, as teachers grapple with balancing personalised learning and learning in community, as well as curriculum demands and student interests. These are some tensions which could potentially be exacerbated by affordances of adaptive learning systems.

Prior to embarking on the DPhil in Education at Oxford, Cindy worked as the Lead Specialist in Technologies for Learning at the Educational Technology Division of Ministry of Education, Singapore. She had previously completed graduate studies at the National University of Singapore and Stanford University where she was awarded Master of Arts in English Studies and Master of Arts in Education.

Reem is DPhil student from Saudi Arabia.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she worked as a Teacher, Professional Developer, then, became a Supervisor and Researcher in the Ministry of Education where she received a scholarship to pursue her DPhil education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests lie in the area of Teacher Education and Professional Learning Policy and Practice.

Publications
  • Alqahtani, Reem (2020). Saudi Universities Role in Developing Teacher Professional Development Programs: Elite Universities Experience. Journal of Educational Sciences. King Saud University.
  • Alqahtani, Reem. (2020). The effect of implementing UDL-based activities in improving EFL learners’ academic achievement and attitudes towards L2. In L. Salas, & E. Ager, Creating Quiet reflective Spaces: Language Teacher Researches Professional Development (pp. 61-62). IATEFL publications.

Lena Zlock is researching the integration of digital technology into structures of teaching, learning, and education in higher education. Her particular focus is on the digital humanities and the potential for digital methods to transform humanistic study. She works with Professor Niall Winters and Dr. James Robson.

Lena’s research interests stem from her education as an M.St. student and Ertegun Graduate Scholar in Modern Languages at the University of Oxford, and as a B.A. student in History at Stanford University. As an undergraduate, she started the Voltaire Library Project, a digitally and data-driven study of the 6,763-book collection of French Enlightenment philosopher Voltaire (you can read more about the project here and here). She has been interested in the application of digital technology to humanistic teaching since her days in Princeton Day School, where she developed an interdisciplinary curriculum on Mexico City (visit the course website here).

Her research on Voltaire led her to think more broadly about the place of digital methods in the humanities classroom, and how new technologies will revolutionise the liberal arts and higher education. As a DPhil candidate, Lena will examine the negotiation and implementation of new learning technologies within the University of Oxford at undergraduate and graduate levels.

Lena is involved in a number of digital humanities initiatives in Oxford. She previously served as the inaugural fellow of the Voltaire Lab at Oxford’s Voltaire Foundation. As a master’s student, Lena co-formulated the convergence agenda for Oxford digital humanities with Professor Howard Hotson, and is currently employed by the Humanities Division to assist with the development of an M.St. degree in Digital Scholarship (read more here). Lena set up and helps to run the History of the Book blog for the Faculty of Medieval and Modern Languages and the Oxford Book History Twitter account.

Lena welcomes inquiries from undergraduate and postgraduate students from Oxford and beyond seeking to get involved with the digital humanities in any capacity. The History of the Book blog also welcomes inquiries from prospective contributors.

 

Abbey is a Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education, in collaboration with the Department of Engineering.

Before joining the DPhil program, Abbey obtained a B.A. in Applied Linguistics with minors in Russian and Chinese from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford. She was the recipient of a Benjamin A. Gilman International Scholarship through U.S. Department of State for study in Russia and was awarded two Foreign Language and Area Studies (FLAS) Fellowships for study in both Russia and China. She holds both TESOL and TEFL certificates and has taught English as a Second Language in various contexts to a wide variety of learner populations.

Abbey’s main research interests lie in the use of technology to facilitate language learning. Her DPhil research focuses on the development of a virtual reality program to bridge the gaps that students face when learning languages through distance learning.

Julie Chia-Yi Lin is a Doctoral student at the University of Oxford, funded by the Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholarship. Her research focus on Internationalization, Policy, Management and Institutional Strategy is rooted in her professional experience in publishing and higher education, as well as from her observations regarding the continuous change in global educational dynamics.

Julie completed her B.A. at National Taiwan University, and earned a joint M.A. from the University of Vienna and the University of Wroclaw. She was previously employed as an officer for the Office of International Affairs at National Taiwan University, and then as a Publisher at Emerald Publishing.

She focuses on the development of higher education, particularly in the processes of internationalization and globalization, and tries to deliver perspectives from different Institutional sectors, and a wide array of participants. She is mindful of the influence that culture has on the development and reception of these processes, and has a special interest in the East Asia region, and Confucian-influenced higher education systems. In her doctoral research, she investigates higher ed institutional strategy, and the relationship it has with real-world policy. This includes delving into the specific interpretation and implementation of official policy by different stakeholders within the institution- faculty, administration, and management.

Publications

Lin, J. (2015). The Impact of Globalization on Taiwan’s Education Policy: The International Student. In A. Lipinsky. (Ed), Vienna Taiwan Studies Series: Immigration societies, Taiwan and Beyond. (pp. 129-151). Vienna: LIT VERLAG GmbH & Co. KG

Yibo Wang has an MA in International Marketing from the Coventry University (UK) and a Master’s in Management: Leadership and Organizational Change from the University of Birmingham (UK).

His doctoral research focuses on ‘knowledge hiding’, ‘leadership style’ and ‘Confucian culture’ in Chinese education and training institutions.

As empirical studies on ‘knowledge hiding’ in the Chinese context are scarce, Yibo hopes to uncover underlying mechanism of knowledge hiding and find its potential influence factors.

Prior to coming to Oxford, he worked as a CEO in an educational consultancy based in Beijing that advised the investment and marketing analyses on education and training industry.

Riziki’s current DPhil research focuses on emergent literacy of refugee children within multilingual settings.

Prior to commencing her DPhil research, Riziki completed an MSc in Child Development at the University of Oxford, looking at the role of teacher behavioural and cognitive judgments on the learning trajectories of Black primary school students in England.

Her research interests are education access and wellbeing of children in resettlement and asylum contexts. In line with this, her research in the past has focused on integration and resettlement processes of refugees and immigrants within Canada.

Publications

Bhattacharyya, P., Ogoe, S., Riziki, A., & Wilkinson, L. (2020). In search of a “home”: comparing the housing challenges experienced by recently arrived Yazidi and Syrian Refugees in Canada. Manuscript submitted for publication.

Bhattacharyya, P., Riziki, A., Songose, L., Ogoe, S., & Wilkinson, L. (2020). Understanding the link between pre-arrival education and trauma and language learning: A case study of Yazidi women in Canada. Canadian Diversity, 17(2).

Bhattacharyya, P., Riziki, A., & Wilkinson, L. (2018). “Settlement Service Use among Syrian Refugees in Canada” Canadian Diversity 15(1).

Wilkinson, L., Bhattacharya, P., Garcea, J., Abdul-Karim, A., Riziki, A., & Schnieders, M. (2017). Finding home: Some housing considerations for refugee families with children. Canadian Diversity, 14 (3), 31-35

Wilkinson, L., Bhattacharyya, P., Riziki, A., & Abdul-Karim, A. (2018).Yazidi Refugee Resettlement in Canada. Calgary: Immigration Refugees and Citizenship Canada-Integration Branch (Prairies and Territories Region).

Wilkinson, L., Garcea, J., Bhattacharyya, P., Riziki, A., Abdul Karim, A. (2017). Resettling on the Canadian Prairies: Integration of Syrian refugees. Calgary: Immigration Refugees and Citizenship Canada, Integration Branch-Prairies., Northwest Territories Division., & Alberta Association of Immigrant Serving Agencies

Anushay completed her BSc Psychology from UCL, where she also started her master’s in Developmental Neuroscience and Psychopathology. She was based at Yale University for her master’s thesis, where she worked with Dr Craig Bailey at the Yale Center for Emotional Intelligence to understand children’s emotion development. Anushay’s research interests include understanding child development across different cultures, factors that might be affecting it, and devising culture-specific ways to support children’s holistic development through the educational system. She is also keen on improving the research scope in Pakistan by working with Pakistani researchers, practitioners, and families.

Anushay balances her research with her position as the founder of a non-profit, Resources for Children, which aims to understand and support children’s development in Pakistan.

Publications

  1. Mazhar, A. (2022, April). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Spring Preview, New Haven, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2021, December). Does an extended family improve mentalising in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK & Pakistan. 2nd International Foundation University Conference of Psychology, Rawalpindi, Pakistan.
  3. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Theory of Mind in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK and Pakistan. Harvard Trends in Psychology Summit, Cambridge, United States.
  1. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Research Rounds, New Haven, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2020, October). Developing a non-profit to advance autism research in Pakistan. Anna Freud Centre Seminar Series, London, United Kingdom

 

Núria is a Professor of Mathematics Education at Autonomous University of Barcelona. Her research is about language and mathematics in secondary school classrooms and professional development contexts with mathematics teachers.

Her first degree was in Mathematics at University of Barcelona (1995). Soon after her initiation as a secondary school mathematics teacher in highly multilingual classrooms of Barcelona, she started her PhD at the UAB Division of Mathematics Education. She wanted to understand the critical factors behind the under-performance in school mathematics of many learners from poor urban backgrounds and recent histories of migration. Since then, she has been committed to classroom and teacher education research grounded on community work with schools and mathematics teachers in urban areas of poverty. Her years as a school teacher have provided her with greater insights into her work as a researcher and have strongly influenced the adoption of sociocultural and sociopolitical approaches to mathematics teaching and learning.

Núria was given the ICREA Academia Award of the Catalan Institution for Research and Advanced Studies in 2013, in recognition of her contributions to research on multilingual mathematics teaching and learning. She was elected to the Executive Committee of the International Commission on Mathematical Instruction as Member-at-Large in 2021, and to the International Committee of the International Group for the Psychology of Mathematics Education from 2010 to 2014. She served as Extraordinarious Professor of Mathematics Education at the University of South Africa from 2013 to 2020. She was Visiting Scholar at London South Bank University, University of Arizona, and University of North Carolina at Chapel-Hill.

Núria is currently on the editorial board of the international journal Mathematics Education Research Journal and Journal of Mathematics Teacher Education. Till 2021 she was the editor-in-chief of the Advances of Research in Mathematics Education, the official journal of the Spanish Society of Research in Mathematics Education. She is the leading co-editor of a 2018 special issue on language research in mathematics education published in ZDM-Mathematics Education, and the leading co-editor of a special issue on decentring mathematics teaching education, to be published in the Journal of Mathematics Teacher Education, February 2024.

She chaired the 7th Topic Conference of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education on Language and Mathematics (Dresden, 2018), and the ERME Topic Working Group on Language and Mathematics from 2015 to 2020. The collaborations established in the ERME context enabled for a broad range of experts to come together and move forward the research field in the form of an co-edited Routledge volume entitled ‘Classroom research on mathematics and language: Seeing learners and teachers differently’ in 2021, with Núria as the leading co-editor. She has also been co-editor of the Springer volume resulting from the 21st ICMI Study on Language Diversity and Mathematics Education in 2016, and of the Brill volume entitled ‘Mathematical discourse that breaks barriers and creates space for marginalized learners’ in 2018.

Núria’s motivation for coming to the Oxford Department of Education is her research collaboration in projects co-coordinated with Jenni Ingram on establishing an international network for research on supporting school mathematics teaching with linguistically disadvantaged learners. From her years as a secondary school in the 1990s, important challenges posed to mathematics education practice remain. Learners of mathematics who are linguistically disadvantaged for a variety of reasons, including impoverished socioeconomic status, continue to be educationally disadvantaged at a considerable risk of school failure and early dropout. More research will hopefully shed light on how to identify and develop improved practices to enable greater access to school mathematics for all learners.

Publications

SELECTION OF 10 LAST-DECADE PUBLICATIONS
[For more publications and research details, see https://orcid.org/0000-0001-5199-6336]
– Planas, N., & Chronaki, A. (2021). Multilingual mathematics learning from a dialogic-translanguaging perspective. In N. Planas, C. Morgan, & M. Schütte (Eds.), Classroom research on mathematics and language: Seeing learners and teachers differently (pp. 151-166). Routledge.
– Planas, N. (2021). How specific can language as resource become for the teaching of algebraic concepts? ZDM-Mathematics Education, 53(2), 277-288.
– Planas, N. (2021). Challenges and opportunities from translingual research on multilingual mathematics classrooms. In A. A. Essien, & A. Msimanga (Eds.), Multilingual education yearbook 2021. Policy and practice in STEM multilingual contexts (pp. 1-18). Springer.
– Planas, N., & Ngoepe, M. (2019). Right to learn mathematics: From language as right to language as resource. In C. Xenofontos (Ed.), Equity in mathematics education. Addressing a changing world (pp. 93-110). Information Age Publishing.
– Planas, N., & Schütte, M. (2018). Research frameworks for the study of language in mathematics education, ZDM-Mathematics Education, 50(6), 965-974.
– Planas, N. (2018). Language as resource: A key notion for understanding the complexity of mathematics learning. Educational Studies in Mathematics, 98(3), 215-229.
– Planas, N., Morgan, C., & Schütte, M. (2018). Mathematics education and language. Lessons and directions from two decades of research. In T. Dreyfus, M. Artigue, S. Prediger, D. Potari, & Ruthven (Eds.), Developing research in mathematics education. Twenty years of communication, cooperation and collaboration in Europe (pp. 196-210). Routledge.
– Planas, N. (2014). One speaker, two languages: Learning opportunities in the mathematics classroom. Educational Studies in Mathematics, 87(1), 51-66.
– Planas, N., & Setati Phakeng, M. (2014). On the process of gaining language as a resource in mathematics education. ZDM-Mathematics Education, 46(6), 883-893.
– Planas, N., & Civil, M. (2013). Language-as-resource and language-as-political. Tensions in the bilingual mathematics classroom. Mathematics Education Research Journal, 25(3), 361-378.

 

https://portalrecerca.uab.cat/en/persons/nuria-planas-raig-3

https://orcid.org/0000-0001-5199-6336

 

Cindy works at the intersection of learning, design, and technology, with a keen interest in the orchestration of future-ready tech-enabled learning.

She is curious how the deployment of adaptive learning systems to schools will impact classroom learning and hopes to learn more about the human-machine partnership in education. Specifically, her research is concerned with the implications that the use of such systems has on teacher-student interactions, as teachers grapple with balancing personalised learning and learning in community, as well as curriculum demands and student interests. These are some tensions which could potentially be exacerbated by affordances of adaptive learning systems.

Prior to embarking on the DPhil in Education at Oxford, Cindy worked as the Lead Specialist in Technologies for Learning at the Educational Technology Division of Ministry of Education, Singapore. She had previously completed graduate studies at the National University of Singapore and Stanford University where she was awarded Master of Arts in English Studies and Master of Arts in Education.

Reem is DPhil student from Saudi Arabia.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she worked as a Teacher, Professional Developer, then, became a Supervisor and Researcher in the Ministry of Education where she received a scholarship to pursue her DPhil education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests lie in the area of Teacher Education and Professional Learning Policy and Practice.

Publications
  • Alqahtani, Reem (2020). Saudi Universities Role in Developing Teacher Professional Development Programs: Elite Universities Experience. Journal of Educational Sciences. King Saud University.
  • Alqahtani, Reem. (2020). The effect of implementing UDL-based activities in improving EFL learners’ academic achievement and attitudes towards L2. In L. Salas, & E. Ager, Creating Quiet reflective Spaces: Language Teacher Researches Professional Development (pp. 61-62). IATEFL publications.

Lena Zlock is researching the integration of digital technology into structures of teaching, learning, and education in higher education. Her particular focus is on the digital humanities and the potential for digital methods to transform humanistic study. She works with Professor Niall Winters and Dr. James Robson.

Lena’s research interests stem from her education as an M.St. student and Ertegun Graduate Scholar in Modern Languages at the University of Oxford, and as a B.A. student in History at Stanford University. As an undergraduate, she started the Voltaire Library Project, a digitally and data-driven study of the 6,763-book collection of French Enlightenment philosopher Voltaire (you can read more about the project here and here). She has been interested in the application of digital technology to humanistic teaching since her days in Princeton Day School, where she developed an interdisciplinary curriculum on Mexico City (visit the course website here).

Her research on Voltaire led her to think more broadly about the place of digital methods in the humanities classroom, and how new technologies will revolutionise the liberal arts and higher education. As a DPhil candidate, Lena will examine the negotiation and implementation of new learning technologies within the University of Oxford at undergraduate and graduate levels.

Lena is involved in a number of digital humanities initiatives in Oxford. She previously served as the inaugural fellow of the Voltaire Lab at Oxford’s Voltaire Foundation. As a master’s student, Lena co-formulated the convergence agenda for Oxford digital humanities with Professor Howard Hotson, and is currently employed by the Humanities Division to assist with the development of an M.St. degree in Digital Scholarship (read more here). Lena set up and helps to run the History of the Book blog for the Faculty of Medieval and Modern Languages and the Oxford Book History Twitter account.

Lena welcomes inquiries from undergraduate and postgraduate students from Oxford and beyond seeking to get involved with the digital humanities in any capacity. The History of the Book blog also welcomes inquiries from prospective contributors.

 

Abbey is a Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education, in collaboration with the Department of Engineering.

Before joining the DPhil program, Abbey obtained a B.A. in Applied Linguistics with minors in Russian and Chinese from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford. She was the recipient of a Benjamin A. Gilman International Scholarship through U.S. Department of State for study in Russia and was awarded two Foreign Language and Area Studies (FLAS) Fellowships for study in both Russia and China. She holds both TESOL and TEFL certificates and has taught English as a Second Language in various contexts to a wide variety of learner populations.

Abbey’s main research interests lie in the use of technology to facilitate language learning. Her DPhil research focuses on the development of a virtual reality program to bridge the gaps that students face when learning languages through distance learning.

Julie Chia-Yi Lin is a Doctoral student at the University of Oxford, funded by the Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholarship. Her research focus on Internationalization, Policy, Management and Institutional Strategy is rooted in her professional experience in publishing and higher education, as well as from her observations regarding the continuous change in global educational dynamics.

Julie completed her B.A. at National Taiwan University, and earned a joint M.A. from the University of Vienna and the University of Wroclaw. She was previously employed as an officer for the Office of International Affairs at National Taiwan University, and then as a Publisher at Emerald Publishing.

She focuses on the development of higher education, particularly in the processes of internationalization and globalization, and tries to deliver perspectives from different Institutional sectors, and a wide array of participants. She is mindful of the influence that culture has on the development and reception of these processes, and has a special interest in the East Asia region, and Confucian-influenced higher education systems. In her doctoral research, she investigates higher ed institutional strategy, and the relationship it has with real-world policy. This includes delving into the specific interpretation and implementation of official policy by different stakeholders within the institution- faculty, administration, and management.

Publications

Lin, J. (2015). The Impact of Globalization on Taiwan’s Education Policy: The International Student. In A. Lipinsky. (Ed), Vienna Taiwan Studies Series: Immigration societies, Taiwan and Beyond. (pp. 129-151). Vienna: LIT VERLAG GmbH & Co. KG

Yibo Wang has an MA in International Marketing from the Coventry University (UK) and a Master’s in Management: Leadership and Organizational Change from the University of Birmingham (UK).

His doctoral research focuses on ‘knowledge hiding’, ‘leadership style’ and ‘Confucian culture’ in Chinese education and training institutions.

As empirical studies on ‘knowledge hiding’ in the Chinese context are scarce, Yibo hopes to uncover underlying mechanism of knowledge hiding and find its potential influence factors.

Prior to coming to Oxford, he worked as a CEO in an educational consultancy based in Beijing that advised the investment and marketing analyses on education and training industry.

Riziki’s current DPhil research focuses on emergent literacy of refugee children within multilingual settings.

Prior to commencing her DPhil research, Riziki completed an MSc in Child Development at the University of Oxford, looking at the role of teacher behavioural and cognitive judgments on the learning trajectories of Black primary school students in England.

Her research interests are education access and wellbeing of children in resettlement and asylum contexts. In line with this, her research in the past has focused on integration and resettlement processes of refugees and immigrants within Canada.

Publications

Bhattacharyya, P., Ogoe, S., Riziki, A., & Wilkinson, L. (2020). In search of a “home”: comparing the housing challenges experienced by recently arrived Yazidi and Syrian Refugees in Canada. Manuscript submitted for publication.

Bhattacharyya, P., Riziki, A., Songose, L., Ogoe, S., & Wilkinson, L. (2020). Understanding the link between pre-arrival education and trauma and language learning: A case study of Yazidi women in Canada. Canadian Diversity, 17(2).

Bhattacharyya, P., Riziki, A., & Wilkinson, L. (2018). “Settlement Service Use among Syrian Refugees in Canada” Canadian Diversity 15(1).

Wilkinson, L., Bhattacharya, P., Garcea, J., Abdul-Karim, A., Riziki, A., & Schnieders, M. (2017). Finding home: Some housing considerations for refugee families with children. Canadian Diversity, 14 (3), 31-35

Wilkinson, L., Bhattacharyya, P., Riziki, A., & Abdul-Karim, A. (2018).Yazidi Refugee Resettlement in Canada. Calgary: Immigration Refugees and Citizenship Canada-Integration Branch (Prairies and Territories Region).

Wilkinson, L., Garcea, J., Bhattacharyya, P., Riziki, A., Abdul Karim, A. (2017). Resettling on the Canadian Prairies: Integration of Syrian refugees. Calgary: Immigration Refugees and Citizenship Canada, Integration Branch-Prairies., Northwest Territories Division., & Alberta Association of Immigrant Serving Agencies

Anushay completed her BSc Psychology from UCL, where she also started her master’s in Developmental Neuroscience and Psychopathology. She was based at Yale University for her master’s thesis, where she worked with Dr Craig Bailey at the Yale Center for Emotional Intelligence to understand children’s emotion development. Anushay’s research interests include understanding child development across different cultures, factors that might be affecting it, and devising culture-specific ways to support children’s holistic development through the educational system. She is also keen on improving the research scope in Pakistan by working with Pakistani researchers, practitioners, and families.

Anushay balances her research with her position as the founder of a non-profit, Resources for Children, which aims to understand and support children’s development in Pakistan.

Publications

  1. Mazhar, A. (2022, April). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Spring Preview, New Haven, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2021, December). Does an extended family improve mentalising in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK & Pakistan. 2nd International Foundation University Conference of Psychology, Rawalpindi, Pakistan.
  3. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Theory of Mind in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK and Pakistan. Harvard Trends in Psychology Summit, Cambridge, United States.
  1. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Research Rounds, New Haven, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2020, October). Developing a non-profit to advance autism research in Pakistan. Anna Freud Centre Seminar Series, London, United Kingdom

 

Núria is a Professor of Mathematics Education at Autonomous University of Barcelona. Her research is about language and mathematics in secondary school classrooms and professional development contexts with mathematics teachers.

Her first degree was in Mathematics at University of Barcelona (1995). Soon after her initiation as a secondary school mathematics teacher in highly multilingual classrooms of Barcelona, she started her PhD at the UAB Division of Mathematics Education. She wanted to understand the critical factors behind the under-performance in school mathematics of many learners from poor urban backgrounds and recent histories of migration. Since then, she has been committed to classroom and teacher education research grounded on community work with schools and mathematics teachers in urban areas of poverty. Her years as a school teacher have provided her with greater insights into her work as a researcher and have strongly influenced the adoption of sociocultural and sociopolitical approaches to mathematics teaching and learning.

Núria was given the ICREA Academia Award of the Catalan Institution for Research and Advanced Studies in 2013, in recognition of her contributions to research on multilingual mathematics teaching and learning. She was elected to the Executive Committee of the International Commission on Mathematical Instruction as Member-at-Large in 2021, and to the International Committee of the International Group for the Psychology of Mathematics Education from 2010 to 2014. She served as Extraordinarious Professor of Mathematics Education at the University of South Africa from 2013 to 2020. She was Visiting Scholar at London South Bank University, University of Arizona, and University of North Carolina at Chapel-Hill.

Núria is currently on the editorial board of the international journal Mathematics Education Research Journal and Journal of Mathematics Teacher Education. Till 2021 she was the editor-in-chief of the Advances of Research in Mathematics Education, the official journal of the Spanish Society of Research in Mathematics Education. She is the leading co-editor of a 2018 special issue on language research in mathematics education published in ZDM-Mathematics Education, and the leading co-editor of a special issue on decentring mathematics teaching education, to be published in the Journal of Mathematics Teacher Education, February 2024.

She chaired the 7th Topic Conference of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education on Language and Mathematics (Dresden, 2018), and the ERME Topic Working Group on Language and Mathematics from 2015 to 2020. The collaborations established in the ERME context enabled for a broad range of experts to come together and move forward the research field in the form of an co-edited Routledge volume entitled ‘Classroom research on mathematics and language: Seeing learners and teachers differently’ in 2021, with Núria as the leading co-editor. She has also been co-editor of the Springer volume resulting from the 21st ICMI Study on Language Diversity and Mathematics Education in 2016, and of the Brill volume entitled ‘Mathematical discourse that breaks barriers and creates space for marginalized learners’ in 2018.

Núria’s motivation for coming to the Oxford Department of Education is her research collaboration in projects co-coordinated with Jenni Ingram on establishing an international network for research on supporting school mathematics teaching with linguistically disadvantaged learners. From her years as a secondary school in the 1990s, important challenges posed to mathematics education practice remain. Learners of mathematics who are linguistically disadvantaged for a variety of reasons, including impoverished socioeconomic status, continue to be educationally disadvantaged at a considerable risk of school failure and early dropout. More research will hopefully shed light on how to identify and develop improved practices to enable greater access to school mathematics for all learners.

Publications

SELECTION OF 10 LAST-DECADE PUBLICATIONS
[For more publications and research details, see https://orcid.org/0000-0001-5199-6336]
– Planas, N., & Chronaki, A. (2021). Multilingual mathematics learning from a dialogic-translanguaging perspective. In N. Planas, C. Morgan, & M. Schütte (Eds.), Classroom research on mathematics and language: Seeing learners and teachers differently (pp. 151-166). Routledge.
– Planas, N. (2021). How specific can language as resource become for the teaching of algebraic concepts? ZDM-Mathematics Education, 53(2), 277-288.
– Planas, N. (2021). Challenges and opportunities from translingual research on multilingual mathematics classrooms. In A. A. Essien, & A. Msimanga (Eds.), Multilingual education yearbook 2021. Policy and practice in STEM multilingual contexts (pp. 1-18). Springer.
– Planas, N., & Ngoepe, M. (2019). Right to learn mathematics: From language as right to language as resource. In C. Xenofontos (Ed.), Equity in mathematics education. Addressing a changing world (pp. 93-110). Information Age Publishing.
– Planas, N., & Schütte, M. (2018). Research frameworks for the study of language in mathematics education, ZDM-Mathematics Education, 50(6), 965-974.
– Planas, N. (2018). Language as resource: A key notion for understanding the complexity of mathematics learning. Educational Studies in Mathematics, 98(3), 215-229.
– Planas, N., Morgan, C., & Schütte, M. (2018). Mathematics education and language. Lessons and directions from two decades of research. In T. Dreyfus, M. Artigue, S. Prediger, D. Potari, & Ruthven (Eds.), Developing research in mathematics education. Twenty years of communication, cooperation and collaboration in Europe (pp. 196-210). Routledge.
– Planas, N. (2014). One speaker, two languages: Learning opportunities in the mathematics classroom. Educational Studies in Mathematics, 87(1), 51-66.
– Planas, N., & Setati Phakeng, M. (2014). On the process of gaining language as a resource in mathematics education. ZDM-Mathematics Education, 46(6), 883-893.
– Planas, N., & Civil, M. (2013). Language-as-resource and language-as-political. Tensions in the bilingual mathematics classroom. Mathematics Education Research Journal, 25(3), 361-378.

 

https://portalrecerca.uab.cat/en/persons/nuria-planas-raig-3

https://orcid.org/0000-0001-5199-6336

 

Cindy works at the intersection of learning, design, and technology, with a keen interest in the orchestration of future-ready tech-enabled learning.

She is curious how the deployment of adaptive learning systems to schools will impact classroom learning and hopes to learn more about the human-machine partnership in education. Specifically, her research is concerned with the implications that the use of such systems has on teacher-student interactions, as teachers grapple with balancing personalised learning and learning in community, as well as curriculum demands and student interests. These are some tensions which could potentially be exacerbated by affordances of adaptive learning systems.

Prior to embarking on the DPhil in Education at Oxford, Cindy worked as the Lead Specialist in Technologies for Learning at the Educational Technology Division of Ministry of Education, Singapore. She had previously completed graduate studies at the National University of Singapore and Stanford University where she was awarded Master of Arts in English Studies and Master of Arts in Education.

Reem is DPhil student from Saudi Arabia.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she worked as a Teacher, Professional Developer, then, became a Supervisor and Researcher in the Ministry of Education where she received a scholarship to pursue her DPhil education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests lie in the area of Teacher Education and Professional Learning Policy and Practice.

Publications
  • Alqahtani, Reem (2020). Saudi Universities Role in Developing Teacher Professional Development Programs: Elite Universities Experience. Journal of Educational Sciences. King Saud University.
  • Alqahtani, Reem. (2020). The effect of implementing UDL-based activities in improving EFL learners’ academic achievement and attitudes towards L2. In L. Salas, & E. Ager, Creating Quiet reflective Spaces: Language Teacher Researches Professional Development (pp. 61-62). IATEFL publications.

Lena Zlock is researching the integration of digital technology into structures of teaching, learning, and education in higher education. Her particular focus is on the digital humanities and the potential for digital methods to transform humanistic study. She works with Professor Niall Winters and Dr. James Robson.

Lena’s research interests stem from her education as an M.St. student and Ertegun Graduate Scholar in Modern Languages at the University of Oxford, and as a B.A. student in History at Stanford University. As an undergraduate, she started the Voltaire Library Project, a digitally and data-driven study of the 6,763-book collection of French Enlightenment philosopher Voltaire (you can read more about the project here and here). She has been interested in the application of digital technology to humanistic teaching since her days in Princeton Day School, where she developed an interdisciplinary curriculum on Mexico City (visit the course website here).

Her research on Voltaire led her to think more broadly about the place of digital methods in the humanities classroom, and how new technologies will revolutionise the liberal arts and higher education. As a DPhil candidate, Lena will examine the negotiation and implementation of new learning technologies within the University of Oxford at undergraduate and graduate levels.

Lena is involved in a number of digital humanities initiatives in Oxford. She previously served as the inaugural fellow of the Voltaire Lab at Oxford’s Voltaire Foundation. As a master’s student, Lena co-formulated the convergence agenda for Oxford digital humanities with Professor Howard Hotson, and is currently employed by the Humanities Division to assist with the development of an M.St. degree in Digital Scholarship (read more here). Lena set up and helps to run the History of the Book blog for the Faculty of Medieval and Modern Languages and the Oxford Book History Twitter account.

Lena welcomes inquiries from undergraduate and postgraduate students from Oxford and beyond seeking to get involved with the digital humanities in any capacity. The History of the Book blog also welcomes inquiries from prospective contributors.

 

Abbey is a Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education, in collaboration with the Department of Engineering.

Before joining the DPhil program, Abbey obtained a B.A. in Applied Linguistics with minors in Russian and Chinese from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford. She was the recipient of a Benjamin A. Gilman International Scholarship through U.S. Department of State for study in Russia and was awarded two Foreign Language and Area Studies (FLAS) Fellowships for study in both Russia and China. She holds both TESOL and TEFL certificates and has taught English as a Second Language in various contexts to a wide variety of learner populations.

Abbey’s main research interests lie in the use of technology to facilitate language learning. Her DPhil research focuses on the development of a virtual reality program to bridge the gaps that students face when learning languages through distance learning.

Julie Chia-Yi Lin is a Doctoral student at the University of Oxford, funded by the Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholarship. Her research focus on Internationalization, Policy, Management and Institutional Strategy is rooted in her professional experience in publishing and higher education, as well as from her observations regarding the continuous change in global educational dynamics.

Julie completed her B.A. at National Taiwan University, and earned a joint M.A. from the University of Vienna and the University of Wroclaw. She was previously employed as an officer for the Office of International Affairs at National Taiwan University, and then as a Publisher at Emerald Publishing.

She focuses on the development of higher education, particularly in the processes of internationalization and globalization, and tries to deliver perspectives from different Institutional sectors, and a wide array of participants. She is mindful of the influence that culture has on the development and reception of these processes, and has a special interest in the East Asia region, and Confucian-influenced higher education systems. In her doctoral research, she investigates higher ed institutional strategy, and the relationship it has with real-world policy. This includes delving into the specific interpretation and implementation of official policy by different stakeholders within the institution- faculty, administration, and management.

Publications

Lin, J. (2015). The Impact of Globalization on Taiwan’s Education Policy: The International Student. In A. Lipinsky. (Ed), Vienna Taiwan Studies Series: Immigration societies, Taiwan and Beyond. (pp. 129-151). Vienna: LIT VERLAG GmbH & Co. KG

Yibo Wang has an MA in International Marketing from the Coventry University (UK) and a Master’s in Management: Leadership and Organizational Change from the University of Birmingham (UK).

His doctoral research focuses on ‘knowledge hiding’, ‘leadership style’ and ‘Confucian culture’ in Chinese education and training institutions.

As empirical studies on ‘knowledge hiding’ in the Chinese context are scarce, Yibo hopes to uncover underlying mechanism of knowledge hiding and find its potential influence factors.

Prior to coming to Oxford, he worked as a CEO in an educational consultancy based in Beijing that advised the investment and marketing analyses on education and training industry.

Riziki’s current DPhil research focuses on emergent literacy of refugee children within multilingual settings.

Prior to commencing her DPhil research, Riziki completed an MSc in Child Development at the University of Oxford, looking at the role of teacher behavioural and cognitive judgments on the learning trajectories of Black primary school students in England.

Her research interests are education access and wellbeing of children in resettlement and asylum contexts. In line with this, her research in the past has focused on integration and resettlement processes of refugees and immigrants within Canada.

Publications

Bhattacharyya, P., Ogoe, S., Riziki, A., & Wilkinson, L. (2020). In search of a “home”: comparing the housing challenges experienced by recently arrived Yazidi and Syrian Refugees in Canada. Manuscript submitted for publication.

Bhattacharyya, P., Riziki, A., Songose, L., Ogoe, S., & Wilkinson, L. (2020). Understanding the link between pre-arrival education and trauma and language learning: A case study of Yazidi women in Canada. Canadian Diversity, 17(2).

Bhattacharyya, P., Riziki, A., & Wilkinson, L. (2018). “Settlement Service Use among Syrian Refugees in Canada” Canadian Diversity 15(1).

Wilkinson, L., Bhattacharya, P., Garcea, J., Abdul-Karim, A., Riziki, A., & Schnieders, M. (2017). Finding home: Some housing considerations for refugee families with children. Canadian Diversity, 14 (3), 31-35

Wilkinson, L., Bhattacharyya, P., Riziki, A., & Abdul-Karim, A. (2018).Yazidi Refugee Resettlement in Canada. Calgary: Immigration Refugees and Citizenship Canada-Integration Branch (Prairies and Territories Region).

Wilkinson, L., Garcea, J., Bhattacharyya, P., Riziki, A., Abdul Karim, A. (2017). Resettling on the Canadian Prairies: Integration of Syrian refugees. Calgary: Immigration Refugees and Citizenship Canada, Integration Branch-Prairies., Northwest Territories Division., & Alberta Association of Immigrant Serving Agencies

Anushay completed her BSc Psychology from UCL, where she also started her master’s in Developmental Neuroscience and Psychopathology. She was based at Yale University for her master’s thesis, where she worked with Dr Craig Bailey at the Yale Center for Emotional Intelligence to understand children’s emotion development. Anushay’s research interests include understanding child development across different cultures, factors that might be affecting it, and devising culture-specific ways to support children’s holistic development through the educational system. She is also keen on improving the research scope in Pakistan by working with Pakistani researchers, practitioners, and families.

Anushay balances her research with her position as the founder of a non-profit, Resources for Children, which aims to understand and support children’s development in Pakistan.

Publications

  1. Mazhar, A. (2022, April). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Spring Preview, New Haven, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2021, December). Does an extended family improve mentalising in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK & Pakistan. 2nd International Foundation University Conference of Psychology, Rawalpindi, Pakistan.
  3. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Theory of Mind in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK and Pakistan. Harvard Trends in Psychology Summit, Cambridge, United States.
  1. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Research Rounds, New Haven, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2020, October). Developing a non-profit to advance autism research in Pakistan. Anna Freud Centre Seminar Series, London, United Kingdom

 

Núria is a Professor of Mathematics Education at Autonomous University of Barcelona. Her research is about language and mathematics in secondary school classrooms and professional development contexts with mathematics teachers.

Her first degree was in Mathematics at University of Barcelona (1995). Soon after her initiation as a secondary school mathematics teacher in highly multilingual classrooms of Barcelona, she started her PhD at the UAB Division of Mathematics Education. She wanted to understand the critical factors behind the under-performance in school mathematics of many learners from poor urban backgrounds and recent histories of migration. Since then, she has been committed to classroom and teacher education research grounded on community work with schools and mathematics teachers in urban areas of poverty. Her years as a school teacher have provided her with greater insights into her work as a researcher and have strongly influenced the adoption of sociocultural and sociopolitical approaches to mathematics teaching and learning.

Núria was given the ICREA Academia Award of the Catalan Institution for Research and Advanced Studies in 2013, in recognition of her contributions to research on multilingual mathematics teaching and learning. She was elected to the Executive Committee of the International Commission on Mathematical Instruction as Member-at-Large in 2021, and to the International Committee of the International Group for the Psychology of Mathematics Education from 2010 to 2014. She served as Extraordinarious Professor of Mathematics Education at the University of South Africa from 2013 to 2020. She was Visiting Scholar at London South Bank University, University of Arizona, and University of North Carolina at Chapel-Hill.

Núria is currently on the editorial board of the international journal Mathematics Education Research Journal and Journal of Mathematics Teacher Education. Till 2021 she was the editor-in-chief of the Advances of Research in Mathematics Education, the official journal of the Spanish Society of Research in Mathematics Education. She is the leading co-editor of a 2018 special issue on language research in mathematics education published in ZDM-Mathematics Education, and the leading co-editor of a special issue on decentring mathematics teaching education, to be published in the Journal of Mathematics Teacher Education, February 2024.

She chaired the 7th Topic Conference of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education on Language and Mathematics (Dresden, 2018), and the ERME Topic Working Group on Language and Mathematics from 2015 to 2020. The collaborations established in the ERME context enabled for a broad range of experts to come together and move forward the research field in the form of an co-edited Routledge volume entitled ‘Classroom research on mathematics and language: Seeing learners and teachers differently’ in 2021, with Núria as the leading co-editor. She has also been co-editor of the Springer volume resulting from the 21st ICMI Study on Language Diversity and Mathematics Education in 2016, and of the Brill volume entitled ‘Mathematical discourse that breaks barriers and creates space for marginalized learners’ in 2018.

Núria’s motivation for coming to the Oxford Department of Education is her research collaboration in projects co-coordinated with Jenni Ingram on establishing an international network for research on supporting school mathematics teaching with linguistically disadvantaged learners. From her years as a secondary school in the 1990s, important challenges posed to mathematics education practice remain. Learners of mathematics who are linguistically disadvantaged for a variety of reasons, including impoverished socioeconomic status, continue to be educationally disadvantaged at a considerable risk of school failure and early dropout. More research will hopefully shed light on how to identify and develop improved practices to enable greater access to school mathematics for all learners.

Publications

SELECTION OF 10 LAST-DECADE PUBLICATIONS
[For more publications and research details, see https://orcid.org/0000-0001-5199-6336]
– Planas, N., & Chronaki, A. (2021). Multilingual mathematics learning from a dialogic-translanguaging perspective. In N. Planas, C. Morgan, & M. Schütte (Eds.), Classroom research on mathematics and language: Seeing learners and teachers differently (pp. 151-166). Routledge.
– Planas, N. (2021). How specific can language as resource become for the teaching of algebraic concepts? ZDM-Mathematics Education, 53(2), 277-288.
– Planas, N. (2021). Challenges and opportunities from translingual research on multilingual mathematics classrooms. In A. A. Essien, & A. Msimanga (Eds.), Multilingual education yearbook 2021. Policy and practice in STEM multilingual contexts (pp. 1-18). Springer.
– Planas, N., & Ngoepe, M. (2019). Right to learn mathematics: From language as right to language as resource. In C. Xenofontos (Ed.), Equity in mathematics education. Addressing a changing world (pp. 93-110). Information Age Publishing.
– Planas, N., & Schütte, M. (2018). Research frameworks for the study of language in mathematics education, ZDM-Mathematics Education, 50(6), 965-974.
– Planas, N. (2018). Language as resource: A key notion for understanding the complexity of mathematics learning. Educational Studies in Mathematics, 98(3), 215-229.
– Planas, N., Morgan, C., & Schütte, M. (2018). Mathematics education and language. Lessons and directions from two decades of research. In T. Dreyfus, M. Artigue, S. Prediger, D. Potari, & Ruthven (Eds.), Developing research in mathematics education. Twenty years of communication, cooperation and collaboration in Europe (pp. 196-210). Routledge.
– Planas, N. (2014). One speaker, two languages: Learning opportunities in the mathematics classroom. Educational Studies in Mathematics, 87(1), 51-66.
– Planas, N., & Setati Phakeng, M. (2014). On the process of gaining language as a resource in mathematics education. ZDM-Mathematics Education, 46(6), 883-893.
– Planas, N., & Civil, M. (2013). Language-as-resource and language-as-political. Tensions in the bilingual mathematics classroom. Mathematics Education Research Journal, 25(3), 361-378.

 

https://portalrecerca.uab.cat/en/persons/nuria-planas-raig-3

https://orcid.org/0000-0001-5199-6336

 

Cindy works at the intersection of learning, design, and technology, with a keen interest in the orchestration of future-ready tech-enabled learning.

She is curious how the deployment of adaptive learning systems to schools will impact classroom learning and hopes to learn more about the human-machine partnership in education. Specifically, her research is concerned with the implications that the use of such systems has on teacher-student interactions, as teachers grapple with balancing personalised learning and learning in community, as well as curriculum demands and student interests. These are some tensions which could potentially be exacerbated by affordances of adaptive learning systems.

Prior to embarking on the DPhil in Education at Oxford, Cindy worked as the Lead Specialist in Technologies for Learning at the Educational Technology Division of Ministry of Education, Singapore. She had previously completed graduate studies at the National University of Singapore and Stanford University where she was awarded Master of Arts in English Studies and Master of Arts in Education.

Reem is DPhil student from Saudi Arabia.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she worked as a Teacher, Professional Developer, then, became a Supervisor and Researcher in the Ministry of Education where she received a scholarship to pursue her DPhil education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests lie in the area of Teacher Education and Professional Learning Policy and Practice.

Publications
  • Alqahtani, Reem (2020). Saudi Universities Role in Developing Teacher Professional Development Programs: Elite Universities Experience. Journal of Educational Sciences. King Saud University.
  • Alqahtani, Reem. (2020). The effect of implementing UDL-based activities in improving EFL learners’ academic achievement and attitudes towards L2. In L. Salas, & E. Ager, Creating Quiet reflective Spaces: Language Teacher Researches Professional Development (pp. 61-62). IATEFL publications.

Lena Zlock is researching the integration of digital technology into structures of teaching, learning, and education in higher education. Her particular focus is on the digital humanities and the potential for digital methods to transform humanistic study. She works with Professor Niall Winters and Dr. James Robson.

Lena’s research interests stem from her education as an M.St. student and Ertegun Graduate Scholar in Modern Languages at the University of Oxford, and as a B.A. student in History at Stanford University. As an undergraduate, she started the Voltaire Library Project, a digitally and data-driven study of the 6,763-book collection of French Enlightenment philosopher Voltaire (you can read more about the project here and here). She has been interested in the application of digital technology to humanistic teaching since her days in Princeton Day School, where she developed an interdisciplinary curriculum on Mexico City (visit the course website here).

Her research on Voltaire led her to think more broadly about the place of digital methods in the humanities classroom, and how new technologies will revolutionise the liberal arts and higher education. As a DPhil candidate, Lena will examine the negotiation and implementation of new learning technologies within the University of Oxford at undergraduate and graduate levels.

Lena is involved in a number of digital humanities initiatives in Oxford. She previously served as the inaugural fellow of the Voltaire Lab at Oxford’s Voltaire Foundation. As a master’s student, Lena co-formulated the convergence agenda for Oxford digital humanities with Professor Howard Hotson, and is currently employed by the Humanities Division to assist with the development of an M.St. degree in Digital Scholarship (read more here). Lena set up and helps to run the History of the Book blog for the Faculty of Medieval and Modern Languages and the Oxford Book History Twitter account.

Lena welcomes inquiries from undergraduate and postgraduate students from Oxford and beyond seeking to get involved with the digital humanities in any capacity. The History of the Book blog also welcomes inquiries from prospective contributors.

 

Abbey is a Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education, in collaboration with the Department of Engineering.

Before joining the DPhil program, Abbey obtained a B.A. in Applied Linguistics with minors in Russian and Chinese from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford. She was the recipient of a Benjamin A. Gilman International Scholarship through U.S. Department of State for study in Russia and was awarded two Foreign Language and Area Studies (FLAS) Fellowships for study in both Russia and China. She holds both TESOL and TEFL certificates and has taught English as a Second Language in various contexts to a wide variety of learner populations.

Abbey’s main research interests lie in the use of technology to facilitate language learning. Her DPhil research focuses on the development of a virtual reality program to bridge the gaps that students face when learning languages through distance learning.

Julie Chia-Yi Lin is a Doctoral student at the University of Oxford, funded by the Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholarship. Her research focus on Internationalization, Policy, Management and Institutional Strategy is rooted in her professional experience in publishing and higher education, as well as from her observations regarding the continuous change in global educational dynamics.

Julie completed her B.A. at National Taiwan University, and earned a joint M.A. from the University of Vienna and the University of Wroclaw. She was previously employed as an officer for the Office of International Affairs at National Taiwan University, and then as a Publisher at Emerald Publishing.

She focuses on the development of higher education, particularly in the processes of internationalization and globalization, and tries to deliver perspectives from different Institutional sectors, and a wide array of participants. She is mindful of the influence that culture has on the development and reception of these processes, and has a special interest in the East Asia region, and Confucian-influenced higher education systems. In her doctoral research, she investigates higher ed institutional strategy, and the relationship it has with real-world policy. This includes delving into the specific interpretation and implementation of official policy by different stakeholders within the institution- faculty, administration, and management.

Publications

Lin, J. (2015). The Impact of Globalization on Taiwan’s Education Policy: The International Student. In A. Lipinsky. (Ed), Vienna Taiwan Studies Series: Immigration societies, Taiwan and Beyond. (pp. 129-151). Vienna: LIT VERLAG GmbH & Co. KG

Yibo Wang has an MA in International Marketing from the Coventry University (UK) and a Master’s in Management: Leadership and Organizational Change from the University of Birmingham (UK).

His doctoral research focuses on ‘knowledge hiding’, ‘leadership style’ and ‘Confucian culture’ in Chinese education and training institutions.

As empirical studies on ‘knowledge hiding’ in the Chinese context are scarce, Yibo hopes to uncover underlying mechanism of knowledge hiding and find its potential influence factors.

Prior to coming to Oxford, he worked as a CEO in an educational consultancy based in Beijing that advised the investment and marketing analyses on education and training industry.

Riziki’s current DPhil research focuses on emergent literacy of refugee children within multilingual settings.

Prior to commencing her DPhil research, Riziki completed an MSc in Child Development at the University of Oxford, looking at the role of teacher behavioural and cognitive judgments on the learning trajectories of Black primary school students in England.

Her research interests are education access and wellbeing of children in resettlement and asylum contexts. In line with this, her research in the past has focused on integration and resettlement processes of refugees and immigrants within Canada.

Publications

Bhattacharyya, P., Ogoe, S., Riziki, A., & Wilkinson, L. (2020). In search of a “home”: comparing the housing challenges experienced by recently arrived Yazidi and Syrian Refugees in Canada. Manuscript submitted for publication.

Bhattacharyya, P., Riziki, A., Songose, L., Ogoe, S., & Wilkinson, L. (2020). Understanding the link between pre-arrival education and trauma and language learning: A case study of Yazidi women in Canada. Canadian Diversity, 17(2).

Bhattacharyya, P., Riziki, A., & Wilkinson, L. (2018). “Settlement Service Use among Syrian Refugees in Canada” Canadian Diversity 15(1).

Wilkinson, L., Bhattacharya, P., Garcea, J., Abdul-Karim, A., Riziki, A., & Schnieders, M. (2017). Finding home: Some housing considerations for refugee families with children. Canadian Diversity, 14 (3), 31-35

Wilkinson, L., Bhattacharyya, P., Riziki, A., & Abdul-Karim, A. (2018).Yazidi Refugee Resettlement in Canada. Calgary: Immigration Refugees and Citizenship Canada-Integration Branch (Prairies and Territories Region).

Wilkinson, L., Garcea, J., Bhattacharyya, P., Riziki, A., Abdul Karim, A. (2017). Resettling on the Canadian Prairies: Integration of Syrian refugees. Calgary: Immigration Refugees and Citizenship Canada, Integration Branch-Prairies., Northwest Territories Division., & Alberta Association of Immigrant Serving Agencies

Anushay completed her BSc Psychology from UCL, where she also started her master’s in Developmental Neuroscience and Psychopathology. She was based at Yale University for her master’s thesis, where she worked with Dr Craig Bailey at the Yale Center for Emotional Intelligence to understand children’s emotion development. Anushay’s research interests include understanding child development across different cultures, factors that might be affecting it, and devising culture-specific ways to support children’s holistic development through the educational system. She is also keen on improving the research scope in Pakistan by working with Pakistani researchers, practitioners, and families.

Anushay balances her research with her position as the founder of a non-profit, Resources for Children, which aims to understand and support children’s development in Pakistan.

Publications

  1. Mazhar, A. (2022, April). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Spring Preview, New Haven, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2021, December). Does an extended family improve mentalising in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK & Pakistan. 2nd International Foundation University Conference of Psychology, Rawalpindi, Pakistan.
  3. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Theory of Mind in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK and Pakistan. Harvard Trends in Psychology Summit, Cambridge, United States.
  1. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Research Rounds, New Haven, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2020, October). Developing a non-profit to advance autism research in Pakistan. Anna Freud Centre Seminar Series, London, United Kingdom

 

Núria is a Professor of Mathematics Education at Autonomous University of Barcelona. Her research is about language and mathematics in secondary school classrooms and professional development contexts with mathematics teachers.

