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Department of Education

Viewing archives for St Anne's College

Joanna is a Doctoral Student, and ESRC Grand Union DTP Scholar, researching in-class support for multilingualism in UK schools.

She has over 12 years of experience as a teaching professional, having worked as a class teacher, EAL specialist and Teaching Assistant in the UK, China, Brazil and Italy. Her main area of interest is school-based education (3-18), specifically the support for multilingual pupils and their language practices, as well as the relationship between teaching assistants and both teachers and children in schools.

Joanna holds a BA in Jurisprudence and a MSc in Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching, both from the University of Oxford. She also has a PGCE, and a PGDip in French.

Joining the Department of Education in 2020 after teaching English and foreign languages in secondary schools and early years settings for 15 years, Catherine completed the MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition in 2021. Her doctoral research investigates the effectiveness of using songs as pedagogical tools with young second language learners in formal educational settings.

Additionally, Catherine hosts The Language Revolution podcast, exploring how linguistics and language awareness might inform/transform languages teaching with guests including Michael Rosen and David Crystal. She also project manages the annual conference for NALDIC, the national subject association for EAL.

Publications

Multilingual is Normal: An anthology of voices, talking about talking (2020)

Renyu completed her BA degree in Psychology at the University of British Columbia (Vancouver, Canada) and her MPhil degree in Education at University of Cambridge.

During her MPhil study, she worked with children aged 4 to 6 years to investigate the relationship between bilingualism, vocabulary size, and inhibitory control, and also to validate a novel app designed to assess early language development. For her Dphil study at Oxford, Renyu aims to explore the factors that might affect L2 pronunciation learning in young children and the interaction between children’s L1 and L2. She is particularly interested in the psychological factors that might influence a child’s L2 pronunciation.

Prior to studying at Oxford, Renyu worked as Research Assistant at the Assessment Research Group at British Council for one year and a half. She was involved in various projects, including gap analysis on reading demand and reading ability, participant feedback questionnaire design and analysis, design and recruitment for a new EAP task study, etc.

Bernard holds a PhD in Marketing from the University of Nottingham and a DBA from the University of Newcastle.

His research to date explores the leadership in HE. Prior to coming to Oxford, he worked in various HEIs and served as the supervisor of a secondary school.

Publications

Lee, B., Tsui, A. & Yau, O.H.M. (2019), Higher-order Goals, Trust-in-leader, and Self-efficacy as Moderators of Transformational Leadership Performance: The Case of Multi-level Marketing Organizations in China, Journal of Euromarketing, Vol.28 (3-4), 76-97. (2011 RG Impact factor: 0.83).

Conferences

Lee, B. (2020), “Self-formation for the Underprivileged,” 2020 International Online Symposium, Toward a New Paradigm of Economics,organized by Macau Ricci Institute, The University of Saint Joseph, 15 & 16 October. (Online Conference Platform Presentation).

Steve is Associate Professor of Teacher Education. He is a curriculum tutor for the Geography PGCE and MSc Learning and Teaching.

Steve is a qualified geography teacher and was previously the head of department at a comprehensive secondary school in Oxfordshire, and Head of Programmes at Bishop Grosseteste University, Lincoln.

He holds an MA in Educational Leadership and Innovation from Warwick University, an MSc in Educational Research Methodology and DPhil in Education from the University of Oxford which were funded by an ESRC Studentship. He is a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

He researches at the intersection between the academic discipline and school subject of geography, including recent collaborations developing through the Smart Cities Network for Sustainable Urban Future project which was shortlisted for the 2017 Newton Prize (India). He is currently leading research on Climate Change Education Futures in India (GCRF) in collaboration with colleagues at IISER, Pune, and on the role of cultural heritage in curriculum making in Kolkata.

Collaborations with colleagues in the School of Geography and the Environment are contributing to anti-racist curriculum futures, including in the school subject, and in postgraduate teaching through the TDEP-funded Oxford-UNISA course ‘Decolonising Research Methods’.

His research on teacher education focuses on the contribution that geography education research offers to the conceptualisation and practice of teaching. This work includes ethnographic research on teachers’ curriculum making exploring the journeys through which information travels into school classrooms, beginning teachers’ experiences of school subject departments, and the role of written lesson observation feedback in constructing ‘good teaching’.

Steve serves on the editorial board of the journal Geography, and is Chair of the Geography Education Research Collective (GEReCo/IGU-CGE).

 

Caitlin is a Doctoral student in the Department of Education working on how teachers interact with refugee and unaccompanied asylum-seeking pupils in UK schools.

Her Doctoral study uses survey data, interviews, observation, and document analysis to examine teacher knowledge, attitudes, and practices in relation to refugee pupils. Previously, Caitlin worked as a primary school teacher in Aberdeen, London, and at Rose Hill Primary School in Oxford. She completed an MA (Gaelic Medium Education, Oral History) and a PGDE (Primary Education) at the University of Aberdeen, and a BA (Human Geography, Environmental Studies) at Middlebury College in the US. She has a general interest in improving inclusion and equity in education.

Helen’s academic interest in higher education policy developed from more than 20 years of professional experience of university administration – in public relations and admissions.

She gained her doctorate from Oxford in 2010 (a study of the market created by the introduction of £3000 fees for Home/EU undergraduates at English universities in 2006); since then, she has conducted research into the impacts of student fees and funding on institutions, students, graduates and applicants within the higher education sector in England. She also works as a consultant to higher education institutions.

Helen was Pathway Convenor for the MSc Education (HE) for two years and has taught on this course since completing her DPhil. As an inspector for the British Accreditation Council, Helen has the opportunity to gain insights into the operation of higher education providers globally. She is also an Associate of the SKOPE, the department’s research centre for Skills, Knowledge and Organisational Performance.

From 2012-17, Helen was a member of the governing council of the Society for Research into Higher Education (SRHE), serving as Vice-Chair from 2014-17.

 

Jo-Anne is Director of the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment.  She completed a six-year term as Head of the Department of Education, has been Standing Adviser to the House of Commons Education Select Committee, a member of Ofqual’s Standing Advisory Group on Standards, Chair of the National Reference Test Expert Group, and a member of the Welsh Government’s Curriculum and Assessment Group.  Before coming to Oxford, Jo-Anne held academic posts at the Institute of Education, University of London and the University of Bristol. Her first degree and doctorate were in psychology and she has an MBA.  Her current research projects include Setting and Maintaining Standards in national examinations, Examination reform: the impact of modular and linear examinations at GCSE, Assessment for Learning in Africa (AFLA), intelligent accountability and the Progress in International Reading Literacy Study England national centre.

Her research interests are in educational assessment, including system-wide structures and processes, examination standards, marking and assessment design.  Jo-Anne conducts a lot of work with government and industry partners, including acting as the Standing Adviser to the House of Commons Education Select Committee, a member of Ofqual’s Standing Advisory Group and membership of the Welsh Government’s Curriculum and Assessment Group.  She is a member of the Editorial Board of the Oxford Review of Education journal and the International Advisory Board of Assessment in Education: principles, policy & practice.  She has been a Visiting Professor at the universities of Bergen and Queen’s (Belfast).  From 2013 to 2015 she was President of the Association for Educational Assessment – Europe.

Qualifications
  • B.A.H. Linguistics/Psychology – Queen’s University, Kingston On, Canada
  • M.A. Educational Psychology – McGill University, Canada
  • Ph.D. – Second Language Education – McGill University Canada

Victoria Murphy would welcome informal contacts from prospective doctoral students interested in the following topics:

  • Language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/ Language Minority) children
  • Child L2 and bilingualism
  • Foreign language learning in primary school
  • Lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Research

Victoria is active in the following research areas, and would welcome DPhil applications on any of these, particularly those relating to EAL (language minority) children and child L2 learning and foreign language learning in primary school.  She is also the convenor of the Research in English as an Additional Language (REAL) group.  Her research is currently being funded by the ESRC, Leverhulme Trust and Nuffield Foundation.

  • language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/Language minority) children
  • child L2 learning and bilingualism
  • foreign language learning in primary school
  • cognitive processes underlying L1 and L2 learning
  • lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Current Research Project(s)

Joanna is a Doctoral Student, and ESRC Grand Union DTP Scholar, researching in-class support for multilingualism in UK schools.

She has over 12 years of experience as a teaching professional, having worked as a class teacher, EAL specialist and Teaching Assistant in the UK, China, Brazil and Italy. Her main area of interest is school-based education (3-18), specifically the support for multilingual pupils and their language practices, as well as the relationship between teaching assistants and both teachers and children in schools.

Joanna holds a BA in Jurisprudence and a MSc in Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching, both from the University of Oxford. She also has a PGCE, and a PGDip in French.

Joining the Department of Education in 2020 after teaching English and foreign languages in secondary schools and early years settings for 15 years, Catherine completed the MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition in 2021. Her doctoral research investigates the effectiveness of using songs as pedagogical tools with young second language learners in formal educational settings.

Additionally, Catherine hosts The Language Revolution podcast, exploring how linguistics and language awareness might inform/transform languages teaching with guests including Michael Rosen and David Crystal. She also project manages the annual conference for NALDIC, the national subject association for EAL.

Publications

Multilingual is Normal: An anthology of voices, talking about talking (2020)

Renyu completed her BA degree in Psychology at the University of British Columbia (Vancouver, Canada) and her MPhil degree in Education at University of Cambridge.

During her MPhil study, she worked with children aged 4 to 6 years to investigate the relationship between bilingualism, vocabulary size, and inhibitory control, and also to validate a novel app designed to assess early language development. For her Dphil study at Oxford, Renyu aims to explore the factors that might affect L2 pronunciation learning in young children and the interaction between children’s L1 and L2. She is particularly interested in the psychological factors that might influence a child’s L2 pronunciation.

Prior to studying at Oxford, Renyu worked as Research Assistant at the Assessment Research Group at British Council for one year and a half. She was involved in various projects, including gap analysis on reading demand and reading ability, participant feedback questionnaire design and analysis, design and recruitment for a new EAP task study, etc.

Bernard holds a PhD in Marketing from the University of Nottingham and a DBA from the University of Newcastle.

His research to date explores the leadership in HE. Prior to coming to Oxford, he worked in various HEIs and served as the supervisor of a secondary school.

Publications

Lee, B., Tsui, A. & Yau, O.H.M. (2019), Higher-order Goals, Trust-in-leader, and Self-efficacy as Moderators of Transformational Leadership Performance: The Case of Multi-level Marketing Organizations in China, Journal of Euromarketing, Vol.28 (3-4), 76-97. (2011 RG Impact factor: 0.83).

Conferences

Lee, B. (2020), “Self-formation for the Underprivileged,” 2020 International Online Symposium, Toward a New Paradigm of Economics,organized by Macau Ricci Institute, The University of Saint Joseph, 15 & 16 October. (Online Conference Platform Presentation).

Steve is Associate Professor of Teacher Education. He is a curriculum tutor for the Geography PGCE and MSc Learning and Teaching.

Steve is a qualified geography teacher and was previously the head of department at a comprehensive secondary school in Oxfordshire, and Head of Programmes at Bishop Grosseteste University, Lincoln.

He holds an MA in Educational Leadership and Innovation from Warwick University, an MSc in Educational Research Methodology and DPhil in Education from the University of Oxford which were funded by an ESRC Studentship. He is a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

He researches at the intersection between the academic discipline and school subject of geography, including recent collaborations developing through the Smart Cities Network for Sustainable Urban Future project which was shortlisted for the 2017 Newton Prize (India). He is currently leading research on Climate Change Education Futures in India (GCRF) in collaboration with colleagues at IISER, Pune, and on the role of cultural heritage in curriculum making in Kolkata.

Collaborations with colleagues in the School of Geography and the Environment are contributing to anti-racist curriculum futures, including in the school subject, and in postgraduate teaching through the TDEP-funded Oxford-UNISA course ‘Decolonising Research Methods’.

His research on teacher education focuses on the contribution that geography education research offers to the conceptualisation and practice of teaching. This work includes ethnographic research on teachers’ curriculum making exploring the journeys through which information travels into school classrooms, beginning teachers’ experiences of school subject departments, and the role of written lesson observation feedback in constructing ‘good teaching’.

Steve serves on the editorial board of the journal Geography, and is Chair of the Geography Education Research Collective (GEReCo/IGU-CGE).

 

Caitlin is a Doctoral student in the Department of Education working on how teachers interact with refugee and unaccompanied asylum-seeking pupils in UK schools.

Her Doctoral study uses survey data, interviews, observation, and document analysis to examine teacher knowledge, attitudes, and practices in relation to refugee pupils. Previously, Caitlin worked as a primary school teacher in Aberdeen, London, and at Rose Hill Primary School in Oxford. She completed an MA (Gaelic Medium Education, Oral History) and a PGDE (Primary Education) at the University of Aberdeen, and a BA (Human Geography, Environmental Studies) at Middlebury College in the US. She has a general interest in improving inclusion and equity in education.

Helen’s academic interest in higher education policy developed from more than 20 years of professional experience of university administration – in public relations and admissions.

She gained her doctorate from Oxford in 2010 (a study of the market created by the introduction of £3000 fees for Home/EU undergraduates at English universities in 2006); since then, she has conducted research into the impacts of student fees and funding on institutions, students, graduates and applicants within the higher education sector in England. She also works as a consultant to higher education institutions.

Helen was Pathway Convenor for the MSc Education (HE) for two years and has taught on this course since completing her DPhil. As an inspector for the British Accreditation Council, Helen has the opportunity to gain insights into the operation of higher education providers globally. She is also an Associate of the SKOPE, the department’s research centre for Skills, Knowledge and Organisational Performance.

From 2012-17, Helen was a member of the governing council of the Society for Research into Higher Education (SRHE), serving as Vice-Chair from 2014-17.

 

Jo-Anne is Director of the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment.  She completed a six-year term as Head of the Department of Education, has been Standing Adviser to the House of Commons Education Select Committee, a member of Ofqual’s Standing Advisory Group on Standards, Chair of the National Reference Test Expert Group, and a member of the Welsh Government’s Curriculum and Assessment Group.  Before coming to Oxford, Jo-Anne held academic posts at the Institute of Education, University of London and the University of Bristol. Her first degree and doctorate were in psychology and she has an MBA.  Her current research projects include Setting and Maintaining Standards in national examinations, Examination reform: the impact of modular and linear examinations at GCSE, Assessment for Learning in Africa (AFLA), intelligent accountability and the Progress in International Reading Literacy Study England national centre.

Her research interests are in educational assessment, including system-wide structures and processes, examination standards, marking and assessment design.  Jo-Anne conducts a lot of work with government and industry partners, including acting as the Standing Adviser to the House of Commons Education Select Committee, a member of Ofqual’s Standing Advisory Group and membership of the Welsh Government’s Curriculum and Assessment Group.  She is a member of the Editorial Board of the Oxford Review of Education journal and the International Advisory Board of Assessment in Education: principles, policy & practice.  She has been a Visiting Professor at the universities of Bergen and Queen’s (Belfast).  From 2013 to 2015 she was President of the Association for Educational Assessment – Europe.

Qualifications
  • B.A.H. Linguistics/Psychology – Queen’s University, Kingston On, Canada
  • M.A. Educational Psychology – McGill University, Canada
  • Ph.D. – Second Language Education – McGill University Canada

Victoria Murphy would welcome informal contacts from prospective doctoral students interested in the following topics:

  • Language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/ Language Minority) children
  • Child L2 and bilingualism
  • Foreign language learning in primary school
  • Lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Research

Victoria is active in the following research areas, and would welcome DPhil applications on any of these, particularly those relating to EAL (language minority) children and child L2 learning and foreign language learning in primary school.  She is also the convenor of the Research in English as an Additional Language (REAL) group.  Her research is currently being funded by the ESRC, Leverhulme Trust and Nuffield Foundation.

  • language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/Language minority) children
  • child L2 learning and bilingualism
  • foreign language learning in primary school
  • cognitive processes underlying L1 and L2 learning
  • lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Current Research Project(s)

Joanna is a Doctoral Student, and ESRC Grand Union DTP Scholar, researching in-class support for multilingualism in UK schools.

She has over 12 years of experience as a teaching professional, having worked as a class teacher, EAL specialist and Teaching Assistant in the UK, China, Brazil and Italy. Her main area of interest is school-based education (3-18), specifically the support for multilingual pupils and their language practices, as well as the relationship between teaching assistants and both teachers and children in schools.

Joanna holds a BA in Jurisprudence and a MSc in Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching, both from the University of Oxford. She also has a PGCE, and a PGDip in French.

Joining the Department of Education in 2020 after teaching English and foreign languages in secondary schools and early years settings for 15 years, Catherine completed the MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition in 2021. Her doctoral research investigates the effectiveness of using songs as pedagogical tools with young second language learners in formal educational settings.

Additionally, Catherine hosts The Language Revolution podcast, exploring how linguistics and language awareness might inform/transform languages teaching with guests including Michael Rosen and David Crystal. She also project manages the annual conference for NALDIC, the national subject association for EAL.

Publications

Multilingual is Normal: An anthology of voices, talking about talking (2020)

Renyu completed her BA degree in Psychology at the University of British Columbia (Vancouver, Canada) and her MPhil degree in Education at University of Cambridge.

During her MPhil study, she worked with children aged 4 to 6 years to investigate the relationship between bilingualism, vocabulary size, and inhibitory control, and also to validate a novel app designed to assess early language development. For her Dphil study at Oxford, Renyu aims to explore the factors that might affect L2 pronunciation learning in young children and the interaction between children’s L1 and L2. She is particularly interested in the psychological factors that might influence a child’s L2 pronunciation.

Prior to studying at Oxford, Renyu worked as Research Assistant at the Assessment Research Group at British Council for one year and a half. She was involved in various projects, including gap analysis on reading demand and reading ability, participant feedback questionnaire design and analysis, design and recruitment for a new EAP task study, etc.

Bernard holds a PhD in Marketing from the University of Nottingham and a DBA from the University of Newcastle.

His research to date explores the leadership in HE. Prior to coming to Oxford, he worked in various HEIs and served as the supervisor of a secondary school.

Publications

Lee, B., Tsui, A. & Yau, O.H.M. (2019), Higher-order Goals, Trust-in-leader, and Self-efficacy as Moderators of Transformational Leadership Performance: The Case of Multi-level Marketing Organizations in China, Journal of Euromarketing, Vol.28 (3-4), 76-97. (2011 RG Impact factor: 0.83).

Conferences

Lee, B. (2020), “Self-formation for the Underprivileged,” 2020 International Online Symposium, Toward a New Paradigm of Economics,organized by Macau Ricci Institute, The University of Saint Joseph, 15 & 16 October. (Online Conference Platform Presentation).

Steve is Associate Professor of Teacher Education. He is a curriculum tutor for the Geography PGCE and MSc Learning and Teaching.

Steve is a qualified geography teacher and was previously the head of department at a comprehensive secondary school in Oxfordshire, and Head of Programmes at Bishop Grosseteste University, Lincoln.

He holds an MA in Educational Leadership and Innovation from Warwick University, an MSc in Educational Research Methodology and DPhil in Education from the University of Oxford which were funded by an ESRC Studentship. He is a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

He researches at the intersection between the academic discipline and school subject of geography, including recent collaborations developing through the Smart Cities Network for Sustainable Urban Future project which was shortlisted for the 2017 Newton Prize (India). He is currently leading research on Climate Change Education Futures in India (GCRF) in collaboration with colleagues at IISER, Pune, and on the role of cultural heritage in curriculum making in Kolkata.

Collaborations with colleagues in the School of Geography and the Environment are contributing to anti-racist curriculum futures, including in the school subject, and in postgraduate teaching through the TDEP-funded Oxford-UNISA course ‘Decolonising Research Methods’.

His research on teacher education focuses on the contribution that geography education research offers to the conceptualisation and practice of teaching. This work includes ethnographic research on teachers’ curriculum making exploring the journeys through which information travels into school classrooms, beginning teachers’ experiences of school subject departments, and the role of written lesson observation feedback in constructing ‘good teaching’.

Steve serves on the editorial board of the journal Geography, and is Chair of the Geography Education Research Collective (GEReCo/IGU-CGE).

 

Caitlin is a Doctoral student in the Department of Education working on how teachers interact with refugee and unaccompanied asylum-seeking pupils in UK schools.

Her Doctoral study uses survey data, interviews, observation, and document analysis to examine teacher knowledge, attitudes, and practices in relation to refugee pupils. Previously, Caitlin worked as a primary school teacher in Aberdeen, London, and at Rose Hill Primary School in Oxford. She completed an MA (Gaelic Medium Education, Oral History) and a PGDE (Primary Education) at the University of Aberdeen, and a BA (Human Geography, Environmental Studies) at Middlebury College in the US. She has a general interest in improving inclusion and equity in education.

Helen’s academic interest in higher education policy developed from more than 20 years of professional experience of university administration – in public relations and admissions.

She gained her doctorate from Oxford in 2010 (a study of the market created by the introduction of £3000 fees for Home/EU undergraduates at English universities in 2006); since then, she has conducted research into the impacts of student fees and funding on institutions, students, graduates and applicants within the higher education sector in England. She also works as a consultant to higher education institutions.

Helen was Pathway Convenor for the MSc Education (HE) for two years and has taught on this course since completing her DPhil. As an inspector for the British Accreditation Council, Helen has the opportunity to gain insights into the operation of higher education providers globally. She is also an Associate of the SKOPE, the department’s research centre for Skills, Knowledge and Organisational Performance.

From 2012-17, Helen was a member of the governing council of the Society for Research into Higher Education (SRHE), serving as Vice-Chair from 2014-17.

 

Jo-Anne is Director of the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment.  She completed a six-year term as Head of the Department of Education, has been Standing Adviser to the House of Commons Education Select Committee, a member of Ofqual’s Standing Advisory Group on Standards, Chair of the National Reference Test Expert Group, and a member of the Welsh Government’s Curriculum and Assessment Group.  Before coming to Oxford, Jo-Anne held academic posts at the Institute of Education, University of London and the University of Bristol. Her first degree and doctorate were in psychology and she has an MBA.  Her current research projects include Setting and Maintaining Standards in national examinations, Examination reform: the impact of modular and linear examinations at GCSE, Assessment for Learning in Africa (AFLA), intelligent accountability and the Progress in International Reading Literacy Study England national centre.

Her research interests are in educational assessment, including system-wide structures and processes, examination standards, marking and assessment design.  Jo-Anne conducts a lot of work with government and industry partners, including acting as the Standing Adviser to the House of Commons Education Select Committee, a member of Ofqual’s Standing Advisory Group and membership of the Welsh Government’s Curriculum and Assessment Group.  She is a member of the Editorial Board of the Oxford Review of Education journal and the International Advisory Board of Assessment in Education: principles, policy & practice.  She has been a Visiting Professor at the universities of Bergen and Queen’s (Belfast).  From 2013 to 2015 she was President of the Association for Educational Assessment – Europe.

Qualifications
  • B.A.H. Linguistics/Psychology – Queen’s University, Kingston On, Canada
  • M.A. Educational Psychology – McGill University, Canada
  • Ph.D. – Second Language Education – McGill University Canada

Victoria Murphy would welcome informal contacts from prospective doctoral students interested in the following topics:

  • Language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/ Language Minority) children
  • Child L2 and bilingualism
  • Foreign language learning in primary school
  • Lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Research

Victoria is active in the following research areas, and would welcome DPhil applications on any of these, particularly those relating to EAL (language minority) children and child L2 learning and foreign language learning in primary school.  She is also the convenor of the Research in English as an Additional Language (REAL) group.  Her research is currently being funded by the ESRC, Leverhulme Trust and Nuffield Foundation.

  • language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/Language minority) children
  • child L2 learning and bilingualism
  • foreign language learning in primary school
  • cognitive processes underlying L1 and L2 learning
  • lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Current Research Project(s)

Joanna is a Doctoral Student, and ESRC Grand Union DTP Scholar, researching in-class support for multilingualism in UK schools.

She has over 12 years of experience as a teaching professional, having worked as a class teacher, EAL specialist and Teaching Assistant in the UK, China, Brazil and Italy. Her main area of interest is school-based education (3-18), specifically the support for multilingual pupils and their language practices, as well as the relationship between teaching assistants and both teachers and children in schools.

Joanna holds a BA in Jurisprudence and a MSc in Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching, both from the University of Oxford. She also has a PGCE, and a PGDip in French.

Joining the Department of Education in 2020 after teaching English and foreign languages in secondary schools and early years settings for 15 years, Catherine completed the MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition in 2021. Her doctoral research investigates the effectiveness of using songs as pedagogical tools with young second language learners in formal educational settings.

Additionally, Catherine hosts The Language Revolution podcast, exploring how linguistics and language awareness might inform/transform languages teaching with guests including Michael Rosen and David Crystal. She also project manages the annual conference for NALDIC, the national subject association for EAL.

Publications

Multilingual is Normal: An anthology of voices, talking about talking (2020)

Renyu completed her BA degree in Psychology at the University of British Columbia (Vancouver, Canada) and her MPhil degree in Education at University of Cambridge.

During her MPhil study, she worked with children aged 4 to 6 years to investigate the relationship between bilingualism, vocabulary size, and inhibitory control, and also to validate a novel app designed to assess early language development. For her Dphil study at Oxford, Renyu aims to explore the factors that might affect L2 pronunciation learning in young children and the interaction between children’s L1 and L2. She is particularly interested in the psychological factors that might influence a child’s L2 pronunciation.

Prior to studying at Oxford, Renyu worked as Research Assistant at the Assessment Research Group at British Council for one year and a half. She was involved in various projects, including gap analysis on reading demand and reading ability, participant feedback questionnaire design and analysis, design and recruitment for a new EAP task study, etc.

Bernard holds a PhD in Marketing from the University of Nottingham and a DBA from the University of Newcastle.

His research to date explores the leadership in HE. Prior to coming to Oxford, he worked in various HEIs and served as the supervisor of a secondary school.

Publications

Lee, B., Tsui, A. & Yau, O.H.M. (2019), Higher-order Goals, Trust-in-leader, and Self-efficacy as Moderators of Transformational Leadership Performance: The Case of Multi-level Marketing Organizations in China, Journal of Euromarketing, Vol.28 (3-4), 76-97. (2011 RG Impact factor: 0.83).

Conferences

Lee, B. (2020), “Self-formation for the Underprivileged,” 2020 International Online Symposium, Toward a New Paradigm of Economics,organized by Macau Ricci Institute, The University of Saint Joseph, 15 & 16 October. (Online Conference Platform Presentation).

Steve is Associate Professor of Teacher Education. He is a curriculum tutor for the Geography PGCE and MSc Learning and Teaching.

Steve is a qualified geography teacher and was previously the head of department at a comprehensive secondary school in Oxfordshire, and Head of Programmes at Bishop Grosseteste University, Lincoln.

He holds an MA in Educational Leadership and Innovation from Warwick University, an MSc in Educational Research Methodology and DPhil in Education from the University of Oxford which were funded by an ESRC Studentship. He is a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

He researches at the intersection between the academic discipline and school subject of geography, including recent collaborations developing through the Smart Cities Network for Sustainable Urban Future project which was shortlisted for the 2017 Newton Prize (India). He is currently leading research on Climate Change Education Futures in India (GCRF) in collaboration with colleagues at IISER, Pune, and on the role of cultural heritage in curriculum making in Kolkata.

Collaborations with colleagues in the School of Geography and the Environment are contributing to anti-racist curriculum futures, including in the school subject, and in postgraduate teaching through the TDEP-funded Oxford-UNISA course ‘Decolonising Research Methods’.

His research on teacher education focuses on the contribution that geography education research offers to the conceptualisation and practice of teaching. This work includes ethnographic research on teachers’ curriculum making exploring the journeys through which information travels into school classrooms, beginning teachers’ experiences of school subject departments, and the role of written lesson observation feedback in constructing ‘good teaching’.

Steve serves on the editorial board of the journal Geography, and is Chair of the Geography Education Research Collective (GEReCo/IGU-CGE).

 

Caitlin is a Doctoral student in the Department of Education working on how teachers interact with refugee and unaccompanied asylum-seeking pupils in UK schools.

Her Doctoral study uses survey data, interviews, observation, and document analysis to examine teacher knowledge, attitudes, and practices in relation to refugee pupils. Previously, Caitlin worked as a primary school teacher in Aberdeen, London, and at Rose Hill Primary School in Oxford. She completed an MA (Gaelic Medium Education, Oral History) and a PGDE (Primary Education) at the University of Aberdeen, and a BA (Human Geography, Environmental Studies) at Middlebury College in the US. She has a general interest in improving inclusion and equity in education.

Helen’s academic interest in higher education policy developed from more than 20 years of professional experience of university administration – in public relations and admissions.

She gained her doctorate from Oxford in 2010 (a study of the market created by the introduction of £3000 fees for Home/EU undergraduates at English universities in 2006); since then, she has conducted research into the impacts of student fees and funding on institutions, students, graduates and applicants within the higher education sector in England. She also works as a consultant to higher education institutions.

Helen was Pathway Convenor for the MSc Education (HE) for two years and has taught on this course since completing her DPhil. As an inspector for the British Accreditation Council, Helen has the opportunity to gain insights into the operation of higher education providers globally. She is also an Associate of the SKOPE, the department’s research centre for Skills, Knowledge and Organisational Performance.

From 2012-17, Helen was a member of the governing council of the Society for Research into Higher Education (SRHE), serving as Vice-Chair from 2014-17.

 

Jo-Anne is Director of the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment.  She completed a six-year term as Head of the Department of Education, has been Standing Adviser to the House of Commons Education Select Committee, a member of Ofqual’s Standing Advisory Group on Standards, Chair of the National Reference Test Expert Group, and a member of the Welsh Government’s Curriculum and Assessment Group.  Before coming to Oxford, Jo-Anne held academic posts at the Institute of Education, University of London and the University of Bristol. Her first degree and doctorate were in psychology and she has an MBA.  Her current research projects include Setting and Maintaining Standards in national examinations, Examination reform: the impact of modular and linear examinations at GCSE, Assessment for Learning in Africa (AFLA), intelligent accountability and the Progress in International Reading Literacy Study England national centre.

Her research interests are in educational assessment, including system-wide structures and processes, examination standards, marking and assessment design.  Jo-Anne conducts a lot of work with government and industry partners, including acting as the Standing Adviser to the House of Commons Education Select Committee, a member of Ofqual’s Standing Advisory Group and membership of the Welsh Government’s Curriculum and Assessment Group.  She is a member of the Editorial Board of the Oxford Review of Education journal and the International Advisory Board of Assessment in Education: principles, policy & practice.  She has been a Visiting Professor at the universities of Bergen and Queen’s (Belfast).  From 2013 to 2015 she was President of the Association for Educational Assessment – Europe.

Qualifications
  • B.A.H. Linguistics/Psychology – Queen’s University, Kingston On, Canada
  • M.A. Educational Psychology – McGill University, Canada
  • Ph.D. – Second Language Education – McGill University Canada

Victoria Murphy would welcome informal contacts from prospective doctoral students interested in the following topics:

  • Language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/ Language Minority) children
  • Child L2 and bilingualism
  • Foreign language learning in primary school
  • Lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Research

Victoria is active in the following research areas, and would welcome DPhil applications on any of these, particularly those relating to EAL (language minority) children and child L2 learning and foreign language learning in primary school.  She is also the convenor of the Research in English as an Additional Language (REAL) group.  Her research is currently being funded by the ESRC, Leverhulme Trust and Nuffield Foundation.

  • language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/Language minority) children
  • child L2 learning and bilingualism
  • foreign language learning in primary school
  • cognitive processes underlying L1 and L2 learning
  • lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Current Research Project(s)

Joanna is a Doctoral Student, and ESRC Grand Union DTP Scholar, researching in-class support for multilingualism in UK schools.

She has over 12 years of experience as a teaching professional, having worked as a class teacher, EAL specialist and Teaching Assistant in the UK, China, Brazil and Italy. Her main area of interest is school-based education (3-18), specifically the support for multilingual pupils and their language practices, as well as the relationship between teaching assistants and both teachers and children in schools.

Joanna holds a BA in Jurisprudence and a MSc in Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching, both from the University of Oxford. She also has a PGCE, and a PGDip in French.

Joining the Department of Education in 2020 after teaching English and foreign languages in secondary schools and early years settings for 15 years, Catherine completed the MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition in 2021. Her doctoral research investigates the effectiveness of using songs as pedagogical tools with young second language learners in formal educational settings.

Additionally, Catherine hosts The Language Revolution podcast, exploring how linguistics and language awareness might inform/transform languages teaching with guests including Michael Rosen and David Crystal. She also project manages the annual conference for NALDIC, the national subject association for EAL.

Publications

Multilingual is Normal: An anthology of voices, talking about talking (2020)

Renyu completed her BA degree in Psychology at the University of British Columbia (Vancouver, Canada) and her MPhil degree in Education at University of Cambridge.

During her MPhil study, she worked with children aged 4 to 6 years to investigate the relationship between bilingualism, vocabulary size, and inhibitory control, and also to validate a novel app designed to assess early language development. For her Dphil study at Oxford, Renyu aims to explore the factors that might affect L2 pronunciation learning in young children and the interaction between children’s L1 and L2. She is particularly interested in the psychological factors that might influence a child’s L2 pronunciation.

Prior to studying at Oxford, Renyu worked as Research Assistant at the Assessment Research Group at British Council for one year and a half. She was involved in various projects, including gap analysis on reading demand and reading ability, participant feedback questionnaire design and analysis, design and recruitment for a new EAP task study, etc.

Bernard holds a PhD in Marketing from the University of Nottingham and a DBA from the University of Newcastle.

His research to date explores the leadership in HE. Prior to coming to Oxford, he worked in various HEIs and served as the supervisor of a secondary school.

Publications

Lee, B., Tsui, A. & Yau, O.H.M. (2019), Higher-order Goals, Trust-in-leader, and Self-efficacy as Moderators of Transformational Leadership Performance: The Case of Multi-level Marketing Organizations in China, Journal of Euromarketing, Vol.28 (3-4), 76-97. (2011 RG Impact factor: 0.83).

Conferences

Lee, B. (2020), “Self-formation for the Underprivileged,” 2020 International Online Symposium, Toward a New Paradigm of Economics,organized by Macau Ricci Institute, The University of Saint Joseph, 15 & 16 October. (Online Conference Platform Presentation).

Steve is Associate Professor of Teacher Education. He is a curriculum tutor for the Geography PGCE and MSc Learning and Teaching.

Steve is a qualified geography teacher and was previously the head of department at a comprehensive secondary school in Oxfordshire, and Head of Programmes at Bishop Grosseteste University, Lincoln.

He holds an MA in Educational Leadership and Innovation from Warwick University, an MSc in Educational Research Methodology and DPhil in Education from the University of Oxford which were funded by an ESRC Studentship. He is a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

He researches at the intersection between the academic discipline and school subject of geography, including recent collaborations developing through the Smart Cities Network for Sustainable Urban Future project which was shortlisted for the 2017 Newton Prize (India). He is currently leading research on Climate Change Education Futures in India (GCRF) in collaboration with colleagues at IISER, Pune, and on the role of cultural heritage in curriculum making in Kolkata.

Collaborations with colleagues in the School of Geography and the Environment are contributing to anti-racist curriculum futures, including in the school subject, and in postgraduate teaching through the TDEP-funded Oxford-UNISA course ‘Decolonising Research Methods’.

His research on teacher education focuses on the contribution that geography education research offers to the conceptualisation and practice of teaching. This work includes ethnographic research on teachers’ curriculum making exploring the journeys through which information travels into school classrooms, beginning teachers’ experiences of school subject departments, and the role of written lesson observation feedback in constructing ‘good teaching’.

Steve serves on the editorial board of the journal Geography, and is Chair of the Geography Education Research Collective (GEReCo/IGU-CGE).

 

Caitlin is a Doctoral student in the Department of Education working on how teachers interact with refugee and unaccompanied asylum-seeking pupils in UK schools.

Her Doctoral study uses survey data, interviews, observation, and document analysis to examine teacher knowledge, attitudes, and practices in relation to refugee pupils. Previously, Caitlin worked as a primary school teacher in Aberdeen, London, and at Rose Hill Primary School in Oxford. She completed an MA (Gaelic Medium Education, Oral History) and a PGDE (Primary Education) at the University of Aberdeen, and a BA (Human Geography, Environmental Studies) at Middlebury College in the US. She has a general interest in improving inclusion and equity in education.

Helen’s academic interest in higher education policy developed from more than 20 years of professional experience of university administration – in public relations and admissions.

She gained her doctorate from Oxford in 2010 (a study of the market created by the introduction of £3000 fees for Home/EU undergraduates at English universities in 2006); since then, she has conducted research into the impacts of student fees and funding on institutions, students, graduates and applicants within the higher education sector in England. She also works as a consultant to higher education institutions.

Helen was Pathway Convenor for the MSc Education (HE) for two years and has taught on this course since completing her DPhil. As an inspector for the British Accreditation Council, Helen has the opportunity to gain insights into the operation of higher education providers globally. She is also an Associate of the SKOPE, the department’s research centre for Skills, Knowledge and Organisational Performance.

From 2012-17, Helen was a member of the governing council of the Society for Research into Higher Education (SRHE), serving as Vice-Chair from 2014-17.

 

Jo-Anne is Director of the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment.  She completed a six-year term as Head of the Department of Education, has been Standing Adviser to the House of Commons Education Select Committee, a member of Ofqual’s Standing Advisory Group on Standards, Chair of the National Reference Test Expert Group, and a member of the Welsh Government’s Curriculum and Assessment Group.  Before coming to Oxford, Jo-Anne held academic posts at the Institute of Education, University of London and the University of Bristol. Her first degree and doctorate were in psychology and she has an MBA.  Her current research projects include Setting and Maintaining Standards in national examinations, Examination reform: the impact of modular and linear examinations at GCSE, Assessment for Learning in Africa (AFLA), intelligent accountability and the Progress in International Reading Literacy Study England national centre.

Her research interests are in educational assessment, including system-wide structures and processes, examination standards, marking and assessment design.  Jo-Anne conducts a lot of work with government and industry partners, including acting as the Standing Adviser to the House of Commons Education Select Committee, a member of Ofqual’s Standing Advisory Group and membership of the Welsh Government’s Curriculum and Assessment Group.  She is a member of the Editorial Board of the Oxford Review of Education journal and the International Advisory Board of Assessment in Education: principles, policy & practice.  She has been a Visiting Professor at the universities of Bergen and Queen’s (Belfast).  From 2013 to 2015 she was President of the Association for Educational Assessment – Europe.

Qualifications
  • B.A.H. Linguistics/Psychology – Queen’s University, Kingston On, Canada
  • M.A. Educational Psychology – McGill University, Canada
  • Ph.D. – Second Language Education – McGill University Canada

Victoria Murphy would welcome informal contacts from prospective doctoral students interested in the following topics:

  • Language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/ Language Minority) children
  • Child L2 and bilingualism
  • Foreign language learning in primary school
  • Lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Research

Victoria is active in the following research areas, and would welcome DPhil applications on any of these, particularly those relating to EAL (language minority) children and child L2 learning and foreign language learning in primary school.  She is also the convenor of the Research in English as an Additional Language (REAL) group.  Her research is currently being funded by the ESRC, Leverhulme Trust and Nuffield Foundation.

  • language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/Language minority) children
  • child L2 learning and bilingualism
  • foreign language learning in primary school
  • cognitive processes underlying L1 and L2 learning
  • lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Current Research Project(s)

Joanna is a Doctoral Student, and ESRC Grand Union DTP Scholar, researching in-class support for multilingualism in UK schools.

She has over 12 years of experience as a teaching professional, having worked as a class teacher, EAL specialist and Teaching Assistant in the UK, China, Brazil and Italy. Her main area of interest is school-based education (3-18), specifically the support for multilingual pupils and their language practices, as well as the relationship between teaching assistants and both teachers and children in schools.

Joanna holds a BA in Jurisprudence and a MSc in Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching, both from the University of Oxford. She also has a PGCE, and a PGDip in French.

Joining the Department of Education in 2020 after teaching English and foreign languages in secondary schools and early years settings for 15 years, Catherine completed the MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition in 2021. Her doctoral research investigates the effectiveness of using songs as pedagogical tools with young second language learners in formal educational settings.

Additionally, Catherine hosts The Language Revolution podcast, exploring how linguistics and language awareness might inform/transform languages teaching with guests including Michael Rosen and David Crystal. She also project manages the annual conference for NALDIC, the national subject association for EAL.

Publications

Multilingual is Normal: An anthology of voices, talking about talking (2020)

Renyu completed her BA degree in Psychology at the University of British Columbia (Vancouver, Canada) and her MPhil degree in Education at University of Cambridge.

During her MPhil study, she worked with children aged 4 to 6 years to investigate the relationship between bilingualism, vocabulary size, and inhibitory control, and also to validate a novel app designed to assess early language development. For her Dphil study at Oxford, Renyu aims to explore the factors that might affect L2 pronunciation learning in young children and the interaction between children’s L1 and L2. She is particularly interested in the psychological factors that might influence a child’s L2 pronunciation.

Prior to studying at Oxford, Renyu worked as Research Assistant at the Assessment Research Group at British Council for one year and a half. She was involved in various projects, including gap analysis on reading demand and reading ability, participant feedback questionnaire design and analysis, design and recruitment for a new EAP task study, etc.

Bernard holds a PhD in Marketing from the University of Nottingham and a DBA from the University of Newcastle.

His research to date explores the leadership in HE. Prior to coming to Oxford, he worked in various HEIs and served as the supervisor of a secondary school.

Publications

Lee, B., Tsui, A. & Yau, O.H.M. (2019), Higher-order Goals, Trust-in-leader, and Self-efficacy as Moderators of Transformational Leadership Performance: The Case of Multi-level Marketing Organizations in China, Journal of Euromarketing, Vol.28 (3-4), 76-97. (2011 RG Impact factor: 0.83).

Conferences

Lee, B. (2020), “Self-formation for the Underprivileged,” 2020 International Online Symposium, Toward a New Paradigm of Economics,organized by Macau Ricci Institute, The University of Saint Joseph, 15 & 16 October. (Online Conference Platform Presentation).

Steve is Associate Professor of Teacher Education. He is a curriculum tutor for the Geography PGCE and MSc Learning and Teaching.

Steve is a qualified geography teacher and was previously the head of department at a comprehensive secondary school in Oxfordshire, and Head of Programmes at Bishop Grosseteste University, Lincoln.

He holds an MA in Educational Leadership and Innovation from Warwick University, an MSc in Educational Research Methodology and DPhil in Education from the University of Oxford which were funded by an ESRC Studentship. He is a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

He researches at the intersection between the academic discipline and school subject of geography, including recent collaborations developing through the Smart Cities Network for Sustainable Urban Future project which was shortlisted for the 2017 Newton Prize (India). He is currently leading research on Climate Change Education Futures in India (GCRF) in collaboration with colleagues at IISER, Pune, and on the role of cultural heritage in curriculum making in Kolkata.

Collaborations with colleagues in the School of Geography and the Environment are contributing to anti-racist curriculum futures, including in the school subject, and in postgraduate teaching through the TDEP-funded Oxford-UNISA course ‘Decolonising Research Methods’.

His research on teacher education focuses on the contribution that geography education research offers to the conceptualisation and practice of teaching. This work includes ethnographic research on teachers’ curriculum making exploring the journeys through which information travels into school classrooms, beginning teachers’ experiences of school subject departments, and the role of written lesson observation feedback in constructing ‘good teaching’.

Steve serves on the editorial board of the journal Geography, and is Chair of the Geography Education Research Collective (GEReCo/IGU-CGE).

 

Caitlin is a Doctoral student in the Department of Education working on how teachers interact with refugee and unaccompanied asylum-seeking pupils in UK schools.

Her Doctoral study uses survey data, interviews, observation, and document analysis to examine teacher knowledge, attitudes, and practices in relation to refugee pupils. Previously, Caitlin worked as a primary school teacher in Aberdeen, London, and at Rose Hill Primary School in Oxford. She completed an MA (Gaelic Medium Education, Oral History) and a PGDE (Primary Education) at the University of Aberdeen, and a BA (Human Geography, Environmental Studies) at Middlebury College in the US. She has a general interest in improving inclusion and equity in education.

Helen’s academic interest in higher education policy developed from more than 20 years of professional experience of university administration – in public relations and admissions.

She gained her doctorate from Oxford in 2010 (a study of the market created by the introduction of £3000 fees for Home/EU undergraduates at English universities in 2006); since then, she has conducted research into the impacts of student fees and funding on institutions, students, graduates and applicants within the higher education sector in England. She also works as a consultant to higher education institutions.

Helen was Pathway Convenor for the MSc Education (HE) for two years and has taught on this course since completing her DPhil. As an inspector for the British Accreditation Council, Helen has the opportunity to gain insights into the operation of higher education providers globally. She is also an Associate of the SKOPE, the department’s research centre for Skills, Knowledge and Organisational Performance.

From 2012-17, Helen was a member of the governing council of the Society for Research into Higher Education (SRHE), serving as Vice-Chair from 2014-17.

 

Jo-Anne is Director of the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment.  She completed a six-year term as Head of the Department of Education, has been Standing Adviser to the House of Commons Education Select Committee, a member of Ofqual’s Standing Advisory Group on Standards, Chair of the National Reference Test Expert Group, and a member of the Welsh Government’s Curriculum and Assessment Group.  Before coming to Oxford, Jo-Anne held academic posts at the Institute of Education, University of London and the University of Bristol. Her first degree and doctorate were in psychology and she has an MBA.  Her current research projects include Setting and Maintaining Standards in national examinations, Examination reform: the impact of modular and linear examinations at GCSE, Assessment for Learning in Africa (AFLA), intelligent accountability and the Progress in International Reading Literacy Study England national centre.

Her research interests are in educational assessment, including system-wide structures and processes, examination standards, marking and assessment design.  Jo-Anne conducts a lot of work with government and industry partners, including acting as the Standing Adviser to the House of Commons Education Select Committee, a member of Ofqual’s Standing Advisory Group and membership of the Welsh Government’s Curriculum and Assessment Group.  She is a member of the Editorial Board of the Oxford Review of Education journal and the International Advisory Board of Assessment in Education: principles, policy & practice.  She has been a Visiting Professor at the universities of Bergen and Queen’s (Belfast).  From 2013 to 2015 she was President of the Association for Educational Assessment – Europe.

Qualifications
  • B.A.H. Linguistics/Psychology – Queen’s University, Kingston On, Canada
  • M.A. Educational Psychology – McGill University, Canada
  • Ph.D. – Second Language Education – McGill University Canada

Victoria Murphy would welcome informal contacts from prospective doctoral students interested in the following topics:

  • Language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/ Language Minority) children
  • Child L2 and bilingualism
  • Foreign language learning in primary school
  • Lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Research

Victoria is active in the following research areas, and would welcome DPhil applications on any of these, particularly those relating to EAL (language minority) children and child L2 learning and foreign language learning in primary school.  She is also the convenor of the Research in English as an Additional Language (REAL) group.  Her research is currently being funded by the ESRC, Leverhulme Trust and Nuffield Foundation.

  • language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/Language minority) children
  • child L2 learning and bilingualism
  • foreign language learning in primary school
  • cognitive processes underlying L1 and L2 learning
  • lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Current Research Project(s)

Joanna is a Doctoral Student, and ESRC Grand Union DTP Scholar, researching in-class support for multilingualism in UK schools.

She has over 12 years of experience as a teaching professional, having worked as a class teacher, EAL specialist and Teaching Assistant in the UK, China, Brazil and Italy. Her main area of interest is school-based education (3-18), specifically the support for multilingual pupils and their language practices, as well as the relationship between teaching assistants and both teachers and children in schools.

Joanna holds a BA in Jurisprudence and a MSc in Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching, both from the University of Oxford. She also has a PGCE, and a PGDip in French.

Joining the Department of Education in 2020 after teaching English and foreign languages in secondary schools and early years settings for 15 years, Catherine completed the MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition in 2021. Her doctoral research investigates the effectiveness of using songs as pedagogical tools with young second language learners in formal educational settings.

Additionally, Catherine hosts The Language Revolution podcast, exploring how linguistics and language awareness might inform/transform languages teaching with guests including Michael Rosen and David Crystal. She also project manages the annual conference for NALDIC, the national subject association for EAL.

Publications

Multilingual is Normal: An anthology of voices, talking about talking (2020)

Renyu completed her BA degree in Psychology at the University of British Columbia (Vancouver, Canada) and her MPhil degree in Education at University of Cambridge.

During her MPhil study, she worked with children aged 4 to 6 years to investigate the relationship between bilingualism, vocabulary size, and inhibitory control, and also to validate a novel app designed to assess early language development. For her Dphil study at Oxford, Renyu aims to explore the factors that might affect L2 pronunciation learning in young children and the interaction between children’s L1 and L2. She is particularly interested in the psychological factors that might influence a child’s L2 pronunciation.

Prior to studying at Oxford, Renyu worked as Research Assistant at the Assessment Research Group at British Council for one year and a half. She was involved in various projects, including gap analysis on reading demand and reading ability, participant feedback questionnaire design and analysis, design and recruitment for a new EAP task study, etc.

Bernard holds a PhD in Marketing from the University of Nottingham and a DBA from the University of Newcastle.

His research to date explores the leadership in HE. Prior to coming to Oxford, he worked in various HEIs and served as the supervisor of a secondary school.

Publications

Lee, B., Tsui, A. & Yau, O.H.M. (2019), Higher-order Goals, Trust-in-leader, and Self-efficacy as Moderators of Transformational Leadership Performance: The Case of Multi-level Marketing Organizations in China, Journal of Euromarketing, Vol.28 (3-4), 76-97. (2011 RG Impact factor: 0.83).

Conferences

Lee, B. (2020), “Self-formation for the Underprivileged,” 2020 International Online Symposium, Toward a New Paradigm of Economics,organized by Macau Ricci Institute, The University of Saint Joseph, 15 & 16 October. (Online Conference Platform Presentation).

Steve is Associate Professor of Teacher Education. He is a curriculum tutor for the Geography PGCE and MSc Learning and Teaching.

Steve is a qualified geography teacher and was previously the head of department at a comprehensive secondary school in Oxfordshire, and Head of Programmes at Bishop Grosseteste University, Lincoln.

He holds an MA in Educational Leadership and Innovation from Warwick University, an MSc in Educational Research Methodology and DPhil in Education from the University of Oxford which were funded by an ESRC Studentship. He is a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

He researches at the intersection between the academic discipline and school subject of geography, including recent collaborations developing through the Smart Cities Network for Sustainable Urban Future project which was shortlisted for the 2017 Newton Prize (India). He is currently leading research on Climate Change Education Futures in India (GCRF) in collaboration with colleagues at IISER, Pune, and on the role of cultural heritage in curriculum making in Kolkata.

Collaborations with colleagues in the School of Geography and the Environment are contributing to anti-racist curriculum futures, including in the school subject, and in postgraduate teaching through the TDEP-funded Oxford-UNISA course ‘Decolonising Research Methods’.

His research on teacher education focuses on the contribution that geography education research offers to the conceptualisation and practice of teaching. This work includes ethnographic research on teachers’ curriculum making exploring the journeys through which information travels into school classrooms, beginning teachers’ experiences of school subject departments, and the role of written lesson observation feedback in constructing ‘good teaching’.

Steve serves on the editorial board of the journal Geography, and is Chair of the Geography Education Research Collective (GEReCo/IGU-CGE).

 

Caitlin is a Doctoral student in the Department of Education working on how teachers interact with refugee and unaccompanied asylum-seeking pupils in UK schools.

Her Doctoral study uses survey data, interviews, observation, and document analysis to examine teacher knowledge, attitudes, and practices in relation to refugee pupils. Previously, Caitlin worked as a primary school teacher in Aberdeen, London, and at Rose Hill Primary School in Oxford. She completed an MA (Gaelic Medium Education, Oral History) and a PGDE (Primary Education) at the University of Aberdeen, and a BA (Human Geography, Environmental Studies) at Middlebury College in the US. She has a general interest in improving inclusion and equity in education.

