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Dr Nadiya Ivanenko is a Visiting Research Fellow in the field of civic education and citizenship linguistics. She is a member of the Applied Linguistics research group and Higher Education research group at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

After receiving PhD in Comparative Linguistics from Kyiv National Linguistic University (2008) Nadiya worked as an Associate Professor of the Germanic Languages and Teaching Methodology Department, Faculty of Ukrainian Philology, Foreign Languages and Social Communications and Vice Dean of the Faculty of Foreign Languages, Central Ukrainian State University, Ukraine.

Nadiya was a Chevening scholar and Postgraduate researcher at the Department of Education, University of Oxford (2003-2004). She was a Co-chair of the joint UNESCO Chair/UNITWIN project ‘Education as a Humanitarian Response’ (2004-2012); a participant of BECA joint project ‘Education for Democracy’ between Montclair State University (USA) and Kirovohrad State Pedagogical University (Ukraine). Nadiya had internship for teachers of EFL in the Department of Educational and Cultural Programmes at Shakespeare’s Globe Theater, London, UK (2011). She was the Head of the British Council International Mobility Grant ‘Internalizing Higher Education in Ukraine’, which included 2 internships at the University of Durham, UK (2016). She participated in the internship “Retraining in the Field of Teaching Excellence”, Bayreuth University, Germany (Erasmus + Project (2021) and was a coordinator of the Erasmus+ Project: Innovative Approach to Promotion Teaching Excellence (2021-2022) at Central Ukrainian State University.

Selected Publications

BOOKS

  • Rastrygina, A., Ivanenko, N. (2021). Pedagogy of Freedom in the Paradigmal Space of Modern Education and Upbringing.
  • Ivanenko, N., Liashuk, A. (2021). English Activity Book. Practical Course of English. Kropyvnytskyi.
  • Ivanenko N. (2014). (Edit.) Education in Eastern Europe and Eurasia. London: Bloomsbury.
  • Ivanenko N. (2008). The Concept of Good in English and Ukrainian Language Pictures of the World. Kirovohrad: KOD.
  • Ivanenko N. (2007). Written Practice and Conversation for 1 Year. Kropyvnytskyi.
  • Garkusha, L., Ivanenko, N. (2004). Critical thinking in life skills training. Kirovohrad.

BOOK CHAPTERS

  • Ivanenko, N. (2024). Words and word meanings In The Routledge Companion To English Studies/ by Constant Leung & Jo Lewkowicz. London, UK: Routledge (in publishing).
  • Ivanenko N. (2023). Development of civic education in Ukrainian universities: new challenges of modern realities in the conditions of the transformation of society. In Contemporary Education in Ukraine: Integration into the European Educational Space. Dnipro (pp. 387-412) DOI:36550/978-617-8245-57-3-20
  • Ivanenko N. (2019). Citizenship Education, Moral Fluency and Social and Political Future Challenges. In Polish-Jewish History, Culture, Values, and Education between Paradise and Inferno. Irvine, USA: Brown Walker Press (pp. 93-103)
  • Ivanenko N. (2014). Education Change, Transformation, Reforms – a Regional Overview. In N. Ivanenko (Edit.) Education in Eastern Europe and Eurasia. London: Bloomsbury (pp. 9-45)
  • Ivanenko N. (2013). Vulnerable Children in Ukraine and Educational Response. In M. Matsumoto (Edit.) Education and Disadvantaged Children and Young People. London: Bloomsbury (pp. 95-132)

JOURNAL ARTICLES

  1. Ivanenko, N. (2024). Challenges of Ukrainian Higher Education in Times of War. International Higher Education. The Boston College Centre for International Higher Education, 118, pp. 35-36 https://doi.org/10.36197/IHE.2024.118.17
  2. Ivanenko, N., Paska, T., Irkha, A. Rud, A., & Boguslavskas, L., (2024). The Role of Higher Education for Ensuring National Security in Ukraine. Futurity Education, 4(1), 210-237 https://doi.org/10.57125/FED.2024.03.25.11
  3. Leleka, T., Ivanenko, N., Demeshko, I., Kapitan T., & Demchenko, I. (2024). The Process of English Internationalization in the Ukrainian Educational Paradigm. Slavistica Vilnensis, 68(2), 76-89 doi:10.15388/SlavViln.2023.68(2).6
  4. Ivanenko, N., Rud, A., Hurbanska, A., Cheban, Y., & Syrtseva, S. (2024). Digitalization of Education of the Future – A Trend or a Requirement of the Time? Journal of Higher Education Theory and Practice24(2). DOI: https://doi.org/10.33423/jhetp.v24i2.6791
  5. Ivanenko, N. (2023). Civic character cultivation as a basic virtue within and beyond modern educational institutions. Academic Notes. Series Pedagogical sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 209, 180-185 DOI: https://doi.org/10.36550/2415-7988-2022-1-209-180-185
  6. Rastrygina, A., Ivanenko, N. (2023). A Pedagogy of freedom as a viable basis for implementing gender equality in Ukraine’s educational institutions. International Review of Education, 69(1-2), 143-174. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/s11159-023-09995-9
  7. Ivanenko N., Biletska O., Hurbanska S., Hurbanska, A., & Kochmar, D. (2023). English language morphological neologisms reflecting the war in Ukraine. World Journal of English Language, 13(5), pp. 432-438    DOI: doi:http://dx.doi.org/10.5430/wjel.v13n5p432
  8. Ivanenko, N., Boiko, A., Fedorchuk, L., Panchenko, I., & Marieiev, D. (2023). Development of educational policy in Ukraine in the context of European integration and digital transformation. Revista Eduweb, 17(2), 296-305 DOI: https://doi.org/10.46502/issn.1856-7576/2023.17.02.25
  9. Ivanenko, N.V., Gerasymenko,Yu. A., Kostenko, V.G. (2023). Innovative approaches to the modernization of philological education and science in Ukraine: a response to the challenges of wartime. Akademichni Vizii, (in Ukrainian). URL: https://academy-vision.org/index.php/av/article/view/281 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5281/zenodo.7795088
  10. Ivanenko N. (2022). Phraseological units of the conceptual field MARRIAGE in the English picture of the world. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi: KOD, 202, pp. 140-146
  11. Bilous, O., Mishchenko, A., Datska, T., Ivanenko, N., Kit, L., Piankovska, I., and Vereshchak, Y. (2021). Modern linguistic technologies: strategy of teaching translation studies. Rupkatha Journal on Interdisciplinary Studies in Humanities, 13(4), pp. 1-12 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/21659/rupkatha.v13n4.65
  12. Leleka, T., Ivanenko, N., Moskalenko O., Herasymenko, L., Shevchuk L., Pidlubna, O. (2021). Angloamerican loanwords use in the Ukrainian student slang. Laplage em Revista, 7(Extra-D): University and science: possible dialogues. pp.163-174. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/24115/S2446-622020217Extra-D1081p.163-174
  13. Ivanenko N. (2021). Figurative and valuable component of the MARRIAGE concept. Trends in Science and Practice of Today. Ankara, Turkey, pp. 356-361
  14. Ivanenko N. (2021). Inclusive learning environment for students’ achievements and foreign language development. Priorities in the Development of Science and Education. Budapest, Hungary, pp.74-80
  15. Ivanenko N. (2021). The nominative field of the MARRIAGE concept and the analysis of the synonymous series of its key unit. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi: KOD, 193, pp 218-224 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.36550/2522-4077-2021-1-193-218-224
  16. Ivanenko N. (2020). Language intervention stages in project-based learning. Modern Trends in Foreign Language Professional Training in a Multicultural Space. Kyiv, pp. 249 – 255
  17. Rastrygina, A., Ivanenko, N. (2020). Gender comfortable educational environment as a factor of development of personal freedom. Research Bulletin. Pedagogical Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 188, pp. 28 – 35 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.36550/2415-7988-2020-1-188-28-35
  18. Ivanenko N. (2020). Texting slang as one of the most common groups of everyday youth Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi: KOD, 187, pp. 38-45
  19. Ivanenko N. (2019). Computer use in foreign language Intellectual and Emotional Components of Foreign Language Learning: Latest Trends and Challenges for Higher Education. Kyiv, pp. 152 – 158.
  20. Ivanenko N. (2019). Initial stages of elaborating a project in a foreign language classroom. Science and Society. Hamilton, Canada, pp. 13 – 20.
  21. Ivanenko N. (2019). Project-based learning as a way to incorporate effective foreign language teaching. Research Bulletin. Pedagogical Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 177, pp. 207 – 211
  22. Ivanenko N. (2019). Youth vocabulary as a reflection of changes in modern society. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi: KOD, 175, pp. 34 – 39.
  23. Ivanenko N. (2018). Promoting citizenship education in the English language Proceedings of the IV International Conference. Kyiv, pp. 130 – 137
  24. Ivanenko N. (2018). Educating global citizens at a foreign language class. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, – pp. 494 – 500
  25. Ivanenko N. (2018). Formation of civic values through teaching a foreign language. Proceedings of the II International Conference “Foreign Language in Professional Training of Specialists: Problems and Strategies”. Kropyvnytskyi, pp. 189-191
  26. Ivanenko N. (2017). Citizenship education in the English language classroom. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 154. – pp. 92 – 97
  27. Ivanenko N. (2017). Education for democratic citizenship: teaching virtues and values. Research Bulletin. Pedagogical Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 152, pp. 110-113
  28. Ivanenko N. (2016). Citizenship education as a way to develop moral fluency to solve social and political challenges of the future. Scientific Journal of Ariel University. Israel: Ariel University.
  29. Ivanenko N. (2016). Functioning peculiarities of lexical units of the RESPECT concept in the English language. Proceedings of the International Conference Linguistic and Linguacultural Aspects of Teaching Foreign Languages in Ukrainian Universities”. Dnipropetrovsk, pp. 87-94
  30. Ivanenko N. (2016). Semantic relationships of lexical units of the concept of love in the English language. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, pp. 221-226
  31. Ivanenko N. (2015). Citizenship education as the coordination and integration of educational establishment and community. Research Proceedings of the national UniversityOstrog Academy”. Ostrog, pp. 136-142
  32. Ivanenko N. (2015). The value of citizenship education in practices of student governing body. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 136. pp. 438-442

Louise’s doctoral research investigates how teachers become who they are.

Louise’s work situates the schoolteacher as a particular type of subject, that is both made and makes itself from within a network of power relations. Her study combines Foucauldian theory, Critical Discourse Analysis, and Narrative analysis to provide an account of schoolteachers’ ethical agency in the context of top-down policy practices.

Louise is a Doctoral Teaching Fellow at the Department of Education, where she teaches and supervises students in the MSc in Learning and Teaching course. Currently, Louise is collaborating the OECD in their Globally Teaching InSights project. Her research supports the Schools+ Network aims to fuel an ecosystem of organisations that are driving change in education from the bottom-up.

In March 2023 she presented her preliminary research at the Philosophy of Education Society of Great Britain (PESGB)’s annual conference.

As Honorary Fellow John attends seminars and consults with current staff in Mathematics Education.

During 40 years at the Open University supporting the teaching of mathematics he authored a wide range of papers, and dozens of Open University Books and Teaching materials. He co-authored the classic Thinking Mathematically; Mathematics as a Constructive Activity (with his wife Prof. Anne Watson); Questions and Prompts for Mathematical Thinking & Thinkers (with Anne and other colleagues), among many others.

His research methods are phenomenological, based on the Discipline of Noticing. He is interested in the lived experience of learning, doing and teaching mathematics. He focuses on the structure and form of Attention in the teaching of mathematics, as he supports those who wish to foster and sustain mathematical thinking in others.

He is an Honorary Fellow of BSRLM and ATM, a long-standing member of  the MAA and the  MA.H.

 

Publications

  • Mason, J. (2022). Consequences of a Virtual Encounter with George Pólya. Teaching Mathematics and Computer Science.  20 (2) p173-182.
  • Zazkis, R. Kontorovich, I. & Mason, J. (2021). The Learning and Teaching of Number: paths less travelled through well-trodden terrain. London: Routledge
  • Mason, J. (2021). Learning about Noticing, by, and through, Noticing. ZDM – Mathematics Education. 53(1) p231-243. doi: 10.1007/s11858-020-01192-4
  • Mason, J. & Czarnocha,B. (2021). Aha! Moments, Bisociation and Multifocal Attention. In B. Czarnocha & W. Baker. Creativity of an Aha! Moment and Mathematics Education. Leiden: Brill. p345-361.
  • Mason, J. (2018) Making Distinctions: a phenomenological exploration in mathematics education. In P. Ernest (Ed.). The Philosophy of Mathematics Education Today. ICME-13 Monographs. Springer.
  • Mason, J. (2018). Reflecting on values emerging from practice and the value of reflecting on practice. In D. Rowe & A. Watson (Eds.). Faith and Experience in Education: essays from Quaker perspectives. London: Trentham Books. p63-91.
  • Mason, J. & Metz, M. (2017). Digging Beneath Dual Systems Theory and the Bicameral Brain: abductions about the human psyche from experience in mathematical problem solving. In U. Xolocotzin (Ed.). Understanding Emotions in Mathematical Thinking and Learning. p379-407. Cambridge: Elsevier/Academic Press.
  • Mason, J. (2016). Rising Above a Cause-and-Effect Stance in Mathematics Education Research. JMTE 19(4) p297-300. http://rdcu.be/npTf
  • Mason, J. & Davis, B. (2013). The Importance of Teachers’ Mathematical Awareness for In-The-Moment Pedagogy. CJSMTE 13(2) p182-197.
  • Mason, J. (2012). Noticing: roots and branches. In M. Sherin, V. Jacobs, & R. Phillip (Eds.) Mathematics Teacher Noticing:  Seeing Through Teachers’ Eyes. p35-50. Mahwah: Erlbaum.
  • Mason, J. (2008). Being Mathematical With & In Front of Learners: Attention, Awareness, and Attitude as Sources of Differences between Teacher Educators, Teachers & Learners. In T. Wood (Series Ed.) & B. Jaworski (Vol. Ed.), International Handbook of Mathematics Teacher Education: Vol.4. The Mathematics Teacher Educator as a Developing Professional. Rotterdam, the Netherlands: Sense Publishers, p31-56.
  • Mason, J. & Johnston-Wilder, S. (2006 2nd edition). Designing and Using Mathematical Tasks. St. Albans: Tarquin.
  • Watson, A. & Mason, J. (2006). Seeing an Exercise as a Single Mathematical Object: Using Variation to Structure Sense-Making. Mathematical Thinking and Learning. 8(2) p91-111.
  • Watson, A. & Mason, J. (2005). Mathematics as a Constructive Activity: learners generating examples. Mahwah: Erlbaum.
  • Mason, J. & Johnston-Wilder, S. (2004). Fundamental Constructs in Mathematics Education, RoutledgeFalmer, London.
  • Mason, J. 2003, Structure of Attention in the Learning of Mathematics, in J. Novotná (Ed.) Proceedings, International Symposium on Elementary Mathematics Teaching, Charles University, Prague, p9-16.
  • Mason, J. 2002, Mathematics Teaching Practice: a guidebook for university and college lecturers, Horwood Publishing, Chichester.
  • Mason, J. 2002, Researching Your own Practice: The Discipline of Noticing, RoutledgeFalmer, London.
  • Mason, J. 2001, Modelling Modelling: where is the centre of gravity of-for-when modelling?, in J. Matos, W. Blum, S. Houston & S. Carreira (Eds.) Modelling and Mathematics Education: ICTMA 9 applications in science and technology, Horwood Publishing, Chichester, p39-61.
  • Mason, J. Burton L. & Stacey K. (1982). Thinking Mathematically, Addison Wesley, London

Website

www.pmtheta.com

Mark has worked in ELT and EMI for over 35 years as a teacher, teacher trainer, lecturer, course writer, syllabus designer, examiner, Director of Studies, and consultant editor for OUP. For the British Council he has worked as a consultant trainer and course developer in EMI and EAP. For the University of Oxford Department of Education Mark delivered the ELT option on the MSc ALSLA and is Teaching Associate of the EMI Research Group in which capacity he has worked as a CI and has developed and delivered EMI teacher training courses in China, Serbia and Oxford. Mark has worked in universities in Russia, Ukraine, Kazakhstan, Belarus, Czechia, Italy, Germany, Mexico, Peru, Chile, Brazil, Colombia and Morocco.

He continues to be involved in EMI and is currently co-authoring an EMI student guide.

Mark is an alumnus of the University of Oxford Department of Education and was among the first to be awarded the innovative MSc in Teaching English Language in University Settings.

Anushay is a second-year DPhil student investigating how classroom characteristics are related to Pakistani children’s development. She is supervised by Professor Iram Siraj and Dr Katharina Ereky-Stevens and her work is being supported by the Aga Khan University (Pakistan). Anushay received the Patrice Engle Dissertation Grant Award from the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD) in 2023.

Anushay completed her BSc Psychology from UCL, where she also started her master’s in Developmental Neuroscience and Psychopathology. She was based at Yale University for her master’s thesis, where she worked with Dr Craig Bailey at the Yale Center for Emotional Intelligence to understand children’s emotion development. Anushay also works as a part-time research  assistant at the Developmental Diversity Lab at UCL’s Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience. Anushay’s research interests include understanding child development across different cultures, factors that might be affecting it, and devising culture-specific ways to support children’s holistic development through the educational system. She is also keen on improving the research scope in Pakistan by working with Pakistani researchers, practitioners, and families. Anushay balances her research with her position as the founder of a non-profit, Resources for Children, which aims to understand and support children’s development in Pakistan.

Publications

Journal Articles

  1. Mazhar, A., & Bailey, C., S. (under review). Understanding Children’s Emotion-Specific Biases: How They Relate to Child and Family Factors, Emotion Recognition Accuracy, and Social Behaviour.

Presentations

  1. Mazhar, A., & Bailey, C., S. (2023, March). Understanding Children’s Emotion-Specific Biases: How They Relate to Child-Level Factors and Emotion Recognition Accuracy [Paper Presentation]. Society for Research in Child Development, Salt Lake City, Utah, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2022, April). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Spring Preview, New Haven, United States.
  3. Mazhar, A. (2021, December). Does an extended family improve mentalising in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK & Pakistan. 2nd International Foundation University Conference of Psychology, Rawalpindi, Pakistan.
  4. Mazhar, A. (2020, October). Developing a non-profit to advance autism research in Pakistan. Anna Freud Centre Seminar Series, London, United Kingdom.

Posters

  1. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Theory of Mind in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK and Pakistan. Harvard Trends in Psychology Summit, Cambridge, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Research Rounds, New Haven, United States.

Cindy works at the intersection of learning, design, and technology, with a keen interest in the orchestration of future-ready tech-enabled learning.

She is curious how the deployment of adaptive learning systems to schools will impact classroom learning and hopes to learn more about the human-machine partnership in education. Specifically, her research is concerned with the implications that the use of such systems has on teacher-student interactions, as teachers grapple with balancing personalised learning and learning in community, as well as curriculum demands and student interests. These are some tensions which could potentially be exacerbated by affordances of adaptive learning systems.

Prior to embarking on the DPhil in Education at Oxford, Cindy worked as the Lead Specialist in Technologies for Learning at the Educational Technology Division of Ministry of Education, Singapore. She had previously completed graduate studies at the National University of Singapore and Stanford University where she was awarded Master of Arts in English Studies and Master of Arts in Education.

Reem is DPhil student from Saudi Arabia.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she worked as a Teacher, Professional Developer, then, became a Supervisor and Researcher in the Ministry of Education where she received a scholarship to pursue her DPhil education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests lie in the area of Teacher Education and Professional Learning Policy and Practice.

Publications
  • Alqahtani, Reem (2020). Saudi Universities Role in Developing Teacher Professional Development Programs: Elite Universities Experience. Journal of Educational Sciences. King Saud University.
  • Alqahtani, Reem. (2020). The effect of implementing UDL-based activities in improving EFL learners’ academic achievement and attitudes towards L2. In L. Salas, & E. Ager, Creating Quiet reflective Spaces: Language Teacher Researches Professional Development (pp. 61-62). IATEFL publications.

Lena Zlock is researching the integration of digital technology into structures of teaching, learning, and education in higher education. Her particular focus is on the digital humanities and the potential for digital methods to transform humanistic study. She works with Professor Niall Winters and Dr. James Robson.

Lena’s research interests stem from her education as an M.St. student and Ertegun Graduate Scholar in Modern Languages at the University of Oxford, and as a B.A. student in History at Stanford University. As an undergraduate, she started the Voltaire Library Project, a digitally and data-driven study of the 6,763-book collection of French Enlightenment philosopher Voltaire (you can read more about the project here and here). She has been interested in the application of digital technology to humanistic teaching since her days in Princeton Day School, where she developed an interdisciplinary curriculum on Mexico City (visit the course website here).

Her research on Voltaire led her to think more broadly about the place of digital methods in the humanities classroom, and how new technologies will revolutionise the liberal arts and higher education. As a DPhil candidate, Lena will examine the negotiation and implementation of new learning technologies within the University of Oxford at undergraduate and graduate levels.

Lena is involved in a number of digital humanities initiatives in Oxford. She previously served as the inaugural fellow of the Voltaire Lab at Oxford’s Voltaire Foundation. As a master’s student, Lena co-formulated the convergence agenda for Oxford digital humanities with Professor Howard Hotson, and is currently employed by the Humanities Division to assist with the development of an M.St. degree in Digital Scholarship (read more here). Lena set up and helps to run the History of the Book blog for the Faculty of Medieval and Modern Languages and the Oxford Book History Twitter account.

Lena welcomes inquiries from undergraduate and postgraduate students from Oxford and beyond seeking to get involved with the digital humanities in any capacity. The History of the Book blog also welcomes inquiries from prospective contributors.

 

Abbey is a Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education, in collaboration with the Department of Engineering.

Before joining the DPhil program, Abbey obtained a B.A. in Applied Linguistics with minors in Russian and Chinese from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford. She was the recipient of a Benjamin A. Gilman International Scholarship through U.S. Department of State for study in Russia and was awarded two Foreign Language and Area Studies (FLAS) Fellowships for study in both Russia and China. She holds both TESOL and TEFL certificates and has taught English as a Second Language in various contexts to a wide variety of learner populations.

Abbey’s main research interests lie in the use of technology to facilitate language learning. Her DPhil research focuses on the development of a virtual reality program to bridge the gaps that students face when learning languages through distance learning.

Dr Nadiya Ivanenko is a Visiting Research Fellow in the field of civic education and citizenship linguistics. She is a member of the Applied Linguistics research group and Higher Education research group at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

After receiving PhD in Comparative Linguistics from Kyiv National Linguistic University (2008) Nadiya worked as an Associate Professor of the Germanic Languages and Teaching Methodology Department, Faculty of Ukrainian Philology, Foreign Languages and Social Communications and Vice Dean of the Faculty of Foreign Languages, Central Ukrainian State University, Ukraine.

Nadiya was a Chevening scholar and Postgraduate researcher at the Department of Education, University of Oxford (2003-2004). She was a Co-chair of the joint UNESCO Chair/UNITWIN project ‘Education as a Humanitarian Response’ (2004-2012); a participant of BECA joint project ‘Education for Democracy’ between Montclair State University (USA) and Kirovohrad State Pedagogical University (Ukraine). Nadiya had internship for teachers of EFL in the Department of Educational and Cultural Programmes at Shakespeare’s Globe Theater, London, UK (2011). She was the Head of the British Council International Mobility Grant ‘Internalizing Higher Education in Ukraine’, which included 2 internships at the University of Durham, UK (2016). She participated in the internship “Retraining in the Field of Teaching Excellence”, Bayreuth University, Germany (Erasmus + Project (2021) and was a coordinator of the Erasmus+ Project: Innovative Approach to Promotion Teaching Excellence (2021-2022) at Central Ukrainian State University.

Selected Publications

BOOKS

  • Rastrygina, A., Ivanenko, N. (2021). Pedagogy of Freedom in the Paradigmal Space of Modern Education and Upbringing.
  • Ivanenko, N., Liashuk, A. (2021). English Activity Book. Practical Course of English. Kropyvnytskyi.
  • Ivanenko N. (2014). (Edit.) Education in Eastern Europe and Eurasia. London: Bloomsbury.
  • Ivanenko N. (2008). The Concept of Good in English and Ukrainian Language Pictures of the World. Kirovohrad: KOD.
  • Ivanenko N. (2007). Written Practice and Conversation for 1 Year. Kropyvnytskyi.
  • Garkusha, L., Ivanenko, N. (2004). Critical thinking in life skills training. Kirovohrad.

BOOK CHAPTERS

  • Ivanenko, N. (2024). Words and word meanings In The Routledge Companion To English Studies/ by Constant Leung & Jo Lewkowicz. London, UK: Routledge (in publishing).
  • Ivanenko N. (2023). Development of civic education in Ukrainian universities: new challenges of modern realities in the conditions of the transformation of society. In Contemporary Education in Ukraine: Integration into the European Educational Space. Dnipro (pp. 387-412) DOI:36550/978-617-8245-57-3-20
  • Ivanenko N. (2019). Citizenship Education, Moral Fluency and Social and Political Future Challenges. In Polish-Jewish History, Culture, Values, and Education between Paradise and Inferno. Irvine, USA: Brown Walker Press (pp. 93-103)
  • Ivanenko N. (2014). Education Change, Transformation, Reforms – a Regional Overview. In N. Ivanenko (Edit.) Education in Eastern Europe and Eurasia. London: Bloomsbury (pp. 9-45)
  • Ivanenko N. (2013). Vulnerable Children in Ukraine and Educational Response. In M. Matsumoto (Edit.) Education and Disadvantaged Children and Young People. London: Bloomsbury (pp. 95-132)

JOURNAL ARTICLES

  1. Ivanenko, N. (2024). Challenges of Ukrainian Higher Education in Times of War. International Higher Education. The Boston College Centre for International Higher Education, 118, pp. 35-36 https://doi.org/10.36197/IHE.2024.118.17
  2. Ivanenko, N., Paska, T., Irkha, A. Rud, A., & Boguslavskas, L., (2024). The Role of Higher Education for Ensuring National Security in Ukraine. Futurity Education, 4(1), 210-237 https://doi.org/10.57125/FED.2024.03.25.11
  3. Leleka, T., Ivanenko, N., Demeshko, I., Kapitan T., & Demchenko, I. (2024). The Process of English Internationalization in the Ukrainian Educational Paradigm. Slavistica Vilnensis, 68(2), 76-89 doi:10.15388/SlavViln.2023.68(2).6
  4. Ivanenko, N., Rud, A., Hurbanska, A., Cheban, Y., & Syrtseva, S. (2024). Digitalization of Education of the Future – A Trend or a Requirement of the Time? Journal of Higher Education Theory and Practice24(2). DOI: https://doi.org/10.33423/jhetp.v24i2.6791
  5. Ivanenko, N. (2023). Civic character cultivation as a basic virtue within and beyond modern educational institutions. Academic Notes. Series Pedagogical sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 209, 180-185 DOI: https://doi.org/10.36550/2415-7988-2022-1-209-180-185
  6. Rastrygina, A., Ivanenko, N. (2023). A Pedagogy of freedom as a viable basis for implementing gender equality in Ukraine’s educational institutions. International Review of Education, 69(1-2), 143-174. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/s11159-023-09995-9
  7. Ivanenko N., Biletska O., Hurbanska S., Hurbanska, A., & Kochmar, D. (2023). English language morphological neologisms reflecting the war in Ukraine. World Journal of English Language, 13(5), pp. 432-438    DOI: doi:http://dx.doi.org/10.5430/wjel.v13n5p432
  8. Ivanenko, N., Boiko, A., Fedorchuk, L., Panchenko, I., & Marieiev, D. (2023). Development of educational policy in Ukraine in the context of European integration and digital transformation. Revista Eduweb, 17(2), 296-305 DOI: https://doi.org/10.46502/issn.1856-7576/2023.17.02.25
  9. Ivanenko, N.V., Gerasymenko,Yu. A., Kostenko, V.G. (2023). Innovative approaches to the modernization of philological education and science in Ukraine: a response to the challenges of wartime. Akademichni Vizii, (in Ukrainian). URL: https://academy-vision.org/index.php/av/article/view/281 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5281/zenodo.7795088
  10. Ivanenko N. (2022). Phraseological units of the conceptual field MARRIAGE in the English picture of the world. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi: KOD, 202, pp. 140-146
  11. Bilous, O., Mishchenko, A., Datska, T., Ivanenko, N., Kit, L., Piankovska, I., and Vereshchak, Y. (2021). Modern linguistic technologies: strategy of teaching translation studies. Rupkatha Journal on Interdisciplinary Studies in Humanities, 13(4), pp. 1-12 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/21659/rupkatha.v13n4.65
  12. Leleka, T., Ivanenko, N., Moskalenko O., Herasymenko, L., Shevchuk L., Pidlubna, O. (2021). Angloamerican loanwords use in the Ukrainian student slang. Laplage em Revista, 7(Extra-D): University and science: possible dialogues. pp.163-174. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/24115/S2446-622020217Extra-D1081p.163-174
  13. Ivanenko N. (2021). Figurative and valuable component of the MARRIAGE concept. Trends in Science and Practice of Today. Ankara, Turkey, pp. 356-361
  14. Ivanenko N. (2021). Inclusive learning environment for students’ achievements and foreign language development. Priorities in the Development of Science and Education. Budapest, Hungary, pp.74-80
  15. Ivanenko N. (2021). The nominative field of the MARRIAGE concept and the analysis of the synonymous series of its key unit. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi: KOD, 193, pp 218-224 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.36550/2522-4077-2021-1-193-218-224
  16. Ivanenko N. (2020). Language intervention stages in project-based learning. Modern Trends in Foreign Language Professional Training in a Multicultural Space. Kyiv, pp. 249 – 255
  17. Rastrygina, A., Ivanenko, N. (2020). Gender comfortable educational environment as a factor of development of personal freedom. Research Bulletin. Pedagogical Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 188, pp. 28 – 35 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.36550/2415-7988-2020-1-188-28-35
  18. Ivanenko N. (2020). Texting slang as one of the most common groups of everyday youth Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi: KOD, 187, pp. 38-45
  19. Ivanenko N. (2019). Computer use in foreign language Intellectual and Emotional Components of Foreign Language Learning: Latest Trends and Challenges for Higher Education. Kyiv, pp. 152 – 158.
  20. Ivanenko N. (2019). Initial stages of elaborating a project in a foreign language classroom. Science and Society. Hamilton, Canada, pp. 13 – 20.
  21. Ivanenko N. (2019). Project-based learning as a way to incorporate effective foreign language teaching. Research Bulletin. Pedagogical Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 177, pp. 207 – 211
  22. Ivanenko N. (2019). Youth vocabulary as a reflection of changes in modern society. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi: KOD, 175, pp. 34 – 39.
  23. Ivanenko N. (2018). Promoting citizenship education in the English language Proceedings of the IV International Conference. Kyiv, pp. 130 – 137
  24. Ivanenko N. (2018). Educating global citizens at a foreign language class. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, – pp. 494 – 500
  25. Ivanenko N. (2018). Formation of civic values through teaching a foreign language. Proceedings of the II International Conference “Foreign Language in Professional Training of Specialists: Problems and Strategies”. Kropyvnytskyi, pp. 189-191
  26. Ivanenko N. (2017). Citizenship education in the English language classroom. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 154. – pp. 92 – 97
  27. Ivanenko N. (2017). Education for democratic citizenship: teaching virtues and values. Research Bulletin. Pedagogical Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 152, pp. 110-113
  28. Ivanenko N. (2016). Citizenship education as a way to develop moral fluency to solve social and political challenges of the future. Scientific Journal of Ariel University. Israel: Ariel University.
  29. Ivanenko N. (2016). Functioning peculiarities of lexical units of the RESPECT concept in the English language. Proceedings of the International Conference Linguistic and Linguacultural Aspects of Teaching Foreign Languages in Ukrainian Universities”. Dnipropetrovsk, pp. 87-94
  30. Ivanenko N. (2016). Semantic relationships of lexical units of the concept of love in the English language. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, pp. 221-226
  31. Ivanenko N. (2015). Citizenship education as the coordination and integration of educational establishment and community. Research Proceedings of the national UniversityOstrog Academy”. Ostrog, pp. 136-142
  32. Ivanenko N. (2015). The value of citizenship education in practices of student governing body. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 136. pp. 438-442

Louise’s doctoral research investigates how teachers become who they are.

Louise’s work situates the schoolteacher as a particular type of subject, that is both made and makes itself from within a network of power relations. Her study combines Foucauldian theory, Critical Discourse Analysis, and Narrative analysis to provide an account of schoolteachers’ ethical agency in the context of top-down policy practices.

Louise is a Doctoral Teaching Fellow at the Department of Education, where she teaches and supervises students in the MSc in Learning and Teaching course. Currently, Louise is collaborating the OECD in their Globally Teaching InSights project. Her research supports the Schools+ Network aims to fuel an ecosystem of organisations that are driving change in education from the bottom-up.

In March 2023 she presented her preliminary research at the Philosophy of Education Society of Great Britain (PESGB)’s annual conference.

As Honorary Fellow John attends seminars and consults with current staff in Mathematics Education.

During 40 years at the Open University supporting the teaching of mathematics he authored a wide range of papers, and dozens of Open University Books and Teaching materials. He co-authored the classic Thinking Mathematically; Mathematics as a Constructive Activity (with his wife Prof. Anne Watson); Questions and Prompts for Mathematical Thinking & Thinkers (with Anne and other colleagues), among many others.

His research methods are phenomenological, based on the Discipline of Noticing. He is interested in the lived experience of learning, doing and teaching mathematics. He focuses on the structure and form of Attention in the teaching of mathematics, as he supports those who wish to foster and sustain mathematical thinking in others.

He is an Honorary Fellow of BSRLM and ATM, a long-standing member of  the MAA and the  MA.H.

 

Publications

  • Mason, J. (2022). Consequences of a Virtual Encounter with George Pólya. Teaching Mathematics and Computer Science.  20 (2) p173-182.
  • Zazkis, R. Kontorovich, I. & Mason, J. (2021). The Learning and Teaching of Number: paths less travelled through well-trodden terrain. London: Routledge
  • Mason, J. (2021). Learning about Noticing, by, and through, Noticing. ZDM – Mathematics Education. 53(1) p231-243. doi: 10.1007/s11858-020-01192-4
  • Mason, J. & Czarnocha,B. (2021). Aha! Moments, Bisociation and Multifocal Attention. In B. Czarnocha & W. Baker. Creativity of an Aha! Moment and Mathematics Education. Leiden: Brill. p345-361.
  • Mason, J. (2018) Making Distinctions: a phenomenological exploration in mathematics education. In P. Ernest (Ed.). The Philosophy of Mathematics Education Today. ICME-13 Monographs. Springer.
  • Mason, J. (2018). Reflecting on values emerging from practice and the value of reflecting on practice. In D. Rowe & A. Watson (Eds.). Faith and Experience in Education: essays from Quaker perspectives. London: Trentham Books. p63-91.
  • Mason, J. & Metz, M. (2017). Digging Beneath Dual Systems Theory and the Bicameral Brain: abductions about the human psyche from experience in mathematical problem solving. In U. Xolocotzin (Ed.). Understanding Emotions in Mathematical Thinking and Learning. p379-407. Cambridge: Elsevier/Academic Press.
  • Mason, J. (2016). Rising Above a Cause-and-Effect Stance in Mathematics Education Research. JMTE 19(4) p297-300. http://rdcu.be/npTf
  • Mason, J. & Davis, B. (2013). The Importance of Teachers’ Mathematical Awareness for In-The-Moment Pedagogy. CJSMTE 13(2) p182-197.
  • Mason, J. (2012). Noticing: roots and branches. In M. Sherin, V. Jacobs, & R. Phillip (Eds.) Mathematics Teacher Noticing:  Seeing Through Teachers’ Eyes. p35-50. Mahwah: Erlbaum.
  • Mason, J. (2008). Being Mathematical With & In Front of Learners: Attention, Awareness, and Attitude as Sources of Differences between Teacher Educators, Teachers & Learners. In T. Wood (Series Ed.) & B. Jaworski (Vol. Ed.), International Handbook of Mathematics Teacher Education: Vol.4. The Mathematics Teacher Educator as a Developing Professional. Rotterdam, the Netherlands: Sense Publishers, p31-56.
  • Mason, J. & Johnston-Wilder, S. (2006 2nd edition). Designing and Using Mathematical Tasks. St. Albans: Tarquin.
  • Watson, A. & Mason, J. (2006). Seeing an Exercise as a Single Mathematical Object: Using Variation to Structure Sense-Making. Mathematical Thinking and Learning. 8(2) p91-111.
  • Watson, A. & Mason, J. (2005). Mathematics as a Constructive Activity: learners generating examples. Mahwah: Erlbaum.
  • Mason, J. & Johnston-Wilder, S. (2004). Fundamental Constructs in Mathematics Education, RoutledgeFalmer, London.
  • Mason, J. 2003, Structure of Attention in the Learning of Mathematics, in J. Novotná (Ed.) Proceedings, International Symposium on Elementary Mathematics Teaching, Charles University, Prague, p9-16.
  • Mason, J. 2002, Mathematics Teaching Practice: a guidebook for university and college lecturers, Horwood Publishing, Chichester.
  • Mason, J. 2002, Researching Your own Practice: The Discipline of Noticing, RoutledgeFalmer, London.
  • Mason, J. 2001, Modelling Modelling: where is the centre of gravity of-for-when modelling?, in J. Matos, W. Blum, S. Houston & S. Carreira (Eds.) Modelling and Mathematics Education: ICTMA 9 applications in science and technology, Horwood Publishing, Chichester, p39-61.
  • Mason, J. Burton L. & Stacey K. (1982). Thinking Mathematically, Addison Wesley, London

Website

www.pmtheta.com

Mark has worked in ELT and EMI for over 35 years as a teacher, teacher trainer, lecturer, course writer, syllabus designer, examiner, Director of Studies, and consultant editor for OUP. For the British Council he has worked as a consultant trainer and course developer in EMI and EAP. For the University of Oxford Department of Education Mark delivered the ELT option on the MSc ALSLA and is Teaching Associate of the EMI Research Group in which capacity he has worked as a CI and has developed and delivered EMI teacher training courses in China, Serbia and Oxford. Mark has worked in universities in Russia, Ukraine, Kazakhstan, Belarus, Czechia, Italy, Germany, Mexico, Peru, Chile, Brazil, Colombia and Morocco.

He continues to be involved in EMI and is currently co-authoring an EMI student guide.

Mark is an alumnus of the University of Oxford Department of Education and was among the first to be awarded the innovative MSc in Teaching English Language in University Settings.

Anushay is a second-year DPhil student investigating how classroom characteristics are related to Pakistani children’s development. She is supervised by Professor Iram Siraj and Dr Katharina Ereky-Stevens and her work is being supported by the Aga Khan University (Pakistan). Anushay received the Patrice Engle Dissertation Grant Award from the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD) in 2023.

Anushay completed her BSc Psychology from UCL, where she also started her master’s in Developmental Neuroscience and Psychopathology. She was based at Yale University for her master’s thesis, where she worked with Dr Craig Bailey at the Yale Center for Emotional Intelligence to understand children’s emotion development. Anushay also works as a part-time research  assistant at the Developmental Diversity Lab at UCL’s Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience. Anushay’s research interests include understanding child development across different cultures, factors that might be affecting it, and devising culture-specific ways to support children’s holistic development through the educational system. She is also keen on improving the research scope in Pakistan by working with Pakistani researchers, practitioners, and families. Anushay balances her research with her position as the founder of a non-profit, Resources for Children, which aims to understand and support children’s development in Pakistan.

Publications

Journal Articles

  1. Mazhar, A., & Bailey, C., S. (under review). Understanding Children’s Emotion-Specific Biases: How They Relate to Child and Family Factors, Emotion Recognition Accuracy, and Social Behaviour.

Presentations

  1. Mazhar, A., & Bailey, C., S. (2023, March). Understanding Children’s Emotion-Specific Biases: How They Relate to Child-Level Factors and Emotion Recognition Accuracy [Paper Presentation]. Society for Research in Child Development, Salt Lake City, Utah, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2022, April). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Spring Preview, New Haven, United States.
  3. Mazhar, A. (2021, December). Does an extended family improve mentalising in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK & Pakistan. 2nd International Foundation University Conference of Psychology, Rawalpindi, Pakistan.
  4. Mazhar, A. (2020, October). Developing a non-profit to advance autism research in Pakistan. Anna Freud Centre Seminar Series, London, United Kingdom.

Posters

  1. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Theory of Mind in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK and Pakistan. Harvard Trends in Psychology Summit, Cambridge, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Research Rounds, New Haven, United States.

Cindy works at the intersection of learning, design, and technology, with a keen interest in the orchestration of future-ready tech-enabled learning.

She is curious how the deployment of adaptive learning systems to schools will impact classroom learning and hopes to learn more about the human-machine partnership in education. Specifically, her research is concerned with the implications that the use of such systems has on teacher-student interactions, as teachers grapple with balancing personalised learning and learning in community, as well as curriculum demands and student interests. These are some tensions which could potentially be exacerbated by affordances of adaptive learning systems.

Prior to embarking on the DPhil in Education at Oxford, Cindy worked as the Lead Specialist in Technologies for Learning at the Educational Technology Division of Ministry of Education, Singapore. She had previously completed graduate studies at the National University of Singapore and Stanford University where she was awarded Master of Arts in English Studies and Master of Arts in Education.

Reem is DPhil student from Saudi Arabia.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she worked as a Teacher, Professional Developer, then, became a Supervisor and Researcher in the Ministry of Education where she received a scholarship to pursue her DPhil education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests lie in the area of Teacher Education and Professional Learning Policy and Practice.

Publications
  • Alqahtani, Reem (2020). Saudi Universities Role in Developing Teacher Professional Development Programs: Elite Universities Experience. Journal of Educational Sciences. King Saud University.
  • Alqahtani, Reem. (2020). The effect of implementing UDL-based activities in improving EFL learners’ academic achievement and attitudes towards L2. In L. Salas, & E. Ager, Creating Quiet reflective Spaces: Language Teacher Researches Professional Development (pp. 61-62). IATEFL publications.

Lena Zlock is researching the integration of digital technology into structures of teaching, learning, and education in higher education. Her particular focus is on the digital humanities and the potential for digital methods to transform humanistic study. She works with Professor Niall Winters and Dr. James Robson.

Lena’s research interests stem from her education as an M.St. student and Ertegun Graduate Scholar in Modern Languages at the University of Oxford, and as a B.A. student in History at Stanford University. As an undergraduate, she started the Voltaire Library Project, a digitally and data-driven study of the 6,763-book collection of French Enlightenment philosopher Voltaire (you can read more about the project here and here). She has been interested in the application of digital technology to humanistic teaching since her days in Princeton Day School, where she developed an interdisciplinary curriculum on Mexico City (visit the course website here).

Her research on Voltaire led her to think more broadly about the place of digital methods in the humanities classroom, and how new technologies will revolutionise the liberal arts and higher education. As a DPhil candidate, Lena will examine the negotiation and implementation of new learning technologies within the University of Oxford at undergraduate and graduate levels.

Lena is involved in a number of digital humanities initiatives in Oxford. She previously served as the inaugural fellow of the Voltaire Lab at Oxford’s Voltaire Foundation. As a master’s student, Lena co-formulated the convergence agenda for Oxford digital humanities with Professor Howard Hotson, and is currently employed by the Humanities Division to assist with the development of an M.St. degree in Digital Scholarship (read more here). Lena set up and helps to run the History of the Book blog for the Faculty of Medieval and Modern Languages and the Oxford Book History Twitter account.

Lena welcomes inquiries from undergraduate and postgraduate students from Oxford and beyond seeking to get involved with the digital humanities in any capacity. The History of the Book blog also welcomes inquiries from prospective contributors.

 

Abbey is a Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education, in collaboration with the Department of Engineering.

Before joining the DPhil program, Abbey obtained a B.A. in Applied Linguistics with minors in Russian and Chinese from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford. She was the recipient of a Benjamin A. Gilman International Scholarship through U.S. Department of State for study in Russia and was awarded two Foreign Language and Area Studies (FLAS) Fellowships for study in both Russia and China. She holds both TESOL and TEFL certificates and has taught English as a Second Language in various contexts to a wide variety of learner populations.

Abbey’s main research interests lie in the use of technology to facilitate language learning. Her DPhil research focuses on the development of a virtual reality program to bridge the gaps that students face when learning languages through distance learning.

Dr Nadiya Ivanenko is a Visiting Research Fellow in the field of civic education and citizenship linguistics. She is a member of the Applied Linguistics research group and Higher Education research group at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

After receiving PhD in Comparative Linguistics from Kyiv National Linguistic University (2008) Nadiya worked as an Associate Professor of the Germanic Languages and Teaching Methodology Department, Faculty of Ukrainian Philology, Foreign Languages and Social Communications and Vice Dean of the Faculty of Foreign Languages, Central Ukrainian State University, Ukraine.

Nadiya was a Chevening scholar and Postgraduate researcher at the Department of Education, University of Oxford (2003-2004). She was a Co-chair of the joint UNESCO Chair/UNITWIN project ‘Education as a Humanitarian Response’ (2004-2012); a participant of BECA joint project ‘Education for Democracy’ between Montclair State University (USA) and Kirovohrad State Pedagogical University (Ukraine). Nadiya had internship for teachers of EFL in the Department of Educational and Cultural Programmes at Shakespeare’s Globe Theater, London, UK (2011). She was the Head of the British Council International Mobility Grant ‘Internalizing Higher Education in Ukraine’, which included 2 internships at the University of Durham, UK (2016). She participated in the internship “Retraining in the Field of Teaching Excellence”, Bayreuth University, Germany (Erasmus + Project (2021) and was a coordinator of the Erasmus+ Project: Innovative Approach to Promotion Teaching Excellence (2021-2022) at Central Ukrainian State University.

Selected Publications

BOOKS

  • Rastrygina, A., Ivanenko, N. (2021). Pedagogy of Freedom in the Paradigmal Space of Modern Education and Upbringing.
  • Ivanenko, N., Liashuk, A. (2021). English Activity Book. Practical Course of English. Kropyvnytskyi.
  • Ivanenko N. (2014). (Edit.) Education in Eastern Europe and Eurasia. London: Bloomsbury.
  • Ivanenko N. (2008). The Concept of Good in English and Ukrainian Language Pictures of the World. Kirovohrad: KOD.
  • Ivanenko N. (2007). Written Practice and Conversation for 1 Year. Kropyvnytskyi.
  • Garkusha, L., Ivanenko, N. (2004). Critical thinking in life skills training. Kirovohrad.

BOOK CHAPTERS

  • Ivanenko, N. (2024). Words and word meanings In The Routledge Companion To English Studies/ by Constant Leung & Jo Lewkowicz. London, UK: Routledge (in publishing).
  • Ivanenko N. (2023). Development of civic education in Ukrainian universities: new challenges of modern realities in the conditions of the transformation of society. In Contemporary Education in Ukraine: Integration into the European Educational Space. Dnipro (pp. 387-412) DOI:36550/978-617-8245-57-3-20
  • Ivanenko N. (2019). Citizenship Education, Moral Fluency and Social and Political Future Challenges. In Polish-Jewish History, Culture, Values, and Education between Paradise and Inferno. Irvine, USA: Brown Walker Press (pp. 93-103)
  • Ivanenko N. (2014). Education Change, Transformation, Reforms – a Regional Overview. In N. Ivanenko (Edit.) Education in Eastern Europe and Eurasia. London: Bloomsbury (pp. 9-45)
  • Ivanenko N. (2013). Vulnerable Children in Ukraine and Educational Response. In M. Matsumoto (Edit.) Education and Disadvantaged Children and Young People. London: Bloomsbury (pp. 95-132)

JOURNAL ARTICLES

  1. Ivanenko, N. (2024). Challenges of Ukrainian Higher Education in Times of War. International Higher Education. The Boston College Centre for International Higher Education, 118, pp. 35-36 https://doi.org/10.36197/IHE.2024.118.17
  2. Ivanenko, N., Paska, T., Irkha, A. Rud, A., & Boguslavskas, L., (2024). The Role of Higher Education for Ensuring National Security in Ukraine. Futurity Education, 4(1), 210-237 https://doi.org/10.57125/FED.2024.03.25.11
  3. Leleka, T., Ivanenko, N., Demeshko, I., Kapitan T., & Demchenko, I. (2024). The Process of English Internationalization in the Ukrainian Educational Paradigm. Slavistica Vilnensis, 68(2), 76-89 doi:10.15388/SlavViln.2023.68(2).6
  4. Ivanenko, N., Rud, A., Hurbanska, A., Cheban, Y., & Syrtseva, S. (2024). Digitalization of Education of the Future – A Trend or a Requirement of the Time? Journal of Higher Education Theory and Practice24(2). DOI: https://doi.org/10.33423/jhetp.v24i2.6791
  5. Ivanenko, N. (2023). Civic character cultivation as a basic virtue within and beyond modern educational institutions. Academic Notes. Series Pedagogical sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 209, 180-185 DOI: https://doi.org/10.36550/2415-7988-2022-1-209-180-185
  6. Rastrygina, A., Ivanenko, N. (2023). A Pedagogy of freedom as a viable basis for implementing gender equality in Ukraine’s educational institutions. International Review of Education, 69(1-2), 143-174. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/s11159-023-09995-9
  7. Ivanenko N., Biletska O., Hurbanska S., Hurbanska, A., & Kochmar, D. (2023). English language morphological neologisms reflecting the war in Ukraine. World Journal of English Language, 13(5), pp. 432-438    DOI: doi:http://dx.doi.org/10.5430/wjel.v13n5p432
  8. Ivanenko, N., Boiko, A., Fedorchuk, L., Panchenko, I., & Marieiev, D. (2023). Development of educational policy in Ukraine in the context of European integration and digital transformation. Revista Eduweb, 17(2), 296-305 DOI: https://doi.org/10.46502/issn.1856-7576/2023.17.02.25
  9. Ivanenko, N.V., Gerasymenko,Yu. A., Kostenko, V.G. (2023). Innovative approaches to the modernization of philological education and science in Ukraine: a response to the challenges of wartime. Akademichni Vizii, (in Ukrainian). URL: https://academy-vision.org/index.php/av/article/view/281 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5281/zenodo.7795088
  10. Ivanenko N. (2022). Phraseological units of the conceptual field MARRIAGE in the English picture of the world. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi: KOD, 202, pp. 140-146
  11. Bilous, O., Mishchenko, A., Datska, T., Ivanenko, N., Kit, L., Piankovska, I., and Vereshchak, Y. (2021). Modern linguistic technologies: strategy of teaching translation studies. Rupkatha Journal on Interdisciplinary Studies in Humanities, 13(4), pp. 1-12 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/21659/rupkatha.v13n4.65
  12. Leleka, T., Ivanenko, N., Moskalenko O., Herasymenko, L., Shevchuk L., Pidlubna, O. (2021). Angloamerican loanwords use in the Ukrainian student slang. Laplage em Revista, 7(Extra-D): University and science: possible dialogues. pp.163-174. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/24115/S2446-622020217Extra-D1081p.163-174
  13. Ivanenko N. (2021). Figurative and valuable component of the MARRIAGE concept. Trends in Science and Practice of Today. Ankara, Turkey, pp. 356-361
  14. Ivanenko N. (2021). Inclusive learning environment for students’ achievements and foreign language development. Priorities in the Development of Science and Education. Budapest, Hungary, pp.74-80
  15. Ivanenko N. (2021). The nominative field of the MARRIAGE concept and the analysis of the synonymous series of its key unit. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi: KOD, 193, pp 218-224 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.36550/2522-4077-2021-1-193-218-224
  16. Ivanenko N. (2020). Language intervention stages in project-based learning. Modern Trends in Foreign Language Professional Training in a Multicultural Space. Kyiv, pp. 249 – 255
  17. Rastrygina, A., Ivanenko, N. (2020). Gender comfortable educational environment as a factor of development of personal freedom. Research Bulletin. Pedagogical Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 188, pp. 28 – 35 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.36550/2415-7988-2020-1-188-28-35
  18. Ivanenko N. (2020). Texting slang as one of the most common groups of everyday youth Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi: KOD, 187, pp. 38-45
  19. Ivanenko N. (2019). Computer use in foreign language Intellectual and Emotional Components of Foreign Language Learning: Latest Trends and Challenges for Higher Education. Kyiv, pp. 152 – 158.
  20. Ivanenko N. (2019). Initial stages of elaborating a project in a foreign language classroom. Science and Society. Hamilton, Canada, pp. 13 – 20.
  21. Ivanenko N. (2019). Project-based learning as a way to incorporate effective foreign language teaching. Research Bulletin. Pedagogical Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 177, pp. 207 – 211
  22. Ivanenko N. (2019). Youth vocabulary as a reflection of changes in modern society. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi: KOD, 175, pp. 34 – 39.
  23. Ivanenko N. (2018). Promoting citizenship education in the English language Proceedings of the IV International Conference. Kyiv, pp. 130 – 137
  24. Ivanenko N. (2018). Educating global citizens at a foreign language class. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, – pp. 494 – 500
  25. Ivanenko N. (2018). Formation of civic values through teaching a foreign language. Proceedings of the II International Conference “Foreign Language in Professional Training of Specialists: Problems and Strategies”. Kropyvnytskyi, pp. 189-191
  26. Ivanenko N. (2017). Citizenship education in the English language classroom. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 154. – pp. 92 – 97
  27. Ivanenko N. (2017). Education for democratic citizenship: teaching virtues and values. Research Bulletin. Pedagogical Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 152, pp. 110-113
  28. Ivanenko N. (2016). Citizenship education as a way to develop moral fluency to solve social and political challenges of the future. Scientific Journal of Ariel University. Israel: Ariel University.
  29. Ivanenko N. (2016). Functioning peculiarities of lexical units of the RESPECT concept in the English language. Proceedings of the International Conference Linguistic and Linguacultural Aspects of Teaching Foreign Languages in Ukrainian Universities”. Dnipropetrovsk, pp. 87-94
  30. Ivanenko N. (2016). Semantic relationships of lexical units of the concept of love in the English language. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, pp. 221-226
  31. Ivanenko N. (2015). Citizenship education as the coordination and integration of educational establishment and community. Research Proceedings of the national UniversityOstrog Academy”. Ostrog, pp. 136-142
  32. Ivanenko N. (2015). The value of citizenship education in practices of student governing body. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 136. pp. 438-442

Louise’s doctoral research investigates how teachers become who they are.

Louise’s work situates the schoolteacher as a particular type of subject, that is both made and makes itself from within a network of power relations. Her study combines Foucauldian theory, Critical Discourse Analysis, and Narrative analysis to provide an account of schoolteachers’ ethical agency in the context of top-down policy practices.

Louise is a Doctoral Teaching Fellow at the Department of Education, where she teaches and supervises students in the MSc in Learning and Teaching course. Currently, Louise is collaborating the OECD in their Globally Teaching InSights project. Her research supports the Schools+ Network aims to fuel an ecosystem of organisations that are driving change in education from the bottom-up.

In March 2023 she presented her preliminary research at the Philosophy of Education Society of Great Britain (PESGB)’s annual conference.

As Honorary Fellow John attends seminars and consults with current staff in Mathematics Education.

During 40 years at the Open University supporting the teaching of mathematics he authored a wide range of papers, and dozens of Open University Books and Teaching materials. He co-authored the classic Thinking Mathematically; Mathematics as a Constructive Activity (with his wife Prof. Anne Watson); Questions and Prompts for Mathematical Thinking & Thinkers (with Anne and other colleagues), among many others.

His research methods are phenomenological, based on the Discipline of Noticing. He is interested in the lived experience of learning, doing and teaching mathematics. He focuses on the structure and form of Attention in the teaching of mathematics, as he supports those who wish to foster and sustain mathematical thinking in others.

He is an Honorary Fellow of BSRLM and ATM, a long-standing member of  the MAA and the  MA.H.

 

Publications

  • Mason, J. (2022). Consequences of a Virtual Encounter with George Pólya. Teaching Mathematics and Computer Science.  20 (2) p173-182.
  • Zazkis, R. Kontorovich, I. & Mason, J. (2021). The Learning and Teaching of Number: paths less travelled through well-trodden terrain. London: Routledge
  • Mason, J. (2021). Learning about Noticing, by, and through, Noticing. ZDM – Mathematics Education. 53(1) p231-243. doi: 10.1007/s11858-020-01192-4
  • Mason, J. & Czarnocha,B. (2021). Aha! Moments, Bisociation and Multifocal Attention. In B. Czarnocha & W. Baker. Creativity of an Aha! Moment and Mathematics Education. Leiden: Brill. p345-361.
  • Mason, J. (2018) Making Distinctions: a phenomenological exploration in mathematics education. In P. Ernest (Ed.). The Philosophy of Mathematics Education Today. ICME-13 Monographs. Springer.
  • Mason, J. (2018). Reflecting on values emerging from practice and the value of reflecting on practice. In D. Rowe & A. Watson (Eds.). Faith and Experience in Education: essays from Quaker perspectives. London: Trentham Books. p63-91.
  • Mason, J. & Metz, M. (2017). Digging Beneath Dual Systems Theory and the Bicameral Brain: abductions about the human psyche from experience in mathematical problem solving. In U. Xolocotzin (Ed.). Understanding Emotions in Mathematical Thinking and Learning. p379-407. Cambridge: Elsevier/Academic Press.
  • Mason, J. (2016). Rising Above a Cause-and-Effect Stance in Mathematics Education Research. JMTE 19(4) p297-300. http://rdcu.be/npTf
  • Mason, J. & Davis, B. (2013). The Importance of Teachers’ Mathematical Awareness for In-The-Moment Pedagogy. CJSMTE 13(2) p182-197.
  • Mason, J. (2012). Noticing: roots and branches. In M. Sherin, V. Jacobs, & R. Phillip (Eds.) Mathematics Teacher Noticing:  Seeing Through Teachers’ Eyes. p35-50. Mahwah: Erlbaum.
  • Mason, J. (2008). Being Mathematical With & In Front of Learners: Attention, Awareness, and Attitude as Sources of Differences between Teacher Educators, Teachers & Learners. In T. Wood (Series Ed.) & B. Jaworski (Vol. Ed.), International Handbook of Mathematics Teacher Education: Vol.4. The Mathematics Teacher Educator as a Developing Professional. Rotterdam, the Netherlands: Sense Publishers, p31-56.
  • Mason, J. & Johnston-Wilder, S. (2006 2nd edition). Designing and Using Mathematical Tasks. St. Albans: Tarquin.
  • Watson, A. & Mason, J. (2006). Seeing an Exercise as a Single Mathematical Object: Using Variation to Structure Sense-Making. Mathematical Thinking and Learning. 8(2) p91-111.
  • Watson, A. & Mason, J. (2005). Mathematics as a Constructive Activity: learners generating examples. Mahwah: Erlbaum.
  • Mason, J. & Johnston-Wilder, S. (2004). Fundamental Constructs in Mathematics Education, RoutledgeFalmer, London.
  • Mason, J. 2003, Structure of Attention in the Learning of Mathematics, in J. Novotná (Ed.) Proceedings, International Symposium on Elementary Mathematics Teaching, Charles University, Prague, p9-16.
  • Mason, J. 2002, Mathematics Teaching Practice: a guidebook for university and college lecturers, Horwood Publishing, Chichester.
  • Mason, J. 2002, Researching Your own Practice: The Discipline of Noticing, RoutledgeFalmer, London.
  • Mason, J. 2001, Modelling Modelling: where is the centre of gravity of-for-when modelling?, in J. Matos, W. Blum, S. Houston & S. Carreira (Eds.) Modelling and Mathematics Education: ICTMA 9 applications in science and technology, Horwood Publishing, Chichester, p39-61.
  • Mason, J. Burton L. & Stacey K. (1982). Thinking Mathematically, Addison Wesley, London

Website

www.pmtheta.com

Mark has worked in ELT and EMI for over 35 years as a teacher, teacher trainer, lecturer, course writer, syllabus designer, examiner, Director of Studies, and consultant editor for OUP. For the British Council he has worked as a consultant trainer and course developer in EMI and EAP. For the University of Oxford Department of Education Mark delivered the ELT option on the MSc ALSLA and is Teaching Associate of the EMI Research Group in which capacity he has worked as a CI and has developed and delivered EMI teacher training courses in China, Serbia and Oxford. Mark has worked in universities in Russia, Ukraine, Kazakhstan, Belarus, Czechia, Italy, Germany, Mexico, Peru, Chile, Brazil, Colombia and Morocco.

He continues to be involved in EMI and is currently co-authoring an EMI student guide.

Mark is an alumnus of the University of Oxford Department of Education and was among the first to be awarded the innovative MSc in Teaching English Language in University Settings.

Anushay is a second-year DPhil student investigating how classroom characteristics are related to Pakistani children’s development. She is supervised by Professor Iram Siraj and Dr Katharina Ereky-Stevens and her work is being supported by the Aga Khan University (Pakistan). Anushay received the Patrice Engle Dissertation Grant Award from the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD) in 2023.

Anushay completed her BSc Psychology from UCL, where she also started her master’s in Developmental Neuroscience and Psychopathology. She was based at Yale University for her master’s thesis, where she worked with Dr Craig Bailey at the Yale Center for Emotional Intelligence to understand children’s emotion development. Anushay also works as a part-time research  assistant at the Developmental Diversity Lab at UCL’s Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience. Anushay’s research interests include understanding child development across different cultures, factors that might be affecting it, and devising culture-specific ways to support children’s holistic development through the educational system. She is also keen on improving the research scope in Pakistan by working with Pakistani researchers, practitioners, and families. Anushay balances her research with her position as the founder of a non-profit, Resources for Children, which aims to understand and support children’s development in Pakistan.

Publications

Journal Articles

  1. Mazhar, A., & Bailey, C., S. (under review). Understanding Children’s Emotion-Specific Biases: How They Relate to Child and Family Factors, Emotion Recognition Accuracy, and Social Behaviour.

Presentations

  1. Mazhar, A., & Bailey, C., S. (2023, March). Understanding Children’s Emotion-Specific Biases: How They Relate to Child-Level Factors and Emotion Recognition Accuracy [Paper Presentation]. Society for Research in Child Development, Salt Lake City, Utah, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2022, April). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Spring Preview, New Haven, United States.
  3. Mazhar, A. (2021, December). Does an extended family improve mentalising in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK & Pakistan. 2nd International Foundation University Conference of Psychology, Rawalpindi, Pakistan.
  4. Mazhar, A. (2020, October). Developing a non-profit to advance autism research in Pakistan. Anna Freud Centre Seminar Series, London, United Kingdom.

Posters

  1. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Theory of Mind in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK and Pakistan. Harvard Trends in Psychology Summit, Cambridge, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Research Rounds, New Haven, United States.

Cindy works at the intersection of learning, design, and technology, with a keen interest in the orchestration of future-ready tech-enabled learning.

She is curious how the deployment of adaptive learning systems to schools will impact classroom learning and hopes to learn more about the human-machine partnership in education. Specifically, her research is concerned with the implications that the use of such systems has on teacher-student interactions, as teachers grapple with balancing personalised learning and learning in community, as well as curriculum demands and student interests. These are some tensions which could potentially be exacerbated by affordances of adaptive learning systems.

Prior to embarking on the DPhil in Education at Oxford, Cindy worked as the Lead Specialist in Technologies for Learning at the Educational Technology Division of Ministry of Education, Singapore. She had previously completed graduate studies at the National University of Singapore and Stanford University where she was awarded Master of Arts in English Studies and Master of Arts in Education.

Reem is DPhil student from Saudi Arabia.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she worked as a Teacher, Professional Developer, then, became a Supervisor and Researcher in the Ministry of Education where she received a scholarship to pursue her DPhil education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests lie in the area of Teacher Education and Professional Learning Policy and Practice.

Publications
  • Alqahtani, Reem (2020). Saudi Universities Role in Developing Teacher Professional Development Programs: Elite Universities Experience. Journal of Educational Sciences. King Saud University.
  • Alqahtani, Reem. (2020). The effect of implementing UDL-based activities in improving EFL learners’ academic achievement and attitudes towards L2. In L. Salas, & E. Ager, Creating Quiet reflective Spaces: Language Teacher Researches Professional Development (pp. 61-62). IATEFL publications.

Lena Zlock is researching the integration of digital technology into structures of teaching, learning, and education in higher education. Her particular focus is on the digital humanities and the potential for digital methods to transform humanistic study. She works with Professor Niall Winters and Dr. James Robson.

Lena’s research interests stem from her education as an M.St. student and Ertegun Graduate Scholar in Modern Languages at the University of Oxford, and as a B.A. student in History at Stanford University. As an undergraduate, she started the Voltaire Library Project, a digitally and data-driven study of the 6,763-book collection of French Enlightenment philosopher Voltaire (you can read more about the project here and here). She has been interested in the application of digital technology to humanistic teaching since her days in Princeton Day School, where she developed an interdisciplinary curriculum on Mexico City (visit the course website here).

Her research on Voltaire led her to think more broadly about the place of digital methods in the humanities classroom, and how new technologies will revolutionise the liberal arts and higher education. As a DPhil candidate, Lena will examine the negotiation and implementation of new learning technologies within the University of Oxford at undergraduate and graduate levels.

Lena is involved in a number of digital humanities initiatives in Oxford. She previously served as the inaugural fellow of the Voltaire Lab at Oxford’s Voltaire Foundation. As a master’s student, Lena co-formulated the convergence agenda for Oxford digital humanities with Professor Howard Hotson, and is currently employed by the Humanities Division to assist with the development of an M.St. degree in Digital Scholarship (read more here). Lena set up and helps to run the History of the Book blog for the Faculty of Medieval and Modern Languages and the Oxford Book History Twitter account.

Lena welcomes inquiries from undergraduate and postgraduate students from Oxford and beyond seeking to get involved with the digital humanities in any capacity. The History of the Book blog also welcomes inquiries from prospective contributors.

 

Abbey is a Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education, in collaboration with the Department of Engineering.

Before joining the DPhil program, Abbey obtained a B.A. in Applied Linguistics with minors in Russian and Chinese from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford. She was the recipient of a Benjamin A. Gilman International Scholarship through U.S. Department of State for study in Russia and was awarded two Foreign Language and Area Studies (FLAS) Fellowships for study in both Russia and China. She holds both TESOL and TEFL certificates and has taught English as a Second Language in various contexts to a wide variety of learner populations.

Abbey’s main research interests lie in the use of technology to facilitate language learning. Her DPhil research focuses on the development of a virtual reality program to bridge the gaps that students face when learning languages through distance learning.

Dr Nadiya Ivanenko is a Visiting Research Fellow in the field of civic education and citizenship linguistics. She is a member of the Applied Linguistics research group and Higher Education research group at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

After receiving PhD in Comparative Linguistics from Kyiv National Linguistic University (2008) Nadiya worked as an Associate Professor of the Germanic Languages and Teaching Methodology Department, Faculty of Ukrainian Philology, Foreign Languages and Social Communications and Vice Dean of the Faculty of Foreign Languages, Central Ukrainian State University, Ukraine.

Nadiya was a Chevening scholar and Postgraduate researcher at the Department of Education, University of Oxford (2003-2004). She was a Co-chair of the joint UNESCO Chair/UNITWIN project ‘Education as a Humanitarian Response’ (2004-2012); a participant of BECA joint project ‘Education for Democracy’ between Montclair State University (USA) and Kirovohrad State Pedagogical University (Ukraine). Nadiya had internship for teachers of EFL in the Department of Educational and Cultural Programmes at Shakespeare’s Globe Theater, London, UK (2011). She was the Head of the British Council International Mobility Grant ‘Internalizing Higher Education in Ukraine’, which included 2 internships at the University of Durham, UK (2016). She participated in the internship “Retraining in the Field of Teaching Excellence”, Bayreuth University, Germany (Erasmus + Project (2021) and was a coordinator of the Erasmus+ Project: Innovative Approach to Promotion Teaching Excellence (2021-2022) at Central Ukrainian State University.

Selected Publications

BOOKS

  • Rastrygina, A., Ivanenko, N. (2021). Pedagogy of Freedom in the Paradigmal Space of Modern Education and Upbringing.
  • Ivanenko, N., Liashuk, A. (2021). English Activity Book. Practical Course of English. Kropyvnytskyi.
  • Ivanenko N. (2014). (Edit.) Education in Eastern Europe and Eurasia. London: Bloomsbury.
  • Ivanenko N. (2008). The Concept of Good in English and Ukrainian Language Pictures of the World. Kirovohrad: KOD.
  • Ivanenko N. (2007). Written Practice and Conversation for 1 Year. Kropyvnytskyi.
  • Garkusha, L., Ivanenko, N. (2004). Critical thinking in life skills training. Kirovohrad.

BOOK CHAPTERS

  • Ivanenko, N. (2024). Words and word meanings In The Routledge Companion To English Studies/ by Constant Leung & Jo Lewkowicz. London, UK: Routledge (in publishing).
  • Ivanenko N. (2023). Development of civic education in Ukrainian universities: new challenges of modern realities in the conditions of the transformation of society. In Contemporary Education in Ukraine: Integration into the European Educational Space. Dnipro (pp. 387-412) DOI:36550/978-617-8245-57-3-20
  • Ivanenko N. (2019). Citizenship Education, Moral Fluency and Social and Political Future Challenges. In Polish-Jewish History, Culture, Values, and Education between Paradise and Inferno. Irvine, USA: Brown Walker Press (pp. 93-103)
  • Ivanenko N. (2014). Education Change, Transformation, Reforms – a Regional Overview. In N. Ivanenko (Edit.) Education in Eastern Europe and Eurasia. London: Bloomsbury (pp. 9-45)
  • Ivanenko N. (2013). Vulnerable Children in Ukraine and Educational Response. In M. Matsumoto (Edit.) Education and Disadvantaged Children and Young People. London: Bloomsbury (pp. 95-132)

JOURNAL ARTICLES

  1. Ivanenko, N. (2024). Challenges of Ukrainian Higher Education in Times of War. International Higher Education. The Boston College Centre for International Higher Education, 118, pp. 35-36 https://doi.org/10.36197/IHE.2024.118.17
  2. Ivanenko, N., Paska, T., Irkha, A. Rud, A., & Boguslavskas, L., (2024). The Role of Higher Education for Ensuring National Security in Ukraine. Futurity Education, 4(1), 210-237 https://doi.org/10.57125/FED.2024.03.25.11
  3. Leleka, T., Ivanenko, N., Demeshko, I., Kapitan T., & Demchenko, I. (2024). The Process of English Internationalization in the Ukrainian Educational Paradigm. Slavistica Vilnensis, 68(2), 76-89 doi:10.15388/SlavViln.2023.68(2).6
  4. Ivanenko, N., Rud, A., Hurbanska, A., Cheban, Y., & Syrtseva, S. (2024). Digitalization of Education of the Future – A Trend or a Requirement of the Time? Journal of Higher Education Theory and Practice24(2). DOI: https://doi.org/10.33423/jhetp.v24i2.6791
  5. Ivanenko, N. (2023). Civic character cultivation as a basic virtue within and beyond modern educational institutions. Academic Notes. Series Pedagogical sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 209, 180-185 DOI: https://doi.org/10.36550/2415-7988-2022-1-209-180-185
  6. Rastrygina, A., Ivanenko, N. (2023). A Pedagogy of freedom as a viable basis for implementing gender equality in Ukraine’s educational institutions. International Review of Education, 69(1-2), 143-174. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/s11159-023-09995-9
  7. Ivanenko N., Biletska O., Hurbanska S., Hurbanska, A., & Kochmar, D. (2023). English language morphological neologisms reflecting the war in Ukraine. World Journal of English Language, 13(5), pp. 432-438    DOI: doi:http://dx.doi.org/10.5430/wjel.v13n5p432
  8. Ivanenko, N., Boiko, A., Fedorchuk, L., Panchenko, I., & Marieiev, D. (2023). Development of educational policy in Ukraine in the context of European integration and digital transformation. Revista Eduweb, 17(2), 296-305 DOI: https://doi.org/10.46502/issn.1856-7576/2023.17.02.25
  9. Ivanenko, N.V., Gerasymenko,Yu. A., Kostenko, V.G. (2023). Innovative approaches to the modernization of philological education and science in Ukraine: a response to the challenges of wartime. Akademichni Vizii, (in Ukrainian). URL: https://academy-vision.org/index.php/av/article/view/281 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5281/zenodo.7795088
  10. Ivanenko N. (2022). Phraseological units of the conceptual field MARRIAGE in the English picture of the world. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi: KOD, 202, pp. 140-146
  11. Bilous, O., Mishchenko, A., Datska, T., Ivanenko, N., Kit, L., Piankovska, I., and Vereshchak, Y. (2021). Modern linguistic technologies: strategy of teaching translation studies. Rupkatha Journal on Interdisciplinary Studies in Humanities, 13(4), pp. 1-12 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/21659/rupkatha.v13n4.65
  12. Leleka, T., Ivanenko, N., Moskalenko O., Herasymenko, L., Shevchuk L., Pidlubna, O. (2021). Angloamerican loanwords use in the Ukrainian student slang. Laplage em Revista, 7(Extra-D): University and science: possible dialogues. pp.163-174. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/24115/S2446-622020217Extra-D1081p.163-174
  13. Ivanenko N. (2021). Figurative and valuable component of the MARRIAGE concept. Trends in Science and Practice of Today. Ankara, Turkey, pp. 356-361
  14. Ivanenko N. (2021). Inclusive learning environment for students’ achievements and foreign language development. Priorities in the Development of Science and Education. Budapest, Hungary, pp.74-80
  15. Ivanenko N. (2021). The nominative field of the MARRIAGE concept and the analysis of the synonymous series of its key unit. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi: KOD, 193, pp 218-224 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.36550/2522-4077-2021-1-193-218-224
  16. Ivanenko N. (2020). Language intervention stages in project-based learning. Modern Trends in Foreign Language Professional Training in a Multicultural Space. Kyiv, pp. 249 – 255
  17. Rastrygina, A., Ivanenko, N. (2020). Gender comfortable educational environment as a factor of development of personal freedom. Research Bulletin. Pedagogical Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 188, pp. 28 – 35 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.36550/2415-7988-2020-1-188-28-35
  18. Ivanenko N. (2020). Texting slang as one of the most common groups of everyday youth Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi: KOD, 187, pp. 38-45
  19. Ivanenko N. (2019). Computer use in foreign language Intellectual and Emotional Components of Foreign Language Learning: Latest Trends and Challenges for Higher Education. Kyiv, pp. 152 – 158.
  20. Ivanenko N. (2019). Initial stages of elaborating a project in a foreign language classroom. Science and Society. Hamilton, Canada, pp. 13 – 20.
  21. Ivanenko N. (2019). Project-based learning as a way to incorporate effective foreign language teaching. Research Bulletin. Pedagogical Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 177, pp. 207 – 211
  22. Ivanenko N. (2019). Youth vocabulary as a reflection of changes in modern society. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi: KOD, 175, pp. 34 – 39.
  23. Ivanenko N. (2018). Promoting citizenship education in the English language Proceedings of the IV International Conference. Kyiv, pp. 130 – 137
  24. Ivanenko N. (2018). Educating global citizens at a foreign language class. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, – pp. 494 – 500
  25. Ivanenko N. (2018). Formation of civic values through teaching a foreign language. Proceedings of the II International Conference “Foreign Language in Professional Training of Specialists: Problems and Strategies”. Kropyvnytskyi, pp. 189-191
  26. Ivanenko N. (2017). Citizenship education in the English language classroom. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 154. – pp. 92 – 97
  27. Ivanenko N. (2017). Education for democratic citizenship: teaching virtues and values. Research Bulletin. Pedagogical Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 152, pp. 110-113
  28. Ivanenko N. (2016). Citizenship education as a way to develop moral fluency to solve social and political challenges of the future. Scientific Journal of Ariel University. Israel: Ariel University.
  29. Ivanenko N. (2016). Functioning peculiarities of lexical units of the RESPECT concept in the English language. Proceedings of the International Conference Linguistic and Linguacultural Aspects of Teaching Foreign Languages in Ukrainian Universities”. Dnipropetrovsk, pp. 87-94
  30. Ivanenko N. (2016). Semantic relationships of lexical units of the concept of love in the English language. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, pp. 221-226
  31. Ivanenko N. (2015). Citizenship education as the coordination and integration of educational establishment and community. Research Proceedings of the national UniversityOstrog Academy”. Ostrog, pp. 136-142
  32. Ivanenko N. (2015). The value of citizenship education in practices of student governing body. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 136. pp. 438-442

Louise’s doctoral research investigates how teachers become who they are.

Louise’s work situates the schoolteacher as a particular type of subject, that is both made and makes itself from within a network of power relations. Her study combines Foucauldian theory, Critical Discourse Analysis, and Narrative analysis to provide an account of schoolteachers’ ethical agency in the context of top-down policy practices.

Louise is a Doctoral Teaching Fellow at the Department of Education, where she teaches and supervises students in the MSc in Learning and Teaching course. Currently, Louise is collaborating the OECD in their Globally Teaching InSights project. Her research supports the Schools+ Network aims to fuel an ecosystem of organisations that are driving change in education from the bottom-up.

In March 2023 she presented her preliminary research at the Philosophy of Education Society of Great Britain (PESGB)’s annual conference.

As Honorary Fellow John attends seminars and consults with current staff in Mathematics Education.

During 40 years at the Open University supporting the teaching of mathematics he authored a wide range of papers, and dozens of Open University Books and Teaching materials. He co-authored the classic Thinking Mathematically; Mathematics as a Constructive Activity (with his wife Prof. Anne Watson); Questions and Prompts for Mathematical Thinking & Thinkers (with Anne and other colleagues), among many others.

His research methods are phenomenological, based on the Discipline of Noticing. He is interested in the lived experience of learning, doing and teaching mathematics. He focuses on the structure and form of Attention in the teaching of mathematics, as he supports those who wish to foster and sustain mathematical thinking in others.

He is an Honorary Fellow of BSRLM and ATM, a long-standing member of  the MAA and the  MA.H.

 

Publications

  • Mason, J. (2022). Consequences of a Virtual Encounter with George Pólya. Teaching Mathematics and Computer Science.  20 (2) p173-182.
  • Zazkis, R. Kontorovich, I. & Mason, J. (2021). The Learning and Teaching of Number: paths less travelled through well-trodden terrain. London: Routledge
  • Mason, J. (2021). Learning about Noticing, by, and through, Noticing. ZDM – Mathematics Education. 53(1) p231-243. doi: 10.1007/s11858-020-01192-4
  • Mason, J. & Czarnocha,B. (2021). Aha! Moments, Bisociation and Multifocal Attention. In B. Czarnocha & W. Baker. Creativity of an Aha! Moment and Mathematics Education. Leiden: Brill. p345-361.
  • Mason, J. (2018) Making Distinctions: a phenomenological exploration in mathematics education. In P. Ernest (Ed.). The Philosophy of Mathematics Education Today. ICME-13 Monographs. Springer.
  • Mason, J. (2018). Reflecting on values emerging from practice and the value of reflecting on practice. In D. Rowe & A. Watson (Eds.). Faith and Experience in Education: essays from Quaker perspectives. London: Trentham Books. p63-91.
  • Mason, J. & Metz, M. (2017). Digging Beneath Dual Systems Theory and the Bicameral Brain: abductions about the human psyche from experience in mathematical problem solving. In U. Xolocotzin (Ed.). Understanding Emotions in Mathematical Thinking and Learning. p379-407. Cambridge: Elsevier/Academic Press.
  • Mason, J. (2016). Rising Above a Cause-and-Effect Stance in Mathematics Education Research. JMTE 19(4) p297-300. http://rdcu.be/npTf
  • Mason, J. & Davis, B. (2013). The Importance of Teachers’ Mathematical Awareness for In-The-Moment Pedagogy. CJSMTE 13(2) p182-197.
  • Mason, J. (2012). Noticing: roots and branches. In M. Sherin, V. Jacobs, & R. Phillip (Eds.) Mathematics Teacher Noticing:  Seeing Through Teachers’ Eyes. p35-50. Mahwah: Erlbaum.
  • Mason, J. (2008). Being Mathematical With & In Front of Learners: Attention, Awareness, and Attitude as Sources of Differences between Teacher Educators, Teachers & Learners. In T. Wood (Series Ed.) & B. Jaworski (Vol. Ed.), International Handbook of Mathematics Teacher Education: Vol.4. The Mathematics Teacher Educator as a Developing Professional. Rotterdam, the Netherlands: Sense Publishers, p31-56.
  • Mason, J. & Johnston-Wilder, S. (2006 2nd edition). Designing and Using Mathematical Tasks. St. Albans: Tarquin.
  • Watson, A. & Mason, J. (2006). Seeing an Exercise as a Single Mathematical Object: Using Variation to Structure Sense-Making. Mathematical Thinking and Learning. 8(2) p91-111.
  • Watson, A. & Mason, J. (2005). Mathematics as a Constructive Activity: learners generating examples. Mahwah: Erlbaum.
  • Mason, J. & Johnston-Wilder, S. (2004). Fundamental Constructs in Mathematics Education, RoutledgeFalmer, London.
  • Mason, J. 2003, Structure of Attention in the Learning of Mathematics, in J. Novotná (Ed.) Proceedings, International Symposium on Elementary Mathematics Teaching, Charles University, Prague, p9-16.
  • Mason, J. 2002, Mathematics Teaching Practice: a guidebook for university and college lecturers, Horwood Publishing, Chichester.
  • Mason, J. 2002, Researching Your own Practice: The Discipline of Noticing, RoutledgeFalmer, London.
  • Mason, J. 2001, Modelling Modelling: where is the centre of gravity of-for-when modelling?, in J. Matos, W. Blum, S. Houston & S. Carreira (Eds.) Modelling and Mathematics Education: ICTMA 9 applications in science and technology, Horwood Publishing, Chichester, p39-61.
  • Mason, J. Burton L. & Stacey K. (1982). Thinking Mathematically, Addison Wesley, London

Website

www.pmtheta.com

Mark has worked in ELT and EMI for over 35 years as a teacher, teacher trainer, lecturer, course writer, syllabus designer, examiner, Director of Studies, and consultant editor for OUP. For the British Council he has worked as a consultant trainer and course developer in EMI and EAP. For the University of Oxford Department of Education Mark delivered the ELT option on the MSc ALSLA and is Teaching Associate of the EMI Research Group in which capacity he has worked as a CI and has developed and delivered EMI teacher training courses in China, Serbia and Oxford. Mark has worked in universities in Russia, Ukraine, Kazakhstan, Belarus, Czechia, Italy, Germany, Mexico, Peru, Chile, Brazil, Colombia and Morocco.

He continues to be involved in EMI and is currently co-authoring an EMI student guide.

Mark is an alumnus of the University of Oxford Department of Education and was among the first to be awarded the innovative MSc in Teaching English Language in University Settings.

Anushay is a second-year DPhil student investigating how classroom characteristics are related to Pakistani children’s development. She is supervised by Professor Iram Siraj and Dr Katharina Ereky-Stevens and her work is being supported by the Aga Khan University (Pakistan). Anushay received the Patrice Engle Dissertation Grant Award from the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD) in 2023.

Anushay completed her BSc Psychology from UCL, where she also started her master’s in Developmental Neuroscience and Psychopathology. She was based at Yale University for her master’s thesis, where she worked with Dr Craig Bailey at the Yale Center for Emotional Intelligence to understand children’s emotion development. Anushay also works as a part-time research  assistant at the Developmental Diversity Lab at UCL’s Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience. Anushay’s research interests include understanding child development across different cultures, factors that might be affecting it, and devising culture-specific ways to support children’s holistic development through the educational system. She is also keen on improving the research scope in Pakistan by working with Pakistani researchers, practitioners, and families. Anushay balances her research with her position as the founder of a non-profit, Resources for Children, which aims to understand and support children’s development in Pakistan.

Publications

Journal Articles

  1. Mazhar, A., & Bailey, C., S. (under review). Understanding Children’s Emotion-Specific Biases: How They Relate to Child and Family Factors, Emotion Recognition Accuracy, and Social Behaviour.

Presentations

  1. Mazhar, A., & Bailey, C., S. (2023, March). Understanding Children’s Emotion-Specific Biases: How They Relate to Child-Level Factors and Emotion Recognition Accuracy [Paper Presentation]. Society for Research in Child Development, Salt Lake City, Utah, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2022, April). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Spring Preview, New Haven, United States.
  3. Mazhar, A. (2021, December). Does an extended family improve mentalising in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK & Pakistan. 2nd International Foundation University Conference of Psychology, Rawalpindi, Pakistan.
  4. Mazhar, A. (2020, October). Developing a non-profit to advance autism research in Pakistan. Anna Freud Centre Seminar Series, London, United Kingdom.

Posters

  1. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Theory of Mind in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK and Pakistan. Harvard Trends in Psychology Summit, Cambridge, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Research Rounds, New Haven, United States.

Cindy works at the intersection of learning, design, and technology, with a keen interest in the orchestration of future-ready tech-enabled learning.

She is curious how the deployment of adaptive learning systems to schools will impact classroom learning and hopes to learn more about the human-machine partnership in education. Specifically, her research is concerned with the implications that the use of such systems has on teacher-student interactions, as teachers grapple with balancing personalised learning and learning in community, as well as curriculum demands and student interests. These are some tensions which could potentially be exacerbated by affordances of adaptive learning systems.

Prior to embarking on the DPhil in Education at Oxford, Cindy worked as the Lead Specialist in Technologies for Learning at the Educational Technology Division of Ministry of Education, Singapore. She had previously completed graduate studies at the National University of Singapore and Stanford University where she was awarded Master of Arts in English Studies and Master of Arts in Education.

Reem is DPhil student from Saudi Arabia.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she worked as a Teacher, Professional Developer, then, became a Supervisor and Researcher in the Ministry of Education where she received a scholarship to pursue her DPhil education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests lie in the area of Teacher Education and Professional Learning Policy and Practice.

Publications
  • Alqahtani, Reem (2020). Saudi Universities Role in Developing Teacher Professional Development Programs: Elite Universities Experience. Journal of Educational Sciences. King Saud University.
  • Alqahtani, Reem. (2020). The effect of implementing UDL-based activities in improving EFL learners’ academic achievement and attitudes towards L2. In L. Salas, & E. Ager, Creating Quiet reflective Spaces: Language Teacher Researches Professional Development (pp. 61-62). IATEFL publications.

Lena Zlock is researching the integration of digital technology into structures of teaching, learning, and education in higher education. Her particular focus is on the digital humanities and the potential for digital methods to transform humanistic study. She works with Professor Niall Winters and Dr. James Robson.

Lena’s research interests stem from her education as an M.St. student and Ertegun Graduate Scholar in Modern Languages at the University of Oxford, and as a B.A. student in History at Stanford University. As an undergraduate, she started the Voltaire Library Project, a digitally and data-driven study of the 6,763-book collection of French Enlightenment philosopher Voltaire (you can read more about the project here and here). She has been interested in the application of digital technology to humanistic teaching since her days in Princeton Day School, where she developed an interdisciplinary curriculum on Mexico City (visit the course website here).

Her research on Voltaire led her to think more broadly about the place of digital methods in the humanities classroom, and how new technologies will revolutionise the liberal arts and higher education. As a DPhil candidate, Lena will examine the negotiation and implementation of new learning technologies within the University of Oxford at undergraduate and graduate levels.

Lena is involved in a number of digital humanities initiatives in Oxford. She previously served as the inaugural fellow of the Voltaire Lab at Oxford’s Voltaire Foundation. As a master’s student, Lena co-formulated the convergence agenda for Oxford digital humanities with Professor Howard Hotson, and is currently employed by the Humanities Division to assist with the development of an M.St. degree in Digital Scholarship (read more here). Lena set up and helps to run the History of the Book blog for the Faculty of Medieval and Modern Languages and the Oxford Book History Twitter account.

Lena welcomes inquiries from undergraduate and postgraduate students from Oxford and beyond seeking to get involved with the digital humanities in any capacity. The History of the Book blog also welcomes inquiries from prospective contributors.

 

Abbey is a Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education, in collaboration with the Department of Engineering.

Before joining the DPhil program, Abbey obtained a B.A. in Applied Linguistics with minors in Russian and Chinese from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford. She was the recipient of a Benjamin A. Gilman International Scholarship through U.S. Department of State for study in Russia and was awarded two Foreign Language and Area Studies (FLAS) Fellowships for study in both Russia and China. She holds both TESOL and TEFL certificates and has taught English as a Second Language in various contexts to a wide variety of learner populations.

Abbey’s main research interests lie in the use of technology to facilitate language learning. Her DPhil research focuses on the development of a virtual reality program to bridge the gaps that students face when learning languages through distance learning.