Her first degree was in Mathematics at University of Barcelona (1995). Soon after her initiation as a secondary school mathematics teacher in highly multilingual classrooms of Barcelona, she started her PhD at the UAB Division of Mathematics Education. She wanted to understand the critical factors behind the under-performance in school mathematics of many learners from poor urban backgrounds and recent histories of migration. Since then, she has been committed to classroom and teacher education research grounded on community work with schools and mathematics teachers in urban areas of poverty. Her years as a school teacher have provided her with greater insights into her work as a researcher and have strongly influenced the adoption of sociocultural and sociopolitical approaches to mathematics teaching and learning.

Núria was given the ICREA Academia Award of the Catalan Institution for Research and Advanced Studies in 2013, in recognition of her contributions to research on multilingual mathematics teaching and learning. She was elected to the Executive Committee of the International Commission on Mathematical Instruction as Member-at-Large in 2021, and to the International Committee of the International Group for the Psychology of Mathematics Education from 2010 to 2014. She served as Extraordinarious Professor of Mathematics Education at the University of South Africa from 2013 to 2020. She was Visiting Scholar at London South Bank University, University of Arizona, and University of North Carolina at Chapel-Hill.

Núria is currently on the editorial board of the international journal Mathematics Education Research Journal and Journal of Mathematics Teacher Education. Till 2021 she was the editor-in-chief of the Advances of Research in Mathematics Education, the official journal of the Spanish Society of Research in Mathematics Education. She is the leading co-editor of a 2018 special issue on language research in mathematics education published in ZDM-Mathematics Education, and the leading co-editor of a special issue on decentring mathematics teaching education, to be published in the Journal of Mathematics Teacher Education, February 2024.

She chaired the 7th Topic Conference of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education on Language and Mathematics (Dresden, 2018), and the ERME Topic Working Group on Language and Mathematics from 2015 to 2020. The collaborations established in the ERME context enabled for a broad range of experts to come together and move forward the research field in the form of an co-edited Routledge volume entitled ‘Classroom research on mathematics and language: Seeing learners and teachers differently’ in 2021, with Núria as the leading co-editor. She has also been co-editor of the Springer volume resulting from the 21st ICMI Study on Language Diversity and Mathematics Education in 2016, and of the Brill volume entitled ‘Mathematical discourse that breaks barriers and creates space for marginalized learners’ in 2018.

Núria’s motivation for coming to the Oxford Department of Education is her research collaboration in projects co-coordinated with Jenni Ingram on establishing an international network for research on supporting school mathematics teaching with linguistically disadvantaged learners. From her years as a secondary school in the 1990s, important challenges posed to mathematics education practice remain. Learners of mathematics who are linguistically disadvantaged for a variety of reasons, including impoverished socioeconomic status, continue to be educationally disadvantaged at a considerable risk of school failure and early dropout. More research will hopefully shed light on how to identify and develop improved practices to enable greater access to school mathematics for all learners.

Publications

SELECTION OF 10 LAST-DECADE PUBLICATIONS
[For more publications and research details, see https://orcid.org/0000-0001-5199-6336]
– Planas, N., & Chronaki, A. (2021). Multilingual mathematics learning from a dialogic-translanguaging perspective. In N. Planas, C. Morgan, & M. Schütte (Eds.), Classroom research on mathematics and language: Seeing learners and teachers differently (pp. 151-166). Routledge.
– Planas, N. (2021). How specific can language as resource become for the teaching of algebraic concepts? ZDM-Mathematics Education, 53(2), 277-288.
– Planas, N. (2021). Challenges and opportunities from translingual research on multilingual mathematics classrooms. In A. A. Essien, & A. Msimanga (Eds.), Multilingual education yearbook 2021. Policy and practice in STEM multilingual contexts (pp. 1-18). Springer.
– Planas, N., & Ngoepe, M. (2019). Right to learn mathematics: From language as right to language as resource. In C. Xenofontos (Ed.), Equity in mathematics education. Addressing a changing world (pp. 93-110). Information Age Publishing.
– Planas, N., & Schütte, M. (2018). Research frameworks for the study of language in mathematics education, ZDM-Mathematics Education, 50(6), 965-974.
– Planas, N. (2018). Language as resource: A key notion for understanding the complexity of mathematics learning. Educational Studies in Mathematics, 98(3), 215-229.
– Planas, N., Morgan, C., & Schütte, M. (2018). Mathematics education and language. Lessons and directions from two decades of research. In T. Dreyfus, M. Artigue, S. Prediger, D. Potari, & Ruthven (Eds.), Developing research in mathematics education. Twenty years of communication, cooperation and collaboration in Europe (pp. 196-210). Routledge.
– Planas, N. (2014). One speaker, two languages: Learning opportunities in the mathematics classroom. Educational Studies in Mathematics, 87(1), 51-66.
– Planas, N., & Setati Phakeng, M. (2014). On the process of gaining language as a resource in mathematics education. ZDM-Mathematics Education, 46(6), 883-893.
– Planas, N., & Civil, M. (2013). Language-as-resource and language-as-political. Tensions in the bilingual mathematics classroom. Mathematics Education Research Journal, 25(3), 361-378.

 

https://portalrecerca.uab.cat/en/persons/nuria-planas-raig-3

https://orcid.org/0000-0001-5199-6336

 

Cindy works at the intersection of learning, design, and technology, with a keen interest in the orchestration of future-ready tech-enabled learning.

She is curious how the deployment of adaptive learning systems to schools will impact classroom learning and hopes to learn more about the human-machine partnership in education. Specifically, her research is concerned with the implications that the use of such systems has on teacher-student interactions, as teachers grapple with balancing personalised learning and learning in community, as well as curriculum demands and student interests. These are some tensions which could potentially be exacerbated by affordances of adaptive learning systems.

Prior to embarking on the DPhil in Education at Oxford, Cindy worked as the Lead Specialist in Technologies for Learning at the Educational Technology Division of Ministry of Education, Singapore. She had previously completed graduate studies at the National University of Singapore and Stanford University where she was awarded Master of Arts in English Studies and Master of Arts in Education.

Reem is DPhil student from Saudi Arabia.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she worked as a Teacher, Professional Developer, then, became a Supervisor and Researcher in the Ministry of Education where she received a scholarship to pursue her DPhil education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests lie in the area of Teacher Education and Professional Learning Policy and Practice.

Publications
  • Alqahtani, Reem (2020). Saudi Universities Role in Developing Teacher Professional Development Programs: Elite Universities Experience. Journal of Educational Sciences. King Saud University.
  • Alqahtani, Reem. (2020). The effect of implementing UDL-based activities in improving EFL learners’ academic achievement and attitudes towards L2. In L. Salas, & E. Ager, Creating Quiet reflective Spaces: Language Teacher Researches Professional Development (pp. 61-62). IATEFL publications.

Lena Zlock is researching the integration of digital technology into structures of teaching, learning, and education in higher education. Her particular focus is on the digital humanities and the potential for digital methods to transform humanistic study. She works with Professor Niall Winters and Dr. James Robson.

Lena’s research interests stem from her education as an M.St. student and Ertegun Graduate Scholar in Modern Languages at the University of Oxford, and as a B.A. student in History at Stanford University. As an undergraduate, she started the Voltaire Library Project, a digitally and data-driven study of the 6,763-book collection of French Enlightenment philosopher Voltaire (you can read more about the project here and here). She has been interested in the application of digital technology to humanistic teaching since her days in Princeton Day School, where she developed an interdisciplinary curriculum on Mexico City (visit the course website here).

Her research on Voltaire led her to think more broadly about the place of digital methods in the humanities classroom, and how new technologies will revolutionise the liberal arts and higher education. As a DPhil candidate, Lena will examine the negotiation and implementation of new learning technologies within the University of Oxford at undergraduate and graduate levels.

Lena is involved in a number of digital humanities initiatives in Oxford. She previously served as the inaugural fellow of the Voltaire Lab at Oxford’s Voltaire Foundation. As a master’s student, Lena co-formulated the convergence agenda for Oxford digital humanities with Professor Howard Hotson, and is currently employed by the Humanities Division to assist with the development of an M.St. degree in Digital Scholarship (read more here). Lena set up and helps to run the History of the Book blog for the Faculty of Medieval and Modern Languages and the Oxford Book History Twitter account.

Lena welcomes inquiries from undergraduate and postgraduate students from Oxford and beyond seeking to get involved with the digital humanities in any capacity. The History of the Book blog also welcomes inquiries from prospective contributors.

 

Abbey is a Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education, in collaboration with the Department of Engineering.

Before joining the DPhil program, Abbey obtained a B.A. in Applied Linguistics with minors in Russian and Chinese from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford. She was the recipient of a Benjamin A. Gilman International Scholarship through U.S. Department of State for study in Russia and was awarded two Foreign Language and Area Studies (FLAS) Fellowships for study in both Russia and China. She holds both TESOL and TEFL certificates and has taught English as a Second Language in various contexts to a wide variety of learner populations.

Abbey’s main research interests lie in the use of technology to facilitate language learning. Her DPhil research focuses on the development of a virtual reality program to bridge the gaps that students face when learning languages through distance learning.

Julie Chia-Yi Lin is a Doctoral student at the University of Oxford, funded by the Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholarship. Her research focus on Internationalization, Policy, Management and Institutional Strategy is rooted in her professional experience in publishing and higher education, as well as from her observations regarding the continuous change in global educational dynamics.

Julie completed her B.A. at National Taiwan University, and earned a joint M.A. from the University of Vienna and the University of Wroclaw. She was previously employed as an officer for the Office of International Affairs at National Taiwan University, and then as a Publisher at Emerald Publishing.

She focuses on the development of higher education, particularly in the processes of internationalization and globalization, and tries to deliver perspectives from different Institutional sectors, and a wide array of participants. She is mindful of the influence that culture has on the development and reception of these processes, and has a special interest in the East Asia region, and Confucian-influenced higher education systems. In her doctoral research, she investigates higher ed institutional strategy, and the relationship it has with real-world policy. This includes delving into the specific interpretation and implementation of official policy by different stakeholders within the institution- faculty, administration, and management.

Publications

Lin, J. (2015). The Impact of Globalization on Taiwan’s Education Policy: The International Student. In A. Lipinsky. (Ed), Vienna Taiwan Studies Series: Immigration societies, Taiwan and Beyond. (pp. 129-151). Vienna: LIT VERLAG GmbH & Co. KG

Yibo Wang has an MA in International Marketing from the Coventry University (UK) and a Master’s in Management: Leadership and Organizational Change from the University of Birmingham (UK).

His doctoral research focuses on ‘knowledge hiding’, ‘leadership style’ and ‘Confucian culture’ in Chinese education and training institutions.

As empirical studies on ‘knowledge hiding’ in the Chinese context are scarce, Yibo hopes to uncover underlying mechanism of knowledge hiding and find its potential influence factors.

Prior to coming to Oxford, he worked as a CEO in an educational consultancy based in Beijing that advised the investment and marketing analyses on education and training industry.

Riziki’s current DPhil research focuses on emergent literacy of refugee children within multilingual settings.

Prior to commencing her DPhil research, Riziki completed an MSc in Child Development at the University of Oxford, looking at the role of teacher behavioural and cognitive judgments on the learning trajectories of Black primary school students in England.

Her research interests are education access and wellbeing of children in resettlement and asylum contexts. In line with this, her research in the past has focused on integration and resettlement processes of refugees and immigrants within Canada.

Publications

Bhattacharyya, P., Ogoe, S., Riziki, A., & Wilkinson, L. (2020). In search of a “home”: comparing the housing challenges experienced by recently arrived Yazidi and Syrian Refugees in Canada. Manuscript submitted for publication.

Bhattacharyya, P., Riziki, A., Songose, L., Ogoe, S., & Wilkinson, L. (2020). Understanding the link between pre-arrival education and trauma and language learning: A case study of Yazidi women in Canada. Canadian Diversity, 17(2).

Bhattacharyya, P., Riziki, A., & Wilkinson, L. (2018). “Settlement Service Use among Syrian Refugees in Canada” Canadian Diversity 15(1).

Wilkinson, L., Bhattacharya, P., Garcea, J., Abdul-Karim, A., Riziki, A., & Schnieders, M. (2017). Finding home: Some housing considerations for refugee families with children. Canadian Diversity, 14 (3), 31-35

Wilkinson, L., Bhattacharyya, P., Riziki, A., & Abdul-Karim, A. (2018).Yazidi Refugee Resettlement in Canada. Calgary: Immigration Refugees and Citizenship Canada-Integration Branch (Prairies and Territories Region).

Wilkinson, L., Garcea, J., Bhattacharyya, P., Riziki, A., Abdul Karim, A. (2017). Resettling on the Canadian Prairies: Integration of Syrian refugees. Calgary: Immigration Refugees and Citizenship Canada, Integration Branch-Prairies., Northwest Territories Division., & Alberta Association of Immigrant Serving Agencies

Anushay completed her BSc Psychology from UCL, where she also started her master’s in Developmental Neuroscience and Psychopathology. She was based at Yale University for her master’s thesis, where she worked with Dr Craig Bailey at the Yale Center for Emotional Intelligence to understand children’s emotion development. Anushay’s research interests include understanding child development across different cultures, factors that might be affecting it, and devising culture-specific ways to support children’s holistic development through the educational system. She is also keen on improving the research scope in Pakistan by working with Pakistani researchers, practitioners, and families.

Anushay balances her research with her position as the founder of a non-profit, Resources for Children, which aims to understand and support children’s development in Pakistan.

Publications

  1. Mazhar, A. (2022, April). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Spring Preview, New Haven, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2021, December). Does an extended family improve mentalising in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK & Pakistan. 2nd International Foundation University Conference of Psychology, Rawalpindi, Pakistan.
  3. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Theory of Mind in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK and Pakistan. Harvard Trends in Psychology Summit, Cambridge, United States.
  1. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Research Rounds, New Haven, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2020, October). Developing a non-profit to advance autism research in Pakistan. Anna Freud Centre Seminar Series, London, United Kingdom

 

Núria is a Professor of Mathematics Education at Autonomous University of Barcelona. Her research is about language and mathematics in secondary school classrooms and professional development contexts with mathematics teachers.

Her first degree was in Mathematics at University of Barcelona (1995). Soon after her initiation as a secondary school mathematics teacher in highly multilingual classrooms of Barcelona, she started her PhD at the UAB Division of Mathematics Education. She wanted to understand the critical factors behind the under-performance in school mathematics of many learners from poor urban backgrounds and recent histories of migration. Since then, she has been committed to classroom and teacher education research grounded on community work with schools and mathematics teachers in urban areas of poverty. Her years as a school teacher have provided her with greater insights into her work as a researcher and have strongly influenced the adoption of sociocultural and sociopolitical approaches to mathematics teaching and learning.

Núria was given the ICREA Academia Award of the Catalan Institution for Research and Advanced Studies in 2013, in recognition of her contributions to research on multilingual mathematics teaching and learning. She was elected to the Executive Committee of the International Commission on Mathematical Instruction as Member-at-Large in 2021, and to the International Committee of the International Group for the Psychology of Mathematics Education from 2010 to 2014. She served as Extraordinarious Professor of Mathematics Education at the University of South Africa from 2013 to 2020. She was Visiting Scholar at London South Bank University, University of Arizona, and University of North Carolina at Chapel-Hill.

Núria is currently on the editorial board of the international journal Mathematics Education Research Journal and Journal of Mathematics Teacher Education. Till 2021 she was the editor-in-chief of the Advances of Research in Mathematics Education, the official journal of the Spanish Society of Research in Mathematics Education. She is the leading co-editor of a 2018 special issue on language research in mathematics education published in ZDM-Mathematics Education, and the leading co-editor of a special issue on decentring mathematics teaching education, to be published in the Journal of Mathematics Teacher Education, February 2024.

She chaired the 7th Topic Conference of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education on Language and Mathematics (Dresden, 2018), and the ERME Topic Working Group on Language and Mathematics from 2015 to 2020. The collaborations established in the ERME context enabled for a broad range of experts to come together and move forward the research field in the form of an co-edited Routledge volume entitled ‘Classroom research on mathematics and language: Seeing learners and teachers differently’ in 2021, with Núria as the leading co-editor. She has also been co-editor of the Springer volume resulting from the 21st ICMI Study on Language Diversity and Mathematics Education in 2016, and of the Brill volume entitled ‘Mathematical discourse that breaks barriers and creates space for marginalized learners’ in 2018.

Núria’s motivation for coming to the Oxford Department of Education is her research collaboration in projects co-coordinated with Jenni Ingram on establishing an international network for research on supporting school mathematics teaching with linguistically disadvantaged learners. From her years as a secondary school in the 1990s, important challenges posed to mathematics education practice remain. Learners of mathematics who are linguistically disadvantaged for a variety of reasons, including impoverished socioeconomic status, continue to be educationally disadvantaged at a considerable risk of school failure and early dropout. More research will hopefully shed light on how to identify and develop improved practices to enable greater access to school mathematics for all learners.

Publications

SELECTION OF 10 LAST-DECADE PUBLICATIONS
[For more publications and research details, see https://orcid.org/0000-0001-5199-6336]
– Planas, N., & Chronaki, A. (2021). Multilingual mathematics learning from a dialogic-translanguaging perspective. In N. Planas, C. Morgan, & M. Schütte (Eds.), Classroom research on mathematics and language: Seeing learners and teachers differently (pp. 151-166). Routledge.
– Planas, N. (2021). How specific can language as resource become for the teaching of algebraic concepts? ZDM-Mathematics Education, 53(2), 277-288.
– Planas, N. (2021). Challenges and opportunities from translingual research on multilingual mathematics classrooms. In A. A. Essien, & A. Msimanga (Eds.), Multilingual education yearbook 2021. Policy and practice in STEM multilingual contexts (pp. 1-18). Springer.
– Planas, N., & Ngoepe, M. (2019). Right to learn mathematics: From language as right to language as resource. In C. Xenofontos (Ed.), Equity in mathematics education. Addressing a changing world (pp. 93-110). Information Age Publishing.
– Planas, N., & Schütte, M. (2018). Research frameworks for the study of language in mathematics education, ZDM-Mathematics Education, 50(6), 965-974.
– Planas, N. (2018). Language as resource: A key notion for understanding the complexity of mathematics learning. Educational Studies in Mathematics, 98(3), 215-229.
– Planas, N., Morgan, C., & Schütte, M. (2018). Mathematics education and language. Lessons and directions from two decades of research. In T. Dreyfus, M. Artigue, S. Prediger, D. Potari, & Ruthven (Eds.), Developing research in mathematics education. Twenty years of communication, cooperation and collaboration in Europe (pp. 196-210). Routledge.
– Planas, N. (2014). One speaker, two languages: Learning opportunities in the mathematics classroom. Educational Studies in Mathematics, 87(1), 51-66.
– Planas, N., & Setati Phakeng, M. (2014). On the process of gaining language as a resource in mathematics education. ZDM-Mathematics Education, 46(6), 883-893.
– Planas, N., & Civil, M. (2013). Language-as-resource and language-as-political. Tensions in the bilingual mathematics classroom. Mathematics Education Research Journal, 25(3), 361-378.

 

https://portalrecerca.uab.cat/en/persons/nuria-planas-raig-3

https://orcid.org/0000-0001-5199-6336

 

Cindy works at the intersection of learning, design, and technology, with a keen interest in the orchestration of future-ready tech-enabled learning.

She is curious how the deployment of adaptive learning systems to schools will impact classroom learning and hopes to learn more about the human-machine partnership in education. Specifically, her research is concerned with the implications that the use of such systems has on teacher-student interactions, as teachers grapple with balancing personalised learning and learning in community, as well as curriculum demands and student interests. These are some tensions which could potentially be exacerbated by affordances of adaptive learning systems.

Prior to embarking on the DPhil in Education at Oxford, Cindy worked as the Lead Specialist in Technologies for Learning at the Educational Technology Division of Ministry of Education, Singapore. She had previously completed graduate studies at the National University of Singapore and Stanford University where she was awarded Master of Arts in English Studies and Master of Arts in Education.

Reem is DPhil student from Saudi Arabia.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she worked as a Teacher, Professional Developer, then, became a Supervisor and Researcher in the Ministry of Education where she received a scholarship to pursue her DPhil education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests lie in the area of Teacher Education and Professional Learning Policy and Practice.

Publications
  • Alqahtani, Reem (2020). Saudi Universities Role in Developing Teacher Professional Development Programs: Elite Universities Experience. Journal of Educational Sciences. King Saud University.
  • Alqahtani, Reem. (2020). The effect of implementing UDL-based activities in improving EFL learners’ academic achievement and attitudes towards L2. In L. Salas, & E. Ager, Creating Quiet reflective Spaces: Language Teacher Researches Professional Development (pp. 61-62). IATEFL publications.

Lena Zlock is researching the integration of digital technology into structures of teaching, learning, and education in higher education. Her particular focus is on the digital humanities and the potential for digital methods to transform humanistic study. She works with Professor Niall Winters and Dr. James Robson.

Lena’s research interests stem from her education as an M.St. student and Ertegun Graduate Scholar in Modern Languages at the University of Oxford, and as a B.A. student in History at Stanford University. As an undergraduate, she started the Voltaire Library Project, a digitally and data-driven study of the 6,763-book collection of French Enlightenment philosopher Voltaire (you can read more about the project here and here). She has been interested in the application of digital technology to humanistic teaching since her days in Princeton Day School, where she developed an interdisciplinary curriculum on Mexico City (visit the course website here).

Her research on Voltaire led her to think more broadly about the place of digital methods in the humanities classroom, and how new technologies will revolutionise the liberal arts and higher education. As a DPhil candidate, Lena will examine the negotiation and implementation of new learning technologies within the University of Oxford at undergraduate and graduate levels.

Lena is involved in a number of digital humanities initiatives in Oxford. She previously served as the inaugural fellow of the Voltaire Lab at Oxford’s Voltaire Foundation. As a master’s student, Lena co-formulated the convergence agenda for Oxford digital humanities with Professor Howard Hotson, and is currently employed by the Humanities Division to assist with the development of an M.St. degree in Digital Scholarship (read more here). Lena set up and helps to run the History of the Book blog for the Faculty of Medieval and Modern Languages and the Oxford Book History Twitter account.

Lena welcomes inquiries from undergraduate and postgraduate students from Oxford and beyond seeking to get involved with the digital humanities in any capacity. The History of the Book blog also welcomes inquiries from prospective contributors.

 

Abbey is a Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education, in collaboration with the Department of Engineering.

Before joining the DPhil program, Abbey obtained a B.A. in Applied Linguistics with minors in Russian and Chinese from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford. She was the recipient of a Benjamin A. Gilman International Scholarship through U.S. Department of State for study in Russia and was awarded two Foreign Language and Area Studies (FLAS) Fellowships for study in both Russia and China. She holds both TESOL and TEFL certificates and has taught English as a Second Language in various contexts to a wide variety of learner populations.

Abbey’s main research interests lie in the use of technology to facilitate language learning. Her DPhil research focuses on the development of a virtual reality program to bridge the gaps that students face when learning languages through distance learning.

Julie Chia-Yi Lin is a Doctoral student at the University of Oxford, funded by the Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholarship. Her research focus on Internationalization, Policy, Management and Institutional Strategy is rooted in her professional experience in publishing and higher education, as well as from her observations regarding the continuous change in global educational dynamics.

Julie completed her B.A. at National Taiwan University, and earned a joint M.A. from the University of Vienna and the University of Wroclaw. She was previously employed as an officer for the Office of International Affairs at National Taiwan University, and then as a Publisher at Emerald Publishing.

She focuses on the development of higher education, particularly in the processes of internationalization and globalization, and tries to deliver perspectives from different Institutional sectors, and a wide array of participants. She is mindful of the influence that culture has on the development and reception of these processes, and has a special interest in the East Asia region, and Confucian-influenced higher education systems. In her doctoral research, she investigates higher ed institutional strategy, and the relationship it has with real-world policy. This includes delving into the specific interpretation and implementation of official policy by different stakeholders within the institution- faculty, administration, and management.

Publications

Lin, J. (2015). The Impact of Globalization on Taiwan’s Education Policy: The International Student. In A. Lipinsky. (Ed), Vienna Taiwan Studies Series: Immigration societies, Taiwan and Beyond. (pp. 129-151). Vienna: LIT VERLAG GmbH & Co. KG

Yibo Wang has an MA in International Marketing from the Coventry University (UK) and a Master’s in Management: Leadership and Organizational Change from the University of Birmingham (UK).

His doctoral research focuses on ‘knowledge hiding’, ‘leadership style’ and ‘Confucian culture’ in Chinese education and training institutions.

As empirical studies on ‘knowledge hiding’ in the Chinese context are scarce, Yibo hopes to uncover underlying mechanism of knowledge hiding and find its potential influence factors.

Prior to coming to Oxford, he worked as a CEO in an educational consultancy based in Beijing that advised the investment and marketing analyses on education and training industry.

Riziki’s current DPhil research focuses on emergent literacy of refugee children within multilingual settings.

Prior to commencing her DPhil research, Riziki completed an MSc in Child Development at the University of Oxford, looking at the role of teacher behavioural and cognitive judgments on the learning trajectories of Black primary school students in England.

Her research interests are education access and wellbeing of children in resettlement and asylum contexts. In line with this, her research in the past has focused on integration and resettlement processes of refugees and immigrants within Canada.

Publications

Bhattacharyya, P., Ogoe, S., Riziki, A., & Wilkinson, L. (2020). In search of a “home”: comparing the housing challenges experienced by recently arrived Yazidi and Syrian Refugees in Canada. Manuscript submitted for publication.

Bhattacharyya, P., Riziki, A., Songose, L., Ogoe, S., & Wilkinson, L. (2020). Understanding the link between pre-arrival education and trauma and language learning: A case study of Yazidi women in Canada. Canadian Diversity, 17(2).

Bhattacharyya, P., Riziki, A., & Wilkinson, L. (2018). “Settlement Service Use among Syrian Refugees in Canada” Canadian Diversity 15(1).

Wilkinson, L., Bhattacharya, P., Garcea, J., Abdul-Karim, A., Riziki, A., & Schnieders, M. (2017). Finding home: Some housing considerations for refugee families with children. Canadian Diversity, 14 (3), 31-35

Wilkinson, L., Bhattacharyya, P., Riziki, A., & Abdul-Karim, A. (2018).Yazidi Refugee Resettlement in Canada. Calgary: Immigration Refugees and Citizenship Canada-Integration Branch (Prairies and Territories Region).

Wilkinson, L., Garcea, J., Bhattacharyya, P., Riziki, A., Abdul Karim, A. (2017). Resettling on the Canadian Prairies: Integration of Syrian refugees. Calgary: Immigration Refugees and Citizenship Canada, Integration Branch-Prairies., Northwest Territories Division., & Alberta Association of Immigrant Serving Agencies

Anushay completed her BSc Psychology from UCL, where she also started her master’s in Developmental Neuroscience and Psychopathology. She was based at Yale University for her master’s thesis, where she worked with Dr Craig Bailey at the Yale Center for Emotional Intelligence to understand children’s emotion development. Anushay’s research interests include understanding child development across different cultures, factors that might be affecting it, and devising culture-specific ways to support children’s holistic development through the educational system. She is also keen on improving the research scope in Pakistan by working with Pakistani researchers, practitioners, and families.

Anushay balances her research with her position as the founder of a non-profit, Resources for Children, which aims to understand and support children’s development in Pakistan.

Publications

  1. Mazhar, A. (2022, April). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Spring Preview, New Haven, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2021, December). Does an extended family improve mentalising in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK & Pakistan. 2nd International Foundation University Conference of Psychology, Rawalpindi, Pakistan.
  3. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Theory of Mind in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK and Pakistan. Harvard Trends in Psychology Summit, Cambridge, United States.
  1. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Research Rounds, New Haven, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2020, October). Developing a non-profit to advance autism research in Pakistan. Anna Freud Centre Seminar Series, London, United Kingdom

 

Núria is a Professor of Mathematics Education at Autonomous University of Barcelona. Her research is about language and mathematics in secondary school classrooms and professional development contexts with mathematics teachers.

Her first degree was in Mathematics at University of Barcelona (1995). Soon after her initiation as a secondary school mathematics teacher in highly multilingual classrooms of Barcelona, she started her PhD at the UAB Division of Mathematics Education. She wanted to understand the critical factors behind the under-performance in school mathematics of many learners from poor urban backgrounds and recent histories of migration. Since then, she has been committed to classroom and teacher education research grounded on community work with schools and mathematics teachers in urban areas of poverty. Her years as a school teacher have provided her with greater insights into her work as a researcher and have strongly influenced the adoption of sociocultural and sociopolitical approaches to mathematics teaching and learning.

Núria was given the ICREA Academia Award of the Catalan Institution for Research and Advanced Studies in 2013, in recognition of her contributions to research on multilingual mathematics teaching and learning. She was elected to the Executive Committee of the International Commission on Mathematical Instruction as Member-at-Large in 2021, and to the International Committee of the International Group for the Psychology of Mathematics Education from 2010 to 2014. She served as Extraordinarious Professor of Mathematics Education at the University of South Africa from 2013 to 2020. She was Visiting Scholar at London South Bank University, University of Arizona, and University of North Carolina at Chapel-Hill.

Núria is currently on the editorial board of the international journal Mathematics Education Research Journal and Journal of Mathematics Teacher Education. Till 2021 she was the editor-in-chief of the Advances of Research in Mathematics Education, the official journal of the Spanish Society of Research in Mathematics Education. She is the leading co-editor of a 2018 special issue on language research in mathematics education published in ZDM-Mathematics Education, and the leading co-editor of a special issue on decentring mathematics teaching education, to be published in the Journal of Mathematics Teacher Education, February 2024.

She chaired the 7th Topic Conference of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education on Language and Mathematics (Dresden, 2018), and the ERME Topic Working Group on Language and Mathematics from 2015 to 2020. The collaborations established in the ERME context enabled for a broad range of experts to come together and move forward the research field in the form of an co-edited Routledge volume entitled ‘Classroom research on mathematics and language: Seeing learners and teachers differently’ in 2021, with Núria as the leading co-editor. She has also been co-editor of the Springer volume resulting from the 21st ICMI Study on Language Diversity and Mathematics Education in 2016, and of the Brill volume entitled ‘Mathematical discourse that breaks barriers and creates space for marginalized learners’ in 2018.

Núria’s motivation for coming to the Oxford Department of Education is her research collaboration in projects co-coordinated with Jenni Ingram on establishing an international network for research on supporting school mathematics teaching with linguistically disadvantaged learners. From her years as a secondary school in the 1990s, important challenges posed to mathematics education practice remain. Learners of mathematics who are linguistically disadvantaged for a variety of reasons, including impoverished socioeconomic status, continue to be educationally disadvantaged at a considerable risk of school failure and early dropout. More research will hopefully shed light on how to identify and develop improved practices to enable greater access to school mathematics for all learners.

Publications

SELECTION OF 10 LAST-DECADE PUBLICATIONS
[For more publications and research details, see https://orcid.org/0000-0001-5199-6336]
– Planas, N., & Chronaki, A. (2021). Multilingual mathematics learning from a dialogic-translanguaging perspective. In N. Planas, C. Morgan, & M. Schütte (Eds.), Classroom research on mathematics and language: Seeing learners and teachers differently (pp. 151-166). Routledge.
– Planas, N. (2021). How specific can language as resource become for the teaching of algebraic concepts? ZDM-Mathematics Education, 53(2), 277-288.
– Planas, N. (2021). Challenges and opportunities from translingual research on multilingual mathematics classrooms. In A. A. Essien, & A. Msimanga (Eds.), Multilingual education yearbook 2021. Policy and practice in STEM multilingual contexts (pp. 1-18). Springer.
– Planas, N., & Ngoepe, M. (2019). Right to learn mathematics: From language as right to language as resource. In C. Xenofontos (Ed.), Equity in mathematics education. Addressing a changing world (pp. 93-110). Information Age Publishing.
– Planas, N., & Schütte, M. (2018). Research frameworks for the study of language in mathematics education, ZDM-Mathematics Education, 50(6), 965-974.
– Planas, N. (2018). Language as resource: A key notion for understanding the complexity of mathematics learning. Educational Studies in Mathematics, 98(3), 215-229.
– Planas, N., Morgan, C., & Schütte, M. (2018). Mathematics education and language. Lessons and directions from two decades of research. In T. Dreyfus, M. Artigue, S. Prediger, D. Potari, & Ruthven (Eds.), Developing research in mathematics education. Twenty years of communication, cooperation and collaboration in Europe (pp. 196-210). Routledge.
– Planas, N. (2014). One speaker, two languages: Learning opportunities in the mathematics classroom. Educational Studies in Mathematics, 87(1), 51-66.
– Planas, N., & Setati Phakeng, M. (2014). On the process of gaining language as a resource in mathematics education. ZDM-Mathematics Education, 46(6), 883-893.
– Planas, N., & Civil, M. (2013). Language-as-resource and language-as-political. Tensions in the bilingual mathematics classroom. Mathematics Education Research Journal, 25(3), 361-378.

 

https://portalrecerca.uab.cat/en/persons/nuria-planas-raig-3

https://orcid.org/0000-0001-5199-6336

 

Cindy works at the intersection of learning, design, and technology, with a keen interest in the orchestration of future-ready tech-enabled learning.

She is curious how the deployment of adaptive learning systems to schools will impact classroom learning and hopes to learn more about the human-machine partnership in education. Specifically, her research is concerned with the implications that the use of such systems has on teacher-student interactions, as teachers grapple with balancing personalised learning and learning in community, as well as curriculum demands and student interests. These are some tensions which could potentially be exacerbated by affordances of adaptive learning systems.

Prior to embarking on the DPhil in Education at Oxford, Cindy worked as the Lead Specialist in Technologies for Learning at the Educational Technology Division of Ministry of Education, Singapore. She had previously completed graduate studies at the National University of Singapore and Stanford University where she was awarded Master of Arts in English Studies and Master of Arts in Education.

Reem is DPhil student from Saudi Arabia.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she worked as a Teacher, Professional Developer, then, became a Supervisor and Researcher in the Ministry of Education where she received a scholarship to pursue her DPhil education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests lie in the area of Teacher Education and Professional Learning Policy and Practice.

Publications
  • Alqahtani, Reem (2020). Saudi Universities Role in Developing Teacher Professional Development Programs: Elite Universities Experience. Journal of Educational Sciences. King Saud University.
  • Alqahtani, Reem. (2020). The effect of implementing UDL-based activities in improving EFL learners’ academic achievement and attitudes towards L2. In L. Salas, & E. Ager, Creating Quiet reflective Spaces: Language Teacher Researches Professional Development (pp. 61-62). IATEFL publications.

Lena Zlock is researching the integration of digital technology into structures of teaching, learning, and education in higher education. Her particular focus is on the digital humanities and the potential for digital methods to transform humanistic study. She works with Professor Niall Winters and Dr. James Robson.

Lena’s research interests stem from her education as an M.St. student and Ertegun Graduate Scholar in Modern Languages at the University of Oxford, and as a B.A. student in History at Stanford University. As an undergraduate, she started the Voltaire Library Project, a digitally and data-driven study of the 6,763-book collection of French Enlightenment philosopher Voltaire (you can read more about the project here and here). She has been interested in the application of digital technology to humanistic teaching since her days in Princeton Day School, where she developed an interdisciplinary curriculum on Mexico City (visit the course website here).

Her research on Voltaire led her to think more broadly about the place of digital methods in the humanities classroom, and how new technologies will revolutionise the liberal arts and higher education. As a DPhil candidate, Lena will examine the negotiation and implementation of new learning technologies within the University of Oxford at undergraduate and graduate levels.

Lena is involved in a number of digital humanities initiatives in Oxford. She previously served as the inaugural fellow of the Voltaire Lab at Oxford’s Voltaire Foundation. As a master’s student, Lena co-formulated the convergence agenda for Oxford digital humanities with Professor Howard Hotson, and is currently employed by the Humanities Division to assist with the development of an M.St. degree in Digital Scholarship (read more here). Lena set up and helps to run the History of the Book blog for the Faculty of Medieval and Modern Languages and the Oxford Book History Twitter account.

Lena welcomes inquiries from undergraduate and postgraduate students from Oxford and beyond seeking to get involved with the digital humanities in any capacity. The History of the Book blog also welcomes inquiries from prospective contributors.

 

Abbey is a Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education, in collaboration with the Department of Engineering.

Before joining the DPhil program, Abbey obtained a B.A. in Applied Linguistics with minors in Russian and Chinese from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford. She was the recipient of a Benjamin A. Gilman International Scholarship through U.S. Department of State for study in Russia and was awarded two Foreign Language and Area Studies (FLAS) Fellowships for study in both Russia and China. She holds both TESOL and TEFL certificates and has taught English as a Second Language in various contexts to a wide variety of learner populations.

Abbey’s main research interests lie in the use of technology to facilitate language learning. Her DPhil research focuses on the development of a virtual reality program to bridge the gaps that students face when learning languages through distance learning.

Julie Chia-Yi Lin is a Doctoral student at the University of Oxford, funded by the Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholarship. Her research focus on Internationalization, Policy, Management and Institutional Strategy is rooted in her professional experience in publishing and higher education, as well as from her observations regarding the continuous change in global educational dynamics.

Julie completed her B.A. at National Taiwan University, and earned a joint M.A. from the University of Vienna and the University of Wroclaw. She was previously employed as an officer for the Office of International Affairs at National Taiwan University, and then as a Publisher at Emerald Publishing.

She focuses on the development of higher education, particularly in the processes of internationalization and globalization, and tries to deliver perspectives from different Institutional sectors, and a wide array of participants. She is mindful of the influence that culture has on the development and reception of these processes, and has a special interest in the East Asia region, and Confucian-influenced higher education systems. In her doctoral research, she investigates higher ed institutional strategy, and the relationship it has with real-world policy. This includes delving into the specific interpretation and implementation of official policy by different stakeholders within the institution- faculty, administration, and management.

Publications

Lin, J. (2015). The Impact of Globalization on Taiwan’s Education Policy: The International Student. In A. Lipinsky. (Ed), Vienna Taiwan Studies Series: Immigration societies, Taiwan and Beyond. (pp. 129-151). Vienna: LIT VERLAG GmbH & Co. KG

Yibo Wang has an MA in International Marketing from the Coventry University (UK) and a Master’s in Management: Leadership and Organizational Change from the University of Birmingham (UK).

His doctoral research focuses on ‘knowledge hiding’, ‘leadership style’ and ‘Confucian culture’ in Chinese education and training institutions.

As empirical studies on ‘knowledge hiding’ in the Chinese context are scarce, Yibo hopes to uncover underlying mechanism of knowledge hiding and find its potential influence factors.

Prior to coming to Oxford, he worked as a CEO in an educational consultancy based in Beijing that advised the investment and marketing analyses on education and training industry.

Riziki’s current DPhil research focuses on emergent literacy of refugee children within multilingual settings.

Prior to commencing her DPhil research, Riziki completed an MSc in Child Development at the University of Oxford, looking at the role of teacher behavioural and cognitive judgments on the learning trajectories of Black primary school students in England.

Her research interests are education access and wellbeing of children in resettlement and asylum contexts. In line with this, her research in the past has focused on integration and resettlement processes of refugees and immigrants within Canada.

Publications

Bhattacharyya, P., Ogoe, S., Riziki, A., & Wilkinson, L. (2020). In search of a “home”: comparing the housing challenges experienced by recently arrived Yazidi and Syrian Refugees in Canada. Manuscript submitted for publication.

Bhattacharyya, P., Riziki, A., Songose, L., Ogoe, S., & Wilkinson, L. (2020). Understanding the link between pre-arrival education and trauma and language learning: A case study of Yazidi women in Canada. Canadian Diversity, 17(2).

Bhattacharyya, P., Riziki, A., & Wilkinson, L. (2018). “Settlement Service Use among Syrian Refugees in Canada” Canadian Diversity 15(1).

Wilkinson, L., Bhattacharya, P., Garcea, J., Abdul-Karim, A., Riziki, A., & Schnieders, M. (2017). Finding home: Some housing considerations for refugee families with children. Canadian Diversity, 14 (3), 31-35

Wilkinson, L., Bhattacharyya, P., Riziki, A., & Abdul-Karim, A. (2018).Yazidi Refugee Resettlement in Canada. Calgary: Immigration Refugees and Citizenship Canada-Integration Branch (Prairies and Territories Region).

Wilkinson, L., Garcea, J., Bhattacharyya, P., Riziki, A., Abdul Karim, A. (2017). Resettling on the Canadian Prairies: Integration of Syrian refugees. Calgary: Immigration Refugees and Citizenship Canada, Integration Branch-Prairies., Northwest Territories Division., & Alberta Association of Immigrant Serving Agencies

Anushay completed her BSc Psychology from UCL, where she also started her master’s in Developmental Neuroscience and Psychopathology. She was based at Yale University for her master’s thesis, where she worked with Dr Craig Bailey at the Yale Center for Emotional Intelligence to understand children’s emotion development. Anushay’s research interests include understanding child development across different cultures, factors that might be affecting it, and devising culture-specific ways to support children’s holistic development through the educational system. She is also keen on improving the research scope in Pakistan by working with Pakistani researchers, practitioners, and families.

Anushay balances her research with her position as the founder of a non-profit, Resources for Children, which aims to understand and support children’s development in Pakistan.

Publications

  1. Mazhar, A. (2022, April). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Spring Preview, New Haven, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2021, December). Does an extended family improve mentalising in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK & Pakistan. 2nd International Foundation University Conference of Psychology, Rawalpindi, Pakistan.
  3. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Theory of Mind in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK and Pakistan. Harvard Trends in Psychology Summit, Cambridge, United States.
  1. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Research Rounds, New Haven, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2020, October). Developing a non-profit to advance autism research in Pakistan. Anna Freud Centre Seminar Series, London, United Kingdom

 

Núria is a Professor of Mathematics Education at Autonomous University of Barcelona. Her research is about language and mathematics in secondary school classrooms and professional development contexts with mathematics teachers.

Her first degree was in Mathematics at University of Barcelona (1995). Soon after her initiation as a secondary school mathematics teacher in highly multilingual classrooms of Barcelona, she started her PhD at the UAB Division of Mathematics Education. She wanted to understand the critical factors behind the under-performance in school mathematics of many learners from poor urban backgrounds and recent histories of migration. Since then, she has been committed to classroom and teacher education research grounded on community work with schools and mathematics teachers in urban areas of poverty. Her years as a school teacher have provided her with greater insights into her work as a researcher and have strongly influenced the adoption of sociocultural and sociopolitical approaches to mathematics teaching and learning.

Núria was given the ICREA Academia Award of the Catalan Institution for Research and Advanced Studies in 2013, in recognition of her contributions to research on multilingual mathematics teaching and learning. She was elected to the Executive Committee of the International Commission on Mathematical Instruction as Member-at-Large in 2021, and to the International Committee of the International Group for the Psychology of Mathematics Education from 2010 to 2014. She served as Extraordinarious Professor of Mathematics Education at the University of South Africa from 2013 to 2020. She was Visiting Scholar at London South Bank University, University of Arizona, and University of North Carolina at Chapel-Hill.

Núria is currently on the editorial board of the international journal Mathematics Education Research Journal and Journal of Mathematics Teacher Education. Till 2021 she was the editor-in-chief of the Advances of Research in Mathematics Education, the official journal of the Spanish Society of Research in Mathematics Education. She is the leading co-editor of a 2018 special issue on language research in mathematics education published in ZDM-Mathematics Education, and the leading co-editor of a special issue on decentring mathematics teaching education, to be published in the Journal of Mathematics Teacher Education, February 2024.

She chaired the 7th Topic Conference of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education on Language and Mathematics (Dresden, 2018), and the ERME Topic Working Group on Language and Mathematics from 2015 to 2020. The collaborations established in the ERME context enabled for a broad range of experts to come together and move forward the research field in the form of an co-edited Routledge volume entitled ‘Classroom research on mathematics and language: Seeing learners and teachers differently’ in 2021, with Núria as the leading co-editor. She has also been co-editor of the Springer volume resulting from the 21st ICMI Study on Language Diversity and Mathematics Education in 2016, and of the Brill volume entitled ‘Mathematical discourse that breaks barriers and creates space for marginalized learners’ in 2018.

Núria’s motivation for coming to the Oxford Department of Education is her research collaboration in projects co-coordinated with Jenni Ingram on establishing an international network for research on supporting school mathematics teaching with linguistically disadvantaged learners. From her years as a secondary school in the 1990s, important challenges posed to mathematics education practice remain. Learners of mathematics who are linguistically disadvantaged for a variety of reasons, including impoverished socioeconomic status, continue to be educationally disadvantaged at a considerable risk of school failure and early dropout. More research will hopefully shed light on how to identify and develop improved practices to enable greater access to school mathematics for all learners.

Publications

SELECTION OF 10 LAST-DECADE PUBLICATIONS
[For more publications and research details, see https://orcid.org/0000-0001-5199-6336]
– Planas, N., & Chronaki, A. (2021). Multilingual mathematics learning from a dialogic-translanguaging perspective. In N. Planas, C. Morgan, & M. Schütte (Eds.), Classroom research on mathematics and language: Seeing learners and teachers differently (pp. 151-166). Routledge.
– Planas, N. (2021). How specific can language as resource become for the teaching of algebraic concepts? ZDM-Mathematics Education, 53(2), 277-288.
– Planas, N. (2021). Challenges and opportunities from translingual research on multilingual mathematics classrooms. In A. A. Essien, & A. Msimanga (Eds.), Multilingual education yearbook 2021. Policy and practice in STEM multilingual contexts (pp. 1-18). Springer.
– Planas, N., & Ngoepe, M. (2019). Right to learn mathematics: From language as right to language as resource. In C. Xenofontos (Ed.), Equity in mathematics education. Addressing a changing world (pp. 93-110). Information Age Publishing.
– Planas, N., & Schütte, M. (2018). Research frameworks for the study of language in mathematics education, ZDM-Mathematics Education, 50(6), 965-974.
– Planas, N. (2018). Language as resource: A key notion for understanding the complexity of mathematics learning. Educational Studies in Mathematics, 98(3), 215-229.
– Planas, N., Morgan, C., & Schütte, M. (2018). Mathematics education and language. Lessons and directions from two decades of research. In T. Dreyfus, M. Artigue, S. Prediger, D. Potari, & Ruthven (Eds.), Developing research in mathematics education. Twenty years of communication, cooperation and collaboration in Europe (pp. 196-210). Routledge.
– Planas, N. (2014). One speaker, two languages: Learning opportunities in the mathematics classroom. Educational Studies in Mathematics, 87(1), 51-66.
– Planas, N., & Setati Phakeng, M. (2014). On the process of gaining language as a resource in mathematics education. ZDM-Mathematics Education, 46(6), 883-893.
– Planas, N., & Civil, M. (2013). Language-as-resource and language-as-political. Tensions in the bilingual mathematics classroom. Mathematics Education Research Journal, 25(3), 361-378.

 

https://portalrecerca.uab.cat/en/persons/nuria-planas-raig-3

https://orcid.org/0000-0001-5199-6336

 

Cindy works at the intersection of learning, design, and technology, with a keen interest in the orchestration of future-ready tech-enabled learning.

She is curious how the deployment of adaptive learning systems to schools will impact classroom learning and hopes to learn more about the human-machine partnership in education. Specifically, her research is concerned with the implications that the use of such systems has on teacher-student interactions, as teachers grapple with balancing personalised learning and learning in community, as well as curriculum demands and student interests. These are some tensions which could potentially be exacerbated by affordances of adaptive learning systems.

Prior to embarking on the DPhil in Education at Oxford, Cindy worked as the Lead Specialist in Technologies for Learning at the Educational Technology Division of Ministry of Education, Singapore. She had previously completed graduate studies at the National University of Singapore and Stanford University where she was awarded Master of Arts in English Studies and Master of Arts in Education.

Reem is DPhil student from Saudi Arabia.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she worked as a Teacher, Professional Developer, then, became a Supervisor and Researcher in the Ministry of Education where she received a scholarship to pursue her DPhil education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests lie in the area of Teacher Education and Professional Learning Policy and Practice.

Publications
  • Alqahtani, Reem (2020). Saudi Universities Role in Developing Teacher Professional Development Programs: Elite Universities Experience. Journal of Educational Sciences. King Saud University.
  • Alqahtani, Reem. (2020). The effect of implementing UDL-based activities in improving EFL learners’ academic achievement and attitudes towards L2. In L. Salas, & E. Ager, Creating Quiet reflective Spaces: Language Teacher Researches Professional Development (pp. 61-62). IATEFL publications.

Lena Zlock is researching the integration of digital technology into structures of teaching, learning, and education in higher education. Her particular focus is on the digital humanities and the potential for digital methods to transform humanistic study. She works with Professor Niall Winters and Dr. James Robson.

Lena’s research interests stem from her education as an M.St. student and Ertegun Graduate Scholar in Modern Languages at the University of Oxford, and as a B.A. student in History at Stanford University. As an undergraduate, she started the Voltaire Library Project, a digitally and data-driven study of the 6,763-book collection of French Enlightenment philosopher Voltaire (you can read more about the project here and here). She has been interested in the application of digital technology to humanistic teaching since her days in Princeton Day School, where she developed an interdisciplinary curriculum on Mexico City (visit the course website here).

Her research on Voltaire led her to think more broadly about the place of digital methods in the humanities classroom, and how new technologies will revolutionise the liberal arts and higher education. As a DPhil candidate, Lena will examine the negotiation and implementation of new learning technologies within the University of Oxford at undergraduate and graduate levels.

Lena is involved in a number of digital humanities initiatives in Oxford. She previously served as the inaugural fellow of the Voltaire Lab at Oxford’s Voltaire Foundation. As a master’s student, Lena co-formulated the convergence agenda for Oxford digital humanities with Professor Howard Hotson, and is currently employed by the Humanities Division to assist with the development of an M.St. degree in Digital Scholarship (read more here). Lena set up and helps to run the History of the Book blog for the Faculty of Medieval and Modern Languages and the Oxford Book History Twitter account.