Helen’s academic interest in higher education policy developed from more than 20 years of professional experience of university administration – in public relations and admissions.

She gained her doctorate from Oxford in 2010 (a study of the market created by the introduction of £3000 fees for Home/EU undergraduates at English universities in 2006); since then, she has conducted research into the impacts of student fees and funding on institutions, students, graduates and applicants within the higher education sector in England. She also works as a consultant to higher education institutions.

Helen was Pathway Convenor for the MSc Education (HE) for two years and has taught on this course since completing her DPhil. As an inspector for the British Accreditation Council, Helen has the opportunity to gain insights into the operation of higher education providers globally. She is also an Associate of the SKOPE, the department’s research centre for Skills, Knowledge and Organisational Performance.

From 2012-17, Helen was a member of the governing council of the Society for Research into Higher Education (SRHE), serving as Vice-Chair from 2014-17.

 

Jo-Anne is Director of the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment.  She completed a six-year term as Head of the Department of Education, has been Standing Adviser to the House of Commons Education Select Committee, a member of Ofqual’s Standing Advisory Group on Standards, Chair of the National Reference Test Expert Group, and a member of the Welsh Government’s Curriculum and Assessment Group.  Before coming to Oxford, Jo-Anne held academic posts at the Institute of Education, University of London and the University of Bristol. Her first degree and doctorate were in psychology and she has an MBA.  Her current research projects include Setting and Maintaining Standards in national examinations, Examination reform: the impact of modular and linear examinations at GCSE, Assessment for Learning in Africa (AFLA), intelligent accountability and the Progress in International Reading Literacy Study England national centre.

Her research interests are in educational assessment, including system-wide structures and processes, examination standards, marking and assessment design.  Jo-Anne conducts a lot of work with government and industry partners, including acting as the Standing Adviser to the House of Commons Education Select Committee, a member of Ofqual’s Standing Advisory Group and membership of the Welsh Government’s Curriculum and Assessment Group.  She is a member of the Editorial Board of the Oxford Review of Education journal and the International Advisory Board of Assessment in Education: principles, policy & practice.  She has been a Visiting Professor at the universities of Bergen and Queen’s (Belfast).  From 2013 to 2015 she was President of the Association for Educational Assessment – Europe.

Qualifications
  • B.A.H. Linguistics/Psychology – Queen’s University, Kingston On, Canada
  • M.A. Educational Psychology – McGill University, Canada
  • Ph.D. – Second Language Education – McGill University Canada

Victoria Murphy would welcome informal contacts from prospective doctoral students interested in the following topics:

  • Language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/ Language Minority) children
  • Child L2 and bilingualism
  • Foreign language learning in primary school
  • Lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Research

Victoria is active in the following research areas, and would welcome DPhil applications on any of these, particularly those relating to EAL (language minority) children and child L2 learning and foreign language learning in primary school.  She is also the convenor of the Research in English as an Additional Language (REAL) group.  Her research is currently being funded by the ESRC, Leverhulme Trust and Nuffield Foundation.

  • language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/Language minority) children
  • child L2 learning and bilingualism
  • foreign language learning in primary school
  • cognitive processes underlying L1 and L2 learning
  • lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Current Research Project(s)

Joanna is a Doctoral Student, and ESRC Grand Union DTP Scholar, researching in-class support for multilingualism in UK schools.

She has over 12 years of experience as a teaching professional, having worked as a class teacher, EAL specialist and Teaching Assistant in the UK, China, Brazil and Italy. Her main area of interest is school-based education (3-18), specifically the support for multilingual pupils and their language practices, as well as the relationship between teaching assistants and both teachers and children in schools.

Joanna holds a BA in Jurisprudence and a MSc in Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching, both from the University of Oxford. She also has a PGCE, and a PGDip in French.

Joining the Department of Education in 2020 after teaching English and foreign languages in secondary schools and early years settings for 15 years, Catherine completed the MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition in 2021. Her doctoral research investigates the effectiveness of using songs as pedagogical tools with young second language learners in formal educational settings.

Additionally, Catherine hosts The Language Revolution podcast, exploring how linguistics and language awareness might inform/transform languages teaching with guests including Michael Rosen and David Crystal. She also project manages the annual conference for NALDIC, the national subject association for EAL.

Publications

Multilingual is Normal: An anthology of voices, talking about talking (2020)

Renyu completed her BA degree in Psychology at the University of British Columbia (Vancouver, Canada) and her MPhil degree in Education at University of Cambridge.

During her MPhil study, she worked with children aged 4 to 6 years to investigate the relationship between bilingualism, vocabulary size, and inhibitory control, and also to validate a novel app designed to assess early language development. For her Dphil study at Oxford, Renyu aims to explore the factors that might affect L2 pronunciation learning in young children and the interaction between children’s L1 and L2. She is particularly interested in the psychological factors that might influence a child’s L2 pronunciation.

Prior to studying at Oxford, Renyu worked as Research Assistant at the Assessment Research Group at British Council for one year and a half. She was involved in various projects, including gap analysis on reading demand and reading ability, participant feedback questionnaire design and analysis, design and recruitment for a new EAP task study, etc.

Bernard holds a PhD in Marketing from the University of Nottingham and a DBA from the University of Newcastle.

His research to date explores the leadership in HE. Prior to coming to Oxford, he worked in various HEIs and served as the supervisor of a secondary school.

Publications

Lee, B., Tsui, A. & Yau, O.H.M. (2019), Higher-order Goals, Trust-in-leader, and Self-efficacy as Moderators of Transformational Leadership Performance: The Case of Multi-level Marketing Organizations in China, Journal of Euromarketing, Vol.28 (3-4), 76-97. (2011 RG Impact factor: 0.83).

Conferences

Lee, B. (2020), “Self-formation for the Underprivileged,” 2020 International Online Symposium, Toward a New Paradigm of Economics,organized by Macau Ricci Institute, The University of Saint Joseph, 15 & 16 October. (Online Conference Platform Presentation).

Steve is Associate Professor of Teacher Education. He is a curriculum tutor for the Geography PGCE and MSc Learning and Teaching.

Steve is a qualified geography teacher and was previously the head of department at a comprehensive secondary school in Oxfordshire, and Head of Programmes at Bishop Grosseteste University, Lincoln.

He holds an MA in Educational Leadership and Innovation from Warwick University, an MSc in Educational Research Methodology and DPhil in Education from the University of Oxford which were funded by an ESRC Studentship. He is a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

He researches at the intersection between the academic discipline and school subject of geography, including recent collaborations developing through the Smart Cities Network for Sustainable Urban Future project which was shortlisted for the 2017 Newton Prize (India). He is currently leading research on Climate Change Education Futures in India (GCRF) in collaboration with colleagues at IISER, Pune, and on the role of cultural heritage in curriculum making in Kolkata.

Collaborations with colleagues in the School of Geography and the Environment are contributing to anti-racist curriculum futures, including in the school subject, and in postgraduate teaching through the TDEP-funded Oxford-UNISA course ‘Decolonising Research Methods’.

His research on teacher education focuses on the contribution that geography education research offers to the conceptualisation and practice of teaching. This work includes ethnographic research on teachers’ curriculum making exploring the journeys through which information travels into school classrooms, beginning teachers’ experiences of school subject departments, and the role of written lesson observation feedback in constructing ‘good teaching’.

Steve serves on the editorial board of the journal Geography, and is Chair of the Geography Education Research Collective (GEReCo/IGU-CGE).

 

Caitlin is a Doctoral student in the Department of Education working on how teachers interact with refugee and unaccompanied asylum-seeking pupils in UK schools.

Her Doctoral study uses survey data, interviews, observation, and document analysis to examine teacher knowledge, attitudes, and practices in relation to refugee pupils. Previously, Caitlin worked as a primary school teacher in Aberdeen, London, and at Rose Hill Primary School in Oxford. She completed an MA (Gaelic Medium Education, Oral History) and a PGDE (Primary Education) at the University of Aberdeen, and a BA (Human Geography, Environmental Studies) at Middlebury College in the US. She has a general interest in improving inclusion and equity in education.

Helen’s academic interest in higher education policy developed from more than 20 years of professional experience of university administration – in public relations and admissions.

She gained her doctorate from Oxford in 2010 (a study of the market created by the introduction of £3000 fees for Home/EU undergraduates at English universities in 2006); since then, she has conducted research into the impacts of student fees and funding on institutions, students, graduates and applicants within the higher education sector in England. She also works as a consultant to higher education institutions.

Helen was Pathway Convenor for the MSc Education (HE) for two years and has taught on this course since completing her DPhil. As an inspector for the British Accreditation Council, Helen has the opportunity to gain insights into the operation of higher education providers globally. She is also an Associate of the SKOPE, the department’s research centre for Skills, Knowledge and Organisational Performance.

From 2012-17, Helen was a member of the governing council of the Society for Research into Higher Education (SRHE), serving as Vice-Chair from 2014-17.

 

Jo-Anne is Director of the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment.  She completed a six-year term as Head of the Department of Education, has been Standing Adviser to the House of Commons Education Select Committee, a member of Ofqual’s Standing Advisory Group on Standards, Chair of the National Reference Test Expert Group, and a member of the Welsh Government’s Curriculum and Assessment Group.  Before coming to Oxford, Jo-Anne held academic posts at the Institute of Education, University of London and the University of Bristol. Her first degree and doctorate were in psychology and she has an MBA.  Her current research projects include Setting and Maintaining Standards in national examinations, Examination reform: the impact of modular and linear examinations at GCSE, Assessment for Learning in Africa (AFLA), intelligent accountability and the Progress in International Reading Literacy Study England national centre.

Her research interests are in educational assessment, including system-wide structures and processes, examination standards, marking and assessment design.  Jo-Anne conducts a lot of work with government and industry partners, including acting as the Standing Adviser to the House of Commons Education Select Committee, a member of Ofqual’s Standing Advisory Group and membership of the Welsh Government’s Curriculum and Assessment Group.  She is a member of the Editorial Board of the Oxford Review of Education journal and the International Advisory Board of Assessment in Education: principles, policy & practice.  She has been a Visiting Professor at the universities of Bergen and Queen’s (Belfast).  From 2013 to 2015 she was President of the Association for Educational Assessment – Europe.

Qualifications
  • B.A.H. Linguistics/Psychology – Queen’s University, Kingston On, Canada
  • M.A. Educational Psychology – McGill University, Canada
  • Ph.D. – Second Language Education – McGill University Canada

Victoria Murphy would welcome informal contacts from prospective doctoral students interested in the following topics:

  • Language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/ Language Minority) children
  • Child L2 and bilingualism
  • Foreign language learning in primary school
  • Lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Research

Victoria is active in the following research areas, and would welcome DPhil applications on any of these, particularly those relating to EAL (language minority) children and child L2 learning and foreign language learning in primary school.  She is also the convenor of the Research in English as an Additional Language (REAL) group.  Her research is currently being funded by the ESRC, Leverhulme Trust and Nuffield Foundation.

  • language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/Language minority) children
  • child L2 learning and bilingualism
  • foreign language learning in primary school
  • cognitive processes underlying L1 and L2 learning
  • lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Current Research Project(s)

Joanna is a Doctoral Student, and ESRC Grand Union DTP Scholar, researching in-class support for multilingualism in UK schools.

She has over 12 years of experience as a teaching professional, having worked as a class teacher, EAL specialist and Teaching Assistant in the UK, China, Brazil and Italy. Her main area of interest is school-based education (3-18), specifically the support for multilingual pupils and their language practices, as well as the relationship between teaching assistants and both teachers and children in schools.

Joanna holds a BA in Jurisprudence and a MSc in Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching, both from the University of Oxford. She also has a PGCE, and a PGDip in French.

Joining the Department of Education in 2020 after teaching English and foreign languages in secondary schools and early years settings for 15 years, Catherine completed the MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition in 2021. Her doctoral research investigates the effectiveness of using songs as pedagogical tools with young second language learners in formal educational settings.

Additionally, Catherine hosts The Language Revolution podcast, exploring how linguistics and language awareness might inform/transform languages teaching with guests including Michael Rosen and David Crystal. She also project manages the annual conference for NALDIC, the national subject association for EAL.

Publications

Multilingual is Normal: An anthology of voices, talking about talking (2020)

Renyu completed her BA degree in Psychology at the University of British Columbia (Vancouver, Canada) and her MPhil degree in Education at University of Cambridge.

During her MPhil study, she worked with children aged 4 to 6 years to investigate the relationship between bilingualism, vocabulary size, and inhibitory control, and also to validate a novel app designed to assess early language development. For her Dphil study at Oxford, Renyu aims to explore the factors that might affect L2 pronunciation learning in young children and the interaction between children’s L1 and L2. She is particularly interested in the psychological factors that might influence a child’s L2 pronunciation.

Prior to studying at Oxford, Renyu worked as Research Assistant at the Assessment Research Group at British Council for one year and a half. She was involved in various projects, including gap analysis on reading demand and reading ability, participant feedback questionnaire design and analysis, design and recruitment for a new EAP task study, etc.

Bernard holds a PhD in Marketing from the University of Nottingham and a DBA from the University of Newcastle.

His research to date explores the leadership in HE. Prior to coming to Oxford, he worked in various HEIs and served as the supervisor of a secondary school.

Publications

Lee, B., Tsui, A. & Yau, O.H.M. (2019), Higher-order Goals, Trust-in-leader, and Self-efficacy as Moderators of Transformational Leadership Performance: The Case of Multi-level Marketing Organizations in China, Journal of Euromarketing, Vol.28 (3-4), 76-97. (2011 RG Impact factor: 0.83).

Conferences

Lee, B. (2020), “Self-formation for the Underprivileged,” 2020 International Online Symposium, Toward a New Paradigm of Economics,organized by Macau Ricci Institute, The University of Saint Joseph, 15 & 16 October. (Online Conference Platform Presentation).

Steve is Associate Professor of Teacher Education. He is a curriculum tutor for the Geography PGCE and MSc Learning and Teaching.

Steve is a qualified geography teacher and was previously the head of department at a comprehensive secondary school in Oxfordshire, and Head of Programmes at Bishop Grosseteste University, Lincoln.

He holds an MA in Educational Leadership and Innovation from Warwick University, an MSc in Educational Research Methodology and DPhil in Education from the University of Oxford which were funded by an ESRC Studentship. He is a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

He researches at the intersection between the academic discipline and school subject of geography, including recent collaborations developing through the Smart Cities Network for Sustainable Urban Future project which was shortlisted for the 2017 Newton Prize (India). He is currently leading research on Climate Change Education Futures in India (GCRF) in collaboration with colleagues at IISER, Pune, and on the role of cultural heritage in curriculum making in Kolkata.

Collaborations with colleagues in the School of Geography and the Environment are contributing to anti-racist curriculum futures, including in the school subject, and in postgraduate teaching through the TDEP-funded Oxford-UNISA course ‘Decolonising Research Methods’.

His research on teacher education focuses on the contribution that geography education research offers to the conceptualisation and practice of teaching. This work includes ethnographic research on teachers’ curriculum making exploring the journeys through which information travels into school classrooms, beginning teachers’ experiences of school subject departments, and the role of written lesson observation feedback in constructing ‘good teaching’.

Steve serves on the editorial board of the journal Geography, and is Chair of the Geography Education Research Collective (GEReCo/IGU-CGE).

 

Caitlin is a Doctoral student in the Department of Education working on how teachers interact with refugee and unaccompanied asylum-seeking pupils in UK schools.

Her Doctoral study uses survey data, interviews, observation, and document analysis to examine teacher knowledge, attitudes, and practices in relation to refugee pupils. Previously, Caitlin worked as a primary school teacher in Aberdeen, London, and at Rose Hill Primary School in Oxford. She completed an MA (Gaelic Medium Education, Oral History) and a PGDE (Primary Education) at the University of Aberdeen, and a BA (Human Geography, Environmental Studies) at Middlebury College in the US. She has a general interest in improving inclusion and equity in education.

Helen’s academic interest in higher education policy developed from more than 20 years of professional experience of university administration – in public relations and admissions.

She gained her doctorate from Oxford in 2010 (a study of the market created by the introduction of £3000 fees for Home/EU undergraduates at English universities in 2006); since then, she has conducted research into the impacts of student fees and funding on institutions, students, graduates and applicants within the higher education sector in England. She also works as a consultant to higher education institutions.

Helen was Pathway Convenor for the MSc Education (HE) for two years and has taught on this course since completing her DPhil. As an inspector for the British Accreditation Council, Helen has the opportunity to gain insights into the operation of higher education providers globally. She is also an Associate of the SKOPE, the department’s research centre for Skills, Knowledge and Organisational Performance.

From 2012-17, Helen was a member of the governing council of the Society for Research into Higher Education (SRHE), serving as Vice-Chair from 2014-17.

 

Jo-Anne is Director of the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment.  She completed a six-year term as Head of the Department of Education, has been Standing Adviser to the House of Commons Education Select Committee, a member of Ofqual’s Standing Advisory Group on Standards, Chair of the National Reference Test Expert Group, and a member of the Welsh Government’s Curriculum and Assessment Group.  Before coming to Oxford, Jo-Anne held academic posts at the Institute of Education, University of London and the University of Bristol. Her first degree and doctorate were in psychology and she has an MBA.  Her current research projects include Setting and Maintaining Standards in national examinations, Examination reform: the impact of modular and linear examinations at GCSE, Assessment for Learning in Africa (AFLA), intelligent accountability and the Progress in International Reading Literacy Study England national centre.

Her research interests are in educational assessment, including system-wide structures and processes, examination standards, marking and assessment design.  Jo-Anne conducts a lot of work with government and industry partners, including acting as the Standing Adviser to the House of Commons Education Select Committee, a member of Ofqual’s Standing Advisory Group and membership of the Welsh Government’s Curriculum and Assessment Group.  She is a member of the Editorial Board of the Oxford Review of Education journal and the International Advisory Board of Assessment in Education: principles, policy & practice.  She has been a Visiting Professor at the universities of Bergen and Queen’s (Belfast).  From 2013 to 2015 she was President of the Association for Educational Assessment – Europe.

Qualifications
  • B.A.H. Linguistics/Psychology – Queen’s University, Kingston On, Canada
  • M.A. Educational Psychology – McGill University, Canada
  • Ph.D. – Second Language Education – McGill University Canada

Victoria Murphy would welcome informal contacts from prospective doctoral students interested in the following topics:

  • Language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/ Language Minority) children
  • Child L2 and bilingualism
  • Foreign language learning in primary school
  • Lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Research

Victoria is active in the following research areas, and would welcome DPhil applications on any of these, particularly those relating to EAL (language minority) children and child L2 learning and foreign language learning in primary school.  She is also the convenor of the Research in English as an Additional Language (REAL) group.  Her research is currently being funded by the ESRC, Leverhulme Trust and Nuffield Foundation.

  • language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/Language minority) children
  • child L2 learning and bilingualism
  • foreign language learning in primary school
  • cognitive processes underlying L1 and L2 learning
  • lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Current Research Project(s)

Joanna is a Doctoral Student, and ESRC Grand Union DTP Scholar, researching in-class support for multilingualism in UK schools.

She has over 12 years of experience as a teaching professional, having worked as a class teacher, EAL specialist and Teaching Assistant in the UK, China, Brazil and Italy. Her main area of interest is school-based education (3-18), specifically the support for multilingual pupils and their language practices, as well as the relationship between teaching assistants and both teachers and children in schools.

Joanna holds a BA in Jurisprudence and a MSc in Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching, both from the University of Oxford. She also has a PGCE, and a PGDip in French.

Joining the Department of Education in 2020 after teaching English and foreign languages in secondary schools and early years settings for 15 years, Catherine completed the MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition in 2021. Her doctoral research investigates the effectiveness of using songs as pedagogical tools with young second language learners in formal educational settings.

Additionally, Catherine hosts The Language Revolution podcast, exploring how linguistics and language awareness might inform/transform languages teaching with guests including Michael Rosen and David Crystal. She also project manages the annual conference for NALDIC, the national subject association for EAL.

Publications

Multilingual is Normal: An anthology of voices, talking about talking (2020)

Renyu completed her BA degree in Psychology at the University of British Columbia (Vancouver, Canada) and her MPhil degree in Education at University of Cambridge.

During her MPhil study, she worked with children aged 4 to 6 years to investigate the relationship between bilingualism, vocabulary size, and inhibitory control, and also to validate a novel app designed to assess early language development. For her Dphil study at Oxford, Renyu aims to explore the factors that might affect L2 pronunciation learning in young children and the interaction between children’s L1 and L2. She is particularly interested in the psychological factors that might influence a child’s L2 pronunciation.

Prior to studying at Oxford, Renyu worked as Research Assistant at the Assessment Research Group at British Council for one year and a half. She was involved in various projects, including gap analysis on reading demand and reading ability, participant feedback questionnaire design and analysis, design and recruitment for a new EAP task study, etc.

Bernard holds a PhD in Marketing from the University of Nottingham and a DBA from the University of Newcastle.

His research to date explores the leadership in HE. Prior to coming to Oxford, he worked in various HEIs and served as the supervisor of a secondary school.

Publications

Lee, B., Tsui, A. & Yau, O.H.M. (2019), Higher-order Goals, Trust-in-leader, and Self-efficacy as Moderators of Transformational Leadership Performance: The Case of Multi-level Marketing Organizations in China, Journal of Euromarketing, Vol.28 (3-4), 76-97. (2011 RG Impact factor: 0.83).

Conferences

Lee, B. (2020), “Self-formation for the Underprivileged,” 2020 International Online Symposium, Toward a New Paradigm of Economics,organized by Macau Ricci Institute, The University of Saint Joseph, 15 & 16 October. (Online Conference Platform Presentation).

Steve is Associate Professor of Teacher Education. He is a curriculum tutor for the Geography PGCE and MSc Learning and Teaching.

Steve is a qualified geography teacher and was previously the head of department at a comprehensive secondary school in Oxfordshire, and Head of Programmes at Bishop Grosseteste University, Lincoln.

He holds an MA in Educational Leadership and Innovation from Warwick University, an MSc in Educational Research Methodology and DPhil in Education from the University of Oxford which were funded by an ESRC Studentship. He is a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

He researches at the intersection between the academic discipline and school subject of geography, including recent collaborations developing through the Smart Cities Network for Sustainable Urban Future project which was shortlisted for the 2017 Newton Prize (India). He is currently leading research on Climate Change Education Futures in India (GCRF) in collaboration with colleagues at IISER, Pune, and on the role of cultural heritage in curriculum making in Kolkata.

Collaborations with colleagues in the School of Geography and the Environment are contributing to anti-racist curriculum futures, including in the school subject, and in postgraduate teaching through the TDEP-funded Oxford-UNISA course ‘Decolonising Research Methods’.

His research on teacher education focuses on the contribution that geography education research offers to the conceptualisation and practice of teaching. This work includes ethnographic research on teachers’ curriculum making exploring the journeys through which information travels into school classrooms, beginning teachers’ experiences of school subject departments, and the role of written lesson observation feedback in constructing ‘good teaching’.

Steve serves on the editorial board of the journal Geography, and is Chair of the Geography Education Research Collective (GEReCo/IGU-CGE).

 

Caitlin is a Doctoral student in the Department of Education working on how teachers interact with refugee and unaccompanied asylum-seeking pupils in UK schools.

Her Doctoral study uses survey data, interviews, observation, and document analysis to examine teacher knowledge, attitudes, and practices in relation to refugee pupils. Previously, Caitlin worked as a primary school teacher in Aberdeen, London, and at Rose Hill Primary School in Oxford. She completed an MA (Gaelic Medium Education, Oral History) and a PGDE (Primary Education) at the University of Aberdeen, and a BA (Human Geography, Environmental Studies) at Middlebury College in the US. She has a general interest in improving inclusion and equity in education.

Helen’s academic interest in higher education policy developed from more than 20 years of professional experience of university administration – in public relations and admissions.

She gained her doctorate from Oxford in 2010 (a study of the market created by the introduction of £3000 fees for Home/EU undergraduates at English universities in 2006); since then, she has conducted research into the impacts of student fees and funding on institutions, students, graduates and applicants within the higher education sector in England. She also works as a consultant to higher education institutions.

Helen was Pathway Convenor for the MSc Education (HE) for two years and has taught on this course since completing her DPhil. As an inspector for the British Accreditation Council, Helen has the opportunity to gain insights into the operation of higher education providers globally. She is also an Associate of the SKOPE, the department’s research centre for Skills, Knowledge and Organisational Performance.

From 2012-17, Helen was a member of the governing council of the Society for Research into Higher Education (SRHE), serving as Vice-Chair from 2014-17.

 

Jo-Anne is Director of the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment.  She completed a six-year term as Head of the Department of Education, has been Standing Adviser to the House of Commons Education Select Committee, a member of Ofqual’s Standing Advisory Group on Standards, Chair of the National Reference Test Expert Group, and a member of the Welsh Government’s Curriculum and Assessment Group.  Before coming to Oxford, Jo-Anne held academic posts at the Institute of Education, University of London and the University of Bristol. Her first degree and doctorate were in psychology and she has an MBA.  Her current research projects include Setting and Maintaining Standards in national examinations, Examination reform: the impact of modular and linear examinations at GCSE, Assessment for Learning in Africa (AFLA), intelligent accountability and the Progress in International Reading Literacy Study England national centre.

Her research interests are in educational assessment, including system-wide structures and processes, examination standards, marking and assessment design.  Jo-Anne conducts a lot of work with government and industry partners, including acting as the Standing Adviser to the House of Commons Education Select Committee, a member of Ofqual’s Standing Advisory Group and membership of the Welsh Government’s Curriculum and Assessment Group.  She is a member of the Editorial Board of the Oxford Review of Education journal and the International Advisory Board of Assessment in Education: principles, policy & practice.  She has been a Visiting Professor at the universities of Bergen and Queen’s (Belfast).  From 2013 to 2015 she was President of the Association for Educational Assessment – Europe.

Qualifications
  • B.A.H. Linguistics/Psychology – Queen’s University, Kingston On, Canada
  • M.A. Educational Psychology – McGill University, Canada
  • Ph.D. – Second Language Education – McGill University Canada

Victoria Murphy would welcome informal contacts from prospective doctoral students interested in the following topics:

  • Language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/ Language Minority) children
  • Child L2 and bilingualism
  • Foreign language learning in primary school
  • Lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Research

Victoria is active in the following research areas, and would welcome DPhil applications on any of these, particularly those relating to EAL (language minority) children and child L2 learning and foreign language learning in primary school.  She is also the convenor of the Research in English as an Additional Language (REAL) group.  Her research is currently being funded by the ESRC, Leverhulme Trust and Nuffield Foundation.

  • language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/Language minority) children
  • child L2 learning and bilingualism
  • foreign language learning in primary school
  • cognitive processes underlying L1 and L2 learning
  • lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Current Research Project(s)

Joanna is a Doctoral Student, and ESRC Grand Union DTP Scholar, researching in-class support for multilingualism in UK schools.

She has over 12 years of experience as a teaching professional, having worked as a class teacher, EAL specialist and Teaching Assistant in the UK, China, Brazil and Italy. Her main area of interest is school-based education (3-18), specifically the support for multilingual pupils and their language practices, as well as the relationship between teaching assistants and both teachers and children in schools.

Joanna holds a BA in Jurisprudence and a MSc in Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching, both from the University of Oxford. She also has a PGCE, and a PGDip in French.

Joining the Department of Education in 2020 after teaching English and foreign languages in secondary schools and early years settings for 15 years, Catherine completed the MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition in 2021. Her doctoral research investigates the effectiveness of using songs as pedagogical tools with young second language learners in formal educational settings.

Additionally, Catherine hosts The Language Revolution podcast, exploring how linguistics and language awareness might inform/transform languages teaching with guests including Michael Rosen and David Crystal. She also project manages the annual conference for NALDIC, the national subject association for EAL.

Publications

Multilingual is Normal: An anthology of voices, talking about talking (2020)

Renyu completed her BA degree in Psychology at the University of British Columbia (Vancouver, Canada) and her MPhil degree in Education at University of Cambridge.

During her MPhil study, she worked with children aged 4 to 6 years to investigate the relationship between bilingualism, vocabulary size, and inhibitory control, and also to validate a novel app designed to assess early language development. For her Dphil study at Oxford, Renyu aims to explore the factors that might affect L2 pronunciation learning in young children and the interaction between children’s L1 and L2. She is particularly interested in the psychological factors that might influence a child’s L2 pronunciation.

Prior to studying at Oxford, Renyu worked as Research Assistant at the Assessment Research Group at British Council for one year and a half. She was involved in various projects, including gap analysis on reading demand and reading ability, participant feedback questionnaire design and analysis, design and recruitment for a new EAP task study, etc.

Bernard holds a PhD in Marketing from the University of Nottingham and a DBA from the University of Newcastle.

His research to date explores the leadership in HE. Prior to coming to Oxford, he worked in various HEIs and served as the supervisor of a secondary school.

Publications

Lee, B., Tsui, A. & Yau, O.H.M. (2019), Higher-order Goals, Trust-in-leader, and Self-efficacy as Moderators of Transformational Leadership Performance: The Case of Multi-level Marketing Organizations in China, Journal of Euromarketing, Vol.28 (3-4), 76-97. (2011 RG Impact factor: 0.83).

Conferences

Lee, B. (2020), “Self-formation for the Underprivileged,” 2020 International Online Symposium, Toward a New Paradigm of Economics,organized by Macau Ricci Institute, The University of Saint Joseph, 15 & 16 October. (Online Conference Platform Presentation).

Steve is Associate Professor of Teacher Education. He is a curriculum tutor for the Geography PGCE and MSc Learning and Teaching.

Steve is a qualified geography teacher and was previously the head of department at a comprehensive secondary school in Oxfordshire, and Head of Programmes at Bishop Grosseteste University, Lincoln.

He holds an MA in Educational Leadership and Innovation from Warwick University, an MSc in Educational Research Methodology and DPhil in Education from the University of Oxford which were funded by an ESRC Studentship. He is a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

He researches at the intersection between the academic discipline and school subject of geography, including recent collaborations developing through the Smart Cities Network for Sustainable Urban Future project which was shortlisted for the 2017 Newton Prize (India). He is currently leading research on Climate Change Education Futures in India (GCRF) in collaboration with colleagues at IISER, Pune, and on the role of cultural heritage in curriculum making in Kolkata.

Collaborations with colleagues in the School of Geography and the Environment are contributing to anti-racist curriculum futures, including in the school subject, and in postgraduate teaching through the TDEP-funded Oxford-UNISA course ‘Decolonising Research Methods’.

His research on teacher education focuses on the contribution that geography education research offers to the conceptualisation and practice of teaching. This work includes ethnographic research on teachers’ curriculum making exploring the journeys through which information travels into school classrooms, beginning teachers’ experiences of school subject departments, and the role of written lesson observation feedback in constructing ‘good teaching’.

Steve serves on the editorial board of the journal Geography, and is Chair of the Geography Education Research Collective (GEReCo/IGU-CGE).

 

Caitlin is a Doctoral student in the Department of Education working on how teachers interact with refugee and unaccompanied asylum-seeking pupils in UK schools.

Her Doctoral study uses survey data, interviews, observation, and document analysis to examine teacher knowledge, attitudes, and practices in relation to refugee pupils. Previously, Caitlin worked as a primary school teacher in Aberdeen, London, and at Rose Hill Primary School in Oxford. She completed an MA (Gaelic Medium Education, Oral History) and a PGDE (Primary Education) at the University of Aberdeen, and a BA (Human Geography, Environmental Studies) at Middlebury College in the US. She has a general interest in improving inclusion and equity in education.

Helen’s academic interest in higher education policy developed from more than 20 years of professional experience of university administration – in public relations and admissions.

She gained her doctorate from Oxford in 2010 (a study of the market created by the introduction of £3000 fees for Home/EU undergraduates at English universities in 2006); since then, she has conducted research into the impacts of student fees and funding on institutions, students, graduates and applicants within the higher education sector in England. She also works as a consultant to higher education institutions.

Helen was Pathway Convenor for the MSc Education (HE) for two years and has taught on this course since completing her DPhil. As an inspector for the British Accreditation Council, Helen has the opportunity to gain insights into the operation of higher education providers globally. She is also an Associate of the SKOPE, the department’s research centre for Skills, Knowledge and Organisational Performance.

From 2012-17, Helen was a member of the governing council of the Society for Research into Higher Education (SRHE), serving as Vice-Chair from 2014-17.

 

Jo-Anne is Director of the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment.  She completed a six-year term as Head of the Department of Education, has been Standing Adviser to the House of Commons Education Select Committee, a member of Ofqual’s Standing Advisory Group on Standards, Chair of the National Reference Test Expert Group, and a member of the Welsh Government’s Curriculum and Assessment Group.  Before coming to Oxford, Jo-Anne held academic posts at the Institute of Education, University of London and the University of Bristol. Her first degree and doctorate were in psychology and she has an MBA.  Her current research projects include Setting and Maintaining Standards in national examinations, Examination reform: the impact of modular and linear examinations at GCSE, Assessment for Learning in Africa (AFLA), intelligent accountability and the Progress in International Reading Literacy Study England national centre.

Her research interests are in educational assessment, including system-wide structures and processes, examination standards, marking and assessment design.  Jo-Anne conducts a lot of work with government and industry partners, including acting as the Standing Adviser to the House of Commons Education Select Committee, a member of Ofqual’s Standing Advisory Group and membership of the Welsh Government’s Curriculum and Assessment Group.  She is a member of the Editorial Board of the Oxford Review of Education journal and the International Advisory Board of Assessment in Education: principles, policy & practice.  She has been a Visiting Professor at the universities of Bergen and Queen’s (Belfast).  From 2013 to 2015 she was President of the Association for Educational Assessment – Europe.

Qualifications
  • B.A.H. Linguistics/Psychology – Queen’s University, Kingston On, Canada
  • M.A. Educational Psychology – McGill University, Canada
  • Ph.D. – Second Language Education – McGill University Canada

Victoria Murphy would welcome informal contacts from prospective doctoral students interested in the following topics:

  • Language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/ Language Minority) children
  • Child L2 and bilingualism
  • Foreign language learning in primary school
  • Lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Research

Victoria is active in the following research areas, and would welcome DPhil applications on any of these, particularly those relating to EAL (language minority) children and child L2 learning and foreign language learning in primary school.  She is also the convenor of the Research in English as an Additional Language (REAL) group.  Her research is currently being funded by the ESRC, Leverhulme Trust and Nuffield Foundation.

  • language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/Language minority) children
  • child L2 learning and bilingualism
  • foreign language learning in primary school
  • cognitive processes underlying L1 and L2 learning
  • lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Current Research Project(s)

Joanna is a Doctoral Student, and ESRC Grand Union DTP Scholar, researching in-class support for multilingualism in UK schools.

She has over 12 years of experience as a teaching professional, having worked as a class teacher, EAL specialist and Teaching Assistant in the UK, China, Brazil and Italy. Her main area of interest is school-based education (3-18), specifically the support for multilingual pupils and their language practices, as well as the relationship between teaching assistants and both teachers and children in schools.

Joanna holds a BA in Jurisprudence and a MSc in Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching, both from the University of Oxford. She also has a PGCE, and a PGDip in French.

Joining the Department of Education in 2020 after teaching English and foreign languages in secondary schools and early years settings for 15 years, Catherine completed the MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition in 2021. Her doctoral research investigates the effectiveness of using songs as pedagogical tools with young second language learners in formal educational settings.

Additionally, Catherine hosts The Language Revolution podcast, exploring how linguistics and language awareness might inform/transform languages teaching with guests including Michael Rosen and David Crystal. She also project manages the annual conference for NALDIC, the national subject association for EAL.

Publications

Multilingual is Normal: An anthology of voices, talking about talking (2020)

Renyu completed her BA degree in Psychology at the University of British Columbia (Vancouver, Canada) and her MPhil degree in Education at University of Cambridge.

During her MPhil study, she worked with children aged 4 to 6 years to investigate the relationship between bilingualism, vocabulary size, and inhibitory control, and also to validate a novel app designed to assess early language development. For her Dphil study at Oxford, Renyu aims to explore the factors that might affect L2 pronunciation learning in young children and the interaction between children’s L1 and L2. She is particularly interested in the psychological factors that might influence a child’s L2 pronunciation.

Prior to studying at Oxford, Renyu worked as Research Assistant at the Assessment Research Group at British Council for one year and a half. She was involved in various projects, including gap analysis on reading demand and reading ability, participant feedback questionnaire design and analysis, design and recruitment for a new EAP task study, etc.

Bernard holds a PhD in Marketing from the University of Nottingham and a DBA from the University of Newcastle.

His research to date explores the leadership in HE. Prior to coming to Oxford, he worked in various HEIs and served as the supervisor of a secondary school.

Publications

Lee, B., Tsui, A. & Yau, O.H.M. (2019), Higher-order Goals, Trust-in-leader, and Self-efficacy as Moderators of Transformational Leadership Performance: The Case of Multi-level Marketing Organizations in China, Journal of Euromarketing, Vol.28 (3-4), 76-97. (2011 RG Impact factor: 0.83).

Conferences

Lee, B. (2020), “Self-formation for the Underprivileged,” 2020 International Online Symposium, Toward a New Paradigm of Economics,organized by Macau Ricci Institute, The University of Saint Joseph, 15 & 16 October. (Online Conference Platform Presentation).

Steve is Associate Professor of Teacher Education. He is a curriculum tutor for the Geography PGCE and MSc Learning and Teaching.

Steve is a qualified geography teacher and was previously the head of department at a comprehensive secondary school in Oxfordshire, and Head of Programmes at Bishop Grosseteste University, Lincoln.

He holds an MA in Educational Leadership and Innovation from Warwick University, an MSc in Educational Research Methodology and DPhil in Education from the University of Oxford which were funded by an ESRC Studentship. He is a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

He researches at the intersection between the academic discipline and school subject of geography, including recent collaborations developing through the Smart Cities Network for Sustainable Urban Future project which was shortlisted for the 2017 Newton Prize (India). He is currently leading research on Climate Change Education Futures in India (GCRF) in collaboration with colleagues at IISER, Pune, and on the role of cultural heritage in curriculum making in Kolkata.

Collaborations with colleagues in the School of Geography and the Environment are contributing to anti-racist curriculum futures, including in the school subject, and in postgraduate teaching through the TDEP-funded Oxford-UNISA course ‘Decolonising Research Methods’.

His research on teacher education focuses on the contribution that geography education research offers to the conceptualisation and practice of teaching. This work includes ethnographic research on teachers’ curriculum making exploring the journeys through which information travels into school classrooms, beginning teachers’ experiences of school subject departments, and the role of written lesson observation feedback in constructing ‘good teaching’.

Steve serves on the editorial board of the journal Geography, and is Chair of the Geography Education Research Collective (GEReCo/IGU-CGE).

 

Caitlin is a Doctoral student in the Department of Education working on how teachers interact with refugee and unaccompanied asylum-seeking pupils in UK schools.

Her Doctoral study uses survey data, interviews, observation, and document analysis to examine teacher knowledge, attitudes, and practices in relation to refugee pupils. Previously, Caitlin worked as a primary school teacher in Aberdeen, London, and at Rose Hill Primary School in Oxford. She completed an MA (Gaelic Medium Education, Oral History) and a PGDE (Primary Education) at the University of Aberdeen, and a BA (Human Geography, Environmental Studies) at Middlebury College in the US. She has a general interest in improving inclusion and equity in education.

Helen’s academic interest in higher education policy developed from more than 20 years of professional experience of university administration – in public relations and admissions.

She gained her doctorate from Oxford in 2010 (a study of the market created by the introduction of £3000 fees for Home/EU undergraduates at English universities in 2006); since then, she has conducted research into the impacts of student fees and funding on institutions, students, graduates and applicants within the higher education sector in England. She also works as a consultant to higher education institutions.

Helen was Pathway Convenor for the MSc Education (HE) for two years and has taught on this course since completing her DPhil. As an inspector for the British Accreditation Council, Helen has the opportunity to gain insights into the operation of higher education providers globally. She is also an Associate of the SKOPE, the department’s research centre for Skills, Knowledge and Organisational Performance.

From 2012-17, Helen was a member of the governing council of the Society for Research into Higher Education (SRHE), serving as Vice-Chair from 2014-17.

 

Jo-Anne is Director of the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment.  She completed a six-year term as Head of the Department of Education, has been Standing Adviser to the House of Commons Education Select Committee, a member of Ofqual’s Standing Advisory Group on Standards, Chair of the National Reference Test Expert Group, and a member of the Welsh Government’s Curriculum and Assessment Group.  Before coming to Oxford, Jo-Anne held academic posts at the Institute of Education, University of London and the University of Bristol. Her first degree and doctorate were in psychology and she has an MBA.  Her current research projects include Setting and Maintaining Standards in national examinations, Examination reform: the impact of modular and linear examinations at GCSE, Assessment for Learning in Africa (AFLA), intelligent accountability and the Progress in International Reading Literacy Study England national centre.

Her research interests are in educational assessment, including system-wide structures and processes, examination standards, marking and assessment design.  Jo-Anne conducts a lot of work with government and industry partners, including acting as the Standing Adviser to the House of Commons Education Select Committee, a member of Ofqual’s Standing Advisory Group and membership of the Welsh Government’s Curriculum and Assessment Group.  She is a member of the Editorial Board of the Oxford Review of Education journal and the International Advisory Board of Assessment in Education: principles, policy & practice.  She has been a Visiting Professor at the universities of Bergen and Queen’s (Belfast).  From 2013 to 2015 she was President of the Association for Educational Assessment – Europe.

Qualifications
  • B.A.H. Linguistics/Psychology – Queen’s University, Kingston On, Canada
  • M.A. Educational Psychology – McGill University, Canada
  • Ph.D. – Second Language Education – McGill University Canada

Victoria Murphy would welcome informal contacts from prospective doctoral students interested in the following topics:

  • Language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/ Language Minority) children
  • Child L2 and bilingualism
  • Foreign language learning in primary school
  • Lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Research

Victoria is active in the following research areas, and would welcome DPhil applications on any of these, particularly those relating to EAL (language minority) children and child L2 learning and foreign language learning in primary school.  She is also the convenor of the Research in English as an Additional Language (REAL) group.  Her research is currently being funded by the ESRC, Leverhulme Trust and Nuffield Foundation.

  • language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/Language minority) children
  • child L2 learning and bilingualism
  • foreign language learning in primary school
  • cognitive processes underlying L1 and L2 learning
  • lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Current Research Project(s)

Joanna is a Doctoral Student, and ESRC Grand Union DTP Scholar, researching in-class support for multilingualism in UK schools.

She has over 12 years of experience as a teaching professional, having worked as a class teacher, EAL specialist and Teaching Assistant in the UK, China, Brazil and Italy. Her main area of interest is school-based education (3-18), specifically the support for multilingual pupils and their language practices, as well as the relationship between teaching assistants and both teachers and children in schools.

Joanna holds a BA in Jurisprudence and a MSc in Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching, both from the University of Oxford. She also has a PGCE, and a PGDip in French.

Joining the Department of Education in 2020 after teaching English and foreign languages in secondary schools and early years settings for 15 years, Catherine completed the MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition in 2021. Her doctoral research investigates the effectiveness of using songs as pedagogical tools with young second language learners in formal educational settings.

Additionally, Catherine hosts The Language Revolution podcast, exploring how linguistics and language awareness might inform/transform languages teaching with guests including Michael Rosen and David Crystal. She also project manages the annual conference for NALDIC, the national subject association for EAL.

Publications

Multilingual is Normal: An anthology of voices, talking about talking (2020)

Renyu completed her BA degree in Psychology at the University of British Columbia (Vancouver, Canada) and her MPhil degree in Education at University of Cambridge.

During her MPhil study, she worked with children aged 4 to 6 years to investigate the relationship between bilingualism, vocabulary size, and inhibitory control, and also to validate a novel app designed to assess early language development. For her Dphil study at Oxford, Renyu aims to explore the factors that might affect L2 pronunciation learning in young children and the interaction between children’s L1 and L2. She is particularly interested in the psychological factors that might influence a child’s L2 pronunciation.

Prior to studying at Oxford, Renyu worked as Research Assistant at the Assessment Research Group at British Council for one year and a half. She was involved in various projects, including gap analysis on reading demand and reading ability, participant feedback questionnaire design and analysis, design and recruitment for a new EAP task study, etc.

Bernard holds a PhD in Marketing from the University of Nottingham and a DBA from the University of Newcastle.

His research to date explores the leadership in HE. Prior to coming to Oxford, he worked in various HEIs and served as the supervisor of a secondary school.

Publications

Lee, B., Tsui, A. & Yau, O.H.M. (2019), Higher-order Goals, Trust-in-leader, and Self-efficacy as Moderators of Transformational Leadership Performance: The Case of Multi-level Marketing Organizations in China, Journal of Euromarketing, Vol.28 (3-4), 76-97. (2011 RG Impact factor: 0.83).

Conferences

Lee, B. (2020), “Self-formation for the Underprivileged,” 2020 International Online Symposium, Toward a New Paradigm of Economics,organized by Macau Ricci Institute, The University of Saint Joseph, 15 & 16 October. (Online Conference Platform Presentation).

Steve is Associate Professor of Teacher Education. He is a curriculum tutor for the Geography PGCE and MSc Learning and Teaching.

Steve is a qualified geography teacher and was previously the head of department at a comprehensive secondary school in Oxfordshire, and Head of Programmes at Bishop Grosseteste University, Lincoln.

He holds an MA in Educational Leadership and Innovation from Warwick University, an MSc in Educational Research Methodology and DPhil in Education from the University of Oxford which were funded by an ESRC Studentship. He is a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

He researches at the intersection between the academic discipline and school subject of geography, including recent collaborations developing through the Smart Cities Network for Sustainable Urban Future project which was shortlisted for the 2017 Newton Prize (India). He is currently leading research on Climate Change Education Futures in India (GCRF) in collaboration with colleagues at IISER, Pune, and on the role of cultural heritage in curriculum making in Kolkata.

Collaborations with colleagues in the School of Geography and the Environment are contributing to anti-racist curriculum futures, including in the school subject, and in postgraduate teaching through the TDEP-funded Oxford-UNISA course ‘Decolonising Research Methods’.

His research on teacher education focuses on the contribution that geography education research offers to the conceptualisation and practice of teaching. This work includes ethnographic research on teachers’ curriculum making exploring the journeys through which information travels into school classrooms, beginning teachers’ experiences of school subject departments, and the role of written lesson observation feedback in constructing ‘good teaching’.

Steve serves on the editorial board of the journal Geography, and is Chair of the Geography Education Research Collective (GEReCo/IGU-CGE).

 

Caitlin is a Doctoral student in the Department of Education working on how teachers interact with refugee and unaccompanied asylum-seeking pupils in UK schools.

Her Doctoral study uses survey data, interviews, observation, and document analysis to examine teacher knowledge, attitudes, and practices in relation to refugee pupils. Previously, Caitlin worked as a primary school teacher in Aberdeen, London, and at Rose Hill Primary School in Oxford. She completed an MA (Gaelic Medium Education, Oral History) and a PGDE (Primary Education) at the University of Aberdeen, and a BA (Human Geography, Environmental Studies) at Middlebury College in the US. She has a general interest in improving inclusion and equity in education.

Helen’s academic interest in higher education policy developed from more than 20 years of professional experience of university administration – in public relations and admissions.

She gained her doctorate from Oxford in 2010 (a study of the market created by the introduction of £3000 fees for Home/EU undergraduates at English universities in 2006); since then, she has conducted research into the impacts of student fees and funding on institutions, students, graduates and applicants within the higher education sector in England. She also works as a consultant to higher education institutions.

Helen was Pathway Convenor for the MSc Education (HE) for two years and has taught on this course since completing her DPhil. As an inspector for the British Accreditation Council, Helen has the opportunity to gain insights into the operation of higher education providers globally. She is also an Associate of the SKOPE, the department’s research centre for Skills, Knowledge and Organisational Performance.

From 2012-17, Helen was a member of the governing council of the Society for Research into Higher Education (SRHE), serving as Vice-Chair from 2014-17.

 

Jo-Anne is Director of the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment.  She completed a six-year term as Head of the Department of Education, has been Standing Adviser to the House of Commons Education Select Committee, a member of Ofqual’s Standing Advisory Group on Standards, Chair of the National Reference Test Expert Group, and a member of the Welsh Government’s Curriculum and Assessment Group.  Before coming to Oxford, Jo-Anne held academic posts at the Institute of Education, University of London and the University of Bristol. Her first degree and doctorate were in psychology and she has an MBA.  Her current research projects include Setting and Maintaining Standards in national examinations, Examination reform: the impact of modular and linear examinations at GCSE, Assessment for Learning in Africa (AFLA), intelligent accountability and the Progress in International Reading Literacy Study England national centre.

Her research interests are in educational assessment, including system-wide structures and processes, examination standards, marking and assessment design.  Jo-Anne conducts a lot of work with government and industry partners, including acting as the Standing Adviser to the House of Commons Education Select Committee, a member of Ofqual’s Standing Advisory Group and membership of the Welsh Government’s Curriculum and Assessment Group.  She is a member of the Editorial Board of the Oxford Review of Education journal and the International Advisory Board of Assessment in Education: principles, policy & practice.  She has been a Visiting Professor at the universities of Bergen and Queen’s (Belfast).  From 2013 to 2015 she was President of the Association for Educational Assessment – Europe.

Qualifications
  • B.A.H. Linguistics/Psychology – Queen’s University, Kingston On, Canada
  • M.A. Educational Psychology – McGill University, Canada
  • Ph.D. – Second Language Education – McGill University Canada

Victoria Murphy would welcome informal contacts from prospective doctoral students interested in the following topics:

  • Language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/ Language Minority) children
  • Child L2 and bilingualism
  • Foreign language learning in primary school
  • Lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Research

Victoria is active in the following research areas, and would welcome DPhil applications on any of these, particularly those relating to EAL (language minority) children and child L2 learning and foreign language learning in primary school.  She is also the convenor of the Research in English as an Additional Language (REAL) group.  Her research is currently being funded by the ESRC, Leverhulme Trust and Nuffield Foundation.

  • language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/Language minority) children
  • child L2 learning and bilingualism
  • foreign language learning in primary school
  • cognitive processes underlying L1 and L2 learning
  • lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Current Research Project(s)

Joanna is a Doctoral Student, and ESRC Grand Union DTP Scholar, researching in-class support for multilingualism in UK schools.

She has over 12 years of experience as a teaching professional, having worked as a class teacher, EAL specialist and Teaching Assistant in the UK, China, Brazil and Italy. Her main area of interest is school-based education (3-18), specifically the support for multilingual pupils and their language practices, as well as the relationship between teaching assistants and both teachers and children in schools.

Joanna holds a BA in Jurisprudence and a MSc in Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching, both from the University of Oxford. She also has a PGCE, and a PGDip in French.

Joining the Department of Education in 2020 after teaching English and foreign languages in secondary schools and early years settings for 15 years, Catherine completed the MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition in 2021. Her doctoral research investigates the effectiveness of using songs as pedagogical tools with young second language learners in formal educational settings.

Additionally, Catherine hosts The Language Revolution podcast, exploring how linguistics and language awareness might inform/transform languages teaching with guests including Michael Rosen and David Crystal. She also project manages the annual conference for NALDIC, the national subject association for EAL.

Publications

Multilingual is Normal: An anthology of voices, talking about talking (2020)

Renyu completed her BA degree in Psychology at the University of British Columbia (Vancouver, Canada) and her MPhil degree in Education at University of Cambridge.

During her MPhil study, she worked with children aged 4 to 6 years to investigate the relationship between bilingualism, vocabulary size, and inhibitory control, and also to validate a novel app designed to assess early language development. For her Dphil study at Oxford, Renyu aims to explore the factors that might affect L2 pronunciation learning in young children and the interaction between children’s L1 and L2. She is particularly interested in the psychological factors that might influence a child’s L2 pronunciation.