Dr Nadiya Ivanenko is a Visiting Research Fellow in the field of civic education and citizenship linguistics. She is a member of the Applied Linguistics research group and Higher Education research group at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

After receiving PhD in Comparative Linguistics from Kyiv National Linguistic University (2008) Nadiya worked as an Associate Professor of the Germanic Languages and Teaching Methodology Department, Faculty of Ukrainian Philology, Foreign Languages and Social Communications and Vice Dean of the Faculty of Foreign Languages, Central Ukrainian State University, Ukraine.

Nadiya was a Chevening scholar and Postgraduate researcher at the Department of Education, University of Oxford (2003-2004). She was a Co-chair of the joint UNESCO Chair/UNITWIN project ‘Education as a Humanitarian Response’ (2004-2012); a participant of BECA joint project ‘Education for Democracy’ between Montclair State University (USA) and Kirovohrad State Pedagogical University (Ukraine). Nadiya had internship for teachers of EFL in the Department of Educational and Cultural Programmes at Shakespeare’s Globe Theater, London, UK (2011). She was the Head of the British Council International Mobility Grant ‘Internalizing Higher Education in Ukraine’, which included 2 internships at the University of Durham, UK (2016). She participated in the internship “Retraining in the Field of Teaching Excellence”, Bayreuth University, Germany (Erasmus + Project (2021) and was a coordinator of the Erasmus+ Project: Innovative Approach to Promotion Teaching Excellence (2021-2022) at Central Ukrainian State University.

Selected Publications

BOOKS

  • Rastrygina, A., Ivanenko, N. (2021). Pedagogy of Freedom in the Paradigmal Space of Modern Education and Upbringing.
  • Ivanenko, N., Liashuk, A. (2021). English Activity Book. Practical Course of English. Kropyvnytskyi.
  • Ivanenko N. (2014). (Edit.) Education in Eastern Europe and Eurasia. London: Bloomsbury.
  • Ivanenko N. (2008). The Concept of Good in English and Ukrainian Language Pictures of the World. Kirovohrad: KOD.
  • Ivanenko N. (2007). Written Practice and Conversation for 1 Year. Kropyvnytskyi.
  • Garkusha, L., Ivanenko, N. (2004). Critical thinking in life skills training. Kirovohrad.

BOOK CHAPTERS

  • Ivanenko, N. (2024). Words and word meanings In The Routledge Companion To English Studies/ by Constant Leung & Jo Lewkowicz. London, UK: Routledge (in publishing).
  • Ivanenko N. (2023). Development of civic education in Ukrainian universities: new challenges of modern realities in the conditions of the transformation of society. In Contemporary Education in Ukraine: Integration into the European Educational Space. Dnipro (pp. 387-412) DOI:36550/978-617-8245-57-3-20
  • Ivanenko N. (2019). Citizenship Education, Moral Fluency and Social and Political Future Challenges. In Polish-Jewish History, Culture, Values, and Education between Paradise and Inferno. Irvine, USA: Brown Walker Press (pp. 93-103)
  • Ivanenko N. (2014). Education Change, Transformation, Reforms – a Regional Overview. In N. Ivanenko (Edit.) Education in Eastern Europe and Eurasia. London: Bloomsbury (pp. 9-45)
  • Ivanenko N. (2013). Vulnerable Children in Ukraine and Educational Response. In M. Matsumoto (Edit.) Education and Disadvantaged Children and Young People. London: Bloomsbury (pp. 95-132)

JOURNAL ARTICLES

  1. Ivanenko, N. (2024). Challenges of Ukrainian Higher Education in Times of War. International Higher Education. The Boston College Centre for International Higher Education, 118, pp. 35-36 https://doi.org/10.36197/IHE.2024.118.17
  2. Ivanenko, N., Paska, T., Irkha, A. Rud, A., & Boguslavskas, L., (2024). The Role of Higher Education for Ensuring National Security in Ukraine. Futurity Education, 4(1), 210-237 https://doi.org/10.57125/FED.2024.03.25.11
  3. Leleka, T., Ivanenko, N., Demeshko, I., Kapitan T., & Demchenko, I. (2024). The Process of English Internationalization in the Ukrainian Educational Paradigm. Slavistica Vilnensis, 68(2), 76-89 doi:10.15388/SlavViln.2023.68(2).6
  4. Ivanenko, N., Rud, A., Hurbanska, A., Cheban, Y., & Syrtseva, S. (2024). Digitalization of Education of the Future – A Trend or a Requirement of the Time? Journal of Higher Education Theory and Practice24(2). DOI: https://doi.org/10.33423/jhetp.v24i2.6791
  5. Ivanenko, N. (2023). Civic character cultivation as a basic virtue within and beyond modern educational institutions. Academic Notes. Series Pedagogical sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 209, 180-185 DOI: https://doi.org/10.36550/2415-7988-2022-1-209-180-185
  6. Rastrygina, A., Ivanenko, N. (2023). A Pedagogy of freedom as a viable basis for implementing gender equality in Ukraine’s educational institutions. International Review of Education, 69(1-2), 143-174. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/s11159-023-09995-9
  7. Ivanenko N., Biletska O., Hurbanska S., Hurbanska, A., & Kochmar, D. (2023). English language morphological neologisms reflecting the war in Ukraine. World Journal of English Language, 13(5), pp. 432-438    DOI: doi:http://dx.doi.org/10.5430/wjel.v13n5p432
  8. Ivanenko, N., Boiko, A., Fedorchuk, L., Panchenko, I., & Marieiev, D. (2023). Development of educational policy in Ukraine in the context of European integration and digital transformation. Revista Eduweb, 17(2), 296-305 DOI: https://doi.org/10.46502/issn.1856-7576/2023.17.02.25
  9. Ivanenko, N.V., Gerasymenko,Yu. A., Kostenko, V.G. (2023). Innovative approaches to the modernization of philological education and science in Ukraine: a response to the challenges of wartime. Akademichni Vizii, (in Ukrainian). URL: https://academy-vision.org/index.php/av/article/view/281 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5281/zenodo.7795088
  10. Ivanenko N. (2022). Phraseological units of the conceptual field MARRIAGE in the English picture of the world. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi: KOD, 202, pp. 140-146
  11. Bilous, O., Mishchenko, A., Datska, T., Ivanenko, N., Kit, L., Piankovska, I., and Vereshchak, Y. (2021). Modern linguistic technologies: strategy of teaching translation studies. Rupkatha Journal on Interdisciplinary Studies in Humanities, 13(4), pp. 1-12 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/21659/rupkatha.v13n4.65
  12. Leleka, T., Ivanenko, N., Moskalenko O., Herasymenko, L., Shevchuk L., Pidlubna, O. (2021). Angloamerican loanwords use in the Ukrainian student slang. Laplage em Revista, 7(Extra-D): University and science: possible dialogues. pp.163-174. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/24115/S2446-622020217Extra-D1081p.163-174
  13. Ivanenko N. (2021). Figurative and valuable component of the MARRIAGE concept. Trends in Science and Practice of Today. Ankara, Turkey, pp. 356-361
  14. Ivanenko N. (2021). Inclusive learning environment for students’ achievements and foreign language development. Priorities in the Development of Science and Education. Budapest, Hungary, pp.74-80
  15. Ivanenko N. (2021). The nominative field of the MARRIAGE concept and the analysis of the synonymous series of its key unit. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi: KOD, 193, pp 218-224 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.36550/2522-4077-2021-1-193-218-224
  16. Ivanenko N. (2020). Language intervention stages in project-based learning. Modern Trends in Foreign Language Professional Training in a Multicultural Space. Kyiv, pp. 249 – 255
  17. Rastrygina, A., Ivanenko, N. (2020). Gender comfortable educational environment as a factor of development of personal freedom. Research Bulletin. Pedagogical Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 188, pp. 28 – 35 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.36550/2415-7988-2020-1-188-28-35
  18. Ivanenko N. (2020). Texting slang as one of the most common groups of everyday youth Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi: KOD, 187, pp. 38-45
  19. Ivanenko N. (2019). Computer use in foreign language Intellectual and Emotional Components of Foreign Language Learning: Latest Trends and Challenges for Higher Education. Kyiv, pp. 152 – 158.
  20. Ivanenko N. (2019). Initial stages of elaborating a project in a foreign language classroom. Science and Society. Hamilton, Canada, pp. 13 – 20.
  21. Ivanenko N. (2019). Project-based learning as a way to incorporate effective foreign language teaching. Research Bulletin. Pedagogical Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 177, pp. 207 – 211
  22. Ivanenko N. (2019). Youth vocabulary as a reflection of changes in modern society. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi: KOD, 175, pp. 34 – 39.
  23. Ivanenko N. (2018). Promoting citizenship education in the English language Proceedings of the IV International Conference. Kyiv, pp. 130 – 137
  24. Ivanenko N. (2018). Educating global citizens at a foreign language class. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, – pp. 494 – 500
  25. Ivanenko N. (2018). Formation of civic values through teaching a foreign language. Proceedings of the II International Conference “Foreign Language in Professional Training of Specialists: Problems and Strategies”. Kropyvnytskyi, pp. 189-191
  26. Ivanenko N. (2017). Citizenship education in the English language classroom. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 154. – pp. 92 – 97
  27. Ivanenko N. (2017). Education for democratic citizenship: teaching virtues and values. Research Bulletin. Pedagogical Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 152, pp. 110-113
  28. Ivanenko N. (2016). Citizenship education as a way to develop moral fluency to solve social and political challenges of the future. Scientific Journal of Ariel University. Israel: Ariel University.
  29. Ivanenko N. (2016). Functioning peculiarities of lexical units of the RESPECT concept in the English language. Proceedings of the International Conference Linguistic and Linguacultural Aspects of Teaching Foreign Languages in Ukrainian Universities”. Dnipropetrovsk, pp. 87-94
  30. Ivanenko N. (2016). Semantic relationships of lexical units of the concept of love in the English language. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, pp. 221-226
  31. Ivanenko N. (2015). Citizenship education as the coordination and integration of educational establishment and community. Research Proceedings of the national UniversityOstrog Academy”. Ostrog, pp. 136-142
  32. Ivanenko N. (2015). The value of citizenship education in practices of student governing body. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 136. pp. 438-442

Louise’s doctoral research investigates how teachers become who they are.

Louise’s work situates the schoolteacher as a particular type of subject, that is both made and makes itself from within a network of power relations. Her study combines Foucauldian theory, Critical Discourse Analysis, and Narrative analysis to provide an account of schoolteachers’ ethical agency in the context of top-down policy practices.

Louise is a Doctoral Teaching Fellow at the Department of Education, where she teaches and supervises students in the MSc in Learning and Teaching course. Currently, Louise is collaborating the OECD in their Globally Teaching InSights project. Her research supports the Schools+ Network aims to fuel an ecosystem of organisations that are driving change in education from the bottom-up.

In March 2023 she presented her preliminary research at the Philosophy of Education Society of Great Britain (PESGB)’s annual conference.

As Honorary Fellow John attends seminars and consults with current staff in Mathematics Education.

During 40 years at the Open University supporting the teaching of mathematics he authored a wide range of papers, and dozens of Open University Books and Teaching materials. He co-authored the classic Thinking Mathematically; Mathematics as a Constructive Activity (with his wife Prof. Anne Watson); Questions and Prompts for Mathematical Thinking & Thinkers (with Anne and other colleagues), among many others.

His research methods are phenomenological, based on the Discipline of Noticing. He is interested in the lived experience of learning, doing and teaching mathematics. He focuses on the structure and form of Attention in the teaching of mathematics, as he supports those who wish to foster and sustain mathematical thinking in others.

He is an Honorary Fellow of BSRLM and ATM, a long-standing member of  the MAA and the  MA.H.

 

Publications

  • Mason, J. (2022). Consequences of a Virtual Encounter with George Pólya. Teaching Mathematics and Computer Science.  20 (2) p173-182.
  • Zazkis, R. Kontorovich, I. & Mason, J. (2021). The Learning and Teaching of Number: paths less travelled through well-trodden terrain. London: Routledge
  • Mason, J. (2021). Learning about Noticing, by, and through, Noticing. ZDM – Mathematics Education. 53(1) p231-243. doi: 10.1007/s11858-020-01192-4
  • Mason, J. & Czarnocha,B. (2021). Aha! Moments, Bisociation and Multifocal Attention. In B. Czarnocha & W. Baker. Creativity of an Aha! Moment and Mathematics Education. Leiden: Brill. p345-361.
  • Mason, J. (2018) Making Distinctions: a phenomenological exploration in mathematics education. In P. Ernest (Ed.). The Philosophy of Mathematics Education Today. ICME-13 Monographs. Springer.
  • Mason, J. (2018). Reflecting on values emerging from practice and the value of reflecting on practice. In D. Rowe & A. Watson (Eds.). Faith and Experience in Education: essays from Quaker perspectives. London: Trentham Books. p63-91.
  • Mason, J. & Metz, M. (2017). Digging Beneath Dual Systems Theory and the Bicameral Brain: abductions about the human psyche from experience in mathematical problem solving. In U. Xolocotzin (Ed.). Understanding Emotions in Mathematical Thinking and Learning. p379-407. Cambridge: Elsevier/Academic Press.
  • Mason, J. (2016). Rising Above a Cause-and-Effect Stance in Mathematics Education Research. JMTE 19(4) p297-300. http://rdcu.be/npTf
  • Mason, J. & Davis, B. (2013). The Importance of Teachers’ Mathematical Awareness for In-The-Moment Pedagogy. CJSMTE 13(2) p182-197.
  • Mason, J. (2012). Noticing: roots and branches. In M. Sherin, V. Jacobs, & R. Phillip (Eds.) Mathematics Teacher Noticing:  Seeing Through Teachers’ Eyes. p35-50. Mahwah: Erlbaum.
  • Mason, J. (2008). Being Mathematical With & In Front of Learners: Attention, Awareness, and Attitude as Sources of Differences between Teacher Educators, Teachers & Learners. In T. Wood (Series Ed.) & B. Jaworski (Vol. Ed.), International Handbook of Mathematics Teacher Education: Vol.4. The Mathematics Teacher Educator as a Developing Professional. Rotterdam, the Netherlands: Sense Publishers, p31-56.
  • Mason, J. & Johnston-Wilder, S. (2006 2nd edition). Designing and Using Mathematical Tasks. St. Albans: Tarquin.
  • Watson, A. & Mason, J. (2006). Seeing an Exercise as a Single Mathematical Object: Using Variation to Structure Sense-Making. Mathematical Thinking and Learning. 8(2) p91-111.
  • Watson, A. & Mason, J. (2005). Mathematics as a Constructive Activity: learners generating examples. Mahwah: Erlbaum.
  • Mason, J. & Johnston-Wilder, S. (2004). Fundamental Constructs in Mathematics Education, RoutledgeFalmer, London.
  • Mason, J. 2003, Structure of Attention in the Learning of Mathematics, in J. Novotná (Ed.) Proceedings, International Symposium on Elementary Mathematics Teaching, Charles University, Prague, p9-16.
  • Mason, J. 2002, Mathematics Teaching Practice: a guidebook for university and college lecturers, Horwood Publishing, Chichester.
  • Mason, J. 2002, Researching Your own Practice: The Discipline of Noticing, RoutledgeFalmer, London.
  • Mason, J. 2001, Modelling Modelling: where is the centre of gravity of-for-when modelling?, in J. Matos, W. Blum, S. Houston & S. Carreira (Eds.) Modelling and Mathematics Education: ICTMA 9 applications in science and technology, Horwood Publishing, Chichester, p39-61.
  • Mason, J. Burton L. & Stacey K. (1982). Thinking Mathematically, Addison Wesley, London

Website

www.pmtheta.com

Mark has worked in ELT and EMI for over 35 years as a teacher, teacher trainer, lecturer, course writer, syllabus designer, examiner, Director of Studies, and consultant editor for OUP. For the British Council he has worked as a consultant trainer and course developer in EMI and EAP. For the University of Oxford Department of Education Mark delivered the ELT option on the MSc ALSLA and is Teaching Associate of the EMI Research Group in which capacity he has worked as a CI and has developed and delivered EMI teacher training courses in China, Serbia and Oxford. Mark has worked in universities in Russia, Ukraine, Kazakhstan, Belarus, Czechia, Italy, Germany, Mexico, Peru, Chile, Brazil, Colombia and Morocco.

He continues to be involved in EMI and is currently co-authoring an EMI student guide.

Mark is an alumnus of the University of Oxford Department of Education and was among the first to be awarded the innovative MSc in Teaching English Language in University Settings.

Anushay is a second-year DPhil student investigating how classroom characteristics are related to Pakistani children’s development. She is supervised by Professor Iram Siraj and Dr Katharina Ereky-Stevens and her work is being supported by the Aga Khan University (Pakistan). Anushay received the Patrice Engle Dissertation Grant Award from the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD) in 2023.

Anushay completed her BSc Psychology from UCL, where she also started her master’s in Developmental Neuroscience and Psychopathology. She was based at Yale University for her master’s thesis, where she worked with Dr Craig Bailey at the Yale Center for Emotional Intelligence to understand children’s emotion development. Anushay also works as a part-time research  assistant at the Developmental Diversity Lab at UCL’s Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience. Anushay’s research interests include understanding child development across different cultures, factors that might be affecting it, and devising culture-specific ways to support children’s holistic development through the educational system. She is also keen on improving the research scope in Pakistan by working with Pakistani researchers, practitioners, and families. Anushay balances her research with her position as the founder of a non-profit, Resources for Children, which aims to understand and support children’s development in Pakistan.

Publications

Journal Articles

  1. Mazhar, A., & Bailey, C., S. (under review). Understanding Children’s Emotion-Specific Biases: How They Relate to Child and Family Factors, Emotion Recognition Accuracy, and Social Behaviour.

Presentations

  1. Mazhar, A., & Bailey, C., S. (2023, March). Understanding Children’s Emotion-Specific Biases: How They Relate to Child-Level Factors and Emotion Recognition Accuracy [Paper Presentation]. Society for Research in Child Development, Salt Lake City, Utah, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2022, April). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Spring Preview, New Haven, United States.
  3. Mazhar, A. (2021, December). Does an extended family improve mentalising in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK & Pakistan. 2nd International Foundation University Conference of Psychology, Rawalpindi, Pakistan.
  4. Mazhar, A. (2020, October). Developing a non-profit to advance autism research in Pakistan. Anna Freud Centre Seminar Series, London, United Kingdom.

Posters

  1. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Theory of Mind in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK and Pakistan. Harvard Trends in Psychology Summit, Cambridge, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Research Rounds, New Haven, United States.

Cindy works at the intersection of learning, design, and technology, with a keen interest in the orchestration of future-ready tech-enabled learning.

She is curious how the deployment of adaptive learning systems to schools will impact classroom learning and hopes to learn more about the human-machine partnership in education. Specifically, her research is concerned with the implications that the use of such systems has on teacher-student interactions, as teachers grapple with balancing personalised learning and learning in community, as well as curriculum demands and student interests. These are some tensions which could potentially be exacerbated by affordances of adaptive learning systems.

Prior to embarking on the DPhil in Education at Oxford, Cindy worked as the Lead Specialist in Technologies for Learning at the Educational Technology Division of Ministry of Education, Singapore. She had previously completed graduate studies at the National University of Singapore and Stanford University where she was awarded Master of Arts in English Studies and Master of Arts in Education.

Reem is DPhil student from Saudi Arabia.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she worked as a Teacher, Professional Developer, then, became a Supervisor and Researcher in the Ministry of Education where she received a scholarship to pursue her DPhil education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests lie in the area of Teacher Education and Professional Learning Policy and Practice.

Publications
  • Alqahtani, Reem (2020). Saudi Universities Role in Developing Teacher Professional Development Programs: Elite Universities Experience. Journal of Educational Sciences. King Saud University.
  • Alqahtani, Reem. (2020). The effect of implementing UDL-based activities in improving EFL learners’ academic achievement and attitudes towards L2. In L. Salas, & E. Ager, Creating Quiet reflective Spaces: Language Teacher Researches Professional Development (pp. 61-62). IATEFL publications.

Lena Zlock is researching the integration of digital technology into structures of teaching, learning, and education in higher education. Her particular focus is on the digital humanities and the potential for digital methods to transform humanistic study. She works with Professor Niall Winters and Dr. James Robson.

Lena’s research interests stem from her education as an M.St. student and Ertegun Graduate Scholar in Modern Languages at the University of Oxford, and as a B.A. student in History at Stanford University. As an undergraduate, she started the Voltaire Library Project, a digitally and data-driven study of the 6,763-book collection of French Enlightenment philosopher Voltaire (you can read more about the project here and here). She has been interested in the application of digital technology to humanistic teaching since her days in Princeton Day School, where she developed an interdisciplinary curriculum on Mexico City (visit the course website here).

Her research on Voltaire led her to think more broadly about the place of digital methods in the humanities classroom, and how new technologies will revolutionise the liberal arts and higher education. As a DPhil candidate, Lena will examine the negotiation and implementation of new learning technologies within the University of Oxford at undergraduate and graduate levels.

Lena is involved in a number of digital humanities initiatives in Oxford. She previously served as the inaugural fellow of the Voltaire Lab at Oxford’s Voltaire Foundation. As a master’s student, Lena co-formulated the convergence agenda for Oxford digital humanities with Professor Howard Hotson, and is currently employed by the Humanities Division to assist with the development of an M.St. degree in Digital Scholarship (read more here). Lena set up and helps to run the History of the Book blog for the Faculty of Medieval and Modern Languages and the Oxford Book History Twitter account.

Lena welcomes inquiries from undergraduate and postgraduate students from Oxford and beyond seeking to get involved with the digital humanities in any capacity. The History of the Book blog also welcomes inquiries from prospective contributors.

 

Abbey is a Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education, in collaboration with the Department of Engineering.

Before joining the DPhil program, Abbey obtained a B.A. in Applied Linguistics with minors in Russian and Chinese from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford. She was the recipient of a Benjamin A. Gilman International Scholarship through U.S. Department of State for study in Russia and was awarded two Foreign Language and Area Studies (FLAS) Fellowships for study in both Russia and China. She holds both TESOL and TEFL certificates and has taught English as a Second Language in various contexts to a wide variety of learner populations.

Abbey’s main research interests lie in the use of technology to facilitate language learning. Her DPhil research focuses on the development of a virtual reality program to bridge the gaps that students face when learning languages through distance learning.

Dr Nadiya Ivanenko is a Visiting Research Fellow in the field of civic education and citizenship linguistics. She is a member of the Applied Linguistics research group and Higher Education research group at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

After receiving PhD in Comparative Linguistics from Kyiv National Linguistic University (2008) Nadiya worked as an Associate Professor of the Germanic Languages and Teaching Methodology Department, Faculty of Ukrainian Philology, Foreign Languages and Social Communications and Vice Dean of the Faculty of Foreign Languages, Central Ukrainian State University, Ukraine.

Nadiya was a Chevening scholar and Postgraduate researcher at the Department of Education, University of Oxford (2003-2004). She was a Co-chair of the joint UNESCO Chair/UNITWIN project ‘Education as a Humanitarian Response’ (2004-2012); a participant of BECA joint project ‘Education for Democracy’ between Montclair State University (USA) and Kirovohrad State Pedagogical University (Ukraine). Nadiya had internship for teachers of EFL in the Department of Educational and Cultural Programmes at Shakespeare’s Globe Theater, London, UK (2011). She was the Head of the British Council International Mobility Grant ‘Internalizing Higher Education in Ukraine’, which included 2 internships at the University of Durham, UK (2016). She participated in the internship “Retraining in the Field of Teaching Excellence”, Bayreuth University, Germany (Erasmus + Project (2021) and was a coordinator of the Erasmus+ Project: Innovative Approach to Promotion Teaching Excellence (2021-2022) at Central Ukrainian State University.

Selected Publications

BOOKS

  • Rastrygina, A., Ivanenko, N. (2021). Pedagogy of Freedom in the Paradigmal Space of Modern Education and Upbringing.
  • Ivanenko, N., Liashuk, A. (2021). English Activity Book. Practical Course of English. Kropyvnytskyi.
  • Ivanenko N. (2014). (Edit.) Education in Eastern Europe and Eurasia. London: Bloomsbury.
  • Ivanenko N. (2008). The Concept of Good in English and Ukrainian Language Pictures of the World. Kirovohrad: KOD.
  • Ivanenko N. (2007). Written Practice and Conversation for 1 Year. Kropyvnytskyi.
  • Garkusha, L., Ivanenko, N. (2004). Critical thinking in life skills training. Kirovohrad.

BOOK CHAPTERS

  • Ivanenko, N. (2024). Words and word meanings In The Routledge Companion To English Studies/ by Constant Leung & Jo Lewkowicz. London, UK: Routledge (in publishing).
  • Ivanenko N. (2023). Development of civic education in Ukrainian universities: new challenges of modern realities in the conditions of the transformation of society. In Contemporary Education in Ukraine: Integration into the European Educational Space. Dnipro (pp. 387-412) DOI:36550/978-617-8245-57-3-20
  • Ivanenko N. (2019). Citizenship Education, Moral Fluency and Social and Political Future Challenges. In Polish-Jewish History, Culture, Values, and Education between Paradise and Inferno. Irvine, USA: Brown Walker Press (pp. 93-103)
  • Ivanenko N. (2014). Education Change, Transformation, Reforms – a Regional Overview. In N. Ivanenko (Edit.) Education in Eastern Europe and Eurasia. London: Bloomsbury (pp. 9-45)
  • Ivanenko N. (2013). Vulnerable Children in Ukraine and Educational Response. In M. Matsumoto (Edit.) Education and Disadvantaged Children and Young People. London: Bloomsbury (pp. 95-132)

JOURNAL ARTICLES

  1. Ivanenko, N. (2024). Challenges of Ukrainian Higher Education in Times of War. International Higher Education. The Boston College Centre for International Higher Education, 118, pp. 35-36 https://doi.org/10.36197/IHE.2024.118.17
  2. Ivanenko, N., Paska, T., Irkha, A. Rud, A., & Boguslavskas, L., (2024). The Role of Higher Education for Ensuring National Security in Ukraine. Futurity Education, 4(1), 210-237 https://doi.org/10.57125/FED.2024.03.25.11
  3. Leleka, T., Ivanenko, N., Demeshko, I., Kapitan T., & Demchenko, I. (2024). The Process of English Internationalization in the Ukrainian Educational Paradigm. Slavistica Vilnensis, 68(2), 76-89 doi:10.15388/SlavViln.2023.68(2).6
  4. Ivanenko, N., Rud, A., Hurbanska, A., Cheban, Y., & Syrtseva, S. (2024). Digitalization of Education of the Future – A Trend or a Requirement of the Time? Journal of Higher Education Theory and Practice24(2). DOI: https://doi.org/10.33423/jhetp.v24i2.6791
  5. Ivanenko, N. (2023). Civic character cultivation as a basic virtue within and beyond modern educational institutions. Academic Notes. Series Pedagogical sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 209, 180-185 DOI: https://doi.org/10.36550/2415-7988-2022-1-209-180-185
  6. Rastrygina, A., Ivanenko, N. (2023). A Pedagogy of freedom as a viable basis for implementing gender equality in Ukraine’s educational institutions. International Review of Education, 69(1-2), 143-174. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/s11159-023-09995-9
  7. Ivanenko N., Biletska O., Hurbanska S., Hurbanska, A., & Kochmar, D. (2023). English language morphological neologisms reflecting the war in Ukraine. World Journal of English Language, 13(5), pp. 432-438    DOI: doi:http://dx.doi.org/10.5430/wjel.v13n5p432
  8. Ivanenko, N., Boiko, A., Fedorchuk, L., Panchenko, I., & Marieiev, D. (2023). Development of educational policy in Ukraine in the context of European integration and digital transformation. Revista Eduweb, 17(2), 296-305 DOI: https://doi.org/10.46502/issn.1856-7576/2023.17.02.25
  9. Ivanenko, N.V., Gerasymenko,Yu. A., Kostenko, V.G. (2023). Innovative approaches to the modernization of philological education and science in Ukraine: a response to the challenges of wartime. Akademichni Vizii, (in Ukrainian). URL: https://academy-vision.org/index.php/av/article/view/281 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5281/zenodo.7795088
  10. Ivanenko N. (2022). Phraseological units of the conceptual field MARRIAGE in the English picture of the world. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi: KOD, 202, pp. 140-146
  11. Bilous, O., Mishchenko, A., Datska, T., Ivanenko, N., Kit, L., Piankovska, I., and Vereshchak, Y. (2021). Modern linguistic technologies: strategy of teaching translation studies. Rupkatha Journal on Interdisciplinary Studies in Humanities, 13(4), pp. 1-12 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/21659/rupkatha.v13n4.65
  12. Leleka, T., Ivanenko, N., Moskalenko O., Herasymenko, L., Shevchuk L., Pidlubna, O. (2021). Angloamerican loanwords use in the Ukrainian student slang. Laplage em Revista, 7(Extra-D): University and science: possible dialogues. pp.163-174. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/24115/S2446-622020217Extra-D1081p.163-174
  13. Ivanenko N. (2021). Figurative and valuable component of the MARRIAGE concept. Trends in Science and Practice of Today. Ankara, Turkey, pp. 356-361
  14. Ivanenko N. (2021). Inclusive learning environment for students’ achievements and foreign language development. Priorities in the Development of Science and Education. Budapest, Hungary, pp.74-80
  15. Ivanenko N. (2021). The nominative field of the MARRIAGE concept and the analysis of the synonymous series of its key unit. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi: KOD, 193, pp 218-224 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.36550/2522-4077-2021-1-193-218-224
  16. Ivanenko N. (2020). Language intervention stages in project-based learning. Modern Trends in Foreign Language Professional Training in a Multicultural Space. Kyiv, pp. 249 – 255
  17. Rastrygina, A., Ivanenko, N. (2020). Gender comfortable educational environment as a factor of development of personal freedom. Research Bulletin. Pedagogical Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 188, pp. 28 – 35 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.36550/2415-7988-2020-1-188-28-35
  18. Ivanenko N. (2020). Texting slang as one of the most common groups of everyday youth Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi: KOD, 187, pp. 38-45
  19. Ivanenko N. (2019). Computer use in foreign language Intellectual and Emotional Components of Foreign Language Learning: Latest Trends and Challenges for Higher Education. Kyiv, pp. 152 – 158.
  20. Ivanenko N. (2019). Initial stages of elaborating a project in a foreign language classroom. Science and Society. Hamilton, Canada, pp. 13 – 20.
  21. Ivanenko N. (2019). Project-based learning as a way to incorporate effective foreign language teaching. Research Bulletin. Pedagogical Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 177, pp. 207 – 211
  22. Ivanenko N. (2019). Youth vocabulary as a reflection of changes in modern society. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi: KOD, 175, pp. 34 – 39.
  23. Ivanenko N. (2018). Promoting citizenship education in the English language Proceedings of the IV International Conference. Kyiv, pp. 130 – 137
  24. Ivanenko N. (2018). Educating global citizens at a foreign language class. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, – pp. 494 – 500
  25. Ivanenko N. (2018). Formation of civic values through teaching a foreign language. Proceedings of the II International Conference “Foreign Language in Professional Training of Specialists: Problems and Strategies”. Kropyvnytskyi, pp. 189-191
  26. Ivanenko N. (2017). Citizenship education in the English language classroom. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 154. – pp. 92 – 97
  27. Ivanenko N. (2017). Education for democratic citizenship: teaching virtues and values. Research Bulletin. Pedagogical Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 152, pp. 110-113
  28. Ivanenko N. (2016). Citizenship education as a way to develop moral fluency to solve social and political challenges of the future. Scientific Journal of Ariel University. Israel: Ariel University.
  29. Ivanenko N. (2016). Functioning peculiarities of lexical units of the RESPECT concept in the English language. Proceedings of the International Conference Linguistic and Linguacultural Aspects of Teaching Foreign Languages in Ukrainian Universities”. Dnipropetrovsk, pp. 87-94
  30. Ivanenko N. (2016). Semantic relationships of lexical units of the concept of love in the English language. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, pp. 221-226
  31. Ivanenko N. (2015). Citizenship education as the coordination and integration of educational establishment and community. Research Proceedings of the national UniversityOstrog Academy”. Ostrog, pp. 136-142
  32. Ivanenko N. (2015). The value of citizenship education in practices of student governing body. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 136. pp. 438-442

Louise’s doctoral research investigates how teachers become who they are.

Louise’s work situates the schoolteacher as a particular type of subject, that is both made and makes itself from within a network of power relations. Her study combines Foucauldian theory, Critical Discourse Analysis, and Narrative analysis to provide an account of schoolteachers’ ethical agency in the context of top-down policy practices.

Louise is a Doctoral Teaching Fellow at the Department of Education, where she teaches and supervises students in the MSc in Learning and Teaching course. Currently, Louise is collaborating the OECD in their Globally Teaching InSights project. Her research supports the Schools+ Network aims to fuel an ecosystem of organisations that are driving change in education from the bottom-up.

In March 2023 she presented her preliminary research at the Philosophy of Education Society of Great Britain (PESGB)’s annual conference.

As Honorary Fellow John attends seminars and consults with current staff in Mathematics Education.

During 40 years at the Open University supporting the teaching of mathematics he authored a wide range of papers, and dozens of Open University Books and Teaching materials. He co-authored the classic Thinking Mathematically; Mathematics as a Constructive Activity (with his wife Prof. Anne Watson); Questions and Prompts for Mathematical Thinking & Thinkers (with Anne and other colleagues), among many others.

His research methods are phenomenological, based on the Discipline of Noticing. He is interested in the lived experience of learning, doing and teaching mathematics. He focuses on the structure and form of Attention in the teaching of mathematics, as he supports those who wish to foster and sustain mathematical thinking in others.

He is an Honorary Fellow of BSRLM and ATM, a long-standing member of  the MAA and the  MA.H.

 

Publications

  • Mason, J. (2022). Consequences of a Virtual Encounter with George Pólya. Teaching Mathematics and Computer Science.  20 (2) p173-182.
  • Zazkis, R. Kontorovich, I. & Mason, J. (2021). The Learning and Teaching of Number: paths less travelled through well-trodden terrain. London: Routledge
  • Mason, J. (2021). Learning about Noticing, by, and through, Noticing. ZDM – Mathematics Education. 53(1) p231-243. doi: 10.1007/s11858-020-01192-4
  • Mason, J. & Czarnocha,B. (2021). Aha! Moments, Bisociation and Multifocal Attention. In B. Czarnocha & W. Baker. Creativity of an Aha! Moment and Mathematics Education. Leiden: Brill. p345-361.
  • Mason, J. (2018) Making Distinctions: a phenomenological exploration in mathematics education. In P. Ernest (Ed.). The Philosophy of Mathematics Education Today. ICME-13 Monographs. Springer.
  • Mason, J. (2018). Reflecting on values emerging from practice and the value of reflecting on practice. In D. Rowe & A. Watson (Eds.). Faith and Experience in Education: essays from Quaker perspectives. London: Trentham Books. p63-91.
  • Mason, J. & Metz, M. (2017). Digging Beneath Dual Systems Theory and the Bicameral Brain: abductions about the human psyche from experience in mathematical problem solving. In U. Xolocotzin (Ed.). Understanding Emotions in Mathematical Thinking and Learning. p379-407. Cambridge: Elsevier/Academic Press.
  • Mason, J. (2016). Rising Above a Cause-and-Effect Stance in Mathematics Education Research. JMTE 19(4) p297-300. http://rdcu.be/npTf
  • Mason, J. & Davis, B. (2013). The Importance of Teachers’ Mathematical Awareness for In-The-Moment Pedagogy. CJSMTE 13(2) p182-197.
  • Mason, J. (2012). Noticing: roots and branches. In M. Sherin, V. Jacobs, & R. Phillip (Eds.) Mathematics Teacher Noticing:  Seeing Through Teachers’ Eyes. p35-50. Mahwah: Erlbaum.
  • Mason, J. (2008). Being Mathematical With & In Front of Learners: Attention, Awareness, and Attitude as Sources of Differences between Teacher Educators, Teachers & Learners. In T. Wood (Series Ed.) & B. Jaworski (Vol. Ed.), International Handbook of Mathematics Teacher Education: Vol.4. The Mathematics Teacher Educator as a Developing Professional. Rotterdam, the Netherlands: Sense Publishers, p31-56.
  • Mason, J. & Johnston-Wilder, S. (2006 2nd edition). Designing and Using Mathematical Tasks. St. Albans: Tarquin.
  • Watson, A. & Mason, J. (2006). Seeing an Exercise as a Single Mathematical Object: Using Variation to Structure Sense-Making. Mathematical Thinking and Learning. 8(2) p91-111.
  • Watson, A. & Mason, J. (2005). Mathematics as a Constructive Activity: learners generating examples. Mahwah: Erlbaum.
  • Mason, J. & Johnston-Wilder, S. (2004). Fundamental Constructs in Mathematics Education, RoutledgeFalmer, London.
  • Mason, J. 2003, Structure of Attention in the Learning of Mathematics, in J. Novotná (Ed.) Proceedings, International Symposium on Elementary Mathematics Teaching, Charles University, Prague, p9-16.
  • Mason, J. 2002, Mathematics Teaching Practice: a guidebook for university and college lecturers, Horwood Publishing, Chichester.
  • Mason, J. 2002, Researching Your own Practice: The Discipline of Noticing, RoutledgeFalmer, London.
  • Mason, J. 2001, Modelling Modelling: where is the centre of gravity of-for-when modelling?, in J. Matos, W. Blum, S. Houston & S. Carreira (Eds.) Modelling and Mathematics Education: ICTMA 9 applications in science and technology, Horwood Publishing, Chichester, p39-61.
  • Mason, J. Burton L. & Stacey K. (1982). Thinking Mathematically, Addison Wesley, London

Website

www.pmtheta.com

Mark has worked in ELT and EMI for over 35 years as a teacher, teacher trainer, lecturer, course writer, syllabus designer, examiner, Director of Studies, and consultant editor for OUP. For the British Council he has worked as a consultant trainer and course developer in EMI and EAP. For the University of Oxford Department of Education Mark delivered the ELT option on the MSc ALSLA and is Teaching Associate of the EMI Research Group in which capacity he has worked as a CI and has developed and delivered EMI teacher training courses in China, Serbia and Oxford. Mark has worked in universities in Russia, Ukraine, Kazakhstan, Belarus, Czechia, Italy, Germany, Mexico, Peru, Chile, Brazil, Colombia and Morocco.

He continues to be involved in EMI and is currently co-authoring an EMI student guide.

Mark is an alumnus of the University of Oxford Department of Education and was among the first to be awarded the innovative MSc in Teaching English Language in University Settings.

Anushay is a second-year DPhil student investigating how classroom characteristics are related to Pakistani children’s development. She is supervised by Professor Iram Siraj and Dr Katharina Ereky-Stevens and her work is being supported by the Aga Khan University (Pakistan). Anushay received the Patrice Engle Dissertation Grant Award from the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD) in 2023.

Anushay completed her BSc Psychology from UCL, where she also started her master’s in Developmental Neuroscience and Psychopathology. She was based at Yale University for her master’s thesis, where she worked with Dr Craig Bailey at the Yale Center for Emotional Intelligence to understand children’s emotion development. Anushay also works as a part-time research  assistant at the Developmental Diversity Lab at UCL’s Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience. Anushay’s research interests include understanding child development across different cultures, factors that might be affecting it, and devising culture-specific ways to support children’s holistic development through the educational system. She is also keen on improving the research scope in Pakistan by working with Pakistani researchers, practitioners, and families. Anushay balances her research with her position as the founder of a non-profit, Resources for Children, which aims to understand and support children’s development in Pakistan.

Publications

Journal Articles

  1. Mazhar, A., & Bailey, C., S. (under review). Understanding Children’s Emotion-Specific Biases: How They Relate to Child and Family Factors, Emotion Recognition Accuracy, and Social Behaviour.

Presentations

  1. Mazhar, A., & Bailey, C., S. (2023, March). Understanding Children’s Emotion-Specific Biases: How They Relate to Child-Level Factors and Emotion Recognition Accuracy [Paper Presentation]. Society for Research in Child Development, Salt Lake City, Utah, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2022, April). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Spring Preview, New Haven, United States.
  3. Mazhar, A. (2021, December). Does an extended family improve mentalising in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK & Pakistan. 2nd International Foundation University Conference of Psychology, Rawalpindi, Pakistan.
  4. Mazhar, A. (2020, October). Developing a non-profit to advance autism research in Pakistan. Anna Freud Centre Seminar Series, London, United Kingdom.

Posters

  1. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Theory of Mind in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK and Pakistan. Harvard Trends in Psychology Summit, Cambridge, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Research Rounds, New Haven, United States.

Cindy works at the intersection of learning, design, and technology, with a keen interest in the orchestration of future-ready tech-enabled learning.

She is curious how the deployment of adaptive learning systems to schools will impact classroom learning and hopes to learn more about the human-machine partnership in education. Specifically, her research is concerned with the implications that the use of such systems has on teacher-student interactions, as teachers grapple with balancing personalised learning and learning in community, as well as curriculum demands and student interests. These are some tensions which could potentially be exacerbated by affordances of adaptive learning systems.

Prior to embarking on the DPhil in Education at Oxford, Cindy worked as the Lead Specialist in Technologies for Learning at the Educational Technology Division of Ministry of Education, Singapore. She had previously completed graduate studies at the National University of Singapore and Stanford University where she was awarded Master of Arts in English Studies and Master of Arts in Education.

Reem is DPhil student from Saudi Arabia.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she worked as a Teacher, Professional Developer, then, became a Supervisor and Researcher in the Ministry of Education where she received a scholarship to pursue her DPhil education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests lie in the area of Teacher Education and Professional Learning Policy and Practice.

Publications
  • Alqahtani, Reem (2020). Saudi Universities Role in Developing Teacher Professional Development Programs: Elite Universities Experience. Journal of Educational Sciences. King Saud University.
  • Alqahtani, Reem. (2020). The effect of implementing UDL-based activities in improving EFL learners’ academic achievement and attitudes towards L2. In L. Salas, & E. Ager, Creating Quiet reflective Spaces: Language Teacher Researches Professional Development (pp. 61-62). IATEFL publications.

Lena Zlock is researching the integration of digital technology into structures of teaching, learning, and education in higher education. Her particular focus is on the digital humanities and the potential for digital methods to transform humanistic study. She works with Professor Niall Winters and Dr. James Robson.

Lena’s research interests stem from her education as an M.St. student and Ertegun Graduate Scholar in Modern Languages at the University of Oxford, and as a B.A. student in History at Stanford University. As an undergraduate, she started the Voltaire Library Project, a digitally and data-driven study of the 6,763-book collection of French Enlightenment philosopher Voltaire (you can read more about the project here and here). She has been interested in the application of digital technology to humanistic teaching since her days in Princeton Day School, where she developed an interdisciplinary curriculum on Mexico City (visit the course website here).

Her research on Voltaire led her to think more broadly about the place of digital methods in the humanities classroom, and how new technologies will revolutionise the liberal arts and higher education. As a DPhil candidate, Lena will examine the negotiation and implementation of new learning technologies within the University of Oxford at undergraduate and graduate levels.

Lena is involved in a number of digital humanities initiatives in Oxford. She previously served as the inaugural fellow of the Voltaire Lab at Oxford’s Voltaire Foundation. As a master’s student, Lena co-formulated the convergence agenda for Oxford digital humanities with Professor Howard Hotson, and is currently employed by the Humanities Division to assist with the development of an M.St. degree in Digital Scholarship (read more here). Lena set up and helps to run the History of the Book blog for the Faculty of Medieval and Modern Languages and the Oxford Book History Twitter account.

Lena welcomes inquiries from undergraduate and postgraduate students from Oxford and beyond seeking to get involved with the digital humanities in any capacity. The History of the Book blog also welcomes inquiries from prospective contributors.

 

Abbey is a Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education, in collaboration with the Department of Engineering.

Before joining the DPhil program, Abbey obtained a B.A. in Applied Linguistics with minors in Russian and Chinese from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford. She was the recipient of a Benjamin A. Gilman International Scholarship through U.S. Department of State for study in Russia and was awarded two Foreign Language and Area Studies (FLAS) Fellowships for study in both Russia and China. She holds both TESOL and TEFL certificates and has taught English as a Second Language in various contexts to a wide variety of learner populations.

Abbey’s main research interests lie in the use of technology to facilitate language learning. Her DPhil research focuses on the development of a virtual reality program to bridge the gaps that students face when learning languages through distance learning.

Dr Nadiya Ivanenko is a Visiting Research Fellow in the field of civic education and citizenship linguistics. She is a member of the Applied Linguistics research group and Higher Education research group at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

After receiving PhD in Comparative Linguistics from Kyiv National Linguistic University (2008) Nadiya worked as an Associate Professor of the Germanic Languages and Teaching Methodology Department, Faculty of Ukrainian Philology, Foreign Languages and Social Communications and Vice Dean of the Faculty of Foreign Languages, Central Ukrainian State University, Ukraine.

Nadiya was a Chevening scholar and Postgraduate researcher at the Department of Education, University of Oxford (2003-2004). She was a Co-chair of the joint UNESCO Chair/UNITWIN project ‘Education as a Humanitarian Response’ (2004-2012); a participant of BECA joint project ‘Education for Democracy’ between Montclair State University (USA) and Kirovohrad State Pedagogical University (Ukraine). Nadiya had internship for teachers of EFL in the Department of Educational and Cultural Programmes at Shakespeare’s Globe Theater, London, UK (2011). She was the Head of the British Council International Mobility Grant ‘Internalizing Higher Education in Ukraine’, which included 2 internships at the University of Durham, UK (2016). She participated in the internship “Retraining in the Field of Teaching Excellence”, Bayreuth University, Germany (Erasmus + Project (2021) and was a coordinator of the Erasmus+ Project: Innovative Approach to Promotion Teaching Excellence (2021-2022) at Central Ukrainian State University.

Selected Publications

BOOKS

  • Rastrygina, A., Ivanenko, N. (2021). Pedagogy of Freedom in the Paradigmal Space of Modern Education and Upbringing.
  • Ivanenko, N., Liashuk, A. (2021). English Activity Book. Practical Course of English. Kropyvnytskyi.
  • Ivanenko N. (2014). (Edit.) Education in Eastern Europe and Eurasia. London: Bloomsbury.
  • Ivanenko N. (2008). The Concept of Good in English and Ukrainian Language Pictures of the World. Kirovohrad: KOD.
  • Ivanenko N. (2007). Written Practice and Conversation for 1 Year. Kropyvnytskyi.
  • Garkusha, L., Ivanenko, N. (2004). Critical thinking in life skills training. Kirovohrad.

BOOK CHAPTERS

  • Ivanenko, N. (2024). Words and word meanings In The Routledge Companion To English Studies/ by Constant Leung & Jo Lewkowicz. London, UK: Routledge (in publishing).
  • Ivanenko N. (2023). Development of civic education in Ukrainian universities: new challenges of modern realities in the conditions of the transformation of society. In Contemporary Education in Ukraine: Integration into the European Educational Space. Dnipro (pp. 387-412) DOI:36550/978-617-8245-57-3-20
  • Ivanenko N. (2019). Citizenship Education, Moral Fluency and Social and Political Future Challenges. In Polish-Jewish History, Culture, Values, and Education between Paradise and Inferno. Irvine, USA: Brown Walker Press (pp. 93-103)
  • Ivanenko N. (2014). Education Change, Transformation, Reforms – a Regional Overview. In N. Ivanenko (Edit.) Education in Eastern Europe and Eurasia. London: Bloomsbury (pp. 9-45)
  • Ivanenko N. (2013). Vulnerable Children in Ukraine and Educational Response. In M. Matsumoto (Edit.) Education and Disadvantaged Children and Young People. London: Bloomsbury (pp. 95-132)

JOURNAL ARTICLES

  1. Ivanenko, N. (2024). Challenges of Ukrainian Higher Education in Times of War. International Higher Education. The Boston College Centre for International Higher Education, 118, pp. 35-36 https://doi.org/10.36197/IHE.2024.118.17
  2. Ivanenko, N., Paska, T., Irkha, A. Rud, A., & Boguslavskas, L., (2024). The Role of Higher Education for Ensuring National Security in Ukraine. Futurity Education, 4(1), 210-237 https://doi.org/10.57125/FED.2024.03.25.11
  3. Leleka, T., Ivanenko, N., Demeshko, I., Kapitan T., & Demchenko, I. (2024). The Process of English Internationalization in the Ukrainian Educational Paradigm. Slavistica Vilnensis, 68(2), 76-89 doi:10.15388/SlavViln.2023.68(2).6
  4. Ivanenko, N., Rud, A., Hurbanska, A., Cheban, Y., & Syrtseva, S. (2024). Digitalization of Education of the Future – A Trend or a Requirement of the Time? Journal of Higher Education Theory and Practice24(2). DOI: https://doi.org/10.33423/jhetp.v24i2.6791
  5. Ivanenko, N. (2023). Civic character cultivation as a basic virtue within and beyond modern educational institutions. Academic Notes. Series Pedagogical sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 209, 180-185 DOI: https://doi.org/10.36550/2415-7988-2022-1-209-180-185
  6. Rastrygina, A., Ivanenko, N. (2023). A Pedagogy of freedom as a viable basis for implementing gender equality in Ukraine’s educational institutions. International Review of Education, 69(1-2), 143-174. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/s11159-023-09995-9
  7. Ivanenko N., Biletska O., Hurbanska S., Hurbanska, A., & Kochmar, D. (2023). English language morphological neologisms reflecting the war in Ukraine. World Journal of English Language, 13(5), pp. 432-438    DOI: doi:http://dx.doi.org/10.5430/wjel.v13n5p432
  8. Ivanenko, N., Boiko, A., Fedorchuk, L., Panchenko, I., & Marieiev, D. (2023). Development of educational policy in Ukraine in the context of European integration and digital transformation. Revista Eduweb, 17(2), 296-305 DOI: https://doi.org/10.46502/issn.1856-7576/2023.17.02.25
  9. Ivanenko, N.V., Gerasymenko,Yu. A., Kostenko, V.G. (2023). Innovative approaches to the modernization of philological education and science in Ukraine: a response to the challenges of wartime. Akademichni Vizii, (in Ukrainian). URL: https://academy-vision.org/index.php/av/article/view/281 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5281/zenodo.7795088
  10. Ivanenko N. (2022). Phraseological units of the conceptual field MARRIAGE in the English picture of the world. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi: KOD, 202, pp. 140-146
  11. Bilous, O., Mishchenko, A., Datska, T., Ivanenko, N., Kit, L., Piankovska, I., and Vereshchak, Y. (2021). Modern linguistic technologies: strategy of teaching translation studies. Rupkatha Journal on Interdisciplinary Studies in Humanities, 13(4), pp. 1-12 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/21659/rupkatha.v13n4.65
  12. Leleka, T., Ivanenko, N., Moskalenko O., Herasymenko, L., Shevchuk L., Pidlubna, O. (2021). Angloamerican loanwords use in the Ukrainian student slang. Laplage em Revista, 7(Extra-D): University and science: possible dialogues. pp.163-174. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/24115/S2446-622020217Extra-D1081p.163-174
  13. Ivanenko N. (2021). Figurative and valuable component of the MARRIAGE concept. Trends in Science and Practice of Today. Ankara, Turkey, pp. 356-361
  14. Ivanenko N. (2021). Inclusive learning environment for students’ achievements and foreign language development. Priorities in the Development of Science and Education. Budapest, Hungary, pp.74-80
  15. Ivanenko N. (2021). The nominative field of the MARRIAGE concept and the analysis of the synonymous series of its key unit. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi: KOD, 193, pp 218-224 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.36550/2522-4077-2021-1-193-218-224
  16. Ivanenko N. (2020). Language intervention stages in project-based learning. Modern Trends in Foreign Language Professional Training in a Multicultural Space. Kyiv, pp. 249 – 255
  17. Rastrygina, A., Ivanenko, N. (2020). Gender comfortable educational environment as a factor of development of personal freedom. Research Bulletin. Pedagogical Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 188, pp. 28 – 35 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.36550/2415-7988-2020-1-188-28-35
  18. Ivanenko N. (2020). Texting slang as one of the most common groups of everyday youth Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi: KOD, 187, pp. 38-45
  19. Ivanenko N. (2019). Computer use in foreign language Intellectual and Emotional Components of Foreign Language Learning: Latest Trends and Challenges for Higher Education. Kyiv, pp. 152 – 158.
  20. Ivanenko N. (2019). Initial stages of elaborating a project in a foreign language classroom. Science and Society. Hamilton, Canada, pp. 13 – 20.
  21. Ivanenko N. (2019). Project-based learning as a way to incorporate effective foreign language teaching. Research Bulletin. Pedagogical Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 177, pp. 207 – 211
  22. Ivanenko N. (2019). Youth vocabulary as a reflection of changes in modern society. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi: KOD, 175, pp. 34 – 39.
  23. Ivanenko N. (2018). Promoting citizenship education in the English language Proceedings of the IV International Conference. Kyiv, pp. 130 – 137
  24. Ivanenko N. (2018). Educating global citizens at a foreign language class. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, – pp. 494 – 500
  25. Ivanenko N. (2018). Formation of civic values through teaching a foreign language. Proceedings of the II International Conference “Foreign Language in Professional Training of Specialists: Problems and Strategies”. Kropyvnytskyi, pp. 189-191
  26. Ivanenko N. (2017). Citizenship education in the English language classroom. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 154. – pp. 92 – 97
  27. Ivanenko N. (2017). Education for democratic citizenship: teaching virtues and values. Research Bulletin. Pedagogical Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 152, pp. 110-113
  28. Ivanenko N. (2016). Citizenship education as a way to develop moral fluency to solve social and political challenges of the future. Scientific Journal of Ariel University. Israel: Ariel University.
  29. Ivanenko N. (2016). Functioning peculiarities of lexical units of the RESPECT concept in the English language. Proceedings of the International Conference Linguistic and Linguacultural Aspects of Teaching Foreign Languages in Ukrainian Universities”. Dnipropetrovsk, pp. 87-94
  30. Ivanenko N. (2016). Semantic relationships of lexical units of the concept of love in the English language. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, pp. 221-226
  31. Ivanenko N. (2015). Citizenship education as the coordination and integration of educational establishment and community. Research Proceedings of the national UniversityOstrog Academy”. Ostrog, pp. 136-142
  32. Ivanenko N. (2015). The value of citizenship education in practices of student governing body. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 136. pp. 438-442

Louise’s doctoral research investigates how teachers become who they are.

Louise’s work situates the schoolteacher as a particular type of subject, that is both made and makes itself from within a network of power relations. Her study combines Foucauldian theory, Critical Discourse Analysis, and Narrative analysis to provide an account of schoolteachers’ ethical agency in the context of top-down policy practices.

Louise is a Doctoral Teaching Fellow at the Department of Education, where she teaches and supervises students in the MSc in Learning and Teaching course. Currently, Louise is collaborating the OECD in their Globally Teaching InSights project. Her research supports the Schools+ Network aims to fuel an ecosystem of organisations that are driving change in education from the bottom-up.

In March 2023 she presented her preliminary research at the Philosophy of Education Society of Great Britain (PESGB)’s annual conference.

As Honorary Fellow John attends seminars and consults with current staff in Mathematics Education.

During 40 years at the Open University supporting the teaching of mathematics he authored a wide range of papers, and dozens of Open University Books and Teaching materials. He co-authored the classic Thinking Mathematically; Mathematics as a Constructive Activity (with his wife Prof. Anne Watson); Questions and Prompts for Mathematical Thinking & Thinkers (with Anne and other colleagues), among many others.

His research methods are phenomenological, based on the Discipline of Noticing. He is interested in the lived experience of learning, doing and teaching mathematics. He focuses on the structure and form of Attention in the teaching of mathematics, as he supports those who wish to foster and sustain mathematical thinking in others.

He is an Honorary Fellow of BSRLM and ATM, a long-standing member of  the MAA and the  MA.H.

 

Publications

  • Mason, J. (2022). Consequences of a Virtual Encounter with George Pólya. Teaching Mathematics and Computer Science.  20 (2) p173-182.
  • Zazkis, R. Kontorovich, I. & Mason, J. (2021). The Learning and Teaching of Number: paths less travelled through well-trodden terrain. London: Routledge
  • Mason, J. (2021). Learning about Noticing, by, and through, Noticing. ZDM – Mathematics Education. 53(1) p231-243. doi: 10.1007/s11858-020-01192-4
  • Mason, J. & Czarnocha,B. (2021). Aha! Moments, Bisociation and Multifocal Attention. In B. Czarnocha & W. Baker. Creativity of an Aha! Moment and Mathematics Education. Leiden: Brill. p345-361.
  • Mason, J. (2018) Making Distinctions: a phenomenological exploration in mathematics education. In P. Ernest (Ed.). The Philosophy of Mathematics Education Today. ICME-13 Monographs. Springer.
  • Mason, J. (2018). Reflecting on values emerging from practice and the value of reflecting on practice. In D. Rowe & A. Watson (Eds.). Faith and Experience in Education: essays from Quaker perspectives. London: Trentham Books. p63-91.
  • Mason, J. & Metz, M. (2017). Digging Beneath Dual Systems Theory and the Bicameral Brain: abductions about the human psyche from experience in mathematical problem solving. In U. Xolocotzin (Ed.). Understanding Emotions in Mathematical Thinking and Learning. p379-407. Cambridge: Elsevier/Academic Press.
  • Mason, J. (2016). Rising Above a Cause-and-Effect Stance in Mathematics Education Research. JMTE 19(4) p297-300. http://rdcu.be/npTf
  • Mason, J. & Davis, B. (2013). The Importance of Teachers’ Mathematical Awareness for In-The-Moment Pedagogy. CJSMTE 13(2) p182-197.
  • Mason, J. (2012). Noticing: roots and branches. In M. Sherin, V. Jacobs, & R. Phillip (Eds.) Mathematics Teacher Noticing:  Seeing Through Teachers’ Eyes. p35-50. Mahwah: Erlbaum.
  • Mason, J. (2008). Being Mathematical With & In Front of Learners: Attention, Awareness, and Attitude as Sources of Differences between Teacher Educators, Teachers & Learners. In T. Wood (Series Ed.) & B. Jaworski (Vol. Ed.), International Handbook of Mathematics Teacher Education: Vol.4. The Mathematics Teacher Educator as a Developing Professional. Rotterdam, the Netherlands: Sense Publishers, p31-56.
  • Mason, J. & Johnston-Wilder, S. (2006 2nd edition). Designing and Using Mathematical Tasks. St. Albans: Tarquin.
  • Watson, A. & Mason, J. (2006). Seeing an Exercise as a Single Mathematical Object: Using Variation to Structure Sense-Making. Mathematical Thinking and Learning. 8(2) p91-111.
  • Watson, A. & Mason, J. (2005). Mathematics as a Constructive Activity: learners generating examples. Mahwah: Erlbaum.
  • Mason, J. & Johnston-Wilder, S. (2004). Fundamental Constructs in Mathematics Education, RoutledgeFalmer, London.
  • Mason, J. 2003, Structure of Attention in the Learning of Mathematics, in J. Novotná (Ed.) Proceedings, International Symposium on Elementary Mathematics Teaching, Charles University, Prague, p9-16.
  • Mason, J. 2002, Mathematics Teaching Practice: a guidebook for university and college lecturers, Horwood Publishing, Chichester.
  • Mason, J. 2002, Researching Your own Practice: The Discipline of Noticing, RoutledgeFalmer, London.
  • Mason, J. 2001, Modelling Modelling: where is the centre of gravity of-for-when modelling?, in J. Matos, W. Blum, S. Houston & S. Carreira (Eds.) Modelling and Mathematics Education: ICTMA 9 applications in science and technology, Horwood Publishing, Chichester, p39-61.
  • Mason, J. Burton L. & Stacey K. (1982). Thinking Mathematically, Addison Wesley, London

Website

www.pmtheta.com

Mark has worked in ELT and EMI for over 35 years as a teacher, teacher trainer, lecturer, course writer, syllabus designer, examiner, Director of Studies, and consultant editor for OUP. For the British Council he has worked as a consultant trainer and course developer in EMI and EAP. For the University of Oxford Department of Education Mark delivered the ELT option on the MSc ALSLA and is Teaching Associate of the EMI Research Group in which capacity he has worked as a CI and has developed and delivered EMI teacher training courses in China, Serbia and Oxford. Mark has worked in universities in Russia, Ukraine, Kazakhstan, Belarus, Czechia, Italy, Germany, Mexico, Peru, Chile, Brazil, Colombia and Morocco.

He continues to be involved in EMI and is currently co-authoring an EMI student guide.

Mark is an alumnus of the University of Oxford Department of Education and was among the first to be awarded the innovative MSc in Teaching English Language in University Settings.

Anushay is a second-year DPhil student investigating how classroom characteristics are related to Pakistani children’s development. She is supervised by Professor Iram Siraj and Dr Katharina Ereky-Stevens and her work is being supported by the Aga Khan University (Pakistan). Anushay received the Patrice Engle Dissertation Grant Award from the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD) in 2023.

Anushay completed her BSc Psychology from UCL, where she also started her master’s in Developmental Neuroscience and Psychopathology. She was based at Yale University for her master’s thesis, where she worked with Dr Craig Bailey at the Yale Center for Emotional Intelligence to understand children’s emotion development. Anushay also works as a part-time research  assistant at the Developmental Diversity Lab at UCL’s Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience. Anushay’s research interests include understanding child development across different cultures, factors that might be affecting it, and devising culture-specific ways to support children’s holistic development through the educational system. She is also keen on improving the research scope in Pakistan by working with Pakistani researchers, practitioners, and families. Anushay balances her research with her position as the founder of a non-profit, Resources for Children, which aims to understand and support children’s development in Pakistan.

Publications

Journal Articles

  1. Mazhar, A., & Bailey, C., S. (under review). Understanding Children’s Emotion-Specific Biases: How They Relate to Child and Family Factors, Emotion Recognition Accuracy, and Social Behaviour.

Presentations

  1. Mazhar, A., & Bailey, C., S. (2023, March). Understanding Children’s Emotion-Specific Biases: How They Relate to Child-Level Factors and Emotion Recognition Accuracy [Paper Presentation]. Society for Research in Child Development, Salt Lake City, Utah, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2022, April). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Spring Preview, New Haven, United States.
  3. Mazhar, A. (2021, December). Does an extended family improve mentalising in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK & Pakistan. 2nd International Foundation University Conference of Psychology, Rawalpindi, Pakistan.
  4. Mazhar, A. (2020, October). Developing a non-profit to advance autism research in Pakistan. Anna Freud Centre Seminar Series, London, United Kingdom.

Posters

  1. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Theory of Mind in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK and Pakistan. Harvard Trends in Psychology Summit, Cambridge, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Research Rounds, New Haven, United States.

Cindy works at the intersection of learning, design, and technology, with a keen interest in the orchestration of future-ready tech-enabled learning.

She is curious how the deployment of adaptive learning systems to schools will impact classroom learning and hopes to learn more about the human-machine partnership in education. Specifically, her research is concerned with the implications that the use of such systems has on teacher-student interactions, as teachers grapple with balancing personalised learning and learning in community, as well as curriculum demands and student interests. These are some tensions which could potentially be exacerbated by affordances of adaptive learning systems.

Prior to embarking on the DPhil in Education at Oxford, Cindy worked as the Lead Specialist in Technologies for Learning at the Educational Technology Division of Ministry of Education, Singapore. She had previously completed graduate studies at the National University of Singapore and Stanford University where she was awarded Master of Arts in English Studies and Master of Arts in Education.

Reem is DPhil student from Saudi Arabia.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she worked as a Teacher, Professional Developer, then, became a Supervisor and Researcher in the Ministry of Education where she received a scholarship to pursue her DPhil education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests lie in the area of Teacher Education and Professional Learning Policy and Practice.

Publications
  • Alqahtani, Reem (2020). Saudi Universities Role in Developing Teacher Professional Development Programs: Elite Universities Experience. Journal of Educational Sciences. King Saud University.
  • Alqahtani, Reem. (2020). The effect of implementing UDL-based activities in improving EFL learners’ academic achievement and attitudes towards L2. In L. Salas, & E. Ager, Creating Quiet reflective Spaces: Language Teacher Researches Professional Development (pp. 61-62). IATEFL publications.

Lena Zlock is researching the integration of digital technology into structures of teaching, learning, and education in higher education. Her particular focus is on the digital humanities and the potential for digital methods to transform humanistic study. She works with Professor Niall Winters and Dr. James Robson.

Lena’s research interests stem from her education as an M.St. student and Ertegun Graduate Scholar in Modern Languages at the University of Oxford, and as a B.A. student in History at Stanford University. As an undergraduate, she started the Voltaire Library Project, a digitally and data-driven study of the 6,763-book collection of French Enlightenment philosopher Voltaire (you can read more about the project here and here). She has been interested in the application of digital technology to humanistic teaching since her days in Princeton Day School, where she developed an interdisciplinary curriculum on Mexico City (visit the course website here).

Her research on Voltaire led her to think more broadly about the place of digital methods in the humanities classroom, and how new technologies will revolutionise the liberal arts and higher education. As a DPhil candidate, Lena will examine the negotiation and implementation of new learning technologies within the University of Oxford at undergraduate and graduate levels.

Lena is involved in a number of digital humanities initiatives in Oxford. She previously served as the inaugural fellow of the Voltaire Lab at Oxford’s Voltaire Foundation. As a master’s student, Lena co-formulated the convergence agenda for Oxford digital humanities with Professor Howard Hotson, and is currently employed by the Humanities Division to assist with the development of an M.St. degree in Digital Scholarship (read more here). Lena set up and helps to run the History of the Book blog for the Faculty of Medieval and Modern Languages and the Oxford Book History Twitter account.

Lena welcomes inquiries from undergraduate and postgraduate students from Oxford and beyond seeking to get involved with the digital humanities in any capacity. The History of the Book blog also welcomes inquiries from prospective contributors.

 

Abbey is a Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education, in collaboration with the Department of Engineering.

Before joining the DPhil program, Abbey obtained a B.A. in Applied Linguistics with minors in Russian and Chinese from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford. She was the recipient of a Benjamin A. Gilman International Scholarship through U.S. Department of State for study in Russia and was awarded two Foreign Language and Area Studies (FLAS) Fellowships for study in both Russia and China. She holds both TESOL and TEFL certificates and has taught English as a Second Language in various contexts to a wide variety of learner populations.

Abbey’s main research interests lie in the use of technology to facilitate language learning. Her DPhil research focuses on the development of a virtual reality program to bridge the gaps that students face when learning languages through distance learning.

Dr Nadiya Ivanenko is a Visiting Research Fellow in the field of civic education and citizenship linguistics. She is a member of the Applied Linguistics research group and Higher Education research group at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

After receiving PhD in Comparative Linguistics from Kyiv National Linguistic University (2008) Nadiya worked as an Associate Professor of the Germanic Languages and Teaching Methodology Department, Faculty of Ukrainian Philology, Foreign Languages and Social Communications and Vice Dean of the Faculty of Foreign Languages, Central Ukrainian State University, Ukraine.

Nadiya was a Chevening scholar and Postgraduate researcher at the Department of Education, University of Oxford (2003-2004). She was a Co-chair of the joint UNESCO Chair/UNITWIN project ‘Education as a Humanitarian Response’ (2004-2012); a participant of BECA joint project ‘Education for Democracy’ between Montclair State University (USA) and Kirovohrad State Pedagogical University (Ukraine). Nadiya had internship for teachers of EFL in the Department of Educational and Cultural Programmes at Shakespeare’s Globe Theater, London, UK (2011). She was the Head of the British Council International Mobility Grant ‘Internalizing Higher Education in Ukraine’, which included 2 internships at the University of Durham, UK (2016). She participated in the internship “Retraining in the Field of Teaching Excellence”, Bayreuth University, Germany (Erasmus + Project (2021) and was a coordinator of the Erasmus+ Project: Innovative Approach to Promotion Teaching Excellence (2021-2022) at Central Ukrainian State University.

Selected Publications

BOOKS

  • Rastrygina, A., Ivanenko, N. (2021). Pedagogy of Freedom in the Paradigmal Space of Modern Education and Upbringing.
  • Ivanenko, N., Liashuk, A. (2021). English Activity Book. Practical Course of English. Kropyvnytskyi.
  • Ivanenko N. (2014). (Edit.) Education in Eastern Europe and Eurasia. London: Bloomsbury.
  • Ivanenko N. (2008). The Concept of Good in English and Ukrainian Language Pictures of the World. Kirovohrad: KOD.
  • Ivanenko N. (2007). Written Practice and Conversation for 1 Year. Kropyvnytskyi.
  • Garkusha, L., Ivanenko, N. (2004). Critical thinking in life skills training. Kirovohrad.

BOOK CHAPTERS

  • Ivanenko, N. (2024). Words and word meanings In The Routledge Companion To English Studies/ by Constant Leung & Jo Lewkowicz. London, UK: Routledge (in publishing).
  • Ivanenko N. (2023). Development of civic education in Ukrainian universities: new challenges of modern realities in the conditions of the transformation of society. In Contemporary Education in Ukraine: Integration into the European Educational Space. Dnipro (pp. 387-412) DOI:36550/978-617-8245-57-3-20
  • Ivanenko N. (2019). Citizenship Education, Moral Fluency and Social and Political Future Challenges. In Polish-Jewish History, Culture, Values, and Education between Paradise and Inferno. Irvine, USA: Brown Walker Press (pp. 93-103)
  • Ivanenko N. (2014). Education Change, Transformation, Reforms – a Regional Overview. In N. Ivanenko (Edit.) Education in Eastern Europe and Eurasia. London: Bloomsbury (pp. 9-45)
  • Ivanenko N. (2013). Vulnerable Children in Ukraine and Educational Response. In M. Matsumoto (Edit.) Education and Disadvantaged Children and Young People. London: Bloomsbury (pp. 95-132)

JOURNAL ARTICLES

  1. Ivanenko, N. (2024). Challenges of Ukrainian Higher Education in Times of War. International Higher Education. The Boston College Centre for International Higher Education, 118, pp. 35-36 https://doi.org/10.36197/IHE.2024.118.17
  2. Ivanenko, N., Paska, T., Irkha, A. Rud, A., & Boguslavskas, L., (2024). The Role of Higher Education for Ensuring National Security in Ukraine. Futurity Education, 4(1), 210-237 https://doi.org/10.57125/FED.2024.03.25.11
  3. Leleka, T., Ivanenko, N., Demeshko, I., Kapitan T., & Demchenko, I. (2024). The Process of English Internationalization in the Ukrainian Educational Paradigm. Slavistica Vilnensis, 68(2), 76-89 doi:10.15388/SlavViln.2023.68(2).6
  4. Ivanenko, N., Rud, A., Hurbanska, A., Cheban, Y., & Syrtseva, S. (2024). Digitalization of Education of the Future – A Trend or a Requirement of the Time? Journal of Higher Education Theory and Practice24(2). DOI: https://doi.org/10.33423/jhetp.v24i2.6791
  5. Ivanenko, N. (2023). Civic character cultivation as a basic virtue within and beyond modern educational institutions. Academic Notes. Series Pedagogical sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 209, 180-185 DOI: https://doi.org/10.36550/2415-7988-2022-1-209-180-185
  6. Rastrygina, A., Ivanenko, N. (2023). A Pedagogy of freedom as a viable basis for implementing gender equality in Ukraine’s educational institutions. International Review of Education, 69(1-2), 143-174. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/s11159-023-09995-9
  7. Ivanenko N., Biletska O., Hurbanska S., Hurbanska, A., & Kochmar, D. (2023). English language morphological neologisms reflecting the war in Ukraine. World Journal of English Language, 13(5), pp. 432-438    DOI: doi:http://dx.doi.org/10.5430/wjel.v13n5p432
  8. Ivanenko, N., Boiko, A., Fedorchuk, L., Panchenko, I., & Marieiev, D. (2023). Development of educational policy in Ukraine in the context of European integration and digital transformation. Revista Eduweb, 17(2), 296-305 DOI: https://doi.org/10.46502/issn.1856-7576/2023.17.02.25
  9. Ivanenko, N.V., Gerasymenko,Yu. A., Kostenko, V.G. (2023). Innovative approaches to the modernization of philological education and science in Ukraine: a response to the challenges of wartime. Akademichni Vizii, (in Ukrainian). URL: https://academy-vision.org/index.php/av/article/view/281 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5281/zenodo.7795088
  10. Ivanenko N. (2022). Phraseological units of the conceptual field MARRIAGE in the English picture of the world. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi: KOD, 202, pp. 140-146
  11. Bilous, O., Mishchenko, A., Datska, T., Ivanenko, N., Kit, L., Piankovska, I., and Vereshchak, Y. (2021). Modern linguistic technologies: strategy of teaching translation studies. Rupkatha Journal on Interdisciplinary Studies in Humanities, 13(4), pp. 1-12 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/21659/rupkatha.v13n4.65
  12. Leleka, T., Ivanenko, N., Moskalenko O., Herasymenko, L., Shevchuk L., Pidlubna, O. (2021). Angloamerican loanwords use in the Ukrainian student slang. Laplage em Revista, 7(Extra-D): University and science: possible dialogues. pp.163-174. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/24115/S2446-622020217Extra-D1081p.163-174
  13. Ivanenko N. (2021). Figurative and valuable component of the MARRIAGE concept. Trends in Science and Practice of Today. Ankara, Turkey, pp. 356-361
  14. Ivanenko N. (2021). Inclusive learning environment for students’ achievements and foreign language development. Priorities in the Development of Science and Education. Budapest, Hungary, pp.74-80
  15. Ivanenko N. (2021). The nominative field of the MARRIAGE concept and the analysis of the synonymous series of its key unit. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi: KOD, 193, pp 218-224 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.36550/2522-4077-2021-1-193-218-224
  16. Ivanenko N. (2020). Language intervention stages in project-based learning. Modern Trends in Foreign Language Professional Training in a Multicultural Space. Kyiv, pp. 249 – 255
  17. Rastrygina, A., Ivanenko, N. (2020). Gender comfortable educational environment as a factor of development of personal freedom. Research Bulletin. Pedagogical Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 188, pp. 28 – 35 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.36550/2415-7988-2020-1-188-28-35
  18. Ivanenko N. (2020). Texting slang as one of the most common groups of everyday youth Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi: KOD, 187, pp. 38-45
  19. Ivanenko N. (2019). Computer use in foreign language Intellectual and Emotional Components of Foreign Language Learning: Latest Trends and Challenges for Higher Education. Kyiv, pp. 152 – 158.
  20. Ivanenko N. (2019). Initial stages of elaborating a project in a foreign language classroom. Science and Society. Hamilton, Canada, pp. 13 – 20.
  21. Ivanenko N. (2019). Project-based learning as a way to incorporate effective foreign language teaching. Research Bulletin. Pedagogical Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 177, pp. 207 – 211
  22. Ivanenko N. (2019). Youth vocabulary as a reflection of changes in modern society. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi: KOD, 175, pp. 34 – 39.
  23. Ivanenko N. (2018). Promoting citizenship education in the English language Proceedings of the IV International Conference. Kyiv, pp. 130 – 137
  24. Ivanenko N. (2018). Educating global citizens at a foreign language class. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, – pp. 494 – 500
  25. Ivanenko N. (2018). Formation of civic values through teaching a foreign language. Proceedings of the II International Conference “Foreign Language in Professional Training of Specialists: Problems and Strategies”. Kropyvnytskyi, pp. 189-191
  26. Ivanenko N. (2017). Citizenship education in the English language classroom. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 154. – pp. 92 – 97
  27. Ivanenko N. (2017). Education for democratic citizenship: teaching virtues and values. Research Bulletin. Pedagogical Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 152, pp. 110-113
  28. Ivanenko N. (2016). Citizenship education as a way to develop moral fluency to solve social and political challenges of the future. Scientific Journal of Ariel University. Israel: Ariel University.
  29. Ivanenko N. (2016). Functioning peculiarities of lexical units of the RESPECT concept in the English language. Proceedings of the International Conference Linguistic and Linguacultural Aspects of Teaching Foreign Languages in Ukrainian Universities”. Dnipropetrovsk, pp. 87-94
  30. Ivanenko N. (2016). Semantic relationships of lexical units of the concept of love in the English language. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, pp. 221-226
  31. Ivanenko N. (2015). Citizenship education as the coordination and integration of educational establishment and community. Research Proceedings of the national UniversityOstrog Academy”. Ostrog, pp. 136-142
  32. Ivanenko N. (2015). The value of citizenship education in practices of student governing body. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 136. pp. 438-442

Louise’s doctoral research investigates how teachers become who they are.

Louise’s work situates the schoolteacher as a particular type of subject, that is both made and makes itself from within a network of power relations. Her study combines Foucauldian theory, Critical Discourse Analysis, and Narrative analysis to provide an account of schoolteachers’ ethical agency in the context of top-down policy practices.

Louise is a Doctoral Teaching Fellow at the Department of Education, where she teaches and supervises students in the MSc in Learning and Teaching course. Currently, Louise is collaborating the OECD in their Globally Teaching InSights project. Her research supports the Schools+ Network aims to fuel an ecosystem of organisations that are driving change in education from the bottom-up.

In March 2023 she presented her preliminary research at the Philosophy of Education Society of Great Britain (PESGB)’s annual conference.

As Honorary Fellow John attends seminars and consults with current staff in Mathematics Education.

During 40 years at the Open University supporting the teaching of mathematics he authored a wide range of papers, and dozens of Open University Books and Teaching materials. He co-authored the classic Thinking Mathematically; Mathematics as a Constructive Activity (with his wife Prof. Anne Watson); Questions and Prompts for Mathematical Thinking & Thinkers (with Anne and other colleagues), among many others.

His research methods are phenomenological, based on the Discipline of Noticing. He is interested in the lived experience of learning, doing and teaching mathematics. He focuses on the structure and form of Attention in the teaching of mathematics, as he supports those who wish to foster and sustain mathematical thinking in others.

He is an Honorary Fellow of BSRLM and ATM, a long-standing member of  the MAA and the  MA.H.

 

Publications

  • Mason, J. (2022). Consequences of a Virtual Encounter with George Pólya. Teaching Mathematics and Computer Science.  20 (2) p173-182.
  • Zazkis, R. Kontorovich, I. & Mason, J. (2021). The Learning and Teaching of Number: paths less travelled through well-trodden terrain. London: Routledge
  • Mason, J. (2021). Learning about Noticing, by, and through, Noticing. ZDM – Mathematics Education. 53(1) p231-243. doi: 10.1007/s11858-020-01192-4
  • Mason, J. & Czarnocha,B. (2021). Aha! Moments, Bisociation and Multifocal Attention. In B. Czarnocha & W. Baker. Creativity of an Aha! Moment and Mathematics Education. Leiden: Brill. p345-361.
  • Mason, J. (2018) Making Distinctions: a phenomenological exploration in mathematics education. In P. Ernest (Ed.). The Philosophy of Mathematics Education Today. ICME-13 Monographs. Springer.
  • Mason, J. (2018). Reflecting on values emerging from practice and the value of reflecting on practice. In D. Rowe & A. Watson (Eds.). Faith and Experience in Education: essays from Quaker perspectives. London: Trentham Books. p63-91.
  • Mason, J. & Metz, M. (2017). Digging Beneath Dual Systems Theory and the Bicameral Brain: abductions about the human psyche from experience in mathematical problem solving. In U. Xolocotzin (Ed.). Understanding Emotions in Mathematical Thinking and Learning. p379-407. Cambridge: Elsevier/Academic Press.
  • Mason, J. (2016). Rising Above a Cause-and-Effect Stance in Mathematics Education Research. JMTE 19(4) p297-300. http://rdcu.be/npTf
  • Mason, J. & Davis, B. (2013). The Importance of Teachers’ Mathematical Awareness for In-The-Moment Pedagogy. CJSMTE 13(2) p182-197.
  • Mason, J. (2012). Noticing: roots and branches. In M. Sherin, V. Jacobs, & R. Phillip (Eds.) Mathematics Teacher Noticing:  Seeing Through Teachers’ Eyes. p35-50. Mahwah: Erlbaum.
  • Mason, J. (2008). Being Mathematical With & In Front of Learners: Attention, Awareness, and Attitude as Sources of Differences between Teacher Educators, Teachers & Learners. In T. Wood (Series Ed.) & B. Jaworski (Vol. Ed.), International Handbook of Mathematics Teacher Education: Vol.4. The Mathematics Teacher Educator as a Developing Professional. Rotterdam, the Netherlands: Sense Publishers, p31-56.
  • Mason, J. & Johnston-Wilder, S. (2006 2nd edition). Designing and Using Mathematical Tasks. St. Albans: Tarquin.
  • Watson, A. & Mason, J. (2006). Seeing an Exercise as a Single Mathematical Object: Using Variation to Structure Sense-Making. Mathematical Thinking and Learning. 8(2) p91-111.
  • Watson, A. & Mason, J. (2005). Mathematics as a Constructive Activity: learners generating examples. Mahwah: Erlbaum.
  • Mason, J. & Johnston-Wilder, S. (2004). Fundamental Constructs in Mathematics Education, RoutledgeFalmer, London.
  • Mason, J. 2003, Structure of Attention in the Learning of Mathematics, in J. Novotná (Ed.) Proceedings, International Symposium on Elementary Mathematics Teaching, Charles University, Prague, p9-16.
  • Mason, J. 2002, Mathematics Teaching Practice: a guidebook for university and college lecturers, Horwood Publishing, Chichester.
  • Mason, J. 2002, Researching Your own Practice: The Discipline of Noticing, RoutledgeFalmer, London.
  • Mason, J. 2001, Modelling Modelling: where is the centre of gravity of-for-when modelling?, in J. Matos, W. Blum, S. Houston & S. Carreira (Eds.) Modelling and Mathematics Education: ICTMA 9 applications in science and technology, Horwood Publishing, Chichester, p39-61.
  • Mason, J. Burton L. & Stacey K. (1982). Thinking Mathematically, Addison Wesley, London

Website

www.pmtheta.com

Mark has worked in ELT and EMI for over 35 years as a teacher, teacher trainer, lecturer, course writer, syllabus designer, examiner, Director of Studies, and consultant editor for OUP. For the British Council he has worked as a consultant trainer and course developer in EMI and EAP. For the University of Oxford Department of Education Mark delivered the ELT option on the MSc ALSLA and is Teaching Associate of the EMI Research Group in which capacity he has worked as a CI and has developed and delivered EMI teacher training courses in China, Serbia and Oxford. Mark has worked in universities in Russia, Ukraine, Kazakhstan, Belarus, Czechia, Italy, Germany, Mexico, Peru, Chile, Brazil, Colombia and Morocco.

He continues to be involved in EMI and is currently co-authoring an EMI student guide.

Mark is an alumnus of the University of Oxford Department of Education and was among the first to be awarded the innovative MSc in Teaching English Language in University Settings.

Anushay is a second-year DPhil student investigating how classroom characteristics are related to Pakistani children’s development. She is supervised by Professor Iram Siraj and Dr Katharina Ereky-Stevens and her work is being supported by the Aga Khan University (Pakistan). Anushay received the Patrice Engle Dissertation Grant Award from the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD) in 2023.

Anushay completed her BSc Psychology from UCL, where she also started her master’s in Developmental Neuroscience and Psychopathology. She was based at Yale University for her master’s thesis, where she worked with Dr Craig Bailey at the Yale Center for Emotional Intelligence to understand children’s emotion development. Anushay also works as a part-time research  assistant at the Developmental Diversity Lab at UCL’s Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience. Anushay’s research interests include understanding child development across different cultures, factors that might be affecting it, and devising culture-specific ways to support children’s holistic development through the educational system. She is also keen on improving the research scope in Pakistan by working with Pakistani researchers, practitioners, and families. Anushay balances her research with her position as the founder of a non-profit, Resources for Children, which aims to understand and support children’s development in Pakistan.

Publications

Journal Articles

  1. Mazhar, A., & Bailey, C., S. (under review). Understanding Children’s Emotion-Specific Biases: How They Relate to Child and Family Factors, Emotion Recognition Accuracy, and Social Behaviour.

Presentations

  1. Mazhar, A., & Bailey, C., S. (2023, March). Understanding Children’s Emotion-Specific Biases: How They Relate to Child-Level Factors and Emotion Recognition Accuracy [Paper Presentation]. Society for Research in Child Development, Salt Lake City, Utah, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2022, April). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Spring Preview, New Haven, United States.
  3. Mazhar, A. (2021, December). Does an extended family improve mentalising in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK & Pakistan. 2nd International Foundation University Conference of Psychology, Rawalpindi, Pakistan.
  4. Mazhar, A. (2020, October). Developing a non-profit to advance autism research in Pakistan. Anna Freud Centre Seminar Series, London, United Kingdom.

Posters

  1. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Theory of Mind in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK and Pakistan. Harvard Trends in Psychology Summit, Cambridge, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Research Rounds, New Haven, United States.

Cindy works at the intersection of learning, design, and technology, with a keen interest in the orchestration of future-ready tech-enabled learning.

She is curious how the deployment of adaptive learning systems to schools will impact classroom learning and hopes to learn more about the human-machine partnership in education. Specifically, her research is concerned with the implications that the use of such systems has on teacher-student interactions, as teachers grapple with balancing personalised learning and learning in community, as well as curriculum demands and student interests. These are some tensions which could potentially be exacerbated by affordances of adaptive learning systems.

Prior to embarking on the DPhil in Education at Oxford, Cindy worked as the Lead Specialist in Technologies for Learning at the Educational Technology Division of Ministry of Education, Singapore. She had previously completed graduate studies at the National University of Singapore and Stanford University where she was awarded Master of Arts in English Studies and Master of Arts in Education.

Reem is DPhil student from Saudi Arabia.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she worked as a Teacher, Professional Developer, then, became a Supervisor and Researcher in the Ministry of Education where she received a scholarship to pursue her DPhil education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests lie in the area of Teacher Education and Professional Learning Policy and Practice.

Publications
  • Alqahtani, Reem (2020). Saudi Universities Role in Developing Teacher Professional Development Programs: Elite Universities Experience. Journal of Educational Sciences. King Saud University.
  • Alqahtani, Reem. (2020). The effect of implementing UDL-based activities in improving EFL learners’ academic achievement and attitudes towards L2. In L. Salas, & E. Ager, Creating Quiet reflective Spaces: Language Teacher Researches Professional Development (pp. 61-62). IATEFL publications.

Lena Zlock is researching the integration of digital technology into structures of teaching, learning, and education in higher education. Her particular focus is on the digital humanities and the potential for digital methods to transform humanistic study. She works with Professor Niall Winters and Dr. James Robson.

Lena’s research interests stem from her education as an M.St. student and Ertegun Graduate Scholar in Modern Languages at the University of Oxford, and as a B.A. student in History at Stanford University. As an undergraduate, she started the Voltaire Library Project, a digitally and data-driven study of the 6,763-book collection of French Enlightenment philosopher Voltaire (you can read more about the project here and here). She has been interested in the application of digital technology to humanistic teaching since her days in Princeton Day School, where she developed an interdisciplinary curriculum on Mexico City (visit the course website here).

Her research on Voltaire led her to think more broadly about the place of digital methods in the humanities classroom, and how new technologies will revolutionise the liberal arts and higher education. As a DPhil candidate, Lena will examine the negotiation and implementation of new learning technologies within the University of Oxford at undergraduate and graduate levels.

Lena is involved in a number of digital humanities initiatives in Oxford. She previously served as the inaugural fellow of the Voltaire Lab at Oxford’s Voltaire Foundation. As a master’s student, Lena co-formulated the convergence agenda for Oxford digital humanities with Professor Howard Hotson, and is currently employed by the Humanities Division to assist with the development of an M.St. degree in Digital Scholarship (read more here). Lena set up and helps to run the History of the Book blog for the Faculty of Medieval and Modern Languages and the Oxford Book History Twitter account.

Lena welcomes inquiries from undergraduate and postgraduate students from Oxford and beyond seeking to get involved with the digital humanities in any capacity. The History of the Book blog also welcomes inquiries from prospective contributors.

 

Abbey is a Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education, in collaboration with the Department of Engineering.

Before joining the DPhil program, Abbey obtained a B.A. in Applied Linguistics with minors in Russian and Chinese from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford. She was the recipient of a Benjamin A. Gilman International Scholarship through U.S. Department of State for study in Russia and was awarded two Foreign Language and Area Studies (FLAS) Fellowships for study in both Russia and China. She holds both TESOL and TEFL certificates and has taught English as a Second Language in various contexts to a wide variety of learner populations.

Abbey’s main research interests lie in the use of technology to facilitate language learning. Her DPhil research focuses on the development of a virtual reality program to bridge the gaps that students face when learning languages through distance learning.