Lena welcomes inquiries from undergraduate and postgraduate students from Oxford and beyond seeking to get involved with the digital humanities in any capacity. The History of the Book blog also welcomes inquiries from prospective contributors.

 

Abbey is a Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education, in collaboration with the Department of Engineering.

Before joining the DPhil program, Abbey obtained a B.A. in Applied Linguistics with minors in Russian and Chinese from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford. She was the recipient of a Benjamin A. Gilman International Scholarship through U.S. Department of State for study in Russia and was awarded two Foreign Language and Area Studies (FLAS) Fellowships for study in both Russia and China. She holds both TESOL and TEFL certificates and has taught English as a Second Language in various contexts to a wide variety of learner populations.

Abbey’s main research interests lie in the use of technology to facilitate language learning. Her DPhil research focuses on the development of a virtual reality program to bridge the gaps that students face when learning languages through distance learning.

Julie Chia-Yi Lin is a Doctoral student at the University of Oxford, funded by the Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholarship. Her research focus on Internationalization, Policy, Management and Institutional Strategy is rooted in her professional experience in publishing and higher education, as well as from her observations regarding the continuous change in global educational dynamics.

Julie completed her B.A. at National Taiwan University, and earned a joint M.A. from the University of Vienna and the University of Wroclaw. She was previously employed as an officer for the Office of International Affairs at National Taiwan University, and then as a Publisher at Emerald Publishing.

She focuses on the development of higher education, particularly in the processes of internationalization and globalization, and tries to deliver perspectives from different Institutional sectors, and a wide array of participants. She is mindful of the influence that culture has on the development and reception of these processes, and has a special interest in the East Asia region, and Confucian-influenced higher education systems. In her doctoral research, she investigates higher ed institutional strategy, and the relationship it has with real-world policy. This includes delving into the specific interpretation and implementation of official policy by different stakeholders within the institution- faculty, administration, and management.

Publications

Lin, J. (2015). The Impact of Globalization on Taiwan’s Education Policy: The International Student. In A. Lipinsky. (Ed), Vienna Taiwan Studies Series: Immigration societies, Taiwan and Beyond. (pp. 129-151). Vienna: LIT VERLAG GmbH & Co. KG

Yibo Wang has an MA in International Marketing from the Coventry University (UK) and a Master’s in Management: Leadership and Organizational Change from the University of Birmingham (UK).

His doctoral research focuses on ‘knowledge hiding’, ‘leadership style’ and ‘Confucian culture’ in Chinese education and training institutions.

As empirical studies on ‘knowledge hiding’ in the Chinese context are scarce, Yibo hopes to uncover underlying mechanism of knowledge hiding and find its potential influence factors.

Prior to coming to Oxford, he worked as a CEO in an educational consultancy based in Beijing that advised the investment and marketing analyses on education and training industry.

Riziki’s current DPhil research focuses on emergent literacy of refugee children within multilingual settings.

Prior to commencing her DPhil research, Riziki completed an MSc in Child Development at the University of Oxford, looking at the role of teacher behavioural and cognitive judgments on the learning trajectories of Black primary school students in England.

Her research interests are education access and wellbeing of children in resettlement and asylum contexts. In line with this, her research in the past has focused on integration and resettlement processes of refugees and immigrants within Canada.

Publications

Bhattacharyya, P., Ogoe, S., Riziki, A., & Wilkinson, L. (2020). In search of a “home”: comparing the housing challenges experienced by recently arrived Yazidi and Syrian Refugees in Canada. Manuscript submitted for publication.

Bhattacharyya, P., Riziki, A., Songose, L., Ogoe, S., & Wilkinson, L. (2020). Understanding the link between pre-arrival education and trauma and language learning: A case study of Yazidi women in Canada. Canadian Diversity, 17(2).

Bhattacharyya, P., Riziki, A., & Wilkinson, L. (2018). “Settlement Service Use among Syrian Refugees in Canada” Canadian Diversity 15(1).

Wilkinson, L., Bhattacharya, P., Garcea, J., Abdul-Karim, A., Riziki, A., & Schnieders, M. (2017). Finding home: Some housing considerations for refugee families with children. Canadian Diversity, 14 (3), 31-35

Wilkinson, L., Bhattacharyya, P., Riziki, A., & Abdul-Karim, A. (2018).Yazidi Refugee Resettlement in Canada. Calgary: Immigration Refugees and Citizenship Canada-Integration Branch (Prairies and Territories Region).

Wilkinson, L., Garcea, J., Bhattacharyya, P., Riziki, A., Abdul Karim, A. (2017). Resettling on the Canadian Prairies: Integration of Syrian refugees. Calgary: Immigration Refugees and Citizenship Canada, Integration Branch-Prairies., Northwest Territories Division., & Alberta Association of Immigrant Serving Agencies

Anushay completed her BSc Psychology from UCL, where she also started her master’s in Developmental Neuroscience and Psychopathology. She was based at Yale University for her master’s thesis, where she worked with Dr Craig Bailey at the Yale Center for Emotional Intelligence to understand children’s emotion development. Anushay’s research interests include understanding child development across different cultures, factors that might be affecting it, and devising culture-specific ways to support children’s holistic development through the educational system. She is also keen on improving the research scope in Pakistan by working with Pakistani researchers, practitioners, and families.

Anushay balances her research with her position as the founder of a non-profit, Resources for Children, which aims to understand and support children’s development in Pakistan.

Publications

  1. Mazhar, A. (2022, April). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Spring Preview, New Haven, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2021, December). Does an extended family improve mentalising in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK & Pakistan. 2nd International Foundation University Conference of Psychology, Rawalpindi, Pakistan.
  3. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Theory of Mind in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK and Pakistan. Harvard Trends in Psychology Summit, Cambridge, United States.
  1. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Research Rounds, New Haven, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2020, October). Developing a non-profit to advance autism research in Pakistan. Anna Freud Centre Seminar Series, London, United Kingdom

 

Núria is a Professor of Mathematics Education at Autonomous University of Barcelona. Her research is about language and mathematics in secondary school classrooms and professional development contexts with mathematics teachers.

Her first degree was in Mathematics at University of Barcelona (1995). Soon after her initiation as a secondary school mathematics teacher in highly multilingual classrooms of Barcelona, she started her PhD at the UAB Division of Mathematics Education. She wanted to understand the critical factors behind the under-performance in school mathematics of many learners from poor urban backgrounds and recent histories of migration. Since then, she has been committed to classroom and teacher education research grounded on community work with schools and mathematics teachers in urban areas of poverty. Her years as a school teacher have provided her with greater insights into her work as a researcher and have strongly influenced the adoption of sociocultural and sociopolitical approaches to mathematics teaching and learning.

Núria was given the ICREA Academia Award of the Catalan Institution for Research and Advanced Studies in 2013, in recognition of her contributions to research on multilingual mathematics teaching and learning. She was elected to the Executive Committee of the International Commission on Mathematical Instruction as Member-at-Large in 2021, and to the International Committee of the International Group for the Psychology of Mathematics Education from 2010 to 2014. She served as Extraordinarious Professor of Mathematics Education at the University of South Africa from 2013 to 2020. She was Visiting Scholar at London South Bank University, University of Arizona, and University of North Carolina at Chapel-Hill.

Núria is currently on the editorial board of the international journal Mathematics Education Research Journal and Journal of Mathematics Teacher Education. Till 2021 she was the editor-in-chief of the Advances of Research in Mathematics Education, the official journal of the Spanish Society of Research in Mathematics Education. She is the leading co-editor of a 2018 special issue on language research in mathematics education published in ZDM-Mathematics Education, and the leading co-editor of a special issue on decentring mathematics teaching education, to be published in the Journal of Mathematics Teacher Education, February 2024.

She chaired the 7th Topic Conference of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education on Language and Mathematics (Dresden, 2018), and the ERME Topic Working Group on Language and Mathematics from 2015 to 2020. The collaborations established in the ERME context enabled for a broad range of experts to come together and move forward the research field in the form of an co-edited Routledge volume entitled ‘Classroom research on mathematics and language: Seeing learners and teachers differently’ in 2021, with Núria as the leading co-editor. She has also been co-editor of the Springer volume resulting from the 21st ICMI Study on Language Diversity and Mathematics Education in 2016, and of the Brill volume entitled ‘Mathematical discourse that breaks barriers and creates space for marginalized learners’ in 2018.

Núria’s motivation for coming to the Oxford Department of Education is her research collaboration in projects co-coordinated with Jenni Ingram on establishing an international network for research on supporting school mathematics teaching with linguistically disadvantaged learners. From her years as a secondary school in the 1990s, important challenges posed to mathematics education practice remain. Learners of mathematics who are linguistically disadvantaged for a variety of reasons, including impoverished socioeconomic status, continue to be educationally disadvantaged at a considerable risk of school failure and early dropout. More research will hopefully shed light on how to identify and develop improved practices to enable greater access to school mathematics for all learners.

Publications

SELECTION OF 10 LAST-DECADE PUBLICATIONS
[For more publications and research details, see https://orcid.org/0000-0001-5199-6336]
– Planas, N., & Chronaki, A. (2021). Multilingual mathematics learning from a dialogic-translanguaging perspective. In N. Planas, C. Morgan, & M. Schütte (Eds.), Classroom research on mathematics and language: Seeing learners and teachers differently (pp. 151-166). Routledge.
– Planas, N. (2021). How specific can language as resource become for the teaching of algebraic concepts? ZDM-Mathematics Education, 53(2), 277-288.
– Planas, N. (2021). Challenges and opportunities from translingual research on multilingual mathematics classrooms. In A. A. Essien, & A. Msimanga (Eds.), Multilingual education yearbook 2021. Policy and practice in STEM multilingual contexts (pp. 1-18). Springer.
– Planas, N., & Ngoepe, M. (2019). Right to learn mathematics: From language as right to language as resource. In C. Xenofontos (Ed.), Equity in mathematics education. Addressing a changing world (pp. 93-110). Information Age Publishing.
– Planas, N., & Schütte, M. (2018). Research frameworks for the study of language in mathematics education, ZDM-Mathematics Education, 50(6), 965-974.
– Planas, N. (2018). Language as resource: A key notion for understanding the complexity of mathematics learning. Educational Studies in Mathematics, 98(3), 215-229.
– Planas, N., Morgan, C., & Schütte, M. (2018). Mathematics education and language. Lessons and directions from two decades of research. In T. Dreyfus, M. Artigue, S. Prediger, D. Potari, & Ruthven (Eds.), Developing research in mathematics education. Twenty years of communication, cooperation and collaboration in Europe (pp. 196-210). Routledge.
– Planas, N. (2014). One speaker, two languages: Learning opportunities in the mathematics classroom. Educational Studies in Mathematics, 87(1), 51-66.
– Planas, N., & Setati Phakeng, M. (2014). On the process of gaining language as a resource in mathematics education. ZDM-Mathematics Education, 46(6), 883-893.
– Planas, N., & Civil, M. (2013). Language-as-resource and language-as-political. Tensions in the bilingual mathematics classroom. Mathematics Education Research Journal, 25(3), 361-378.

 

https://portalrecerca.uab.cat/en/persons/nuria-planas-raig-3

https://orcid.org/0000-0001-5199-6336

 

Cindy works at the intersection of learning, design, and technology, with a keen interest in the orchestration of future-ready tech-enabled learning.

She is curious how the deployment of adaptive learning systems to schools will impact classroom learning and hopes to learn more about the human-machine partnership in education. Specifically, her research is concerned with the implications that the use of such systems has on teacher-student interactions, as teachers grapple with balancing personalised learning and learning in community, as well as curriculum demands and student interests. These are some tensions which could potentially be exacerbated by affordances of adaptive learning systems.

Prior to embarking on the DPhil in Education at Oxford, Cindy worked as the Lead Specialist in Technologies for Learning at the Educational Technology Division of Ministry of Education, Singapore. She had previously completed graduate studies at the National University of Singapore and Stanford University where she was awarded Master of Arts in English Studies and Master of Arts in Education.

Reem is DPhil student from Saudi Arabia.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she worked as a Teacher, Professional Developer, then, became a Supervisor and Researcher in the Ministry of Education where she received a scholarship to pursue her DPhil education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests lie in the area of Teacher Education and Professional Learning Policy and Practice.

Publications
  • Alqahtani, Reem (2020). Saudi Universities Role in Developing Teacher Professional Development Programs: Elite Universities Experience. Journal of Educational Sciences. King Saud University.
  • Alqahtani, Reem. (2020). The effect of implementing UDL-based activities in improving EFL learners’ academic achievement and attitudes towards L2. In L. Salas, & E. Ager, Creating Quiet reflective Spaces: Language Teacher Researches Professional Development (pp. 61-62). IATEFL publications.

Lena Zlock is researching the integration of digital technology into structures of teaching, learning, and education in higher education. Her particular focus is on the digital humanities and the potential for digital methods to transform humanistic study. She works with Professor Niall Winters and Dr. James Robson.

Lena’s research interests stem from her education as an M.St. student and Ertegun Graduate Scholar in Modern Languages at the University of Oxford, and as a B.A. student in History at Stanford University. As an undergraduate, she started the Voltaire Library Project, a digitally and data-driven study of the 6,763-book collection of French Enlightenment philosopher Voltaire (you can read more about the project here and here). She has been interested in the application of digital technology to humanistic teaching since her days in Princeton Day School, where she developed an interdisciplinary curriculum on Mexico City (visit the course website here).

Her research on Voltaire led her to think more broadly about the place of digital methods in the humanities classroom, and how new technologies will revolutionise the liberal arts and higher education. As a DPhil candidate, Lena will examine the negotiation and implementation of new learning technologies within the University of Oxford at undergraduate and graduate levels.

Lena is involved in a number of digital humanities initiatives in Oxford. She previously served as the inaugural fellow of the Voltaire Lab at Oxford’s Voltaire Foundation. As a master’s student, Lena co-formulated the convergence agenda for Oxford digital humanities with Professor Howard Hotson, and is currently employed by the Humanities Division to assist with the development of an M.St. degree in Digital Scholarship (read more here). Lena set up and helps to run the History of the Book blog for the Faculty of Medieval and Modern Languages and the Oxford Book History Twitter account.

Lena welcomes inquiries from undergraduate and postgraduate students from Oxford and beyond seeking to get involved with the digital humanities in any capacity. The History of the Book blog also welcomes inquiries from prospective contributors.

 

Abbey is a Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education, in collaboration with the Department of Engineering.

Before joining the DPhil program, Abbey obtained a B.A. in Applied Linguistics with minors in Russian and Chinese from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford. She was the recipient of a Benjamin A. Gilman International Scholarship through U.S. Department of State for study in Russia and was awarded two Foreign Language and Area Studies (FLAS) Fellowships for study in both Russia and China. She holds both TESOL and TEFL certificates and has taught English as a Second Language in various contexts to a wide variety of learner populations.

Abbey’s main research interests lie in the use of technology to facilitate language learning. Her DPhil research focuses on the development of a virtual reality program to bridge the gaps that students face when learning languages through distance learning.

Julie Chia-Yi Lin is a Doctoral student at the University of Oxford, funded by the Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholarship. Her research focus on Internationalization, Policy, Management and Institutional Strategy is rooted in her professional experience in publishing and higher education, as well as from her observations regarding the continuous change in global educational dynamics.

Julie completed her B.A. at National Taiwan University, and earned a joint M.A. from the University of Vienna and the University of Wroclaw. She was previously employed as an officer for the Office of International Affairs at National Taiwan University, and then as a Publisher at Emerald Publishing.

She focuses on the development of higher education, particularly in the processes of internationalization and globalization, and tries to deliver perspectives from different Institutional sectors, and a wide array of participants. She is mindful of the influence that culture has on the development and reception of these processes, and has a special interest in the East Asia region, and Confucian-influenced higher education systems. In her doctoral research, she investigates higher ed institutional strategy, and the relationship it has with real-world policy. This includes delving into the specific interpretation and implementation of official policy by different stakeholders within the institution- faculty, administration, and management.

Publications

Lin, J. (2015). The Impact of Globalization on Taiwan’s Education Policy: The International Student. In A. Lipinsky. (Ed), Vienna Taiwan Studies Series: Immigration societies, Taiwan and Beyond. (pp. 129-151). Vienna: LIT VERLAG GmbH & Co. KG

Yibo Wang has an MA in International Marketing from the Coventry University (UK) and a Master’s in Management: Leadership and Organizational Change from the University of Birmingham (UK).

His doctoral research focuses on ‘knowledge hiding’, ‘leadership style’ and ‘Confucian culture’ in Chinese education and training institutions.

As empirical studies on ‘knowledge hiding’ in the Chinese context are scarce, Yibo hopes to uncover underlying mechanism of knowledge hiding and find its potential influence factors.

Prior to coming to Oxford, he worked as a CEO in an educational consultancy based in Beijing that advised the investment and marketing analyses on education and training industry.

Riziki’s current DPhil research focuses on emergent literacy of refugee children within multilingual settings.

Prior to commencing her DPhil research, Riziki completed an MSc in Child Development at the University of Oxford, looking at the role of teacher behavioural and cognitive judgments on the learning trajectories of Black primary school students in England.

Her research interests are education access and wellbeing of children in resettlement and asylum contexts. In line with this, her research in the past has focused on integration and resettlement processes of refugees and immigrants within Canada.

Publications

Bhattacharyya, P., Ogoe, S., Riziki, A., & Wilkinson, L. (2020). In search of a “home”: comparing the housing challenges experienced by recently arrived Yazidi and Syrian Refugees in Canada. Manuscript submitted for publication.

Bhattacharyya, P., Riziki, A., Songose, L., Ogoe, S., & Wilkinson, L. (2020). Understanding the link between pre-arrival education and trauma and language learning: A case study of Yazidi women in Canada. Canadian Diversity, 17(2).

Bhattacharyya, P., Riziki, A., & Wilkinson, L. (2018). “Settlement Service Use among Syrian Refugees in Canada” Canadian Diversity 15(1).

Wilkinson, L., Bhattacharya, P., Garcea, J., Abdul-Karim, A., Riziki, A., & Schnieders, M. (2017). Finding home: Some housing considerations for refugee families with children. Canadian Diversity, 14 (3), 31-35

Wilkinson, L., Bhattacharyya, P., Riziki, A., & Abdul-Karim, A. (2018).Yazidi Refugee Resettlement in Canada. Calgary: Immigration Refugees and Citizenship Canada-Integration Branch (Prairies and Territories Region).

Wilkinson, L., Garcea, J., Bhattacharyya, P., Riziki, A., Abdul Karim, A. (2017). Resettling on the Canadian Prairies: Integration of Syrian refugees. Calgary: Immigration Refugees and Citizenship Canada, Integration Branch-Prairies., Northwest Territories Division., & Alberta Association of Immigrant Serving Agencies

Anushay completed her BSc Psychology from UCL, where she also started her master’s in Developmental Neuroscience and Psychopathology. She was based at Yale University for her master’s thesis, where she worked with Dr Craig Bailey at the Yale Center for Emotional Intelligence to understand children’s emotion development. Anushay’s research interests include understanding child development across different cultures, factors that might be affecting it, and devising culture-specific ways to support children’s holistic development through the educational system. She is also keen on improving the research scope in Pakistan by working with Pakistani researchers, practitioners, and families.

Anushay balances her research with her position as the founder of a non-profit, Resources for Children, which aims to understand and support children’s development in Pakistan.

Publications

  1. Mazhar, A. (2022, April). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Spring Preview, New Haven, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2021, December). Does an extended family improve mentalising in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK & Pakistan. 2nd International Foundation University Conference of Psychology, Rawalpindi, Pakistan.
  3. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Theory of Mind in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK and Pakistan. Harvard Trends in Psychology Summit, Cambridge, United States.
  1. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Research Rounds, New Haven, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2020, October). Developing a non-profit to advance autism research in Pakistan. Anna Freud Centre Seminar Series, London, United Kingdom

 

Núria is a Professor of Mathematics Education at Autonomous University of Barcelona. Her research is about language and mathematics in secondary school classrooms and professional development contexts with mathematics teachers.

Her first degree was in Mathematics at University of Barcelona (1995). Soon after her initiation as a secondary school mathematics teacher in highly multilingual classrooms of Barcelona, she started her PhD at the UAB Division of Mathematics Education. She wanted to understand the critical factors behind the under-performance in school mathematics of many learners from poor urban backgrounds and recent histories of migration. Since then, she has been committed to classroom and teacher education research grounded on community work with schools and mathematics teachers in urban areas of poverty. Her years as a school teacher have provided her with greater insights into her work as a researcher and have strongly influenced the adoption of sociocultural and sociopolitical approaches to mathematics teaching and learning.

Núria was given the ICREA Academia Award of the Catalan Institution for Research and Advanced Studies in 2013, in recognition of her contributions to research on multilingual mathematics teaching and learning. She was elected to the Executive Committee of the International Commission on Mathematical Instruction as Member-at-Large in 2021, and to the International Committee of the International Group for the Psychology of Mathematics Education from 2010 to 2014. She served as Extraordinarious Professor of Mathematics Education at the University of South Africa from 2013 to 2020. She was Visiting Scholar at London South Bank University, University of Arizona, and University of North Carolina at Chapel-Hill.

Núria is currently on the editorial board of the international journal Mathematics Education Research Journal and Journal of Mathematics Teacher Education. Till 2021 she was the editor-in-chief of the Advances of Research in Mathematics Education, the official journal of the Spanish Society of Research in Mathematics Education. She is the leading co-editor of a 2018 special issue on language research in mathematics education published in ZDM-Mathematics Education, and the leading co-editor of a special issue on decentring mathematics teaching education, to be published in the Journal of Mathematics Teacher Education, February 2024.

She chaired the 7th Topic Conference of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education on Language and Mathematics (Dresden, 2018), and the ERME Topic Working Group on Language and Mathematics from 2015 to 2020. The collaborations established in the ERME context enabled for a broad range of experts to come together and move forward the research field in the form of an co-edited Routledge volume entitled ‘Classroom research on mathematics and language: Seeing learners and teachers differently’ in 2021, with Núria as the leading co-editor. She has also been co-editor of the Springer volume resulting from the 21st ICMI Study on Language Diversity and Mathematics Education in 2016, and of the Brill volume entitled ‘Mathematical discourse that breaks barriers and creates space for marginalized learners’ in 2018.

Núria’s motivation for coming to the Oxford Department of Education is her research collaboration in projects co-coordinated with Jenni Ingram on establishing an international network for research on supporting school mathematics teaching with linguistically disadvantaged learners. From her years as a secondary school in the 1990s, important challenges posed to mathematics education practice remain. Learners of mathematics who are linguistically disadvantaged for a variety of reasons, including impoverished socioeconomic status, continue to be educationally disadvantaged at a considerable risk of school failure and early dropout. More research will hopefully shed light on how to identify and develop improved practices to enable greater access to school mathematics for all learners.

Publications

SELECTION OF 10 LAST-DECADE PUBLICATIONS
[For more publications and research details, see https://orcid.org/0000-0001-5199-6336]
– Planas, N., & Chronaki, A. (2021). Multilingual mathematics learning from a dialogic-translanguaging perspective. In N. Planas, C. Morgan, & M. Schütte (Eds.), Classroom research on mathematics and language: Seeing learners and teachers differently (pp. 151-166). Routledge.
– Planas, N. (2021). How specific can language as resource become for the teaching of algebraic concepts? ZDM-Mathematics Education, 53(2), 277-288.
– Planas, N. (2021). Challenges and opportunities from translingual research on multilingual mathematics classrooms. In A. A. Essien, & A. Msimanga (Eds.), Multilingual education yearbook 2021. Policy and practice in STEM multilingual contexts (pp. 1-18). Springer.
– Planas, N., & Ngoepe, M. (2019). Right to learn mathematics: From language as right to language as resource. In C. Xenofontos (Ed.), Equity in mathematics education. Addressing a changing world (pp. 93-110). Information Age Publishing.
– Planas, N., & Schütte, M. (2018). Research frameworks for the study of language in mathematics education, ZDM-Mathematics Education, 50(6), 965-974.
– Planas, N. (2018). Language as resource: A key notion for understanding the complexity of mathematics learning. Educational Studies in Mathematics, 98(3), 215-229.
– Planas, N., Morgan, C., & Schütte, M. (2018). Mathematics education and language. Lessons and directions from two decades of research. In T. Dreyfus, M. Artigue, S. Prediger, D. Potari, & Ruthven (Eds.), Developing research in mathematics education. Twenty years of communication, cooperation and collaboration in Europe (pp. 196-210). Routledge.
– Planas, N. (2014). One speaker, two languages: Learning opportunities in the mathematics classroom. Educational Studies in Mathematics, 87(1), 51-66.
– Planas, N., & Setati Phakeng, M. (2014). On the process of gaining language as a resource in mathematics education. ZDM-Mathematics Education, 46(6), 883-893.
– Planas, N., & Civil, M. (2013). Language-as-resource and language-as-political. Tensions in the bilingual mathematics classroom. Mathematics Education Research Journal, 25(3), 361-378.

 

https://portalrecerca.uab.cat/en/persons/nuria-planas-raig-3

https://orcid.org/0000-0001-5199-6336

 

Cindy works at the intersection of learning, design, and technology, with a keen interest in the orchestration of future-ready tech-enabled learning.

She is curious how the deployment of adaptive learning systems to schools will impact classroom learning and hopes to learn more about the human-machine partnership in education. Specifically, her research is concerned with the implications that the use of such systems has on teacher-student interactions, as teachers grapple with balancing personalised learning and learning in community, as well as curriculum demands and student interests. These are some tensions which could potentially be exacerbated by affordances of adaptive learning systems.

Prior to embarking on the DPhil in Education at Oxford, Cindy worked as the Lead Specialist in Technologies for Learning at the Educational Technology Division of Ministry of Education, Singapore. She had previously completed graduate studies at the National University of Singapore and Stanford University where she was awarded Master of Arts in English Studies and Master of Arts in Education.

Reem is DPhil student from Saudi Arabia.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she worked as a Teacher, Professional Developer, then, became a Supervisor and Researcher in the Ministry of Education where she received a scholarship to pursue her DPhil education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests lie in the area of Teacher Education and Professional Learning Policy and Practice.

Publications
  • Alqahtani, Reem (2020). Saudi Universities Role in Developing Teacher Professional Development Programs: Elite Universities Experience. Journal of Educational Sciences. King Saud University.
  • Alqahtani, Reem. (2020). The effect of implementing UDL-based activities in improving EFL learners’ academic achievement and attitudes towards L2. In L. Salas, & E. Ager, Creating Quiet reflective Spaces: Language Teacher Researches Professional Development (pp. 61-62). IATEFL publications.

Lena Zlock is researching the integration of digital technology into structures of teaching, learning, and education in higher education. Her particular focus is on the digital humanities and the potential for digital methods to transform humanistic study. She works with Professor Niall Winters and Dr. James Robson.

Lena’s research interests stem from her education as an M.St. student and Ertegun Graduate Scholar in Modern Languages at the University of Oxford, and as a B.A. student in History at Stanford University. As an undergraduate, she started the Voltaire Library Project, a digitally and data-driven study of the 6,763-book collection of French Enlightenment philosopher Voltaire (you can read more about the project here and here). She has been interested in the application of digital technology to humanistic teaching since her days in Princeton Day School, where she developed an interdisciplinary curriculum on Mexico City (visit the course website here).

Her research on Voltaire led her to think more broadly about the place of digital methods in the humanities classroom, and how new technologies will revolutionise the liberal arts and higher education. As a DPhil candidate, Lena will examine the negotiation and implementation of new learning technologies within the University of Oxford at undergraduate and graduate levels.

Lena is involved in a number of digital humanities initiatives in Oxford. She previously served as the inaugural fellow of the Voltaire Lab at Oxford’s Voltaire Foundation. As a master’s student, Lena co-formulated the convergence agenda for Oxford digital humanities with Professor Howard Hotson, and is currently employed by the Humanities Division to assist with the development of an M.St. degree in Digital Scholarship (read more here). Lena set up and helps to run the History of the Book blog for the Faculty of Medieval and Modern Languages and the Oxford Book History Twitter account.

Lena welcomes inquiries from undergraduate and postgraduate students from Oxford and beyond seeking to get involved with the digital humanities in any capacity. The History of the Book blog also welcomes inquiries from prospective contributors.

 

Abbey is a Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education, in collaboration with the Department of Engineering.

Before joining the DPhil program, Abbey obtained a B.A. in Applied Linguistics with minors in Russian and Chinese from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford. She was the recipient of a Benjamin A. Gilman International Scholarship through U.S. Department of State for study in Russia and was awarded two Foreign Language and Area Studies (FLAS) Fellowships for study in both Russia and China. She holds both TESOL and TEFL certificates and has taught English as a Second Language in various contexts to a wide variety of learner populations.

Abbey’s main research interests lie in the use of technology to facilitate language learning. Her DPhil research focuses on the development of a virtual reality program to bridge the gaps that students face when learning languages through distance learning.

Julie Chia-Yi Lin is a Doctoral student at the University of Oxford, funded by the Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholarship. Her research focus on Internationalization, Policy, Management and Institutional Strategy is rooted in her professional experience in publishing and higher education, as well as from her observations regarding the continuous change in global educational dynamics.

Julie completed her B.A. at National Taiwan University, and earned a joint M.A. from the University of Vienna and the University of Wroclaw. She was previously employed as an officer for the Office of International Affairs at National Taiwan University, and then as a Publisher at Emerald Publishing.

She focuses on the development of higher education, particularly in the processes of internationalization and globalization, and tries to deliver perspectives from different Institutional sectors, and a wide array of participants. She is mindful of the influence that culture has on the development and reception of these processes, and has a special interest in the East Asia region, and Confucian-influenced higher education systems. In her doctoral research, she investigates higher ed institutional strategy, and the relationship it has with real-world policy. This includes delving into the specific interpretation and implementation of official policy by different stakeholders within the institution- faculty, administration, and management.

Publications

Lin, J. (2015). The Impact of Globalization on Taiwan’s Education Policy: The International Student. In A. Lipinsky. (Ed), Vienna Taiwan Studies Series: Immigration societies, Taiwan and Beyond. (pp. 129-151). Vienna: LIT VERLAG GmbH & Co. KG

Yibo Wang has an MA in International Marketing from the Coventry University (UK) and a Master’s in Management: Leadership and Organizational Change from the University of Birmingham (UK).

His doctoral research focuses on ‘knowledge hiding’, ‘leadership style’ and ‘Confucian culture’ in Chinese education and training institutions.

As empirical studies on ‘knowledge hiding’ in the Chinese context are scarce, Yibo hopes to uncover underlying mechanism of knowledge hiding and find its potential influence factors.

Prior to coming to Oxford, he worked as a CEO in an educational consultancy based in Beijing that advised the investment and marketing analyses on education and training industry.

Riziki’s current DPhil research focuses on emergent literacy of refugee children within multilingual settings.

Prior to commencing her DPhil research, Riziki completed an MSc in Child Development at the University of Oxford, looking at the role of teacher behavioural and cognitive judgments on the learning trajectories of Black primary school students in England.

Her research interests are education access and wellbeing of children in resettlement and asylum contexts. In line with this, her research in the past has focused on integration and resettlement processes of refugees and immigrants within Canada.

Publications

Bhattacharyya, P., Ogoe, S., Riziki, A., & Wilkinson, L. (2020). In search of a “home”: comparing the housing challenges experienced by recently arrived Yazidi and Syrian Refugees in Canada. Manuscript submitted for publication.

Bhattacharyya, P., Riziki, A., Songose, L., Ogoe, S., & Wilkinson, L. (2020). Understanding the link between pre-arrival education and trauma and language learning: A case study of Yazidi women in Canada. Canadian Diversity, 17(2).

Bhattacharyya, P., Riziki, A., & Wilkinson, L. (2018). “Settlement Service Use among Syrian Refugees in Canada” Canadian Diversity 15(1).

Wilkinson, L., Bhattacharya, P., Garcea, J., Abdul-Karim, A., Riziki, A., & Schnieders, M. (2017). Finding home: Some housing considerations for refugee families with children. Canadian Diversity, 14 (3), 31-35

Wilkinson, L., Bhattacharyya, P., Riziki, A., & Abdul-Karim, A. (2018).Yazidi Refugee Resettlement in Canada. Calgary: Immigration Refugees and Citizenship Canada-Integration Branch (Prairies and Territories Region).

Wilkinson, L., Garcea, J., Bhattacharyya, P., Riziki, A., Abdul Karim, A. (2017). Resettling on the Canadian Prairies: Integration of Syrian refugees. Calgary: Immigration Refugees and Citizenship Canada, Integration Branch-Prairies., Northwest Territories Division., & Alberta Association of Immigrant Serving Agencies

Anushay completed her BSc Psychology from UCL, where she also started her master’s in Developmental Neuroscience and Psychopathology. She was based at Yale University for her master’s thesis, where she worked with Dr Craig Bailey at the Yale Center for Emotional Intelligence to understand children’s emotion development. Anushay’s research interests include understanding child development across different cultures, factors that might be affecting it, and devising culture-specific ways to support children’s holistic development through the educational system. She is also keen on improving the research scope in Pakistan by working with Pakistani researchers, practitioners, and families.

Anushay balances her research with her position as the founder of a non-profit, Resources for Children, which aims to understand and support children’s development in Pakistan.

Publications

  1. Mazhar, A. (2022, April). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Spring Preview, New Haven, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2021, December). Does an extended family improve mentalising in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK & Pakistan. 2nd International Foundation University Conference of Psychology, Rawalpindi, Pakistan.
  3. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Theory of Mind in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK and Pakistan. Harvard Trends in Psychology Summit, Cambridge, United States.
  1. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Research Rounds, New Haven, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2020, October). Developing a non-profit to advance autism research in Pakistan. Anna Freud Centre Seminar Series, London, United Kingdom

 

Núria is a Professor of Mathematics Education at Autonomous University of Barcelona. Her research is about language and mathematics in secondary school classrooms and professional development contexts with mathematics teachers.

Her first degree was in Mathematics at University of Barcelona (1995). Soon after her initiation as a secondary school mathematics teacher in highly multilingual classrooms of Barcelona, she started her PhD at the UAB Division of Mathematics Education. She wanted to understand the critical factors behind the under-performance in school mathematics of many learners from poor urban backgrounds and recent histories of migration. Since then, she has been committed to classroom and teacher education research grounded on community work with schools and mathematics teachers in urban areas of poverty. Her years as a school teacher have provided her with greater insights into her work as a researcher and have strongly influenced the adoption of sociocultural and sociopolitical approaches to mathematics teaching and learning.

Núria was given the ICREA Academia Award of the Catalan Institution for Research and Advanced Studies in 2013, in recognition of her contributions to research on multilingual mathematics teaching and learning. She was elected to the Executive Committee of the International Commission on Mathematical Instruction as Member-at-Large in 2021, and to the International Committee of the International Group for the Psychology of Mathematics Education from 2010 to 2014. She served as Extraordinarious Professor of Mathematics Education at the University of South Africa from 2013 to 2020. She was Visiting Scholar at London South Bank University, University of Arizona, and University of North Carolina at Chapel-Hill.

Núria is currently on the editorial board of the international journal Mathematics Education Research Journal and Journal of Mathematics Teacher Education. Till 2021 she was the editor-in-chief of the Advances of Research in Mathematics Education, the official journal of the Spanish Society of Research in Mathematics Education. She is the leading co-editor of a 2018 special issue on language research in mathematics education published in ZDM-Mathematics Education, and the leading co-editor of a special issue on decentring mathematics teaching education, to be published in the Journal of Mathematics Teacher Education, February 2024.

She chaired the 7th Topic Conference of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education on Language and Mathematics (Dresden, 2018), and the ERME Topic Working Group on Language and Mathematics from 2015 to 2020. The collaborations established in the ERME context enabled for a broad range of experts to come together and move forward the research field in the form of an co-edited Routledge volume entitled ‘Classroom research on mathematics and language: Seeing learners and teachers differently’ in 2021, with Núria as the leading co-editor. She has also been co-editor of the Springer volume resulting from the 21st ICMI Study on Language Diversity and Mathematics Education in 2016, and of the Brill volume entitled ‘Mathematical discourse that breaks barriers and creates space for marginalized learners’ in 2018.

Núria’s motivation for coming to the Oxford Department of Education is her research collaboration in projects co-coordinated with Jenni Ingram on establishing an international network for research on supporting school mathematics teaching with linguistically disadvantaged learners. From her years as a secondary school in the 1990s, important challenges posed to mathematics education practice remain. Learners of mathematics who are linguistically disadvantaged for a variety of reasons, including impoverished socioeconomic status, continue to be educationally disadvantaged at a considerable risk of school failure and early dropout. More research will hopefully shed light on how to identify and develop improved practices to enable greater access to school mathematics for all learners.

Publications

SELECTION OF 10 LAST-DECADE PUBLICATIONS
[For more publications and research details, see https://orcid.org/0000-0001-5199-6336]
– Planas, N., & Chronaki, A. (2021). Multilingual mathematics learning from a dialogic-translanguaging perspective. In N. Planas, C. Morgan, & M. Schütte (Eds.), Classroom research on mathematics and language: Seeing learners and teachers differently (pp. 151-166). Routledge.
– Planas, N. (2021). How specific can language as resource become for the teaching of algebraic concepts? ZDM-Mathematics Education, 53(2), 277-288.
– Planas, N. (2021). Challenges and opportunities from translingual research on multilingual mathematics classrooms. In A. A. Essien, & A. Msimanga (Eds.), Multilingual education yearbook 2021. Policy and practice in STEM multilingual contexts (pp. 1-18). Springer.
– Planas, N., & Ngoepe, M. (2019). Right to learn mathematics: From language as right to language as resource. In C. Xenofontos (Ed.), Equity in mathematics education. Addressing a changing world (pp. 93-110). Information Age Publishing.
– Planas, N., & Schütte, M. (2018). Research frameworks for the study of language in mathematics education, ZDM-Mathematics Education, 50(6), 965-974.
– Planas, N. (2018). Language as resource: A key notion for understanding the complexity of mathematics learning. Educational Studies in Mathematics, 98(3), 215-229.
– Planas, N., Morgan, C., & Schütte, M. (2018). Mathematics education and language. Lessons and directions from two decades of research. In T. Dreyfus, M. Artigue, S. Prediger, D. Potari, & Ruthven (Eds.), Developing research in mathematics education. Twenty years of communication, cooperation and collaboration in Europe (pp. 196-210). Routledge.
– Planas, N. (2014). One speaker, two languages: Learning opportunities in the mathematics classroom. Educational Studies in Mathematics, 87(1), 51-66.
– Planas, N., & Setati Phakeng, M. (2014). On the process of gaining language as a resource in mathematics education. ZDM-Mathematics Education, 46(6), 883-893.
– Planas, N., & Civil, M. (2013). Language-as-resource and language-as-political. Tensions in the bilingual mathematics classroom. Mathematics Education Research Journal, 25(3), 361-378.

 

https://portalrecerca.uab.cat/en/persons/nuria-planas-raig-3

https://orcid.org/0000-0001-5199-6336

 

Cindy works at the intersection of learning, design, and technology, with a keen interest in the orchestration of future-ready tech-enabled learning.

She is curious how the deployment of adaptive learning systems to schools will impact classroom learning and hopes to learn more about the human-machine partnership in education. Specifically, her research is concerned with the implications that the use of such systems has on teacher-student interactions, as teachers grapple with balancing personalised learning and learning in community, as well as curriculum demands and student interests. These are some tensions which could potentially be exacerbated by affordances of adaptive learning systems.

Prior to embarking on the DPhil in Education at Oxford, Cindy worked as the Lead Specialist in Technologies for Learning at the Educational Technology Division of Ministry of Education, Singapore. She had previously completed graduate studies at the National University of Singapore and Stanford University where she was awarded Master of Arts in English Studies and Master of Arts in Education.

Reem is DPhil student from Saudi Arabia.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she worked as a Teacher, Professional Developer, then, became a Supervisor and Researcher in the Ministry of Education where she received a scholarship to pursue her DPhil education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests lie in the area of Teacher Education and Professional Learning Policy and Practice.

Publications
  • Alqahtani, Reem (2020). Saudi Universities Role in Developing Teacher Professional Development Programs: Elite Universities Experience. Journal of Educational Sciences. King Saud University.
  • Alqahtani, Reem. (2020). The effect of implementing UDL-based activities in improving EFL learners’ academic achievement and attitudes towards L2. In L. Salas, & E. Ager, Creating Quiet reflective Spaces: Language Teacher Researches Professional Development (pp. 61-62). IATEFL publications.

Lena Zlock is researching the integration of digital technology into structures of teaching, learning, and education in higher education. Her particular focus is on the digital humanities and the potential for digital methods to transform humanistic study. She works with Professor Niall Winters and Dr. James Robson.

Lena’s research interests stem from her education as an M.St. student and Ertegun Graduate Scholar in Modern Languages at the University of Oxford, and as a B.A. student in History at Stanford University. As an undergraduate, she started the Voltaire Library Project, a digitally and data-driven study of the 6,763-book collection of French Enlightenment philosopher Voltaire (you can read more about the project here and here). She has been interested in the application of digital technology to humanistic teaching since her days in Princeton Day School, where she developed an interdisciplinary curriculum on Mexico City (visit the course website here).

Her research on Voltaire led her to think more broadly about the place of digital methods in the humanities classroom, and how new technologies will revolutionise the liberal arts and higher education. As a DPhil candidate, Lena will examine the negotiation and implementation of new learning technologies within the University of Oxford at undergraduate and graduate levels.

Lena is involved in a number of digital humanities initiatives in Oxford. She previously served as the inaugural fellow of the Voltaire Lab at Oxford’s Voltaire Foundation. As a master’s student, Lena co-formulated the convergence agenda for Oxford digital humanities with Professor Howard Hotson, and is currently employed by the Humanities Division to assist with the development of an M.St. degree in Digital Scholarship (read more here). Lena set up and helps to run the History of the Book blog for the Faculty of Medieval and Modern Languages and the Oxford Book History Twitter account.

Lena welcomes inquiries from undergraduate and postgraduate students from Oxford and beyond seeking to get involved with the digital humanities in any capacity. The History of the Book blog also welcomes inquiries from prospective contributors.

 

Abbey is a Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education, in collaboration with the Department of Engineering.

Before joining the DPhil program, Abbey obtained a B.A. in Applied Linguistics with minors in Russian and Chinese from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford. She was the recipient of a Benjamin A. Gilman International Scholarship through U.S. Department of State for study in Russia and was awarded two Foreign Language and Area Studies (FLAS) Fellowships for study in both Russia and China. She holds both TESOL and TEFL certificates and has taught English as a Second Language in various contexts to a wide variety of learner populations.

Abbey’s main research interests lie in the use of technology to facilitate language learning. Her DPhil research focuses on the development of a virtual reality program to bridge the gaps that students face when learning languages through distance learning.

Julie Chia-Yi Lin is a Doctoral student at the University of Oxford, funded by the Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholarship. Her research focus on Internationalization, Policy, Management and Institutional Strategy is rooted in her professional experience in publishing and higher education, as well as from her observations regarding the continuous change in global educational dynamics.

Julie completed her B.A. at National Taiwan University, and earned a joint M.A. from the University of Vienna and the University of Wroclaw. She was previously employed as an officer for the Office of International Affairs at National Taiwan University, and then as a Publisher at Emerald Publishing.

She focuses on the development of higher education, particularly in the processes of internationalization and globalization, and tries to deliver perspectives from different Institutional sectors, and a wide array of participants. She is mindful of the influence that culture has on the development and reception of these processes, and has a special interest in the East Asia region, and Confucian-influenced higher education systems. In her doctoral research, she investigates higher ed institutional strategy, and the relationship it has with real-world policy. This includes delving into the specific interpretation and implementation of official policy by different stakeholders within the institution- faculty, administration, and management.

Publications

Lin, J. (2015). The Impact of Globalization on Taiwan’s Education Policy: The International Student. In A. Lipinsky. (Ed), Vienna Taiwan Studies Series: Immigration societies, Taiwan and Beyond. (pp. 129-151). Vienna: LIT VERLAG GmbH & Co. KG

Yibo Wang has an MA in International Marketing from the Coventry University (UK) and a Master’s in Management: Leadership and Organizational Change from the University of Birmingham (UK).

His doctoral research focuses on ‘knowledge hiding’, ‘leadership style’ and ‘Confucian culture’ in Chinese education and training institutions.

As empirical studies on ‘knowledge hiding’ in the Chinese context are scarce, Yibo hopes to uncover underlying mechanism of knowledge hiding and find its potential influence factors.

Prior to coming to Oxford, he worked as a CEO in an educational consultancy based in Beijing that advised the investment and marketing analyses on education and training industry.

Riziki’s current DPhil research focuses on emergent literacy of refugee children within multilingual settings.

Prior to commencing her DPhil research, Riziki completed an MSc in Child Development at the University of Oxford, looking at the role of teacher behavioural and cognitive judgments on the learning trajectories of Black primary school students in England.

Her research interests are education access and wellbeing of children in resettlement and asylum contexts. In line with this, her research in the past has focused on integration and resettlement processes of refugees and immigrants within Canada.

Publications

Bhattacharyya, P., Ogoe, S., Riziki, A., & Wilkinson, L. (2020). In search of a “home”: comparing the housing challenges experienced by recently arrived Yazidi and Syrian Refugees in Canada. Manuscript submitted for publication.

Bhattacharyya, P., Riziki, A., Songose, L., Ogoe, S., & Wilkinson, L. (2020). Understanding the link between pre-arrival education and trauma and language learning: A case study of Yazidi women in Canada. Canadian Diversity, 17(2).

Bhattacharyya, P., Riziki, A., & Wilkinson, L. (2018). “Settlement Service Use among Syrian Refugees in Canada” Canadian Diversity 15(1).

Wilkinson, L., Bhattacharya, P., Garcea, J., Abdul-Karim, A., Riziki, A., & Schnieders, M. (2017). Finding home: Some housing considerations for refugee families with children. Canadian Diversity, 14 (3), 31-35

Wilkinson, L., Bhattacharyya, P., Riziki, A., & Abdul-Karim, A. (2018).Yazidi Refugee Resettlement in Canada. Calgary: Immigration Refugees and Citizenship Canada-Integration Branch (Prairies and Territories Region).

Wilkinson, L., Garcea, J., Bhattacharyya, P., Riziki, A., Abdul Karim, A. (2017). Resettling on the Canadian Prairies: Integration of Syrian refugees. Calgary: Immigration Refugees and Citizenship Canada, Integration Branch-Prairies., Northwest Territories Division., & Alberta Association of Immigrant Serving Agencies

Anushay completed her BSc Psychology from UCL, where she also started her master’s in Developmental Neuroscience and Psychopathology. She was based at Yale University for her master’s thesis, where she worked with Dr Craig Bailey at the Yale Center for Emotional Intelligence to understand children’s emotion development. Anushay’s research interests include understanding child development across different cultures, factors that might be affecting it, and devising culture-specific ways to support children’s holistic development through the educational system. She is also keen on improving the research scope in Pakistan by working with Pakistani researchers, practitioners, and families.

Anushay balances her research with her position as the founder of a non-profit, Resources for Children, which aims to understand and support children’s development in Pakistan.

Publications

  1. Mazhar, A. (2022, April). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Spring Preview, New Haven, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2021, December). Does an extended family improve mentalising in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK & Pakistan. 2nd International Foundation University Conference of Psychology, Rawalpindi, Pakistan.
  3. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Theory of Mind in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK and Pakistan. Harvard Trends in Psychology Summit, Cambridge, United States.
  1. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Research Rounds, New Haven, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2020, October). Developing a non-profit to advance autism research in Pakistan. Anna Freud Centre Seminar Series, London, United Kingdom

 

Núria is a Professor of Mathematics Education at Autonomous University of Barcelona. Her research is about language and mathematics in secondary school classrooms and professional development contexts with mathematics teachers.

Her first degree was in Mathematics at University of Barcelona (1995). Soon after her initiation as a secondary school mathematics teacher in highly multilingual classrooms of Barcelona, she started her PhD at the UAB Division of Mathematics Education. She wanted to understand the critical factors behind the under-performance in school mathematics of many learners from poor urban backgrounds and recent histories of migration. Since then, she has been committed to classroom and teacher education research grounded on community work with schools and mathematics teachers in urban areas of poverty. Her years as a school teacher have provided her with greater insights into her work as a researcher and have strongly influenced the adoption of sociocultural and sociopolitical approaches to mathematics teaching and learning.

Núria was given the ICREA Academia Award of the Catalan Institution for Research and Advanced Studies in 2013, in recognition of her contributions to research on multilingual mathematics teaching and learning. She was elected to the Executive Committee of the International Commission on Mathematical Instruction as Member-at-Large in 2021, and to the International Committee of the International Group for the Psychology of Mathematics Education from 2010 to 2014. She served as Extraordinarious Professor of Mathematics Education at the University of South Africa from 2013 to 2020. She was Visiting Scholar at London South Bank University, University of Arizona, and University of North Carolina at Chapel-Hill.

Núria is currently on the editorial board of the international journal Mathematics Education Research Journal and Journal of Mathematics Teacher Education. Till 2021 she was the editor-in-chief of the Advances of Research in Mathematics Education, the official journal of the Spanish Society of Research in Mathematics Education. She is the leading co-editor of a 2018 special issue on language research in mathematics education published in ZDM-Mathematics Education, and the leading co-editor of a special issue on decentring mathematics teaching education, to be published in the Journal of Mathematics Teacher Education, February 2024.

She chaired the 7th Topic Conference of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education on Language and Mathematics (Dresden, 2018), and the ERME Topic Working Group on Language and Mathematics from 2015 to 2020. The collaborations established in the ERME context enabled for a broad range of experts to come together and move forward the research field in the form of an co-edited Routledge volume entitled ‘Classroom research on mathematics and language: Seeing learners and teachers differently’ in 2021, with Núria as the leading co-editor. She has also been co-editor of the Springer volume resulting from the 21st ICMI Study on Language Diversity and Mathematics Education in 2016, and of the Brill volume entitled ‘Mathematical discourse that breaks barriers and creates space for marginalized learners’ in 2018.

Núria’s motivation for coming to the Oxford Department of Education is her research collaboration in projects co-coordinated with Jenni Ingram on establishing an international network for research on supporting school mathematics teaching with linguistically disadvantaged learners. From her years as a secondary school in the 1990s, important challenges posed to mathematics education practice remain. Learners of mathematics who are linguistically disadvantaged for a variety of reasons, including impoverished socioeconomic status, continue to be educationally disadvantaged at a considerable risk of school failure and early dropout. More research will hopefully shed light on how to identify and develop improved practices to enable greater access to school mathematics for all learners.