Prior to studying at Oxford, Renyu worked as Research Assistant at the Assessment Research Group at British Council for one year and a half. She was involved in various projects, including gap analysis on reading demand and reading ability, participant feedback questionnaire design and analysis, design and recruitment for a new EAP task study, etc.

Bernard holds a PhD in Marketing from the University of Nottingham and a DBA from the University of Newcastle.

His research to date explores the leadership in HE. Prior to coming to Oxford, he worked in various HEIs and served as the supervisor of a secondary school.

Publications

Lee, B., Tsui, A. & Yau, O.H.M. (2019), Higher-order Goals, Trust-in-leader, and Self-efficacy as Moderators of Transformational Leadership Performance: The Case of Multi-level Marketing Organizations in China, Journal of Euromarketing, Vol.28 (3-4), 76-97. (2011 RG Impact factor: 0.83).

Conferences

Lee, B. (2020), “Self-formation for the Underprivileged,” 2020 International Online Symposium, Toward a New Paradigm of Economics,organized by Macau Ricci Institute, The University of Saint Joseph, 15 & 16 October. (Online Conference Platform Presentation).

Steve is Associate Professor of Teacher Education. He is a curriculum tutor for the Geography PGCE and MSc Learning and Teaching.

Steve is a qualified geography teacher and was previously the head of department at a comprehensive secondary school in Oxfordshire, and Head of Programmes at Bishop Grosseteste University, Lincoln.

He holds an MA in Educational Leadership and Innovation from Warwick University, an MSc in Educational Research Methodology and DPhil in Education from the University of Oxford which were funded by an ESRC Studentship. He is a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

He researches at the intersection between the academic discipline and school subject of geography, including recent collaborations developing through the Smart Cities Network for Sustainable Urban Future project which was shortlisted for the 2017 Newton Prize (India). He is currently leading research on Climate Change Education Futures in India (GCRF) in collaboration with colleagues at IISER, Pune, and on the role of cultural heritage in curriculum making in Kolkata.

Collaborations with colleagues in the School of Geography and the Environment are contributing to anti-racist curriculum futures, including in the school subject, and in postgraduate teaching through the TDEP-funded Oxford-UNISA course ‘Decolonising Research Methods’.

His research on teacher education focuses on the contribution that geography education research offers to the conceptualisation and practice of teaching. This work includes ethnographic research on teachers’ curriculum making exploring the journeys through which information travels into school classrooms, beginning teachers’ experiences of school subject departments, and the role of written lesson observation feedback in constructing ‘good teaching’.

Steve serves on the editorial board of the journal Geography, and is Chair of the Geography Education Research Collective (GEReCo/IGU-CGE).

 

Caitlin is a Doctoral student in the Department of Education working on how teachers interact with refugee and unaccompanied asylum-seeking pupils in UK schools.

Her Doctoral study uses survey data, interviews, observation, and document analysis to examine teacher knowledge, attitudes, and practices in relation to refugee pupils. Previously, Caitlin worked as a primary school teacher in Aberdeen, London, and at Rose Hill Primary School in Oxford. She completed an MA (Gaelic Medium Education, Oral History) and a PGDE (Primary Education) at the University of Aberdeen, and a BA (Human Geography, Environmental Studies) at Middlebury College in the US. She has a general interest in improving inclusion and equity in education.

Helen’s academic interest in higher education policy developed from more than 20 years of professional experience of university administration – in public relations and admissions.

She gained her doctorate from Oxford in 2010 (a study of the market created by the introduction of £3000 fees for Home/EU undergraduates at English universities in 2006); since then, she has conducted research into the impacts of student fees and funding on institutions, students, graduates and applicants within the higher education sector in England. She also works as a consultant to higher education institutions.

Helen was Pathway Convenor for the MSc Education (HE) for two years and has taught on this course since completing her DPhil. As an inspector for the British Accreditation Council, Helen has the opportunity to gain insights into the operation of higher education providers globally. She is also an Associate of the SKOPE, the department’s research centre for Skills, Knowledge and Organisational Performance.

From 2012-17, Helen was a member of the governing council of the Society for Research into Higher Education (SRHE), serving as Vice-Chair from 2014-17.

 

Jo-Anne is Director of the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment.  She completed a six-year term as Head of the Department of Education, has been Standing Adviser to the House of Commons Education Select Committee, a member of Ofqual’s Standing Advisory Group on Standards, Chair of the National Reference Test Expert Group, and a member of the Welsh Government’s Curriculum and Assessment Group.  Before coming to Oxford, Jo-Anne held academic posts at the Institute of Education, University of London and the University of Bristol. Her first degree and doctorate were in psychology and she has an MBA.  Her current research projects include Setting and Maintaining Standards in national examinations, Examination reform: the impact of modular and linear examinations at GCSE, Assessment for Learning in Africa (AFLA), intelligent accountability and the Progress in International Reading Literacy Study England national centre.

Her research interests are in educational assessment, including system-wide structures and processes, examination standards, marking and assessment design.  Jo-Anne conducts a lot of work with government and industry partners, including acting as the Standing Adviser to the House of Commons Education Select Committee, a member of Ofqual’s Standing Advisory Group and membership of the Welsh Government’s Curriculum and Assessment Group.  She is a member of the Editorial Board of the Oxford Review of Education journal and the International Advisory Board of Assessment in Education: principles, policy & practice.  She has been a Visiting Professor at the universities of Bergen and Queen’s (Belfast).  From 2013 to 2015 she was President of the Association for Educational Assessment – Europe.

Qualifications
  • B.A.H. Linguistics/Psychology – Queen’s University, Kingston On, Canada
  • M.A. Educational Psychology – McGill University, Canada
  • Ph.D. – Second Language Education – McGill University Canada

Victoria Murphy would welcome informal contacts from prospective doctoral students interested in the following topics:

  • Language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/ Language Minority) children
  • Child L2 and bilingualism
  • Foreign language learning in primary school
  • Lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Research

Victoria is active in the following research areas, and would welcome DPhil applications on any of these, particularly those relating to EAL (language minority) children and child L2 learning and foreign language learning in primary school.  She is also the convenor of the Research in English as an Additional Language (REAL) group.  Her research is currently being funded by the ESRC, Leverhulme Trust and Nuffield Foundation.

  • language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/Language minority) children
  • child L2 learning and bilingualism
  • foreign language learning in primary school
  • cognitive processes underlying L1 and L2 learning
  • lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Current Research Project(s)

Joanna is a Doctoral Student, and ESRC Grand Union DTP Scholar, researching in-class support for multilingualism in UK schools.

She has over 12 years of experience as a teaching professional, having worked as a class teacher, EAL specialist and Teaching Assistant in the UK, China, Brazil and Italy. Her main area of interest is school-based education (3-18), specifically the support for multilingual pupils and their language practices, as well as the relationship between teaching assistants and both teachers and children in schools.

Joanna holds a BA in Jurisprudence and a MSc in Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching, both from the University of Oxford. She also has a PGCE, and a PGDip in French.

Joining the Department of Education in 2020 after teaching English and foreign languages in secondary schools and early years settings for 15 years, Catherine completed the MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition in 2021. Her doctoral research investigates the effectiveness of using songs as pedagogical tools with young second language learners in formal educational settings.

Additionally, Catherine hosts The Language Revolution podcast, exploring how linguistics and language awareness might inform/transform languages teaching with guests including Michael Rosen and David Crystal. She also project manages the annual conference for NALDIC, the national subject association for EAL.

Publications

Multilingual is Normal: An anthology of voices, talking about talking (2020)

Renyu completed her BA degree in Psychology at the University of British Columbia (Vancouver, Canada) and her MPhil degree in Education at University of Cambridge.

During her MPhil study, she worked with children aged 4 to 6 years to investigate the relationship between bilingualism, vocabulary size, and inhibitory control, and also to validate a novel app designed to assess early language development. For her Dphil study at Oxford, Renyu aims to explore the factors that might affect L2 pronunciation learning in young children and the interaction between children’s L1 and L2. She is particularly interested in the psychological factors that might influence a child’s L2 pronunciation.

Prior to studying at Oxford, Renyu worked as Research Assistant at the Assessment Research Group at British Council for one year and a half. She was involved in various projects, including gap analysis on reading demand and reading ability, participant feedback questionnaire design and analysis, design and recruitment for a new EAP task study, etc.

Bernard holds a PhD in Marketing from the University of Nottingham and a DBA from the University of Newcastle.

His research to date explores the leadership in HE. Prior to coming to Oxford, he worked in various HEIs and served as the supervisor of a secondary school.

Publications

Lee, B., Tsui, A. & Yau, O.H.M. (2019), Higher-order Goals, Trust-in-leader, and Self-efficacy as Moderators of Transformational Leadership Performance: The Case of Multi-level Marketing Organizations in China, Journal of Euromarketing, Vol.28 (3-4), 76-97. (2011 RG Impact factor: 0.83).

Conferences

Lee, B. (2020), “Self-formation for the Underprivileged,” 2020 International Online Symposium, Toward a New Paradigm of Economics,organized by Macau Ricci Institute, The University of Saint Joseph, 15 & 16 October. (Online Conference Platform Presentation).

Steve is Associate Professor of Teacher Education. He is a curriculum tutor for the Geography PGCE and MSc Learning and Teaching.

Steve is a qualified geography teacher and was previously the head of department at a comprehensive secondary school in Oxfordshire, and Head of Programmes at Bishop Grosseteste University, Lincoln.

He holds an MA in Educational Leadership and Innovation from Warwick University, an MSc in Educational Research Methodology and DPhil in Education from the University of Oxford which were funded by an ESRC Studentship. He is a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

He researches at the intersection between the academic discipline and school subject of geography, including recent collaborations developing through the Smart Cities Network for Sustainable Urban Future project which was shortlisted for the 2017 Newton Prize (India). He is currently leading research on Climate Change Education Futures in India (GCRF) in collaboration with colleagues at IISER, Pune, and on the role of cultural heritage in curriculum making in Kolkata.

Collaborations with colleagues in the School of Geography and the Environment are contributing to anti-racist curriculum futures, including in the school subject, and in postgraduate teaching through the TDEP-funded Oxford-UNISA course ‘Decolonising Research Methods’.

His research on teacher education focuses on the contribution that geography education research offers to the conceptualisation and practice of teaching. This work includes ethnographic research on teachers’ curriculum making exploring the journeys through which information travels into school classrooms, beginning teachers’ experiences of school subject departments, and the role of written lesson observation feedback in constructing ‘good teaching’.

Steve serves on the editorial board of the journal Geography, and is Chair of the Geography Education Research Collective (GEReCo/IGU-CGE).

 

Caitlin is a Doctoral student in the Department of Education working on how teachers interact with refugee and unaccompanied asylum-seeking pupils in UK schools.

Her Doctoral study uses survey data, interviews, observation, and document analysis to examine teacher knowledge, attitudes, and practices in relation to refugee pupils. Previously, Caitlin worked as a primary school teacher in Aberdeen, London, and at Rose Hill Primary School in Oxford. She completed an MA (Gaelic Medium Education, Oral History) and a PGDE (Primary Education) at the University of Aberdeen, and a BA (Human Geography, Environmental Studies) at Middlebury College in the US. She has a general interest in improving inclusion and equity in education.

Helen’s academic interest in higher education policy developed from more than 20 years of professional experience of university administration – in public relations and admissions.

She gained her doctorate from Oxford in 2010 (a study of the market created by the introduction of £3000 fees for Home/EU undergraduates at English universities in 2006); since then, she has conducted research into the impacts of student fees and funding on institutions, students, graduates and applicants within the higher education sector in England. She also works as a consultant to higher education institutions.

Helen was Pathway Convenor for the MSc Education (HE) for two years and has taught on this course since completing her DPhil. As an inspector for the British Accreditation Council, Helen has the opportunity to gain insights into the operation of higher education providers globally. She is also an Associate of the SKOPE, the department’s research centre for Skills, Knowledge and Organisational Performance.

From 2012-17, Helen was a member of the governing council of the Society for Research into Higher Education (SRHE), serving as Vice-Chair from 2014-17.

 

Jo-Anne is Director of the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment.  She completed a six-year term as Head of the Department of Education, has been Standing Adviser to the House of Commons Education Select Committee, a member of Ofqual’s Standing Advisory Group on Standards, Chair of the National Reference Test Expert Group, and a member of the Welsh Government’s Curriculum and Assessment Group.  Before coming to Oxford, Jo-Anne held academic posts at the Institute of Education, University of London and the University of Bristol. Her first degree and doctorate were in psychology and she has an MBA.  Her current research projects include Setting and Maintaining Standards in national examinations, Examination reform: the impact of modular and linear examinations at GCSE, Assessment for Learning in Africa (AFLA), intelligent accountability and the Progress in International Reading Literacy Study England national centre.

Her research interests are in educational assessment, including system-wide structures and processes, examination standards, marking and assessment design.  Jo-Anne conducts a lot of work with government and industry partners, including acting as the Standing Adviser to the House of Commons Education Select Committee, a member of Ofqual’s Standing Advisory Group and membership of the Welsh Government’s Curriculum and Assessment Group.  She is a member of the Editorial Board of the Oxford Review of Education journal and the International Advisory Board of Assessment in Education: principles, policy & practice.  She has been a Visiting Professor at the universities of Bergen and Queen’s (Belfast).  From 2013 to 2015 she was President of the Association for Educational Assessment – Europe.

Qualifications
  • B.A.H. Linguistics/Psychology – Queen’s University, Kingston On, Canada
  • M.A. Educational Psychology – McGill University, Canada
  • Ph.D. – Second Language Education – McGill University Canada

Victoria Murphy would welcome informal contacts from prospective doctoral students interested in the following topics:

  • Language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/ Language Minority) children
  • Child L2 and bilingualism
  • Foreign language learning in primary school
  • Lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Research

Victoria is active in the following research areas, and would welcome DPhil applications on any of these, particularly those relating to EAL (language minority) children and child L2 learning and foreign language learning in primary school.  She is also the convenor of the Research in English as an Additional Language (REAL) group.  Her research is currently being funded by the ESRC, Leverhulme Trust and Nuffield Foundation.

  • language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/Language minority) children
  • child L2 learning and bilingualism
  • foreign language learning in primary school
  • cognitive processes underlying L1 and L2 learning
  • lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Current Research Project(s)

Joanna is a Doctoral Student, and ESRC Grand Union DTP Scholar, researching in-class support for multilingualism in UK schools.

She has over 12 years of experience as a teaching professional, having worked as a class teacher, EAL specialist and Teaching Assistant in the UK, China, Brazil and Italy. Her main area of interest is school-based education (3-18), specifically the support for multilingual pupils and their language practices, as well as the relationship between teaching assistants and both teachers and children in schools.

Joanna holds a BA in Jurisprudence and a MSc in Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching, both from the University of Oxford. She also has a PGCE, and a PGDip in French.

Joining the Department of Education in 2020 after teaching English and foreign languages in secondary schools and early years settings for 15 years, Catherine completed the MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition in 2021. Her doctoral research investigates the effectiveness of using songs as pedagogical tools with young second language learners in formal educational settings.

Additionally, Catherine hosts The Language Revolution podcast, exploring how linguistics and language awareness might inform/transform languages teaching with guests including Michael Rosen and David Crystal. She also project manages the annual conference for NALDIC, the national subject association for EAL.

Publications

Multilingual is Normal: An anthology of voices, talking about talking (2020)

Renyu completed her BA degree in Psychology at the University of British Columbia (Vancouver, Canada) and her MPhil degree in Education at University of Cambridge.

During her MPhil study, she worked with children aged 4 to 6 years to investigate the relationship between bilingualism, vocabulary size, and inhibitory control, and also to validate a novel app designed to assess early language development. For her Dphil study at Oxford, Renyu aims to explore the factors that might affect L2 pronunciation learning in young children and the interaction between children’s L1 and L2. She is particularly interested in the psychological factors that might influence a child’s L2 pronunciation.

Prior to studying at Oxford, Renyu worked as Research Assistant at the Assessment Research Group at British Council for one year and a half. She was involved in various projects, including gap analysis on reading demand and reading ability, participant feedback questionnaire design and analysis, design and recruitment for a new EAP task study, etc.

Bernard holds a PhD in Marketing from the University of Nottingham and a DBA from the University of Newcastle.

His research to date explores the leadership in HE. Prior to coming to Oxford, he worked in various HEIs and served as the supervisor of a secondary school.

Publications

Lee, B., Tsui, A. & Yau, O.H.M. (2019), Higher-order Goals, Trust-in-leader, and Self-efficacy as Moderators of Transformational Leadership Performance: The Case of Multi-level Marketing Organizations in China, Journal of Euromarketing, Vol.28 (3-4), 76-97. (2011 RG Impact factor: 0.83).

Conferences

Lee, B. (2020), “Self-formation for the Underprivileged,” 2020 International Online Symposium, Toward a New Paradigm of Economics,organized by Macau Ricci Institute, The University of Saint Joseph, 15 & 16 October. (Online Conference Platform Presentation).

Steve is Associate Professor of Teacher Education. He is a curriculum tutor for the Geography PGCE and MSc Learning and Teaching.

Steve is a qualified geography teacher and was previously the head of department at a comprehensive secondary school in Oxfordshire, and Head of Programmes at Bishop Grosseteste University, Lincoln.

He holds an MA in Educational Leadership and Innovation from Warwick University, an MSc in Educational Research Methodology and DPhil in Education from the University of Oxford which were funded by an ESRC Studentship. He is a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

He researches at the intersection between the academic discipline and school subject of geography, including recent collaborations developing through the Smart Cities Network for Sustainable Urban Future project which was shortlisted for the 2017 Newton Prize (India). He is currently leading research on Climate Change Education Futures in India (GCRF) in collaboration with colleagues at IISER, Pune, and on the role of cultural heritage in curriculum making in Kolkata.

Collaborations with colleagues in the School of Geography and the Environment are contributing to anti-racist curriculum futures, including in the school subject, and in postgraduate teaching through the TDEP-funded Oxford-UNISA course ‘Decolonising Research Methods’.

His research on teacher education focuses on the contribution that geography education research offers to the conceptualisation and practice of teaching. This work includes ethnographic research on teachers’ curriculum making exploring the journeys through which information travels into school classrooms, beginning teachers’ experiences of school subject departments, and the role of written lesson observation feedback in constructing ‘good teaching’.

Steve serves on the editorial board of the journal Geography, and is Chair of the Geography Education Research Collective (GEReCo/IGU-CGE).

 

Caitlin is a Doctoral student in the Department of Education working on how teachers interact with refugee and unaccompanied asylum-seeking pupils in UK schools.

Her Doctoral study uses survey data, interviews, observation, and document analysis to examine teacher knowledge, attitudes, and practices in relation to refugee pupils. Previously, Caitlin worked as a primary school teacher in Aberdeen, London, and at Rose Hill Primary School in Oxford. She completed an MA (Gaelic Medium Education, Oral History) and a PGDE (Primary Education) at the University of Aberdeen, and a BA (Human Geography, Environmental Studies) at Middlebury College in the US. She has a general interest in improving inclusion and equity in education.

Helen’s academic interest in higher education policy developed from more than 20 years of professional experience of university administration – in public relations and admissions.

She gained her doctorate from Oxford in 2010 (a study of the market created by the introduction of £3000 fees for Home/EU undergraduates at English universities in 2006); since then, she has conducted research into the impacts of student fees and funding on institutions, students, graduates and applicants within the higher education sector in England. She also works as a consultant to higher education institutions.

Helen was Pathway Convenor for the MSc Education (HE) for two years and has taught on this course since completing her DPhil. As an inspector for the British Accreditation Council, Helen has the opportunity to gain insights into the operation of higher education providers globally. She is also an Associate of the SKOPE, the department’s research centre for Skills, Knowledge and Organisational Performance.

From 2012-17, Helen was a member of the governing council of the Society for Research into Higher Education (SRHE), serving as Vice-Chair from 2014-17.

 

Jo-Anne is Director of the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment.  She completed a six-year term as Head of the Department of Education, has been Standing Adviser to the House of Commons Education Select Committee, a member of Ofqual’s Standing Advisory Group on Standards, Chair of the National Reference Test Expert Group, and a member of the Welsh Government’s Curriculum and Assessment Group.  Before coming to Oxford, Jo-Anne held academic posts at the Institute of Education, University of London and the University of Bristol. Her first degree and doctorate were in psychology and she has an MBA.  Her current research projects include Setting and Maintaining Standards in national examinations, Examination reform: the impact of modular and linear examinations at GCSE, Assessment for Learning in Africa (AFLA), intelligent accountability and the Progress in International Reading Literacy Study England national centre.

Her research interests are in educational assessment, including system-wide structures and processes, examination standards, marking and assessment design.  Jo-Anne conducts a lot of work with government and industry partners, including acting as the Standing Adviser to the House of Commons Education Select Committee, a member of Ofqual’s Standing Advisory Group and membership of the Welsh Government’s Curriculum and Assessment Group.  She is a member of the Editorial Board of the Oxford Review of Education journal and the International Advisory Board of Assessment in Education: principles, policy & practice.  She has been a Visiting Professor at the universities of Bergen and Queen’s (Belfast).  From 2013 to 2015 she was President of the Association for Educational Assessment – Europe.

Qualifications
  • B.A.H. Linguistics/Psychology – Queen’s University, Kingston On, Canada
  • M.A. Educational Psychology – McGill University, Canada
  • Ph.D. – Second Language Education – McGill University Canada

Victoria Murphy would welcome informal contacts from prospective doctoral students interested in the following topics:

  • Language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/ Language Minority) children
  • Child L2 and bilingualism
  • Foreign language learning in primary school
  • Lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Research

Victoria is active in the following research areas, and would welcome DPhil applications on any of these, particularly those relating to EAL (language minority) children and child L2 learning and foreign language learning in primary school.  She is also the convenor of the Research in English as an Additional Language (REAL) group.  Her research is currently being funded by the ESRC, Leverhulme Trust and Nuffield Foundation.

  • language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/Language minority) children
  • child L2 learning and bilingualism
  • foreign language learning in primary school
  • cognitive processes underlying L1 and L2 learning
  • lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Current Research Project(s)

Joanna is a Doctoral Student, and ESRC Grand Union DTP Scholar, researching in-class support for multilingualism in UK schools.

She has over 12 years of experience as a teaching professional, having worked as a class teacher, EAL specialist and Teaching Assistant in the UK, China, Brazil and Italy. Her main area of interest is school-based education (3-18), specifically the support for multilingual pupils and their language practices, as well as the relationship between teaching assistants and both teachers and children in schools.

Joanna holds a BA in Jurisprudence and a MSc in Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching, both from the University of Oxford. She also has a PGCE, and a PGDip in French.

Joining the Department of Education in 2020 after teaching English and foreign languages in secondary schools and early years settings for 15 years, Catherine completed the MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition in 2021. Her doctoral research investigates the effectiveness of using songs as pedagogical tools with young second language learners in formal educational settings.

Additionally, Catherine hosts The Language Revolution podcast, exploring how linguistics and language awareness might inform/transform languages teaching with guests including Michael Rosen and David Crystal. She also project manages the annual conference for NALDIC, the national subject association for EAL.

Publications

Multilingual is Normal: An anthology of voices, talking about talking (2020)

Renyu completed her BA degree in Psychology at the University of British Columbia (Vancouver, Canada) and her MPhil degree in Education at University of Cambridge.

During her MPhil study, she worked with children aged 4 to 6 years to investigate the relationship between bilingualism, vocabulary size, and inhibitory control, and also to validate a novel app designed to assess early language development. For her Dphil study at Oxford, Renyu aims to explore the factors that might affect L2 pronunciation learning in young children and the interaction between children’s L1 and L2. She is particularly interested in the psychological factors that might influence a child’s L2 pronunciation.

Prior to studying at Oxford, Renyu worked as Research Assistant at the Assessment Research Group at British Council for one year and a half. She was involved in various projects, including gap analysis on reading demand and reading ability, participant feedback questionnaire design and analysis, design and recruitment for a new EAP task study, etc.

Bernard holds a PhD in Marketing from the University of Nottingham and a DBA from the University of Newcastle.

His research to date explores the leadership in HE. Prior to coming to Oxford, he worked in various HEIs and served as the supervisor of a secondary school.

Publications

Lee, B., Tsui, A. & Yau, O.H.M. (2019), Higher-order Goals, Trust-in-leader, and Self-efficacy as Moderators of Transformational Leadership Performance: The Case of Multi-level Marketing Organizations in China, Journal of Euromarketing, Vol.28 (3-4), 76-97. (2011 RG Impact factor: 0.83).

Conferences

Lee, B. (2020), “Self-formation for the Underprivileged,” 2020 International Online Symposium, Toward a New Paradigm of Economics,organized by Macau Ricci Institute, The University of Saint Joseph, 15 & 16 October. (Online Conference Platform Presentation).

Steve is Associate Professor of Teacher Education. He is a curriculum tutor for the Geography PGCE and MSc Learning and Teaching.

Steve is a qualified geography teacher and was previously the head of department at a comprehensive secondary school in Oxfordshire, and Head of Programmes at Bishop Grosseteste University, Lincoln.

He holds an MA in Educational Leadership and Innovation from Warwick University, an MSc in Educational Research Methodology and DPhil in Education from the University of Oxford which were funded by an ESRC Studentship. He is a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

He researches at the intersection between the academic discipline and school subject of geography, including recent collaborations developing through the Smart Cities Network for Sustainable Urban Future project which was shortlisted for the 2017 Newton Prize (India). He is currently leading research on Climate Change Education Futures in India (GCRF) in collaboration with colleagues at IISER, Pune, and on the role of cultural heritage in curriculum making in Kolkata.

Collaborations with colleagues in the School of Geography and the Environment are contributing to anti-racist curriculum futures, including in the school subject, and in postgraduate teaching through the TDEP-funded Oxford-UNISA course ‘Decolonising Research Methods’.

His research on teacher education focuses on the contribution that geography education research offers to the conceptualisation and practice of teaching. This work includes ethnographic research on teachers’ curriculum making exploring the journeys through which information travels into school classrooms, beginning teachers’ experiences of school subject departments, and the role of written lesson observation feedback in constructing ‘good teaching’.

Steve serves on the editorial board of the journal Geography, and is Chair of the Geography Education Research Collective (GEReCo/IGU-CGE).

 

Caitlin is a Doctoral student in the Department of Education working on how teachers interact with refugee and unaccompanied asylum-seeking pupils in UK schools.

Her Doctoral study uses survey data, interviews, observation, and document analysis to examine teacher knowledge, attitudes, and practices in relation to refugee pupils. Previously, Caitlin worked as a primary school teacher in Aberdeen, London, and at Rose Hill Primary School in Oxford. She completed an MA (Gaelic Medium Education, Oral History) and a PGDE (Primary Education) at the University of Aberdeen, and a BA (Human Geography, Environmental Studies) at Middlebury College in the US. She has a general interest in improving inclusion and equity in education.

Helen’s academic interest in higher education policy developed from more than 20 years of professional experience of university administration – in public relations and admissions.

She gained her doctorate from Oxford in 2010 (a study of the market created by the introduction of £3000 fees for Home/EU undergraduates at English universities in 2006); since then, she has conducted research into the impacts of student fees and funding on institutions, students, graduates and applicants within the higher education sector in England. She also works as a consultant to higher education institutions.

Helen was Pathway Convenor for the MSc Education (HE) for two years and has taught on this course since completing her DPhil. As an inspector for the British Accreditation Council, Helen has the opportunity to gain insights into the operation of higher education providers globally. She is also an Associate of the SKOPE, the department’s research centre for Skills, Knowledge and Organisational Performance.

From 2012-17, Helen was a member of the governing council of the Society for Research into Higher Education (SRHE), serving as Vice-Chair from 2014-17.

 

Jo-Anne is Director of the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment.  She completed a six-year term as Head of the Department of Education, has been Standing Adviser to the House of Commons Education Select Committee, a member of Ofqual’s Standing Advisory Group on Standards, Chair of the National Reference Test Expert Group, and a member of the Welsh Government’s Curriculum and Assessment Group.  Before coming to Oxford, Jo-Anne held academic posts at the Institute of Education, University of London and the University of Bristol. Her first degree and doctorate were in psychology and she has an MBA.  Her current research projects include Setting and Maintaining Standards in national examinations, Examination reform: the impact of modular and linear examinations at GCSE, Assessment for Learning in Africa (AFLA), intelligent accountability and the Progress in International Reading Literacy Study England national centre.

Her research interests are in educational assessment, including system-wide structures and processes, examination standards, marking and assessment design.  Jo-Anne conducts a lot of work with government and industry partners, including acting as the Standing Adviser to the House of Commons Education Select Committee, a member of Ofqual’s Standing Advisory Group and membership of the Welsh Government’s Curriculum and Assessment Group.  She is a member of the Editorial Board of the Oxford Review of Education journal and the International Advisory Board of Assessment in Education: principles, policy & practice.  She has been a Visiting Professor at the universities of Bergen and Queen’s (Belfast).  From 2013 to 2015 she was President of the Association for Educational Assessment – Europe.

Qualifications
  • B.A.H. Linguistics/Psychology – Queen’s University, Kingston On, Canada
  • M.A. Educational Psychology – McGill University, Canada
  • Ph.D. – Second Language Education – McGill University Canada

Victoria Murphy would welcome informal contacts from prospective doctoral students interested in the following topics:

  • Language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/ Language Minority) children
  • Child L2 and bilingualism
  • Foreign language learning in primary school
  • Lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Research

Victoria is active in the following research areas, and would welcome DPhil applications on any of these, particularly those relating to EAL (language minority) children and child L2 learning and foreign language learning in primary school.  She is also the convenor of the Research in English as an Additional Language (REAL) group.  Her research is currently being funded by the ESRC, Leverhulme Trust and Nuffield Foundation.

  • language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/Language minority) children
  • child L2 learning and bilingualism
  • foreign language learning in primary school
  • cognitive processes underlying L1 and L2 learning
  • lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Current Research Project(s)

Joanna is a Doctoral Student, and ESRC Grand Union DTP Scholar, researching in-class support for multilingualism in UK schools.

She has over 12 years of experience as a teaching professional, having worked as a class teacher, EAL specialist and Teaching Assistant in the UK, China, Brazil and Italy. Her main area of interest is school-based education (3-18), specifically the support for multilingual pupils and their language practices, as well as the relationship between teaching assistants and both teachers and children in schools.

Joanna holds a BA in Jurisprudence and a MSc in Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching, both from the University of Oxford. She also has a PGCE, and a PGDip in French.

Joining the Department of Education in 2020 after teaching English and foreign languages in secondary schools and early years settings for 15 years, Catherine completed the MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition in 2021. Her doctoral research investigates the effectiveness of using songs as pedagogical tools with young second language learners in formal educational settings.

Additionally, Catherine hosts The Language Revolution podcast, exploring how linguistics and language awareness might inform/transform languages teaching with guests including Michael Rosen and David Crystal. She also project manages the annual conference for NALDIC, the national subject association for EAL.

Publications

Multilingual is Normal: An anthology of voices, talking about talking (2020)

Renyu completed her BA degree in Psychology at the University of British Columbia (Vancouver, Canada) and her MPhil degree in Education at University of Cambridge.

During her MPhil study, she worked with children aged 4 to 6 years to investigate the relationship between bilingualism, vocabulary size, and inhibitory control, and also to validate a novel app designed to assess early language development. For her Dphil study at Oxford, Renyu aims to explore the factors that might affect L2 pronunciation learning in young children and the interaction between children’s L1 and L2. She is particularly interested in the psychological factors that might influence a child’s L2 pronunciation.

Prior to studying at Oxford, Renyu worked as Research Assistant at the Assessment Research Group at British Council for one year and a half. She was involved in various projects, including gap analysis on reading demand and reading ability, participant feedback questionnaire design and analysis, design and recruitment for a new EAP task study, etc.

Bernard holds a PhD in Marketing from the University of Nottingham and a DBA from the University of Newcastle.

His research to date explores the leadership in HE. Prior to coming to Oxford, he worked in various HEIs and served as the supervisor of a secondary school.

Publications

Lee, B., Tsui, A. & Yau, O.H.M. (2019), Higher-order Goals, Trust-in-leader, and Self-efficacy as Moderators of Transformational Leadership Performance: The Case of Multi-level Marketing Organizations in China, Journal of Euromarketing, Vol.28 (3-4), 76-97. (2011 RG Impact factor: 0.83).

Conferences

Lee, B. (2020), “Self-formation for the Underprivileged,” 2020 International Online Symposium, Toward a New Paradigm of Economics,organized by Macau Ricci Institute, The University of Saint Joseph, 15 & 16 October. (Online Conference Platform Presentation).

Steve is Associate Professor of Teacher Education. He is a curriculum tutor for the Geography PGCE and MSc Learning and Teaching.

Steve is a qualified geography teacher and was previously the head of department at a comprehensive secondary school in Oxfordshire, and Head of Programmes at Bishop Grosseteste University, Lincoln.

He holds an MA in Educational Leadership and Innovation from Warwick University, an MSc in Educational Research Methodology and DPhil in Education from the University of Oxford which were funded by an ESRC Studentship. He is a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

He researches at the intersection between the academic discipline and school subject of geography, including recent collaborations developing through the Smart Cities Network for Sustainable Urban Future project which was shortlisted for the 2017 Newton Prize (India). He is currently leading research on Climate Change Education Futures in India (GCRF) in collaboration with colleagues at IISER, Pune, and on the role of cultural heritage in curriculum making in Kolkata.

Collaborations with colleagues in the School of Geography and the Environment are contributing to anti-racist curriculum futures, including in the school subject, and in postgraduate teaching through the TDEP-funded Oxford-UNISA course ‘Decolonising Research Methods’.

His research on teacher education focuses on the contribution that geography education research offers to the conceptualisation and practice of teaching. This work includes ethnographic research on teachers’ curriculum making exploring the journeys through which information travels into school classrooms, beginning teachers’ experiences of school subject departments, and the role of written lesson observation feedback in constructing ‘good teaching’.

Steve serves on the editorial board of the journal Geography, and is Chair of the Geography Education Research Collective (GEReCo/IGU-CGE).

 

Caitlin is a Doctoral student in the Department of Education working on how teachers interact with refugee and unaccompanied asylum-seeking pupils in UK schools.

Her Doctoral study uses survey data, interviews, observation, and document analysis to examine teacher knowledge, attitudes, and practices in relation to refugee pupils. Previously, Caitlin worked as a primary school teacher in Aberdeen, London, and at Rose Hill Primary School in Oxford. She completed an MA (Gaelic Medium Education, Oral History) and a PGDE (Primary Education) at the University of Aberdeen, and a BA (Human Geography, Environmental Studies) at Middlebury College in the US. She has a general interest in improving inclusion and equity in education.

Helen’s academic interest in higher education policy developed from more than 20 years of professional experience of university administration – in public relations and admissions.

She gained her doctorate from Oxford in 2010 (a study of the market created by the introduction of £3000 fees for Home/EU undergraduates at English universities in 2006); since then, she has conducted research into the impacts of student fees and funding on institutions, students, graduates and applicants within the higher education sector in England. She also works as a consultant to higher education institutions.

Helen was Pathway Convenor for the MSc Education (HE) for two years and has taught on this course since completing her DPhil. As an inspector for the British Accreditation Council, Helen has the opportunity to gain insights into the operation of higher education providers globally. She is also an Associate of the SKOPE, the department’s research centre for Skills, Knowledge and Organisational Performance.

From 2012-17, Helen was a member of the governing council of the Society for Research into Higher Education (SRHE), serving as Vice-Chair from 2014-17.

 

Jo-Anne is Director of the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment.  She completed a six-year term as Head of the Department of Education, has been Standing Adviser to the House of Commons Education Select Committee, a member of Ofqual’s Standing Advisory Group on Standards, Chair of the National Reference Test Expert Group, and a member of the Welsh Government’s Curriculum and Assessment Group.  Before coming to Oxford, Jo-Anne held academic posts at the Institute of Education, University of London and the University of Bristol. Her first degree and doctorate were in psychology and she has an MBA.  Her current research projects include Setting and Maintaining Standards in national examinations, Examination reform: the impact of modular and linear examinations at GCSE, Assessment for Learning in Africa (AFLA), intelligent accountability and the Progress in International Reading Literacy Study England national centre.

Her research interests are in educational assessment, including system-wide structures and processes, examination standards, marking and assessment design.  Jo-Anne conducts a lot of work with government and industry partners, including acting as the Standing Adviser to the House of Commons Education Select Committee, a member of Ofqual’s Standing Advisory Group and membership of the Welsh Government’s Curriculum and Assessment Group.  She is a member of the Editorial Board of the Oxford Review of Education journal and the International Advisory Board of Assessment in Education: principles, policy & practice.  She has been a Visiting Professor at the universities of Bergen and Queen’s (Belfast).  From 2013 to 2015 she was President of the Association for Educational Assessment – Europe.

Qualifications
  • B.A.H. Linguistics/Psychology – Queen’s University, Kingston On, Canada
  • M.A. Educational Psychology – McGill University, Canada
  • Ph.D. – Second Language Education – McGill University Canada

Victoria Murphy would welcome informal contacts from prospective doctoral students interested in the following topics:

  • Language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/ Language Minority) children
  • Child L2 and bilingualism
  • Foreign language learning in primary school
  • Lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Research

Victoria is active in the following research areas, and would welcome DPhil applications on any of these, particularly those relating to EAL (language minority) children and child L2 learning and foreign language learning in primary school.  She is also the convenor of the Research in English as an Additional Language (REAL) group.  Her research is currently being funded by the ESRC, Leverhulme Trust and Nuffield Foundation.

  • language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/Language minority) children
  • child L2 learning and bilingualism
  • foreign language learning in primary school
  • cognitive processes underlying L1 and L2 learning
  • lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Current Research Project(s)

Joanna is a Doctoral Student, and ESRC Grand Union DTP Scholar, researching in-class support for multilingualism in UK schools.

She has over 12 years of experience as a teaching professional, having worked as a class teacher, EAL specialist and Teaching Assistant in the UK, China, Brazil and Italy. Her main area of interest is school-based education (3-18), specifically the support for multilingual pupils and their language practices, as well as the relationship between teaching assistants and both teachers and children in schools.

Joanna holds a BA in Jurisprudence and a MSc in Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching, both from the University of Oxford. She also has a PGCE, and a PGDip in French.

Joining the Department of Education in 2020 after teaching English and foreign languages in secondary schools and early years settings for 15 years, Catherine completed the MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition in 2021. Her doctoral research investigates the effectiveness of using songs as pedagogical tools with young second language learners in formal educational settings.

Additionally, Catherine hosts The Language Revolution podcast, exploring how linguistics and language awareness might inform/transform languages teaching with guests including Michael Rosen and David Crystal. She also project manages the annual conference for NALDIC, the national subject association for EAL.

Publications

Multilingual is Normal: An anthology of voices, talking about talking (2020)

Renyu completed her BA degree in Psychology at the University of British Columbia (Vancouver, Canada) and her MPhil degree in Education at University of Cambridge.

During her MPhil study, she worked with children aged 4 to 6 years to investigate the relationship between bilingualism, vocabulary size, and inhibitory control, and also to validate a novel app designed to assess early language development. For her Dphil study at Oxford, Renyu aims to explore the factors that might affect L2 pronunciation learning in young children and the interaction between children’s L1 and L2. She is particularly interested in the psychological factors that might influence a child’s L2 pronunciation.

Prior to studying at Oxford, Renyu worked as Research Assistant at the Assessment Research Group at British Council for one year and a half. She was involved in various projects, including gap analysis on reading demand and reading ability, participant feedback questionnaire design and analysis, design and recruitment for a new EAP task study, etc.

Bernard holds a PhD in Marketing from the University of Nottingham and a DBA from the University of Newcastle.

His research to date explores the leadership in HE. Prior to coming to Oxford, he worked in various HEIs and served as the supervisor of a secondary school.

Publications

Lee, B., Tsui, A. & Yau, O.H.M. (2019), Higher-order Goals, Trust-in-leader, and Self-efficacy as Moderators of Transformational Leadership Performance: The Case of Multi-level Marketing Organizations in China, Journal of Euromarketing, Vol.28 (3-4), 76-97. (2011 RG Impact factor: 0.83).

Conferences

Lee, B. (2020), “Self-formation for the Underprivileged,” 2020 International Online Symposium, Toward a New Paradigm of Economics,organized by Macau Ricci Institute, The University of Saint Joseph, 15 & 16 October. (Online Conference Platform Presentation).

Steve is Associate Professor of Teacher Education. He is a curriculum tutor for the Geography PGCE and MSc Learning and Teaching.

Steve is a qualified geography teacher and was previously the head of department at a comprehensive secondary school in Oxfordshire, and Head of Programmes at Bishop Grosseteste University, Lincoln.

He holds an MA in Educational Leadership and Innovation from Warwick University, an MSc in Educational Research Methodology and DPhil in Education from the University of Oxford which were funded by an ESRC Studentship. He is a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

He researches at the intersection between the academic discipline and school subject of geography, including recent collaborations developing through the Smart Cities Network for Sustainable Urban Future project which was shortlisted for the 2017 Newton Prize (India). He is currently leading research on Climate Change Education Futures in India (GCRF) in collaboration with colleagues at IISER, Pune, and on the role of cultural heritage in curriculum making in Kolkata.

Collaborations with colleagues in the School of Geography and the Environment are contributing to anti-racist curriculum futures, including in the school subject, and in postgraduate teaching through the TDEP-funded Oxford-UNISA course ‘Decolonising Research Methods’.

His research on teacher education focuses on the contribution that geography education research offers to the conceptualisation and practice of teaching. This work includes ethnographic research on teachers’ curriculum making exploring the journeys through which information travels into school classrooms, beginning teachers’ experiences of school subject departments, and the role of written lesson observation feedback in constructing ‘good teaching’.

Steve serves on the editorial board of the journal Geography, and is Chair of the Geography Education Research Collective (GEReCo/IGU-CGE).

 

Caitlin is a Doctoral student in the Department of Education working on how teachers interact with refugee and unaccompanied asylum-seeking pupils in UK schools.

Her Doctoral study uses survey data, interviews, observation, and document analysis to examine teacher knowledge, attitudes, and practices in relation to refugee pupils. Previously, Caitlin worked as a primary school teacher in Aberdeen, London, and at Rose Hill Primary School in Oxford. She completed an MA (Gaelic Medium Education, Oral History) and a PGDE (Primary Education) at the University of Aberdeen, and a BA (Human Geography, Environmental Studies) at Middlebury College in the US. She has a general interest in improving inclusion and equity in education.

Helen’s academic interest in higher education policy developed from more than 20 years of professional experience of university administration – in public relations and admissions.

She gained her doctorate from Oxford in 2010 (a study of the market created by the introduction of £3000 fees for Home/EU undergraduates at English universities in 2006); since then, she has conducted research into the impacts of student fees and funding on institutions, students, graduates and applicants within the higher education sector in England. She also works as a consultant to higher education institutions.

Helen was Pathway Convenor for the MSc Education (HE) for two years and has taught on this course since completing her DPhil. As an inspector for the British Accreditation Council, Helen has the opportunity to gain insights into the operation of higher education providers globally. She is also an Associate of the SKOPE, the department’s research centre for Skills, Knowledge and Organisational Performance.

From 2012-17, Helen was a member of the governing council of the Society for Research into Higher Education (SRHE), serving as Vice-Chair from 2014-17.

 

Jo-Anne is Director of the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment.  She completed a six-year term as Head of the Department of Education, has been Standing Adviser to the House of Commons Education Select Committee, a member of Ofqual’s Standing Advisory Group on Standards, Chair of the National Reference Test Expert Group, and a member of the Welsh Government’s Curriculum and Assessment Group.  Before coming to Oxford, Jo-Anne held academic posts at the Institute of Education, University of London and the University of Bristol. Her first degree and doctorate were in psychology and she has an MBA.  Her current research projects include Setting and Maintaining Standards in national examinations, Examination reform: the impact of modular and linear examinations at GCSE, Assessment for Learning in Africa (AFLA), intelligent accountability and the Progress in International Reading Literacy Study England national centre.

Her research interests are in educational assessment, including system-wide structures and processes, examination standards, marking and assessment design.  Jo-Anne conducts a lot of work with government and industry partners, including acting as the Standing Adviser to the House of Commons Education Select Committee, a member of Ofqual’s Standing Advisory Group and membership of the Welsh Government’s Curriculum and Assessment Group.  She is a member of the Editorial Board of the Oxford Review of Education journal and the International Advisory Board of Assessment in Education: principles, policy & practice.  She has been a Visiting Professor at the universities of Bergen and Queen’s (Belfast).  From 2013 to 2015 she was President of the Association for Educational Assessment – Europe.

Qualifications
  • B.A.H. Linguistics/Psychology – Queen’s University, Kingston On, Canada
  • M.A. Educational Psychology – McGill University, Canada
  • Ph.D. – Second Language Education – McGill University Canada

Victoria Murphy would welcome informal contacts from prospective doctoral students interested in the following topics:

  • Language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/ Language Minority) children
  • Child L2 and bilingualism
  • Foreign language learning in primary school
  • Lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Research

Victoria is active in the following research areas, and would welcome DPhil applications on any of these, particularly those relating to EAL (language minority) children and child L2 learning and foreign language learning in primary school.  She is also the convenor of the Research in English as an Additional Language (REAL) group.  Her research is currently being funded by the ESRC, Leverhulme Trust and Nuffield Foundation.

  • language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/Language minority) children
  • child L2 learning and bilingualism
  • foreign language learning in primary school
  • cognitive processes underlying L1 and L2 learning
  • lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Current Research Project(s)

Joanna is a Doctoral Student, and ESRC Grand Union DTP Scholar, researching in-class support for multilingualism in UK schools.

She has over 12 years of experience as a teaching professional, having worked as a class teacher, EAL specialist and Teaching Assistant in the UK, China, Brazil and Italy. Her main area of interest is school-based education (3-18), specifically the support for multilingual pupils and their language practices, as well as the relationship between teaching assistants and both teachers and children in schools.

Joanna holds a BA in Jurisprudence and a MSc in Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching, both from the University of Oxford. She also has a PGCE, and a PGDip in French.

Joining the Department of Education in 2020 after teaching English and foreign languages in secondary schools and early years settings for 15 years, Catherine completed the MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition in 2021. Her doctoral research investigates the effectiveness of using songs as pedagogical tools with young second language learners in formal educational settings.

Additionally, Catherine hosts The Language Revolution podcast, exploring how linguistics and language awareness might inform/transform languages teaching with guests including Michael Rosen and David Crystal. She also project manages the annual conference for NALDIC, the national subject association for EAL.

Publications

Multilingual is Normal: An anthology of voices, talking about talking (2020)

Renyu completed her BA degree in Psychology at the University of British Columbia (Vancouver, Canada) and her MPhil degree in Education at University of Cambridge.

During her MPhil study, she worked with children aged 4 to 6 years to investigate the relationship between bilingualism, vocabulary size, and inhibitory control, and also to validate a novel app designed to assess early language development. For her Dphil study at Oxford, Renyu aims to explore the factors that might affect L2 pronunciation learning in young children and the interaction between children’s L1 and L2. She is particularly interested in the psychological factors that might influence a child’s L2 pronunciation.

Prior to studying at Oxford, Renyu worked as Research Assistant at the Assessment Research Group at British Council for one year and a half. She was involved in various projects, including gap analysis on reading demand and reading ability, participant feedback questionnaire design and analysis, design and recruitment for a new EAP task study, etc.

Bernard holds a PhD in Marketing from the University of Nottingham and a DBA from the University of Newcastle.

His research to date explores the leadership in HE. Prior to coming to Oxford, he worked in various HEIs and served as the supervisor of a secondary school.

Publications

Lee, B., Tsui, A. & Yau, O.H.M. (2019), Higher-order Goals, Trust-in-leader, and Self-efficacy as Moderators of Transformational Leadership Performance: The Case of Multi-level Marketing Organizations in China, Journal of Euromarketing, Vol.28 (3-4), 76-97. (2011 RG Impact factor: 0.83).

Conferences

Lee, B. (2020), “Self-formation for the Underprivileged,” 2020 International Online Symposium, Toward a New Paradigm of Economics,organized by Macau Ricci Institute, The University of Saint Joseph, 15 & 16 October. (Online Conference Platform Presentation).

Steve is Associate Professor of Teacher Education. He is a curriculum tutor for the Geography PGCE and MSc Learning and Teaching.

Steve is a qualified geography teacher and was previously the head of department at a comprehensive secondary school in Oxfordshire, and Head of Programmes at Bishop Grosseteste University, Lincoln.

He holds an MA in Educational Leadership and Innovation from Warwick University, an MSc in Educational Research Methodology and DPhil in Education from the University of Oxford which were funded by an ESRC Studentship. He is a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

He researches at the intersection between the academic discipline and school subject of geography, including recent collaborations developing through the Smart Cities Network for Sustainable Urban Future project which was shortlisted for the 2017 Newton Prize (India). He is currently leading research on Climate Change Education Futures in India (GCRF) in collaboration with colleagues at IISER, Pune, and on the role of cultural heritage in curriculum making in Kolkata.

Collaborations with colleagues in the School of Geography and the Environment are contributing to anti-racist curriculum futures, including in the school subject, and in postgraduate teaching through the TDEP-funded Oxford-UNISA course ‘Decolonising Research Methods’.

His research on teacher education focuses on the contribution that geography education research offers to the conceptualisation and practice of teaching. This work includes ethnographic research on teachers’ curriculum making exploring the journeys through which information travels into school classrooms, beginning teachers’ experiences of school subject departments, and the role of written lesson observation feedback in constructing ‘good teaching’.

Steve serves on the editorial board of the journal Geography, and is Chair of the Geography Education Research Collective (GEReCo/IGU-CGE).

 

Caitlin is a Doctoral student in the Department of Education working on how teachers interact with refugee and unaccompanied asylum-seeking pupils in UK schools.

Her Doctoral study uses survey data, interviews, observation, and document analysis to examine teacher knowledge, attitudes, and practices in relation to refugee pupils. Previously, Caitlin worked as a primary school teacher in Aberdeen, London, and at Rose Hill Primary School in Oxford. She completed an MA (Gaelic Medium Education, Oral History) and a PGDE (Primary Education) at the University of Aberdeen, and a BA (Human Geography, Environmental Studies) at Middlebury College in the US. She has a general interest in improving inclusion and equity in education.

Helen’s academic interest in higher education policy developed from more than 20 years of professional experience of university administration – in public relations and admissions.

She gained her doctorate from Oxford in 2010 (a study of the market created by the introduction of £3000 fees for Home/EU undergraduates at English universities in 2006); since then, she has conducted research into the impacts of student fees and funding on institutions, students, graduates and applicants within the higher education sector in England. She also works as a consultant to higher education institutions.

Helen was Pathway Convenor for the MSc Education (HE) for two years and has taught on this course since completing her DPhil. As an inspector for the British Accreditation Council, Helen has the opportunity to gain insights into the operation of higher education providers globally. She is also an Associate of the SKOPE, the department’s research centre for Skills, Knowledge and Organisational Performance.

From 2012-17, Helen was a member of the governing council of the Society for Research into Higher Education (SRHE), serving as Vice-Chair from 2014-17.

 

Jo-Anne is Director of the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment.  She completed a six-year term as Head of the Department of Education, has been Standing Adviser to the House of Commons Education Select Committee, a member of Ofqual’s Standing Advisory Group on Standards, Chair of the National Reference Test Expert Group, and a member of the Welsh Government’s Curriculum and Assessment Group.  Before coming to Oxford, Jo-Anne held academic posts at the Institute of Education, University of London and the University of Bristol. Her first degree and doctorate were in psychology and she has an MBA.  Her current research projects include Setting and Maintaining Standards in national examinations, Examination reform: the impact of modular and linear examinations at GCSE, Assessment for Learning in Africa (AFLA), intelligent accountability and the Progress in International Reading Literacy Study England national centre.