Dr Nadiya Ivanenko is a Visiting Research Fellow in the field of civic education and citizenship linguistics. She is a member of the Applied Linguistics research group and Higher Education research group at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

After receiving PhD in Comparative Linguistics from Kyiv National Linguistic University (2008) Nadiya worked as an Associate Professor of the Germanic Languages and Teaching Methodology Department, Faculty of Ukrainian Philology, Foreign Languages and Social Communications and Vice Dean of the Faculty of Foreign Languages, Central Ukrainian State University, Ukraine.

Nadiya was a Chevening scholar and Postgraduate researcher at the Department of Education, University of Oxford (2003-2004). She was a Co-chair of the joint UNESCO Chair/UNITWIN project ‘Education as a Humanitarian Response’ (2004-2012); a participant of BECA joint project ‘Education for Democracy’ between Montclair State University (USA) and Kirovohrad State Pedagogical University (Ukraine). Nadiya had internship for teachers of EFL in the Department of Educational and Cultural Programmes at Shakespeare’s Globe Theater, London, UK (2011). She was the Head of the British Council International Mobility Grant ‘Internalizing Higher Education in Ukraine’, which included 2 internships at the University of Durham, UK (2016). She participated in the internship “Retraining in the Field of Teaching Excellence”, Bayreuth University, Germany (Erasmus + Project (2021) and was a coordinator of the Erasmus+ Project: Innovative Approach to Promotion Teaching Excellence (2021-2022) at Central Ukrainian State University.

Selected Publications

BOOKS

  • Rastrygina, A., Ivanenko, N. (2021). Pedagogy of Freedom in the Paradigmal Space of Modern Education and Upbringing.
  • Ivanenko, N., Liashuk, A. (2021). English Activity Book. Practical Course of English. Kropyvnytskyi.
  • Ivanenko N. (2014). (Edit.) Education in Eastern Europe and Eurasia. London: Bloomsbury.
  • Ivanenko N. (2008). The Concept of Good in English and Ukrainian Language Pictures of the World. Kirovohrad: KOD.
  • Ivanenko N. (2007). Written Practice and Conversation for 1 Year. Kropyvnytskyi.
  • Garkusha, L., Ivanenko, N. (2004). Critical thinking in life skills training. Kirovohrad.

BOOK CHAPTERS

  • Ivanenko, N. (2024). Words and word meanings In The Routledge Companion To English Studies/ by Constant Leung & Jo Lewkowicz. London, UK: Routledge (in publishing).
  • Ivanenko N. (2023). Development of civic education in Ukrainian universities: new challenges of modern realities in the conditions of the transformation of society. In Contemporary Education in Ukraine: Integration into the European Educational Space. Dnipro (pp. 387-412) DOI:36550/978-617-8245-57-3-20
  • Ivanenko N. (2019). Citizenship Education, Moral Fluency and Social and Political Future Challenges. In Polish-Jewish History, Culture, Values, and Education between Paradise and Inferno. Irvine, USA: Brown Walker Press (pp. 93-103)
  • Ivanenko N. (2014). Education Change, Transformation, Reforms – a Regional Overview. In N. Ivanenko (Edit.) Education in Eastern Europe and Eurasia. London: Bloomsbury (pp. 9-45)
  • Ivanenko N. (2013). Vulnerable Children in Ukraine and Educational Response. In M. Matsumoto (Edit.) Education and Disadvantaged Children and Young People. London: Bloomsbury (pp. 95-132)

JOURNAL ARTICLES

  1. Ivanenko, N. (2024). Challenges of Ukrainian Higher Education in Times of War. International Higher Education. The Boston College Centre for International Higher Education, 118, pp. 35-36 https://doi.org/10.36197/IHE.2024.118.17
  2. Ivanenko, N., Paska, T., Irkha, A. Rud, A., & Boguslavskas, L., (2024). The Role of Higher Education for Ensuring National Security in Ukraine. Futurity Education, 4(1), 210-237 https://doi.org/10.57125/FED.2024.03.25.11
  3. Leleka, T., Ivanenko, N., Demeshko, I., Kapitan T., & Demchenko, I. (2024). The Process of English Internationalization in the Ukrainian Educational Paradigm. Slavistica Vilnensis, 68(2), 76-89 doi:10.15388/SlavViln.2023.68(2).6
  4. Ivanenko, N., Rud, A., Hurbanska, A., Cheban, Y., & Syrtseva, S. (2024). Digitalization of Education of the Future – A Trend or a Requirement of the Time? Journal of Higher Education Theory and Practice24(2). DOI: https://doi.org/10.33423/jhetp.v24i2.6791
  5. Ivanenko, N. (2023). Civic character cultivation as a basic virtue within and beyond modern educational institutions. Academic Notes. Series Pedagogical sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 209, 180-185 DOI: https://doi.org/10.36550/2415-7988-2022-1-209-180-185
  6. Rastrygina, A., Ivanenko, N. (2023). A Pedagogy of freedom as a viable basis for implementing gender equality in Ukraine’s educational institutions. International Review of Education, 69(1-2), 143-174. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/s11159-023-09995-9
  7. Ivanenko N., Biletska O., Hurbanska S., Hurbanska, A., & Kochmar, D. (2023). English language morphological neologisms reflecting the war in Ukraine. World Journal of English Language, 13(5), pp. 432-438    DOI: doi:http://dx.doi.org/10.5430/wjel.v13n5p432
  8. Ivanenko, N., Boiko, A., Fedorchuk, L., Panchenko, I., & Marieiev, D. (2023). Development of educational policy in Ukraine in the context of European integration and digital transformation. Revista Eduweb, 17(2), 296-305 DOI: https://doi.org/10.46502/issn.1856-7576/2023.17.02.25
  9. Ivanenko, N.V., Gerasymenko,Yu. A., Kostenko, V.G. (2023). Innovative approaches to the modernization of philological education and science in Ukraine: a response to the challenges of wartime. Akademichni Vizii, (in Ukrainian). URL: https://academy-vision.org/index.php/av/article/view/281 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5281/zenodo.7795088
  10. Ivanenko N. (2022). Phraseological units of the conceptual field MARRIAGE in the English picture of the world. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi: KOD, 202, pp. 140-146
  11. Bilous, O., Mishchenko, A., Datska, T., Ivanenko, N., Kit, L., Piankovska, I., and Vereshchak, Y. (2021). Modern linguistic technologies: strategy of teaching translation studies. Rupkatha Journal on Interdisciplinary Studies in Humanities, 13(4), pp. 1-12 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/21659/rupkatha.v13n4.65
  12. Leleka, T., Ivanenko, N., Moskalenko O., Herasymenko, L., Shevchuk L., Pidlubna, O. (2021). Angloamerican loanwords use in the Ukrainian student slang. Laplage em Revista, 7(Extra-D): University and science: possible dialogues. pp.163-174. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/24115/S2446-622020217Extra-D1081p.163-174
  13. Ivanenko N. (2021). Figurative and valuable component of the MARRIAGE concept. Trends in Science and Practice of Today. Ankara, Turkey, pp. 356-361
  14. Ivanenko N. (2021). Inclusive learning environment for students’ achievements and foreign language development. Priorities in the Development of Science and Education. Budapest, Hungary, pp.74-80
  15. Ivanenko N. (2021). The nominative field of the MARRIAGE concept and the analysis of the synonymous series of its key unit. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi: KOD, 193, pp 218-224 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.36550/2522-4077-2021-1-193-218-224
  16. Ivanenko N. (2020). Language intervention stages in project-based learning. Modern Trends in Foreign Language Professional Training in a Multicultural Space. Kyiv, pp. 249 – 255
  17. Rastrygina, A., Ivanenko, N. (2020). Gender comfortable educational environment as a factor of development of personal freedom. Research Bulletin. Pedagogical Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 188, pp. 28 – 35 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.36550/2415-7988-2020-1-188-28-35
  18. Ivanenko N. (2020). Texting slang as one of the most common groups of everyday youth Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi: KOD, 187, pp. 38-45
  19. Ivanenko N. (2019). Computer use in foreign language Intellectual and Emotional Components of Foreign Language Learning: Latest Trends and Challenges for Higher Education. Kyiv, pp. 152 – 158.
  20. Ivanenko N. (2019). Initial stages of elaborating a project in a foreign language classroom. Science and Society. Hamilton, Canada, pp. 13 – 20.
  21. Ivanenko N. (2019). Project-based learning as a way to incorporate effective foreign language teaching. Research Bulletin. Pedagogical Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 177, pp. 207 – 211
  22. Ivanenko N. (2019). Youth vocabulary as a reflection of changes in modern society. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi: KOD, 175, pp. 34 – 39.
  23. Ivanenko N. (2018). Promoting citizenship education in the English language Proceedings of the IV International Conference. Kyiv, pp. 130 – 137
  24. Ivanenko N. (2018). Educating global citizens at a foreign language class. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, – pp. 494 – 500
  25. Ivanenko N. (2018). Formation of civic values through teaching a foreign language. Proceedings of the II International Conference “Foreign Language in Professional Training of Specialists: Problems and Strategies”. Kropyvnytskyi, pp. 189-191
  26. Ivanenko N. (2017). Citizenship education in the English language classroom. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 154. – pp. 92 – 97
  27. Ivanenko N. (2017). Education for democratic citizenship: teaching virtues and values. Research Bulletin. Pedagogical Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 152, pp. 110-113
  28. Ivanenko N. (2016). Citizenship education as a way to develop moral fluency to solve social and political challenges of the future. Scientific Journal of Ariel University. Israel: Ariel University.
  29. Ivanenko N. (2016). Functioning peculiarities of lexical units of the RESPECT concept in the English language. Proceedings of the International Conference Linguistic and Linguacultural Aspects of Teaching Foreign Languages in Ukrainian Universities”. Dnipropetrovsk, pp. 87-94
  30. Ivanenko N. (2016). Semantic relationships of lexical units of the concept of love in the English language. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, pp. 221-226
  31. Ivanenko N. (2015). Citizenship education as the coordination and integration of educational establishment and community. Research Proceedings of the national UniversityOstrog Academy”. Ostrog, pp. 136-142
  32. Ivanenko N. (2015). The value of citizenship education in practices of student governing body. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 136. pp. 438-442

Louise’s doctoral research investigates how teachers become who they are.

Louise’s work situates the schoolteacher as a particular type of subject, that is both made and makes itself from within a network of power relations. Her study combines Foucauldian theory, Critical Discourse Analysis, and Narrative analysis to provide an account of schoolteachers’ ethical agency in the context of top-down policy practices.

Louise is a Doctoral Teaching Fellow at the Department of Education, where she teaches and supervises students in the MSc in Learning and Teaching course. Currently, Louise is collaborating the OECD in their Globally Teaching InSights project. Her research supports the Schools+ Network aims to fuel an ecosystem of organisations that are driving change in education from the bottom-up.

In March 2023 she presented her preliminary research at the Philosophy of Education Society of Great Britain (PESGB)’s annual conference.

As Honorary Fellow John attends seminars and consults with current staff in Mathematics Education.

During 40 years at the Open University supporting the teaching of mathematics he authored a wide range of papers, and dozens of Open University Books and Teaching materials. He co-authored the classic Thinking Mathematically; Mathematics as a Constructive Activity (with his wife Prof. Anne Watson); Questions and Prompts for Mathematical Thinking & Thinkers (with Anne and other colleagues), among many others.

His research methods are phenomenological, based on the Discipline of Noticing. He is interested in the lived experience of learning, doing and teaching mathematics. He focuses on the structure and form of Attention in the teaching of mathematics, as he supports those who wish to foster and sustain mathematical thinking in others.

He is an Honorary Fellow of BSRLM and ATM, a long-standing member of  the MAA and the  MA.H.

 

Publications

  • Mason, J. (2022). Consequences of a Virtual Encounter with George Pólya. Teaching Mathematics and Computer Science.  20 (2) p173-182.
  • Zazkis, R. Kontorovich, I. & Mason, J. (2021). The Learning and Teaching of Number: paths less travelled through well-trodden terrain. London: Routledge
  • Mason, J. (2021). Learning about Noticing, by, and through, Noticing. ZDM – Mathematics Education. 53(1) p231-243. doi: 10.1007/s11858-020-01192-4
  • Mason, J. & Czarnocha,B. (2021). Aha! Moments, Bisociation and Multifocal Attention. In B. Czarnocha & W. Baker. Creativity of an Aha! Moment and Mathematics Education. Leiden: Brill. p345-361.
  • Mason, J. (2018) Making Distinctions: a phenomenological exploration in mathematics education. In P. Ernest (Ed.). The Philosophy of Mathematics Education Today. ICME-13 Monographs. Springer.
  • Mason, J. (2018). Reflecting on values emerging from practice and the value of reflecting on practice. In D. Rowe & A. Watson (Eds.). Faith and Experience in Education: essays from Quaker perspectives. London: Trentham Books. p63-91.
  • Mason, J. & Metz, M. (2017). Digging Beneath Dual Systems Theory and the Bicameral Brain: abductions about the human psyche from experience in mathematical problem solving. In U. Xolocotzin (Ed.). Understanding Emotions in Mathematical Thinking and Learning. p379-407. Cambridge: Elsevier/Academic Press.
  • Mason, J. (2016). Rising Above a Cause-and-Effect Stance in Mathematics Education Research. JMTE 19(4) p297-300. http://rdcu.be/npTf
  • Mason, J. & Davis, B. (2013). The Importance of Teachers’ Mathematical Awareness for In-The-Moment Pedagogy. CJSMTE 13(2) p182-197.
  • Mason, J. (2012). Noticing: roots and branches. In M. Sherin, V. Jacobs, & R. Phillip (Eds.) Mathematics Teacher Noticing:  Seeing Through Teachers’ Eyes. p35-50. Mahwah: Erlbaum.
  • Mason, J. (2008). Being Mathematical With & In Front of Learners: Attention, Awareness, and Attitude as Sources of Differences between Teacher Educators, Teachers & Learners. In T. Wood (Series Ed.) & B. Jaworski (Vol. Ed.), International Handbook of Mathematics Teacher Education: Vol.4. The Mathematics Teacher Educator as a Developing Professional. Rotterdam, the Netherlands: Sense Publishers, p31-56.
  • Mason, J. & Johnston-Wilder, S. (2006 2nd edition). Designing and Using Mathematical Tasks. St. Albans: Tarquin.
  • Watson, A. & Mason, J. (2006). Seeing an Exercise as a Single Mathematical Object: Using Variation to Structure Sense-Making. Mathematical Thinking and Learning. 8(2) p91-111.
  • Watson, A. & Mason, J. (2005). Mathematics as a Constructive Activity: learners generating examples. Mahwah: Erlbaum.
  • Mason, J. & Johnston-Wilder, S. (2004). Fundamental Constructs in Mathematics Education, RoutledgeFalmer, London.
  • Mason, J. 2003, Structure of Attention in the Learning of Mathematics, in J. Novotná (Ed.) Proceedings, International Symposium on Elementary Mathematics Teaching, Charles University, Prague, p9-16.
  • Mason, J. 2002, Mathematics Teaching Practice: a guidebook for university and college lecturers, Horwood Publishing, Chichester.
  • Mason, J. 2002, Researching Your own Practice: The Discipline of Noticing, RoutledgeFalmer, London.
  • Mason, J. 2001, Modelling Modelling: where is the centre of gravity of-for-when modelling?, in J. Matos, W. Blum, S. Houston & S. Carreira (Eds.) Modelling and Mathematics Education: ICTMA 9 applications in science and technology, Horwood Publishing, Chichester, p39-61.
  • Mason, J. Burton L. & Stacey K. (1982). Thinking Mathematically, Addison Wesley, London

Website

www.pmtheta.com

Mark has worked in ELT and EMI for over 35 years as a teacher, teacher trainer, lecturer, course writer, syllabus designer, examiner, Director of Studies, and consultant editor for OUP. For the British Council he has worked as a consultant trainer and course developer in EMI and EAP. For the University of Oxford Department of Education Mark delivered the ELT option on the MSc ALSLA and is Teaching Associate of the EMI Research Group in which capacity he has worked as a CI and has developed and delivered EMI teacher training courses in China, Serbia and Oxford. Mark has worked in universities in Russia, Ukraine, Kazakhstan, Belarus, Czechia, Italy, Germany, Mexico, Peru, Chile, Brazil, Colombia and Morocco.

He continues to be involved in EMI and is currently co-authoring an EMI student guide.

Mark is an alumnus of the University of Oxford Department of Education and was among the first to be awarded the innovative MSc in Teaching English Language in University Settings.

Anushay is a second-year DPhil student investigating how classroom characteristics are related to Pakistani children’s development. She is supervised by Professor Iram Siraj and Dr Katharina Ereky-Stevens and her work is being supported by the Aga Khan University (Pakistan). Anushay received the Patrice Engle Dissertation Grant Award from the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD) in 2023.

Anushay completed her BSc Psychology from UCL, where she also started her master’s in Developmental Neuroscience and Psychopathology. She was based at Yale University for her master’s thesis, where she worked with Dr Craig Bailey at the Yale Center for Emotional Intelligence to understand children’s emotion development. Anushay also works as a part-time research  assistant at the Developmental Diversity Lab at UCL’s Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience. Anushay’s research interests include understanding child development across different cultures, factors that might be affecting it, and devising culture-specific ways to support children’s holistic development through the educational system. She is also keen on improving the research scope in Pakistan by working with Pakistani researchers, practitioners, and families. Anushay balances her research with her position as the founder of a non-profit, Resources for Children, which aims to understand and support children’s development in Pakistan.

Publications

Journal Articles

  1. Mazhar, A., & Bailey, C., S. (under review). Understanding Children’s Emotion-Specific Biases: How They Relate to Child and Family Factors, Emotion Recognition Accuracy, and Social Behaviour.

Presentations

  1. Mazhar, A., & Bailey, C., S. (2023, March). Understanding Children’s Emotion-Specific Biases: How They Relate to Child-Level Factors and Emotion Recognition Accuracy [Paper Presentation]. Society for Research in Child Development, Salt Lake City, Utah, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2022, April). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Spring Preview, New Haven, United States.
  3. Mazhar, A. (2021, December). Does an extended family improve mentalising in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK & Pakistan. 2nd International Foundation University Conference of Psychology, Rawalpindi, Pakistan.
  4. Mazhar, A. (2020, October). Developing a non-profit to advance autism research in Pakistan. Anna Freud Centre Seminar Series, London, United Kingdom.

Posters

  1. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Theory of Mind in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK and Pakistan. Harvard Trends in Psychology Summit, Cambridge, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Research Rounds, New Haven, United States.

Cindy works at the intersection of learning, design, and technology, with a keen interest in the orchestration of future-ready tech-enabled learning.

She is curious how the deployment of adaptive learning systems to schools will impact classroom learning and hopes to learn more about the human-machine partnership in education. Specifically, her research is concerned with the implications that the use of such systems has on teacher-student interactions, as teachers grapple with balancing personalised learning and learning in community, as well as curriculum demands and student interests. These are some tensions which could potentially be exacerbated by affordances of adaptive learning systems.

Prior to embarking on the DPhil in Education at Oxford, Cindy worked as the Lead Specialist in Technologies for Learning at the Educational Technology Division of Ministry of Education, Singapore. She had previously completed graduate studies at the National University of Singapore and Stanford University where she was awarded Master of Arts in English Studies and Master of Arts in Education.

Reem is DPhil student from Saudi Arabia.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she worked as a Teacher, Professional Developer, then, became a Supervisor and Researcher in the Ministry of Education where she received a scholarship to pursue her DPhil education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests lie in the area of Teacher Education and Professional Learning Policy and Practice.

Publications
  • Alqahtani, Reem (2020). Saudi Universities Role in Developing Teacher Professional Development Programs: Elite Universities Experience. Journal of Educational Sciences. King Saud University.
  • Alqahtani, Reem. (2020). The effect of implementing UDL-based activities in improving EFL learners’ academic achievement and attitudes towards L2. In L. Salas, & E. Ager, Creating Quiet reflective Spaces: Language Teacher Researches Professional Development (pp. 61-62). IATEFL publications.

Lena Zlock is researching the integration of digital technology into structures of teaching, learning, and education in higher education. Her particular focus is on the digital humanities and the potential for digital methods to transform humanistic study. She works with Professor Niall Winters and Dr. James Robson.

Lena’s research interests stem from her education as an M.St. student and Ertegun Graduate Scholar in Modern Languages at the University of Oxford, and as a B.A. student in History at Stanford University. As an undergraduate, she started the Voltaire Library Project, a digitally and data-driven study of the 6,763-book collection of French Enlightenment philosopher Voltaire (you can read more about the project here and here). She has been interested in the application of digital technology to humanistic teaching since her days in Princeton Day School, where she developed an interdisciplinary curriculum on Mexico City (visit the course website here).

Her research on Voltaire led her to think more broadly about the place of digital methods in the humanities classroom, and how new technologies will revolutionise the liberal arts and higher education. As a DPhil candidate, Lena will examine the negotiation and implementation of new learning technologies within the University of Oxford at undergraduate and graduate levels.

Lena is involved in a number of digital humanities initiatives in Oxford. She previously served as the inaugural fellow of the Voltaire Lab at Oxford’s Voltaire Foundation. As a master’s student, Lena co-formulated the convergence agenda for Oxford digital humanities with Professor Howard Hotson, and is currently employed by the Humanities Division to assist with the development of an M.St. degree in Digital Scholarship (read more here). Lena set up and helps to run the History of the Book blog for the Faculty of Medieval and Modern Languages and the Oxford Book History Twitter account.

Lena welcomes inquiries from undergraduate and postgraduate students from Oxford and beyond seeking to get involved with the digital humanities in any capacity. The History of the Book blog also welcomes inquiries from prospective contributors.

 

Abbey is a Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education, in collaboration with the Department of Engineering.

Before joining the DPhil program, Abbey obtained a B.A. in Applied Linguistics with minors in Russian and Chinese from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford. She was the recipient of a Benjamin A. Gilman International Scholarship through U.S. Department of State for study in Russia and was awarded two Foreign Language and Area Studies (FLAS) Fellowships for study in both Russia and China. She holds both TESOL and TEFL certificates and has taught English as a Second Language in various contexts to a wide variety of learner populations.

Abbey’s main research interests lie in the use of technology to facilitate language learning. Her DPhil research focuses on the development of a virtual reality program to bridge the gaps that students face when learning languages through distance learning.

Dr Nadiya Ivanenko is a Visiting Research Fellow in the field of civic education and citizenship linguistics. She is a member of the Applied Linguistics research group and Higher Education research group at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

After receiving PhD in Comparative Linguistics from Kyiv National Linguistic University (2008) Nadiya worked as an Associate Professor of the Germanic Languages and Teaching Methodology Department, Faculty of Ukrainian Philology, Foreign Languages and Social Communications and Vice Dean of the Faculty of Foreign Languages, Central Ukrainian State University, Ukraine.

Nadiya was a Chevening scholar and Postgraduate researcher at the Department of Education, University of Oxford (2003-2004). She was a Co-chair of the joint UNESCO Chair/UNITWIN project ‘Education as a Humanitarian Response’ (2004-2012); a participant of BECA joint project ‘Education for Democracy’ between Montclair State University (USA) and Kirovohrad State Pedagogical University (Ukraine). Nadiya had internship for teachers of EFL in the Department of Educational and Cultural Programmes at Shakespeare’s Globe Theater, London, UK (2011). She was the Head of the British Council International Mobility Grant ‘Internalizing Higher Education in Ukraine’, which included 2 internships at the University of Durham, UK (2016). She participated in the internship “Retraining in the Field of Teaching Excellence”, Bayreuth University, Germany (Erasmus + Project (2021) and was a coordinator of the Erasmus+ Project: Innovative Approach to Promotion Teaching Excellence (2021-2022) at Central Ukrainian State University.

Selected Publications

BOOKS

  • Rastrygina, A., Ivanenko, N. (2021). Pedagogy of Freedom in the Paradigmal Space of Modern Education and Upbringing.
  • Ivanenko, N., Liashuk, A. (2021). English Activity Book. Practical Course of English. Kropyvnytskyi.
  • Ivanenko N. (2014). (Edit.) Education in Eastern Europe and Eurasia. London: Bloomsbury.
  • Ivanenko N. (2008). The Concept of Good in English and Ukrainian Language Pictures of the World. Kirovohrad: KOD.
  • Ivanenko N. (2007). Written Practice and Conversation for 1 Year. Kropyvnytskyi.
  • Garkusha, L., Ivanenko, N. (2004). Critical thinking in life skills training. Kirovohrad.

BOOK CHAPTERS

  • Ivanenko, N. (2024). Words and word meanings In The Routledge Companion To English Studies/ by Constant Leung & Jo Lewkowicz. London, UK: Routledge (in publishing).
  • Ivanenko N. (2023). Development of civic education in Ukrainian universities: new challenges of modern realities in the conditions of the transformation of society. In Contemporary Education in Ukraine: Integration into the European Educational Space. Dnipro (pp. 387-412) DOI:36550/978-617-8245-57-3-20
  • Ivanenko N. (2019). Citizenship Education, Moral Fluency and Social and Political Future Challenges. In Polish-Jewish History, Culture, Values, and Education between Paradise and Inferno. Irvine, USA: Brown Walker Press (pp. 93-103)
  • Ivanenko N. (2014). Education Change, Transformation, Reforms – a Regional Overview. In N. Ivanenko (Edit.) Education in Eastern Europe and Eurasia. London: Bloomsbury (pp. 9-45)
  • Ivanenko N. (2013). Vulnerable Children in Ukraine and Educational Response. In M. Matsumoto (Edit.) Education and Disadvantaged Children and Young People. London: Bloomsbury (pp. 95-132)

JOURNAL ARTICLES

  1. Ivanenko, N. (2024). Challenges of Ukrainian Higher Education in Times of War. International Higher Education. The Boston College Centre for International Higher Education, 118, pp. 35-36 https://doi.org/10.36197/IHE.2024.118.17
  2. Ivanenko, N., Paska, T., Irkha, A. Rud, A., & Boguslavskas, L., (2024). The Role of Higher Education for Ensuring National Security in Ukraine. Futurity Education, 4(1), 210-237 https://doi.org/10.57125/FED.2024.03.25.11
  3. Leleka, T., Ivanenko, N., Demeshko, I., Kapitan T., & Demchenko, I. (2024). The Process of English Internationalization in the Ukrainian Educational Paradigm. Slavistica Vilnensis, 68(2), 76-89 doi:10.15388/SlavViln.2023.68(2).6
  4. Ivanenko, N., Rud, A., Hurbanska, A., Cheban, Y., & Syrtseva, S. (2024). Digitalization of Education of the Future – A Trend or a Requirement of the Time? Journal of Higher Education Theory and Practice24(2). DOI: https://doi.org/10.33423/jhetp.v24i2.6791
  5. Ivanenko, N. (2023). Civic character cultivation as a basic virtue within and beyond modern educational institutions. Academic Notes. Series Pedagogical sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 209, 180-185 DOI: https://doi.org/10.36550/2415-7988-2022-1-209-180-185
  6. Rastrygina, A., Ivanenko, N. (2023). A Pedagogy of freedom as a viable basis for implementing gender equality in Ukraine’s educational institutions. International Review of Education, 69(1-2), 143-174. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/s11159-023-09995-9
  7. Ivanenko N., Biletska O., Hurbanska S., Hurbanska, A., & Kochmar, D. (2023). English language morphological neologisms reflecting the war in Ukraine. World Journal of English Language, 13(5), pp. 432-438    DOI: doi:http://dx.doi.org/10.5430/wjel.v13n5p432
  8. Ivanenko, N., Boiko, A., Fedorchuk, L., Panchenko, I., & Marieiev, D. (2023). Development of educational policy in Ukraine in the context of European integration and digital transformation. Revista Eduweb, 17(2), 296-305 DOI: https://doi.org/10.46502/issn.1856-7576/2023.17.02.25
  9. Ivanenko, N.V., Gerasymenko,Yu. A., Kostenko, V.G. (2023). Innovative approaches to the modernization of philological education and science in Ukraine: a response to the challenges of wartime. Akademichni Vizii, (in Ukrainian). URL: https://academy-vision.org/index.php/av/article/view/281 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5281/zenodo.7795088
  10. Ivanenko N. (2022). Phraseological units of the conceptual field MARRIAGE in the English picture of the world. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi: KOD, 202, pp. 140-146
  11. Bilous, O., Mishchenko, A., Datska, T., Ivanenko, N., Kit, L., Piankovska, I., and Vereshchak, Y. (2021). Modern linguistic technologies: strategy of teaching translation studies. Rupkatha Journal on Interdisciplinary Studies in Humanities, 13(4), pp. 1-12 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/21659/rupkatha.v13n4.65
  12. Leleka, T., Ivanenko, N., Moskalenko O., Herasymenko, L., Shevchuk L., Pidlubna, O. (2021). Angloamerican loanwords use in the Ukrainian student slang. Laplage em Revista, 7(Extra-D): University and science: possible dialogues. pp.163-174. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/24115/S2446-622020217Extra-D1081p.163-174
  13. Ivanenko N. (2021). Figurative and valuable component of the MARRIAGE concept. Trends in Science and Practice of Today. Ankara, Turkey, pp. 356-361
  14. Ivanenko N. (2021). Inclusive learning environment for students’ achievements and foreign language development. Priorities in the Development of Science and Education. Budapest, Hungary, pp.74-80
  15. Ivanenko N. (2021). The nominative field of the MARRIAGE concept and the analysis of the synonymous series of its key unit. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi: KOD, 193, pp 218-224 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.36550/2522-4077-2021-1-193-218-224
  16. Ivanenko N. (2020). Language intervention stages in project-based learning. Modern Trends in Foreign Language Professional Training in a Multicultural Space. Kyiv, pp. 249 – 255
  17. Rastrygina, A., Ivanenko, N. (2020). Gender comfortable educational environment as a factor of development of personal freedom. Research Bulletin. Pedagogical Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 188, pp. 28 – 35 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.36550/2415-7988-2020-1-188-28-35
  18. Ivanenko N. (2020). Texting slang as one of the most common groups of everyday youth Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi: KOD, 187, pp. 38-45
  19. Ivanenko N. (2019). Computer use in foreign language Intellectual and Emotional Components of Foreign Language Learning: Latest Trends and Challenges for Higher Education. Kyiv, pp. 152 – 158.
  20. Ivanenko N. (2019). Initial stages of elaborating a project in a foreign language classroom. Science and Society. Hamilton, Canada, pp. 13 – 20.
  21. Ivanenko N. (2019). Project-based learning as a way to incorporate effective foreign language teaching. Research Bulletin. Pedagogical Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 177, pp. 207 – 211
  22. Ivanenko N. (2019). Youth vocabulary as a reflection of changes in modern society. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi: KOD, 175, pp. 34 – 39.
  23. Ivanenko N. (2018). Promoting citizenship education in the English language Proceedings of the IV International Conference. Kyiv, pp. 130 – 137
  24. Ivanenko N. (2018). Educating global citizens at a foreign language class. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, – pp. 494 – 500
  25. Ivanenko N. (2018). Formation of civic values through teaching a foreign language. Proceedings of the II International Conference “Foreign Language in Professional Training of Specialists: Problems and Strategies”. Kropyvnytskyi, pp. 189-191
  26. Ivanenko N. (2017). Citizenship education in the English language classroom. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 154. – pp. 92 – 97
  27. Ivanenko N. (2017). Education for democratic citizenship: teaching virtues and values. Research Bulletin. Pedagogical Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 152, pp. 110-113
  28. Ivanenko N. (2016). Citizenship education as a way to develop moral fluency to solve social and political challenges of the future. Scientific Journal of Ariel University. Israel: Ariel University.
  29. Ivanenko N. (2016). Functioning peculiarities of lexical units of the RESPECT concept in the English language. Proceedings of the International Conference Linguistic and Linguacultural Aspects of Teaching Foreign Languages in Ukrainian Universities”. Dnipropetrovsk, pp. 87-94
  30. Ivanenko N. (2016). Semantic relationships of lexical units of the concept of love in the English language. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, pp. 221-226
  31. Ivanenko N. (2015). Citizenship education as the coordination and integration of educational establishment and community. Research Proceedings of the national UniversityOstrog Academy”. Ostrog, pp. 136-142
  32. Ivanenko N. (2015). The value of citizenship education in practices of student governing body. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 136. pp. 438-442

Louise’s doctoral research investigates how teachers become who they are.

Louise’s work situates the schoolteacher as a particular type of subject, that is both made and makes itself from within a network of power relations. Her study combines Foucauldian theory, Critical Discourse Analysis, and Narrative analysis to provide an account of schoolteachers’ ethical agency in the context of top-down policy practices.

Louise is a Doctoral Teaching Fellow at the Department of Education, where she teaches and supervises students in the MSc in Learning and Teaching course. Currently, Louise is collaborating the OECD in their Globally Teaching InSights project. Her research supports the Schools+ Network aims to fuel an ecosystem of organisations that are driving change in education from the bottom-up.

In March 2023 she presented her preliminary research at the Philosophy of Education Society of Great Britain (PESGB)’s annual conference.

As Honorary Fellow John attends seminars and consults with current staff in Mathematics Education.

During 40 years at the Open University supporting the teaching of mathematics he authored a wide range of papers, and dozens of Open University Books and Teaching materials. He co-authored the classic Thinking Mathematically; Mathematics as a Constructive Activity (with his wife Prof. Anne Watson); Questions and Prompts for Mathematical Thinking & Thinkers (with Anne and other colleagues), among many others.

His research methods are phenomenological, based on the Discipline of Noticing. He is interested in the lived experience of learning, doing and teaching mathematics. He focuses on the structure and form of Attention in the teaching of mathematics, as he supports those who wish to foster and sustain mathematical thinking in others.

He is an Honorary Fellow of BSRLM and ATM, a long-standing member of  the MAA and the  MA.H.

 

Publications

  • Mason, J. (2022). Consequences of a Virtual Encounter with George Pólya. Teaching Mathematics and Computer Science.  20 (2) p173-182.
  • Zazkis, R. Kontorovich, I. & Mason, J. (2021). The Learning and Teaching of Number: paths less travelled through well-trodden terrain. London: Routledge
  • Mason, J. (2021). Learning about Noticing, by, and through, Noticing. ZDM – Mathematics Education. 53(1) p231-243. doi: 10.1007/s11858-020-01192-4
  • Mason, J. & Czarnocha,B. (2021). Aha! Moments, Bisociation and Multifocal Attention. In B. Czarnocha & W. Baker. Creativity of an Aha! Moment and Mathematics Education. Leiden: Brill. p345-361.
  • Mason, J. (2018) Making Distinctions: a phenomenological exploration in mathematics education. In P. Ernest (Ed.). The Philosophy of Mathematics Education Today. ICME-13 Monographs. Springer.
  • Mason, J. (2018). Reflecting on values emerging from practice and the value of reflecting on practice. In D. Rowe & A. Watson (Eds.). Faith and Experience in Education: essays from Quaker perspectives. London: Trentham Books. p63-91.
  • Mason, J. & Metz, M. (2017). Digging Beneath Dual Systems Theory and the Bicameral Brain: abductions about the human psyche from experience in mathematical problem solving. In U. Xolocotzin (Ed.). Understanding Emotions in Mathematical Thinking and Learning. p379-407. Cambridge: Elsevier/Academic Press.
  • Mason, J. (2016). Rising Above a Cause-and-Effect Stance in Mathematics Education Research. JMTE 19(4) p297-300. http://rdcu.be/npTf
  • Mason, J. & Davis, B. (2013). The Importance of Teachers’ Mathematical Awareness for In-The-Moment Pedagogy. CJSMTE 13(2) p182-197.
  • Mason, J. (2012). Noticing: roots and branches. In M. Sherin, V. Jacobs, & R. Phillip (Eds.) Mathematics Teacher Noticing:  Seeing Through Teachers’ Eyes. p35-50. Mahwah: Erlbaum.
  • Mason, J. (2008). Being Mathematical With & In Front of Learners: Attention, Awareness, and Attitude as Sources of Differences between Teacher Educators, Teachers & Learners. In T. Wood (Series Ed.) & B. Jaworski (Vol. Ed.), International Handbook of Mathematics Teacher Education: Vol.4. The Mathematics Teacher Educator as a Developing Professional. Rotterdam, the Netherlands: Sense Publishers, p31-56.
  • Mason, J. & Johnston-Wilder, S. (2006 2nd edition). Designing and Using Mathematical Tasks. St. Albans: Tarquin.
  • Watson, A. & Mason, J. (2006). Seeing an Exercise as a Single Mathematical Object: Using Variation to Structure Sense-Making. Mathematical Thinking and Learning. 8(2) p91-111.
  • Watson, A. & Mason, J. (2005). Mathematics as a Constructive Activity: learners generating examples. Mahwah: Erlbaum.
  • Mason, J. & Johnston-Wilder, S. (2004). Fundamental Constructs in Mathematics Education, RoutledgeFalmer, London.
  • Mason, J. 2003, Structure of Attention in the Learning of Mathematics, in J. Novotná (Ed.) Proceedings, International Symposium on Elementary Mathematics Teaching, Charles University, Prague, p9-16.
  • Mason, J. 2002, Mathematics Teaching Practice: a guidebook for university and college lecturers, Horwood Publishing, Chichester.
  • Mason, J. 2002, Researching Your own Practice: The Discipline of Noticing, RoutledgeFalmer, London.
  • Mason, J. 2001, Modelling Modelling: where is the centre of gravity of-for-when modelling?, in J. Matos, W. Blum, S. Houston & S. Carreira (Eds.) Modelling and Mathematics Education: ICTMA 9 applications in science and technology, Horwood Publishing, Chichester, p39-61.
  • Mason, J. Burton L. & Stacey K. (1982). Thinking Mathematically, Addison Wesley, London

Website

www.pmtheta.com

Mark has worked in ELT and EMI for over 35 years as a teacher, teacher trainer, lecturer, course writer, syllabus designer, examiner, Director of Studies, and consultant editor for OUP. For the British Council he has worked as a consultant trainer and course developer in EMI and EAP. For the University of Oxford Department of Education Mark delivered the ELT option on the MSc ALSLA and is Teaching Associate of the EMI Research Group in which capacity he has worked as a CI and has developed and delivered EMI teacher training courses in China, Serbia and Oxford. Mark has worked in universities in Russia, Ukraine, Kazakhstan, Belarus, Czechia, Italy, Germany, Mexico, Peru, Chile, Brazil, Colombia and Morocco.

He continues to be involved in EMI and is currently co-authoring an EMI student guide.

Mark is an alumnus of the University of Oxford Department of Education and was among the first to be awarded the innovative MSc in Teaching English Language in University Settings.

Anushay is a second-year DPhil student investigating how classroom characteristics are related to Pakistani children’s development. She is supervised by Professor Iram Siraj and Dr Katharina Ereky-Stevens and her work is being supported by the Aga Khan University (Pakistan). Anushay received the Patrice Engle Dissertation Grant Award from the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD) in 2023.

Anushay completed her BSc Psychology from UCL, where she also started her master’s in Developmental Neuroscience and Psychopathology. She was based at Yale University for her master’s thesis, where she worked with Dr Craig Bailey at the Yale Center for Emotional Intelligence to understand children’s emotion development. Anushay also works as a part-time research  assistant at the Developmental Diversity Lab at UCL’s Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience. Anushay’s research interests include understanding child development across different cultures, factors that might be affecting it, and devising culture-specific ways to support children’s holistic development through the educational system. She is also keen on improving the research scope in Pakistan by working with Pakistani researchers, practitioners, and families. Anushay balances her research with her position as the founder of a non-profit, Resources for Children, which aims to understand and support children’s development in Pakistan.

Publications

Journal Articles

  1. Mazhar, A., & Bailey, C., S. (under review). Understanding Children’s Emotion-Specific Biases: How They Relate to Child and Family Factors, Emotion Recognition Accuracy, and Social Behaviour.

Presentations

  1. Mazhar, A., & Bailey, C., S. (2023, March). Understanding Children’s Emotion-Specific Biases: How They Relate to Child-Level Factors and Emotion Recognition Accuracy [Paper Presentation]. Society for Research in Child Development, Salt Lake City, Utah, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2022, April). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Spring Preview, New Haven, United States.
  3. Mazhar, A. (2021, December). Does an extended family improve mentalising in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK & Pakistan. 2nd International Foundation University Conference of Psychology, Rawalpindi, Pakistan.
  4. Mazhar, A. (2020, October). Developing a non-profit to advance autism research in Pakistan. Anna Freud Centre Seminar Series, London, United Kingdom.

Posters

  1. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Theory of Mind in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK and Pakistan. Harvard Trends in Psychology Summit, Cambridge, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Research Rounds, New Haven, United States.

Cindy works at the intersection of learning, design, and technology, with a keen interest in the orchestration of future-ready tech-enabled learning.

She is curious how the deployment of adaptive learning systems to schools will impact classroom learning and hopes to learn more about the human-machine partnership in education. Specifically, her research is concerned with the implications that the use of such systems has on teacher-student interactions, as teachers grapple with balancing personalised learning and learning in community, as well as curriculum demands and student interests. These are some tensions which could potentially be exacerbated by affordances of adaptive learning systems.

Prior to embarking on the DPhil in Education at Oxford, Cindy worked as the Lead Specialist in Technologies for Learning at the Educational Technology Division of Ministry of Education, Singapore. She had previously completed graduate studies at the National University of Singapore and Stanford University where she was awarded Master of Arts in English Studies and Master of Arts in Education.

Reem is DPhil student from Saudi Arabia.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she worked as a Teacher, Professional Developer, then, became a Supervisor and Researcher in the Ministry of Education where she received a scholarship to pursue her DPhil education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests lie in the area of Teacher Education and Professional Learning Policy and Practice.

Publications
  • Alqahtani, Reem (2020). Saudi Universities Role in Developing Teacher Professional Development Programs: Elite Universities Experience. Journal of Educational Sciences. King Saud University.
  • Alqahtani, Reem. (2020). The effect of implementing UDL-based activities in improving EFL learners’ academic achievement and attitudes towards L2. In L. Salas, & E. Ager, Creating Quiet reflective Spaces: Language Teacher Researches Professional Development (pp. 61-62). IATEFL publications.

Lena Zlock is researching the integration of digital technology into structures of teaching, learning, and education in higher education. Her particular focus is on the digital humanities and the potential for digital methods to transform humanistic study. She works with Professor Niall Winters and Dr. James Robson.

Lena’s research interests stem from her education as an M.St. student and Ertegun Graduate Scholar in Modern Languages at the University of Oxford, and as a B.A. student in History at Stanford University. As an undergraduate, she started the Voltaire Library Project, a digitally and data-driven study of the 6,763-book collection of French Enlightenment philosopher Voltaire (you can read more about the project here and here). She has been interested in the application of digital technology to humanistic teaching since her days in Princeton Day School, where she developed an interdisciplinary curriculum on Mexico City (visit the course website here).

Her research on Voltaire led her to think more broadly about the place of digital methods in the humanities classroom, and how new technologies will revolutionise the liberal arts and higher education. As a DPhil candidate, Lena will examine the negotiation and implementation of new learning technologies within the University of Oxford at undergraduate and graduate levels.

Lena is involved in a number of digital humanities initiatives in Oxford. She previously served as the inaugural fellow of the Voltaire Lab at Oxford’s Voltaire Foundation. As a master’s student, Lena co-formulated the convergence agenda for Oxford digital humanities with Professor Howard Hotson, and is currently employed by the Humanities Division to assist with the development of an M.St. degree in Digital Scholarship (read more here). Lena set up and helps to run the History of the Book blog for the Faculty of Medieval and Modern Languages and the Oxford Book History Twitter account.

Lena welcomes inquiries from undergraduate and postgraduate students from Oxford and beyond seeking to get involved with the digital humanities in any capacity. The History of the Book blog also welcomes inquiries from prospective contributors.

 

Abbey is a Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education, in collaboration with the Department of Engineering.

Before joining the DPhil program, Abbey obtained a B.A. in Applied Linguistics with minors in Russian and Chinese from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford. She was the recipient of a Benjamin A. Gilman International Scholarship through U.S. Department of State for study in Russia and was awarded two Foreign Language and Area Studies (FLAS) Fellowships for study in both Russia and China. She holds both TESOL and TEFL certificates and has taught English as a Second Language in various contexts to a wide variety of learner populations.

Abbey’s main research interests lie in the use of technology to facilitate language learning. Her DPhil research focuses on the development of a virtual reality program to bridge the gaps that students face when learning languages through distance learning.

Dr Nadiya Ivanenko is a Visiting Research Fellow in the field of civic education and citizenship linguistics. She is a member of the Applied Linguistics research group and Higher Education research group at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

After receiving PhD in Comparative Linguistics from Kyiv National Linguistic University (2008) Nadiya worked as an Associate Professor of the Germanic Languages and Teaching Methodology Department, Faculty of Ukrainian Philology, Foreign Languages and Social Communications and Vice Dean of the Faculty of Foreign Languages, Central Ukrainian State University, Ukraine.

Nadiya was a Chevening scholar and Postgraduate researcher at the Department of Education, University of Oxford (2003-2004). She was a Co-chair of the joint UNESCO Chair/UNITWIN project ‘Education as a Humanitarian Response’ (2004-2012); a participant of BECA joint project ‘Education for Democracy’ between Montclair State University (USA) and Kirovohrad State Pedagogical University (Ukraine). Nadiya had internship for teachers of EFL in the Department of Educational and Cultural Programmes at Shakespeare’s Globe Theater, London, UK (2011). She was the Head of the British Council International Mobility Grant ‘Internalizing Higher Education in Ukraine’, which included 2 internships at the University of Durham, UK (2016). She participated in the internship “Retraining in the Field of Teaching Excellence”, Bayreuth University, Germany (Erasmus + Project (2021) and was a coordinator of the Erasmus+ Project: Innovative Approach to Promotion Teaching Excellence (2021-2022) at Central Ukrainian State University.

Selected Publications

BOOKS

  • Rastrygina, A., Ivanenko, N. (2021). Pedagogy of Freedom in the Paradigmal Space of Modern Education and Upbringing.
  • Ivanenko, N., Liashuk, A. (2021). English Activity Book. Practical Course of English. Kropyvnytskyi.
  • Ivanenko N. (2014). (Edit.) Education in Eastern Europe and Eurasia. London: Bloomsbury.
  • Ivanenko N. (2008). The Concept of Good in English and Ukrainian Language Pictures of the World. Kirovohrad: KOD.
  • Ivanenko N. (2007). Written Practice and Conversation for 1 Year. Kropyvnytskyi.
  • Garkusha, L., Ivanenko, N. (2004). Critical thinking in life skills training. Kirovohrad.

BOOK CHAPTERS

  • Ivanenko, N. (2024). Words and word meanings In The Routledge Companion To English Studies/ by Constant Leung & Jo Lewkowicz. London, UK: Routledge (in publishing).
  • Ivanenko N. (2023). Development of civic education in Ukrainian universities: new challenges of modern realities in the conditions of the transformation of society. In Contemporary Education in Ukraine: Integration into the European Educational Space. Dnipro (pp. 387-412) DOI:36550/978-617-8245-57-3-20
  • Ivanenko N. (2019). Citizenship Education, Moral Fluency and Social and Political Future Challenges. In Polish-Jewish History, Culture, Values, and Education between Paradise and Inferno. Irvine, USA: Brown Walker Press (pp. 93-103)
  • Ivanenko N. (2014). Education Change, Transformation, Reforms – a Regional Overview. In N. Ivanenko (Edit.) Education in Eastern Europe and Eurasia. London: Bloomsbury (pp. 9-45)
  • Ivanenko N. (2013). Vulnerable Children in Ukraine and Educational Response. In M. Matsumoto (Edit.) Education and Disadvantaged Children and Young People. London: Bloomsbury (pp. 95-132)

JOURNAL ARTICLES

  1. Ivanenko, N. (2024). Challenges of Ukrainian Higher Education in Times of War. International Higher Education. The Boston College Centre for International Higher Education, 118, pp. 35-36 https://doi.org/10.36197/IHE.2024.118.17
  2. Ivanenko, N., Paska, T., Irkha, A. Rud, A., & Boguslavskas, L., (2024). The Role of Higher Education for Ensuring National Security in Ukraine. Futurity Education, 4(1), 210-237 https://doi.org/10.57125/FED.2024.03.25.11
  3. Leleka, T., Ivanenko, N., Demeshko, I., Kapitan T., & Demchenko, I. (2024). The Process of English Internationalization in the Ukrainian Educational Paradigm. Slavistica Vilnensis, 68(2), 76-89 doi:10.15388/SlavViln.2023.68(2).6
  4. Ivanenko, N., Rud, A., Hurbanska, A., Cheban, Y., & Syrtseva, S. (2024). Digitalization of Education of the Future – A Trend or a Requirement of the Time? Journal of Higher Education Theory and Practice24(2). DOI: https://doi.org/10.33423/jhetp.v24i2.6791
  5. Ivanenko, N. (2023). Civic character cultivation as a basic virtue within and beyond modern educational institutions. Academic Notes. Series Pedagogical sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 209, 180-185 DOI: https://doi.org/10.36550/2415-7988-2022-1-209-180-185
  6. Rastrygina, A., Ivanenko, N. (2023). A Pedagogy of freedom as a viable basis for implementing gender equality in Ukraine’s educational institutions. International Review of Education, 69(1-2), 143-174. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/s11159-023-09995-9
  7. Ivanenko N., Biletska O., Hurbanska S., Hurbanska, A., & Kochmar, D. (2023). English language morphological neologisms reflecting the war in Ukraine. World Journal of English Language, 13(5), pp. 432-438    DOI: doi:http://dx.doi.org/10.5430/wjel.v13n5p432
  8. Ivanenko, N., Boiko, A., Fedorchuk, L., Panchenko, I., & Marieiev, D. (2023). Development of educational policy in Ukraine in the context of European integration and digital transformation. Revista Eduweb, 17(2), 296-305 DOI: https://doi.org/10.46502/issn.1856-7576/2023.17.02.25
  9. Ivanenko, N.V., Gerasymenko,Yu. A., Kostenko, V.G. (2023). Innovative approaches to the modernization of philological education and science in Ukraine: a response to the challenges of wartime. Akademichni Vizii, (in Ukrainian). URL: https://academy-vision.org/index.php/av/article/view/281 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5281/zenodo.7795088
  10. Ivanenko N. (2022). Phraseological units of the conceptual field MARRIAGE in the English picture of the world. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi: KOD, 202, pp. 140-146
  11. Bilous, O., Mishchenko, A., Datska, T., Ivanenko, N., Kit, L., Piankovska, I., and Vereshchak, Y. (2021). Modern linguistic technologies: strategy of teaching translation studies. Rupkatha Journal on Interdisciplinary Studies in Humanities, 13(4), pp. 1-12 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/21659/rupkatha.v13n4.65
  12. Leleka, T., Ivanenko, N., Moskalenko O., Herasymenko, L., Shevchuk L., Pidlubna, O. (2021). Angloamerican loanwords use in the Ukrainian student slang. Laplage em Revista, 7(Extra-D): University and science: possible dialogues. pp.163-174. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/24115/S2446-622020217Extra-D1081p.163-174
  13. Ivanenko N. (2021). Figurative and valuable component of the MARRIAGE concept. Trends in Science and Practice of Today. Ankara, Turkey, pp. 356-361
  14. Ivanenko N. (2021). Inclusive learning environment for students’ achievements and foreign language development. Priorities in the Development of Science and Education. Budapest, Hungary, pp.74-80
  15. Ivanenko N. (2021). The nominative field of the MARRIAGE concept and the analysis of the synonymous series of its key unit. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi: KOD, 193, pp 218-224 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.36550/2522-4077-2021-1-193-218-224
  16. Ivanenko N. (2020). Language intervention stages in project-based learning. Modern Trends in Foreign Language Professional Training in a Multicultural Space. Kyiv, pp. 249 – 255
  17. Rastrygina, A., Ivanenko, N. (2020). Gender comfortable educational environment as a factor of development of personal freedom. Research Bulletin. Pedagogical Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 188, pp. 28 – 35 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.36550/2415-7988-2020-1-188-28-35
  18. Ivanenko N. (2020). Texting slang as one of the most common groups of everyday youth Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi: KOD, 187, pp. 38-45
  19. Ivanenko N. (2019). Computer use in foreign language Intellectual and Emotional Components of Foreign Language Learning: Latest Trends and Challenges for Higher Education. Kyiv, pp. 152 – 158.
  20. Ivanenko N. (2019). Initial stages of elaborating a project in a foreign language classroom. Science and Society. Hamilton, Canada, pp. 13 – 20.
  21. Ivanenko N. (2019). Project-based learning as a way to incorporate effective foreign language teaching. Research Bulletin. Pedagogical Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 177, pp. 207 – 211
  22. Ivanenko N. (2019). Youth vocabulary as a reflection of changes in modern society. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi: KOD, 175, pp. 34 – 39.
  23. Ivanenko N. (2018). Promoting citizenship education in the English language Proceedings of the IV International Conference. Kyiv, pp. 130 – 137
  24. Ivanenko N. (2018). Educating global citizens at a foreign language class. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, – pp. 494 – 500
  25. Ivanenko N. (2018). Formation of civic values through teaching a foreign language. Proceedings of the II International Conference “Foreign Language in Professional Training of Specialists: Problems and Strategies”. Kropyvnytskyi, pp. 189-191
  26. Ivanenko N. (2017). Citizenship education in the English language classroom. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 154. – pp. 92 – 97
  27. Ivanenko N. (2017). Education for democratic citizenship: teaching virtues and values. Research Bulletin. Pedagogical Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 152, pp. 110-113
  28. Ivanenko N. (2016). Citizenship education as a way to develop moral fluency to solve social and political challenges of the future. Scientific Journal of Ariel University. Israel: Ariel University.
  29. Ivanenko N. (2016). Functioning peculiarities of lexical units of the RESPECT concept in the English language. Proceedings of the International Conference Linguistic and Linguacultural Aspects of Teaching Foreign Languages in Ukrainian Universities”. Dnipropetrovsk, pp. 87-94
  30. Ivanenko N. (2016). Semantic relationships of lexical units of the concept of love in the English language. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, pp. 221-226
  31. Ivanenko N. (2015). Citizenship education as the coordination and integration of educational establishment and community. Research Proceedings of the national UniversityOstrog Academy”. Ostrog, pp. 136-142
  32. Ivanenko N. (2015). The value of citizenship education in practices of student governing body. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 136. pp. 438-442

Louise’s doctoral research investigates how teachers become who they are.

Louise’s work situates the schoolteacher as a particular type of subject, that is both made and makes itself from within a network of power relations. Her study combines Foucauldian theory, Critical Discourse Analysis, and Narrative analysis to provide an account of schoolteachers’ ethical agency in the context of top-down policy practices.

Louise is a Doctoral Teaching Fellow at the Department of Education, where she teaches and supervises students in the MSc in Learning and Teaching course. Currently, Louise is collaborating the OECD in their Globally Teaching InSights project. Her research supports the Schools+ Network aims to fuel an ecosystem of organisations that are driving change in education from the bottom-up.

In March 2023 she presented her preliminary research at the Philosophy of Education Society of Great Britain (PESGB)’s annual conference.

As Honorary Fellow John attends seminars and consults with current staff in Mathematics Education.

During 40 years at the Open University supporting the teaching of mathematics he authored a wide range of papers, and dozens of Open University Books and Teaching materials. He co-authored the classic Thinking Mathematically; Mathematics as a Constructive Activity (with his wife Prof. Anne Watson); Questions and Prompts for Mathematical Thinking & Thinkers (with Anne and other colleagues), among many others.

His research methods are phenomenological, based on the Discipline of Noticing. He is interested in the lived experience of learning, doing and teaching mathematics. He focuses on the structure and form of Attention in the teaching of mathematics, as he supports those who wish to foster and sustain mathematical thinking in others.

He is an Honorary Fellow of BSRLM and ATM, a long-standing member of  the MAA and the  MA.H.

 

Publications

  • Mason, J. (2022). Consequences of a Virtual Encounter with George Pólya. Teaching Mathematics and Computer Science.  20 (2) p173-182.
  • Zazkis, R. Kontorovich, I. & Mason, J. (2021). The Learning and Teaching of Number: paths less travelled through well-trodden terrain. London: Routledge
  • Mason, J. (2021). Learning about Noticing, by, and through, Noticing. ZDM – Mathematics Education. 53(1) p231-243. doi: 10.1007/s11858-020-01192-4
  • Mason, J. & Czarnocha,B. (2021). Aha! Moments, Bisociation and Multifocal Attention. In B. Czarnocha & W. Baker. Creativity of an Aha! Moment and Mathematics Education. Leiden: Brill. p345-361.
  • Mason, J. (2018) Making Distinctions: a phenomenological exploration in mathematics education. In P. Ernest (Ed.). The Philosophy of Mathematics Education Today. ICME-13 Monographs. Springer.
  • Mason, J. (2018). Reflecting on values emerging from practice and the value of reflecting on practice. In D. Rowe & A. Watson (Eds.). Faith and Experience in Education: essays from Quaker perspectives. London: Trentham Books. p63-91.
  • Mason, J. & Metz, M. (2017). Digging Beneath Dual Systems Theory and the Bicameral Brain: abductions about the human psyche from experience in mathematical problem solving. In U. Xolocotzin (Ed.). Understanding Emotions in Mathematical Thinking and Learning. p379-407. Cambridge: Elsevier/Academic Press.
  • Mason, J. (2016). Rising Above a Cause-and-Effect Stance in Mathematics Education Research. JMTE 19(4) p297-300. http://rdcu.be/npTf
  • Mason, J. & Davis, B. (2013). The Importance of Teachers’ Mathematical Awareness for In-The-Moment Pedagogy. CJSMTE 13(2) p182-197.
  • Mason, J. (2012). Noticing: roots and branches. In M. Sherin, V. Jacobs, & R. Phillip (Eds.) Mathematics Teacher Noticing:  Seeing Through Teachers’ Eyes. p35-50. Mahwah: Erlbaum.
  • Mason, J. (2008). Being Mathematical With & In Front of Learners: Attention, Awareness, and Attitude as Sources of Differences between Teacher Educators, Teachers & Learners. In T. Wood (Series Ed.) & B. Jaworski (Vol. Ed.), International Handbook of Mathematics Teacher Education: Vol.4. The Mathematics Teacher Educator as a Developing Professional. Rotterdam, the Netherlands: Sense Publishers, p31-56.
  • Mason, J. & Johnston-Wilder, S. (2006 2nd edition). Designing and Using Mathematical Tasks. St. Albans: Tarquin.
  • Watson, A. & Mason, J. (2006). Seeing an Exercise as a Single Mathematical Object: Using Variation to Structure Sense-Making. Mathematical Thinking and Learning. 8(2) p91-111.
  • Watson, A. & Mason, J. (2005). Mathematics as a Constructive Activity: learners generating examples. Mahwah: Erlbaum.
  • Mason, J. & Johnston-Wilder, S. (2004). Fundamental Constructs in Mathematics Education, RoutledgeFalmer, London.
  • Mason, J. 2003, Structure of Attention in the Learning of Mathematics, in J. Novotná (Ed.) Proceedings, International Symposium on Elementary Mathematics Teaching, Charles University, Prague, p9-16.
  • Mason, J. 2002, Mathematics Teaching Practice: a guidebook for university and college lecturers, Horwood Publishing, Chichester.
  • Mason, J. 2002, Researching Your own Practice: The Discipline of Noticing, RoutledgeFalmer, London.
  • Mason, J. 2001, Modelling Modelling: where is the centre of gravity of-for-when modelling?, in J. Matos, W. Blum, S. Houston & S. Carreira (Eds.) Modelling and Mathematics Education: ICTMA 9 applications in science and technology, Horwood Publishing, Chichester, p39-61.
  • Mason, J. Burton L. & Stacey K. (1982). Thinking Mathematically, Addison Wesley, London

Website

www.pmtheta.com

Mark has worked in ELT and EMI for over 35 years as a teacher, teacher trainer, lecturer, course writer, syllabus designer, examiner, Director of Studies, and consultant editor for OUP. For the British Council he has worked as a consultant trainer and course developer in EMI and EAP. For the University of Oxford Department of Education Mark delivered the ELT option on the MSc ALSLA and is Teaching Associate of the EMI Research Group in which capacity he has worked as a CI and has developed and delivered EMI teacher training courses in China, Serbia and Oxford. Mark has worked in universities in Russia, Ukraine, Kazakhstan, Belarus, Czechia, Italy, Germany, Mexico, Peru, Chile, Brazil, Colombia and Morocco.

He continues to be involved in EMI and is currently co-authoring an EMI student guide.

Mark is an alumnus of the University of Oxford Department of Education and was among the first to be awarded the innovative MSc in Teaching English Language in University Settings.

Anushay is a second-year DPhil student investigating how classroom characteristics are related to Pakistani children’s development. She is supervised by Professor Iram Siraj and Dr Katharina Ereky-Stevens and her work is being supported by the Aga Khan University (Pakistan). Anushay received the Patrice Engle Dissertation Grant Award from the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD) in 2023.

Anushay completed her BSc Psychology from UCL, where she also started her master’s in Developmental Neuroscience and Psychopathology. She was based at Yale University for her master’s thesis, where she worked with Dr Craig Bailey at the Yale Center for Emotional Intelligence to understand children’s emotion development. Anushay also works as a part-time research  assistant at the Developmental Diversity Lab at UCL’s Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience. Anushay’s research interests include understanding child development across different cultures, factors that might be affecting it, and devising culture-specific ways to support children’s holistic development through the educational system. She is also keen on improving the research scope in Pakistan by working with Pakistani researchers, practitioners, and families. Anushay balances her research with her position as the founder of a non-profit, Resources for Children, which aims to understand and support children’s development in Pakistan.

Publications

Journal Articles

  1. Mazhar, A., & Bailey, C., S. (under review). Understanding Children’s Emotion-Specific Biases: How They Relate to Child and Family Factors, Emotion Recognition Accuracy, and Social Behaviour.

Presentations

  1. Mazhar, A., & Bailey, C., S. (2023, March). Understanding Children’s Emotion-Specific Biases: How They Relate to Child-Level Factors and Emotion Recognition Accuracy [Paper Presentation]. Society for Research in Child Development, Salt Lake City, Utah, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2022, April). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Spring Preview, New Haven, United States.
  3. Mazhar, A. (2021, December). Does an extended family improve mentalising in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK & Pakistan. 2nd International Foundation University Conference of Psychology, Rawalpindi, Pakistan.
  4. Mazhar, A. (2020, October). Developing a non-profit to advance autism research in Pakistan. Anna Freud Centre Seminar Series, London, United Kingdom.

Posters

  1. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Theory of Mind in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK and Pakistan. Harvard Trends in Psychology Summit, Cambridge, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Research Rounds, New Haven, United States.

Cindy works at the intersection of learning, design, and technology, with a keen interest in the orchestration of future-ready tech-enabled learning.

She is curious how the deployment of adaptive learning systems to schools will impact classroom learning and hopes to learn more about the human-machine partnership in education. Specifically, her research is concerned with the implications that the use of such systems has on teacher-student interactions, as teachers grapple with balancing personalised learning and learning in community, as well as curriculum demands and student interests. These are some tensions which could potentially be exacerbated by affordances of adaptive learning systems.

Prior to embarking on the DPhil in Education at Oxford, Cindy worked as the Lead Specialist in Technologies for Learning at the Educational Technology Division of Ministry of Education, Singapore. She had previously completed graduate studies at the National University of Singapore and Stanford University where she was awarded Master of Arts in English Studies and Master of Arts in Education.

Reem is DPhil student from Saudi Arabia.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she worked as a Teacher, Professional Developer, then, became a Supervisor and Researcher in the Ministry of Education where she received a scholarship to pursue her DPhil education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests lie in the area of Teacher Education and Professional Learning Policy and Practice.

Publications
  • Alqahtani, Reem (2020). Saudi Universities Role in Developing Teacher Professional Development Programs: Elite Universities Experience. Journal of Educational Sciences. King Saud University.
  • Alqahtani, Reem. (2020). The effect of implementing UDL-based activities in improving EFL learners’ academic achievement and attitudes towards L2. In L. Salas, & E. Ager, Creating Quiet reflective Spaces: Language Teacher Researches Professional Development (pp. 61-62). IATEFL publications.

Lena Zlock is researching the integration of digital technology into structures of teaching, learning, and education in higher education. Her particular focus is on the digital humanities and the potential for digital methods to transform humanistic study. She works with Professor Niall Winters and Dr. James Robson.

Lena’s research interests stem from her education as an M.St. student and Ertegun Graduate Scholar in Modern Languages at the University of Oxford, and as a B.A. student in History at Stanford University. As an undergraduate, she started the Voltaire Library Project, a digitally and data-driven study of the 6,763-book collection of French Enlightenment philosopher Voltaire (you can read more about the project here and here). She has been interested in the application of digital technology to humanistic teaching since her days in Princeton Day School, where she developed an interdisciplinary curriculum on Mexico City (visit the course website here).

Her research on Voltaire led her to think more broadly about the place of digital methods in the humanities classroom, and how new technologies will revolutionise the liberal arts and higher education. As a DPhil candidate, Lena will examine the negotiation and implementation of new learning technologies within the University of Oxford at undergraduate and graduate levels.

Lena is involved in a number of digital humanities initiatives in Oxford. She previously served as the inaugural fellow of the Voltaire Lab at Oxford’s Voltaire Foundation. As a master’s student, Lena co-formulated the convergence agenda for Oxford digital humanities with Professor Howard Hotson, and is currently employed by the Humanities Division to assist with the development of an M.St. degree in Digital Scholarship (read more here). Lena set up and helps to run the History of the Book blog for the Faculty of Medieval and Modern Languages and the Oxford Book History Twitter account.

Lena welcomes inquiries from undergraduate and postgraduate students from Oxford and beyond seeking to get involved with the digital humanities in any capacity. The History of the Book blog also welcomes inquiries from prospective contributors.

 

Abbey is a Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education, in collaboration with the Department of Engineering.

Before joining the DPhil program, Abbey obtained a B.A. in Applied Linguistics with minors in Russian and Chinese from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford. She was the recipient of a Benjamin A. Gilman International Scholarship through U.S. Department of State for study in Russia and was awarded two Foreign Language and Area Studies (FLAS) Fellowships for study in both Russia and China. She holds both TESOL and TEFL certificates and has taught English as a Second Language in various contexts to a wide variety of learner populations.

Abbey’s main research interests lie in the use of technology to facilitate language learning. Her DPhil research focuses on the development of a virtual reality program to bridge the gaps that students face when learning languages through distance learning.

Dr Nadiya Ivanenko is a Visiting Research Fellow in the field of civic education and citizenship linguistics. She is a member of the Applied Linguistics research group and Higher Education research group at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

After receiving PhD in Comparative Linguistics from Kyiv National Linguistic University (2008) Nadiya worked as an Associate Professor of the Germanic Languages and Teaching Methodology Department, Faculty of Ukrainian Philology, Foreign Languages and Social Communications and Vice Dean of the Faculty of Foreign Languages, Central Ukrainian State University, Ukraine.

Nadiya was a Chevening scholar and Postgraduate researcher at the Department of Education, University of Oxford (2003-2004). She was a Co-chair of the joint UNESCO Chair/UNITWIN project ‘Education as a Humanitarian Response’ (2004-2012); a participant of BECA joint project ‘Education for Democracy’ between Montclair State University (USA) and Kirovohrad State Pedagogical University (Ukraine). Nadiya had internship for teachers of EFL in the Department of Educational and Cultural Programmes at Shakespeare’s Globe Theater, London, UK (2011). She was the Head of the British Council International Mobility Grant ‘Internalizing Higher Education in Ukraine’, which included 2 internships at the University of Durham, UK (2016). She participated in the internship “Retraining in the Field of Teaching Excellence”, Bayreuth University, Germany (Erasmus + Project (2021) and was a coordinator of the Erasmus+ Project: Innovative Approach to Promotion Teaching Excellence (2021-2022) at Central Ukrainian State University.

Selected Publications

BOOKS

  • Rastrygina, A., Ivanenko, N. (2021). Pedagogy of Freedom in the Paradigmal Space of Modern Education and Upbringing.
  • Ivanenko, N., Liashuk, A. (2021). English Activity Book. Practical Course of English. Kropyvnytskyi.
  • Ivanenko N. (2014). (Edit.) Education in Eastern Europe and Eurasia. London: Bloomsbury.
  • Ivanenko N. (2008). The Concept of Good in English and Ukrainian Language Pictures of the World. Kirovohrad: KOD.
  • Ivanenko N. (2007). Written Practice and Conversation for 1 Year. Kropyvnytskyi.
  • Garkusha, L., Ivanenko, N. (2004). Critical thinking in life skills training. Kirovohrad.

BOOK CHAPTERS

  • Ivanenko, N. (2024). Words and word meanings In The Routledge Companion To English Studies/ by Constant Leung & Jo Lewkowicz. London, UK: Routledge (in publishing).
  • Ivanenko N. (2023). Development of civic education in Ukrainian universities: new challenges of modern realities in the conditions of the transformation of society. In Contemporary Education in Ukraine: Integration into the European Educational Space. Dnipro (pp. 387-412) DOI:36550/978-617-8245-57-3-20
  • Ivanenko N. (2019). Citizenship Education, Moral Fluency and Social and Political Future Challenges. In Polish-Jewish History, Culture, Values, and Education between Paradise and Inferno. Irvine, USA: Brown Walker Press (pp. 93-103)
  • Ivanenko N. (2014). Education Change, Transformation, Reforms – a Regional Overview. In N. Ivanenko (Edit.) Education in Eastern Europe and Eurasia. London: Bloomsbury (pp. 9-45)
  • Ivanenko N. (2013). Vulnerable Children in Ukraine and Educational Response. In M. Matsumoto (Edit.) Education and Disadvantaged Children and Young People. London: Bloomsbury (pp. 95-132)

JOURNAL ARTICLES

  1. Ivanenko, N. (2024). Challenges of Ukrainian Higher Education in Times of War. International Higher Education. The Boston College Centre for International Higher Education, 118, pp. 35-36 https://doi.org/10.36197/IHE.2024.118.17
  2. Ivanenko, N., Paska, T., Irkha, A. Rud, A., & Boguslavskas, L., (2024). The Role of Higher Education for Ensuring National Security in Ukraine. Futurity Education, 4(1), 210-237 https://doi.org/10.57125/FED.2024.03.25.11
  3. Leleka, T., Ivanenko, N., Demeshko, I., Kapitan T., & Demchenko, I. (2024). The Process of English Internationalization in the Ukrainian Educational Paradigm. Slavistica Vilnensis, 68(2), 76-89 doi:10.15388/SlavViln.2023.68(2).6
  4. Ivanenko, N., Rud, A., Hurbanska, A., Cheban, Y., & Syrtseva, S. (2024). Digitalization of Education of the Future – A Trend or a Requirement of the Time? Journal of Higher Education Theory and Practice24(2). DOI: https://doi.org/10.33423/jhetp.v24i2.6791
  5. Ivanenko, N. (2023). Civic character cultivation as a basic virtue within and beyond modern educational institutions. Academic Notes. Series Pedagogical sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 209, 180-185 DOI: https://doi.org/10.36550/2415-7988-2022-1-209-180-185
  6. Rastrygina, A., Ivanenko, N. (2023). A Pedagogy of freedom as a viable basis for implementing gender equality in Ukraine’s educational institutions. International Review of Education, 69(1-2), 143-174. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/s11159-023-09995-9
  7. Ivanenko N., Biletska O., Hurbanska S., Hurbanska, A., & Kochmar, D. (2023). English language morphological neologisms reflecting the war in Ukraine. World Journal of English Language, 13(5), pp. 432-438    DOI: doi:http://dx.doi.org/10.5430/wjel.v13n5p432
  8. Ivanenko, N., Boiko, A., Fedorchuk, L., Panchenko, I., & Marieiev, D. (2023). Development of educational policy in Ukraine in the context of European integration and digital transformation. Revista Eduweb, 17(2), 296-305 DOI: https://doi.org/10.46502/issn.1856-7576/2023.17.02.25
  9. Ivanenko, N.V., Gerasymenko,Yu. A., Kostenko, V.G. (2023). Innovative approaches to the modernization of philological education and science in Ukraine: a response to the challenges of wartime. Akademichni Vizii, (in Ukrainian). URL: https://academy-vision.org/index.php/av/article/view/281 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5281/zenodo.7795088
  10. Ivanenko N. (2022). Phraseological units of the conceptual field MARRIAGE in the English picture of the world. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi: KOD, 202, pp. 140-146
  11. Bilous, O., Mishchenko, A., Datska, T., Ivanenko, N., Kit, L., Piankovska, I., and Vereshchak, Y. (2021). Modern linguistic technologies: strategy of teaching translation studies. Rupkatha Journal on Interdisciplinary Studies in Humanities, 13(4), pp. 1-12 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/21659/rupkatha.v13n4.65
  12. Leleka, T., Ivanenko, N., Moskalenko O., Herasymenko, L., Shevchuk L., Pidlubna, O. (2021). Angloamerican loanwords use in the Ukrainian student slang. Laplage em Revista, 7(Extra-D): University and science: possible dialogues. pp.163-174. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/24115/S2446-622020217Extra-D1081p.163-174
  13. Ivanenko N. (2021). Figurative and valuable component of the MARRIAGE concept. Trends in Science and Practice of Today. Ankara, Turkey, pp. 356-361
  14. Ivanenko N. (2021). Inclusive learning environment for students’ achievements and foreign language development. Priorities in the Development of Science and Education. Budapest, Hungary, pp.74-80
  15. Ivanenko N. (2021). The nominative field of the MARRIAGE concept and the analysis of the synonymous series of its key unit. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi: KOD, 193, pp 218-224 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.36550/2522-4077-2021-1-193-218-224
  16. Ivanenko N. (2020). Language intervention stages in project-based learning. Modern Trends in Foreign Language Professional Training in a Multicultural Space. Kyiv, pp. 249 – 255
  17. Rastrygina, A., Ivanenko, N. (2020). Gender comfortable educational environment as a factor of development of personal freedom. Research Bulletin. Pedagogical Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 188, pp. 28 – 35 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.36550/2415-7988-2020-1-188-28-35
  18. Ivanenko N. (2020). Texting slang as one of the most common groups of everyday youth Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi: KOD, 187, pp. 38-45
  19. Ivanenko N. (2019). Computer use in foreign language Intellectual and Emotional Components of Foreign Language Learning: Latest Trends and Challenges for Higher Education. Kyiv, pp. 152 – 158.
  20. Ivanenko N. (2019). Initial stages of elaborating a project in a foreign language classroom. Science and Society. Hamilton, Canada, pp. 13 – 20.
  21. Ivanenko N. (2019). Project-based learning as a way to incorporate effective foreign language teaching. Research Bulletin. Pedagogical Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 177, pp. 207 – 211
  22. Ivanenko N. (2019). Youth vocabulary as a reflection of changes in modern society. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi: KOD, 175, pp. 34 – 39.
  23. Ivanenko N. (2018). Promoting citizenship education in the English language Proceedings of the IV International Conference. Kyiv, pp. 130 – 137
  24. Ivanenko N. (2018). Educating global citizens at a foreign language class. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, – pp. 494 – 500
  25. Ivanenko N. (2018). Formation of civic values through teaching a foreign language. Proceedings of the II International Conference “Foreign Language in Professional Training of Specialists: Problems and Strategies”. Kropyvnytskyi, pp. 189-191
  26. Ivanenko N. (2017). Citizenship education in the English language classroom. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 154. – pp. 92 – 97
  27. Ivanenko N. (2017). Education for democratic citizenship: teaching virtues and values. Research Bulletin. Pedagogical Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 152, pp. 110-113
  28. Ivanenko N. (2016). Citizenship education as a way to develop moral fluency to solve social and political challenges of the future. Scientific Journal of Ariel University. Israel: Ariel University.
  29. Ivanenko N. (2016). Functioning peculiarities of lexical units of the RESPECT concept in the English language. Proceedings of the International Conference Linguistic and Linguacultural Aspects of Teaching Foreign Languages in Ukrainian Universities”. Dnipropetrovsk, pp. 87-94
  30. Ivanenko N. (2016). Semantic relationships of lexical units of the concept of love in the English language. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, pp. 221-226
  31. Ivanenko N. (2015). Citizenship education as the coordination and integration of educational establishment and community. Research Proceedings of the national UniversityOstrog Academy”. Ostrog, pp. 136-142
  32. Ivanenko N. (2015). The value of citizenship education in practices of student governing body. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 136. pp. 438-442

Louise’s doctoral research investigates how teachers become who they are.

Louise’s work situates the schoolteacher as a particular type of subject, that is both made and makes itself from within a network of power relations. Her study combines Foucauldian theory, Critical Discourse Analysis, and Narrative analysis to provide an account of schoolteachers’ ethical agency in the context of top-down policy practices.

Louise is a Doctoral Teaching Fellow at the Department of Education, where she teaches and supervises students in the MSc in Learning and Teaching course. Currently, Louise is collaborating the OECD in their Globally Teaching InSights project. Her research supports the Schools+ Network aims to fuel an ecosystem of organisations that are driving change in education from the bottom-up.

In March 2023 she presented her preliminary research at the Philosophy of Education Society of Great Britain (PESGB)’s annual conference.

As Honorary Fellow John attends seminars and consults with current staff in Mathematics Education.

During 40 years at the Open University supporting the teaching of mathematics he authored a wide range of papers, and dozens of Open University Books and Teaching materials. He co-authored the classic Thinking Mathematically; Mathematics as a Constructive Activity (with his wife Prof. Anne Watson); Questions and Prompts for Mathematical Thinking & Thinkers (with Anne and other colleagues), among many others.

His research methods are phenomenological, based on the Discipline of Noticing. He is interested in the lived experience of learning, doing and teaching mathematics. He focuses on the structure and form of Attention in the teaching of mathematics, as he supports those who wish to foster and sustain mathematical thinking in others.

He is an Honorary Fellow of BSRLM and ATM, a long-standing member of  the MAA and the  MA.H.

 

Publications

  • Mason, J. (2022). Consequences of a Virtual Encounter with George Pólya. Teaching Mathematics and Computer Science.  20 (2) p173-182.
  • Zazkis, R. Kontorovich, I. & Mason, J. (2021). The Learning and Teaching of Number: paths less travelled through well-trodden terrain. London: Routledge
  • Mason, J. (2021). Learning about Noticing, by, and through, Noticing. ZDM – Mathematics Education. 53(1) p231-243. doi: 10.1007/s11858-020-01192-4
  • Mason, J. & Czarnocha,B. (2021). Aha! Moments, Bisociation and Multifocal Attention. In B. Czarnocha & W. Baker. Creativity of an Aha! Moment and Mathematics Education. Leiden: Brill. p345-361.
  • Mason, J. (2018) Making Distinctions: a phenomenological exploration in mathematics education. In P. Ernest (Ed.). The Philosophy of Mathematics Education Today. ICME-13 Monographs. Springer.
  • Mason, J. (2018). Reflecting on values emerging from practice and the value of reflecting on practice. In D. Rowe & A. Watson (Eds.). Faith and Experience in Education: essays from Quaker perspectives. London: Trentham Books. p63-91.
  • Mason, J. & Metz, M. (2017). Digging Beneath Dual Systems Theory and the Bicameral Brain: abductions about the human psyche from experience in mathematical problem solving. In U. Xolocotzin (Ed.). Understanding Emotions in Mathematical Thinking and Learning. p379-407. Cambridge: Elsevier/Academic Press.
  • Mason, J. (2016). Rising Above a Cause-and-Effect Stance in Mathematics Education Research. JMTE 19(4) p297-300. http://rdcu.be/npTf
  • Mason, J. & Davis, B. (2013). The Importance of Teachers’ Mathematical Awareness for In-The-Moment Pedagogy. CJSMTE 13(2) p182-197.
  • Mason, J. (2012). Noticing: roots and branches. In M. Sherin, V. Jacobs, & R. Phillip (Eds.) Mathematics Teacher Noticing:  Seeing Through Teachers’ Eyes. p35-50. Mahwah: Erlbaum.
  • Mason, J. (2008). Being Mathematical With & In Front of Learners: Attention, Awareness, and Attitude as Sources of Differences between Teacher Educators, Teachers & Learners. In T. Wood (Series Ed.) & B. Jaworski (Vol. Ed.), International Handbook of Mathematics Teacher Education: Vol.4. The Mathematics Teacher Educator as a Developing Professional. Rotterdam, the Netherlands: Sense Publishers, p31-56.
  • Mason, J. & Johnston-Wilder, S. (2006 2nd edition). Designing and Using Mathematical Tasks. St. Albans: Tarquin.
  • Watson, A. & Mason, J. (2006). Seeing an Exercise as a Single Mathematical Object: Using Variation to Structure Sense-Making. Mathematical Thinking and Learning. 8(2) p91-111.
  • Watson, A. & Mason, J. (2005). Mathematics as a Constructive Activity: learners generating examples. Mahwah: Erlbaum.
  • Mason, J. & Johnston-Wilder, S. (2004). Fundamental Constructs in Mathematics Education, RoutledgeFalmer, London.
  • Mason, J. 2003, Structure of Attention in the Learning of Mathematics, in J. Novotná (Ed.) Proceedings, International Symposium on Elementary Mathematics Teaching, Charles University, Prague, p9-16.
  • Mason, J. 2002, Mathematics Teaching Practice: a guidebook for university and college lecturers, Horwood Publishing, Chichester.
  • Mason, J. 2002, Researching Your own Practice: The Discipline of Noticing, RoutledgeFalmer, London.
  • Mason, J. 2001, Modelling Modelling: where is the centre of gravity of-for-when modelling?, in J. Matos, W. Blum, S. Houston & S. Carreira (Eds.) Modelling and Mathematics Education: ICTMA 9 applications in science and technology, Horwood Publishing, Chichester, p39-61.
  • Mason, J. Burton L. & Stacey K. (1982). Thinking Mathematically, Addison Wesley, London

Website

www.pmtheta.com

Mark has worked in ELT and EMI for over 35 years as a teacher, teacher trainer, lecturer, course writer, syllabus designer, examiner, Director of Studies, and consultant editor for OUP. For the British Council he has worked as a consultant trainer and course developer in EMI and EAP. For the University of Oxford Department of Education Mark delivered the ELT option on the MSc ALSLA and is Teaching Associate of the EMI Research Group in which capacity he has worked as a CI and has developed and delivered EMI teacher training courses in China, Serbia and Oxford. Mark has worked in universities in Russia, Ukraine, Kazakhstan, Belarus, Czechia, Italy, Germany, Mexico, Peru, Chile, Brazil, Colombia and Morocco.

He continues to be involved in EMI and is currently co-authoring an EMI student guide.

Mark is an alumnus of the University of Oxford Department of Education and was among the first to be awarded the innovative MSc in Teaching English Language in University Settings.

Anushay is a second-year DPhil student investigating how classroom characteristics are related to Pakistani children’s development. She is supervised by Professor Iram Siraj and Dr Katharina Ereky-Stevens and her work is being supported by the Aga Khan University (Pakistan). Anushay received the Patrice Engle Dissertation Grant Award from the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD) in 2023.

Anushay completed her BSc Psychology from UCL, where she also started her master’s in Developmental Neuroscience and Psychopathology. She was based at Yale University for her master’s thesis, where she worked with Dr Craig Bailey at the Yale Center for Emotional Intelligence to understand children’s emotion development. Anushay also works as a part-time research  assistant at the Developmental Diversity Lab at UCL’s Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience. Anushay’s research interests include understanding child development across different cultures, factors that might be affecting it, and devising culture-specific ways to support children’s holistic development through the educational system. She is also keen on improving the research scope in Pakistan by working with Pakistani researchers, practitioners, and families. Anushay balances her research with her position as the founder of a non-profit, Resources for Children, which aims to understand and support children’s development in Pakistan.

Publications

Journal Articles

  1. Mazhar, A., & Bailey, C., S. (under review). Understanding Children’s Emotion-Specific Biases: How They Relate to Child and Family Factors, Emotion Recognition Accuracy, and Social Behaviour.

Presentations

  1. Mazhar, A., & Bailey, C., S. (2023, March). Understanding Children’s Emotion-Specific Biases: How They Relate to Child-Level Factors and Emotion Recognition Accuracy [Paper Presentation]. Society for Research in Child Development, Salt Lake City, Utah, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2022, April). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Spring Preview, New Haven, United States.
  3. Mazhar, A. (2021, December). Does an extended family improve mentalising in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK & Pakistan. 2nd International Foundation University Conference of Psychology, Rawalpindi, Pakistan.
  4. Mazhar, A. (2020, October). Developing a non-profit to advance autism research in Pakistan. Anna Freud Centre Seminar Series, London, United Kingdom.

Posters

  1. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Theory of Mind in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK and Pakistan. Harvard Trends in Psychology Summit, Cambridge, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Research Rounds, New Haven, United States.

Cindy works at the intersection of learning, design, and technology, with a keen interest in the orchestration of future-ready tech-enabled learning.

She is curious how the deployment of adaptive learning systems to schools will impact classroom learning and hopes to learn more about the human-machine partnership in education. Specifically, her research is concerned with the implications that the use of such systems has on teacher-student interactions, as teachers grapple with balancing personalised learning and learning in community, as well as curriculum demands and student interests. These are some tensions which could potentially be exacerbated by affordances of adaptive learning systems.

Prior to embarking on the DPhil in Education at Oxford, Cindy worked as the Lead Specialist in Technologies for Learning at the Educational Technology Division of Ministry of Education, Singapore. She had previously completed graduate studies at the National University of Singapore and Stanford University where she was awarded Master of Arts in English Studies and Master of Arts in Education.

Reem is DPhil student from Saudi Arabia.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she worked as a Teacher, Professional Developer, then, became a Supervisor and Researcher in the Ministry of Education where she received a scholarship to pursue her DPhil education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests lie in the area of Teacher Education and Professional Learning Policy and Practice.

Publications
  • Alqahtani, Reem (2020). Saudi Universities Role in Developing Teacher Professional Development Programs: Elite Universities Experience. Journal of Educational Sciences. King Saud University.
  • Alqahtani, Reem. (2020). The effect of implementing UDL-based activities in improving EFL learners’ academic achievement and attitudes towards L2. In L. Salas, & E. Ager, Creating Quiet reflective Spaces: Language Teacher Researches Professional Development (pp. 61-62). IATEFL publications.

Lena Zlock is researching the integration of digital technology into structures of teaching, learning, and education in higher education. Her particular focus is on the digital humanities and the potential for digital methods to transform humanistic study. She works with Professor Niall Winters and Dr. James Robson.

Lena’s research interests stem from her education as an M.St. student and Ertegun Graduate Scholar in Modern Languages at the University of Oxford, and as a B.A. student in History at Stanford University. As an undergraduate, she started the Voltaire Library Project, a digitally and data-driven study of the 6,763-book collection of French Enlightenment philosopher Voltaire (you can read more about the project here and here). She has been interested in the application of digital technology to humanistic teaching since her days in Princeton Day School, where she developed an interdisciplinary curriculum on Mexico City (visit the course website here).

Her research on Voltaire led her to think more broadly about the place of digital methods in the humanities classroom, and how new technologies will revolutionise the liberal arts and higher education. As a DPhil candidate, Lena will examine the negotiation and implementation of new learning technologies within the University of Oxford at undergraduate and graduate levels.

Lena is involved in a number of digital humanities initiatives in Oxford. She previously served as the inaugural fellow of the Voltaire Lab at Oxford’s Voltaire Foundation. As a master’s student, Lena co-formulated the convergence agenda for Oxford digital humanities with Professor Howard Hotson, and is currently employed by the Humanities Division to assist with the development of an M.St. degree in Digital Scholarship (read more here). Lena set up and helps to run the History of the Book blog for the Faculty of Medieval and Modern Languages and the Oxford Book History Twitter account.

Lena welcomes inquiries from undergraduate and postgraduate students from Oxford and beyond seeking to get involved with the digital humanities in any capacity. The History of the Book blog also welcomes inquiries from prospective contributors.

 

Abbey is a Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education, in collaboration with the Department of Engineering.

Before joining the DPhil program, Abbey obtained a B.A. in Applied Linguistics with minors in Russian and Chinese from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford. She was the recipient of a Benjamin A. Gilman International Scholarship through U.S. Department of State for study in Russia and was awarded two Foreign Language and Area Studies (FLAS) Fellowships for study in both Russia and China. She holds both TESOL and TEFL certificates and has taught English as a Second Language in various contexts to a wide variety of learner populations.

Abbey’s main research interests lie in the use of technology to facilitate language learning. Her DPhil research focuses on the development of a virtual reality program to bridge the gaps that students face when learning languages through distance learning.

Dr Nadiya Ivanenko is a Visiting Research Fellow in the field of civic education and citizenship linguistics. She is a member of the Applied Linguistics research group and Higher Education research group at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

After receiving PhD in Comparative Linguistics from Kyiv National Linguistic University (2008) Nadiya worked as an Associate Professor of the Germanic Languages and Teaching Methodology Department, Faculty of Ukrainian Philology, Foreign Languages and Social Communications and Vice Dean of the Faculty of Foreign Languages, Central Ukrainian State University, Ukraine.