Publications

SELECTION OF 10 LAST-DECADE PUBLICATIONS
[For more publications and research details, see https://orcid.org/0000-0001-5199-6336]
– Planas, N., & Chronaki, A. (2021). Multilingual mathematics learning from a dialogic-translanguaging perspective. In N. Planas, C. Morgan, & M. Schütte (Eds.), Classroom research on mathematics and language: Seeing learners and teachers differently (pp. 151-166). Routledge.
– Planas, N. (2021). How specific can language as resource become for the teaching of algebraic concepts? ZDM-Mathematics Education, 53(2), 277-288.
– Planas, N. (2021). Challenges and opportunities from translingual research on multilingual mathematics classrooms. In A. A. Essien, & A. Msimanga (Eds.), Multilingual education yearbook 2021. Policy and practice in STEM multilingual contexts (pp. 1-18). Springer.
– Planas, N., & Ngoepe, M. (2019). Right to learn mathematics: From language as right to language as resource. In C. Xenofontos (Ed.), Equity in mathematics education. Addressing a changing world (pp. 93-110). Information Age Publishing.
– Planas, N., & Schütte, M. (2018). Research frameworks for the study of language in mathematics education, ZDM-Mathematics Education, 50(6), 965-974.
– Planas, N. (2018). Language as resource: A key notion for understanding the complexity of mathematics learning. Educational Studies in Mathematics, 98(3), 215-229.
– Planas, N., Morgan, C., & Schütte, M. (2018). Mathematics education and language. Lessons and directions from two decades of research. In T. Dreyfus, M. Artigue, S. Prediger, D. Potari, & Ruthven (Eds.), Developing research in mathematics education. Twenty years of communication, cooperation and collaboration in Europe (pp. 196-210). Routledge.
– Planas, N. (2014). One speaker, two languages: Learning opportunities in the mathematics classroom. Educational Studies in Mathematics, 87(1), 51-66.
– Planas, N., & Setati Phakeng, M. (2014). On the process of gaining language as a resource in mathematics education. ZDM-Mathematics Education, 46(6), 883-893.
– Planas, N., & Civil, M. (2013). Language-as-resource and language-as-political. Tensions in the bilingual mathematics classroom. Mathematics Education Research Journal, 25(3), 361-378.

 

https://portalrecerca.uab.cat/en/persons/nuria-planas-raig-3

https://orcid.org/0000-0001-5199-6336

 

Cindy works at the intersection of learning, design, and technology, with a keen interest in the orchestration of future-ready tech-enabled learning.

She is curious how the deployment of adaptive learning systems to schools will impact classroom learning and hopes to learn more about the human-machine partnership in education. Specifically, her research is concerned with the implications that the use of such systems has on teacher-student interactions, as teachers grapple with balancing personalised learning and learning in community, as well as curriculum demands and student interests. These are some tensions which could potentially be exacerbated by affordances of adaptive learning systems.

Prior to embarking on the DPhil in Education at Oxford, Cindy worked as the Lead Specialist in Technologies for Learning at the Educational Technology Division of Ministry of Education, Singapore. She had previously completed graduate studies at the National University of Singapore and Stanford University where she was awarded Master of Arts in English Studies and Master of Arts in Education.

Reem is DPhil student from Saudi Arabia.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she worked as a Teacher, Professional Developer, then, became a Supervisor and Researcher in the Ministry of Education where she received a scholarship to pursue her DPhil education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests lie in the area of Teacher Education and Professional Learning Policy and Practice.

Publications
  • Alqahtani, Reem (2020). Saudi Universities Role in Developing Teacher Professional Development Programs: Elite Universities Experience. Journal of Educational Sciences. King Saud University.
  • Alqahtani, Reem. (2020). The effect of implementing UDL-based activities in improving EFL learners’ academic achievement and attitudes towards L2. In L. Salas, & E. Ager, Creating Quiet reflective Spaces: Language Teacher Researches Professional Development (pp. 61-62). IATEFL publications.

Lena Zlock is researching the integration of digital technology into structures of teaching, learning, and education in higher education. Her particular focus is on the digital humanities and the potential for digital methods to transform humanistic study. She works with Professor Niall Winters and Dr. James Robson.

Lena’s research interests stem from her education as an M.St. student and Ertegun Graduate Scholar in Modern Languages at the University of Oxford, and as a B.A. student in History at Stanford University. As an undergraduate, she started the Voltaire Library Project, a digitally and data-driven study of the 6,763-book collection of French Enlightenment philosopher Voltaire (you can read more about the project here and here). She has been interested in the application of digital technology to humanistic teaching since her days in Princeton Day School, where she developed an interdisciplinary curriculum on Mexico City (visit the course website here).

Her research on Voltaire led her to think more broadly about the place of digital methods in the humanities classroom, and how new technologies will revolutionise the liberal arts and higher education. As a DPhil candidate, Lena will examine the negotiation and implementation of new learning technologies within the University of Oxford at undergraduate and graduate levels.

Lena is involved in a number of digital humanities initiatives in Oxford. She previously served as the inaugural fellow of the Voltaire Lab at Oxford’s Voltaire Foundation. As a master’s student, Lena co-formulated the convergence agenda for Oxford digital humanities with Professor Howard Hotson, and is currently employed by the Humanities Division to assist with the development of an M.St. degree in Digital Scholarship (read more here). Lena set up and helps to run the History of the Book blog for the Faculty of Medieval and Modern Languages and the Oxford Book History Twitter account.

Lena welcomes inquiries from undergraduate and postgraduate students from Oxford and beyond seeking to get involved with the digital humanities in any capacity. The History of the Book blog also welcomes inquiries from prospective contributors.

 

Abbey is a Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education, in collaboration with the Department of Engineering.

Before joining the DPhil program, Abbey obtained a B.A. in Applied Linguistics with minors in Russian and Chinese from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford. She was the recipient of a Benjamin A. Gilman International Scholarship through U.S. Department of State for study in Russia and was awarded two Foreign Language and Area Studies (FLAS) Fellowships for study in both Russia and China. She holds both TESOL and TEFL certificates and has taught English as a Second Language in various contexts to a wide variety of learner populations.

Abbey’s main research interests lie in the use of technology to facilitate language learning. Her DPhil research focuses on the development of a virtual reality program to bridge the gaps that students face when learning languages through distance learning.

Julie Chia-Yi Lin is a Doctoral student at the University of Oxford, funded by the Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholarship. Her research focus on Internationalization, Policy, Management and Institutional Strategy is rooted in her professional experience in publishing and higher education, as well as from her observations regarding the continuous change in global educational dynamics.

Julie completed her B.A. at National Taiwan University, and earned a joint M.A. from the University of Vienna and the University of Wroclaw. She was previously employed as an officer for the Office of International Affairs at National Taiwan University, and then as a Publisher at Emerald Publishing.

She focuses on the development of higher education, particularly in the processes of internationalization and globalization, and tries to deliver perspectives from different Institutional sectors, and a wide array of participants. She is mindful of the influence that culture has on the development and reception of these processes, and has a special interest in the East Asia region, and Confucian-influenced higher education systems. In her doctoral research, she investigates higher ed institutional strategy, and the relationship it has with real-world policy. This includes delving into the specific interpretation and implementation of official policy by different stakeholders within the institution- faculty, administration, and management.

Publications

Lin, J. (2015). The Impact of Globalization on Taiwan’s Education Policy: The International Student. In A. Lipinsky. (Ed), Vienna Taiwan Studies Series: Immigration societies, Taiwan and Beyond. (pp. 129-151). Vienna: LIT VERLAG GmbH & Co. KG

Yibo Wang has an MA in International Marketing from the Coventry University (UK) and a Master’s in Management: Leadership and Organizational Change from the University of Birmingham (UK).

His doctoral research focuses on ‘knowledge hiding’, ‘leadership style’ and ‘Confucian culture’ in Chinese education and training institutions.

As empirical studies on ‘knowledge hiding’ in the Chinese context are scarce, Yibo hopes to uncover underlying mechanism of knowledge hiding and find its potential influence factors.

Prior to coming to Oxford, he worked as a CEO in an educational consultancy based in Beijing that advised the investment and marketing analyses on education and training industry.

Riziki’s current DPhil research focuses on emergent literacy of refugee children within multilingual settings.

Prior to commencing her DPhil research, Riziki completed an MSc in Child Development at the University of Oxford, looking at the role of teacher behavioural and cognitive judgments on the learning trajectories of Black primary school students in England.

Her research interests are education access and wellbeing of children in resettlement and asylum contexts. In line with this, her research in the past has focused on integration and resettlement processes of refugees and immigrants within Canada.

Publications

Bhattacharyya, P., Ogoe, S., Riziki, A., & Wilkinson, L. (2020). In search of a “home”: comparing the housing challenges experienced by recently arrived Yazidi and Syrian Refugees in Canada. Manuscript submitted for publication.

Bhattacharyya, P., Riziki, A., Songose, L., Ogoe, S., & Wilkinson, L. (2020). Understanding the link between pre-arrival education and trauma and language learning: A case study of Yazidi women in Canada. Canadian Diversity, 17(2).

Bhattacharyya, P., Riziki, A., & Wilkinson, L. (2018). “Settlement Service Use among Syrian Refugees in Canada” Canadian Diversity 15(1).

Wilkinson, L., Bhattacharya, P., Garcea, J., Abdul-Karim, A., Riziki, A., & Schnieders, M. (2017). Finding home: Some housing considerations for refugee families with children. Canadian Diversity, 14 (3), 31-35

Wilkinson, L., Bhattacharyya, P., Riziki, A., & Abdul-Karim, A. (2018).Yazidi Refugee Resettlement in Canada. Calgary: Immigration Refugees and Citizenship Canada-Integration Branch (Prairies and Territories Region).

Wilkinson, L., Garcea, J., Bhattacharyya, P., Riziki, A., Abdul Karim, A. (2017). Resettling on the Canadian Prairies: Integration of Syrian refugees. Calgary: Immigration Refugees and Citizenship Canada, Integration Branch-Prairies., Northwest Territories Division., & Alberta Association of Immigrant Serving Agencies

Anushay completed her BSc Psychology from UCL, where she also started her master’s in Developmental Neuroscience and Psychopathology. She was based at Yale University for her master’s thesis, where she worked with Dr Craig Bailey at the Yale Center for Emotional Intelligence to understand children’s emotion development. Anushay’s research interests include understanding child development across different cultures, factors that might be affecting it, and devising culture-specific ways to support children’s holistic development through the educational system. She is also keen on improving the research scope in Pakistan by working with Pakistani researchers, practitioners, and families.

Anushay balances her research with her position as the founder of a non-profit, Resources for Children, which aims to understand and support children’s development in Pakistan.

Publications

  1. Mazhar, A. (2022, April). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Spring Preview, New Haven, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2021, December). Does an extended family improve mentalising in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK & Pakistan. 2nd International Foundation University Conference of Psychology, Rawalpindi, Pakistan.
  3. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Theory of Mind in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK and Pakistan. Harvard Trends in Psychology Summit, Cambridge, United States.
  1. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Research Rounds, New Haven, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2020, October). Developing a non-profit to advance autism research in Pakistan. Anna Freud Centre Seminar Series, London, United Kingdom

 

Núria is a Professor of Mathematics Education at Autonomous University of Barcelona. Her research is about language and mathematics in secondary school classrooms and professional development contexts with mathematics teachers.

Her first degree was in Mathematics at University of Barcelona (1995). Soon after her initiation as a secondary school mathematics teacher in highly multilingual classrooms of Barcelona, she started her PhD at the UAB Division of Mathematics Education. She wanted to understand the critical factors behind the under-performance in school mathematics of many learners from poor urban backgrounds and recent histories of migration. Since then, she has been committed to classroom and teacher education research grounded on community work with schools and mathematics teachers in urban areas of poverty. Her years as a school teacher have provided her with greater insights into her work as a researcher and have strongly influenced the adoption of sociocultural and sociopolitical approaches to mathematics teaching and learning.

Núria was given the ICREA Academia Award of the Catalan Institution for Research and Advanced Studies in 2013, in recognition of her contributions to research on multilingual mathematics teaching and learning. She was elected to the Executive Committee of the International Commission on Mathematical Instruction as Member-at-Large in 2021, and to the International Committee of the International Group for the Psychology of Mathematics Education from 2010 to 2014. She served as Extraordinarious Professor of Mathematics Education at the University of South Africa from 2013 to 2020. She was Visiting Scholar at London South Bank University, University of Arizona, and University of North Carolina at Chapel-Hill.

Núria is currently on the editorial board of the international journal Mathematics Education Research Journal and Journal of Mathematics Teacher Education. Till 2021 she was the editor-in-chief of the Advances of Research in Mathematics Education, the official journal of the Spanish Society of Research in Mathematics Education. She is the leading co-editor of a 2018 special issue on language research in mathematics education published in ZDM-Mathematics Education, and the leading co-editor of a special issue on decentring mathematics teaching education, to be published in the Journal of Mathematics Teacher Education, February 2024.

She chaired the 7th Topic Conference of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education on Language and Mathematics (Dresden, 2018), and the ERME Topic Working Group on Language and Mathematics from 2015 to 2020. The collaborations established in the ERME context enabled for a broad range of experts to come together and move forward the research field in the form of an co-edited Routledge volume entitled ‘Classroom research on mathematics and language: Seeing learners and teachers differently’ in 2021, with Núria as the leading co-editor. She has also been co-editor of the Springer volume resulting from the 21st ICMI Study on Language Diversity and Mathematics Education in 2016, and of the Brill volume entitled ‘Mathematical discourse that breaks barriers and creates space for marginalized learners’ in 2018.

Núria’s motivation for coming to the Oxford Department of Education is her research collaboration in projects co-coordinated with Jenni Ingram on establishing an international network for research on supporting school mathematics teaching with linguistically disadvantaged learners. From her years as a secondary school in the 1990s, important challenges posed to mathematics education practice remain. Learners of mathematics who are linguistically disadvantaged for a variety of reasons, including impoverished socioeconomic status, continue to be educationally disadvantaged at a considerable risk of school failure and early dropout. More research will hopefully shed light on how to identify and develop improved practices to enable greater access to school mathematics for all learners.

Publications

SELECTION OF 10 LAST-DECADE PUBLICATIONS
[For more publications and research details, see https://orcid.org/0000-0001-5199-6336]
– Planas, N., & Chronaki, A. (2021). Multilingual mathematics learning from a dialogic-translanguaging perspective. In N. Planas, C. Morgan, & M. Schütte (Eds.), Classroom research on mathematics and language: Seeing learners and teachers differently (pp. 151-166). Routledge.
– Planas, N. (2021). How specific can language as resource become for the teaching of algebraic concepts? ZDM-Mathematics Education, 53(2), 277-288.
– Planas, N. (2021). Challenges and opportunities from translingual research on multilingual mathematics classrooms. In A. A. Essien, & A. Msimanga (Eds.), Multilingual education yearbook 2021. Policy and practice in STEM multilingual contexts (pp. 1-18). Springer.
– Planas, N., & Ngoepe, M. (2019). Right to learn mathematics: From language as right to language as resource. In C. Xenofontos (Ed.), Equity in mathematics education. Addressing a changing world (pp. 93-110). Information Age Publishing.
– Planas, N., & Schütte, M. (2018). Research frameworks for the study of language in mathematics education, ZDM-Mathematics Education, 50(6), 965-974.
– Planas, N. (2018). Language as resource: A key notion for understanding the complexity of mathematics learning. Educational Studies in Mathematics, 98(3), 215-229.
– Planas, N., Morgan, C., & Schütte, M. (2018). Mathematics education and language. Lessons and directions from two decades of research. In T. Dreyfus, M. Artigue, S. Prediger, D. Potari, & Ruthven (Eds.), Developing research in mathematics education. Twenty years of communication, cooperation and collaboration in Europe (pp. 196-210). Routledge.
– Planas, N. (2014). One speaker, two languages: Learning opportunities in the mathematics classroom. Educational Studies in Mathematics, 87(1), 51-66.
– Planas, N., & Setati Phakeng, M. (2014). On the process of gaining language as a resource in mathematics education. ZDM-Mathematics Education, 46(6), 883-893.
– Planas, N., & Civil, M. (2013). Language-as-resource and language-as-political. Tensions in the bilingual mathematics classroom. Mathematics Education Research Journal, 25(3), 361-378.

 

https://portalrecerca.uab.cat/en/persons/nuria-planas-raig-3

https://orcid.org/0000-0001-5199-6336

 

Cindy works at the intersection of learning, design, and technology, with a keen interest in the orchestration of future-ready tech-enabled learning.

She is curious how the deployment of adaptive learning systems to schools will impact classroom learning and hopes to learn more about the human-machine partnership in education. Specifically, her research is concerned with the implications that the use of such systems has on teacher-student interactions, as teachers grapple with balancing personalised learning and learning in community, as well as curriculum demands and student interests. These are some tensions which could potentially be exacerbated by affordances of adaptive learning systems.

Prior to embarking on the DPhil in Education at Oxford, Cindy worked as the Lead Specialist in Technologies for Learning at the Educational Technology Division of Ministry of Education, Singapore. She had previously completed graduate studies at the National University of Singapore and Stanford University where she was awarded Master of Arts in English Studies and Master of Arts in Education.

Reem is DPhil student from Saudi Arabia.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she worked as a Teacher, Professional Developer, then, became a Supervisor and Researcher in the Ministry of Education where she received a scholarship to pursue her DPhil education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests lie in the area of Teacher Education and Professional Learning Policy and Practice.

Publications
  • Alqahtani, Reem (2020). Saudi Universities Role in Developing Teacher Professional Development Programs: Elite Universities Experience. Journal of Educational Sciences. King Saud University.
  • Alqahtani, Reem. (2020). The effect of implementing UDL-based activities in improving EFL learners’ academic achievement and attitudes towards L2. In L. Salas, & E. Ager, Creating Quiet reflective Spaces: Language Teacher Researches Professional Development (pp. 61-62). IATEFL publications.

Lena Zlock is researching the integration of digital technology into structures of teaching, learning, and education in higher education. Her particular focus is on the digital humanities and the potential for digital methods to transform humanistic study. She works with Professor Niall Winters and Dr. James Robson.

Lena’s research interests stem from her education as an M.St. student and Ertegun Graduate Scholar in Modern Languages at the University of Oxford, and as a B.A. student in History at Stanford University. As an undergraduate, she started the Voltaire Library Project, a digitally and data-driven study of the 6,763-book collection of French Enlightenment philosopher Voltaire (you can read more about the project here and here). She has been interested in the application of digital technology to humanistic teaching since her days in Princeton Day School, where she developed an interdisciplinary curriculum on Mexico City (visit the course website here).

Her research on Voltaire led her to think more broadly about the place of digital methods in the humanities classroom, and how new technologies will revolutionise the liberal arts and higher education. As a DPhil candidate, Lena will examine the negotiation and implementation of new learning technologies within the University of Oxford at undergraduate and graduate levels.

Lena is involved in a number of digital humanities initiatives in Oxford. She previously served as the inaugural fellow of the Voltaire Lab at Oxford’s Voltaire Foundation. As a master’s student, Lena co-formulated the convergence agenda for Oxford digital humanities with Professor Howard Hotson, and is currently employed by the Humanities Division to assist with the development of an M.St. degree in Digital Scholarship (read more here). Lena set up and helps to run the History of the Book blog for the Faculty of Medieval and Modern Languages and the Oxford Book History Twitter account.

Lena welcomes inquiries from undergraduate and postgraduate students from Oxford and beyond seeking to get involved with the digital humanities in any capacity. The History of the Book blog also welcomes inquiries from prospective contributors.

 

Abbey is a Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education, in collaboration with the Department of Engineering.

Before joining the DPhil program, Abbey obtained a B.A. in Applied Linguistics with minors in Russian and Chinese from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford. She was the recipient of a Benjamin A. Gilman International Scholarship through U.S. Department of State for study in Russia and was awarded two Foreign Language and Area Studies (FLAS) Fellowships for study in both Russia and China. She holds both TESOL and TEFL certificates and has taught English as a Second Language in various contexts to a wide variety of learner populations.

Abbey’s main research interests lie in the use of technology to facilitate language learning. Her DPhil research focuses on the development of a virtual reality program to bridge the gaps that students face when learning languages through distance learning.

Julie Chia-Yi Lin is a Doctoral student at the University of Oxford, funded by the Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholarship. Her research focus on Internationalization, Policy, Management and Institutional Strategy is rooted in her professional experience in publishing and higher education, as well as from her observations regarding the continuous change in global educational dynamics.

Julie completed her B.A. at National Taiwan University, and earned a joint M.A. from the University of Vienna and the University of Wroclaw. She was previously employed as an officer for the Office of International Affairs at National Taiwan University, and then as a Publisher at Emerald Publishing.

She focuses on the development of higher education, particularly in the processes of internationalization and globalization, and tries to deliver perspectives from different Institutional sectors, and a wide array of participants. She is mindful of the influence that culture has on the development and reception of these processes, and has a special interest in the East Asia region, and Confucian-influenced higher education systems. In her doctoral research, she investigates higher ed institutional strategy, and the relationship it has with real-world policy. This includes delving into the specific interpretation and implementation of official policy by different stakeholders within the institution- faculty, administration, and management.

Publications

Lin, J. (2015). The Impact of Globalization on Taiwan’s Education Policy: The International Student. In A. Lipinsky. (Ed), Vienna Taiwan Studies Series: Immigration societies, Taiwan and Beyond. (pp. 129-151). Vienna: LIT VERLAG GmbH & Co. KG

Yibo Wang has an MA in International Marketing from the Coventry University (UK) and a Master’s in Management: Leadership and Organizational Change from the University of Birmingham (UK).

His doctoral research focuses on ‘knowledge hiding’, ‘leadership style’ and ‘Confucian culture’ in Chinese education and training institutions.

As empirical studies on ‘knowledge hiding’ in the Chinese context are scarce, Yibo hopes to uncover underlying mechanism of knowledge hiding and find its potential influence factors.

Prior to coming to Oxford, he worked as a CEO in an educational consultancy based in Beijing that advised the investment and marketing analyses on education and training industry.

Riziki’s current DPhil research focuses on emergent literacy of refugee children within multilingual settings.

Prior to commencing her DPhil research, Riziki completed an MSc in Child Development at the University of Oxford, looking at the role of teacher behavioural and cognitive judgments on the learning trajectories of Black primary school students in England.

Her research interests are education access and wellbeing of children in resettlement and asylum contexts. In line with this, her research in the past has focused on integration and resettlement processes of refugees and immigrants within Canada.

Publications

Bhattacharyya, P., Ogoe, S., Riziki, A., & Wilkinson, L. (2020). In search of a “home”: comparing the housing challenges experienced by recently arrived Yazidi and Syrian Refugees in Canada. Manuscript submitted for publication.

Bhattacharyya, P., Riziki, A., Songose, L., Ogoe, S., & Wilkinson, L. (2020). Understanding the link between pre-arrival education and trauma and language learning: A case study of Yazidi women in Canada. Canadian Diversity, 17(2).

Bhattacharyya, P., Riziki, A., & Wilkinson, L. (2018). “Settlement Service Use among Syrian Refugees in Canada” Canadian Diversity 15(1).

Wilkinson, L., Bhattacharya, P., Garcea, J., Abdul-Karim, A., Riziki, A., & Schnieders, M. (2017). Finding home: Some housing considerations for refugee families with children. Canadian Diversity, 14 (3), 31-35

Wilkinson, L., Bhattacharyya, P., Riziki, A., & Abdul-Karim, A. (2018).Yazidi Refugee Resettlement in Canada. Calgary: Immigration Refugees and Citizenship Canada-Integration Branch (Prairies and Territories Region).

Wilkinson, L., Garcea, J., Bhattacharyya, P., Riziki, A., Abdul Karim, A. (2017). Resettling on the Canadian Prairies: Integration of Syrian refugees. Calgary: Immigration Refugees and Citizenship Canada, Integration Branch-Prairies., Northwest Territories Division., & Alberta Association of Immigrant Serving Agencies

Anushay completed her BSc Psychology from UCL, where she also started her master’s in Developmental Neuroscience and Psychopathology. She was based at Yale University for her master’s thesis, where she worked with Dr Craig Bailey at the Yale Center for Emotional Intelligence to understand children’s emotion development. Anushay’s research interests include understanding child development across different cultures, factors that might be affecting it, and devising culture-specific ways to support children’s holistic development through the educational system. She is also keen on improving the research scope in Pakistan by working with Pakistani researchers, practitioners, and families.

Anushay balances her research with her position as the founder of a non-profit, Resources for Children, which aims to understand and support children’s development in Pakistan.

Publications

  1. Mazhar, A. (2022, April). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Spring Preview, New Haven, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2021, December). Does an extended family improve mentalising in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK & Pakistan. 2nd International Foundation University Conference of Psychology, Rawalpindi, Pakistan.
  3. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Theory of Mind in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK and Pakistan. Harvard Trends in Psychology Summit, Cambridge, United States.
  1. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Research Rounds, New Haven, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2020, October). Developing a non-profit to advance autism research in Pakistan. Anna Freud Centre Seminar Series, London, United Kingdom

 

Núria is a Professor of Mathematics Education at Autonomous University of Barcelona. Her research is about language and mathematics in secondary school classrooms and professional development contexts with mathematics teachers.

Her first degree was in Mathematics at University of Barcelona (1995). Soon after her initiation as a secondary school mathematics teacher in highly multilingual classrooms of Barcelona, she started her PhD at the UAB Division of Mathematics Education. She wanted to understand the critical factors behind the under-performance in school mathematics of many learners from poor urban backgrounds and recent histories of migration. Since then, she has been committed to classroom and teacher education research grounded on community work with schools and mathematics teachers in urban areas of poverty. Her years as a school teacher have provided her with greater insights into her work as a researcher and have strongly influenced the adoption of sociocultural and sociopolitical approaches to mathematics teaching and learning.

Núria was given the ICREA Academia Award of the Catalan Institution for Research and Advanced Studies in 2013, in recognition of her contributions to research on multilingual mathematics teaching and learning. She was elected to the Executive Committee of the International Commission on Mathematical Instruction as Member-at-Large in 2021, and to the International Committee of the International Group for the Psychology of Mathematics Education from 2010 to 2014. She served as Extraordinarious Professor of Mathematics Education at the University of South Africa from 2013 to 2020. She was Visiting Scholar at London South Bank University, University of Arizona, and University of North Carolina at Chapel-Hill.

Núria is currently on the editorial board of the international journal Mathematics Education Research Journal and Journal of Mathematics Teacher Education. Till 2021 she was the editor-in-chief of the Advances of Research in Mathematics Education, the official journal of the Spanish Society of Research in Mathematics Education. She is the leading co-editor of a 2018 special issue on language research in mathematics education published in ZDM-Mathematics Education, and the leading co-editor of a special issue on decentring mathematics teaching education, to be published in the Journal of Mathematics Teacher Education, February 2024.

She chaired the 7th Topic Conference of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education on Language and Mathematics (Dresden, 2018), and the ERME Topic Working Group on Language and Mathematics from 2015 to 2020. The collaborations established in the ERME context enabled for a broad range of experts to come together and move forward the research field in the form of an co-edited Routledge volume entitled ‘Classroom research on mathematics and language: Seeing learners and teachers differently’ in 2021, with Núria as the leading co-editor. She has also been co-editor of the Springer volume resulting from the 21st ICMI Study on Language Diversity and Mathematics Education in 2016, and of the Brill volume entitled ‘Mathematical discourse that breaks barriers and creates space for marginalized learners’ in 2018.

Núria’s motivation for coming to the Oxford Department of Education is her research collaboration in projects co-coordinated with Jenni Ingram on establishing an international network for research on supporting school mathematics teaching with linguistically disadvantaged learners. From her years as a secondary school in the 1990s, important challenges posed to mathematics education practice remain. Learners of mathematics who are linguistically disadvantaged for a variety of reasons, including impoverished socioeconomic status, continue to be educationally disadvantaged at a considerable risk of school failure and early dropout. More research will hopefully shed light on how to identify and develop improved practices to enable greater access to school mathematics for all learners.

Publications

SELECTION OF 10 LAST-DECADE PUBLICATIONS
[For more publications and research details, see https://orcid.org/0000-0001-5199-6336]
– Planas, N., & Chronaki, A. (2021). Multilingual mathematics learning from a dialogic-translanguaging perspective. In N. Planas, C. Morgan, & M. Schütte (Eds.), Classroom research on mathematics and language: Seeing learners and teachers differently (pp. 151-166). Routledge.
– Planas, N. (2021). How specific can language as resource become for the teaching of algebraic concepts? ZDM-Mathematics Education, 53(2), 277-288.
– Planas, N. (2021). Challenges and opportunities from translingual research on multilingual mathematics classrooms. In A. A. Essien, & A. Msimanga (Eds.), Multilingual education yearbook 2021. Policy and practice in STEM multilingual contexts (pp. 1-18). Springer.
– Planas, N., & Ngoepe, M. (2019). Right to learn mathematics: From language as right to language as resource. In C. Xenofontos (Ed.), Equity in mathematics education. Addressing a changing world (pp. 93-110). Information Age Publishing.
– Planas, N., & Schütte, M. (2018). Research frameworks for the study of language in mathematics education, ZDM-Mathematics Education, 50(6), 965-974.
– Planas, N. (2018). Language as resource: A key notion for understanding the complexity of mathematics learning. Educational Studies in Mathematics, 98(3), 215-229.
– Planas, N., Morgan, C., & Schütte, M. (2018). Mathematics education and language. Lessons and directions from two decades of research. In T. Dreyfus, M. Artigue, S. Prediger, D. Potari, & Ruthven (Eds.), Developing research in mathematics education. Twenty years of communication, cooperation and collaboration in Europe (pp. 196-210). Routledge.
– Planas, N. (2014). One speaker, two languages: Learning opportunities in the mathematics classroom. Educational Studies in Mathematics, 87(1), 51-66.
– Planas, N., & Setati Phakeng, M. (2014). On the process of gaining language as a resource in mathematics education. ZDM-Mathematics Education, 46(6), 883-893.
– Planas, N., & Civil, M. (2013). Language-as-resource and language-as-political. Tensions in the bilingual mathematics classroom. Mathematics Education Research Journal, 25(3), 361-378.

 

https://portalrecerca.uab.cat/en/persons/nuria-planas-raig-3

https://orcid.org/0000-0001-5199-6336

 

Cindy works at the intersection of learning, design, and technology, with a keen interest in the orchestration of future-ready tech-enabled learning.

She is curious how the deployment of adaptive learning systems to schools will impact classroom learning and hopes to learn more about the human-machine partnership in education. Specifically, her research is concerned with the implications that the use of such systems has on teacher-student interactions, as teachers grapple with balancing personalised learning and learning in community, as well as curriculum demands and student interests. These are some tensions which could potentially be exacerbated by affordances of adaptive learning systems.

Prior to embarking on the DPhil in Education at Oxford, Cindy worked as the Lead Specialist in Technologies for Learning at the Educational Technology Division of Ministry of Education, Singapore. She had previously completed graduate studies at the National University of Singapore and Stanford University where she was awarded Master of Arts in English Studies and Master of Arts in Education.

Reem is DPhil student from Saudi Arabia.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she worked as a Teacher, Professional Developer, then, became a Supervisor and Researcher in the Ministry of Education where she received a scholarship to pursue her DPhil education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests lie in the area of Teacher Education and Professional Learning Policy and Practice.

Publications
  • Alqahtani, Reem (2020). Saudi Universities Role in Developing Teacher Professional Development Programs: Elite Universities Experience. Journal of Educational Sciences. King Saud University.
  • Alqahtani, Reem. (2020). The effect of implementing UDL-based activities in improving EFL learners’ academic achievement and attitudes towards L2. In L. Salas, & E. Ager, Creating Quiet reflective Spaces: Language Teacher Researches Professional Development (pp. 61-62). IATEFL publications.

Lena Zlock is researching the integration of digital technology into structures of teaching, learning, and education in higher education. Her particular focus is on the digital humanities and the potential for digital methods to transform humanistic study. She works with Professor Niall Winters and Dr. James Robson.

Lena’s research interests stem from her education as an M.St. student and Ertegun Graduate Scholar in Modern Languages at the University of Oxford, and as a B.A. student in History at Stanford University. As an undergraduate, she started the Voltaire Library Project, a digitally and data-driven study of the 6,763-book collection of French Enlightenment philosopher Voltaire (you can read more about the project here and here). She has been interested in the application of digital technology to humanistic teaching since her days in Princeton Day School, where she developed an interdisciplinary curriculum on Mexico City (visit the course website here).

Her research on Voltaire led her to think more broadly about the place of digital methods in the humanities classroom, and how new technologies will revolutionise the liberal arts and higher education. As a DPhil candidate, Lena will examine the negotiation and implementation of new learning technologies within the University of Oxford at undergraduate and graduate levels.

Lena is involved in a number of digital humanities initiatives in Oxford. She previously served as the inaugural fellow of the Voltaire Lab at Oxford’s Voltaire Foundation. As a master’s student, Lena co-formulated the convergence agenda for Oxford digital humanities with Professor Howard Hotson, and is currently employed by the Humanities Division to assist with the development of an M.St. degree in Digital Scholarship (read more here). Lena set up and helps to run the History of the Book blog for the Faculty of Medieval and Modern Languages and the Oxford Book History Twitter account.

Lena welcomes inquiries from undergraduate and postgraduate students from Oxford and beyond seeking to get involved with the digital humanities in any capacity. The History of the Book blog also welcomes inquiries from prospective contributors.

 

Abbey is a Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education, in collaboration with the Department of Engineering.

Before joining the DPhil program, Abbey obtained a B.A. in Applied Linguistics with minors in Russian and Chinese from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford. She was the recipient of a Benjamin A. Gilman International Scholarship through U.S. Department of State for study in Russia and was awarded two Foreign Language and Area Studies (FLAS) Fellowships for study in both Russia and China. She holds both TESOL and TEFL certificates and has taught English as a Second Language in various contexts to a wide variety of learner populations.

Abbey’s main research interests lie in the use of technology to facilitate language learning. Her DPhil research focuses on the development of a virtual reality program to bridge the gaps that students face when learning languages through distance learning.

Julie Chia-Yi Lin is a Doctoral student at the University of Oxford, funded by the Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholarship. Her research focus on Internationalization, Policy, Management and Institutional Strategy is rooted in her professional experience in publishing and higher education, as well as from her observations regarding the continuous change in global educational dynamics.

Julie completed her B.A. at National Taiwan University, and earned a joint M.A. from the University of Vienna and the University of Wroclaw. She was previously employed as an officer for the Office of International Affairs at National Taiwan University, and then as a Publisher at Emerald Publishing.

She focuses on the development of higher education, particularly in the processes of internationalization and globalization, and tries to deliver perspectives from different Institutional sectors, and a wide array of participants. She is mindful of the influence that culture has on the development and reception of these processes, and has a special interest in the East Asia region, and Confucian-influenced higher education systems. In her doctoral research, she investigates higher ed institutional strategy, and the relationship it has with real-world policy. This includes delving into the specific interpretation and implementation of official policy by different stakeholders within the institution- faculty, administration, and management.

Publications

Lin, J. (2015). The Impact of Globalization on Taiwan’s Education Policy: The International Student. In A. Lipinsky. (Ed), Vienna Taiwan Studies Series: Immigration societies, Taiwan and Beyond. (pp. 129-151). Vienna: LIT VERLAG GmbH & Co. KG

Yibo Wang has an MA in International Marketing from the Coventry University (UK) and a Master’s in Management: Leadership and Organizational Change from the University of Birmingham (UK).

His doctoral research focuses on ‘knowledge hiding’, ‘leadership style’ and ‘Confucian culture’ in Chinese education and training institutions.

As empirical studies on ‘knowledge hiding’ in the Chinese context are scarce, Yibo hopes to uncover underlying mechanism of knowledge hiding and find its potential influence factors.

Prior to coming to Oxford, he worked as a CEO in an educational consultancy based in Beijing that advised the investment and marketing analyses on education and training industry.

Riziki’s current DPhil research focuses on emergent literacy of refugee children within multilingual settings.

Prior to commencing her DPhil research, Riziki completed an MSc in Child Development at the University of Oxford, looking at the role of teacher behavioural and cognitive judgments on the learning trajectories of Black primary school students in England.

Her research interests are education access and wellbeing of children in resettlement and asylum contexts. In line with this, her research in the past has focused on integration and resettlement processes of refugees and immigrants within Canada.

Publications

Bhattacharyya, P., Ogoe, S., Riziki, A., & Wilkinson, L. (2020). In search of a “home”: comparing the housing challenges experienced by recently arrived Yazidi and Syrian Refugees in Canada. Manuscript submitted for publication.

Bhattacharyya, P., Riziki, A., Songose, L., Ogoe, S., & Wilkinson, L. (2020). Understanding the link between pre-arrival education and trauma and language learning: A case study of Yazidi women in Canada. Canadian Diversity, 17(2).

Bhattacharyya, P., Riziki, A., & Wilkinson, L. (2018). “Settlement Service Use among Syrian Refugees in Canada” Canadian Diversity 15(1).

Wilkinson, L., Bhattacharya, P., Garcea, J., Abdul-Karim, A., Riziki, A., & Schnieders, M. (2017). Finding home: Some housing considerations for refugee families with children. Canadian Diversity, 14 (3), 31-35

Wilkinson, L., Bhattacharyya, P., Riziki, A., & Abdul-Karim, A. (2018).Yazidi Refugee Resettlement in Canada. Calgary: Immigration Refugees and Citizenship Canada-Integration Branch (Prairies and Territories Region).

Wilkinson, L., Garcea, J., Bhattacharyya, P., Riziki, A., Abdul Karim, A. (2017). Resettling on the Canadian Prairies: Integration of Syrian refugees. Calgary: Immigration Refugees and Citizenship Canada, Integration Branch-Prairies., Northwest Territories Division., & Alberta Association of Immigrant Serving Agencies

Anushay completed her BSc Psychology from UCL, where she also started her master’s in Developmental Neuroscience and Psychopathology. She was based at Yale University for her master’s thesis, where she worked with Dr Craig Bailey at the Yale Center for Emotional Intelligence to understand children’s emotion development. Anushay’s research interests include understanding child development across different cultures, factors that might be affecting it, and devising culture-specific ways to support children’s holistic development through the educational system. She is also keen on improving the research scope in Pakistan by working with Pakistani researchers, practitioners, and families.

Anushay balances her research with her position as the founder of a non-profit, Resources for Children, which aims to understand and support children’s development in Pakistan.

Publications

  1. Mazhar, A. (2022, April). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Spring Preview, New Haven, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2021, December). Does an extended family improve mentalising in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK & Pakistan. 2nd International Foundation University Conference of Psychology, Rawalpindi, Pakistan.
  3. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Theory of Mind in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK and Pakistan. Harvard Trends in Psychology Summit, Cambridge, United States.
  1. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Research Rounds, New Haven, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2020, October). Developing a non-profit to advance autism research in Pakistan. Anna Freud Centre Seminar Series, London, United Kingdom

 

Núria is a Professor of Mathematics Education at Autonomous University of Barcelona. Her research is about language and mathematics in secondary school classrooms and professional development contexts with mathematics teachers.

Her first degree was in Mathematics at University of Barcelona (1995). Soon after her initiation as a secondary school mathematics teacher in highly multilingual classrooms of Barcelona, she started her PhD at the UAB Division of Mathematics Education. She wanted to understand the critical factors behind the under-performance in school mathematics of many learners from poor urban backgrounds and recent histories of migration. Since then, she has been committed to classroom and teacher education research grounded on community work with schools and mathematics teachers in urban areas of poverty. Her years as a school teacher have provided her with greater insights into her work as a researcher and have strongly influenced the adoption of sociocultural and sociopolitical approaches to mathematics teaching and learning.

Núria was given the ICREA Academia Award of the Catalan Institution for Research and Advanced Studies in 2013, in recognition of her contributions to research on multilingual mathematics teaching and learning. She was elected to the Executive Committee of the International Commission on Mathematical Instruction as Member-at-Large in 2021, and to the International Committee of the International Group for the Psychology of Mathematics Education from 2010 to 2014. She served as Extraordinarious Professor of Mathematics Education at the University of South Africa from 2013 to 2020. She was Visiting Scholar at London South Bank University, University of Arizona, and University of North Carolina at Chapel-Hill.

Núria is currently on the editorial board of the international journal Mathematics Education Research Journal and Journal of Mathematics Teacher Education. Till 2021 she was the editor-in-chief of the Advances of Research in Mathematics Education, the official journal of the Spanish Society of Research in Mathematics Education. She is the leading co-editor of a 2018 special issue on language research in mathematics education published in ZDM-Mathematics Education, and the leading co-editor of a special issue on decentring mathematics teaching education, to be published in the Journal of Mathematics Teacher Education, February 2024.

She chaired the 7th Topic Conference of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education on Language and Mathematics (Dresden, 2018), and the ERME Topic Working Group on Language and Mathematics from 2015 to 2020. The collaborations established in the ERME context enabled for a broad range of experts to come together and move forward the research field in the form of an co-edited Routledge volume entitled ‘Classroom research on mathematics and language: Seeing learners and teachers differently’ in 2021, with Núria as the leading co-editor. She has also been co-editor of the Springer volume resulting from the 21st ICMI Study on Language Diversity and Mathematics Education in 2016, and of the Brill volume entitled ‘Mathematical discourse that breaks barriers and creates space for marginalized learners’ in 2018.

Núria’s motivation for coming to the Oxford Department of Education is her research collaboration in projects co-coordinated with Jenni Ingram on establishing an international network for research on supporting school mathematics teaching with linguistically disadvantaged learners. From her years as a secondary school in the 1990s, important challenges posed to mathematics education practice remain. Learners of mathematics who are linguistically disadvantaged for a variety of reasons, including impoverished socioeconomic status, continue to be educationally disadvantaged at a considerable risk of school failure and early dropout. More research will hopefully shed light on how to identify and develop improved practices to enable greater access to school mathematics for all learners.

Publications

SELECTION OF 10 LAST-DECADE PUBLICATIONS
[For more publications and research details, see https://orcid.org/0000-0001-5199-6336]
– Planas, N., & Chronaki, A. (2021). Multilingual mathematics learning from a dialogic-translanguaging perspective. In N. Planas, C. Morgan, & M. Schütte (Eds.), Classroom research on mathematics and language: Seeing learners and teachers differently (pp. 151-166). Routledge.
– Planas, N. (2021). How specific can language as resource become for the teaching of algebraic concepts? ZDM-Mathematics Education, 53(2), 277-288.
– Planas, N. (2021). Challenges and opportunities from translingual research on multilingual mathematics classrooms. In A. A. Essien, & A. Msimanga (Eds.), Multilingual education yearbook 2021. Policy and practice in STEM multilingual contexts (pp. 1-18). Springer.
– Planas, N., & Ngoepe, M. (2019). Right to learn mathematics: From language as right to language as resource. In C. Xenofontos (Ed.), Equity in mathematics education. Addressing a changing world (pp. 93-110). Information Age Publishing.
– Planas, N., & Schütte, M. (2018). Research frameworks for the study of language in mathematics education, ZDM-Mathematics Education, 50(6), 965-974.
– Planas, N. (2018). Language as resource: A key notion for understanding the complexity of mathematics learning. Educational Studies in Mathematics, 98(3), 215-229.
– Planas, N., Morgan, C., & Schütte, M. (2018). Mathematics education and language. Lessons and directions from two decades of research. In T. Dreyfus, M. Artigue, S. Prediger, D. Potari, & Ruthven (Eds.), Developing research in mathematics education. Twenty years of communication, cooperation and collaboration in Europe (pp. 196-210). Routledge.
– Planas, N. (2014). One speaker, two languages: Learning opportunities in the mathematics classroom. Educational Studies in Mathematics, 87(1), 51-66.
– Planas, N., & Setati Phakeng, M. (2014). On the process of gaining language as a resource in mathematics education. ZDM-Mathematics Education, 46(6), 883-893.
– Planas, N., & Civil, M. (2013). Language-as-resource and language-as-political. Tensions in the bilingual mathematics classroom. Mathematics Education Research Journal, 25(3), 361-378.

 

https://portalrecerca.uab.cat/en/persons/nuria-planas-raig-3

https://orcid.org/0000-0001-5199-6336

 

Cindy works at the intersection of learning, design, and technology, with a keen interest in the orchestration of future-ready tech-enabled learning.

She is curious how the deployment of adaptive learning systems to schools will impact classroom learning and hopes to learn more about the human-machine partnership in education. Specifically, her research is concerned with the implications that the use of such systems has on teacher-student interactions, as teachers grapple with balancing personalised learning and learning in community, as well as curriculum demands and student interests. These are some tensions which could potentially be exacerbated by affordances of adaptive learning systems.

Prior to embarking on the DPhil in Education at Oxford, Cindy worked as the Lead Specialist in Technologies for Learning at the Educational Technology Division of Ministry of Education, Singapore. She had previously completed graduate studies at the National University of Singapore and Stanford University where she was awarded Master of Arts in English Studies and Master of Arts in Education.

Reem is DPhil student from Saudi Arabia.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she worked as a Teacher, Professional Developer, then, became a Supervisor and Researcher in the Ministry of Education where she received a scholarship to pursue her DPhil education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests lie in the area of Teacher Education and Professional Learning Policy and Practice.

Publications
  • Alqahtani, Reem (2020). Saudi Universities Role in Developing Teacher Professional Development Programs: Elite Universities Experience. Journal of Educational Sciences. King Saud University.
  • Alqahtani, Reem. (2020). The effect of implementing UDL-based activities in improving EFL learners’ academic achievement and attitudes towards L2. In L. Salas, & E. Ager, Creating Quiet reflective Spaces: Language Teacher Researches Professional Development (pp. 61-62). IATEFL publications.

Lena Zlock is researching the integration of digital technology into structures of teaching, learning, and education in higher education. Her particular focus is on the digital humanities and the potential for digital methods to transform humanistic study. She works with Professor Niall Winters and Dr. James Robson.

Lena’s research interests stem from her education as an M.St. student and Ertegun Graduate Scholar in Modern Languages at the University of Oxford, and as a B.A. student in History at Stanford University. As an undergraduate, she started the Voltaire Library Project, a digitally and data-driven study of the 6,763-book collection of French Enlightenment philosopher Voltaire (you can read more about the project here and here). She has been interested in the application of digital technology to humanistic teaching since her days in Princeton Day School, where she developed an interdisciplinary curriculum on Mexico City (visit the course website here).

Her research on Voltaire led her to think more broadly about the place of digital methods in the humanities classroom, and how new technologies will revolutionise the liberal arts and higher education. As a DPhil candidate, Lena will examine the negotiation and implementation of new learning technologies within the University of Oxford at undergraduate and graduate levels.

Lena is involved in a number of digital humanities initiatives in Oxford. She previously served as the inaugural fellow of the Voltaire Lab at Oxford’s Voltaire Foundation. As a master’s student, Lena co-formulated the convergence agenda for Oxford digital humanities with Professor Howard Hotson, and is currently employed by the Humanities Division to assist with the development of an M.St. degree in Digital Scholarship (read more here). Lena set up and helps to run the History of the Book blog for the Faculty of Medieval and Modern Languages and the Oxford Book History Twitter account.

Lena welcomes inquiries from undergraduate and postgraduate students from Oxford and beyond seeking to get involved with the digital humanities in any capacity. The History of the Book blog also welcomes inquiries from prospective contributors.

 

Abbey is a Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education, in collaboration with the Department of Engineering.

Before joining the DPhil program, Abbey obtained a B.A. in Applied Linguistics with minors in Russian and Chinese from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford. She was the recipient of a Benjamin A. Gilman International Scholarship through U.S. Department of State for study in Russia and was awarded two Foreign Language and Area Studies (FLAS) Fellowships for study in both Russia and China. She holds both TESOL and TEFL certificates and has taught English as a Second Language in various contexts to a wide variety of learner populations.

Abbey’s main research interests lie in the use of technology to facilitate language learning. Her DPhil research focuses on the development of a virtual reality program to bridge the gaps that students face when learning languages through distance learning.

Julie Chia-Yi Lin is a Doctoral student at the University of Oxford, funded by the Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholarship. Her research focus on Internationalization, Policy, Management and Institutional Strategy is rooted in her professional experience in publishing and higher education, as well as from her observations regarding the continuous change in global educational dynamics.

Julie completed her B.A. at National Taiwan University, and earned a joint M.A. from the University of Vienna and the University of Wroclaw. She was previously employed as an officer for the Office of International Affairs at National Taiwan University, and then as a Publisher at Emerald Publishing.

She focuses on the development of higher education, particularly in the processes of internationalization and globalization, and tries to deliver perspectives from different Institutional sectors, and a wide array of participants. She is mindful of the influence that culture has on the development and reception of these processes, and has a special interest in the East Asia region, and Confucian-influenced higher education systems. In her doctoral research, she investigates higher ed institutional strategy, and the relationship it has with real-world policy. This includes delving into the specific interpretation and implementation of official policy by different stakeholders within the institution- faculty, administration, and management.

Publications

Lin, J. (2015). The Impact of Globalization on Taiwan’s Education Policy: The International Student. In A. Lipinsky. (Ed), Vienna Taiwan Studies Series: Immigration societies, Taiwan and Beyond. (pp. 129-151). Vienna: LIT VERLAG GmbH & Co. KG

Yibo Wang has an MA in International Marketing from the Coventry University (UK) and a Master’s in Management: Leadership and Organizational Change from the University of Birmingham (UK).

His doctoral research focuses on ‘knowledge hiding’, ‘leadership style’ and ‘Confucian culture’ in Chinese education and training institutions.

As empirical studies on ‘knowledge hiding’ in the Chinese context are scarce, Yibo hopes to uncover underlying mechanism of knowledge hiding and find its potential influence factors.

Prior to coming to Oxford, he worked as a CEO in an educational consultancy based in Beijing that advised the investment and marketing analyses on education and training industry.

Riziki’s current DPhil research focuses on emergent literacy of refugee children within multilingual settings.