Her research interests are in educational assessment, including system-wide structures and processes, examination standards, marking and assessment design.  Jo-Anne conducts a lot of work with government and industry partners, including acting as the Standing Adviser to the House of Commons Education Select Committee, a member of Ofqual’s Standing Advisory Group and membership of the Welsh Government’s Curriculum and Assessment Group.  She is a member of the Editorial Board of the Oxford Review of Education journal and the International Advisory Board of Assessment in Education: principles, policy & practice.  She has been a Visiting Professor at the universities of Bergen and Queen’s (Belfast).  From 2013 to 2015 she was President of the Association for Educational Assessment – Europe.

Qualifications
  • B.A.H. Linguistics/Psychology – Queen’s University, Kingston On, Canada
  • M.A. Educational Psychology – McGill University, Canada
  • Ph.D. – Second Language Education – McGill University Canada

Victoria Murphy would welcome informal contacts from prospective doctoral students interested in the following topics:

  • Language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/ Language Minority) children
  • Child L2 and bilingualism
  • Foreign language learning in primary school
  • Lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Research

Victoria is active in the following research areas, and would welcome DPhil applications on any of these, particularly those relating to EAL (language minority) children and child L2 learning and foreign language learning in primary school.  She is also the convenor of the Research in English as an Additional Language (REAL) group.  Her research is currently being funded by the ESRC, Leverhulme Trust and Nuffield Foundation.

  • language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/Language minority) children
  • child L2 learning and bilingualism
  • foreign language learning in primary school
  • cognitive processes underlying L1 and L2 learning
  • lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Current Research Project(s)

Joanna is a Doctoral Student, and ESRC Grand Union DTP Scholar, researching in-class support for multilingualism in UK schools.

She has over 12 years of experience as a teaching professional, having worked as a class teacher, EAL specialist and Teaching Assistant in the UK, China, Brazil and Italy. Her main area of interest is school-based education (3-18), specifically the support for multilingual pupils and their language practices, as well as the relationship between teaching assistants and both teachers and children in schools.

Joanna holds a BA in Jurisprudence and a MSc in Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching, both from the University of Oxford. She also has a PGCE, and a PGDip in French.

Joining the Department of Education in 2020 after teaching English and foreign languages in secondary schools and early years settings for 15 years, Catherine completed the MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition in 2021. Her doctoral research investigates the effectiveness of using songs as pedagogical tools with young second language learners in formal educational settings.

Additionally, Catherine hosts The Language Revolution podcast, exploring how linguistics and language awareness might inform/transform languages teaching with guests including Michael Rosen and David Crystal. She also project manages the annual conference for NALDIC, the national subject association for EAL.

Publications

Multilingual is Normal: An anthology of voices, talking about talking (2020)

Renyu completed her BA degree in Psychology at the University of British Columbia (Vancouver, Canada) and her MPhil degree in Education at University of Cambridge.

During her MPhil study, she worked with children aged 4 to 6 years to investigate the relationship between bilingualism, vocabulary size, and inhibitory control, and also to validate a novel app designed to assess early language development. For her Dphil study at Oxford, Renyu aims to explore the factors that might affect L2 pronunciation learning in young children and the interaction between children’s L1 and L2. She is particularly interested in the psychological factors that might influence a child’s L2 pronunciation.

Prior to studying at Oxford, Renyu worked as Research Assistant at the Assessment Research Group at British Council for one year and a half. She was involved in various projects, including gap analysis on reading demand and reading ability, participant feedback questionnaire design and analysis, design and recruitment for a new EAP task study, etc.

Bernard holds a PhD in Marketing from the University of Nottingham and a DBA from the University of Newcastle.

His research to date explores the leadership in HE. Prior to coming to Oxford, he worked in various HEIs and served as the supervisor of a secondary school.

Publications

Lee, B., Tsui, A. & Yau, O.H.M. (2019), Higher-order Goals, Trust-in-leader, and Self-efficacy as Moderators of Transformational Leadership Performance: The Case of Multi-level Marketing Organizations in China, Journal of Euromarketing, Vol.28 (3-4), 76-97. (2011 RG Impact factor: 0.83).

Conferences

Lee, B. (2020), “Self-formation for the Underprivileged,” 2020 International Online Symposium, Toward a New Paradigm of Economics,organized by Macau Ricci Institute, The University of Saint Joseph, 15 & 16 October. (Online Conference Platform Presentation).

Steve is Associate Professor of Teacher Education. He is a curriculum tutor for the Geography PGCE and MSc Learning and Teaching.

Steve is a qualified geography teacher and was previously the head of department at a comprehensive secondary school in Oxfordshire, and Head of Programmes at Bishop Grosseteste University, Lincoln.

He holds an MA in Educational Leadership and Innovation from Warwick University, an MSc in Educational Research Methodology and DPhil in Education from the University of Oxford which were funded by an ESRC Studentship. He is a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

He researches at the intersection between the academic discipline and school subject of geography, including recent collaborations developing through the Smart Cities Network for Sustainable Urban Future project which was shortlisted for the 2017 Newton Prize (India). He is currently leading research on Climate Change Education Futures in India (GCRF) in collaboration with colleagues at IISER, Pune, and on the role of cultural heritage in curriculum making in Kolkata.

Collaborations with colleagues in the School of Geography and the Environment are contributing to anti-racist curriculum futures, including in the school subject, and in postgraduate teaching through the TDEP-funded Oxford-UNISA course ‘Decolonising Research Methods’.

His research on teacher education focuses on the contribution that geography education research offers to the conceptualisation and practice of teaching. This work includes ethnographic research on teachers’ curriculum making exploring the journeys through which information travels into school classrooms, beginning teachers’ experiences of school subject departments, and the role of written lesson observation feedback in constructing ‘good teaching’.

Steve serves on the editorial board of the journal Geography, and is Chair of the Geography Education Research Collective (GEReCo/IGU-CGE).

 

Caitlin is a Doctoral student in the Department of Education working on how teachers interact with refugee and unaccompanied asylum-seeking pupils in UK schools.

Her Doctoral study uses survey data, interviews, observation, and document analysis to examine teacher knowledge, attitudes, and practices in relation to refugee pupils. Previously, Caitlin worked as a primary school teacher in Aberdeen, London, and at Rose Hill Primary School in Oxford. She completed an MA (Gaelic Medium Education, Oral History) and a PGDE (Primary Education) at the University of Aberdeen, and a BA (Human Geography, Environmental Studies) at Middlebury College in the US. She has a general interest in improving inclusion and equity in education.

Helen’s academic interest in higher education policy developed from more than 20 years of professional experience of university administration – in public relations and admissions.

She gained her doctorate from Oxford in 2010 (a study of the market created by the introduction of £3000 fees for Home/EU undergraduates at English universities in 2006); since then, she has conducted research into the impacts of student fees and funding on institutions, students, graduates and applicants within the higher education sector in England. She also works as a consultant to higher education institutions.

Helen was Pathway Convenor for the MSc Education (HE) for two years and has taught on this course since completing her DPhil. As an inspector for the British Accreditation Council, Helen has the opportunity to gain insights into the operation of higher education providers globally. She is also an Associate of the SKOPE, the department’s research centre for Skills, Knowledge and Organisational Performance.

From 2012-17, Helen was a member of the governing council of the Society for Research into Higher Education (SRHE), serving as Vice-Chair from 2014-17.

 

Jo-Anne is Director of the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment.  She completed a six-year term as Head of the Department of Education, has been Standing Adviser to the House of Commons Education Select Committee, a member of Ofqual’s Standing Advisory Group on Standards, Chair of the National Reference Test Expert Group, and a member of the Welsh Government’s Curriculum and Assessment Group.  Before coming to Oxford, Jo-Anne held academic posts at the Institute of Education, University of London and the University of Bristol. Her first degree and doctorate were in psychology and she has an MBA.  Her current research projects include Setting and Maintaining Standards in national examinations, Examination reform: the impact of modular and linear examinations at GCSE, Assessment for Learning in Africa (AFLA), intelligent accountability and the Progress in International Reading Literacy Study England national centre.

Her research interests are in educational assessment, including system-wide structures and processes, examination standards, marking and assessment design.  Jo-Anne conducts a lot of work with government and industry partners, including acting as the Standing Adviser to the House of Commons Education Select Committee, a member of Ofqual’s Standing Advisory Group and membership of the Welsh Government’s Curriculum and Assessment Group.  She is a member of the Editorial Board of the Oxford Review of Education journal and the International Advisory Board of Assessment in Education: principles, policy & practice.  She has been a Visiting Professor at the universities of Bergen and Queen’s (Belfast).  From 2013 to 2015 she was President of the Association for Educational Assessment – Europe.

Qualifications
  • B.A.H. Linguistics/Psychology – Queen’s University, Kingston On, Canada
  • M.A. Educational Psychology – McGill University, Canada
  • Ph.D. – Second Language Education – McGill University Canada

Victoria Murphy would welcome informal contacts from prospective doctoral students interested in the following topics:

  • Language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/ Language Minority) children
  • Child L2 and bilingualism
  • Foreign language learning in primary school
  • Lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Research

Victoria is active in the following research areas, and would welcome DPhil applications on any of these, particularly those relating to EAL (language minority) children and child L2 learning and foreign language learning in primary school.  She is also the convenor of the Research in English as an Additional Language (REAL) group.  Her research is currently being funded by the ESRC, Leverhulme Trust and Nuffield Foundation.

  • language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/Language minority) children
  • child L2 learning and bilingualism
  • foreign language learning in primary school
  • cognitive processes underlying L1 and L2 learning
  • lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Current Research Project(s)

Joanna is a Doctoral Student, and ESRC Grand Union DTP Scholar, researching in-class support for multilingualism in UK schools.

She has over 12 years of experience as a teaching professional, having worked as a class teacher, EAL specialist and Teaching Assistant in the UK, China, Brazil and Italy. Her main area of interest is school-based education (3-18), specifically the support for multilingual pupils and their language practices, as well as the relationship between teaching assistants and both teachers and children in schools.

Joanna holds a BA in Jurisprudence and a MSc in Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching, both from the University of Oxford. She also has a PGCE, and a PGDip in French.

Joining the Department of Education in 2020 after teaching English and foreign languages in secondary schools and early years settings for 15 years, Catherine completed the MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition in 2021. Her doctoral research investigates the effectiveness of using songs as pedagogical tools with young second language learners in formal educational settings.

Additionally, Catherine hosts The Language Revolution podcast, exploring how linguistics and language awareness might inform/transform languages teaching with guests including Michael Rosen and David Crystal. She also project manages the annual conference for NALDIC, the national subject association for EAL.

Publications

Multilingual is Normal: An anthology of voices, talking about talking (2020)

Renyu completed her BA degree in Psychology at the University of British Columbia (Vancouver, Canada) and her MPhil degree in Education at University of Cambridge.

During her MPhil study, she worked with children aged 4 to 6 years to investigate the relationship between bilingualism, vocabulary size, and inhibitory control, and also to validate a novel app designed to assess early language development. For her Dphil study at Oxford, Renyu aims to explore the factors that might affect L2 pronunciation learning in young children and the interaction between children’s L1 and L2. She is particularly interested in the psychological factors that might influence a child’s L2 pronunciation.

Prior to studying at Oxford, Renyu worked as Research Assistant at the Assessment Research Group at British Council for one year and a half. She was involved in various projects, including gap analysis on reading demand and reading ability, participant feedback questionnaire design and analysis, design and recruitment for a new EAP task study, etc.

Bernard holds a PhD in Marketing from the University of Nottingham and a DBA from the University of Newcastle.

His research to date explores the leadership in HE. Prior to coming to Oxford, he worked in various HEIs and served as the supervisor of a secondary school.

Publications

Lee, B., Tsui, A. & Yau, O.H.M. (2019), Higher-order Goals, Trust-in-leader, and Self-efficacy as Moderators of Transformational Leadership Performance: The Case of Multi-level Marketing Organizations in China, Journal of Euromarketing, Vol.28 (3-4), 76-97. (2011 RG Impact factor: 0.83).

Conferences

Lee, B. (2020), “Self-formation for the Underprivileged,” 2020 International Online Symposium, Toward a New Paradigm of Economics,organized by Macau Ricci Institute, The University of Saint Joseph, 15 & 16 October. (Online Conference Platform Presentation).

Steve is Associate Professor of Teacher Education. He is a curriculum tutor for the Geography PGCE and MSc Learning and Teaching.

Steve is a qualified geography teacher and was previously the head of department at a comprehensive secondary school in Oxfordshire, and Head of Programmes at Bishop Grosseteste University, Lincoln.

He holds an MA in Educational Leadership and Innovation from Warwick University, an MSc in Educational Research Methodology and DPhil in Education from the University of Oxford which were funded by an ESRC Studentship. He is a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

He researches at the intersection between the academic discipline and school subject of geography, including recent collaborations developing through the Smart Cities Network for Sustainable Urban Future project which was shortlisted for the 2017 Newton Prize (India). He is currently leading research on Climate Change Education Futures in India (GCRF) in collaboration with colleagues at IISER, Pune, and on the role of cultural heritage in curriculum making in Kolkata.

Collaborations with colleagues in the School of Geography and the Environment are contributing to anti-racist curriculum futures, including in the school subject, and in postgraduate teaching through the TDEP-funded Oxford-UNISA course ‘Decolonising Research Methods’.

His research on teacher education focuses on the contribution that geography education research offers to the conceptualisation and practice of teaching. This work includes ethnographic research on teachers’ curriculum making exploring the journeys through which information travels into school classrooms, beginning teachers’ experiences of school subject departments, and the role of written lesson observation feedback in constructing ‘good teaching’.

Steve serves on the editorial board of the journal Geography, and is Chair of the Geography Education Research Collective (GEReCo/IGU-CGE).

 

Caitlin is a Doctoral student in the Department of Education working on how teachers interact with refugee and unaccompanied asylum-seeking pupils in UK schools.

Her Doctoral study uses survey data, interviews, observation, and document analysis to examine teacher knowledge, attitudes, and practices in relation to refugee pupils. Previously, Caitlin worked as a primary school teacher in Aberdeen, London, and at Rose Hill Primary School in Oxford. She completed an MA (Gaelic Medium Education, Oral History) and a PGDE (Primary Education) at the University of Aberdeen, and a BA (Human Geography, Environmental Studies) at Middlebury College in the US. She has a general interest in improving inclusion and equity in education.

Helen’s academic interest in higher education policy developed from more than 20 years of professional experience of university administration – in public relations and admissions.

She gained her doctorate from Oxford in 2010 (a study of the market created by the introduction of £3000 fees for Home/EU undergraduates at English universities in 2006); since then, she has conducted research into the impacts of student fees and funding on institutions, students, graduates and applicants within the higher education sector in England. She also works as a consultant to higher education institutions.

Helen was Pathway Convenor for the MSc Education (HE) for two years and has taught on this course since completing her DPhil. As an inspector for the British Accreditation Council, Helen has the opportunity to gain insights into the operation of higher education providers globally. She is also an Associate of the SKOPE, the department’s research centre for Skills, Knowledge and Organisational Performance.

From 2012-17, Helen was a member of the governing council of the Society for Research into Higher Education (SRHE), serving as Vice-Chair from 2014-17.

 

Jo-Anne is Director of the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment.  She completed a six-year term as Head of the Department of Education, has been Standing Adviser to the House of Commons Education Select Committee, a member of Ofqual’s Standing Advisory Group on Standards, Chair of the National Reference Test Expert Group, and a member of the Welsh Government’s Curriculum and Assessment Group.  Before coming to Oxford, Jo-Anne held academic posts at the Institute of Education, University of London and the University of Bristol. Her first degree and doctorate were in psychology and she has an MBA.  Her current research projects include Setting and Maintaining Standards in national examinations, Examination reform: the impact of modular and linear examinations at GCSE, Assessment for Learning in Africa (AFLA), intelligent accountability and the Progress in International Reading Literacy Study England national centre.

Her research interests are in educational assessment, including system-wide structures and processes, examination standards, marking and assessment design.  Jo-Anne conducts a lot of work with government and industry partners, including acting as the Standing Adviser to the House of Commons Education Select Committee, a member of Ofqual’s Standing Advisory Group and membership of the Welsh Government’s Curriculum and Assessment Group.  She is a member of the Editorial Board of the Oxford Review of Education journal and the International Advisory Board of Assessment in Education: principles, policy & practice.  She has been a Visiting Professor at the universities of Bergen and Queen’s (Belfast).  From 2013 to 2015 she was President of the Association for Educational Assessment – Europe.

Qualifications
  • B.A.H. Linguistics/Psychology – Queen’s University, Kingston On, Canada
  • M.A. Educational Psychology – McGill University, Canada
  • Ph.D. – Second Language Education – McGill University Canada

Victoria Murphy would welcome informal contacts from prospective doctoral students interested in the following topics:

  • Language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/ Language Minority) children
  • Child L2 and bilingualism
  • Foreign language learning in primary school
  • Lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Research

Victoria is active in the following research areas, and would welcome DPhil applications on any of these, particularly those relating to EAL (language minority) children and child L2 learning and foreign language learning in primary school.  She is also the convenor of the Research in English as an Additional Language (REAL) group.  Her research is currently being funded by the ESRC, Leverhulme Trust and Nuffield Foundation.

  • language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/Language minority) children
  • child L2 learning and bilingualism
  • foreign language learning in primary school
  • cognitive processes underlying L1 and L2 learning
  • lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Current Research Project(s)

Joanna is a Doctoral Student, and ESRC Grand Union DTP Scholar, researching in-class support for multilingualism in UK schools.

She has over 12 years of experience as a teaching professional, having worked as a class teacher, EAL specialist and Teaching Assistant in the UK, China, Brazil and Italy. Her main area of interest is school-based education (3-18), specifically the support for multilingual pupils and their language practices, as well as the relationship between teaching assistants and both teachers and children in schools.

Joanna holds a BA in Jurisprudence and a MSc in Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching, both from the University of Oxford. She also has a PGCE, and a PGDip in French.

Joining the Department of Education in 2020 after teaching English and foreign languages in secondary schools and early years settings for 15 years, Catherine completed the MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition in 2021. Her doctoral research investigates the effectiveness of using songs as pedagogical tools with young second language learners in formal educational settings.

Additionally, Catherine hosts The Language Revolution podcast, exploring how linguistics and language awareness might inform/transform languages teaching with guests including Michael Rosen and David Crystal. She also project manages the annual conference for NALDIC, the national subject association for EAL.

Publications

Multilingual is Normal: An anthology of voices, talking about talking (2020)

Renyu completed her BA degree in Psychology at the University of British Columbia (Vancouver, Canada) and her MPhil degree in Education at University of Cambridge.

During her MPhil study, she worked with children aged 4 to 6 years to investigate the relationship between bilingualism, vocabulary size, and inhibitory control, and also to validate a novel app designed to assess early language development. For her Dphil study at Oxford, Renyu aims to explore the factors that might affect L2 pronunciation learning in young children and the interaction between children’s L1 and L2. She is particularly interested in the psychological factors that might influence a child’s L2 pronunciation.

Prior to studying at Oxford, Renyu worked as Research Assistant at the Assessment Research Group at British Council for one year and a half. She was involved in various projects, including gap analysis on reading demand and reading ability, participant feedback questionnaire design and analysis, design and recruitment for a new EAP task study, etc.

Bernard holds a PhD in Marketing from the University of Nottingham and a DBA from the University of Newcastle.

His research to date explores the leadership in HE. Prior to coming to Oxford, he worked in various HEIs and served as the supervisor of a secondary school.

Publications

Lee, B., Tsui, A. & Yau, O.H.M. (2019), Higher-order Goals, Trust-in-leader, and Self-efficacy as Moderators of Transformational Leadership Performance: The Case of Multi-level Marketing Organizations in China, Journal of Euromarketing, Vol.28 (3-4), 76-97. (2011 RG Impact factor: 0.83).

Conferences

Lee, B. (2020), “Self-formation for the Underprivileged,” 2020 International Online Symposium, Toward a New Paradigm of Economics,organized by Macau Ricci Institute, The University of Saint Joseph, 15 & 16 October. (Online Conference Platform Presentation).

Steve is Associate Professor of Teacher Education. He is a curriculum tutor for the Geography PGCE and MSc Learning and Teaching.

Steve is a qualified geography teacher and was previously the head of department at a comprehensive secondary school in Oxfordshire, and Head of Programmes at Bishop Grosseteste University, Lincoln.

He holds an MA in Educational Leadership and Innovation from Warwick University, an MSc in Educational Research Methodology and DPhil in Education from the University of Oxford which were funded by an ESRC Studentship. He is a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

He researches at the intersection between the academic discipline and school subject of geography, including recent collaborations developing through the Smart Cities Network for Sustainable Urban Future project which was shortlisted for the 2017 Newton Prize (India). He is currently leading research on Climate Change Education Futures in India (GCRF) in collaboration with colleagues at IISER, Pune, and on the role of cultural heritage in curriculum making in Kolkata.

Collaborations with colleagues in the School of Geography and the Environment are contributing to anti-racist curriculum futures, including in the school subject, and in postgraduate teaching through the TDEP-funded Oxford-UNISA course ‘Decolonising Research Methods’.

His research on teacher education focuses on the contribution that geography education research offers to the conceptualisation and practice of teaching. This work includes ethnographic research on teachers’ curriculum making exploring the journeys through which information travels into school classrooms, beginning teachers’ experiences of school subject departments, and the role of written lesson observation feedback in constructing ‘good teaching’.

Steve serves on the editorial board of the journal Geography, and is Chair of the Geography Education Research Collective (GEReCo/IGU-CGE).

 

Caitlin is a Doctoral student in the Department of Education working on how teachers interact with refugee and unaccompanied asylum-seeking pupils in UK schools.

Her Doctoral study uses survey data, interviews, observation, and document analysis to examine teacher knowledge, attitudes, and practices in relation to refugee pupils. Previously, Caitlin worked as a primary school teacher in Aberdeen, London, and at Rose Hill Primary School in Oxford. She completed an MA (Gaelic Medium Education, Oral History) and a PGDE (Primary Education) at the University of Aberdeen, and a BA (Human Geography, Environmental Studies) at Middlebury College in the US. She has a general interest in improving inclusion and equity in education.

Helen’s academic interest in higher education policy developed from more than 20 years of professional experience of university administration – in public relations and admissions.

She gained her doctorate from Oxford in 2010 (a study of the market created by the introduction of £3000 fees for Home/EU undergraduates at English universities in 2006); since then, she has conducted research into the impacts of student fees and funding on institutions, students, graduates and applicants within the higher education sector in England. She also works as a consultant to higher education institutions.

Helen was Pathway Convenor for the MSc Education (HE) for two years and has taught on this course since completing her DPhil. As an inspector for the British Accreditation Council, Helen has the opportunity to gain insights into the operation of higher education providers globally. She is also an Associate of the SKOPE, the department’s research centre for Skills, Knowledge and Organisational Performance.

From 2012-17, Helen was a member of the governing council of the Society for Research into Higher Education (SRHE), serving as Vice-Chair from 2014-17.

 

Jo-Anne is Director of the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment.  She completed a six-year term as Head of the Department of Education, has been Standing Adviser to the House of Commons Education Select Committee, a member of Ofqual’s Standing Advisory Group on Standards, Chair of the National Reference Test Expert Group, and a member of the Welsh Government’s Curriculum and Assessment Group.  Before coming to Oxford, Jo-Anne held academic posts at the Institute of Education, University of London and the University of Bristol. Her first degree and doctorate were in psychology and she has an MBA.  Her current research projects include Setting and Maintaining Standards in national examinations, Examination reform: the impact of modular and linear examinations at GCSE, Assessment for Learning in Africa (AFLA), intelligent accountability and the Progress in International Reading Literacy Study England national centre.

Her research interests are in educational assessment, including system-wide structures and processes, examination standards, marking and assessment design.  Jo-Anne conducts a lot of work with government and industry partners, including acting as the Standing Adviser to the House of Commons Education Select Committee, a member of Ofqual’s Standing Advisory Group and membership of the Welsh Government’s Curriculum and Assessment Group.  She is a member of the Editorial Board of the Oxford Review of Education journal and the International Advisory Board of Assessment in Education: principles, policy & practice.  She has been a Visiting Professor at the universities of Bergen and Queen’s (Belfast).  From 2013 to 2015 she was President of the Association for Educational Assessment – Europe.

Qualifications
  • B.A.H. Linguistics/Psychology – Queen’s University, Kingston On, Canada
  • M.A. Educational Psychology – McGill University, Canada
  • Ph.D. – Second Language Education – McGill University Canada

Victoria Murphy would welcome informal contacts from prospective doctoral students interested in the following topics:

  • Language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/ Language Minority) children
  • Child L2 and bilingualism
  • Foreign language learning in primary school
  • Lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Research

Victoria is active in the following research areas, and would welcome DPhil applications on any of these, particularly those relating to EAL (language minority) children and child L2 learning and foreign language learning in primary school.  She is also the convenor of the Research in English as an Additional Language (REAL) group.  Her research is currently being funded by the ESRC, Leverhulme Trust and Nuffield Foundation.

  • language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/Language minority) children
  • child L2 learning and bilingualism
  • foreign language learning in primary school
  • cognitive processes underlying L1 and L2 learning
  • lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Current Research Project(s)

Joanna is a Doctoral Student, and ESRC Grand Union DTP Scholar, researching in-class support for multilingualism in UK schools.

She has over 12 years of experience as a teaching professional, having worked as a class teacher, EAL specialist and Teaching Assistant in the UK, China, Brazil and Italy. Her main area of interest is school-based education (3-18), specifically the support for multilingual pupils and their language practices, as well as the relationship between teaching assistants and both teachers and children in schools.

Joanna holds a BA in Jurisprudence and a MSc in Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching, both from the University of Oxford. She also has a PGCE, and a PGDip in French.

Joining the Department of Education in 2020 after teaching English and foreign languages in secondary schools and early years settings for 15 years, Catherine completed the MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition in 2021. Her doctoral research investigates the effectiveness of using songs as pedagogical tools with young second language learners in formal educational settings.

Additionally, Catherine hosts The Language Revolution podcast, exploring how linguistics and language awareness might inform/transform languages teaching with guests including Michael Rosen and David Crystal. She also project manages the annual conference for NALDIC, the national subject association for EAL.

Publications

Multilingual is Normal: An anthology of voices, talking about talking (2020)

Renyu completed her BA degree in Psychology at the University of British Columbia (Vancouver, Canada) and her MPhil degree in Education at University of Cambridge.

During her MPhil study, she worked with children aged 4 to 6 years to investigate the relationship between bilingualism, vocabulary size, and inhibitory control, and also to validate a novel app designed to assess early language development. For her Dphil study at Oxford, Renyu aims to explore the factors that might affect L2 pronunciation learning in young children and the interaction between children’s L1 and L2. She is particularly interested in the psychological factors that might influence a child’s L2 pronunciation.

Prior to studying at Oxford, Renyu worked as Research Assistant at the Assessment Research Group at British Council for one year and a half. She was involved in various projects, including gap analysis on reading demand and reading ability, participant feedback questionnaire design and analysis, design and recruitment for a new EAP task study, etc.

Bernard holds a PhD in Marketing from the University of Nottingham and a DBA from the University of Newcastle.

His research to date explores the leadership in HE. Prior to coming to Oxford, he worked in various HEIs and served as the supervisor of a secondary school.

Publications

Lee, B., Tsui, A. & Yau, O.H.M. (2019), Higher-order Goals, Trust-in-leader, and Self-efficacy as Moderators of Transformational Leadership Performance: The Case of Multi-level Marketing Organizations in China, Journal of Euromarketing, Vol.28 (3-4), 76-97. (2011 RG Impact factor: 0.83).

Conferences

Lee, B. (2020), “Self-formation for the Underprivileged,” 2020 International Online Symposium, Toward a New Paradigm of Economics,organized by Macau Ricci Institute, The University of Saint Joseph, 15 & 16 October. (Online Conference Platform Presentation).

Steve is Associate Professor of Teacher Education. He is a curriculum tutor for the Geography PGCE and MSc Learning and Teaching.

Steve is a qualified geography teacher and was previously the head of department at a comprehensive secondary school in Oxfordshire, and Head of Programmes at Bishop Grosseteste University, Lincoln.

He holds an MA in Educational Leadership and Innovation from Warwick University, an MSc in Educational Research Methodology and DPhil in Education from the University of Oxford which were funded by an ESRC Studentship. He is a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

He researches at the intersection between the academic discipline and school subject of geography, including recent collaborations developing through the Smart Cities Network for Sustainable Urban Future project which was shortlisted for the 2017 Newton Prize (India). He is currently leading research on Climate Change Education Futures in India (GCRF) in collaboration with colleagues at IISER, Pune, and on the role of cultural heritage in curriculum making in Kolkata.

Collaborations with colleagues in the School of Geography and the Environment are contributing to anti-racist curriculum futures, including in the school subject, and in postgraduate teaching through the TDEP-funded Oxford-UNISA course ‘Decolonising Research Methods’.

His research on teacher education focuses on the contribution that geography education research offers to the conceptualisation and practice of teaching. This work includes ethnographic research on teachers’ curriculum making exploring the journeys through which information travels into school classrooms, beginning teachers’ experiences of school subject departments, and the role of written lesson observation feedback in constructing ‘good teaching’.

Steve serves on the editorial board of the journal Geography, and is Chair of the Geography Education Research Collective (GEReCo/IGU-CGE).

 

Caitlin is a Doctoral student in the Department of Education working on how teachers interact with refugee and unaccompanied asylum-seeking pupils in UK schools.

Her Doctoral study uses survey data, interviews, observation, and document analysis to examine teacher knowledge, attitudes, and practices in relation to refugee pupils. Previously, Caitlin worked as a primary school teacher in Aberdeen, London, and at Rose Hill Primary School in Oxford. She completed an MA (Gaelic Medium Education, Oral History) and a PGDE (Primary Education) at the University of Aberdeen, and a BA (Human Geography, Environmental Studies) at Middlebury College in the US. She has a general interest in improving inclusion and equity in education.

Helen’s academic interest in higher education policy developed from more than 20 years of professional experience of university administration – in public relations and admissions.

She gained her doctorate from Oxford in 2010 (a study of the market created by the introduction of £3000 fees for Home/EU undergraduates at English universities in 2006); since then, she has conducted research into the impacts of student fees and funding on institutions, students, graduates and applicants within the higher education sector in England. She also works as a consultant to higher education institutions.

Helen was Pathway Convenor for the MSc Education (HE) for two years and has taught on this course since completing her DPhil. As an inspector for the British Accreditation Council, Helen has the opportunity to gain insights into the operation of higher education providers globally. She is also an Associate of the SKOPE, the department’s research centre for Skills, Knowledge and Organisational Performance.

From 2012-17, Helen was a member of the governing council of the Society for Research into Higher Education (SRHE), serving as Vice-Chair from 2014-17.

 

Jo-Anne is Director of the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment.  She completed a six-year term as Head of the Department of Education, has been Standing Adviser to the House of Commons Education Select Committee, a member of Ofqual’s Standing Advisory Group on Standards, Chair of the National Reference Test Expert Group, and a member of the Welsh Government’s Curriculum and Assessment Group.  Before coming to Oxford, Jo-Anne held academic posts at the Institute of Education, University of London and the University of Bristol. Her first degree and doctorate were in psychology and she has an MBA.  Her current research projects include Setting and Maintaining Standards in national examinations, Examination reform: the impact of modular and linear examinations at GCSE, Assessment for Learning in Africa (AFLA), intelligent accountability and the Progress in International Reading Literacy Study England national centre.

Her research interests are in educational assessment, including system-wide structures and processes, examination standards, marking and assessment design.  Jo-Anne conducts a lot of work with government and industry partners, including acting as the Standing Adviser to the House of Commons Education Select Committee, a member of Ofqual’s Standing Advisory Group and membership of the Welsh Government’s Curriculum and Assessment Group.  She is a member of the Editorial Board of the Oxford Review of Education journal and the International Advisory Board of Assessment in Education: principles, policy & practice.  She has been a Visiting Professor at the universities of Bergen and Queen’s (Belfast).  From 2013 to 2015 she was President of the Association for Educational Assessment – Europe.

Qualifications
  • B.A.H. Linguistics/Psychology – Queen’s University, Kingston On, Canada
  • M.A. Educational Psychology – McGill University, Canada
  • Ph.D. – Second Language Education – McGill University Canada

Victoria Murphy would welcome informal contacts from prospective doctoral students interested in the following topics:

  • Language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/ Language Minority) children
  • Child L2 and bilingualism
  • Foreign language learning in primary school
  • Lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Research

Victoria is active in the following research areas, and would welcome DPhil applications on any of these, particularly those relating to EAL (language minority) children and child L2 learning and foreign language learning in primary school.  She is also the convenor of the Research in English as an Additional Language (REAL) group.  Her research is currently being funded by the ESRC, Leverhulme Trust and Nuffield Foundation.

  • language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/Language minority) children
  • child L2 learning and bilingualism
  • foreign language learning in primary school
  • cognitive processes underlying L1 and L2 learning
  • lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Current Research Project(s)

Joanna is a Doctoral Student, and ESRC Grand Union DTP Scholar, researching in-class support for multilingualism in UK schools.

She has over 12 years of experience as a teaching professional, having worked as a class teacher, EAL specialist and Teaching Assistant in the UK, China, Brazil and Italy. Her main area of interest is school-based education (3-18), specifically the support for multilingual pupils and their language practices, as well as the relationship between teaching assistants and both teachers and children in schools.

Joanna holds a BA in Jurisprudence and a MSc in Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching, both from the University of Oxford. She also has a PGCE, and a PGDip in French.

Joining the Department of Education in 2020 after teaching English and foreign languages in secondary schools and early years settings for 15 years, Catherine completed the MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition in 2021. Her doctoral research investigates the effectiveness of using songs as pedagogical tools with young second language learners in formal educational settings.

Additionally, Catherine hosts The Language Revolution podcast, exploring how linguistics and language awareness might inform/transform languages teaching with guests including Michael Rosen and David Crystal. She also project manages the annual conference for NALDIC, the national subject association for EAL.

Publications

Multilingual is Normal: An anthology of voices, talking about talking (2020)

Renyu completed her BA degree in Psychology at the University of British Columbia (Vancouver, Canada) and her MPhil degree in Education at University of Cambridge.

During her MPhil study, she worked with children aged 4 to 6 years to investigate the relationship between bilingualism, vocabulary size, and inhibitory control, and also to validate a novel app designed to assess early language development. For her Dphil study at Oxford, Renyu aims to explore the factors that might affect L2 pronunciation learning in young children and the interaction between children’s L1 and L2. She is particularly interested in the psychological factors that might influence a child’s L2 pronunciation.

Prior to studying at Oxford, Renyu worked as Research Assistant at the Assessment Research Group at British Council for one year and a half. She was involved in various projects, including gap analysis on reading demand and reading ability, participant feedback questionnaire design and analysis, design and recruitment for a new EAP task study, etc.

Bernard holds a PhD in Marketing from the University of Nottingham and a DBA from the University of Newcastle.

His research to date explores the leadership in HE. Prior to coming to Oxford, he worked in various HEIs and served as the supervisor of a secondary school.

Publications

Lee, B., Tsui, A. & Yau, O.H.M. (2019), Higher-order Goals, Trust-in-leader, and Self-efficacy as Moderators of Transformational Leadership Performance: The Case of Multi-level Marketing Organizations in China, Journal of Euromarketing, Vol.28 (3-4), 76-97. (2011 RG Impact factor: 0.83).

Conferences

Lee, B. (2020), “Self-formation for the Underprivileged,” 2020 International Online Symposium, Toward a New Paradigm of Economics,organized by Macau Ricci Institute, The University of Saint Joseph, 15 & 16 October. (Online Conference Platform Presentation).

Steve is Associate Professor of Teacher Education. He is a curriculum tutor for the Geography PGCE and MSc Learning and Teaching.

Steve is a qualified geography teacher and was previously the head of department at a comprehensive secondary school in Oxfordshire, and Head of Programmes at Bishop Grosseteste University, Lincoln.

He holds an MA in Educational Leadership and Innovation from Warwick University, an MSc in Educational Research Methodology and DPhil in Education from the University of Oxford which were funded by an ESRC Studentship. He is a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

He researches at the intersection between the academic discipline and school subject of geography, including recent collaborations developing through the Smart Cities Network for Sustainable Urban Future project which was shortlisted for the 2017 Newton Prize (India). He is currently leading research on Climate Change Education Futures in India (GCRF) in collaboration with colleagues at IISER, Pune, and on the role of cultural heritage in curriculum making in Kolkata.

Collaborations with colleagues in the School of Geography and the Environment are contributing to anti-racist curriculum futures, including in the school subject, and in postgraduate teaching through the TDEP-funded Oxford-UNISA course ‘Decolonising Research Methods’.

His research on teacher education focuses on the contribution that geography education research offers to the conceptualisation and practice of teaching. This work includes ethnographic research on teachers’ curriculum making exploring the journeys through which information travels into school classrooms, beginning teachers’ experiences of school subject departments, and the role of written lesson observation feedback in constructing ‘good teaching’.

Steve serves on the editorial board of the journal Geography, and is Chair of the Geography Education Research Collective (GEReCo/IGU-CGE).

 

Caitlin is a Doctoral student in the Department of Education working on how teachers interact with refugee and unaccompanied asylum-seeking pupils in UK schools.

Her Doctoral study uses survey data, interviews, observation, and document analysis to examine teacher knowledge, attitudes, and practices in relation to refugee pupils. Previously, Caitlin worked as a primary school teacher in Aberdeen, London, and at Rose Hill Primary School in Oxford. She completed an MA (Gaelic Medium Education, Oral History) and a PGDE (Primary Education) at the University of Aberdeen, and a BA (Human Geography, Environmental Studies) at Middlebury College in the US. She has a general interest in improving inclusion and equity in education.

Helen’s academic interest in higher education policy developed from more than 20 years of professional experience of university administration – in public relations and admissions.

She gained her doctorate from Oxford in 2010 (a study of the market created by the introduction of £3000 fees for Home/EU undergraduates at English universities in 2006); since then, she has conducted research into the impacts of student fees and funding on institutions, students, graduates and applicants within the higher education sector in England. She also works as a consultant to higher education institutions.

Helen was Pathway Convenor for the MSc Education (HE) for two years and has taught on this course since completing her DPhil. As an inspector for the British Accreditation Council, Helen has the opportunity to gain insights into the operation of higher education providers globally. She is also an Associate of the SKOPE, the department’s research centre for Skills, Knowledge and Organisational Performance.

From 2012-17, Helen was a member of the governing council of the Society for Research into Higher Education (SRHE), serving as Vice-Chair from 2014-17.

 

Jo-Anne is Director of the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment.  She completed a six-year term as Head of the Department of Education, has been Standing Adviser to the House of Commons Education Select Committee, a member of Ofqual’s Standing Advisory Group on Standards, Chair of the National Reference Test Expert Group, and a member of the Welsh Government’s Curriculum and Assessment Group.  Before coming to Oxford, Jo-Anne held academic posts at the Institute of Education, University of London and the University of Bristol. Her first degree and doctorate were in psychology and she has an MBA.  Her current research projects include Setting and Maintaining Standards in national examinations, Examination reform: the impact of modular and linear examinations at GCSE, Assessment for Learning in Africa (AFLA), intelligent accountability and the Progress in International Reading Literacy Study England national centre.

Her research interests are in educational assessment, including system-wide structures and processes, examination standards, marking and assessment design.  Jo-Anne conducts a lot of work with government and industry partners, including acting as the Standing Adviser to the House of Commons Education Select Committee, a member of Ofqual’s Standing Advisory Group and membership of the Welsh Government’s Curriculum and Assessment Group.  She is a member of the Editorial Board of the Oxford Review of Education journal and the International Advisory Board of Assessment in Education: principles, policy & practice.  She has been a Visiting Professor at the universities of Bergen and Queen’s (Belfast).  From 2013 to 2015 she was President of the Association for Educational Assessment – Europe.

Qualifications
  • B.A.H. Linguistics/Psychology – Queen’s University, Kingston On, Canada
  • M.A. Educational Psychology – McGill University, Canada
  • Ph.D. – Second Language Education – McGill University Canada

Victoria Murphy would welcome informal contacts from prospective doctoral students interested in the following topics:

  • Language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/ Language Minority) children
  • Child L2 and bilingualism
  • Foreign language learning in primary school
  • Lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Research

Victoria is active in the following research areas, and would welcome DPhil applications on any of these, particularly those relating to EAL (language minority) children and child L2 learning and foreign language learning in primary school.  She is also the convenor of the Research in English as an Additional Language (REAL) group.  Her research is currently being funded by the ESRC, Leverhulme Trust and Nuffield Foundation.

  • language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/Language minority) children
  • child L2 learning and bilingualism
  • foreign language learning in primary school
  • cognitive processes underlying L1 and L2 learning
  • lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Current Research Project(s)

Joanna is a Doctoral Student, and ESRC Grand Union DTP Scholar, researching in-class support for multilingualism in UK schools.

She has over 12 years of experience as a teaching professional, having worked as a class teacher, EAL specialist and Teaching Assistant in the UK, China, Brazil and Italy. Her main area of interest is school-based education (3-18), specifically the support for multilingual pupils and their language practices, as well as the relationship between teaching assistants and both teachers and children in schools.

Joanna holds a BA in Jurisprudence and a MSc in Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching, both from the University of Oxford. She also has a PGCE, and a PGDip in French.

Joining the Department of Education in 2020 after teaching English and foreign languages in secondary schools and early years settings for 15 years, Catherine completed the MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition in 2021. Her doctoral research investigates the effectiveness of using songs as pedagogical tools with young second language learners in formal educational settings.

Additionally, Catherine hosts The Language Revolution podcast, exploring how linguistics and language awareness might inform/transform languages teaching with guests including Michael Rosen and David Crystal. She also project manages the annual conference for NALDIC, the national subject association for EAL.

Publications

Multilingual is Normal: An anthology of voices, talking about talking (2020)

Renyu completed her BA degree in Psychology at the University of British Columbia (Vancouver, Canada) and her MPhil degree in Education at University of Cambridge.

During her MPhil study, she worked with children aged 4 to 6 years to investigate the relationship between bilingualism, vocabulary size, and inhibitory control, and also to validate a novel app designed to assess early language development. For her Dphil study at Oxford, Renyu aims to explore the factors that might affect L2 pronunciation learning in young children and the interaction between children’s L1 and L2. She is particularly interested in the psychological factors that might influence a child’s L2 pronunciation.

Prior to studying at Oxford, Renyu worked as Research Assistant at the Assessment Research Group at British Council for one year and a half. She was involved in various projects, including gap analysis on reading demand and reading ability, participant feedback questionnaire design and analysis, design and recruitment for a new EAP task study, etc.

Bernard holds a PhD in Marketing from the University of Nottingham and a DBA from the University of Newcastle.

His research to date explores the leadership in HE. Prior to coming to Oxford, he worked in various HEIs and served as the supervisor of a secondary school.

Publications

Lee, B., Tsui, A. & Yau, O.H.M. (2019), Higher-order Goals, Trust-in-leader, and Self-efficacy as Moderators of Transformational Leadership Performance: The Case of Multi-level Marketing Organizations in China, Journal of Euromarketing, Vol.28 (3-4), 76-97. (2011 RG Impact factor: 0.83).

Conferences

Lee, B. (2020), “Self-formation for the Underprivileged,” 2020 International Online Symposium, Toward a New Paradigm of Economics,organized by Macau Ricci Institute, The University of Saint Joseph, 15 & 16 October. (Online Conference Platform Presentation).

Steve is Associate Professor of Teacher Education. He is a curriculum tutor for the Geography PGCE and MSc Learning and Teaching.

Steve is a qualified geography teacher and was previously the head of department at a comprehensive secondary school in Oxfordshire, and Head of Programmes at Bishop Grosseteste University, Lincoln.

He holds an MA in Educational Leadership and Innovation from Warwick University, an MSc in Educational Research Methodology and DPhil in Education from the University of Oxford which were funded by an ESRC Studentship. He is a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

He researches at the intersection between the academic discipline and school subject of geography, including recent collaborations developing through the Smart Cities Network for Sustainable Urban Future project which was shortlisted for the 2017 Newton Prize (India). He is currently leading research on Climate Change Education Futures in India (GCRF) in collaboration with colleagues at IISER, Pune, and on the role of cultural heritage in curriculum making in Kolkata.

Collaborations with colleagues in the School of Geography and the Environment are contributing to anti-racist curriculum futures, including in the school subject, and in postgraduate teaching through the TDEP-funded Oxford-UNISA course ‘Decolonising Research Methods’.

His research on teacher education focuses on the contribution that geography education research offers to the conceptualisation and practice of teaching. This work includes ethnographic research on teachers’ curriculum making exploring the journeys through which information travels into school classrooms, beginning teachers’ experiences of school subject departments, and the role of written lesson observation feedback in constructing ‘good teaching’.

Steve serves on the editorial board of the journal Geography, and is Chair of the Geography Education Research Collective (GEReCo/IGU-CGE).

 

Caitlin is a Doctoral student in the Department of Education working on how teachers interact with refugee and unaccompanied asylum-seeking pupils in UK schools.

Her Doctoral study uses survey data, interviews, observation, and document analysis to examine teacher knowledge, attitudes, and practices in relation to refugee pupils. Previously, Caitlin worked as a primary school teacher in Aberdeen, London, and at Rose Hill Primary School in Oxford. She completed an MA (Gaelic Medium Education, Oral History) and a PGDE (Primary Education) at the University of Aberdeen, and a BA (Human Geography, Environmental Studies) at Middlebury College in the US. She has a general interest in improving inclusion and equity in education.

Helen’s academic interest in higher education policy developed from more than 20 years of professional experience of university administration – in public relations and admissions.

She gained her doctorate from Oxford in 2010 (a study of the market created by the introduction of £3000 fees for Home/EU undergraduates at English universities in 2006); since then, she has conducted research into the impacts of student fees and funding on institutions, students, graduates and applicants within the higher education sector in England. She also works as a consultant to higher education institutions.

Helen was Pathway Convenor for the MSc Education (HE) for two years and has taught on this course since completing her DPhil. As an inspector for the British Accreditation Council, Helen has the opportunity to gain insights into the operation of higher education providers globally. She is also an Associate of the SKOPE, the department’s research centre for Skills, Knowledge and Organisational Performance.

From 2012-17, Helen was a member of the governing council of the Society for Research into Higher Education (SRHE), serving as Vice-Chair from 2014-17.

 

Jo-Anne is Director of the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment.  She completed a six-year term as Head of the Department of Education, has been Standing Adviser to the House of Commons Education Select Committee, a member of Ofqual’s Standing Advisory Group on Standards, Chair of the National Reference Test Expert Group, and a member of the Welsh Government’s Curriculum and Assessment Group.  Before coming to Oxford, Jo-Anne held academic posts at the Institute of Education, University of London and the University of Bristol. Her first degree and doctorate were in psychology and she has an MBA.  Her current research projects include Setting and Maintaining Standards in national examinations, Examination reform: the impact of modular and linear examinations at GCSE, Assessment for Learning in Africa (AFLA), intelligent accountability and the Progress in International Reading Literacy Study England national centre.

Her research interests are in educational assessment, including system-wide structures and processes, examination standards, marking and assessment design.  Jo-Anne conducts a lot of work with government and industry partners, including acting as the Standing Adviser to the House of Commons Education Select Committee, a member of Ofqual’s Standing Advisory Group and membership of the Welsh Government’s Curriculum and Assessment Group.  She is a member of the Editorial Board of the Oxford Review of Education journal and the International Advisory Board of Assessment in Education: principles, policy & practice.  She has been a Visiting Professor at the universities of Bergen and Queen’s (Belfast).  From 2013 to 2015 she was President of the Association for Educational Assessment – Europe.

Qualifications
  • B.A.H. Linguistics/Psychology – Queen’s University, Kingston On, Canada
  • M.A. Educational Psychology – McGill University, Canada
  • Ph.D. – Second Language Education – McGill University Canada

Victoria Murphy would welcome informal contacts from prospective doctoral students interested in the following topics:

  • Language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/ Language Minority) children
  • Child L2 and bilingualism
  • Foreign language learning in primary school
  • Lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Research

Victoria is active in the following research areas, and would welcome DPhil applications on any of these, particularly those relating to EAL (language minority) children and child L2 learning and foreign language learning in primary school.  She is also the convenor of the Research in English as an Additional Language (REAL) group.  Her research is currently being funded by the ESRC, Leverhulme Trust and Nuffield Foundation.

  • language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/Language minority) children
  • child L2 learning and bilingualism
  • foreign language learning in primary school
  • cognitive processes underlying L1 and L2 learning
  • lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Current Research Project(s)

Joanna is a Doctoral Student, and ESRC Grand Union DTP Scholar, researching in-class support for multilingualism in UK schools.

She has over 12 years of experience as a teaching professional, having worked as a class teacher, EAL specialist and Teaching Assistant in the UK, China, Brazil and Italy. Her main area of interest is school-based education (3-18), specifically the support for multilingual pupils and their language practices, as well as the relationship between teaching assistants and both teachers and children in schools.

Joanna holds a BA in Jurisprudence and a MSc in Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching, both from the University of Oxford. She also has a PGCE, and a PGDip in French.

Joining the Department of Education in 2020 after teaching English and foreign languages in secondary schools and early years settings for 15 years, Catherine completed the MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition in 2021. Her doctoral research investigates the effectiveness of using songs as pedagogical tools with young second language learners in formal educational settings.

Additionally, Catherine hosts The Language Revolution podcast, exploring how linguistics and language awareness might inform/transform languages teaching with guests including Michael Rosen and David Crystal. She also project manages the annual conference for NALDIC, the national subject association for EAL.

Publications

Multilingual is Normal: An anthology of voices, talking about talking (2020)

Renyu completed her BA degree in Psychology at the University of British Columbia (Vancouver, Canada) and her MPhil degree in Education at University of Cambridge.

During her MPhil study, she worked with children aged 4 to 6 years to investigate the relationship between bilingualism, vocabulary size, and inhibitory control, and also to validate a novel app designed to assess early language development. For her Dphil study at Oxford, Renyu aims to explore the factors that might affect L2 pronunciation learning in young children and the interaction between children’s L1 and L2. She is particularly interested in the psychological factors that might influence a child’s L2 pronunciation.

Prior to studying at Oxford, Renyu worked as Research Assistant at the Assessment Research Group at British Council for one year and a half. She was involved in various projects, including gap analysis on reading demand and reading ability, participant feedback questionnaire design and analysis, design and recruitment for a new EAP task study, etc.

Bernard holds a PhD in Marketing from the University of Nottingham and a DBA from the University of Newcastle.

His research to date explores the leadership in HE. Prior to coming to Oxford, he worked in various HEIs and served as the supervisor of a secondary school.

Publications

Lee, B., Tsui, A. & Yau, O.H.M. (2019), Higher-order Goals, Trust-in-leader, and Self-efficacy as Moderators of Transformational Leadership Performance: The Case of Multi-level Marketing Organizations in China, Journal of Euromarketing, Vol.28 (3-4), 76-97. (2011 RG Impact factor: 0.83).

Conferences

Lee, B. (2020), “Self-formation for the Underprivileged,” 2020 International Online Symposium, Toward a New Paradigm of Economics,organized by Macau Ricci Institute, The University of Saint Joseph, 15 & 16 October. (Online Conference Platform Presentation).

Steve is Associate Professor of Teacher Education. He is a curriculum tutor for the Geography PGCE and MSc Learning and Teaching.

Steve is a qualified geography teacher and was previously the head of department at a comprehensive secondary school in Oxfordshire, and Head of Programmes at Bishop Grosseteste University, Lincoln.

He holds an MA in Educational Leadership and Innovation from Warwick University, an MSc in Educational Research Methodology and DPhil in Education from the University of Oxford which were funded by an ESRC Studentship. He is a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

He researches at the intersection between the academic discipline and school subject of geography, including recent collaborations developing through the Smart Cities Network for Sustainable Urban Future project which was shortlisted for the 2017 Newton Prize (India). He is currently leading research on Climate Change Education Futures in India (GCRF) in collaboration with colleagues at IISER, Pune, and on the role of cultural heritage in curriculum making in Kolkata.