Nadiya was a Chevening scholar and Postgraduate researcher at the Department of Education, University of Oxford (2003-2004). She was a Co-chair of the joint UNESCO Chair/UNITWIN project ‘Education as a Humanitarian Response’ (2004-2012); a participant of BECA joint project ‘Education for Democracy’ between Montclair State University (USA) and Kirovohrad State Pedagogical University (Ukraine). Nadiya had internship for teachers of EFL in the Department of Educational and Cultural Programmes at Shakespeare’s Globe Theater, London, UK (2011). She was the Head of the British Council International Mobility Grant ‘Internalizing Higher Education in Ukraine’, which included 2 internships at the University of Durham, UK (2016). She participated in the internship “Retraining in the Field of Teaching Excellence”, Bayreuth University, Germany (Erasmus + Project (2021) and was a coordinator of the Erasmus+ Project: Innovative Approach to Promotion Teaching Excellence (2021-2022) at Central Ukrainian State University.

Selected Publications

BOOKS

  • Rastrygina, A., Ivanenko, N. (2021). Pedagogy of Freedom in the Paradigmal Space of Modern Education and Upbringing.
  • Ivanenko, N., Liashuk, A. (2021). English Activity Book. Practical Course of English. Kropyvnytskyi.
  • Ivanenko N. (2014). (Edit.) Education in Eastern Europe and Eurasia. London: Bloomsbury.
  • Ivanenko N. (2008). The Concept of Good in English and Ukrainian Language Pictures of the World. Kirovohrad: KOD.
  • Ivanenko N. (2007). Written Practice and Conversation for 1 Year. Kropyvnytskyi.
  • Garkusha, L., Ivanenko, N. (2004). Critical thinking in life skills training. Kirovohrad.

BOOK CHAPTERS

  • Ivanenko, N. (2024). Words and word meanings In The Routledge Companion To English Studies/ by Constant Leung & Jo Lewkowicz. London, UK: Routledge (in publishing).
  • Ivanenko N. (2023). Development of civic education in Ukrainian universities: new challenges of modern realities in the conditions of the transformation of society. In Contemporary Education in Ukraine: Integration into the European Educational Space. Dnipro (pp. 387-412) DOI:36550/978-617-8245-57-3-20
  • Ivanenko N. (2019). Citizenship Education, Moral Fluency and Social and Political Future Challenges. In Polish-Jewish History, Culture, Values, and Education between Paradise and Inferno. Irvine, USA: Brown Walker Press (pp. 93-103)
  • Ivanenko N. (2014). Education Change, Transformation, Reforms – a Regional Overview. In N. Ivanenko (Edit.) Education in Eastern Europe and Eurasia. London: Bloomsbury (pp. 9-45)
  • Ivanenko N. (2013). Vulnerable Children in Ukraine and Educational Response. In M. Matsumoto (Edit.) Education and Disadvantaged Children and Young People. London: Bloomsbury (pp. 95-132)

JOURNAL ARTICLES

  1. Ivanenko, N. (2024). Challenges of Ukrainian Higher Education in Times of War. International Higher Education. The Boston College Centre for International Higher Education, 118, pp. 35-36 https://doi.org/10.36197/IHE.2024.118.17
  2. Ivanenko, N., Paska, T., Irkha, A. Rud, A., & Boguslavskas, L., (2024). The Role of Higher Education for Ensuring National Security in Ukraine. Futurity Education, 4(1), 210-237 https://doi.org/10.57125/FED.2024.03.25.11
  3. Leleka, T., Ivanenko, N., Demeshko, I., Kapitan T., & Demchenko, I. (2024). The Process of English Internationalization in the Ukrainian Educational Paradigm. Slavistica Vilnensis, 68(2), 76-89 doi:10.15388/SlavViln.2023.68(2).6
  4. Ivanenko, N., Rud, A., Hurbanska, A., Cheban, Y., & Syrtseva, S. (2024). Digitalization of Education of the Future – A Trend or a Requirement of the Time? Journal of Higher Education Theory and Practice24(2). DOI: https://doi.org/10.33423/jhetp.v24i2.6791
  5. Ivanenko, N. (2023). Civic character cultivation as a basic virtue within and beyond modern educational institutions. Academic Notes. Series Pedagogical sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 209, 180-185 DOI: https://doi.org/10.36550/2415-7988-2022-1-209-180-185
  6. Rastrygina, A., Ivanenko, N. (2023). A Pedagogy of freedom as a viable basis for implementing gender equality in Ukraine’s educational institutions. International Review of Education, 69(1-2), 143-174. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/s11159-023-09995-9
  7. Ivanenko N., Biletska O., Hurbanska S., Hurbanska, A., & Kochmar, D. (2023). English language morphological neologisms reflecting the war in Ukraine. World Journal of English Language, 13(5), pp. 432-438    DOI: doi:http://dx.doi.org/10.5430/wjel.v13n5p432
  8. Ivanenko, N., Boiko, A., Fedorchuk, L., Panchenko, I., & Marieiev, D. (2023). Development of educational policy in Ukraine in the context of European integration and digital transformation. Revista Eduweb, 17(2), 296-305 DOI: https://doi.org/10.46502/issn.1856-7576/2023.17.02.25
  9. Ivanenko, N.V., Gerasymenko,Yu. A., Kostenko, V.G. (2023). Innovative approaches to the modernization of philological education and science in Ukraine: a response to the challenges of wartime. Akademichni Vizii, (in Ukrainian). URL: https://academy-vision.org/index.php/av/article/view/281 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5281/zenodo.7795088
  10. Ivanenko N. (2022). Phraseological units of the conceptual field MARRIAGE in the English picture of the world. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi: KOD, 202, pp. 140-146
  11. Bilous, O., Mishchenko, A., Datska, T., Ivanenko, N., Kit, L., Piankovska, I., and Vereshchak, Y. (2021). Modern linguistic technologies: strategy of teaching translation studies. Rupkatha Journal on Interdisciplinary Studies in Humanities, 13(4), pp. 1-12 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/21659/rupkatha.v13n4.65
  12. Leleka, T., Ivanenko, N., Moskalenko O., Herasymenko, L., Shevchuk L., Pidlubna, O. (2021). Angloamerican loanwords use in the Ukrainian student slang. Laplage em Revista, 7(Extra-D): University and science: possible dialogues. pp.163-174. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/24115/S2446-622020217Extra-D1081p.163-174
  13. Ivanenko N. (2021). Figurative and valuable component of the MARRIAGE concept. Trends in Science and Practice of Today. Ankara, Turkey, pp. 356-361
  14. Ivanenko N. (2021). Inclusive learning environment for students’ achievements and foreign language development. Priorities in the Development of Science and Education. Budapest, Hungary, pp.74-80
  15. Ivanenko N. (2021). The nominative field of the MARRIAGE concept and the analysis of the synonymous series of its key unit. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi: KOD, 193, pp 218-224 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.36550/2522-4077-2021-1-193-218-224
  16. Ivanenko N. (2020). Language intervention stages in project-based learning. Modern Trends in Foreign Language Professional Training in a Multicultural Space. Kyiv, pp. 249 – 255
  17. Rastrygina, A., Ivanenko, N. (2020). Gender comfortable educational environment as a factor of development of personal freedom. Research Bulletin. Pedagogical Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 188, pp. 28 – 35 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.36550/2415-7988-2020-1-188-28-35
  18. Ivanenko N. (2020). Texting slang as one of the most common groups of everyday youth Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi: KOD, 187, pp. 38-45
  19. Ivanenko N. (2019). Computer use in foreign language Intellectual and Emotional Components of Foreign Language Learning: Latest Trends and Challenges for Higher Education. Kyiv, pp. 152 – 158.
  20. Ivanenko N. (2019). Initial stages of elaborating a project in a foreign language classroom. Science and Society. Hamilton, Canada, pp. 13 – 20.
  21. Ivanenko N. (2019). Project-based learning as a way to incorporate effective foreign language teaching. Research Bulletin. Pedagogical Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 177, pp. 207 – 211
  22. Ivanenko N. (2019). Youth vocabulary as a reflection of changes in modern society. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi: KOD, 175, pp. 34 – 39.
  23. Ivanenko N. (2018). Promoting citizenship education in the English language Proceedings of the IV International Conference. Kyiv, pp. 130 – 137
  24. Ivanenko N. (2018). Educating global citizens at a foreign language class. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, – pp. 494 – 500
  25. Ivanenko N. (2018). Formation of civic values through teaching a foreign language. Proceedings of the II International Conference “Foreign Language in Professional Training of Specialists: Problems and Strategies”. Kropyvnytskyi, pp. 189-191
  26. Ivanenko N. (2017). Citizenship education in the English language classroom. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 154. – pp. 92 – 97
  27. Ivanenko N. (2017). Education for democratic citizenship: teaching virtues and values. Research Bulletin. Pedagogical Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 152, pp. 110-113
  28. Ivanenko N. (2016). Citizenship education as a way to develop moral fluency to solve social and political challenges of the future. Scientific Journal of Ariel University. Israel: Ariel University.
  29. Ivanenko N. (2016). Functioning peculiarities of lexical units of the RESPECT concept in the English language. Proceedings of the International Conference Linguistic and Linguacultural Aspects of Teaching Foreign Languages in Ukrainian Universities”. Dnipropetrovsk, pp. 87-94
  30. Ivanenko N. (2016). Semantic relationships of lexical units of the concept of love in the English language. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, pp. 221-226
  31. Ivanenko N. (2015). Citizenship education as the coordination and integration of educational establishment and community. Research Proceedings of the national UniversityOstrog Academy”. Ostrog, pp. 136-142
  32. Ivanenko N. (2015). The value of citizenship education in practices of student governing body. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 136. pp. 438-442

Louise’s doctoral research investigates how teachers become who they are.

Louise’s work situates the schoolteacher as a particular type of subject, that is both made and makes itself from within a network of power relations. Her study combines Foucauldian theory, Critical Discourse Analysis, and Narrative analysis to provide an account of schoolteachers’ ethical agency in the context of top-down policy practices.

Louise is a Doctoral Teaching Fellow at the Department of Education, where she teaches and supervises students in the MSc in Learning and Teaching course. Currently, Louise is collaborating the OECD in their Globally Teaching InSights project. Her research supports the Schools+ Network aims to fuel an ecosystem of organisations that are driving change in education from the bottom-up.

In March 2023 she presented her preliminary research at the Philosophy of Education Society of Great Britain (PESGB)’s annual conference.

As Honorary Fellow John attends seminars and consults with current staff in Mathematics Education.

During 40 years at the Open University supporting the teaching of mathematics he authored a wide range of papers, and dozens of Open University Books and Teaching materials. He co-authored the classic Thinking Mathematically; Mathematics as a Constructive Activity (with his wife Prof. Anne Watson); Questions and Prompts for Mathematical Thinking & Thinkers (with Anne and other colleagues), among many others.

His research methods are phenomenological, based on the Discipline of Noticing. He is interested in the lived experience of learning, doing and teaching mathematics. He focuses on the structure and form of Attention in the teaching of mathematics, as he supports those who wish to foster and sustain mathematical thinking in others.

He is an Honorary Fellow of BSRLM and ATM, a long-standing member of  the MAA and the  MA.H.

 

Publications

  • Mason, J. (2022). Consequences of a Virtual Encounter with George Pólya. Teaching Mathematics and Computer Science.  20 (2) p173-182.
  • Zazkis, R. Kontorovich, I. & Mason, J. (2021). The Learning and Teaching of Number: paths less travelled through well-trodden terrain. London: Routledge
  • Mason, J. (2021). Learning about Noticing, by, and through, Noticing. ZDM – Mathematics Education. 53(1) p231-243. doi: 10.1007/s11858-020-01192-4
  • Mason, J. & Czarnocha,B. (2021). Aha! Moments, Bisociation and Multifocal Attention. In B. Czarnocha & W. Baker. Creativity of an Aha! Moment and Mathematics Education. Leiden: Brill. p345-361.
  • Mason, J. (2018) Making Distinctions: a phenomenological exploration in mathematics education. In P. Ernest (Ed.). The Philosophy of Mathematics Education Today. ICME-13 Monographs. Springer.
  • Mason, J. (2018). Reflecting on values emerging from practice and the value of reflecting on practice. In D. Rowe & A. Watson (Eds.). Faith and Experience in Education: essays from Quaker perspectives. London: Trentham Books. p63-91.
  • Mason, J. & Metz, M. (2017). Digging Beneath Dual Systems Theory and the Bicameral Brain: abductions about the human psyche from experience in mathematical problem solving. In U. Xolocotzin (Ed.). Understanding Emotions in Mathematical Thinking and Learning. p379-407. Cambridge: Elsevier/Academic Press.
  • Mason, J. (2016). Rising Above a Cause-and-Effect Stance in Mathematics Education Research. JMTE 19(4) p297-300. http://rdcu.be/npTf
  • Mason, J. & Davis, B. (2013). The Importance of Teachers’ Mathematical Awareness for In-The-Moment Pedagogy. CJSMTE 13(2) p182-197.
  • Mason, J. (2012). Noticing: roots and branches. In M. Sherin, V. Jacobs, & R. Phillip (Eds.) Mathematics Teacher Noticing:  Seeing Through Teachers’ Eyes. p35-50. Mahwah: Erlbaum.
  • Mason, J. (2008). Being Mathematical With & In Front of Learners: Attention, Awareness, and Attitude as Sources of Differences between Teacher Educators, Teachers & Learners. In T. Wood (Series Ed.) & B. Jaworski (Vol. Ed.), International Handbook of Mathematics Teacher Education: Vol.4. The Mathematics Teacher Educator as a Developing Professional. Rotterdam, the Netherlands: Sense Publishers, p31-56.
  • Mason, J. & Johnston-Wilder, S. (2006 2nd edition). Designing and Using Mathematical Tasks. St. Albans: Tarquin.
  • Watson, A. & Mason, J. (2006). Seeing an Exercise as a Single Mathematical Object: Using Variation to Structure Sense-Making. Mathematical Thinking and Learning. 8(2) p91-111.
  • Watson, A. & Mason, J. (2005). Mathematics as a Constructive Activity: learners generating examples. Mahwah: Erlbaum.
  • Mason, J. & Johnston-Wilder, S. (2004). Fundamental Constructs in Mathematics Education, RoutledgeFalmer, London.
  • Mason, J. 2003, Structure of Attention in the Learning of Mathematics, in J. Novotná (Ed.) Proceedings, International Symposium on Elementary Mathematics Teaching, Charles University, Prague, p9-16.
  • Mason, J. 2002, Mathematics Teaching Practice: a guidebook for university and college lecturers, Horwood Publishing, Chichester.
  • Mason, J. 2002, Researching Your own Practice: The Discipline of Noticing, RoutledgeFalmer, London.
  • Mason, J. 2001, Modelling Modelling: where is the centre of gravity of-for-when modelling?, in J. Matos, W. Blum, S. Houston & S. Carreira (Eds.) Modelling and Mathematics Education: ICTMA 9 applications in science and technology, Horwood Publishing, Chichester, p39-61.
  • Mason, J. Burton L. & Stacey K. (1982). Thinking Mathematically, Addison Wesley, London

Website

www.pmtheta.com

Mark has worked in ELT and EMI for over 35 years as a teacher, teacher trainer, lecturer, course writer, syllabus designer, examiner, Director of Studies, and consultant editor for OUP. For the British Council he has worked as a consultant trainer and course developer in EMI and EAP. For the University of Oxford Department of Education Mark delivered the ELT option on the MSc ALSLA and is Teaching Associate of the EMI Research Group in which capacity he has worked as a CI and has developed and delivered EMI teacher training courses in China, Serbia and Oxford. Mark has worked in universities in Russia, Ukraine, Kazakhstan, Belarus, Czechia, Italy, Germany, Mexico, Peru, Chile, Brazil, Colombia and Morocco.

He continues to be involved in EMI and is currently co-authoring an EMI student guide.

Mark is an alumnus of the University of Oxford Department of Education and was among the first to be awarded the innovative MSc in Teaching English Language in University Settings.

Anushay is a second-year DPhil student investigating how classroom characteristics are related to Pakistani children’s development. She is supervised by Professor Iram Siraj and Dr Katharina Ereky-Stevens and her work is being supported by the Aga Khan University (Pakistan). Anushay received the Patrice Engle Dissertation Grant Award from the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD) in 2023.

Anushay completed her BSc Psychology from UCL, where she also started her master’s in Developmental Neuroscience and Psychopathology. She was based at Yale University for her master’s thesis, where she worked with Dr Craig Bailey at the Yale Center for Emotional Intelligence to understand children’s emotion development. Anushay also works as a part-time research  assistant at the Developmental Diversity Lab at UCL’s Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience. Anushay’s research interests include understanding child development across different cultures, factors that might be affecting it, and devising culture-specific ways to support children’s holistic development through the educational system. She is also keen on improving the research scope in Pakistan by working with Pakistani researchers, practitioners, and families. Anushay balances her research with her position as the founder of a non-profit, Resources for Children, which aims to understand and support children’s development in Pakistan.

Publications

Journal Articles

  1. Mazhar, A., & Bailey, C., S. (under review). Understanding Children’s Emotion-Specific Biases: How They Relate to Child and Family Factors, Emotion Recognition Accuracy, and Social Behaviour.

Presentations

  1. Mazhar, A., & Bailey, C., S. (2023, March). Understanding Children’s Emotion-Specific Biases: How They Relate to Child-Level Factors and Emotion Recognition Accuracy [Paper Presentation]. Society for Research in Child Development, Salt Lake City, Utah, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2022, April). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Spring Preview, New Haven, United States.
  3. Mazhar, A. (2021, December). Does an extended family improve mentalising in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK & Pakistan. 2nd International Foundation University Conference of Psychology, Rawalpindi, Pakistan.
  4. Mazhar, A. (2020, October). Developing a non-profit to advance autism research in Pakistan. Anna Freud Centre Seminar Series, London, United Kingdom.

Posters

  1. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Theory of Mind in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK and Pakistan. Harvard Trends in Psychology Summit, Cambridge, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Research Rounds, New Haven, United States.

Cindy works at the intersection of learning, design, and technology, with a keen interest in the orchestration of future-ready tech-enabled learning.

She is curious how the deployment of adaptive learning systems to schools will impact classroom learning and hopes to learn more about the human-machine partnership in education. Specifically, her research is concerned with the implications that the use of such systems has on teacher-student interactions, as teachers grapple with balancing personalised learning and learning in community, as well as curriculum demands and student interests. These are some tensions which could potentially be exacerbated by affordances of adaptive learning systems.

Prior to embarking on the DPhil in Education at Oxford, Cindy worked as the Lead Specialist in Technologies for Learning at the Educational Technology Division of Ministry of Education, Singapore. She had previously completed graduate studies at the National University of Singapore and Stanford University where she was awarded Master of Arts in English Studies and Master of Arts in Education.

Reem is DPhil student from Saudi Arabia.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she worked as a Teacher, Professional Developer, then, became a Supervisor and Researcher in the Ministry of Education where she received a scholarship to pursue her DPhil education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests lie in the area of Teacher Education and Professional Learning Policy and Practice.

Publications
  • Alqahtani, Reem (2020). Saudi Universities Role in Developing Teacher Professional Development Programs: Elite Universities Experience. Journal of Educational Sciences. King Saud University.
  • Alqahtani, Reem. (2020). The effect of implementing UDL-based activities in improving EFL learners’ academic achievement and attitudes towards L2. In L. Salas, & E. Ager, Creating Quiet reflective Spaces: Language Teacher Researches Professional Development (pp. 61-62). IATEFL publications.

Lena Zlock is researching the integration of digital technology into structures of teaching, learning, and education in higher education. Her particular focus is on the digital humanities and the potential for digital methods to transform humanistic study. She works with Professor Niall Winters and Dr. James Robson.

Lena’s research interests stem from her education as an M.St. student and Ertegun Graduate Scholar in Modern Languages at the University of Oxford, and as a B.A. student in History at Stanford University. As an undergraduate, she started the Voltaire Library Project, a digitally and data-driven study of the 6,763-book collection of French Enlightenment philosopher Voltaire (you can read more about the project here and here). She has been interested in the application of digital technology to humanistic teaching since her days in Princeton Day School, where she developed an interdisciplinary curriculum on Mexico City (visit the course website here).

Her research on Voltaire led her to think more broadly about the place of digital methods in the humanities classroom, and how new technologies will revolutionise the liberal arts and higher education. As a DPhil candidate, Lena will examine the negotiation and implementation of new learning technologies within the University of Oxford at undergraduate and graduate levels.

Lena is involved in a number of digital humanities initiatives in Oxford. She previously served as the inaugural fellow of the Voltaire Lab at Oxford’s Voltaire Foundation. As a master’s student, Lena co-formulated the convergence agenda for Oxford digital humanities with Professor Howard Hotson, and is currently employed by the Humanities Division to assist with the development of an M.St. degree in Digital Scholarship (read more here). Lena set up and helps to run the History of the Book blog for the Faculty of Medieval and Modern Languages and the Oxford Book History Twitter account.

Lena welcomes inquiries from undergraduate and postgraduate students from Oxford and beyond seeking to get involved with the digital humanities in any capacity. The History of the Book blog also welcomes inquiries from prospective contributors.

 

Abbey is a Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education, in collaboration with the Department of Engineering.

Before joining the DPhil program, Abbey obtained a B.A. in Applied Linguistics with minors in Russian and Chinese from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford. She was the recipient of a Benjamin A. Gilman International Scholarship through U.S. Department of State for study in Russia and was awarded two Foreign Language and Area Studies (FLAS) Fellowships for study in both Russia and China. She holds both TESOL and TEFL certificates and has taught English as a Second Language in various contexts to a wide variety of learner populations.

Abbey’s main research interests lie in the use of technology to facilitate language learning. Her DPhil research focuses on the development of a virtual reality program to bridge the gaps that students face when learning languages through distance learning.

Dr Nadiya Ivanenko is a Visiting Research Fellow in the field of civic education and citizenship linguistics. She is a member of the Applied Linguistics research group and Higher Education research group at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

After receiving PhD in Comparative Linguistics from Kyiv National Linguistic University (2008) Nadiya worked as an Associate Professor of the Germanic Languages and Teaching Methodology Department, Faculty of Ukrainian Philology, Foreign Languages and Social Communications and Vice Dean of the Faculty of Foreign Languages, Central Ukrainian State University, Ukraine.

Nadiya was a Chevening scholar and Postgraduate researcher at the Department of Education, University of Oxford (2003-2004). She was a Co-chair of the joint UNESCO Chair/UNITWIN project ‘Education as a Humanitarian Response’ (2004-2012); a participant of BECA joint project ‘Education for Democracy’ between Montclair State University (USA) and Kirovohrad State Pedagogical University (Ukraine). Nadiya had internship for teachers of EFL in the Department of Educational and Cultural Programmes at Shakespeare’s Globe Theater, London, UK (2011). She was the Head of the British Council International Mobility Grant ‘Internalizing Higher Education in Ukraine’, which included 2 internships at the University of Durham, UK (2016). She participated in the internship “Retraining in the Field of Teaching Excellence”, Bayreuth University, Germany (Erasmus + Project (2021) and was a coordinator of the Erasmus+ Project: Innovative Approach to Promotion Teaching Excellence (2021-2022) at Central Ukrainian State University.

Selected Publications

BOOKS

  • Rastrygina, A., Ivanenko, N. (2021). Pedagogy of Freedom in the Paradigmal Space of Modern Education and Upbringing.
  • Ivanenko, N., Liashuk, A. (2021). English Activity Book. Practical Course of English. Kropyvnytskyi.
  • Ivanenko N. (2014). (Edit.) Education in Eastern Europe and Eurasia. London: Bloomsbury.
  • Ivanenko N. (2008). The Concept of Good in English and Ukrainian Language Pictures of the World. Kirovohrad: KOD.
  • Ivanenko N. (2007). Written Practice and Conversation for 1 Year. Kropyvnytskyi.
  • Garkusha, L., Ivanenko, N. (2004). Critical thinking in life skills training. Kirovohrad.

BOOK CHAPTERS

  • Ivanenko, N. (2024). Words and word meanings In The Routledge Companion To English Studies/ by Constant Leung & Jo Lewkowicz. London, UK: Routledge (in publishing).
  • Ivanenko N. (2023). Development of civic education in Ukrainian universities: new challenges of modern realities in the conditions of the transformation of society. In Contemporary Education in Ukraine: Integration into the European Educational Space. Dnipro (pp. 387-412) DOI:36550/978-617-8245-57-3-20
  • Ivanenko N. (2019). Citizenship Education, Moral Fluency and Social and Political Future Challenges. In Polish-Jewish History, Culture, Values, and Education between Paradise and Inferno. Irvine, USA: Brown Walker Press (pp. 93-103)
  • Ivanenko N. (2014). Education Change, Transformation, Reforms – a Regional Overview. In N. Ivanenko (Edit.) Education in Eastern Europe and Eurasia. London: Bloomsbury (pp. 9-45)
  • Ivanenko N. (2013). Vulnerable Children in Ukraine and Educational Response. In M. Matsumoto (Edit.) Education and Disadvantaged Children and Young People. London: Bloomsbury (pp. 95-132)

JOURNAL ARTICLES

  1. Ivanenko, N. (2024). Challenges of Ukrainian Higher Education in Times of War. International Higher Education. The Boston College Centre for International Higher Education, 118, pp. 35-36 https://doi.org/10.36197/IHE.2024.118.17
  2. Ivanenko, N., Paska, T., Irkha, A. Rud, A., & Boguslavskas, L., (2024). The Role of Higher Education for Ensuring National Security in Ukraine. Futurity Education, 4(1), 210-237 https://doi.org/10.57125/FED.2024.03.25.11
  3. Leleka, T., Ivanenko, N., Demeshko, I., Kapitan T., & Demchenko, I. (2024). The Process of English Internationalization in the Ukrainian Educational Paradigm. Slavistica Vilnensis, 68(2), 76-89 doi:10.15388/SlavViln.2023.68(2).6
  4. Ivanenko, N., Rud, A., Hurbanska, A., Cheban, Y., & Syrtseva, S. (2024). Digitalization of Education of the Future – A Trend or a Requirement of the Time? Journal of Higher Education Theory and Practice24(2). DOI: https://doi.org/10.33423/jhetp.v24i2.6791
  5. Ivanenko, N. (2023). Civic character cultivation as a basic virtue within and beyond modern educational institutions. Academic Notes. Series Pedagogical sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 209, 180-185 DOI: https://doi.org/10.36550/2415-7988-2022-1-209-180-185
  6. Rastrygina, A., Ivanenko, N. (2023). A Pedagogy of freedom as a viable basis for implementing gender equality in Ukraine’s educational institutions. International Review of Education, 69(1-2), 143-174. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/s11159-023-09995-9
  7. Ivanenko N., Biletska O., Hurbanska S., Hurbanska, A., & Kochmar, D. (2023). English language morphological neologisms reflecting the war in Ukraine. World Journal of English Language, 13(5), pp. 432-438    DOI: doi:http://dx.doi.org/10.5430/wjel.v13n5p432
  8. Ivanenko, N., Boiko, A., Fedorchuk, L., Panchenko, I., & Marieiev, D. (2023). Development of educational policy in Ukraine in the context of European integration and digital transformation. Revista Eduweb, 17(2), 296-305 DOI: https://doi.org/10.46502/issn.1856-7576/2023.17.02.25
  9. Ivanenko, N.V., Gerasymenko,Yu. A., Kostenko, V.G. (2023). Innovative approaches to the modernization of philological education and science in Ukraine: a response to the challenges of wartime. Akademichni Vizii, (in Ukrainian). URL: https://academy-vision.org/index.php/av/article/view/281 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5281/zenodo.7795088
  10. Ivanenko N. (2022). Phraseological units of the conceptual field MARRIAGE in the English picture of the world. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi: KOD, 202, pp. 140-146
  11. Bilous, O., Mishchenko, A., Datska, T., Ivanenko, N., Kit, L., Piankovska, I., and Vereshchak, Y. (2021). Modern linguistic technologies: strategy of teaching translation studies. Rupkatha Journal on Interdisciplinary Studies in Humanities, 13(4), pp. 1-12 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/21659/rupkatha.v13n4.65
  12. Leleka, T., Ivanenko, N., Moskalenko O., Herasymenko, L., Shevchuk L., Pidlubna, O. (2021). Angloamerican loanwords use in the Ukrainian student slang. Laplage em Revista, 7(Extra-D): University and science: possible dialogues. pp.163-174. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/24115/S2446-622020217Extra-D1081p.163-174
  13. Ivanenko N. (2021). Figurative and valuable component of the MARRIAGE concept. Trends in Science and Practice of Today. Ankara, Turkey, pp. 356-361
  14. Ivanenko N. (2021). Inclusive learning environment for students’ achievements and foreign language development. Priorities in the Development of Science and Education. Budapest, Hungary, pp.74-80
  15. Ivanenko N. (2021). The nominative field of the MARRIAGE concept and the analysis of the synonymous series of its key unit. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi: KOD, 193, pp 218-224 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.36550/2522-4077-2021-1-193-218-224
  16. Ivanenko N. (2020). Language intervention stages in project-based learning. Modern Trends in Foreign Language Professional Training in a Multicultural Space. Kyiv, pp. 249 – 255
  17. Rastrygina, A., Ivanenko, N. (2020). Gender comfortable educational environment as a factor of development of personal freedom. Research Bulletin. Pedagogical Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 188, pp. 28 – 35 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.36550/2415-7988-2020-1-188-28-35
  18. Ivanenko N. (2020). Texting slang as one of the most common groups of everyday youth Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi: KOD, 187, pp. 38-45
  19. Ivanenko N. (2019). Computer use in foreign language Intellectual and Emotional Components of Foreign Language Learning: Latest Trends and Challenges for Higher Education. Kyiv, pp. 152 – 158.
  20. Ivanenko N. (2019). Initial stages of elaborating a project in a foreign language classroom. Science and Society. Hamilton, Canada, pp. 13 – 20.
  21. Ivanenko N. (2019). Project-based learning as a way to incorporate effective foreign language teaching. Research Bulletin. Pedagogical Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 177, pp. 207 – 211
  22. Ivanenko N. (2019). Youth vocabulary as a reflection of changes in modern society. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi: KOD, 175, pp. 34 – 39.
  23. Ivanenko N. (2018). Promoting citizenship education in the English language Proceedings of the IV International Conference. Kyiv, pp. 130 – 137
  24. Ivanenko N. (2018). Educating global citizens at a foreign language class. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, – pp. 494 – 500
  25. Ivanenko N. (2018). Formation of civic values through teaching a foreign language. Proceedings of the II International Conference “Foreign Language in Professional Training of Specialists: Problems and Strategies”. Kropyvnytskyi, pp. 189-191
  26. Ivanenko N. (2017). Citizenship education in the English language classroom. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 154. – pp. 92 – 97
  27. Ivanenko N. (2017). Education for democratic citizenship: teaching virtues and values. Research Bulletin. Pedagogical Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 152, pp. 110-113
  28. Ivanenko N. (2016). Citizenship education as a way to develop moral fluency to solve social and political challenges of the future. Scientific Journal of Ariel University. Israel: Ariel University.
  29. Ivanenko N. (2016). Functioning peculiarities of lexical units of the RESPECT concept in the English language. Proceedings of the International Conference Linguistic and Linguacultural Aspects of Teaching Foreign Languages in Ukrainian Universities”. Dnipropetrovsk, pp. 87-94
  30. Ivanenko N. (2016). Semantic relationships of lexical units of the concept of love in the English language. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, pp. 221-226
  31. Ivanenko N. (2015). Citizenship education as the coordination and integration of educational establishment and community. Research Proceedings of the national UniversityOstrog Academy”. Ostrog, pp. 136-142
  32. Ivanenko N. (2015). The value of citizenship education in practices of student governing body. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 136. pp. 438-442

Louise’s doctoral research investigates how teachers become who they are.

Louise’s work situates the schoolteacher as a particular type of subject, that is both made and makes itself from within a network of power relations. Her study combines Foucauldian theory, Critical Discourse Analysis, and Narrative analysis to provide an account of schoolteachers’ ethical agency in the context of top-down policy practices.

Louise is a Doctoral Teaching Fellow at the Department of Education, where she teaches and supervises students in the MSc in Learning and Teaching course. Currently, Louise is collaborating the OECD in their Globally Teaching InSights project. Her research supports the Schools+ Network aims to fuel an ecosystem of organisations that are driving change in education from the bottom-up.

In March 2023 she presented her preliminary research at the Philosophy of Education Society of Great Britain (PESGB)’s annual conference.

As Honorary Fellow John attends seminars and consults with current staff in Mathematics Education.

During 40 years at the Open University supporting the teaching of mathematics he authored a wide range of papers, and dozens of Open University Books and Teaching materials. He co-authored the classic Thinking Mathematically; Mathematics as a Constructive Activity (with his wife Prof. Anne Watson); Questions and Prompts for Mathematical Thinking & Thinkers (with Anne and other colleagues), among many others.

His research methods are phenomenological, based on the Discipline of Noticing. He is interested in the lived experience of learning, doing and teaching mathematics. He focuses on the structure and form of Attention in the teaching of mathematics, as he supports those who wish to foster and sustain mathematical thinking in others.

He is an Honorary Fellow of BSRLM and ATM, a long-standing member of  the MAA and the  MA.H.

 

Publications

  • Mason, J. (2022). Consequences of a Virtual Encounter with George Pólya. Teaching Mathematics and Computer Science.  20 (2) p173-182.
  • Zazkis, R. Kontorovich, I. & Mason, J. (2021). The Learning and Teaching of Number: paths less travelled through well-trodden terrain. London: Routledge
  • Mason, J. (2021). Learning about Noticing, by, and through, Noticing. ZDM – Mathematics Education. 53(1) p231-243. doi: 10.1007/s11858-020-01192-4
  • Mason, J. & Czarnocha,B. (2021). Aha! Moments, Bisociation and Multifocal Attention. In B. Czarnocha & W. Baker. Creativity of an Aha! Moment and Mathematics Education. Leiden: Brill. p345-361.
  • Mason, J. (2018) Making Distinctions: a phenomenological exploration in mathematics education. In P. Ernest (Ed.). The Philosophy of Mathematics Education Today. ICME-13 Monographs. Springer.
  • Mason, J. (2018). Reflecting on values emerging from practice and the value of reflecting on practice. In D. Rowe & A. Watson (Eds.). Faith and Experience in Education: essays from Quaker perspectives. London: Trentham Books. p63-91.
  • Mason, J. & Metz, M. (2017). Digging Beneath Dual Systems Theory and the Bicameral Brain: abductions about the human psyche from experience in mathematical problem solving. In U. Xolocotzin (Ed.). Understanding Emotions in Mathematical Thinking and Learning. p379-407. Cambridge: Elsevier/Academic Press.
  • Mason, J. (2016). Rising Above a Cause-and-Effect Stance in Mathematics Education Research. JMTE 19(4) p297-300. http://rdcu.be/npTf
  • Mason, J. & Davis, B. (2013). The Importance of Teachers’ Mathematical Awareness for In-The-Moment Pedagogy. CJSMTE 13(2) p182-197.
  • Mason, J. (2012). Noticing: roots and branches. In M. Sherin, V. Jacobs, & R. Phillip (Eds.) Mathematics Teacher Noticing:  Seeing Through Teachers’ Eyes. p35-50. Mahwah: Erlbaum.
  • Mason, J. (2008). Being Mathematical With & In Front of Learners: Attention, Awareness, and Attitude as Sources of Differences between Teacher Educators, Teachers & Learners. In T. Wood (Series Ed.) & B. Jaworski (Vol. Ed.), International Handbook of Mathematics Teacher Education: Vol.4. The Mathematics Teacher Educator as a Developing Professional. Rotterdam, the Netherlands: Sense Publishers, p31-56.
  • Mason, J. & Johnston-Wilder, S. (2006 2nd edition). Designing and Using Mathematical Tasks. St. Albans: Tarquin.
  • Watson, A. & Mason, J. (2006). Seeing an Exercise as a Single Mathematical Object: Using Variation to Structure Sense-Making. Mathematical Thinking and Learning. 8(2) p91-111.
  • Watson, A. & Mason, J. (2005). Mathematics as a Constructive Activity: learners generating examples. Mahwah: Erlbaum.
  • Mason, J. & Johnston-Wilder, S. (2004). Fundamental Constructs in Mathematics Education, RoutledgeFalmer, London.
  • Mason, J. 2003, Structure of Attention in the Learning of Mathematics, in J. Novotná (Ed.) Proceedings, International Symposium on Elementary Mathematics Teaching, Charles University, Prague, p9-16.
  • Mason, J. 2002, Mathematics Teaching Practice: a guidebook for university and college lecturers, Horwood Publishing, Chichester.
  • Mason, J. 2002, Researching Your own Practice: The Discipline of Noticing, RoutledgeFalmer, London.
  • Mason, J. 2001, Modelling Modelling: where is the centre of gravity of-for-when modelling?, in J. Matos, W. Blum, S. Houston & S. Carreira (Eds.) Modelling and Mathematics Education: ICTMA 9 applications in science and technology, Horwood Publishing, Chichester, p39-61.
  • Mason, J. Burton L. & Stacey K. (1982). Thinking Mathematically, Addison Wesley, London

Website

www.pmtheta.com

Mark has worked in ELT and EMI for over 35 years as a teacher, teacher trainer, lecturer, course writer, syllabus designer, examiner, Director of Studies, and consultant editor for OUP. For the British Council he has worked as a consultant trainer and course developer in EMI and EAP. For the University of Oxford Department of Education Mark delivered the ELT option on the MSc ALSLA and is Teaching Associate of the EMI Research Group in which capacity he has worked as a CI and has developed and delivered EMI teacher training courses in China, Serbia and Oxford. Mark has worked in universities in Russia, Ukraine, Kazakhstan, Belarus, Czechia, Italy, Germany, Mexico, Peru, Chile, Brazil, Colombia and Morocco.

He continues to be involved in EMI and is currently co-authoring an EMI student guide.

Mark is an alumnus of the University of Oxford Department of Education and was among the first to be awarded the innovative MSc in Teaching English Language in University Settings.

Anushay is a second-year DPhil student investigating how classroom characteristics are related to Pakistani children’s development. She is supervised by Professor Iram Siraj and Dr Katharina Ereky-Stevens and her work is being supported by the Aga Khan University (Pakistan). Anushay received the Patrice Engle Dissertation Grant Award from the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD) in 2023.

Anushay completed her BSc Psychology from UCL, where she also started her master’s in Developmental Neuroscience and Psychopathology. She was based at Yale University for her master’s thesis, where she worked with Dr Craig Bailey at the Yale Center for Emotional Intelligence to understand children’s emotion development. Anushay also works as a part-time research  assistant at the Developmental Diversity Lab at UCL’s Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience. Anushay’s research interests include understanding child development across different cultures, factors that might be affecting it, and devising culture-specific ways to support children’s holistic development through the educational system. She is also keen on improving the research scope in Pakistan by working with Pakistani researchers, practitioners, and families. Anushay balances her research with her position as the founder of a non-profit, Resources for Children, which aims to understand and support children’s development in Pakistan.

Publications

Journal Articles

  1. Mazhar, A., & Bailey, C., S. (under review). Understanding Children’s Emotion-Specific Biases: How They Relate to Child and Family Factors, Emotion Recognition Accuracy, and Social Behaviour.

Presentations

  1. Mazhar, A., & Bailey, C., S. (2023, March). Understanding Children’s Emotion-Specific Biases: How They Relate to Child-Level Factors and Emotion Recognition Accuracy [Paper Presentation]. Society for Research in Child Development, Salt Lake City, Utah, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2022, April). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Spring Preview, New Haven, United States.
  3. Mazhar, A. (2021, December). Does an extended family improve mentalising in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK & Pakistan. 2nd International Foundation University Conference of Psychology, Rawalpindi, Pakistan.
  4. Mazhar, A. (2020, October). Developing a non-profit to advance autism research in Pakistan. Anna Freud Centre Seminar Series, London, United Kingdom.

Posters

  1. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Theory of Mind in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK and Pakistan. Harvard Trends in Psychology Summit, Cambridge, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Research Rounds, New Haven, United States.

Cindy works at the intersection of learning, design, and technology, with a keen interest in the orchestration of future-ready tech-enabled learning.

She is curious how the deployment of adaptive learning systems to schools will impact classroom learning and hopes to learn more about the human-machine partnership in education. Specifically, her research is concerned with the implications that the use of such systems has on teacher-student interactions, as teachers grapple with balancing personalised learning and learning in community, as well as curriculum demands and student interests. These are some tensions which could potentially be exacerbated by affordances of adaptive learning systems.

Prior to embarking on the DPhil in Education at Oxford, Cindy worked as the Lead Specialist in Technologies for Learning at the Educational Technology Division of Ministry of Education, Singapore. She had previously completed graduate studies at the National University of Singapore and Stanford University where she was awarded Master of Arts in English Studies and Master of Arts in Education.

Reem is DPhil student from Saudi Arabia.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she worked as a Teacher, Professional Developer, then, became a Supervisor and Researcher in the Ministry of Education where she received a scholarship to pursue her DPhil education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests lie in the area of Teacher Education and Professional Learning Policy and Practice.

Publications
  • Alqahtani, Reem (2020). Saudi Universities Role in Developing Teacher Professional Development Programs: Elite Universities Experience. Journal of Educational Sciences. King Saud University.
  • Alqahtani, Reem. (2020). The effect of implementing UDL-based activities in improving EFL learners’ academic achievement and attitudes towards L2. In L. Salas, & E. Ager, Creating Quiet reflective Spaces: Language Teacher Researches Professional Development (pp. 61-62). IATEFL publications.

Lena Zlock is researching the integration of digital technology into structures of teaching, learning, and education in higher education. Her particular focus is on the digital humanities and the potential for digital methods to transform humanistic study. She works with Professor Niall Winters and Dr. James Robson.

Lena’s research interests stem from her education as an M.St. student and Ertegun Graduate Scholar in Modern Languages at the University of Oxford, and as a B.A. student in History at Stanford University. As an undergraduate, she started the Voltaire Library Project, a digitally and data-driven study of the 6,763-book collection of French Enlightenment philosopher Voltaire (you can read more about the project here and here). She has been interested in the application of digital technology to humanistic teaching since her days in Princeton Day School, where she developed an interdisciplinary curriculum on Mexico City (visit the course website here).

Her research on Voltaire led her to think more broadly about the place of digital methods in the humanities classroom, and how new technologies will revolutionise the liberal arts and higher education. As a DPhil candidate, Lena will examine the negotiation and implementation of new learning technologies within the University of Oxford at undergraduate and graduate levels.

Lena is involved in a number of digital humanities initiatives in Oxford. She previously served as the inaugural fellow of the Voltaire Lab at Oxford’s Voltaire Foundation. As a master’s student, Lena co-formulated the convergence agenda for Oxford digital humanities with Professor Howard Hotson, and is currently employed by the Humanities Division to assist with the development of an M.St. degree in Digital Scholarship (read more here). Lena set up and helps to run the History of the Book blog for the Faculty of Medieval and Modern Languages and the Oxford Book History Twitter account.

Lena welcomes inquiries from undergraduate and postgraduate students from Oxford and beyond seeking to get involved with the digital humanities in any capacity. The History of the Book blog also welcomes inquiries from prospective contributors.

 

Abbey is a Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education, in collaboration with the Department of Engineering.

Before joining the DPhil program, Abbey obtained a B.A. in Applied Linguistics with minors in Russian and Chinese from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford. She was the recipient of a Benjamin A. Gilman International Scholarship through U.S. Department of State for study in Russia and was awarded two Foreign Language and Area Studies (FLAS) Fellowships for study in both Russia and China. She holds both TESOL and TEFL certificates and has taught English as a Second Language in various contexts to a wide variety of learner populations.

Abbey’s main research interests lie in the use of technology to facilitate language learning. Her DPhil research focuses on the development of a virtual reality program to bridge the gaps that students face when learning languages through distance learning.

Dr Nadiya Ivanenko is a Visiting Research Fellow in the field of civic education and citizenship linguistics. She is a member of the Applied Linguistics research group and Higher Education research group at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

After receiving PhD in Comparative Linguistics from Kyiv National Linguistic University (2008) Nadiya worked as an Associate Professor of the Germanic Languages and Teaching Methodology Department, Faculty of Ukrainian Philology, Foreign Languages and Social Communications and Vice Dean of the Faculty of Foreign Languages, Central Ukrainian State University, Ukraine.

Nadiya was a Chevening scholar and Postgraduate researcher at the Department of Education, University of Oxford (2003-2004). She was a Co-chair of the joint UNESCO Chair/UNITWIN project ‘Education as a Humanitarian Response’ (2004-2012); a participant of BECA joint project ‘Education for Democracy’ between Montclair State University (USA) and Kirovohrad State Pedagogical University (Ukraine). Nadiya had internship for teachers of EFL in the Department of Educational and Cultural Programmes at Shakespeare’s Globe Theater, London, UK (2011). She was the Head of the British Council International Mobility Grant ‘Internalizing Higher Education in Ukraine’, which included 2 internships at the University of Durham, UK (2016). She participated in the internship “Retraining in the Field of Teaching Excellence”, Bayreuth University, Germany (Erasmus + Project (2021) and was a coordinator of the Erasmus+ Project: Innovative Approach to Promotion Teaching Excellence (2021-2022) at Central Ukrainian State University.

Selected Publications

BOOKS

  • Rastrygina, A., Ivanenko, N. (2021). Pedagogy of Freedom in the Paradigmal Space of Modern Education and Upbringing.
  • Ivanenko, N., Liashuk, A. (2021). English Activity Book. Practical Course of English. Kropyvnytskyi.
  • Ivanenko N. (2014). (Edit.) Education in Eastern Europe and Eurasia. London: Bloomsbury.
  • Ivanenko N. (2008). The Concept of Good in English and Ukrainian Language Pictures of the World. Kirovohrad: KOD.
  • Ivanenko N. (2007). Written Practice and Conversation for 1 Year. Kropyvnytskyi.
  • Garkusha, L., Ivanenko, N. (2004). Critical thinking in life skills training. Kirovohrad.

BOOK CHAPTERS

  • Ivanenko, N. (2024). Words and word meanings In The Routledge Companion To English Studies/ by Constant Leung & Jo Lewkowicz. London, UK: Routledge (in publishing).
  • Ivanenko N. (2023). Development of civic education in Ukrainian universities: new challenges of modern realities in the conditions of the transformation of society. In Contemporary Education in Ukraine: Integration into the European Educational Space. Dnipro (pp. 387-412) DOI:36550/978-617-8245-57-3-20
  • Ivanenko N. (2019). Citizenship Education, Moral Fluency and Social and Political Future Challenges. In Polish-Jewish History, Culture, Values, and Education between Paradise and Inferno. Irvine, USA: Brown Walker Press (pp. 93-103)
  • Ivanenko N. (2014). Education Change, Transformation, Reforms – a Regional Overview. In N. Ivanenko (Edit.) Education in Eastern Europe and Eurasia. London: Bloomsbury (pp. 9-45)
  • Ivanenko N. (2013). Vulnerable Children in Ukraine and Educational Response. In M. Matsumoto (Edit.) Education and Disadvantaged Children and Young People. London: Bloomsbury (pp. 95-132)

JOURNAL ARTICLES

  1. Ivanenko, N. (2024). Challenges of Ukrainian Higher Education in Times of War. International Higher Education. The Boston College Centre for International Higher Education, 118, pp. 35-36 https://doi.org/10.36197/IHE.2024.118.17
  2. Ivanenko, N., Paska, T., Irkha, A. Rud, A., & Boguslavskas, L., (2024). The Role of Higher Education for Ensuring National Security in Ukraine. Futurity Education, 4(1), 210-237 https://doi.org/10.57125/FED.2024.03.25.11
  3. Leleka, T., Ivanenko, N., Demeshko, I., Kapitan T., & Demchenko, I. (2024). The Process of English Internationalization in the Ukrainian Educational Paradigm. Slavistica Vilnensis, 68(2), 76-89 doi:10.15388/SlavViln.2023.68(2).6
  4. Ivanenko, N., Rud, A., Hurbanska, A., Cheban, Y., & Syrtseva, S. (2024). Digitalization of Education of the Future – A Trend or a Requirement of the Time? Journal of Higher Education Theory and Practice24(2). DOI: https://doi.org/10.33423/jhetp.v24i2.6791
  5. Ivanenko, N. (2023). Civic character cultivation as a basic virtue within and beyond modern educational institutions. Academic Notes. Series Pedagogical sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 209, 180-185 DOI: https://doi.org/10.36550/2415-7988-2022-1-209-180-185
  6. Rastrygina, A., Ivanenko, N. (2023). A Pedagogy of freedom as a viable basis for implementing gender equality in Ukraine’s educational institutions. International Review of Education, 69(1-2), 143-174. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/s11159-023-09995-9
  7. Ivanenko N., Biletska O., Hurbanska S., Hurbanska, A., & Kochmar, D. (2023). English language morphological neologisms reflecting the war in Ukraine. World Journal of English Language, 13(5), pp. 432-438    DOI: doi:http://dx.doi.org/10.5430/wjel.v13n5p432
  8. Ivanenko, N., Boiko, A., Fedorchuk, L., Panchenko, I., & Marieiev, D. (2023). Development of educational policy in Ukraine in the context of European integration and digital transformation. Revista Eduweb, 17(2), 296-305 DOI: https://doi.org/10.46502/issn.1856-7576/2023.17.02.25
  9. Ivanenko, N.V., Gerasymenko,Yu. A., Kostenko, V.G. (2023). Innovative approaches to the modernization of philological education and science in Ukraine: a response to the challenges of wartime. Akademichni Vizii, (in Ukrainian). URL: https://academy-vision.org/index.php/av/article/view/281 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5281/zenodo.7795088
  10. Ivanenko N. (2022). Phraseological units of the conceptual field MARRIAGE in the English picture of the world. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi: KOD, 202, pp. 140-146
  11. Bilous, O., Mishchenko, A., Datska, T., Ivanenko, N., Kit, L., Piankovska, I., and Vereshchak, Y. (2021). Modern linguistic technologies: strategy of teaching translation studies. Rupkatha Journal on Interdisciplinary Studies in Humanities, 13(4), pp. 1-12 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/21659/rupkatha.v13n4.65
  12. Leleka, T., Ivanenko, N., Moskalenko O., Herasymenko, L., Shevchuk L., Pidlubna, O. (2021). Angloamerican loanwords use in the Ukrainian student slang. Laplage em Revista, 7(Extra-D): University and science: possible dialogues. pp.163-174. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/24115/S2446-622020217Extra-D1081p.163-174
  13. Ivanenko N. (2021). Figurative and valuable component of the MARRIAGE concept. Trends in Science and Practice of Today. Ankara, Turkey, pp. 356-361
  14. Ivanenko N. (2021). Inclusive learning environment for students’ achievements and foreign language development. Priorities in the Development of Science and Education. Budapest, Hungary, pp.74-80
  15. Ivanenko N. (2021). The nominative field of the MARRIAGE concept and the analysis of the synonymous series of its key unit. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi: KOD, 193, pp 218-224 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.36550/2522-4077-2021-1-193-218-224
  16. Ivanenko N. (2020). Language intervention stages in project-based learning. Modern Trends in Foreign Language Professional Training in a Multicultural Space. Kyiv, pp. 249 – 255
  17. Rastrygina, A., Ivanenko, N. (2020). Gender comfortable educational environment as a factor of development of personal freedom. Research Bulletin. Pedagogical Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 188, pp. 28 – 35 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.36550/2415-7988-2020-1-188-28-35
  18. Ivanenko N. (2020). Texting slang as one of the most common groups of everyday youth Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi: KOD, 187, pp. 38-45
  19. Ivanenko N. (2019). Computer use in foreign language Intellectual and Emotional Components of Foreign Language Learning: Latest Trends and Challenges for Higher Education. Kyiv, pp. 152 – 158.
  20. Ivanenko N. (2019). Initial stages of elaborating a project in a foreign language classroom. Science and Society. Hamilton, Canada, pp. 13 – 20.
  21. Ivanenko N. (2019). Project-based learning as a way to incorporate effective foreign language teaching. Research Bulletin. Pedagogical Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 177, pp. 207 – 211
  22. Ivanenko N. (2019). Youth vocabulary as a reflection of changes in modern society. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi: KOD, 175, pp. 34 – 39.
  23. Ivanenko N. (2018). Promoting citizenship education in the English language Proceedings of the IV International Conference. Kyiv, pp. 130 – 137
  24. Ivanenko N. (2018). Educating global citizens at a foreign language class. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, – pp. 494 – 500
  25. Ivanenko N. (2018). Formation of civic values through teaching a foreign language. Proceedings of the II International Conference “Foreign Language in Professional Training of Specialists: Problems and Strategies”. Kropyvnytskyi, pp. 189-191
  26. Ivanenko N. (2017). Citizenship education in the English language classroom. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 154. – pp. 92 – 97
  27. Ivanenko N. (2017). Education for democratic citizenship: teaching virtues and values. Research Bulletin. Pedagogical Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 152, pp. 110-113
  28. Ivanenko N. (2016). Citizenship education as a way to develop moral fluency to solve social and political challenges of the future. Scientific Journal of Ariel University. Israel: Ariel University.
  29. Ivanenko N. (2016). Functioning peculiarities of lexical units of the RESPECT concept in the English language. Proceedings of the International Conference Linguistic and Linguacultural Aspects of Teaching Foreign Languages in Ukrainian Universities”. Dnipropetrovsk, pp. 87-94
  30. Ivanenko N. (2016). Semantic relationships of lexical units of the concept of love in the English language. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, pp. 221-226
  31. Ivanenko N. (2015). Citizenship education as the coordination and integration of educational establishment and community. Research Proceedings of the national UniversityOstrog Academy”. Ostrog, pp. 136-142
  32. Ivanenko N. (2015). The value of citizenship education in practices of student governing body. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 136. pp. 438-442

Louise’s doctoral research investigates how teachers become who they are.

Louise’s work situates the schoolteacher as a particular type of subject, that is both made and makes itself from within a network of power relations. Her study combines Foucauldian theory, Critical Discourse Analysis, and Narrative analysis to provide an account of schoolteachers’ ethical agency in the context of top-down policy practices.

Louise is a Doctoral Teaching Fellow at the Department of Education, where she teaches and supervises students in the MSc in Learning and Teaching course. Currently, Louise is collaborating the OECD in their Globally Teaching InSights project. Her research supports the Schools+ Network aims to fuel an ecosystem of organisations that are driving change in education from the bottom-up.

In March 2023 she presented her preliminary research at the Philosophy of Education Society of Great Britain (PESGB)’s annual conference.

As Honorary Fellow John attends seminars and consults with current staff in Mathematics Education.

During 40 years at the Open University supporting the teaching of mathematics he authored a wide range of papers, and dozens of Open University Books and Teaching materials. He co-authored the classic Thinking Mathematically; Mathematics as a Constructive Activity (with his wife Prof. Anne Watson); Questions and Prompts for Mathematical Thinking & Thinkers (with Anne and other colleagues), among many others.

His research methods are phenomenological, based on the Discipline of Noticing. He is interested in the lived experience of learning, doing and teaching mathematics. He focuses on the structure and form of Attention in the teaching of mathematics, as he supports those who wish to foster and sustain mathematical thinking in others.

He is an Honorary Fellow of BSRLM and ATM, a long-standing member of  the MAA and the  MA.H.

 

Publications

  • Mason, J. (2022). Consequences of a Virtual Encounter with George Pólya. Teaching Mathematics and Computer Science.  20 (2) p173-182.
  • Zazkis, R. Kontorovich, I. & Mason, J. (2021). The Learning and Teaching of Number: paths less travelled through well-trodden terrain. London: Routledge
  • Mason, J. (2021). Learning about Noticing, by, and through, Noticing. ZDM – Mathematics Education. 53(1) p231-243. doi: 10.1007/s11858-020-01192-4
  • Mason, J. & Czarnocha,B. (2021). Aha! Moments, Bisociation and Multifocal Attention. In B. Czarnocha & W. Baker. Creativity of an Aha! Moment and Mathematics Education. Leiden: Brill. p345-361.
  • Mason, J. (2018) Making Distinctions: a phenomenological exploration in mathematics education. In P. Ernest (Ed.). The Philosophy of Mathematics Education Today. ICME-13 Monographs. Springer.
  • Mason, J. (2018). Reflecting on values emerging from practice and the value of reflecting on practice. In D. Rowe & A. Watson (Eds.). Faith and Experience in Education: essays from Quaker perspectives. London: Trentham Books. p63-91.
  • Mason, J. & Metz, M. (2017). Digging Beneath Dual Systems Theory and the Bicameral Brain: abductions about the human psyche from experience in mathematical problem solving. In U. Xolocotzin (Ed.). Understanding Emotions in Mathematical Thinking and Learning. p379-407. Cambridge: Elsevier/Academic Press.
  • Mason, J. (2016). Rising Above a Cause-and-Effect Stance in Mathematics Education Research. JMTE 19(4) p297-300. http://rdcu.be/npTf
  • Mason, J. & Davis, B. (2013). The Importance of Teachers’ Mathematical Awareness for In-The-Moment Pedagogy. CJSMTE 13(2) p182-197.
  • Mason, J. (2012). Noticing: roots and branches. In M. Sherin, V. Jacobs, & R. Phillip (Eds.) Mathematics Teacher Noticing:  Seeing Through Teachers’ Eyes. p35-50. Mahwah: Erlbaum.
  • Mason, J. (2008). Being Mathematical With & In Front of Learners: Attention, Awareness, and Attitude as Sources of Differences between Teacher Educators, Teachers & Learners. In T. Wood (Series Ed.) & B. Jaworski (Vol. Ed.), International Handbook of Mathematics Teacher Education: Vol.4. The Mathematics Teacher Educator as a Developing Professional. Rotterdam, the Netherlands: Sense Publishers, p31-56.
  • Mason, J. & Johnston-Wilder, S. (2006 2nd edition). Designing and Using Mathematical Tasks. St. Albans: Tarquin.
  • Watson, A. & Mason, J. (2006). Seeing an Exercise as a Single Mathematical Object: Using Variation to Structure Sense-Making. Mathematical Thinking and Learning. 8(2) p91-111.
  • Watson, A. & Mason, J. (2005). Mathematics as a Constructive Activity: learners generating examples. Mahwah: Erlbaum.
  • Mason, J. & Johnston-Wilder, S. (2004). Fundamental Constructs in Mathematics Education, RoutledgeFalmer, London.
  • Mason, J. 2003, Structure of Attention in the Learning of Mathematics, in J. Novotná (Ed.) Proceedings, International Symposium on Elementary Mathematics Teaching, Charles University, Prague, p9-16.
  • Mason, J. 2002, Mathematics Teaching Practice: a guidebook for university and college lecturers, Horwood Publishing, Chichester.
  • Mason, J. 2002, Researching Your own Practice: The Discipline of Noticing, RoutledgeFalmer, London.
  • Mason, J. 2001, Modelling Modelling: where is the centre of gravity of-for-when modelling?, in J. Matos, W. Blum, S. Houston & S. Carreira (Eds.) Modelling and Mathematics Education: ICTMA 9 applications in science and technology, Horwood Publishing, Chichester, p39-61.
  • Mason, J. Burton L. & Stacey K. (1982). Thinking Mathematically, Addison Wesley, London

Website

www.pmtheta.com

Mark has worked in ELT and EMI for over 35 years as a teacher, teacher trainer, lecturer, course writer, syllabus designer, examiner, Director of Studies, and consultant editor for OUP. For the British Council he has worked as a consultant trainer and course developer in EMI and EAP. For the University of Oxford Department of Education Mark delivered the ELT option on the MSc ALSLA and is Teaching Associate of the EMI Research Group in which capacity he has worked as a CI and has developed and delivered EMI teacher training courses in China, Serbia and Oxford. Mark has worked in universities in Russia, Ukraine, Kazakhstan, Belarus, Czechia, Italy, Germany, Mexico, Peru, Chile, Brazil, Colombia and Morocco.

He continues to be involved in EMI and is currently co-authoring an EMI student guide.

Mark is an alumnus of the University of Oxford Department of Education and was among the first to be awarded the innovative MSc in Teaching English Language in University Settings.

Anushay is a second-year DPhil student investigating how classroom characteristics are related to Pakistani children’s development. She is supervised by Professor Iram Siraj and Dr Katharina Ereky-Stevens and her work is being supported by the Aga Khan University (Pakistan). Anushay received the Patrice Engle Dissertation Grant Award from the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD) in 2023.

Anushay completed her BSc Psychology from UCL, where she also started her master’s in Developmental Neuroscience and Psychopathology. She was based at Yale University for her master’s thesis, where she worked with Dr Craig Bailey at the Yale Center for Emotional Intelligence to understand children’s emotion development. Anushay also works as a part-time research  assistant at the Developmental Diversity Lab at UCL’s Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience. Anushay’s research interests include understanding child development across different cultures, factors that might be affecting it, and devising culture-specific ways to support children’s holistic development through the educational system. She is also keen on improving the research scope in Pakistan by working with Pakistani researchers, practitioners, and families. Anushay balances her research with her position as the founder of a non-profit, Resources for Children, which aims to understand and support children’s development in Pakistan.

Publications

Journal Articles

  1. Mazhar, A., & Bailey, C., S. (under review). Understanding Children’s Emotion-Specific Biases: How They Relate to Child and Family Factors, Emotion Recognition Accuracy, and Social Behaviour.

Presentations

  1. Mazhar, A., & Bailey, C., S. (2023, March). Understanding Children’s Emotion-Specific Biases: How They Relate to Child-Level Factors and Emotion Recognition Accuracy [Paper Presentation]. Society for Research in Child Development, Salt Lake City, Utah, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2022, April). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Spring Preview, New Haven, United States.
  3. Mazhar, A. (2021, December). Does an extended family improve mentalising in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK & Pakistan. 2nd International Foundation University Conference of Psychology, Rawalpindi, Pakistan.
  4. Mazhar, A. (2020, October). Developing a non-profit to advance autism research in Pakistan. Anna Freud Centre Seminar Series, London, United Kingdom.

Posters

  1. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Theory of Mind in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK and Pakistan. Harvard Trends in Psychology Summit, Cambridge, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Research Rounds, New Haven, United States.

Cindy works at the intersection of learning, design, and technology, with a keen interest in the orchestration of future-ready tech-enabled learning.

She is curious how the deployment of adaptive learning systems to schools will impact classroom learning and hopes to learn more about the human-machine partnership in education. Specifically, her research is concerned with the implications that the use of such systems has on teacher-student interactions, as teachers grapple with balancing personalised learning and learning in community, as well as curriculum demands and student interests. These are some tensions which could potentially be exacerbated by affordances of adaptive learning systems.

Prior to embarking on the DPhil in Education at Oxford, Cindy worked as the Lead Specialist in Technologies for Learning at the Educational Technology Division of Ministry of Education, Singapore. She had previously completed graduate studies at the National University of Singapore and Stanford University where she was awarded Master of Arts in English Studies and Master of Arts in Education.

Reem is DPhil student from Saudi Arabia.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she worked as a Teacher, Professional Developer, then, became a Supervisor and Researcher in the Ministry of Education where she received a scholarship to pursue her DPhil education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests lie in the area of Teacher Education and Professional Learning Policy and Practice.

Publications
  • Alqahtani, Reem (2020). Saudi Universities Role in Developing Teacher Professional Development Programs: Elite Universities Experience. Journal of Educational Sciences. King Saud University.
  • Alqahtani, Reem. (2020). The effect of implementing UDL-based activities in improving EFL learners’ academic achievement and attitudes towards L2. In L. Salas, & E. Ager, Creating Quiet reflective Spaces: Language Teacher Researches Professional Development (pp. 61-62). IATEFL publications.

Lena Zlock is researching the integration of digital technology into structures of teaching, learning, and education in higher education. Her particular focus is on the digital humanities and the potential for digital methods to transform humanistic study. She works with Professor Niall Winters and Dr. James Robson.

Lena’s research interests stem from her education as an M.St. student and Ertegun Graduate Scholar in Modern Languages at the University of Oxford, and as a B.A. student in History at Stanford University. As an undergraduate, she started the Voltaire Library Project, a digitally and data-driven study of the 6,763-book collection of French Enlightenment philosopher Voltaire (you can read more about the project here and here). She has been interested in the application of digital technology to humanistic teaching since her days in Princeton Day School, where she developed an interdisciplinary curriculum on Mexico City (visit the course website here).

Her research on Voltaire led her to think more broadly about the place of digital methods in the humanities classroom, and how new technologies will revolutionise the liberal arts and higher education. As a DPhil candidate, Lena will examine the negotiation and implementation of new learning technologies within the University of Oxford at undergraduate and graduate levels.

Lena is involved in a number of digital humanities initiatives in Oxford. She previously served as the inaugural fellow of the Voltaire Lab at Oxford’s Voltaire Foundation. As a master’s student, Lena co-formulated the convergence agenda for Oxford digital humanities with Professor Howard Hotson, and is currently employed by the Humanities Division to assist with the development of an M.St. degree in Digital Scholarship (read more here). Lena set up and helps to run the History of the Book blog for the Faculty of Medieval and Modern Languages and the Oxford Book History Twitter account.

Lena welcomes inquiries from undergraduate and postgraduate students from Oxford and beyond seeking to get involved with the digital humanities in any capacity. The History of the Book blog also welcomes inquiries from prospective contributors.

 

Abbey is a Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education, in collaboration with the Department of Engineering.

Before joining the DPhil program, Abbey obtained a B.A. in Applied Linguistics with minors in Russian and Chinese from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford. She was the recipient of a Benjamin A. Gilman International Scholarship through U.S. Department of State for study in Russia and was awarded two Foreign Language and Area Studies (FLAS) Fellowships for study in both Russia and China. She holds both TESOL and TEFL certificates and has taught English as a Second Language in various contexts to a wide variety of learner populations.

Abbey’s main research interests lie in the use of technology to facilitate language learning. Her DPhil research focuses on the development of a virtual reality program to bridge the gaps that students face when learning languages through distance learning.

Dr Nadiya Ivanenko is a Visiting Research Fellow in the field of civic education and citizenship linguistics. She is a member of the Applied Linguistics research group and Higher Education research group at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

After receiving PhD in Comparative Linguistics from Kyiv National Linguistic University (2008) Nadiya worked as an Associate Professor of the Germanic Languages and Teaching Methodology Department, Faculty of Ukrainian Philology, Foreign Languages and Social Communications and Vice Dean of the Faculty of Foreign Languages, Central Ukrainian State University, Ukraine.

Nadiya was a Chevening scholar and Postgraduate researcher at the Department of Education, University of Oxford (2003-2004). She was a Co-chair of the joint UNESCO Chair/UNITWIN project ‘Education as a Humanitarian Response’ (2004-2012); a participant of BECA joint project ‘Education for Democracy’ between Montclair State University (USA) and Kirovohrad State Pedagogical University (Ukraine). Nadiya had internship for teachers of EFL in the Department of Educational and Cultural Programmes at Shakespeare’s Globe Theater, London, UK (2011). She was the Head of the British Council International Mobility Grant ‘Internalizing Higher Education in Ukraine’, which included 2 internships at the University of Durham, UK (2016). She participated in the internship “Retraining in the Field of Teaching Excellence”, Bayreuth University, Germany (Erasmus + Project (2021) and was a coordinator of the Erasmus+ Project: Innovative Approach to Promotion Teaching Excellence (2021-2022) at Central Ukrainian State University.

Selected Publications

BOOKS

  • Rastrygina, A., Ivanenko, N. (2021). Pedagogy of Freedom in the Paradigmal Space of Modern Education and Upbringing.
  • Ivanenko, N., Liashuk, A. (2021). English Activity Book. Practical Course of English. Kropyvnytskyi.
  • Ivanenko N. (2014). (Edit.) Education in Eastern Europe and Eurasia. London: Bloomsbury.
  • Ivanenko N. (2008). The Concept of Good in English and Ukrainian Language Pictures of the World. Kirovohrad: KOD.
  • Ivanenko N. (2007). Written Practice and Conversation for 1 Year. Kropyvnytskyi.
  • Garkusha, L., Ivanenko, N. (2004). Critical thinking in life skills training. Kirovohrad.

BOOK CHAPTERS

  • Ivanenko, N. (2024). Words and word meanings In The Routledge Companion To English Studies/ by Constant Leung & Jo Lewkowicz. London, UK: Routledge (in publishing).
  • Ivanenko N. (2023). Development of civic education in Ukrainian universities: new challenges of modern realities in the conditions of the transformation of society. In Contemporary Education in Ukraine: Integration into the European Educational Space. Dnipro (pp. 387-412) DOI:36550/978-617-8245-57-3-20
  • Ivanenko N. (2019). Citizenship Education, Moral Fluency and Social and Political Future Challenges. In Polish-Jewish History, Culture, Values, and Education between Paradise and Inferno. Irvine, USA: Brown Walker Press (pp. 93-103)
  • Ivanenko N. (2014). Education Change, Transformation, Reforms – a Regional Overview. In N. Ivanenko (Edit.) Education in Eastern Europe and Eurasia. London: Bloomsbury (pp. 9-45)
  • Ivanenko N. (2013). Vulnerable Children in Ukraine and Educational Response. In M. Matsumoto (Edit.) Education and Disadvantaged Children and Young People. London: Bloomsbury (pp. 95-132)

JOURNAL ARTICLES

  1. Ivanenko, N. (2024). Challenges of Ukrainian Higher Education in Times of War. International Higher Education. The Boston College Centre for International Higher Education, 118, pp. 35-36 https://doi.org/10.36197/IHE.2024.118.17
  2. Ivanenko, N., Paska, T., Irkha, A. Rud, A., & Boguslavskas, L., (2024). The Role of Higher Education for Ensuring National Security in Ukraine. Futurity Education, 4(1), 210-237 https://doi.org/10.57125/FED.2024.03.25.11
  3. Leleka, T., Ivanenko, N., Demeshko, I., Kapitan T., & Demchenko, I. (2024). The Process of English Internationalization in the Ukrainian Educational Paradigm. Slavistica Vilnensis, 68(2), 76-89 doi:10.15388/SlavViln.2023.68(2).6
  4. Ivanenko, N., Rud, A., Hurbanska, A., Cheban, Y., & Syrtseva, S. (2024). Digitalization of Education of the Future – A Trend or a Requirement of the Time? Journal of Higher Education Theory and Practice24(2). DOI: https://doi.org/10.33423/jhetp.v24i2.6791
  5. Ivanenko, N. (2023). Civic character cultivation as a basic virtue within and beyond modern educational institutions. Academic Notes. Series Pedagogical sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 209, 180-185 DOI: https://doi.org/10.36550/2415-7988-2022-1-209-180-185
  6. Rastrygina, A., Ivanenko, N. (2023). A Pedagogy of freedom as a viable basis for implementing gender equality in Ukraine’s educational institutions. International Review of Education, 69(1-2), 143-174. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/s11159-023-09995-9
  7. Ivanenko N., Biletska O., Hurbanska S., Hurbanska, A., & Kochmar, D. (2023). English language morphological neologisms reflecting the war in Ukraine. World Journal of English Language, 13(5), pp. 432-438    DOI: doi:http://dx.doi.org/10.5430/wjel.v13n5p432
  8. Ivanenko, N., Boiko, A., Fedorchuk, L., Panchenko, I., & Marieiev, D. (2023). Development of educational policy in Ukraine in the context of European integration and digital transformation. Revista Eduweb, 17(2), 296-305 DOI: https://doi.org/10.46502/issn.1856-7576/2023.17.02.25
  9. Ivanenko, N.V., Gerasymenko,Yu. A., Kostenko, V.G. (2023). Innovative approaches to the modernization of philological education and science in Ukraine: a response to the challenges of wartime. Akademichni Vizii, (in Ukrainian). URL: https://academy-vision.org/index.php/av/article/view/281 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5281/zenodo.7795088
  10. Ivanenko N. (2022). Phraseological units of the conceptual field MARRIAGE in the English picture of the world. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi: KOD, 202, pp. 140-146
  11. Bilous, O., Mishchenko, A., Datska, T., Ivanenko, N., Kit, L., Piankovska, I., and Vereshchak, Y. (2021). Modern linguistic technologies: strategy of teaching translation studies. Rupkatha Journal on Interdisciplinary Studies in Humanities, 13(4), pp. 1-12 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/21659/rupkatha.v13n4.65
  12. Leleka, T., Ivanenko, N., Moskalenko O., Herasymenko, L., Shevchuk L., Pidlubna, O. (2021). Angloamerican loanwords use in the Ukrainian student slang. Laplage em Revista, 7(Extra-D): University and science: possible dialogues. pp.163-174. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/24115/S2446-622020217Extra-D1081p.163-174
  13. Ivanenko N. (2021). Figurative and valuable component of the MARRIAGE concept. Trends in Science and Practice of Today. Ankara, Turkey, pp. 356-361
  14. Ivanenko N. (2021). Inclusive learning environment for students’ achievements and foreign language development. Priorities in the Development of Science and Education. Budapest, Hungary, pp.74-80
  15. Ivanenko N. (2021). The nominative field of the MARRIAGE concept and the analysis of the synonymous series of its key unit. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi: KOD, 193, pp 218-224 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.36550/2522-4077-2021-1-193-218-224
  16. Ivanenko N. (2020). Language intervention stages in project-based learning. Modern Trends in Foreign Language Professional Training in a Multicultural Space. Kyiv, pp. 249 – 255
  17. Rastrygina, A., Ivanenko, N. (2020). Gender comfortable educational environment as a factor of development of personal freedom. Research Bulletin. Pedagogical Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 188, pp. 28 – 35 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.36550/2415-7988-2020-1-188-28-35
  18. Ivanenko N. (2020). Texting slang as one of the most common groups of everyday youth Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi: KOD, 187, pp. 38-45
  19. Ivanenko N. (2019). Computer use in foreign language Intellectual and Emotional Components of Foreign Language Learning: Latest Trends and Challenges for Higher Education. Kyiv, pp. 152 – 158.
  20. Ivanenko N. (2019). Initial stages of elaborating a project in a foreign language classroom. Science and Society. Hamilton, Canada, pp. 13 – 20.
  21. Ivanenko N. (2019). Project-based learning as a way to incorporate effective foreign language teaching. Research Bulletin. Pedagogical Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 177, pp. 207 – 211
  22. Ivanenko N. (2019). Youth vocabulary as a reflection of changes in modern society. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi: KOD, 175, pp. 34 – 39.
  23. Ivanenko N. (2018). Promoting citizenship education in the English language Proceedings of the IV International Conference. Kyiv, pp. 130 – 137
  24. Ivanenko N. (2018). Educating global citizens at a foreign language class. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, – pp. 494 – 500
  25. Ivanenko N. (2018). Formation of civic values through teaching a foreign language. Proceedings of the II International Conference “Foreign Language in Professional Training of Specialists: Problems and Strategies”. Kropyvnytskyi, pp. 189-191
  26. Ivanenko N. (2017). Citizenship education in the English language classroom. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 154. – pp. 92 – 97
  27. Ivanenko N. (2017). Education for democratic citizenship: teaching virtues and values. Research Bulletin. Pedagogical Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 152, pp. 110-113
  28. Ivanenko N. (2016). Citizenship education as a way to develop moral fluency to solve social and political challenges of the future. Scientific Journal of Ariel University. Israel: Ariel University.
  29. Ivanenko N. (2016). Functioning peculiarities of lexical units of the RESPECT concept in the English language. Proceedings of the International Conference Linguistic and Linguacultural Aspects of Teaching Foreign Languages in Ukrainian Universities”. Dnipropetrovsk, pp. 87-94
  30. Ivanenko N. (2016). Semantic relationships of lexical units of the concept of love in the English language. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, pp. 221-226
  31. Ivanenko N. (2015). Citizenship education as the coordination and integration of educational establishment and community. Research Proceedings of the national UniversityOstrog Academy”. Ostrog, pp. 136-142
  32. Ivanenko N. (2015). The value of citizenship education in practices of student governing body. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 136. pp. 438-442

Louise’s doctoral research investigates how teachers become who they are.

Louise’s work situates the schoolteacher as a particular type of subject, that is both made and makes itself from within a network of power relations. Her study combines Foucauldian theory, Critical Discourse Analysis, and Narrative analysis to provide an account of schoolteachers’ ethical agency in the context of top-down policy practices.

Louise is a Doctoral Teaching Fellow at the Department of Education, where she teaches and supervises students in the MSc in Learning and Teaching course. Currently, Louise is collaborating the OECD in their Globally Teaching InSights project. Her research supports the Schools+ Network aims to fuel an ecosystem of organisations that are driving change in education from the bottom-up.

In March 2023 she presented her preliminary research at the Philosophy of Education Society of Great Britain (PESGB)’s annual conference.

As Honorary Fellow John attends seminars and consults with current staff in Mathematics Education.

During 40 years at the Open University supporting the teaching of mathematics he authored a wide range of papers, and dozens of Open University Books and Teaching materials. He co-authored the classic Thinking Mathematically; Mathematics as a Constructive Activity (with his wife Prof. Anne Watson); Questions and Prompts for Mathematical Thinking & Thinkers (with Anne and other colleagues), among many others.

His research methods are phenomenological, based on the Discipline of Noticing. He is interested in the lived experience of learning, doing and teaching mathematics. He focuses on the structure and form of Attention in the teaching of mathematics, as he supports those who wish to foster and sustain mathematical thinking in others.

He is an Honorary Fellow of BSRLM and ATM, a long-standing member of  the MAA and the  MA.H.

 

Publications

  • Mason, J. (2022). Consequences of a Virtual Encounter with George Pólya. Teaching Mathematics and Computer Science.  20 (2) p173-182.
  • Zazkis, R. Kontorovich, I. & Mason, J. (2021). The Learning and Teaching of Number: paths less travelled through well-trodden terrain. London: Routledge
  • Mason, J. (2021). Learning about Noticing, by, and through, Noticing. ZDM – Mathematics Education. 53(1) p231-243. doi: 10.1007/s11858-020-01192-4
  • Mason, J. & Czarnocha,B. (2021). Aha! Moments, Bisociation and Multifocal Attention. In B. Czarnocha & W. Baker. Creativity of an Aha! Moment and Mathematics Education. Leiden: Brill. p345-361.
  • Mason, J. (2018) Making Distinctions: a phenomenological exploration in mathematics education. In P. Ernest (Ed.). The Philosophy of Mathematics Education Today. ICME-13 Monographs. Springer.
  • Mason, J. (2018). Reflecting on values emerging from practice and the value of reflecting on practice. In D. Rowe & A. Watson (Eds.). Faith and Experience in Education: essays from Quaker perspectives. London: Trentham Books. p63-91.
  • Mason, J. & Metz, M. (2017). Digging Beneath Dual Systems Theory and the Bicameral Brain: abductions about the human psyche from experience in mathematical problem solving. In U. Xolocotzin (Ed.). Understanding Emotions in Mathematical Thinking and Learning. p379-407. Cambridge: Elsevier/Academic Press.
  • Mason, J. (2016). Rising Above a Cause-and-Effect Stance in Mathematics Education Research. JMTE 19(4) p297-300. http://rdcu.be/npTf
  • Mason, J. & Davis, B. (2013). The Importance of Teachers’ Mathematical Awareness for In-The-Moment Pedagogy. CJSMTE 13(2) p182-197.
  • Mason, J. (2012). Noticing: roots and branches. In M. Sherin, V. Jacobs, & R. Phillip (Eds.) Mathematics Teacher Noticing:  Seeing Through Teachers’ Eyes. p35-50. Mahwah: Erlbaum.
  • Mason, J. (2008). Being Mathematical With & In Front of Learners: Attention, Awareness, and Attitude as Sources of Differences between Teacher Educators, Teachers & Learners. In T. Wood (Series Ed.) & B. Jaworski (Vol. Ed.), International Handbook of Mathematics Teacher Education: Vol.4. The Mathematics Teacher Educator as a Developing Professional. Rotterdam, the Netherlands: Sense Publishers, p31-56.
  • Mason, J. & Johnston-Wilder, S. (2006 2nd edition). Designing and Using Mathematical Tasks. St. Albans: Tarquin.
  • Watson, A. & Mason, J. (2006). Seeing an Exercise as a Single Mathematical Object: Using Variation to Structure Sense-Making. Mathematical Thinking and Learning. 8(2) p91-111.
  • Watson, A. & Mason, J. (2005). Mathematics as a Constructive Activity: learners generating examples. Mahwah: Erlbaum.
  • Mason, J. & Johnston-Wilder, S. (2004). Fundamental Constructs in Mathematics Education, RoutledgeFalmer, London.
  • Mason, J. 2003, Structure of Attention in the Learning of Mathematics, in J. Novotná (Ed.) Proceedings, International Symposium on Elementary Mathematics Teaching, Charles University, Prague, p9-16.
  • Mason, J. 2002, Mathematics Teaching Practice: a guidebook for university and college lecturers, Horwood Publishing, Chichester.
  • Mason, J. 2002, Researching Your own Practice: The Discipline of Noticing, RoutledgeFalmer, London.
  • Mason, J. 2001, Modelling Modelling: where is the centre of gravity of-for-when modelling?, in J. Matos, W. Blum, S. Houston & S. Carreira (Eds.) Modelling and Mathematics Education: ICTMA 9 applications in science and technology, Horwood Publishing, Chichester, p39-61.
  • Mason, J. Burton L. & Stacey K. (1982). Thinking Mathematically, Addison Wesley, London

Website

www.pmtheta.com

Mark has worked in ELT and EMI for over 35 years as a teacher, teacher trainer, lecturer, course writer, syllabus designer, examiner, Director of Studies, and consultant editor for OUP. For the British Council he has worked as a consultant trainer and course developer in EMI and EAP. For the University of Oxford Department of Education Mark delivered the ELT option on the MSc ALSLA and is Teaching Associate of the EMI Research Group in which capacity he has worked as a CI and has developed and delivered EMI teacher training courses in China, Serbia and Oxford. Mark has worked in universities in Russia, Ukraine, Kazakhstan, Belarus, Czechia, Italy, Germany, Mexico, Peru, Chile, Brazil, Colombia and Morocco.

He continues to be involved in EMI and is currently co-authoring an EMI student guide.

Mark is an alumnus of the University of Oxford Department of Education and was among the first to be awarded the innovative MSc in Teaching English Language in University Settings.

Anushay is a second-year DPhil student investigating how classroom characteristics are related to Pakistani children’s development. She is supervised by Professor Iram Siraj and Dr Katharina Ereky-Stevens and her work is being supported by the Aga Khan University (Pakistan). Anushay received the Patrice Engle Dissertation Grant Award from the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD) in 2023.

Anushay completed her BSc Psychology from UCL, where she also started her master’s in Developmental Neuroscience and Psychopathology. She was based at Yale University for her master’s thesis, where she worked with Dr Craig Bailey at the Yale Center for Emotional Intelligence to understand children’s emotion development. Anushay also works as a part-time research  assistant at the Developmental Diversity Lab at UCL’s Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience. Anushay’s research interests include understanding child development across different cultures, factors that might be affecting it, and devising culture-specific ways to support children’s holistic development through the educational system. She is also keen on improving the research scope in Pakistan by working with Pakistani researchers, practitioners, and families. Anushay balances her research with her position as the founder of a non-profit, Resources for Children, which aims to understand and support children’s development in Pakistan.

Publications

Journal Articles

  1. Mazhar, A., & Bailey, C., S. (under review). Understanding Children’s Emotion-Specific Biases: How They Relate to Child and Family Factors, Emotion Recognition Accuracy, and Social Behaviour.

Presentations

  1. Mazhar, A., & Bailey, C., S. (2023, March). Understanding Children’s Emotion-Specific Biases: How They Relate to Child-Level Factors and Emotion Recognition Accuracy [Paper Presentation]. Society for Research in Child Development, Salt Lake City, Utah, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2022, April). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Spring Preview, New Haven, United States.
  3. Mazhar, A. (2021, December). Does an extended family improve mentalising in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK & Pakistan. 2nd International Foundation University Conference of Psychology, Rawalpindi, Pakistan.
  4. Mazhar, A. (2020, October). Developing a non-profit to advance autism research in Pakistan. Anna Freud Centre Seminar Series, London, United Kingdom.

Posters

  1. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Theory of Mind in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK and Pakistan. Harvard Trends in Psychology Summit, Cambridge, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Research Rounds, New Haven, United States.

Cindy works at the intersection of learning, design, and technology, with a keen interest in the orchestration of future-ready tech-enabled learning.

She is curious how the deployment of adaptive learning systems to schools will impact classroom learning and hopes to learn more about the human-machine partnership in education. Specifically, her research is concerned with the implications that the use of such systems has on teacher-student interactions, as teachers grapple with balancing personalised learning and learning in community, as well as curriculum demands and student interests. These are some tensions which could potentially be exacerbated by affordances of adaptive learning systems.

Prior to embarking on the DPhil in Education at Oxford, Cindy worked as the Lead Specialist in Technologies for Learning at the Educational Technology Division of Ministry of Education, Singapore. She had previously completed graduate studies at the National University of Singapore and Stanford University where she was awarded Master of Arts in English Studies and Master of Arts in Education.

Reem is DPhil student from Saudi Arabia.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she worked as a Teacher, Professional Developer, then, became a Supervisor and Researcher in the Ministry of Education where she received a scholarship to pursue her DPhil education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests lie in the area of Teacher Education and Professional Learning Policy and Practice.

Publications
  • Alqahtani, Reem (2020). Saudi Universities Role in Developing Teacher Professional Development Programs: Elite Universities Experience. Journal of Educational Sciences. King Saud University.
  • Alqahtani, Reem. (2020). The effect of implementing UDL-based activities in improving EFL learners’ academic achievement and attitudes towards L2. In L. Salas, & E. Ager, Creating Quiet reflective Spaces: Language Teacher Researches Professional Development (pp. 61-62). IATEFL publications.

Lena Zlock is researching the integration of digital technology into structures of teaching, learning, and education in higher education. Her particular focus is on the digital humanities and the potential for digital methods to transform humanistic study. She works with Professor Niall Winters and Dr. James Robson.

Lena’s research interests stem from her education as an M.St. student and Ertegun Graduate Scholar in Modern Languages at the University of Oxford, and as a B.A. student in History at Stanford University. As an undergraduate, she started the Voltaire Library Project, a digitally and data-driven study of the 6,763-book collection of French Enlightenment philosopher Voltaire (you can read more about the project here and here). She has been interested in the application of digital technology to humanistic teaching since her days in Princeton Day School, where she developed an interdisciplinary curriculum on Mexico City (visit the course website here).

Her research on Voltaire led her to think more broadly about the place of digital methods in the humanities classroom, and how new technologies will revolutionise the liberal arts and higher education. As a DPhil candidate, Lena will examine the negotiation and implementation of new learning technologies within the University of Oxford at undergraduate and graduate levels.

Lena is involved in a number of digital humanities initiatives in Oxford. She previously served as the inaugural fellow of the Voltaire Lab at Oxford’s Voltaire Foundation. As a master’s student, Lena co-formulated the convergence agenda for Oxford digital humanities with Professor Howard Hotson, and is currently employed by the Humanities Division to assist with the development of an M.St. degree in Digital Scholarship (read more here). Lena set up and helps to run the History of the Book blog for the Faculty of Medieval and Modern Languages and the Oxford Book History Twitter account.

Lena welcomes inquiries from undergraduate and postgraduate students from Oxford and beyond seeking to get involved with the digital humanities in any capacity. The History of the Book blog also welcomes inquiries from prospective contributors.

 

Abbey is a Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education, in collaboration with the Department of Engineering.

Before joining the DPhil program, Abbey obtained a B.A. in Applied Linguistics with minors in Russian and Chinese from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford. She was the recipient of a Benjamin A. Gilman International Scholarship through U.S. Department of State for study in Russia and was awarded two Foreign Language and Area Studies (FLAS) Fellowships for study in both Russia and China. She holds both TESOL and TEFL certificates and has taught English as a Second Language in various contexts to a wide variety of learner populations.

Abbey’s main research interests lie in the use of technology to facilitate language learning. Her DPhil research focuses on the development of a virtual reality program to bridge the gaps that students face when learning languages through distance learning.

Dr Nadiya Ivanenko is a Visiting Research Fellow in the field of civic education and citizenship linguistics. She is a member of the Applied Linguistics research group and Higher Education research group at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

After receiving PhD in Comparative Linguistics from Kyiv National Linguistic University (2008) Nadiya worked as an Associate Professor of the Germanic Languages and Teaching Methodology Department, Faculty of Ukrainian Philology, Foreign Languages and Social Communications and Vice Dean of the Faculty of Foreign Languages, Central Ukrainian State University, Ukraine.