Prior to commencing her DPhil research, Riziki completed an MSc in Child Development at the University of Oxford, looking at the role of teacher behavioural and cognitive judgments on the learning trajectories of Black primary school students in England.

Her research interests are education access and wellbeing of children in resettlement and asylum contexts. In line with this, her research in the past has focused on integration and resettlement processes of refugees and immigrants within Canada.

Publications

Bhattacharyya, P., Ogoe, S., Riziki, A., & Wilkinson, L. (2020). In search of a “home”: comparing the housing challenges experienced by recently arrived Yazidi and Syrian Refugees in Canada. Manuscript submitted for publication.

Bhattacharyya, P., Riziki, A., Songose, L., Ogoe, S., & Wilkinson, L. (2020). Understanding the link between pre-arrival education and trauma and language learning: A case study of Yazidi women in Canada. Canadian Diversity, 17(2).

Bhattacharyya, P., Riziki, A., & Wilkinson, L. (2018). “Settlement Service Use among Syrian Refugees in Canada” Canadian Diversity 15(1).

Wilkinson, L., Bhattacharya, P., Garcea, J., Abdul-Karim, A., Riziki, A., & Schnieders, M. (2017). Finding home: Some housing considerations for refugee families with children. Canadian Diversity, 14 (3), 31-35

Wilkinson, L., Bhattacharyya, P., Riziki, A., & Abdul-Karim, A. (2018).Yazidi Refugee Resettlement in Canada. Calgary: Immigration Refugees and Citizenship Canada-Integration Branch (Prairies and Territories Region).

Wilkinson, L., Garcea, J., Bhattacharyya, P., Riziki, A., Abdul Karim, A. (2017). Resettling on the Canadian Prairies: Integration of Syrian refugees. Calgary: Immigration Refugees and Citizenship Canada, Integration Branch-Prairies., Northwest Territories Division., & Alberta Association of Immigrant Serving Agencies

Anushay completed her BSc Psychology from UCL, where she also started her master’s in Developmental Neuroscience and Psychopathology. She was based at Yale University for her master’s thesis, where she worked with Dr Craig Bailey at the Yale Center for Emotional Intelligence to understand children’s emotion development. Anushay’s research interests include understanding child development across different cultures, factors that might be affecting it, and devising culture-specific ways to support children’s holistic development through the educational system. She is also keen on improving the research scope in Pakistan by working with Pakistani researchers, practitioners, and families.

Anushay balances her research with her position as the founder of a non-profit, Resources for Children, which aims to understand and support children’s development in Pakistan.

Publications

  1. Mazhar, A. (2022, April). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Spring Preview, New Haven, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2021, December). Does an extended family improve mentalising in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK & Pakistan. 2nd International Foundation University Conference of Psychology, Rawalpindi, Pakistan.
  3. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Theory of Mind in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK and Pakistan. Harvard Trends in Psychology Summit, Cambridge, United States.
  1. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Research Rounds, New Haven, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2020, October). Developing a non-profit to advance autism research in Pakistan. Anna Freud Centre Seminar Series, London, United Kingdom

 

Núria is a Professor of Mathematics Education at Autonomous University of Barcelona. Her research is about language and mathematics in secondary school classrooms and professional development contexts with mathematics teachers.

Her first degree was in Mathematics at University of Barcelona (1995). Soon after her initiation as a secondary school mathematics teacher in highly multilingual classrooms of Barcelona, she started her PhD at the UAB Division of Mathematics Education. She wanted to understand the critical factors behind the under-performance in school mathematics of many learners from poor urban backgrounds and recent histories of migration. Since then, she has been committed to classroom and teacher education research grounded on community work with schools and mathematics teachers in urban areas of poverty. Her years as a school teacher have provided her with greater insights into her work as a researcher and have strongly influenced the adoption of sociocultural and sociopolitical approaches to mathematics teaching and learning.

Núria was given the ICREA Academia Award of the Catalan Institution for Research and Advanced Studies in 2013, in recognition of her contributions to research on multilingual mathematics teaching and learning. She was elected to the Executive Committee of the International Commission on Mathematical Instruction as Member-at-Large in 2021, and to the International Committee of the International Group for the Psychology of Mathematics Education from 2010 to 2014. She served as Extraordinarious Professor of Mathematics Education at the University of South Africa from 2013 to 2020. She was Visiting Scholar at London South Bank University, University of Arizona, and University of North Carolina at Chapel-Hill.

Núria is currently on the editorial board of the international journal Mathematics Education Research Journal and Journal of Mathematics Teacher Education. Till 2021 she was the editor-in-chief of the Advances of Research in Mathematics Education, the official journal of the Spanish Society of Research in Mathematics Education. She is the leading co-editor of a 2018 special issue on language research in mathematics education published in ZDM-Mathematics Education, and the leading co-editor of a special issue on decentring mathematics teaching education, to be published in the Journal of Mathematics Teacher Education, February 2024.

She chaired the 7th Topic Conference of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education on Language and Mathematics (Dresden, 2018), and the ERME Topic Working Group on Language and Mathematics from 2015 to 2020. The collaborations established in the ERME context enabled for a broad range of experts to come together and move forward the research field in the form of an co-edited Routledge volume entitled ‘Classroom research on mathematics and language: Seeing learners and teachers differently’ in 2021, with Núria as the leading co-editor. She has also been co-editor of the Springer volume resulting from the 21st ICMI Study on Language Diversity and Mathematics Education in 2016, and of the Brill volume entitled ‘Mathematical discourse that breaks barriers and creates space for marginalized learners’ in 2018.

Núria’s motivation for coming to the Oxford Department of Education is her research collaboration in projects co-coordinated with Jenni Ingram on establishing an international network for research on supporting school mathematics teaching with linguistically disadvantaged learners. From her years as a secondary school in the 1990s, important challenges posed to mathematics education practice remain. Learners of mathematics who are linguistically disadvantaged for a variety of reasons, including impoverished socioeconomic status, continue to be educationally disadvantaged at a considerable risk of school failure and early dropout. More research will hopefully shed light on how to identify and develop improved practices to enable greater access to school mathematics for all learners.

Publications

SELECTION OF 10 LAST-DECADE PUBLICATIONS
[For more publications and research details, see https://orcid.org/0000-0001-5199-6336]
– Planas, N., & Chronaki, A. (2021). Multilingual mathematics learning from a dialogic-translanguaging perspective. In N. Planas, C. Morgan, & M. Schütte (Eds.), Classroom research on mathematics and language: Seeing learners and teachers differently (pp. 151-166). Routledge.
– Planas, N. (2021). How specific can language as resource become for the teaching of algebraic concepts? ZDM-Mathematics Education, 53(2), 277-288.
– Planas, N. (2021). Challenges and opportunities from translingual research on multilingual mathematics classrooms. In A. A. Essien, & A. Msimanga (Eds.), Multilingual education yearbook 2021. Policy and practice in STEM multilingual contexts (pp. 1-18). Springer.
– Planas, N., & Ngoepe, M. (2019). Right to learn mathematics: From language as right to language as resource. In C. Xenofontos (Ed.), Equity in mathematics education. Addressing a changing world (pp. 93-110). Information Age Publishing.
– Planas, N., & Schütte, M. (2018). Research frameworks for the study of language in mathematics education, ZDM-Mathematics Education, 50(6), 965-974.
– Planas, N. (2018). Language as resource: A key notion for understanding the complexity of mathematics learning. Educational Studies in Mathematics, 98(3), 215-229.
– Planas, N., Morgan, C., & Schütte, M. (2018). Mathematics education and language. Lessons and directions from two decades of research. In T. Dreyfus, M. Artigue, S. Prediger, D. Potari, & Ruthven (Eds.), Developing research in mathematics education. Twenty years of communication, cooperation and collaboration in Europe (pp. 196-210). Routledge.
– Planas, N. (2014). One speaker, two languages: Learning opportunities in the mathematics classroom. Educational Studies in Mathematics, 87(1), 51-66.
– Planas, N., & Setati Phakeng, M. (2014). On the process of gaining language as a resource in mathematics education. ZDM-Mathematics Education, 46(6), 883-893.
– Planas, N., & Civil, M. (2013). Language-as-resource and language-as-political. Tensions in the bilingual mathematics classroom. Mathematics Education Research Journal, 25(3), 361-378.

 

https://portalrecerca.uab.cat/en/persons/nuria-planas-raig-3

https://orcid.org/0000-0001-5199-6336

 

Cindy works at the intersection of learning, design, and technology, with a keen interest in the orchestration of future-ready tech-enabled learning.

She is curious how the deployment of adaptive learning systems to schools will impact classroom learning and hopes to learn more about the human-machine partnership in education. Specifically, her research is concerned with the implications that the use of such systems has on teacher-student interactions, as teachers grapple with balancing personalised learning and learning in community, as well as curriculum demands and student interests. These are some tensions which could potentially be exacerbated by affordances of adaptive learning systems.

Prior to embarking on the DPhil in Education at Oxford, Cindy worked as the Lead Specialist in Technologies for Learning at the Educational Technology Division of Ministry of Education, Singapore. She had previously completed graduate studies at the National University of Singapore and Stanford University where she was awarded Master of Arts in English Studies and Master of Arts in Education.

Reem is DPhil student from Saudi Arabia.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she worked as a Teacher, Professional Developer, then, became a Supervisor and Researcher in the Ministry of Education where she received a scholarship to pursue her DPhil education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests lie in the area of Teacher Education and Professional Learning Policy and Practice.

Publications
  • Alqahtani, Reem (2020). Saudi Universities Role in Developing Teacher Professional Development Programs: Elite Universities Experience. Journal of Educational Sciences. King Saud University.
  • Alqahtani, Reem. (2020). The effect of implementing UDL-based activities in improving EFL learners’ academic achievement and attitudes towards L2. In L. Salas, & E. Ager, Creating Quiet reflective Spaces: Language Teacher Researches Professional Development (pp. 61-62). IATEFL publications.

Lena Zlock is researching the integration of digital technology into structures of teaching, learning, and education in higher education. Her particular focus is on the digital humanities and the potential for digital methods to transform humanistic study. She works with Professor Niall Winters and Dr. James Robson.

Lena’s research interests stem from her education as an M.St. student and Ertegun Graduate Scholar in Modern Languages at the University of Oxford, and as a B.A. student in History at Stanford University. As an undergraduate, she started the Voltaire Library Project, a digitally and data-driven study of the 6,763-book collection of French Enlightenment philosopher Voltaire (you can read more about the project here and here). She has been interested in the application of digital technology to humanistic teaching since her days in Princeton Day School, where she developed an interdisciplinary curriculum on Mexico City (visit the course website here).

Her research on Voltaire led her to think more broadly about the place of digital methods in the humanities classroom, and how new technologies will revolutionise the liberal arts and higher education. As a DPhil candidate, Lena will examine the negotiation and implementation of new learning technologies within the University of Oxford at undergraduate and graduate levels.

Lena is involved in a number of digital humanities initiatives in Oxford. She previously served as the inaugural fellow of the Voltaire Lab at Oxford’s Voltaire Foundation. As a master’s student, Lena co-formulated the convergence agenda for Oxford digital humanities with Professor Howard Hotson, and is currently employed by the Humanities Division to assist with the development of an M.St. degree in Digital Scholarship (read more here). Lena set up and helps to run the History of the Book blog for the Faculty of Medieval and Modern Languages and the Oxford Book History Twitter account.

Lena welcomes inquiries from undergraduate and postgraduate students from Oxford and beyond seeking to get involved with the digital humanities in any capacity. The History of the Book blog also welcomes inquiries from prospective contributors.

 

Abbey is a Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education, in collaboration with the Department of Engineering.

Before joining the DPhil program, Abbey obtained a B.A. in Applied Linguistics with minors in Russian and Chinese from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford. She was the recipient of a Benjamin A. Gilman International Scholarship through U.S. Department of State for study in Russia and was awarded two Foreign Language and Area Studies (FLAS) Fellowships for study in both Russia and China. She holds both TESOL and TEFL certificates and has taught English as a Second Language in various contexts to a wide variety of learner populations.

Abbey’s main research interests lie in the use of technology to facilitate language learning. Her DPhil research focuses on the development of a virtual reality program to bridge the gaps that students face when learning languages through distance learning.

Julie Chia-Yi Lin is a Doctoral student at the University of Oxford, funded by the Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholarship. Her research focus on Internationalization, Policy, Management and Institutional Strategy is rooted in her professional experience in publishing and higher education, as well as from her observations regarding the continuous change in global educational dynamics.

Julie completed her B.A. at National Taiwan University, and earned a joint M.A. from the University of Vienna and the University of Wroclaw. She was previously employed as an officer for the Office of International Affairs at National Taiwan University, and then as a Publisher at Emerald Publishing.

She focuses on the development of higher education, particularly in the processes of internationalization and globalization, and tries to deliver perspectives from different Institutional sectors, and a wide array of participants. She is mindful of the influence that culture has on the development and reception of these processes, and has a special interest in the East Asia region, and Confucian-influenced higher education systems. In her doctoral research, she investigates higher ed institutional strategy, and the relationship it has with real-world policy. This includes delving into the specific interpretation and implementation of official policy by different stakeholders within the institution- faculty, administration, and management.

Publications

Lin, J. (2015). The Impact of Globalization on Taiwan’s Education Policy: The International Student. In A. Lipinsky. (Ed), Vienna Taiwan Studies Series: Immigration societies, Taiwan and Beyond. (pp. 129-151). Vienna: LIT VERLAG GmbH & Co. KG

Yibo Wang has an MA in International Marketing from the Coventry University (UK) and a Master’s in Management: Leadership and Organizational Change from the University of Birmingham (UK).

His doctoral research focuses on ‘knowledge hiding’, ‘leadership style’ and ‘Confucian culture’ in Chinese education and training institutions.

As empirical studies on ‘knowledge hiding’ in the Chinese context are scarce, Yibo hopes to uncover underlying mechanism of knowledge hiding and find its potential influence factors.

Prior to coming to Oxford, he worked as a CEO in an educational consultancy based in Beijing that advised the investment and marketing analyses on education and training industry.

Riziki’s current DPhil research focuses on emergent literacy of refugee children within multilingual settings.

Prior to commencing her DPhil research, Riziki completed an MSc in Child Development at the University of Oxford, looking at the role of teacher behavioural and cognitive judgments on the learning trajectories of Black primary school students in England.

Her research interests are education access and wellbeing of children in resettlement and asylum contexts. In line with this, her research in the past has focused on integration and resettlement processes of refugees and immigrants within Canada.

Publications

Bhattacharyya, P., Ogoe, S., Riziki, A., & Wilkinson, L. (2020). In search of a “home”: comparing the housing challenges experienced by recently arrived Yazidi and Syrian Refugees in Canada. Manuscript submitted for publication.

Bhattacharyya, P., Riziki, A., Songose, L., Ogoe, S., & Wilkinson, L. (2020). Understanding the link between pre-arrival education and trauma and language learning: A case study of Yazidi women in Canada. Canadian Diversity, 17(2).

Bhattacharyya, P., Riziki, A., & Wilkinson, L. (2018). “Settlement Service Use among Syrian Refugees in Canada” Canadian Diversity 15(1).

Wilkinson, L., Bhattacharya, P., Garcea, J., Abdul-Karim, A., Riziki, A., & Schnieders, M. (2017). Finding home: Some housing considerations for refugee families with children. Canadian Diversity, 14 (3), 31-35

Wilkinson, L., Bhattacharyya, P., Riziki, A., & Abdul-Karim, A. (2018).Yazidi Refugee Resettlement in Canada. Calgary: Immigration Refugees and Citizenship Canada-Integration Branch (Prairies and Territories Region).

Wilkinson, L., Garcea, J., Bhattacharyya, P., Riziki, A., Abdul Karim, A. (2017). Resettling on the Canadian Prairies: Integration of Syrian refugees. Calgary: Immigration Refugees and Citizenship Canada, Integration Branch-Prairies., Northwest Territories Division., & Alberta Association of Immigrant Serving Agencies

Anushay completed her BSc Psychology from UCL, where she also started her master’s in Developmental Neuroscience and Psychopathology. She was based at Yale University for her master’s thesis, where she worked with Dr Craig Bailey at the Yale Center for Emotional Intelligence to understand children’s emotion development. Anushay’s research interests include understanding child development across different cultures, factors that might be affecting it, and devising culture-specific ways to support children’s holistic development through the educational system. She is also keen on improving the research scope in Pakistan by working with Pakistani researchers, practitioners, and families.

Anushay balances her research with her position as the founder of a non-profit, Resources for Children, which aims to understand and support children’s development in Pakistan.

Publications

  1. Mazhar, A. (2022, April). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Spring Preview, New Haven, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2021, December). Does an extended family improve mentalising in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK & Pakistan. 2nd International Foundation University Conference of Psychology, Rawalpindi, Pakistan.
  3. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Theory of Mind in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK and Pakistan. Harvard Trends in Psychology Summit, Cambridge, United States.
  1. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Research Rounds, New Haven, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2020, October). Developing a non-profit to advance autism research in Pakistan. Anna Freud Centre Seminar Series, London, United Kingdom

 

Núria is a Professor of Mathematics Education at Autonomous University of Barcelona. Her research is about language and mathematics in secondary school classrooms and professional development contexts with mathematics teachers.

Her first degree was in Mathematics at University of Barcelona (1995). Soon after her initiation as a secondary school mathematics teacher in highly multilingual classrooms of Barcelona, she started her PhD at the UAB Division of Mathematics Education. She wanted to understand the critical factors behind the under-performance in school mathematics of many learners from poor urban backgrounds and recent histories of migration. Since then, she has been committed to classroom and teacher education research grounded on community work with schools and mathematics teachers in urban areas of poverty. Her years as a school teacher have provided her with greater insights into her work as a researcher and have strongly influenced the adoption of sociocultural and sociopolitical approaches to mathematics teaching and learning.

Núria was given the ICREA Academia Award of the Catalan Institution for Research and Advanced Studies in 2013, in recognition of her contributions to research on multilingual mathematics teaching and learning. She was elected to the Executive Committee of the International Commission on Mathematical Instruction as Member-at-Large in 2021, and to the International Committee of the International Group for the Psychology of Mathematics Education from 2010 to 2014. She served as Extraordinarious Professor of Mathematics Education at the University of South Africa from 2013 to 2020. She was Visiting Scholar at London South Bank University, University of Arizona, and University of North Carolina at Chapel-Hill.

Núria is currently on the editorial board of the international journal Mathematics Education Research Journal and Journal of Mathematics Teacher Education. Till 2021 she was the editor-in-chief of the Advances of Research in Mathematics Education, the official journal of the Spanish Society of Research in Mathematics Education. She is the leading co-editor of a 2018 special issue on language research in mathematics education published in ZDM-Mathematics Education, and the leading co-editor of a special issue on decentring mathematics teaching education, to be published in the Journal of Mathematics Teacher Education, February 2024.

She chaired the 7th Topic Conference of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education on Language and Mathematics (Dresden, 2018), and the ERME Topic Working Group on Language and Mathematics from 2015 to 2020. The collaborations established in the ERME context enabled for a broad range of experts to come together and move forward the research field in the form of an co-edited Routledge volume entitled ‘Classroom research on mathematics and language: Seeing learners and teachers differently’ in 2021, with Núria as the leading co-editor. She has also been co-editor of the Springer volume resulting from the 21st ICMI Study on Language Diversity and Mathematics Education in 2016, and of the Brill volume entitled ‘Mathematical discourse that breaks barriers and creates space for marginalized learners’ in 2018.

Núria’s motivation for coming to the Oxford Department of Education is her research collaboration in projects co-coordinated with Jenni Ingram on establishing an international network for research on supporting school mathematics teaching with linguistically disadvantaged learners. From her years as a secondary school in the 1990s, important challenges posed to mathematics education practice remain. Learners of mathematics who are linguistically disadvantaged for a variety of reasons, including impoverished socioeconomic status, continue to be educationally disadvantaged at a considerable risk of school failure and early dropout. More research will hopefully shed light on how to identify and develop improved practices to enable greater access to school mathematics for all learners.

Publications

SELECTION OF 10 LAST-DECADE PUBLICATIONS
[For more publications and research details, see https://orcid.org/0000-0001-5199-6336]
– Planas, N., & Chronaki, A. (2021). Multilingual mathematics learning from a dialogic-translanguaging perspective. In N. Planas, C. Morgan, & M. Schütte (Eds.), Classroom research on mathematics and language: Seeing learners and teachers differently (pp. 151-166). Routledge.
– Planas, N. (2021). How specific can language as resource become for the teaching of algebraic concepts? ZDM-Mathematics Education, 53(2), 277-288.
– Planas, N. (2021). Challenges and opportunities from translingual research on multilingual mathematics classrooms. In A. A. Essien, & A. Msimanga (Eds.), Multilingual education yearbook 2021. Policy and practice in STEM multilingual contexts (pp. 1-18). Springer.
– Planas, N., & Ngoepe, M. (2019). Right to learn mathematics: From language as right to language as resource. In C. Xenofontos (Ed.), Equity in mathematics education. Addressing a changing world (pp. 93-110). Information Age Publishing.
– Planas, N., & Schütte, M. (2018). Research frameworks for the study of language in mathematics education, ZDM-Mathematics Education, 50(6), 965-974.
– Planas, N. (2018). Language as resource: A key notion for understanding the complexity of mathematics learning. Educational Studies in Mathematics, 98(3), 215-229.
– Planas, N., Morgan, C., & Schütte, M. (2018). Mathematics education and language. Lessons and directions from two decades of research. In T. Dreyfus, M. Artigue, S. Prediger, D. Potari, & Ruthven (Eds.), Developing research in mathematics education. Twenty years of communication, cooperation and collaboration in Europe (pp. 196-210). Routledge.
– Planas, N. (2014). One speaker, two languages: Learning opportunities in the mathematics classroom. Educational Studies in Mathematics, 87(1), 51-66.
– Planas, N., & Setati Phakeng, M. (2014). On the process of gaining language as a resource in mathematics education. ZDM-Mathematics Education, 46(6), 883-893.
– Planas, N., & Civil, M. (2013). Language-as-resource and language-as-political. Tensions in the bilingual mathematics classroom. Mathematics Education Research Journal, 25(3), 361-378.

 

https://portalrecerca.uab.cat/en/persons/nuria-planas-raig-3

https://orcid.org/0000-0001-5199-6336

 

Cindy works at the intersection of learning, design, and technology, with a keen interest in the orchestration of future-ready tech-enabled learning.

She is curious how the deployment of adaptive learning systems to schools will impact classroom learning and hopes to learn more about the human-machine partnership in education. Specifically, her research is concerned with the implications that the use of such systems has on teacher-student interactions, as teachers grapple with balancing personalised learning and learning in community, as well as curriculum demands and student interests. These are some tensions which could potentially be exacerbated by affordances of adaptive learning systems.

Prior to embarking on the DPhil in Education at Oxford, Cindy worked as the Lead Specialist in Technologies for Learning at the Educational Technology Division of Ministry of Education, Singapore. She had previously completed graduate studies at the National University of Singapore and Stanford University where she was awarded Master of Arts in English Studies and Master of Arts in Education.

Reem is DPhil student from Saudi Arabia.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she worked as a Teacher, Professional Developer, then, became a Supervisor and Researcher in the Ministry of Education where she received a scholarship to pursue her DPhil education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests lie in the area of Teacher Education and Professional Learning Policy and Practice.

Publications
  • Alqahtani, Reem (2020). Saudi Universities Role in Developing Teacher Professional Development Programs: Elite Universities Experience. Journal of Educational Sciences. King Saud University.
  • Alqahtani, Reem. (2020). The effect of implementing UDL-based activities in improving EFL learners’ academic achievement and attitudes towards L2. In L. Salas, & E. Ager, Creating Quiet reflective Spaces: Language Teacher Researches Professional Development (pp. 61-62). IATEFL publications.

Lena Zlock is researching the integration of digital technology into structures of teaching, learning, and education in higher education. Her particular focus is on the digital humanities and the potential for digital methods to transform humanistic study. She works with Professor Niall Winters and Dr. James Robson.

Lena’s research interests stem from her education as an M.St. student and Ertegun Graduate Scholar in Modern Languages at the University of Oxford, and as a B.A. student in History at Stanford University. As an undergraduate, she started the Voltaire Library Project, a digitally and data-driven study of the 6,763-book collection of French Enlightenment philosopher Voltaire (you can read more about the project here and here). She has been interested in the application of digital technology to humanistic teaching since her days in Princeton Day School, where she developed an interdisciplinary curriculum on Mexico City (visit the course website here).

Her research on Voltaire led her to think more broadly about the place of digital methods in the humanities classroom, and how new technologies will revolutionise the liberal arts and higher education. As a DPhil candidate, Lena will examine the negotiation and implementation of new learning technologies within the University of Oxford at undergraduate and graduate levels.

Lena is involved in a number of digital humanities initiatives in Oxford. She previously served as the inaugural fellow of the Voltaire Lab at Oxford’s Voltaire Foundation. As a master’s student, Lena co-formulated the convergence agenda for Oxford digital humanities with Professor Howard Hotson, and is currently employed by the Humanities Division to assist with the development of an M.St. degree in Digital Scholarship (read more here). Lena set up and helps to run the History of the Book blog for the Faculty of Medieval and Modern Languages and the Oxford Book History Twitter account.

Lena welcomes inquiries from undergraduate and postgraduate students from Oxford and beyond seeking to get involved with the digital humanities in any capacity. The History of the Book blog also welcomes inquiries from prospective contributors.

 

Abbey is a Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education, in collaboration with the Department of Engineering.

Before joining the DPhil program, Abbey obtained a B.A. in Applied Linguistics with minors in Russian and Chinese from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford. She was the recipient of a Benjamin A. Gilman International Scholarship through U.S. Department of State for study in Russia and was awarded two Foreign Language and Area Studies (FLAS) Fellowships for study in both Russia and China. She holds both TESOL and TEFL certificates and has taught English as a Second Language in various contexts to a wide variety of learner populations.

Abbey’s main research interests lie in the use of technology to facilitate language learning. Her DPhil research focuses on the development of a virtual reality program to bridge the gaps that students face when learning languages through distance learning.

Julie Chia-Yi Lin is a Doctoral student at the University of Oxford, funded by the Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholarship. Her research focus on Internationalization, Policy, Management and Institutional Strategy is rooted in her professional experience in publishing and higher education, as well as from her observations regarding the continuous change in global educational dynamics.

Julie completed her B.A. at National Taiwan University, and earned a joint M.A. from the University of Vienna and the University of Wroclaw. She was previously employed as an officer for the Office of International Affairs at National Taiwan University, and then as a Publisher at Emerald Publishing.

She focuses on the development of higher education, particularly in the processes of internationalization and globalization, and tries to deliver perspectives from different Institutional sectors, and a wide array of participants. She is mindful of the influence that culture has on the development and reception of these processes, and has a special interest in the East Asia region, and Confucian-influenced higher education systems. In her doctoral research, she investigates higher ed institutional strategy, and the relationship it has with real-world policy. This includes delving into the specific interpretation and implementation of official policy by different stakeholders within the institution- faculty, administration, and management.

Publications

Lin, J. (2015). The Impact of Globalization on Taiwan’s Education Policy: The International Student. In A. Lipinsky. (Ed), Vienna Taiwan Studies Series: Immigration societies, Taiwan and Beyond. (pp. 129-151). Vienna: LIT VERLAG GmbH & Co. KG

Yibo Wang has an MA in International Marketing from the Coventry University (UK) and a Master’s in Management: Leadership and Organizational Change from the University of Birmingham (UK).

His doctoral research focuses on ‘knowledge hiding’, ‘leadership style’ and ‘Confucian culture’ in Chinese education and training institutions.

As empirical studies on ‘knowledge hiding’ in the Chinese context are scarce, Yibo hopes to uncover underlying mechanism of knowledge hiding and find its potential influence factors.

Prior to coming to Oxford, he worked as a CEO in an educational consultancy based in Beijing that advised the investment and marketing analyses on education and training industry.

Riziki’s current DPhil research focuses on emergent literacy of refugee children within multilingual settings.

Prior to commencing her DPhil research, Riziki completed an MSc in Child Development at the University of Oxford, looking at the role of teacher behavioural and cognitive judgments on the learning trajectories of Black primary school students in England.

Her research interests are education access and wellbeing of children in resettlement and asylum contexts. In line with this, her research in the past has focused on integration and resettlement processes of refugees and immigrants within Canada.

Publications

Bhattacharyya, P., Ogoe, S., Riziki, A., & Wilkinson, L. (2020). In search of a “home”: comparing the housing challenges experienced by recently arrived Yazidi and Syrian Refugees in Canada. Manuscript submitted for publication.

Bhattacharyya, P., Riziki, A., Songose, L., Ogoe, S., & Wilkinson, L. (2020). Understanding the link between pre-arrival education and trauma and language learning: A case study of Yazidi women in Canada. Canadian Diversity, 17(2).

Bhattacharyya, P., Riziki, A., & Wilkinson, L. (2018). “Settlement Service Use among Syrian Refugees in Canada” Canadian Diversity 15(1).

Wilkinson, L., Bhattacharya, P., Garcea, J., Abdul-Karim, A., Riziki, A., & Schnieders, M. (2017). Finding home: Some housing considerations for refugee families with children. Canadian Diversity, 14 (3), 31-35

Wilkinson, L., Bhattacharyya, P., Riziki, A., & Abdul-Karim, A. (2018).Yazidi Refugee Resettlement in Canada. Calgary: Immigration Refugees and Citizenship Canada-Integration Branch (Prairies and Territories Region).

Wilkinson, L., Garcea, J., Bhattacharyya, P., Riziki, A., Abdul Karim, A. (2017). Resettling on the Canadian Prairies: Integration of Syrian refugees. Calgary: Immigration Refugees and Citizenship Canada, Integration Branch-Prairies., Northwest Territories Division., & Alberta Association of Immigrant Serving Agencies

Anushay completed her BSc Psychology from UCL, where she also started her master’s in Developmental Neuroscience and Psychopathology. She was based at Yale University for her master’s thesis, where she worked with Dr Craig Bailey at the Yale Center for Emotional Intelligence to understand children’s emotion development. Anushay’s research interests include understanding child development across different cultures, factors that might be affecting it, and devising culture-specific ways to support children’s holistic development through the educational system. She is also keen on improving the research scope in Pakistan by working with Pakistani researchers, practitioners, and families.

Anushay balances her research with her position as the founder of a non-profit, Resources for Children, which aims to understand and support children’s development in Pakistan.

Publications

  1. Mazhar, A. (2022, April). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Spring Preview, New Haven, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2021, December). Does an extended family improve mentalising in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK & Pakistan. 2nd International Foundation University Conference of Psychology, Rawalpindi, Pakistan.
  3. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Theory of Mind in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK and Pakistan. Harvard Trends in Psychology Summit, Cambridge, United States.
  1. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Research Rounds, New Haven, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2020, October). Developing a non-profit to advance autism research in Pakistan. Anna Freud Centre Seminar Series, London, United Kingdom

 

Núria is a Professor of Mathematics Education at Autonomous University of Barcelona. Her research is about language and mathematics in secondary school classrooms and professional development contexts with mathematics teachers.

Her first degree was in Mathematics at University of Barcelona (1995). Soon after her initiation as a secondary school mathematics teacher in highly multilingual classrooms of Barcelona, she started her PhD at the UAB Division of Mathematics Education. She wanted to understand the critical factors behind the under-performance in school mathematics of many learners from poor urban backgrounds and recent histories of migration. Since then, she has been committed to classroom and teacher education research grounded on community work with schools and mathematics teachers in urban areas of poverty. Her years as a school teacher have provided her with greater insights into her work as a researcher and have strongly influenced the adoption of sociocultural and sociopolitical approaches to mathematics teaching and learning.

Núria was given the ICREA Academia Award of the Catalan Institution for Research and Advanced Studies in 2013, in recognition of her contributions to research on multilingual mathematics teaching and learning. She was elected to the Executive Committee of the International Commission on Mathematical Instruction as Member-at-Large in 2021, and to the International Committee of the International Group for the Psychology of Mathematics Education from 2010 to 2014. She served as Extraordinarious Professor of Mathematics Education at the University of South Africa from 2013 to 2020. She was Visiting Scholar at London South Bank University, University of Arizona, and University of North Carolina at Chapel-Hill.

Núria is currently on the editorial board of the international journal Mathematics Education Research Journal and Journal of Mathematics Teacher Education. Till 2021 she was the editor-in-chief of the Advances of Research in Mathematics Education, the official journal of the Spanish Society of Research in Mathematics Education. She is the leading co-editor of a 2018 special issue on language research in mathematics education published in ZDM-Mathematics Education, and the leading co-editor of a special issue on decentring mathematics teaching education, to be published in the Journal of Mathematics Teacher Education, February 2024.

She chaired the 7th Topic Conference of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education on Language and Mathematics (Dresden, 2018), and the ERME Topic Working Group on Language and Mathematics from 2015 to 2020. The collaborations established in the ERME context enabled for a broad range of experts to come together and move forward the research field in the form of an co-edited Routledge volume entitled ‘Classroom research on mathematics and language: Seeing learners and teachers differently’ in 2021, with Núria as the leading co-editor. She has also been co-editor of the Springer volume resulting from the 21st ICMI Study on Language Diversity and Mathematics Education in 2016, and of the Brill volume entitled ‘Mathematical discourse that breaks barriers and creates space for marginalized learners’ in 2018.

Núria’s motivation for coming to the Oxford Department of Education is her research collaboration in projects co-coordinated with Jenni Ingram on establishing an international network for research on supporting school mathematics teaching with linguistically disadvantaged learners. From her years as a secondary school in the 1990s, important challenges posed to mathematics education practice remain. Learners of mathematics who are linguistically disadvantaged for a variety of reasons, including impoverished socioeconomic status, continue to be educationally disadvantaged at a considerable risk of school failure and early dropout. More research will hopefully shed light on how to identify and develop improved practices to enable greater access to school mathematics for all learners.

Publications

SELECTION OF 10 LAST-DECADE PUBLICATIONS
[For more publications and research details, see https://orcid.org/0000-0001-5199-6336]
– Planas, N., & Chronaki, A. (2021). Multilingual mathematics learning from a dialogic-translanguaging perspective. In N. Planas, C. Morgan, & M. Schütte (Eds.), Classroom research on mathematics and language: Seeing learners and teachers differently (pp. 151-166). Routledge.
– Planas, N. (2021). How specific can language as resource become for the teaching of algebraic concepts? ZDM-Mathematics Education, 53(2), 277-288.
– Planas, N. (2021). Challenges and opportunities from translingual research on multilingual mathematics classrooms. In A. A. Essien, & A. Msimanga (Eds.), Multilingual education yearbook 2021. Policy and practice in STEM multilingual contexts (pp. 1-18). Springer.
– Planas, N., & Ngoepe, M. (2019). Right to learn mathematics: From language as right to language as resource. In C. Xenofontos (Ed.), Equity in mathematics education. Addressing a changing world (pp. 93-110). Information Age Publishing.
– Planas, N., & Schütte, M. (2018). Research frameworks for the study of language in mathematics education, ZDM-Mathematics Education, 50(6), 965-974.
– Planas, N. (2018). Language as resource: A key notion for understanding the complexity of mathematics learning. Educational Studies in Mathematics, 98(3), 215-229.
– Planas, N., Morgan, C., & Schütte, M. (2018). Mathematics education and language. Lessons and directions from two decades of research. In T. Dreyfus, M. Artigue, S. Prediger, D. Potari, & Ruthven (Eds.), Developing research in mathematics education. Twenty years of communication, cooperation and collaboration in Europe (pp. 196-210). Routledge.
– Planas, N. (2014). One speaker, two languages: Learning opportunities in the mathematics classroom. Educational Studies in Mathematics, 87(1), 51-66.
– Planas, N., & Setati Phakeng, M. (2014). On the process of gaining language as a resource in mathematics education. ZDM-Mathematics Education, 46(6), 883-893.
– Planas, N., & Civil, M. (2013). Language-as-resource and language-as-political. Tensions in the bilingual mathematics classroom. Mathematics Education Research Journal, 25(3), 361-378.

 

https://portalrecerca.uab.cat/en/persons/nuria-planas-raig-3

https://orcid.org/0000-0001-5199-6336

 

Cindy works at the intersection of learning, design, and technology, with a keen interest in the orchestration of future-ready tech-enabled learning.

She is curious how the deployment of adaptive learning systems to schools will impact classroom learning and hopes to learn more about the human-machine partnership in education. Specifically, her research is concerned with the implications that the use of such systems has on teacher-student interactions, as teachers grapple with balancing personalised learning and learning in community, as well as curriculum demands and student interests. These are some tensions which could potentially be exacerbated by affordances of adaptive learning systems.

Prior to embarking on the DPhil in Education at Oxford, Cindy worked as the Lead Specialist in Technologies for Learning at the Educational Technology Division of Ministry of Education, Singapore. She had previously completed graduate studies at the National University of Singapore and Stanford University where she was awarded Master of Arts in English Studies and Master of Arts in Education.

Reem is DPhil student from Saudi Arabia.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she worked as a Teacher, Professional Developer, then, became a Supervisor and Researcher in the Ministry of Education where she received a scholarship to pursue her DPhil education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests lie in the area of Teacher Education and Professional Learning Policy and Practice.

Publications
  • Alqahtani, Reem (2020). Saudi Universities Role in Developing Teacher Professional Development Programs: Elite Universities Experience. Journal of Educational Sciences. King Saud University.
  • Alqahtani, Reem. (2020). The effect of implementing UDL-based activities in improving EFL learners’ academic achievement and attitudes towards L2. In L. Salas, & E. Ager, Creating Quiet reflective Spaces: Language Teacher Researches Professional Development (pp. 61-62). IATEFL publications.

Lena Zlock is researching the integration of digital technology into structures of teaching, learning, and education in higher education. Her particular focus is on the digital humanities and the potential for digital methods to transform humanistic study. She works with Professor Niall Winters and Dr. James Robson.

Lena’s research interests stem from her education as an M.St. student and Ertegun Graduate Scholar in Modern Languages at the University of Oxford, and as a B.A. student in History at Stanford University. As an undergraduate, she started the Voltaire Library Project, a digitally and data-driven study of the 6,763-book collection of French Enlightenment philosopher Voltaire (you can read more about the project here and here). She has been interested in the application of digital technology to humanistic teaching since her days in Princeton Day School, where she developed an interdisciplinary curriculum on Mexico City (visit the course website here).

Her research on Voltaire led her to think more broadly about the place of digital methods in the humanities classroom, and how new technologies will revolutionise the liberal arts and higher education. As a DPhil candidate, Lena will examine the negotiation and implementation of new learning technologies within the University of Oxford at undergraduate and graduate levels.

Lena is involved in a number of digital humanities initiatives in Oxford. She previously served as the inaugural fellow of the Voltaire Lab at Oxford’s Voltaire Foundation. As a master’s student, Lena co-formulated the convergence agenda for Oxford digital humanities with Professor Howard Hotson, and is currently employed by the Humanities Division to assist with the development of an M.St. degree in Digital Scholarship (read more here). Lena set up and helps to run the History of the Book blog for the Faculty of Medieval and Modern Languages and the Oxford Book History Twitter account.

Lena welcomes inquiries from undergraduate and postgraduate students from Oxford and beyond seeking to get involved with the digital humanities in any capacity. The History of the Book blog also welcomes inquiries from prospective contributors.

 

Abbey is a Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education, in collaboration with the Department of Engineering.

Before joining the DPhil program, Abbey obtained a B.A. in Applied Linguistics with minors in Russian and Chinese from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford. She was the recipient of a Benjamin A. Gilman International Scholarship through U.S. Department of State for study in Russia and was awarded two Foreign Language and Area Studies (FLAS) Fellowships for study in both Russia and China. She holds both TESOL and TEFL certificates and has taught English as a Second Language in various contexts to a wide variety of learner populations.

Abbey’s main research interests lie in the use of technology to facilitate language learning. Her DPhil research focuses on the development of a virtual reality program to bridge the gaps that students face when learning languages through distance learning.

Julie Chia-Yi Lin is a Doctoral student at the University of Oxford, funded by the Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholarship. Her research focus on Internationalization, Policy, Management and Institutional Strategy is rooted in her professional experience in publishing and higher education, as well as from her observations regarding the continuous change in global educational dynamics.

Julie completed her B.A. at National Taiwan University, and earned a joint M.A. from the University of Vienna and the University of Wroclaw. She was previously employed as an officer for the Office of International Affairs at National Taiwan University, and then as a Publisher at Emerald Publishing.

She focuses on the development of higher education, particularly in the processes of internationalization and globalization, and tries to deliver perspectives from different Institutional sectors, and a wide array of participants. She is mindful of the influence that culture has on the development and reception of these processes, and has a special interest in the East Asia region, and Confucian-influenced higher education systems. In her doctoral research, she investigates higher ed institutional strategy, and the relationship it has with real-world policy. This includes delving into the specific interpretation and implementation of official policy by different stakeholders within the institution- faculty, administration, and management.

Publications

Lin, J. (2015). The Impact of Globalization on Taiwan’s Education Policy: The International Student. In A. Lipinsky. (Ed), Vienna Taiwan Studies Series: Immigration societies, Taiwan and Beyond. (pp. 129-151). Vienna: LIT VERLAG GmbH & Co. KG

Yibo Wang has an MA in International Marketing from the Coventry University (UK) and a Master’s in Management: Leadership and Organizational Change from the University of Birmingham (UK).

His doctoral research focuses on ‘knowledge hiding’, ‘leadership style’ and ‘Confucian culture’ in Chinese education and training institutions.

As empirical studies on ‘knowledge hiding’ in the Chinese context are scarce, Yibo hopes to uncover underlying mechanism of knowledge hiding and find its potential influence factors.

Prior to coming to Oxford, he worked as a CEO in an educational consultancy based in Beijing that advised the investment and marketing analyses on education and training industry.

Riziki’s current DPhil research focuses on emergent literacy of refugee children within multilingual settings.

Prior to commencing her DPhil research, Riziki completed an MSc in Child Development at the University of Oxford, looking at the role of teacher behavioural and cognitive judgments on the learning trajectories of Black primary school students in England.

Her research interests are education access and wellbeing of children in resettlement and asylum contexts. In line with this, her research in the past has focused on integration and resettlement processes of refugees and immigrants within Canada.

Publications

Bhattacharyya, P., Ogoe, S., Riziki, A., & Wilkinson, L. (2020). In search of a “home”: comparing the housing challenges experienced by recently arrived Yazidi and Syrian Refugees in Canada. Manuscript submitted for publication.

Bhattacharyya, P., Riziki, A., Songose, L., Ogoe, S., & Wilkinson, L. (2020). Understanding the link between pre-arrival education and trauma and language learning: A case study of Yazidi women in Canada. Canadian Diversity, 17(2).

Bhattacharyya, P., Riziki, A., & Wilkinson, L. (2018). “Settlement Service Use among Syrian Refugees in Canada” Canadian Diversity 15(1).

Wilkinson, L., Bhattacharya, P., Garcea, J., Abdul-Karim, A., Riziki, A., & Schnieders, M. (2017). Finding home: Some housing considerations for refugee families with children. Canadian Diversity, 14 (3), 31-35

Wilkinson, L., Bhattacharyya, P., Riziki, A., & Abdul-Karim, A. (2018).Yazidi Refugee Resettlement in Canada. Calgary: Immigration Refugees and Citizenship Canada-Integration Branch (Prairies and Territories Region).

Wilkinson, L., Garcea, J., Bhattacharyya, P., Riziki, A., Abdul Karim, A. (2017). Resettling on the Canadian Prairies: Integration of Syrian refugees. Calgary: Immigration Refugees and Citizenship Canada, Integration Branch-Prairies., Northwest Territories Division., & Alberta Association of Immigrant Serving Agencies

Anushay completed her BSc Psychology from UCL, where she also started her master’s in Developmental Neuroscience and Psychopathology. She was based at Yale University for her master’s thesis, where she worked with Dr Craig Bailey at the Yale Center for Emotional Intelligence to understand children’s emotion development. Anushay’s research interests include understanding child development across different cultures, factors that might be affecting it, and devising culture-specific ways to support children’s holistic development through the educational system. She is also keen on improving the research scope in Pakistan by working with Pakistani researchers, practitioners, and families.

Anushay balances her research with her position as the founder of a non-profit, Resources for Children, which aims to understand and support children’s development in Pakistan.

Publications

  1. Mazhar, A. (2022, April). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Spring Preview, New Haven, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2021, December). Does an extended family improve mentalising in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK & Pakistan. 2nd International Foundation University Conference of Psychology, Rawalpindi, Pakistan.
  3. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Theory of Mind in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK and Pakistan. Harvard Trends in Psychology Summit, Cambridge, United States.
  1. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Research Rounds, New Haven, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2020, October). Developing a non-profit to advance autism research in Pakistan. Anna Freud Centre Seminar Series, London, United Kingdom

 

Núria is a Professor of Mathematics Education at Autonomous University of Barcelona. Her research is about language and mathematics in secondary school classrooms and professional development contexts with mathematics teachers.

Her first degree was in Mathematics at University of Barcelona (1995). Soon after her initiation as a secondary school mathematics teacher in highly multilingual classrooms of Barcelona, she started her PhD at the UAB Division of Mathematics Education. She wanted to understand the critical factors behind the under-performance in school mathematics of many learners from poor urban backgrounds and recent histories of migration. Since then, she has been committed to classroom and teacher education research grounded on community work with schools and mathematics teachers in urban areas of poverty. Her years as a school teacher have provided her with greater insights into her work as a researcher and have strongly influenced the adoption of sociocultural and sociopolitical approaches to mathematics teaching and learning.

Núria was given the ICREA Academia Award of the Catalan Institution for Research and Advanced Studies in 2013, in recognition of her contributions to research on multilingual mathematics teaching and learning. She was elected to the Executive Committee of the International Commission on Mathematical Instruction as Member-at-Large in 2021, and to the International Committee of the International Group for the Psychology of Mathematics Education from 2010 to 2014. She served as Extraordinarious Professor of Mathematics Education at the University of South Africa from 2013 to 2020. She was Visiting Scholar at London South Bank University, University of Arizona, and University of North Carolina at Chapel-Hill.

Núria is currently on the editorial board of the international journal Mathematics Education Research Journal and Journal of Mathematics Teacher Education. Till 2021 she was the editor-in-chief of the Advances of Research in Mathematics Education, the official journal of the Spanish Society of Research in Mathematics Education. She is the leading co-editor of a 2018 special issue on language research in mathematics education published in ZDM-Mathematics Education, and the leading co-editor of a special issue on decentring mathematics teaching education, to be published in the Journal of Mathematics Teacher Education, February 2024.

She chaired the 7th Topic Conference of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education on Language and Mathematics (Dresden, 2018), and the ERME Topic Working Group on Language and Mathematics from 2015 to 2020. The collaborations established in the ERME context enabled for a broad range of experts to come together and move forward the research field in the form of an co-edited Routledge volume entitled ‘Classroom research on mathematics and language: Seeing learners and teachers differently’ in 2021, with Núria as the leading co-editor. She has also been co-editor of the Springer volume resulting from the 21st ICMI Study on Language Diversity and Mathematics Education in 2016, and of the Brill volume entitled ‘Mathematical discourse that breaks barriers and creates space for marginalized learners’ in 2018.

Núria’s motivation for coming to the Oxford Department of Education is her research collaboration in projects co-coordinated with Jenni Ingram on establishing an international network for research on supporting school mathematics teaching with linguistically disadvantaged learners. From her years as a secondary school in the 1990s, important challenges posed to mathematics education practice remain. Learners of mathematics who are linguistically disadvantaged for a variety of reasons, including impoverished socioeconomic status, continue to be educationally disadvantaged at a considerable risk of school failure and early dropout. More research will hopefully shed light on how to identify and develop improved practices to enable greater access to school mathematics for all learners.

Publications

SELECTION OF 10 LAST-DECADE PUBLICATIONS
[For more publications and research details, see https://orcid.org/0000-0001-5199-6336]
– Planas, N., & Chronaki, A. (2021). Multilingual mathematics learning from a dialogic-translanguaging perspective. In N. Planas, C. Morgan, & M. Schütte (Eds.), Classroom research on mathematics and language: Seeing learners and teachers differently (pp. 151-166). Routledge.
– Planas, N. (2021). How specific can language as resource become for the teaching of algebraic concepts? ZDM-Mathematics Education, 53(2), 277-288.
– Planas, N. (2021). Challenges and opportunities from translingual research on multilingual mathematics classrooms. In A. A. Essien, & A. Msimanga (Eds.), Multilingual education yearbook 2021. Policy and practice in STEM multilingual contexts (pp. 1-18). Springer.
– Planas, N., & Ngoepe, M. (2019). Right to learn mathematics: From language as right to language as resource. In C. Xenofontos (Ed.), Equity in mathematics education. Addressing a changing world (pp. 93-110). Information Age Publishing.
– Planas, N., & Schütte, M. (2018). Research frameworks for the study of language in mathematics education, ZDM-Mathematics Education, 50(6), 965-974.
– Planas, N. (2018). Language as resource: A key notion for understanding the complexity of mathematics learning. Educational Studies in Mathematics, 98(3), 215-229.
– Planas, N., Morgan, C., & Schütte, M. (2018). Mathematics education and language. Lessons and directions from two decades of research. In T. Dreyfus, M. Artigue, S. Prediger, D. Potari, & Ruthven (Eds.), Developing research in mathematics education. Twenty years of communication, cooperation and collaboration in Europe (pp. 196-210). Routledge.
– Planas, N. (2014). One speaker, two languages: Learning opportunities in the mathematics classroom. Educational Studies in Mathematics, 87(1), 51-66.
– Planas, N., & Setati Phakeng, M. (2014). On the process of gaining language as a resource in mathematics education. ZDM-Mathematics Education, 46(6), 883-893.
– Planas, N., & Civil, M. (2013). Language-as-resource and language-as-political. Tensions in the bilingual mathematics classroom. Mathematics Education Research Journal, 25(3), 361-378.

 

https://portalrecerca.uab.cat/en/persons/nuria-planas-raig-3

https://orcid.org/0000-0001-5199-6336

 

Cindy works at the intersection of learning, design, and technology, with a keen interest in the orchestration of future-ready tech-enabled learning.