Collaborations with colleagues in the School of Geography and the Environment are contributing to anti-racist curriculum futures, including in the school subject, and in postgraduate teaching through the TDEP-funded Oxford-UNISA course ‘Decolonising Research Methods’.

His research on teacher education focuses on the contribution that geography education research offers to the conceptualisation and practice of teaching. This work includes ethnographic research on teachers’ curriculum making exploring the journeys through which information travels into school classrooms, beginning teachers’ experiences of school subject departments, and the role of written lesson observation feedback in constructing ‘good teaching’.

Steve serves on the editorial board of the journal Geography, and is Chair of the Geography Education Research Collective (GEReCo/IGU-CGE).

 

Caitlin is a Doctoral student in the Department of Education working on how teachers interact with refugee and unaccompanied asylum-seeking pupils in UK schools.

Her Doctoral study uses survey data, interviews, observation, and document analysis to examine teacher knowledge, attitudes, and practices in relation to refugee pupils. Previously, Caitlin worked as a primary school teacher in Aberdeen, London, and at Rose Hill Primary School in Oxford. She completed an MA (Gaelic Medium Education, Oral History) and a PGDE (Primary Education) at the University of Aberdeen, and a BA (Human Geography, Environmental Studies) at Middlebury College in the US. She has a general interest in improving inclusion and equity in education.

Helen’s academic interest in higher education policy developed from more than 20 years of professional experience of university administration – in public relations and admissions.

She gained her doctorate from Oxford in 2010 (a study of the market created by the introduction of £3000 fees for Home/EU undergraduates at English universities in 2006); since then, she has conducted research into the impacts of student fees and funding on institutions, students, graduates and applicants within the higher education sector in England. She also works as a consultant to higher education institutions.

Helen was Pathway Convenor for the MSc Education (HE) for two years and has taught on this course since completing her DPhil. As an inspector for the British Accreditation Council, Helen has the opportunity to gain insights into the operation of higher education providers globally. She is also an Associate of the SKOPE, the department’s research centre for Skills, Knowledge and Organisational Performance.

From 2012-17, Helen was a member of the governing council of the Society for Research into Higher Education (SRHE), serving as Vice-Chair from 2014-17.

 

Jo-Anne is Director of the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment.  She completed a six-year term as Head of the Department of Education, has been Standing Adviser to the House of Commons Education Select Committee, a member of Ofqual’s Standing Advisory Group on Standards, Chair of the National Reference Test Expert Group, and a member of the Welsh Government’s Curriculum and Assessment Group.  Before coming to Oxford, Jo-Anne held academic posts at the Institute of Education, University of London and the University of Bristol. Her first degree and doctorate were in psychology and she has an MBA.  Her current research projects include Setting and Maintaining Standards in national examinations, Examination reform: the impact of modular and linear examinations at GCSE, Assessment for Learning in Africa (AFLA), intelligent accountability and the Progress in International Reading Literacy Study England national centre.

Her research interests are in educational assessment, including system-wide structures and processes, examination standards, marking and assessment design.  Jo-Anne conducts a lot of work with government and industry partners, including acting as the Standing Adviser to the House of Commons Education Select Committee, a member of Ofqual’s Standing Advisory Group and membership of the Welsh Government’s Curriculum and Assessment Group.  She is a member of the Editorial Board of the Oxford Review of Education journal and the International Advisory Board of Assessment in Education: principles, policy & practice.  She has been a Visiting Professor at the universities of Bergen and Queen’s (Belfast).  From 2013 to 2015 she was President of the Association for Educational Assessment – Europe.

Qualifications
  • B.A.H. Linguistics/Psychology – Queen’s University, Kingston On, Canada
  • M.A. Educational Psychology – McGill University, Canada
  • Ph.D. – Second Language Education – McGill University Canada

Victoria Murphy would welcome informal contacts from prospective doctoral students interested in the following topics:

  • Language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/ Language Minority) children
  • Child L2 and bilingualism
  • Foreign language learning in primary school
  • Lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Research

Victoria is active in the following research areas, and would welcome DPhil applications on any of these, particularly those relating to EAL (language minority) children and child L2 learning and foreign language learning in primary school.  She is also the convenor of the Research in English as an Additional Language (REAL) group.  Her research is currently being funded by the ESRC, Leverhulme Trust and Nuffield Foundation.

  • language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/Language minority) children
  • child L2 learning and bilingualism
  • foreign language learning in primary school
  • cognitive processes underlying L1 and L2 learning
  • lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Current Research Project(s)

Joanna is a Doctoral Student, and ESRC Grand Union DTP Scholar, researching in-class support for multilingualism in UK schools.

She has over 12 years of experience as a teaching professional, having worked as a class teacher, EAL specialist and Teaching Assistant in the UK, China, Brazil and Italy. Her main area of interest is school-based education (3-18), specifically the support for multilingual pupils and their language practices, as well as the relationship between teaching assistants and both teachers and children in schools.

Joanna holds a BA in Jurisprudence and a MSc in Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching, both from the University of Oxford. She also has a PGCE, and a PGDip in French.

Joining the Department of Education in 2020 after teaching English and foreign languages in secondary schools and early years settings for 15 years, Catherine completed the MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition in 2021. Her doctoral research investigates the effectiveness of using songs as pedagogical tools with young second language learners in formal educational settings.

Additionally, Catherine hosts The Language Revolution podcast, exploring how linguistics and language awareness might inform/transform languages teaching with guests including Michael Rosen and David Crystal. She also project manages the annual conference for NALDIC, the national subject association for EAL.

Publications

Multilingual is Normal: An anthology of voices, talking about talking (2020)

Renyu completed her BA degree in Psychology at the University of British Columbia (Vancouver, Canada) and her MPhil degree in Education at University of Cambridge.

During her MPhil study, she worked with children aged 4 to 6 years to investigate the relationship between bilingualism, vocabulary size, and inhibitory control, and also to validate a novel app designed to assess early language development. For her Dphil study at Oxford, Renyu aims to explore the factors that might affect L2 pronunciation learning in young children and the interaction between children’s L1 and L2. She is particularly interested in the psychological factors that might influence a child’s L2 pronunciation.

Prior to studying at Oxford, Renyu worked as Research Assistant at the Assessment Research Group at British Council for one year and a half. She was involved in various projects, including gap analysis on reading demand and reading ability, participant feedback questionnaire design and analysis, design and recruitment for a new EAP task study, etc.

Bernard holds a PhD in Marketing from the University of Nottingham and a DBA from the University of Newcastle.

His research to date explores the leadership in HE. Prior to coming to Oxford, he worked in various HEIs and served as the supervisor of a secondary school.

Publications

Lee, B., Tsui, A. & Yau, O.H.M. (2019), Higher-order Goals, Trust-in-leader, and Self-efficacy as Moderators of Transformational Leadership Performance: The Case of Multi-level Marketing Organizations in China, Journal of Euromarketing, Vol.28 (3-4), 76-97. (2011 RG Impact factor: 0.83).

Conferences

Lee, B. (2020), “Self-formation for the Underprivileged,” 2020 International Online Symposium, Toward a New Paradigm of Economics,organized by Macau Ricci Institute, The University of Saint Joseph, 15 & 16 October. (Online Conference Platform Presentation).

Steve is Associate Professor of Teacher Education. He is a curriculum tutor for the Geography PGCE and MSc Learning and Teaching.

Steve is a qualified geography teacher and was previously the head of department at a comprehensive secondary school in Oxfordshire, and Head of Programmes at Bishop Grosseteste University, Lincoln.

He holds an MA in Educational Leadership and Innovation from Warwick University, an MSc in Educational Research Methodology and DPhil in Education from the University of Oxford which were funded by an ESRC Studentship. He is a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

He researches at the intersection between the academic discipline and school subject of geography, including recent collaborations developing through the Smart Cities Network for Sustainable Urban Future project which was shortlisted for the 2017 Newton Prize (India). He is currently leading research on Climate Change Education Futures in India (GCRF) in collaboration with colleagues at IISER, Pune, and on the role of cultural heritage in curriculum making in Kolkata.

Collaborations with colleagues in the School of Geography and the Environment are contributing to anti-racist curriculum futures, including in the school subject, and in postgraduate teaching through the TDEP-funded Oxford-UNISA course ‘Decolonising Research Methods’.

His research on teacher education focuses on the contribution that geography education research offers to the conceptualisation and practice of teaching. This work includes ethnographic research on teachers’ curriculum making exploring the journeys through which information travels into school classrooms, beginning teachers’ experiences of school subject departments, and the role of written lesson observation feedback in constructing ‘good teaching’.

Steve serves on the editorial board of the journal Geography, and is Chair of the Geography Education Research Collective (GEReCo/IGU-CGE).

 

Caitlin is a Doctoral student in the Department of Education working on how teachers interact with refugee and unaccompanied asylum-seeking pupils in UK schools.

Her Doctoral study uses survey data, interviews, observation, and document analysis to examine teacher knowledge, attitudes, and practices in relation to refugee pupils. Previously, Caitlin worked as a primary school teacher in Aberdeen, London, and at Rose Hill Primary School in Oxford. She completed an MA (Gaelic Medium Education, Oral History) and a PGDE (Primary Education) at the University of Aberdeen, and a BA (Human Geography, Environmental Studies) at Middlebury College in the US. She has a general interest in improving inclusion and equity in education.

Helen’s academic interest in higher education policy developed from more than 20 years of professional experience of university administration – in public relations and admissions.

She gained her doctorate from Oxford in 2010 (a study of the market created by the introduction of £3000 fees for Home/EU undergraduates at English universities in 2006); since then, she has conducted research into the impacts of student fees and funding on institutions, students, graduates and applicants within the higher education sector in England. She also works as a consultant to higher education institutions.

Helen was Pathway Convenor for the MSc Education (HE) for two years and has taught on this course since completing her DPhil. As an inspector for the British Accreditation Council, Helen has the opportunity to gain insights into the operation of higher education providers globally. She is also an Associate of the SKOPE, the department’s research centre for Skills, Knowledge and Organisational Performance.

From 2012-17, Helen was a member of the governing council of the Society for Research into Higher Education (SRHE), serving as Vice-Chair from 2014-17.

 

Jo-Anne is Director of the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment.  She completed a six-year term as Head of the Department of Education, has been Standing Adviser to the House of Commons Education Select Committee, a member of Ofqual’s Standing Advisory Group on Standards, Chair of the National Reference Test Expert Group, and a member of the Welsh Government’s Curriculum and Assessment Group.  Before coming to Oxford, Jo-Anne held academic posts at the Institute of Education, University of London and the University of Bristol. Her first degree and doctorate were in psychology and she has an MBA.  Her current research projects include Setting and Maintaining Standards in national examinations, Examination reform: the impact of modular and linear examinations at GCSE, Assessment for Learning in Africa (AFLA), intelligent accountability and the Progress in International Reading Literacy Study England national centre.

Her research interests are in educational assessment, including system-wide structures and processes, examination standards, marking and assessment design.  Jo-Anne conducts a lot of work with government and industry partners, including acting as the Standing Adviser to the House of Commons Education Select Committee, a member of Ofqual’s Standing Advisory Group and membership of the Welsh Government’s Curriculum and Assessment Group.  She is a member of the Editorial Board of the Oxford Review of Education journal and the International Advisory Board of Assessment in Education: principles, policy & practice.  She has been a Visiting Professor at the universities of Bergen and Queen’s (Belfast).  From 2013 to 2015 she was President of the Association for Educational Assessment – Europe.

Qualifications
  • B.A.H. Linguistics/Psychology – Queen’s University, Kingston On, Canada
  • M.A. Educational Psychology – McGill University, Canada
  • Ph.D. – Second Language Education – McGill University Canada

Victoria Murphy would welcome informal contacts from prospective doctoral students interested in the following topics:

  • Language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/ Language Minority) children
  • Child L2 and bilingualism
  • Foreign language learning in primary school
  • Lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Research

Victoria is active in the following research areas, and would welcome DPhil applications on any of these, particularly those relating to EAL (language minority) children and child L2 learning and foreign language learning in primary school.  She is also the convenor of the Research in English as an Additional Language (REAL) group.  Her research is currently being funded by the ESRC, Leverhulme Trust and Nuffield Foundation.

  • language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/Language minority) children
  • child L2 learning and bilingualism
  • foreign language learning in primary school
  • cognitive processes underlying L1 and L2 learning
  • lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Current Research Project(s)

Joanna is a Doctoral Student, and ESRC Grand Union DTP Scholar, researching in-class support for multilingualism in UK schools.

She has over 12 years of experience as a teaching professional, having worked as a class teacher, EAL specialist and Teaching Assistant in the UK, China, Brazil and Italy. Her main area of interest is school-based education (3-18), specifically the support for multilingual pupils and their language practices, as well as the relationship between teaching assistants and both teachers and children in schools.

Joanna holds a BA in Jurisprudence and a MSc in Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching, both from the University of Oxford. She also has a PGCE, and a PGDip in French.

Joining the Department of Education in 2020 after teaching English and foreign languages in secondary schools and early years settings for 15 years, Catherine completed the MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition in 2021. Her doctoral research investigates the effectiveness of using songs as pedagogical tools with young second language learners in formal educational settings.

Additionally, Catherine hosts The Language Revolution podcast, exploring how linguistics and language awareness might inform/transform languages teaching with guests including Michael Rosen and David Crystal. She also project manages the annual conference for NALDIC, the national subject association for EAL.

Publications

Multilingual is Normal: An anthology of voices, talking about talking (2020)

Renyu completed her BA degree in Psychology at the University of British Columbia (Vancouver, Canada) and her MPhil degree in Education at University of Cambridge.

During her MPhil study, she worked with children aged 4 to 6 years to investigate the relationship between bilingualism, vocabulary size, and inhibitory control, and also to validate a novel app designed to assess early language development. For her Dphil study at Oxford, Renyu aims to explore the factors that might affect L2 pronunciation learning in young children and the interaction between children’s L1 and L2. She is particularly interested in the psychological factors that might influence a child’s L2 pronunciation.

Prior to studying at Oxford, Renyu worked as Research Assistant at the Assessment Research Group at British Council for one year and a half. She was involved in various projects, including gap analysis on reading demand and reading ability, participant feedback questionnaire design and analysis, design and recruitment for a new EAP task study, etc.

Bernard holds a PhD in Marketing from the University of Nottingham and a DBA from the University of Newcastle.

His research to date explores the leadership in HE. Prior to coming to Oxford, he worked in various HEIs and served as the supervisor of a secondary school.

Publications

Lee, B., Tsui, A. & Yau, O.H.M. (2019), Higher-order Goals, Trust-in-leader, and Self-efficacy as Moderators of Transformational Leadership Performance: The Case of Multi-level Marketing Organizations in China, Journal of Euromarketing, Vol.28 (3-4), 76-97. (2011 RG Impact factor: 0.83).

Conferences

Lee, B. (2020), “Self-formation for the Underprivileged,” 2020 International Online Symposium, Toward a New Paradigm of Economics,organized by Macau Ricci Institute, The University of Saint Joseph, 15 & 16 October. (Online Conference Platform Presentation).

Steve is Associate Professor of Teacher Education. He is a curriculum tutor for the Geography PGCE and MSc Learning and Teaching.

Steve is a qualified geography teacher and was previously the head of department at a comprehensive secondary school in Oxfordshire, and Head of Programmes at Bishop Grosseteste University, Lincoln.

He holds an MA in Educational Leadership and Innovation from Warwick University, an MSc in Educational Research Methodology and DPhil in Education from the University of Oxford which were funded by an ESRC Studentship. He is a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

He researches at the intersection between the academic discipline and school subject of geography, including recent collaborations developing through the Smart Cities Network for Sustainable Urban Future project which was shortlisted for the 2017 Newton Prize (India). He is currently leading research on Climate Change Education Futures in India (GCRF) in collaboration with colleagues at IISER, Pune, and on the role of cultural heritage in curriculum making in Kolkata.

Collaborations with colleagues in the School of Geography and the Environment are contributing to anti-racist curriculum futures, including in the school subject, and in postgraduate teaching through the TDEP-funded Oxford-UNISA course ‘Decolonising Research Methods’.

His research on teacher education focuses on the contribution that geography education research offers to the conceptualisation and practice of teaching. This work includes ethnographic research on teachers’ curriculum making exploring the journeys through which information travels into school classrooms, beginning teachers’ experiences of school subject departments, and the role of written lesson observation feedback in constructing ‘good teaching’.

Steve serves on the editorial board of the journal Geography, and is Chair of the Geography Education Research Collective (GEReCo/IGU-CGE).

 

Caitlin is a Doctoral student in the Department of Education working on how teachers interact with refugee and unaccompanied asylum-seeking pupils in UK schools.

Her Doctoral study uses survey data, interviews, observation, and document analysis to examine teacher knowledge, attitudes, and practices in relation to refugee pupils. Previously, Caitlin worked as a primary school teacher in Aberdeen, London, and at Rose Hill Primary School in Oxford. She completed an MA (Gaelic Medium Education, Oral History) and a PGDE (Primary Education) at the University of Aberdeen, and a BA (Human Geography, Environmental Studies) at Middlebury College in the US. She has a general interest in improving inclusion and equity in education.

Helen’s academic interest in higher education policy developed from more than 20 years of professional experience of university administration – in public relations and admissions.

She gained her doctorate from Oxford in 2010 (a study of the market created by the introduction of £3000 fees for Home/EU undergraduates at English universities in 2006); since then, she has conducted research into the impacts of student fees and funding on institutions, students, graduates and applicants within the higher education sector in England. She also works as a consultant to higher education institutions.

Helen was Pathway Convenor for the MSc Education (HE) for two years and has taught on this course since completing her DPhil. As an inspector for the British Accreditation Council, Helen has the opportunity to gain insights into the operation of higher education providers globally. She is also an Associate of the SKOPE, the department’s research centre for Skills, Knowledge and Organisational Performance.

From 2012-17, Helen was a member of the governing council of the Society for Research into Higher Education (SRHE), serving as Vice-Chair from 2014-17.

 

Jo-Anne is Director of the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment.  She completed a six-year term as Head of the Department of Education, has been Standing Adviser to the House of Commons Education Select Committee, a member of Ofqual’s Standing Advisory Group on Standards, Chair of the National Reference Test Expert Group, and a member of the Welsh Government’s Curriculum and Assessment Group.  Before coming to Oxford, Jo-Anne held academic posts at the Institute of Education, University of London and the University of Bristol. Her first degree and doctorate were in psychology and she has an MBA.  Her current research projects include Setting and Maintaining Standards in national examinations, Examination reform: the impact of modular and linear examinations at GCSE, Assessment for Learning in Africa (AFLA), intelligent accountability and the Progress in International Reading Literacy Study England national centre.

Her research interests are in educational assessment, including system-wide structures and processes, examination standards, marking and assessment design.  Jo-Anne conducts a lot of work with government and industry partners, including acting as the Standing Adviser to the House of Commons Education Select Committee, a member of Ofqual’s Standing Advisory Group and membership of the Welsh Government’s Curriculum and Assessment Group.  She is a member of the Editorial Board of the Oxford Review of Education journal and the International Advisory Board of Assessment in Education: principles, policy & practice.  She has been a Visiting Professor at the universities of Bergen and Queen’s (Belfast).  From 2013 to 2015 she was President of the Association for Educational Assessment – Europe.

Qualifications
  • B.A.H. Linguistics/Psychology – Queen’s University, Kingston On, Canada
  • M.A. Educational Psychology – McGill University, Canada
  • Ph.D. – Second Language Education – McGill University Canada

Victoria Murphy would welcome informal contacts from prospective doctoral students interested in the following topics:

  • Language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/ Language Minority) children
  • Child L2 and bilingualism
  • Foreign language learning in primary school
  • Lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Research

Victoria is active in the following research areas, and would welcome DPhil applications on any of these, particularly those relating to EAL (language minority) children and child L2 learning and foreign language learning in primary school.  She is also the convenor of the Research in English as an Additional Language (REAL) group.  Her research is currently being funded by the ESRC, Leverhulme Trust and Nuffield Foundation.

  • language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/Language minority) children
  • child L2 learning and bilingualism
  • foreign language learning in primary school
  • cognitive processes underlying L1 and L2 learning
  • lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Current Research Project(s)

Joanna is a Doctoral Student, and ESRC Grand Union DTP Scholar, researching in-class support for multilingualism in UK schools.

She has over 12 years of experience as a teaching professional, having worked as a class teacher, EAL specialist and Teaching Assistant in the UK, China, Brazil and Italy. Her main area of interest is school-based education (3-18), specifically the support for multilingual pupils and their language practices, as well as the relationship between teaching assistants and both teachers and children in schools.

Joanna holds a BA in Jurisprudence and a MSc in Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching, both from the University of Oxford. She also has a PGCE, and a PGDip in French.

Joining the Department of Education in 2020 after teaching English and foreign languages in secondary schools and early years settings for 15 years, Catherine completed the MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition in 2021. Her doctoral research investigates the effectiveness of using songs as pedagogical tools with young second language learners in formal educational settings.

Additionally, Catherine hosts The Language Revolution podcast, exploring how linguistics and language awareness might inform/transform languages teaching with guests including Michael Rosen and David Crystal. She also project manages the annual conference for NALDIC, the national subject association for EAL.

Publications

Multilingual is Normal: An anthology of voices, talking about talking (2020)

Renyu completed her BA degree in Psychology at the University of British Columbia (Vancouver, Canada) and her MPhil degree in Education at University of Cambridge.

During her MPhil study, she worked with children aged 4 to 6 years to investigate the relationship between bilingualism, vocabulary size, and inhibitory control, and also to validate a novel app designed to assess early language development. For her Dphil study at Oxford, Renyu aims to explore the factors that might affect L2 pronunciation learning in young children and the interaction between children’s L1 and L2. She is particularly interested in the psychological factors that might influence a child’s L2 pronunciation.

Prior to studying at Oxford, Renyu worked as Research Assistant at the Assessment Research Group at British Council for one year and a half. She was involved in various projects, including gap analysis on reading demand and reading ability, participant feedback questionnaire design and analysis, design and recruitment for a new EAP task study, etc.

Bernard holds a PhD in Marketing from the University of Nottingham and a DBA from the University of Newcastle.

His research to date explores the leadership in HE. Prior to coming to Oxford, he worked in various HEIs and served as the supervisor of a secondary school.

Publications

Lee, B., Tsui, A. & Yau, O.H.M. (2019), Higher-order Goals, Trust-in-leader, and Self-efficacy as Moderators of Transformational Leadership Performance: The Case of Multi-level Marketing Organizations in China, Journal of Euromarketing, Vol.28 (3-4), 76-97. (2011 RG Impact factor: 0.83).

Conferences

Lee, B. (2020), “Self-formation for the Underprivileged,” 2020 International Online Symposium, Toward a New Paradigm of Economics,organized by Macau Ricci Institute, The University of Saint Joseph, 15 & 16 October. (Online Conference Platform Presentation).

Steve is Associate Professor of Teacher Education. He is a curriculum tutor for the Geography PGCE and MSc Learning and Teaching.

Steve is a qualified geography teacher and was previously the head of department at a comprehensive secondary school in Oxfordshire, and Head of Programmes at Bishop Grosseteste University, Lincoln.

He holds an MA in Educational Leadership and Innovation from Warwick University, an MSc in Educational Research Methodology and DPhil in Education from the University of Oxford which were funded by an ESRC Studentship. He is a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

He researches at the intersection between the academic discipline and school subject of geography, including recent collaborations developing through the Smart Cities Network for Sustainable Urban Future project which was shortlisted for the 2017 Newton Prize (India). He is currently leading research on Climate Change Education Futures in India (GCRF) in collaboration with colleagues at IISER, Pune, and on the role of cultural heritage in curriculum making in Kolkata.

Collaborations with colleagues in the School of Geography and the Environment are contributing to anti-racist curriculum futures, including in the school subject, and in postgraduate teaching through the TDEP-funded Oxford-UNISA course ‘Decolonising Research Methods’.

His research on teacher education focuses on the contribution that geography education research offers to the conceptualisation and practice of teaching. This work includes ethnographic research on teachers’ curriculum making exploring the journeys through which information travels into school classrooms, beginning teachers’ experiences of school subject departments, and the role of written lesson observation feedback in constructing ‘good teaching’.

Steve serves on the editorial board of the journal Geography, and is Chair of the Geography Education Research Collective (GEReCo/IGU-CGE).

 

Caitlin is a Doctoral student in the Department of Education working on how teachers interact with refugee and unaccompanied asylum-seeking pupils in UK schools.

Her Doctoral study uses survey data, interviews, observation, and document analysis to examine teacher knowledge, attitudes, and practices in relation to refugee pupils. Previously, Caitlin worked as a primary school teacher in Aberdeen, London, and at Rose Hill Primary School in Oxford. She completed an MA (Gaelic Medium Education, Oral History) and a PGDE (Primary Education) at the University of Aberdeen, and a BA (Human Geography, Environmental Studies) at Middlebury College in the US. She has a general interest in improving inclusion and equity in education.

Helen’s academic interest in higher education policy developed from more than 20 years of professional experience of university administration – in public relations and admissions.

She gained her doctorate from Oxford in 2010 (a study of the market created by the introduction of £3000 fees for Home/EU undergraduates at English universities in 2006); since then, she has conducted research into the impacts of student fees and funding on institutions, students, graduates and applicants within the higher education sector in England. She also works as a consultant to higher education institutions.

Helen was Pathway Convenor for the MSc Education (HE) for two years and has taught on this course since completing her DPhil. As an inspector for the British Accreditation Council, Helen has the opportunity to gain insights into the operation of higher education providers globally. She is also an Associate of the SKOPE, the department’s research centre for Skills, Knowledge and Organisational Performance.

From 2012-17, Helen was a member of the governing council of the Society for Research into Higher Education (SRHE), serving as Vice-Chair from 2014-17.

 

Jo-Anne is Director of the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment.  She completed a six-year term as Head of the Department of Education, has been Standing Adviser to the House of Commons Education Select Committee, a member of Ofqual’s Standing Advisory Group on Standards, Chair of the National Reference Test Expert Group, and a member of the Welsh Government’s Curriculum and Assessment Group.  Before coming to Oxford, Jo-Anne held academic posts at the Institute of Education, University of London and the University of Bristol. Her first degree and doctorate were in psychology and she has an MBA.  Her current research projects include Setting and Maintaining Standards in national examinations, Examination reform: the impact of modular and linear examinations at GCSE, Assessment for Learning in Africa (AFLA), intelligent accountability and the Progress in International Reading Literacy Study England national centre.

Her research interests are in educational assessment, including system-wide structures and processes, examination standards, marking and assessment design.  Jo-Anne conducts a lot of work with government and industry partners, including acting as the Standing Adviser to the House of Commons Education Select Committee, a member of Ofqual’s Standing Advisory Group and membership of the Welsh Government’s Curriculum and Assessment Group.  She is a member of the Editorial Board of the Oxford Review of Education journal and the International Advisory Board of Assessment in Education: principles, policy & practice.  She has been a Visiting Professor at the universities of Bergen and Queen’s (Belfast).  From 2013 to 2015 she was President of the Association for Educational Assessment – Europe.

Qualifications
  • B.A.H. Linguistics/Psychology – Queen’s University, Kingston On, Canada
  • M.A. Educational Psychology – McGill University, Canada
  • Ph.D. – Second Language Education – McGill University Canada

Victoria Murphy would welcome informal contacts from prospective doctoral students interested in the following topics:

  • Language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/ Language Minority) children
  • Child L2 and bilingualism
  • Foreign language learning in primary school
  • Lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Research

Victoria is active in the following research areas, and would welcome DPhil applications on any of these, particularly those relating to EAL (language minority) children and child L2 learning and foreign language learning in primary school.  She is also the convenor of the Research in English as an Additional Language (REAL) group.  Her research is currently being funded by the ESRC, Leverhulme Trust and Nuffield Foundation.

  • language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/Language minority) children
  • child L2 learning and bilingualism
  • foreign language learning in primary school
  • cognitive processes underlying L1 and L2 learning
  • lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Current Research Project(s)

Joanna is a Doctoral Student, and ESRC Grand Union DTP Scholar, researching in-class support for multilingualism in UK schools.

She has over 12 years of experience as a teaching professional, having worked as a class teacher, EAL specialist and Teaching Assistant in the UK, China, Brazil and Italy. Her main area of interest is school-based education (3-18), specifically the support for multilingual pupils and their language practices, as well as the relationship between teaching assistants and both teachers and children in schools.

Joanna holds a BA in Jurisprudence and a MSc in Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching, both from the University of Oxford. She also has a PGCE, and a PGDip in French.

Joining the Department of Education in 2020 after teaching English and foreign languages in secondary schools and early years settings for 15 years, Catherine completed the MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition in 2021. Her doctoral research investigates the effectiveness of using songs as pedagogical tools with young second language learners in formal educational settings.

Additionally, Catherine hosts The Language Revolution podcast, exploring how linguistics and language awareness might inform/transform languages teaching with guests including Michael Rosen and David Crystal. She also project manages the annual conference for NALDIC, the national subject association for EAL.

Publications

Multilingual is Normal: An anthology of voices, talking about talking (2020)

Renyu completed her BA degree in Psychology at the University of British Columbia (Vancouver, Canada) and her MPhil degree in Education at University of Cambridge.

During her MPhil study, she worked with children aged 4 to 6 years to investigate the relationship between bilingualism, vocabulary size, and inhibitory control, and also to validate a novel app designed to assess early language development. For her Dphil study at Oxford, Renyu aims to explore the factors that might affect L2 pronunciation learning in young children and the interaction between children’s L1 and L2. She is particularly interested in the psychological factors that might influence a child’s L2 pronunciation.

Prior to studying at Oxford, Renyu worked as Research Assistant at the Assessment Research Group at British Council for one year and a half. She was involved in various projects, including gap analysis on reading demand and reading ability, participant feedback questionnaire design and analysis, design and recruitment for a new EAP task study, etc.

Bernard holds a PhD in Marketing from the University of Nottingham and a DBA from the University of Newcastle.

His research to date explores the leadership in HE. Prior to coming to Oxford, he worked in various HEIs and served as the supervisor of a secondary school.

Publications

Lee, B., Tsui, A. & Yau, O.H.M. (2019), Higher-order Goals, Trust-in-leader, and Self-efficacy as Moderators of Transformational Leadership Performance: The Case of Multi-level Marketing Organizations in China, Journal of Euromarketing, Vol.28 (3-4), 76-97. (2011 RG Impact factor: 0.83).

Conferences

Lee, B. (2020), “Self-formation for the Underprivileged,” 2020 International Online Symposium, Toward a New Paradigm of Economics,organized by Macau Ricci Institute, The University of Saint Joseph, 15 & 16 October. (Online Conference Platform Presentation).

Steve is Associate Professor of Teacher Education. He is a curriculum tutor for the Geography PGCE and MSc Learning and Teaching.

Steve is a qualified geography teacher and was previously the head of department at a comprehensive secondary school in Oxfordshire, and Head of Programmes at Bishop Grosseteste University, Lincoln.

He holds an MA in Educational Leadership and Innovation from Warwick University, an MSc in Educational Research Methodology and DPhil in Education from the University of Oxford which were funded by an ESRC Studentship. He is a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

He researches at the intersection between the academic discipline and school subject of geography, including recent collaborations developing through the Smart Cities Network for Sustainable Urban Future project which was shortlisted for the 2017 Newton Prize (India). He is currently leading research on Climate Change Education Futures in India (GCRF) in collaboration with colleagues at IISER, Pune, and on the role of cultural heritage in curriculum making in Kolkata.

Collaborations with colleagues in the School of Geography and the Environment are contributing to anti-racist curriculum futures, including in the school subject, and in postgraduate teaching through the TDEP-funded Oxford-UNISA course ‘Decolonising Research Methods’.

His research on teacher education focuses on the contribution that geography education research offers to the conceptualisation and practice of teaching. This work includes ethnographic research on teachers’ curriculum making exploring the journeys through which information travels into school classrooms, beginning teachers’ experiences of school subject departments, and the role of written lesson observation feedback in constructing ‘good teaching’.

Steve serves on the editorial board of the journal Geography, and is Chair of the Geography Education Research Collective (GEReCo/IGU-CGE).

 

Caitlin is a Doctoral student in the Department of Education working on how teachers interact with refugee and unaccompanied asylum-seeking pupils in UK schools.

Her Doctoral study uses survey data, interviews, observation, and document analysis to examine teacher knowledge, attitudes, and practices in relation to refugee pupils. Previously, Caitlin worked as a primary school teacher in Aberdeen, London, and at Rose Hill Primary School in Oxford. She completed an MA (Gaelic Medium Education, Oral History) and a PGDE (Primary Education) at the University of Aberdeen, and a BA (Human Geography, Environmental Studies) at Middlebury College in the US. She has a general interest in improving inclusion and equity in education.

Helen’s academic interest in higher education policy developed from more than 20 years of professional experience of university administration – in public relations and admissions.

She gained her doctorate from Oxford in 2010 (a study of the market created by the introduction of £3000 fees for Home/EU undergraduates at English universities in 2006); since then, she has conducted research into the impacts of student fees and funding on institutions, students, graduates and applicants within the higher education sector in England. She also works as a consultant to higher education institutions.

Helen was Pathway Convenor for the MSc Education (HE) for two years and has taught on this course since completing her DPhil. As an inspector for the British Accreditation Council, Helen has the opportunity to gain insights into the operation of higher education providers globally. She is also an Associate of the SKOPE, the department’s research centre for Skills, Knowledge and Organisational Performance.

From 2012-17, Helen was a member of the governing council of the Society for Research into Higher Education (SRHE), serving as Vice-Chair from 2014-17.

 

Jo-Anne is Director of the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment.  She completed a six-year term as Head of the Department of Education, has been Standing Adviser to the House of Commons Education Select Committee, a member of Ofqual’s Standing Advisory Group on Standards, Chair of the National Reference Test Expert Group, and a member of the Welsh Government’s Curriculum and Assessment Group.  Before coming to Oxford, Jo-Anne held academic posts at the Institute of Education, University of London and the University of Bristol. Her first degree and doctorate were in psychology and she has an MBA.  Her current research projects include Setting and Maintaining Standards in national examinations, Examination reform: the impact of modular and linear examinations at GCSE, Assessment for Learning in Africa (AFLA), intelligent accountability and the Progress in International Reading Literacy Study England national centre.

Her research interests are in educational assessment, including system-wide structures and processes, examination standards, marking and assessment design.  Jo-Anne conducts a lot of work with government and industry partners, including acting as the Standing Adviser to the House of Commons Education Select Committee, a member of Ofqual’s Standing Advisory Group and membership of the Welsh Government’s Curriculum and Assessment Group.  She is a member of the Editorial Board of the Oxford Review of Education journal and the International Advisory Board of Assessment in Education: principles, policy & practice.  She has been a Visiting Professor at the universities of Bergen and Queen’s (Belfast).  From 2013 to 2015 she was President of the Association for Educational Assessment – Europe.

Qualifications
  • B.A.H. Linguistics/Psychology – Queen’s University, Kingston On, Canada
  • M.A. Educational Psychology – McGill University, Canada
  • Ph.D. – Second Language Education – McGill University Canada

Victoria Murphy would welcome informal contacts from prospective doctoral students interested in the following topics:

  • Language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/ Language Minority) children
  • Child L2 and bilingualism
  • Foreign language learning in primary school
  • Lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Research

Victoria is active in the following research areas, and would welcome DPhil applications on any of these, particularly those relating to EAL (language minority) children and child L2 learning and foreign language learning in primary school.  She is also the convenor of the Research in English as an Additional Language (REAL) group.  Her research is currently being funded by the ESRC, Leverhulme Trust and Nuffield Foundation.

  • language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/Language minority) children
  • child L2 learning and bilingualism
  • foreign language learning in primary school
  • cognitive processes underlying L1 and L2 learning
  • lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Current Research Project(s)

Joanna is a Doctoral Student, and ESRC Grand Union DTP Scholar, researching in-class support for multilingualism in UK schools.

She has over 12 years of experience as a teaching professional, having worked as a class teacher, EAL specialist and Teaching Assistant in the UK, China, Brazil and Italy. Her main area of interest is school-based education (3-18), specifically the support for multilingual pupils and their language practices, as well as the relationship between teaching assistants and both teachers and children in schools.

Joanna holds a BA in Jurisprudence and a MSc in Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching, both from the University of Oxford. She also has a PGCE, and a PGDip in French.

Joining the Department of Education in 2020 after teaching English and foreign languages in secondary schools and early years settings for 15 years, Catherine completed the MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition in 2021. Her doctoral research investigates the effectiveness of using songs as pedagogical tools with young second language learners in formal educational settings.

Additionally, Catherine hosts The Language Revolution podcast, exploring how linguistics and language awareness might inform/transform languages teaching with guests including Michael Rosen and David Crystal. She also project manages the annual conference for NALDIC, the national subject association for EAL.

Publications

Multilingual is Normal: An anthology of voices, talking about talking (2020)

Renyu completed her BA degree in Psychology at the University of British Columbia (Vancouver, Canada) and her MPhil degree in Education at University of Cambridge.

During her MPhil study, she worked with children aged 4 to 6 years to investigate the relationship between bilingualism, vocabulary size, and inhibitory control, and also to validate a novel app designed to assess early language development. For her Dphil study at Oxford, Renyu aims to explore the factors that might affect L2 pronunciation learning in young children and the interaction between children’s L1 and L2. She is particularly interested in the psychological factors that might influence a child’s L2 pronunciation.

Prior to studying at Oxford, Renyu worked as Research Assistant at the Assessment Research Group at British Council for one year and a half. She was involved in various projects, including gap analysis on reading demand and reading ability, participant feedback questionnaire design and analysis, design and recruitment for a new EAP task study, etc.

Bernard holds a PhD in Marketing from the University of Nottingham and a DBA from the University of Newcastle.

His research to date explores the leadership in HE. Prior to coming to Oxford, he worked in various HEIs and served as the supervisor of a secondary school.

Publications

Lee, B., Tsui, A. & Yau, O.H.M. (2019), Higher-order Goals, Trust-in-leader, and Self-efficacy as Moderators of Transformational Leadership Performance: The Case of Multi-level Marketing Organizations in China, Journal of Euromarketing, Vol.28 (3-4), 76-97. (2011 RG Impact factor: 0.83).

Conferences

Lee, B. (2020), “Self-formation for the Underprivileged,” 2020 International Online Symposium, Toward a New Paradigm of Economics,organized by Macau Ricci Institute, The University of Saint Joseph, 15 & 16 October. (Online Conference Platform Presentation).

Steve is Associate Professor of Teacher Education. He is a curriculum tutor for the Geography PGCE and MSc Learning and Teaching.

Steve is a qualified geography teacher and was previously the head of department at a comprehensive secondary school in Oxfordshire, and Head of Programmes at Bishop Grosseteste University, Lincoln.

He holds an MA in Educational Leadership and Innovation from Warwick University, an MSc in Educational Research Methodology and DPhil in Education from the University of Oxford which were funded by an ESRC Studentship. He is a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

He researches at the intersection between the academic discipline and school subject of geography, including recent collaborations developing through the Smart Cities Network for Sustainable Urban Future project which was shortlisted for the 2017 Newton Prize (India). He is currently leading research on Climate Change Education Futures in India (GCRF) in collaboration with colleagues at IISER, Pune, and on the role of cultural heritage in curriculum making in Kolkata.

Collaborations with colleagues in the School of Geography and the Environment are contributing to anti-racist curriculum futures, including in the school subject, and in postgraduate teaching through the TDEP-funded Oxford-UNISA course ‘Decolonising Research Methods’.

His research on teacher education focuses on the contribution that geography education research offers to the conceptualisation and practice of teaching. This work includes ethnographic research on teachers’ curriculum making exploring the journeys through which information travels into school classrooms, beginning teachers’ experiences of school subject departments, and the role of written lesson observation feedback in constructing ‘good teaching’.

Steve serves on the editorial board of the journal Geography, and is Chair of the Geography Education Research Collective (GEReCo/IGU-CGE).

 

Caitlin is a Doctoral student in the Department of Education working on how teachers interact with refugee and unaccompanied asylum-seeking pupils in UK schools.

Her Doctoral study uses survey data, interviews, observation, and document analysis to examine teacher knowledge, attitudes, and practices in relation to refugee pupils. Previously, Caitlin worked as a primary school teacher in Aberdeen, London, and at Rose Hill Primary School in Oxford. She completed an MA (Gaelic Medium Education, Oral History) and a PGDE (Primary Education) at the University of Aberdeen, and a BA (Human Geography, Environmental Studies) at Middlebury College in the US. She has a general interest in improving inclusion and equity in education.

Helen’s academic interest in higher education policy developed from more than 20 years of professional experience of university administration – in public relations and admissions.

She gained her doctorate from Oxford in 2010 (a study of the market created by the introduction of £3000 fees for Home/EU undergraduates at English universities in 2006); since then, she has conducted research into the impacts of student fees and funding on institutions, students, graduates and applicants within the higher education sector in England. She also works as a consultant to higher education institutions.

Helen was Pathway Convenor for the MSc Education (HE) for two years and has taught on this course since completing her DPhil. As an inspector for the British Accreditation Council, Helen has the opportunity to gain insights into the operation of higher education providers globally. She is also an Associate of the SKOPE, the department’s research centre for Skills, Knowledge and Organisational Performance.

From 2012-17, Helen was a member of the governing council of the Society for Research into Higher Education (SRHE), serving as Vice-Chair from 2014-17.

 

Jo-Anne is Director of the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment.  She completed a six-year term as Head of the Department of Education, has been Standing Adviser to the House of Commons Education Select Committee, a member of Ofqual’s Standing Advisory Group on Standards, Chair of the National Reference Test Expert Group, and a member of the Welsh Government’s Curriculum and Assessment Group.  Before coming to Oxford, Jo-Anne held academic posts at the Institute of Education, University of London and the University of Bristol. Her first degree and doctorate were in psychology and she has an MBA.  Her current research projects include Setting and Maintaining Standards in national examinations, Examination reform: the impact of modular and linear examinations at GCSE, Assessment for Learning in Africa (AFLA), intelligent accountability and the Progress in International Reading Literacy Study England national centre.

Her research interests are in educational assessment, including system-wide structures and processes, examination standards, marking and assessment design.  Jo-Anne conducts a lot of work with government and industry partners, including acting as the Standing Adviser to the House of Commons Education Select Committee, a member of Ofqual’s Standing Advisory Group and membership of the Welsh Government’s Curriculum and Assessment Group.  She is a member of the Editorial Board of the Oxford Review of Education journal and the International Advisory Board of Assessment in Education: principles, policy & practice.  She has been a Visiting Professor at the universities of Bergen and Queen’s (Belfast).  From 2013 to 2015 she was President of the Association for Educational Assessment – Europe.

Qualifications
  • B.A.H. Linguistics/Psychology – Queen’s University, Kingston On, Canada
  • M.A. Educational Psychology – McGill University, Canada
  • Ph.D. – Second Language Education – McGill University Canada

Victoria Murphy would welcome informal contacts from prospective doctoral students interested in the following topics:

  • Language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/ Language Minority) children
  • Child L2 and bilingualism
  • Foreign language learning in primary school
  • Lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Research

Victoria is active in the following research areas, and would welcome DPhil applications on any of these, particularly those relating to EAL (language minority) children and child L2 learning and foreign language learning in primary school.  She is also the convenor of the Research in English as an Additional Language (REAL) group.  Her research is currently being funded by the ESRC, Leverhulme Trust and Nuffield Foundation.

  • language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/Language minority) children
  • child L2 learning and bilingualism
  • foreign language learning in primary school
  • cognitive processes underlying L1 and L2 learning
  • lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Current Research Project(s)

Joanna is a Doctoral Student, and ESRC Grand Union DTP Scholar, researching in-class support for multilingualism in UK schools.

She has over 12 years of experience as a teaching professional, having worked as a class teacher, EAL specialist and Teaching Assistant in the UK, China, Brazil and Italy. Her main area of interest is school-based education (3-18), specifically the support for multilingual pupils and their language practices, as well as the relationship between teaching assistants and both teachers and children in schools.

Joanna holds a BA in Jurisprudence and a MSc in Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching, both from the University of Oxford. She also has a PGCE, and a PGDip in French.

Joining the Department of Education in 2020 after teaching English and foreign languages in secondary schools and early years settings for 15 years, Catherine completed the MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition in 2021. Her doctoral research investigates the effectiveness of using songs as pedagogical tools with young second language learners in formal educational settings.

Additionally, Catherine hosts The Language Revolution podcast, exploring how linguistics and language awareness might inform/transform languages teaching with guests including Michael Rosen and David Crystal. She also project manages the annual conference for NALDIC, the national subject association for EAL.

Publications

Multilingual is Normal: An anthology of voices, talking about talking (2020)

Renyu completed her BA degree in Psychology at the University of British Columbia (Vancouver, Canada) and her MPhil degree in Education at University of Cambridge.

During her MPhil study, she worked with children aged 4 to 6 years to investigate the relationship between bilingualism, vocabulary size, and inhibitory control, and also to validate a novel app designed to assess early language development. For her Dphil study at Oxford, Renyu aims to explore the factors that might affect L2 pronunciation learning in young children and the interaction between children’s L1 and L2. She is particularly interested in the psychological factors that might influence a child’s L2 pronunciation.

Prior to studying at Oxford, Renyu worked as Research Assistant at the Assessment Research Group at British Council for one year and a half. She was involved in various projects, including gap analysis on reading demand and reading ability, participant feedback questionnaire design and analysis, design and recruitment for a new EAP task study, etc.

Bernard holds a PhD in Marketing from the University of Nottingham and a DBA from the University of Newcastle.

His research to date explores the leadership in HE. Prior to coming to Oxford, he worked in various HEIs and served as the supervisor of a secondary school.

Publications

Lee, B., Tsui, A. & Yau, O.H.M. (2019), Higher-order Goals, Trust-in-leader, and Self-efficacy as Moderators of Transformational Leadership Performance: The Case of Multi-level Marketing Organizations in China, Journal of Euromarketing, Vol.28 (3-4), 76-97. (2011 RG Impact factor: 0.83).

Conferences

Lee, B. (2020), “Self-formation for the Underprivileged,” 2020 International Online Symposium, Toward a New Paradigm of Economics,organized by Macau Ricci Institute, The University of Saint Joseph, 15 & 16 October. (Online Conference Platform Presentation).

Steve is Associate Professor of Teacher Education. He is a curriculum tutor for the Geography PGCE and MSc Learning and Teaching.

Steve is a qualified geography teacher and was previously the head of department at a comprehensive secondary school in Oxfordshire, and Head of Programmes at Bishop Grosseteste University, Lincoln.

He holds an MA in Educational Leadership and Innovation from Warwick University, an MSc in Educational Research Methodology and DPhil in Education from the University of Oxford which were funded by an ESRC Studentship. He is a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

He researches at the intersection between the academic discipline and school subject of geography, including recent collaborations developing through the Smart Cities Network for Sustainable Urban Future project which was shortlisted for the 2017 Newton Prize (India). He is currently leading research on Climate Change Education Futures in India (GCRF) in collaboration with colleagues at IISER, Pune, and on the role of cultural heritage in curriculum making in Kolkata.

Collaborations with colleagues in the School of Geography and the Environment are contributing to anti-racist curriculum futures, including in the school subject, and in postgraduate teaching through the TDEP-funded Oxford-UNISA course ‘Decolonising Research Methods’.

His research on teacher education focuses on the contribution that geography education research offers to the conceptualisation and practice of teaching. This work includes ethnographic research on teachers’ curriculum making exploring the journeys through which information travels into school classrooms, beginning teachers’ experiences of school subject departments, and the role of written lesson observation feedback in constructing ‘good teaching’.

Steve serves on the editorial board of the journal Geography, and is Chair of the Geography Education Research Collective (GEReCo/IGU-CGE).

 

Caitlin is a Doctoral student in the Department of Education working on how teachers interact with refugee and unaccompanied asylum-seeking pupils in UK schools.

Her Doctoral study uses survey data, interviews, observation, and document analysis to examine teacher knowledge, attitudes, and practices in relation to refugee pupils. Previously, Caitlin worked as a primary school teacher in Aberdeen, London, and at Rose Hill Primary School in Oxford. She completed an MA (Gaelic Medium Education, Oral History) and a PGDE (Primary Education) at the University of Aberdeen, and a BA (Human Geography, Environmental Studies) at Middlebury College in the US. She has a general interest in improving inclusion and equity in education.

Helen’s academic interest in higher education policy developed from more than 20 years of professional experience of university administration – in public relations and admissions.

She gained her doctorate from Oxford in 2010 (a study of the market created by the introduction of £3000 fees for Home/EU undergraduates at English universities in 2006); since then, she has conducted research into the impacts of student fees and funding on institutions, students, graduates and applicants within the higher education sector in England. She also works as a consultant to higher education institutions.

Helen was Pathway Convenor for the MSc Education (HE) for two years and has taught on this course since completing her DPhil. As an inspector for the British Accreditation Council, Helen has the opportunity to gain insights into the operation of higher education providers globally. She is also an Associate of the SKOPE, the department’s research centre for Skills, Knowledge and Organisational Performance.

From 2012-17, Helen was a member of the governing council of the Society for Research into Higher Education (SRHE), serving as Vice-Chair from 2014-17.

 

Jo-Anne is Director of the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment.  She completed a six-year term as Head of the Department of Education, has been Standing Adviser to the House of Commons Education Select Committee, a member of Ofqual’s Standing Advisory Group on Standards, Chair of the National Reference Test Expert Group, and a member of the Welsh Government’s Curriculum and Assessment Group.  Before coming to Oxford, Jo-Anne held academic posts at the Institute of Education, University of London and the University of Bristol. Her first degree and doctorate were in psychology and she has an MBA.  Her current research projects include Setting and Maintaining Standards in national examinations, Examination reform: the impact of modular and linear examinations at GCSE, Assessment for Learning in Africa (AFLA), intelligent accountability and the Progress in International Reading Literacy Study England national centre.

Her research interests are in educational assessment, including system-wide structures and processes, examination standards, marking and assessment design.  Jo-Anne conducts a lot of work with government and industry partners, including acting as the Standing Adviser to the House of Commons Education Select Committee, a member of Ofqual’s Standing Advisory Group and membership of the Welsh Government’s Curriculum and Assessment Group.  She is a member of the Editorial Board of the Oxford Review of Education journal and the International Advisory Board of Assessment in Education: principles, policy & practice.  She has been a Visiting Professor at the universities of Bergen and Queen’s (Belfast).  From 2013 to 2015 she was President of the Association for Educational Assessment – Europe.

Qualifications
  • B.A.H. Linguistics/Psychology – Queen’s University, Kingston On, Canada
  • M.A. Educational Psychology – McGill University, Canada
  • Ph.D. – Second Language Education – McGill University Canada

Victoria Murphy would welcome informal contacts from prospective doctoral students interested in the following topics:

  • Language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/ Language Minority) children
  • Child L2 and bilingualism
  • Foreign language learning in primary school
  • Lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Research

Victoria is active in the following research areas, and would welcome DPhil applications on any of these, particularly those relating to EAL (language minority) children and child L2 learning and foreign language learning in primary school.  She is also the convenor of the Research in English as an Additional Language (REAL) group.  Her research is currently being funded by the ESRC, Leverhulme Trust and Nuffield Foundation.

  • language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/Language minority) children
  • child L2 learning and bilingualism
  • foreign language learning in primary school
  • cognitive processes underlying L1 and L2 learning
  • lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Current Research Project(s)

Joanna is a Doctoral Student, and ESRC Grand Union DTP Scholar, researching in-class support for multilingualism in UK schools.

She has over 12 years of experience as a teaching professional, having worked as a class teacher, EAL specialist and Teaching Assistant in the UK, China, Brazil and Italy. Her main area of interest is school-based education (3-18), specifically the support for multilingual pupils and their language practices, as well as the relationship between teaching assistants and both teachers and children in schools.