Nadiya was a Chevening scholar and Postgraduate researcher at the Department of Education, University of Oxford (2003-2004). She was a Co-chair of the joint UNESCO Chair/UNITWIN project ‘Education as a Humanitarian Response’ (2004-2012); a participant of BECA joint project ‘Education for Democracy’ between Montclair State University (USA) and Kirovohrad State Pedagogical University (Ukraine). Nadiya had internship for teachers of EFL in the Department of Educational and Cultural Programmes at Shakespeare’s Globe Theater, London, UK (2011). She was the Head of the British Council International Mobility Grant ‘Internalizing Higher Education in Ukraine’, which included 2 internships at the University of Durham, UK (2016). She participated in the internship “Retraining in the Field of Teaching Excellence”, Bayreuth University, Germany (Erasmus + Project (2021) and was a coordinator of the Erasmus+ Project: Innovative Approach to Promotion Teaching Excellence (2021-2022) at Central Ukrainian State University.

Selected Publications

BOOKS

  • Rastrygina, A., Ivanenko, N. (2021). Pedagogy of Freedom in the Paradigmal Space of Modern Education and Upbringing.
  • Ivanenko, N., Liashuk, A. (2021). English Activity Book. Practical Course of English. Kropyvnytskyi.
  • Ivanenko N. (2014). (Edit.) Education in Eastern Europe and Eurasia. London: Bloomsbury.
  • Ivanenko N. (2008). The Concept of Good in English and Ukrainian Language Pictures of the World. Kirovohrad: KOD.
  • Ivanenko N. (2007). Written Practice and Conversation for 1 Year. Kropyvnytskyi.
  • Garkusha, L., Ivanenko, N. (2004). Critical thinking in life skills training. Kirovohrad.

BOOK CHAPTERS

  • Ivanenko, N. (2024). Words and word meanings In The Routledge Companion To English Studies/ by Constant Leung & Jo Lewkowicz. London, UK: Routledge (in publishing).
  • Ivanenko N. (2023). Development of civic education in Ukrainian universities: new challenges of modern realities in the conditions of the transformation of society. In Contemporary Education in Ukraine: Integration into the European Educational Space. Dnipro (pp. 387-412) DOI:36550/978-617-8245-57-3-20
  • Ivanenko N. (2019). Citizenship Education, Moral Fluency and Social and Political Future Challenges. In Polish-Jewish History, Culture, Values, and Education between Paradise and Inferno. Irvine, USA: Brown Walker Press (pp. 93-103)
  • Ivanenko N. (2014). Education Change, Transformation, Reforms – a Regional Overview. In N. Ivanenko (Edit.) Education in Eastern Europe and Eurasia. London: Bloomsbury (pp. 9-45)
  • Ivanenko N. (2013). Vulnerable Children in Ukraine and Educational Response. In M. Matsumoto (Edit.) Education and Disadvantaged Children and Young People. London: Bloomsbury (pp. 95-132)

JOURNAL ARTICLES

  1. Ivanenko, N. (2024). Challenges of Ukrainian Higher Education in Times of War. International Higher Education. The Boston College Centre for International Higher Education, 118, pp. 35-36 https://doi.org/10.36197/IHE.2024.118.17
  2. Ivanenko, N., Paska, T., Irkha, A. Rud, A., & Boguslavskas, L., (2024). The Role of Higher Education for Ensuring National Security in Ukraine. Futurity Education, 4(1), 210-237 https://doi.org/10.57125/FED.2024.03.25.11
  3. Leleka, T., Ivanenko, N., Demeshko, I., Kapitan T., & Demchenko, I. (2024). The Process of English Internationalization in the Ukrainian Educational Paradigm. Slavistica Vilnensis, 68(2), 76-89 doi:10.15388/SlavViln.2023.68(2).6
  4. Ivanenko, N., Rud, A., Hurbanska, A., Cheban, Y., & Syrtseva, S. (2024). Digitalization of Education of the Future – A Trend or a Requirement of the Time? Journal of Higher Education Theory and Practice24(2). DOI: https://doi.org/10.33423/jhetp.v24i2.6791
  5. Ivanenko, N. (2023). Civic character cultivation as a basic virtue within and beyond modern educational institutions. Academic Notes. Series Pedagogical sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 209, 180-185 DOI: https://doi.org/10.36550/2415-7988-2022-1-209-180-185
  6. Rastrygina, A., Ivanenko, N. (2023). A Pedagogy of freedom as a viable basis for implementing gender equality in Ukraine’s educational institutions. International Review of Education, 69(1-2), 143-174. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/s11159-023-09995-9
  7. Ivanenko N., Biletska O., Hurbanska S., Hurbanska, A., & Kochmar, D. (2023). English language morphological neologisms reflecting the war in Ukraine. World Journal of English Language, 13(5), pp. 432-438    DOI: doi:http://dx.doi.org/10.5430/wjel.v13n5p432
  8. Ivanenko, N., Boiko, A., Fedorchuk, L., Panchenko, I., & Marieiev, D. (2023). Development of educational policy in Ukraine in the context of European integration and digital transformation. Revista Eduweb, 17(2), 296-305 DOI: https://doi.org/10.46502/issn.1856-7576/2023.17.02.25
  9. Ivanenko, N.V., Gerasymenko,Yu. A., Kostenko, V.G. (2023). Innovative approaches to the modernization of philological education and science in Ukraine: a response to the challenges of wartime. Akademichni Vizii, (in Ukrainian). URL: https://academy-vision.org/index.php/av/article/view/281 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5281/zenodo.7795088
  10. Ivanenko N. (2022). Phraseological units of the conceptual field MARRIAGE in the English picture of the world. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi: KOD, 202, pp. 140-146
  11. Bilous, O., Mishchenko, A., Datska, T., Ivanenko, N., Kit, L., Piankovska, I., and Vereshchak, Y. (2021). Modern linguistic technologies: strategy of teaching translation studies. Rupkatha Journal on Interdisciplinary Studies in Humanities, 13(4), pp. 1-12 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/21659/rupkatha.v13n4.65
  12. Leleka, T., Ivanenko, N., Moskalenko O., Herasymenko, L., Shevchuk L., Pidlubna, O. (2021). Angloamerican loanwords use in the Ukrainian student slang. Laplage em Revista, 7(Extra-D): University and science: possible dialogues. pp.163-174. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/24115/S2446-622020217Extra-D1081p.163-174
  13. Ivanenko N. (2021). Figurative and valuable component of the MARRIAGE concept. Trends in Science and Practice of Today. Ankara, Turkey, pp. 356-361
  14. Ivanenko N. (2021). Inclusive learning environment for students’ achievements and foreign language development. Priorities in the Development of Science and Education. Budapest, Hungary, pp.74-80
  15. Ivanenko N. (2021). The nominative field of the MARRIAGE concept and the analysis of the synonymous series of its key unit. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi: KOD, 193, pp 218-224 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.36550/2522-4077-2021-1-193-218-224
  16. Ivanenko N. (2020). Language intervention stages in project-based learning. Modern Trends in Foreign Language Professional Training in a Multicultural Space. Kyiv, pp. 249 – 255
  17. Rastrygina, A., Ivanenko, N. (2020). Gender comfortable educational environment as a factor of development of personal freedom. Research Bulletin. Pedagogical Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 188, pp. 28 – 35 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.36550/2415-7988-2020-1-188-28-35
  18. Ivanenko N. (2020). Texting slang as one of the most common groups of everyday youth Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi: KOD, 187, pp. 38-45
  19. Ivanenko N. (2019). Computer use in foreign language Intellectual and Emotional Components of Foreign Language Learning: Latest Trends and Challenges for Higher Education. Kyiv, pp. 152 – 158.
  20. Ivanenko N. (2019). Initial stages of elaborating a project in a foreign language classroom. Science and Society. Hamilton, Canada, pp. 13 – 20.
  21. Ivanenko N. (2019). Project-based learning as a way to incorporate effective foreign language teaching. Research Bulletin. Pedagogical Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 177, pp. 207 – 211
  22. Ivanenko N. (2019). Youth vocabulary as a reflection of changes in modern society. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi: KOD, 175, pp. 34 – 39.
  23. Ivanenko N. (2018). Promoting citizenship education in the English language Proceedings of the IV International Conference. Kyiv, pp. 130 – 137
  24. Ivanenko N. (2018). Educating global citizens at a foreign language class. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, – pp. 494 – 500
  25. Ivanenko N. (2018). Formation of civic values through teaching a foreign language. Proceedings of the II International Conference “Foreign Language in Professional Training of Specialists: Problems and Strategies”. Kropyvnytskyi, pp. 189-191
  26. Ivanenko N. (2017). Citizenship education in the English language classroom. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 154. – pp. 92 – 97
  27. Ivanenko N. (2017). Education for democratic citizenship: teaching virtues and values. Research Bulletin. Pedagogical Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 152, pp. 110-113
  28. Ivanenko N. (2016). Citizenship education as a way to develop moral fluency to solve social and political challenges of the future. Scientific Journal of Ariel University. Israel: Ariel University.
  29. Ivanenko N. (2016). Functioning peculiarities of lexical units of the RESPECT concept in the English language. Proceedings of the International Conference Linguistic and Linguacultural Aspects of Teaching Foreign Languages in Ukrainian Universities”. Dnipropetrovsk, pp. 87-94
  30. Ivanenko N. (2016). Semantic relationships of lexical units of the concept of love in the English language. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, pp. 221-226
  31. Ivanenko N. (2015). Citizenship education as the coordination and integration of educational establishment and community. Research Proceedings of the national UniversityOstrog Academy”. Ostrog, pp. 136-142
  32. Ivanenko N. (2015). The value of citizenship education in practices of student governing body. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 136. pp. 438-442

Louise’s doctoral research investigates how teachers become who they are.

Louise’s work situates the schoolteacher as a particular type of subject, that is both made and makes itself from within a network of power relations. Her study combines Foucauldian theory, Critical Discourse Analysis, and Narrative analysis to provide an account of schoolteachers’ ethical agency in the context of top-down policy practices.

Louise is a Doctoral Teaching Fellow at the Department of Education, where she teaches and supervises students in the MSc in Learning and Teaching course. Currently, Louise is collaborating the OECD in their Globally Teaching InSights project. Her research supports the Schools+ Network aims to fuel an ecosystem of organisations that are driving change in education from the bottom-up.

In March 2023 she presented her preliminary research at the Philosophy of Education Society of Great Britain (PESGB)’s annual conference.

As Honorary Fellow John attends seminars and consults with current staff in Mathematics Education.

During 40 years at the Open University supporting the teaching of mathematics he authored a wide range of papers, and dozens of Open University Books and Teaching materials. He co-authored the classic Thinking Mathematically; Mathematics as a Constructive Activity (with his wife Prof. Anne Watson); Questions and Prompts for Mathematical Thinking & Thinkers (with Anne and other colleagues), among many others.

His research methods are phenomenological, based on the Discipline of Noticing. He is interested in the lived experience of learning, doing and teaching mathematics. He focuses on the structure and form of Attention in the teaching of mathematics, as he supports those who wish to foster and sustain mathematical thinking in others.

He is an Honorary Fellow of BSRLM and ATM, a long-standing member of  the MAA and the  MA.H.

 

Publications

  • Mason, J. (2022). Consequences of a Virtual Encounter with George Pólya. Teaching Mathematics and Computer Science.  20 (2) p173-182.
  • Zazkis, R. Kontorovich, I. & Mason, J. (2021). The Learning and Teaching of Number: paths less travelled through well-trodden terrain. London: Routledge
  • Mason, J. (2021). Learning about Noticing, by, and through, Noticing. ZDM – Mathematics Education. 53(1) p231-243. doi: 10.1007/s11858-020-01192-4
  • Mason, J. & Czarnocha,B. (2021). Aha! Moments, Bisociation and Multifocal Attention. In B. Czarnocha & W. Baker. Creativity of an Aha! Moment and Mathematics Education. Leiden: Brill. p345-361.
  • Mason, J. (2018) Making Distinctions: a phenomenological exploration in mathematics education. In P. Ernest (Ed.). The Philosophy of Mathematics Education Today. ICME-13 Monographs. Springer.
  • Mason, J. (2018). Reflecting on values emerging from practice and the value of reflecting on practice. In D. Rowe & A. Watson (Eds.). Faith and Experience in Education: essays from Quaker perspectives. London: Trentham Books. p63-91.
  • Mason, J. & Metz, M. (2017). Digging Beneath Dual Systems Theory and the Bicameral Brain: abductions about the human psyche from experience in mathematical problem solving. In U. Xolocotzin (Ed.). Understanding Emotions in Mathematical Thinking and Learning. p379-407. Cambridge: Elsevier/Academic Press.
  • Mason, J. (2016). Rising Above a Cause-and-Effect Stance in Mathematics Education Research. JMTE 19(4) p297-300. http://rdcu.be/npTf
  • Mason, J. & Davis, B. (2013). The Importance of Teachers’ Mathematical Awareness for In-The-Moment Pedagogy. CJSMTE 13(2) p182-197.
  • Mason, J. (2012). Noticing: roots and branches. In M. Sherin, V. Jacobs, & R. Phillip (Eds.) Mathematics Teacher Noticing:  Seeing Through Teachers’ Eyes. p35-50. Mahwah: Erlbaum.
  • Mason, J. (2008). Being Mathematical With & In Front of Learners: Attention, Awareness, and Attitude as Sources of Differences between Teacher Educators, Teachers & Learners. In T. Wood (Series Ed.) & B. Jaworski (Vol. Ed.), International Handbook of Mathematics Teacher Education: Vol.4. The Mathematics Teacher Educator as a Developing Professional. Rotterdam, the Netherlands: Sense Publishers, p31-56.
  • Mason, J. & Johnston-Wilder, S. (2006 2nd edition). Designing and Using Mathematical Tasks. St. Albans: Tarquin.
  • Watson, A. & Mason, J. (2006). Seeing an Exercise as a Single Mathematical Object: Using Variation to Structure Sense-Making. Mathematical Thinking and Learning. 8(2) p91-111.
  • Watson, A. & Mason, J. (2005). Mathematics as a Constructive Activity: learners generating examples. Mahwah: Erlbaum.
  • Mason, J. & Johnston-Wilder, S. (2004). Fundamental Constructs in Mathematics Education, RoutledgeFalmer, London.
  • Mason, J. 2003, Structure of Attention in the Learning of Mathematics, in J. Novotná (Ed.) Proceedings, International Symposium on Elementary Mathematics Teaching, Charles University, Prague, p9-16.
  • Mason, J. 2002, Mathematics Teaching Practice: a guidebook for university and college lecturers, Horwood Publishing, Chichester.
  • Mason, J. 2002, Researching Your own Practice: The Discipline of Noticing, RoutledgeFalmer, London.
  • Mason, J. 2001, Modelling Modelling: where is the centre of gravity of-for-when modelling?, in J. Matos, W. Blum, S. Houston & S. Carreira (Eds.) Modelling and Mathematics Education: ICTMA 9 applications in science and technology, Horwood Publishing, Chichester, p39-61.
  • Mason, J. Burton L. & Stacey K. (1982). Thinking Mathematically, Addison Wesley, London

Website

www.pmtheta.com

Mark has worked in ELT and EMI for over 35 years as a teacher, teacher trainer, lecturer, course writer, syllabus designer, examiner, Director of Studies, and consultant editor for OUP. For the British Council he has worked as a consultant trainer and course developer in EMI and EAP. For the University of Oxford Department of Education Mark delivered the ELT option on the MSc ALSLA and is Teaching Associate of the EMI Research Group in which capacity he has worked as a CI and has developed and delivered EMI teacher training courses in China, Serbia and Oxford. Mark has worked in universities in Russia, Ukraine, Kazakhstan, Belarus, Czechia, Italy, Germany, Mexico, Peru, Chile, Brazil, Colombia and Morocco.

He continues to be involved in EMI and is currently co-authoring an EMI student guide.

Mark is an alumnus of the University of Oxford Department of Education and was among the first to be awarded the innovative MSc in Teaching English Language in University Settings.

Anushay is a second-year DPhil student investigating how classroom characteristics are related to Pakistani children’s development. She is supervised by Professor Iram Siraj and Dr Katharina Ereky-Stevens and her work is being supported by the Aga Khan University (Pakistan). Anushay received the Patrice Engle Dissertation Grant Award from the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD) in 2023.

Anushay completed her BSc Psychology from UCL, where she also started her master’s in Developmental Neuroscience and Psychopathology. She was based at Yale University for her master’s thesis, where she worked with Dr Craig Bailey at the Yale Center for Emotional Intelligence to understand children’s emotion development. Anushay also works as a part-time research  assistant at the Developmental Diversity Lab at UCL’s Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience. Anushay’s research interests include understanding child development across different cultures, factors that might be affecting it, and devising culture-specific ways to support children’s holistic development through the educational system. She is also keen on improving the research scope in Pakistan by working with Pakistani researchers, practitioners, and families. Anushay balances her research with her position as the founder of a non-profit, Resources for Children, which aims to understand and support children’s development in Pakistan.

Publications

Journal Articles

  1. Mazhar, A., & Bailey, C., S. (under review). Understanding Children’s Emotion-Specific Biases: How They Relate to Child and Family Factors, Emotion Recognition Accuracy, and Social Behaviour.

Presentations

  1. Mazhar, A., & Bailey, C., S. (2023, March). Understanding Children’s Emotion-Specific Biases: How They Relate to Child-Level Factors and Emotion Recognition Accuracy [Paper Presentation]. Society for Research in Child Development, Salt Lake City, Utah, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2022, April). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Spring Preview, New Haven, United States.
  3. Mazhar, A. (2021, December). Does an extended family improve mentalising in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK & Pakistan. 2nd International Foundation University Conference of Psychology, Rawalpindi, Pakistan.
  4. Mazhar, A. (2020, October). Developing a non-profit to advance autism research in Pakistan. Anna Freud Centre Seminar Series, London, United Kingdom.

Posters

  1. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Theory of Mind in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK and Pakistan. Harvard Trends in Psychology Summit, Cambridge, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Research Rounds, New Haven, United States.

Cindy works at the intersection of learning, design, and technology, with a keen interest in the orchestration of future-ready tech-enabled learning.

She is curious how the deployment of adaptive learning systems to schools will impact classroom learning and hopes to learn more about the human-machine partnership in education. Specifically, her research is concerned with the implications that the use of such systems has on teacher-student interactions, as teachers grapple with balancing personalised learning and learning in community, as well as curriculum demands and student interests. These are some tensions which could potentially be exacerbated by affordances of adaptive learning systems.

Prior to embarking on the DPhil in Education at Oxford, Cindy worked as the Lead Specialist in Technologies for Learning at the Educational Technology Division of Ministry of Education, Singapore. She had previously completed graduate studies at the National University of Singapore and Stanford University where she was awarded Master of Arts in English Studies and Master of Arts in Education.

Reem is DPhil student from Saudi Arabia.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she worked as a Teacher, Professional Developer, then, became a Supervisor and Researcher in the Ministry of Education where she received a scholarship to pursue her DPhil education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests lie in the area of Teacher Education and Professional Learning Policy and Practice.

Publications
  • Alqahtani, Reem (2020). Saudi Universities Role in Developing Teacher Professional Development Programs: Elite Universities Experience. Journal of Educational Sciences. King Saud University.
  • Alqahtani, Reem. (2020). The effect of implementing UDL-based activities in improving EFL learners’ academic achievement and attitudes towards L2. In L. Salas, & E. Ager, Creating Quiet reflective Spaces: Language Teacher Researches Professional Development (pp. 61-62). IATEFL publications.

Lena Zlock is researching the integration of digital technology into structures of teaching, learning, and education in higher education. Her particular focus is on the digital humanities and the potential for digital methods to transform humanistic study. She works with Professor Niall Winters and Dr. James Robson.

Lena’s research interests stem from her education as an M.St. student and Ertegun Graduate Scholar in Modern Languages at the University of Oxford, and as a B.A. student in History at Stanford University. As an undergraduate, she started the Voltaire Library Project, a digitally and data-driven study of the 6,763-book collection of French Enlightenment philosopher Voltaire (you can read more about the project here and here). She has been interested in the application of digital technology to humanistic teaching since her days in Princeton Day School, where she developed an interdisciplinary curriculum on Mexico City (visit the course website here).

Her research on Voltaire led her to think more broadly about the place of digital methods in the humanities classroom, and how new technologies will revolutionise the liberal arts and higher education. As a DPhil candidate, Lena will examine the negotiation and implementation of new learning technologies within the University of Oxford at undergraduate and graduate levels.

Lena is involved in a number of digital humanities initiatives in Oxford. She previously served as the inaugural fellow of the Voltaire Lab at Oxford’s Voltaire Foundation. As a master’s student, Lena co-formulated the convergence agenda for Oxford digital humanities with Professor Howard Hotson, and is currently employed by the Humanities Division to assist with the development of an M.St. degree in Digital Scholarship (read more here). Lena set up and helps to run the History of the Book blog for the Faculty of Medieval and Modern Languages and the Oxford Book History Twitter account.

Lena welcomes inquiries from undergraduate and postgraduate students from Oxford and beyond seeking to get involved with the digital humanities in any capacity. The History of the Book blog also welcomes inquiries from prospective contributors.

 

Abbey is a Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education, in collaboration with the Department of Engineering.

Before joining the DPhil program, Abbey obtained a B.A. in Applied Linguistics with minors in Russian and Chinese from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford. She was the recipient of a Benjamin A. Gilman International Scholarship through U.S. Department of State for study in Russia and was awarded two Foreign Language and Area Studies (FLAS) Fellowships for study in both Russia and China. She holds both TESOL and TEFL certificates and has taught English as a Second Language in various contexts to a wide variety of learner populations.

Abbey’s main research interests lie in the use of technology to facilitate language learning. Her DPhil research focuses on the development of a virtual reality program to bridge the gaps that students face when learning languages through distance learning.

Dr Nadiya Ivanenko is a Visiting Research Fellow in the field of civic education and citizenship linguistics. She is a member of the Applied Linguistics research group and Higher Education research group at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

After receiving PhD in Comparative Linguistics from Kyiv National Linguistic University (2008) Nadiya worked as an Associate Professor of the Germanic Languages and Teaching Methodology Department, Faculty of Ukrainian Philology, Foreign Languages and Social Communications and Vice Dean of the Faculty of Foreign Languages, Central Ukrainian State University, Ukraine.

Nadiya was a Chevening scholar and Postgraduate researcher at the Department of Education, University of Oxford (2003-2004). She was a Co-chair of the joint UNESCO Chair/UNITWIN project ‘Education as a Humanitarian Response’ (2004-2012); a participant of BECA joint project ‘Education for Democracy’ between Montclair State University (USA) and Kirovohrad State Pedagogical University (Ukraine). Nadiya had internship for teachers of EFL in the Department of Educational and Cultural Programmes at Shakespeare’s Globe Theater, London, UK (2011). She was the Head of the British Council International Mobility Grant ‘Internalizing Higher Education in Ukraine’, which included 2 internships at the University of Durham, UK (2016). She participated in the internship “Retraining in the Field of Teaching Excellence”, Bayreuth University, Germany (Erasmus + Project (2021) and was a coordinator of the Erasmus+ Project: Innovative Approach to Promotion Teaching Excellence (2021-2022) at Central Ukrainian State University.

Selected Publications

BOOKS

  • Rastrygina, A., Ivanenko, N. (2021). Pedagogy of Freedom in the Paradigmal Space of Modern Education and Upbringing.
  • Ivanenko, N., Liashuk, A. (2021). English Activity Book. Practical Course of English. Kropyvnytskyi.
  • Ivanenko N. (2014). (Edit.) Education in Eastern Europe and Eurasia. London: Bloomsbury.
  • Ivanenko N. (2008). The Concept of Good in English and Ukrainian Language Pictures of the World. Kirovohrad: KOD.
  • Ivanenko N. (2007). Written Practice and Conversation for 1 Year. Kropyvnytskyi.
  • Garkusha, L., Ivanenko, N. (2004). Critical thinking in life skills training. Kirovohrad.

BOOK CHAPTERS

  • Ivanenko, N. (2024). Words and word meanings In The Routledge Companion To English Studies/ by Constant Leung & Jo Lewkowicz. London, UK: Routledge (in publishing).
  • Ivanenko N. (2023). Development of civic education in Ukrainian universities: new challenges of modern realities in the conditions of the transformation of society. In Contemporary Education in Ukraine: Integration into the European Educational Space. Dnipro (pp. 387-412) DOI:36550/978-617-8245-57-3-20
  • Ivanenko N. (2019). Citizenship Education, Moral Fluency and Social and Political Future Challenges. In Polish-Jewish History, Culture, Values, and Education between Paradise and Inferno. Irvine, USA: Brown Walker Press (pp. 93-103)
  • Ivanenko N. (2014). Education Change, Transformation, Reforms – a Regional Overview. In N. Ivanenko (Edit.) Education in Eastern Europe and Eurasia. London: Bloomsbury (pp. 9-45)
  • Ivanenko N. (2013). Vulnerable Children in Ukraine and Educational Response. In M. Matsumoto (Edit.) Education and Disadvantaged Children and Young People. London: Bloomsbury (pp. 95-132)

JOURNAL ARTICLES

  1. Ivanenko, N. (2024). Challenges of Ukrainian Higher Education in Times of War. International Higher Education. The Boston College Centre for International Higher Education, 118, pp. 35-36 https://doi.org/10.36197/IHE.2024.118.17
  2. Ivanenko, N., Paska, T., Irkha, A. Rud, A., & Boguslavskas, L., (2024). The Role of Higher Education for Ensuring National Security in Ukraine. Futurity Education, 4(1), 210-237 https://doi.org/10.57125/FED.2024.03.25.11
  3. Leleka, T., Ivanenko, N., Demeshko, I., Kapitan T., & Demchenko, I. (2024). The Process of English Internationalization in the Ukrainian Educational Paradigm. Slavistica Vilnensis, 68(2), 76-89 doi:10.15388/SlavViln.2023.68(2).6
  4. Ivanenko, N., Rud, A., Hurbanska, A., Cheban, Y., & Syrtseva, S. (2024). Digitalization of Education of the Future – A Trend or a Requirement of the Time? Journal of Higher Education Theory and Practice24(2). DOI: https://doi.org/10.33423/jhetp.v24i2.6791
  5. Ivanenko, N. (2023). Civic character cultivation as a basic virtue within and beyond modern educational institutions. Academic Notes. Series Pedagogical sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 209, 180-185 DOI: https://doi.org/10.36550/2415-7988-2022-1-209-180-185
  6. Rastrygina, A., Ivanenko, N. (2023). A Pedagogy of freedom as a viable basis for implementing gender equality in Ukraine’s educational institutions. International Review of Education, 69(1-2), 143-174. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/s11159-023-09995-9
  7. Ivanenko N., Biletska O., Hurbanska S., Hurbanska, A., & Kochmar, D. (2023). English language morphological neologisms reflecting the war in Ukraine. World Journal of English Language, 13(5), pp. 432-438    DOI: doi:http://dx.doi.org/10.5430/wjel.v13n5p432
  8. Ivanenko, N., Boiko, A., Fedorchuk, L., Panchenko, I., & Marieiev, D. (2023). Development of educational policy in Ukraine in the context of European integration and digital transformation. Revista Eduweb, 17(2), 296-305 DOI: https://doi.org/10.46502/issn.1856-7576/2023.17.02.25
  9. Ivanenko, N.V., Gerasymenko,Yu. A., Kostenko, V.G. (2023). Innovative approaches to the modernization of philological education and science in Ukraine: a response to the challenges of wartime. Akademichni Vizii, (in Ukrainian). URL: https://academy-vision.org/index.php/av/article/view/281 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5281/zenodo.7795088
  10. Ivanenko N. (2022). Phraseological units of the conceptual field MARRIAGE in the English picture of the world. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi: KOD, 202, pp. 140-146
  11. Bilous, O., Mishchenko, A., Datska, T., Ivanenko, N., Kit, L., Piankovska, I., and Vereshchak, Y. (2021). Modern linguistic technologies: strategy of teaching translation studies. Rupkatha Journal on Interdisciplinary Studies in Humanities, 13(4), pp. 1-12 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/21659/rupkatha.v13n4.65
  12. Leleka, T., Ivanenko, N., Moskalenko O., Herasymenko, L., Shevchuk L., Pidlubna, O. (2021). Angloamerican loanwords use in the Ukrainian student slang. Laplage em Revista, 7(Extra-D): University and science: possible dialogues. pp.163-174. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/24115/S2446-622020217Extra-D1081p.163-174
  13. Ivanenko N. (2021). Figurative and valuable component of the MARRIAGE concept. Trends in Science and Practice of Today. Ankara, Turkey, pp. 356-361
  14. Ivanenko N. (2021). Inclusive learning environment for students’ achievements and foreign language development. Priorities in the Development of Science and Education. Budapest, Hungary, pp.74-80
  15. Ivanenko N. (2021). The nominative field of the MARRIAGE concept and the analysis of the synonymous series of its key unit. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi: KOD, 193, pp 218-224 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.36550/2522-4077-2021-1-193-218-224
  16. Ivanenko N. (2020). Language intervention stages in project-based learning. Modern Trends in Foreign Language Professional Training in a Multicultural Space. Kyiv, pp. 249 – 255
  17. Rastrygina, A., Ivanenko, N. (2020). Gender comfortable educational environment as a factor of development of personal freedom. Research Bulletin. Pedagogical Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 188, pp. 28 – 35 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.36550/2415-7988-2020-1-188-28-35
  18. Ivanenko N. (2020). Texting slang as one of the most common groups of everyday youth Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi: KOD, 187, pp. 38-45
  19. Ivanenko N. (2019). Computer use in foreign language Intellectual and Emotional Components of Foreign Language Learning: Latest Trends and Challenges for Higher Education. Kyiv, pp. 152 – 158.
  20. Ivanenko N. (2019). Initial stages of elaborating a project in a foreign language classroom. Science and Society. Hamilton, Canada, pp. 13 – 20.
  21. Ivanenko N. (2019). Project-based learning as a way to incorporate effective foreign language teaching. Research Bulletin. Pedagogical Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 177, pp. 207 – 211
  22. Ivanenko N. (2019). Youth vocabulary as a reflection of changes in modern society. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi: KOD, 175, pp. 34 – 39.
  23. Ivanenko N. (2018). Promoting citizenship education in the English language Proceedings of the IV International Conference. Kyiv, pp. 130 – 137
  24. Ivanenko N. (2018). Educating global citizens at a foreign language class. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, – pp. 494 – 500
  25. Ivanenko N. (2018). Formation of civic values through teaching a foreign language. Proceedings of the II International Conference “Foreign Language in Professional Training of Specialists: Problems and Strategies”. Kropyvnytskyi, pp. 189-191
  26. Ivanenko N. (2017). Citizenship education in the English language classroom. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 154. – pp. 92 – 97
  27. Ivanenko N. (2017). Education for democratic citizenship: teaching virtues and values. Research Bulletin. Pedagogical Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 152, pp. 110-113
  28. Ivanenko N. (2016). Citizenship education as a way to develop moral fluency to solve social and political challenges of the future. Scientific Journal of Ariel University. Israel: Ariel University.
  29. Ivanenko N. (2016). Functioning peculiarities of lexical units of the RESPECT concept in the English language. Proceedings of the International Conference Linguistic and Linguacultural Aspects of Teaching Foreign Languages in Ukrainian Universities”. Dnipropetrovsk, pp. 87-94
  30. Ivanenko N. (2016). Semantic relationships of lexical units of the concept of love in the English language. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, pp. 221-226
  31. Ivanenko N. (2015). Citizenship education as the coordination and integration of educational establishment and community. Research Proceedings of the national UniversityOstrog Academy”. Ostrog, pp. 136-142
  32. Ivanenko N. (2015). The value of citizenship education in practices of student governing body. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 136. pp. 438-442

Louise’s doctoral research investigates how teachers become who they are.

Louise’s work situates the schoolteacher as a particular type of subject, that is both made and makes itself from within a network of power relations. Her study combines Foucauldian theory, Critical Discourse Analysis, and Narrative analysis to provide an account of schoolteachers’ ethical agency in the context of top-down policy practices.

Louise is a Doctoral Teaching Fellow at the Department of Education, where she teaches and supervises students in the MSc in Learning and Teaching course. Currently, Louise is collaborating the OECD in their Globally Teaching InSights project. Her research supports the Schools+ Network aims to fuel an ecosystem of organisations that are driving change in education from the bottom-up.

In March 2023 she presented her preliminary research at the Philosophy of Education Society of Great Britain (PESGB)’s annual conference.

As Honorary Fellow John attends seminars and consults with current staff in Mathematics Education.

During 40 years at the Open University supporting the teaching of mathematics he authored a wide range of papers, and dozens of Open University Books and Teaching materials. He co-authored the classic Thinking Mathematically; Mathematics as a Constructive Activity (with his wife Prof. Anne Watson); Questions and Prompts for Mathematical Thinking & Thinkers (with Anne and other colleagues), among many others.

His research methods are phenomenological, based on the Discipline of Noticing. He is interested in the lived experience of learning, doing and teaching mathematics. He focuses on the structure and form of Attention in the teaching of mathematics, as he supports those who wish to foster and sustain mathematical thinking in others.

He is an Honorary Fellow of BSRLM and ATM, a long-standing member of  the MAA and the  MA.H.

 

Publications

  • Mason, J. (2022). Consequences of a Virtual Encounter with George Pólya. Teaching Mathematics and Computer Science.  20 (2) p173-182.
  • Zazkis, R. Kontorovich, I. & Mason, J. (2021). The Learning and Teaching of Number: paths less travelled through well-trodden terrain. London: Routledge
  • Mason, J. (2021). Learning about Noticing, by, and through, Noticing. ZDM – Mathematics Education. 53(1) p231-243. doi: 10.1007/s11858-020-01192-4
  • Mason, J. & Czarnocha,B. (2021). Aha! Moments, Bisociation and Multifocal Attention. In B. Czarnocha & W. Baker. Creativity of an Aha! Moment and Mathematics Education. Leiden: Brill. p345-361.
  • Mason, J. (2018) Making Distinctions: a phenomenological exploration in mathematics education. In P. Ernest (Ed.). The Philosophy of Mathematics Education Today. ICME-13 Monographs. Springer.
  • Mason, J. (2018). Reflecting on values emerging from practice and the value of reflecting on practice. In D. Rowe & A. Watson (Eds.). Faith and Experience in Education: essays from Quaker perspectives. London: Trentham Books. p63-91.
  • Mason, J. & Metz, M. (2017). Digging Beneath Dual Systems Theory and the Bicameral Brain: abductions about the human psyche from experience in mathematical problem solving. In U. Xolocotzin (Ed.). Understanding Emotions in Mathematical Thinking and Learning. p379-407. Cambridge: Elsevier/Academic Press.
  • Mason, J. (2016). Rising Above a Cause-and-Effect Stance in Mathematics Education Research. JMTE 19(4) p297-300. http://rdcu.be/npTf
  • Mason, J. & Davis, B. (2013). The Importance of Teachers’ Mathematical Awareness for In-The-Moment Pedagogy. CJSMTE 13(2) p182-197.
  • Mason, J. (2012). Noticing: roots and branches. In M. Sherin, V. Jacobs, & R. Phillip (Eds.) Mathematics Teacher Noticing:  Seeing Through Teachers’ Eyes. p35-50. Mahwah: Erlbaum.
  • Mason, J. (2008). Being Mathematical With & In Front of Learners: Attention, Awareness, and Attitude as Sources of Differences between Teacher Educators, Teachers & Learners. In T. Wood (Series Ed.) & B. Jaworski (Vol. Ed.), International Handbook of Mathematics Teacher Education: Vol.4. The Mathematics Teacher Educator as a Developing Professional. Rotterdam, the Netherlands: Sense Publishers, p31-56.
  • Mason, J. & Johnston-Wilder, S. (2006 2nd edition). Designing and Using Mathematical Tasks. St. Albans: Tarquin.
  • Watson, A. & Mason, J. (2006). Seeing an Exercise as a Single Mathematical Object: Using Variation to Structure Sense-Making. Mathematical Thinking and Learning. 8(2) p91-111.
  • Watson, A. & Mason, J. (2005). Mathematics as a Constructive Activity: learners generating examples. Mahwah: Erlbaum.
  • Mason, J. & Johnston-Wilder, S. (2004). Fundamental Constructs in Mathematics Education, RoutledgeFalmer, London.
  • Mason, J. 2003, Structure of Attention in the Learning of Mathematics, in J. Novotná (Ed.) Proceedings, International Symposium on Elementary Mathematics Teaching, Charles University, Prague, p9-16.
  • Mason, J. 2002, Mathematics Teaching Practice: a guidebook for university and college lecturers, Horwood Publishing, Chichester.
  • Mason, J. 2002, Researching Your own Practice: The Discipline of Noticing, RoutledgeFalmer, London.
  • Mason, J. 2001, Modelling Modelling: where is the centre of gravity of-for-when modelling?, in J. Matos, W. Blum, S. Houston & S. Carreira (Eds.) Modelling and Mathematics Education: ICTMA 9 applications in science and technology, Horwood Publishing, Chichester, p39-61.
  • Mason, J. Burton L. & Stacey K. (1982). Thinking Mathematically, Addison Wesley, London

Website

www.pmtheta.com

Mark has worked in ELT and EMI for over 35 years as a teacher, teacher trainer, lecturer, course writer, syllabus designer, examiner, Director of Studies, and consultant editor for OUP. For the British Council he has worked as a consultant trainer and course developer in EMI and EAP. For the University of Oxford Department of Education Mark delivered the ELT option on the MSc ALSLA and is Teaching Associate of the EMI Research Group in which capacity he has worked as a CI and has developed and delivered EMI teacher training courses in China, Serbia and Oxford. Mark has worked in universities in Russia, Ukraine, Kazakhstan, Belarus, Czechia, Italy, Germany, Mexico, Peru, Chile, Brazil, Colombia and Morocco.

He continues to be involved in EMI and is currently co-authoring an EMI student guide.

Mark is an alumnus of the University of Oxford Department of Education and was among the first to be awarded the innovative MSc in Teaching English Language in University Settings.

Anushay is a second-year DPhil student investigating how classroom characteristics are related to Pakistani children’s development. She is supervised by Professor Iram Siraj and Dr Katharina Ereky-Stevens and her work is being supported by the Aga Khan University (Pakistan). Anushay received the Patrice Engle Dissertation Grant Award from the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD) in 2023.

Anushay completed her BSc Psychology from UCL, where she also started her master’s in Developmental Neuroscience and Psychopathology. She was based at Yale University for her master’s thesis, where she worked with Dr Craig Bailey at the Yale Center for Emotional Intelligence to understand children’s emotion development. Anushay also works as a part-time research  assistant at the Developmental Diversity Lab at UCL’s Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience. Anushay’s research interests include understanding child development across different cultures, factors that might be affecting it, and devising culture-specific ways to support children’s holistic development through the educational system. She is also keen on improving the research scope in Pakistan by working with Pakistani researchers, practitioners, and families. Anushay balances her research with her position as the founder of a non-profit, Resources for Children, which aims to understand and support children’s development in Pakistan.

Publications

Journal Articles

  1. Mazhar, A., & Bailey, C., S. (under review). Understanding Children’s Emotion-Specific Biases: How They Relate to Child and Family Factors, Emotion Recognition Accuracy, and Social Behaviour.

Presentations

  1. Mazhar, A., & Bailey, C., S. (2023, March). Understanding Children’s Emotion-Specific Biases: How They Relate to Child-Level Factors and Emotion Recognition Accuracy [Paper Presentation]. Society for Research in Child Development, Salt Lake City, Utah, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2022, April). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Spring Preview, New Haven, United States.
  3. Mazhar, A. (2021, December). Does an extended family improve mentalising in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK & Pakistan. 2nd International Foundation University Conference of Psychology, Rawalpindi, Pakistan.
  4. Mazhar, A. (2020, October). Developing a non-profit to advance autism research in Pakistan. Anna Freud Centre Seminar Series, London, United Kingdom.

Posters

  1. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Theory of Mind in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK and Pakistan. Harvard Trends in Psychology Summit, Cambridge, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Research Rounds, New Haven, United States.

Cindy works at the intersection of learning, design, and technology, with a keen interest in the orchestration of future-ready tech-enabled learning.

She is curious how the deployment of adaptive learning systems to schools will impact classroom learning and hopes to learn more about the human-machine partnership in education. Specifically, her research is concerned with the implications that the use of such systems has on teacher-student interactions, as teachers grapple with balancing personalised learning and learning in community, as well as curriculum demands and student interests. These are some tensions which could potentially be exacerbated by affordances of adaptive learning systems.

Prior to embarking on the DPhil in Education at Oxford, Cindy worked as the Lead Specialist in Technologies for Learning at the Educational Technology Division of Ministry of Education, Singapore. She had previously completed graduate studies at the National University of Singapore and Stanford University where she was awarded Master of Arts in English Studies and Master of Arts in Education.

Reem is DPhil student from Saudi Arabia.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she worked as a Teacher, Professional Developer, then, became a Supervisor and Researcher in the Ministry of Education where she received a scholarship to pursue her DPhil education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests lie in the area of Teacher Education and Professional Learning Policy and Practice.

Publications
  • Alqahtani, Reem (2020). Saudi Universities Role in Developing Teacher Professional Development Programs: Elite Universities Experience. Journal of Educational Sciences. King Saud University.
  • Alqahtani, Reem. (2020). The effect of implementing UDL-based activities in improving EFL learners’ academic achievement and attitudes towards L2. In L. Salas, & E. Ager, Creating Quiet reflective Spaces: Language Teacher Researches Professional Development (pp. 61-62). IATEFL publications.

Lena Zlock is researching the integration of digital technology into structures of teaching, learning, and education in higher education. Her particular focus is on the digital humanities and the potential for digital methods to transform humanistic study. She works with Professor Niall Winters and Dr. James Robson.

Lena’s research interests stem from her education as an M.St. student and Ertegun Graduate Scholar in Modern Languages at the University of Oxford, and as a B.A. student in History at Stanford University. As an undergraduate, she started the Voltaire Library Project, a digitally and data-driven study of the 6,763-book collection of French Enlightenment philosopher Voltaire (you can read more about the project here and here). She has been interested in the application of digital technology to humanistic teaching since her days in Princeton Day School, where she developed an interdisciplinary curriculum on Mexico City (visit the course website here).

Her research on Voltaire led her to think more broadly about the place of digital methods in the humanities classroom, and how new technologies will revolutionise the liberal arts and higher education. As a DPhil candidate, Lena will examine the negotiation and implementation of new learning technologies within the University of Oxford at undergraduate and graduate levels.

Lena is involved in a number of digital humanities initiatives in Oxford. She previously served as the inaugural fellow of the Voltaire Lab at Oxford’s Voltaire Foundation. As a master’s student, Lena co-formulated the convergence agenda for Oxford digital humanities with Professor Howard Hotson, and is currently employed by the Humanities Division to assist with the development of an M.St. degree in Digital Scholarship (read more here). Lena set up and helps to run the History of the Book blog for the Faculty of Medieval and Modern Languages and the Oxford Book History Twitter account.

Lena welcomes inquiries from undergraduate and postgraduate students from Oxford and beyond seeking to get involved with the digital humanities in any capacity. The History of the Book blog also welcomes inquiries from prospective contributors.

 

Abbey is a Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education, in collaboration with the Department of Engineering.

Before joining the DPhil program, Abbey obtained a B.A. in Applied Linguistics with minors in Russian and Chinese from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford. She was the recipient of a Benjamin A. Gilman International Scholarship through U.S. Department of State for study in Russia and was awarded two Foreign Language and Area Studies (FLAS) Fellowships for study in both Russia and China. She holds both TESOL and TEFL certificates and has taught English as a Second Language in various contexts to a wide variety of learner populations.

Abbey’s main research interests lie in the use of technology to facilitate language learning. Her DPhil research focuses on the development of a virtual reality program to bridge the gaps that students face when learning languages through distance learning.

Dr Nadiya Ivanenko is a Visiting Research Fellow in the field of civic education and citizenship linguistics. She is a member of the Applied Linguistics research group and Higher Education research group at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

After receiving PhD in Comparative Linguistics from Kyiv National Linguistic University (2008) Nadiya worked as an Associate Professor of the Germanic Languages and Teaching Methodology Department, Faculty of Ukrainian Philology, Foreign Languages and Social Communications and Vice Dean of the Faculty of Foreign Languages, Central Ukrainian State University, Ukraine.

Nadiya was a Chevening scholar and Postgraduate researcher at the Department of Education, University of Oxford (2003-2004). She was a Co-chair of the joint UNESCO Chair/UNITWIN project ‘Education as a Humanitarian Response’ (2004-2012); a participant of BECA joint project ‘Education for Democracy’ between Montclair State University (USA) and Kirovohrad State Pedagogical University (Ukraine). Nadiya had internship for teachers of EFL in the Department of Educational and Cultural Programmes at Shakespeare’s Globe Theater, London, UK (2011). She was the Head of the British Council International Mobility Grant ‘Internalizing Higher Education in Ukraine’, which included 2 internships at the University of Durham, UK (2016). She participated in the internship “Retraining in the Field of Teaching Excellence”, Bayreuth University, Germany (Erasmus + Project (2021) and was a coordinator of the Erasmus+ Project: Innovative Approach to Promotion Teaching Excellence (2021-2022) at Central Ukrainian State University.

Selected Publications

BOOKS

  • Rastrygina, A., Ivanenko, N. (2021). Pedagogy of Freedom in the Paradigmal Space of Modern Education and Upbringing.
  • Ivanenko, N., Liashuk, A. (2021). English Activity Book. Practical Course of English. Kropyvnytskyi.
  • Ivanenko N. (2014). (Edit.) Education in Eastern Europe and Eurasia. London: Bloomsbury.
  • Ivanenko N. (2008). The Concept of Good in English and Ukrainian Language Pictures of the World. Kirovohrad: KOD.
  • Ivanenko N. (2007). Written Practice and Conversation for 1 Year. Kropyvnytskyi.
  • Garkusha, L., Ivanenko, N. (2004). Critical thinking in life skills training. Kirovohrad.

BOOK CHAPTERS

  • Ivanenko, N. (2024). Words and word meanings In The Routledge Companion To English Studies/ by Constant Leung & Jo Lewkowicz. London, UK: Routledge (in publishing).
  • Ivanenko N. (2023). Development of civic education in Ukrainian universities: new challenges of modern realities in the conditions of the transformation of society. In Contemporary Education in Ukraine: Integration into the European Educational Space. Dnipro (pp. 387-412) DOI:36550/978-617-8245-57-3-20
  • Ivanenko N. (2019). Citizenship Education, Moral Fluency and Social and Political Future Challenges. In Polish-Jewish History, Culture, Values, and Education between Paradise and Inferno. Irvine, USA: Brown Walker Press (pp. 93-103)
  • Ivanenko N. (2014). Education Change, Transformation, Reforms – a Regional Overview. In N. Ivanenko (Edit.) Education in Eastern Europe and Eurasia. London: Bloomsbury (pp. 9-45)
  • Ivanenko N. (2013). Vulnerable Children in Ukraine and Educational Response. In M. Matsumoto (Edit.) Education and Disadvantaged Children and Young People. London: Bloomsbury (pp. 95-132)

JOURNAL ARTICLES

  1. Ivanenko, N. (2024). Challenges of Ukrainian Higher Education in Times of War. International Higher Education. The Boston College Centre for International Higher Education, 118, pp. 35-36 https://doi.org/10.36197/IHE.2024.118.17
  2. Ivanenko, N., Paska, T., Irkha, A. Rud, A., & Boguslavskas, L., (2024). The Role of Higher Education for Ensuring National Security in Ukraine. Futurity Education, 4(1), 210-237 https://doi.org/10.57125/FED.2024.03.25.11
  3. Leleka, T., Ivanenko, N., Demeshko, I., Kapitan T., & Demchenko, I. (2024). The Process of English Internationalization in the Ukrainian Educational Paradigm. Slavistica Vilnensis, 68(2), 76-89 doi:10.15388/SlavViln.2023.68(2).6
  4. Ivanenko, N., Rud, A., Hurbanska, A., Cheban, Y., & Syrtseva, S. (2024). Digitalization of Education of the Future – A Trend or a Requirement of the Time? Journal of Higher Education Theory and Practice24(2). DOI: https://doi.org/10.33423/jhetp.v24i2.6791
  5. Ivanenko, N. (2023). Civic character cultivation as a basic virtue within and beyond modern educational institutions. Academic Notes. Series Pedagogical sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 209, 180-185 DOI: https://doi.org/10.36550/2415-7988-2022-1-209-180-185
  6. Rastrygina, A., Ivanenko, N. (2023). A Pedagogy of freedom as a viable basis for implementing gender equality in Ukraine’s educational institutions. International Review of Education, 69(1-2), 143-174. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/s11159-023-09995-9
  7. Ivanenko N., Biletska O., Hurbanska S., Hurbanska, A., & Kochmar, D. (2023). English language morphological neologisms reflecting the war in Ukraine. World Journal of English Language, 13(5), pp. 432-438    DOI: doi:http://dx.doi.org/10.5430/wjel.v13n5p432
  8. Ivanenko, N., Boiko, A., Fedorchuk, L., Panchenko, I., & Marieiev, D. (2023). Development of educational policy in Ukraine in the context of European integration and digital transformation. Revista Eduweb, 17(2), 296-305 DOI: https://doi.org/10.46502/issn.1856-7576/2023.17.02.25
  9. Ivanenko, N.V., Gerasymenko,Yu. A., Kostenko, V.G. (2023). Innovative approaches to the modernization of philological education and science in Ukraine: a response to the challenges of wartime. Akademichni Vizii, (in Ukrainian). URL: https://academy-vision.org/index.php/av/article/view/281 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5281/zenodo.7795088
  10. Ivanenko N. (2022). Phraseological units of the conceptual field MARRIAGE in the English picture of the world. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi: KOD, 202, pp. 140-146
  11. Bilous, O., Mishchenko, A., Datska, T., Ivanenko, N., Kit, L., Piankovska, I., and Vereshchak, Y. (2021). Modern linguistic technologies: strategy of teaching translation studies. Rupkatha Journal on Interdisciplinary Studies in Humanities, 13(4), pp. 1-12 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/21659/rupkatha.v13n4.65
  12. Leleka, T., Ivanenko, N., Moskalenko O., Herasymenko, L., Shevchuk L., Pidlubna, O. (2021). Angloamerican loanwords use in the Ukrainian student slang. Laplage em Revista, 7(Extra-D): University and science: possible dialogues. pp.163-174. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/24115/S2446-622020217Extra-D1081p.163-174
  13. Ivanenko N. (2021). Figurative and valuable component of the MARRIAGE concept. Trends in Science and Practice of Today. Ankara, Turkey, pp. 356-361
  14. Ivanenko N. (2021). Inclusive learning environment for students’ achievements and foreign language development. Priorities in the Development of Science and Education. Budapest, Hungary, pp.74-80
  15. Ivanenko N. (2021). The nominative field of the MARRIAGE concept and the analysis of the synonymous series of its key unit. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi: KOD, 193, pp 218-224 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.36550/2522-4077-2021-1-193-218-224
  16. Ivanenko N. (2020). Language intervention stages in project-based learning. Modern Trends in Foreign Language Professional Training in a Multicultural Space. Kyiv, pp. 249 – 255
  17. Rastrygina, A., Ivanenko, N. (2020). Gender comfortable educational environment as a factor of development of personal freedom. Research Bulletin. Pedagogical Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 188, pp. 28 – 35 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.36550/2415-7988-2020-1-188-28-35
  18. Ivanenko N. (2020). Texting slang as one of the most common groups of everyday youth Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi: KOD, 187, pp. 38-45
  19. Ivanenko N. (2019). Computer use in foreign language Intellectual and Emotional Components of Foreign Language Learning: Latest Trends and Challenges for Higher Education. Kyiv, pp. 152 – 158.
  20. Ivanenko N. (2019). Initial stages of elaborating a project in a foreign language classroom. Science and Society. Hamilton, Canada, pp. 13 – 20.
  21. Ivanenko N. (2019). Project-based learning as a way to incorporate effective foreign language teaching. Research Bulletin. Pedagogical Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 177, pp. 207 – 211
  22. Ivanenko N. (2019). Youth vocabulary as a reflection of changes in modern society. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi: KOD, 175, pp. 34 – 39.
  23. Ivanenko N. (2018). Promoting citizenship education in the English language Proceedings of the IV International Conference. Kyiv, pp. 130 – 137
  24. Ivanenko N. (2018). Educating global citizens at a foreign language class. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, – pp. 494 – 500
  25. Ivanenko N. (2018). Formation of civic values through teaching a foreign language. Proceedings of the II International Conference “Foreign Language in Professional Training of Specialists: Problems and Strategies”. Kropyvnytskyi, pp. 189-191
  26. Ivanenko N. (2017). Citizenship education in the English language classroom. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 154. – pp. 92 – 97
  27. Ivanenko N. (2017). Education for democratic citizenship: teaching virtues and values. Research Bulletin. Pedagogical Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 152, pp. 110-113
  28. Ivanenko N. (2016). Citizenship education as a way to develop moral fluency to solve social and political challenges of the future. Scientific Journal of Ariel University. Israel: Ariel University.
  29. Ivanenko N. (2016). Functioning peculiarities of lexical units of the RESPECT concept in the English language. Proceedings of the International Conference Linguistic and Linguacultural Aspects of Teaching Foreign Languages in Ukrainian Universities”. Dnipropetrovsk, pp. 87-94
  30. Ivanenko N. (2016). Semantic relationships of lexical units of the concept of love in the English language. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, pp. 221-226
  31. Ivanenko N. (2015). Citizenship education as the coordination and integration of educational establishment and community. Research Proceedings of the national UniversityOstrog Academy”. Ostrog, pp. 136-142
  32. Ivanenko N. (2015). The value of citizenship education in practices of student governing body. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 136. pp. 438-442

Louise’s doctoral research investigates how teachers become who they are.

Louise’s work situates the schoolteacher as a particular type of subject, that is both made and makes itself from within a network of power relations. Her study combines Foucauldian theory, Critical Discourse Analysis, and Narrative analysis to provide an account of schoolteachers’ ethical agency in the context of top-down policy practices.

Louise is a Doctoral Teaching Fellow at the Department of Education, where she teaches and supervises students in the MSc in Learning and Teaching course. Currently, Louise is collaborating the OECD in their Globally Teaching InSights project. Her research supports the Schools+ Network aims to fuel an ecosystem of organisations that are driving change in education from the bottom-up.

In March 2023 she presented her preliminary research at the Philosophy of Education Society of Great Britain (PESGB)’s annual conference.

As Honorary Fellow John attends seminars and consults with current staff in Mathematics Education.

During 40 years at the Open University supporting the teaching of mathematics he authored a wide range of papers, and dozens of Open University Books and Teaching materials. He co-authored the classic Thinking Mathematically; Mathematics as a Constructive Activity (with his wife Prof. Anne Watson); Questions and Prompts for Mathematical Thinking & Thinkers (with Anne and other colleagues), among many others.

His research methods are phenomenological, based on the Discipline of Noticing. He is interested in the lived experience of learning, doing and teaching mathematics. He focuses on the structure and form of Attention in the teaching of mathematics, as he supports those who wish to foster and sustain mathematical thinking in others.

He is an Honorary Fellow of BSRLM and ATM, a long-standing member of  the MAA and the  MA.H.

 

Publications

  • Mason, J. (2022). Consequences of a Virtual Encounter with George Pólya. Teaching Mathematics and Computer Science.  20 (2) p173-182.
  • Zazkis, R. Kontorovich, I. & Mason, J. (2021). The Learning and Teaching of Number: paths less travelled through well-trodden terrain. London: Routledge
  • Mason, J. (2021). Learning about Noticing, by, and through, Noticing. ZDM – Mathematics Education. 53(1) p231-243. doi: 10.1007/s11858-020-01192-4
  • Mason, J. & Czarnocha,B. (2021). Aha! Moments, Bisociation and Multifocal Attention. In B. Czarnocha & W. Baker. Creativity of an Aha! Moment and Mathematics Education. Leiden: Brill. p345-361.
  • Mason, J. (2018) Making Distinctions: a phenomenological exploration in mathematics education. In P. Ernest (Ed.). The Philosophy of Mathematics Education Today. ICME-13 Monographs. Springer.
  • Mason, J. (2018). Reflecting on values emerging from practice and the value of reflecting on practice. In D. Rowe & A. Watson (Eds.). Faith and Experience in Education: essays from Quaker perspectives. London: Trentham Books. p63-91.
  • Mason, J. & Metz, M. (2017). Digging Beneath Dual Systems Theory and the Bicameral Brain: abductions about the human psyche from experience in mathematical problem solving. In U. Xolocotzin (Ed.). Understanding Emotions in Mathematical Thinking and Learning. p379-407. Cambridge: Elsevier/Academic Press.
  • Mason, J. (2016). Rising Above a Cause-and-Effect Stance in Mathematics Education Research. JMTE 19(4) p297-300. http://rdcu.be/npTf
  • Mason, J. & Davis, B. (2013). The Importance of Teachers’ Mathematical Awareness for In-The-Moment Pedagogy. CJSMTE 13(2) p182-197.
  • Mason, J. (2012). Noticing: roots and branches. In M. Sherin, V. Jacobs, & R. Phillip (Eds.) Mathematics Teacher Noticing:  Seeing Through Teachers’ Eyes. p35-50. Mahwah: Erlbaum.
  • Mason, J. (2008). Being Mathematical With & In Front of Learners: Attention, Awareness, and Attitude as Sources of Differences between Teacher Educators, Teachers & Learners. In T. Wood (Series Ed.) & B. Jaworski (Vol. Ed.), International Handbook of Mathematics Teacher Education: Vol.4. The Mathematics Teacher Educator as a Developing Professional. Rotterdam, the Netherlands: Sense Publishers, p31-56.
  • Mason, J. & Johnston-Wilder, S. (2006 2nd edition). Designing and Using Mathematical Tasks. St. Albans: Tarquin.
  • Watson, A. & Mason, J. (2006). Seeing an Exercise as a Single Mathematical Object: Using Variation to Structure Sense-Making. Mathematical Thinking and Learning. 8(2) p91-111.
  • Watson, A. & Mason, J. (2005). Mathematics as a Constructive Activity: learners generating examples. Mahwah: Erlbaum.
  • Mason, J. & Johnston-Wilder, S. (2004). Fundamental Constructs in Mathematics Education, RoutledgeFalmer, London.
  • Mason, J. 2003, Structure of Attention in the Learning of Mathematics, in J. Novotná (Ed.) Proceedings, International Symposium on Elementary Mathematics Teaching, Charles University, Prague, p9-16.
  • Mason, J. 2002, Mathematics Teaching Practice: a guidebook for university and college lecturers, Horwood Publishing, Chichester.
  • Mason, J. 2002, Researching Your own Practice: The Discipline of Noticing, RoutledgeFalmer, London.
  • Mason, J. 2001, Modelling Modelling: where is the centre of gravity of-for-when modelling?, in J. Matos, W. Blum, S. Houston & S. Carreira (Eds.) Modelling and Mathematics Education: ICTMA 9 applications in science and technology, Horwood Publishing, Chichester, p39-61.
  • Mason, J. Burton L. & Stacey K. (1982). Thinking Mathematically, Addison Wesley, London

Website

www.pmtheta.com

Mark has worked in ELT and EMI for over 35 years as a teacher, teacher trainer, lecturer, course writer, syllabus designer, examiner, Director of Studies, and consultant editor for OUP. For the British Council he has worked as a consultant trainer and course developer in EMI and EAP. For the University of Oxford Department of Education Mark delivered the ELT option on the MSc ALSLA and is Teaching Associate of the EMI Research Group in which capacity he has worked as a CI and has developed and delivered EMI teacher training courses in China, Serbia and Oxford. Mark has worked in universities in Russia, Ukraine, Kazakhstan, Belarus, Czechia, Italy, Germany, Mexico, Peru, Chile, Brazil, Colombia and Morocco.

He continues to be involved in EMI and is currently co-authoring an EMI student guide.

Mark is an alumnus of the University of Oxford Department of Education and was among the first to be awarded the innovative MSc in Teaching English Language in University Settings.

Anushay is a second-year DPhil student investigating how classroom characteristics are related to Pakistani children’s development. She is supervised by Professor Iram Siraj and Dr Katharina Ereky-Stevens and her work is being supported by the Aga Khan University (Pakistan). Anushay received the Patrice Engle Dissertation Grant Award from the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD) in 2023.

Anushay completed her BSc Psychology from UCL, where she also started her master’s in Developmental Neuroscience and Psychopathology. She was based at Yale University for her master’s thesis, where she worked with Dr Craig Bailey at the Yale Center for Emotional Intelligence to understand children’s emotion development. Anushay also works as a part-time research  assistant at the Developmental Diversity Lab at UCL’s Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience. Anushay’s research interests include understanding child development across different cultures, factors that might be affecting it, and devising culture-specific ways to support children’s holistic development through the educational system. She is also keen on improving the research scope in Pakistan by working with Pakistani researchers, practitioners, and families. Anushay balances her research with her position as the founder of a non-profit, Resources for Children, which aims to understand and support children’s development in Pakistan.

Publications

Journal Articles

  1. Mazhar, A., & Bailey, C., S. (under review). Understanding Children’s Emotion-Specific Biases: How They Relate to Child and Family Factors, Emotion Recognition Accuracy, and Social Behaviour.

Presentations

  1. Mazhar, A., & Bailey, C., S. (2023, March). Understanding Children’s Emotion-Specific Biases: How They Relate to Child-Level Factors and Emotion Recognition Accuracy [Paper Presentation]. Society for Research in Child Development, Salt Lake City, Utah, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2022, April). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Spring Preview, New Haven, United States.
  3. Mazhar, A. (2021, December). Does an extended family improve mentalising in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK & Pakistan. 2nd International Foundation University Conference of Psychology, Rawalpindi, Pakistan.
  4. Mazhar, A. (2020, October). Developing a non-profit to advance autism research in Pakistan. Anna Freud Centre Seminar Series, London, United Kingdom.

Posters

  1. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Theory of Mind in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK and Pakistan. Harvard Trends in Psychology Summit, Cambridge, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Research Rounds, New Haven, United States.

Cindy works at the intersection of learning, design, and technology, with a keen interest in the orchestration of future-ready tech-enabled learning.

She is curious how the deployment of adaptive learning systems to schools will impact classroom learning and hopes to learn more about the human-machine partnership in education. Specifically, her research is concerned with the implications that the use of such systems has on teacher-student interactions, as teachers grapple with balancing personalised learning and learning in community, as well as curriculum demands and student interests. These are some tensions which could potentially be exacerbated by affordances of adaptive learning systems.

Prior to embarking on the DPhil in Education at Oxford, Cindy worked as the Lead Specialist in Technologies for Learning at the Educational Technology Division of Ministry of Education, Singapore. She had previously completed graduate studies at the National University of Singapore and Stanford University where she was awarded Master of Arts in English Studies and Master of Arts in Education.

Reem is DPhil student from Saudi Arabia.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she worked as a Teacher, Professional Developer, then, became a Supervisor and Researcher in the Ministry of Education where she received a scholarship to pursue her DPhil education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests lie in the area of Teacher Education and Professional Learning Policy and Practice.

Publications
  • Alqahtani, Reem (2020). Saudi Universities Role in Developing Teacher Professional Development Programs: Elite Universities Experience. Journal of Educational Sciences. King Saud University.
  • Alqahtani, Reem. (2020). The effect of implementing UDL-based activities in improving EFL learners’ academic achievement and attitudes towards L2. In L. Salas, & E. Ager, Creating Quiet reflective Spaces: Language Teacher Researches Professional Development (pp. 61-62). IATEFL publications.

Lena Zlock is researching the integration of digital technology into structures of teaching, learning, and education in higher education. Her particular focus is on the digital humanities and the potential for digital methods to transform humanistic study. She works with Professor Niall Winters and Dr. James Robson.

Lena’s research interests stem from her education as an M.St. student and Ertegun Graduate Scholar in Modern Languages at the University of Oxford, and as a B.A. student in History at Stanford University. As an undergraduate, she started the Voltaire Library Project, a digitally and data-driven study of the 6,763-book collection of French Enlightenment philosopher Voltaire (you can read more about the project here and here). She has been interested in the application of digital technology to humanistic teaching since her days in Princeton Day School, where she developed an interdisciplinary curriculum on Mexico City (visit the course website here).

Her research on Voltaire led her to think more broadly about the place of digital methods in the humanities classroom, and how new technologies will revolutionise the liberal arts and higher education. As a DPhil candidate, Lena will examine the negotiation and implementation of new learning technologies within the University of Oxford at undergraduate and graduate levels.

Lena is involved in a number of digital humanities initiatives in Oxford. She previously served as the inaugural fellow of the Voltaire Lab at Oxford’s Voltaire Foundation. As a master’s student, Lena co-formulated the convergence agenda for Oxford digital humanities with Professor Howard Hotson, and is currently employed by the Humanities Division to assist with the development of an M.St. degree in Digital Scholarship (read more here). Lena set up and helps to run the History of the Book blog for the Faculty of Medieval and Modern Languages and the Oxford Book History Twitter account.

Lena welcomes inquiries from undergraduate and postgraduate students from Oxford and beyond seeking to get involved with the digital humanities in any capacity. The History of the Book blog also welcomes inquiries from prospective contributors.

 

Abbey is a Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education, in collaboration with the Department of Engineering.

Before joining the DPhil program, Abbey obtained a B.A. in Applied Linguistics with minors in Russian and Chinese from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford. She was the recipient of a Benjamin A. Gilman International Scholarship through U.S. Department of State for study in Russia and was awarded two Foreign Language and Area Studies (FLAS) Fellowships for study in both Russia and China. She holds both TESOL and TEFL certificates and has taught English as a Second Language in various contexts to a wide variety of learner populations.

Abbey’s main research interests lie in the use of technology to facilitate language learning. Her DPhil research focuses on the development of a virtual reality program to bridge the gaps that students face when learning languages through distance learning.

Dr Nadiya Ivanenko is a Visiting Research Fellow in the field of civic education and citizenship linguistics. She is a member of the Applied Linguistics research group and Higher Education research group at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

After receiving PhD in Comparative Linguistics from Kyiv National Linguistic University (2008) Nadiya worked as an Associate Professor of the Germanic Languages and Teaching Methodology Department, Faculty of Ukrainian Philology, Foreign Languages and Social Communications and Vice Dean of the Faculty of Foreign Languages, Central Ukrainian State University, Ukraine.

Nadiya was a Chevening scholar and Postgraduate researcher at the Department of Education, University of Oxford (2003-2004). She was a Co-chair of the joint UNESCO Chair/UNITWIN project ‘Education as a Humanitarian Response’ (2004-2012); a participant of BECA joint project ‘Education for Democracy’ between Montclair State University (USA) and Kirovohrad State Pedagogical University (Ukraine). Nadiya had internship for teachers of EFL in the Department of Educational and Cultural Programmes at Shakespeare’s Globe Theater, London, UK (2011). She was the Head of the British Council International Mobility Grant ‘Internalizing Higher Education in Ukraine’, which included 2 internships at the University of Durham, UK (2016). She participated in the internship “Retraining in the Field of Teaching Excellence”, Bayreuth University, Germany (Erasmus + Project (2021) and was a coordinator of the Erasmus+ Project: Innovative Approach to Promotion Teaching Excellence (2021-2022) at Central Ukrainian State University.

Selected Publications

BOOKS

  • Rastrygina, A., Ivanenko, N. (2021). Pedagogy of Freedom in the Paradigmal Space of Modern Education and Upbringing.
  • Ivanenko, N., Liashuk, A. (2021). English Activity Book. Practical Course of English. Kropyvnytskyi.
  • Ivanenko N. (2014). (Edit.) Education in Eastern Europe and Eurasia. London: Bloomsbury.
  • Ivanenko N. (2008). The Concept of Good in English and Ukrainian Language Pictures of the World. Kirovohrad: KOD.
  • Ivanenko N. (2007). Written Practice and Conversation for 1 Year. Kropyvnytskyi.
  • Garkusha, L., Ivanenko, N. (2004). Critical thinking in life skills training. Kirovohrad.

BOOK CHAPTERS

  • Ivanenko, N. (2024). Words and word meanings In The Routledge Companion To English Studies/ by Constant Leung & Jo Lewkowicz. London, UK: Routledge (in publishing).
  • Ivanenko N. (2023). Development of civic education in Ukrainian universities: new challenges of modern realities in the conditions of the transformation of society. In Contemporary Education in Ukraine: Integration into the European Educational Space. Dnipro (pp. 387-412) DOI:36550/978-617-8245-57-3-20
  • Ivanenko N. (2019). Citizenship Education, Moral Fluency and Social and Political Future Challenges. In Polish-Jewish History, Culture, Values, and Education between Paradise and Inferno. Irvine, USA: Brown Walker Press (pp. 93-103)
  • Ivanenko N. (2014). Education Change, Transformation, Reforms – a Regional Overview. In N. Ivanenko (Edit.) Education in Eastern Europe and Eurasia. London: Bloomsbury (pp. 9-45)
  • Ivanenko N. (2013). Vulnerable Children in Ukraine and Educational Response. In M. Matsumoto (Edit.) Education and Disadvantaged Children and Young People. London: Bloomsbury (pp. 95-132)

JOURNAL ARTICLES

  1. Ivanenko, N. (2024). Challenges of Ukrainian Higher Education in Times of War. International Higher Education. The Boston College Centre for International Higher Education, 118, pp. 35-36 https://doi.org/10.36197/IHE.2024.118.17
  2. Ivanenko, N., Paska, T., Irkha, A. Rud, A., & Boguslavskas, L., (2024). The Role of Higher Education for Ensuring National Security in Ukraine. Futurity Education, 4(1), 210-237 https://doi.org/10.57125/FED.2024.03.25.11
  3. Leleka, T., Ivanenko, N., Demeshko, I., Kapitan T., & Demchenko, I. (2024). The Process of English Internationalization in the Ukrainian Educational Paradigm. Slavistica Vilnensis, 68(2), 76-89 doi:10.15388/SlavViln.2023.68(2).6
  4. Ivanenko, N., Rud, A., Hurbanska, A., Cheban, Y., & Syrtseva, S. (2024). Digitalization of Education of the Future – A Trend or a Requirement of the Time? Journal of Higher Education Theory and Practice24(2). DOI: https://doi.org/10.33423/jhetp.v24i2.6791
  5. Ivanenko, N. (2023). Civic character cultivation as a basic virtue within and beyond modern educational institutions. Academic Notes. Series Pedagogical sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 209, 180-185 DOI: https://doi.org/10.36550/2415-7988-2022-1-209-180-185
  6. Rastrygina, A., Ivanenko, N. (2023). A Pedagogy of freedom as a viable basis for implementing gender equality in Ukraine’s educational institutions. International Review of Education, 69(1-2), 143-174. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/s11159-023-09995-9
  7. Ivanenko N., Biletska O., Hurbanska S., Hurbanska, A., & Kochmar, D. (2023). English language morphological neologisms reflecting the war in Ukraine. World Journal of English Language, 13(5), pp. 432-438    DOI: doi:http://dx.doi.org/10.5430/wjel.v13n5p432
  8. Ivanenko, N., Boiko, A., Fedorchuk, L., Panchenko, I., & Marieiev, D. (2023). Development of educational policy in Ukraine in the context of European integration and digital transformation. Revista Eduweb, 17(2), 296-305 DOI: https://doi.org/10.46502/issn.1856-7576/2023.17.02.25
  9. Ivanenko, N.V., Gerasymenko,Yu. A., Kostenko, V.G. (2023). Innovative approaches to the modernization of philological education and science in Ukraine: a response to the challenges of wartime. Akademichni Vizii, (in Ukrainian). URL: https://academy-vision.org/index.php/av/article/view/281 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5281/zenodo.7795088
  10. Ivanenko N. (2022). Phraseological units of the conceptual field MARRIAGE in the English picture of the world. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi: KOD, 202, pp. 140-146
  11. Bilous, O., Mishchenko, A., Datska, T., Ivanenko, N., Kit, L., Piankovska, I., and Vereshchak, Y. (2021). Modern linguistic technologies: strategy of teaching translation studies. Rupkatha Journal on Interdisciplinary Studies in Humanities, 13(4), pp. 1-12 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/21659/rupkatha.v13n4.65
  12. Leleka, T., Ivanenko, N., Moskalenko O., Herasymenko, L., Shevchuk L., Pidlubna, O. (2021). Angloamerican loanwords use in the Ukrainian student slang. Laplage em Revista, 7(Extra-D): University and science: possible dialogues. pp.163-174. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/24115/S2446-622020217Extra-D1081p.163-174
  13. Ivanenko N. (2021). Figurative and valuable component of the MARRIAGE concept. Trends in Science and Practice of Today. Ankara, Turkey, pp. 356-361
  14. Ivanenko N. (2021). Inclusive learning environment for students’ achievements and foreign language development. Priorities in the Development of Science and Education. Budapest, Hungary, pp.74-80
  15. Ivanenko N. (2021). The nominative field of the MARRIAGE concept and the analysis of the synonymous series of its key unit. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi: KOD, 193, pp 218-224 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.36550/2522-4077-2021-1-193-218-224
  16. Ivanenko N. (2020). Language intervention stages in project-based learning. Modern Trends in Foreign Language Professional Training in a Multicultural Space. Kyiv, pp. 249 – 255
  17. Rastrygina, A., Ivanenko, N. (2020). Gender comfortable educational environment as a factor of development of personal freedom. Research Bulletin. Pedagogical Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 188, pp. 28 – 35 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.36550/2415-7988-2020-1-188-28-35
  18. Ivanenko N. (2020). Texting slang as one of the most common groups of everyday youth Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi: KOD, 187, pp. 38-45
  19. Ivanenko N. (2019). Computer use in foreign language Intellectual and Emotional Components of Foreign Language Learning: Latest Trends and Challenges for Higher Education. Kyiv, pp. 152 – 158.
  20. Ivanenko N. (2019). Initial stages of elaborating a project in a foreign language classroom. Science and Society. Hamilton, Canada, pp. 13 – 20.
  21. Ivanenko N. (2019). Project-based learning as a way to incorporate effective foreign language teaching. Research Bulletin. Pedagogical Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 177, pp. 207 – 211
  22. Ivanenko N. (2019). Youth vocabulary as a reflection of changes in modern society. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi: KOD, 175, pp. 34 – 39.
  23. Ivanenko N. (2018). Promoting citizenship education in the English language Proceedings of the IV International Conference. Kyiv, pp. 130 – 137
  24. Ivanenko N. (2018). Educating global citizens at a foreign language class. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, – pp. 494 – 500
  25. Ivanenko N. (2018). Formation of civic values through teaching a foreign language. Proceedings of the II International Conference “Foreign Language in Professional Training of Specialists: Problems and Strategies”. Kropyvnytskyi, pp. 189-191
  26. Ivanenko N. (2017). Citizenship education in the English language classroom. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 154. – pp. 92 – 97
  27. Ivanenko N. (2017). Education for democratic citizenship: teaching virtues and values. Research Bulletin. Pedagogical Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 152, pp. 110-113
  28. Ivanenko N. (2016). Citizenship education as a way to develop moral fluency to solve social and political challenges of the future. Scientific Journal of Ariel University. Israel: Ariel University.
  29. Ivanenko N. (2016). Functioning peculiarities of lexical units of the RESPECT concept in the English language. Proceedings of the International Conference Linguistic and Linguacultural Aspects of Teaching Foreign Languages in Ukrainian Universities”. Dnipropetrovsk, pp. 87-94
  30. Ivanenko N. (2016). Semantic relationships of lexical units of the concept of love in the English language. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, pp. 221-226
  31. Ivanenko N. (2015). Citizenship education as the coordination and integration of educational establishment and community. Research Proceedings of the national UniversityOstrog Academy”. Ostrog, pp. 136-142
  32. Ivanenko N. (2015). The value of citizenship education in practices of student governing body. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 136. pp. 438-442

Louise’s doctoral research investigates how teachers become who they are.

Louise’s work situates the schoolteacher as a particular type of subject, that is both made and makes itself from within a network of power relations. Her study combines Foucauldian theory, Critical Discourse Analysis, and Narrative analysis to provide an account of schoolteachers’ ethical agency in the context of top-down policy practices.

Louise is a Doctoral Teaching Fellow at the Department of Education, where she teaches and supervises students in the MSc in Learning and Teaching course. Currently, Louise is collaborating the OECD in their Globally Teaching InSights project. Her research supports the Schools+ Network aims to fuel an ecosystem of organisations that are driving change in education from the bottom-up.

In March 2023 she presented her preliminary research at the Philosophy of Education Society of Great Britain (PESGB)’s annual conference.

As Honorary Fellow John attends seminars and consults with current staff in Mathematics Education.

During 40 years at the Open University supporting the teaching of mathematics he authored a wide range of papers, and dozens of Open University Books and Teaching materials. He co-authored the classic Thinking Mathematically; Mathematics as a Constructive Activity (with his wife Prof. Anne Watson); Questions and Prompts for Mathematical Thinking & Thinkers (with Anne and other colleagues), among many others.

His research methods are phenomenological, based on the Discipline of Noticing. He is interested in the lived experience of learning, doing and teaching mathematics. He focuses on the structure and form of Attention in the teaching of mathematics, as he supports those who wish to foster and sustain mathematical thinking in others.

He is an Honorary Fellow of BSRLM and ATM, a long-standing member of  the MAA and the  MA.H.

 

Publications

  • Mason, J. (2022). Consequences of a Virtual Encounter with George Pólya. Teaching Mathematics and Computer Science.  20 (2) p173-182.
  • Zazkis, R. Kontorovich, I. & Mason, J. (2021). The Learning and Teaching of Number: paths less travelled through well-trodden terrain. London: Routledge
  • Mason, J. (2021). Learning about Noticing, by, and through, Noticing. ZDM – Mathematics Education. 53(1) p231-243. doi: 10.1007/s11858-020-01192-4
  • Mason, J. & Czarnocha,B. (2021). Aha! Moments, Bisociation and Multifocal Attention. In B. Czarnocha & W. Baker. Creativity of an Aha! Moment and Mathematics Education. Leiden: Brill. p345-361.
  • Mason, J. (2018) Making Distinctions: a phenomenological exploration in mathematics education. In P. Ernest (Ed.). The Philosophy of Mathematics Education Today. ICME-13 Monographs. Springer.
  • Mason, J. (2018). Reflecting on values emerging from practice and the value of reflecting on practice. In D. Rowe & A. Watson (Eds.). Faith and Experience in Education: essays from Quaker perspectives. London: Trentham Books. p63-91.
  • Mason, J. & Metz, M. (2017). Digging Beneath Dual Systems Theory and the Bicameral Brain: abductions about the human psyche from experience in mathematical problem solving. In U. Xolocotzin (Ed.). Understanding Emotions in Mathematical Thinking and Learning. p379-407. Cambridge: Elsevier/Academic Press.
  • Mason, J. (2016). Rising Above a Cause-and-Effect Stance in Mathematics Education Research. JMTE 19(4) p297-300. http://rdcu.be/npTf
  • Mason, J. & Davis, B. (2013). The Importance of Teachers’ Mathematical Awareness for In-The-Moment Pedagogy. CJSMTE 13(2) p182-197.
  • Mason, J. (2012). Noticing: roots and branches. In M. Sherin, V. Jacobs, & R. Phillip (Eds.) Mathematics Teacher Noticing:  Seeing Through Teachers’ Eyes. p35-50. Mahwah: Erlbaum.
  • Mason, J. (2008). Being Mathematical With & In Front of Learners: Attention, Awareness, and Attitude as Sources of Differences between Teacher Educators, Teachers & Learners. In T. Wood (Series Ed.) & B. Jaworski (Vol. Ed.), International Handbook of Mathematics Teacher Education: Vol.4. The Mathematics Teacher Educator as a Developing Professional. Rotterdam, the Netherlands: Sense Publishers, p31-56.
  • Mason, J. & Johnston-Wilder, S. (2006 2nd edition). Designing and Using Mathematical Tasks. St. Albans: Tarquin.
  • Watson, A. & Mason, J. (2006). Seeing an Exercise as a Single Mathematical Object: Using Variation to Structure Sense-Making. Mathematical Thinking and Learning. 8(2) p91-111.
  • Watson, A. & Mason, J. (2005). Mathematics as a Constructive Activity: learners generating examples. Mahwah: Erlbaum.
  • Mason, J. & Johnston-Wilder, S. (2004). Fundamental Constructs in Mathematics Education, RoutledgeFalmer, London.
  • Mason, J. 2003, Structure of Attention in the Learning of Mathematics, in J. Novotná (Ed.) Proceedings, International Symposium on Elementary Mathematics Teaching, Charles University, Prague, p9-16.
  • Mason, J. 2002, Mathematics Teaching Practice: a guidebook for university and college lecturers, Horwood Publishing, Chichester.
  • Mason, J. 2002, Researching Your own Practice: The Discipline of Noticing, RoutledgeFalmer, London.
  • Mason, J. 2001, Modelling Modelling: where is the centre of gravity of-for-when modelling?, in J. Matos, W. Blum, S. Houston & S. Carreira (Eds.) Modelling and Mathematics Education: ICTMA 9 applications in science and technology, Horwood Publishing, Chichester, p39-61.
  • Mason, J. Burton L. & Stacey K. (1982). Thinking Mathematically, Addison Wesley, London

Website

www.pmtheta.com

Mark has worked in ELT and EMI for over 35 years as a teacher, teacher trainer, lecturer, course writer, syllabus designer, examiner, Director of Studies, and consultant editor for OUP. For the British Council he has worked as a consultant trainer and course developer in EMI and EAP. For the University of Oxford Department of Education Mark delivered the ELT option on the MSc ALSLA and is Teaching Associate of the EMI Research Group in which capacity he has worked as a CI and has developed and delivered EMI teacher training courses in China, Serbia and Oxford. Mark has worked in universities in Russia, Ukraine, Kazakhstan, Belarus, Czechia, Italy, Germany, Mexico, Peru, Chile, Brazil, Colombia and Morocco.

He continues to be involved in EMI and is currently co-authoring an EMI student guide.

Mark is an alumnus of the University of Oxford Department of Education and was among the first to be awarded the innovative MSc in Teaching English Language in University Settings.

Anushay is a second-year DPhil student investigating how classroom characteristics are related to Pakistani children’s development. She is supervised by Professor Iram Siraj and Dr Katharina Ereky-Stevens and her work is being supported by the Aga Khan University (Pakistan). Anushay received the Patrice Engle Dissertation Grant Award from the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD) in 2023.

Anushay completed her BSc Psychology from UCL, where she also started her master’s in Developmental Neuroscience and Psychopathology. She was based at Yale University for her master’s thesis, where she worked with Dr Craig Bailey at the Yale Center for Emotional Intelligence to understand children’s emotion development. Anushay also works as a part-time research  assistant at the Developmental Diversity Lab at UCL’s Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience. Anushay’s research interests include understanding child development across different cultures, factors that might be affecting it, and devising culture-specific ways to support children’s holistic development through the educational system. She is also keen on improving the research scope in Pakistan by working with Pakistani researchers, practitioners, and families. Anushay balances her research with her position as the founder of a non-profit, Resources for Children, which aims to understand and support children’s development in Pakistan.

Publications

Journal Articles

  1. Mazhar, A., & Bailey, C., S. (under review). Understanding Children’s Emotion-Specific Biases: How They Relate to Child and Family Factors, Emotion Recognition Accuracy, and Social Behaviour.

Presentations

  1. Mazhar, A., & Bailey, C., S. (2023, March). Understanding Children’s Emotion-Specific Biases: How They Relate to Child-Level Factors and Emotion Recognition Accuracy [Paper Presentation]. Society for Research in Child Development, Salt Lake City, Utah, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2022, April). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Spring Preview, New Haven, United States.
  3. Mazhar, A. (2021, December). Does an extended family improve mentalising in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK & Pakistan. 2nd International Foundation University Conference of Psychology, Rawalpindi, Pakistan.
  4. Mazhar, A. (2020, October). Developing a non-profit to advance autism research in Pakistan. Anna Freud Centre Seminar Series, London, United Kingdom.

Posters

  1. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Theory of Mind in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK and Pakistan. Harvard Trends in Psychology Summit, Cambridge, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Research Rounds, New Haven, United States.

Cindy works at the intersection of learning, design, and technology, with a keen interest in the orchestration of future-ready tech-enabled learning.

She is curious how the deployment of adaptive learning systems to schools will impact classroom learning and hopes to learn more about the human-machine partnership in education. Specifically, her research is concerned with the implications that the use of such systems has on teacher-student interactions, as teachers grapple with balancing personalised learning and learning in community, as well as curriculum demands and student interests. These are some tensions which could potentially be exacerbated by affordances of adaptive learning systems.

Prior to embarking on the DPhil in Education at Oxford, Cindy worked as the Lead Specialist in Technologies for Learning at the Educational Technology Division of Ministry of Education, Singapore. She had previously completed graduate studies at the National University of Singapore and Stanford University where she was awarded Master of Arts in English Studies and Master of Arts in Education.

Reem is DPhil student from Saudi Arabia.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she worked as a Teacher, Professional Developer, then, became a Supervisor and Researcher in the Ministry of Education where she received a scholarship to pursue her DPhil education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests lie in the area of Teacher Education and Professional Learning Policy and Practice.

Publications
  • Alqahtani, Reem (2020). Saudi Universities Role in Developing Teacher Professional Development Programs: Elite Universities Experience. Journal of Educational Sciences. King Saud University.
  • Alqahtani, Reem. (2020). The effect of implementing UDL-based activities in improving EFL learners’ academic achievement and attitudes towards L2. In L. Salas, & E. Ager, Creating Quiet reflective Spaces: Language Teacher Researches Professional Development (pp. 61-62). IATEFL publications.

Lena Zlock is researching the integration of digital technology into structures of teaching, learning, and education in higher education. Her particular focus is on the digital humanities and the potential for digital methods to transform humanistic study. She works with Professor Niall Winters and Dr. James Robson.

Lena’s research interests stem from her education as an M.St. student and Ertegun Graduate Scholar in Modern Languages at the University of Oxford, and as a B.A. student in History at Stanford University. As an undergraduate, she started the Voltaire Library Project, a digitally and data-driven study of the 6,763-book collection of French Enlightenment philosopher Voltaire (you can read more about the project here and here). She has been interested in the application of digital technology to humanistic teaching since her days in Princeton Day School, where she developed an interdisciplinary curriculum on Mexico City (visit the course website here).

Her research on Voltaire led her to think more broadly about the place of digital methods in the humanities classroom, and how new technologies will revolutionise the liberal arts and higher education. As a DPhil candidate, Lena will examine the negotiation and implementation of new learning technologies within the University of Oxford at undergraduate and graduate levels.

Lena is involved in a number of digital humanities initiatives in Oxford. She previously served as the inaugural fellow of the Voltaire Lab at Oxford’s Voltaire Foundation. As a master’s student, Lena co-formulated the convergence agenda for Oxford digital humanities with Professor Howard Hotson, and is currently employed by the Humanities Division to assist with the development of an M.St. degree in Digital Scholarship (read more here). Lena set up and helps to run the History of the Book blog for the Faculty of Medieval and Modern Languages and the Oxford Book History Twitter account.

Lena welcomes inquiries from undergraduate and postgraduate students from Oxford and beyond seeking to get involved with the digital humanities in any capacity. The History of the Book blog also welcomes inquiries from prospective contributors.

 

Abbey is a Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education, in collaboration with the Department of Engineering.

Before joining the DPhil program, Abbey obtained a B.A. in Applied Linguistics with minors in Russian and Chinese from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford. She was the recipient of a Benjamin A. Gilman International Scholarship through U.S. Department of State for study in Russia and was awarded two Foreign Language and Area Studies (FLAS) Fellowships for study in both Russia and China. She holds both TESOL and TEFL certificates and has taught English as a Second Language in various contexts to a wide variety of learner populations.

Abbey’s main research interests lie in the use of technology to facilitate language learning. Her DPhil research focuses on the development of a virtual reality program to bridge the gaps that students face when learning languages through distance learning.

Dr Nadiya Ivanenko is a Visiting Research Fellow in the field of civic education and citizenship linguistics. She is a member of the Applied Linguistics research group and Higher Education research group at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

After receiving PhD in Comparative Linguistics from Kyiv National Linguistic University (2008) Nadiya worked as an Associate Professor of the Germanic Languages and Teaching Methodology Department, Faculty of Ukrainian Philology, Foreign Languages and Social Communications and Vice Dean of the Faculty of Foreign Languages, Central Ukrainian State University, Ukraine.