She is curious how the deployment of adaptive learning systems to schools will impact classroom learning and hopes to learn more about the human-machine partnership in education. Specifically, her research is concerned with the implications that the use of such systems has on teacher-student interactions, as teachers grapple with balancing personalised learning and learning in community, as well as curriculum demands and student interests. These are some tensions which could potentially be exacerbated by affordances of adaptive learning systems.

Prior to embarking on the DPhil in Education at Oxford, Cindy worked as the Lead Specialist in Technologies for Learning at the Educational Technology Division of Ministry of Education, Singapore. She had previously completed graduate studies at the National University of Singapore and Stanford University where she was awarded Master of Arts in English Studies and Master of Arts in Education.

Reem is DPhil student from Saudi Arabia.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she worked as a Teacher, Professional Developer, then, became a Supervisor and Researcher in the Ministry of Education where she received a scholarship to pursue her DPhil education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests lie in the area of Teacher Education and Professional Learning Policy and Practice.

Publications
  • Alqahtani, Reem (2020). Saudi Universities Role in Developing Teacher Professional Development Programs: Elite Universities Experience. Journal of Educational Sciences. King Saud University.
  • Alqahtani, Reem. (2020). The effect of implementing UDL-based activities in improving EFL learners’ academic achievement and attitudes towards L2. In L. Salas, & E. Ager, Creating Quiet reflective Spaces: Language Teacher Researches Professional Development (pp. 61-62). IATEFL publications.

Lena Zlock is researching the integration of digital technology into structures of teaching, learning, and education in higher education. Her particular focus is on the digital humanities and the potential for digital methods to transform humanistic study. She works with Professor Niall Winters and Dr. James Robson.

Lena’s research interests stem from her education as an M.St. student and Ertegun Graduate Scholar in Modern Languages at the University of Oxford, and as a B.A. student in History at Stanford University. As an undergraduate, she started the Voltaire Library Project, a digitally and data-driven study of the 6,763-book collection of French Enlightenment philosopher Voltaire (you can read more about the project here and here). She has been interested in the application of digital technology to humanistic teaching since her days in Princeton Day School, where she developed an interdisciplinary curriculum on Mexico City (visit the course website here).

Her research on Voltaire led her to think more broadly about the place of digital methods in the humanities classroom, and how new technologies will revolutionise the liberal arts and higher education. As a DPhil candidate, Lena will examine the negotiation and implementation of new learning technologies within the University of Oxford at undergraduate and graduate levels.

Lena is involved in a number of digital humanities initiatives in Oxford. She previously served as the inaugural fellow of the Voltaire Lab at Oxford’s Voltaire Foundation. As a master’s student, Lena co-formulated the convergence agenda for Oxford digital humanities with Professor Howard Hotson, and is currently employed by the Humanities Division to assist with the development of an M.St. degree in Digital Scholarship (read more here). Lena set up and helps to run the History of the Book blog for the Faculty of Medieval and Modern Languages and the Oxford Book History Twitter account.

Lena welcomes inquiries from undergraduate and postgraduate students from Oxford and beyond seeking to get involved with the digital humanities in any capacity. The History of the Book blog also welcomes inquiries from prospective contributors.

 

Abbey is a Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education, in collaboration with the Department of Engineering.

Before joining the DPhil program, Abbey obtained a B.A. in Applied Linguistics with minors in Russian and Chinese from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford. She was the recipient of a Benjamin A. Gilman International Scholarship through U.S. Department of State for study in Russia and was awarded two Foreign Language and Area Studies (FLAS) Fellowships for study in both Russia and China. She holds both TESOL and TEFL certificates and has taught English as a Second Language in various contexts to a wide variety of learner populations.

Abbey’s main research interests lie in the use of technology to facilitate language learning. Her DPhil research focuses on the development of a virtual reality program to bridge the gaps that students face when learning languages through distance learning.

Julie Chia-Yi Lin is a Doctoral student at the University of Oxford, funded by the Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholarship. Her research focus on Internationalization, Policy, Management and Institutional Strategy is rooted in her professional experience in publishing and higher education, as well as from her observations regarding the continuous change in global educational dynamics.

Julie completed her B.A. at National Taiwan University, and earned a joint M.A. from the University of Vienna and the University of Wroclaw. She was previously employed as an officer for the Office of International Affairs at National Taiwan University, and then as a Publisher at Emerald Publishing.

She focuses on the development of higher education, particularly in the processes of internationalization and globalization, and tries to deliver perspectives from different Institutional sectors, and a wide array of participants. She is mindful of the influence that culture has on the development and reception of these processes, and has a special interest in the East Asia region, and Confucian-influenced higher education systems. In her doctoral research, she investigates higher ed institutional strategy, and the relationship it has with real-world policy. This includes delving into the specific interpretation and implementation of official policy by different stakeholders within the institution- faculty, administration, and management.

Publications

Lin, J. (2015). The Impact of Globalization on Taiwan’s Education Policy: The International Student. In A. Lipinsky. (Ed), Vienna Taiwan Studies Series: Immigration societies, Taiwan and Beyond. (pp. 129-151). Vienna: LIT VERLAG GmbH & Co. KG

Yibo Wang has an MA in International Marketing from the Coventry University (UK) and a Master’s in Management: Leadership and Organizational Change from the University of Birmingham (UK).

His doctoral research focuses on ‘knowledge hiding’, ‘leadership style’ and ‘Confucian culture’ in Chinese education and training institutions.

As empirical studies on ‘knowledge hiding’ in the Chinese context are scarce, Yibo hopes to uncover underlying mechanism of knowledge hiding and find its potential influence factors.

Prior to coming to Oxford, he worked as a CEO in an educational consultancy based in Beijing that advised the investment and marketing analyses on education and training industry.

Riziki’s current DPhil research focuses on emergent literacy of refugee children within multilingual settings.

Prior to commencing her DPhil research, Riziki completed an MSc in Child Development at the University of Oxford, looking at the role of teacher behavioural and cognitive judgments on the learning trajectories of Black primary school students in England.

Her research interests are education access and wellbeing of children in resettlement and asylum contexts. In line with this, her research in the past has focused on integration and resettlement processes of refugees and immigrants within Canada.

Publications

Bhattacharyya, P., Ogoe, S., Riziki, A., & Wilkinson, L. (2020). In search of a “home”: comparing the housing challenges experienced by recently arrived Yazidi and Syrian Refugees in Canada. Manuscript submitted for publication.

Bhattacharyya, P., Riziki, A., Songose, L., Ogoe, S., & Wilkinson, L. (2020). Understanding the link between pre-arrival education and trauma and language learning: A case study of Yazidi women in Canada. Canadian Diversity, 17(2).

Bhattacharyya, P., Riziki, A., & Wilkinson, L. (2018). “Settlement Service Use among Syrian Refugees in Canada” Canadian Diversity 15(1).

Wilkinson, L., Bhattacharya, P., Garcea, J., Abdul-Karim, A., Riziki, A., & Schnieders, M. (2017). Finding home: Some housing considerations for refugee families with children. Canadian Diversity, 14 (3), 31-35

Wilkinson, L., Bhattacharyya, P., Riziki, A., & Abdul-Karim, A. (2018).Yazidi Refugee Resettlement in Canada. Calgary: Immigration Refugees and Citizenship Canada-Integration Branch (Prairies and Territories Region).

Wilkinson, L., Garcea, J., Bhattacharyya, P., Riziki, A., Abdul Karim, A. (2017). Resettling on the Canadian Prairies: Integration of Syrian refugees. Calgary: Immigration Refugees and Citizenship Canada, Integration Branch-Prairies., Northwest Territories Division., & Alberta Association of Immigrant Serving Agencies

Anushay completed her BSc Psychology from UCL, where she also started her master’s in Developmental Neuroscience and Psychopathology. She was based at Yale University for her master’s thesis, where she worked with Dr Craig Bailey at the Yale Center for Emotional Intelligence to understand children’s emotion development. Anushay’s research interests include understanding child development across different cultures, factors that might be affecting it, and devising culture-specific ways to support children’s holistic development through the educational system. She is also keen on improving the research scope in Pakistan by working with Pakistani researchers, practitioners, and families.

Anushay balances her research with her position as the founder of a non-profit, Resources for Children, which aims to understand and support children’s development in Pakistan.

Publications

  1. Mazhar, A. (2022, April). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Spring Preview, New Haven, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2021, December). Does an extended family improve mentalising in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK & Pakistan. 2nd International Foundation University Conference of Psychology, Rawalpindi, Pakistan.
  3. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Theory of Mind in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK and Pakistan. Harvard Trends in Psychology Summit, Cambridge, United States.
  1. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Research Rounds, New Haven, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2020, October). Developing a non-profit to advance autism research in Pakistan. Anna Freud Centre Seminar Series, London, United Kingdom

 

Núria is a Professor of Mathematics Education at Autonomous University of Barcelona. Her research is about language and mathematics in secondary school classrooms and professional development contexts with mathematics teachers.

Her first degree was in Mathematics at University of Barcelona (1995). Soon after her initiation as a secondary school mathematics teacher in highly multilingual classrooms of Barcelona, she started her PhD at the UAB Division of Mathematics Education. She wanted to understand the critical factors behind the under-performance in school mathematics of many learners from poor urban backgrounds and recent histories of migration. Since then, she has been committed to classroom and teacher education research grounded on community work with schools and mathematics teachers in urban areas of poverty. Her years as a school teacher have provided her with greater insights into her work as a researcher and have strongly influenced the adoption of sociocultural and sociopolitical approaches to mathematics teaching and learning.

Núria was given the ICREA Academia Award of the Catalan Institution for Research and Advanced Studies in 2013, in recognition of her contributions to research on multilingual mathematics teaching and learning. She was elected to the Executive Committee of the International Commission on Mathematical Instruction as Member-at-Large in 2021, and to the International Committee of the International Group for the Psychology of Mathematics Education from 2010 to 2014. She served as Extraordinarious Professor of Mathematics Education at the University of South Africa from 2013 to 2020. She was Visiting Scholar at London South Bank University, University of Arizona, and University of North Carolina at Chapel-Hill.

Núria is currently on the editorial board of the international journal Mathematics Education Research Journal and Journal of Mathematics Teacher Education. Till 2021 she was the editor-in-chief of the Advances of Research in Mathematics Education, the official journal of the Spanish Society of Research in Mathematics Education. She is the leading co-editor of a 2018 special issue on language research in mathematics education published in ZDM-Mathematics Education, and the leading co-editor of a special issue on decentring mathematics teaching education, to be published in the Journal of Mathematics Teacher Education, February 2024.

She chaired the 7th Topic Conference of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education on Language and Mathematics (Dresden, 2018), and the ERME Topic Working Group on Language and Mathematics from 2015 to 2020. The collaborations established in the ERME context enabled for a broad range of experts to come together and move forward the research field in the form of an co-edited Routledge volume entitled ‘Classroom research on mathematics and language: Seeing learners and teachers differently’ in 2021, with Núria as the leading co-editor. She has also been co-editor of the Springer volume resulting from the 21st ICMI Study on Language Diversity and Mathematics Education in 2016, and of the Brill volume entitled ‘Mathematical discourse that breaks barriers and creates space for marginalized learners’ in 2018.

Núria’s motivation for coming to the Oxford Department of Education is her research collaboration in projects co-coordinated with Jenni Ingram on establishing an international network for research on supporting school mathematics teaching with linguistically disadvantaged learners. From her years as a secondary school in the 1990s, important challenges posed to mathematics education practice remain. Learners of mathematics who are linguistically disadvantaged for a variety of reasons, including impoverished socioeconomic status, continue to be educationally disadvantaged at a considerable risk of school failure and early dropout. More research will hopefully shed light on how to identify and develop improved practices to enable greater access to school mathematics for all learners.

Publications

SELECTION OF 10 LAST-DECADE PUBLICATIONS
[For more publications and research details, see https://orcid.org/0000-0001-5199-6336]
– Planas, N., & Chronaki, A. (2021). Multilingual mathematics learning from a dialogic-translanguaging perspective. In N. Planas, C. Morgan, & M. Schütte (Eds.), Classroom research on mathematics and language: Seeing learners and teachers differently (pp. 151-166). Routledge.
– Planas, N. (2021). How specific can language as resource become for the teaching of algebraic concepts? ZDM-Mathematics Education, 53(2), 277-288.
– Planas, N. (2021). Challenges and opportunities from translingual research on multilingual mathematics classrooms. In A. A. Essien, & A. Msimanga (Eds.), Multilingual education yearbook 2021. Policy and practice in STEM multilingual contexts (pp. 1-18). Springer.
– Planas, N., & Ngoepe, M. (2019). Right to learn mathematics: From language as right to language as resource. In C. Xenofontos (Ed.), Equity in mathematics education. Addressing a changing world (pp. 93-110). Information Age Publishing.
– Planas, N., & Schütte, M. (2018). Research frameworks for the study of language in mathematics education, ZDM-Mathematics Education, 50(6), 965-974.
– Planas, N. (2018). Language as resource: A key notion for understanding the complexity of mathematics learning. Educational Studies in Mathematics, 98(3), 215-229.
– Planas, N., Morgan, C., & Schütte, M. (2018). Mathematics education and language. Lessons and directions from two decades of research. In T. Dreyfus, M. Artigue, S. Prediger, D. Potari, & Ruthven (Eds.), Developing research in mathematics education. Twenty years of communication, cooperation and collaboration in Europe (pp. 196-210). Routledge.
– Planas, N. (2014). One speaker, two languages: Learning opportunities in the mathematics classroom. Educational Studies in Mathematics, 87(1), 51-66.
– Planas, N., & Setati Phakeng, M. (2014). On the process of gaining language as a resource in mathematics education. ZDM-Mathematics Education, 46(6), 883-893.
– Planas, N., & Civil, M. (2013). Language-as-resource and language-as-political. Tensions in the bilingual mathematics classroom. Mathematics Education Research Journal, 25(3), 361-378.

 

https://portalrecerca.uab.cat/en/persons/nuria-planas-raig-3

https://orcid.org/0000-0001-5199-6336

 

Cindy works at the intersection of learning, design, and technology, with a keen interest in the orchestration of future-ready tech-enabled learning.

She is curious how the deployment of adaptive learning systems to schools will impact classroom learning and hopes to learn more about the human-machine partnership in education. Specifically, her research is concerned with the implications that the use of such systems has on teacher-student interactions, as teachers grapple with balancing personalised learning and learning in community, as well as curriculum demands and student interests. These are some tensions which could potentially be exacerbated by affordances of adaptive learning systems.

Prior to embarking on the DPhil in Education at Oxford, Cindy worked as the Lead Specialist in Technologies for Learning at the Educational Technology Division of Ministry of Education, Singapore. She had previously completed graduate studies at the National University of Singapore and Stanford University where she was awarded Master of Arts in English Studies and Master of Arts in Education.

Reem is DPhil student from Saudi Arabia.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she worked as a Teacher, Professional Developer, then, became a Supervisor and Researcher in the Ministry of Education where she received a scholarship to pursue her DPhil education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests lie in the area of Teacher Education and Professional Learning Policy and Practice.

Publications
  • Alqahtani, Reem (2020). Saudi Universities Role in Developing Teacher Professional Development Programs: Elite Universities Experience. Journal of Educational Sciences. King Saud University.
  • Alqahtani, Reem. (2020). The effect of implementing UDL-based activities in improving EFL learners’ academic achievement and attitudes towards L2. In L. Salas, & E. Ager, Creating Quiet reflective Spaces: Language Teacher Researches Professional Development (pp. 61-62). IATEFL publications.

Lena Zlock is researching the integration of digital technology into structures of teaching, learning, and education in higher education. Her particular focus is on the digital humanities and the potential for digital methods to transform humanistic study. She works with Professor Niall Winters and Dr. James Robson.

Lena’s research interests stem from her education as an M.St. student and Ertegun Graduate Scholar in Modern Languages at the University of Oxford, and as a B.A. student in History at Stanford University. As an undergraduate, she started the Voltaire Library Project, a digitally and data-driven study of the 6,763-book collection of French Enlightenment philosopher Voltaire (you can read more about the project here and here). She has been interested in the application of digital technology to humanistic teaching since her days in Princeton Day School, where she developed an interdisciplinary curriculum on Mexico City (visit the course website here).

Her research on Voltaire led her to think more broadly about the place of digital methods in the humanities classroom, and how new technologies will revolutionise the liberal arts and higher education. As a DPhil candidate, Lena will examine the negotiation and implementation of new learning technologies within the University of Oxford at undergraduate and graduate levels.

Lena is involved in a number of digital humanities initiatives in Oxford. She previously served as the inaugural fellow of the Voltaire Lab at Oxford’s Voltaire Foundation. As a master’s student, Lena co-formulated the convergence agenda for Oxford digital humanities with Professor Howard Hotson, and is currently employed by the Humanities Division to assist with the development of an M.St. degree in Digital Scholarship (read more here). Lena set up and helps to run the History of the Book blog for the Faculty of Medieval and Modern Languages and the Oxford Book History Twitter account.

Lena welcomes inquiries from undergraduate and postgraduate students from Oxford and beyond seeking to get involved with the digital humanities in any capacity. The History of the Book blog also welcomes inquiries from prospective contributors.

 

Abbey is a Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education, in collaboration with the Department of Engineering.

Before joining the DPhil program, Abbey obtained a B.A. in Applied Linguistics with minors in Russian and Chinese from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford. She was the recipient of a Benjamin A. Gilman International Scholarship through U.S. Department of State for study in Russia and was awarded two Foreign Language and Area Studies (FLAS) Fellowships for study in both Russia and China. She holds both TESOL and TEFL certificates and has taught English as a Second Language in various contexts to a wide variety of learner populations.

Abbey’s main research interests lie in the use of technology to facilitate language learning. Her DPhil research focuses on the development of a virtual reality program to bridge the gaps that students face when learning languages through distance learning.

Julie Chia-Yi Lin is a Doctoral student at the University of Oxford, funded by the Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholarship. Her research focus on Internationalization, Policy, Management and Institutional Strategy is rooted in her professional experience in publishing and higher education, as well as from her observations regarding the continuous change in global educational dynamics.

Julie completed her B.A. at National Taiwan University, and earned a joint M.A. from the University of Vienna and the University of Wroclaw. She was previously employed as an officer for the Office of International Affairs at National Taiwan University, and then as a Publisher at Emerald Publishing.

She focuses on the development of higher education, particularly in the processes of internationalization and globalization, and tries to deliver perspectives from different Institutional sectors, and a wide array of participants. She is mindful of the influence that culture has on the development and reception of these processes, and has a special interest in the East Asia region, and Confucian-influenced higher education systems. In her doctoral research, she investigates higher ed institutional strategy, and the relationship it has with real-world policy. This includes delving into the specific interpretation and implementation of official policy by different stakeholders within the institution- faculty, administration, and management.

Publications

Lin, J. (2015). The Impact of Globalization on Taiwan’s Education Policy: The International Student. In A. Lipinsky. (Ed), Vienna Taiwan Studies Series: Immigration societies, Taiwan and Beyond. (pp. 129-151). Vienna: LIT VERLAG GmbH & Co. KG

Yibo Wang has an MA in International Marketing from the Coventry University (UK) and a Master’s in Management: Leadership and Organizational Change from the University of Birmingham (UK).

His doctoral research focuses on ‘knowledge hiding’, ‘leadership style’ and ‘Confucian culture’ in Chinese education and training institutions.

As empirical studies on ‘knowledge hiding’ in the Chinese context are scarce, Yibo hopes to uncover underlying mechanism of knowledge hiding and find its potential influence factors.

Prior to coming to Oxford, he worked as a CEO in an educational consultancy based in Beijing that advised the investment and marketing analyses on education and training industry.

Riziki’s current DPhil research focuses on emergent literacy of refugee children within multilingual settings.

Prior to commencing her DPhil research, Riziki completed an MSc in Child Development at the University of Oxford, looking at the role of teacher behavioural and cognitive judgments on the learning trajectories of Black primary school students in England.

Her research interests are education access and wellbeing of children in resettlement and asylum contexts. In line with this, her research in the past has focused on integration and resettlement processes of refugees and immigrants within Canada.

Publications

Bhattacharyya, P., Ogoe, S., Riziki, A., & Wilkinson, L. (2020). In search of a “home”: comparing the housing challenges experienced by recently arrived Yazidi and Syrian Refugees in Canada. Manuscript submitted for publication.

Bhattacharyya, P., Riziki, A., Songose, L., Ogoe, S., & Wilkinson, L. (2020). Understanding the link between pre-arrival education and trauma and language learning: A case study of Yazidi women in Canada. Canadian Diversity, 17(2).

Bhattacharyya, P., Riziki, A., & Wilkinson, L. (2018). “Settlement Service Use among Syrian Refugees in Canada” Canadian Diversity 15(1).

Wilkinson, L., Bhattacharya, P., Garcea, J., Abdul-Karim, A., Riziki, A., & Schnieders, M. (2017). Finding home: Some housing considerations for refugee families with children. Canadian Diversity, 14 (3), 31-35

Wilkinson, L., Bhattacharyya, P., Riziki, A., & Abdul-Karim, A. (2018).Yazidi Refugee Resettlement in Canada. Calgary: Immigration Refugees and Citizenship Canada-Integration Branch (Prairies and Territories Region).

Wilkinson, L., Garcea, J., Bhattacharyya, P., Riziki, A., Abdul Karim, A. (2017). Resettling on the Canadian Prairies: Integration of Syrian refugees. Calgary: Immigration Refugees and Citizenship Canada, Integration Branch-Prairies., Northwest Territories Division., & Alberta Association of Immigrant Serving Agencies

Anushay completed her BSc Psychology from UCL, where she also started her master’s in Developmental Neuroscience and Psychopathology. She was based at Yale University for her master’s thesis, where she worked with Dr Craig Bailey at the Yale Center for Emotional Intelligence to understand children’s emotion development. Anushay’s research interests include understanding child development across different cultures, factors that might be affecting it, and devising culture-specific ways to support children’s holistic development through the educational system. She is also keen on improving the research scope in Pakistan by working with Pakistani researchers, practitioners, and families.

Anushay balances her research with her position as the founder of a non-profit, Resources for Children, which aims to understand and support children’s development in Pakistan.

Publications

  1. Mazhar, A. (2022, April). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Spring Preview, New Haven, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2021, December). Does an extended family improve mentalising in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK & Pakistan. 2nd International Foundation University Conference of Psychology, Rawalpindi, Pakistan.
  3. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Theory of Mind in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK and Pakistan. Harvard Trends in Psychology Summit, Cambridge, United States.
  1. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Research Rounds, New Haven, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2020, October). Developing a non-profit to advance autism research in Pakistan. Anna Freud Centre Seminar Series, London, United Kingdom

 

Núria is a Professor of Mathematics Education at Autonomous University of Barcelona. Her research is about language and mathematics in secondary school classrooms and professional development contexts with mathematics teachers.

Her first degree was in Mathematics at University of Barcelona (1995). Soon after her initiation as a secondary school mathematics teacher in highly multilingual classrooms of Barcelona, she started her PhD at the UAB Division of Mathematics Education. She wanted to understand the critical factors behind the under-performance in school mathematics of many learners from poor urban backgrounds and recent histories of migration. Since then, she has been committed to classroom and teacher education research grounded on community work with schools and mathematics teachers in urban areas of poverty. Her years as a school teacher have provided her with greater insights into her work as a researcher and have strongly influenced the adoption of sociocultural and sociopolitical approaches to mathematics teaching and learning.

Núria was given the ICREA Academia Award of the Catalan Institution for Research and Advanced Studies in 2013, in recognition of her contributions to research on multilingual mathematics teaching and learning. She was elected to the Executive Committee of the International Commission on Mathematical Instruction as Member-at-Large in 2021, and to the International Committee of the International Group for the Psychology of Mathematics Education from 2010 to 2014. She served as Extraordinarious Professor of Mathematics Education at the University of South Africa from 2013 to 2020. She was Visiting Scholar at London South Bank University, University of Arizona, and University of North Carolina at Chapel-Hill.

Núria is currently on the editorial board of the international journal Mathematics Education Research Journal and Journal of Mathematics Teacher Education. Till 2021 she was the editor-in-chief of the Advances of Research in Mathematics Education, the official journal of the Spanish Society of Research in Mathematics Education. She is the leading co-editor of a 2018 special issue on language research in mathematics education published in ZDM-Mathematics Education, and the leading co-editor of a special issue on decentring mathematics teaching education, to be published in the Journal of Mathematics Teacher Education, February 2024.

She chaired the 7th Topic Conference of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education on Language and Mathematics (Dresden, 2018), and the ERME Topic Working Group on Language and Mathematics from 2015 to 2020. The collaborations established in the ERME context enabled for a broad range of experts to come together and move forward the research field in the form of an co-edited Routledge volume entitled ‘Classroom research on mathematics and language: Seeing learners and teachers differently’ in 2021, with Núria as the leading co-editor. She has also been co-editor of the Springer volume resulting from the 21st ICMI Study on Language Diversity and Mathematics Education in 2016, and of the Brill volume entitled ‘Mathematical discourse that breaks barriers and creates space for marginalized learners’ in 2018.

Núria’s motivation for coming to the Oxford Department of Education is her research collaboration in projects co-coordinated with Jenni Ingram on establishing an international network for research on supporting school mathematics teaching with linguistically disadvantaged learners. From her years as a secondary school in the 1990s, important challenges posed to mathematics education practice remain. Learners of mathematics who are linguistically disadvantaged for a variety of reasons, including impoverished socioeconomic status, continue to be educationally disadvantaged at a considerable risk of school failure and early dropout. More research will hopefully shed light on how to identify and develop improved practices to enable greater access to school mathematics for all learners.

Publications

SELECTION OF 10 LAST-DECADE PUBLICATIONS
[For more publications and research details, see https://orcid.org/0000-0001-5199-6336]
– Planas, N., & Chronaki, A. (2021). Multilingual mathematics learning from a dialogic-translanguaging perspective. In N. Planas, C. Morgan, & M. Schütte (Eds.), Classroom research on mathematics and language: Seeing learners and teachers differently (pp. 151-166). Routledge.
– Planas, N. (2021). How specific can language as resource become for the teaching of algebraic concepts? ZDM-Mathematics Education, 53(2), 277-288.
– Planas, N. (2021). Challenges and opportunities from translingual research on multilingual mathematics classrooms. In A. A. Essien, & A. Msimanga (Eds.), Multilingual education yearbook 2021. Policy and practice in STEM multilingual contexts (pp. 1-18). Springer.
– Planas, N., & Ngoepe, M. (2019). Right to learn mathematics: From language as right to language as resource. In C. Xenofontos (Ed.), Equity in mathematics education. Addressing a changing world (pp. 93-110). Information Age Publishing.
– Planas, N., & Schütte, M. (2018). Research frameworks for the study of language in mathematics education, ZDM-Mathematics Education, 50(6), 965-974.
– Planas, N. (2018). Language as resource: A key notion for understanding the complexity of mathematics learning. Educational Studies in Mathematics, 98(3), 215-229.
– Planas, N., Morgan, C., & Schütte, M. (2018). Mathematics education and language. Lessons and directions from two decades of research. In T. Dreyfus, M. Artigue, S. Prediger, D. Potari, & Ruthven (Eds.), Developing research in mathematics education. Twenty years of communication, cooperation and collaboration in Europe (pp. 196-210). Routledge.
– Planas, N. (2014). One speaker, two languages: Learning opportunities in the mathematics classroom. Educational Studies in Mathematics, 87(1), 51-66.
– Planas, N., & Setati Phakeng, M. (2014). On the process of gaining language as a resource in mathematics education. ZDM-Mathematics Education, 46(6), 883-893.
– Planas, N., & Civil, M. (2013). Language-as-resource and language-as-political. Tensions in the bilingual mathematics classroom. Mathematics Education Research Journal, 25(3), 361-378.

 

https://portalrecerca.uab.cat/en/persons/nuria-planas-raig-3

https://orcid.org/0000-0001-5199-6336

 

Cindy works at the intersection of learning, design, and technology, with a keen interest in the orchestration of future-ready tech-enabled learning.

She is curious how the deployment of adaptive learning systems to schools will impact classroom learning and hopes to learn more about the human-machine partnership in education. Specifically, her research is concerned with the implications that the use of such systems has on teacher-student interactions, as teachers grapple with balancing personalised learning and learning in community, as well as curriculum demands and student interests. These are some tensions which could potentially be exacerbated by affordances of adaptive learning systems.

Prior to embarking on the DPhil in Education at Oxford, Cindy worked as the Lead Specialist in Technologies for Learning at the Educational Technology Division of Ministry of Education, Singapore. She had previously completed graduate studies at the National University of Singapore and Stanford University where she was awarded Master of Arts in English Studies and Master of Arts in Education.

Reem is DPhil student from Saudi Arabia.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she worked as a Teacher, Professional Developer, then, became a Supervisor and Researcher in the Ministry of Education where she received a scholarship to pursue her DPhil education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests lie in the area of Teacher Education and Professional Learning Policy and Practice.

Publications
  • Alqahtani, Reem (2020). Saudi Universities Role in Developing Teacher Professional Development Programs: Elite Universities Experience. Journal of Educational Sciences. King Saud University.
  • Alqahtani, Reem. (2020). The effect of implementing UDL-based activities in improving EFL learners’ academic achievement and attitudes towards L2. In L. Salas, & E. Ager, Creating Quiet reflective Spaces: Language Teacher Researches Professional Development (pp. 61-62). IATEFL publications.

Lena Zlock is researching the integration of digital technology into structures of teaching, learning, and education in higher education. Her particular focus is on the digital humanities and the potential for digital methods to transform humanistic study. She works with Professor Niall Winters and Dr. James Robson.

Lena’s research interests stem from her education as an M.St. student and Ertegun Graduate Scholar in Modern Languages at the University of Oxford, and as a B.A. student in History at Stanford University. As an undergraduate, she started the Voltaire Library Project, a digitally and data-driven study of the 6,763-book collection of French Enlightenment philosopher Voltaire (you can read more about the project here and here). She has been interested in the application of digital technology to humanistic teaching since her days in Princeton Day School, where she developed an interdisciplinary curriculum on Mexico City (visit the course website here).

Her research on Voltaire led her to think more broadly about the place of digital methods in the humanities classroom, and how new technologies will revolutionise the liberal arts and higher education. As a DPhil candidate, Lena will examine the negotiation and implementation of new learning technologies within the University of Oxford at undergraduate and graduate levels.

Lena is involved in a number of digital humanities initiatives in Oxford. She previously served as the inaugural fellow of the Voltaire Lab at Oxford’s Voltaire Foundation. As a master’s student, Lena co-formulated the convergence agenda for Oxford digital humanities with Professor Howard Hotson, and is currently employed by the Humanities Division to assist with the development of an M.St. degree in Digital Scholarship (read more here). Lena set up and helps to run the History of the Book blog for the Faculty of Medieval and Modern Languages and the Oxford Book History Twitter account.

Lena welcomes inquiries from undergraduate and postgraduate students from Oxford and beyond seeking to get involved with the digital humanities in any capacity. The History of the Book blog also welcomes inquiries from prospective contributors.

 

Abbey is a Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education, in collaboration with the Department of Engineering.

Before joining the DPhil program, Abbey obtained a B.A. in Applied Linguistics with minors in Russian and Chinese from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford. She was the recipient of a Benjamin A. Gilman International Scholarship through U.S. Department of State for study in Russia and was awarded two Foreign Language and Area Studies (FLAS) Fellowships for study in both Russia and China. She holds both TESOL and TEFL certificates and has taught English as a Second Language in various contexts to a wide variety of learner populations.

Abbey’s main research interests lie in the use of technology to facilitate language learning. Her DPhil research focuses on the development of a virtual reality program to bridge the gaps that students face when learning languages through distance learning.

Julie Chia-Yi Lin is a Doctoral student at the University of Oxford, funded by the Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholarship. Her research focus on Internationalization, Policy, Management and Institutional Strategy is rooted in her professional experience in publishing and higher education, as well as from her observations regarding the continuous change in global educational dynamics.

Julie completed her B.A. at National Taiwan University, and earned a joint M.A. from the University of Vienna and the University of Wroclaw. She was previously employed as an officer for the Office of International Affairs at National Taiwan University, and then as a Publisher at Emerald Publishing.

She focuses on the development of higher education, particularly in the processes of internationalization and globalization, and tries to deliver perspectives from different Institutional sectors, and a wide array of participants. She is mindful of the influence that culture has on the development and reception of these processes, and has a special interest in the East Asia region, and Confucian-influenced higher education systems. In her doctoral research, she investigates higher ed institutional strategy, and the relationship it has with real-world policy. This includes delving into the specific interpretation and implementation of official policy by different stakeholders within the institution- faculty, administration, and management.

Publications

Lin, J. (2015). The Impact of Globalization on Taiwan’s Education Policy: The International Student. In A. Lipinsky. (Ed), Vienna Taiwan Studies Series: Immigration societies, Taiwan and Beyond. (pp. 129-151). Vienna: LIT VERLAG GmbH & Co. KG

Yibo Wang has an MA in International Marketing from the Coventry University (UK) and a Master’s in Management: Leadership and Organizational Change from the University of Birmingham (UK).

His doctoral research focuses on ‘knowledge hiding’, ‘leadership style’ and ‘Confucian culture’ in Chinese education and training institutions.

As empirical studies on ‘knowledge hiding’ in the Chinese context are scarce, Yibo hopes to uncover underlying mechanism of knowledge hiding and find its potential influence factors.

Prior to coming to Oxford, he worked as a CEO in an educational consultancy based in Beijing that advised the investment and marketing analyses on education and training industry.

Riziki’s current DPhil research focuses on emergent literacy of refugee children within multilingual settings.

Prior to commencing her DPhil research, Riziki completed an MSc in Child Development at the University of Oxford, looking at the role of teacher behavioural and cognitive judgments on the learning trajectories of Black primary school students in England.

Her research interests are education access and wellbeing of children in resettlement and asylum contexts. In line with this, her research in the past has focused on integration and resettlement processes of refugees and immigrants within Canada.

Publications

Bhattacharyya, P., Ogoe, S., Riziki, A., & Wilkinson, L. (2020). In search of a “home”: comparing the housing challenges experienced by recently arrived Yazidi and Syrian Refugees in Canada. Manuscript submitted for publication.

Bhattacharyya, P., Riziki, A., Songose, L., Ogoe, S., & Wilkinson, L. (2020). Understanding the link between pre-arrival education and trauma and language learning: A case study of Yazidi women in Canada. Canadian Diversity, 17(2).

Bhattacharyya, P., Riziki, A., & Wilkinson, L. (2018). “Settlement Service Use among Syrian Refugees in Canada” Canadian Diversity 15(1).

Wilkinson, L., Bhattacharya, P., Garcea, J., Abdul-Karim, A., Riziki, A., & Schnieders, M. (2017). Finding home: Some housing considerations for refugee families with children. Canadian Diversity, 14 (3), 31-35

Wilkinson, L., Bhattacharyya, P., Riziki, A., & Abdul-Karim, A. (2018).Yazidi Refugee Resettlement in Canada. Calgary: Immigration Refugees and Citizenship Canada-Integration Branch (Prairies and Territories Region).

Wilkinson, L., Garcea, J., Bhattacharyya, P., Riziki, A., Abdul Karim, A. (2017). Resettling on the Canadian Prairies: Integration of Syrian refugees. Calgary: Immigration Refugees and Citizenship Canada, Integration Branch-Prairies., Northwest Territories Division., & Alberta Association of Immigrant Serving Agencies

Anushay completed her BSc Psychology from UCL, where she also started her master’s in Developmental Neuroscience and Psychopathology. She was based at Yale University for her master’s thesis, where she worked with Dr Craig Bailey at the Yale Center for Emotional Intelligence to understand children’s emotion development. Anushay’s research interests include understanding child development across different cultures, factors that might be affecting it, and devising culture-specific ways to support children’s holistic development through the educational system. She is also keen on improving the research scope in Pakistan by working with Pakistani researchers, practitioners, and families.

Anushay balances her research with her position as the founder of a non-profit, Resources for Children, which aims to understand and support children’s development in Pakistan.

Publications

  1. Mazhar, A. (2022, April). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Spring Preview, New Haven, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2021, December). Does an extended family improve mentalising in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK & Pakistan. 2nd International Foundation University Conference of Psychology, Rawalpindi, Pakistan.
  3. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Theory of Mind in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK and Pakistan. Harvard Trends in Psychology Summit, Cambridge, United States.
  1. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Research Rounds, New Haven, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2020, October). Developing a non-profit to advance autism research in Pakistan. Anna Freud Centre Seminar Series, London, United Kingdom

 

Núria is a Professor of Mathematics Education at Autonomous University of Barcelona. Her research is about language and mathematics in secondary school classrooms and professional development contexts with mathematics teachers.

Her first degree was in Mathematics at University of Barcelona (1995). Soon after her initiation as a secondary school mathematics teacher in highly multilingual classrooms of Barcelona, she started her PhD at the UAB Division of Mathematics Education. She wanted to understand the critical factors behind the under-performance in school mathematics of many learners from poor urban backgrounds and recent histories of migration. Since then, she has been committed to classroom and teacher education research grounded on community work with schools and mathematics teachers in urban areas of poverty. Her years as a school teacher have provided her with greater insights into her work as a researcher and have strongly influenced the adoption of sociocultural and sociopolitical approaches to mathematics teaching and learning.

Núria was given the ICREA Academia Award of the Catalan Institution for Research and Advanced Studies in 2013, in recognition of her contributions to research on multilingual mathematics teaching and learning. She was elected to the Executive Committee of the International Commission on Mathematical Instruction as Member-at-Large in 2021, and to the International Committee of the International Group for the Psychology of Mathematics Education from 2010 to 2014. She served as Extraordinarious Professor of Mathematics Education at the University of South Africa from 2013 to 2020. She was Visiting Scholar at London South Bank University, University of Arizona, and University of North Carolina at Chapel-Hill.

Núria is currently on the editorial board of the international journal Mathematics Education Research Journal and Journal of Mathematics Teacher Education. Till 2021 she was the editor-in-chief of the Advances of Research in Mathematics Education, the official journal of the Spanish Society of Research in Mathematics Education. She is the leading co-editor of a 2018 special issue on language research in mathematics education published in ZDM-Mathematics Education, and the leading co-editor of a special issue on decentring mathematics teaching education, to be published in the Journal of Mathematics Teacher Education, February 2024.

She chaired the 7th Topic Conference of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education on Language and Mathematics (Dresden, 2018), and the ERME Topic Working Group on Language and Mathematics from 2015 to 2020. The collaborations established in the ERME context enabled for a broad range of experts to come together and move forward the research field in the form of an co-edited Routledge volume entitled ‘Classroom research on mathematics and language: Seeing learners and teachers differently’ in 2021, with Núria as the leading co-editor. She has also been co-editor of the Springer volume resulting from the 21st ICMI Study on Language Diversity and Mathematics Education in 2016, and of the Brill volume entitled ‘Mathematical discourse that breaks barriers and creates space for marginalized learners’ in 2018.

Núria’s motivation for coming to the Oxford Department of Education is her research collaboration in projects co-coordinated with Jenni Ingram on establishing an international network for research on supporting school mathematics teaching with linguistically disadvantaged learners. From her years as a secondary school in the 1990s, important challenges posed to mathematics education practice remain. Learners of mathematics who are linguistically disadvantaged for a variety of reasons, including impoverished socioeconomic status, continue to be educationally disadvantaged at a considerable risk of school failure and early dropout. More research will hopefully shed light on how to identify and develop improved practices to enable greater access to school mathematics for all learners.

Publications

SELECTION OF 10 LAST-DECADE PUBLICATIONS
[For more publications and research details, see https://orcid.org/0000-0001-5199-6336]
– Planas, N., & Chronaki, A. (2021). Multilingual mathematics learning from a dialogic-translanguaging perspective. In N. Planas, C. Morgan, & M. Schütte (Eds.), Classroom research on mathematics and language: Seeing learners and teachers differently (pp. 151-166). Routledge.
– Planas, N. (2021). How specific can language as resource become for the teaching of algebraic concepts? ZDM-Mathematics Education, 53(2), 277-288.
– Planas, N. (2021). Challenges and opportunities from translingual research on multilingual mathematics classrooms. In A. A. Essien, & A. Msimanga (Eds.), Multilingual education yearbook 2021. Policy and practice in STEM multilingual contexts (pp. 1-18). Springer.
– Planas, N., & Ngoepe, M. (2019). Right to learn mathematics: From language as right to language as resource. In C. Xenofontos (Ed.), Equity in mathematics education. Addressing a changing world (pp. 93-110). Information Age Publishing.
– Planas, N., & Schütte, M. (2018). Research frameworks for the study of language in mathematics education, ZDM-Mathematics Education, 50(6), 965-974.
– Planas, N. (2018). Language as resource: A key notion for understanding the complexity of mathematics learning. Educational Studies in Mathematics, 98(3), 215-229.
– Planas, N., Morgan, C., & Schütte, M. (2018). Mathematics education and language. Lessons and directions from two decades of research. In T. Dreyfus, M. Artigue, S. Prediger, D. Potari, & Ruthven (Eds.), Developing research in mathematics education. Twenty years of communication, cooperation and collaboration in Europe (pp. 196-210). Routledge.
– Planas, N. (2014). One speaker, two languages: Learning opportunities in the mathematics classroom. Educational Studies in Mathematics, 87(1), 51-66.
– Planas, N., & Setati Phakeng, M. (2014). On the process of gaining language as a resource in mathematics education. ZDM-Mathematics Education, 46(6), 883-893.
– Planas, N., & Civil, M. (2013). Language-as-resource and language-as-political. Tensions in the bilingual mathematics classroom. Mathematics Education Research Journal, 25(3), 361-378.

 

https://portalrecerca.uab.cat/en/persons/nuria-planas-raig-3

https://orcid.org/0000-0001-5199-6336

 

Cindy works at the intersection of learning, design, and technology, with a keen interest in the orchestration of future-ready tech-enabled learning.

She is curious how the deployment of adaptive learning systems to schools will impact classroom learning and hopes to learn more about the human-machine partnership in education. Specifically, her research is concerned with the implications that the use of such systems has on teacher-student interactions, as teachers grapple with balancing personalised learning and learning in community, as well as curriculum demands and student interests. These are some tensions which could potentially be exacerbated by affordances of adaptive learning systems.

Prior to embarking on the DPhil in Education at Oxford, Cindy worked as the Lead Specialist in Technologies for Learning at the Educational Technology Division of Ministry of Education, Singapore. She had previously completed graduate studies at the National University of Singapore and Stanford University where she was awarded Master of Arts in English Studies and Master of Arts in Education.

Reem is DPhil student from Saudi Arabia.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she worked as a Teacher, Professional Developer, then, became a Supervisor and Researcher in the Ministry of Education where she received a scholarship to pursue her DPhil education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests lie in the area of Teacher Education and Professional Learning Policy and Practice.

Publications
  • Alqahtani, Reem (2020). Saudi Universities Role in Developing Teacher Professional Development Programs: Elite Universities Experience. Journal of Educational Sciences. King Saud University.
  • Alqahtani, Reem. (2020). The effect of implementing UDL-based activities in improving EFL learners’ academic achievement and attitudes towards L2. In L. Salas, & E. Ager, Creating Quiet reflective Spaces: Language Teacher Researches Professional Development (pp. 61-62). IATEFL publications.

Lena Zlock is researching the integration of digital technology into structures of teaching, learning, and education in higher education. Her particular focus is on the digital humanities and the potential for digital methods to transform humanistic study. She works with Professor Niall Winters and Dr. James Robson.

Lena’s research interests stem from her education as an M.St. student and Ertegun Graduate Scholar in Modern Languages at the University of Oxford, and as a B.A. student in History at Stanford University. As an undergraduate, she started the Voltaire Library Project, a digitally and data-driven study of the 6,763-book collection of French Enlightenment philosopher Voltaire (you can read more about the project here and here). She has been interested in the application of digital technology to humanistic teaching since her days in Princeton Day School, where she developed an interdisciplinary curriculum on Mexico City (visit the course website here).

Her research on Voltaire led her to think more broadly about the place of digital methods in the humanities classroom, and how new technologies will revolutionise the liberal arts and higher education. As a DPhil candidate, Lena will examine the negotiation and implementation of new learning technologies within the University of Oxford at undergraduate and graduate levels.

Lena is involved in a number of digital humanities initiatives in Oxford. She previously served as the inaugural fellow of the Voltaire Lab at Oxford’s Voltaire Foundation. As a master’s student, Lena co-formulated the convergence agenda for Oxford digital humanities with Professor Howard Hotson, and is currently employed by the Humanities Division to assist with the development of an M.St. degree in Digital Scholarship (read more here). Lena set up and helps to run the History of the Book blog for the Faculty of Medieval and Modern Languages and the Oxford Book History Twitter account.

Lena welcomes inquiries from undergraduate and postgraduate students from Oxford and beyond seeking to get involved with the digital humanities in any capacity. The History of the Book blog also welcomes inquiries from prospective contributors.

 

Abbey is a Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education, in collaboration with the Department of Engineering.

Before joining the DPhil program, Abbey obtained a B.A. in Applied Linguistics with minors in Russian and Chinese from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford. She was the recipient of a Benjamin A. Gilman International Scholarship through U.S. Department of State for study in Russia and was awarded two Foreign Language and Area Studies (FLAS) Fellowships for study in both Russia and China. She holds both TESOL and TEFL certificates and has taught English as a Second Language in various contexts to a wide variety of learner populations.

Abbey’s main research interests lie in the use of technology to facilitate language learning. Her DPhil research focuses on the development of a virtual reality program to bridge the gaps that students face when learning languages through distance learning.

Julie Chia-Yi Lin is a Doctoral student at the University of Oxford, funded by the Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholarship. Her research focus on Internationalization, Policy, Management and Institutional Strategy is rooted in her professional experience in publishing and higher education, as well as from her observations regarding the continuous change in global educational dynamics.

Julie completed her B.A. at National Taiwan University, and earned a joint M.A. from the University of Vienna and the University of Wroclaw. She was previously employed as an officer for the Office of International Affairs at National Taiwan University, and then as a Publisher at Emerald Publishing.

She focuses on the development of higher education, particularly in the processes of internationalization and globalization, and tries to deliver perspectives from different Institutional sectors, and a wide array of participants. She is mindful of the influence that culture has on the development and reception of these processes, and has a special interest in the East Asia region, and Confucian-influenced higher education systems. In her doctoral research, she investigates higher ed institutional strategy, and the relationship it has with real-world policy. This includes delving into the specific interpretation and implementation of official policy by different stakeholders within the institution- faculty, administration, and management.

Publications

Lin, J. (2015). The Impact of Globalization on Taiwan’s Education Policy: The International Student. In A. Lipinsky. (Ed), Vienna Taiwan Studies Series: Immigration societies, Taiwan and Beyond. (pp. 129-151). Vienna: LIT VERLAG GmbH & Co. KG

Yibo Wang has an MA in International Marketing from the Coventry University (UK) and a Master’s in Management: Leadership and Organizational Change from the University of Birmingham (UK).

His doctoral research focuses on ‘knowledge hiding’, ‘leadership style’ and ‘Confucian culture’ in Chinese education and training institutions.

As empirical studies on ‘knowledge hiding’ in the Chinese context are scarce, Yibo hopes to uncover underlying mechanism of knowledge hiding and find its potential influence factors.

Prior to coming to Oxford, he worked as a CEO in an educational consultancy based in Beijing that advised the investment and marketing analyses on education and training industry.

Riziki’s current DPhil research focuses on emergent literacy of refugee children within multilingual settings.

Prior to commencing her DPhil research, Riziki completed an MSc in Child Development at the University of Oxford, looking at the role of teacher behavioural and cognitive judgments on the learning trajectories of Black primary school students in England.

Her research interests are education access and wellbeing of children in resettlement and asylum contexts. In line with this, her research in the past has focused on integration and resettlement processes of refugees and immigrants within Canada.

Publications

Bhattacharyya, P., Ogoe, S., Riziki, A., & Wilkinson, L. (2020). In search of a “home”: comparing the housing challenges experienced by recently arrived Yazidi and Syrian Refugees in Canada. Manuscript submitted for publication.

Bhattacharyya, P., Riziki, A., Songose, L., Ogoe, S., & Wilkinson, L. (2020). Understanding the link between pre-arrival education and trauma and language learning: A case study of Yazidi women in Canada. Canadian Diversity, 17(2).

Bhattacharyya, P., Riziki, A., & Wilkinson, L. (2018). “Settlement Service Use among Syrian Refugees in Canada” Canadian Diversity 15(1).

Wilkinson, L., Bhattacharya, P., Garcea, J., Abdul-Karim, A., Riziki, A., & Schnieders, M. (2017). Finding home: Some housing considerations for refugee families with children. Canadian Diversity, 14 (3), 31-35

Wilkinson, L., Bhattacharyya, P., Riziki, A., & Abdul-Karim, A. (2018).Yazidi Refugee Resettlement in Canada. Calgary: Immigration Refugees and Citizenship Canada-Integration Branch (Prairies and Territories Region).

Wilkinson, L., Garcea, J., Bhattacharyya, P., Riziki, A., Abdul Karim, A. (2017). Resettling on the Canadian Prairies: Integration of Syrian refugees. Calgary: Immigration Refugees and Citizenship Canada, Integration Branch-Prairies., Northwest Territories Division., & Alberta Association of Immigrant Serving Agencies

Anushay completed her BSc Psychology from UCL, where she also started her master’s in Developmental Neuroscience and Psychopathology. She was based at Yale University for her master’s thesis, where she worked with Dr Craig Bailey at the Yale Center for Emotional Intelligence to understand children’s emotion development. Anushay’s research interests include understanding child development across different cultures, factors that might be affecting it, and devising culture-specific ways to support children’s holistic development through the educational system. She is also keen on improving the research scope in Pakistan by working with Pakistani researchers, practitioners, and families.

Anushay balances her research with her position as the founder of a non-profit, Resources for Children, which aims to understand and support children’s development in Pakistan.