Joanna holds a BA in Jurisprudence and a MSc in Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching, both from the University of Oxford. She also has a PGCE, and a PGDip in French.

Joining the Department of Education in 2020 after teaching English and foreign languages in secondary schools and early years settings for 15 years, Catherine completed the MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition in 2021. Her doctoral research investigates the effectiveness of using songs as pedagogical tools with young second language learners in formal educational settings.

Additionally, Catherine hosts The Language Revolution podcast, exploring how linguistics and language awareness might inform/transform languages teaching with guests including Michael Rosen and David Crystal. She also project manages the annual conference for NALDIC, the national subject association for EAL.

Publications

Multilingual is Normal: An anthology of voices, talking about talking (2020)

Renyu completed her BA degree in Psychology at the University of British Columbia (Vancouver, Canada) and her MPhil degree in Education at University of Cambridge.

During her MPhil study, she worked with children aged 4 to 6 years to investigate the relationship between bilingualism, vocabulary size, and inhibitory control, and also to validate a novel app designed to assess early language development. For her Dphil study at Oxford, Renyu aims to explore the factors that might affect L2 pronunciation learning in young children and the interaction between children’s L1 and L2. She is particularly interested in the psychological factors that might influence a child’s L2 pronunciation.

Prior to studying at Oxford, Renyu worked as Research Assistant at the Assessment Research Group at British Council for one year and a half. She was involved in various projects, including gap analysis on reading demand and reading ability, participant feedback questionnaire design and analysis, design and recruitment for a new EAP task study, etc.

Bernard holds a PhD in Marketing from the University of Nottingham and a DBA from the University of Newcastle.

His research to date explores the leadership in HE. Prior to coming to Oxford, he worked in various HEIs and served as the supervisor of a secondary school.

Publications

Lee, B., Tsui, A. & Yau, O.H.M. (2019), Higher-order Goals, Trust-in-leader, and Self-efficacy as Moderators of Transformational Leadership Performance: The Case of Multi-level Marketing Organizations in China, Journal of Euromarketing, Vol.28 (3-4), 76-97. (2011 RG Impact factor: 0.83).

Conferences

Lee, B. (2020), “Self-formation for the Underprivileged,” 2020 International Online Symposium, Toward a New Paradigm of Economics,organized by Macau Ricci Institute, The University of Saint Joseph, 15 & 16 October. (Online Conference Platform Presentation).

Steve is Associate Professor of Teacher Education. He is a curriculum tutor for the Geography PGCE and MSc Learning and Teaching.

Steve is a qualified geography teacher and was previously the head of department at a comprehensive secondary school in Oxfordshire, and Head of Programmes at Bishop Grosseteste University, Lincoln.

He holds an MA in Educational Leadership and Innovation from Warwick University, an MSc in Educational Research Methodology and DPhil in Education from the University of Oxford which were funded by an ESRC Studentship. He is a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

He researches at the intersection between the academic discipline and school subject of geography, including recent collaborations developing through the Smart Cities Network for Sustainable Urban Future project which was shortlisted for the 2017 Newton Prize (India). He is currently leading research on Climate Change Education Futures in India (GCRF) in collaboration with colleagues at IISER, Pune, and on the role of cultural heritage in curriculum making in Kolkata.

Collaborations with colleagues in the School of Geography and the Environment are contributing to anti-racist curriculum futures, including in the school subject, and in postgraduate teaching through the TDEP-funded Oxford-UNISA course ‘Decolonising Research Methods’.

His research on teacher education focuses on the contribution that geography education research offers to the conceptualisation and practice of teaching. This work includes ethnographic research on teachers’ curriculum making exploring the journeys through which information travels into school classrooms, beginning teachers’ experiences of school subject departments, and the role of written lesson observation feedback in constructing ‘good teaching’.

Steve serves on the editorial board of the journal Geography, and is Chair of the Geography Education Research Collective (GEReCo/IGU-CGE).

 

Caitlin is a Doctoral student in the Department of Education working on how teachers interact with refugee and unaccompanied asylum-seeking pupils in UK schools.

Her Doctoral study uses survey data, interviews, observation, and document analysis to examine teacher knowledge, attitudes, and practices in relation to refugee pupils. Previously, Caitlin worked as a primary school teacher in Aberdeen, London, and at Rose Hill Primary School in Oxford. She completed an MA (Gaelic Medium Education, Oral History) and a PGDE (Primary Education) at the University of Aberdeen, and a BA (Human Geography, Environmental Studies) at Middlebury College in the US. She has a general interest in improving inclusion and equity in education.

Helen’s academic interest in higher education policy developed from more than 20 years of professional experience of university administration – in public relations and admissions.

She gained her doctorate from Oxford in 2010 (a study of the market created by the introduction of £3000 fees for Home/EU undergraduates at English universities in 2006); since then, she has conducted research into the impacts of student fees and funding on institutions, students, graduates and applicants within the higher education sector in England. She also works as a consultant to higher education institutions.

Helen was Pathway Convenor for the MSc Education (HE) for two years and has taught on this course since completing her DPhil. As an inspector for the British Accreditation Council, Helen has the opportunity to gain insights into the operation of higher education providers globally. She is also an Associate of the SKOPE, the department’s research centre for Skills, Knowledge and Organisational Performance.

From 2012-17, Helen was a member of the governing council of the Society for Research into Higher Education (SRHE), serving as Vice-Chair from 2014-17.

 

Jo-Anne is Director of the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment.  She completed a six-year term as Head of the Department of Education, has been Standing Adviser to the House of Commons Education Select Committee, a member of Ofqual’s Standing Advisory Group on Standards, Chair of the National Reference Test Expert Group, and a member of the Welsh Government’s Curriculum and Assessment Group.  Before coming to Oxford, Jo-Anne held academic posts at the Institute of Education, University of London and the University of Bristol. Her first degree and doctorate were in psychology and she has an MBA.  Her current research projects include Setting and Maintaining Standards in national examinations, Examination reform: the impact of modular and linear examinations at GCSE, Assessment for Learning in Africa (AFLA), intelligent accountability and the Progress in International Reading Literacy Study England national centre.

Her research interests are in educational assessment, including system-wide structures and processes, examination standards, marking and assessment design.  Jo-Anne conducts a lot of work with government and industry partners, including acting as the Standing Adviser to the House of Commons Education Select Committee, a member of Ofqual’s Standing Advisory Group and membership of the Welsh Government’s Curriculum and Assessment Group.  She is a member of the Editorial Board of the Oxford Review of Education journal and the International Advisory Board of Assessment in Education: principles, policy & practice.  She has been a Visiting Professor at the universities of Bergen and Queen’s (Belfast).  From 2013 to 2015 she was President of the Association for Educational Assessment – Europe.

Qualifications
  • B.A.H. Linguistics/Psychology – Queen’s University, Kingston On, Canada
  • M.A. Educational Psychology – McGill University, Canada
  • Ph.D. – Second Language Education – McGill University Canada

Victoria Murphy would welcome informal contacts from prospective doctoral students interested in the following topics:

  • Language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/ Language Minority) children
  • Child L2 and bilingualism
  • Foreign language learning in primary school
  • Lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Research

Victoria is active in the following research areas, and would welcome DPhil applications on any of these, particularly those relating to EAL (language minority) children and child L2 learning and foreign language learning in primary school.  She is also the convenor of the Research in English as an Additional Language (REAL) group.  Her research is currently being funded by the ESRC, Leverhulme Trust and Nuffield Foundation.

  • language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/Language minority) children
  • child L2 learning and bilingualism
  • foreign language learning in primary school
  • cognitive processes underlying L1 and L2 learning
  • lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Current Research Project(s)

Joanna is a Doctoral Student, and ESRC Grand Union DTP Scholar, researching in-class support for multilingualism in UK schools.

She has over 12 years of experience as a teaching professional, having worked as a class teacher, EAL specialist and Teaching Assistant in the UK, China, Brazil and Italy. Her main area of interest is school-based education (3-18), specifically the support for multilingual pupils and their language practices, as well as the relationship between teaching assistants and both teachers and children in schools.

Joanna holds a BA in Jurisprudence and a MSc in Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching, both from the University of Oxford. She also has a PGCE, and a PGDip in French.

Joining the Department of Education in 2020 after teaching English and foreign languages in secondary schools and early years settings for 15 years, Catherine completed the MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition in 2021. Her doctoral research investigates the effectiveness of using songs as pedagogical tools with young second language learners in formal educational settings.

Additionally, Catherine hosts The Language Revolution podcast, exploring how linguistics and language awareness might inform/transform languages teaching with guests including Michael Rosen and David Crystal. She also project manages the annual conference for NALDIC, the national subject association for EAL.

Publications

Multilingual is Normal: An anthology of voices, talking about talking (2020)

Renyu completed her BA degree in Psychology at the University of British Columbia (Vancouver, Canada) and her MPhil degree in Education at University of Cambridge.

During her MPhil study, she worked with children aged 4 to 6 years to investigate the relationship between bilingualism, vocabulary size, and inhibitory control, and also to validate a novel app designed to assess early language development. For her Dphil study at Oxford, Renyu aims to explore the factors that might affect L2 pronunciation learning in young children and the interaction between children’s L1 and L2. She is particularly interested in the psychological factors that might influence a child’s L2 pronunciation.

Prior to studying at Oxford, Renyu worked as Research Assistant at the Assessment Research Group at British Council for one year and a half. She was involved in various projects, including gap analysis on reading demand and reading ability, participant feedback questionnaire design and analysis, design and recruitment for a new EAP task study, etc.

Bernard holds a PhD in Marketing from the University of Nottingham and a DBA from the University of Newcastle.

His research to date explores the leadership in HE. Prior to coming to Oxford, he worked in various HEIs and served as the supervisor of a secondary school.

Publications

Lee, B., Tsui, A. & Yau, O.H.M. (2019), Higher-order Goals, Trust-in-leader, and Self-efficacy as Moderators of Transformational Leadership Performance: The Case of Multi-level Marketing Organizations in China, Journal of Euromarketing, Vol.28 (3-4), 76-97. (2011 RG Impact factor: 0.83).

Conferences

Lee, B. (2020), “Self-formation for the Underprivileged,” 2020 International Online Symposium, Toward a New Paradigm of Economics,organized by Macau Ricci Institute, The University of Saint Joseph, 15 & 16 October. (Online Conference Platform Presentation).

Steve is Associate Professor of Teacher Education. He is a curriculum tutor for the Geography PGCE and MSc Learning and Teaching.

Steve is a qualified geography teacher and was previously the head of department at a comprehensive secondary school in Oxfordshire, and Head of Programmes at Bishop Grosseteste University, Lincoln.

He holds an MA in Educational Leadership and Innovation from Warwick University, an MSc in Educational Research Methodology and DPhil in Education from the University of Oxford which were funded by an ESRC Studentship. He is a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

He researches at the intersection between the academic discipline and school subject of geography, including recent collaborations developing through the Smart Cities Network for Sustainable Urban Future project which was shortlisted for the 2017 Newton Prize (India). He is currently leading research on Climate Change Education Futures in India (GCRF) in collaboration with colleagues at IISER, Pune, and on the role of cultural heritage in curriculum making in Kolkata.

Collaborations with colleagues in the School of Geography and the Environment are contributing to anti-racist curriculum futures, including in the school subject, and in postgraduate teaching through the TDEP-funded Oxford-UNISA course ‘Decolonising Research Methods’.

His research on teacher education focuses on the contribution that geography education research offers to the conceptualisation and practice of teaching. This work includes ethnographic research on teachers’ curriculum making exploring the journeys through which information travels into school classrooms, beginning teachers’ experiences of school subject departments, and the role of written lesson observation feedback in constructing ‘good teaching’.

Steve serves on the editorial board of the journal Geography, and is Chair of the Geography Education Research Collective (GEReCo/IGU-CGE).

 

Caitlin is a Doctoral student in the Department of Education working on how teachers interact with refugee and unaccompanied asylum-seeking pupils in UK schools.

Her Doctoral study uses survey data, interviews, observation, and document analysis to examine teacher knowledge, attitudes, and practices in relation to refugee pupils. Previously, Caitlin worked as a primary school teacher in Aberdeen, London, and at Rose Hill Primary School in Oxford. She completed an MA (Gaelic Medium Education, Oral History) and a PGDE (Primary Education) at the University of Aberdeen, and a BA (Human Geography, Environmental Studies) at Middlebury College in the US. She has a general interest in improving inclusion and equity in education.

Helen’s academic interest in higher education policy developed from more than 20 years of professional experience of university administration – in public relations and admissions.

She gained her doctorate from Oxford in 2010 (a study of the market created by the introduction of £3000 fees for Home/EU undergraduates at English universities in 2006); since then, she has conducted research into the impacts of student fees and funding on institutions, students, graduates and applicants within the higher education sector in England. She also works as a consultant to higher education institutions.

Helen was Pathway Convenor for the MSc Education (HE) for two years and has taught on this course since completing her DPhil. As an inspector for the British Accreditation Council, Helen has the opportunity to gain insights into the operation of higher education providers globally. She is also an Associate of the SKOPE, the department’s research centre for Skills, Knowledge and Organisational Performance.

From 2012-17, Helen was a member of the governing council of the Society for Research into Higher Education (SRHE), serving as Vice-Chair from 2014-17.

 

Jo-Anne is Director of the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment.  She completed a six-year term as Head of the Department of Education, has been Standing Adviser to the House of Commons Education Select Committee, a member of Ofqual’s Standing Advisory Group on Standards, Chair of the National Reference Test Expert Group, and a member of the Welsh Government’s Curriculum and Assessment Group.  Before coming to Oxford, Jo-Anne held academic posts at the Institute of Education, University of London and the University of Bristol. Her first degree and doctorate were in psychology and she has an MBA.  Her current research projects include Setting and Maintaining Standards in national examinations, Examination reform: the impact of modular and linear examinations at GCSE, Assessment for Learning in Africa (AFLA), intelligent accountability and the Progress in International Reading Literacy Study England national centre.

Her research interests are in educational assessment, including system-wide structures and processes, examination standards, marking and assessment design.  Jo-Anne conducts a lot of work with government and industry partners, including acting as the Standing Adviser to the House of Commons Education Select Committee, a member of Ofqual’s Standing Advisory Group and membership of the Welsh Government’s Curriculum and Assessment Group.  She is a member of the Editorial Board of the Oxford Review of Education journal and the International Advisory Board of Assessment in Education: principles, policy & practice.  She has been a Visiting Professor at the universities of Bergen and Queen’s (Belfast).  From 2013 to 2015 she was President of the Association for Educational Assessment – Europe.

Qualifications
  • B.A.H. Linguistics/Psychology – Queen’s University, Kingston On, Canada
  • M.A. Educational Psychology – McGill University, Canada
  • Ph.D. – Second Language Education – McGill University Canada

Victoria Murphy would welcome informal contacts from prospective doctoral students interested in the following topics:

  • Language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/ Language Minority) children
  • Child L2 and bilingualism
  • Foreign language learning in primary school
  • Lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Research

Victoria is active in the following research areas, and would welcome DPhil applications on any of these, particularly those relating to EAL (language minority) children and child L2 learning and foreign language learning in primary school.  She is also the convenor of the Research in English as an Additional Language (REAL) group.  Her research is currently being funded by the ESRC, Leverhulme Trust and Nuffield Foundation.

  • language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/Language minority) children
  • child L2 learning and bilingualism
  • foreign language learning in primary school
  • cognitive processes underlying L1 and L2 learning
  • lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Current Research Project(s)

Joanna is a Doctoral Student, and ESRC Grand Union DTP Scholar, researching in-class support for multilingualism in UK schools.

She has over 12 years of experience as a teaching professional, having worked as a class teacher, EAL specialist and Teaching Assistant in the UK, China, Brazil and Italy. Her main area of interest is school-based education (3-18), specifically the support for multilingual pupils and their language practices, as well as the relationship between teaching assistants and both teachers and children in schools.

Joanna holds a BA in Jurisprudence and a MSc in Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching, both from the University of Oxford. She also has a PGCE, and a PGDip in French.

Joining the Department of Education in 2020 after teaching English and foreign languages in secondary schools and early years settings for 15 years, Catherine completed the MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition in 2021. Her doctoral research investigates the effectiveness of using songs as pedagogical tools with young second language learners in formal educational settings.

Additionally, Catherine hosts The Language Revolution podcast, exploring how linguistics and language awareness might inform/transform languages teaching with guests including Michael Rosen and David Crystal. She also project manages the annual conference for NALDIC, the national subject association for EAL.

Publications

Multilingual is Normal: An anthology of voices, talking about talking (2020)

Renyu completed her BA degree in Psychology at the University of British Columbia (Vancouver, Canada) and her MPhil degree in Education at University of Cambridge.

During her MPhil study, she worked with children aged 4 to 6 years to investigate the relationship between bilingualism, vocabulary size, and inhibitory control, and also to validate a novel app designed to assess early language development. For her Dphil study at Oxford, Renyu aims to explore the factors that might affect L2 pronunciation learning in young children and the interaction between children’s L1 and L2. She is particularly interested in the psychological factors that might influence a child’s L2 pronunciation.

Prior to studying at Oxford, Renyu worked as Research Assistant at the Assessment Research Group at British Council for one year and a half. She was involved in various projects, including gap analysis on reading demand and reading ability, participant feedback questionnaire design and analysis, design and recruitment for a new EAP task study, etc.

Bernard holds a PhD in Marketing from the University of Nottingham and a DBA from the University of Newcastle.

His research to date explores the leadership in HE. Prior to coming to Oxford, he worked in various HEIs and served as the supervisor of a secondary school.

Publications

Lee, B., Tsui, A. & Yau, O.H.M. (2019), Higher-order Goals, Trust-in-leader, and Self-efficacy as Moderators of Transformational Leadership Performance: The Case of Multi-level Marketing Organizations in China, Journal of Euromarketing, Vol.28 (3-4), 76-97. (2011 RG Impact factor: 0.83).

Conferences

Lee, B. (2020), “Self-formation for the Underprivileged,” 2020 International Online Symposium, Toward a New Paradigm of Economics,organized by Macau Ricci Institute, The University of Saint Joseph, 15 & 16 October. (Online Conference Platform Presentation).

Steve is Associate Professor of Teacher Education. He is a curriculum tutor for the Geography PGCE and MSc Learning and Teaching.

Steve is a qualified geography teacher and was previously the head of department at a comprehensive secondary school in Oxfordshire, and Head of Programmes at Bishop Grosseteste University, Lincoln.

He holds an MA in Educational Leadership and Innovation from Warwick University, an MSc in Educational Research Methodology and DPhil in Education from the University of Oxford which were funded by an ESRC Studentship. He is a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

He researches at the intersection between the academic discipline and school subject of geography, including recent collaborations developing through the Smart Cities Network for Sustainable Urban Future project which was shortlisted for the 2017 Newton Prize (India). He is currently leading research on Climate Change Education Futures in India (GCRF) in collaboration with colleagues at IISER, Pune, and on the role of cultural heritage in curriculum making in Kolkata.

Collaborations with colleagues in the School of Geography and the Environment are contributing to anti-racist curriculum futures, including in the school subject, and in postgraduate teaching through the TDEP-funded Oxford-UNISA course ‘Decolonising Research Methods’.

His research on teacher education focuses on the contribution that geography education research offers to the conceptualisation and practice of teaching. This work includes ethnographic research on teachers’ curriculum making exploring the journeys through which information travels into school classrooms, beginning teachers’ experiences of school subject departments, and the role of written lesson observation feedback in constructing ‘good teaching’.

Steve serves on the editorial board of the journal Geography, and is Chair of the Geography Education Research Collective (GEReCo/IGU-CGE).

 

Caitlin is a Doctoral student in the Department of Education working on how teachers interact with refugee and unaccompanied asylum-seeking pupils in UK schools.

Her Doctoral study uses survey data, interviews, observation, and document analysis to examine teacher knowledge, attitudes, and practices in relation to refugee pupils. Previously, Caitlin worked as a primary school teacher in Aberdeen, London, and at Rose Hill Primary School in Oxford. She completed an MA (Gaelic Medium Education, Oral History) and a PGDE (Primary Education) at the University of Aberdeen, and a BA (Human Geography, Environmental Studies) at Middlebury College in the US. She has a general interest in improving inclusion and equity in education.

Helen’s academic interest in higher education policy developed from more than 20 years of professional experience of university administration – in public relations and admissions.

She gained her doctorate from Oxford in 2010 (a study of the market created by the introduction of £3000 fees for Home/EU undergraduates at English universities in 2006); since then, she has conducted research into the impacts of student fees and funding on institutions, students, graduates and applicants within the higher education sector in England. She also works as a consultant to higher education institutions.

Helen was Pathway Convenor for the MSc Education (HE) for two years and has taught on this course since completing her DPhil. As an inspector for the British Accreditation Council, Helen has the opportunity to gain insights into the operation of higher education providers globally. She is also an Associate of the SKOPE, the department’s research centre for Skills, Knowledge and Organisational Performance.

From 2012-17, Helen was a member of the governing council of the Society for Research into Higher Education (SRHE), serving as Vice-Chair from 2014-17.

 

Jo-Anne is Director of the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment.  She completed a six-year term as Head of the Department of Education, has been Standing Adviser to the House of Commons Education Select Committee, a member of Ofqual’s Standing Advisory Group on Standards, Chair of the National Reference Test Expert Group, and a member of the Welsh Government’s Curriculum and Assessment Group.  Before coming to Oxford, Jo-Anne held academic posts at the Institute of Education, University of London and the University of Bristol. Her first degree and doctorate were in psychology and she has an MBA.  Her current research projects include Setting and Maintaining Standards in national examinations, Examination reform: the impact of modular and linear examinations at GCSE, Assessment for Learning in Africa (AFLA), intelligent accountability and the Progress in International Reading Literacy Study England national centre.

Her research interests are in educational assessment, including system-wide structures and processes, examination standards, marking and assessment design.  Jo-Anne conducts a lot of work with government and industry partners, including acting as the Standing Adviser to the House of Commons Education Select Committee, a member of Ofqual’s Standing Advisory Group and membership of the Welsh Government’s Curriculum and Assessment Group.  She is a member of the Editorial Board of the Oxford Review of Education journal and the International Advisory Board of Assessment in Education: principles, policy & practice.  She has been a Visiting Professor at the universities of Bergen and Queen’s (Belfast).  From 2013 to 2015 she was President of the Association for Educational Assessment – Europe.

Qualifications
  • B.A.H. Linguistics/Psychology – Queen’s University, Kingston On, Canada
  • M.A. Educational Psychology – McGill University, Canada
  • Ph.D. – Second Language Education – McGill University Canada

Victoria Murphy would welcome informal contacts from prospective doctoral students interested in the following topics:

  • Language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/ Language Minority) children
  • Child L2 and bilingualism
  • Foreign language learning in primary school
  • Lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Research

Victoria is active in the following research areas, and would welcome DPhil applications on any of these, particularly those relating to EAL (language minority) children and child L2 learning and foreign language learning in primary school.  She is also the convenor of the Research in English as an Additional Language (REAL) group.  Her research is currently being funded by the ESRC, Leverhulme Trust and Nuffield Foundation.

  • language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/Language minority) children
  • child L2 learning and bilingualism
  • foreign language learning in primary school
  • cognitive processes underlying L1 and L2 learning
  • lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Current Research Project(s)

Joanna is a Doctoral Student, and ESRC Grand Union DTP Scholar, researching in-class support for multilingualism in UK schools.

She has over 12 years of experience as a teaching professional, having worked as a class teacher, EAL specialist and Teaching Assistant in the UK, China, Brazil and Italy. Her main area of interest is school-based education (3-18), specifically the support for multilingual pupils and their language practices, as well as the relationship between teaching assistants and both teachers and children in schools.

Joanna holds a BA in Jurisprudence and a MSc in Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching, both from the University of Oxford. She also has a PGCE, and a PGDip in French.

Joining the Department of Education in 2020 after teaching English and foreign languages in secondary schools and early years settings for 15 years, Catherine completed the MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition in 2021. Her doctoral research investigates the effectiveness of using songs as pedagogical tools with young second language learners in formal educational settings.

Additionally, Catherine hosts The Language Revolution podcast, exploring how linguistics and language awareness might inform/transform languages teaching with guests including Michael Rosen and David Crystal. She also project manages the annual conference for NALDIC, the national subject association for EAL.

Publications

Multilingual is Normal: An anthology of voices, talking about talking (2020)

Renyu completed her BA degree in Psychology at the University of British Columbia (Vancouver, Canada) and her MPhil degree in Education at University of Cambridge.

During her MPhil study, she worked with children aged 4 to 6 years to investigate the relationship between bilingualism, vocabulary size, and inhibitory control, and also to validate a novel app designed to assess early language development. For her Dphil study at Oxford, Renyu aims to explore the factors that might affect L2 pronunciation learning in young children and the interaction between children’s L1 and L2. She is particularly interested in the psychological factors that might influence a child’s L2 pronunciation.

Prior to studying at Oxford, Renyu worked as Research Assistant at the Assessment Research Group at British Council for one year and a half. She was involved in various projects, including gap analysis on reading demand and reading ability, participant feedback questionnaire design and analysis, design and recruitment for a new EAP task study, etc.

Bernard holds a PhD in Marketing from the University of Nottingham and a DBA from the University of Newcastle.

His research to date explores the leadership in HE. Prior to coming to Oxford, he worked in various HEIs and served as the supervisor of a secondary school.

Publications

Lee, B., Tsui, A. & Yau, O.H.M. (2019), Higher-order Goals, Trust-in-leader, and Self-efficacy as Moderators of Transformational Leadership Performance: The Case of Multi-level Marketing Organizations in China, Journal of Euromarketing, Vol.28 (3-4), 76-97. (2011 RG Impact factor: 0.83).

Conferences

Lee, B. (2020), “Self-formation for the Underprivileged,” 2020 International Online Symposium, Toward a New Paradigm of Economics,organized by Macau Ricci Institute, The University of Saint Joseph, 15 & 16 October. (Online Conference Platform Presentation).

Steve is Associate Professor of Teacher Education. He is a curriculum tutor for the Geography PGCE and MSc Learning and Teaching.

Steve is a qualified geography teacher and was previously the head of department at a comprehensive secondary school in Oxfordshire, and Head of Programmes at Bishop Grosseteste University, Lincoln.

He holds an MA in Educational Leadership and Innovation from Warwick University, an MSc in Educational Research Methodology and DPhil in Education from the University of Oxford which were funded by an ESRC Studentship. He is a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

He researches at the intersection between the academic discipline and school subject of geography, including recent collaborations developing through the Smart Cities Network for Sustainable Urban Future project which was shortlisted for the 2017 Newton Prize (India). He is currently leading research on Climate Change Education Futures in India (GCRF) in collaboration with colleagues at IISER, Pune, and on the role of cultural heritage in curriculum making in Kolkata.

Collaborations with colleagues in the School of Geography and the Environment are contributing to anti-racist curriculum futures, including in the school subject, and in postgraduate teaching through the TDEP-funded Oxford-UNISA course ‘Decolonising Research Methods’.

His research on teacher education focuses on the contribution that geography education research offers to the conceptualisation and practice of teaching. This work includes ethnographic research on teachers’ curriculum making exploring the journeys through which information travels into school classrooms, beginning teachers’ experiences of school subject departments, and the role of written lesson observation feedback in constructing ‘good teaching’.

Steve serves on the editorial board of the journal Geography, and is Chair of the Geography Education Research Collective (GEReCo/IGU-CGE).

 

Caitlin is a Doctoral student in the Department of Education working on how teachers interact with refugee and unaccompanied asylum-seeking pupils in UK schools.

Her Doctoral study uses survey data, interviews, observation, and document analysis to examine teacher knowledge, attitudes, and practices in relation to refugee pupils. Previously, Caitlin worked as a primary school teacher in Aberdeen, London, and at Rose Hill Primary School in Oxford. She completed an MA (Gaelic Medium Education, Oral History) and a PGDE (Primary Education) at the University of Aberdeen, and a BA (Human Geography, Environmental Studies) at Middlebury College in the US. She has a general interest in improving inclusion and equity in education.

Helen’s academic interest in higher education policy developed from more than 20 years of professional experience of university administration – in public relations and admissions.

She gained her doctorate from Oxford in 2010 (a study of the market created by the introduction of £3000 fees for Home/EU undergraduates at English universities in 2006); since then, she has conducted research into the impacts of student fees and funding on institutions, students, graduates and applicants within the higher education sector in England. She also works as a consultant to higher education institutions.

Helen was Pathway Convenor for the MSc Education (HE) for two years and has taught on this course since completing her DPhil. As an inspector for the British Accreditation Council, Helen has the opportunity to gain insights into the operation of higher education providers globally. She is also an Associate of the SKOPE, the department’s research centre for Skills, Knowledge and Organisational Performance.

From 2012-17, Helen was a member of the governing council of the Society for Research into Higher Education (SRHE), serving as Vice-Chair from 2014-17.

 

Jo-Anne is Director of the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment.  She completed a six-year term as Head of the Department of Education, has been Standing Adviser to the House of Commons Education Select Committee, a member of Ofqual’s Standing Advisory Group on Standards, Chair of the National Reference Test Expert Group, and a member of the Welsh Government’s Curriculum and Assessment Group.  Before coming to Oxford, Jo-Anne held academic posts at the Institute of Education, University of London and the University of Bristol. Her first degree and doctorate were in psychology and she has an MBA.  Her current research projects include Setting and Maintaining Standards in national examinations, Examination reform: the impact of modular and linear examinations at GCSE, Assessment for Learning in Africa (AFLA), intelligent accountability and the Progress in International Reading Literacy Study England national centre.

Her research interests are in educational assessment, including system-wide structures and processes, examination standards, marking and assessment design.  Jo-Anne conducts a lot of work with government and industry partners, including acting as the Standing Adviser to the House of Commons Education Select Committee, a member of Ofqual’s Standing Advisory Group and membership of the Welsh Government’s Curriculum and Assessment Group.  She is a member of the Editorial Board of the Oxford Review of Education journal and the International Advisory Board of Assessment in Education: principles, policy & practice.  She has been a Visiting Professor at the universities of Bergen and Queen’s (Belfast).  From 2013 to 2015 she was President of the Association for Educational Assessment – Europe.

Qualifications
  • B.A.H. Linguistics/Psychology – Queen’s University, Kingston On, Canada
  • M.A. Educational Psychology – McGill University, Canada
  • Ph.D. – Second Language Education – McGill University Canada

Victoria Murphy would welcome informal contacts from prospective doctoral students interested in the following topics:

  • Language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/ Language Minority) children
  • Child L2 and bilingualism
  • Foreign language learning in primary school
  • Lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Research

Victoria is active in the following research areas, and would welcome DPhil applications on any of these, particularly those relating to EAL (language minority) children and child L2 learning and foreign language learning in primary school.  She is also the convenor of the Research in English as an Additional Language (REAL) group.  Her research is currently being funded by the ESRC, Leverhulme Trust and Nuffield Foundation.

  • language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/Language minority) children
  • child L2 learning and bilingualism
  • foreign language learning in primary school
  • cognitive processes underlying L1 and L2 learning
  • lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Current Research Project(s)

Joanna is a Doctoral Student, and ESRC Grand Union DTP Scholar, researching in-class support for multilingualism in UK schools.

She has over 12 years of experience as a teaching professional, having worked as a class teacher, EAL specialist and Teaching Assistant in the UK, China, Brazil and Italy. Her main area of interest is school-based education (3-18), specifically the support for multilingual pupils and their language practices, as well as the relationship between teaching assistants and both teachers and children in schools.

Joanna holds a BA in Jurisprudence and a MSc in Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching, both from the University of Oxford. She also has a PGCE, and a PGDip in French.

Joining the Department of Education in 2020 after teaching English and foreign languages in secondary schools and early years settings for 15 years, Catherine completed the MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition in 2021. Her doctoral research investigates the effectiveness of using songs as pedagogical tools with young second language learners in formal educational settings.

Additionally, Catherine hosts The Language Revolution podcast, exploring how linguistics and language awareness might inform/transform languages teaching with guests including Michael Rosen and David Crystal. She also project manages the annual conference for NALDIC, the national subject association for EAL.

Publications

Multilingual is Normal: An anthology of voices, talking about talking (2020)

Renyu completed her BA degree in Psychology at the University of British Columbia (Vancouver, Canada) and her MPhil degree in Education at University of Cambridge.

During her MPhil study, she worked with children aged 4 to 6 years to investigate the relationship between bilingualism, vocabulary size, and inhibitory control, and also to validate a novel app designed to assess early language development. For her Dphil study at Oxford, Renyu aims to explore the factors that might affect L2 pronunciation learning in young children and the interaction between children’s L1 and L2. She is particularly interested in the psychological factors that might influence a child’s L2 pronunciation.

Prior to studying at Oxford, Renyu worked as Research Assistant at the Assessment Research Group at British Council for one year and a half. She was involved in various projects, including gap analysis on reading demand and reading ability, participant feedback questionnaire design and analysis, design and recruitment for a new EAP task study, etc.

Bernard holds a PhD in Marketing from the University of Nottingham and a DBA from the University of Newcastle.

His research to date explores the leadership in HE. Prior to coming to Oxford, he worked in various HEIs and served as the supervisor of a secondary school.

Publications

Lee, B., Tsui, A. & Yau, O.H.M. (2019), Higher-order Goals, Trust-in-leader, and Self-efficacy as Moderators of Transformational Leadership Performance: The Case of Multi-level Marketing Organizations in China, Journal of Euromarketing, Vol.28 (3-4), 76-97. (2011 RG Impact factor: 0.83).

Conferences

Lee, B. (2020), “Self-formation for the Underprivileged,” 2020 International Online Symposium, Toward a New Paradigm of Economics,organized by Macau Ricci Institute, The University of Saint Joseph, 15 & 16 October. (Online Conference Platform Presentation).

Steve is Associate Professor of Teacher Education. He is a curriculum tutor for the Geography PGCE and MSc Learning and Teaching.

Steve is a qualified geography teacher and was previously the head of department at a comprehensive secondary school in Oxfordshire, and Head of Programmes at Bishop Grosseteste University, Lincoln.

He holds an MA in Educational Leadership and Innovation from Warwick University, an MSc in Educational Research Methodology and DPhil in Education from the University of Oxford which were funded by an ESRC Studentship. He is a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

He researches at the intersection between the academic discipline and school subject of geography, including recent collaborations developing through the Smart Cities Network for Sustainable Urban Future project which was shortlisted for the 2017 Newton Prize (India). He is currently leading research on Climate Change Education Futures in India (GCRF) in collaboration with colleagues at IISER, Pune, and on the role of cultural heritage in curriculum making in Kolkata.

Collaborations with colleagues in the School of Geography and the Environment are contributing to anti-racist curriculum futures, including in the school subject, and in postgraduate teaching through the TDEP-funded Oxford-UNISA course ‘Decolonising Research Methods’.

His research on teacher education focuses on the contribution that geography education research offers to the conceptualisation and practice of teaching. This work includes ethnographic research on teachers’ curriculum making exploring the journeys through which information travels into school classrooms, beginning teachers’ experiences of school subject departments, and the role of written lesson observation feedback in constructing ‘good teaching’.

Steve serves on the editorial board of the journal Geography, and is Chair of the Geography Education Research Collective (GEReCo/IGU-CGE).

 

Caitlin is a Doctoral student in the Department of Education working on how teachers interact with refugee and unaccompanied asylum-seeking pupils in UK schools.

Her Doctoral study uses survey data, interviews, observation, and document analysis to examine teacher knowledge, attitudes, and practices in relation to refugee pupils. Previously, Caitlin worked as a primary school teacher in Aberdeen, London, and at Rose Hill Primary School in Oxford. She completed an MA (Gaelic Medium Education, Oral History) and a PGDE (Primary Education) at the University of Aberdeen, and a BA (Human Geography, Environmental Studies) at Middlebury College in the US. She has a general interest in improving inclusion and equity in education.

Helen’s academic interest in higher education policy developed from more than 20 years of professional experience of university administration – in public relations and admissions.

She gained her doctorate from Oxford in 2010 (a study of the market created by the introduction of £3000 fees for Home/EU undergraduates at English universities in 2006); since then, she has conducted research into the impacts of student fees and funding on institutions, students, graduates and applicants within the higher education sector in England. She also works as a consultant to higher education institutions.

Helen was Pathway Convenor for the MSc Education (HE) for two years and has taught on this course since completing her DPhil. As an inspector for the British Accreditation Council, Helen has the opportunity to gain insights into the operation of higher education providers globally. She is also an Associate of the SKOPE, the department’s research centre for Skills, Knowledge and Organisational Performance.

From 2012-17, Helen was a member of the governing council of the Society for Research into Higher Education (SRHE), serving as Vice-Chair from 2014-17.

 

Jo-Anne is Director of the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment.  She completed a six-year term as Head of the Department of Education, has been Standing Adviser to the House of Commons Education Select Committee, a member of Ofqual’s Standing Advisory Group on Standards, Chair of the National Reference Test Expert Group, and a member of the Welsh Government’s Curriculum and Assessment Group.  Before coming to Oxford, Jo-Anne held academic posts at the Institute of Education, University of London and the University of Bristol. Her first degree and doctorate were in psychology and she has an MBA.  Her current research projects include Setting and Maintaining Standards in national examinations, Examination reform: the impact of modular and linear examinations at GCSE, Assessment for Learning in Africa (AFLA), intelligent accountability and the Progress in International Reading Literacy Study England national centre.

Her research interests are in educational assessment, including system-wide structures and processes, examination standards, marking and assessment design.  Jo-Anne conducts a lot of work with government and industry partners, including acting as the Standing Adviser to the House of Commons Education Select Committee, a member of Ofqual’s Standing Advisory Group and membership of the Welsh Government’s Curriculum and Assessment Group.  She is a member of the Editorial Board of the Oxford Review of Education journal and the International Advisory Board of Assessment in Education: principles, policy & practice.  She has been a Visiting Professor at the universities of Bergen and Queen’s (Belfast).  From 2013 to 2015 she was President of the Association for Educational Assessment – Europe.

Qualifications
  • B.A.H. Linguistics/Psychology – Queen’s University, Kingston On, Canada
  • M.A. Educational Psychology – McGill University, Canada
  • Ph.D. – Second Language Education – McGill University Canada

Victoria Murphy would welcome informal contacts from prospective doctoral students interested in the following topics:

  • Language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/ Language Minority) children
  • Child L2 and bilingualism
  • Foreign language learning in primary school
  • Lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Research

Victoria is active in the following research areas, and would welcome DPhil applications on any of these, particularly those relating to EAL (language minority) children and child L2 learning and foreign language learning in primary school.  She is also the convenor of the Research in English as an Additional Language (REAL) group.  Her research is currently being funded by the ESRC, Leverhulme Trust and Nuffield Foundation.

  • language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/Language minority) children
  • child L2 learning and bilingualism
  • foreign language learning in primary school
  • cognitive processes underlying L1 and L2 learning
  • lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Current Research Project(s)

Joanna is a Doctoral Student, and ESRC Grand Union DTP Scholar, researching in-class support for multilingualism in UK schools.

She has over 12 years of experience as a teaching professional, having worked as a class teacher, EAL specialist and Teaching Assistant in the UK, China, Brazil and Italy. Her main area of interest is school-based education (3-18), specifically the support for multilingual pupils and their language practices, as well as the relationship between teaching assistants and both teachers and children in schools.

Joanna holds a BA in Jurisprudence and a MSc in Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching, both from the University of Oxford. She also has a PGCE, and a PGDip in French.

Joining the Department of Education in 2020 after teaching English and foreign languages in secondary schools and early years settings for 15 years, Catherine completed the MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition in 2021. Her doctoral research investigates the effectiveness of using songs as pedagogical tools with young second language learners in formal educational settings.

Additionally, Catherine hosts The Language Revolution podcast, exploring how linguistics and language awareness might inform/transform languages teaching with guests including Michael Rosen and David Crystal. She also project manages the annual conference for NALDIC, the national subject association for EAL.

Publications

Multilingual is Normal: An anthology of voices, talking about talking (2020)

Renyu completed her BA degree in Psychology at the University of British Columbia (Vancouver, Canada) and her MPhil degree in Education at University of Cambridge.

During her MPhil study, she worked with children aged 4 to 6 years to investigate the relationship between bilingualism, vocabulary size, and inhibitory control, and also to validate a novel app designed to assess early language development. For her Dphil study at Oxford, Renyu aims to explore the factors that might affect L2 pronunciation learning in young children and the interaction between children’s L1 and L2. She is particularly interested in the psychological factors that might influence a child’s L2 pronunciation.

Prior to studying at Oxford, Renyu worked as Research Assistant at the Assessment Research Group at British Council for one year and a half. She was involved in various projects, including gap analysis on reading demand and reading ability, participant feedback questionnaire design and analysis, design and recruitment for a new EAP task study, etc.

Bernard holds a PhD in Marketing from the University of Nottingham and a DBA from the University of Newcastle.

His research to date explores the leadership in HE. Prior to coming to Oxford, he worked in various HEIs and served as the supervisor of a secondary school.

Publications

Lee, B., Tsui, A. & Yau, O.H.M. (2019), Higher-order Goals, Trust-in-leader, and Self-efficacy as Moderators of Transformational Leadership Performance: The Case of Multi-level Marketing Organizations in China, Journal of Euromarketing, Vol.28 (3-4), 76-97. (2011 RG Impact factor: 0.83).

Conferences

Lee, B. (2020), “Self-formation for the Underprivileged,” 2020 International Online Symposium, Toward a New Paradigm of Economics,organized by Macau Ricci Institute, The University of Saint Joseph, 15 & 16 October. (Online Conference Platform Presentation).

Steve is Associate Professor of Teacher Education. He is a curriculum tutor for the Geography PGCE and MSc Learning and Teaching.

Steve is a qualified geography teacher and was previously the head of department at a comprehensive secondary school in Oxfordshire, and Head of Programmes at Bishop Grosseteste University, Lincoln.

He holds an MA in Educational Leadership and Innovation from Warwick University, an MSc in Educational Research Methodology and DPhil in Education from the University of Oxford which were funded by an ESRC Studentship. He is a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

He researches at the intersection between the academic discipline and school subject of geography, including recent collaborations developing through the Smart Cities Network for Sustainable Urban Future project which was shortlisted for the 2017 Newton Prize (India). He is currently leading research on Climate Change Education Futures in India (GCRF) in collaboration with colleagues at IISER, Pune, and on the role of cultural heritage in curriculum making in Kolkata.

Collaborations with colleagues in the School of Geography and the Environment are contributing to anti-racist curriculum futures, including in the school subject, and in postgraduate teaching through the TDEP-funded Oxford-UNISA course ‘Decolonising Research Methods’.

His research on teacher education focuses on the contribution that geography education research offers to the conceptualisation and practice of teaching. This work includes ethnographic research on teachers’ curriculum making exploring the journeys through which information travels into school classrooms, beginning teachers’ experiences of school subject departments, and the role of written lesson observation feedback in constructing ‘good teaching’.

Steve serves on the editorial board of the journal Geography, and is Chair of the Geography Education Research Collective (GEReCo/IGU-CGE).

 

Caitlin is a Doctoral student in the Department of Education working on how teachers interact with refugee and unaccompanied asylum-seeking pupils in UK schools.

Her Doctoral study uses survey data, interviews, observation, and document analysis to examine teacher knowledge, attitudes, and practices in relation to refugee pupils. Previously, Caitlin worked as a primary school teacher in Aberdeen, London, and at Rose Hill Primary School in Oxford. She completed an MA (Gaelic Medium Education, Oral History) and a PGDE (Primary Education) at the University of Aberdeen, and a BA (Human Geography, Environmental Studies) at Middlebury College in the US. She has a general interest in improving inclusion and equity in education.

Helen’s academic interest in higher education policy developed from more than 20 years of professional experience of university administration – in public relations and admissions.

She gained her doctorate from Oxford in 2010 (a study of the market created by the introduction of £3000 fees for Home/EU undergraduates at English universities in 2006); since then, she has conducted research into the impacts of student fees and funding on institutions, students, graduates and applicants within the higher education sector in England. She also works as a consultant to higher education institutions.

Helen was Pathway Convenor for the MSc Education (HE) for two years and has taught on this course since completing her DPhil. As an inspector for the British Accreditation Council, Helen has the opportunity to gain insights into the operation of higher education providers globally. She is also an Associate of the SKOPE, the department’s research centre for Skills, Knowledge and Organisational Performance.

From 2012-17, Helen was a member of the governing council of the Society for Research into Higher Education (SRHE), serving as Vice-Chair from 2014-17.

 

Jo-Anne is Director of the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment.  She completed a six-year term as Head of the Department of Education, has been Standing Adviser to the House of Commons Education Select Committee, a member of Ofqual’s Standing Advisory Group on Standards, Chair of the National Reference Test Expert Group, and a member of the Welsh Government’s Curriculum and Assessment Group.  Before coming to Oxford, Jo-Anne held academic posts at the Institute of Education, University of London and the University of Bristol. Her first degree and doctorate were in psychology and she has an MBA.  Her current research projects include Setting and Maintaining Standards in national examinations, Examination reform: the impact of modular and linear examinations at GCSE, Assessment for Learning in Africa (AFLA), intelligent accountability and the Progress in International Reading Literacy Study England national centre.

Her research interests are in educational assessment, including system-wide structures and processes, examination standards, marking and assessment design.  Jo-Anne conducts a lot of work with government and industry partners, including acting as the Standing Adviser to the House of Commons Education Select Committee, a member of Ofqual’s Standing Advisory Group and membership of the Welsh Government’s Curriculum and Assessment Group.  She is a member of the Editorial Board of the Oxford Review of Education journal and the International Advisory Board of Assessment in Education: principles, policy & practice.  She has been a Visiting Professor at the universities of Bergen and Queen’s (Belfast).  From 2013 to 2015 she was President of the Association for Educational Assessment – Europe.

Qualifications
  • B.A.H. Linguistics/Psychology – Queen’s University, Kingston On, Canada
  • M.A. Educational Psychology – McGill University, Canada
  • Ph.D. – Second Language Education – McGill University Canada

Victoria Murphy would welcome informal contacts from prospective doctoral students interested in the following topics:

  • Language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/ Language Minority) children
  • Child L2 and bilingualism
  • Foreign language learning in primary school
  • Lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Research

Victoria is active in the following research areas, and would welcome DPhil applications on any of these, particularly those relating to EAL (language minority) children and child L2 learning and foreign language learning in primary school.  She is also the convenor of the Research in English as an Additional Language (REAL) group.  Her research is currently being funded by the ESRC, Leverhulme Trust and Nuffield Foundation.

  • language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/Language minority) children
  • child L2 learning and bilingualism
  • foreign language learning in primary school
  • cognitive processes underlying L1 and L2 learning
  • lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Current Research Project(s)

Joanna is a Doctoral Student, and ESRC Grand Union DTP Scholar, researching in-class support for multilingualism in UK schools.

She has over 12 years of experience as a teaching professional, having worked as a class teacher, EAL specialist and Teaching Assistant in the UK, China, Brazil and Italy. Her main area of interest is school-based education (3-18), specifically the support for multilingual pupils and their language practices, as well as the relationship between teaching assistants and both teachers and children in schools.

Joanna holds a BA in Jurisprudence and a MSc in Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching, both from the University of Oxford. She also has a PGCE, and a PGDip in French.

Joining the Department of Education in 2020 after teaching English and foreign languages in secondary schools and early years settings for 15 years, Catherine completed the MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition in 2021. Her doctoral research investigates the effectiveness of using songs as pedagogical tools with young second language learners in formal educational settings.

Additionally, Catherine hosts The Language Revolution podcast, exploring how linguistics and language awareness might inform/transform languages teaching with guests including Michael Rosen and David Crystal. She also project manages the annual conference for NALDIC, the national subject association for EAL.

Publications

Multilingual is Normal: An anthology of voices, talking about talking (2020)

Renyu completed her BA degree in Psychology at the University of British Columbia (Vancouver, Canada) and her MPhil degree in Education at University of Cambridge.

During her MPhil study, she worked with children aged 4 to 6 years to investigate the relationship between bilingualism, vocabulary size, and inhibitory control, and also to validate a novel app designed to assess early language development. For her Dphil study at Oxford, Renyu aims to explore the factors that might affect L2 pronunciation learning in young children and the interaction between children’s L1 and L2. She is particularly interested in the psychological factors that might influence a child’s L2 pronunciation.

Prior to studying at Oxford, Renyu worked as Research Assistant at the Assessment Research Group at British Council for one year and a half. She was involved in various projects, including gap analysis on reading demand and reading ability, participant feedback questionnaire design and analysis, design and recruitment for a new EAP task study, etc.

Bernard holds a PhD in Marketing from the University of Nottingham and a DBA from the University of Newcastle.

His research to date explores the leadership in HE. Prior to coming to Oxford, he worked in various HEIs and served as the supervisor of a secondary school.

Publications

Lee, B., Tsui, A. & Yau, O.H.M. (2019), Higher-order Goals, Trust-in-leader, and Self-efficacy as Moderators of Transformational Leadership Performance: The Case of Multi-level Marketing Organizations in China, Journal of Euromarketing, Vol.28 (3-4), 76-97. (2011 RG Impact factor: 0.83).

Conferences

Lee, B. (2020), “Self-formation for the Underprivileged,” 2020 International Online Symposium, Toward a New Paradigm of Economics,organized by Macau Ricci Institute, The University of Saint Joseph, 15 & 16 October. (Online Conference Platform Presentation).

Steve is Associate Professor of Teacher Education. He is a curriculum tutor for the Geography PGCE and MSc Learning and Teaching.

Steve is a qualified geography teacher and was previously the head of department at a comprehensive secondary school in Oxfordshire, and Head of Programmes at Bishop Grosseteste University, Lincoln.

He holds an MA in Educational Leadership and Innovation from Warwick University, an MSc in Educational Research Methodology and DPhil in Education from the University of Oxford which were funded by an ESRC Studentship. He is a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

He researches at the intersection between the academic discipline and school subject of geography, including recent collaborations developing through the Smart Cities Network for Sustainable Urban Future project which was shortlisted for the 2017 Newton Prize (India). He is currently leading research on Climate Change Education Futures in India (GCRF) in collaboration with colleagues at IISER, Pune, and on the role of cultural heritage in curriculum making in Kolkata.

Collaborations with colleagues in the School of Geography and the Environment are contributing to anti-racist curriculum futures, including in the school subject, and in postgraduate teaching through the TDEP-funded Oxford-UNISA course ‘Decolonising Research Methods’.

His research on teacher education focuses on the contribution that geography education research offers to the conceptualisation and practice of teaching. This work includes ethnographic research on teachers’ curriculum making exploring the journeys through which information travels into school classrooms, beginning teachers’ experiences of school subject departments, and the role of written lesson observation feedback in constructing ‘good teaching’.

Steve serves on the editorial board of the journal Geography, and is Chair of the Geography Education Research Collective (GEReCo/IGU-CGE).

 

Caitlin is a Doctoral student in the Department of Education working on how teachers interact with refugee and unaccompanied asylum-seeking pupils in UK schools.

Her Doctoral study uses survey data, interviews, observation, and document analysis to examine teacher knowledge, attitudes, and practices in relation to refugee pupils. Previously, Caitlin worked as a primary school teacher in Aberdeen, London, and at Rose Hill Primary School in Oxford. She completed an MA (Gaelic Medium Education, Oral History) and a PGDE (Primary Education) at the University of Aberdeen, and a BA (Human Geography, Environmental Studies) at Middlebury College in the US. She has a general interest in improving inclusion and equity in education.

Helen’s academic interest in higher education policy developed from more than 20 years of professional experience of university administration – in public relations and admissions.

She gained her doctorate from Oxford in 2010 (a study of the market created by the introduction of £3000 fees for Home/EU undergraduates at English universities in 2006); since then, she has conducted research into the impacts of student fees and funding on institutions, students, graduates and applicants within the higher education sector in England. She also works as a consultant to higher education institutions.