Nadiya was a Chevening scholar and Postgraduate researcher at the Department of Education, University of Oxford (2003-2004). She was a Co-chair of the joint UNESCO Chair/UNITWIN project ‘Education as a Humanitarian Response’ (2004-2012); a participant of BECA joint project ‘Education for Democracy’ between Montclair State University (USA) and Kirovohrad State Pedagogical University (Ukraine). Nadiya had internship for teachers of EFL in the Department of Educational and Cultural Programmes at Shakespeare’s Globe Theater, London, UK (2011). She was the Head of the British Council International Mobility Grant ‘Internalizing Higher Education in Ukraine’, which included 2 internships at the University of Durham, UK (2016). She participated in the internship “Retraining in the Field of Teaching Excellence”, Bayreuth University, Germany (Erasmus + Project (2021) and was a coordinator of the Erasmus+ Project: Innovative Approach to Promotion Teaching Excellence (2021-2022) at Central Ukrainian State University.

Selected Publications

BOOKS

  • Rastrygina, A., Ivanenko, N. (2021). Pedagogy of Freedom in the Paradigmal Space of Modern Education and Upbringing.
  • Ivanenko, N., Liashuk, A. (2021). English Activity Book. Practical Course of English. Kropyvnytskyi.
  • Ivanenko N. (2014). (Edit.) Education in Eastern Europe and Eurasia. London: Bloomsbury.
  • Ivanenko N. (2008). The Concept of Good in English and Ukrainian Language Pictures of the World. Kirovohrad: KOD.
  • Ivanenko N. (2007). Written Practice and Conversation for 1 Year. Kropyvnytskyi.
  • Garkusha, L., Ivanenko, N. (2004). Critical thinking in life skills training. Kirovohrad.

BOOK CHAPTERS

  • Ivanenko, N. (2024). Words and word meanings In The Routledge Companion To English Studies/ by Constant Leung & Jo Lewkowicz. London, UK: Routledge (in publishing).
  • Ivanenko N. (2023). Development of civic education in Ukrainian universities: new challenges of modern realities in the conditions of the transformation of society. In Contemporary Education in Ukraine: Integration into the European Educational Space. Dnipro (pp. 387-412) DOI:36550/978-617-8245-57-3-20
  • Ivanenko N. (2019). Citizenship Education, Moral Fluency and Social and Political Future Challenges. In Polish-Jewish History, Culture, Values, and Education between Paradise and Inferno. Irvine, USA: Brown Walker Press (pp. 93-103)
  • Ivanenko N. (2014). Education Change, Transformation, Reforms – a Regional Overview. In N. Ivanenko (Edit.) Education in Eastern Europe and Eurasia. London: Bloomsbury (pp. 9-45)
  • Ivanenko N. (2013). Vulnerable Children in Ukraine and Educational Response. In M. Matsumoto (Edit.) Education and Disadvantaged Children and Young People. London: Bloomsbury (pp. 95-132)

JOURNAL ARTICLES

  1. Ivanenko, N. (2024). Challenges of Ukrainian Higher Education in Times of War. International Higher Education. The Boston College Centre for International Higher Education, 118, pp. 35-36 https://doi.org/10.36197/IHE.2024.118.17
  2. Ivanenko, N., Paska, T., Irkha, A. Rud, A., & Boguslavskas, L., (2024). The Role of Higher Education for Ensuring National Security in Ukraine. Futurity Education, 4(1), 210-237 https://doi.org/10.57125/FED.2024.03.25.11
  3. Leleka, T., Ivanenko, N., Demeshko, I., Kapitan T., & Demchenko, I. (2024). The Process of English Internationalization in the Ukrainian Educational Paradigm. Slavistica Vilnensis, 68(2), 76-89 doi:10.15388/SlavViln.2023.68(2).6
  4. Ivanenko, N., Rud, A., Hurbanska, A., Cheban, Y., & Syrtseva, S. (2024). Digitalization of Education of the Future – A Trend or a Requirement of the Time? Journal of Higher Education Theory and Practice24(2). DOI: https://doi.org/10.33423/jhetp.v24i2.6791
  5. Ivanenko, N. (2023). Civic character cultivation as a basic virtue within and beyond modern educational institutions. Academic Notes. Series Pedagogical sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 209, 180-185 DOI: https://doi.org/10.36550/2415-7988-2022-1-209-180-185
  6. Rastrygina, A., Ivanenko, N. (2023). A Pedagogy of freedom as a viable basis for implementing gender equality in Ukraine’s educational institutions. International Review of Education, 69(1-2), 143-174. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/s11159-023-09995-9
  7. Ivanenko N., Biletska O., Hurbanska S., Hurbanska, A., & Kochmar, D. (2023). English language morphological neologisms reflecting the war in Ukraine. World Journal of English Language, 13(5), pp. 432-438    DOI: doi:http://dx.doi.org/10.5430/wjel.v13n5p432
  8. Ivanenko, N., Boiko, A., Fedorchuk, L., Panchenko, I., & Marieiev, D. (2023). Development of educational policy in Ukraine in the context of European integration and digital transformation. Revista Eduweb, 17(2), 296-305 DOI: https://doi.org/10.46502/issn.1856-7576/2023.17.02.25
  9. Ivanenko, N.V., Gerasymenko,Yu. A., Kostenko, V.G. (2023). Innovative approaches to the modernization of philological education and science in Ukraine: a response to the challenges of wartime. Akademichni Vizii, (in Ukrainian). URL: https://academy-vision.org/index.php/av/article/view/281 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5281/zenodo.7795088
  10. Ivanenko N. (2022). Phraseological units of the conceptual field MARRIAGE in the English picture of the world. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi: KOD, 202, pp. 140-146
  11. Bilous, O., Mishchenko, A., Datska, T., Ivanenko, N., Kit, L., Piankovska, I., and Vereshchak, Y. (2021). Modern linguistic technologies: strategy of teaching translation studies. Rupkatha Journal on Interdisciplinary Studies in Humanities, 13(4), pp. 1-12 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/21659/rupkatha.v13n4.65
  12. Leleka, T., Ivanenko, N., Moskalenko O., Herasymenko, L., Shevchuk L., Pidlubna, O. (2021). Angloamerican loanwords use in the Ukrainian student slang. Laplage em Revista, 7(Extra-D): University and science: possible dialogues. pp.163-174. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/24115/S2446-622020217Extra-D1081p.163-174
  13. Ivanenko N. (2021). Figurative and valuable component of the MARRIAGE concept. Trends in Science and Practice of Today. Ankara, Turkey, pp. 356-361
  14. Ivanenko N. (2021). Inclusive learning environment for students’ achievements and foreign language development. Priorities in the Development of Science and Education. Budapest, Hungary, pp.74-80
  15. Ivanenko N. (2021). The nominative field of the MARRIAGE concept and the analysis of the synonymous series of its key unit. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi: KOD, 193, pp 218-224 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.36550/2522-4077-2021-1-193-218-224
  16. Ivanenko N. (2020). Language intervention stages in project-based learning. Modern Trends in Foreign Language Professional Training in a Multicultural Space. Kyiv, pp. 249 – 255
  17. Rastrygina, A., Ivanenko, N. (2020). Gender comfortable educational environment as a factor of development of personal freedom. Research Bulletin. Pedagogical Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 188, pp. 28 – 35 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.36550/2415-7988-2020-1-188-28-35
  18. Ivanenko N. (2020). Texting slang as one of the most common groups of everyday youth Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi: KOD, 187, pp. 38-45
  19. Ivanenko N. (2019). Computer use in foreign language Intellectual and Emotional Components of Foreign Language Learning: Latest Trends and Challenges for Higher Education. Kyiv, pp. 152 – 158.
  20. Ivanenko N. (2019). Initial stages of elaborating a project in a foreign language classroom. Science and Society. Hamilton, Canada, pp. 13 – 20.
  21. Ivanenko N. (2019). Project-based learning as a way to incorporate effective foreign language teaching. Research Bulletin. Pedagogical Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 177, pp. 207 – 211
  22. Ivanenko N. (2019). Youth vocabulary as a reflection of changes in modern society. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi: KOD, 175, pp. 34 – 39.
  23. Ivanenko N. (2018). Promoting citizenship education in the English language Proceedings of the IV International Conference. Kyiv, pp. 130 – 137
  24. Ivanenko N. (2018). Educating global citizens at a foreign language class. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, – pp. 494 – 500
  25. Ivanenko N. (2018). Formation of civic values through teaching a foreign language. Proceedings of the II International Conference “Foreign Language in Professional Training of Specialists: Problems and Strategies”. Kropyvnytskyi, pp. 189-191
  26. Ivanenko N. (2017). Citizenship education in the English language classroom. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 154. – pp. 92 – 97
  27. Ivanenko N. (2017). Education for democratic citizenship: teaching virtues and values. Research Bulletin. Pedagogical Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 152, pp. 110-113
  28. Ivanenko N. (2016). Citizenship education as a way to develop moral fluency to solve social and political challenges of the future. Scientific Journal of Ariel University. Israel: Ariel University.
  29. Ivanenko N. (2016). Functioning peculiarities of lexical units of the RESPECT concept in the English language. Proceedings of the International Conference Linguistic and Linguacultural Aspects of Teaching Foreign Languages in Ukrainian Universities”. Dnipropetrovsk, pp. 87-94
  30. Ivanenko N. (2016). Semantic relationships of lexical units of the concept of love in the English language. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, pp. 221-226
  31. Ivanenko N. (2015). Citizenship education as the coordination and integration of educational establishment and community. Research Proceedings of the national UniversityOstrog Academy”. Ostrog, pp. 136-142
  32. Ivanenko N. (2015). The value of citizenship education in practices of student governing body. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 136. pp. 438-442

Louise’s doctoral research investigates how teachers become who they are.

Louise’s work situates the schoolteacher as a particular type of subject, that is both made and makes itself from within a network of power relations. Her study combines Foucauldian theory, Critical Discourse Analysis, and Narrative analysis to provide an account of schoolteachers’ ethical agency in the context of top-down policy practices.

Louise is a Doctoral Teaching Fellow at the Department of Education, where she teaches and supervises students in the MSc in Learning and Teaching course. Currently, Louise is collaborating the OECD in their Globally Teaching InSights project. Her research supports the Schools+ Network aims to fuel an ecosystem of organisations that are driving change in education from the bottom-up.

In March 2023 she presented her preliminary research at the Philosophy of Education Society of Great Britain (PESGB)’s annual conference.

As Honorary Fellow John attends seminars and consults with current staff in Mathematics Education.

During 40 years at the Open University supporting the teaching of mathematics he authored a wide range of papers, and dozens of Open University Books and Teaching materials. He co-authored the classic Thinking Mathematically; Mathematics as a Constructive Activity (with his wife Prof. Anne Watson); Questions and Prompts for Mathematical Thinking & Thinkers (with Anne and other colleagues), among many others.

His research methods are phenomenological, based on the Discipline of Noticing. He is interested in the lived experience of learning, doing and teaching mathematics. He focuses on the structure and form of Attention in the teaching of mathematics, as he supports those who wish to foster and sustain mathematical thinking in others.

He is an Honorary Fellow of BSRLM and ATM, a long-standing member of  the MAA and the  MA.H.

 

Publications

  • Mason, J. (2022). Consequences of a Virtual Encounter with George Pólya. Teaching Mathematics and Computer Science.  20 (2) p173-182.
  • Zazkis, R. Kontorovich, I. & Mason, J. (2021). The Learning and Teaching of Number: paths less travelled through well-trodden terrain. London: Routledge
  • Mason, J. (2021). Learning about Noticing, by, and through, Noticing. ZDM – Mathematics Education. 53(1) p231-243. doi: 10.1007/s11858-020-01192-4
  • Mason, J. & Czarnocha,B. (2021). Aha! Moments, Bisociation and Multifocal Attention. In B. Czarnocha & W. Baker. Creativity of an Aha! Moment and Mathematics Education. Leiden: Brill. p345-361.
  • Mason, J. (2018) Making Distinctions: a phenomenological exploration in mathematics education. In P. Ernest (Ed.). The Philosophy of Mathematics Education Today. ICME-13 Monographs. Springer.
  • Mason, J. (2018). Reflecting on values emerging from practice and the value of reflecting on practice. In D. Rowe & A. Watson (Eds.). Faith and Experience in Education: essays from Quaker perspectives. London: Trentham Books. p63-91.
  • Mason, J. & Metz, M. (2017). Digging Beneath Dual Systems Theory and the Bicameral Brain: abductions about the human psyche from experience in mathematical problem solving. In U. Xolocotzin (Ed.). Understanding Emotions in Mathematical Thinking and Learning. p379-407. Cambridge: Elsevier/Academic Press.
  • Mason, J. (2016). Rising Above a Cause-and-Effect Stance in Mathematics Education Research. JMTE 19(4) p297-300. http://rdcu.be/npTf
  • Mason, J. & Davis, B. (2013). The Importance of Teachers’ Mathematical Awareness for In-The-Moment Pedagogy. CJSMTE 13(2) p182-197.
  • Mason, J. (2012). Noticing: roots and branches. In M. Sherin, V. Jacobs, & R. Phillip (Eds.) Mathematics Teacher Noticing:  Seeing Through Teachers’ Eyes. p35-50. Mahwah: Erlbaum.
  • Mason, J. (2008). Being Mathematical With & In Front of Learners: Attention, Awareness, and Attitude as Sources of Differences between Teacher Educators, Teachers & Learners. In T. Wood (Series Ed.) & B. Jaworski (Vol. Ed.), International Handbook of Mathematics Teacher Education: Vol.4. The Mathematics Teacher Educator as a Developing Professional. Rotterdam, the Netherlands: Sense Publishers, p31-56.
  • Mason, J. & Johnston-Wilder, S. (2006 2nd edition). Designing and Using Mathematical Tasks. St. Albans: Tarquin.
  • Watson, A. & Mason, J. (2006). Seeing an Exercise as a Single Mathematical Object: Using Variation to Structure Sense-Making. Mathematical Thinking and Learning. 8(2) p91-111.
  • Watson, A. & Mason, J. (2005). Mathematics as a Constructive Activity: learners generating examples. Mahwah: Erlbaum.
  • Mason, J. & Johnston-Wilder, S. (2004). Fundamental Constructs in Mathematics Education, RoutledgeFalmer, London.
  • Mason, J. 2003, Structure of Attention in the Learning of Mathematics, in J. Novotná (Ed.) Proceedings, International Symposium on Elementary Mathematics Teaching, Charles University, Prague, p9-16.
  • Mason, J. 2002, Mathematics Teaching Practice: a guidebook for university and college lecturers, Horwood Publishing, Chichester.
  • Mason, J. 2002, Researching Your own Practice: The Discipline of Noticing, RoutledgeFalmer, London.
  • Mason, J. 2001, Modelling Modelling: where is the centre of gravity of-for-when modelling?, in J. Matos, W. Blum, S. Houston & S. Carreira (Eds.) Modelling and Mathematics Education: ICTMA 9 applications in science and technology, Horwood Publishing, Chichester, p39-61.
  • Mason, J. Burton L. & Stacey K. (1982). Thinking Mathematically, Addison Wesley, London

Website

www.pmtheta.com

Mark has worked in ELT and EMI for over 35 years as a teacher, teacher trainer, lecturer, course writer, syllabus designer, examiner, Director of Studies, and consultant editor for OUP. For the British Council he has worked as a consultant trainer and course developer in EMI and EAP. For the University of Oxford Department of Education Mark delivered the ELT option on the MSc ALSLA and is Teaching Associate of the EMI Research Group in which capacity he has worked as a CI and has developed and delivered EMI teacher training courses in China, Serbia and Oxford. Mark has worked in universities in Russia, Ukraine, Kazakhstan, Belarus, Czechia, Italy, Germany, Mexico, Peru, Chile, Brazil, Colombia and Morocco.

He continues to be involved in EMI and is currently co-authoring an EMI student guide.

Mark is an alumnus of the University of Oxford Department of Education and was among the first to be awarded the innovative MSc in Teaching English Language in University Settings.

Anushay is a second-year DPhil student investigating how classroom characteristics are related to Pakistani children’s development. She is supervised by Professor Iram Siraj and Dr Katharina Ereky-Stevens and her work is being supported by the Aga Khan University (Pakistan). Anushay received the Patrice Engle Dissertation Grant Award from the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD) in 2023.

Anushay completed her BSc Psychology from UCL, where she also started her master’s in Developmental Neuroscience and Psychopathology. She was based at Yale University for her master’s thesis, where she worked with Dr Craig Bailey at the Yale Center for Emotional Intelligence to understand children’s emotion development. Anushay also works as a part-time research  assistant at the Developmental Diversity Lab at UCL’s Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience. Anushay’s research interests include understanding child development across different cultures, factors that might be affecting it, and devising culture-specific ways to support children’s holistic development through the educational system. She is also keen on improving the research scope in Pakistan by working with Pakistani researchers, practitioners, and families. Anushay balances her research with her position as the founder of a non-profit, Resources for Children, which aims to understand and support children’s development in Pakistan.

Publications

Journal Articles

  1. Mazhar, A., & Bailey, C., S. (under review). Understanding Children’s Emotion-Specific Biases: How They Relate to Child and Family Factors, Emotion Recognition Accuracy, and Social Behaviour.

Presentations

  1. Mazhar, A., & Bailey, C., S. (2023, March). Understanding Children’s Emotion-Specific Biases: How They Relate to Child-Level Factors and Emotion Recognition Accuracy [Paper Presentation]. Society for Research in Child Development, Salt Lake City, Utah, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2022, April). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Spring Preview, New Haven, United States.
  3. Mazhar, A. (2021, December). Does an extended family improve mentalising in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK & Pakistan. 2nd International Foundation University Conference of Psychology, Rawalpindi, Pakistan.
  4. Mazhar, A. (2020, October). Developing a non-profit to advance autism research in Pakistan. Anna Freud Centre Seminar Series, London, United Kingdom.

Posters

  1. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Theory of Mind in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK and Pakistan. Harvard Trends in Psychology Summit, Cambridge, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Research Rounds, New Haven, United States.

Cindy works at the intersection of learning, design, and technology, with a keen interest in the orchestration of future-ready tech-enabled learning.

She is curious how the deployment of adaptive learning systems to schools will impact classroom learning and hopes to learn more about the human-machine partnership in education. Specifically, her research is concerned with the implications that the use of such systems has on teacher-student interactions, as teachers grapple with balancing personalised learning and learning in community, as well as curriculum demands and student interests. These are some tensions which could potentially be exacerbated by affordances of adaptive learning systems.

Prior to embarking on the DPhil in Education at Oxford, Cindy worked as the Lead Specialist in Technologies for Learning at the Educational Technology Division of Ministry of Education, Singapore. She had previously completed graduate studies at the National University of Singapore and Stanford University where she was awarded Master of Arts in English Studies and Master of Arts in Education.

Reem is DPhil student from Saudi Arabia.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she worked as a Teacher, Professional Developer, then, became a Supervisor and Researcher in the Ministry of Education where she received a scholarship to pursue her DPhil education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests lie in the area of Teacher Education and Professional Learning Policy and Practice.

Publications
  • Alqahtani, Reem (2020). Saudi Universities Role in Developing Teacher Professional Development Programs: Elite Universities Experience. Journal of Educational Sciences. King Saud University.
  • Alqahtani, Reem. (2020). The effect of implementing UDL-based activities in improving EFL learners’ academic achievement and attitudes towards L2. In L. Salas, & E. Ager, Creating Quiet reflective Spaces: Language Teacher Researches Professional Development (pp. 61-62). IATEFL publications.

Lena Zlock is researching the integration of digital technology into structures of teaching, learning, and education in higher education. Her particular focus is on the digital humanities and the potential for digital methods to transform humanistic study. She works with Professor Niall Winters and Dr. James Robson.

Lena’s research interests stem from her education as an M.St. student and Ertegun Graduate Scholar in Modern Languages at the University of Oxford, and as a B.A. student in History at Stanford University. As an undergraduate, she started the Voltaire Library Project, a digitally and data-driven study of the 6,763-book collection of French Enlightenment philosopher Voltaire (you can read more about the project here and here). She has been interested in the application of digital technology to humanistic teaching since her days in Princeton Day School, where she developed an interdisciplinary curriculum on Mexico City (visit the course website here).

Her research on Voltaire led her to think more broadly about the place of digital methods in the humanities classroom, and how new technologies will revolutionise the liberal arts and higher education. As a DPhil candidate, Lena will examine the negotiation and implementation of new learning technologies within the University of Oxford at undergraduate and graduate levels.

Lena is involved in a number of digital humanities initiatives in Oxford. She previously served as the inaugural fellow of the Voltaire Lab at Oxford’s Voltaire Foundation. As a master’s student, Lena co-formulated the convergence agenda for Oxford digital humanities with Professor Howard Hotson, and is currently employed by the Humanities Division to assist with the development of an M.St. degree in Digital Scholarship (read more here). Lena set up and helps to run the History of the Book blog for the Faculty of Medieval and Modern Languages and the Oxford Book History Twitter account.

Lena welcomes inquiries from undergraduate and postgraduate students from Oxford and beyond seeking to get involved with the digital humanities in any capacity. The History of the Book blog also welcomes inquiries from prospective contributors.

 

Abbey is a Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education, in collaboration with the Department of Engineering.

Before joining the DPhil program, Abbey obtained a B.A. in Applied Linguistics with minors in Russian and Chinese from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford. She was the recipient of a Benjamin A. Gilman International Scholarship through U.S. Department of State for study in Russia and was awarded two Foreign Language and Area Studies (FLAS) Fellowships for study in both Russia and China. She holds both TESOL and TEFL certificates and has taught English as a Second Language in various contexts to a wide variety of learner populations.

Abbey’s main research interests lie in the use of technology to facilitate language learning. Her DPhil research focuses on the development of a virtual reality program to bridge the gaps that students face when learning languages through distance learning.

Dr Nadiya Ivanenko is a Visiting Research Fellow in the field of civic education and citizenship linguistics. She is a member of the Applied Linguistics research group and Higher Education research group at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

After receiving PhD in Comparative Linguistics from Kyiv National Linguistic University (2008) Nadiya worked as an Associate Professor of the Germanic Languages and Teaching Methodology Department, Faculty of Ukrainian Philology, Foreign Languages and Social Communications and Vice Dean of the Faculty of Foreign Languages, Central Ukrainian State University, Ukraine.

Nadiya was a Chevening scholar and Postgraduate researcher at the Department of Education, University of Oxford (2003-2004). She was a Co-chair of the joint UNESCO Chair/UNITWIN project ‘Education as a Humanitarian Response’ (2004-2012); a participant of BECA joint project ‘Education for Democracy’ between Montclair State University (USA) and Kirovohrad State Pedagogical University (Ukraine). Nadiya had internship for teachers of EFL in the Department of Educational and Cultural Programmes at Shakespeare’s Globe Theater, London, UK (2011). She was the Head of the British Council International Mobility Grant ‘Internalizing Higher Education in Ukraine’, which included 2 internships at the University of Durham, UK (2016). She participated in the internship “Retraining in the Field of Teaching Excellence”, Bayreuth University, Germany (Erasmus + Project (2021) and was a coordinator of the Erasmus+ Project: Innovative Approach to Promotion Teaching Excellence (2021-2022) at Central Ukrainian State University.

Selected Publications

BOOKS

  • Rastrygina, A., Ivanenko, N. (2021). Pedagogy of Freedom in the Paradigmal Space of Modern Education and Upbringing.
  • Ivanenko, N., Liashuk, A. (2021). English Activity Book. Practical Course of English. Kropyvnytskyi.
  • Ivanenko N. (2014). (Edit.) Education in Eastern Europe and Eurasia. London: Bloomsbury.
  • Ivanenko N. (2008). The Concept of Good in English and Ukrainian Language Pictures of the World. Kirovohrad: KOD.
  • Ivanenko N. (2007). Written Practice and Conversation for 1 Year. Kropyvnytskyi.
  • Garkusha, L., Ivanenko, N. (2004). Critical thinking in life skills training. Kirovohrad.

BOOK CHAPTERS

  • Ivanenko, N. (2024). Words and word meanings In The Routledge Companion To English Studies/ by Constant Leung & Jo Lewkowicz. London, UK: Routledge (in publishing).
  • Ivanenko N. (2023). Development of civic education in Ukrainian universities: new challenges of modern realities in the conditions of the transformation of society. In Contemporary Education in Ukraine: Integration into the European Educational Space. Dnipro (pp. 387-412) DOI:36550/978-617-8245-57-3-20
  • Ivanenko N. (2019). Citizenship Education, Moral Fluency and Social and Political Future Challenges. In Polish-Jewish History, Culture, Values, and Education between Paradise and Inferno. Irvine, USA: Brown Walker Press (pp. 93-103)
  • Ivanenko N. (2014). Education Change, Transformation, Reforms – a Regional Overview. In N. Ivanenko (Edit.) Education in Eastern Europe and Eurasia. London: Bloomsbury (pp. 9-45)
  • Ivanenko N. (2013). Vulnerable Children in Ukraine and Educational Response. In M. Matsumoto (Edit.) Education and Disadvantaged Children and Young People. London: Bloomsbury (pp. 95-132)

JOURNAL ARTICLES

  1. Ivanenko, N. (2024). Challenges of Ukrainian Higher Education in Times of War. International Higher Education. The Boston College Centre for International Higher Education, 118, pp. 35-36 https://doi.org/10.36197/IHE.2024.118.17
  2. Ivanenko, N., Paska, T., Irkha, A. Rud, A., & Boguslavskas, L., (2024). The Role of Higher Education for Ensuring National Security in Ukraine. Futurity Education, 4(1), 210-237 https://doi.org/10.57125/FED.2024.03.25.11
  3. Leleka, T., Ivanenko, N., Demeshko, I., Kapitan T., & Demchenko, I. (2024). The Process of English Internationalization in the Ukrainian Educational Paradigm. Slavistica Vilnensis, 68(2), 76-89 doi:10.15388/SlavViln.2023.68(2).6
  4. Ivanenko, N., Rud, A., Hurbanska, A., Cheban, Y., & Syrtseva, S. (2024). Digitalization of Education of the Future – A Trend or a Requirement of the Time? Journal of Higher Education Theory and Practice24(2). DOI: https://doi.org/10.33423/jhetp.v24i2.6791
  5. Ivanenko, N. (2023). Civic character cultivation as a basic virtue within and beyond modern educational institutions. Academic Notes. Series Pedagogical sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 209, 180-185 DOI: https://doi.org/10.36550/2415-7988-2022-1-209-180-185
  6. Rastrygina, A., Ivanenko, N. (2023). A Pedagogy of freedom as a viable basis for implementing gender equality in Ukraine’s educational institutions. International Review of Education, 69(1-2), 143-174. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/s11159-023-09995-9
  7. Ivanenko N., Biletska O., Hurbanska S., Hurbanska, A., & Kochmar, D. (2023). English language morphological neologisms reflecting the war in Ukraine. World Journal of English Language, 13(5), pp. 432-438    DOI: doi:http://dx.doi.org/10.5430/wjel.v13n5p432
  8. Ivanenko, N., Boiko, A., Fedorchuk, L., Panchenko, I., & Marieiev, D. (2023). Development of educational policy in Ukraine in the context of European integration and digital transformation. Revista Eduweb, 17(2), 296-305 DOI: https://doi.org/10.46502/issn.1856-7576/2023.17.02.25
  9. Ivanenko, N.V., Gerasymenko,Yu. A., Kostenko, V.G. (2023). Innovative approaches to the modernization of philological education and science in Ukraine: a response to the challenges of wartime. Akademichni Vizii, (in Ukrainian). URL: https://academy-vision.org/index.php/av/article/view/281 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5281/zenodo.7795088
  10. Ivanenko N. (2022). Phraseological units of the conceptual field MARRIAGE in the English picture of the world. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi: KOD, 202, pp. 140-146
  11. Bilous, O., Mishchenko, A., Datska, T., Ivanenko, N., Kit, L., Piankovska, I., and Vereshchak, Y. (2021). Modern linguistic technologies: strategy of teaching translation studies. Rupkatha Journal on Interdisciplinary Studies in Humanities, 13(4), pp. 1-12 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/21659/rupkatha.v13n4.65
  12. Leleka, T., Ivanenko, N., Moskalenko O., Herasymenko, L., Shevchuk L., Pidlubna, O. (2021). Angloamerican loanwords use in the Ukrainian student slang. Laplage em Revista, 7(Extra-D): University and science: possible dialogues. pp.163-174. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/24115/S2446-622020217Extra-D1081p.163-174
  13. Ivanenko N. (2021). Figurative and valuable component of the MARRIAGE concept. Trends in Science and Practice of Today. Ankara, Turkey, pp. 356-361
  14. Ivanenko N. (2021). Inclusive learning environment for students’ achievements and foreign language development. Priorities in the Development of Science and Education. Budapest, Hungary, pp.74-80
  15. Ivanenko N. (2021). The nominative field of the MARRIAGE concept and the analysis of the synonymous series of its key unit. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi: KOD, 193, pp 218-224 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.36550/2522-4077-2021-1-193-218-224
  16. Ivanenko N. (2020). Language intervention stages in project-based learning. Modern Trends in Foreign Language Professional Training in a Multicultural Space. Kyiv, pp. 249 – 255
  17. Rastrygina, A., Ivanenko, N. (2020). Gender comfortable educational environment as a factor of development of personal freedom. Research Bulletin. Pedagogical Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 188, pp. 28 – 35 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.36550/2415-7988-2020-1-188-28-35
  18. Ivanenko N. (2020). Texting slang as one of the most common groups of everyday youth Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi: KOD, 187, pp. 38-45
  19. Ivanenko N. (2019). Computer use in foreign language Intellectual and Emotional Components of Foreign Language Learning: Latest Trends and Challenges for Higher Education. Kyiv, pp. 152 – 158.
  20. Ivanenko N. (2019). Initial stages of elaborating a project in a foreign language classroom. Science and Society. Hamilton, Canada, pp. 13 – 20.
  21. Ivanenko N. (2019). Project-based learning as a way to incorporate effective foreign language teaching. Research Bulletin. Pedagogical Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 177, pp. 207 – 211
  22. Ivanenko N. (2019). Youth vocabulary as a reflection of changes in modern society. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi: KOD, 175, pp. 34 – 39.
  23. Ivanenko N. (2018). Promoting citizenship education in the English language Proceedings of the IV International Conference. Kyiv, pp. 130 – 137
  24. Ivanenko N. (2018). Educating global citizens at a foreign language class. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, – pp. 494 – 500
  25. Ivanenko N. (2018). Formation of civic values through teaching a foreign language. Proceedings of the II International Conference “Foreign Language in Professional Training of Specialists: Problems and Strategies”. Kropyvnytskyi, pp. 189-191
  26. Ivanenko N. (2017). Citizenship education in the English language classroom. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 154. – pp. 92 – 97
  27. Ivanenko N. (2017). Education for democratic citizenship: teaching virtues and values. Research Bulletin. Pedagogical Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 152, pp. 110-113
  28. Ivanenko N. (2016). Citizenship education as a way to develop moral fluency to solve social and political challenges of the future. Scientific Journal of Ariel University. Israel: Ariel University.
  29. Ivanenko N. (2016). Functioning peculiarities of lexical units of the RESPECT concept in the English language. Proceedings of the International Conference Linguistic and Linguacultural Aspects of Teaching Foreign Languages in Ukrainian Universities”. Dnipropetrovsk, pp. 87-94
  30. Ivanenko N. (2016). Semantic relationships of lexical units of the concept of love in the English language. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, pp. 221-226
  31. Ivanenko N. (2015). Citizenship education as the coordination and integration of educational establishment and community. Research Proceedings of the national UniversityOstrog Academy”. Ostrog, pp. 136-142
  32. Ivanenko N. (2015). The value of citizenship education in practices of student governing body. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 136. pp. 438-442

Louise’s doctoral research investigates how teachers become who they are.

Louise’s work situates the schoolteacher as a particular type of subject, that is both made and makes itself from within a network of power relations. Her study combines Foucauldian theory, Critical Discourse Analysis, and Narrative analysis to provide an account of schoolteachers’ ethical agency in the context of top-down policy practices.

Louise is a Doctoral Teaching Fellow at the Department of Education, where she teaches and supervises students in the MSc in Learning and Teaching course. Currently, Louise is collaborating the OECD in their Globally Teaching InSights project. Her research supports the Schools+ Network aims to fuel an ecosystem of organisations that are driving change in education from the bottom-up.

In March 2023 she presented her preliminary research at the Philosophy of Education Society of Great Britain (PESGB)’s annual conference.

As Honorary Fellow John attends seminars and consults with current staff in Mathematics Education.

During 40 years at the Open University supporting the teaching of mathematics he authored a wide range of papers, and dozens of Open University Books and Teaching materials. He co-authored the classic Thinking Mathematically; Mathematics as a Constructive Activity (with his wife Prof. Anne Watson); Questions and Prompts for Mathematical Thinking & Thinkers (with Anne and other colleagues), among many others.

His research methods are phenomenological, based on the Discipline of Noticing. He is interested in the lived experience of learning, doing and teaching mathematics. He focuses on the structure and form of Attention in the teaching of mathematics, as he supports those who wish to foster and sustain mathematical thinking in others.

He is an Honorary Fellow of BSRLM and ATM, a long-standing member of  the MAA and the  MA.H.

 

Publications

  • Mason, J. (2022). Consequences of a Virtual Encounter with George Pólya. Teaching Mathematics and Computer Science.  20 (2) p173-182.
  • Zazkis, R. Kontorovich, I. & Mason, J. (2021). The Learning and Teaching of Number: paths less travelled through well-trodden terrain. London: Routledge
  • Mason, J. (2021). Learning about Noticing, by, and through, Noticing. ZDM – Mathematics Education. 53(1) p231-243. doi: 10.1007/s11858-020-01192-4
  • Mason, J. & Czarnocha,B. (2021). Aha! Moments, Bisociation and Multifocal Attention. In B. Czarnocha & W. Baker. Creativity of an Aha! Moment and Mathematics Education. Leiden: Brill. p345-361.
  • Mason, J. (2018) Making Distinctions: a phenomenological exploration in mathematics education. In P. Ernest (Ed.). The Philosophy of Mathematics Education Today. ICME-13 Monographs. Springer.
  • Mason, J. (2018). Reflecting on values emerging from practice and the value of reflecting on practice. In D. Rowe & A. Watson (Eds.). Faith and Experience in Education: essays from Quaker perspectives. London: Trentham Books. p63-91.
  • Mason, J. & Metz, M. (2017). Digging Beneath Dual Systems Theory and the Bicameral Brain: abductions about the human psyche from experience in mathematical problem solving. In U. Xolocotzin (Ed.). Understanding Emotions in Mathematical Thinking and Learning. p379-407. Cambridge: Elsevier/Academic Press.
  • Mason, J. (2016). Rising Above a Cause-and-Effect Stance in Mathematics Education Research. JMTE 19(4) p297-300. http://rdcu.be/npTf
  • Mason, J. & Davis, B. (2013). The Importance of Teachers’ Mathematical Awareness for In-The-Moment Pedagogy. CJSMTE 13(2) p182-197.
  • Mason, J. (2012). Noticing: roots and branches. In M. Sherin, V. Jacobs, & R. Phillip (Eds.) Mathematics Teacher Noticing:  Seeing Through Teachers’ Eyes. p35-50. Mahwah: Erlbaum.
  • Mason, J. (2008). Being Mathematical With & In Front of Learners: Attention, Awareness, and Attitude as Sources of Differences between Teacher Educators, Teachers & Learners. In T. Wood (Series Ed.) & B. Jaworski (Vol. Ed.), International Handbook of Mathematics Teacher Education: Vol.4. The Mathematics Teacher Educator as a Developing Professional. Rotterdam, the Netherlands: Sense Publishers, p31-56.
  • Mason, J. & Johnston-Wilder, S. (2006 2nd edition). Designing and Using Mathematical Tasks. St. Albans: Tarquin.
  • Watson, A. & Mason, J. (2006). Seeing an Exercise as a Single Mathematical Object: Using Variation to Structure Sense-Making. Mathematical Thinking and Learning. 8(2) p91-111.
  • Watson, A. & Mason, J. (2005). Mathematics as a Constructive Activity: learners generating examples. Mahwah: Erlbaum.
  • Mason, J. & Johnston-Wilder, S. (2004). Fundamental Constructs in Mathematics Education, RoutledgeFalmer, London.
  • Mason, J. 2003, Structure of Attention in the Learning of Mathematics, in J. Novotná (Ed.) Proceedings, International Symposium on Elementary Mathematics Teaching, Charles University, Prague, p9-16.
  • Mason, J. 2002, Mathematics Teaching Practice: a guidebook for university and college lecturers, Horwood Publishing, Chichester.
  • Mason, J. 2002, Researching Your own Practice: The Discipline of Noticing, RoutledgeFalmer, London.
  • Mason, J. 2001, Modelling Modelling: where is the centre of gravity of-for-when modelling?, in J. Matos, W. Blum, S. Houston & S. Carreira (Eds.) Modelling and Mathematics Education: ICTMA 9 applications in science and technology, Horwood Publishing, Chichester, p39-61.
  • Mason, J. Burton L. & Stacey K. (1982). Thinking Mathematically, Addison Wesley, London

Website

www.pmtheta.com

Mark has worked in ELT and EMI for over 35 years as a teacher, teacher trainer, lecturer, course writer, syllabus designer, examiner, Director of Studies, and consultant editor for OUP. For the British Council he has worked as a consultant trainer and course developer in EMI and EAP. For the University of Oxford Department of Education Mark delivered the ELT option on the MSc ALSLA and is Teaching Associate of the EMI Research Group in which capacity he has worked as a CI and has developed and delivered EMI teacher training courses in China, Serbia and Oxford. Mark has worked in universities in Russia, Ukraine, Kazakhstan, Belarus, Czechia, Italy, Germany, Mexico, Peru, Chile, Brazil, Colombia and Morocco.

He continues to be involved in EMI and is currently co-authoring an EMI student guide.

Mark is an alumnus of the University of Oxford Department of Education and was among the first to be awarded the innovative MSc in Teaching English Language in University Settings.

Anushay is a second-year DPhil student investigating how classroom characteristics are related to Pakistani children’s development. She is supervised by Professor Iram Siraj and Dr Katharina Ereky-Stevens and her work is being supported by the Aga Khan University (Pakistan). Anushay received the Patrice Engle Dissertation Grant Award from the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD) in 2023.

Anushay completed her BSc Psychology from UCL, where she also started her master’s in Developmental Neuroscience and Psychopathology. She was based at Yale University for her master’s thesis, where she worked with Dr Craig Bailey at the Yale Center for Emotional Intelligence to understand children’s emotion development. Anushay also works as a part-time research  assistant at the Developmental Diversity Lab at UCL’s Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience. Anushay’s research interests include understanding child development across different cultures, factors that might be affecting it, and devising culture-specific ways to support children’s holistic development through the educational system. She is also keen on improving the research scope in Pakistan by working with Pakistani researchers, practitioners, and families. Anushay balances her research with her position as the founder of a non-profit, Resources for Children, which aims to understand and support children’s development in Pakistan.

Publications

Journal Articles

  1. Mazhar, A., & Bailey, C., S. (under review). Understanding Children’s Emotion-Specific Biases: How They Relate to Child and Family Factors, Emotion Recognition Accuracy, and Social Behaviour.

Presentations

  1. Mazhar, A., & Bailey, C., S. (2023, March). Understanding Children’s Emotion-Specific Biases: How They Relate to Child-Level Factors and Emotion Recognition Accuracy [Paper Presentation]. Society for Research in Child Development, Salt Lake City, Utah, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2022, April). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Spring Preview, New Haven, United States.
  3. Mazhar, A. (2021, December). Does an extended family improve mentalising in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK & Pakistan. 2nd International Foundation University Conference of Psychology, Rawalpindi, Pakistan.
  4. Mazhar, A. (2020, October). Developing a non-profit to advance autism research in Pakistan. Anna Freud Centre Seminar Series, London, United Kingdom.

Posters

  1. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Theory of Mind in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK and Pakistan. Harvard Trends in Psychology Summit, Cambridge, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Research Rounds, New Haven, United States.

Cindy works at the intersection of learning, design, and technology, with a keen interest in the orchestration of future-ready tech-enabled learning.

She is curious how the deployment of adaptive learning systems to schools will impact classroom learning and hopes to learn more about the human-machine partnership in education. Specifically, her research is concerned with the implications that the use of such systems has on teacher-student interactions, as teachers grapple with balancing personalised learning and learning in community, as well as curriculum demands and student interests. These are some tensions which could potentially be exacerbated by affordances of adaptive learning systems.

Prior to embarking on the DPhil in Education at Oxford, Cindy worked as the Lead Specialist in Technologies for Learning at the Educational Technology Division of Ministry of Education, Singapore. She had previously completed graduate studies at the National University of Singapore and Stanford University where she was awarded Master of Arts in English Studies and Master of Arts in Education.

Reem is DPhil student from Saudi Arabia.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she worked as a Teacher, Professional Developer, then, became a Supervisor and Researcher in the Ministry of Education where she received a scholarship to pursue her DPhil education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests lie in the area of Teacher Education and Professional Learning Policy and Practice.

Publications
  • Alqahtani, Reem (2020). Saudi Universities Role in Developing Teacher Professional Development Programs: Elite Universities Experience. Journal of Educational Sciences. King Saud University.
  • Alqahtani, Reem. (2020). The effect of implementing UDL-based activities in improving EFL learners’ academic achievement and attitudes towards L2. In L. Salas, & E. Ager, Creating Quiet reflective Spaces: Language Teacher Researches Professional Development (pp. 61-62). IATEFL publications.

Lena Zlock is researching the integration of digital technology into structures of teaching, learning, and education in higher education. Her particular focus is on the digital humanities and the potential for digital methods to transform humanistic study. She works with Professor Niall Winters and Dr. James Robson.

Lena’s research interests stem from her education as an M.St. student and Ertegun Graduate Scholar in Modern Languages at the University of Oxford, and as a B.A. student in History at Stanford University. As an undergraduate, she started the Voltaire Library Project, a digitally and data-driven study of the 6,763-book collection of French Enlightenment philosopher Voltaire (you can read more about the project here and here). She has been interested in the application of digital technology to humanistic teaching since her days in Princeton Day School, where she developed an interdisciplinary curriculum on Mexico City (visit the course website here).

Her research on Voltaire led her to think more broadly about the place of digital methods in the humanities classroom, and how new technologies will revolutionise the liberal arts and higher education. As a DPhil candidate, Lena will examine the negotiation and implementation of new learning technologies within the University of Oxford at undergraduate and graduate levels.

Lena is involved in a number of digital humanities initiatives in Oxford. She previously served as the inaugural fellow of the Voltaire Lab at Oxford’s Voltaire Foundation. As a master’s student, Lena co-formulated the convergence agenda for Oxford digital humanities with Professor Howard Hotson, and is currently employed by the Humanities Division to assist with the development of an M.St. degree in Digital Scholarship (read more here). Lena set up and helps to run the History of the Book blog for the Faculty of Medieval and Modern Languages and the Oxford Book History Twitter account.

Lena welcomes inquiries from undergraduate and postgraduate students from Oxford and beyond seeking to get involved with the digital humanities in any capacity. The History of the Book blog also welcomes inquiries from prospective contributors.

 

Abbey is a Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education, in collaboration with the Department of Engineering.

Before joining the DPhil program, Abbey obtained a B.A. in Applied Linguistics with minors in Russian and Chinese from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford. She was the recipient of a Benjamin A. Gilman International Scholarship through U.S. Department of State for study in Russia and was awarded two Foreign Language and Area Studies (FLAS) Fellowships for study in both Russia and China. She holds both TESOL and TEFL certificates and has taught English as a Second Language in various contexts to a wide variety of learner populations.

Abbey’s main research interests lie in the use of technology to facilitate language learning. Her DPhil research focuses on the development of a virtual reality program to bridge the gaps that students face when learning languages through distance learning.

Dr Nadiya Ivanenko is a Visiting Research Fellow in the field of civic education and citizenship linguistics. She is a member of the Applied Linguistics research group and Higher Education research group at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

After receiving PhD in Comparative Linguistics from Kyiv National Linguistic University (2008) Nadiya worked as an Associate Professor of the Germanic Languages and Teaching Methodology Department, Faculty of Ukrainian Philology, Foreign Languages and Social Communications and Vice Dean of the Faculty of Foreign Languages, Central Ukrainian State University, Ukraine.

Nadiya was a Chevening scholar and Postgraduate researcher at the Department of Education, University of Oxford (2003-2004). She was a Co-chair of the joint UNESCO Chair/UNITWIN project ‘Education as a Humanitarian Response’ (2004-2012); a participant of BECA joint project ‘Education for Democracy’ between Montclair State University (USA) and Kirovohrad State Pedagogical University (Ukraine). Nadiya had internship for teachers of EFL in the Department of Educational and Cultural Programmes at Shakespeare’s Globe Theater, London, UK (2011). She was the Head of the British Council International Mobility Grant ‘Internalizing Higher Education in Ukraine’, which included 2 internships at the University of Durham, UK (2016). She participated in the internship “Retraining in the Field of Teaching Excellence”, Bayreuth University, Germany (Erasmus + Project (2021) and was a coordinator of the Erasmus+ Project: Innovative Approach to Promotion Teaching Excellence (2021-2022) at Central Ukrainian State University.

Selected Publications

BOOKS

  • Rastrygina, A., Ivanenko, N. (2021). Pedagogy of Freedom in the Paradigmal Space of Modern Education and Upbringing.
  • Ivanenko, N., Liashuk, A. (2021). English Activity Book. Practical Course of English. Kropyvnytskyi.
  • Ivanenko N. (2014). (Edit.) Education in Eastern Europe and Eurasia. London: Bloomsbury.
  • Ivanenko N. (2008). The Concept of Good in English and Ukrainian Language Pictures of the World. Kirovohrad: KOD.
  • Ivanenko N. (2007). Written Practice and Conversation for 1 Year. Kropyvnytskyi.
  • Garkusha, L., Ivanenko, N. (2004). Critical thinking in life skills training. Kirovohrad.

BOOK CHAPTERS

  • Ivanenko, N. (2024). Words and word meanings In The Routledge Companion To English Studies/ by Constant Leung & Jo Lewkowicz. London, UK: Routledge (in publishing).
  • Ivanenko N. (2023). Development of civic education in Ukrainian universities: new challenges of modern realities in the conditions of the transformation of society. In Contemporary Education in Ukraine: Integration into the European Educational Space. Dnipro (pp. 387-412) DOI:36550/978-617-8245-57-3-20
  • Ivanenko N. (2019). Citizenship Education, Moral Fluency and Social and Political Future Challenges. In Polish-Jewish History, Culture, Values, and Education between Paradise and Inferno. Irvine, USA: Brown Walker Press (pp. 93-103)
  • Ivanenko N. (2014). Education Change, Transformation, Reforms – a Regional Overview. In N. Ivanenko (Edit.) Education in Eastern Europe and Eurasia. London: Bloomsbury (pp. 9-45)
  • Ivanenko N. (2013). Vulnerable Children in Ukraine and Educational Response. In M. Matsumoto (Edit.) Education and Disadvantaged Children and Young People. London: Bloomsbury (pp. 95-132)

JOURNAL ARTICLES

  1. Ivanenko, N. (2024). Challenges of Ukrainian Higher Education in Times of War. International Higher Education. The Boston College Centre for International Higher Education, 118, pp. 35-36 https://doi.org/10.36197/IHE.2024.118.17
  2. Ivanenko, N., Paska, T., Irkha, A. Rud, A., & Boguslavskas, L., (2024). The Role of Higher Education for Ensuring National Security in Ukraine. Futurity Education, 4(1), 210-237 https://doi.org/10.57125/FED.2024.03.25.11
  3. Leleka, T., Ivanenko, N., Demeshko, I., Kapitan T., & Demchenko, I. (2024). The Process of English Internationalization in the Ukrainian Educational Paradigm. Slavistica Vilnensis, 68(2), 76-89 doi:10.15388/SlavViln.2023.68(2).6
  4. Ivanenko, N., Rud, A., Hurbanska, A., Cheban, Y., & Syrtseva, S. (2024). Digitalization of Education of the Future – A Trend or a Requirement of the Time? Journal of Higher Education Theory and Practice24(2). DOI: https://doi.org/10.33423/jhetp.v24i2.6791
  5. Ivanenko, N. (2023). Civic character cultivation as a basic virtue within and beyond modern educational institutions. Academic Notes. Series Pedagogical sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 209, 180-185 DOI: https://doi.org/10.36550/2415-7988-2022-1-209-180-185
  6. Rastrygina, A., Ivanenko, N. (2023). A Pedagogy of freedom as a viable basis for implementing gender equality in Ukraine’s educational institutions. International Review of Education, 69(1-2), 143-174. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/s11159-023-09995-9
  7. Ivanenko N., Biletska O., Hurbanska S., Hurbanska, A., & Kochmar, D. (2023). English language morphological neologisms reflecting the war in Ukraine. World Journal of English Language, 13(5), pp. 432-438    DOI: doi:http://dx.doi.org/10.5430/wjel.v13n5p432
  8. Ivanenko, N., Boiko, A., Fedorchuk, L., Panchenko, I., & Marieiev, D. (2023). Development of educational policy in Ukraine in the context of European integration and digital transformation. Revista Eduweb, 17(2), 296-305 DOI: https://doi.org/10.46502/issn.1856-7576/2023.17.02.25
  9. Ivanenko, N.V., Gerasymenko,Yu. A., Kostenko, V.G. (2023). Innovative approaches to the modernization of philological education and science in Ukraine: a response to the challenges of wartime. Akademichni Vizii, (in Ukrainian). URL: https://academy-vision.org/index.php/av/article/view/281 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5281/zenodo.7795088
  10. Ivanenko N. (2022). Phraseological units of the conceptual field MARRIAGE in the English picture of the world. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi: KOD, 202, pp. 140-146
  11. Bilous, O., Mishchenko, A., Datska, T., Ivanenko, N., Kit, L., Piankovska, I., and Vereshchak, Y. (2021). Modern linguistic technologies: strategy of teaching translation studies. Rupkatha Journal on Interdisciplinary Studies in Humanities, 13(4), pp. 1-12 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/21659/rupkatha.v13n4.65
  12. Leleka, T., Ivanenko, N., Moskalenko O., Herasymenko, L., Shevchuk L., Pidlubna, O. (2021). Angloamerican loanwords use in the Ukrainian student slang. Laplage em Revista, 7(Extra-D): University and science: possible dialogues. pp.163-174. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/24115/S2446-622020217Extra-D1081p.163-174
  13. Ivanenko N. (2021). Figurative and valuable component of the MARRIAGE concept. Trends in Science and Practice of Today. Ankara, Turkey, pp. 356-361
  14. Ivanenko N. (2021). Inclusive learning environment for students’ achievements and foreign language development. Priorities in the Development of Science and Education. Budapest, Hungary, pp.74-80
  15. Ivanenko N. (2021). The nominative field of the MARRIAGE concept and the analysis of the synonymous series of its key unit. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi: KOD, 193, pp 218-224 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.36550/2522-4077-2021-1-193-218-224
  16. Ivanenko N. (2020). Language intervention stages in project-based learning. Modern Trends in Foreign Language Professional Training in a Multicultural Space. Kyiv, pp. 249 – 255
  17. Rastrygina, A., Ivanenko, N. (2020). Gender comfortable educational environment as a factor of development of personal freedom. Research Bulletin. Pedagogical Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 188, pp. 28 – 35 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.36550/2415-7988-2020-1-188-28-35
  18. Ivanenko N. (2020). Texting slang as one of the most common groups of everyday youth Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi: KOD, 187, pp. 38-45
  19. Ivanenko N. (2019). Computer use in foreign language Intellectual and Emotional Components of Foreign Language Learning: Latest Trends and Challenges for Higher Education. Kyiv, pp. 152 – 158.
  20. Ivanenko N. (2019). Initial stages of elaborating a project in a foreign language classroom. Science and Society. Hamilton, Canada, pp. 13 – 20.
  21. Ivanenko N. (2019). Project-based learning as a way to incorporate effective foreign language teaching. Research Bulletin. Pedagogical Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 177, pp. 207 – 211
  22. Ivanenko N. (2019). Youth vocabulary as a reflection of changes in modern society. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi: KOD, 175, pp. 34 – 39.
  23. Ivanenko N. (2018). Promoting citizenship education in the English language Proceedings of the IV International Conference. Kyiv, pp. 130 – 137
  24. Ivanenko N. (2018). Educating global citizens at a foreign language class. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, – pp. 494 – 500
  25. Ivanenko N. (2018). Formation of civic values through teaching a foreign language. Proceedings of the II International Conference “Foreign Language in Professional Training of Specialists: Problems and Strategies”. Kropyvnytskyi, pp. 189-191
  26. Ivanenko N. (2017). Citizenship education in the English language classroom. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 154. – pp. 92 – 97
  27. Ivanenko N. (2017). Education for democratic citizenship: teaching virtues and values. Research Bulletin. Pedagogical Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 152, pp. 110-113
  28. Ivanenko N. (2016). Citizenship education as a way to develop moral fluency to solve social and political challenges of the future. Scientific Journal of Ariel University. Israel: Ariel University.
  29. Ivanenko N. (2016). Functioning peculiarities of lexical units of the RESPECT concept in the English language. Proceedings of the International Conference Linguistic and Linguacultural Aspects of Teaching Foreign Languages in Ukrainian Universities”. Dnipropetrovsk, pp. 87-94
  30. Ivanenko N. (2016). Semantic relationships of lexical units of the concept of love in the English language. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, pp. 221-226
  31. Ivanenko N. (2015). Citizenship education as the coordination and integration of educational establishment and community. Research Proceedings of the national UniversityOstrog Academy”. Ostrog, pp. 136-142
  32. Ivanenko N. (2015). The value of citizenship education in practices of student governing body. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 136. pp. 438-442

Louise’s doctoral research investigates how teachers become who they are.

Louise’s work situates the schoolteacher as a particular type of subject, that is both made and makes itself from within a network of power relations. Her study combines Foucauldian theory, Critical Discourse Analysis, and Narrative analysis to provide an account of schoolteachers’ ethical agency in the context of top-down policy practices.

Louise is a Doctoral Teaching Fellow at the Department of Education, where she teaches and supervises students in the MSc in Learning and Teaching course. Currently, Louise is collaborating the OECD in their Globally Teaching InSights project. Her research supports the Schools+ Network aims to fuel an ecosystem of organisations that are driving change in education from the bottom-up.

In March 2023 she presented her preliminary research at the Philosophy of Education Society of Great Britain (PESGB)’s annual conference.

As Honorary Fellow John attends seminars and consults with current staff in Mathematics Education.

During 40 years at the Open University supporting the teaching of mathematics he authored a wide range of papers, and dozens of Open University Books and Teaching materials. He co-authored the classic Thinking Mathematically; Mathematics as a Constructive Activity (with his wife Prof. Anne Watson); Questions and Prompts for Mathematical Thinking & Thinkers (with Anne and other colleagues), among many others.

His research methods are phenomenological, based on the Discipline of Noticing. He is interested in the lived experience of learning, doing and teaching mathematics. He focuses on the structure and form of Attention in the teaching of mathematics, as he supports those who wish to foster and sustain mathematical thinking in others.

He is an Honorary Fellow of BSRLM and ATM, a long-standing member of  the MAA and the  MA.H.

 

Publications

  • Mason, J. (2022). Consequences of a Virtual Encounter with George Pólya. Teaching Mathematics and Computer Science.  20 (2) p173-182.
  • Zazkis, R. Kontorovich, I. & Mason, J. (2021). The Learning and Teaching of Number: paths less travelled through well-trodden terrain. London: Routledge
  • Mason, J. (2021). Learning about Noticing, by, and through, Noticing. ZDM – Mathematics Education. 53(1) p231-243. doi: 10.1007/s11858-020-01192-4
  • Mason, J. & Czarnocha,B. (2021). Aha! Moments, Bisociation and Multifocal Attention. In B. Czarnocha & W. Baker. Creativity of an Aha! Moment and Mathematics Education. Leiden: Brill. p345-361.
  • Mason, J. (2018) Making Distinctions: a phenomenological exploration in mathematics education. In P. Ernest (Ed.). The Philosophy of Mathematics Education Today. ICME-13 Monographs. Springer.
  • Mason, J. (2018). Reflecting on values emerging from practice and the value of reflecting on practice. In D. Rowe & A. Watson (Eds.). Faith and Experience in Education: essays from Quaker perspectives. London: Trentham Books. p63-91.
  • Mason, J. & Metz, M. (2017). Digging Beneath Dual Systems Theory and the Bicameral Brain: abductions about the human psyche from experience in mathematical problem solving. In U. Xolocotzin (Ed.). Understanding Emotions in Mathematical Thinking and Learning. p379-407. Cambridge: Elsevier/Academic Press.
  • Mason, J. (2016). Rising Above a Cause-and-Effect Stance in Mathematics Education Research. JMTE 19(4) p297-300. http://rdcu.be/npTf
  • Mason, J. & Davis, B. (2013). The Importance of Teachers’ Mathematical Awareness for In-The-Moment Pedagogy. CJSMTE 13(2) p182-197.
  • Mason, J. (2012). Noticing: roots and branches. In M. Sherin, V. Jacobs, & R. Phillip (Eds.) Mathematics Teacher Noticing:  Seeing Through Teachers’ Eyes. p35-50. Mahwah: Erlbaum.
  • Mason, J. (2008). Being Mathematical With & In Front of Learners: Attention, Awareness, and Attitude as Sources of Differences between Teacher Educators, Teachers & Learners. In T. Wood (Series Ed.) & B. Jaworski (Vol. Ed.), International Handbook of Mathematics Teacher Education: Vol.4. The Mathematics Teacher Educator as a Developing Professional. Rotterdam, the Netherlands: Sense Publishers, p31-56.
  • Mason, J. & Johnston-Wilder, S. (2006 2nd edition). Designing and Using Mathematical Tasks. St. Albans: Tarquin.
  • Watson, A. & Mason, J. (2006). Seeing an Exercise as a Single Mathematical Object: Using Variation to Structure Sense-Making. Mathematical Thinking and Learning. 8(2) p91-111.
  • Watson, A. & Mason, J. (2005). Mathematics as a Constructive Activity: learners generating examples. Mahwah: Erlbaum.
  • Mason, J. & Johnston-Wilder, S. (2004). Fundamental Constructs in Mathematics Education, RoutledgeFalmer, London.
  • Mason, J. 2003, Structure of Attention in the Learning of Mathematics, in J. Novotná (Ed.) Proceedings, International Symposium on Elementary Mathematics Teaching, Charles University, Prague, p9-16.
  • Mason, J. 2002, Mathematics Teaching Practice: a guidebook for university and college lecturers, Horwood Publishing, Chichester.
  • Mason, J. 2002, Researching Your own Practice: The Discipline of Noticing, RoutledgeFalmer, London.
  • Mason, J. 2001, Modelling Modelling: where is the centre of gravity of-for-when modelling?, in J. Matos, W. Blum, S. Houston & S. Carreira (Eds.) Modelling and Mathematics Education: ICTMA 9 applications in science and technology, Horwood Publishing, Chichester, p39-61.
  • Mason, J. Burton L. & Stacey K. (1982). Thinking Mathematically, Addison Wesley, London

Website

www.pmtheta.com

Mark has worked in ELT and EMI for over 35 years as a teacher, teacher trainer, lecturer, course writer, syllabus designer, examiner, Director of Studies, and consultant editor for OUP. For the British Council he has worked as a consultant trainer and course developer in EMI and EAP. For the University of Oxford Department of Education Mark delivered the ELT option on the MSc ALSLA and is Teaching Associate of the EMI Research Group in which capacity he has worked as a CI and has developed and delivered EMI teacher training courses in China, Serbia and Oxford. Mark has worked in universities in Russia, Ukraine, Kazakhstan, Belarus, Czechia, Italy, Germany, Mexico, Peru, Chile, Brazil, Colombia and Morocco.

He continues to be involved in EMI and is currently co-authoring an EMI student guide.

Mark is an alumnus of the University of Oxford Department of Education and was among the first to be awarded the innovative MSc in Teaching English Language in University Settings.

Anushay is a second-year DPhil student investigating how classroom characteristics are related to Pakistani children’s development. She is supervised by Professor Iram Siraj and Dr Katharina Ereky-Stevens and her work is being supported by the Aga Khan University (Pakistan). Anushay received the Patrice Engle Dissertation Grant Award from the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD) in 2023.

Anushay completed her BSc Psychology from UCL, where she also started her master’s in Developmental Neuroscience and Psychopathology. She was based at Yale University for her master’s thesis, where she worked with Dr Craig Bailey at the Yale Center for Emotional Intelligence to understand children’s emotion development. Anushay also works as a part-time research  assistant at the Developmental Diversity Lab at UCL’s Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience. Anushay’s research interests include understanding child development across different cultures, factors that might be affecting it, and devising culture-specific ways to support children’s holistic development through the educational system. She is also keen on improving the research scope in Pakistan by working with Pakistani researchers, practitioners, and families. Anushay balances her research with her position as the founder of a non-profit, Resources for Children, which aims to understand and support children’s development in Pakistan.

Publications

Journal Articles

  1. Mazhar, A., & Bailey, C., S. (under review). Understanding Children’s Emotion-Specific Biases: How They Relate to Child and Family Factors, Emotion Recognition Accuracy, and Social Behaviour.

Presentations

  1. Mazhar, A., & Bailey, C., S. (2023, March). Understanding Children’s Emotion-Specific Biases: How They Relate to Child-Level Factors and Emotion Recognition Accuracy [Paper Presentation]. Society for Research in Child Development, Salt Lake City, Utah, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2022, April). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Spring Preview, New Haven, United States.
  3. Mazhar, A. (2021, December). Does an extended family improve mentalising in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK & Pakistan. 2nd International Foundation University Conference of Psychology, Rawalpindi, Pakistan.
  4. Mazhar, A. (2020, October). Developing a non-profit to advance autism research in Pakistan. Anna Freud Centre Seminar Series, London, United Kingdom.

Posters

  1. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Theory of Mind in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK and Pakistan. Harvard Trends in Psychology Summit, Cambridge, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Research Rounds, New Haven, United States.

Cindy works at the intersection of learning, design, and technology, with a keen interest in the orchestration of future-ready tech-enabled learning.

She is curious how the deployment of adaptive learning systems to schools will impact classroom learning and hopes to learn more about the human-machine partnership in education. Specifically, her research is concerned with the implications that the use of such systems has on teacher-student interactions, as teachers grapple with balancing personalised learning and learning in community, as well as curriculum demands and student interests. These are some tensions which could potentially be exacerbated by affordances of adaptive learning systems.

Prior to embarking on the DPhil in Education at Oxford, Cindy worked as the Lead Specialist in Technologies for Learning at the Educational Technology Division of Ministry of Education, Singapore. She had previously completed graduate studies at the National University of Singapore and Stanford University where she was awarded Master of Arts in English Studies and Master of Arts in Education.

Reem is DPhil student from Saudi Arabia.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she worked as a Teacher, Professional Developer, then, became a Supervisor and Researcher in the Ministry of Education where she received a scholarship to pursue her DPhil education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests lie in the area of Teacher Education and Professional Learning Policy and Practice.

Publications
  • Alqahtani, Reem (2020). Saudi Universities Role in Developing Teacher Professional Development Programs: Elite Universities Experience. Journal of Educational Sciences. King Saud University.
  • Alqahtani, Reem. (2020). The effect of implementing UDL-based activities in improving EFL learners’ academic achievement and attitudes towards L2. In L. Salas, & E. Ager, Creating Quiet reflective Spaces: Language Teacher Researches Professional Development (pp. 61-62). IATEFL publications.

Lena Zlock is researching the integration of digital technology into structures of teaching, learning, and education in higher education. Her particular focus is on the digital humanities and the potential for digital methods to transform humanistic study. She works with Professor Niall Winters and Dr. James Robson.

Lena’s research interests stem from her education as an M.St. student and Ertegun Graduate Scholar in Modern Languages at the University of Oxford, and as a B.A. student in History at Stanford University. As an undergraduate, she started the Voltaire Library Project, a digitally and data-driven study of the 6,763-book collection of French Enlightenment philosopher Voltaire (you can read more about the project here and here). She has been interested in the application of digital technology to humanistic teaching since her days in Princeton Day School, where she developed an interdisciplinary curriculum on Mexico City (visit the course website here).

Her research on Voltaire led her to think more broadly about the place of digital methods in the humanities classroom, and how new technologies will revolutionise the liberal arts and higher education. As a DPhil candidate, Lena will examine the negotiation and implementation of new learning technologies within the University of Oxford at undergraduate and graduate levels.

Lena is involved in a number of digital humanities initiatives in Oxford. She previously served as the inaugural fellow of the Voltaire Lab at Oxford’s Voltaire Foundation. As a master’s student, Lena co-formulated the convergence agenda for Oxford digital humanities with Professor Howard Hotson, and is currently employed by the Humanities Division to assist with the development of an M.St. degree in Digital Scholarship (read more here). Lena set up and helps to run the History of the Book blog for the Faculty of Medieval and Modern Languages and the Oxford Book History Twitter account.

Lena welcomes inquiries from undergraduate and postgraduate students from Oxford and beyond seeking to get involved with the digital humanities in any capacity. The History of the Book blog also welcomes inquiries from prospective contributors.

 

Abbey is a Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education, in collaboration with the Department of Engineering.

Before joining the DPhil program, Abbey obtained a B.A. in Applied Linguistics with minors in Russian and Chinese from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford. She was the recipient of a Benjamin A. Gilman International Scholarship through U.S. Department of State for study in Russia and was awarded two Foreign Language and Area Studies (FLAS) Fellowships for study in both Russia and China. She holds both TESOL and TEFL certificates and has taught English as a Second Language in various contexts to a wide variety of learner populations.

Abbey’s main research interests lie in the use of technology to facilitate language learning. Her DPhil research focuses on the development of a virtual reality program to bridge the gaps that students face when learning languages through distance learning.

Dr Nadiya Ivanenko is a Visiting Research Fellow in the field of civic education and citizenship linguistics. She is a member of the Applied Linguistics research group and Higher Education research group at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

After receiving PhD in Comparative Linguistics from Kyiv National Linguistic University (2008) Nadiya worked as an Associate Professor of the Germanic Languages and Teaching Methodology Department, Faculty of Ukrainian Philology, Foreign Languages and Social Communications and Vice Dean of the Faculty of Foreign Languages, Central Ukrainian State University, Ukraine.

Nadiya was a Chevening scholar and Postgraduate researcher at the Department of Education, University of Oxford (2003-2004). She was a Co-chair of the joint UNESCO Chair/UNITWIN project ‘Education as a Humanitarian Response’ (2004-2012); a participant of BECA joint project ‘Education for Democracy’ between Montclair State University (USA) and Kirovohrad State Pedagogical University (Ukraine). Nadiya had internship for teachers of EFL in the Department of Educational and Cultural Programmes at Shakespeare’s Globe Theater, London, UK (2011). She was the Head of the British Council International Mobility Grant ‘Internalizing Higher Education in Ukraine’, which included 2 internships at the University of Durham, UK (2016). She participated in the internship “Retraining in the Field of Teaching Excellence”, Bayreuth University, Germany (Erasmus + Project (2021) and was a coordinator of the Erasmus+ Project: Innovative Approach to Promotion Teaching Excellence (2021-2022) at Central Ukrainian State University.

Selected Publications

BOOKS

  • Rastrygina, A., Ivanenko, N. (2021). Pedagogy of Freedom in the Paradigmal Space of Modern Education and Upbringing.
  • Ivanenko, N., Liashuk, A. (2021). English Activity Book. Practical Course of English. Kropyvnytskyi.
  • Ivanenko N. (2014). (Edit.) Education in Eastern Europe and Eurasia. London: Bloomsbury.
  • Ivanenko N. (2008). The Concept of Good in English and Ukrainian Language Pictures of the World. Kirovohrad: KOD.
  • Ivanenko N. (2007). Written Practice and Conversation for 1 Year. Kropyvnytskyi.
  • Garkusha, L., Ivanenko, N. (2004). Critical thinking in life skills training. Kirovohrad.

BOOK CHAPTERS

  • Ivanenko, N. (2024). Words and word meanings In The Routledge Companion To English Studies/ by Constant Leung & Jo Lewkowicz. London, UK: Routledge (in publishing).
  • Ivanenko N. (2023). Development of civic education in Ukrainian universities: new challenges of modern realities in the conditions of the transformation of society. In Contemporary Education in Ukraine: Integration into the European Educational Space. Dnipro (pp. 387-412) DOI:36550/978-617-8245-57-3-20
  • Ivanenko N. (2019). Citizenship Education, Moral Fluency and Social and Political Future Challenges. In Polish-Jewish History, Culture, Values, and Education between Paradise and Inferno. Irvine, USA: Brown Walker Press (pp. 93-103)
  • Ivanenko N. (2014). Education Change, Transformation, Reforms – a Regional Overview. In N. Ivanenko (Edit.) Education in Eastern Europe and Eurasia. London: Bloomsbury (pp. 9-45)
  • Ivanenko N. (2013). Vulnerable Children in Ukraine and Educational Response. In M. Matsumoto (Edit.) Education and Disadvantaged Children and Young People. London: Bloomsbury (pp. 95-132)

JOURNAL ARTICLES

  1. Ivanenko, N. (2024). Challenges of Ukrainian Higher Education in Times of War. International Higher Education. The Boston College Centre for International Higher Education, 118, pp. 35-36 https://doi.org/10.36197/IHE.2024.118.17
  2. Ivanenko, N., Paska, T., Irkha, A. Rud, A., & Boguslavskas, L., (2024). The Role of Higher Education for Ensuring National Security in Ukraine. Futurity Education, 4(1), 210-237 https://doi.org/10.57125/FED.2024.03.25.11
  3. Leleka, T., Ivanenko, N., Demeshko, I., Kapitan T., & Demchenko, I. (2024). The Process of English Internationalization in the Ukrainian Educational Paradigm. Slavistica Vilnensis, 68(2), 76-89 doi:10.15388/SlavViln.2023.68(2).6
  4. Ivanenko, N., Rud, A., Hurbanska, A., Cheban, Y., & Syrtseva, S. (2024). Digitalization of Education of the Future – A Trend or a Requirement of the Time? Journal of Higher Education Theory and Practice24(2). DOI: https://doi.org/10.33423/jhetp.v24i2.6791
  5. Ivanenko, N. (2023). Civic character cultivation as a basic virtue within and beyond modern educational institutions. Academic Notes. Series Pedagogical sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 209, 180-185 DOI: https://doi.org/10.36550/2415-7988-2022-1-209-180-185
  6. Rastrygina, A., Ivanenko, N. (2023). A Pedagogy of freedom as a viable basis for implementing gender equality in Ukraine’s educational institutions. International Review of Education, 69(1-2), 143-174. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/s11159-023-09995-9
  7. Ivanenko N., Biletska O., Hurbanska S., Hurbanska, A., & Kochmar, D. (2023). English language morphological neologisms reflecting the war in Ukraine. World Journal of English Language, 13(5), pp. 432-438    DOI: doi:http://dx.doi.org/10.5430/wjel.v13n5p432
  8. Ivanenko, N., Boiko, A., Fedorchuk, L., Panchenko, I., & Marieiev, D. (2023). Development of educational policy in Ukraine in the context of European integration and digital transformation. Revista Eduweb, 17(2), 296-305 DOI: https://doi.org/10.46502/issn.1856-7576/2023.17.02.25
  9. Ivanenko, N.V., Gerasymenko,Yu. A., Kostenko, V.G. (2023). Innovative approaches to the modernization of philological education and science in Ukraine: a response to the challenges of wartime. Akademichni Vizii, (in Ukrainian). URL: https://academy-vision.org/index.php/av/article/view/281 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5281/zenodo.7795088
  10. Ivanenko N. (2022). Phraseological units of the conceptual field MARRIAGE in the English picture of the world. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi: KOD, 202, pp. 140-146
  11. Bilous, O., Mishchenko, A., Datska, T., Ivanenko, N., Kit, L., Piankovska, I., and Vereshchak, Y. (2021). Modern linguistic technologies: strategy of teaching translation studies. Rupkatha Journal on Interdisciplinary Studies in Humanities, 13(4), pp. 1-12 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/21659/rupkatha.v13n4.65
  12. Leleka, T., Ivanenko, N., Moskalenko O., Herasymenko, L., Shevchuk L., Pidlubna, O. (2021). Angloamerican loanwords use in the Ukrainian student slang. Laplage em Revista, 7(Extra-D): University and science: possible dialogues. pp.163-174. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/24115/S2446-622020217Extra-D1081p.163-174
  13. Ivanenko N. (2021). Figurative and valuable component of the MARRIAGE concept. Trends in Science and Practice of Today. Ankara, Turkey, pp. 356-361
  14. Ivanenko N. (2021). Inclusive learning environment for students’ achievements and foreign language development. Priorities in the Development of Science and Education. Budapest, Hungary, pp.74-80
  15. Ivanenko N. (2021). The nominative field of the MARRIAGE concept and the analysis of the synonymous series of its key unit. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi: KOD, 193, pp 218-224 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.36550/2522-4077-2021-1-193-218-224
  16. Ivanenko N. (2020). Language intervention stages in project-based learning. Modern Trends in Foreign Language Professional Training in a Multicultural Space. Kyiv, pp. 249 – 255
  17. Rastrygina, A., Ivanenko, N. (2020). Gender comfortable educational environment as a factor of development of personal freedom. Research Bulletin. Pedagogical Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 188, pp. 28 – 35 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.36550/2415-7988-2020-1-188-28-35
  18. Ivanenko N. (2020). Texting slang as one of the most common groups of everyday youth Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi: KOD, 187, pp. 38-45
  19. Ivanenko N. (2019). Computer use in foreign language Intellectual and Emotional Components of Foreign Language Learning: Latest Trends and Challenges for Higher Education. Kyiv, pp. 152 – 158.
  20. Ivanenko N. (2019). Initial stages of elaborating a project in a foreign language classroom. Science and Society. Hamilton, Canada, pp. 13 – 20.
  21. Ivanenko N. (2019). Project-based learning as a way to incorporate effective foreign language teaching. Research Bulletin. Pedagogical Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 177, pp. 207 – 211
  22. Ivanenko N. (2019). Youth vocabulary as a reflection of changes in modern society. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi: KOD, 175, pp. 34 – 39.
  23. Ivanenko N. (2018). Promoting citizenship education in the English language Proceedings of the IV International Conference. Kyiv, pp. 130 – 137
  24. Ivanenko N. (2018). Educating global citizens at a foreign language class. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, – pp. 494 – 500
  25. Ivanenko N. (2018). Formation of civic values through teaching a foreign language. Proceedings of the II International Conference “Foreign Language in Professional Training of Specialists: Problems and Strategies”. Kropyvnytskyi, pp. 189-191
  26. Ivanenko N. (2017). Citizenship education in the English language classroom. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 154. – pp. 92 – 97
  27. Ivanenko N. (2017). Education for democratic citizenship: teaching virtues and values. Research Bulletin. Pedagogical Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 152, pp. 110-113
  28. Ivanenko N. (2016). Citizenship education as a way to develop moral fluency to solve social and political challenges of the future. Scientific Journal of Ariel University. Israel: Ariel University.
  29. Ivanenko N. (2016). Functioning peculiarities of lexical units of the RESPECT concept in the English language. Proceedings of the International Conference Linguistic and Linguacultural Aspects of Teaching Foreign Languages in Ukrainian Universities”. Dnipropetrovsk, pp. 87-94
  30. Ivanenko N. (2016). Semantic relationships of lexical units of the concept of love in the English language. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, pp. 221-226
  31. Ivanenko N. (2015). Citizenship education as the coordination and integration of educational establishment and community. Research Proceedings of the national UniversityOstrog Academy”. Ostrog, pp. 136-142
  32. Ivanenko N. (2015). The value of citizenship education in practices of student governing body. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 136. pp. 438-442

Louise’s doctoral research investigates how teachers become who they are.

Louise’s work situates the schoolteacher as a particular type of subject, that is both made and makes itself from within a network of power relations. Her study combines Foucauldian theory, Critical Discourse Analysis, and Narrative analysis to provide an account of schoolteachers’ ethical agency in the context of top-down policy practices.

Louise is a Doctoral Teaching Fellow at the Department of Education, where she teaches and supervises students in the MSc in Learning and Teaching course. Currently, Louise is collaborating the OECD in their Globally Teaching InSights project. Her research supports the Schools+ Network aims to fuel an ecosystem of organisations that are driving change in education from the bottom-up.

In March 2023 she presented her preliminary research at the Philosophy of Education Society of Great Britain (PESGB)’s annual conference.

As Honorary Fellow John attends seminars and consults with current staff in Mathematics Education.

During 40 years at the Open University supporting the teaching of mathematics he authored a wide range of papers, and dozens of Open University Books and Teaching materials. He co-authored the classic Thinking Mathematically; Mathematics as a Constructive Activity (with his wife Prof. Anne Watson); Questions and Prompts for Mathematical Thinking & Thinkers (with Anne and other colleagues), among many others.

His research methods are phenomenological, based on the Discipline of Noticing. He is interested in the lived experience of learning, doing and teaching mathematics. He focuses on the structure and form of Attention in the teaching of mathematics, as he supports those who wish to foster and sustain mathematical thinking in others.

He is an Honorary Fellow of BSRLM and ATM, a long-standing member of  the MAA and the  MA.H.

 

Publications

  • Mason, J. (2022). Consequences of a Virtual Encounter with George Pólya. Teaching Mathematics and Computer Science.  20 (2) p173-182.
  • Zazkis, R. Kontorovich, I. & Mason, J. (2021). The Learning and Teaching of Number: paths less travelled through well-trodden terrain. London: Routledge
  • Mason, J. (2021). Learning about Noticing, by, and through, Noticing. ZDM – Mathematics Education. 53(1) p231-243. doi: 10.1007/s11858-020-01192-4
  • Mason, J. & Czarnocha,B. (2021). Aha! Moments, Bisociation and Multifocal Attention. In B. Czarnocha & W. Baker. Creativity of an Aha! Moment and Mathematics Education. Leiden: Brill. p345-361.
  • Mason, J. (2018) Making Distinctions: a phenomenological exploration in mathematics education. In P. Ernest (Ed.). The Philosophy of Mathematics Education Today. ICME-13 Monographs. Springer.
  • Mason, J. (2018). Reflecting on values emerging from practice and the value of reflecting on practice. In D. Rowe & A. Watson (Eds.). Faith and Experience in Education: essays from Quaker perspectives. London: Trentham Books. p63-91.
  • Mason, J. & Metz, M. (2017). Digging Beneath Dual Systems Theory and the Bicameral Brain: abductions about the human psyche from experience in mathematical problem solving. In U. Xolocotzin (Ed.). Understanding Emotions in Mathematical Thinking and Learning. p379-407. Cambridge: Elsevier/Academic Press.
  • Mason, J. (2016). Rising Above a Cause-and-Effect Stance in Mathematics Education Research. JMTE 19(4) p297-300. http://rdcu.be/npTf
  • Mason, J. & Davis, B. (2013). The Importance of Teachers’ Mathematical Awareness for In-The-Moment Pedagogy. CJSMTE 13(2) p182-197.
  • Mason, J. (2012). Noticing: roots and branches. In M. Sherin, V. Jacobs, & R. Phillip (Eds.) Mathematics Teacher Noticing:  Seeing Through Teachers’ Eyes. p35-50. Mahwah: Erlbaum.
  • Mason, J. (2008). Being Mathematical With & In Front of Learners: Attention, Awareness, and Attitude as Sources of Differences between Teacher Educators, Teachers & Learners. In T. Wood (Series Ed.) & B. Jaworski (Vol. Ed.), International Handbook of Mathematics Teacher Education: Vol.4. The Mathematics Teacher Educator as a Developing Professional. Rotterdam, the Netherlands: Sense Publishers, p31-56.
  • Mason, J. & Johnston-Wilder, S. (2006 2nd edition). Designing and Using Mathematical Tasks. St. Albans: Tarquin.
  • Watson, A. & Mason, J. (2006). Seeing an Exercise as a Single Mathematical Object: Using Variation to Structure Sense-Making. Mathematical Thinking and Learning. 8(2) p91-111.
  • Watson, A. & Mason, J. (2005). Mathematics as a Constructive Activity: learners generating examples. Mahwah: Erlbaum.
  • Mason, J. & Johnston-Wilder, S. (2004). Fundamental Constructs in Mathematics Education, RoutledgeFalmer, London.
  • Mason, J. 2003, Structure of Attention in the Learning of Mathematics, in J. Novotná (Ed.) Proceedings, International Symposium on Elementary Mathematics Teaching, Charles University, Prague, p9-16.
  • Mason, J. 2002, Mathematics Teaching Practice: a guidebook for university and college lecturers, Horwood Publishing, Chichester.
  • Mason, J. 2002, Researching Your own Practice: The Discipline of Noticing, RoutledgeFalmer, London.
  • Mason, J. 2001, Modelling Modelling: where is the centre of gravity of-for-when modelling?, in J. Matos, W. Blum, S. Houston & S. Carreira (Eds.) Modelling and Mathematics Education: ICTMA 9 applications in science and technology, Horwood Publishing, Chichester, p39-61.
  • Mason, J. Burton L. & Stacey K. (1982). Thinking Mathematically, Addison Wesley, London

Website

www.pmtheta.com

Mark has worked in ELT and EMI for over 35 years as a teacher, teacher trainer, lecturer, course writer, syllabus designer, examiner, Director of Studies, and consultant editor for OUP. For the British Council he has worked as a consultant trainer and course developer in EMI and EAP. For the University of Oxford Department of Education Mark delivered the ELT option on the MSc ALSLA and is Teaching Associate of the EMI Research Group in which capacity he has worked as a CI and has developed and delivered EMI teacher training courses in China, Serbia and Oxford. Mark has worked in universities in Russia, Ukraine, Kazakhstan, Belarus, Czechia, Italy, Germany, Mexico, Peru, Chile, Brazil, Colombia and Morocco.

He continues to be involved in EMI and is currently co-authoring an EMI student guide.

Mark is an alumnus of the University of Oxford Department of Education and was among the first to be awarded the innovative MSc in Teaching English Language in University Settings.

Anushay is a second-year DPhil student investigating how classroom characteristics are related to Pakistani children’s development. She is supervised by Professor Iram Siraj and Dr Katharina Ereky-Stevens and her work is being supported by the Aga Khan University (Pakistan). Anushay received the Patrice Engle Dissertation Grant Award from the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD) in 2023.

Anushay completed her BSc Psychology from UCL, where she also started her master’s in Developmental Neuroscience and Psychopathology. She was based at Yale University for her master’s thesis, where she worked with Dr Craig Bailey at the Yale Center for Emotional Intelligence to understand children’s emotion development. Anushay also works as a part-time research  assistant at the Developmental Diversity Lab at UCL’s Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience. Anushay’s research interests include understanding child development across different cultures, factors that might be affecting it, and devising culture-specific ways to support children’s holistic development through the educational system. She is also keen on improving the research scope in Pakistan by working with Pakistani researchers, practitioners, and families. Anushay balances her research with her position as the founder of a non-profit, Resources for Children, which aims to understand and support children’s development in Pakistan.

Publications

Journal Articles

  1. Mazhar, A., & Bailey, C., S. (under review). Understanding Children’s Emotion-Specific Biases: How They Relate to Child and Family Factors, Emotion Recognition Accuracy, and Social Behaviour.

Presentations

  1. Mazhar, A., & Bailey, C., S. (2023, March). Understanding Children’s Emotion-Specific Biases: How They Relate to Child-Level Factors and Emotion Recognition Accuracy [Paper Presentation]. Society for Research in Child Development, Salt Lake City, Utah, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2022, April). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Spring Preview, New Haven, United States.
  3. Mazhar, A. (2021, December). Does an extended family improve mentalising in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK & Pakistan. 2nd International Foundation University Conference of Psychology, Rawalpindi, Pakistan.
  4. Mazhar, A. (2020, October). Developing a non-profit to advance autism research in Pakistan. Anna Freud Centre Seminar Series, London, United Kingdom.

Posters

  1. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Theory of Mind in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK and Pakistan. Harvard Trends in Psychology Summit, Cambridge, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Research Rounds, New Haven, United States.

Cindy works at the intersection of learning, design, and technology, with a keen interest in the orchestration of future-ready tech-enabled learning.

She is curious how the deployment of adaptive learning systems to schools will impact classroom learning and hopes to learn more about the human-machine partnership in education. Specifically, her research is concerned with the implications that the use of such systems has on teacher-student interactions, as teachers grapple with balancing personalised learning and learning in community, as well as curriculum demands and student interests. These are some tensions which could potentially be exacerbated by affordances of adaptive learning systems.

Prior to embarking on the DPhil in Education at Oxford, Cindy worked as the Lead Specialist in Technologies for Learning at the Educational Technology Division of Ministry of Education, Singapore. She had previously completed graduate studies at the National University of Singapore and Stanford University where she was awarded Master of Arts in English Studies and Master of Arts in Education.

Reem is DPhil student from Saudi Arabia.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she worked as a Teacher, Professional Developer, then, became a Supervisor and Researcher in the Ministry of Education where she received a scholarship to pursue her DPhil education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests lie in the area of Teacher Education and Professional Learning Policy and Practice.

Publications
  • Alqahtani, Reem (2020). Saudi Universities Role in Developing Teacher Professional Development Programs: Elite Universities Experience. Journal of Educational Sciences. King Saud University.
  • Alqahtani, Reem. (2020). The effect of implementing UDL-based activities in improving EFL learners’ academic achievement and attitudes towards L2. In L. Salas, & E. Ager, Creating Quiet reflective Spaces: Language Teacher Researches Professional Development (pp. 61-62). IATEFL publications.

Lena Zlock is researching the integration of digital technology into structures of teaching, learning, and education in higher education. Her particular focus is on the digital humanities and the potential for digital methods to transform humanistic study. She works with Professor Niall Winters and Dr. James Robson.

Lena’s research interests stem from her education as an M.St. student and Ertegun Graduate Scholar in Modern Languages at the University of Oxford, and as a B.A. student in History at Stanford University. As an undergraduate, she started the Voltaire Library Project, a digitally and data-driven study of the 6,763-book collection of French Enlightenment philosopher Voltaire (you can read more about the project here and here). She has been interested in the application of digital technology to humanistic teaching since her days in Princeton Day School, where she developed an interdisciplinary curriculum on Mexico City (visit the course website here).

Her research on Voltaire led her to think more broadly about the place of digital methods in the humanities classroom, and how new technologies will revolutionise the liberal arts and higher education. As a DPhil candidate, Lena will examine the negotiation and implementation of new learning technologies within the University of Oxford at undergraduate and graduate levels.

Lena is involved in a number of digital humanities initiatives in Oxford. She previously served as the inaugural fellow of the Voltaire Lab at Oxford’s Voltaire Foundation. As a master’s student, Lena co-formulated the convergence agenda for Oxford digital humanities with Professor Howard Hotson, and is currently employed by the Humanities Division to assist with the development of an M.St. degree in Digital Scholarship (read more here). Lena set up and helps to run the History of the Book blog for the Faculty of Medieval and Modern Languages and the Oxford Book History Twitter account.

Lena welcomes inquiries from undergraduate and postgraduate students from Oxford and beyond seeking to get involved with the digital humanities in any capacity. The History of the Book blog also welcomes inquiries from prospective contributors.

 

Abbey is a Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education, in collaboration with the Department of Engineering.

Before joining the DPhil program, Abbey obtained a B.A. in Applied Linguistics with minors in Russian and Chinese from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford. She was the recipient of a Benjamin A. Gilman International Scholarship through U.S. Department of State for study in Russia and was awarded two Foreign Language and Area Studies (FLAS) Fellowships for study in both Russia and China. She holds both TESOL and TEFL certificates and has taught English as a Second Language in various contexts to a wide variety of learner populations.

Abbey’s main research interests lie in the use of technology to facilitate language learning. Her DPhil research focuses on the development of a virtual reality program to bridge the gaps that students face when learning languages through distance learning.

Dr Nadiya Ivanenko is a Visiting Research Fellow in the field of civic education and citizenship linguistics. She is a member of the Applied Linguistics research group and Higher Education research group at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

After receiving PhD in Comparative Linguistics from Kyiv National Linguistic University (2008) Nadiya worked as an Associate Professor of the Germanic Languages and Teaching Methodology Department, Faculty of Ukrainian Philology, Foreign Languages and Social Communications and Vice Dean of the Faculty of Foreign Languages, Central Ukrainian State University, Ukraine.