Publications

  1. Mazhar, A. (2022, April). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Spring Preview, New Haven, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2021, December). Does an extended family improve mentalising in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK & Pakistan. 2nd International Foundation University Conference of Psychology, Rawalpindi, Pakistan.
  3. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Theory of Mind in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK and Pakistan. Harvard Trends in Psychology Summit, Cambridge, United States.
  1. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Research Rounds, New Haven, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2020, October). Developing a non-profit to advance autism research in Pakistan. Anna Freud Centre Seminar Series, London, United Kingdom

 

Núria is a Professor of Mathematics Education at Autonomous University of Barcelona. Her research is about language and mathematics in secondary school classrooms and professional development contexts with mathematics teachers.

Her first degree was in Mathematics at University of Barcelona (1995). Soon after her initiation as a secondary school mathematics teacher in highly multilingual classrooms of Barcelona, she started her PhD at the UAB Division of Mathematics Education. She wanted to understand the critical factors behind the under-performance in school mathematics of many learners from poor urban backgrounds and recent histories of migration. Since then, she has been committed to classroom and teacher education research grounded on community work with schools and mathematics teachers in urban areas of poverty. Her years as a school teacher have provided her with greater insights into her work as a researcher and have strongly influenced the adoption of sociocultural and sociopolitical approaches to mathematics teaching and learning.

Núria was given the ICREA Academia Award of the Catalan Institution for Research and Advanced Studies in 2013, in recognition of her contributions to research on multilingual mathematics teaching and learning. She was elected to the Executive Committee of the International Commission on Mathematical Instruction as Member-at-Large in 2021, and to the International Committee of the International Group for the Psychology of Mathematics Education from 2010 to 2014. She served as Extraordinarious Professor of Mathematics Education at the University of South Africa from 2013 to 2020. She was Visiting Scholar at London South Bank University, University of Arizona, and University of North Carolina at Chapel-Hill.

Núria is currently on the editorial board of the international journal Mathematics Education Research Journal and Journal of Mathematics Teacher Education. Till 2021 she was the editor-in-chief of the Advances of Research in Mathematics Education, the official journal of the Spanish Society of Research in Mathematics Education. She is the leading co-editor of a 2018 special issue on language research in mathematics education published in ZDM-Mathematics Education, and the leading co-editor of a special issue on decentring mathematics teaching education, to be published in the Journal of Mathematics Teacher Education, February 2024.

She chaired the 7th Topic Conference of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education on Language and Mathematics (Dresden, 2018), and the ERME Topic Working Group on Language and Mathematics from 2015 to 2020. The collaborations established in the ERME context enabled for a broad range of experts to come together and move forward the research field in the form of an co-edited Routledge volume entitled ‘Classroom research on mathematics and language: Seeing learners and teachers differently’ in 2021, with Núria as the leading co-editor. She has also been co-editor of the Springer volume resulting from the 21st ICMI Study on Language Diversity and Mathematics Education in 2016, and of the Brill volume entitled ‘Mathematical discourse that breaks barriers and creates space for marginalized learners’ in 2018.

Núria’s motivation for coming to the Oxford Department of Education is her research collaboration in projects co-coordinated with Jenni Ingram on establishing an international network for research on supporting school mathematics teaching with linguistically disadvantaged learners. From her years as a secondary school in the 1990s, important challenges posed to mathematics education practice remain. Learners of mathematics who are linguistically disadvantaged for a variety of reasons, including impoverished socioeconomic status, continue to be educationally disadvantaged at a considerable risk of school failure and early dropout. More research will hopefully shed light on how to identify and develop improved practices to enable greater access to school mathematics for all learners.

Publications

SELECTION OF 10 LAST-DECADE PUBLICATIONS
[For more publications and research details, see https://orcid.org/0000-0001-5199-6336]
– Planas, N., & Chronaki, A. (2021). Multilingual mathematics learning from a dialogic-translanguaging perspective. In N. Planas, C. Morgan, & M. Schütte (Eds.), Classroom research on mathematics and language: Seeing learners and teachers differently (pp. 151-166). Routledge.
– Planas, N. (2021). How specific can language as resource become for the teaching of algebraic concepts? ZDM-Mathematics Education, 53(2), 277-288.
– Planas, N. (2021). Challenges and opportunities from translingual research on multilingual mathematics classrooms. In A. A. Essien, & A. Msimanga (Eds.), Multilingual education yearbook 2021. Policy and practice in STEM multilingual contexts (pp. 1-18). Springer.
– Planas, N., & Ngoepe, M. (2019). Right to learn mathematics: From language as right to language as resource. In C. Xenofontos (Ed.), Equity in mathematics education. Addressing a changing world (pp. 93-110). Information Age Publishing.
– Planas, N., & Schütte, M. (2018). Research frameworks for the study of language in mathematics education, ZDM-Mathematics Education, 50(6), 965-974.
– Planas, N. (2018). Language as resource: A key notion for understanding the complexity of mathematics learning. Educational Studies in Mathematics, 98(3), 215-229.
– Planas, N., Morgan, C., & Schütte, M. (2018). Mathematics education and language. Lessons and directions from two decades of research. In T. Dreyfus, M. Artigue, S. Prediger, D. Potari, & Ruthven (Eds.), Developing research in mathematics education. Twenty years of communication, cooperation and collaboration in Europe (pp. 196-210). Routledge.
– Planas, N. (2014). One speaker, two languages: Learning opportunities in the mathematics classroom. Educational Studies in Mathematics, 87(1), 51-66.
– Planas, N., & Setati Phakeng, M. (2014). On the process of gaining language as a resource in mathematics education. ZDM-Mathematics Education, 46(6), 883-893.
– Planas, N., & Civil, M. (2013). Language-as-resource and language-as-political. Tensions in the bilingual mathematics classroom. Mathematics Education Research Journal, 25(3), 361-378.

 

https://portalrecerca.uab.cat/en/persons/nuria-planas-raig-3

https://orcid.org/0000-0001-5199-6336

 

Cindy works at the intersection of learning, design, and technology, with a keen interest in the orchestration of future-ready tech-enabled learning.

She is curious how the deployment of adaptive learning systems to schools will impact classroom learning and hopes to learn more about the human-machine partnership in education. Specifically, her research is concerned with the implications that the use of such systems has on teacher-student interactions, as teachers grapple with balancing personalised learning and learning in community, as well as curriculum demands and student interests. These are some tensions which could potentially be exacerbated by affordances of adaptive learning systems.

Prior to embarking on the DPhil in Education at Oxford, Cindy worked as the Lead Specialist in Technologies for Learning at the Educational Technology Division of Ministry of Education, Singapore. She had previously completed graduate studies at the National University of Singapore and Stanford University where she was awarded Master of Arts in English Studies and Master of Arts in Education.

Reem is DPhil student from Saudi Arabia.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she worked as a Teacher, Professional Developer, then, became a Supervisor and Researcher in the Ministry of Education where she received a scholarship to pursue her DPhil education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests lie in the area of Teacher Education and Professional Learning Policy and Practice.

Publications
  • Alqahtani, Reem (2020). Saudi Universities Role in Developing Teacher Professional Development Programs: Elite Universities Experience. Journal of Educational Sciences. King Saud University.
  • Alqahtani, Reem. (2020). The effect of implementing UDL-based activities in improving EFL learners’ academic achievement and attitudes towards L2. In L. Salas, & E. Ager, Creating Quiet reflective Spaces: Language Teacher Researches Professional Development (pp. 61-62). IATEFL publications.

Lena Zlock is researching the integration of digital technology into structures of teaching, learning, and education in higher education. Her particular focus is on the digital humanities and the potential for digital methods to transform humanistic study. She works with Professor Niall Winters and Dr. James Robson.

Lena’s research interests stem from her education as an M.St. student and Ertegun Graduate Scholar in Modern Languages at the University of Oxford, and as a B.A. student in History at Stanford University. As an undergraduate, she started the Voltaire Library Project, a digitally and data-driven study of the 6,763-book collection of French Enlightenment philosopher Voltaire (you can read more about the project here and here). She has been interested in the application of digital technology to humanistic teaching since her days in Princeton Day School, where she developed an interdisciplinary curriculum on Mexico City (visit the course website here).

Her research on Voltaire led her to think more broadly about the place of digital methods in the humanities classroom, and how new technologies will revolutionise the liberal arts and higher education. As a DPhil candidate, Lena will examine the negotiation and implementation of new learning technologies within the University of Oxford at undergraduate and graduate levels.

Lena is involved in a number of digital humanities initiatives in Oxford. She previously served as the inaugural fellow of the Voltaire Lab at Oxford’s Voltaire Foundation. As a master’s student, Lena co-formulated the convergence agenda for Oxford digital humanities with Professor Howard Hotson, and is currently employed by the Humanities Division to assist with the development of an M.St. degree in Digital Scholarship (read more here). Lena set up and helps to run the History of the Book blog for the Faculty of Medieval and Modern Languages and the Oxford Book History Twitter account.

Lena welcomes inquiries from undergraduate and postgraduate students from Oxford and beyond seeking to get involved with the digital humanities in any capacity. The History of the Book blog also welcomes inquiries from prospective contributors.

 

Abbey is a Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education, in collaboration with the Department of Engineering.

Before joining the DPhil program, Abbey obtained a B.A. in Applied Linguistics with minors in Russian and Chinese from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford. She was the recipient of a Benjamin A. Gilman International Scholarship through U.S. Department of State for study in Russia and was awarded two Foreign Language and Area Studies (FLAS) Fellowships for study in both Russia and China. She holds both TESOL and TEFL certificates and has taught English as a Second Language in various contexts to a wide variety of learner populations.

Abbey’s main research interests lie in the use of technology to facilitate language learning. Her DPhil research focuses on the development of a virtual reality program to bridge the gaps that students face when learning languages through distance learning.

Julie Chia-Yi Lin is a Doctoral student at the University of Oxford, funded by the Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholarship. Her research focus on Internationalization, Policy, Management and Institutional Strategy is rooted in her professional experience in publishing and higher education, as well as from her observations regarding the continuous change in global educational dynamics.

Julie completed her B.A. at National Taiwan University, and earned a joint M.A. from the University of Vienna and the University of Wroclaw. She was previously employed as an officer for the Office of International Affairs at National Taiwan University, and then as a Publisher at Emerald Publishing.

She focuses on the development of higher education, particularly in the processes of internationalization and globalization, and tries to deliver perspectives from different Institutional sectors, and a wide array of participants. She is mindful of the influence that culture has on the development and reception of these processes, and has a special interest in the East Asia region, and Confucian-influenced higher education systems. In her doctoral research, she investigates higher ed institutional strategy, and the relationship it has with real-world policy. This includes delving into the specific interpretation and implementation of official policy by different stakeholders within the institution- faculty, administration, and management.

Publications

Lin, J. (2015). The Impact of Globalization on Taiwan’s Education Policy: The International Student. In A. Lipinsky. (Ed), Vienna Taiwan Studies Series: Immigration societies, Taiwan and Beyond. (pp. 129-151). Vienna: LIT VERLAG GmbH & Co. KG

Yibo Wang has an MA in International Marketing from the Coventry University (UK) and a Master’s in Management: Leadership and Organizational Change from the University of Birmingham (UK).

His doctoral research focuses on ‘knowledge hiding’, ‘leadership style’ and ‘Confucian culture’ in Chinese education and training institutions.

As empirical studies on ‘knowledge hiding’ in the Chinese context are scarce, Yibo hopes to uncover underlying mechanism of knowledge hiding and find its potential influence factors.

Prior to coming to Oxford, he worked as a CEO in an educational consultancy based in Beijing that advised the investment and marketing analyses on education and training industry.

Riziki’s current DPhil research focuses on emergent literacy of refugee children within multilingual settings.

Prior to commencing her DPhil research, Riziki completed an MSc in Child Development at the University of Oxford, looking at the role of teacher behavioural and cognitive judgments on the learning trajectories of Black primary school students in England.

Her research interests are education access and wellbeing of children in resettlement and asylum contexts. In line with this, her research in the past has focused on integration and resettlement processes of refugees and immigrants within Canada.

Publications

Bhattacharyya, P., Ogoe, S., Riziki, A., & Wilkinson, L. (2020). In search of a “home”: comparing the housing challenges experienced by recently arrived Yazidi and Syrian Refugees in Canada. Manuscript submitted for publication.

Bhattacharyya, P., Riziki, A., Songose, L., Ogoe, S., & Wilkinson, L. (2020). Understanding the link between pre-arrival education and trauma and language learning: A case study of Yazidi women in Canada. Canadian Diversity, 17(2).

Bhattacharyya, P., Riziki, A., & Wilkinson, L. (2018). “Settlement Service Use among Syrian Refugees in Canada” Canadian Diversity 15(1).

Wilkinson, L., Bhattacharya, P., Garcea, J., Abdul-Karim, A., Riziki, A., & Schnieders, M. (2017). Finding home: Some housing considerations for refugee families with children. Canadian Diversity, 14 (3), 31-35

Wilkinson, L., Bhattacharyya, P., Riziki, A., & Abdul-Karim, A. (2018).Yazidi Refugee Resettlement in Canada. Calgary: Immigration Refugees and Citizenship Canada-Integration Branch (Prairies and Territories Region).

Wilkinson, L., Garcea, J., Bhattacharyya, P., Riziki, A., Abdul Karim, A. (2017). Resettling on the Canadian Prairies: Integration of Syrian refugees. Calgary: Immigration Refugees and Citizenship Canada, Integration Branch-Prairies., Northwest Territories Division., & Alberta Association of Immigrant Serving Agencies

Anushay completed her BSc Psychology from UCL, where she also started her master’s in Developmental Neuroscience and Psychopathology. She was based at Yale University for her master’s thesis, where she worked with Dr Craig Bailey at the Yale Center for Emotional Intelligence to understand children’s emotion development. Anushay’s research interests include understanding child development across different cultures, factors that might be affecting it, and devising culture-specific ways to support children’s holistic development through the educational system. She is also keen on improving the research scope in Pakistan by working with Pakistani researchers, practitioners, and families.

Anushay balances her research with her position as the founder of a non-profit, Resources for Children, which aims to understand and support children’s development in Pakistan.

Publications

  1. Mazhar, A. (2022, April). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Spring Preview, New Haven, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2021, December). Does an extended family improve mentalising in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK & Pakistan. 2nd International Foundation University Conference of Psychology, Rawalpindi, Pakistan.
  3. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Theory of Mind in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK and Pakistan. Harvard Trends in Psychology Summit, Cambridge, United States.
  1. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Research Rounds, New Haven, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2020, October). Developing a non-profit to advance autism research in Pakistan. Anna Freud Centre Seminar Series, London, United Kingdom

 

Núria is a Professor of Mathematics Education at Autonomous University of Barcelona. Her research is about language and mathematics in secondary school classrooms and professional development contexts with mathematics teachers.

Her first degree was in Mathematics at University of Barcelona (1995). Soon after her initiation as a secondary school mathematics teacher in highly multilingual classrooms of Barcelona, she started her PhD at the UAB Division of Mathematics Education. She wanted to understand the critical factors behind the under-performance in school mathematics of many learners from poor urban backgrounds and recent histories of migration. Since then, she has been committed to classroom and teacher education research grounded on community work with schools and mathematics teachers in urban areas of poverty. Her years as a school teacher have provided her with greater insights into her work as a researcher and have strongly influenced the adoption of sociocultural and sociopolitical approaches to mathematics teaching and learning.

Núria was given the ICREA Academia Award of the Catalan Institution for Research and Advanced Studies in 2013, in recognition of her contributions to research on multilingual mathematics teaching and learning. She was elected to the Executive Committee of the International Commission on Mathematical Instruction as Member-at-Large in 2021, and to the International Committee of the International Group for the Psychology of Mathematics Education from 2010 to 2014. She served as Extraordinarious Professor of Mathematics Education at the University of South Africa from 2013 to 2020. She was Visiting Scholar at London South Bank University, University of Arizona, and University of North Carolina at Chapel-Hill.

Núria is currently on the editorial board of the international journal Mathematics Education Research Journal and Journal of Mathematics Teacher Education. Till 2021 she was the editor-in-chief of the Advances of Research in Mathematics Education, the official journal of the Spanish Society of Research in Mathematics Education. She is the leading co-editor of a 2018 special issue on language research in mathematics education published in ZDM-Mathematics Education, and the leading co-editor of a special issue on decentring mathematics teaching education, to be published in the Journal of Mathematics Teacher Education, February 2024.

She chaired the 7th Topic Conference of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education on Language and Mathematics (Dresden, 2018), and the ERME Topic Working Group on Language and Mathematics from 2015 to 2020. The collaborations established in the ERME context enabled for a broad range of experts to come together and move forward the research field in the form of an co-edited Routledge volume entitled ‘Classroom research on mathematics and language: Seeing learners and teachers differently’ in 2021, with Núria as the leading co-editor. She has also been co-editor of the Springer volume resulting from the 21st ICMI Study on Language Diversity and Mathematics Education in 2016, and of the Brill volume entitled ‘Mathematical discourse that breaks barriers and creates space for marginalized learners’ in 2018.

Núria’s motivation for coming to the Oxford Department of Education is her research collaboration in projects co-coordinated with Jenni Ingram on establishing an international network for research on supporting school mathematics teaching with linguistically disadvantaged learners. From her years as a secondary school in the 1990s, important challenges posed to mathematics education practice remain. Learners of mathematics who are linguistically disadvantaged for a variety of reasons, including impoverished socioeconomic status, continue to be educationally disadvantaged at a considerable risk of school failure and early dropout. More research will hopefully shed light on how to identify and develop improved practices to enable greater access to school mathematics for all learners.

Publications

SELECTION OF 10 LAST-DECADE PUBLICATIONS
[For more publications and research details, see https://orcid.org/0000-0001-5199-6336]
– Planas, N., & Chronaki, A. (2021). Multilingual mathematics learning from a dialogic-translanguaging perspective. In N. Planas, C. Morgan, & M. Schütte (Eds.), Classroom research on mathematics and language: Seeing learners and teachers differently (pp. 151-166). Routledge.
– Planas, N. (2021). How specific can language as resource become for the teaching of algebraic concepts? ZDM-Mathematics Education, 53(2), 277-288.
– Planas, N. (2021). Challenges and opportunities from translingual research on multilingual mathematics classrooms. In A. A. Essien, & A. Msimanga (Eds.), Multilingual education yearbook 2021. Policy and practice in STEM multilingual contexts (pp. 1-18). Springer.
– Planas, N., & Ngoepe, M. (2019). Right to learn mathematics: From language as right to language as resource. In C. Xenofontos (Ed.), Equity in mathematics education. Addressing a changing world (pp. 93-110). Information Age Publishing.
– Planas, N., & Schütte, M. (2018). Research frameworks for the study of language in mathematics education, ZDM-Mathematics Education, 50(6), 965-974.
– Planas, N. (2018). Language as resource: A key notion for understanding the complexity of mathematics learning. Educational Studies in Mathematics, 98(3), 215-229.
– Planas, N., Morgan, C., & Schütte, M. (2018). Mathematics education and language. Lessons and directions from two decades of research. In T. Dreyfus, M. Artigue, S. Prediger, D. Potari, & Ruthven (Eds.), Developing research in mathematics education. Twenty years of communication, cooperation and collaboration in Europe (pp. 196-210). Routledge.
– Planas, N. (2014). One speaker, two languages: Learning opportunities in the mathematics classroom. Educational Studies in Mathematics, 87(1), 51-66.
– Planas, N., & Setati Phakeng, M. (2014). On the process of gaining language as a resource in mathematics education. ZDM-Mathematics Education, 46(6), 883-893.
– Planas, N., & Civil, M. (2013). Language-as-resource and language-as-political. Tensions in the bilingual mathematics classroom. Mathematics Education Research Journal, 25(3), 361-378.

 

https://portalrecerca.uab.cat/en/persons/nuria-planas-raig-3

https://orcid.org/0000-0001-5199-6336

 

Cindy works at the intersection of learning, design, and technology, with a keen interest in the orchestration of future-ready tech-enabled learning.

She is curious how the deployment of adaptive learning systems to schools will impact classroom learning and hopes to learn more about the human-machine partnership in education. Specifically, her research is concerned with the implications that the use of such systems has on teacher-student interactions, as teachers grapple with balancing personalised learning and learning in community, as well as curriculum demands and student interests. These are some tensions which could potentially be exacerbated by affordances of adaptive learning systems.

Prior to embarking on the DPhil in Education at Oxford, Cindy worked as the Lead Specialist in Technologies for Learning at the Educational Technology Division of Ministry of Education, Singapore. She had previously completed graduate studies at the National University of Singapore and Stanford University where she was awarded Master of Arts in English Studies and Master of Arts in Education.

Reem is DPhil student from Saudi Arabia.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she worked as a Teacher, Professional Developer, then, became a Supervisor and Researcher in the Ministry of Education where she received a scholarship to pursue her DPhil education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests lie in the area of Teacher Education and Professional Learning Policy and Practice.

Publications
  • Alqahtani, Reem (2020). Saudi Universities Role in Developing Teacher Professional Development Programs: Elite Universities Experience. Journal of Educational Sciences. King Saud University.
  • Alqahtani, Reem. (2020). The effect of implementing UDL-based activities in improving EFL learners’ academic achievement and attitudes towards L2. In L. Salas, & E. Ager, Creating Quiet reflective Spaces: Language Teacher Researches Professional Development (pp. 61-62). IATEFL publications.

Lena Zlock is researching the integration of digital technology into structures of teaching, learning, and education in higher education. Her particular focus is on the digital humanities and the potential for digital methods to transform humanistic study. She works with Professor Niall Winters and Dr. James Robson.

Lena’s research interests stem from her education as an M.St. student and Ertegun Graduate Scholar in Modern Languages at the University of Oxford, and as a B.A. student in History at Stanford University. As an undergraduate, she started the Voltaire Library Project, a digitally and data-driven study of the 6,763-book collection of French Enlightenment philosopher Voltaire (you can read more about the project here and here). She has been interested in the application of digital technology to humanistic teaching since her days in Princeton Day School, where she developed an interdisciplinary curriculum on Mexico City (visit the course website here).

Her research on Voltaire led her to think more broadly about the place of digital methods in the humanities classroom, and how new technologies will revolutionise the liberal arts and higher education. As a DPhil candidate, Lena will examine the negotiation and implementation of new learning technologies within the University of Oxford at undergraduate and graduate levels.

Lena is involved in a number of digital humanities initiatives in Oxford. She previously served as the inaugural fellow of the Voltaire Lab at Oxford’s Voltaire Foundation. As a master’s student, Lena co-formulated the convergence agenda for Oxford digital humanities with Professor Howard Hotson, and is currently employed by the Humanities Division to assist with the development of an M.St. degree in Digital Scholarship (read more here). Lena set up and helps to run the History of the Book blog for the Faculty of Medieval and Modern Languages and the Oxford Book History Twitter account.

Lena welcomes inquiries from undergraduate and postgraduate students from Oxford and beyond seeking to get involved with the digital humanities in any capacity. The History of the Book blog also welcomes inquiries from prospective contributors.

 

Abbey is a Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education, in collaboration with the Department of Engineering.

Before joining the DPhil program, Abbey obtained a B.A. in Applied Linguistics with minors in Russian and Chinese from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford. She was the recipient of a Benjamin A. Gilman International Scholarship through U.S. Department of State for study in Russia and was awarded two Foreign Language and Area Studies (FLAS) Fellowships for study in both Russia and China. She holds both TESOL and TEFL certificates and has taught English as a Second Language in various contexts to a wide variety of learner populations.

Abbey’s main research interests lie in the use of technology to facilitate language learning. Her DPhil research focuses on the development of a virtual reality program to bridge the gaps that students face when learning languages through distance learning.

Julie Chia-Yi Lin is a Doctoral student at the University of Oxford, funded by the Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholarship. Her research focus on Internationalization, Policy, Management and Institutional Strategy is rooted in her professional experience in publishing and higher education, as well as from her observations regarding the continuous change in global educational dynamics.

Julie completed her B.A. at National Taiwan University, and earned a joint M.A. from the University of Vienna and the University of Wroclaw. She was previously employed as an officer for the Office of International Affairs at National Taiwan University, and then as a Publisher at Emerald Publishing.

She focuses on the development of higher education, particularly in the processes of internationalization and globalization, and tries to deliver perspectives from different Institutional sectors, and a wide array of participants. She is mindful of the influence that culture has on the development and reception of these processes, and has a special interest in the East Asia region, and Confucian-influenced higher education systems. In her doctoral research, she investigates higher ed institutional strategy, and the relationship it has with real-world policy. This includes delving into the specific interpretation and implementation of official policy by different stakeholders within the institution- faculty, administration, and management.

Publications

Lin, J. (2015). The Impact of Globalization on Taiwan’s Education Policy: The International Student. In A. Lipinsky. (Ed), Vienna Taiwan Studies Series: Immigration societies, Taiwan and Beyond. (pp. 129-151). Vienna: LIT VERLAG GmbH & Co. KG

Yibo Wang has an MA in International Marketing from the Coventry University (UK) and a Master’s in Management: Leadership and Organizational Change from the University of Birmingham (UK).

His doctoral research focuses on ‘knowledge hiding’, ‘leadership style’ and ‘Confucian culture’ in Chinese education and training institutions.

As empirical studies on ‘knowledge hiding’ in the Chinese context are scarce, Yibo hopes to uncover underlying mechanism of knowledge hiding and find its potential influence factors.

Prior to coming to Oxford, he worked as a CEO in an educational consultancy based in Beijing that advised the investment and marketing analyses on education and training industry.

Riziki’s current DPhil research focuses on emergent literacy of refugee children within multilingual settings.

Prior to commencing her DPhil research, Riziki completed an MSc in Child Development at the University of Oxford, looking at the role of teacher behavioural and cognitive judgments on the learning trajectories of Black primary school students in England.

Her research interests are education access and wellbeing of children in resettlement and asylum contexts. In line with this, her research in the past has focused on integration and resettlement processes of refugees and immigrants within Canada.

Publications

Bhattacharyya, P., Ogoe, S., Riziki, A., & Wilkinson, L. (2020). In search of a “home”: comparing the housing challenges experienced by recently arrived Yazidi and Syrian Refugees in Canada. Manuscript submitted for publication.

Bhattacharyya, P., Riziki, A., Songose, L., Ogoe, S., & Wilkinson, L. (2020). Understanding the link between pre-arrival education and trauma and language learning: A case study of Yazidi women in Canada. Canadian Diversity, 17(2).

Bhattacharyya, P., Riziki, A., & Wilkinson, L. (2018). “Settlement Service Use among Syrian Refugees in Canada” Canadian Diversity 15(1).

Wilkinson, L., Bhattacharya, P., Garcea, J., Abdul-Karim, A., Riziki, A., & Schnieders, M. (2017). Finding home: Some housing considerations for refugee families with children. Canadian Diversity, 14 (3), 31-35

Wilkinson, L., Bhattacharyya, P., Riziki, A., & Abdul-Karim, A. (2018).Yazidi Refugee Resettlement in Canada. Calgary: Immigration Refugees and Citizenship Canada-Integration Branch (Prairies and Territories Region).

Wilkinson, L., Garcea, J., Bhattacharyya, P., Riziki, A., Abdul Karim, A. (2017). Resettling on the Canadian Prairies: Integration of Syrian refugees. Calgary: Immigration Refugees and Citizenship Canada, Integration Branch-Prairies., Northwest Territories Division., & Alberta Association of Immigrant Serving Agencies

Anushay completed her BSc Psychology from UCL, where she also started her master’s in Developmental Neuroscience and Psychopathology. She was based at Yale University for her master’s thesis, where she worked with Dr Craig Bailey at the Yale Center for Emotional Intelligence to understand children’s emotion development. Anushay’s research interests include understanding child development across different cultures, factors that might be affecting it, and devising culture-specific ways to support children’s holistic development through the educational system. She is also keen on improving the research scope in Pakistan by working with Pakistani researchers, practitioners, and families.

Anushay balances her research with her position as the founder of a non-profit, Resources for Children, which aims to understand and support children’s development in Pakistan.

Publications

  1. Mazhar, A. (2022, April). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Spring Preview, New Haven, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2021, December). Does an extended family improve mentalising in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK & Pakistan. 2nd International Foundation University Conference of Psychology, Rawalpindi, Pakistan.
  3. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Theory of Mind in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK and Pakistan. Harvard Trends in Psychology Summit, Cambridge, United States.
  1. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Research Rounds, New Haven, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2020, October). Developing a non-profit to advance autism research in Pakistan. Anna Freud Centre Seminar Series, London, United Kingdom

 

Núria is a Professor of Mathematics Education at Autonomous University of Barcelona. Her research is about language and mathematics in secondary school classrooms and professional development contexts with mathematics teachers.

Her first degree was in Mathematics at University of Barcelona (1995). Soon after her initiation as a secondary school mathematics teacher in highly multilingual classrooms of Barcelona, she started her PhD at the UAB Division of Mathematics Education. She wanted to understand the critical factors behind the under-performance in school mathematics of many learners from poor urban backgrounds and recent histories of migration. Since then, she has been committed to classroom and teacher education research grounded on community work with schools and mathematics teachers in urban areas of poverty. Her years as a school teacher have provided her with greater insights into her work as a researcher and have strongly influenced the adoption of sociocultural and sociopolitical approaches to mathematics teaching and learning.

Núria was given the ICREA Academia Award of the Catalan Institution for Research and Advanced Studies in 2013, in recognition of her contributions to research on multilingual mathematics teaching and learning. She was elected to the Executive Committee of the International Commission on Mathematical Instruction as Member-at-Large in 2021, and to the International Committee of the International Group for the Psychology of Mathematics Education from 2010 to 2014. She served as Extraordinarious Professor of Mathematics Education at the University of South Africa from 2013 to 2020. She was Visiting Scholar at London South Bank University, University of Arizona, and University of North Carolina at Chapel-Hill.

Núria is currently on the editorial board of the international journal Mathematics Education Research Journal and Journal of Mathematics Teacher Education. Till 2021 she was the editor-in-chief of the Advances of Research in Mathematics Education, the official journal of the Spanish Society of Research in Mathematics Education. She is the leading co-editor of a 2018 special issue on language research in mathematics education published in ZDM-Mathematics Education, and the leading co-editor of a special issue on decentring mathematics teaching education, to be published in the Journal of Mathematics Teacher Education, February 2024.

She chaired the 7th Topic Conference of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education on Language and Mathematics (Dresden, 2018), and the ERME Topic Working Group on Language and Mathematics from 2015 to 2020. The collaborations established in the ERME context enabled for a broad range of experts to come together and move forward the research field in the form of an co-edited Routledge volume entitled ‘Classroom research on mathematics and language: Seeing learners and teachers differently’ in 2021, with Núria as the leading co-editor. She has also been co-editor of the Springer volume resulting from the 21st ICMI Study on Language Diversity and Mathematics Education in 2016, and of the Brill volume entitled ‘Mathematical discourse that breaks barriers and creates space for marginalized learners’ in 2018.

Núria’s motivation for coming to the Oxford Department of Education is her research collaboration in projects co-coordinated with Jenni Ingram on establishing an international network for research on supporting school mathematics teaching with linguistically disadvantaged learners. From her years as a secondary school in the 1990s, important challenges posed to mathematics education practice remain. Learners of mathematics who are linguistically disadvantaged for a variety of reasons, including impoverished socioeconomic status, continue to be educationally disadvantaged at a considerable risk of school failure and early dropout. More research will hopefully shed light on how to identify and develop improved practices to enable greater access to school mathematics for all learners.

Publications

SELECTION OF 10 LAST-DECADE PUBLICATIONS
[For more publications and research details, see https://orcid.org/0000-0001-5199-6336]
– Planas, N., & Chronaki, A. (2021). Multilingual mathematics learning from a dialogic-translanguaging perspective. In N. Planas, C. Morgan, & M. Schütte (Eds.), Classroom research on mathematics and language: Seeing learners and teachers differently (pp. 151-166). Routledge.
– Planas, N. (2021). How specific can language as resource become for the teaching of algebraic concepts? ZDM-Mathematics Education, 53(2), 277-288.
– Planas, N. (2021). Challenges and opportunities from translingual research on multilingual mathematics classrooms. In A. A. Essien, & A. Msimanga (Eds.), Multilingual education yearbook 2021. Policy and practice in STEM multilingual contexts (pp. 1-18). Springer.
– Planas, N., & Ngoepe, M. (2019). Right to learn mathematics: From language as right to language as resource. In C. Xenofontos (Ed.), Equity in mathematics education. Addressing a changing world (pp. 93-110). Information Age Publishing.
– Planas, N., & Schütte, M. (2018). Research frameworks for the study of language in mathematics education, ZDM-Mathematics Education, 50(6), 965-974.
– Planas, N. (2018). Language as resource: A key notion for understanding the complexity of mathematics learning. Educational Studies in Mathematics, 98(3), 215-229.
– Planas, N., Morgan, C., & Schütte, M. (2018). Mathematics education and language. Lessons and directions from two decades of research. In T. Dreyfus, M. Artigue, S. Prediger, D. Potari, & Ruthven (Eds.), Developing research in mathematics education. Twenty years of communication, cooperation and collaboration in Europe (pp. 196-210). Routledge.
– Planas, N. (2014). One speaker, two languages: Learning opportunities in the mathematics classroom. Educational Studies in Mathematics, 87(1), 51-66.
– Planas, N., & Setati Phakeng, M. (2014). On the process of gaining language as a resource in mathematics education. ZDM-Mathematics Education, 46(6), 883-893.
– Planas, N., & Civil, M. (2013). Language-as-resource and language-as-political. Tensions in the bilingual mathematics classroom. Mathematics Education Research Journal, 25(3), 361-378.

 

https://portalrecerca.uab.cat/en/persons/nuria-planas-raig-3

https://orcid.org/0000-0001-5199-6336

 

Cindy works at the intersection of learning, design, and technology, with a keen interest in the orchestration of future-ready tech-enabled learning.

She is curious how the deployment of adaptive learning systems to schools will impact classroom learning and hopes to learn more about the human-machine partnership in education. Specifically, her research is concerned with the implications that the use of such systems has on teacher-student interactions, as teachers grapple with balancing personalised learning and learning in community, as well as curriculum demands and student interests. These are some tensions which could potentially be exacerbated by affordances of adaptive learning systems.

Prior to embarking on the DPhil in Education at Oxford, Cindy worked as the Lead Specialist in Technologies for Learning at the Educational Technology Division of Ministry of Education, Singapore. She had previously completed graduate studies at the National University of Singapore and Stanford University where she was awarded Master of Arts in English Studies and Master of Arts in Education.

Reem is DPhil student from Saudi Arabia.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she worked as a Teacher, Professional Developer, then, became a Supervisor and Researcher in the Ministry of Education where she received a scholarship to pursue her DPhil education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests lie in the area of Teacher Education and Professional Learning Policy and Practice.

Publications
  • Alqahtani, Reem (2020). Saudi Universities Role in Developing Teacher Professional Development Programs: Elite Universities Experience. Journal of Educational Sciences. King Saud University.
  • Alqahtani, Reem. (2020). The effect of implementing UDL-based activities in improving EFL learners’ academic achievement and attitudes towards L2. In L. Salas, & E. Ager, Creating Quiet reflective Spaces: Language Teacher Researches Professional Development (pp. 61-62). IATEFL publications.

Lena Zlock is researching the integration of digital technology into structures of teaching, learning, and education in higher education. Her particular focus is on the digital humanities and the potential for digital methods to transform humanistic study. She works with Professor Niall Winters and Dr. James Robson.

Lena’s research interests stem from her education as an M.St. student and Ertegun Graduate Scholar in Modern Languages at the University of Oxford, and as a B.A. student in History at Stanford University. As an undergraduate, she started the Voltaire Library Project, a digitally and data-driven study of the 6,763-book collection of French Enlightenment philosopher Voltaire (you can read more about the project here and here). She has been interested in the application of digital technology to humanistic teaching since her days in Princeton Day School, where she developed an interdisciplinary curriculum on Mexico City (visit the course website here).

Her research on Voltaire led her to think more broadly about the place of digital methods in the humanities classroom, and how new technologies will revolutionise the liberal arts and higher education. As a DPhil candidate, Lena will examine the negotiation and implementation of new learning technologies within the University of Oxford at undergraduate and graduate levels.

Lena is involved in a number of digital humanities initiatives in Oxford. She previously served as the inaugural fellow of the Voltaire Lab at Oxford’s Voltaire Foundation. As a master’s student, Lena co-formulated the convergence agenda for Oxford digital humanities with Professor Howard Hotson, and is currently employed by the Humanities Division to assist with the development of an M.St. degree in Digital Scholarship (read more here). Lena set up and helps to run the History of the Book blog for the Faculty of Medieval and Modern Languages and the Oxford Book History Twitter account.

Lena welcomes inquiries from undergraduate and postgraduate students from Oxford and beyond seeking to get involved with the digital humanities in any capacity. The History of the Book blog also welcomes inquiries from prospective contributors.

 

Abbey is a Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education, in collaboration with the Department of Engineering.

Before joining the DPhil program, Abbey obtained a B.A. in Applied Linguistics with minors in Russian and Chinese from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford. She was the recipient of a Benjamin A. Gilman International Scholarship through U.S. Department of State for study in Russia and was awarded two Foreign Language and Area Studies (FLAS) Fellowships for study in both Russia and China. She holds both TESOL and TEFL certificates and has taught English as a Second Language in various contexts to a wide variety of learner populations.

Abbey’s main research interests lie in the use of technology to facilitate language learning. Her DPhil research focuses on the development of a virtual reality program to bridge the gaps that students face when learning languages through distance learning.

Julie Chia-Yi Lin is a Doctoral student at the University of Oxford, funded by the Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholarship. Her research focus on Internationalization, Policy, Management and Institutional Strategy is rooted in her professional experience in publishing and higher education, as well as from her observations regarding the continuous change in global educational dynamics.

Julie completed her B.A. at National Taiwan University, and earned a joint M.A. from the University of Vienna and the University of Wroclaw. She was previously employed as an officer for the Office of International Affairs at National Taiwan University, and then as a Publisher at Emerald Publishing.

She focuses on the development of higher education, particularly in the processes of internationalization and globalization, and tries to deliver perspectives from different Institutional sectors, and a wide array of participants. She is mindful of the influence that culture has on the development and reception of these processes, and has a special interest in the East Asia region, and Confucian-influenced higher education systems. In her doctoral research, she investigates higher ed institutional strategy, and the relationship it has with real-world policy. This includes delving into the specific interpretation and implementation of official policy by different stakeholders within the institution- faculty, administration, and management.

Publications

Lin, J. (2015). The Impact of Globalization on Taiwan’s Education Policy: The International Student. In A. Lipinsky. (Ed), Vienna Taiwan Studies Series: Immigration societies, Taiwan and Beyond. (pp. 129-151). Vienna: LIT VERLAG GmbH & Co. KG

Yibo Wang has an MA in International Marketing from the Coventry University (UK) and a Master’s in Management: Leadership and Organizational Change from the University of Birmingham (UK).

His doctoral research focuses on ‘knowledge hiding’, ‘leadership style’ and ‘Confucian culture’ in Chinese education and training institutions.

As empirical studies on ‘knowledge hiding’ in the Chinese context are scarce, Yibo hopes to uncover underlying mechanism of knowledge hiding and find its potential influence factors.

Prior to coming to Oxford, he worked as a CEO in an educational consultancy based in Beijing that advised the investment and marketing analyses on education and training industry.

Riziki’s current DPhil research focuses on emergent literacy of refugee children within multilingual settings.

Prior to commencing her DPhil research, Riziki completed an MSc in Child Development at the University of Oxford, looking at the role of teacher behavioural and cognitive judgments on the learning trajectories of Black primary school students in England.

Her research interests are education access and wellbeing of children in resettlement and asylum contexts. In line with this, her research in the past has focused on integration and resettlement processes of refugees and immigrants within Canada.

Publications

Bhattacharyya, P., Ogoe, S., Riziki, A., & Wilkinson, L. (2020). In search of a “home”: comparing the housing challenges experienced by recently arrived Yazidi and Syrian Refugees in Canada. Manuscript submitted for publication.

Bhattacharyya, P., Riziki, A., Songose, L., Ogoe, S., & Wilkinson, L. (2020). Understanding the link between pre-arrival education and trauma and language learning: A case study of Yazidi women in Canada. Canadian Diversity, 17(2).

Bhattacharyya, P., Riziki, A., & Wilkinson, L. (2018). “Settlement Service Use among Syrian Refugees in Canada” Canadian Diversity 15(1).

Wilkinson, L., Bhattacharya, P., Garcea, J., Abdul-Karim, A., Riziki, A., & Schnieders, M. (2017). Finding home: Some housing considerations for refugee families with children. Canadian Diversity, 14 (3), 31-35

Wilkinson, L., Bhattacharyya, P., Riziki, A., & Abdul-Karim, A. (2018).Yazidi Refugee Resettlement in Canada. Calgary: Immigration Refugees and Citizenship Canada-Integration Branch (Prairies and Territories Region).

Wilkinson, L., Garcea, J., Bhattacharyya, P., Riziki, A., Abdul Karim, A. (2017). Resettling on the Canadian Prairies: Integration of Syrian refugees. Calgary: Immigration Refugees and Citizenship Canada, Integration Branch-Prairies., Northwest Territories Division., & Alberta Association of Immigrant Serving Agencies

Anushay completed her BSc Psychology from UCL, where she also started her master’s in Developmental Neuroscience and Psychopathology. She was based at Yale University for her master’s thesis, where she worked with Dr Craig Bailey at the Yale Center for Emotional Intelligence to understand children’s emotion development. Anushay’s research interests include understanding child development across different cultures, factors that might be affecting it, and devising culture-specific ways to support children’s holistic development through the educational system. She is also keen on improving the research scope in Pakistan by working with Pakistani researchers, practitioners, and families.

Anushay balances her research with her position as the founder of a non-profit, Resources for Children, which aims to understand and support children’s development in Pakistan.

Publications

  1. Mazhar, A. (2022, April). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Spring Preview, New Haven, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2021, December). Does an extended family improve mentalising in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK & Pakistan. 2nd International Foundation University Conference of Psychology, Rawalpindi, Pakistan.
  3. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Theory of Mind in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK and Pakistan. Harvard Trends in Psychology Summit, Cambridge, United States.
  1. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Research Rounds, New Haven, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2020, October). Developing a non-profit to advance autism research in Pakistan. Anna Freud Centre Seminar Series, London, United Kingdom

 

Núria is a Professor of Mathematics Education at Autonomous University of Barcelona. Her research is about language and mathematics in secondary school classrooms and professional development contexts with mathematics teachers.

Her first degree was in Mathematics at University of Barcelona (1995). Soon after her initiation as a secondary school mathematics teacher in highly multilingual classrooms of Barcelona, she started her PhD at the UAB Division of Mathematics Education. She wanted to understand the critical factors behind the under-performance in school mathematics of many learners from poor urban backgrounds and recent histories of migration. Since then, she has been committed to classroom and teacher education research grounded on community work with schools and mathematics teachers in urban areas of poverty. Her years as a school teacher have provided her with greater insights into her work as a researcher and have strongly influenced the adoption of sociocultural and sociopolitical approaches to mathematics teaching and learning.

Núria was given the ICREA Academia Award of the Catalan Institution for Research and Advanced Studies in 2013, in recognition of her contributions to research on multilingual mathematics teaching and learning. She was elected to the Executive Committee of the International Commission on Mathematical Instruction as Member-at-Large in 2021, and to the International Committee of the International Group for the Psychology of Mathematics Education from 2010 to 2014. She served as Extraordinarious Professor of Mathematics Education at the University of South Africa from 2013 to 2020. She was Visiting Scholar at London South Bank University, University of Arizona, and University of North Carolina at Chapel-Hill.

Núria is currently on the editorial board of the international journal Mathematics Education Research Journal and Journal of Mathematics Teacher Education. Till 2021 she was the editor-in-chief of the Advances of Research in Mathematics Education, the official journal of the Spanish Society of Research in Mathematics Education. She is the leading co-editor of a 2018 special issue on language research in mathematics education published in ZDM-Mathematics Education, and the leading co-editor of a special issue on decentring mathematics teaching education, to be published in the Journal of Mathematics Teacher Education, February 2024.

She chaired the 7th Topic Conference of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education on Language and Mathematics (Dresden, 2018), and the ERME Topic Working Group on Language and Mathematics from 2015 to 2020. The collaborations established in the ERME context enabled for a broad range of experts to come together and move forward the research field in the form of an co-edited Routledge volume entitled ‘Classroom research on mathematics and language: Seeing learners and teachers differently’ in 2021, with Núria as the leading co-editor. She has also been co-editor of the Springer volume resulting from the 21st ICMI Study on Language Diversity and Mathematics Education in 2016, and of the Brill volume entitled ‘Mathematical discourse that breaks barriers and creates space for marginalized learners’ in 2018.

Núria’s motivation for coming to the Oxford Department of Education is her research collaboration in projects co-coordinated with Jenni Ingram on establishing an international network for research on supporting school mathematics teaching with linguistically disadvantaged learners. From her years as a secondary school in the 1990s, important challenges posed to mathematics education practice remain. Learners of mathematics who are linguistically disadvantaged for a variety of reasons, including impoverished socioeconomic status, continue to be educationally disadvantaged at a considerable risk of school failure and early dropout. More research will hopefully shed light on how to identify and develop improved practices to enable greater access to school mathematics for all learners.

Publications

SELECTION OF 10 LAST-DECADE PUBLICATIONS
[For more publications and research details, see https://orcid.org/0000-0001-5199-6336]
– Planas, N., & Chronaki, A. (2021). Multilingual mathematics learning from a dialogic-translanguaging perspective. In N. Planas, C. Morgan, & M. Schütte (Eds.), Classroom research on mathematics and language: Seeing learners and teachers differently (pp. 151-166). Routledge.
– Planas, N. (2021). How specific can language as resource become for the teaching of algebraic concepts? ZDM-Mathematics Education, 53(2), 277-288.
– Planas, N. (2021). Challenges and opportunities from translingual research on multilingual mathematics classrooms. In A. A. Essien, & A. Msimanga (Eds.), Multilingual education yearbook 2021. Policy and practice in STEM multilingual contexts (pp. 1-18). Springer.
– Planas, N., & Ngoepe, M. (2019). Right to learn mathematics: From language as right to language as resource. In C. Xenofontos (Ed.), Equity in mathematics education. Addressing a changing world (pp. 93-110). Information Age Publishing.
– Planas, N., & Schütte, M. (2018). Research frameworks for the study of language in mathematics education, ZDM-Mathematics Education, 50(6), 965-974.
– Planas, N. (2018). Language as resource: A key notion for understanding the complexity of mathematics learning. Educational Studies in Mathematics, 98(3), 215-229.
– Planas, N., Morgan, C., & Schütte, M. (2018). Mathematics education and language. Lessons and directions from two decades of research. In T. Dreyfus, M. Artigue, S. Prediger, D. Potari, & Ruthven (Eds.), Developing research in mathematics education. Twenty years of communication, cooperation and collaboration in Europe (pp. 196-210). Routledge.
– Planas, N. (2014). One speaker, two languages: Learning opportunities in the mathematics classroom. Educational Studies in Mathematics, 87(1), 51-66.
– Planas, N., & Setati Phakeng, M. (2014). On the process of gaining language as a resource in mathematics education. ZDM-Mathematics Education, 46(6), 883-893.
– Planas, N., & Civil, M. (2013). Language-as-resource and language-as-political. Tensions in the bilingual mathematics classroom. Mathematics Education Research Journal, 25(3), 361-378.

 

https://portalrecerca.uab.cat/en/persons/nuria-planas-raig-3

https://orcid.org/0000-0001-5199-6336

 

Cindy works at the intersection of learning, design, and technology, with a keen interest in the orchestration of future-ready tech-enabled learning.

She is curious how the deployment of adaptive learning systems to schools will impact classroom learning and hopes to learn more about the human-machine partnership in education. Specifically, her research is concerned with the implications that the use of such systems has on teacher-student interactions, as teachers grapple with balancing personalised learning and learning in community, as well as curriculum demands and student interests. These are some tensions which could potentially be exacerbated by affordances of adaptive learning systems.

Prior to embarking on the DPhil in Education at Oxford, Cindy worked as the Lead Specialist in Technologies for Learning at the Educational Technology Division of Ministry of Education, Singapore. She had previously completed graduate studies at the National University of Singapore and Stanford University where she was awarded Master of Arts in English Studies and Master of Arts in Education.

Reem is DPhil student from Saudi Arabia.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she worked as a Teacher, Professional Developer, then, became a Supervisor and Researcher in the Ministry of Education where she received a scholarship to pursue her DPhil education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests lie in the area of Teacher Education and Professional Learning Policy and Practice.

Publications
  • Alqahtani, Reem (2020). Saudi Universities Role in Developing Teacher Professional Development Programs: Elite Universities Experience. Journal of Educational Sciences. King Saud University.
  • Alqahtani, Reem. (2020). The effect of implementing UDL-based activities in improving EFL learners’ academic achievement and attitudes towards L2. In L. Salas, & E. Ager, Creating Quiet reflective Spaces: Language Teacher Researches Professional Development (pp. 61-62). IATEFL publications.

Lena Zlock is researching the integration of digital technology into structures of teaching, learning, and education in higher education. Her particular focus is on the digital humanities and the potential for digital methods to transform humanistic study. She works with Professor Niall Winters and Dr. James Robson.

Lena’s research interests stem from her education as an M.St. student and Ertegun Graduate Scholar in Modern Languages at the University of Oxford, and as a B.A. student in History at Stanford University. As an undergraduate, she started the Voltaire Library Project, a digitally and data-driven study of the 6,763-book collection of French Enlightenment philosopher Voltaire (you can read more about the project here and here). She has been interested in the application of digital technology to humanistic teaching since her days in Princeton Day School, where she developed an interdisciplinary curriculum on Mexico City (visit the course website here).

Her research on Voltaire led her to think more broadly about the place of digital methods in the humanities classroom, and how new technologies will revolutionise the liberal arts and higher education. As a DPhil candidate, Lena will examine the negotiation and implementation of new learning technologies within the University of Oxford at undergraduate and graduate levels.

Lena is involved in a number of digital humanities initiatives in Oxford. She previously served as the inaugural fellow of the Voltaire Lab at Oxford’s Voltaire Foundation. As a master’s student, Lena co-formulated the convergence agenda for Oxford digital humanities with Professor Howard Hotson, and is currently employed by the Humanities Division to assist with the development of an M.St. degree in Digital Scholarship (read more here). Lena set up and helps to run the History of the Book blog for the Faculty of Medieval and Modern Languages and the Oxford Book History Twitter account.