Helen was Pathway Convenor for the MSc Education (HE) for two years and has taught on this course since completing her DPhil. As an inspector for the British Accreditation Council, Helen has the opportunity to gain insights into the operation of higher education providers globally. She is also an Associate of the SKOPE, the department’s research centre for Skills, Knowledge and Organisational Performance.

From 2012-17, Helen was a member of the governing council of the Society for Research into Higher Education (SRHE), serving as Vice-Chair from 2014-17.

 

Jo-Anne is Director of the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment.  She completed a six-year term as Head of the Department of Education, has been Standing Adviser to the House of Commons Education Select Committee, a member of Ofqual’s Standing Advisory Group on Standards, Chair of the National Reference Test Expert Group, and a member of the Welsh Government’s Curriculum and Assessment Group.  Before coming to Oxford, Jo-Anne held academic posts at the Institute of Education, University of London and the University of Bristol. Her first degree and doctorate were in psychology and she has an MBA.  Her current research projects include Setting and Maintaining Standards in national examinations, Examination reform: the impact of modular and linear examinations at GCSE, Assessment for Learning in Africa (AFLA), intelligent accountability and the Progress in International Reading Literacy Study England national centre.

Her research interests are in educational assessment, including system-wide structures and processes, examination standards, marking and assessment design.  Jo-Anne conducts a lot of work with government and industry partners, including acting as the Standing Adviser to the House of Commons Education Select Committee, a member of Ofqual’s Standing Advisory Group and membership of the Welsh Government’s Curriculum and Assessment Group.  She is a member of the Editorial Board of the Oxford Review of Education journal and the International Advisory Board of Assessment in Education: principles, policy & practice.  She has been a Visiting Professor at the universities of Bergen and Queen’s (Belfast).  From 2013 to 2015 she was President of the Association for Educational Assessment – Europe.

Qualifications
  • B.A.H. Linguistics/Psychology – Queen’s University, Kingston On, Canada
  • M.A. Educational Psychology – McGill University, Canada
  • Ph.D. – Second Language Education – McGill University Canada

Victoria Murphy would welcome informal contacts from prospective doctoral students interested in the following topics:

  • Language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/ Language Minority) children
  • Child L2 and bilingualism
  • Foreign language learning in primary school
  • Lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Research

Victoria is active in the following research areas, and would welcome DPhil applications on any of these, particularly those relating to EAL (language minority) children and child L2 learning and foreign language learning in primary school.  She is also the convenor of the Research in English as an Additional Language (REAL) group.  Her research is currently being funded by the ESRC, Leverhulme Trust and Nuffield Foundation.

  • language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/Language minority) children
  • child L2 learning and bilingualism
  • foreign language learning in primary school
  • cognitive processes underlying L1 and L2 learning
  • lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Current Research Project(s)

Joanna is a Doctoral Student, and ESRC Grand Union DTP Scholar, researching in-class support for multilingualism in UK schools.

She has over 12 years of experience as a teaching professional, having worked as a class teacher, EAL specialist and Teaching Assistant in the UK, China, Brazil and Italy. Her main area of interest is school-based education (3-18), specifically the support for multilingual pupils and their language practices, as well as the relationship between teaching assistants and both teachers and children in schools.

Joanna holds a BA in Jurisprudence and a MSc in Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching, both from the University of Oxford. She also has a PGCE, and a PGDip in French.

Joining the Department of Education in 2020 after teaching English and foreign languages in secondary schools and early years settings for 15 years, Catherine completed the MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition in 2021. Her doctoral research investigates the effectiveness of using songs as pedagogical tools with young second language learners in formal educational settings.

Additionally, Catherine hosts The Language Revolution podcast, exploring how linguistics and language awareness might inform/transform languages teaching with guests including Michael Rosen and David Crystal. She also project manages the annual conference for NALDIC, the national subject association for EAL.

Publications

Multilingual is Normal: An anthology of voices, talking about talking (2020)

Renyu completed her BA degree in Psychology at the University of British Columbia (Vancouver, Canada) and her MPhil degree in Education at University of Cambridge.

During her MPhil study, she worked with children aged 4 to 6 years to investigate the relationship between bilingualism, vocabulary size, and inhibitory control, and also to validate a novel app designed to assess early language development. For her Dphil study at Oxford, Renyu aims to explore the factors that might affect L2 pronunciation learning in young children and the interaction between children’s L1 and L2. She is particularly interested in the psychological factors that might influence a child’s L2 pronunciation.

Prior to studying at Oxford, Renyu worked as Research Assistant at the Assessment Research Group at British Council for one year and a half. She was involved in various projects, including gap analysis on reading demand and reading ability, participant feedback questionnaire design and analysis, design and recruitment for a new EAP task study, etc.

Bernard holds a PhD in Marketing from the University of Nottingham and a DBA from the University of Newcastle.

His research to date explores the leadership in HE. Prior to coming to Oxford, he worked in various HEIs and served as the supervisor of a secondary school.

Publications

Lee, B., Tsui, A. & Yau, O.H.M. (2019), Higher-order Goals, Trust-in-leader, and Self-efficacy as Moderators of Transformational Leadership Performance: The Case of Multi-level Marketing Organizations in China, Journal of Euromarketing, Vol.28 (3-4), 76-97. (2011 RG Impact factor: 0.83).

Conferences

Lee, B. (2020), “Self-formation for the Underprivileged,” 2020 International Online Symposium, Toward a New Paradigm of Economics,organized by Macau Ricci Institute, The University of Saint Joseph, 15 & 16 October. (Online Conference Platform Presentation).

Steve is Associate Professor of Teacher Education. He is a curriculum tutor for the Geography PGCE and MSc Learning and Teaching.

Steve is a qualified geography teacher and was previously the head of department at a comprehensive secondary school in Oxfordshire, and Head of Programmes at Bishop Grosseteste University, Lincoln.

He holds an MA in Educational Leadership and Innovation from Warwick University, an MSc in Educational Research Methodology and DPhil in Education from the University of Oxford which were funded by an ESRC Studentship. He is a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

He researches at the intersection between the academic discipline and school subject of geography, including recent collaborations developing through the Smart Cities Network for Sustainable Urban Future project which was shortlisted for the 2017 Newton Prize (India). He is currently leading research on Climate Change Education Futures in India (GCRF) in collaboration with colleagues at IISER, Pune, and on the role of cultural heritage in curriculum making in Kolkata.

Collaborations with colleagues in the School of Geography and the Environment are contributing to anti-racist curriculum futures, including in the school subject, and in postgraduate teaching through the TDEP-funded Oxford-UNISA course ‘Decolonising Research Methods’.

His research on teacher education focuses on the contribution that geography education research offers to the conceptualisation and practice of teaching. This work includes ethnographic research on teachers’ curriculum making exploring the journeys through which information travels into school classrooms, beginning teachers’ experiences of school subject departments, and the role of written lesson observation feedback in constructing ‘good teaching’.

Steve serves on the editorial board of the journal Geography, and is Chair of the Geography Education Research Collective (GEReCo/IGU-CGE).

 

Caitlin is a Doctoral student in the Department of Education working on how teachers interact with refugee and unaccompanied asylum-seeking pupils in UK schools.

Her Doctoral study uses survey data, interviews, observation, and document analysis to examine teacher knowledge, attitudes, and practices in relation to refugee pupils. Previously, Caitlin worked as a primary school teacher in Aberdeen, London, and at Rose Hill Primary School in Oxford. She completed an MA (Gaelic Medium Education, Oral History) and a PGDE (Primary Education) at the University of Aberdeen, and a BA (Human Geography, Environmental Studies) at Middlebury College in the US. She has a general interest in improving inclusion and equity in education.

Helen’s academic interest in higher education policy developed from more than 20 years of professional experience of university administration – in public relations and admissions.

She gained her doctorate from Oxford in 2010 (a study of the market created by the introduction of £3000 fees for Home/EU undergraduates at English universities in 2006); since then, she has conducted research into the impacts of student fees and funding on institutions, students, graduates and applicants within the higher education sector in England. She also works as a consultant to higher education institutions.

Helen was Pathway Convenor for the MSc Education (HE) for two years and has taught on this course since completing her DPhil. As an inspector for the British Accreditation Council, Helen has the opportunity to gain insights into the operation of higher education providers globally. She is also an Associate of the SKOPE, the department’s research centre for Skills, Knowledge and Organisational Performance.

From 2012-17, Helen was a member of the governing council of the Society for Research into Higher Education (SRHE), serving as Vice-Chair from 2014-17.

 

Jo-Anne is Director of the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment.  She completed a six-year term as Head of the Department of Education, has been Standing Adviser to the House of Commons Education Select Committee, a member of Ofqual’s Standing Advisory Group on Standards, Chair of the National Reference Test Expert Group, and a member of the Welsh Government’s Curriculum and Assessment Group.  Before coming to Oxford, Jo-Anne held academic posts at the Institute of Education, University of London and the University of Bristol. Her first degree and doctorate were in psychology and she has an MBA.  Her current research projects include Setting and Maintaining Standards in national examinations, Examination reform: the impact of modular and linear examinations at GCSE, Assessment for Learning in Africa (AFLA), intelligent accountability and the Progress in International Reading Literacy Study England national centre.

Her research interests are in educational assessment, including system-wide structures and processes, examination standards, marking and assessment design.  Jo-Anne conducts a lot of work with government and industry partners, including acting as the Standing Adviser to the House of Commons Education Select Committee, a member of Ofqual’s Standing Advisory Group and membership of the Welsh Government’s Curriculum and Assessment Group.  She is a member of the Editorial Board of the Oxford Review of Education journal and the International Advisory Board of Assessment in Education: principles, policy & practice.  She has been a Visiting Professor at the universities of Bergen and Queen’s (Belfast).  From 2013 to 2015 she was President of the Association for Educational Assessment – Europe.

Qualifications
  • B.A.H. Linguistics/Psychology – Queen’s University, Kingston On, Canada
  • M.A. Educational Psychology – McGill University, Canada
  • Ph.D. – Second Language Education – McGill University Canada

Victoria Murphy would welcome informal contacts from prospective doctoral students interested in the following topics:

  • Language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/ Language Minority) children
  • Child L2 and bilingualism
  • Foreign language learning in primary school
  • Lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Research

Victoria is active in the following research areas, and would welcome DPhil applications on any of these, particularly those relating to EAL (language minority) children and child L2 learning and foreign language learning in primary school.  She is also the convenor of the Research in English as an Additional Language (REAL) group.  Her research is currently being funded by the ESRC, Leverhulme Trust and Nuffield Foundation.

  • language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/Language minority) children
  • child L2 learning and bilingualism
  • foreign language learning in primary school
  • cognitive processes underlying L1 and L2 learning
  • lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Current Research Project(s)

Joanna is a Doctoral Student, and ESRC Grand Union DTP Scholar, researching in-class support for multilingualism in UK schools.

She has over 12 years of experience as a teaching professional, having worked as a class teacher, EAL specialist and Teaching Assistant in the UK, China, Brazil and Italy. Her main area of interest is school-based education (3-18), specifically the support for multilingual pupils and their language practices, as well as the relationship between teaching assistants and both teachers and children in schools.

Joanna holds a BA in Jurisprudence and a MSc in Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching, both from the University of Oxford. She also has a PGCE, and a PGDip in French.

Joining the Department of Education in 2020 after teaching English and foreign languages in secondary schools and early years settings for 15 years, Catherine completed the MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition in 2021. Her doctoral research investigates the effectiveness of using songs as pedagogical tools with young second language learners in formal educational settings.

Additionally, Catherine hosts The Language Revolution podcast, exploring how linguistics and language awareness might inform/transform languages teaching with guests including Michael Rosen and David Crystal. She also project manages the annual conference for NALDIC, the national subject association for EAL.

Publications

Multilingual is Normal: An anthology of voices, talking about talking (2020)

Renyu completed her BA degree in Psychology at the University of British Columbia (Vancouver, Canada) and her MPhil degree in Education at University of Cambridge.

During her MPhil study, she worked with children aged 4 to 6 years to investigate the relationship between bilingualism, vocabulary size, and inhibitory control, and also to validate a novel app designed to assess early language development. For her Dphil study at Oxford, Renyu aims to explore the factors that might affect L2 pronunciation learning in young children and the interaction between children’s L1 and L2. She is particularly interested in the psychological factors that might influence a child’s L2 pronunciation.

Prior to studying at Oxford, Renyu worked as Research Assistant at the Assessment Research Group at British Council for one year and a half. She was involved in various projects, including gap analysis on reading demand and reading ability, participant feedback questionnaire design and analysis, design and recruitment for a new EAP task study, etc.

Bernard holds a PhD in Marketing from the University of Nottingham and a DBA from the University of Newcastle.

His research to date explores the leadership in HE. Prior to coming to Oxford, he worked in various HEIs and served as the supervisor of a secondary school.

Publications

Lee, B., Tsui, A. & Yau, O.H.M. (2019), Higher-order Goals, Trust-in-leader, and Self-efficacy as Moderators of Transformational Leadership Performance: The Case of Multi-level Marketing Organizations in China, Journal of Euromarketing, Vol.28 (3-4), 76-97. (2011 RG Impact factor: 0.83).

Conferences

Lee, B. (2020), “Self-formation for the Underprivileged,” 2020 International Online Symposium, Toward a New Paradigm of Economics,organized by Macau Ricci Institute, The University of Saint Joseph, 15 & 16 October. (Online Conference Platform Presentation).

Steve is Associate Professor of Teacher Education. He is a curriculum tutor for the Geography PGCE and MSc Learning and Teaching.

Steve is a qualified geography teacher and was previously the head of department at a comprehensive secondary school in Oxfordshire, and Head of Programmes at Bishop Grosseteste University, Lincoln.

He holds an MA in Educational Leadership and Innovation from Warwick University, an MSc in Educational Research Methodology and DPhil in Education from the University of Oxford which were funded by an ESRC Studentship. He is a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

He researches at the intersection between the academic discipline and school subject of geography, including recent collaborations developing through the Smart Cities Network for Sustainable Urban Future project which was shortlisted for the 2017 Newton Prize (India). He is currently leading research on Climate Change Education Futures in India (GCRF) in collaboration with colleagues at IISER, Pune, and on the role of cultural heritage in curriculum making in Kolkata.

Collaborations with colleagues in the School of Geography and the Environment are contributing to anti-racist curriculum futures, including in the school subject, and in postgraduate teaching through the TDEP-funded Oxford-UNISA course ‘Decolonising Research Methods’.

His research on teacher education focuses on the contribution that geography education research offers to the conceptualisation and practice of teaching. This work includes ethnographic research on teachers’ curriculum making exploring the journeys through which information travels into school classrooms, beginning teachers’ experiences of school subject departments, and the role of written lesson observation feedback in constructing ‘good teaching’.

Steve serves on the editorial board of the journal Geography, and is Chair of the Geography Education Research Collective (GEReCo/IGU-CGE).

 

Caitlin is a Doctoral student in the Department of Education working on how teachers interact with refugee and unaccompanied asylum-seeking pupils in UK schools.

Her Doctoral study uses survey data, interviews, observation, and document analysis to examine teacher knowledge, attitudes, and practices in relation to refugee pupils. Previously, Caitlin worked as a primary school teacher in Aberdeen, London, and at Rose Hill Primary School in Oxford. She completed an MA (Gaelic Medium Education, Oral History) and a PGDE (Primary Education) at the University of Aberdeen, and a BA (Human Geography, Environmental Studies) at Middlebury College in the US. She has a general interest in improving inclusion and equity in education.

Helen’s academic interest in higher education policy developed from more than 20 years of professional experience of university administration – in public relations and admissions.

She gained her doctorate from Oxford in 2010 (a study of the market created by the introduction of £3000 fees for Home/EU undergraduates at English universities in 2006); since then, she has conducted research into the impacts of student fees and funding on institutions, students, graduates and applicants within the higher education sector in England. She also works as a consultant to higher education institutions.

Helen was Pathway Convenor for the MSc Education (HE) for two years and has taught on this course since completing her DPhil. As an inspector for the British Accreditation Council, Helen has the opportunity to gain insights into the operation of higher education providers globally. She is also an Associate of the SKOPE, the department’s research centre for Skills, Knowledge and Organisational Performance.

From 2012-17, Helen was a member of the governing council of the Society for Research into Higher Education (SRHE), serving as Vice-Chair from 2014-17.

 

Jo-Anne is Director of the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment.  She completed a six-year term as Head of the Department of Education, has been Standing Adviser to the House of Commons Education Select Committee, a member of Ofqual’s Standing Advisory Group on Standards, Chair of the National Reference Test Expert Group, and a member of the Welsh Government’s Curriculum and Assessment Group.  Before coming to Oxford, Jo-Anne held academic posts at the Institute of Education, University of London and the University of Bristol. Her first degree and doctorate were in psychology and she has an MBA.  Her current research projects include Setting and Maintaining Standards in national examinations, Examination reform: the impact of modular and linear examinations at GCSE, Assessment for Learning in Africa (AFLA), intelligent accountability and the Progress in International Reading Literacy Study England national centre.

Her research interests are in educational assessment, including system-wide structures and processes, examination standards, marking and assessment design.  Jo-Anne conducts a lot of work with government and industry partners, including acting as the Standing Adviser to the House of Commons Education Select Committee, a member of Ofqual’s Standing Advisory Group and membership of the Welsh Government’s Curriculum and Assessment Group.  She is a member of the Editorial Board of the Oxford Review of Education journal and the International Advisory Board of Assessment in Education: principles, policy & practice.  She has been a Visiting Professor at the universities of Bergen and Queen’s (Belfast).  From 2013 to 2015 she was President of the Association for Educational Assessment – Europe.

Qualifications
  • B.A.H. Linguistics/Psychology – Queen’s University, Kingston On, Canada
  • M.A. Educational Psychology – McGill University, Canada
  • Ph.D. – Second Language Education – McGill University Canada

Victoria Murphy would welcome informal contacts from prospective doctoral students interested in the following topics:

  • Language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/ Language Minority) children
  • Child L2 and bilingualism
  • Foreign language learning in primary school
  • Lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Research

Victoria is active in the following research areas, and would welcome DPhil applications on any of these, particularly those relating to EAL (language minority) children and child L2 learning and foreign language learning in primary school.  She is also the convenor of the Research in English as an Additional Language (REAL) group.  Her research is currently being funded by the ESRC, Leverhulme Trust and Nuffield Foundation.

  • language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/Language minority) children
  • child L2 learning and bilingualism
  • foreign language learning in primary school
  • cognitive processes underlying L1 and L2 learning
  • lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Current Research Project(s)

Joanna is a Doctoral Student, and ESRC Grand Union DTP Scholar, researching in-class support for multilingualism in UK schools.

She has over 12 years of experience as a teaching professional, having worked as a class teacher, EAL specialist and Teaching Assistant in the UK, China, Brazil and Italy. Her main area of interest is school-based education (3-18), specifically the support for multilingual pupils and their language practices, as well as the relationship between teaching assistants and both teachers and children in schools.

Joanna holds a BA in Jurisprudence and a MSc in Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching, both from the University of Oxford. She also has a PGCE, and a PGDip in French.

Joining the Department of Education in 2020 after teaching English and foreign languages in secondary schools and early years settings for 15 years, Catherine completed the MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition in 2021. Her doctoral research investigates the effectiveness of using songs as pedagogical tools with young second language learners in formal educational settings.

Additionally, Catherine hosts The Language Revolution podcast, exploring how linguistics and language awareness might inform/transform languages teaching with guests including Michael Rosen and David Crystal. She also project manages the annual conference for NALDIC, the national subject association for EAL.

Publications

Multilingual is Normal: An anthology of voices, talking about talking (2020)

Renyu completed her BA degree in Psychology at the University of British Columbia (Vancouver, Canada) and her MPhil degree in Education at University of Cambridge.

During her MPhil study, she worked with children aged 4 to 6 years to investigate the relationship between bilingualism, vocabulary size, and inhibitory control, and also to validate a novel app designed to assess early language development. For her Dphil study at Oxford, Renyu aims to explore the factors that might affect L2 pronunciation learning in young children and the interaction between children’s L1 and L2. She is particularly interested in the psychological factors that might influence a child’s L2 pronunciation.

Prior to studying at Oxford, Renyu worked as Research Assistant at the Assessment Research Group at British Council for one year and a half. She was involved in various projects, including gap analysis on reading demand and reading ability, participant feedback questionnaire design and analysis, design and recruitment for a new EAP task study, etc.

Bernard holds a PhD in Marketing from the University of Nottingham and a DBA from the University of Newcastle.

His research to date explores the leadership in HE. Prior to coming to Oxford, he worked in various HEIs and served as the supervisor of a secondary school.

Publications

Lee, B., Tsui, A. & Yau, O.H.M. (2019), Higher-order Goals, Trust-in-leader, and Self-efficacy as Moderators of Transformational Leadership Performance: The Case of Multi-level Marketing Organizations in China, Journal of Euromarketing, Vol.28 (3-4), 76-97. (2011 RG Impact factor: 0.83).

Conferences

Lee, B. (2020), “Self-formation for the Underprivileged,” 2020 International Online Symposium, Toward a New Paradigm of Economics,organized by Macau Ricci Institute, The University of Saint Joseph, 15 & 16 October. (Online Conference Platform Presentation).

Steve is Associate Professor of Teacher Education. He is a curriculum tutor for the Geography PGCE and MSc Learning and Teaching.

Steve is a qualified geography teacher and was previously the head of department at a comprehensive secondary school in Oxfordshire, and Head of Programmes at Bishop Grosseteste University, Lincoln.

He holds an MA in Educational Leadership and Innovation from Warwick University, an MSc in Educational Research Methodology and DPhil in Education from the University of Oxford which were funded by an ESRC Studentship. He is a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

He researches at the intersection between the academic discipline and school subject of geography, including recent collaborations developing through the Smart Cities Network for Sustainable Urban Future project which was shortlisted for the 2017 Newton Prize (India). He is currently leading research on Climate Change Education Futures in India (GCRF) in collaboration with colleagues at IISER, Pune, and on the role of cultural heritage in curriculum making in Kolkata.

Collaborations with colleagues in the School of Geography and the Environment are contributing to anti-racist curriculum futures, including in the school subject, and in postgraduate teaching through the TDEP-funded Oxford-UNISA course ‘Decolonising Research Methods’.

His research on teacher education focuses on the contribution that geography education research offers to the conceptualisation and practice of teaching. This work includes ethnographic research on teachers’ curriculum making exploring the journeys through which information travels into school classrooms, beginning teachers’ experiences of school subject departments, and the role of written lesson observation feedback in constructing ‘good teaching’.

Steve serves on the editorial board of the journal Geography, and is Chair of the Geography Education Research Collective (GEReCo/IGU-CGE).

 

Caitlin is a Doctoral student in the Department of Education working on how teachers interact with refugee and unaccompanied asylum-seeking pupils in UK schools.

Her Doctoral study uses survey data, interviews, observation, and document analysis to examine teacher knowledge, attitudes, and practices in relation to refugee pupils. Previously, Caitlin worked as a primary school teacher in Aberdeen, London, and at Rose Hill Primary School in Oxford. She completed an MA (Gaelic Medium Education, Oral History) and a PGDE (Primary Education) at the University of Aberdeen, and a BA (Human Geography, Environmental Studies) at Middlebury College in the US. She has a general interest in improving inclusion and equity in education.

Helen’s academic interest in higher education policy developed from more than 20 years of professional experience of university administration – in public relations and admissions.

She gained her doctorate from Oxford in 2010 (a study of the market created by the introduction of £3000 fees for Home/EU undergraduates at English universities in 2006); since then, she has conducted research into the impacts of student fees and funding on institutions, students, graduates and applicants within the higher education sector in England. She also works as a consultant to higher education institutions.

Helen was Pathway Convenor for the MSc Education (HE) for two years and has taught on this course since completing her DPhil. As an inspector for the British Accreditation Council, Helen has the opportunity to gain insights into the operation of higher education providers globally. She is also an Associate of the SKOPE, the department’s research centre for Skills, Knowledge and Organisational Performance.

From 2012-17, Helen was a member of the governing council of the Society for Research into Higher Education (SRHE), serving as Vice-Chair from 2014-17.

 

Jo-Anne is Director of the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment.  She completed a six-year term as Head of the Department of Education, has been Standing Adviser to the House of Commons Education Select Committee, a member of Ofqual’s Standing Advisory Group on Standards, Chair of the National Reference Test Expert Group, and a member of the Welsh Government’s Curriculum and Assessment Group.  Before coming to Oxford, Jo-Anne held academic posts at the Institute of Education, University of London and the University of Bristol. Her first degree and doctorate were in psychology and she has an MBA.  Her current research projects include Setting and Maintaining Standards in national examinations, Examination reform: the impact of modular and linear examinations at GCSE, Assessment for Learning in Africa (AFLA), intelligent accountability and the Progress in International Reading Literacy Study England national centre.

Her research interests are in educational assessment, including system-wide structures and processes, examination standards, marking and assessment design.  Jo-Anne conducts a lot of work with government and industry partners, including acting as the Standing Adviser to the House of Commons Education Select Committee, a member of Ofqual’s Standing Advisory Group and membership of the Welsh Government’s Curriculum and Assessment Group.  She is a member of the Editorial Board of the Oxford Review of Education journal and the International Advisory Board of Assessment in Education: principles, policy & practice.  She has been a Visiting Professor at the universities of Bergen and Queen’s (Belfast).  From 2013 to 2015 she was President of the Association for Educational Assessment – Europe.

Qualifications
  • B.A.H. Linguistics/Psychology – Queen’s University, Kingston On, Canada
  • M.A. Educational Psychology – McGill University, Canada
  • Ph.D. – Second Language Education – McGill University Canada

Victoria Murphy would welcome informal contacts from prospective doctoral students interested in the following topics:

  • Language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/ Language Minority) children
  • Child L2 and bilingualism
  • Foreign language learning in primary school
  • Lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Research

Victoria is active in the following research areas, and would welcome DPhil applications on any of these, particularly those relating to EAL (language minority) children and child L2 learning and foreign language learning in primary school.  She is also the convenor of the Research in English as an Additional Language (REAL) group.  Her research is currently being funded by the ESRC, Leverhulme Trust and Nuffield Foundation.

  • language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/Language minority) children
  • child L2 learning and bilingualism
  • foreign language learning in primary school
  • cognitive processes underlying L1 and L2 learning
  • lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Current Research Project(s)

Joanna is a Doctoral Student, and ESRC Grand Union DTP Scholar, researching in-class support for multilingualism in UK schools.

She has over 12 years of experience as a teaching professional, having worked as a class teacher, EAL specialist and Teaching Assistant in the UK, China, Brazil and Italy. Her main area of interest is school-based education (3-18), specifically the support for multilingual pupils and their language practices, as well as the relationship between teaching assistants and both teachers and children in schools.

Joanna holds a BA in Jurisprudence and a MSc in Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching, both from the University of Oxford. She also has a PGCE, and a PGDip in French.

Joining the Department of Education in 2020 after teaching English and foreign languages in secondary schools and early years settings for 15 years, Catherine completed the MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition in 2021. Her doctoral research investigates the effectiveness of using songs as pedagogical tools with young second language learners in formal educational settings.

Additionally, Catherine hosts The Language Revolution podcast, exploring how linguistics and language awareness might inform/transform languages teaching with guests including Michael Rosen and David Crystal. She also project manages the annual conference for NALDIC, the national subject association for EAL.

Publications

Multilingual is Normal: An anthology of voices, talking about talking (2020)

Renyu completed her BA degree in Psychology at the University of British Columbia (Vancouver, Canada) and her MPhil degree in Education at University of Cambridge.

During her MPhil study, she worked with children aged 4 to 6 years to investigate the relationship between bilingualism, vocabulary size, and inhibitory control, and also to validate a novel app designed to assess early language development. For her Dphil study at Oxford, Renyu aims to explore the factors that might affect L2 pronunciation learning in young children and the interaction between children’s L1 and L2. She is particularly interested in the psychological factors that might influence a child’s L2 pronunciation.

Prior to studying at Oxford, Renyu worked as Research Assistant at the Assessment Research Group at British Council for one year and a half. She was involved in various projects, including gap analysis on reading demand and reading ability, participant feedback questionnaire design and analysis, design and recruitment for a new EAP task study, etc.

Bernard holds a PhD in Marketing from the University of Nottingham and a DBA from the University of Newcastle.

His research to date explores the leadership in HE. Prior to coming to Oxford, he worked in various HEIs and served as the supervisor of a secondary school.

Publications

Lee, B., Tsui, A. & Yau, O.H.M. (2019), Higher-order Goals, Trust-in-leader, and Self-efficacy as Moderators of Transformational Leadership Performance: The Case of Multi-level Marketing Organizations in China, Journal of Euromarketing, Vol.28 (3-4), 76-97. (2011 RG Impact factor: 0.83).

Conferences

Lee, B. (2020), “Self-formation for the Underprivileged,” 2020 International Online Symposium, Toward a New Paradigm of Economics,organized by Macau Ricci Institute, The University of Saint Joseph, 15 & 16 October. (Online Conference Platform Presentation).

Steve is Associate Professor of Teacher Education. He is a curriculum tutor for the Geography PGCE and MSc Learning and Teaching.

Steve is a qualified geography teacher and was previously the head of department at a comprehensive secondary school in Oxfordshire, and Head of Programmes at Bishop Grosseteste University, Lincoln.

He holds an MA in Educational Leadership and Innovation from Warwick University, an MSc in Educational Research Methodology and DPhil in Education from the University of Oxford which were funded by an ESRC Studentship. He is a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

He researches at the intersection between the academic discipline and school subject of geography, including recent collaborations developing through the Smart Cities Network for Sustainable Urban Future project which was shortlisted for the 2017 Newton Prize (India). He is currently leading research on Climate Change Education Futures in India (GCRF) in collaboration with colleagues at IISER, Pune, and on the role of cultural heritage in curriculum making in Kolkata.

Collaborations with colleagues in the School of Geography and the Environment are contributing to anti-racist curriculum futures, including in the school subject, and in postgraduate teaching through the TDEP-funded Oxford-UNISA course ‘Decolonising Research Methods’.

His research on teacher education focuses on the contribution that geography education research offers to the conceptualisation and practice of teaching. This work includes ethnographic research on teachers’ curriculum making exploring the journeys through which information travels into school classrooms, beginning teachers’ experiences of school subject departments, and the role of written lesson observation feedback in constructing ‘good teaching’.

Steve serves on the editorial board of the journal Geography, and is Chair of the Geography Education Research Collective (GEReCo/IGU-CGE).

 

Caitlin is a Doctoral student in the Department of Education working on how teachers interact with refugee and unaccompanied asylum-seeking pupils in UK schools.

Her Doctoral study uses survey data, interviews, observation, and document analysis to examine teacher knowledge, attitudes, and practices in relation to refugee pupils. Previously, Caitlin worked as a primary school teacher in Aberdeen, London, and at Rose Hill Primary School in Oxford. She completed an MA (Gaelic Medium Education, Oral History) and a PGDE (Primary Education) at the University of Aberdeen, and a BA (Human Geography, Environmental Studies) at Middlebury College in the US. She has a general interest in improving inclusion and equity in education.

Helen’s academic interest in higher education policy developed from more than 20 years of professional experience of university administration – in public relations and admissions.

She gained her doctorate from Oxford in 2010 (a study of the market created by the introduction of £3000 fees for Home/EU undergraduates at English universities in 2006); since then, she has conducted research into the impacts of student fees and funding on institutions, students, graduates and applicants within the higher education sector in England. She also works as a consultant to higher education institutions.

Helen was Pathway Convenor for the MSc Education (HE) for two years and has taught on this course since completing her DPhil. As an inspector for the British Accreditation Council, Helen has the opportunity to gain insights into the operation of higher education providers globally. She is also an Associate of the SKOPE, the department’s research centre for Skills, Knowledge and Organisational Performance.

From 2012-17, Helen was a member of the governing council of the Society for Research into Higher Education (SRHE), serving as Vice-Chair from 2014-17.

 

Jo-Anne is Director of the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment.  She completed a six-year term as Head of the Department of Education, has been Standing Adviser to the House of Commons Education Select Committee, a member of Ofqual’s Standing Advisory Group on Standards, Chair of the National Reference Test Expert Group, and a member of the Welsh Government’s Curriculum and Assessment Group.  Before coming to Oxford, Jo-Anne held academic posts at the Institute of Education, University of London and the University of Bristol. Her first degree and doctorate were in psychology and she has an MBA.  Her current research projects include Setting and Maintaining Standards in national examinations, Examination reform: the impact of modular and linear examinations at GCSE, Assessment for Learning in Africa (AFLA), intelligent accountability and the Progress in International Reading Literacy Study England national centre.

Her research interests are in educational assessment, including system-wide structures and processes, examination standards, marking and assessment design.  Jo-Anne conducts a lot of work with government and industry partners, including acting as the Standing Adviser to the House of Commons Education Select Committee, a member of Ofqual’s Standing Advisory Group and membership of the Welsh Government’s Curriculum and Assessment Group.  She is a member of the Editorial Board of the Oxford Review of Education journal and the International Advisory Board of Assessment in Education: principles, policy & practice.  She has been a Visiting Professor at the universities of Bergen and Queen’s (Belfast).  From 2013 to 2015 she was President of the Association for Educational Assessment – Europe.

Qualifications
  • B.A.H. Linguistics/Psychology – Queen’s University, Kingston On, Canada
  • M.A. Educational Psychology – McGill University, Canada
  • Ph.D. – Second Language Education – McGill University Canada

Victoria Murphy would welcome informal contacts from prospective doctoral students interested in the following topics:

  • Language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/ Language Minority) children
  • Child L2 and bilingualism
  • Foreign language learning in primary school
  • Lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Research

Victoria is active in the following research areas, and would welcome DPhil applications on any of these, particularly those relating to EAL (language minority) children and child L2 learning and foreign language learning in primary school.  She is also the convenor of the Research in English as an Additional Language (REAL) group.  Her research is currently being funded by the ESRC, Leverhulme Trust and Nuffield Foundation.

  • language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/Language minority) children
  • child L2 learning and bilingualism
  • foreign language learning in primary school
  • cognitive processes underlying L1 and L2 learning
  • lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Current Research Project(s)

Joanna is a Doctoral Student, and ESRC Grand Union DTP Scholar, researching in-class support for multilingualism in UK schools.

She has over 12 years of experience as a teaching professional, having worked as a class teacher, EAL specialist and Teaching Assistant in the UK, China, Brazil and Italy. Her main area of interest is school-based education (3-18), specifically the support for multilingual pupils and their language practices, as well as the relationship between teaching assistants and both teachers and children in schools.

Joanna holds a BA in Jurisprudence and a MSc in Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching, both from the University of Oxford. She also has a PGCE, and a PGDip in French.

Joining the Department of Education in 2020 after teaching English and foreign languages in secondary schools and early years settings for 15 years, Catherine completed the MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition in 2021. Her doctoral research investigates the effectiveness of using songs as pedagogical tools with young second language learners in formal educational settings.

Additionally, Catherine hosts The Language Revolution podcast, exploring how linguistics and language awareness might inform/transform languages teaching with guests including Michael Rosen and David Crystal. She also project manages the annual conference for NALDIC, the national subject association for EAL.

Publications

Multilingual is Normal: An anthology of voices, talking about talking (2020)

Renyu completed her BA degree in Psychology at the University of British Columbia (Vancouver, Canada) and her MPhil degree in Education at University of Cambridge.

During her MPhil study, she worked with children aged 4 to 6 years to investigate the relationship between bilingualism, vocabulary size, and inhibitory control, and also to validate a novel app designed to assess early language development. For her Dphil study at Oxford, Renyu aims to explore the factors that might affect L2 pronunciation learning in young children and the interaction between children’s L1 and L2. She is particularly interested in the psychological factors that might influence a child’s L2 pronunciation.

Prior to studying at Oxford, Renyu worked as Research Assistant at the Assessment Research Group at British Council for one year and a half. She was involved in various projects, including gap analysis on reading demand and reading ability, participant feedback questionnaire design and analysis, design and recruitment for a new EAP task study, etc.

Bernard holds a PhD in Marketing from the University of Nottingham and a DBA from the University of Newcastle.

His research to date explores the leadership in HE. Prior to coming to Oxford, he worked in various HEIs and served as the supervisor of a secondary school.

Publications

Lee, B., Tsui, A. & Yau, O.H.M. (2019), Higher-order Goals, Trust-in-leader, and Self-efficacy as Moderators of Transformational Leadership Performance: The Case of Multi-level Marketing Organizations in China, Journal of Euromarketing, Vol.28 (3-4), 76-97. (2011 RG Impact factor: 0.83).

Conferences

Lee, B. (2020), “Self-formation for the Underprivileged,” 2020 International Online Symposium, Toward a New Paradigm of Economics,organized by Macau Ricci Institute, The University of Saint Joseph, 15 & 16 October. (Online Conference Platform Presentation).

Steve is Associate Professor of Teacher Education. He is a curriculum tutor for the Geography PGCE and MSc Learning and Teaching.

Steve is a qualified geography teacher and was previously the head of department at a comprehensive secondary school in Oxfordshire, and Head of Programmes at Bishop Grosseteste University, Lincoln.

He holds an MA in Educational Leadership and Innovation from Warwick University, an MSc in Educational Research Methodology and DPhil in Education from the University of Oxford which were funded by an ESRC Studentship. He is a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

He researches at the intersection between the academic discipline and school subject of geography, including recent collaborations developing through the Smart Cities Network for Sustainable Urban Future project which was shortlisted for the 2017 Newton Prize (India). He is currently leading research on Climate Change Education Futures in India (GCRF) in collaboration with colleagues at IISER, Pune, and on the role of cultural heritage in curriculum making in Kolkata.

Collaborations with colleagues in the School of Geography and the Environment are contributing to anti-racist curriculum futures, including in the school subject, and in postgraduate teaching through the TDEP-funded Oxford-UNISA course ‘Decolonising Research Methods’.

His research on teacher education focuses on the contribution that geography education research offers to the conceptualisation and practice of teaching. This work includes ethnographic research on teachers’ curriculum making exploring the journeys through which information travels into school classrooms, beginning teachers’ experiences of school subject departments, and the role of written lesson observation feedback in constructing ‘good teaching’.

Steve serves on the editorial board of the journal Geography, and is Chair of the Geography Education Research Collective (GEReCo/IGU-CGE).

 

Caitlin is a Doctoral student in the Department of Education working on how teachers interact with refugee and unaccompanied asylum-seeking pupils in UK schools.

Her Doctoral study uses survey data, interviews, observation, and document analysis to examine teacher knowledge, attitudes, and practices in relation to refugee pupils. Previously, Caitlin worked as a primary school teacher in Aberdeen, London, and at Rose Hill Primary School in Oxford. She completed an MA (Gaelic Medium Education, Oral History) and a PGDE (Primary Education) at the University of Aberdeen, and a BA (Human Geography, Environmental Studies) at Middlebury College in the US. She has a general interest in improving inclusion and equity in education.

Helen’s academic interest in higher education policy developed from more than 20 years of professional experience of university administration – in public relations and admissions.

She gained her doctorate from Oxford in 2010 (a study of the market created by the introduction of £3000 fees for Home/EU undergraduates at English universities in 2006); since then, she has conducted research into the impacts of student fees and funding on institutions, students, graduates and applicants within the higher education sector in England. She also works as a consultant to higher education institutions.

Helen was Pathway Convenor for the MSc Education (HE) for two years and has taught on this course since completing her DPhil. As an inspector for the British Accreditation Council, Helen has the opportunity to gain insights into the operation of higher education providers globally. She is also an Associate of the SKOPE, the department’s research centre for Skills, Knowledge and Organisational Performance.

From 2012-17, Helen was a member of the governing council of the Society for Research into Higher Education (SRHE), serving as Vice-Chair from 2014-17.

 

Jo-Anne is Director of the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment.  She completed a six-year term as Head of the Department of Education, has been Standing Adviser to the House of Commons Education Select Committee, a member of Ofqual’s Standing Advisory Group on Standards, Chair of the National Reference Test Expert Group, and a member of the Welsh Government’s Curriculum and Assessment Group.  Before coming to Oxford, Jo-Anne held academic posts at the Institute of Education, University of London and the University of Bristol. Her first degree and doctorate were in psychology and she has an MBA.  Her current research projects include Setting and Maintaining Standards in national examinations, Examination reform: the impact of modular and linear examinations at GCSE, Assessment for Learning in Africa (AFLA), intelligent accountability and the Progress in International Reading Literacy Study England national centre.

Her research interests are in educational assessment, including system-wide structures and processes, examination standards, marking and assessment design.  Jo-Anne conducts a lot of work with government and industry partners, including acting as the Standing Adviser to the House of Commons Education Select Committee, a member of Ofqual’s Standing Advisory Group and membership of the Welsh Government’s Curriculum and Assessment Group.  She is a member of the Editorial Board of the Oxford Review of Education journal and the International Advisory Board of Assessment in Education: principles, policy & practice.  She has been a Visiting Professor at the universities of Bergen and Queen’s (Belfast).  From 2013 to 2015 she was President of the Association for Educational Assessment – Europe.

Qualifications
  • B.A.H. Linguistics/Psychology – Queen’s University, Kingston On, Canada
  • M.A. Educational Psychology – McGill University, Canada
  • Ph.D. – Second Language Education – McGill University Canada

Victoria Murphy would welcome informal contacts from prospective doctoral students interested in the following topics:

  • Language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/ Language Minority) children
  • Child L2 and bilingualism
  • Foreign language learning in primary school
  • Lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Research

Victoria is active in the following research areas, and would welcome DPhil applications on any of these, particularly those relating to EAL (language minority) children and child L2 learning and foreign language learning in primary school.  She is also the convenor of the Research in English as an Additional Language (REAL) group.  Her research is currently being funded by the ESRC, Leverhulme Trust and Nuffield Foundation.

  • language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/Language minority) children
  • child L2 learning and bilingualism
  • foreign language learning in primary school
  • cognitive processes underlying L1 and L2 learning
  • lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Current Research Project(s)

Joanna is a Doctoral Student, and ESRC Grand Union DTP Scholar, researching in-class support for multilingualism in UK schools.

She has over 12 years of experience as a teaching professional, having worked as a class teacher, EAL specialist and Teaching Assistant in the UK, China, Brazil and Italy. Her main area of interest is school-based education (3-18), specifically the support for multilingual pupils and their language practices, as well as the relationship between teaching assistants and both teachers and children in schools.

Joanna holds a BA in Jurisprudence and a MSc in Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching, both from the University of Oxford. She also has a PGCE, and a PGDip in French.

Joining the Department of Education in 2020 after teaching English and foreign languages in secondary schools and early years settings for 15 years, Catherine completed the MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition in 2021. Her doctoral research investigates the effectiveness of using songs as pedagogical tools with young second language learners in formal educational settings.

Additionally, Catherine hosts The Language Revolution podcast, exploring how linguistics and language awareness might inform/transform languages teaching with guests including Michael Rosen and David Crystal. She also project manages the annual conference for NALDIC, the national subject association for EAL.

Publications

Multilingual is Normal: An anthology of voices, talking about talking (2020)

Renyu completed her BA degree in Psychology at the University of British Columbia (Vancouver, Canada) and her MPhil degree in Education at University of Cambridge.

During her MPhil study, she worked with children aged 4 to 6 years to investigate the relationship between bilingualism, vocabulary size, and inhibitory control, and also to validate a novel app designed to assess early language development. For her Dphil study at Oxford, Renyu aims to explore the factors that might affect L2 pronunciation learning in young children and the interaction between children’s L1 and L2. She is particularly interested in the psychological factors that might influence a child’s L2 pronunciation.

Prior to studying at Oxford, Renyu worked as Research Assistant at the Assessment Research Group at British Council for one year and a half. She was involved in various projects, including gap analysis on reading demand and reading ability, participant feedback questionnaire design and analysis, design and recruitment for a new EAP task study, etc.

Bernard holds a PhD in Marketing from the University of Nottingham and a DBA from the University of Newcastle.

His research to date explores the leadership in HE. Prior to coming to Oxford, he worked in various HEIs and served as the supervisor of a secondary school.

Publications

Lee, B., Tsui, A. & Yau, O.H.M. (2019), Higher-order Goals, Trust-in-leader, and Self-efficacy as Moderators of Transformational Leadership Performance: The Case of Multi-level Marketing Organizations in China, Journal of Euromarketing, Vol.28 (3-4), 76-97. (2011 RG Impact factor: 0.83).

Conferences

Lee, B. (2020), “Self-formation for the Underprivileged,” 2020 International Online Symposium, Toward a New Paradigm of Economics,organized by Macau Ricci Institute, The University of Saint Joseph, 15 & 16 October. (Online Conference Platform Presentation).

Steve is Associate Professor of Teacher Education. He is a curriculum tutor for the Geography PGCE and MSc Learning and Teaching.

Steve is a qualified geography teacher and was previously the head of department at a comprehensive secondary school in Oxfordshire, and Head of Programmes at Bishop Grosseteste University, Lincoln.

He holds an MA in Educational Leadership and Innovation from Warwick University, an MSc in Educational Research Methodology and DPhil in Education from the University of Oxford which were funded by an ESRC Studentship. He is a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

He researches at the intersection between the academic discipline and school subject of geography, including recent collaborations developing through the Smart Cities Network for Sustainable Urban Future project which was shortlisted for the 2017 Newton Prize (India). He is currently leading research on Climate Change Education Futures in India (GCRF) in collaboration with colleagues at IISER, Pune, and on the role of cultural heritage in curriculum making in Kolkata.

Collaborations with colleagues in the School of Geography and the Environment are contributing to anti-racist curriculum futures, including in the school subject, and in postgraduate teaching through the TDEP-funded Oxford-UNISA course ‘Decolonising Research Methods’.

His research on teacher education focuses on the contribution that geography education research offers to the conceptualisation and practice of teaching. This work includes ethnographic research on teachers’ curriculum making exploring the journeys through which information travels into school classrooms, beginning teachers’ experiences of school subject departments, and the role of written lesson observation feedback in constructing ‘good teaching’.

Steve serves on the editorial board of the journal Geography, and is Chair of the Geography Education Research Collective (GEReCo/IGU-CGE).

 

Caitlin is a Doctoral student in the Department of Education working on how teachers interact with refugee and unaccompanied asylum-seeking pupils in UK schools.

Her Doctoral study uses survey data, interviews, observation, and document analysis to examine teacher knowledge, attitudes, and practices in relation to refugee pupils. Previously, Caitlin worked as a primary school teacher in Aberdeen, London, and at Rose Hill Primary School in Oxford. She completed an MA (Gaelic Medium Education, Oral History) and a PGDE (Primary Education) at the University of Aberdeen, and a BA (Human Geography, Environmental Studies) at Middlebury College in the US. She has a general interest in improving inclusion and equity in education.

Helen’s academic interest in higher education policy developed from more than 20 years of professional experience of university administration – in public relations and admissions.

She gained her doctorate from Oxford in 2010 (a study of the market created by the introduction of £3000 fees for Home/EU undergraduates at English universities in 2006); since then, she has conducted research into the impacts of student fees and funding on institutions, students, graduates and applicants within the higher education sector in England. She also works as a consultant to higher education institutions.

Helen was Pathway Convenor for the MSc Education (HE) for two years and has taught on this course since completing her DPhil. As an inspector for the British Accreditation Council, Helen has the opportunity to gain insights into the operation of higher education providers globally. She is also an Associate of the SKOPE, the department’s research centre for Skills, Knowledge and Organisational Performance.

From 2012-17, Helen was a member of the governing council of the Society for Research into Higher Education (SRHE), serving as Vice-Chair from 2014-17.

 

Jo-Anne is Director of the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment.  She completed a six-year term as Head of the Department of Education, has been Standing Adviser to the House of Commons Education Select Committee, a member of Ofqual’s Standing Advisory Group on Standards, Chair of the National Reference Test Expert Group, and a member of the Welsh Government’s Curriculum and Assessment Group.  Before coming to Oxford, Jo-Anne held academic posts at the Institute of Education, University of London and the University of Bristol. Her first degree and doctorate were in psychology and she has an MBA.  Her current research projects include Setting and Maintaining Standards in national examinations, Examination reform: the impact of modular and linear examinations at GCSE, Assessment for Learning in Africa (AFLA), intelligent accountability and the Progress in International Reading Literacy Study England national centre.

Her research interests are in educational assessment, including system-wide structures and processes, examination standards, marking and assessment design.  Jo-Anne conducts a lot of work with government and industry partners, including acting as the Standing Adviser to the House of Commons Education Select Committee, a member of Ofqual’s Standing Advisory Group and membership of the Welsh Government’s Curriculum and Assessment Group.  She is a member of the Editorial Board of the Oxford Review of Education journal and the International Advisory Board of Assessment in Education: principles, policy & practice.  She has been a Visiting Professor at the universities of Bergen and Queen’s (Belfast).  From 2013 to 2015 she was President of the Association for Educational Assessment – Europe.

Qualifications
  • B.A.H. Linguistics/Psychology – Queen’s University, Kingston On, Canada
  • M.A. Educational Psychology – McGill University, Canada
  • Ph.D. – Second Language Education – McGill University Canada

Victoria Murphy would welcome informal contacts from prospective doctoral students interested in the following topics:

  • Language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/ Language Minority) children
  • Child L2 and bilingualism
  • Foreign language learning in primary school
  • Lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Research

Victoria is active in the following research areas, and would welcome DPhil applications on any of these, particularly those relating to EAL (language minority) children and child L2 learning and foreign language learning in primary school.  She is also the convenor of the Research in English as an Additional Language (REAL) group.  Her research is currently being funded by the ESRC, Leverhulme Trust and Nuffield Foundation.

  • language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/Language minority) children
  • child L2 learning and bilingualism
  • foreign language learning in primary school
  • cognitive processes underlying L1 and L2 learning
  • lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Current Research Project(s)

Joanna is a Doctoral Student, and ESRC Grand Union DTP Scholar, researching in-class support for multilingualism in UK schools.

She has over 12 years of experience as a teaching professional, having worked as a class teacher, EAL specialist and Teaching Assistant in the UK, China, Brazil and Italy. Her main area of interest is school-based education (3-18), specifically the support for multilingual pupils and their language practices, as well as the relationship between teaching assistants and both teachers and children in schools.

Joanna holds a BA in Jurisprudence and a MSc in Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching, both from the University of Oxford. She also has a PGCE, and a PGDip in French.

Joining the Department of Education in 2020 after teaching English and foreign languages in secondary schools and early years settings for 15 years, Catherine completed the MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition in 2021. Her doctoral research investigates the effectiveness of using songs as pedagogical tools with young second language learners in formal educational settings.

Additionally, Catherine hosts The Language Revolution podcast, exploring how linguistics and language awareness might inform/transform languages teaching with guests including Michael Rosen and David Crystal. She also project manages the annual conference for NALDIC, the national subject association for EAL.

Publications

Multilingual is Normal: An anthology of voices, talking about talking (2020)

Renyu completed her BA degree in Psychology at the University of British Columbia (Vancouver, Canada) and her MPhil degree in Education at University of Cambridge.

During her MPhil study, she worked with children aged 4 to 6 years to investigate the relationship between bilingualism, vocabulary size, and inhibitory control, and also to validate a novel app designed to assess early language development. For her Dphil study at Oxford, Renyu aims to explore the factors that might affect L2 pronunciation learning in young children and the interaction between children’s L1 and L2. She is particularly interested in the psychological factors that might influence a child’s L2 pronunciation.

Prior to studying at Oxford, Renyu worked as Research Assistant at the Assessment Research Group at British Council for one year and a half. She was involved in various projects, including gap analysis on reading demand and reading ability, participant feedback questionnaire design and analysis, design and recruitment for a new EAP task study, etc.

Bernard holds a PhD in Marketing from the University of Nottingham and a DBA from the University of Newcastle.