Nadiya was a Chevening scholar and Postgraduate researcher at the Department of Education, University of Oxford (2003-2004). She was a Co-chair of the joint UNESCO Chair/UNITWIN project ‘Education as a Humanitarian Response’ (2004-2012); a participant of BECA joint project ‘Education for Democracy’ between Montclair State University (USA) and Kirovohrad State Pedagogical University (Ukraine). Nadiya had internship for teachers of EFL in the Department of Educational and Cultural Programmes at Shakespeare’s Globe Theater, London, UK (2011). She was the Head of the British Council International Mobility Grant ‘Internalizing Higher Education in Ukraine’, which included 2 internships at the University of Durham, UK (2016). She participated in the internship “Retraining in the Field of Teaching Excellence”, Bayreuth University, Germany (Erasmus + Project (2021) and was a coordinator of the Erasmus+ Project: Innovative Approach to Promotion Teaching Excellence (2021-2022) at Central Ukrainian State University.

Selected Publications

BOOKS

  • Rastrygina, A., Ivanenko, N. (2021). Pedagogy of Freedom in the Paradigmal Space of Modern Education and Upbringing.
  • Ivanenko, N., Liashuk, A. (2021). English Activity Book. Practical Course of English. Kropyvnytskyi.
  • Ivanenko N. (2014). (Edit.) Education in Eastern Europe and Eurasia. London: Bloomsbury.
  • Ivanenko N. (2008). The Concept of Good in English and Ukrainian Language Pictures of the World. Kirovohrad: KOD.
  • Ivanenko N. (2007). Written Practice and Conversation for 1 Year. Kropyvnytskyi.
  • Garkusha, L., Ivanenko, N. (2004). Critical thinking in life skills training. Kirovohrad.

BOOK CHAPTERS

  • Ivanenko, N. (2024). Words and word meanings In The Routledge Companion To English Studies/ by Constant Leung & Jo Lewkowicz. London, UK: Routledge (in publishing).
  • Ivanenko N. (2023). Development of civic education in Ukrainian universities: new challenges of modern realities in the conditions of the transformation of society. In Contemporary Education in Ukraine: Integration into the European Educational Space. Dnipro (pp. 387-412) DOI:36550/978-617-8245-57-3-20
  • Ivanenko N. (2019). Citizenship Education, Moral Fluency and Social and Political Future Challenges. In Polish-Jewish History, Culture, Values, and Education between Paradise and Inferno. Irvine, USA: Brown Walker Press (pp. 93-103)
  • Ivanenko N. (2014). Education Change, Transformation, Reforms – a Regional Overview. In N. Ivanenko (Edit.) Education in Eastern Europe and Eurasia. London: Bloomsbury (pp. 9-45)
  • Ivanenko N. (2013). Vulnerable Children in Ukraine and Educational Response. In M. Matsumoto (Edit.) Education and Disadvantaged Children and Young People. London: Bloomsbury (pp. 95-132)

JOURNAL ARTICLES

  1. Ivanenko, N. (2024). Challenges of Ukrainian Higher Education in Times of War. International Higher Education. The Boston College Centre for International Higher Education, 118, pp. 35-36 https://doi.org/10.36197/IHE.2024.118.17
  2. Ivanenko, N., Paska, T., Irkha, A. Rud, A., & Boguslavskas, L., (2024). The Role of Higher Education for Ensuring National Security in Ukraine. Futurity Education, 4(1), 210-237 https://doi.org/10.57125/FED.2024.03.25.11
  3. Leleka, T., Ivanenko, N., Demeshko, I., Kapitan T., & Demchenko, I. (2024). The Process of English Internationalization in the Ukrainian Educational Paradigm. Slavistica Vilnensis, 68(2), 76-89 doi:10.15388/SlavViln.2023.68(2).6
  4. Ivanenko, N., Rud, A., Hurbanska, A., Cheban, Y., & Syrtseva, S. (2024). Digitalization of Education of the Future – A Trend or a Requirement of the Time? Journal of Higher Education Theory and Practice24(2). DOI: https://doi.org/10.33423/jhetp.v24i2.6791
  5. Ivanenko, N. (2023). Civic character cultivation as a basic virtue within and beyond modern educational institutions. Academic Notes. Series Pedagogical sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 209, 180-185 DOI: https://doi.org/10.36550/2415-7988-2022-1-209-180-185
  6. Rastrygina, A., Ivanenko, N. (2023). A Pedagogy of freedom as a viable basis for implementing gender equality in Ukraine’s educational institutions. International Review of Education, 69(1-2), 143-174. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/s11159-023-09995-9
  7. Ivanenko N., Biletska O., Hurbanska S., Hurbanska, A., & Kochmar, D. (2023). English language morphological neologisms reflecting the war in Ukraine. World Journal of English Language, 13(5), pp. 432-438    DOI: doi:http://dx.doi.org/10.5430/wjel.v13n5p432
  8. Ivanenko, N., Boiko, A., Fedorchuk, L., Panchenko, I., & Marieiev, D. (2023). Development of educational policy in Ukraine in the context of European integration and digital transformation. Revista Eduweb, 17(2), 296-305 DOI: https://doi.org/10.46502/issn.1856-7576/2023.17.02.25
  9. Ivanenko, N.V., Gerasymenko,Yu. A., Kostenko, V.G. (2023). Innovative approaches to the modernization of philological education and science in Ukraine: a response to the challenges of wartime. Akademichni Vizii, (in Ukrainian). URL: https://academy-vision.org/index.php/av/article/view/281 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5281/zenodo.7795088
  10. Ivanenko N. (2022). Phraseological units of the conceptual field MARRIAGE in the English picture of the world. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi: KOD, 202, pp. 140-146
  11. Bilous, O., Mishchenko, A., Datska, T., Ivanenko, N., Kit, L., Piankovska, I., and Vereshchak, Y. (2021). Modern linguistic technologies: strategy of teaching translation studies. Rupkatha Journal on Interdisciplinary Studies in Humanities, 13(4), pp. 1-12 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/21659/rupkatha.v13n4.65
  12. Leleka, T., Ivanenko, N., Moskalenko O., Herasymenko, L., Shevchuk L., Pidlubna, O. (2021). Angloamerican loanwords use in the Ukrainian student slang. Laplage em Revista, 7(Extra-D): University and science: possible dialogues. pp.163-174. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/24115/S2446-622020217Extra-D1081p.163-174
  13. Ivanenko N. (2021). Figurative and valuable component of the MARRIAGE concept. Trends in Science and Practice of Today. Ankara, Turkey, pp. 356-361
  14. Ivanenko N. (2021). Inclusive learning environment for students’ achievements and foreign language development. Priorities in the Development of Science and Education. Budapest, Hungary, pp.74-80
  15. Ivanenko N. (2021). The nominative field of the MARRIAGE concept and the analysis of the synonymous series of its key unit. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi: KOD, 193, pp 218-224 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.36550/2522-4077-2021-1-193-218-224
  16. Ivanenko N. (2020). Language intervention stages in project-based learning. Modern Trends in Foreign Language Professional Training in a Multicultural Space. Kyiv, pp. 249 – 255
  17. Rastrygina, A., Ivanenko, N. (2020). Gender comfortable educational environment as a factor of development of personal freedom. Research Bulletin. Pedagogical Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 188, pp. 28 – 35 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.36550/2415-7988-2020-1-188-28-35
  18. Ivanenko N. (2020). Texting slang as one of the most common groups of everyday youth Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi: KOD, 187, pp. 38-45
  19. Ivanenko N. (2019). Computer use in foreign language Intellectual and Emotional Components of Foreign Language Learning: Latest Trends and Challenges for Higher Education. Kyiv, pp. 152 – 158.
  20. Ivanenko N. (2019). Initial stages of elaborating a project in a foreign language classroom. Science and Society. Hamilton, Canada, pp. 13 – 20.
  21. Ivanenko N. (2019). Project-based learning as a way to incorporate effective foreign language teaching. Research Bulletin. Pedagogical Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 177, pp. 207 – 211
  22. Ivanenko N. (2019). Youth vocabulary as a reflection of changes in modern society. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi: KOD, 175, pp. 34 – 39.
  23. Ivanenko N. (2018). Promoting citizenship education in the English language Proceedings of the IV International Conference. Kyiv, pp. 130 – 137
  24. Ivanenko N. (2018). Educating global citizens at a foreign language class. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, – pp. 494 – 500
  25. Ivanenko N. (2018). Formation of civic values through teaching a foreign language. Proceedings of the II International Conference “Foreign Language in Professional Training of Specialists: Problems and Strategies”. Kropyvnytskyi, pp. 189-191
  26. Ivanenko N. (2017). Citizenship education in the English language classroom. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 154. – pp. 92 – 97
  27. Ivanenko N. (2017). Education for democratic citizenship: teaching virtues and values. Research Bulletin. Pedagogical Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 152, pp. 110-113
  28. Ivanenko N. (2016). Citizenship education as a way to develop moral fluency to solve social and political challenges of the future. Scientific Journal of Ariel University. Israel: Ariel University.
  29. Ivanenko N. (2016). Functioning peculiarities of lexical units of the RESPECT concept in the English language. Proceedings of the International Conference Linguistic and Linguacultural Aspects of Teaching Foreign Languages in Ukrainian Universities”. Dnipropetrovsk, pp. 87-94
  30. Ivanenko N. (2016). Semantic relationships of lexical units of the concept of love in the English language. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, pp. 221-226
  31. Ivanenko N. (2015). Citizenship education as the coordination and integration of educational establishment and community. Research Proceedings of the national UniversityOstrog Academy”. Ostrog, pp. 136-142
  32. Ivanenko N. (2015). The value of citizenship education in practices of student governing body. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 136. pp. 438-442

Louise’s doctoral research investigates how teachers become who they are.

Louise’s work situates the schoolteacher as a particular type of subject, that is both made and makes itself from within a network of power relations. Her study combines Foucauldian theory, Critical Discourse Analysis, and Narrative analysis to provide an account of schoolteachers’ ethical agency in the context of top-down policy practices.

Louise is a Doctoral Teaching Fellow at the Department of Education, where she teaches and supervises students in the MSc in Learning and Teaching course. Currently, Louise is collaborating the OECD in their Globally Teaching InSights project. Her research supports the Schools+ Network aims to fuel an ecosystem of organisations that are driving change in education from the bottom-up.

In March 2023 she presented her preliminary research at the Philosophy of Education Society of Great Britain (PESGB)’s annual conference.

As Honorary Fellow John attends seminars and consults with current staff in Mathematics Education.

During 40 years at the Open University supporting the teaching of mathematics he authored a wide range of papers, and dozens of Open University Books and Teaching materials. He co-authored the classic Thinking Mathematically; Mathematics as a Constructive Activity (with his wife Prof. Anne Watson); Questions and Prompts for Mathematical Thinking & Thinkers (with Anne and other colleagues), among many others.

His research methods are phenomenological, based on the Discipline of Noticing. He is interested in the lived experience of learning, doing and teaching mathematics. He focuses on the structure and form of Attention in the teaching of mathematics, as he supports those who wish to foster and sustain mathematical thinking in others.

He is an Honorary Fellow of BSRLM and ATM, a long-standing member of  the MAA and the  MA.H.

 

Publications

  • Mason, J. (2022). Consequences of a Virtual Encounter with George Pólya. Teaching Mathematics and Computer Science.  20 (2) p173-182.
  • Zazkis, R. Kontorovich, I. & Mason, J. (2021). The Learning and Teaching of Number: paths less travelled through well-trodden terrain. London: Routledge
  • Mason, J. (2021). Learning about Noticing, by, and through, Noticing. ZDM – Mathematics Education. 53(1) p231-243. doi: 10.1007/s11858-020-01192-4
  • Mason, J. & Czarnocha,B. (2021). Aha! Moments, Bisociation and Multifocal Attention. In B. Czarnocha & W. Baker. Creativity of an Aha! Moment and Mathematics Education. Leiden: Brill. p345-361.
  • Mason, J. (2018) Making Distinctions: a phenomenological exploration in mathematics education. In P. Ernest (Ed.). The Philosophy of Mathematics Education Today. ICME-13 Monographs. Springer.
  • Mason, J. (2018). Reflecting on values emerging from practice and the value of reflecting on practice. In D. Rowe & A. Watson (Eds.). Faith and Experience in Education: essays from Quaker perspectives. London: Trentham Books. p63-91.
  • Mason, J. & Metz, M. (2017). Digging Beneath Dual Systems Theory and the Bicameral Brain: abductions about the human psyche from experience in mathematical problem solving. In U. Xolocotzin (Ed.). Understanding Emotions in Mathematical Thinking and Learning. p379-407. Cambridge: Elsevier/Academic Press.
  • Mason, J. (2016). Rising Above a Cause-and-Effect Stance in Mathematics Education Research. JMTE 19(4) p297-300. http://rdcu.be/npTf
  • Mason, J. & Davis, B. (2013). The Importance of Teachers’ Mathematical Awareness for In-The-Moment Pedagogy. CJSMTE 13(2) p182-197.
  • Mason, J. (2012). Noticing: roots and branches. In M. Sherin, V. Jacobs, & R. Phillip (Eds.) Mathematics Teacher Noticing:  Seeing Through Teachers’ Eyes. p35-50. Mahwah: Erlbaum.
  • Mason, J. (2008). Being Mathematical With & In Front of Learners: Attention, Awareness, and Attitude as Sources of Differences between Teacher Educators, Teachers & Learners. In T. Wood (Series Ed.) & B. Jaworski (Vol. Ed.), International Handbook of Mathematics Teacher Education: Vol.4. The Mathematics Teacher Educator as a Developing Professional. Rotterdam, the Netherlands: Sense Publishers, p31-56.
  • Mason, J. & Johnston-Wilder, S. (2006 2nd edition). Designing and Using Mathematical Tasks. St. Albans: Tarquin.
  • Watson, A. & Mason, J. (2006). Seeing an Exercise as a Single Mathematical Object: Using Variation to Structure Sense-Making. Mathematical Thinking and Learning. 8(2) p91-111.
  • Watson, A. & Mason, J. (2005). Mathematics as a Constructive Activity: learners generating examples. Mahwah: Erlbaum.
  • Mason, J. & Johnston-Wilder, S. (2004). Fundamental Constructs in Mathematics Education, RoutledgeFalmer, London.
  • Mason, J. 2003, Structure of Attention in the Learning of Mathematics, in J. Novotná (Ed.) Proceedings, International Symposium on Elementary Mathematics Teaching, Charles University, Prague, p9-16.
  • Mason, J. 2002, Mathematics Teaching Practice: a guidebook for university and college lecturers, Horwood Publishing, Chichester.
  • Mason, J. 2002, Researching Your own Practice: The Discipline of Noticing, RoutledgeFalmer, London.
  • Mason, J. 2001, Modelling Modelling: where is the centre of gravity of-for-when modelling?, in J. Matos, W. Blum, S. Houston & S. Carreira (Eds.) Modelling and Mathematics Education: ICTMA 9 applications in science and technology, Horwood Publishing, Chichester, p39-61.
  • Mason, J. Burton L. & Stacey K. (1982). Thinking Mathematically, Addison Wesley, London

Website

www.pmtheta.com

Mark has worked in ELT and EMI for over 35 years as a teacher, teacher trainer, lecturer, course writer, syllabus designer, examiner, Director of Studies, and consultant editor for OUP. For the British Council he has worked as a consultant trainer and course developer in EMI and EAP. For the University of Oxford Department of Education Mark delivered the ELT option on the MSc ALSLA and is Teaching Associate of the EMI Research Group in which capacity he has worked as a CI and has developed and delivered EMI teacher training courses in China, Serbia and Oxford. Mark has worked in universities in Russia, Ukraine, Kazakhstan, Belarus, Czechia, Italy, Germany, Mexico, Peru, Chile, Brazil, Colombia and Morocco.

He continues to be involved in EMI and is currently co-authoring an EMI student guide.

Mark is an alumnus of the University of Oxford Department of Education and was among the first to be awarded the innovative MSc in Teaching English Language in University Settings.

Anushay is a second-year DPhil student investigating how classroom characteristics are related to Pakistani children’s development. She is supervised by Professor Iram Siraj and Dr Katharina Ereky-Stevens and her work is being supported by the Aga Khan University (Pakistan). Anushay received the Patrice Engle Dissertation Grant Award from the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD) in 2023.

Anushay completed her BSc Psychology from UCL, where she also started her master’s in Developmental Neuroscience and Psychopathology. She was based at Yale University for her master’s thesis, where she worked with Dr Craig Bailey at the Yale Center for Emotional Intelligence to understand children’s emotion development. Anushay also works as a part-time research  assistant at the Developmental Diversity Lab at UCL’s Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience. Anushay’s research interests include understanding child development across different cultures, factors that might be affecting it, and devising culture-specific ways to support children’s holistic development through the educational system. She is also keen on improving the research scope in Pakistan by working with Pakistani researchers, practitioners, and families. Anushay balances her research with her position as the founder of a non-profit, Resources for Children, which aims to understand and support children’s development in Pakistan.

Publications

Journal Articles

  1. Mazhar, A., & Bailey, C., S. (under review). Understanding Children’s Emotion-Specific Biases: How They Relate to Child and Family Factors, Emotion Recognition Accuracy, and Social Behaviour.

Presentations

  1. Mazhar, A., & Bailey, C., S. (2023, March). Understanding Children’s Emotion-Specific Biases: How They Relate to Child-Level Factors and Emotion Recognition Accuracy [Paper Presentation]. Society for Research in Child Development, Salt Lake City, Utah, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2022, April). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Spring Preview, New Haven, United States.
  3. Mazhar, A. (2021, December). Does an extended family improve mentalising in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK & Pakistan. 2nd International Foundation University Conference of Psychology, Rawalpindi, Pakistan.
  4. Mazhar, A. (2020, October). Developing a non-profit to advance autism research in Pakistan. Anna Freud Centre Seminar Series, London, United Kingdom.

Posters

  1. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Theory of Mind in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK and Pakistan. Harvard Trends in Psychology Summit, Cambridge, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Research Rounds, New Haven, United States.

Cindy works at the intersection of learning, design, and technology, with a keen interest in the orchestration of future-ready tech-enabled learning.

She is curious how the deployment of adaptive learning systems to schools will impact classroom learning and hopes to learn more about the human-machine partnership in education. Specifically, her research is concerned with the implications that the use of such systems has on teacher-student interactions, as teachers grapple with balancing personalised learning and learning in community, as well as curriculum demands and student interests. These are some tensions which could potentially be exacerbated by affordances of adaptive learning systems.

Prior to embarking on the DPhil in Education at Oxford, Cindy worked as the Lead Specialist in Technologies for Learning at the Educational Technology Division of Ministry of Education, Singapore. She had previously completed graduate studies at the National University of Singapore and Stanford University where she was awarded Master of Arts in English Studies and Master of Arts in Education.

Reem is DPhil student from Saudi Arabia.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she worked as a Teacher, Professional Developer, then, became a Supervisor and Researcher in the Ministry of Education where she received a scholarship to pursue her DPhil education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests lie in the area of Teacher Education and Professional Learning Policy and Practice.

Publications
  • Alqahtani, Reem (2020). Saudi Universities Role in Developing Teacher Professional Development Programs: Elite Universities Experience. Journal of Educational Sciences. King Saud University.
  • Alqahtani, Reem. (2020). The effect of implementing UDL-based activities in improving EFL learners’ academic achievement and attitudes towards L2. In L. Salas, & E. Ager, Creating Quiet reflective Spaces: Language Teacher Researches Professional Development (pp. 61-62). IATEFL publications.

Lena Zlock is researching the integration of digital technology into structures of teaching, learning, and education in higher education. Her particular focus is on the digital humanities and the potential for digital methods to transform humanistic study. She works with Professor Niall Winters and Dr. James Robson.

Lena’s research interests stem from her education as an M.St. student and Ertegun Graduate Scholar in Modern Languages at the University of Oxford, and as a B.A. student in History at Stanford University. As an undergraduate, she started the Voltaire Library Project, a digitally and data-driven study of the 6,763-book collection of French Enlightenment philosopher Voltaire (you can read more about the project here and here). She has been interested in the application of digital technology to humanistic teaching since her days in Princeton Day School, where she developed an interdisciplinary curriculum on Mexico City (visit the course website here).

Her research on Voltaire led her to think more broadly about the place of digital methods in the humanities classroom, and how new technologies will revolutionise the liberal arts and higher education. As a DPhil candidate, Lena will examine the negotiation and implementation of new learning technologies within the University of Oxford at undergraduate and graduate levels.

Lena is involved in a number of digital humanities initiatives in Oxford. She previously served as the inaugural fellow of the Voltaire Lab at Oxford’s Voltaire Foundation. As a master’s student, Lena co-formulated the convergence agenda for Oxford digital humanities with Professor Howard Hotson, and is currently employed by the Humanities Division to assist with the development of an M.St. degree in Digital Scholarship (read more here). Lena set up and helps to run the History of the Book blog for the Faculty of Medieval and Modern Languages and the Oxford Book History Twitter account.

Lena welcomes inquiries from undergraduate and postgraduate students from Oxford and beyond seeking to get involved with the digital humanities in any capacity. The History of the Book blog also welcomes inquiries from prospective contributors.

 

Abbey is a Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education, in collaboration with the Department of Engineering.

Before joining the DPhil program, Abbey obtained a B.A. in Applied Linguistics with minors in Russian and Chinese from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford. She was the recipient of a Benjamin A. Gilman International Scholarship through U.S. Department of State for study in Russia and was awarded two Foreign Language and Area Studies (FLAS) Fellowships for study in both Russia and China. She holds both TESOL and TEFL certificates and has taught English as a Second Language in various contexts to a wide variety of learner populations.

Abbey’s main research interests lie in the use of technology to facilitate language learning. Her DPhil research focuses on the development of a virtual reality program to bridge the gaps that students face when learning languages through distance learning.

Dr Nadiya Ivanenko is a Visiting Research Fellow in the field of civic education and citizenship linguistics. She is a member of the Applied Linguistics research group and Higher Education research group at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

After receiving PhD in Comparative Linguistics from Kyiv National Linguistic University (2008) Nadiya worked as an Associate Professor of the Germanic Languages and Teaching Methodology Department, Faculty of Ukrainian Philology, Foreign Languages and Social Communications and Vice Dean of the Faculty of Foreign Languages, Central Ukrainian State University, Ukraine.

Nadiya was a Chevening scholar and Postgraduate researcher at the Department of Education, University of Oxford (2003-2004). She was a Co-chair of the joint UNESCO Chair/UNITWIN project ‘Education as a Humanitarian Response’ (2004-2012); a participant of BECA joint project ‘Education for Democracy’ between Montclair State University (USA) and Kirovohrad State Pedagogical University (Ukraine). Nadiya had internship for teachers of EFL in the Department of Educational and Cultural Programmes at Shakespeare’s Globe Theater, London, UK (2011). She was the Head of the British Council International Mobility Grant ‘Internalizing Higher Education in Ukraine’, which included 2 internships at the University of Durham, UK (2016). She participated in the internship “Retraining in the Field of Teaching Excellence”, Bayreuth University, Germany (Erasmus + Project (2021) and was a coordinator of the Erasmus+ Project: Innovative Approach to Promotion Teaching Excellence (2021-2022) at Central Ukrainian State University.

Selected Publications

BOOKS

  • Rastrygina, A., Ivanenko, N. (2021). Pedagogy of Freedom in the Paradigmal Space of Modern Education and Upbringing.
  • Ivanenko, N., Liashuk, A. (2021). English Activity Book. Practical Course of English. Kropyvnytskyi.
  • Ivanenko N. (2014). (Edit.) Education in Eastern Europe and Eurasia. London: Bloomsbury.
  • Ivanenko N. (2008). The Concept of Good in English and Ukrainian Language Pictures of the World. Kirovohrad: KOD.
  • Ivanenko N. (2007). Written Practice and Conversation for 1 Year. Kropyvnytskyi.
  • Garkusha, L., Ivanenko, N. (2004). Critical thinking in life skills training. Kirovohrad.

BOOK CHAPTERS

  • Ivanenko, N. (2024). Words and word meanings In The Routledge Companion To English Studies/ by Constant Leung & Jo Lewkowicz. London, UK: Routledge (in publishing).
  • Ivanenko N. (2023). Development of civic education in Ukrainian universities: new challenges of modern realities in the conditions of the transformation of society. In Contemporary Education in Ukraine: Integration into the European Educational Space. Dnipro (pp. 387-412) DOI:36550/978-617-8245-57-3-20
  • Ivanenko N. (2019). Citizenship Education, Moral Fluency and Social and Political Future Challenges. In Polish-Jewish History, Culture, Values, and Education between Paradise and Inferno. Irvine, USA: Brown Walker Press (pp. 93-103)
  • Ivanenko N. (2014). Education Change, Transformation, Reforms – a Regional Overview. In N. Ivanenko (Edit.) Education in Eastern Europe and Eurasia. London: Bloomsbury (pp. 9-45)
  • Ivanenko N. (2013). Vulnerable Children in Ukraine and Educational Response. In M. Matsumoto (Edit.) Education and Disadvantaged Children and Young People. London: Bloomsbury (pp. 95-132)

JOURNAL ARTICLES

  1. Ivanenko, N. (2024). Challenges of Ukrainian Higher Education in Times of War. International Higher Education. The Boston College Centre for International Higher Education, 118, pp. 35-36 https://doi.org/10.36197/IHE.2024.118.17
  2. Ivanenko, N., Paska, T., Irkha, A. Rud, A., & Boguslavskas, L., (2024). The Role of Higher Education for Ensuring National Security in Ukraine. Futurity Education, 4(1), 210-237 https://doi.org/10.57125/FED.2024.03.25.11
  3. Leleka, T., Ivanenko, N., Demeshko, I., Kapitan T., & Demchenko, I. (2024). The Process of English Internationalization in the Ukrainian Educational Paradigm. Slavistica Vilnensis, 68(2), 76-89 doi:10.15388/SlavViln.2023.68(2).6
  4. Ivanenko, N., Rud, A., Hurbanska, A., Cheban, Y., & Syrtseva, S. (2024). Digitalization of Education of the Future – A Trend or a Requirement of the Time? Journal of Higher Education Theory and Practice24(2). DOI: https://doi.org/10.33423/jhetp.v24i2.6791
  5. Ivanenko, N. (2023). Civic character cultivation as a basic virtue within and beyond modern educational institutions. Academic Notes. Series Pedagogical sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 209, 180-185 DOI: https://doi.org/10.36550/2415-7988-2022-1-209-180-185
  6. Rastrygina, A., Ivanenko, N. (2023). A Pedagogy of freedom as a viable basis for implementing gender equality in Ukraine’s educational institutions. International Review of Education, 69(1-2), 143-174. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/s11159-023-09995-9
  7. Ivanenko N., Biletska O., Hurbanska S., Hurbanska, A., & Kochmar, D. (2023). English language morphological neologisms reflecting the war in Ukraine. World Journal of English Language, 13(5), pp. 432-438    DOI: doi:http://dx.doi.org/10.5430/wjel.v13n5p432
  8. Ivanenko, N., Boiko, A., Fedorchuk, L., Panchenko, I., & Marieiev, D. (2023). Development of educational policy in Ukraine in the context of European integration and digital transformation. Revista Eduweb, 17(2), 296-305 DOI: https://doi.org/10.46502/issn.1856-7576/2023.17.02.25
  9. Ivanenko, N.V., Gerasymenko,Yu. A., Kostenko, V.G. (2023). Innovative approaches to the modernization of philological education and science in Ukraine: a response to the challenges of wartime. Akademichni Vizii, (in Ukrainian). URL: https://academy-vision.org/index.php/av/article/view/281 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5281/zenodo.7795088
  10. Ivanenko N. (2022). Phraseological units of the conceptual field MARRIAGE in the English picture of the world. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi: KOD, 202, pp. 140-146
  11. Bilous, O., Mishchenko, A., Datska, T., Ivanenko, N., Kit, L., Piankovska, I., and Vereshchak, Y. (2021). Modern linguistic technologies: strategy of teaching translation studies. Rupkatha Journal on Interdisciplinary Studies in Humanities, 13(4), pp. 1-12 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/21659/rupkatha.v13n4.65
  12. Leleka, T., Ivanenko, N., Moskalenko O., Herasymenko, L., Shevchuk L., Pidlubna, O. (2021). Angloamerican loanwords use in the Ukrainian student slang. Laplage em Revista, 7(Extra-D): University and science: possible dialogues. pp.163-174. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/24115/S2446-622020217Extra-D1081p.163-174
  13. Ivanenko N. (2021). Figurative and valuable component of the MARRIAGE concept. Trends in Science and Practice of Today. Ankara, Turkey, pp. 356-361
  14. Ivanenko N. (2021). Inclusive learning environment for students’ achievements and foreign language development. Priorities in the Development of Science and Education. Budapest, Hungary, pp.74-80
  15. Ivanenko N. (2021). The nominative field of the MARRIAGE concept and the analysis of the synonymous series of its key unit. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi: KOD, 193, pp 218-224 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.36550/2522-4077-2021-1-193-218-224
  16. Ivanenko N. (2020). Language intervention stages in project-based learning. Modern Trends in Foreign Language Professional Training in a Multicultural Space. Kyiv, pp. 249 – 255
  17. Rastrygina, A., Ivanenko, N. (2020). Gender comfortable educational environment as a factor of development of personal freedom. Research Bulletin. Pedagogical Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 188, pp. 28 – 35 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.36550/2415-7988-2020-1-188-28-35
  18. Ivanenko N. (2020). Texting slang as one of the most common groups of everyday youth Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi: KOD, 187, pp. 38-45
  19. Ivanenko N. (2019). Computer use in foreign language Intellectual and Emotional Components of Foreign Language Learning: Latest Trends and Challenges for Higher Education. Kyiv, pp. 152 – 158.
  20. Ivanenko N. (2019). Initial stages of elaborating a project in a foreign language classroom. Science and Society. Hamilton, Canada, pp. 13 – 20.
  21. Ivanenko N. (2019). Project-based learning as a way to incorporate effective foreign language teaching. Research Bulletin. Pedagogical Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 177, pp. 207 – 211
  22. Ivanenko N. (2019). Youth vocabulary as a reflection of changes in modern society. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi: KOD, 175, pp. 34 – 39.
  23. Ivanenko N. (2018). Promoting citizenship education in the English language Proceedings of the IV International Conference. Kyiv, pp. 130 – 137
  24. Ivanenko N. (2018). Educating global citizens at a foreign language class. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, – pp. 494 – 500
  25. Ivanenko N. (2018). Formation of civic values through teaching a foreign language. Proceedings of the II International Conference “Foreign Language in Professional Training of Specialists: Problems and Strategies”. Kropyvnytskyi, pp. 189-191
  26. Ivanenko N. (2017). Citizenship education in the English language classroom. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 154. – pp. 92 – 97
  27. Ivanenko N. (2017). Education for democratic citizenship: teaching virtues and values. Research Bulletin. Pedagogical Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 152, pp. 110-113
  28. Ivanenko N. (2016). Citizenship education as a way to develop moral fluency to solve social and political challenges of the future. Scientific Journal of Ariel University. Israel: Ariel University.
  29. Ivanenko N. (2016). Functioning peculiarities of lexical units of the RESPECT concept in the English language. Proceedings of the International Conference Linguistic and Linguacultural Aspects of Teaching Foreign Languages in Ukrainian Universities”. Dnipropetrovsk, pp. 87-94
  30. Ivanenko N. (2016). Semantic relationships of lexical units of the concept of love in the English language. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, pp. 221-226
  31. Ivanenko N. (2015). Citizenship education as the coordination and integration of educational establishment and community. Research Proceedings of the national UniversityOstrog Academy”. Ostrog, pp. 136-142
  32. Ivanenko N. (2015). The value of citizenship education in practices of student governing body. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 136. pp. 438-442

Louise’s doctoral research investigates how teachers become who they are.

Louise’s work situates the schoolteacher as a particular type of subject, that is both made and makes itself from within a network of power relations. Her study combines Foucauldian theory, Critical Discourse Analysis, and Narrative analysis to provide an account of schoolteachers’ ethical agency in the context of top-down policy practices.

Louise is a Doctoral Teaching Fellow at the Department of Education, where she teaches and supervises students in the MSc in Learning and Teaching course. Currently, Louise is collaborating the OECD in their Globally Teaching InSights project. Her research supports the Schools+ Network aims to fuel an ecosystem of organisations that are driving change in education from the bottom-up.

In March 2023 she presented her preliminary research at the Philosophy of Education Society of Great Britain (PESGB)’s annual conference.

As Honorary Fellow John attends seminars and consults with current staff in Mathematics Education.

During 40 years at the Open University supporting the teaching of mathematics he authored a wide range of papers, and dozens of Open University Books and Teaching materials. He co-authored the classic Thinking Mathematically; Mathematics as a Constructive Activity (with his wife Prof. Anne Watson); Questions and Prompts for Mathematical Thinking & Thinkers (with Anne and other colleagues), among many others.

His research methods are phenomenological, based on the Discipline of Noticing. He is interested in the lived experience of learning, doing and teaching mathematics. He focuses on the structure and form of Attention in the teaching of mathematics, as he supports those who wish to foster and sustain mathematical thinking in others.

He is an Honorary Fellow of BSRLM and ATM, a long-standing member of  the MAA and the  MA.H.

 

Publications

  • Mason, J. (2022). Consequences of a Virtual Encounter with George Pólya. Teaching Mathematics and Computer Science.  20 (2) p173-182.
  • Zazkis, R. Kontorovich, I. & Mason, J. (2021). The Learning and Teaching of Number: paths less travelled through well-trodden terrain. London: Routledge
  • Mason, J. (2021). Learning about Noticing, by, and through, Noticing. ZDM – Mathematics Education. 53(1) p231-243. doi: 10.1007/s11858-020-01192-4
  • Mason, J. & Czarnocha,B. (2021). Aha! Moments, Bisociation and Multifocal Attention. In B. Czarnocha & W. Baker. Creativity of an Aha! Moment and Mathematics Education. Leiden: Brill. p345-361.
  • Mason, J. (2018) Making Distinctions: a phenomenological exploration in mathematics education. In P. Ernest (Ed.). The Philosophy of Mathematics Education Today. ICME-13 Monographs. Springer.
  • Mason, J. (2018). Reflecting on values emerging from practice and the value of reflecting on practice. In D. Rowe & A. Watson (Eds.). Faith and Experience in Education: essays from Quaker perspectives. London: Trentham Books. p63-91.
  • Mason, J. & Metz, M. (2017). Digging Beneath Dual Systems Theory and the Bicameral Brain: abductions about the human psyche from experience in mathematical problem solving. In U. Xolocotzin (Ed.). Understanding Emotions in Mathematical Thinking and Learning. p379-407. Cambridge: Elsevier/Academic Press.
  • Mason, J. (2016). Rising Above a Cause-and-Effect Stance in Mathematics Education Research. JMTE 19(4) p297-300. http://rdcu.be/npTf
  • Mason, J. & Davis, B. (2013). The Importance of Teachers’ Mathematical Awareness for In-The-Moment Pedagogy. CJSMTE 13(2) p182-197.
  • Mason, J. (2012). Noticing: roots and branches. In M. Sherin, V. Jacobs, & R. Phillip (Eds.) Mathematics Teacher Noticing:  Seeing Through Teachers’ Eyes. p35-50. Mahwah: Erlbaum.
  • Mason, J. (2008). Being Mathematical With & In Front of Learners: Attention, Awareness, and Attitude as Sources of Differences between Teacher Educators, Teachers & Learners. In T. Wood (Series Ed.) & B. Jaworski (Vol. Ed.), International Handbook of Mathematics Teacher Education: Vol.4. The Mathematics Teacher Educator as a Developing Professional. Rotterdam, the Netherlands: Sense Publishers, p31-56.
  • Mason, J. & Johnston-Wilder, S. (2006 2nd edition). Designing and Using Mathematical Tasks. St. Albans: Tarquin.
  • Watson, A. & Mason, J. (2006). Seeing an Exercise as a Single Mathematical Object: Using Variation to Structure Sense-Making. Mathematical Thinking and Learning. 8(2) p91-111.
  • Watson, A. & Mason, J. (2005). Mathematics as a Constructive Activity: learners generating examples. Mahwah: Erlbaum.
  • Mason, J. & Johnston-Wilder, S. (2004). Fundamental Constructs in Mathematics Education, RoutledgeFalmer, London.
  • Mason, J. 2003, Structure of Attention in the Learning of Mathematics, in J. Novotná (Ed.) Proceedings, International Symposium on Elementary Mathematics Teaching, Charles University, Prague, p9-16.
  • Mason, J. 2002, Mathematics Teaching Practice: a guidebook for university and college lecturers, Horwood Publishing, Chichester.
  • Mason, J. 2002, Researching Your own Practice: The Discipline of Noticing, RoutledgeFalmer, London.
  • Mason, J. 2001, Modelling Modelling: where is the centre of gravity of-for-when modelling?, in J. Matos, W. Blum, S. Houston & S. Carreira (Eds.) Modelling and Mathematics Education: ICTMA 9 applications in science and technology, Horwood Publishing, Chichester, p39-61.
  • Mason, J. Burton L. & Stacey K. (1982). Thinking Mathematically, Addison Wesley, London

Website

www.pmtheta.com

Mark has worked in ELT and EMI for over 35 years as a teacher, teacher trainer, lecturer, course writer, syllabus designer, examiner, Director of Studies, and consultant editor for OUP. For the British Council he has worked as a consultant trainer and course developer in EMI and EAP. For the University of Oxford Department of Education Mark delivered the ELT option on the MSc ALSLA and is Teaching Associate of the EMI Research Group in which capacity he has worked as a CI and has developed and delivered EMI teacher training courses in China, Serbia and Oxford. Mark has worked in universities in Russia, Ukraine, Kazakhstan, Belarus, Czechia, Italy, Germany, Mexico, Peru, Chile, Brazil, Colombia and Morocco.

He continues to be involved in EMI and is currently co-authoring an EMI student guide.

Mark is an alumnus of the University of Oxford Department of Education and was among the first to be awarded the innovative MSc in Teaching English Language in University Settings.

Anushay is a second-year DPhil student investigating how classroom characteristics are related to Pakistani children’s development. She is supervised by Professor Iram Siraj and Dr Katharina Ereky-Stevens and her work is being supported by the Aga Khan University (Pakistan). Anushay received the Patrice Engle Dissertation Grant Award from the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD) in 2023.

Anushay completed her BSc Psychology from UCL, where she also started her master’s in Developmental Neuroscience and Psychopathology. She was based at Yale University for her master’s thesis, where she worked with Dr Craig Bailey at the Yale Center for Emotional Intelligence to understand children’s emotion development. Anushay also works as a part-time research  assistant at the Developmental Diversity Lab at UCL’s Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience. Anushay’s research interests include understanding child development across different cultures, factors that might be affecting it, and devising culture-specific ways to support children’s holistic development through the educational system. She is also keen on improving the research scope in Pakistan by working with Pakistani researchers, practitioners, and families. Anushay balances her research with her position as the founder of a non-profit, Resources for Children, which aims to understand and support children’s development in Pakistan.

Publications

Journal Articles

  1. Mazhar, A., & Bailey, C., S. (under review). Understanding Children’s Emotion-Specific Biases: How They Relate to Child and Family Factors, Emotion Recognition Accuracy, and Social Behaviour.

Presentations

  1. Mazhar, A., & Bailey, C., S. (2023, March). Understanding Children’s Emotion-Specific Biases: How They Relate to Child-Level Factors and Emotion Recognition Accuracy [Paper Presentation]. Society for Research in Child Development, Salt Lake City, Utah, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2022, April). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Spring Preview, New Haven, United States.
  3. Mazhar, A. (2021, December). Does an extended family improve mentalising in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK & Pakistan. 2nd International Foundation University Conference of Psychology, Rawalpindi, Pakistan.
  4. Mazhar, A. (2020, October). Developing a non-profit to advance autism research in Pakistan. Anna Freud Centre Seminar Series, London, United Kingdom.

Posters

  1. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Theory of Mind in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK and Pakistan. Harvard Trends in Psychology Summit, Cambridge, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Research Rounds, New Haven, United States.

Cindy works at the intersection of learning, design, and technology, with a keen interest in the orchestration of future-ready tech-enabled learning.

She is curious how the deployment of adaptive learning systems to schools will impact classroom learning and hopes to learn more about the human-machine partnership in education. Specifically, her research is concerned with the implications that the use of such systems has on teacher-student interactions, as teachers grapple with balancing personalised learning and learning in community, as well as curriculum demands and student interests. These are some tensions which could potentially be exacerbated by affordances of adaptive learning systems.

Prior to embarking on the DPhil in Education at Oxford, Cindy worked as the Lead Specialist in Technologies for Learning at the Educational Technology Division of Ministry of Education, Singapore. She had previously completed graduate studies at the National University of Singapore and Stanford University where she was awarded Master of Arts in English Studies and Master of Arts in Education.

Reem is DPhil student from Saudi Arabia.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she worked as a Teacher, Professional Developer, then, became a Supervisor and Researcher in the Ministry of Education where she received a scholarship to pursue her DPhil education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests lie in the area of Teacher Education and Professional Learning Policy and Practice.

Publications
  • Alqahtani, Reem (2020). Saudi Universities Role in Developing Teacher Professional Development Programs: Elite Universities Experience. Journal of Educational Sciences. King Saud University.
  • Alqahtani, Reem. (2020). The effect of implementing UDL-based activities in improving EFL learners’ academic achievement and attitudes towards L2. In L. Salas, & E. Ager, Creating Quiet reflective Spaces: Language Teacher Researches Professional Development (pp. 61-62). IATEFL publications.

Lena Zlock is researching the integration of digital technology into structures of teaching, learning, and education in higher education. Her particular focus is on the digital humanities and the potential for digital methods to transform humanistic study. She works with Professor Niall Winters and Dr. James Robson.

Lena’s research interests stem from her education as an M.St. student and Ertegun Graduate Scholar in Modern Languages at the University of Oxford, and as a B.A. student in History at Stanford University. As an undergraduate, she started the Voltaire Library Project, a digitally and data-driven study of the 6,763-book collection of French Enlightenment philosopher Voltaire (you can read more about the project here and here). She has been interested in the application of digital technology to humanistic teaching since her days in Princeton Day School, where she developed an interdisciplinary curriculum on Mexico City (visit the course website here).

Her research on Voltaire led her to think more broadly about the place of digital methods in the humanities classroom, and how new technologies will revolutionise the liberal arts and higher education. As a DPhil candidate, Lena will examine the negotiation and implementation of new learning technologies within the University of Oxford at undergraduate and graduate levels.

Lena is involved in a number of digital humanities initiatives in Oxford. She previously served as the inaugural fellow of the Voltaire Lab at Oxford’s Voltaire Foundation. As a master’s student, Lena co-formulated the convergence agenda for Oxford digital humanities with Professor Howard Hotson, and is currently employed by the Humanities Division to assist with the development of an M.St. degree in Digital Scholarship (read more here). Lena set up and helps to run the History of the Book blog for the Faculty of Medieval and Modern Languages and the Oxford Book History Twitter account.

Lena welcomes inquiries from undergraduate and postgraduate students from Oxford and beyond seeking to get involved with the digital humanities in any capacity. The History of the Book blog also welcomes inquiries from prospective contributors.

 

Abbey is a Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education, in collaboration with the Department of Engineering.

Before joining the DPhil program, Abbey obtained a B.A. in Applied Linguistics with minors in Russian and Chinese from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford. She was the recipient of a Benjamin A. Gilman International Scholarship through U.S. Department of State for study in Russia and was awarded two Foreign Language and Area Studies (FLAS) Fellowships for study in both Russia and China. She holds both TESOL and TEFL certificates and has taught English as a Second Language in various contexts to a wide variety of learner populations.

Abbey’s main research interests lie in the use of technology to facilitate language learning. Her DPhil research focuses on the development of a virtual reality program to bridge the gaps that students face when learning languages through distance learning.

Dr Nadiya Ivanenko is a Visiting Research Fellow in the field of civic education and citizenship linguistics. She is a member of the Applied Linguistics research group and Higher Education research group at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

After receiving PhD in Comparative Linguistics from Kyiv National Linguistic University (2008) Nadiya worked as an Associate Professor of the Germanic Languages and Teaching Methodology Department, Faculty of Ukrainian Philology, Foreign Languages and Social Communications and Vice Dean of the Faculty of Foreign Languages, Central Ukrainian State University, Ukraine.

Nadiya was a Chevening scholar and Postgraduate researcher at the Department of Education, University of Oxford (2003-2004). She was a Co-chair of the joint UNESCO Chair/UNITWIN project ‘Education as a Humanitarian Response’ (2004-2012); a participant of BECA joint project ‘Education for Democracy’ between Montclair State University (USA) and Kirovohrad State Pedagogical University (Ukraine). Nadiya had internship for teachers of EFL in the Department of Educational and Cultural Programmes at Shakespeare’s Globe Theater, London, UK (2011). She was the Head of the British Council International Mobility Grant ‘Internalizing Higher Education in Ukraine’, which included 2 internships at the University of Durham, UK (2016). She participated in the internship “Retraining in the Field of Teaching Excellence”, Bayreuth University, Germany (Erasmus + Project (2021) and was a coordinator of the Erasmus+ Project: Innovative Approach to Promotion Teaching Excellence (2021-2022) at Central Ukrainian State University.

Selected Publications

BOOKS

  • Rastrygina, A., Ivanenko, N. (2021). Pedagogy of Freedom in the Paradigmal Space of Modern Education and Upbringing.
  • Ivanenko, N., Liashuk, A. (2021). English Activity Book. Practical Course of English. Kropyvnytskyi.
  • Ivanenko N. (2014). (Edit.) Education in Eastern Europe and Eurasia. London: Bloomsbury.
  • Ivanenko N. (2008). The Concept of Good in English and Ukrainian Language Pictures of the World. Kirovohrad: KOD.
  • Ivanenko N. (2007). Written Practice and Conversation for 1 Year. Kropyvnytskyi.
  • Garkusha, L., Ivanenko, N. (2004). Critical thinking in life skills training. Kirovohrad.

BOOK CHAPTERS

  • Ivanenko, N. (2024). Words and word meanings In The Routledge Companion To English Studies/ by Constant Leung & Jo Lewkowicz. London, UK: Routledge (in publishing).
  • Ivanenko N. (2023). Development of civic education in Ukrainian universities: new challenges of modern realities in the conditions of the transformation of society. In Contemporary Education in Ukraine: Integration into the European Educational Space. Dnipro (pp. 387-412) DOI:36550/978-617-8245-57-3-20
  • Ivanenko N. (2019). Citizenship Education, Moral Fluency and Social and Political Future Challenges. In Polish-Jewish History, Culture, Values, and Education between Paradise and Inferno. Irvine, USA: Brown Walker Press (pp. 93-103)
  • Ivanenko N. (2014). Education Change, Transformation, Reforms – a Regional Overview. In N. Ivanenko (Edit.) Education in Eastern Europe and Eurasia. London: Bloomsbury (pp. 9-45)
  • Ivanenko N. (2013). Vulnerable Children in Ukraine and Educational Response. In M. Matsumoto (Edit.) Education and Disadvantaged Children and Young People. London: Bloomsbury (pp. 95-132)

JOURNAL ARTICLES

  1. Ivanenko, N. (2024). Challenges of Ukrainian Higher Education in Times of War. International Higher Education. The Boston College Centre for International Higher Education, 118, pp. 35-36 https://doi.org/10.36197/IHE.2024.118.17
  2. Ivanenko, N., Paska, T., Irkha, A. Rud, A., & Boguslavskas, L., (2024). The Role of Higher Education for Ensuring National Security in Ukraine. Futurity Education, 4(1), 210-237 https://doi.org/10.57125/FED.2024.03.25.11
  3. Leleka, T., Ivanenko, N., Demeshko, I., Kapitan T., & Demchenko, I. (2024). The Process of English Internationalization in the Ukrainian Educational Paradigm. Slavistica Vilnensis, 68(2), 76-89 doi:10.15388/SlavViln.2023.68(2).6
  4. Ivanenko, N., Rud, A., Hurbanska, A., Cheban, Y., & Syrtseva, S. (2024). Digitalization of Education of the Future – A Trend or a Requirement of the Time? Journal of Higher Education Theory and Practice24(2). DOI: https://doi.org/10.33423/jhetp.v24i2.6791
  5. Ivanenko, N. (2023). Civic character cultivation as a basic virtue within and beyond modern educational institutions. Academic Notes. Series Pedagogical sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 209, 180-185 DOI: https://doi.org/10.36550/2415-7988-2022-1-209-180-185
  6. Rastrygina, A., Ivanenko, N. (2023). A Pedagogy of freedom as a viable basis for implementing gender equality in Ukraine’s educational institutions. International Review of Education, 69(1-2), 143-174. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/s11159-023-09995-9
  7. Ivanenko N., Biletska O., Hurbanska S., Hurbanska, A., & Kochmar, D. (2023). English language morphological neologisms reflecting the war in Ukraine. World Journal of English Language, 13(5), pp. 432-438    DOI: doi:http://dx.doi.org/10.5430/wjel.v13n5p432
  8. Ivanenko, N., Boiko, A., Fedorchuk, L., Panchenko, I., & Marieiev, D. (2023). Development of educational policy in Ukraine in the context of European integration and digital transformation. Revista Eduweb, 17(2), 296-305 DOI: https://doi.org/10.46502/issn.1856-7576/2023.17.02.25
  9. Ivanenko, N.V., Gerasymenko,Yu. A., Kostenko, V.G. (2023). Innovative approaches to the modernization of philological education and science in Ukraine: a response to the challenges of wartime. Akademichni Vizii, (in Ukrainian). URL: https://academy-vision.org/index.php/av/article/view/281 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5281/zenodo.7795088
  10. Ivanenko N. (2022). Phraseological units of the conceptual field MARRIAGE in the English picture of the world. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi: KOD, 202, pp. 140-146
  11. Bilous, O., Mishchenko, A., Datska, T., Ivanenko, N., Kit, L., Piankovska, I., and Vereshchak, Y. (2021). Modern linguistic technologies: strategy of teaching translation studies. Rupkatha Journal on Interdisciplinary Studies in Humanities, 13(4), pp. 1-12 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/21659/rupkatha.v13n4.65
  12. Leleka, T., Ivanenko, N., Moskalenko O., Herasymenko, L., Shevchuk L., Pidlubna, O. (2021). Angloamerican loanwords use in the Ukrainian student slang. Laplage em Revista, 7(Extra-D): University and science: possible dialogues. pp.163-174. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/24115/S2446-622020217Extra-D1081p.163-174
  13. Ivanenko N. (2021). Figurative and valuable component of the MARRIAGE concept. Trends in Science and Practice of Today. Ankara, Turkey, pp. 356-361
  14. Ivanenko N. (2021). Inclusive learning environment for students’ achievements and foreign language development. Priorities in the Development of Science and Education. Budapest, Hungary, pp.74-80
  15. Ivanenko N. (2021). The nominative field of the MARRIAGE concept and the analysis of the synonymous series of its key unit. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi: KOD, 193, pp 218-224 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.36550/2522-4077-2021-1-193-218-224
  16. Ivanenko N. (2020). Language intervention stages in project-based learning. Modern Trends in Foreign Language Professional Training in a Multicultural Space. Kyiv, pp. 249 – 255
  17. Rastrygina, A., Ivanenko, N. (2020). Gender comfortable educational environment as a factor of development of personal freedom. Research Bulletin. Pedagogical Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 188, pp. 28 – 35 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.36550/2415-7988-2020-1-188-28-35
  18. Ivanenko N. (2020). Texting slang as one of the most common groups of everyday youth Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi: KOD, 187, pp. 38-45
  19. Ivanenko N. (2019). Computer use in foreign language Intellectual and Emotional Components of Foreign Language Learning: Latest Trends and Challenges for Higher Education. Kyiv, pp. 152 – 158.
  20. Ivanenko N. (2019). Initial stages of elaborating a project in a foreign language classroom. Science and Society. Hamilton, Canada, pp. 13 – 20.
  21. Ivanenko N. (2019). Project-based learning as a way to incorporate effective foreign language teaching. Research Bulletin. Pedagogical Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 177, pp. 207 – 211
  22. Ivanenko N. (2019). Youth vocabulary as a reflection of changes in modern society. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi: KOD, 175, pp. 34 – 39.
  23. Ivanenko N. (2018). Promoting citizenship education in the English language Proceedings of the IV International Conference. Kyiv, pp. 130 – 137
  24. Ivanenko N. (2018). Educating global citizens at a foreign language class. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, – pp. 494 – 500
  25. Ivanenko N. (2018). Formation of civic values through teaching a foreign language. Proceedings of the II International Conference “Foreign Language in Professional Training of Specialists: Problems and Strategies”. Kropyvnytskyi, pp. 189-191
  26. Ivanenko N. (2017). Citizenship education in the English language classroom. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 154. – pp. 92 – 97
  27. Ivanenko N. (2017). Education for democratic citizenship: teaching virtues and values. Research Bulletin. Pedagogical Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 152, pp. 110-113
  28. Ivanenko N. (2016). Citizenship education as a way to develop moral fluency to solve social and political challenges of the future. Scientific Journal of Ariel University. Israel: Ariel University.
  29. Ivanenko N. (2016). Functioning peculiarities of lexical units of the RESPECT concept in the English language. Proceedings of the International Conference Linguistic and Linguacultural Aspects of Teaching Foreign Languages in Ukrainian Universities”. Dnipropetrovsk, pp. 87-94
  30. Ivanenko N. (2016). Semantic relationships of lexical units of the concept of love in the English language. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, pp. 221-226
  31. Ivanenko N. (2015). Citizenship education as the coordination and integration of educational establishment and community. Research Proceedings of the national UniversityOstrog Academy”. Ostrog, pp. 136-142
  32. Ivanenko N. (2015). The value of citizenship education in practices of student governing body. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 136. pp. 438-442

Louise’s doctoral research investigates how teachers become who they are.

Louise’s work situates the schoolteacher as a particular type of subject, that is both made and makes itself from within a network of power relations. Her study combines Foucauldian theory, Critical Discourse Analysis, and Narrative analysis to provide an account of schoolteachers’ ethical agency in the context of top-down policy practices.

Louise is a Doctoral Teaching Fellow at the Department of Education, where she teaches and supervises students in the MSc in Learning and Teaching course. Currently, Louise is collaborating the OECD in their Globally Teaching InSights project. Her research supports the Schools+ Network aims to fuel an ecosystem of organisations that are driving change in education from the bottom-up.

In March 2023 she presented her preliminary research at the Philosophy of Education Society of Great Britain (PESGB)’s annual conference.

As Honorary Fellow John attends seminars and consults with current staff in Mathematics Education.

During 40 years at the Open University supporting the teaching of mathematics he authored a wide range of papers, and dozens of Open University Books and Teaching materials. He co-authored the classic Thinking Mathematically; Mathematics as a Constructive Activity (with his wife Prof. Anne Watson); Questions and Prompts for Mathematical Thinking & Thinkers (with Anne and other colleagues), among many others.

His research methods are phenomenological, based on the Discipline of Noticing. He is interested in the lived experience of learning, doing and teaching mathematics. He focuses on the structure and form of Attention in the teaching of mathematics, as he supports those who wish to foster and sustain mathematical thinking in others.

He is an Honorary Fellow of BSRLM and ATM, a long-standing member of  the MAA and the  MA.H.

 

Publications

  • Mason, J. (2022). Consequences of a Virtual Encounter with George Pólya. Teaching Mathematics and Computer Science.  20 (2) p173-182.
  • Zazkis, R. Kontorovich, I. & Mason, J. (2021). The Learning and Teaching of Number: paths less travelled through well-trodden terrain. London: Routledge
  • Mason, J. (2021). Learning about Noticing, by, and through, Noticing. ZDM – Mathematics Education. 53(1) p231-243. doi: 10.1007/s11858-020-01192-4
  • Mason, J. & Czarnocha,B. (2021). Aha! Moments, Bisociation and Multifocal Attention. In B. Czarnocha & W. Baker. Creativity of an Aha! Moment and Mathematics Education. Leiden: Brill. p345-361.
  • Mason, J. (2018) Making Distinctions: a phenomenological exploration in mathematics education. In P. Ernest (Ed.). The Philosophy of Mathematics Education Today. ICME-13 Monographs. Springer.
  • Mason, J. (2018). Reflecting on values emerging from practice and the value of reflecting on practice. In D. Rowe & A. Watson (Eds.). Faith and Experience in Education: essays from Quaker perspectives. London: Trentham Books. p63-91.
  • Mason, J. & Metz, M. (2017). Digging Beneath Dual Systems Theory and the Bicameral Brain: abductions about the human psyche from experience in mathematical problem solving. In U. Xolocotzin (Ed.). Understanding Emotions in Mathematical Thinking and Learning. p379-407. Cambridge: Elsevier/Academic Press.
  • Mason, J. (2016). Rising Above a Cause-and-Effect Stance in Mathematics Education Research. JMTE 19(4) p297-300. http://rdcu.be/npTf
  • Mason, J. & Davis, B. (2013). The Importance of Teachers’ Mathematical Awareness for In-The-Moment Pedagogy. CJSMTE 13(2) p182-197.
  • Mason, J. (2012). Noticing: roots and branches. In M. Sherin, V. Jacobs, & R. Phillip (Eds.) Mathematics Teacher Noticing:  Seeing Through Teachers’ Eyes. p35-50. Mahwah: Erlbaum.
  • Mason, J. (2008). Being Mathematical With & In Front of Learners: Attention, Awareness, and Attitude as Sources of Differences between Teacher Educators, Teachers & Learners. In T. Wood (Series Ed.) & B. Jaworski (Vol. Ed.), International Handbook of Mathematics Teacher Education: Vol.4. The Mathematics Teacher Educator as a Developing Professional. Rotterdam, the Netherlands: Sense Publishers, p31-56.
  • Mason, J. & Johnston-Wilder, S. (2006 2nd edition). Designing and Using Mathematical Tasks. St. Albans: Tarquin.
  • Watson, A. & Mason, J. (2006). Seeing an Exercise as a Single Mathematical Object: Using Variation to Structure Sense-Making. Mathematical Thinking and Learning. 8(2) p91-111.
  • Watson, A. & Mason, J. (2005). Mathematics as a Constructive Activity: learners generating examples. Mahwah: Erlbaum.
  • Mason, J. & Johnston-Wilder, S. (2004). Fundamental Constructs in Mathematics Education, RoutledgeFalmer, London.
  • Mason, J. 2003, Structure of Attention in the Learning of Mathematics, in J. Novotná (Ed.) Proceedings, International Symposium on Elementary Mathematics Teaching, Charles University, Prague, p9-16.
  • Mason, J. 2002, Mathematics Teaching Practice: a guidebook for university and college lecturers, Horwood Publishing, Chichester.
  • Mason, J. 2002, Researching Your own Practice: The Discipline of Noticing, RoutledgeFalmer, London.
  • Mason, J. 2001, Modelling Modelling: where is the centre of gravity of-for-when modelling?, in J. Matos, W. Blum, S. Houston & S. Carreira (Eds.) Modelling and Mathematics Education: ICTMA 9 applications in science and technology, Horwood Publishing, Chichester, p39-61.
  • Mason, J. Burton L. & Stacey K. (1982). Thinking Mathematically, Addison Wesley, London

Website

www.pmtheta.com

Mark has worked in ELT and EMI for over 35 years as a teacher, teacher trainer, lecturer, course writer, syllabus designer, examiner, Director of Studies, and consultant editor for OUP. For the British Council he has worked as a consultant trainer and course developer in EMI and EAP. For the University of Oxford Department of Education Mark delivered the ELT option on the MSc ALSLA and is Teaching Associate of the EMI Research Group in which capacity he has worked as a CI and has developed and delivered EMI teacher training courses in China, Serbia and Oxford. Mark has worked in universities in Russia, Ukraine, Kazakhstan, Belarus, Czechia, Italy, Germany, Mexico, Peru, Chile, Brazil, Colombia and Morocco.

He continues to be involved in EMI and is currently co-authoring an EMI student guide.

Mark is an alumnus of the University of Oxford Department of Education and was among the first to be awarded the innovative MSc in Teaching English Language in University Settings.

Anushay is a second-year DPhil student investigating how classroom characteristics are related to Pakistani children’s development. She is supervised by Professor Iram Siraj and Dr Katharina Ereky-Stevens and her work is being supported by the Aga Khan University (Pakistan). Anushay received the Patrice Engle Dissertation Grant Award from the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD) in 2023.

Anushay completed her BSc Psychology from UCL, where she also started her master’s in Developmental Neuroscience and Psychopathology. She was based at Yale University for her master’s thesis, where she worked with Dr Craig Bailey at the Yale Center for Emotional Intelligence to understand children’s emotion development. Anushay also works as a part-time research  assistant at the Developmental Diversity Lab at UCL’s Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience. Anushay’s research interests include understanding child development across different cultures, factors that might be affecting it, and devising culture-specific ways to support children’s holistic development through the educational system. She is also keen on improving the research scope in Pakistan by working with Pakistani researchers, practitioners, and families. Anushay balances her research with her position as the founder of a non-profit, Resources for Children, which aims to understand and support children’s development in Pakistan.

Publications

Journal Articles

  1. Mazhar, A., & Bailey, C., S. (under review). Understanding Children’s Emotion-Specific Biases: How They Relate to Child and Family Factors, Emotion Recognition Accuracy, and Social Behaviour.

Presentations

  1. Mazhar, A., & Bailey, C., S. (2023, March). Understanding Children’s Emotion-Specific Biases: How They Relate to Child-Level Factors and Emotion Recognition Accuracy [Paper Presentation]. Society for Research in Child Development, Salt Lake City, Utah, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2022, April). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Spring Preview, New Haven, United States.
  3. Mazhar, A. (2021, December). Does an extended family improve mentalising in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK & Pakistan. 2nd International Foundation University Conference of Psychology, Rawalpindi, Pakistan.
  4. Mazhar, A. (2020, October). Developing a non-profit to advance autism research in Pakistan. Anna Freud Centre Seminar Series, London, United Kingdom.

Posters

  1. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Theory of Mind in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK and Pakistan. Harvard Trends in Psychology Summit, Cambridge, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Research Rounds, New Haven, United States.

Cindy works at the intersection of learning, design, and technology, with a keen interest in the orchestration of future-ready tech-enabled learning.

She is curious how the deployment of adaptive learning systems to schools will impact classroom learning and hopes to learn more about the human-machine partnership in education. Specifically, her research is concerned with the implications that the use of such systems has on teacher-student interactions, as teachers grapple with balancing personalised learning and learning in community, as well as curriculum demands and student interests. These are some tensions which could potentially be exacerbated by affordances of adaptive learning systems.

Prior to embarking on the DPhil in Education at Oxford, Cindy worked as the Lead Specialist in Technologies for Learning at the Educational Technology Division of Ministry of Education, Singapore. She had previously completed graduate studies at the National University of Singapore and Stanford University where she was awarded Master of Arts in English Studies and Master of Arts in Education.

Reem is DPhil student from Saudi Arabia.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she worked as a Teacher, Professional Developer, then, became a Supervisor and Researcher in the Ministry of Education where she received a scholarship to pursue her DPhil education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests lie in the area of Teacher Education and Professional Learning Policy and Practice.

Publications
  • Alqahtani, Reem (2020). Saudi Universities Role in Developing Teacher Professional Development Programs: Elite Universities Experience. Journal of Educational Sciences. King Saud University.
  • Alqahtani, Reem. (2020). The effect of implementing UDL-based activities in improving EFL learners’ academic achievement and attitudes towards L2. In L. Salas, & E. Ager, Creating Quiet reflective Spaces: Language Teacher Researches Professional Development (pp. 61-62). IATEFL publications.

Lena Zlock is researching the integration of digital technology into structures of teaching, learning, and education in higher education. Her particular focus is on the digital humanities and the potential for digital methods to transform humanistic study. She works with Professor Niall Winters and Dr. James Robson.

Lena’s research interests stem from her education as an M.St. student and Ertegun Graduate Scholar in Modern Languages at the University of Oxford, and as a B.A. student in History at Stanford University. As an undergraduate, she started the Voltaire Library Project, a digitally and data-driven study of the 6,763-book collection of French Enlightenment philosopher Voltaire (you can read more about the project here and here). She has been interested in the application of digital technology to humanistic teaching since her days in Princeton Day School, where she developed an interdisciplinary curriculum on Mexico City (visit the course website here).

Her research on Voltaire led her to think more broadly about the place of digital methods in the humanities classroom, and how new technologies will revolutionise the liberal arts and higher education. As a DPhil candidate, Lena will examine the negotiation and implementation of new learning technologies within the University of Oxford at undergraduate and graduate levels.

Lena is involved in a number of digital humanities initiatives in Oxford. She previously served as the inaugural fellow of the Voltaire Lab at Oxford’s Voltaire Foundation. As a master’s student, Lena co-formulated the convergence agenda for Oxford digital humanities with Professor Howard Hotson, and is currently employed by the Humanities Division to assist with the development of an M.St. degree in Digital Scholarship (read more here). Lena set up and helps to run the History of the Book blog for the Faculty of Medieval and Modern Languages and the Oxford Book History Twitter account.

Lena welcomes inquiries from undergraduate and postgraduate students from Oxford and beyond seeking to get involved with the digital humanities in any capacity. The History of the Book blog also welcomes inquiries from prospective contributors.

 

Abbey is a Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education, in collaboration with the Department of Engineering.

Before joining the DPhil program, Abbey obtained a B.A. in Applied Linguistics with minors in Russian and Chinese from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford. She was the recipient of a Benjamin A. Gilman International Scholarship through U.S. Department of State for study in Russia and was awarded two Foreign Language and Area Studies (FLAS) Fellowships for study in both Russia and China. She holds both TESOL and TEFL certificates and has taught English as a Second Language in various contexts to a wide variety of learner populations.

Abbey’s main research interests lie in the use of technology to facilitate language learning. Her DPhil research focuses on the development of a virtual reality program to bridge the gaps that students face when learning languages through distance learning.

Dr Nadiya Ivanenko is a Visiting Research Fellow in the field of civic education and citizenship linguistics. She is a member of the Applied Linguistics research group and Higher Education research group at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

After receiving PhD in Comparative Linguistics from Kyiv National Linguistic University (2008) Nadiya worked as an Associate Professor of the Germanic Languages and Teaching Methodology Department, Faculty of Ukrainian Philology, Foreign Languages and Social Communications and Vice Dean of the Faculty of Foreign Languages, Central Ukrainian State University, Ukraine.

Nadiya was a Chevening scholar and Postgraduate researcher at the Department of Education, University of Oxford (2003-2004). She was a Co-chair of the joint UNESCO Chair/UNITWIN project ‘Education as a Humanitarian Response’ (2004-2012); a participant of BECA joint project ‘Education for Democracy’ between Montclair State University (USA) and Kirovohrad State Pedagogical University (Ukraine). Nadiya had internship for teachers of EFL in the Department of Educational and Cultural Programmes at Shakespeare’s Globe Theater, London, UK (2011). She was the Head of the British Council International Mobility Grant ‘Internalizing Higher Education in Ukraine’, which included 2 internships at the University of Durham, UK (2016). She participated in the internship “Retraining in the Field of Teaching Excellence”, Bayreuth University, Germany (Erasmus + Project (2021) and was a coordinator of the Erasmus+ Project: Innovative Approach to Promotion Teaching Excellence (2021-2022) at Central Ukrainian State University.

Selected Publications

BOOKS

  • Rastrygina, A., Ivanenko, N. (2021). Pedagogy of Freedom in the Paradigmal Space of Modern Education and Upbringing.
  • Ivanenko, N., Liashuk, A. (2021). English Activity Book. Practical Course of English. Kropyvnytskyi.
  • Ivanenko N. (2014). (Edit.) Education in Eastern Europe and Eurasia. London: Bloomsbury.
  • Ivanenko N. (2008). The Concept of Good in English and Ukrainian Language Pictures of the World. Kirovohrad: KOD.
  • Ivanenko N. (2007). Written Practice and Conversation for 1 Year. Kropyvnytskyi.
  • Garkusha, L., Ivanenko, N. (2004). Critical thinking in life skills training. Kirovohrad.

BOOK CHAPTERS

  • Ivanenko, N. (2024). Words and word meanings In The Routledge Companion To English Studies/ by Constant Leung & Jo Lewkowicz. London, UK: Routledge (in publishing).
  • Ivanenko N. (2023). Development of civic education in Ukrainian universities: new challenges of modern realities in the conditions of the transformation of society. In Contemporary Education in Ukraine: Integration into the European Educational Space. Dnipro (pp. 387-412) DOI:36550/978-617-8245-57-3-20
  • Ivanenko N. (2019). Citizenship Education, Moral Fluency and Social and Political Future Challenges. In Polish-Jewish History, Culture, Values, and Education between Paradise and Inferno. Irvine, USA: Brown Walker Press (pp. 93-103)
  • Ivanenko N. (2014). Education Change, Transformation, Reforms – a Regional Overview. In N. Ivanenko (Edit.) Education in Eastern Europe and Eurasia. London: Bloomsbury (pp. 9-45)
  • Ivanenko N. (2013). Vulnerable Children in Ukraine and Educational Response. In M. Matsumoto (Edit.) Education and Disadvantaged Children and Young People. London: Bloomsbury (pp. 95-132)

JOURNAL ARTICLES

  1. Ivanenko, N. (2024). Challenges of Ukrainian Higher Education in Times of War. International Higher Education. The Boston College Centre for International Higher Education, 118, pp. 35-36 https://doi.org/10.36197/IHE.2024.118.17
  2. Ivanenko, N., Paska, T., Irkha, A. Rud, A., & Boguslavskas, L., (2024). The Role of Higher Education for Ensuring National Security in Ukraine. Futurity Education, 4(1), 210-237 https://doi.org/10.57125/FED.2024.03.25.11
  3. Leleka, T., Ivanenko, N., Demeshko, I., Kapitan T., & Demchenko, I. (2024). The Process of English Internationalization in the Ukrainian Educational Paradigm. Slavistica Vilnensis, 68(2), 76-89 doi:10.15388/SlavViln.2023.68(2).6
  4. Ivanenko, N., Rud, A., Hurbanska, A., Cheban, Y., & Syrtseva, S. (2024). Digitalization of Education of the Future – A Trend or a Requirement of the Time? Journal of Higher Education Theory and Practice24(2). DOI: https://doi.org/10.33423/jhetp.v24i2.6791
  5. Ivanenko, N. (2023). Civic character cultivation as a basic virtue within and beyond modern educational institutions. Academic Notes. Series Pedagogical sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 209, 180-185 DOI: https://doi.org/10.36550/2415-7988-2022-1-209-180-185
  6. Rastrygina, A., Ivanenko, N. (2023). A Pedagogy of freedom as a viable basis for implementing gender equality in Ukraine’s educational institutions. International Review of Education, 69(1-2), 143-174. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/s11159-023-09995-9
  7. Ivanenko N., Biletska O., Hurbanska S., Hurbanska, A., & Kochmar, D. (2023). English language morphological neologisms reflecting the war in Ukraine. World Journal of English Language, 13(5), pp. 432-438    DOI: doi:http://dx.doi.org/10.5430/wjel.v13n5p432
  8. Ivanenko, N., Boiko, A., Fedorchuk, L., Panchenko, I., & Marieiev, D. (2023). Development of educational policy in Ukraine in the context of European integration and digital transformation. Revista Eduweb, 17(2), 296-305 DOI: https://doi.org/10.46502/issn.1856-7576/2023.17.02.25
  9. Ivanenko, N.V., Gerasymenko,Yu. A., Kostenko, V.G. (2023). Innovative approaches to the modernization of philological education and science in Ukraine: a response to the challenges of wartime. Akademichni Vizii, (in Ukrainian). URL: https://academy-vision.org/index.php/av/article/view/281 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5281/zenodo.7795088
  10. Ivanenko N. (2022). Phraseological units of the conceptual field MARRIAGE in the English picture of the world. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi: KOD, 202, pp. 140-146
  11. Bilous, O., Mishchenko, A., Datska, T., Ivanenko, N., Kit, L., Piankovska, I., and Vereshchak, Y. (2021). Modern linguistic technologies: strategy of teaching translation studies. Rupkatha Journal on Interdisciplinary Studies in Humanities, 13(4), pp. 1-12 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/21659/rupkatha.v13n4.65
  12. Leleka, T., Ivanenko, N., Moskalenko O., Herasymenko, L., Shevchuk L., Pidlubna, O. (2021). Angloamerican loanwords use in the Ukrainian student slang. Laplage em Revista, 7(Extra-D): University and science: possible dialogues. pp.163-174. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/24115/S2446-622020217Extra-D1081p.163-174
  13. Ivanenko N. (2021). Figurative and valuable component of the MARRIAGE concept. Trends in Science and Practice of Today. Ankara, Turkey, pp. 356-361
  14. Ivanenko N. (2021). Inclusive learning environment for students’ achievements and foreign language development. Priorities in the Development of Science and Education. Budapest, Hungary, pp.74-80
  15. Ivanenko N. (2021). The nominative field of the MARRIAGE concept and the analysis of the synonymous series of its key unit. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi: KOD, 193, pp 218-224 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.36550/2522-4077-2021-1-193-218-224
  16. Ivanenko N. (2020). Language intervention stages in project-based learning. Modern Trends in Foreign Language Professional Training in a Multicultural Space. Kyiv, pp. 249 – 255
  17. Rastrygina, A., Ivanenko, N. (2020). Gender comfortable educational environment as a factor of development of personal freedom. Research Bulletin. Pedagogical Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 188, pp. 28 – 35 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.36550/2415-7988-2020-1-188-28-35
  18. Ivanenko N. (2020). Texting slang as one of the most common groups of everyday youth Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi: KOD, 187, pp. 38-45
  19. Ivanenko N. (2019). Computer use in foreign language Intellectual and Emotional Components of Foreign Language Learning: Latest Trends and Challenges for Higher Education. Kyiv, pp. 152 – 158.
  20. Ivanenko N. (2019). Initial stages of elaborating a project in a foreign language classroom. Science and Society. Hamilton, Canada, pp. 13 – 20.
  21. Ivanenko N. (2019). Project-based learning as a way to incorporate effective foreign language teaching. Research Bulletin. Pedagogical Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 177, pp. 207 – 211
  22. Ivanenko N. (2019). Youth vocabulary as a reflection of changes in modern society. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi: KOD, 175, pp. 34 – 39.
  23. Ivanenko N. (2018). Promoting citizenship education in the English language Proceedings of the IV International Conference. Kyiv, pp. 130 – 137
  24. Ivanenko N. (2018). Educating global citizens at a foreign language class. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, – pp. 494 – 500
  25. Ivanenko N. (2018). Formation of civic values through teaching a foreign language. Proceedings of the II International Conference “Foreign Language in Professional Training of Specialists: Problems and Strategies”. Kropyvnytskyi, pp. 189-191
  26. Ivanenko N. (2017). Citizenship education in the English language classroom. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 154. – pp. 92 – 97
  27. Ivanenko N. (2017). Education for democratic citizenship: teaching virtues and values. Research Bulletin. Pedagogical Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 152, pp. 110-113
  28. Ivanenko N. (2016). Citizenship education as a way to develop moral fluency to solve social and political challenges of the future. Scientific Journal of Ariel University. Israel: Ariel University.
  29. Ivanenko N. (2016). Functioning peculiarities of lexical units of the RESPECT concept in the English language. Proceedings of the International Conference Linguistic and Linguacultural Aspects of Teaching Foreign Languages in Ukrainian Universities”. Dnipropetrovsk, pp. 87-94
  30. Ivanenko N. (2016). Semantic relationships of lexical units of the concept of love in the English language. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, pp. 221-226
  31. Ivanenko N. (2015). Citizenship education as the coordination and integration of educational establishment and community. Research Proceedings of the national UniversityOstrog Academy”. Ostrog, pp. 136-142
  32. Ivanenko N. (2015). The value of citizenship education in practices of student governing body. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 136. pp. 438-442

Louise’s doctoral research investigates how teachers become who they are.

Louise’s work situates the schoolteacher as a particular type of subject, that is both made and makes itself from within a network of power relations. Her study combines Foucauldian theory, Critical Discourse Analysis, and Narrative analysis to provide an account of schoolteachers’ ethical agency in the context of top-down policy practices.

Louise is a Doctoral Teaching Fellow at the Department of Education, where she teaches and supervises students in the MSc in Learning and Teaching course. Currently, Louise is collaborating the OECD in their Globally Teaching InSights project. Her research supports the Schools+ Network aims to fuel an ecosystem of organisations that are driving change in education from the bottom-up.

In March 2023 she presented her preliminary research at the Philosophy of Education Society of Great Britain (PESGB)’s annual conference.

As Honorary Fellow John attends seminars and consults with current staff in Mathematics Education.

During 40 years at the Open University supporting the teaching of mathematics he authored a wide range of papers, and dozens of Open University Books and Teaching materials. He co-authored the classic Thinking Mathematically; Mathematics as a Constructive Activity (with his wife Prof. Anne Watson); Questions and Prompts for Mathematical Thinking & Thinkers (with Anne and other colleagues), among many others.

His research methods are phenomenological, based on the Discipline of Noticing. He is interested in the lived experience of learning, doing and teaching mathematics. He focuses on the structure and form of Attention in the teaching of mathematics, as he supports those who wish to foster and sustain mathematical thinking in others.

He is an Honorary Fellow of BSRLM and ATM, a long-standing member of  the MAA and the  MA.H.

 

Publications

  • Mason, J. (2022). Consequences of a Virtual Encounter with George Pólya. Teaching Mathematics and Computer Science.  20 (2) p173-182.
  • Zazkis, R. Kontorovich, I. & Mason, J. (2021). The Learning and Teaching of Number: paths less travelled through well-trodden terrain. London: Routledge
  • Mason, J. (2021). Learning about Noticing, by, and through, Noticing. ZDM – Mathematics Education. 53(1) p231-243. doi: 10.1007/s11858-020-01192-4
  • Mason, J. & Czarnocha,B. (2021). Aha! Moments, Bisociation and Multifocal Attention. In B. Czarnocha & W. Baker. Creativity of an Aha! Moment and Mathematics Education. Leiden: Brill. p345-361.
  • Mason, J. (2018) Making Distinctions: a phenomenological exploration in mathematics education. In P. Ernest (Ed.). The Philosophy of Mathematics Education Today. ICME-13 Monographs. Springer.
  • Mason, J. (2018). Reflecting on values emerging from practice and the value of reflecting on practice. In D. Rowe & A. Watson (Eds.). Faith and Experience in Education: essays from Quaker perspectives. London: Trentham Books. p63-91.
  • Mason, J. & Metz, M. (2017). Digging Beneath Dual Systems Theory and the Bicameral Brain: abductions about the human psyche from experience in mathematical problem solving. In U. Xolocotzin (Ed.). Understanding Emotions in Mathematical Thinking and Learning. p379-407. Cambridge: Elsevier/Academic Press.
  • Mason, J. (2016). Rising Above a Cause-and-Effect Stance in Mathematics Education Research. JMTE 19(4) p297-300. http://rdcu.be/npTf
  • Mason, J. & Davis, B. (2013). The Importance of Teachers’ Mathematical Awareness for In-The-Moment Pedagogy. CJSMTE 13(2) p182-197.
  • Mason, J. (2012). Noticing: roots and branches. In M. Sherin, V. Jacobs, & R. Phillip (Eds.) Mathematics Teacher Noticing:  Seeing Through Teachers’ Eyes. p35-50. Mahwah: Erlbaum.
  • Mason, J. (2008). Being Mathematical With & In Front of Learners: Attention, Awareness, and Attitude as Sources of Differences between Teacher Educators, Teachers & Learners. In T. Wood (Series Ed.) & B. Jaworski (Vol. Ed.), International Handbook of Mathematics Teacher Education: Vol.4. The Mathematics Teacher Educator as a Developing Professional. Rotterdam, the Netherlands: Sense Publishers, p31-56.
  • Mason, J. & Johnston-Wilder, S. (2006 2nd edition). Designing and Using Mathematical Tasks. St. Albans: Tarquin.
  • Watson, A. & Mason, J. (2006). Seeing an Exercise as a Single Mathematical Object: Using Variation to Structure Sense-Making. Mathematical Thinking and Learning. 8(2) p91-111.
  • Watson, A. & Mason, J. (2005). Mathematics as a Constructive Activity: learners generating examples. Mahwah: Erlbaum.
  • Mason, J. & Johnston-Wilder, S. (2004). Fundamental Constructs in Mathematics Education, RoutledgeFalmer, London.
  • Mason, J. 2003, Structure of Attention in the Learning of Mathematics, in J. Novotná (Ed.) Proceedings, International Symposium on Elementary Mathematics Teaching, Charles University, Prague, p9-16.
  • Mason, J. 2002, Mathematics Teaching Practice: a guidebook for university and college lecturers, Horwood Publishing, Chichester.
  • Mason, J. 2002, Researching Your own Practice: The Discipline of Noticing, RoutledgeFalmer, London.
  • Mason, J. 2001, Modelling Modelling: where is the centre of gravity of-for-when modelling?, in J. Matos, W. Blum, S. Houston & S. Carreira (Eds.) Modelling and Mathematics Education: ICTMA 9 applications in science and technology, Horwood Publishing, Chichester, p39-61.
  • Mason, J. Burton L. & Stacey K. (1982). Thinking Mathematically, Addison Wesley, London

Website

www.pmtheta.com

Mark has worked in ELT and EMI for over 35 years as a teacher, teacher trainer, lecturer, course writer, syllabus designer, examiner, Director of Studies, and consultant editor for OUP. For the British Council he has worked as a consultant trainer and course developer in EMI and EAP. For the University of Oxford Department of Education Mark delivered the ELT option on the MSc ALSLA and is Teaching Associate of the EMI Research Group in which capacity he has worked as a CI and has developed and delivered EMI teacher training courses in China, Serbia and Oxford. Mark has worked in universities in Russia, Ukraine, Kazakhstan, Belarus, Czechia, Italy, Germany, Mexico, Peru, Chile, Brazil, Colombia and Morocco.

He continues to be involved in EMI and is currently co-authoring an EMI student guide.

Mark is an alumnus of the University of Oxford Department of Education and was among the first to be awarded the innovative MSc in Teaching English Language in University Settings.

Anushay is a second-year DPhil student investigating how classroom characteristics are related to Pakistani children’s development. She is supervised by Professor Iram Siraj and Dr Katharina Ereky-Stevens and her work is being supported by the Aga Khan University (Pakistan). Anushay received the Patrice Engle Dissertation Grant Award from the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD) in 2023.

Anushay completed her BSc Psychology from UCL, where she also started her master’s in Developmental Neuroscience and Psychopathology. She was based at Yale University for her master’s thesis, where she worked with Dr Craig Bailey at the Yale Center for Emotional Intelligence to understand children’s emotion development. Anushay also works as a part-time research  assistant at the Developmental Diversity Lab at UCL’s Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience. Anushay’s research interests include understanding child development across different cultures, factors that might be affecting it, and devising culture-specific ways to support children’s holistic development through the educational system. She is also keen on improving the research scope in Pakistan by working with Pakistani researchers, practitioners, and families. Anushay balances her research with her position as the founder of a non-profit, Resources for Children, which aims to understand and support children’s development in Pakistan.

Publications

Journal Articles

  1. Mazhar, A., & Bailey, C., S. (under review). Understanding Children’s Emotion-Specific Biases: How They Relate to Child and Family Factors, Emotion Recognition Accuracy, and Social Behaviour.

Presentations

  1. Mazhar, A., & Bailey, C., S. (2023, March). Understanding Children’s Emotion-Specific Biases: How They Relate to Child-Level Factors and Emotion Recognition Accuracy [Paper Presentation]. Society for Research in Child Development, Salt Lake City, Utah, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2022, April). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Spring Preview, New Haven, United States.
  3. Mazhar, A. (2021, December). Does an extended family improve mentalising in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK & Pakistan. 2nd International Foundation University Conference of Psychology, Rawalpindi, Pakistan.
  4. Mazhar, A. (2020, October). Developing a non-profit to advance autism research in Pakistan. Anna Freud Centre Seminar Series, London, United Kingdom.

Posters

  1. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Theory of Mind in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK and Pakistan. Harvard Trends in Psychology Summit, Cambridge, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Research Rounds, New Haven, United States.

Cindy works at the intersection of learning, design, and technology, with a keen interest in the orchestration of future-ready tech-enabled learning.

She is curious how the deployment of adaptive learning systems to schools will impact classroom learning and hopes to learn more about the human-machine partnership in education. Specifically, her research is concerned with the implications that the use of such systems has on teacher-student interactions, as teachers grapple with balancing personalised learning and learning in community, as well as curriculum demands and student interests. These are some tensions which could potentially be exacerbated by affordances of adaptive learning systems.

Prior to embarking on the DPhil in Education at Oxford, Cindy worked as the Lead Specialist in Technologies for Learning at the Educational Technology Division of Ministry of Education, Singapore. She had previously completed graduate studies at the National University of Singapore and Stanford University where she was awarded Master of Arts in English Studies and Master of Arts in Education.

Reem is DPhil student from Saudi Arabia.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she worked as a Teacher, Professional Developer, then, became a Supervisor and Researcher in the Ministry of Education where she received a scholarship to pursue her DPhil education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests lie in the area of Teacher Education and Professional Learning Policy and Practice.

Publications
  • Alqahtani, Reem (2020). Saudi Universities Role in Developing Teacher Professional Development Programs: Elite Universities Experience. Journal of Educational Sciences. King Saud University.
  • Alqahtani, Reem. (2020). The effect of implementing UDL-based activities in improving EFL learners’ academic achievement and attitudes towards L2. In L. Salas, & E. Ager, Creating Quiet reflective Spaces: Language Teacher Researches Professional Development (pp. 61-62). IATEFL publications.

Lena Zlock is researching the integration of digital technology into structures of teaching, learning, and education in higher education. Her particular focus is on the digital humanities and the potential for digital methods to transform humanistic study. She works with Professor Niall Winters and Dr. James Robson.

Lena’s research interests stem from her education as an M.St. student and Ertegun Graduate Scholar in Modern Languages at the University of Oxford, and as a B.A. student in History at Stanford University. As an undergraduate, she started the Voltaire Library Project, a digitally and data-driven study of the 6,763-book collection of French Enlightenment philosopher Voltaire (you can read more about the project here and here). She has been interested in the application of digital technology to humanistic teaching since her days in Princeton Day School, where she developed an interdisciplinary curriculum on Mexico City (visit the course website here).

Her research on Voltaire led her to think more broadly about the place of digital methods in the humanities classroom, and how new technologies will revolutionise the liberal arts and higher education. As a DPhil candidate, Lena will examine the negotiation and implementation of new learning technologies within the University of Oxford at undergraduate and graduate levels.

Lena is involved in a number of digital humanities initiatives in Oxford. She previously served as the inaugural fellow of the Voltaire Lab at Oxford’s Voltaire Foundation. As a master’s student, Lena co-formulated the convergence agenda for Oxford digital humanities with Professor Howard Hotson, and is currently employed by the Humanities Division to assist with the development of an M.St. degree in Digital Scholarship (read more here). Lena set up and helps to run the History of the Book blog for the Faculty of Medieval and Modern Languages and the Oxford Book History Twitter account.

Lena welcomes inquiries from undergraduate and postgraduate students from Oxford and beyond seeking to get involved with the digital humanities in any capacity. The History of the Book blog also welcomes inquiries from prospective contributors.

 

Abbey is a Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education, in collaboration with the Department of Engineering.

Before joining the DPhil program, Abbey obtained a B.A. in Applied Linguistics with minors in Russian and Chinese from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford. She was the recipient of a Benjamin A. Gilman International Scholarship through U.S. Department of State for study in Russia and was awarded two Foreign Language and Area Studies (FLAS) Fellowships for study in both Russia and China. She holds both TESOL and TEFL certificates and has taught English as a Second Language in various contexts to a wide variety of learner populations.

Abbey’s main research interests lie in the use of technology to facilitate language learning. Her DPhil research focuses on the development of a virtual reality program to bridge the gaps that students face when learning languages through distance learning.

Dr Nadiya Ivanenko is a Visiting Research Fellow in the field of civic education and citizenship linguistics. She is a member of the Applied Linguistics research group and Higher Education research group at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

After receiving PhD in Comparative Linguistics from Kyiv National Linguistic University (2008) Nadiya worked as an Associate Professor of the Germanic Languages and Teaching Methodology Department, Faculty of Ukrainian Philology, Foreign Languages and Social Communications and Vice Dean of the Faculty of Foreign Languages, Central Ukrainian State University, Ukraine.