Lena welcomes inquiries from undergraduate and postgraduate students from Oxford and beyond seeking to get involved with the digital humanities in any capacity. The History of the Book blog also welcomes inquiries from prospective contributors.

 

Abbey is a Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education, in collaboration with the Department of Engineering.

Before joining the DPhil program, Abbey obtained a B.A. in Applied Linguistics with minors in Russian and Chinese from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford. She was the recipient of a Benjamin A. Gilman International Scholarship through U.S. Department of State for study in Russia and was awarded two Foreign Language and Area Studies (FLAS) Fellowships for study in both Russia and China. She holds both TESOL and TEFL certificates and has taught English as a Second Language in various contexts to a wide variety of learner populations.

Abbey’s main research interests lie in the use of technology to facilitate language learning. Her DPhil research focuses on the development of a virtual reality program to bridge the gaps that students face when learning languages through distance learning.

Julie Chia-Yi Lin is a Doctoral student at the University of Oxford, funded by the Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholarship. Her research focus on Internationalization, Policy, Management and Institutional Strategy is rooted in her professional experience in publishing and higher education, as well as from her observations regarding the continuous change in global educational dynamics.

Julie completed her B.A. at National Taiwan University, and earned a joint M.A. from the University of Vienna and the University of Wroclaw. She was previously employed as an officer for the Office of International Affairs at National Taiwan University, and then as a Publisher at Emerald Publishing.

She focuses on the development of higher education, particularly in the processes of internationalization and globalization, and tries to deliver perspectives from different Institutional sectors, and a wide array of participants. She is mindful of the influence that culture has on the development and reception of these processes, and has a special interest in the East Asia region, and Confucian-influenced higher education systems. In her doctoral research, she investigates higher ed institutional strategy, and the relationship it has with real-world policy. This includes delving into the specific interpretation and implementation of official policy by different stakeholders within the institution- faculty, administration, and management.

Publications

Lin, J. (2015). The Impact of Globalization on Taiwan’s Education Policy: The International Student. In A. Lipinsky. (Ed), Vienna Taiwan Studies Series: Immigration societies, Taiwan and Beyond. (pp. 129-151). Vienna: LIT VERLAG GmbH & Co. KG

Yibo Wang has an MA in International Marketing from the Coventry University (UK) and a Master’s in Management: Leadership and Organizational Change from the University of Birmingham (UK).

His doctoral research focuses on ‘knowledge hiding’, ‘leadership style’ and ‘Confucian culture’ in Chinese education and training institutions.

As empirical studies on ‘knowledge hiding’ in the Chinese context are scarce, Yibo hopes to uncover underlying mechanism of knowledge hiding and find its potential influence factors.

Prior to coming to Oxford, he worked as a CEO in an educational consultancy based in Beijing that advised the investment and marketing analyses on education and training industry.

Riziki’s current DPhil research focuses on emergent literacy of refugee children within multilingual settings.

Prior to commencing her DPhil research, Riziki completed an MSc in Child Development at the University of Oxford, looking at the role of teacher behavioural and cognitive judgments on the learning trajectories of Black primary school students in England.

Her research interests are education access and wellbeing of children in resettlement and asylum contexts. In line with this, her research in the past has focused on integration and resettlement processes of refugees and immigrants within Canada.

Publications

Bhattacharyya, P., Ogoe, S., Riziki, A., & Wilkinson, L. (2020). In search of a “home”: comparing the housing challenges experienced by recently arrived Yazidi and Syrian Refugees in Canada. Manuscript submitted for publication.

Bhattacharyya, P., Riziki, A., Songose, L., Ogoe, S., & Wilkinson, L. (2020). Understanding the link between pre-arrival education and trauma and language learning: A case study of Yazidi women in Canada. Canadian Diversity, 17(2).

Bhattacharyya, P., Riziki, A., & Wilkinson, L. (2018). “Settlement Service Use among Syrian Refugees in Canada” Canadian Diversity 15(1).

Wilkinson, L., Bhattacharya, P., Garcea, J., Abdul-Karim, A., Riziki, A., & Schnieders, M. (2017). Finding home: Some housing considerations for refugee families with children. Canadian Diversity, 14 (3), 31-35

Wilkinson, L., Bhattacharyya, P., Riziki, A., & Abdul-Karim, A. (2018).Yazidi Refugee Resettlement in Canada. Calgary: Immigration Refugees and Citizenship Canada-Integration Branch (Prairies and Territories Region).

Wilkinson, L., Garcea, J., Bhattacharyya, P., Riziki, A., Abdul Karim, A. (2017). Resettling on the Canadian Prairies: Integration of Syrian refugees. Calgary: Immigration Refugees and Citizenship Canada, Integration Branch-Prairies., Northwest Territories Division., & Alberta Association of Immigrant Serving Agencies

Anushay completed her BSc Psychology from UCL, where she also started her master’s in Developmental Neuroscience and Psychopathology. She was based at Yale University for her master’s thesis, where she worked with Dr Craig Bailey at the Yale Center for Emotional Intelligence to understand children’s emotion development. Anushay’s research interests include understanding child development across different cultures, factors that might be affecting it, and devising culture-specific ways to support children’s holistic development through the educational system. She is also keen on improving the research scope in Pakistan by working with Pakistani researchers, practitioners, and families.

Anushay balances her research with her position as the founder of a non-profit, Resources for Children, which aims to understand and support children’s development in Pakistan.

Publications

  1. Mazhar, A. (2022, April). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Spring Preview, New Haven, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2021, December). Does an extended family improve mentalising in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK & Pakistan. 2nd International Foundation University Conference of Psychology, Rawalpindi, Pakistan.
  3. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Theory of Mind in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK and Pakistan. Harvard Trends in Psychology Summit, Cambridge, United States.
  1. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Research Rounds, New Haven, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2020, October). Developing a non-profit to advance autism research in Pakistan. Anna Freud Centre Seminar Series, London, United Kingdom

 

Núria is a Professor of Mathematics Education at Autonomous University of Barcelona. Her research is about language and mathematics in secondary school classrooms and professional development contexts with mathematics teachers.

Her first degree was in Mathematics at University of Barcelona (1995). Soon after her initiation as a secondary school mathematics teacher in highly multilingual classrooms of Barcelona, she started her PhD at the UAB Division of Mathematics Education. She wanted to understand the critical factors behind the under-performance in school mathematics of many learners from poor urban backgrounds and recent histories of migration. Since then, she has been committed to classroom and teacher education research grounded on community work with schools and mathematics teachers in urban areas of poverty. Her years as a school teacher have provided her with greater insights into her work as a researcher and have strongly influenced the adoption of sociocultural and sociopolitical approaches to mathematics teaching and learning.

Núria was given the ICREA Academia Award of the Catalan Institution for Research and Advanced Studies in 2013, in recognition of her contributions to research on multilingual mathematics teaching and learning. She was elected to the Executive Committee of the International Commission on Mathematical Instruction as Member-at-Large in 2021, and to the International Committee of the International Group for the Psychology of Mathematics Education from 2010 to 2014. She served as Extraordinarious Professor of Mathematics Education at the University of South Africa from 2013 to 2020. She was Visiting Scholar at London South Bank University, University of Arizona, and University of North Carolina at Chapel-Hill.

Núria is currently on the editorial board of the international journal Mathematics Education Research Journal and Journal of Mathematics Teacher Education. Till 2021 she was the editor-in-chief of the Advances of Research in Mathematics Education, the official journal of the Spanish Society of Research in Mathematics Education. She is the leading co-editor of a 2018 special issue on language research in mathematics education published in ZDM-Mathematics Education, and the leading co-editor of a special issue on decentring mathematics teaching education, to be published in the Journal of Mathematics Teacher Education, February 2024.

She chaired the 7th Topic Conference of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education on Language and Mathematics (Dresden, 2018), and the ERME Topic Working Group on Language and Mathematics from 2015 to 2020. The collaborations established in the ERME context enabled for a broad range of experts to come together and move forward the research field in the form of an co-edited Routledge volume entitled ‘Classroom research on mathematics and language: Seeing learners and teachers differently’ in 2021, with Núria as the leading co-editor. She has also been co-editor of the Springer volume resulting from the 21st ICMI Study on Language Diversity and Mathematics Education in 2016, and of the Brill volume entitled ‘Mathematical discourse that breaks barriers and creates space for marginalized learners’ in 2018.

Núria’s motivation for coming to the Oxford Department of Education is her research collaboration in projects co-coordinated with Jenni Ingram on establishing an international network for research on supporting school mathematics teaching with linguistically disadvantaged learners. From her years as a secondary school in the 1990s, important challenges posed to mathematics education practice remain. Learners of mathematics who are linguistically disadvantaged for a variety of reasons, including impoverished socioeconomic status, continue to be educationally disadvantaged at a considerable risk of school failure and early dropout. More research will hopefully shed light on how to identify and develop improved practices to enable greater access to school mathematics for all learners.

Publications

SELECTION OF 10 LAST-DECADE PUBLICATIONS
[For more publications and research details, see https://orcid.org/0000-0001-5199-6336]
– Planas, N., & Chronaki, A. (2021). Multilingual mathematics learning from a dialogic-translanguaging perspective. In N. Planas, C. Morgan, & M. Schütte (Eds.), Classroom research on mathematics and language: Seeing learners and teachers differently (pp. 151-166). Routledge.
– Planas, N. (2021). How specific can language as resource become for the teaching of algebraic concepts? ZDM-Mathematics Education, 53(2), 277-288.
– Planas, N. (2021). Challenges and opportunities from translingual research on multilingual mathematics classrooms. In A. A. Essien, & A. Msimanga (Eds.), Multilingual education yearbook 2021. Policy and practice in STEM multilingual contexts (pp. 1-18). Springer.
– Planas, N., & Ngoepe, M. (2019). Right to learn mathematics: From language as right to language as resource. In C. Xenofontos (Ed.), Equity in mathematics education. Addressing a changing world (pp. 93-110). Information Age Publishing.
– Planas, N., & Schütte, M. (2018). Research frameworks for the study of language in mathematics education, ZDM-Mathematics Education, 50(6), 965-974.
– Planas, N. (2018). Language as resource: A key notion for understanding the complexity of mathematics learning. Educational Studies in Mathematics, 98(3), 215-229.
– Planas, N., Morgan, C., & Schütte, M. (2018). Mathematics education and language. Lessons and directions from two decades of research. In T. Dreyfus, M. Artigue, S. Prediger, D. Potari, & Ruthven (Eds.), Developing research in mathematics education. Twenty years of communication, cooperation and collaboration in Europe (pp. 196-210). Routledge.
– Planas, N. (2014). One speaker, two languages: Learning opportunities in the mathematics classroom. Educational Studies in Mathematics, 87(1), 51-66.
– Planas, N., & Setati Phakeng, M. (2014). On the process of gaining language as a resource in mathematics education. ZDM-Mathematics Education, 46(6), 883-893.
– Planas, N., & Civil, M. (2013). Language-as-resource and language-as-political. Tensions in the bilingual mathematics classroom. Mathematics Education Research Journal, 25(3), 361-378.

 

https://portalrecerca.uab.cat/en/persons/nuria-planas-raig-3

https://orcid.org/0000-0001-5199-6336

 

Cindy works at the intersection of learning, design, and technology, with a keen interest in the orchestration of future-ready tech-enabled learning.

She is curious how the deployment of adaptive learning systems to schools will impact classroom learning and hopes to learn more about the human-machine partnership in education. Specifically, her research is concerned with the implications that the use of such systems has on teacher-student interactions, as teachers grapple with balancing personalised learning and learning in community, as well as curriculum demands and student interests. These are some tensions which could potentially be exacerbated by affordances of adaptive learning systems.

Prior to embarking on the DPhil in Education at Oxford, Cindy worked as the Lead Specialist in Technologies for Learning at the Educational Technology Division of Ministry of Education, Singapore. She had previously completed graduate studies at the National University of Singapore and Stanford University where she was awarded Master of Arts in English Studies and Master of Arts in Education.

Reem is DPhil student from Saudi Arabia.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she worked as a Teacher, Professional Developer, then, became a Supervisor and Researcher in the Ministry of Education where she received a scholarship to pursue her DPhil education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests lie in the area of Teacher Education and Professional Learning Policy and Practice.

Publications
  • Alqahtani, Reem (2020). Saudi Universities Role in Developing Teacher Professional Development Programs: Elite Universities Experience. Journal of Educational Sciences. King Saud University.
  • Alqahtani, Reem. (2020). The effect of implementing UDL-based activities in improving EFL learners’ academic achievement and attitudes towards L2. In L. Salas, & E. Ager, Creating Quiet reflective Spaces: Language Teacher Researches Professional Development (pp. 61-62). IATEFL publications.

Lena Zlock is researching the integration of digital technology into structures of teaching, learning, and education in higher education. Her particular focus is on the digital humanities and the potential for digital methods to transform humanistic study. She works with Professor Niall Winters and Dr. James Robson.

Lena’s research interests stem from her education as an M.St. student and Ertegun Graduate Scholar in Modern Languages at the University of Oxford, and as a B.A. student in History at Stanford University. As an undergraduate, she started the Voltaire Library Project, a digitally and data-driven study of the 6,763-book collection of French Enlightenment philosopher Voltaire (you can read more about the project here and here). She has been interested in the application of digital technology to humanistic teaching since her days in Princeton Day School, where she developed an interdisciplinary curriculum on Mexico City (visit the course website here).

Her research on Voltaire led her to think more broadly about the place of digital methods in the humanities classroom, and how new technologies will revolutionise the liberal arts and higher education. As a DPhil candidate, Lena will examine the negotiation and implementation of new learning technologies within the University of Oxford at undergraduate and graduate levels.

Lena is involved in a number of digital humanities initiatives in Oxford. She previously served as the inaugural fellow of the Voltaire Lab at Oxford’s Voltaire Foundation. As a master’s student, Lena co-formulated the convergence agenda for Oxford digital humanities with Professor Howard Hotson, and is currently employed by the Humanities Division to assist with the development of an M.St. degree in Digital Scholarship (read more here). Lena set up and helps to run the History of the Book blog for the Faculty of Medieval and Modern Languages and the Oxford Book History Twitter account.

Lena welcomes inquiries from undergraduate and postgraduate students from Oxford and beyond seeking to get involved with the digital humanities in any capacity. The History of the Book blog also welcomes inquiries from prospective contributors.

 

Abbey is a Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education, in collaboration with the Department of Engineering.

Before joining the DPhil program, Abbey obtained a B.A. in Applied Linguistics with minors in Russian and Chinese from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford. She was the recipient of a Benjamin A. Gilman International Scholarship through U.S. Department of State for study in Russia and was awarded two Foreign Language and Area Studies (FLAS) Fellowships for study in both Russia and China. She holds both TESOL and TEFL certificates and has taught English as a Second Language in various contexts to a wide variety of learner populations.

Abbey’s main research interests lie in the use of technology to facilitate language learning. Her DPhil research focuses on the development of a virtual reality program to bridge the gaps that students face when learning languages through distance learning.

Julie Chia-Yi Lin is a Doctoral student at the University of Oxford, funded by the Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholarship. Her research focus on Internationalization, Policy, Management and Institutional Strategy is rooted in her professional experience in publishing and higher education, as well as from her observations regarding the continuous change in global educational dynamics.

Julie completed her B.A. at National Taiwan University, and earned a joint M.A. from the University of Vienna and the University of Wroclaw. She was previously employed as an officer for the Office of International Affairs at National Taiwan University, and then as a Publisher at Emerald Publishing.

She focuses on the development of higher education, particularly in the processes of internationalization and globalization, and tries to deliver perspectives from different Institutional sectors, and a wide array of participants. She is mindful of the influence that culture has on the development and reception of these processes, and has a special interest in the East Asia region, and Confucian-influenced higher education systems. In her doctoral research, she investigates higher ed institutional strategy, and the relationship it has with real-world policy. This includes delving into the specific interpretation and implementation of official policy by different stakeholders within the institution- faculty, administration, and management.

Publications

Lin, J. (2015). The Impact of Globalization on Taiwan’s Education Policy: The International Student. In A. Lipinsky. (Ed), Vienna Taiwan Studies Series: Immigration societies, Taiwan and Beyond. (pp. 129-151). Vienna: LIT VERLAG GmbH & Co. KG

Yibo Wang has an MA in International Marketing from the Coventry University (UK) and a Master’s in Management: Leadership and Organizational Change from the University of Birmingham (UK).

His doctoral research focuses on ‘knowledge hiding’, ‘leadership style’ and ‘Confucian culture’ in Chinese education and training institutions.

As empirical studies on ‘knowledge hiding’ in the Chinese context are scarce, Yibo hopes to uncover underlying mechanism of knowledge hiding and find its potential influence factors.

Prior to coming to Oxford, he worked as a CEO in an educational consultancy based in Beijing that advised the investment and marketing analyses on education and training industry.

Riziki’s current DPhil research focuses on emergent literacy of refugee children within multilingual settings.

Prior to commencing her DPhil research, Riziki completed an MSc in Child Development at the University of Oxford, looking at the role of teacher behavioural and cognitive judgments on the learning trajectories of Black primary school students in England.

Her research interests are education access and wellbeing of children in resettlement and asylum contexts. In line with this, her research in the past has focused on integration and resettlement processes of refugees and immigrants within Canada.

Publications

Bhattacharyya, P., Ogoe, S., Riziki, A., & Wilkinson, L. (2020). In search of a “home”: comparing the housing challenges experienced by recently arrived Yazidi and Syrian Refugees in Canada. Manuscript submitted for publication.

Bhattacharyya, P., Riziki, A., Songose, L., Ogoe, S., & Wilkinson, L. (2020). Understanding the link between pre-arrival education and trauma and language learning: A case study of Yazidi women in Canada. Canadian Diversity, 17(2).

Bhattacharyya, P., Riziki, A., & Wilkinson, L. (2018). “Settlement Service Use among Syrian Refugees in Canada” Canadian Diversity 15(1).

Wilkinson, L., Bhattacharya, P., Garcea, J., Abdul-Karim, A., Riziki, A., & Schnieders, M. (2017). Finding home: Some housing considerations for refugee families with children. Canadian Diversity, 14 (3), 31-35

Wilkinson, L., Bhattacharyya, P., Riziki, A., & Abdul-Karim, A. (2018).Yazidi Refugee Resettlement in Canada. Calgary: Immigration Refugees and Citizenship Canada-Integration Branch (Prairies and Territories Region).

Wilkinson, L., Garcea, J., Bhattacharyya, P., Riziki, A., Abdul Karim, A. (2017). Resettling on the Canadian Prairies: Integration of Syrian refugees. Calgary: Immigration Refugees and Citizenship Canada, Integration Branch-Prairies., Northwest Territories Division., & Alberta Association of Immigrant Serving Agencies

Anushay completed her BSc Psychology from UCL, where she also started her master’s in Developmental Neuroscience and Psychopathology. She was based at Yale University for her master’s thesis, where she worked with Dr Craig Bailey at the Yale Center for Emotional Intelligence to understand children’s emotion development. Anushay’s research interests include understanding child development across different cultures, factors that might be affecting it, and devising culture-specific ways to support children’s holistic development through the educational system. She is also keen on improving the research scope in Pakistan by working with Pakistani researchers, practitioners, and families.

Anushay balances her research with her position as the founder of a non-profit, Resources for Children, which aims to understand and support children’s development in Pakistan.

Publications

  1. Mazhar, A. (2022, April). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Spring Preview, New Haven, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2021, December). Does an extended family improve mentalising in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK & Pakistan. 2nd International Foundation University Conference of Psychology, Rawalpindi, Pakistan.
  3. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Theory of Mind in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK and Pakistan. Harvard Trends in Psychology Summit, Cambridge, United States.
  1. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Research Rounds, New Haven, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2020, October). Developing a non-profit to advance autism research in Pakistan. Anna Freud Centre Seminar Series, London, United Kingdom

 

Núria is a Professor of Mathematics Education at Autonomous University of Barcelona. Her research is about language and mathematics in secondary school classrooms and professional development contexts with mathematics teachers.

Her first degree was in Mathematics at University of Barcelona (1995). Soon after her initiation as a secondary school mathematics teacher in highly multilingual classrooms of Barcelona, she started her PhD at the UAB Division of Mathematics Education. She wanted to understand the critical factors behind the under-performance in school mathematics of many learners from poor urban backgrounds and recent histories of migration. Since then, she has been committed to classroom and teacher education research grounded on community work with schools and mathematics teachers in urban areas of poverty. Her years as a school teacher have provided her with greater insights into her work as a researcher and have strongly influenced the adoption of sociocultural and sociopolitical approaches to mathematics teaching and learning.

Núria was given the ICREA Academia Award of the Catalan Institution for Research and Advanced Studies in 2013, in recognition of her contributions to research on multilingual mathematics teaching and learning. She was elected to the Executive Committee of the International Commission on Mathematical Instruction as Member-at-Large in 2021, and to the International Committee of the International Group for the Psychology of Mathematics Education from 2010 to 2014. She served as Extraordinarious Professor of Mathematics Education at the University of South Africa from 2013 to 2020. She was Visiting Scholar at London South Bank University, University of Arizona, and University of North Carolina at Chapel-Hill.

Núria is currently on the editorial board of the international journal Mathematics Education Research Journal and Journal of Mathematics Teacher Education. Till 2021 she was the editor-in-chief of the Advances of Research in Mathematics Education, the official journal of the Spanish Society of Research in Mathematics Education. She is the leading co-editor of a 2018 special issue on language research in mathematics education published in ZDM-Mathematics Education, and the leading co-editor of a special issue on decentring mathematics teaching education, to be published in the Journal of Mathematics Teacher Education, February 2024.

She chaired the 7th Topic Conference of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education on Language and Mathematics (Dresden, 2018), and the ERME Topic Working Group on Language and Mathematics from 2015 to 2020. The collaborations established in the ERME context enabled for a broad range of experts to come together and move forward the research field in the form of an co-edited Routledge volume entitled ‘Classroom research on mathematics and language: Seeing learners and teachers differently’ in 2021, with Núria as the leading co-editor. She has also been co-editor of the Springer volume resulting from the 21st ICMI Study on Language Diversity and Mathematics Education in 2016, and of the Brill volume entitled ‘Mathematical discourse that breaks barriers and creates space for marginalized learners’ in 2018.

Núria’s motivation for coming to the Oxford Department of Education is her research collaboration in projects co-coordinated with Jenni Ingram on establishing an international network for research on supporting school mathematics teaching with linguistically disadvantaged learners. From her years as a secondary school in the 1990s, important challenges posed to mathematics education practice remain. Learners of mathematics who are linguistically disadvantaged for a variety of reasons, including impoverished socioeconomic status, continue to be educationally disadvantaged at a considerable risk of school failure and early dropout. More research will hopefully shed light on how to identify and develop improved practices to enable greater access to school mathematics for all learners.

Publications

SELECTION OF 10 LAST-DECADE PUBLICATIONS
[For more publications and research details, see https://orcid.org/0000-0001-5199-6336]
– Planas, N., & Chronaki, A. (2021). Multilingual mathematics learning from a dialogic-translanguaging perspective. In N. Planas, C. Morgan, & M. Schütte (Eds.), Classroom research on mathematics and language: Seeing learners and teachers differently (pp. 151-166). Routledge.
– Planas, N. (2021). How specific can language as resource become for the teaching of algebraic concepts? ZDM-Mathematics Education, 53(2), 277-288.
– Planas, N. (2021). Challenges and opportunities from translingual research on multilingual mathematics classrooms. In A. A. Essien, & A. Msimanga (Eds.), Multilingual education yearbook 2021. Policy and practice in STEM multilingual contexts (pp. 1-18). Springer.
– Planas, N., & Ngoepe, M. (2019). Right to learn mathematics: From language as right to language as resource. In C. Xenofontos (Ed.), Equity in mathematics education. Addressing a changing world (pp. 93-110). Information Age Publishing.
– Planas, N., & Schütte, M. (2018). Research frameworks for the study of language in mathematics education, ZDM-Mathematics Education, 50(6), 965-974.
– Planas, N. (2018). Language as resource: A key notion for understanding the complexity of mathematics learning. Educational Studies in Mathematics, 98(3), 215-229.
– Planas, N., Morgan, C., & Schütte, M. (2018). Mathematics education and language. Lessons and directions from two decades of research. In T. Dreyfus, M. Artigue, S. Prediger, D. Potari, & Ruthven (Eds.), Developing research in mathematics education. Twenty years of communication, cooperation and collaboration in Europe (pp. 196-210). Routledge.
– Planas, N. (2014). One speaker, two languages: Learning opportunities in the mathematics classroom. Educational Studies in Mathematics, 87(1), 51-66.
– Planas, N., & Setati Phakeng, M. (2014). On the process of gaining language as a resource in mathematics education. ZDM-Mathematics Education, 46(6), 883-893.
– Planas, N., & Civil, M. (2013). Language-as-resource and language-as-political. Tensions in the bilingual mathematics classroom. Mathematics Education Research Journal, 25(3), 361-378.

 

https://portalrecerca.uab.cat/en/persons/nuria-planas-raig-3

https://orcid.org/0000-0001-5199-6336

 

Cindy works at the intersection of learning, design, and technology, with a keen interest in the orchestration of future-ready tech-enabled learning.

She is curious how the deployment of adaptive learning systems to schools will impact classroom learning and hopes to learn more about the human-machine partnership in education. Specifically, her research is concerned with the implications that the use of such systems has on teacher-student interactions, as teachers grapple with balancing personalised learning and learning in community, as well as curriculum demands and student interests. These are some tensions which could potentially be exacerbated by affordances of adaptive learning systems.

Prior to embarking on the DPhil in Education at Oxford, Cindy worked as the Lead Specialist in Technologies for Learning at the Educational Technology Division of Ministry of Education, Singapore. She had previously completed graduate studies at the National University of Singapore and Stanford University where she was awarded Master of Arts in English Studies and Master of Arts in Education.

Reem is DPhil student from Saudi Arabia.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she worked as a Teacher, Professional Developer, then, became a Supervisor and Researcher in the Ministry of Education where she received a scholarship to pursue her DPhil education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests lie in the area of Teacher Education and Professional Learning Policy and Practice.

Publications
  • Alqahtani, Reem (2020). Saudi Universities Role in Developing Teacher Professional Development Programs: Elite Universities Experience. Journal of Educational Sciences. King Saud University.
  • Alqahtani, Reem. (2020). The effect of implementing UDL-based activities in improving EFL learners’ academic achievement and attitudes towards L2. In L. Salas, & E. Ager, Creating Quiet reflective Spaces: Language Teacher Researches Professional Development (pp. 61-62). IATEFL publications.

Lena Zlock is researching the integration of digital technology into structures of teaching, learning, and education in higher education. Her particular focus is on the digital humanities and the potential for digital methods to transform humanistic study. She works with Professor Niall Winters and Dr. James Robson.

Lena’s research interests stem from her education as an M.St. student and Ertegun Graduate Scholar in Modern Languages at the University of Oxford, and as a B.A. student in History at Stanford University. As an undergraduate, she started the Voltaire Library Project, a digitally and data-driven study of the 6,763-book collection of French Enlightenment philosopher Voltaire (you can read more about the project here and here). She has been interested in the application of digital technology to humanistic teaching since her days in Princeton Day School, where she developed an interdisciplinary curriculum on Mexico City (visit the course website here).

Her research on Voltaire led her to think more broadly about the place of digital methods in the humanities classroom, and how new technologies will revolutionise the liberal arts and higher education. As a DPhil candidate, Lena will examine the negotiation and implementation of new learning technologies within the University of Oxford at undergraduate and graduate levels.

Lena is involved in a number of digital humanities initiatives in Oxford. She previously served as the inaugural fellow of the Voltaire Lab at Oxford’s Voltaire Foundation. As a master’s student, Lena co-formulated the convergence agenda for Oxford digital humanities with Professor Howard Hotson, and is currently employed by the Humanities Division to assist with the development of an M.St. degree in Digital Scholarship (read more here). Lena set up and helps to run the History of the Book blog for the Faculty of Medieval and Modern Languages and the Oxford Book History Twitter account.

Lena welcomes inquiries from undergraduate and postgraduate students from Oxford and beyond seeking to get involved with the digital humanities in any capacity. The History of the Book blog also welcomes inquiries from prospective contributors.

 

Abbey is a Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education, in collaboration with the Department of Engineering.

Before joining the DPhil program, Abbey obtained a B.A. in Applied Linguistics with minors in Russian and Chinese from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford. She was the recipient of a Benjamin A. Gilman International Scholarship through U.S. Department of State for study in Russia and was awarded two Foreign Language and Area Studies (FLAS) Fellowships for study in both Russia and China. She holds both TESOL and TEFL certificates and has taught English as a Second Language in various contexts to a wide variety of learner populations.

Abbey’s main research interests lie in the use of technology to facilitate language learning. Her DPhil research focuses on the development of a virtual reality program to bridge the gaps that students face when learning languages through distance learning.

Julie Chia-Yi Lin is a Doctoral student at the University of Oxford, funded by the Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholarship. Her research focus on Internationalization, Policy, Management and Institutional Strategy is rooted in her professional experience in publishing and higher education, as well as from her observations regarding the continuous change in global educational dynamics.

Julie completed her B.A. at National Taiwan University, and earned a joint M.A. from the University of Vienna and the University of Wroclaw. She was previously employed as an officer for the Office of International Affairs at National Taiwan University, and then as a Publisher at Emerald Publishing.

She focuses on the development of higher education, particularly in the processes of internationalization and globalization, and tries to deliver perspectives from different Institutional sectors, and a wide array of participants. She is mindful of the influence that culture has on the development and reception of these processes, and has a special interest in the East Asia region, and Confucian-influenced higher education systems. In her doctoral research, she investigates higher ed institutional strategy, and the relationship it has with real-world policy. This includes delving into the specific interpretation and implementation of official policy by different stakeholders within the institution- faculty, administration, and management.

Publications

Lin, J. (2015). The Impact of Globalization on Taiwan’s Education Policy: The International Student. In A. Lipinsky. (Ed), Vienna Taiwan Studies Series: Immigration societies, Taiwan and Beyond. (pp. 129-151). Vienna: LIT VERLAG GmbH & Co. KG

Yibo Wang has an MA in International Marketing from the Coventry University (UK) and a Master’s in Management: Leadership and Organizational Change from the University of Birmingham (UK).

His doctoral research focuses on ‘knowledge hiding’, ‘leadership style’ and ‘Confucian culture’ in Chinese education and training institutions.

As empirical studies on ‘knowledge hiding’ in the Chinese context are scarce, Yibo hopes to uncover underlying mechanism of knowledge hiding and find its potential influence factors.

Prior to coming to Oxford, he worked as a CEO in an educational consultancy based in Beijing that advised the investment and marketing analyses on education and training industry.

Riziki’s current DPhil research focuses on emergent literacy of refugee children within multilingual settings.

Prior to commencing her DPhil research, Riziki completed an MSc in Child Development at the University of Oxford, looking at the role of teacher behavioural and cognitive judgments on the learning trajectories of Black primary school students in England.

Her research interests are education access and wellbeing of children in resettlement and asylum contexts. In line with this, her research in the past has focused on integration and resettlement processes of refugees and immigrants within Canada.

Publications

Bhattacharyya, P., Ogoe, S., Riziki, A., & Wilkinson, L. (2020). In search of a “home”: comparing the housing challenges experienced by recently arrived Yazidi and Syrian Refugees in Canada. Manuscript submitted for publication.

Bhattacharyya, P., Riziki, A., Songose, L., Ogoe, S., & Wilkinson, L. (2020). Understanding the link between pre-arrival education and trauma and language learning: A case study of Yazidi women in Canada. Canadian Diversity, 17(2).

Bhattacharyya, P., Riziki, A., & Wilkinson, L. (2018). “Settlement Service Use among Syrian Refugees in Canada” Canadian Diversity 15(1).

Wilkinson, L., Bhattacharya, P., Garcea, J., Abdul-Karim, A., Riziki, A., & Schnieders, M. (2017). Finding home: Some housing considerations for refugee families with children. Canadian Diversity, 14 (3), 31-35

Wilkinson, L., Bhattacharyya, P., Riziki, A., & Abdul-Karim, A. (2018).Yazidi Refugee Resettlement in Canada. Calgary: Immigration Refugees and Citizenship Canada-Integration Branch (Prairies and Territories Region).

Wilkinson, L., Garcea, J., Bhattacharyya, P., Riziki, A., Abdul Karim, A. (2017). Resettling on the Canadian Prairies: Integration of Syrian refugees. Calgary: Immigration Refugees and Citizenship Canada, Integration Branch-Prairies., Northwest Territories Division., & Alberta Association of Immigrant Serving Agencies

Anushay completed her BSc Psychology from UCL, where she also started her master’s in Developmental Neuroscience and Psychopathology. She was based at Yale University for her master’s thesis, where she worked with Dr Craig Bailey at the Yale Center for Emotional Intelligence to understand children’s emotion development. Anushay’s research interests include understanding child development across different cultures, factors that might be affecting it, and devising culture-specific ways to support children’s holistic development through the educational system. She is also keen on improving the research scope in Pakistan by working with Pakistani researchers, practitioners, and families.

Anushay balances her research with her position as the founder of a non-profit, Resources for Children, which aims to understand and support children’s development in Pakistan.

Publications

  1. Mazhar, A. (2022, April). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Spring Preview, New Haven, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2021, December). Does an extended family improve mentalising in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK & Pakistan. 2nd International Foundation University Conference of Psychology, Rawalpindi, Pakistan.
  3. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Theory of Mind in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK and Pakistan. Harvard Trends in Psychology Summit, Cambridge, United States.
  1. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Research Rounds, New Haven, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2020, October). Developing a non-profit to advance autism research in Pakistan. Anna Freud Centre Seminar Series, London, United Kingdom

 

Núria is a Professor of Mathematics Education at Autonomous University of Barcelona. Her research is about language and mathematics in secondary school classrooms and professional development contexts with mathematics teachers.

Her first degree was in Mathematics at University of Barcelona (1995). Soon after her initiation as a secondary school mathematics teacher in highly multilingual classrooms of Barcelona, she started her PhD at the UAB Division of Mathematics Education. She wanted to understand the critical factors behind the under-performance in school mathematics of many learners from poor urban backgrounds and recent histories of migration. Since then, she has been committed to classroom and teacher education research grounded on community work with schools and mathematics teachers in urban areas of poverty. Her years as a school teacher have provided her with greater insights into her work as a researcher and have strongly influenced the adoption of sociocultural and sociopolitical approaches to mathematics teaching and learning.

Núria was given the ICREA Academia Award of the Catalan Institution for Research and Advanced Studies in 2013, in recognition of her contributions to research on multilingual mathematics teaching and learning. She was elected to the Executive Committee of the International Commission on Mathematical Instruction as Member-at-Large in 2021, and to the International Committee of the International Group for the Psychology of Mathematics Education from 2010 to 2014. She served as Extraordinarious Professor of Mathematics Education at the University of South Africa from 2013 to 2020. She was Visiting Scholar at London South Bank University, University of Arizona, and University of North Carolina at Chapel-Hill.

Núria is currently on the editorial board of the international journal Mathematics Education Research Journal and Journal of Mathematics Teacher Education. Till 2021 she was the editor-in-chief of the Advances of Research in Mathematics Education, the official journal of the Spanish Society of Research in Mathematics Education. She is the leading co-editor of a 2018 special issue on language research in mathematics education published in ZDM-Mathematics Education, and the leading co-editor of a special issue on decentring mathematics teaching education, to be published in the Journal of Mathematics Teacher Education, February 2024.

She chaired the 7th Topic Conference of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education on Language and Mathematics (Dresden, 2018), and the ERME Topic Working Group on Language and Mathematics from 2015 to 2020. The collaborations established in the ERME context enabled for a broad range of experts to come together and move forward the research field in the form of an co-edited Routledge volume entitled ‘Classroom research on mathematics and language: Seeing learners and teachers differently’ in 2021, with Núria as the leading co-editor. She has also been co-editor of the Springer volume resulting from the 21st ICMI Study on Language Diversity and Mathematics Education in 2016, and of the Brill volume entitled ‘Mathematical discourse that breaks barriers and creates space for marginalized learners’ in 2018.

Núria’s motivation for coming to the Oxford Department of Education is her research collaboration in projects co-coordinated with Jenni Ingram on establishing an international network for research on supporting school mathematics teaching with linguistically disadvantaged learners. From her years as a secondary school in the 1990s, important challenges posed to mathematics education practice remain. Learners of mathematics who are linguistically disadvantaged for a variety of reasons, including impoverished socioeconomic status, continue to be educationally disadvantaged at a considerable risk of school failure and early dropout. More research will hopefully shed light on how to identify and develop improved practices to enable greater access to school mathematics for all learners.

Publications

SELECTION OF 10 LAST-DECADE PUBLICATIONS
[For more publications and research details, see https://orcid.org/0000-0001-5199-6336]
– Planas, N., & Chronaki, A. (2021). Multilingual mathematics learning from a dialogic-translanguaging perspective. In N. Planas, C. Morgan, & M. Schütte (Eds.), Classroom research on mathematics and language: Seeing learners and teachers differently (pp. 151-166). Routledge.
– Planas, N. (2021). How specific can language as resource become for the teaching of algebraic concepts? ZDM-Mathematics Education, 53(2), 277-288.
– Planas, N. (2021). Challenges and opportunities from translingual research on multilingual mathematics classrooms. In A. A. Essien, & A. Msimanga (Eds.), Multilingual education yearbook 2021. Policy and practice in STEM multilingual contexts (pp. 1-18). Springer.
– Planas, N., & Ngoepe, M. (2019). Right to learn mathematics: From language as right to language as resource. In C. Xenofontos (Ed.), Equity in mathematics education. Addressing a changing world (pp. 93-110). Information Age Publishing.
– Planas, N., & Schütte, M. (2018). Research frameworks for the study of language in mathematics education, ZDM-Mathematics Education, 50(6), 965-974.
– Planas, N. (2018). Language as resource: A key notion for understanding the complexity of mathematics learning. Educational Studies in Mathematics, 98(3), 215-229.
– Planas, N., Morgan, C., & Schütte, M. (2018). Mathematics education and language. Lessons and directions from two decades of research. In T. Dreyfus, M. Artigue, S. Prediger, D. Potari, & Ruthven (Eds.), Developing research in mathematics education. Twenty years of communication, cooperation and collaboration in Europe (pp. 196-210). Routledge.
– Planas, N. (2014). One speaker, two languages: Learning opportunities in the mathematics classroom. Educational Studies in Mathematics, 87(1), 51-66.
– Planas, N., & Setati Phakeng, M. (2014). On the process of gaining language as a resource in mathematics education. ZDM-Mathematics Education, 46(6), 883-893.
– Planas, N., & Civil, M. (2013). Language-as-resource and language-as-political. Tensions in the bilingual mathematics classroom. Mathematics Education Research Journal, 25(3), 361-378.

 

https://portalrecerca.uab.cat/en/persons/nuria-planas-raig-3

https://orcid.org/0000-0001-5199-6336

 

Cindy works at the intersection of learning, design, and technology, with a keen interest in the orchestration of future-ready tech-enabled learning.

She is curious how the deployment of adaptive learning systems to schools will impact classroom learning and hopes to learn more about the human-machine partnership in education. Specifically, her research is concerned with the implications that the use of such systems has on teacher-student interactions, as teachers grapple with balancing personalised learning and learning in community, as well as curriculum demands and student interests. These are some tensions which could potentially be exacerbated by affordances of adaptive learning systems.

Prior to embarking on the DPhil in Education at Oxford, Cindy worked as the Lead Specialist in Technologies for Learning at the Educational Technology Division of Ministry of Education, Singapore. She had previously completed graduate studies at the National University of Singapore and Stanford University where she was awarded Master of Arts in English Studies and Master of Arts in Education.

Reem is DPhil student from Saudi Arabia.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she worked as a Teacher, Professional Developer, then, became a Supervisor and Researcher in the Ministry of Education where she received a scholarship to pursue her DPhil education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests lie in the area of Teacher Education and Professional Learning Policy and Practice.

Publications
  • Alqahtani, Reem (2020). Saudi Universities Role in Developing Teacher Professional Development Programs: Elite Universities Experience. Journal of Educational Sciences. King Saud University.
  • Alqahtani, Reem. (2020). The effect of implementing UDL-based activities in improving EFL learners’ academic achievement and attitudes towards L2. In L. Salas, & E. Ager, Creating Quiet reflective Spaces: Language Teacher Researches Professional Development (pp. 61-62). IATEFL publications.

Lena Zlock is researching the integration of digital technology into structures of teaching, learning, and education in higher education. Her particular focus is on the digital humanities and the potential for digital methods to transform humanistic study. She works with Professor Niall Winters and Dr. James Robson.

Lena’s research interests stem from her education as an M.St. student and Ertegun Graduate Scholar in Modern Languages at the University of Oxford, and as a B.A. student in History at Stanford University. As an undergraduate, she started the Voltaire Library Project, a digitally and data-driven study of the 6,763-book collection of French Enlightenment philosopher Voltaire (you can read more about the project here and here). She has been interested in the application of digital technology to humanistic teaching since her days in Princeton Day School, where she developed an interdisciplinary curriculum on Mexico City (visit the course website here).

Her research on Voltaire led her to think more broadly about the place of digital methods in the humanities classroom, and how new technologies will revolutionise the liberal arts and higher education. As a DPhil candidate, Lena will examine the negotiation and implementation of new learning technologies within the University of Oxford at undergraduate and graduate levels.

Lena is involved in a number of digital humanities initiatives in Oxford. She previously served as the inaugural fellow of the Voltaire Lab at Oxford’s Voltaire Foundation. As a master’s student, Lena co-formulated the convergence agenda for Oxford digital humanities with Professor Howard Hotson, and is currently employed by the Humanities Division to assist with the development of an M.St. degree in Digital Scholarship (read more here). Lena set up and helps to run the History of the Book blog for the Faculty of Medieval and Modern Languages and the Oxford Book History Twitter account.

Lena welcomes inquiries from undergraduate and postgraduate students from Oxford and beyond seeking to get involved with the digital humanities in any capacity. The History of the Book blog also welcomes inquiries from prospective contributors.

 

Abbey is a Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education, in collaboration with the Department of Engineering.

Before joining the DPhil program, Abbey obtained a B.A. in Applied Linguistics with minors in Russian and Chinese from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford. She was the recipient of a Benjamin A. Gilman International Scholarship through U.S. Department of State for study in Russia and was awarded two Foreign Language and Area Studies (FLAS) Fellowships for study in both Russia and China. She holds both TESOL and TEFL certificates and has taught English as a Second Language in various contexts to a wide variety of learner populations.

Abbey’s main research interests lie in the use of technology to facilitate language learning. Her DPhil research focuses on the development of a virtual reality program to bridge the gaps that students face when learning languages through distance learning.

Julie Chia-Yi Lin is a Doctoral student at the University of Oxford, funded by the Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholarship. Her research focus on Internationalization, Policy, Management and Institutional Strategy is rooted in her professional experience in publishing and higher education, as well as from her observations regarding the continuous change in global educational dynamics.

Julie completed her B.A. at National Taiwan University, and earned a joint M.A. from the University of Vienna and the University of Wroclaw. She was previously employed as an officer for the Office of International Affairs at National Taiwan University, and then as a Publisher at Emerald Publishing.

She focuses on the development of higher education, particularly in the processes of internationalization and globalization, and tries to deliver perspectives from different Institutional sectors, and a wide array of participants. She is mindful of the influence that culture has on the development and reception of these processes, and has a special interest in the East Asia region, and Confucian-influenced higher education systems. In her doctoral research, she investigates higher ed institutional strategy, and the relationship it has with real-world policy. This includes delving into the specific interpretation and implementation of official policy by different stakeholders within the institution- faculty, administration, and management.

Publications

Lin, J. (2015). The Impact of Globalization on Taiwan’s Education Policy: The International Student. In A. Lipinsky. (Ed), Vienna Taiwan Studies Series: Immigration societies, Taiwan and Beyond. (pp. 129-151). Vienna: LIT VERLAG GmbH & Co. KG

Yibo Wang has an MA in International Marketing from the Coventry University (UK) and a Master’s in Management: Leadership and Organizational Change from the University of Birmingham (UK).

His doctoral research focuses on ‘knowledge hiding’, ‘leadership style’ and ‘Confucian culture’ in Chinese education and training institutions.

As empirical studies on ‘knowledge hiding’ in the Chinese context are scarce, Yibo hopes to uncover underlying mechanism of knowledge hiding and find its potential influence factors.

Prior to coming to Oxford, he worked as a CEO in an educational consultancy based in Beijing that advised the investment and marketing analyses on education and training industry.

Riziki’s current DPhil research focuses on emergent literacy of refugee children within multilingual settings.

Prior to commencing her DPhil research, Riziki completed an MSc in Child Development at the University of Oxford, looking at the role of teacher behavioural and cognitive judgments on the learning trajectories of Black primary school students in England.

Her research interests are education access and wellbeing of children in resettlement and asylum contexts. In line with this, her research in the past has focused on integration and resettlement processes of refugees and immigrants within Canada.

Publications

Bhattacharyya, P., Ogoe, S., Riziki, A., & Wilkinson, L. (2020). In search of a “home”: comparing the housing challenges experienced by recently arrived Yazidi and Syrian Refugees in Canada. Manuscript submitted for publication.

Bhattacharyya, P., Riziki, A., Songose, L., Ogoe, S., & Wilkinson, L. (2020). Understanding the link between pre-arrival education and trauma and language learning: A case study of Yazidi women in Canada. Canadian Diversity, 17(2).

Bhattacharyya, P., Riziki, A., & Wilkinson, L. (2018). “Settlement Service Use among Syrian Refugees in Canada” Canadian Diversity 15(1).

Wilkinson, L., Bhattacharya, P., Garcea, J., Abdul-Karim, A., Riziki, A., & Schnieders, M. (2017). Finding home: Some housing considerations for refugee families with children. Canadian Diversity, 14 (3), 31-35

Wilkinson, L., Bhattacharyya, P., Riziki, A., & Abdul-Karim, A. (2018).Yazidi Refugee Resettlement in Canada. Calgary: Immigration Refugees and Citizenship Canada-Integration Branch (Prairies and Territories Region).

Wilkinson, L., Garcea, J., Bhattacharyya, P., Riziki, A., Abdul Karim, A. (2017). Resettling on the Canadian Prairies: Integration of Syrian refugees. Calgary: Immigration Refugees and Citizenship Canada, Integration Branch-Prairies., Northwest Territories Division., & Alberta Association of Immigrant Serving Agencies

Anushay completed her BSc Psychology from UCL, where she also started her master’s in Developmental Neuroscience and Psychopathology. She was based at Yale University for her master’s thesis, where she worked with Dr Craig Bailey at the Yale Center for Emotional Intelligence to understand children’s emotion development. Anushay’s research interests include understanding child development across different cultures, factors that might be affecting it, and devising culture-specific ways to support children’s holistic development through the educational system. She is also keen on improving the research scope in Pakistan by working with Pakistani researchers, practitioners, and families.

Anushay balances her research with her position as the founder of a non-profit, Resources for Children, which aims to understand and support children’s development in Pakistan.

Publications

  1. Mazhar, A. (2022, April). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Spring Preview, New Haven, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2021, December). Does an extended family improve mentalising in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK & Pakistan. 2nd International Foundation University Conference of Psychology, Rawalpindi, Pakistan.
  3. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Theory of Mind in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK and Pakistan. Harvard Trends in Psychology Summit, Cambridge, United States.
  1. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Research Rounds, New Haven, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2020, October). Developing a non-profit to advance autism research in Pakistan. Anna Freud Centre Seminar Series, London, United Kingdom

 

Núria is a Professor of Mathematics Education at Autonomous University of Barcelona. Her research is about language and mathematics in secondary school classrooms and professional development contexts with mathematics teachers.

Her first degree was in Mathematics at University of Barcelona (1995). Soon after her initiation as a secondary school mathematics teacher in highly multilingual classrooms of Barcelona, she started her PhD at the UAB Division of Mathematics Education. She wanted to understand the critical factors behind the under-performance in school mathematics of many learners from poor urban backgrounds and recent histories of migration. Since then, she has been committed to classroom and teacher education research grounded on community work with schools and mathematics teachers in urban areas of poverty. Her years as a school teacher have provided her with greater insights into her work as a researcher and have strongly influenced the adoption of sociocultural and sociopolitical approaches to mathematics teaching and learning.

Núria was given the ICREA Academia Award of the Catalan Institution for Research and Advanced Studies in 2013, in recognition of her contributions to research on multilingual mathematics teaching and learning. She was elected to the Executive Committee of the International Commission on Mathematical Instruction as Member-at-Large in 2021, and to the International Committee of the International Group for the Psychology of Mathematics Education from 2010 to 2014. She served as Extraordinarious Professor of Mathematics Education at the University of South Africa from 2013 to 2020. She was Visiting Scholar at London South Bank University, University of Arizona, and University of North Carolina at Chapel-Hill.

Núria is currently on the editorial board of the international journal Mathematics Education Research Journal and Journal of Mathematics Teacher Education. Till 2021 she was the editor-in-chief of the Advances of Research in Mathematics Education, the official journal of the Spanish Society of Research in Mathematics Education. She is the leading co-editor of a 2018 special issue on language research in mathematics education published in ZDM-Mathematics Education, and the leading co-editor of a special issue on decentring mathematics teaching education, to be published in the Journal of Mathematics Teacher Education, February 2024.

She chaired the 7th Topic Conference of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education on Language and Mathematics (Dresden, 2018), and the ERME Topic Working Group on Language and Mathematics from 2015 to 2020. The collaborations established in the ERME context enabled for a broad range of experts to come together and move forward the research field in the form of an co-edited Routledge volume entitled ‘Classroom research on mathematics and language: Seeing learners and teachers differently’ in 2021, with Núria as the leading co-editor. She has also been co-editor of the Springer volume resulting from the 21st ICMI Study on Language Diversity and Mathematics Education in 2016, and of the Brill volume entitled ‘Mathematical discourse that breaks barriers and creates space for marginalized learners’ in 2018.

Núria’s motivation for coming to the Oxford Department of Education is her research collaboration in projects co-coordinated with Jenni Ingram on establishing