Nadiya was a Chevening scholar and Postgraduate researcher at the Department of Education, University of Oxford (2003-2004). She was a Co-chair of the joint UNESCO Chair/UNITWIN project ‘Education as a Humanitarian Response’ (2004-2012); a participant of BECA joint project ‘Education for Democracy’ between Montclair State University (USA) and Kirovohrad State Pedagogical University (Ukraine). Nadiya had internship for teachers of EFL in the Department of Educational and Cultural Programmes at Shakespeare’s Globe Theater, London, UK (2011). She was the Head of the British Council International Mobility Grant ‘Internalizing Higher Education in Ukraine’, which included 2 internships at the University of Durham, UK (2016). She participated in the internship “Retraining in the Field of Teaching Excellence”, Bayreuth University, Germany (Erasmus + Project (2021) and was a coordinator of the Erasmus+ Project: Innovative Approach to Promotion Teaching Excellence (2021-2022) at Central Ukrainian State University.

Selected Publications

BOOKS

  • Rastrygina, A., Ivanenko, N. (2021). Pedagogy of Freedom in the Paradigmal Space of Modern Education and Upbringing.
  • Ivanenko, N., Liashuk, A. (2021). English Activity Book. Practical Course of English. Kropyvnytskyi.
  • Ivanenko N. (2014). (Edit.) Education in Eastern Europe and Eurasia. London: Bloomsbury.
  • Ivanenko N. (2008). The Concept of Good in English and Ukrainian Language Pictures of the World. Kirovohrad: KOD.
  • Ivanenko N. (2007). Written Practice and Conversation for 1 Year. Kropyvnytskyi.
  • Garkusha, L., Ivanenko, N. (2004). Critical thinking in life skills training. Kirovohrad.

BOOK CHAPTERS

  • Ivanenko, N. (2024). Words and word meanings In The Routledge Companion To English Studies/ by Constant Leung & Jo Lewkowicz. London, UK: Routledge (in publishing).
  • Ivanenko N. (2023). Development of civic education in Ukrainian universities: new challenges of modern realities in the conditions of the transformation of society. In Contemporary Education in Ukraine: Integration into the European Educational Space. Dnipro (pp. 387-412) DOI:36550/978-617-8245-57-3-20
  • Ivanenko N. (2019). Citizenship Education, Moral Fluency and Social and Political Future Challenges. In Polish-Jewish History, Culture, Values, and Education between Paradise and Inferno. Irvine, USA: Brown Walker Press (pp. 93-103)
  • Ivanenko N. (2014). Education Change, Transformation, Reforms – a Regional Overview. In N. Ivanenko (Edit.) Education in Eastern Europe and Eurasia. London: Bloomsbury (pp. 9-45)
  • Ivanenko N. (2013). Vulnerable Children in Ukraine and Educational Response. In M. Matsumoto (Edit.) Education and Disadvantaged Children and Young People. London: Bloomsbury (pp. 95-132)

JOURNAL ARTICLES

  1. Ivanenko, N. (2024). Challenges of Ukrainian Higher Education in Times of War. International Higher Education. The Boston College Centre for International Higher Education, 118, pp. 35-36 https://doi.org/10.36197/IHE.2024.118.17
  2. Ivanenko, N., Paska, T., Irkha, A. Rud, A., & Boguslavskas, L., (2024). The Role of Higher Education for Ensuring National Security in Ukraine. Futurity Education, 4(1), 210-237 https://doi.org/10.57125/FED.2024.03.25.11
  3. Leleka, T., Ivanenko, N., Demeshko, I., Kapitan T., & Demchenko, I. (2024). The Process of English Internationalization in the Ukrainian Educational Paradigm. Slavistica Vilnensis, 68(2), 76-89 doi:10.15388/SlavViln.2023.68(2).6
  4. Ivanenko, N., Rud, A., Hurbanska, A., Cheban, Y., & Syrtseva, S. (2024). Digitalization of Education of the Future – A Trend or a Requirement of the Time? Journal of Higher Education Theory and Practice24(2). DOI: https://doi.org/10.33423/jhetp.v24i2.6791
  5. Ivanenko, N. (2023). Civic character cultivation as a basic virtue within and beyond modern educational institutions. Academic Notes. Series Pedagogical sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 209, 180-185 DOI: https://doi.org/10.36550/2415-7988-2022-1-209-180-185
  6. Rastrygina, A., Ivanenko, N. (2023). A Pedagogy of freedom as a viable basis for implementing gender equality in Ukraine’s educational institutions. International Review of Education, 69(1-2), 143-174. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/s11159-023-09995-9
  7. Ivanenko N., Biletska O., Hurbanska S., Hurbanska, A., & Kochmar, D. (2023). English language morphological neologisms reflecting the war in Ukraine. World Journal of English Language, 13(5), pp. 432-438    DOI: doi:http://dx.doi.org/10.5430/wjel.v13n5p432
  8. Ivanenko, N., Boiko, A., Fedorchuk, L., Panchenko, I., & Marieiev, D. (2023). Development of educational policy in Ukraine in the context of European integration and digital transformation. Revista Eduweb, 17(2), 296-305 DOI: https://doi.org/10.46502/issn.1856-7576/2023.17.02.25
  9. Ivanenko, N.V., Gerasymenko,Yu. A., Kostenko, V.G. (2023). Innovative approaches to the modernization of philological education and science in Ukraine: a response to the challenges of wartime. Akademichni Vizii, (in Ukrainian). URL: https://academy-vision.org/index.php/av/article/view/281 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5281/zenodo.7795088
  10. Ivanenko N. (2022). Phraseological units of the conceptual field MARRIAGE in the English picture of the world. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi: KOD, 202, pp. 140-146
  11. Bilous, O., Mishchenko, A., Datska, T., Ivanenko, N., Kit, L., Piankovska, I., and Vereshchak, Y. (2021). Modern linguistic technologies: strategy of teaching translation studies. Rupkatha Journal on Interdisciplinary Studies in Humanities, 13(4), pp. 1-12 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/21659/rupkatha.v13n4.65
  12. Leleka, T., Ivanenko, N., Moskalenko O., Herasymenko, L., Shevchuk L., Pidlubna, O. (2021). Angloamerican loanwords use in the Ukrainian student slang. Laplage em Revista, 7(Extra-D): University and science: possible dialogues. pp.163-174. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/24115/S2446-622020217Extra-D1081p.163-174
  13. Ivanenko N. (2021). Figurative and valuable component of the MARRIAGE concept. Trends in Science and Practice of Today. Ankara, Turkey, pp. 356-361
  14. Ivanenko N. (2021). Inclusive learning environment for students’ achievements and foreign language development. Priorities in the Development of Science and Education. Budapest, Hungary, pp.74-80
  15. Ivanenko N. (2021). The nominative field of the MARRIAGE concept and the analysis of the synonymous series of its key unit. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi: KOD, 193, pp 218-224 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.36550/2522-4077-2021-1-193-218-224
  16. Ivanenko N. (2020). Language intervention stages in project-based learning. Modern Trends in Foreign Language Professional Training in a Multicultural Space. Kyiv, pp. 249 – 255
  17. Rastrygina, A., Ivanenko, N. (2020). Gender comfortable educational environment as a factor of development of personal freedom. Research Bulletin. Pedagogical Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 188, pp. 28 – 35 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.36550/2415-7988-2020-1-188-28-35
  18. Ivanenko N. (2020). Texting slang as one of the most common groups of everyday youth Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi: KOD, 187, pp. 38-45
  19. Ivanenko N. (2019). Computer use in foreign language Intellectual and Emotional Components of Foreign Language Learning: Latest Trends and Challenges for Higher Education. Kyiv, pp. 152 – 158.
  20. Ivanenko N. (2019). Initial stages of elaborating a project in a foreign language classroom. Science and Society. Hamilton, Canada, pp. 13 – 20.
  21. Ivanenko N. (2019). Project-based learning as a way to incorporate effective foreign language teaching. Research Bulletin. Pedagogical Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 177, pp. 207 – 211
  22. Ivanenko N. (2019). Youth vocabulary as a reflection of changes in modern society. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi: KOD, 175, pp. 34 – 39.
  23. Ivanenko N. (2018). Promoting citizenship education in the English language Proceedings of the IV International Conference. Kyiv, pp. 130 – 137
  24. Ivanenko N. (2018). Educating global citizens at a foreign language class. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, – pp. 494 – 500
  25. Ivanenko N. (2018). Formation of civic values through teaching a foreign language. Proceedings of the II International Conference “Foreign Language in Professional Training of Specialists: Problems and Strategies”. Kropyvnytskyi, pp. 189-191
  26. Ivanenko N. (2017). Citizenship education in the English language classroom. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 154. – pp. 92 – 97
  27. Ivanenko N. (2017). Education for democratic citizenship: teaching virtues and values. Research Bulletin. Pedagogical Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 152, pp. 110-113
  28. Ivanenko N. (2016). Citizenship education as a way to develop moral fluency to solve social and political challenges of the future. Scientific Journal of Ariel University. Israel: Ariel University.
  29. Ivanenko N. (2016). Functioning peculiarities of lexical units of the RESPECT concept in the English language. Proceedings of the International Conference Linguistic and Linguacultural Aspects of Teaching Foreign Languages in Ukrainian Universities”. Dnipropetrovsk, pp. 87-94
  30. Ivanenko N. (2016). Semantic relationships of lexical units of the concept of love in the English language. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, pp. 221-226
  31. Ivanenko N. (2015). Citizenship education as the coordination and integration of educational establishment and community. Research Proceedings of the national UniversityOstrog Academy”. Ostrog, pp. 136-142
  32. Ivanenko N. (2015). The value of citizenship education in practices of student governing body. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 136. pp. 438-442

Louise’s doctoral research investigates how teachers become who they are.

Louise’s work situates the schoolteacher as a particular type of subject, that is both made and makes itself from within a network of power relations. Her study combines Foucauldian theory, Critical Discourse Analysis, and Narrative analysis to provide an account of schoolteachers’ ethical agency in the context of top-down policy practices.

Louise is a Doctoral Teaching Fellow at the Department of Education, where she teaches and supervises students in the MSc in Learning and Teaching course. Currently, Louise is collaborating the OECD in their Globally Teaching InSights project. Her research supports the Schools+ Network aims to fuel an ecosystem of organisations that are driving change in education from the bottom-up.

In March 2023 she presented her preliminary research at the Philosophy of Education Society of Great Britain (PESGB)’s annual conference.

As Honorary Fellow John attends seminars and consults with current staff in Mathematics Education.

During 40 years at the Open University supporting the teaching of mathematics he authored a wide range of papers, and dozens of Open University Books and Teaching materials. He co-authored the classic Thinking Mathematically; Mathematics as a Constructive Activity (with his wife Prof. Anne Watson); Questions and Prompts for Mathematical Thinking & Thinkers (with Anne and other colleagues), among many others.

His research methods are phenomenological, based on the Discipline of Noticing. He is interested in the lived experience of learning, doing and teaching mathematics. He focuses on the structure and form of Attention in the teaching of mathematics, as he supports those who wish to foster and sustain mathematical thinking in others.

He is an Honorary Fellow of BSRLM and ATM, a long-standing member of  the MAA and the  MA.H.

 

Publications

  • Mason, J. (2022). Consequences of a Virtual Encounter with George Pólya. Teaching Mathematics and Computer Science.  20 (2) p173-182.
  • Zazkis, R. Kontorovich, I. & Mason, J. (2021). The Learning and Teaching of Number: paths less travelled through well-trodden terrain. London: Routledge
  • Mason, J. (2021). Learning about Noticing, by, and through, Noticing. ZDM – Mathematics Education. 53(1) p231-243. doi: 10.1007/s11858-020-01192-4
  • Mason, J. & Czarnocha,B. (2021). Aha! Moments, Bisociation and Multifocal Attention. In B. Czarnocha & W. Baker. Creativity of an Aha! Moment and Mathematics Education. Leiden: Brill. p345-361.
  • Mason, J. (2018) Making Distinctions: a phenomenological exploration in mathematics education. In P. Ernest (Ed.). The Philosophy of Mathematics Education Today. ICME-13 Monographs. Springer.
  • Mason, J. (2018). Reflecting on values emerging from practice and the value of reflecting on practice. In D. Rowe & A. Watson (Eds.). Faith and Experience in Education: essays from Quaker perspectives. London: Trentham Books. p63-91.
  • Mason, J. & Metz, M. (2017). Digging Beneath Dual Systems Theory and the Bicameral Brain: abductions about the human psyche from experience in mathematical problem solving. In U. Xolocotzin (Ed.). Understanding Emotions in Mathematical Thinking and Learning. p379-407. Cambridge: Elsevier/Academic Press.
  • Mason, J. (2016). Rising Above a Cause-and-Effect Stance in Mathematics Education Research. JMTE 19(4) p297-300. http://rdcu.be/npTf
  • Mason, J. & Davis, B. (2013). The Importance of Teachers’ Mathematical Awareness for In-The-Moment Pedagogy. CJSMTE 13(2) p182-197.
  • Mason, J. (2012). Noticing: roots and branches. In M. Sherin, V. Jacobs, & R. Phillip (Eds.) Mathematics Teacher Noticing:  Seeing Through Teachers’ Eyes. p35-50. Mahwah: Erlbaum.
  • Mason, J. (2008). Being Mathematical With & In Front of Learners: Attention, Awareness, and Attitude as Sources of Differences between Teacher Educators, Teachers & Learners. In T. Wood (Series Ed.) & B. Jaworski (Vol. Ed.), International Handbook of Mathematics Teacher Education: Vol.4. The Mathematics Teacher Educator as a Developing Professional. Rotterdam, the Netherlands: Sense Publishers, p31-56.
  • Mason, J. & Johnston-Wilder, S. (2006 2nd edition). Designing and Using Mathematical Tasks. St. Albans: Tarquin.
  • Watson, A. & Mason, J. (2006). Seeing an Exercise as a Single Mathematical Object: Using Variation to Structure Sense-Making. Mathematical Thinking and Learning. 8(2) p91-111.
  • Watson, A. & Mason, J. (2005). Mathematics as a Constructive Activity: learners generating examples. Mahwah: Erlbaum.
  • Mason, J. & Johnston-Wilder, S. (2004). Fundamental Constructs in Mathematics Education, RoutledgeFalmer, London.
  • Mason, J. 2003, Structure of Attention in the Learning of Mathematics, in J. Novotná (Ed.) Proceedings, International Symposium on Elementary Mathematics Teaching, Charles University, Prague, p9-16.
  • Mason, J. 2002, Mathematics Teaching Practice: a guidebook for university and college lecturers, Horwood Publishing, Chichester.
  • Mason, J. 2002, Researching Your own Practice: The Discipline of Noticing, RoutledgeFalmer, London.
  • Mason, J. 2001, Modelling Modelling: where is the centre of gravity of-for-when modelling?, in J. Matos, W. Blum, S. Houston & S. Carreira (Eds.) Modelling and Mathematics Education: ICTMA 9 applications in science and technology, Horwood Publishing, Chichester, p39-61.
  • Mason, J. Burton L. & Stacey K. (1982). Thinking Mathematically, Addison Wesley, London

Website

www.pmtheta.com

Mark has worked in ELT and EMI for over 35 years as a teacher, teacher trainer, lecturer, course writer, syllabus designer, examiner, Director of Studies, and consultant editor for OUP. For the British Council he has worked as a consultant trainer and course developer in EMI and EAP. For the University of Oxford Department of Education Mark delivered the ELT option on the MSc ALSLA and is Teaching Associate of the EMI Research Group in which capacity he has worked as a CI and has developed and delivered EMI teacher training courses in China, Serbia and Oxford. Mark has worked in universities in Russia, Ukraine, Kazakhstan, Belarus, Czechia, Italy, Germany, Mexico, Peru, Chile, Brazil, Colombia and Morocco.

He continues to be involved in EMI and is currently co-authoring an EMI student guide.

Mark is an alumnus of the University of Oxford Department of Education and was among the first to be awarded the innovative MSc in Teaching English Language in University Settings.

Anushay is a second-year DPhil student investigating how classroom characteristics are related to Pakistani children’s development. She is supervised by Professor Iram Siraj and Dr Katharina Ereky-Stevens and her work is being supported by the Aga Khan University (Pakistan). Anushay received the Patrice Engle Dissertation Grant Award from the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD) in 2023.

Anushay completed her BSc Psychology from UCL, where she also started her master’s in Developmental Neuroscience and Psychopathology. She was based at Yale University for her master’s thesis, where she worked with Dr Craig Bailey at the Yale Center for Emotional Intelligence to understand children’s emotion development. Anushay also works as a part-time research  assistant at the Developmental Diversity Lab at UCL’s Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience. Anushay’s research interests include understanding child development across different cultures, factors that might be affecting it, and devising culture-specific ways to support children’s holistic development through the educational system. She is also keen on improving the research scope in Pakistan by working with Pakistani researchers, practitioners, and families. Anushay balances her research with her position as the founder of a non-profit, Resources for Children, which aims to understand and support children’s development in Pakistan.

Publications

Journal Articles

  1. Mazhar, A., & Bailey, C., S. (under review). Understanding Children’s Emotion-Specific Biases: How They Relate to Child and Family Factors, Emotion Recognition Accuracy, and Social Behaviour.

Presentations

  1. Mazhar, A., & Bailey, C., S. (2023, March). Understanding Children’s Emotion-Specific Biases: How They Relate to Child-Level Factors and Emotion Recognition Accuracy [Paper Presentation]. Society for Research in Child Development, Salt Lake City, Utah, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2022, April). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Spring Preview, New Haven, United States.
  3. Mazhar, A. (2021, December). Does an extended family improve mentalising in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK & Pakistan. 2nd International Foundation University Conference of Psychology, Rawalpindi, Pakistan.
  4. Mazhar, A. (2020, October). Developing a non-profit to advance autism research in Pakistan. Anna Freud Centre Seminar Series, London, United Kingdom.

Posters

  1. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Theory of Mind in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK and Pakistan. Harvard Trends in Psychology Summit, Cambridge, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Research Rounds, New Haven, United States.

Cindy works at the intersection of learning, design, and technology, with a keen interest in the orchestration of future-ready tech-enabled learning.

She is curious how the deployment of adaptive learning systems to schools will impact classroom learning and hopes to learn more about the human-machine partnership in education. Specifically, her research is concerned with the implications that the use of such systems has on teacher-student interactions, as teachers grapple with balancing personalised learning and learning in community, as well as curriculum demands and student interests. These are some tensions which could potentially be exacerbated by affordances of adaptive learning systems.

Prior to embarking on the DPhil in Education at Oxford, Cindy worked as the Lead Specialist in Technologies for Learning at the Educational Technology Division of Ministry of Education, Singapore. She had previously completed graduate studies at the National University of Singapore and Stanford University where she was awarded Master of Arts in English Studies and Master of Arts in Education.

Reem is DPhil student from Saudi Arabia.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she worked as a Teacher, Professional Developer, then, became a Supervisor and Researcher in the Ministry of Education where she received a scholarship to pursue her DPhil education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests lie in the area of Teacher Education and Professional Learning Policy and Practice.

Publications
  • Alqahtani, Reem (2020). Saudi Universities Role in Developing Teacher Professional Development Programs: Elite Universities Experience. Journal of Educational Sciences. King Saud University.
  • Alqahtani, Reem. (2020). The effect of implementing UDL-based activities in improving EFL learners’ academic achievement and attitudes towards L2. In L. Salas, & E. Ager, Creating Quiet reflective Spaces: Language Teacher Researches Professional Development (pp. 61-62). IATEFL publications.

Lena Zlock is researching the integration of digital technology into structures of teaching, learning, and education in higher education. Her particular focus is on the digital humanities and the potential for digital methods to transform humanistic study. She works with Professor Niall Winters and Dr. James Robson.

Lena’s research interests stem from her education as an M.St. student and Ertegun Graduate Scholar in Modern Languages at the University of Oxford, and as a B.A. student in History at Stanford University. As an undergraduate, she started the Voltaire Library Project, a digitally and data-driven study of the 6,763-book collection of French Enlightenment philosopher Voltaire (you can read more about the project here and here). She has been interested in the application of digital technology to humanistic teaching since her days in Princeton Day School, where she developed an interdisciplinary curriculum on Mexico City (visit the course website here).

Her research on Voltaire led her to think more broadly about the place of digital methods in the humanities classroom, and how new technologies will revolutionise the liberal arts and higher education. As a DPhil candidate, Lena will examine the negotiation and implementation of new learning technologies within the University of Oxford at undergraduate and graduate levels.

Lena is involved in a number of digital humanities initiatives in Oxford. She previously served as the inaugural fellow of the Voltaire Lab at Oxford’s Voltaire Foundation. As a master’s student, Lena co-formulated the convergence agenda for Oxford digital humanities with Professor Howard Hotson, and is currently employed by the Humanities Division to assist with the development of an M.St. degree in Digital Scholarship (read more here). Lena set up and helps to run the History of the Book blog for the Faculty of Medieval and Modern Languages and the Oxford Book History Twitter account.

Lena welcomes inquiries from undergraduate and postgraduate students from Oxford and beyond seeking to get involved with the digital humanities in any capacity. The History of the Book blog also welcomes inquiries from prospective contributors.

 

Abbey is a Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education, in collaboration with the Department of Engineering.

Before joining the DPhil program, Abbey obtained a B.A. in Applied Linguistics with minors in Russian and Chinese from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford. She was the recipient of a Benjamin A. Gilman International Scholarship through U.S. Department of State for study in Russia and was awarded two Foreign Language and Area Studies (FLAS) Fellowships for study in both Russia and China. She holds both TESOL and TEFL certificates and has taught English as a Second Language in various contexts to a wide variety of learner populations.

Abbey’s main research interests lie in the use of technology to facilitate language learning. Her DPhil research focuses on the development of a virtual reality program to bridge the gaps that students face when learning languages through distance learning.

Dr Nadiya Ivanenko is a Visiting Research Fellow in the field of civic education and citizenship linguistics. She is a member of the Applied Linguistics research group and Higher Education research group at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

After receiving PhD in Comparative Linguistics from Kyiv National Linguistic University (2008) Nadiya worked as an Associate Professor of the Germanic Languages and Teaching Methodology Department, Faculty of Ukrainian Philology, Foreign Languages and Social Communications and Vice Dean of the Faculty of Foreign Languages, Central Ukrainian State University, Ukraine.

Nadiya was a Chevening scholar and Postgraduate researcher at the Department of Education, University of Oxford (2003-2004). She was a Co-chair of the joint UNESCO Chair/UNITWIN project ‘Education as a Humanitarian Response’ (2004-2012); a participant of BECA joint project ‘Education for Democracy’ between Montclair State University (USA) and Kirovohrad State Pedagogical University (Ukraine). Nadiya had internship for teachers of EFL in the Department of Educational and Cultural Programmes at Shakespeare’s Globe Theater, London, UK (2011). She was the Head of the British Council International Mobility Grant ‘Internalizing Higher Education in Ukraine’, which included 2 internships at the University of Durham, UK (2016). She participated in the internship “Retraining in the Field of Teaching Excellence”, Bayreuth University, Germany (Erasmus + Project (2021) and was a coordinator of the Erasmus+ Project: Innovative Approach to Promotion Teaching Excellence (2021-2022) at Central Ukrainian State University.

Selected Publications

BOOKS

  • Rastrygina, A., Ivanenko, N. (2021). Pedagogy of Freedom in the Paradigmal Space of Modern Education and Upbringing.
  • Ivanenko, N., Liashuk, A. (2021). English Activity Book. Practical Course of English. Kropyvnytskyi.
  • Ivanenko N. (2014). (Edit.) Education in Eastern Europe and Eurasia. London: Bloomsbury.
  • Ivanenko N. (2008). The Concept of Good in English and Ukrainian Language Pictures of the World. Kirovohrad: KOD.
  • Ivanenko N. (2007). Written Practice and Conversation for 1 Year. Kropyvnytskyi.
  • Garkusha, L., Ivanenko, N. (2004). Critical thinking in life skills training. Kirovohrad.

BOOK CHAPTERS

  • Ivanenko, N. (2024). Words and word meanings In The Routledge Companion To English Studies/ by Constant Leung & Jo Lewkowicz. London, UK: Routledge (in publishing).
  • Ivanenko N. (2023). Development of civic education in Ukrainian universities: new challenges of modern realities in the conditions of the transformation of society. In Contemporary Education in Ukraine: Integration into the European Educational Space. Dnipro (pp. 387-412) DOI:36550/978-617-8245-57-3-20
  • Ivanenko N. (2019). Citizenship Education, Moral Fluency and Social and Political Future Challenges. In Polish-Jewish History, Culture, Values, and Education between Paradise and Inferno. Irvine, USA: Brown Walker Press (pp. 93-103)
  • Ivanenko N. (2014). Education Change, Transformation, Reforms – a Regional Overview. In N. Ivanenko (Edit.) Education in Eastern Europe and Eurasia. London: Bloomsbury (pp. 9-45)
  • Ivanenko N. (2013). Vulnerable Children in Ukraine and Educational Response. In M. Matsumoto (Edit.) Education and Disadvantaged Children and Young People. London: Bloomsbury (pp. 95-132)

JOURNAL ARTICLES

  1. Ivanenko, N. (2024). Challenges of Ukrainian Higher Education in Times of War. International Higher Education. The Boston College Centre for International Higher Education, 118, pp. 35-36 https://doi.org/10.36197/IHE.2024.118.17
  2. Ivanenko, N., Paska, T., Irkha, A. Rud, A., & Boguslavskas, L., (2024). The Role of Higher Education for Ensuring National Security in Ukraine. Futurity Education, 4(1), 210-237 https://doi.org/10.57125/FED.2024.03.25.11
  3. Leleka, T., Ivanenko, N., Demeshko, I., Kapitan T., & Demchenko, I. (2024). The Process of English Internationalization in the Ukrainian Educational Paradigm. Slavistica Vilnensis, 68(2), 76-89 doi:10.15388/SlavViln.2023.68(2).6
  4. Ivanenko, N., Rud, A., Hurbanska, A., Cheban, Y., & Syrtseva, S. (2024). Digitalization of Education of the Future – A Trend or a Requirement of the Time? Journal of Higher Education Theory and Practice24(2). DOI: https://doi.org/10.33423/jhetp.v24i2.6791
  5. Ivanenko, N. (2023). Civic character cultivation as a basic virtue within and beyond modern educational institutions. Academic Notes. Series Pedagogical sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 209, 180-185 DOI: https://doi.org/10.36550/2415-7988-2022-1-209-180-185
  6. Rastrygina, A., Ivanenko, N. (2023). A Pedagogy of freedom as a viable basis for implementing gender equality in Ukraine’s educational institutions. International Review of Education, 69(1-2), 143-174. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/s11159-023-09995-9
  7. Ivanenko N., Biletska O., Hurbanska S., Hurbanska, A., & Kochmar, D. (2023). English language morphological neologisms reflecting the war in Ukraine. World Journal of English Language, 13(5), pp. 432-438    DOI: doi:http://dx.doi.org/10.5430/wjel.v13n5p432
  8. Ivanenko, N., Boiko, A., Fedorchuk, L., Panchenko, I., & Marieiev, D. (2023). Development of educational policy in Ukraine in the context of European integration and digital transformation. Revista Eduweb, 17(2), 296-305 DOI: https://doi.org/10.46502/issn.1856-7576/2023.17.02.25
  9. Ivanenko, N.V., Gerasymenko,Yu. A., Kostenko, V.G. (2023). Innovative approaches to the modernization of philological education and science in Ukraine: a response to the challenges of wartime. Akademichni Vizii, (in Ukrainian). URL: https://academy-vision.org/index.php/av/article/view/281 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5281/zenodo.7795088
  10. Ivanenko N. (2022). Phraseological units of the conceptual field MARRIAGE in the English picture of the world. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi: KOD, 202, pp. 140-146
  11. Bilous, O., Mishchenko, A., Datska, T., Ivanenko, N., Kit, L., Piankovska, I., and Vereshchak, Y. (2021). Modern linguistic technologies: strategy of teaching translation studies. Rupkatha Journal on Interdisciplinary Studies in Humanities, 13(4), pp. 1-12 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/21659/rupkatha.v13n4.65
  12. Leleka, T., Ivanenko, N., Moskalenko O., Herasymenko, L., Shevchuk L., Pidlubna, O. (2021). Angloamerican loanwords use in the Ukrainian student slang. Laplage em Revista, 7(Extra-D): University and science: possible dialogues. pp.163-174. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/24115/S2446-622020217Extra-D1081p.163-174
  13. Ivanenko N. (2021). Figurative and valuable component of the MARRIAGE concept. Trends in Science and Practice of Today. Ankara, Turkey, pp. 356-361
  14. Ivanenko N. (2021). Inclusive learning environment for students’ achievements and foreign language development. Priorities in the Development of Science and Education. Budapest, Hungary, pp.74-80
  15. Ivanenko N. (2021). The nominative field of the MARRIAGE concept and the analysis of the synonymous series of its key unit. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi: KOD, 193, pp 218-224 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.36550/2522-4077-2021-1-193-218-224
  16. Ivanenko N. (2020). Language intervention stages in project-based learning. Modern Trends in Foreign Language Professional Training in a Multicultural Space. Kyiv, pp. 249 – 255
  17. Rastrygina, A., Ivanenko, N. (2020). Gender comfortable educational environment as a factor of development of personal freedom. Research Bulletin. Pedagogical Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 188, pp. 28 – 35 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.36550/2415-7988-2020-1-188-28-35
  18. Ivanenko N. (2020). Texting slang as one of the most common groups of everyday youth Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi: KOD, 187, pp. 38-45
  19. Ivanenko N. (2019). Computer use in foreign language Intellectual and Emotional Components of Foreign Language Learning: Latest Trends and Challenges for Higher Education. Kyiv, pp. 152 – 158.
  20. Ivanenko N. (2019). Initial stages of elaborating a project in a foreign language classroom. Science and Society. Hamilton, Canada, pp. 13 – 20.
  21. Ivanenko N. (2019). Project-based learning as a way to incorporate effective foreign language teaching. Research Bulletin. Pedagogical Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 177, pp. 207 – 211
  22. Ivanenko N. (2019). Youth vocabulary as a reflection of changes in modern society. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi: KOD, 175, pp. 34 – 39.
  23. Ivanenko N. (2018). Promoting citizenship education in the English language Proceedings of the IV International Conference. Kyiv, pp. 130 – 137
  24. Ivanenko N. (2018). Educating global citizens at a foreign language class. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, – pp. 494 – 500
  25. Ivanenko N. (2018). Formation of civic values through teaching a foreign language. Proceedings of the II International Conference “Foreign Language in Professional Training of Specialists: Problems and Strategies”. Kropyvnytskyi, pp. 189-191
  26. Ivanenko N. (2017). Citizenship education in the English language classroom. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 154. – pp. 92 – 97
  27. Ivanenko N. (2017). Education for democratic citizenship: teaching virtues and values. Research Bulletin. Pedagogical Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 152, pp. 110-113
  28. Ivanenko N. (2016). Citizenship education as a way to develop moral fluency to solve social and political challenges of the future. Scientific Journal of Ariel University. Israel: Ariel University.
  29. Ivanenko N. (2016). Functioning peculiarities of lexical units of the RESPECT concept in the English language. Proceedings of the International Conference Linguistic and Linguacultural Aspects of Teaching Foreign Languages in Ukrainian Universities”. Dnipropetrovsk, pp. 87-94
  30. Ivanenko N. (2016). Semantic relationships of lexical units of the concept of love in the English language. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, pp. 221-226
  31. Ivanenko N. (2015). Citizenship education as the coordination and integration of educational establishment and community. Research Proceedings of the national UniversityOstrog Academy”. Ostrog, pp. 136-142
  32. Ivanenko N. (2015). The value of citizenship education in practices of student governing body. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 136. pp. 438-442

Louise’s doctoral research investigates how teachers become who they are.

Louise’s work situates the schoolteacher as a particular type of subject, that is both made and makes itself from within a network of power relations. Her study combines Foucauldian theory, Critical Discourse Analysis, and Narrative analysis to provide an account of schoolteachers’ ethical agency in the context of top-down policy practices.

Louise is a Doctoral Teaching Fellow at the Department of Education, where she teaches and supervises students in the MSc in Learning and Teaching course. Currently, Louise is collaborating the OECD in their Globally Teaching InSights project. Her research supports the Schools+ Network aims to fuel an ecosystem of organisations that are driving change in education from the bottom-up.

In March 2023 she presented her preliminary research at the Philosophy of Education Society of Great Britain (PESGB)’s annual conference.

As Honorary Fellow John attends seminars and consults with current staff in Mathematics Education.

During 40 years at the Open University supporting the teaching of mathematics he authored a wide range of papers, and dozens of Open University Books and Teaching materials. He co-authored the classic Thinking Mathematically; Mathematics as a Constructive Activity (with his wife Prof. Anne Watson); Questions and Prompts for Mathematical Thinking & Thinkers (with Anne and other colleagues), among many others.

His research methods are phenomenological, based on the Discipline of Noticing. He is interested in the lived experience of learning, doing and teaching mathematics. He focuses on the structure and form of Attention in the teaching of mathematics, as he supports those who wish to foster and sustain mathematical thinking in others.

He is an Honorary Fellow of BSRLM and ATM, a long-standing member of  the MAA and the  MA.H.

 

Publications

  • Mason, J. (2022). Consequences of a Virtual Encounter with George Pólya. Teaching Mathematics and Computer Science.  20 (2) p173-182.
  • Zazkis, R. Kontorovich, I. & Mason, J. (2021). The Learning and Teaching of Number: paths less travelled through well-trodden terrain. London: Routledge
  • Mason, J. (2021). Learning about Noticing, by, and through, Noticing. ZDM – Mathematics Education. 53(1) p231-243. doi: 10.1007/s11858-020-01192-4
  • Mason, J. & Czarnocha,B. (2021). Aha! Moments, Bisociation and Multifocal Attention. In B. Czarnocha & W. Baker. Creativity of an Aha! Moment and Mathematics Education. Leiden: Brill. p345-361.
  • Mason, J. (2018) Making Distinctions: a phenomenological exploration in mathematics education. In P. Ernest (Ed.). The Philosophy of Mathematics Education Today. ICME-13 Monographs. Springer.
  • Mason, J. (2018). Reflecting on values emerging from practice and the value of reflecting on practice. In D. Rowe & A. Watson (Eds.). Faith and Experience in Education: essays from Quaker perspectives. London: Trentham Books. p63-91.
  • Mason, J. & Metz, M. (2017). Digging Beneath Dual Systems Theory and the Bicameral Brain: abductions about the human psyche from experience in mathematical problem solving. In U. Xolocotzin (Ed.). Understanding Emotions in Mathematical Thinking and Learning. p379-407. Cambridge: Elsevier/Academic Press.
  • Mason, J. (2016). Rising Above a Cause-and-Effect Stance in Mathematics Education Research. JMTE 19(4) p297-300. http://rdcu.be/npTf
  • Mason, J. & Davis, B. (2013). The Importance of Teachers’ Mathematical Awareness for In-The-Moment Pedagogy. CJSMTE 13(2) p182-197.
  • Mason, J. (2012). Noticing: roots and branches. In M. Sherin, V. Jacobs, & R. Phillip (Eds.) Mathematics Teacher Noticing:  Seeing Through Teachers’ Eyes. p35-50. Mahwah: Erlbaum.
  • Mason, J. (2008). Being Mathematical With & In Front of Learners: Attention, Awareness, and Attitude as Sources of Differences between Teacher Educators, Teachers & Learners. In T. Wood (Series Ed.) & B. Jaworski (Vol. Ed.), International Handbook of Mathematics Teacher Education: Vol.4. The Mathematics Teacher Educator as a Developing Professional. Rotterdam, the Netherlands: Sense Publishers, p31-56.
  • Mason, J. & Johnston-Wilder, S. (2006 2nd edition). Designing and Using Mathematical Tasks. St. Albans: Tarquin.
  • Watson, A. & Mason, J. (2006). Seeing an Exercise as a Single Mathematical Object: Using Variation to Structure Sense-Making. Mathematical Thinking and Learning. 8(2) p91-111.
  • Watson, A. & Mason, J. (2005). Mathematics as a Constructive Activity: learners generating examples. Mahwah: Erlbaum.
  • Mason, J. & Johnston-Wilder, S. (2004). Fundamental Constructs in Mathematics Education, RoutledgeFalmer, London.
  • Mason, J. 2003, Structure of Attention in the Learning of Mathematics, in J. Novotná (Ed.) Proceedings, International Symposium on Elementary Mathematics Teaching, Charles University, Prague, p9-16.
  • Mason, J. 2002, Mathematics Teaching Practice: a guidebook for university and college lecturers, Horwood Publishing, Chichester.
  • Mason, J. 2002, Researching Your own Practice: The Discipline of Noticing, RoutledgeFalmer, London.
  • Mason, J. 2001, Modelling Modelling: where is the centre of gravity of-for-when modelling?, in J. Matos, W. Blum, S. Houston & S. Carreira (Eds.) Modelling and Mathematics Education: ICTMA 9 applications in science and technology, Horwood Publishing, Chichester, p39-61.
  • Mason, J. Burton L. & Stacey K. (1982). Thinking Mathematically, Addison Wesley, London

Website

www.pmtheta.com

Mark has worked in ELT and EMI for over 35 years as a teacher, teacher trainer, lecturer, course writer, syllabus designer, examiner, Director of Studies, and consultant editor for OUP. For the British Council he has worked as a consultant trainer and course developer in EMI and EAP. For the University of Oxford Department of Education Mark delivered the ELT option on the MSc ALSLA and is Teaching Associate of the EMI Research Group in which capacity he has worked as a CI and has developed and delivered EMI teacher training courses in China, Serbia and Oxford. Mark has worked in universities in Russia, Ukraine, Kazakhstan, Belarus, Czechia, Italy, Germany, Mexico, Peru, Chile, Brazil, Colombia and Morocco.

He continues to be involved in EMI and is currently co-authoring an EMI student guide.

Mark is an alumnus of the University of Oxford Department of Education and was among the first to be awarded the innovative MSc in Teaching English Language in University Settings.

Anushay is a second-year DPhil student investigating how classroom characteristics are related to Pakistani children’s development. She is supervised by Professor Iram Siraj and Dr Katharina Ereky-Stevens and her work is being supported by the Aga Khan University (Pakistan). Anushay received the Patrice Engle Dissertation Grant Award from the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD) in 2023.

Anushay completed her BSc Psychology from UCL, where she also started her master’s in Developmental Neuroscience and Psychopathology. She was based at Yale University for her master’s thesis, where she worked with Dr Craig Bailey at the Yale Center for Emotional Intelligence to understand children’s emotion development. Anushay also works as a part-time research  assistant at the Developmental Diversity Lab at UCL’s Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience. Anushay’s research interests include understanding child development across different cultures, factors that might be affecting it, and devising culture-specific ways to support children’s holistic development through the educational system. She is also keen on improving the research scope in Pakistan by working with Pakistani researchers, practitioners, and families. Anushay balances her research with her position as the founder of a non-profit, Resources for Children, which aims to understand and support children’s development in Pakistan.

Publications

Journal Articles

  1. Mazhar, A., & Bailey, C., S. (under review). Understanding Children’s Emotion-Specific Biases: How They Relate to Child and Family Factors, Emotion Recognition Accuracy, and Social Behaviour.

Presentations

  1. Mazhar, A., & Bailey, C., S. (2023, March). Understanding Children’s Emotion-Specific Biases: How They Relate to Child-Level Factors and Emotion Recognition Accuracy [Paper Presentation]. Society for Research in Child Development, Salt Lake City, Utah, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2022, April). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Spring Preview, New Haven, United States.
  3. Mazhar, A. (2021, December). Does an extended family improve mentalising in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK & Pakistan. 2nd International Foundation University Conference of Psychology, Rawalpindi, Pakistan.
  4. Mazhar, A. (2020, October). Developing a non-profit to advance autism research in Pakistan. Anna Freud Centre Seminar Series, London, United Kingdom.

Posters

  1. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Theory of Mind in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK and Pakistan. Harvard Trends in Psychology Summit, Cambridge, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Research Rounds, New Haven, United States.

Cindy works at the intersection of learning, design, and technology, with a keen interest in the orchestration of future-ready tech-enabled learning.

She is curious how the deployment of adaptive learning systems to schools will impact classroom learning and hopes to learn more about the human-machine partnership in education. Specifically, her research is concerned with the implications that the use of such systems has on teacher-student interactions, as teachers grapple with balancing personalised learning and learning in community, as well as curriculum demands and student interests. These are some tensions which could potentially be exacerbated by affordances of adaptive learning systems.

Prior to embarking on the DPhil in Education at Oxford, Cindy worked as the Lead Specialist in Technologies for Learning at the Educational Technology Division of Ministry of Education, Singapore. She had previously completed graduate studies at the National University of Singapore and Stanford University where she was awarded Master of Arts in English Studies and Master of Arts in Education.

Reem is DPhil student from Saudi Arabia.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she worked as a Teacher, Professional Developer, then, became a Supervisor and Researcher in the Ministry of Education where she received a scholarship to pursue her DPhil education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests lie in the area of Teacher Education and Professional Learning Policy and Practice.

Publications
  • Alqahtani, Reem (2020). Saudi Universities Role in Developing Teacher Professional Development Programs: Elite Universities Experience. Journal of Educational Sciences. King Saud University.
  • Alqahtani, Reem. (2020). The effect of implementing UDL-based activities in improving EFL learners’ academic achievement and attitudes towards L2. In L. Salas, & E. Ager, Creating Quiet reflective Spaces: Language Teacher Researches Professional Development (pp. 61-62). IATEFL publications.

Lena Zlock is researching the integration of digital technology into structures of teaching, learning, and education in higher education. Her particular focus is on the digital humanities and the potential for digital methods to transform humanistic study. She works with Professor Niall Winters and Dr. James Robson.

Lena’s research interests stem from her education as an M.St. student and Ertegun Graduate Scholar in Modern Languages at the University of Oxford, and as a B.A. student in History at Stanford University. As an undergraduate, she started the Voltaire Library Project, a digitally and data-driven study of the 6,763-book collection of French Enlightenment philosopher Voltaire (you can read more about the project here and here). She has been interested in the application of digital technology to humanistic teaching since her days in Princeton Day School, where she developed an interdisciplinary curriculum on Mexico City (visit the course website here).

Her research on Voltaire led her to think more broadly about the place of digital methods in the humanities classroom, and how new technologies will revolutionise the liberal arts and higher education. As a DPhil candidate, Lena will examine the negotiation and implementation of new learning technologies within the University of Oxford at undergraduate and graduate levels.

Lena is involved in a number of digital humanities initiatives in Oxford. She previously served as the inaugural fellow of the Voltaire Lab at Oxford’s Voltaire Foundation. As a master’s student, Lena co-formulated the convergence agenda for Oxford digital humanities with Professor Howard Hotson, and is currently employed by the Humanities Division to assist with the development of an M.St. degree in Digital Scholarship (read more here). Lena set up and helps to run the History of the Book blog for the Faculty of Medieval and Modern Languages and the Oxford Book History Twitter account.

Lena welcomes inquiries from undergraduate and postgraduate students from Oxford and beyond seeking to get involved with the digital humanities in any capacity. The History of the Book blog also welcomes inquiries from prospective contributors.

 

Abbey is a Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education, in collaboration with the Department of Engineering.

Before joining the DPhil program, Abbey obtained a B.A. in Applied Linguistics with minors in Russian and Chinese from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford. She was the recipient of a Benjamin A. Gilman International Scholarship through U.S. Department of State for study in Russia and was awarded two Foreign Language and Area Studies (FLAS) Fellowships for study in both Russia and China. She holds both TESOL and TEFL certificates and has taught English as a Second Language in various contexts to a wide variety of learner populations.

Abbey’s main research interests lie in the use of technology to facilitate language learning. Her DPhil research focuses on the development of a virtual reality program to bridge the gaps that students face when learning languages through distance learning.

Dr Nadiya Ivanenko is a Visiting Research Fellow in the field of civic education and citizenship linguistics. She is a member of the Applied Linguistics research group and Higher Education research group at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

After receiving PhD in Comparative Linguistics from Kyiv National Linguistic University (2008) Nadiya worked as an Associate Professor of the Germanic Languages and Teaching Methodology Department, Faculty of Ukrainian Philology, Foreign Languages and Social Communications and Vice Dean of the Faculty of Foreign Languages, Central Ukrainian State University, Ukraine.

Nadiya was a Chevening scholar and Postgraduate researcher at the Department of Education, University of Oxford (2003-2004). She was a Co-chair of the joint UNESCO Chair/UNITWIN project ‘Education as a Humanitarian Response’ (2004-2012); a participant of BECA joint project ‘Education for Democracy’ between Montclair State University (USA) and Kirovohrad State Pedagogical University (Ukraine). Nadiya had internship for teachers of EFL in the Department of Educational and Cultural Programmes at Shakespeare’s Globe Theater, London, UK (2011). She was the Head of the British Council International Mobility Grant ‘Internalizing Higher Education in Ukraine’, which included 2 internships at the University of Durham, UK (2016). She participated in the internship “Retraining in the Field of Teaching Excellence”, Bayreuth University, Germany (Erasmus + Project (2021) and was a coordinator of the Erasmus+ Project: Innovative Approach to Promotion Teaching Excellence (2021-2022) at Central Ukrainian State University.

Selected Publications

BOOKS

  • Rastrygina, A., Ivanenko, N. (2021). Pedagogy of Freedom in the Paradigmal Space of Modern Education and Upbringing.
  • Ivanenko, N., Liashuk, A. (2021). English Activity Book. Practical Course of English. Kropyvnytskyi.
  • Ivanenko N. (2014). (Edit.) Education in Eastern Europe and Eurasia. London: Bloomsbury.
  • Ivanenko N. (2008). The Concept of Good in English and Ukrainian Language Pictures of the World. Kirovohrad: KOD.
  • Ivanenko N. (2007). Written Practice and Conversation for 1 Year. Kropyvnytskyi.
  • Garkusha, L., Ivanenko, N. (2004). Critical thinking in life skills training. Kirovohrad.

BOOK CHAPTERS

  • Ivanenko, N. (2024). Words and word meanings In The Routledge Companion To English Studies/ by Constant Leung & Jo Lewkowicz. London, UK: Routledge (in publishing).
  • Ivanenko N. (2023). Development of civic education in Ukrainian universities: new challenges of modern realities in the conditions of the transformation of society. In Contemporary Education in Ukraine: Integration into the European Educational Space. Dnipro (pp. 387-412) DOI:36550/978-617-8245-57-3-20
  • Ivanenko N. (2019). Citizenship Education, Moral Fluency and Social and Political Future Challenges. In Polish-Jewish History, Culture, Values, and Education between Paradise and Inferno. Irvine, USA: Brown Walker Press (pp. 93-103)
  • Ivanenko N. (2014). Education Change, Transformation, Reforms – a Regional Overview. In N. Ivanenko (Edit.) Education in Eastern Europe and Eurasia. London: Bloomsbury (pp. 9-45)
  • Ivanenko N. (2013). Vulnerable Children in Ukraine and Educational Response. In M. Matsumoto (Edit.) Education and Disadvantaged Children and Young People. London: Bloomsbury (pp. 95-132)

JOURNAL ARTICLES

  1. Ivanenko, N. (2024). Challenges of Ukrainian Higher Education in Times of War. International Higher Education. The Boston College Centre for International Higher Education, 118, pp. 35-36 https://doi.org/10.36197/IHE.2024.118.17
  2. Ivanenko, N., Paska, T., Irkha, A. Rud, A., & Boguslavskas, L., (2024). The Role of Higher Education for Ensuring National Security in Ukraine. Futurity Education, 4(1), 210-237 https://doi.org/10.57125/FED.2024.03.25.11
  3. Leleka, T., Ivanenko, N., Demeshko, I., Kapitan T., & Demchenko, I. (2024). The Process of English Internationalization in the Ukrainian Educational Paradigm. Slavistica Vilnensis, 68(2), 76-89 doi:10.15388/SlavViln.2023.68(2).6
  4. Ivanenko, N., Rud, A., Hurbanska, A., Cheban, Y., & Syrtseva, S. (2024). Digitalization of Education of the Future – A Trend or a Requirement of the Time? Journal of Higher Education Theory and Practice24(2). DOI: https://doi.org/10.33423/jhetp.v24i2.6791
  5. Ivanenko, N. (2023). Civic character cultivation as a basic virtue within and beyond modern educational institutions. Academic Notes. Series Pedagogical sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 209, 180-185 DOI: https://doi.org/10.36550/2415-7988-2022-1-209-180-185
  6. Rastrygina, A., Ivanenko, N. (2023). A Pedagogy of freedom as a viable basis for implementing gender equality in Ukraine’s educational institutions. International Review of Education, 69(1-2), 143-174. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/s11159-023-09995-9
  7. Ivanenko N., Biletska O., Hurbanska S., Hurbanska, A., & Kochmar, D. (2023). English language morphological neologisms reflecting the war in Ukraine. World Journal of English Language, 13(5), pp. 432-438    DOI: doi:http://dx.doi.org/10.5430/wjel.v13n5p432
  8. Ivanenko, N., Boiko, A., Fedorchuk, L., Panchenko, I., & Marieiev, D. (2023). Development of educational policy in Ukraine in the context of European integration and digital transformation. Revista Eduweb, 17(2), 296-305 DOI: https://doi.org/10.46502/issn.1856-7576/2023.17.02.25
  9. Ivanenko, N.V., Gerasymenko,Yu. A., Kostenko, V.G. (2023). Innovative approaches to the modernization of philological education and science in Ukraine: a response to the challenges of wartime. Akademichni Vizii, (in Ukrainian). URL: https://academy-vision.org/index.php/av/article/view/281 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5281/zenodo.7795088
  10. Ivanenko N. (2022). Phraseological units of the conceptual field MARRIAGE in the English picture of the world. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi: KOD, 202, pp. 140-146
  11. Bilous, O., Mishchenko, A., Datska, T., Ivanenko, N., Kit, L., Piankovska, I., and Vereshchak, Y. (2021). Modern linguistic technologies: strategy of teaching translation studies. Rupkatha Journal on Interdisciplinary Studies in Humanities, 13(4), pp. 1-12 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/21659/rupkatha.v13n4.65
  12. Leleka, T., Ivanenko, N., Moskalenko O., Herasymenko, L., Shevchuk L., Pidlubna, O. (2021). Angloamerican loanwords use in the Ukrainian student slang. Laplage em Revista, 7(Extra-D): University and science: possible dialogues. pp.163-174. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/24115/S2446-622020217Extra-D1081p.163-174
  13. Ivanenko N. (2021). Figurative and valuable component of the MARRIAGE concept. Trends in Science and Practice of Today. Ankara, Turkey, pp. 356-361
  14. Ivanenko N. (2021). Inclusive learning environment for students’ achievements and foreign language development. Priorities in the Development of Science and Education. Budapest, Hungary, pp.74-80
  15. Ivanenko N. (2021). The nominative field of the MARRIAGE concept and the analysis of the synonymous series of its key unit. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi: KOD, 193, pp 218-224 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.36550/2522-4077-2021-1-193-218-224
  16. Ivanenko N. (2020). Language intervention stages in project-based learning. Modern Trends in Foreign Language Professional Training in a Multicultural Space. Kyiv, pp. 249 – 255
  17. Rastrygina, A., Ivanenko, N. (2020). Gender comfortable educational environment as a factor of development of personal freedom. Research Bulletin. Pedagogical Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 188, pp. 28 – 35 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.36550/2415-7988-2020-1-188-28-35
  18. Ivanenko N. (2020). Texting slang as one of the most common groups of everyday youth Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi: KOD, 187, pp. 38-45
  19. Ivanenko N. (2019). Computer use in foreign language Intellectual and Emotional Components of Foreign Language Learning: Latest Trends and Challenges for Higher Education. Kyiv, pp. 152 – 158.
  20. Ivanenko N. (2019). Initial stages of elaborating a project in a foreign language classroom. Science and Society. Hamilton, Canada, pp. 13 – 20.
  21. Ivanenko N. (2019). Project-based learning as a way to incorporate effective foreign language teaching. Research Bulletin. Pedagogical Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 177, pp. 207 – 211
  22. Ivanenko N. (2019). Youth vocabulary as a reflection of changes in modern society. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi: KOD, 175, pp. 34 – 39.
  23. Ivanenko N. (2018). Promoting citizenship education in the English language Proceedings of the IV International Conference. Kyiv, pp. 130 – 137
  24. Ivanenko N. (2018). Educating global citizens at a foreign language class. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, – pp. 494 – 500
  25. Ivanenko N. (2018). Formation of civic values through teaching a foreign language. Proceedings of the II International Conference “Foreign Language in Professional Training of Specialists: Problems and Strategies”. Kropyvnytskyi, pp. 189-191
  26. Ivanenko N. (2017). Citizenship education in the English language classroom. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 154. – pp. 92 – 97
  27. Ivanenko N. (2017). Education for democratic citizenship: teaching virtues and values. Research Bulletin. Pedagogical Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 152, pp. 110-113
  28. Ivanenko N. (2016). Citizenship education as a way to develop moral fluency to solve social and political challenges of the future. Scientific Journal of Ariel University. Israel: Ariel University.
  29. Ivanenko N. (2016). Functioning peculiarities of lexical units of the RESPECT concept in the English language. Proceedings of the International Conference Linguistic and Linguacultural Aspects of Teaching Foreign Languages in Ukrainian Universities”. Dnipropetrovsk, pp. 87-94
  30. Ivanenko N. (2016). Semantic relationships of lexical units of the concept of love in the English language. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, pp. 221-226
  31. Ivanenko N. (2015). Citizenship education as the coordination and integration of educational establishment and community. Research Proceedings of the national UniversityOstrog Academy”. Ostrog, pp. 136-142
  32. Ivanenko N. (2015). The value of citizenship education in practices of student governing body. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 136. pp. 438-442

Louise’s doctoral research investigates how teachers become who they are.

Louise’s work situates the schoolteacher as a particular type of subject, that is both made and makes itself from within a network of power relations. Her study combines Foucauldian theory, Critical Discourse Analysis, and Narrative analysis to provide an account of schoolteachers’ ethical agency in the context of top-down policy practices.

Louise is a Doctoral Teaching Fellow at the Department of Education, where she teaches and supervises students in the MSc in Learning and Teaching course. Currently, Louise is collaborating the OECD in their Globally Teaching InSights project. Her research supports the Schools+ Network aims to fuel an ecosystem of organisations that are driving change in education from the bottom-up.

In March 2023 she presented her preliminary research at the Philosophy of Education Society of Great Britain (PESGB)’s annual conference.

As Honorary Fellow John attends seminars and consults with current staff in Mathematics Education.

During 40 years at the Open University supporting the teaching of mathematics he authored a wide range of papers, and dozens of Open University Books and Teaching materials. He co-authored the classic Thinking Mathematically; Mathematics as a Constructive Activity (with his wife Prof. Anne Watson); Questions and Prompts for Mathematical Thinking & Thinkers (with Anne and other colleagues), among many others.

His research methods are phenomenological, based on the Discipline of Noticing. He is interested in the lived experience of learning, doing and teaching mathematics. He focuses on the structure and form of Attention in the teaching of mathematics, as he supports those who wish to foster and sustain mathematical thinking in others.

He is an Honorary Fellow of BSRLM and ATM, a long-standing member of  the MAA and the  MA.H.

 

Publications

  • Mason, J. (2022). Consequences of a Virtual Encounter with George Pólya. Teaching Mathematics and Computer Science.  20 (2) p173-182.
  • Zazkis, R. Kontorovich, I. & Mason, J. (2021). The Learning and Teaching of Number: paths less travelled through well-trodden terrain. London: Routledge
  • Mason, J. (2021). Learning about Noticing, by, and through, Noticing. ZDM – Mathematics Education. 53(1) p231-243. doi: 10.1007/s11858-020-01192-4
  • Mason, J. & Czarnocha,B. (2021). Aha! Moments, Bisociation and Multifocal Attention. In B. Czarnocha & W. Baker. Creativity of an Aha! Moment and Mathematics Education. Leiden: Brill. p345-361.
  • Mason, J. (2018) Making Distinctions: a phenomenological exploration in mathematics education. In P. Ernest (Ed.). The Philosophy of Mathematics Education Today. ICME-13 Monographs. Springer.
  • Mason, J. (2018). Reflecting on values emerging from practice and the value of reflecting on practice. In D. Rowe & A. Watson (Eds.). Faith and Experience in Education: essays from Quaker perspectives. London: Trentham Books. p63-91.
  • Mason, J. & Metz, M. (2017). Digging Beneath Dual Systems Theory and the Bicameral Brain: abductions about the human psyche from experience in mathematical problem solving. In U. Xolocotzin (Ed.). Understanding Emotions in Mathematical Thinking and Learning. p379-407. Cambridge: Elsevier/Academic Press.
  • Mason, J. (2016). Rising Above a Cause-and-Effect Stance in Mathematics Education Research. JMTE 19(4) p297-300. http://rdcu.be/npTf
  • Mason, J. & Davis, B. (2013). The Importance of Teachers’ Mathematical Awareness for In-The-Moment Pedagogy. CJSMTE 13(2) p182-197.
  • Mason, J. (2012). Noticing: roots and branches. In M. Sherin, V. Jacobs, & R. Phillip (Eds.) Mathematics Teacher Noticing:  Seeing Through Teachers’ Eyes. p35-50. Mahwah: Erlbaum.
  • Mason, J. (2008). Being Mathematical With & In Front of Learners: Attention, Awareness, and Attitude as Sources of Differences between Teacher Educators, Teachers & Learners. In T. Wood (Series Ed.) & B. Jaworski (Vol. Ed.), International Handbook of Mathematics Teacher Education: Vol.4. The Mathematics Teacher Educator as a Developing Professional. Rotterdam, the Netherlands: Sense Publishers, p31-56.
  • Mason, J. & Johnston-Wilder, S. (2006 2nd edition). Designing and Using Mathematical Tasks. St. Albans: Tarquin.
  • Watson, A. & Mason, J. (2006). Seeing an Exercise as a Single Mathematical Object: Using Variation to Structure Sense-Making. Mathematical Thinking and Learning. 8(2) p91-111.
  • Watson, A. & Mason, J. (2005). Mathematics as a Constructive Activity: learners generating examples. Mahwah: Erlbaum.
  • Mason, J. & Johnston-Wilder, S. (2004). Fundamental Constructs in Mathematics Education, RoutledgeFalmer, London.
  • Mason, J. 2003, Structure of Attention in the Learning of Mathematics, in J. Novotná (Ed.) Proceedings, International Symposium on Elementary Mathematics Teaching, Charles University, Prague, p9-16.
  • Mason, J. 2002, Mathematics Teaching Practice: a guidebook for university and college lecturers, Horwood Publishing, Chichester.
  • Mason, J. 2002, Researching Your own Practice: The Discipline of Noticing, RoutledgeFalmer, London.
  • Mason, J. 2001, Modelling Modelling: where is the centre of gravity of-for-when modelling?, in J. Matos, W. Blum, S. Houston & S. Carreira (Eds.) Modelling and Mathematics Education: ICTMA 9 applications in science and technology, Horwood Publishing, Chichester, p39-61.
  • Mason, J. Burton L. & Stacey K. (1982). Thinking Mathematically, Addison Wesley, London

Website

www.pmtheta.com

Mark has worked in ELT and EMI for over 35 years as a teacher, teacher trainer, lecturer, course writer, syllabus designer, examiner, Director of Studies, and consultant editor for OUP. For the British Council he has worked as a consultant trainer and course developer in EMI and EAP. For the University of Oxford Department of Education Mark delivered the ELT option on the MSc ALSLA and is Teaching Associate of the EMI Research Group in which capacity he has worked as a CI and has developed and delivered EMI teacher training courses in China, Serbia and Oxford. Mark has worked in universities in Russia, Ukraine, Kazakhstan, Belarus, Czechia, Italy, Germany, Mexico, Peru, Chile, Brazil, Colombia and Morocco.

He continues to be involved in EMI and is currently co-authoring an EMI student guide.

Mark is an alumnus of the University of Oxford Department of Education and was among the first to be awarded the innovative MSc in Teaching English Language in University Settings.

Anushay is a second-year DPhil student investigating how classroom characteristics are related to Pakistani children’s development. She is supervised by Professor Iram Siraj and Dr Katharina Ereky-Stevens and her work is being supported by the Aga Khan University (Pakistan). Anushay received the Patrice Engle Dissertation Grant Award from the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD) in 2023.

Anushay completed her BSc Psychology from UCL, where she also started her master’s in Developmental Neuroscience and Psychopathology. She was based at Yale University for her master’s thesis, where she worked with Dr Craig Bailey at the Yale Center for Emotional Intelligence to understand children’s emotion development. Anushay also works as a part-time research  assistant at the Developmental Diversity Lab at UCL’s Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience. Anushay’s research interests include understanding child development across different cultures, factors that might be affecting it, and devising culture-specific ways to support children’s holistic development through the educational system. She is also keen on improving the research scope in Pakistan by working with Pakistani researchers, practitioners, and families. Anushay balances her research with her position as the founder of a non-profit, Resources for Children, which aims to understand and support children’s development in Pakistan.

Publications

Journal Articles

  1. Mazhar, A., & Bailey, C., S. (under review). Understanding Children’s Emotion-Specific Biases: How They Relate to Child and Family Factors, Emotion Recognition Accuracy, and Social Behaviour.

Presentations

  1. Mazhar, A., & Bailey, C., S. (2023, March). Understanding Children’s Emotion-Specific Biases: How They Relate to Child-Level Factors and Emotion Recognition Accuracy [Paper Presentation]. Society for Research in Child Development, Salt Lake City, Utah, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2022, April). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Spring Preview, New Haven, United States.
  3. Mazhar, A. (2021, December). Does an extended family improve mentalising in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK & Pakistan. 2nd International Foundation University Conference of Psychology, Rawalpindi, Pakistan.
  4. Mazhar, A. (2020, October). Developing a non-profit to advance autism research in Pakistan. Anna Freud Centre Seminar Series, London, United Kingdom.

Posters

  1. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Theory of Mind in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK and Pakistan. Harvard Trends in Psychology Summit, Cambridge, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Research Rounds, New Haven, United States.

Cindy works at the intersection of learning, design, and technology, with a keen interest in the orchestration of future-ready tech-enabled learning.

She is curious how the deployment of adaptive learning systems to schools will impact classroom learning and hopes to learn more about the human-machine partnership in education. Specifically, her research is concerned with the implications that the use of such systems has on teacher-student interactions, as teachers grapple with balancing personalised learning and learning in community, as well as curriculum demands and student interests. These are some tensions which could potentially be exacerbated by affordances of adaptive learning systems.

Prior to embarking on the DPhil in Education at Oxford, Cindy worked as the Lead Specialist in Technologies for Learning at the Educational Technology Division of Ministry of Education, Singapore. She had previously completed graduate studies at the National University of Singapore and Stanford University where she was awarded Master of Arts in English Studies and Master of Arts in Education.

Reem is DPhil student from Saudi Arabia.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she worked as a Teacher, Professional Developer, then, became a Supervisor and Researcher in the Ministry of Education where she received a scholarship to pursue her DPhil education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests lie in the area of Teacher Education and Professional Learning Policy and Practice.

Publications
  • Alqahtani, Reem (2020). Saudi Universities Role in Developing Teacher Professional Development Programs: Elite Universities Experience. Journal of Educational Sciences. King Saud University.
  • Alqahtani, Reem. (2020). The effect of implementing UDL-based activities in improving EFL learners’ academic achievement and attitudes towards L2. In L. Salas, & E. Ager, Creating Quiet reflective Spaces: Language Teacher Researches Professional Development (pp. 61-62). IATEFL publications.

Lena Zlock is researching the integration of digital technology into structures of teaching, learning, and education in higher education. Her particular focus is on the digital humanities and the potential for digital methods to transform humanistic study. She works with Professor Niall Winters and Dr. James Robson.

Lena’s research interests stem from her education as an M.St. student and Ertegun Graduate Scholar in Modern Languages at the University of Oxford, and as a B.A. student in History at Stanford University. As an undergraduate, she started the Voltaire Library Project, a digitally and data-driven study of the 6,763-book collection of French Enlightenment philosopher Voltaire (you can read more about the project here and here). She has been interested in the application of digital technology to humanistic teaching since her days in Princeton Day School, where she developed an interdisciplinary curriculum on Mexico City (visit the course website here).

Her research on Voltaire led her to think more broadly about the place of digital methods in the humanities classroom, and how new technologies will revolutionise the liberal arts and higher education. As a DPhil candidate, Lena will examine the negotiation and implementation of new learning technologies within the University of Oxford at undergraduate and graduate levels.

Lena is involved in a number of digital humanities initiatives in Oxford. She previously served as the inaugural fellow of the Voltaire Lab at Oxford’s Voltaire Foundation. As a master’s student, Lena co-formulated the convergence agenda for Oxford digital humanities with Professor Howard Hotson, and is currently employed by the Humanities Division to assist with the development of an M.St. degree in Digital Scholarship (read more here). Lena set up and helps to run the History of the Book blog for the Faculty of Medieval and Modern Languages and the Oxford Book History Twitter account.

Lena welcomes inquiries from undergraduate and postgraduate students from Oxford and beyond seeking to get involved with the digital humanities in any capacity. The History of the Book blog also welcomes inquiries from prospective contributors.

 

Abbey is a Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education, in collaboration with the Department of Engineering.

Before joining the DPhil program, Abbey obtained a B.A. in Applied Linguistics with minors in Russian and Chinese from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford. She was the recipient of a Benjamin A. Gilman International Scholarship through U.S. Department of State for study in Russia and was awarded two Foreign Language and Area Studies (FLAS) Fellowships for study in both Russia and China. She holds both TESOL and TEFL certificates and has taught English as a Second Language in various contexts to a wide variety of learner populations.

Abbey’s main research interests lie in the use of technology to facilitate language learning. Her DPhil research focuses on the development of a virtual reality program to bridge the gaps that students face when learning languages through distance learning.

Dr Nadiya Ivanenko is a Visiting Research Fellow in the field of civic education and citizenship linguistics. She is a member of the Applied Linguistics research group and Higher Education research group at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

After receiving PhD in Comparative Linguistics from Kyiv National Linguistic University (2008) Nadiya worked as an Associate Professor of the Germanic Languages and Teaching Methodology Department, Faculty of Ukrainian Philology, Foreign Languages and Social Communications and Vice Dean of the Faculty of Foreign Languages, Central Ukrainian State University, Ukraine.

Nadiya was a Chevening scholar and Postgraduate researcher at the Department of Education, University of Oxford (2003-2004). She was a Co-chair of the joint UNESCO Chair/UNITWIN project ‘Education as a Humanitarian Response’ (2004-2012); a participant of BECA joint project ‘Education for Democracy’ between Montclair State University (USA) and Kirovohrad State Pedagogical University (Ukraine). Nadiya had internship for teachers of EFL in the Department of Educational and Cultural Programmes at Shakespeare’s Globe Theater, London, UK (2011). She was the Head of the British Council International Mobility Grant ‘Internalizing Higher Education in Ukraine’, which included 2 internships at the University of Durham, UK (2016). She participated in the internship “Retraining in the Field of Teaching Excellence”, Bayreuth University, Germany (Erasmus + Project (2021) and was a coordinator of the Erasmus+ Project: Innovative Approach to Promotion Teaching Excellence (2021-2022) at Central Ukrainian State University.

Selected Publications

BOOKS

  • Rastrygina, A., Ivanenko, N. (2021). Pedagogy of Freedom in the Paradigmal Space of Modern Education and Upbringing.
  • Ivanenko, N., Liashuk, A. (2021). English Activity Book. Practical Course of English. Kropyvnytskyi.
  • Ivanenko N. (2014). (Edit.) Education in Eastern Europe and Eurasia. London: Bloomsbury.
  • Ivanenko N. (2008). The Concept of Good in English and Ukrainian Language Pictures of the World. Kirovohrad: KOD.
  • Ivanenko N. (2007). Written Practice and Conversation for 1 Year. Kropyvnytskyi.
  • Garkusha, L., Ivanenko, N. (2004). Critical thinking in life skills training. Kirovohrad.

BOOK CHAPTERS

  • Ivanenko, N. (2024). Words and word meanings In The Routledge Companion To English Studies/ by Constant Leung & Jo Lewkowicz. London, UK: Routledge (in publishing).
  • Ivanenko N. (2023). Development of civic education in Ukrainian universities: new challenges of modern realities in the conditions of the transformation of society. In Contemporary Education in Ukraine: Integration into the European Educational Space. Dnipro (pp. 387-412) DOI:36550/978-617-8245-57-3-20
  • Ivanenko N. (2019). Citizenship Education, Moral Fluency and Social and Political Future Challenges. In Polish-Jewish History, Culture, Values, and Education between Paradise and Inferno. Irvine, USA: Brown Walker Press (pp. 93-103)
  • Ivanenko N. (2014). Education Change, Transformation, Reforms – a Regional Overview. In N. Ivanenko (Edit.) Education in Eastern Europe and Eurasia. London: Bloomsbury (pp. 9-45)
  • Ivanenko N. (2013). Vulnerable Children in Ukraine and Educational Response. In M. Matsumoto (Edit.) Education and Disadvantaged Children and Young People. London: Bloomsbury (pp. 95-132)

JOURNAL ARTICLES

  1. Ivanenko, N. (2024). Challenges of Ukrainian Higher Education in Times of War. International Higher Education. The Boston College Centre for International Higher Education, 118, pp. 35-36 https://doi.org/10.36197/IHE.2024.118.17
  2. Ivanenko, N., Paska, T., Irkha, A. Rud, A., & Boguslavskas, L., (2024). The Role of Higher Education for Ensuring National Security in Ukraine. Futurity Education, 4(1), 210-237 https://doi.org/10.57125/FED.2024.03.25.11
  3. Leleka, T., Ivanenko, N., Demeshko, I., Kapitan T., & Demchenko, I. (2024). The Process of English Internationalization in the Ukrainian Educational Paradigm. Slavistica Vilnensis, 68(2), 76-89 doi:10.15388/SlavViln.2023.68(2).6
  4. Ivanenko, N., Rud, A., Hurbanska, A., Cheban, Y., & Syrtseva, S. (2024). Digitalization of Education of the Future – A Trend or a Requirement of the Time? Journal of Higher Education Theory and Practice24(2). DOI: https://doi.org/10.33423/jhetp.v24i2.6791
  5. Ivanenko, N. (2023). Civic character cultivation as a basic virtue within and beyond modern educational institutions. Academic Notes. Series Pedagogical sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 209, 180-185 DOI: https://doi.org/10.36550/2415-7988-2022-1-209-180-185
  6. Rastrygina, A., Ivanenko, N. (2023). A Pedagogy of freedom as a viable basis for implementing gender equality in Ukraine’s educational institutions. International Review of Education, 69(1-2), 143-174. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/s11159-023-09995-9
  7. Ivanenko N., Biletska O., Hurbanska S., Hurbanska, A., & Kochmar, D. (2023). English language morphological neologisms reflecting the war in Ukraine. World Journal of English Language, 13(5), pp. 432-438    DOI: doi:http://dx.doi.org/10.5430/wjel.v13n5p432
  8. Ivanenko, N., Boiko, A., Fedorchuk, L., Panchenko, I., & Marieiev, D. (2023). Development of educational policy in Ukraine in the context of European integration and digital transformation. Revista Eduweb, 17(2), 296-305 DOI: https://doi.org/10.46502/issn.1856-7576/2023.17.02.25
  9. Ivanenko, N.V., Gerasymenko,Yu. A., Kostenko, V.G. (2023). Innovative approaches to the modernization of philological education and science in Ukraine: a response to the challenges of wartime. Akademichni Vizii, (in Ukrainian). URL: https://academy-vision.org/index.php/av/article/view/281 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5281/zenodo.7795088
  10. Ivanenko N. (2022). Phraseological units of the conceptual field MARRIAGE in the English picture of the world. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi: KOD, 202, pp. 140-146
  11. Bilous, O., Mishchenko, A., Datska, T., Ivanenko, N., Kit, L., Piankovska, I., and Vereshchak, Y. (2021). Modern linguistic technologies: strategy of teaching translation studies. Rupkatha Journal on Interdisciplinary Studies in Humanities, 13(4), pp. 1-12 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/21659/rupkatha.v13n4.65
  12. Leleka, T., Ivanenko, N., Moskalenko O., Herasymenko, L., Shevchuk L., Pidlubna, O. (2021). Angloamerican loanwords use in the Ukrainian student slang. Laplage em Revista, 7(Extra-D): University and science: possible dialogues. pp.163-174. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/24115/S2446-622020217Extra-D1081p.163-174
  13. Ivanenko N. (2021). Figurative and valuable component of the MARRIAGE concept. Trends in Science and Practice of Today. Ankara, Turkey, pp. 356-361
  14. Ivanenko N. (2021). Inclusive learning environment for students’ achievements and foreign language development. Priorities in the Development of Science and Education. Budapest, Hungary, pp.74-80
  15. Ivanenko N. (2021). The nominative field of the MARRIAGE concept and the analysis of the synonymous series of its key unit. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi: KOD, 193, pp 218-224 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.36550/2522-4077-2021-1-193-218-224
  16. Ivanenko N. (2020). Language intervention stages in project-based learning. Modern Trends in Foreign Language Professional Training in a Multicultural Space. Kyiv, pp. 249 – 255
  17. Rastrygina, A., Ivanenko, N. (2020). Gender comfortable educational environment as a factor of development of personal freedom. Research Bulletin. Pedagogical Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 188, pp. 28 – 35 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.36550/2415-7988-2020-1-188-28-35
  18. Ivanenko N. (2020). Texting slang as one of the most common groups of everyday youth Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi: KOD, 187, pp. 38-45
  19. Ivanenko N. (2019). Computer use in foreign language Intellectual and Emotional Components of Foreign Language Learning: Latest Trends and Challenges for Higher Education. Kyiv, pp. 152 – 158.
  20. Ivanenko N. (2019). Initial stages of elaborating a project in a foreign language classroom. Science and Society. Hamilton, Canada, pp. 13 – 20.
  21. Ivanenko N. (2019). Project-based learning as a way to incorporate effective foreign language teaching. Research Bulletin. Pedagogical Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 177, pp. 207 – 211
  22. Ivanenko N. (2019). Youth vocabulary as a reflection of changes in modern society. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi: KOD, 175, pp. 34 – 39.
  23. Ivanenko N. (2018). Promoting citizenship education in the English language Proceedings of the IV International Conference. Kyiv, pp. 130 – 137
  24. Ivanenko N. (2018). Educating global citizens at a foreign language class. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, – pp. 494 – 500
  25. Ivanenko N. (2018). Formation of civic values through teaching a foreign language. Proceedings of the II International Conference “Foreign Language in Professional Training of Specialists: Problems and Strategies”. Kropyvnytskyi, pp. 189-191
  26. Ivanenko N. (2017). Citizenship education in the English language classroom. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 154. – pp. 92 – 97
  27. Ivanenko N. (2017). Education for democratic citizenship: teaching virtues and values. Research Bulletin. Pedagogical Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 152, pp. 110-113
  28. Ivanenko N. (2016). Citizenship education as a way to develop moral fluency to solve social and political challenges of the future. Scientific Journal of Ariel University. Israel: Ariel University.
  29. Ivanenko N. (2016). Functioning peculiarities of lexical units of the RESPECT concept in the English language. Proceedings of the International Conference Linguistic and Linguacultural Aspects of Teaching Foreign Languages in Ukrainian Universities”. Dnipropetrovsk, pp. 87-94
  30. Ivanenko N. (2016). Semantic relationships of lexical units of the concept of love in the English language. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, pp. 221-226
  31. Ivanenko N. (2015). Citizenship education as the coordination and integration of educational establishment and community. Research Proceedings of the national UniversityOstrog Academy”. Ostrog, pp. 136-142
  32. Ivanenko N. (2015). The value of citizenship education in practices of student governing body. Research Bulletin. Philological Sciences. Kropyvnytskyi, 136. pp. 438-442

Louise’s doctoral research investigates how teachers become who they are.

Louise’s work situates the schoolteacher as a particular type of subject, that is both made and makes itself from within a network of power relations. Her study combines Foucauldian theory, Critical Discourse Analysis, and Narrative analysis to provide an account of schoolteachers’ ethical agency in the context of top-down policy practices.

Louise is a Doctoral Teaching Fellow at the Department of Education, where she teaches and supervises students in the MSc in Learning and Teaching course. Currently, Louise is collaborating the OECD in their Globally Teaching InSights project. Her research supports the Schools+ Network aims to fuel an ecosystem of organisations that are driving change in education from the bottom-up.

In March 2023 she presented her preliminary research at the Philosophy of Education Society of Great Britain (PESGB)’s annual conference.

As Honorary Fellow John attends seminars and consults with current staff in Mathematics Education.

During 40 years at the Open University supporting the teaching of mathematics he authored a wide range of papers, and dozens of Open University Books and Teaching materials. He co-authored the classic Thinking Mathematically; Mathematics as a Constructive Activity (with his wife Prof. Anne Watson); Questions and Prompts for Mathematical Thinking & Thinkers (with Anne and other colleagues), among many others.

His research methods are phenomenological, based on the Discipline of Noticing. He is interested in the lived experience of learning, doing and teaching mathematics. He focuses on the structure and form of Attention in the teaching of mathematics, as he supports those who wish to foster and sustain mathematical thinking in others.

He is an Honorary Fellow of BSRLM and ATM, a long-standing member of  the MAA and the  MA.H.

 

Publications

  • Mason, J. (2022). Consequences of a Virtual Encounter with George Pólya. Teaching Mathematics and Computer Science.  20 (2) p173-182.
  • Zazkis, R. Kontorovich, I. & Mason, J. (2021). The Learning and Teaching of Number: paths less travelled through well-trodden terrain. London: Routledge
  • Mason, J. (2021). Learning about Noticing, by, and through, Noticing. ZDM – Mathematics Education. 53(1) p231-243. doi: 10.1007/s11858-020-01192-4
  • Mason, J. & Czarnocha,B. (2021). Aha! Moments, Bisociation and Multifocal Attention. In B. Czarnocha & W. Baker. Creativity of an Aha! Moment and Mathematics Education. Leiden: Brill. p345-361.
  • Mason, J. (2018) Making Distinctions: a phenomenological exploration in mathematics education. In P. Ernest (Ed.). The Philosophy of Mathematics Education Today. ICME-13 Monographs. Springer.
  • Mason, J. (2018). Reflecting on values emerging from practice and the value of reflecting on practice. In D. Rowe & A. Watson (Eds.). Faith and Experience in Education: essays from Quaker perspectives. London: Trentham Books. p63-91.
  • Mason, J. & Metz, M. (2017). Digging Beneath Dual Systems Theory and the Bicameral Brain: abductions about the human psyche from experience in mathematical problem solving. In U. Xolocotzin (Ed.). Understanding Emotions in Mathematical Thinking and Learning. p379-407. Cambridge: Elsevier/Academic Press.
  • Mason, J. (2016). Rising Above a Cause-and-Effect Stance in Mathematics Education Research. JMTE 19(4) p297-300. http://rdcu.be/npTf
  • Mason, J. & Davis, B. (2013). The Importance of Teachers’ Mathematical Awareness for In-The-Moment Pedagogy. CJSMTE 13(2) p182-197.
  • Mason, J. (2012). Noticing: roots and branches. In M. Sherin, V. Jacobs, & R. Phillip (Eds.) Mathematics Teacher Noticing:  Seeing Through Teachers’ Eyes. p35-50. Mahwah: Erlbaum.
  • Mason, J. (2008). Being Mathematical With & In Front of Learners: Attention, Awareness, and Attitude as Sources of Differences between Teacher Educators, Teachers & Learners. In T. Wood (Series Ed.) & B. Jaworski (Vol. Ed.), International Handbook of Mathematics Teacher Education: Vol.4. The Mathematics Teacher Educator as a Developing Professional. Rotterdam, the Netherlands: Sense Publishers, p31-56.
  • Mason, J. & Johnston-Wilder, S. (2006 2nd edition). Designing and Using Mathematical Tasks. St. Albans: Tarquin.
  • Watson, A. & Mason, J. (2006). Seeing an Exercise as a Single Mathematical Object: Using Variation to Structure Sense-Making. Mathematical Thinking and Learning. 8(2) p91-111.
  • Watson, A. & Mason, J. (2005). Mathematics as a Constructive Activity: learners generating examples. Mahwah: Erlbaum.
  • Mason, J. & Johnston-Wilder, S. (2004). Fundamental Constructs in Mathematics Education, RoutledgeFalmer, London.
  • Mason, J. 2003, Structure of Attention in the Learning of Mathematics, in J. Novotná (Ed.) Proceedings, International Symposium on Elementary Mathematics Teaching, Charles University, Prague, p9-16.
  • Mason, J. 2002, Mathematics Teaching Practice: a guidebook for university and college lecturers, Horwood Publishing, Chichester.
  • Mason, J. 2002, Researching Your own Practice: The Discipline of Noticing, RoutledgeFalmer, London.
  • Mason, J. 2001, Modelling Modelling: where is the centre of gravity of-for-when modelling?, in J. Matos, W. Blum, S. Houston & S. Carreira (Eds.) Modelling and Mathematics Education: ICTMA 9 applications in science and technology, Horwood Publishing, Chichester, p39-61.
  • Mason, J. Burton L. & Stacey K. (1982). Thinking Mathematically, Addison Wesley, London

Website

www.pmtheta.com

Mark has worked in ELT and EMI for over 35 years as a teacher, teacher trainer, lecturer, course writer, syllabus designer, examiner, Director of Studies, and consultant editor for OUP. For the British Council he has worked as a consultant trainer and course developer in EMI and EAP. For the University of Oxford Department of Education Mark delivered the ELT option on the MSc ALSLA and is Teaching Associate of the EMI Research Group in which capacity he has worked as a CI and has developed and delivered EMI teacher training courses in China, Serbia and Oxford. Mark has worked in universities in Russia, Ukraine, Kazakhstan, Belarus, Czechia, Italy, Germany, Mexico, Peru, Chile, Brazil, Colombia and Morocco.

He continues to be involved in EMI and is currently co-authoring an EMI student guide.

Mark is an alumnus of the University of Oxford Department of Education and was among the first to be awarded the innovative MSc in Teaching English Language in University Settings.

Anushay is a second-year DPhil student investigating how classroom characteristics are related to Pakistani children’s development. She is supervised by Professor Iram Siraj and Dr Katharina Ereky-Stevens and her work is being supported by the Aga Khan University (Pakistan). Anushay received the Patrice Engle Dissertation Grant Award from the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD) in 2023.

Anushay completed her BSc Psychology from UCL, where she also started her master’s in Developmental Neuroscience and Psychopathology. She was based at Yale University for her master’s thesis, where she worked with Dr Craig Bailey at the Yale Center for Emotional Intelligence to understand children’s emotion development. Anushay also works as a part-time research  assistant at the Developmental Diversity Lab at UCL’s Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience. Anushay’s research interests include understanding child development across different cultures, factors that might be affecting it, and devising culture-specific ways to support children’s holistic development through the educational system. She is also keen on improving the research scope in Pakistan by working with Pakistani researchers, practitioners, and families. Anushay balances her research with her position as the founder of a non-profit, Resources for Children, which aims to understand and support children’s development in Pakistan.

Publications

Journal Articles

  1. Mazhar, A., & Bailey, C., S. (under review). Understanding Children’s Emotion-Specific Biases: How They Relate to Child and Family Factors, Emotion Recognition Accuracy, and Social Behaviour.

Presentations

  1. Mazhar, A., & Bailey, C., S. (2023, March). Understanding Children’s Emotion-Specific Biases: How They Relate to Child-Level Factors and Emotion Recognition Accuracy [Paper Presentation]. Society for Research in Child Development, Salt Lake City, Utah, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2022, April). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Spring Preview, New Haven, United States.
  3. Mazhar, A. (2021, December). Does an extended family improve mentalising in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK & Pakistan. 2nd International Foundation University Conference of Psychology, Rawalpindi, Pakistan.
  4. Mazhar, A. (2020, October). Developing a non-profit to advance autism research in Pakistan. Anna Freud Centre Seminar Series, London, United Kingdom.

Posters

  1. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Theory of Mind in Autistic Children: a cross-cultural perspective from UK and Pakistan. Harvard Trends in Psychology Summit, Cambridge, United States.
  2. Mazhar, A. (2021, November). Understanding children’s emotion-specific biases and how they relate to age, gender, and emotion recognition. Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence Research Rounds, New Haven, United States.

Cindy works at the intersection of learning, design, and technology, with a keen interest in the orchestration of future-ready tech-enabled learning.

She is curious how the deployment of adaptive learning systems to schools will impact classroom learning and hopes to learn more about the human-machine partnership in education. Specifically, her research is concerned with the implications that the use of such systems has on teacher-student interactions, as teachers grapple with balancing personalised learning and learning in community, as well as curriculum demands and student interests. These are some tensions which could potentially be exacerbated by affordances of adaptive learning systems.

Prior to embarking on the DPhil in Education at Oxford, Cindy worked as the Lead Specialist in Technologies for Learning at the Educational Technology Division of Ministry of Education, Singapore. She had previously completed graduate studies at the National University of Singapore and Stanford University where she was awarded Master of Arts in English Studies and Master of Arts in Education.

Reem is DPhil student from Saudi Arabia.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she worked as a Teacher, Professional Developer, then, became a Supervisor and Researcher in the Ministry of Education where she received a scholarship to pursue her DPhil education at the University of Oxford. Her research interests lie in the area of Teacher Education and Professional Learning Policy and Practice.

Publications
  • Alqahtani, Reem (2020). Saudi Universities Role in Developing Teacher Professional Development Programs: Elite Universities Experience. Journal of Educational Sciences. King Saud University.
  • Alqahtani, Reem. (2020). The effect of implementing UDL-based activities in improving EFL learners’ academic achievement and attitudes towards L2. In L. Salas, & E. Ager, Creating Quiet reflective Spaces: Language Teacher Researches Professional Development (pp. 61-62). IATEFL publications.

Lena Zlock is researching the integration of digital technology into structures of teaching, learning, and education in higher education. Her particular focus is on the digital humanities and the potential for digital methods to transform humanistic study. She works with Professor Niall Winters and Dr. James Robson.

Lena’s research interests stem from her education as an M.St. student and Ertegun Graduate Scholar in Modern Languages at the University of Oxford, and as a B.A. student in History at Stanford University. As an undergraduate, she started the Voltaire Library Project, a digitally and data-driven study of the 6,763-book collection of French Enlightenment philosopher Voltaire (you can read more about the project here and here). She has been interested in the application of digital technology to humanistic teaching since her days in Princeton Day School, where she developed an interdisciplinary curriculum on Mexico City (visit the course website here).

Her research on Voltaire led her to think more broadly about the place of digital methods in the humanities classroom, and how new technologies will revolutionise the liberal arts and higher education. As a DPhil candidate, Lena will examine the negotiation and implementation of new learning technologies within the University of Oxford at undergraduate and graduate levels.

Lena is involved in a number of digital humanities initiatives in Oxford. She previously served as the inaugural fellow of the Voltaire Lab at Oxford’s Voltaire Foundation. As a master’s student, Lena co-formulated the convergence agenda for Oxford digital humanities with Professor Howard Hotson, and is currently employed by the Humanities Division to assist with the development of an M.St. degree in Digital Scholarship (read more here). Lena set up and helps to run the History of the Book blog for the Faculty of Medieval and Modern Languages and the Oxford Book History Twitter account.

Lena welcomes inquiries from undergraduate and postgraduate students from Oxford and beyond seeking to get involved with the digital humanities in any capacity. The History of the Book blog also welcomes inquiries from prospective contributors.

 

Abbey is a Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education, in collaboration with the Department of Engineering.

Before joining the DPhil program, Abbey obtained a B.A. in Applied Linguistics with minors in Russian and Chinese from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford. She was the recipient of a Benjamin A. Gilman International Scholarship through U.S. Department of State for study in Russia and was awarded two Foreign Language and Area Studies (FLAS) Fellowships for study in both Russia and China. She holds both TESOL and TEFL certificates and has taught English as a Second Language in various contexts to a wide variety of learner populations.

Abbey’s main research interests lie in the use of technology to facilitate language learning. Her DPhil research focuses on the development of a virtual reality program to bridge the gaps that students face when learning languages through distance learning.

Dr Nadiya Ivanenko is a Visiting Research Fellow in the field of civic education and citizenship linguistics. She is a member of the Applied Linguistics research group and Higher Education research group at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

After receiving PhD in Comparative Linguistics from Kyiv National Linguistic University (2008) Nadiya worked as an Associate Professor of the Germanic Languages and Teaching Methodology Department, Faculty of Ukrainian Philology, Foreign Languages and Social Communications and Vice Dean of the Faculty of Foreign Languages, Central Ukrainian State University, Ukraine.

Nadiya was a Chevening scholar and Postgraduate researcher at the Department of Education, University of Oxford (2003-2004). She was a Co-chair of the joint UNESCO Chair/UNITWIN project ‘Education as a Humanitarian Re