His research to date explores the leadership in HE. Prior to coming to Oxford, he worked in various HEIs and served as the supervisor of a secondary school.

Publications

Lee, B., Tsui, A. & Yau, O.H.M. (2019), Higher-order Goals, Trust-in-leader, and Self-efficacy as Moderators of Transformational Leadership Performance: The Case of Multi-level Marketing Organizations in China, Journal of Euromarketing, Vol.28 (3-4), 76-97. (2011 RG Impact factor: 0.83).

Conferences

Lee, B. (2020), “Self-formation for the Underprivileged,” 2020 International Online Symposium, Toward a New Paradigm of Economics,organized by Macau Ricci Institute, The University of Saint Joseph, 15 & 16 October. (Online Conference Platform Presentation).

Steve is Associate Professor of Teacher Education. He is a curriculum tutor for the Geography PGCE and MSc Learning and Teaching.

Steve is a qualified geography teacher and was previously the head of department at a comprehensive secondary school in Oxfordshire, and Head of Programmes at Bishop Grosseteste University, Lincoln.

He holds an MA in Educational Leadership and Innovation from Warwick University, an MSc in Educational Research Methodology and DPhil in Education from the University of Oxford which were funded by an ESRC Studentship. He is a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

He researches at the intersection between the academic discipline and school subject of geography, including recent collaborations developing through the Smart Cities Network for Sustainable Urban Future project which was shortlisted for the 2017 Newton Prize (India). He is currently leading research on Climate Change Education Futures in India (GCRF) in collaboration with colleagues at IISER, Pune, and on the role of cultural heritage in curriculum making in Kolkata.

Collaborations with colleagues in the School of Geography and the Environment are contributing to anti-racist curriculum futures, including in the school subject, and in postgraduate teaching through the TDEP-funded Oxford-UNISA course ‘Decolonising Research Methods’.

His research on teacher education focuses on the contribution that geography education research offers to the conceptualisation and practice of teaching. This work includes ethnographic research on teachers’ curriculum making exploring the journeys through which information travels into school classrooms, beginning teachers’ experiences of school subject departments, and the role of written lesson observation feedback in constructing ‘good teaching’.

Steve serves on the editorial board of the journal Geography, and is Chair of the Geography Education Research Collective (GEReCo/IGU-CGE).

 

Caitlin is a Doctoral student in the Department of Education working on how teachers interact with refugee and unaccompanied asylum-seeking pupils in UK schools.

Her Doctoral study uses survey data, interviews, observation, and document analysis to examine teacher knowledge, attitudes, and practices in relation to refugee pupils. Previously, Caitlin worked as a primary school teacher in Aberdeen, London, and at Rose Hill Primary School in Oxford. She completed an MA (Gaelic Medium Education, Oral History) and a PGDE (Primary Education) at the University of Aberdeen, and a BA (Human Geography, Environmental Studies) at Middlebury College in the US. She has a general interest in improving inclusion and equity in education.

Helen’s academic interest in higher education policy developed from more than 20 years of professional experience of university administration – in public relations and admissions.

She gained her doctorate from Oxford in 2010 (a study of the market created by the introduction of £3000 fees for Home/EU undergraduates at English universities in 2006); since then, she has conducted research into the impacts of student fees and funding on institutions, students, graduates and applicants within the higher education sector in England. She also works as a consultant to higher education institutions.

Helen was Pathway Convenor for the MSc Education (HE) for two years and has taught on this course since completing her DPhil. As an inspector for the British Accreditation Council, Helen has the opportunity to gain insights into the operation of higher education providers globally. She is also an Associate of the SKOPE, the department’s research centre for Skills, Knowledge and Organisational Performance.

From 2012-17, Helen was a member of the governing council of the Society for Research into Higher Education (SRHE), serving as Vice-Chair from 2014-17.

 

Jo-Anne is Director of the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment.  She completed a six-year term as Head of the Department of Education, has been Standing Adviser to the House of Commons Education Select Committee, a member of Ofqual’s Standing Advisory Group on Standards, Chair of the National Reference Test Expert Group, and a member of the Welsh Government’s Curriculum and Assessment Group.  Before coming to Oxford, Jo-Anne held academic posts at the Institute of Education, University of London and the University of Bristol. Her first degree and doctorate were in psychology and she has an MBA.  Her current research projects include Setting and Maintaining Standards in national examinations, Examination reform: the impact of modular and linear examinations at GCSE, Assessment for Learning in Africa (AFLA), intelligent accountability and the Progress in International Reading Literacy Study England national centre.

Her research interests are in educational assessment, including system-wide structures and processes, examination standards, marking and assessment design.  Jo-Anne conducts a lot of work with government and industry partners, including acting as the Standing Adviser to the House of Commons Education Select Committee, a member of Ofqual’s Standing Advisory Group and membership of the Welsh Government’s Curriculum and Assessment Group.  She is a member of the Editorial Board of the Oxford Review of Education journal and the International Advisory Board of Assessment in Education: principles, policy & practice.  She has been a Visiting Professor at the universities of Bergen and Queen’s (Belfast).  From 2013 to 2015 she was President of the Association for Educational Assessment – Europe.

Qualifications
  • B.A.H. Linguistics/Psychology – Queen’s University, Kingston On, Canada
  • M.A. Educational Psychology – McGill University, Canada
  • Ph.D. – Second Language Education – McGill University Canada

Victoria Murphy would welcome informal contacts from prospective doctoral students interested in the following topics:

  • Language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/ Language Minority) children
  • Child L2 and bilingualism
  • Foreign language learning in primary school
  • Lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Research

Victoria is active in the following research areas, and would welcome DPhil applications on any of these, particularly those relating to EAL (language minority) children and child L2 learning and foreign language learning in primary school.  She is also the convenor of the Research in English as an Additional Language (REAL) group.  Her research is currently being funded by the ESRC, Leverhulme Trust and Nuffield Foundation.

  • language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/Language minority) children
  • child L2 learning and bilingualism
  • foreign language learning in primary school
  • cognitive processes underlying L1 and L2 learning
  • lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Current Research Project(s)

Joanna is a Doctoral Student, and ESRC Grand Union DTP Scholar, researching in-class support for multilingualism in UK schools.

She has over 12 years of experience as a teaching professional, having worked as a class teacher, EAL specialist and Teaching Assistant in the UK, China, Brazil and Italy. Her main area of interest is school-based education (3-18), specifically the support for multilingual pupils and their language practices, as well as the relationship between teaching assistants and both teachers and children in schools.

Joanna holds a BA in Jurisprudence and a MSc in Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching, both from the University of Oxford. She also has a PGCE, and a PGDip in French.

Joining the Department of Education in 2020 after teaching English and foreign languages in secondary schools and early years settings for 15 years, Catherine completed the MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition in 2021. Her doctoral research investigates the effectiveness of using songs as pedagogical tools with young second language learners in formal educational settings.

Additionally, Catherine hosts The Language Revolution podcast, exploring how linguistics and language awareness might inform/transform languages teaching with guests including Michael Rosen and David Crystal. She also project manages the annual conference for NALDIC, the national subject association for EAL.

Publications

Multilingual is Normal: An anthology of voices, talking about talking (2020)

Renyu completed her BA degree in Psychology at the University of British Columbia (Vancouver, Canada) and her MPhil degree in Education at University of Cambridge.

During her MPhil study, she worked with children aged 4 to 6 years to investigate the relationship between bilingualism, vocabulary size, and inhibitory control, and also to validate a novel app designed to assess early language development. For her Dphil study at Oxford, Renyu aims to explore the factors that might affect L2 pronunciation learning in young children and the interaction between children’s L1 and L2. She is particularly interested in the psychological factors that might influence a child’s L2 pronunciation.

Prior to studying at Oxford, Renyu worked as Research Assistant at the Assessment Research Group at British Council for one year and a half. She was involved in various projects, including gap analysis on reading demand and reading ability, participant feedback questionnaire design and analysis, design and recruitment for a new EAP task study, etc.

Bernard holds a PhD in Marketing from the University of Nottingham and a DBA from the University of Newcastle.

His research to date explores the leadership in HE. Prior to coming to Oxford, he worked in various HEIs and served as the supervisor of a secondary school.

Publications

Lee, B., Tsui, A. & Yau, O.H.M. (2019), Higher-order Goals, Trust-in-leader, and Self-efficacy as Moderators of Transformational Leadership Performance: The Case of Multi-level Marketing Organizations in China, Journal of Euromarketing, Vol.28 (3-4), 76-97. (2011 RG Impact factor: 0.83).

Conferences

Lee, B. (2020), “Self-formation for the Underprivileged,” 2020 International Online Symposium, Toward a New Paradigm of Economics,organized by Macau Ricci Institute, The University of Saint Joseph, 15 & 16 October. (Online Conference Platform Presentation).

Steve is Associate Professor of Teacher Education. He is a curriculum tutor for the Geography PGCE and MSc Learning and Teaching.

Steve is a qualified geography teacher and was previously the head of department at a comprehensive secondary school in Oxfordshire, and Head of Programmes at Bishop Grosseteste University, Lincoln.

He holds an MA in Educational Leadership and Innovation from Warwick University, an MSc in Educational Research Methodology and DPhil in Education from the University of Oxford which were funded by an ESRC Studentship. He is a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

He researches at the intersection between the academic discipline and school subject of geography, including recent collaborations developing through the Smart Cities Network for Sustainable Urban Future project which was shortlisted for the 2017 Newton Prize (India). He is currently leading research on Climate Change Education Futures in India (GCRF) in collaboration with colleagues at IISER, Pune, and on the role of cultural heritage in curriculum making in Kolkata.

Collaborations with colleagues in the School of Geography and the Environment are contributing to anti-racist curriculum futures, including in the school subject, and in postgraduate teaching through the TDEP-funded Oxford-UNISA course ‘Decolonising Research Methods’.

His research on teacher education focuses on the contribution that geography education research offers to the conceptualisation and practice of teaching. This work includes ethnographic research on teachers’ curriculum making exploring the journeys through which information travels into school classrooms, beginning teachers’ experiences of school subject departments, and the role of written lesson observation feedback in constructing ‘good teaching’.

Steve serves on the editorial board of the journal Geography, and is Chair of the Geography Education Research Collective (GEReCo/IGU-CGE).

 

Caitlin is a Doctoral student in the Department of Education working on how teachers interact with refugee and unaccompanied asylum-seeking pupils in UK schools.

Her Doctoral study uses survey data, interviews, observation, and document analysis to examine teacher knowledge, attitudes, and practices in relation to refugee pupils. Previously, Caitlin worked as a primary school teacher in Aberdeen, London, and at Rose Hill Primary School in Oxford. She completed an MA (Gaelic Medium Education, Oral History) and a PGDE (Primary Education) at the University of Aberdeen, and a BA (Human Geography, Environmental Studies) at Middlebury College in the US. She has a general interest in improving inclusion and equity in education.

Helen’s academic interest in higher education policy developed from more than 20 years of professional experience of university administration – in public relations and admissions.

She gained her doctorate from Oxford in 2010 (a study of the market created by the introduction of £3000 fees for Home/EU undergraduates at English universities in 2006); since then, she has conducted research into the impacts of student fees and funding on institutions, students, graduates and applicants within the higher education sector in England. She also works as a consultant to higher education institutions.

Helen was Pathway Convenor for the MSc Education (HE) for two years and has taught on this course since completing her DPhil. As an inspector for the British Accreditation Council, Helen has the opportunity to gain insights into the operation of higher education providers globally. She is also an Associate of the SKOPE, the department’s research centre for Skills, Knowledge and Organisational Performance.

From 2012-17, Helen was a member of the governing council of the Society for Research into Higher Education (SRHE), serving as Vice-Chair from 2014-17.

 

Jo-Anne is Director of the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment.  She completed a six-year term as Head of the Department of Education, has been Standing Adviser to the House of Commons Education Select Committee, a member of Ofqual’s Standing Advisory Group on Standards, Chair of the National Reference Test Expert Group, and a member of the Welsh Government’s Curriculum and Assessment Group.  Before coming to Oxford, Jo-Anne held academic posts at the Institute of Education, University of London and the University of Bristol. Her first degree and doctorate were in psychology and she has an MBA.  Her current research projects include Setting and Maintaining Standards in national examinations, Examination reform: the impact of modular and linear examinations at GCSE, Assessment for Learning in Africa (AFLA), intelligent accountability and the Progress in International Reading Literacy Study England national centre.

Her research interests are in educational assessment, including system-wide structures and processes, examination standards, marking and assessment design.  Jo-Anne conducts a lot of work with government and industry partners, including acting as the Standing Adviser to the House of Commons Education Select Committee, a member of Ofqual’s Standing Advisory Group and membership of the Welsh Government’s Curriculum and Assessment Group.  She is a member of the Editorial Board of the Oxford Review of Education journal and the International Advisory Board of Assessment in Education: principles, policy & practice.  She has been a Visiting Professor at the universities of Bergen and Queen’s (Belfast).  From 2013 to 2015 she was President of the Association for Educational Assessment – Europe.

Qualifications
  • B.A.H. Linguistics/Psychology – Queen’s University, Kingston On, Canada
  • M.A. Educational Psychology – McGill University, Canada
  • Ph.D. – Second Language Education – McGill University Canada

Victoria Murphy would welcome informal contacts from prospective doctoral students interested in the following topics:

  • Language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/ Language Minority) children
  • Child L2 and bilingualism
  • Foreign language learning in primary school
  • Lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Research

Victoria is active in the following research areas, and would welcome DPhil applications on any of these, particularly those relating to EAL (language minority) children and child L2 learning and foreign language learning in primary school.  She is also the convenor of the Research in English as an Additional Language (REAL) group.  Her research is currently being funded by the ESRC, Leverhulme Trust and Nuffield Foundation.

  • language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/Language minority) children
  • child L2 learning and bilingualism
  • foreign language learning in primary school
  • cognitive processes underlying L1 and L2 learning
  • lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Current Research Project(s)

Joanna is a Doctoral Student, and ESRC Grand Union DTP Scholar, researching in-class support for multilingualism in UK schools.

She has over 12 years of experience as a teaching professional, having worked as a class teacher, EAL specialist and Teaching Assistant in the UK, China, Brazil and Italy. Her main area of interest is school-based education (3-18), specifically the support for multilingual pupils and their language practices, as well as the relationship between teaching assistants and both teachers and children in schools.

Joanna holds a BA in Jurisprudence and a MSc in Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching, both from the University of Oxford. She also has a PGCE, and a PGDip in French.

Joining the Department of Education in 2020 after teaching English and foreign languages in secondary schools and early years settings for 15 years, Catherine completed the MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition in 2021. Her doctoral research investigates the effectiveness of using songs as pedagogical tools with young second language learners in formal educational settings.

Additionally, Catherine hosts The Language Revolution podcast, exploring how linguistics and language awareness might inform/transform languages teaching with guests including Michael Rosen and David Crystal. She also project manages the annual conference for NALDIC, the national subject association for EAL.

Publications

Multilingual is Normal: An anthology of voices, talking about talking (2020)

Renyu completed her BA degree in Psychology at the University of British Columbia (Vancouver, Canada) and her MPhil degree in Education at University of Cambridge.

During her MPhil study, she worked with children aged 4 to 6 years to investigate the relationship between bilingualism, vocabulary size, and inhibitory control, and also to validate a novel app designed to assess early language development. For her Dphil study at Oxford, Renyu aims to explore the factors that might affect L2 pronunciation learning in young children and the interaction between children’s L1 and L2. She is particularly interested in the psychological factors that might influence a child’s L2 pronunciation.

Prior to studying at Oxford, Renyu worked as Research Assistant at the Assessment Research Group at British Council for one year and a half. She was involved in various projects, including gap analysis on reading demand and reading ability, participant feedback questionnaire design and analysis, design and recruitment for a new EAP task study, etc.

Bernard holds a PhD in Marketing from the University of Nottingham and a DBA from the University of Newcastle.

His research to date explores the leadership in HE. Prior to coming to Oxford, he worked in various HEIs and served as the supervisor of a secondary school.

Publications

Lee, B., Tsui, A. & Yau, O.H.M. (2019), Higher-order Goals, Trust-in-leader, and Self-efficacy as Moderators of Transformational Leadership Performance: The Case of Multi-level Marketing Organizations in China, Journal of Euromarketing, Vol.28 (3-4), 76-97. (2011 RG Impact factor: 0.83).

Conferences

Lee, B. (2020), “Self-formation for the Underprivileged,” 2020 International Online Symposium, Toward a New Paradigm of Economics,organized by Macau Ricci Institute, The University of Saint Joseph, 15 & 16 October. (Online Conference Platform Presentation).

Steve is Associate Professor of Teacher Education. He is a curriculum tutor for the Geography PGCE and MSc Learning and Teaching.

Steve is a qualified geography teacher and was previously the head of department at a comprehensive secondary school in Oxfordshire, and Head of Programmes at Bishop Grosseteste University, Lincoln.

He holds an MA in Educational Leadership and Innovation from Warwick University, an MSc in Educational Research Methodology and DPhil in Education from the University of Oxford which were funded by an ESRC Studentship. He is a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

He researches at the intersection between the academic discipline and school subject of geography, including recent collaborations developing through the Smart Cities Network for Sustainable Urban Future project which was shortlisted for the 2017 Newton Prize (India). He is currently leading research on Climate Change Education Futures in India (GCRF) in collaboration with colleagues at IISER, Pune, and on the role of cultural heritage in curriculum making in Kolkata.

Collaborations with colleagues in the School of Geography and the Environment are contributing to anti-racist curriculum futures, including in the school subject, and in postgraduate teaching through the TDEP-funded Oxford-UNISA course ‘Decolonising Research Methods’.

His research on teacher education focuses on the contribution that geography education research offers to the conceptualisation and practice of teaching. This work includes ethnographic research on teachers’ curriculum making exploring the journeys through which information travels into school classrooms, beginning teachers’ experiences of school subject departments, and the role of written lesson observation feedback in constructing ‘good teaching’.

Steve serves on the editorial board of the journal Geography, and is Chair of the Geography Education Research Collective (GEReCo/IGU-CGE).

 

Caitlin is a Doctoral student in the Department of Education working on how teachers interact with refugee and unaccompanied asylum-seeking pupils in UK schools.

Her Doctoral study uses survey data, interviews, observation, and document analysis to examine teacher knowledge, attitudes, and practices in relation to refugee pupils. Previously, Caitlin worked as a primary school teacher in Aberdeen, London, and at Rose Hill Primary School in Oxford. She completed an MA (Gaelic Medium Education, Oral History) and a PGDE (Primary Education) at the University of Aberdeen, and a BA (Human Geography, Environmental Studies) at Middlebury College in the US. She has a general interest in improving inclusion and equity in education.

Helen’s academic interest in higher education policy developed from more than 20 years of professional experience of university administration – in public relations and admissions.

She gained her doctorate from Oxford in 2010 (a study of the market created by the introduction of £3000 fees for Home/EU undergraduates at English universities in 2006); since then, she has conducted research into the impacts of student fees and funding on institutions, students, graduates and applicants within the higher education sector in England. She also works as a consultant to higher education institutions.

Helen was Pathway Convenor for the MSc Education (HE) for two years and has taught on this course since completing her DPhil. As an inspector for the British Accreditation Council, Helen has the opportunity to gain insights into the operation of higher education providers globally. She is also an Associate of the SKOPE, the department’s research centre for Skills, Knowledge and Organisational Performance.

From 2012-17, Helen was a member of the governing council of the Society for Research into Higher Education (SRHE), serving as Vice-Chair from 2014-17.

 

Jo-Anne is Director of the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment.  She completed a six-year term as Head of the Department of Education, has been Standing Adviser to the House of Commons Education Select Committee, a member of Ofqual’s Standing Advisory Group on Standards, Chair of the National Reference Test Expert Group, and a member of the Welsh Government’s Curriculum and Assessment Group.  Before coming to Oxford, Jo-Anne held academic posts at the Institute of Education, University of London and the University of Bristol. Her first degree and doctorate were in psychology and she has an MBA.  Her current research projects include Setting and Maintaining Standards in national examinations, Examination reform: the impact of modular and linear examinations at GCSE, Assessment for Learning in Africa (AFLA), intelligent accountability and the Progress in International Reading Literacy Study England national centre.

Her research interests are in educational assessment, including system-wide structures and processes, examination standards, marking and assessment design.  Jo-Anne conducts a lot of work with government and industry partners, including acting as the Standing Adviser to the House of Commons Education Select Committee, a member of Ofqual’s Standing Advisory Group and membership of the Welsh Government’s Curriculum and Assessment Group.  She is a member of the Editorial Board of the Oxford Review of Education journal and the International Advisory Board of Assessment in Education: principles, policy & practice.  She has been a Visiting Professor at the universities of Bergen and Queen’s (Belfast).  From 2013 to 2015 she was President of the Association for Educational Assessment – Europe.

Qualifications
  • B.A.H. Linguistics/Psychology – Queen’s University, Kingston On, Canada
  • M.A. Educational Psychology – McGill University, Canada
  • Ph.D. – Second Language Education – McGill University Canada

Victoria Murphy would welcome informal contacts from prospective doctoral students interested in the following topics:

  • Language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/ Language Minority) children
  • Child L2 and bilingualism
  • Foreign language learning in primary school
  • Lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Research

Victoria is active in the following research areas, and would welcome DPhil applications on any of these, particularly those relating to EAL (language minority) children and child L2 learning and foreign language learning in primary school.  She is also the convenor of the Research in English as an Additional Language (REAL) group.  Her research is currently being funded by the ESRC, Leverhulme Trust and Nuffield Foundation.

  • language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/Language minority) children
  • child L2 learning and bilingualism
  • foreign language learning in primary school
  • cognitive processes underlying L1 and L2 learning
  • lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Current Research Project(s)

Joanna is a Doctoral Student, and ESRC Grand Union DTP Scholar, researching in-class support for multilingualism in UK schools.

She has over 12 years of experience as a teaching professional, having worked as a class teacher, EAL specialist and Teaching Assistant in the UK, China, Brazil and Italy. Her main area of interest is school-based education (3-18), specifically the support for multilingual pupils and their language practices, as well as the relationship between teaching assistants and both teachers and children in schools.

Joanna holds a BA in Jurisprudence and a MSc in Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching, both from the University of Oxford. She also has a PGCE, and a PGDip in French.

Joining the Department of Education in 2020 after teaching English and foreign languages in secondary schools and early years settings for 15 years, Catherine completed the MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition in 2021. Her doctoral research investigates the effectiveness of using songs as pedagogical tools with young second language learners in formal educational settings.

Additionally, Catherine hosts The Language Revolution podcast, exploring how linguistics and language awareness might inform/transform languages teaching with guests including Michael Rosen and David Crystal. She also project manages the annual conference for NALDIC, the national subject association for EAL.

Publications

Multilingual is Normal: An anthology of voices, talking about talking (2020)

Renyu completed her BA degree in Psychology at the University of British Columbia (Vancouver, Canada) and her MPhil degree in Education at University of Cambridge.

During her MPhil study, she worked with children aged 4 to 6 years to investigate the relationship between bilingualism, vocabulary size, and inhibitory control, and also to validate a novel app designed to assess early language development. For her Dphil study at Oxford, Renyu aims to explore the factors that might affect L2 pronunciation learning in young children and the interaction between children’s L1 and L2. She is particularly interested in the psychological factors that might influence a child’s L2 pronunciation.

Prior to studying at Oxford, Renyu worked as Research Assistant at the Assessment Research Group at British Council for one year and a half. She was involved in various projects, including gap analysis on reading demand and reading ability, participant feedback questionnaire design and analysis, design and recruitment for a new EAP task study, etc.

Bernard holds a PhD in Marketing from the University of Nottingham and a DBA from the University of Newcastle.

His research to date explores the leadership in HE. Prior to coming to Oxford, he worked in various HEIs and served as the supervisor of a secondary school.

Publications

Lee, B., Tsui, A. & Yau, O.H.M. (2019), Higher-order Goals, Trust-in-leader, and Self-efficacy as Moderators of Transformational Leadership Performance: The Case of Multi-level Marketing Organizations in China, Journal of Euromarketing, Vol.28 (3-4), 76-97. (2011 RG Impact factor: 0.83).

Conferences

Lee, B. (2020), “Self-formation for the Underprivileged,” 2020 International Online Symposium, Toward a New Paradigm of Economics,organized by Macau Ricci Institute, The University of Saint Joseph, 15 & 16 October. (Online Conference Platform Presentation).

Steve is Associate Professor of Teacher Education. He is a curriculum tutor for the Geography PGCE and MSc Learning and Teaching.

Steve is a qualified geography teacher and was previously the head of department at a comprehensive secondary school in Oxfordshire, and Head of Programmes at Bishop Grosseteste University, Lincoln.

He holds an MA in Educational Leadership and Innovation from Warwick University, an MSc in Educational Research Methodology and DPhil in Education from the University of Oxford which were funded by an ESRC Studentship. He is a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

He researches at the intersection between the academic discipline and school subject of geography, including recent collaborations developing through the Smart Cities Network for Sustainable Urban Future project which was shortlisted for the 2017 Newton Prize (India). He is currently leading research on Climate Change Education Futures in India (GCRF) in collaboration with colleagues at IISER, Pune, and on the role of cultural heritage in curriculum making in Kolkata.

Collaborations with colleagues in the School of Geography and the Environment are contributing to anti-racist curriculum futures, including in the school subject, and in postgraduate teaching through the TDEP-funded Oxford-UNISA course ‘Decolonising Research Methods’.

His research on teacher education focuses on the contribution that geography education research offers to the conceptualisation and practice of teaching. This work includes ethnographic research on teachers’ curriculum making exploring the journeys through which information travels into school classrooms, beginning teachers’ experiences of school subject departments, and the role of written lesson observation feedback in constructing ‘good teaching’.

Steve serves on the editorial board of the journal Geography, and is Chair of the Geography Education Research Collective (GEReCo/IGU-CGE).

 

Caitlin is a Doctoral student in the Department of Education working on how teachers interact with refugee and unaccompanied asylum-seeking pupils in UK schools.

Her Doctoral study uses survey data, interviews, observation, and document analysis to examine teacher knowledge, attitudes, and practices in relation to refugee pupils. Previously, Caitlin worked as a primary school teacher in Aberdeen, London, and at Rose Hill Primary School in Oxford. She completed an MA (Gaelic Medium Education, Oral History) and a PGDE (Primary Education) at the University of Aberdeen, and a BA (Human Geography, Environmental Studies) at Middlebury College in the US. She has a general interest in improving inclusion and equity in education.

Helen’s academic interest in higher education policy developed from more than 20 years of professional experience of university administration – in public relations and admissions.

She gained her doctorate from Oxford in 2010 (a study of the market created by the introduction of £3000 fees for Home/EU undergraduates at English universities in 2006); since then, she has conducted research into the impacts of student fees and funding on institutions, students, graduates and applicants within the higher education sector in England. She also works as a consultant to higher education institutions.

Helen was Pathway Convenor for the MSc Education (HE) for two years and has taught on this course since completing her DPhil. As an inspector for the British Accreditation Council, Helen has the opportunity to gain insights into the operation of higher education providers globally. She is also an Associate of the SKOPE, the department’s research centre for Skills, Knowledge and Organisational Performance.

From 2012-17, Helen was a member of the governing council of the Society for Research into Higher Education (SRHE), serving as Vice-Chair from 2014-17.

 

Jo-Anne is Director of the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment.  She completed a six-year term as Head of the Department of Education, has been Standing Adviser to the House of Commons Education Select Committee, a member of Ofqual’s Standing Advisory Group on Standards, Chair of the National Reference Test Expert Group, and a member of the Welsh Government’s Curriculum and Assessment Group.  Before coming to Oxford, Jo-Anne held academic posts at the Institute of Education, University of London and the University of Bristol. Her first degree and doctorate were in psychology and she has an MBA.  Her current research projects include Setting and Maintaining Standards in national examinations, Examination reform: the impact of modular and linear examinations at GCSE, Assessment for Learning in Africa (AFLA), intelligent accountability and the Progress in International Reading Literacy Study England national centre.

Her research interests are in educational assessment, including system-wide structures and processes, examination standards, marking and assessment design.  Jo-Anne conducts a lot of work with government and industry partners, including acting as the Standing Adviser to the House of Commons Education Select Committee, a member of Ofqual’s Standing Advisory Group and membership of the Welsh Government’s Curriculum and Assessment Group.  She is a member of the Editorial Board of the Oxford Review of Education journal and the International Advisory Board of Assessment in Education: principles, policy & practice.  She has been a Visiting Professor at the universities of Bergen and Queen’s (Belfast).  From 2013 to 2015 she was President of the Association for Educational Assessment – Europe.

Qualifications
  • B.A.H. Linguistics/Psychology – Queen’s University, Kingston On, Canada
  • M.A. Educational Psychology – McGill University, Canada
  • Ph.D. – Second Language Education – McGill University Canada

Victoria Murphy would welcome informal contacts from prospective doctoral students interested in the following topics:

  • Language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/ Language Minority) children
  • Child L2 and bilingualism
  • Foreign language learning in primary school
  • Lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Research

Victoria is active in the following research areas, and would welcome DPhil applications on any of these, particularly those relating to EAL (language minority) children and child L2 learning and foreign language learning in primary school.  She is also the convenor of the Research in English as an Additional Language (REAL) group.  Her research is currently being funded by the ESRC, Leverhulme Trust and Nuffield Foundation.

  • language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/Language minority) children
  • child L2 learning and bilingualism
  • foreign language learning in primary school
  • cognitive processes underlying L1 and L2 learning
  • lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Current Research Project(s)

Joanna is a Doctoral Student, and ESRC Grand Union DTP Scholar, researching in-class support for multilingualism in UK schools.

She has over 12 years of experience as a teaching professional, having worked as a class teacher, EAL specialist and Teaching Assistant in the UK, China, Brazil and Italy. Her main area of interest is school-based education (3-18), specifically the support for multilingual pupils and their language practices, as well as the relationship between teaching assistants and both teachers and children in schools.

Joanna holds a BA in Jurisprudence and a MSc in Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching, both from the University of Oxford. She also has a PGCE, and a PGDip in French.

Joining the Department of Education in 2020 after teaching English and foreign languages in secondary schools and early years settings for 15 years, Catherine completed the MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition in 2021. Her doctoral research investigates the effectiveness of using songs as pedagogical tools with young second language learners in formal educational settings.

Additionally, Catherine hosts The Language Revolution podcast, exploring how linguistics and language awareness might inform/transform languages teaching with guests including Michael Rosen and David Crystal. She also project manages the annual conference for NALDIC, the national subject association for EAL.

Publications

Multilingual is Normal: An anthology of voices, talking about talking (2020)

Renyu completed her BA degree in Psychology at the University of British Columbia (Vancouver, Canada) and her MPhil degree in Education at University of Cambridge.

During her MPhil study, she worked with children aged 4 to 6 years to investigate the relationship between bilingualism, vocabulary size, and inhibitory control, and also to validate a novel app designed to assess early language development. For her Dphil study at Oxford, Renyu aims to explore the factors that might affect L2 pronunciation learning in young children and the interaction between children’s L1 and L2. She is particularly interested in the psychological factors that might influence a child’s L2 pronunciation.

Prior to studying at Oxford, Renyu worked as Research Assistant at the Assessment Research Group at British Council for one year and a half. She was involved in various projects, including gap analysis on reading demand and reading ability, participant feedback questionnaire design and analysis, design and recruitment for a new EAP task study, etc.

Bernard holds a PhD in Marketing from the University of Nottingham and a DBA from the University of Newcastle.

His research to date explores the leadership in HE. Prior to coming to Oxford, he worked in various HEIs and served as the supervisor of a secondary school.

Publications

Lee, B., Tsui, A. & Yau, O.H.M. (2019), Higher-order Goals, Trust-in-leader, and Self-efficacy as Moderators of Transformational Leadership Performance: The Case of Multi-level Marketing Organizations in China, Journal of Euromarketing, Vol.28 (3-4), 76-97. (2011 RG Impact factor: 0.83).

Conferences

Lee, B. (2020), “Self-formation for the Underprivileged,” 2020 International Online Symposium, Toward a New Paradigm of Economics,organized by Macau Ricci Institute, The University of Saint Joseph, 15 & 16 October. (Online Conference Platform Presentation).

Steve is Associate Professor of Teacher Education. He is a curriculum tutor for the Geography PGCE and MSc Learning and Teaching.

Steve is a qualified geography teacher and was previously the head of department at a comprehensive secondary school in Oxfordshire, and Head of Programmes at Bishop Grosseteste University, Lincoln.

He holds an MA in Educational Leadership and Innovation from Warwick University, an MSc in Educational Research Methodology and DPhil in Education from the University of Oxford which were funded by an ESRC Studentship. He is a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

He researches at the intersection between the academic discipline and school subject of geography, including recent collaborations developing through the Smart Cities Network for Sustainable Urban Future project which was shortlisted for the 2017 Newton Prize (India). He is currently leading research on Climate Change Education Futures in India (GCRF) in collaboration with colleagues at IISER, Pune, and on the role of cultural heritage in curriculum making in Kolkata.

Collaborations with colleagues in the School of Geography and the Environment are contributing to anti-racist curriculum futures, including in the school subject, and in postgraduate teaching through the TDEP-funded Oxford-UNISA course ‘Decolonising Research Methods’.

His research on teacher education focuses on the contribution that geography education research offers to the conceptualisation and practice of teaching. This work includes ethnographic research on teachers’ curriculum making exploring the journeys through which information travels into school classrooms, beginning teachers’ experiences of school subject departments, and the role of written lesson observation feedback in constructing ‘good teaching’.

Steve serves on the editorial board of the journal Geography, and is Chair of the Geography Education Research Collective (GEReCo/IGU-CGE).

 

Caitlin is a Doctoral student in the Department of Education working on how teachers interact with refugee and unaccompanied asylum-seeking pupils in UK schools.

Her Doctoral study uses survey data, interviews, observation, and document analysis to examine teacher knowledge, attitudes, and practices in relation to refugee pupils. Previously, Caitlin worked as a primary school teacher in Aberdeen, London, and at Rose Hill Primary School in Oxford. She completed an MA (Gaelic Medium Education, Oral History) and a PGDE (Primary Education) at the University of Aberdeen, and a BA (Human Geography, Environmental Studies) at Middlebury College in the US. She has a general interest in improving inclusion and equity in education.

Helen’s academic interest in higher education policy developed from more than 20 years of professional experience of university administration – in public relations and admissions.

She gained her doctorate from Oxford in 2010 (a study of the market created by the introduction of £3000 fees for Home/EU undergraduates at English universities in 2006); since then, she has conducted research into the impacts of student fees and funding on institutions, students, graduates and applicants within the higher education sector in England. She also works as a consultant to higher education institutions.

Helen was Pathway Convenor for the MSc Education (HE) for two years and has taught on this course since completing her DPhil. As an inspector for the British Accreditation Council, Helen has the opportunity to gain insights into the operation of higher education providers globally. She is also an Associate of the SKOPE, the department’s research centre for Skills, Knowledge and Organisational Performance.

From 2012-17, Helen was a member of the governing council of the Society for Research into Higher Education (SRHE), serving as Vice-Chair from 2014-17.

 

Jo-Anne is Director of the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment.  She completed a six-year term as Head of the Department of Education, has been Standing Adviser to the House of Commons Education Select Committee, a member of Ofqual’s Standing Advisory Group on Standards, Chair of the National Reference Test Expert Group, and a member of the Welsh Government’s Curriculum and Assessment Group.  Before coming to Oxford, Jo-Anne held academic posts at the Institute of Education, University of London and the University of Bristol. Her first degree and doctorate were in psychology and she has an MBA.  Her current research projects include Setting and Maintaining Standards in national examinations, Examination reform: the impact of modular and linear examinations at GCSE, Assessment for Learning in Africa (AFLA), intelligent accountability and the Progress in International Reading Literacy Study England national centre.

Her research interests are in educational assessment, including system-wide structures and processes, examination standards, marking and assessment design.  Jo-Anne conducts a lot of work with government and industry partners, including acting as the Standing Adviser to the House of Commons Education Select Committee, a member of Ofqual’s Standing Advisory Group and membership of the Welsh Government’s Curriculum and Assessment Group.  She is a member of the Editorial Board of the Oxford Review of Education journal and the International Advisory Board of Assessment in Education: principles, policy & practice.  She has been a Visiting Professor at the universities of Bergen and Queen’s (Belfast).  From 2013 to 2015 she was President of the Association for Educational Assessment – Europe.

Qualifications
  • B.A.H. Linguistics/Psychology – Queen’s University, Kingston On, Canada
  • M.A. Educational Psychology – McGill University, Canada
  • Ph.D. – Second Language Education – McGill University Canada

Victoria Murphy would welcome informal contacts from prospective doctoral students interested in the following topics:

  • Language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/ Language Minority) children
  • Child L2 and bilingualism
  • Foreign language learning in primary school
  • Lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Research

Victoria is active in the following research areas, and would welcome DPhil applications on any of these, particularly those relating to EAL (language minority) children and child L2 learning and foreign language learning in primary school.  She is also the convenor of the Research in English as an Additional Language (REAL) group.  Her research is currently being funded by the ESRC, Leverhulme Trust and Nuffield Foundation.

  • language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/Language minority) children
  • child L2 learning and bilingualism
  • foreign language learning in primary school
  • cognitive processes underlying L1 and L2 learning
  • lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Current Research Project(s)

Joanna is a Doctoral Student, and ESRC Grand Union DTP Scholar, researching in-class support for multilingualism in UK schools.

She has over 12 years of experience as a teaching professional, having worked as a class teacher, EAL specialist and Teaching Assistant in the UK, China, Brazil and Italy. Her main area of interest is school-based education (3-18), specifically the support for multilingual pupils and their language practices, as well as the relationship between teaching assistants and both teachers and children in schools.

Joanna holds a BA in Jurisprudence and a MSc in Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching, both from the University of Oxford. She also has a PGCE, and a PGDip in French.

Joining the Department of Education in 2020 after teaching English and foreign languages in secondary schools and early years settings for 15 years, Catherine completed the MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition in 2021. Her doctoral research investigates the effectiveness of using songs as pedagogical tools with young second language learners in formal educational settings.

Additionally, Catherine hosts The Language Revolution podcast, exploring how linguistics and language awareness might inform/transform languages teaching with guests including Michael Rosen and David Crystal. She also project manages the annual conference for NALDIC, the national subject association for EAL.

Publications

Multilingual is Normal: An anthology of voices, talking about talking (2020)

Renyu completed her BA degree in Psychology at the University of British Columbia (Vancouver, Canada) and her MPhil degree in Education at University of Cambridge.

During her MPhil study, she worked with children aged 4 to 6 years to investigate the relationship between bilingualism, vocabulary size, and inhibitory control, and also to validate a novel app designed to assess early language development. For her Dphil study at Oxford, Renyu aims to explore the factors that might affect L2 pronunciation learning in young children and the interaction between children’s L1 and L2. She is particularly interested in the psychological factors that might influence a child’s L2 pronunciation.

Prior to studying at Oxford, Renyu worked as Research Assistant at the Assessment Research Group at British Council for one year and a half. She was involved in various projects, including gap analysis on reading demand and reading ability, participant feedback questionnaire design and analysis, design and recruitment for a new EAP task study, etc.

Bernard holds a PhD in Marketing from the University of Nottingham and a DBA from the University of Newcastle.

His research to date explores the leadership in HE. Prior to coming to Oxford, he worked in various HEIs and served as the supervisor of a secondary school.

Publications

Lee, B., Tsui, A. & Yau, O.H.M. (2019), Higher-order Goals, Trust-in-leader, and Self-efficacy as Moderators of Transformational Leadership Performance: The Case of Multi-level Marketing Organizations in China, Journal of Euromarketing, Vol.28 (3-4), 76-97. (2011 RG Impact factor: 0.83).

Conferences

Lee, B. (2020), “Self-formation for the Underprivileged,” 2020 International Online Symposium, Toward a New Paradigm of Economics,organized by Macau Ricci Institute, The University of Saint Joseph, 15 & 16 October. (Online Conference Platform Presentation).

Steve is Associate Professor of Teacher Education. He is a curriculum tutor for the Geography PGCE and MSc Learning and Teaching.

Steve is a qualified geography teacher and was previously the head of department at a comprehensive secondary school in Oxfordshire, and Head of Programmes at Bishop Grosseteste University, Lincoln.

He holds an MA in Educational Leadership and Innovation from Warwick University, an MSc in Educational Research Methodology and DPhil in Education from the University of Oxford which were funded by an ESRC Studentship. He is a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

He researches at the intersection between the academic discipline and school subject of geography, including recent collaborations developing through the Smart Cities Network for Sustainable Urban Future project which was shortlisted for the 2017 Newton Prize (India). He is currently leading research on Climate Change Education Futures in India (GCRF) in collaboration with colleagues at IISER, Pune, and on the role of cultural heritage in curriculum making in Kolkata.

Collaborations with colleagues in the School of Geography and the Environment are contributing to anti-racist curriculum futures, including in the school subject, and in postgraduate teaching through the TDEP-funded Oxford-UNISA course ‘Decolonising Research Methods’.

His research on teacher education focuses on the contribution that geography education research offers to the conceptualisation and practice of teaching. This work includes ethnographic research on teachers’ curriculum making exploring the journeys through which information travels into school classrooms, beginning teachers’ experiences of school subject departments, and the role of written lesson observation feedback in constructing ‘good teaching’.

Steve serves on the editorial board of the journal Geography, and is Chair of the Geography Education Research Collective (GEReCo/IGU-CGE).

 

Caitlin is a Doctoral student in the Department of Education working on how teachers interact with refugee and unaccompanied asylum-seeking pupils in UK schools.

Her Doctoral study uses survey data, interviews, observation, and document analysis to examine teacher knowledge, attitudes, and practices in relation to refugee pupils. Previously, Caitlin worked as a primary school teacher in Aberdeen, London, and at Rose Hill Primary School in Oxford. She completed an MA (Gaelic Medium Education, Oral History) and a PGDE (Primary Education) at the University of Aberdeen, and a BA (Human Geography, Environmental Studies) at Middlebury College in the US. She has a general interest in improving inclusion and equity in education.

Helen’s academic interest in higher education policy developed from more than 20 years of professional experience of university administration – in public relations and admissions.

She gained her doctorate from Oxford in 2010 (a study of the market created by the introduction of £3000 fees for Home/EU undergraduates at English universities in 2006); since then, she has conducted research into the impacts of student fees and funding on institutions, students, graduates and applicants within the higher education sector in England. She also works as a consultant to higher education institutions.

Helen was Pathway Convenor for the MSc Education (HE) for two years and has taught on this course since completing her DPhil. As an inspector for the British Accreditation Council, Helen has the opportunity to gain insights into the operation of higher education providers globally. She is also an Associate of the SKOPE, the department’s research centre for Skills, Knowledge and Organisational Performance.

From 2012-17, Helen was a member of the governing council of the Society for Research into Higher Education (SRHE), serving as Vice-Chair from 2014-17.

 

Jo-Anne is Director of the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment.  She completed a six-year term as Head of the Department of Education, has been Standing Adviser to the House of Commons Education Select Committee, a member of Ofqual’s Standing Advisory Group on Standards, Chair of the National Reference Test Expert Group, and a member of the Welsh Government’s Curriculum and Assessment Group.  Before coming to Oxford, Jo-Anne held academic posts at the Institute of Education, University of London and the University of Bristol. Her first degree and doctorate were in psychology and she has an MBA.  Her current research projects include Setting and Maintaining Standards in national examinations, Examination reform: the impact of modular and linear examinations at GCSE, Assessment for Learning in Africa (AFLA), intelligent accountability and the Progress in International Reading Literacy Study England national centre.

Her research interests are in educational assessment, including system-wide structures and processes, examination standards, marking and assessment design.  Jo-Anne conducts a lot of work with government and industry partners, including acting as the Standing Adviser to the House of Commons Education Select Committee, a member of Ofqual’s Standing Advisory Group and membership of the Welsh Government’s Curriculum and Assessment Group.  She is a member of the Editorial Board of the Oxford Review of Education journal and the International Advisory Board of Assessment in Education: principles, policy & practice.  She has been a Visiting Professor at the universities of Bergen and Queen’s (Belfast).  From 2013 to 2015 she was President of the Association for Educational Assessment – Europe.

Qualifications
  • B.A.H. Linguistics/Psychology – Queen’s University, Kingston On, Canada
  • M.A. Educational Psychology – McGill University, Canada
  • Ph.D. – Second Language Education – McGill University Canada

Victoria Murphy would welcome informal contacts from prospective doctoral students interested in the following topics:

  • Language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/ Language Minority) children
  • Child L2 and bilingualism
  • Foreign language learning in primary school
  • Lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Research

Victoria is active in the following research areas, and would welcome DPhil applications on any of these, particularly those relating to EAL (language minority) children and child L2 learning and foreign language learning in primary school.  She is also the convenor of the Research in English as an Additional Language (REAL) group.  Her research is currently being funded by the ESRC, Leverhulme Trust and Nuffield Foundation.

  • language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/Language minority) children
  • child L2 learning and bilingualism
  • foreign language learning in primary school
  • cognitive processes underlying L1 and L2 learning
  • lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Current Research Project(s)

Joanna is a Doctoral Student, and ESRC Grand Union DTP Scholar, researching in-class support for multilingualism in UK schools.

She has over 12 years of experience as a teaching professional, having worked as a class teacher, EAL specialist and Teaching Assistant in the UK, China, Brazil and Italy. Her main area of interest is school-based education (3-18), specifically the support for multilingual pupils and their language practices, as well as the relationship between teaching assistants and both teachers and children in schools.

Joanna holds a BA in Jurisprudence and a MSc in Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching, both from the University of Oxford. She also has a PGCE, and a PGDip in French.

Joining the Department of Education in 2020 after teaching English and foreign languages in secondary schools and early years settings for 15 years, Catherine completed the MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition in 2021. Her doctoral research investigates the effectiveness of using songs as pedagogical tools with young second language learners in formal educational settings.

Additionally, Catherine hosts The Language Revolution podcast, exploring how linguistics and language awareness might inform/transform languages teaching with guests including Michael Rosen and David Crystal. She also project manages the annual conference for NALDIC, the national subject association for EAL.

Publications

Multilingual is Normal: An anthology of voices, talking about talking (2020)

Renyu completed her BA degree in Psychology at the University of British Columbia (Vancouver, Canada) and her MPhil degree in Education at University of Cambridge.

During her MPhil study, she worked with children aged 4 to 6 years to investigate the relationship between bilingualism, vocabulary size, and inhibitory control, and also to validate a novel app designed to assess early language development. For her Dphil study at Oxford, Renyu aims to explore the factors that might affect L2 pronunciation learning in young children and the interaction between children’s L1 and L2. She is particularly interested in the psychological factors that might influence a child’s L2 pronunciation.

Prior to studying at Oxford, Renyu worked as Research Assistant at the Assessment Research Group at British Council for one year and a half. She was involved in various projects, including gap analysis on reading demand and reading ability, participant feedback questionnaire design and analysis, design and recruitment for a new EAP task study, etc.

Bernard holds a PhD in Marketing from the University of Nottingham and a DBA from the University of Newcastle.

His research to date explores the leadership in HE. Prior to coming to Oxford, he worked in various HEIs and served as the supervisor of a secondary school.

Publications

Lee, B., Tsui, A. & Yau, O.H.M. (2019), Higher-order Goals, Trust-in-leader, and Self-efficacy as Moderators of Transformational Leadership Performance: The Case of Multi-level Marketing Organizations in China, Journal of Euromarketing, Vol.28 (3-4), 76-97. (2011 RG Impact factor: 0.83).

Conferences

Lee, B. (2020), “Self-formation for the Underprivileged,” 2020 International Online Symposium, Toward a New Paradigm of Economics,organized by Macau Ricci Institute, The University of Saint Joseph, 15 & 16 October. (Online Conference Platform Presentation).

Steve is Associate Professor of Teacher Education. He is a curriculum tutor for the Geography PGCE and MSc Learning and Teaching.

Steve is a qualified geography teacher and was previously the head of department at a comprehensive secondary school in Oxfordshire, and Head of Programmes at Bishop Grosseteste University, Lincoln.

He holds an MA in Educational Leadership and Innovation from Warwick University, an MSc in Educational Research Methodology and DPhil in Education from the University of Oxford which were funded by an ESRC Studentship. He is a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

He researches at the intersection between the academic discipline and school subject of geography, including recent collaborations developing through the Smart Cities Network for Sustainable Urban Future project which was shortlisted for the 2017 Newton Prize (India). He is currently leading research on Climate Change Education Futures in India (GCRF) in collaboration with colleagues at IISER, Pune, and on the role of cultural heritage in curriculum making in Kolkata.

Collaborations with colleagues in the School of Geography and the Environment are contributing to anti-racist curriculum futures, including in the school subject, and in postgraduate teaching through the TDEP-funded Oxford-UNISA course ‘Decolonising Research Methods’.

His research on teacher education focuses on the contribution that geography education research offers to the conceptualisation and practice of teaching. This work includes ethnographic research on teachers’ curriculum making exploring the journeys through which information travels into school classrooms, beginning teachers’ experiences of school subject departments, and the role of written lesson observation feedback in constructing ‘good teaching’.

Steve serves on the editorial board of the journal Geography, and is Chair of the Geography Education Research Collective (GEReCo/IGU-CGE).

 

Caitlin is a Doctoral student in the Department of Education working on how teachers interact with refugee and unaccompanied asylum-seeking pupils in UK schools.

Her Doctoral study uses survey data, interviews, observation, and document analysis to examine teacher knowledge, attitudes, and practices in relation to refugee pupils. Previously, Caitlin worked as a primary school teacher in Aberdeen, London, and at Rose Hill Primary School in Oxford. She completed an MA (Gaelic Medium Education, Oral History) and a PGDE (Primary Education) at the University of Aberdeen, and a BA (Human Geography, Environmental Studies) at Middlebury College in the US. She has a general interest in improving inclusion and equity in education.

Helen’s academic interest in higher education policy developed from more than 20 years of professional experience of university administration – in public relations and admissions.

She gained her doctorate from Oxford in 2010 (a study of the market created by the introduction of £3000 fees for Home/EU undergraduates at English universities in 2006); since then, she has conducted research into the impacts of student fees and funding on institutions, students, graduates and applicants within the higher education sector in England. She also works as a consultant to higher education institutions.

Helen was Pathway Convenor for the MSc Education (HE) for two years and has taught on this course since completing her DPhil. As an inspector for the British Accreditation Council, Helen has the opportunity to gain insights into the operation of higher education providers globally. She is also an Associate of the SKOPE, the department’s research centre for Skills, Knowledge and Organisational Performance.

From 2012-17, Helen was a member of the governing council of the Society for Research into Higher Education (SRHE), serving as Vice-Chair from 2014-17.

 

Jo-Anne is Director of the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment.  She completed a six-year term as Head of the Department of Education, has been Standing Adviser to the House of Commons Education Select Committee, a member of Ofqual’s Standing Advisory Group on Standards, Chair of the National Reference Test Expert Group, and a member of the Welsh Government’s Curriculum and Assessment Group.  Before coming to Oxford, Jo-Anne held academic posts at the Institute of Education, University of London and the University of Bristol. Her first degree and doctorate were in psychology and she has an MBA.  Her current research projects include Setting and Maintaining Standards in national examinations, Examination reform: the impact of modular and linear examinations at GCSE, Assessment for Learning in Africa (AFLA), intelligent accountability and the Progress in International Reading Literacy Study England national centre.

Her research interests are in educational assessment, including system-wide structures and processes, examination standards, marking and assessment design.  Jo-Anne conducts a lot of work with government and industry partners, including acting as the Standing Adviser to the House of Commons Education Select Committee, a member of Ofqual’s Standing Advisory Group and membership of the Welsh Government’s Curriculum and Assessment Group.  She is a member of the Editorial Board of the Oxford Review of Education journal and the International Advisory Board of Assessment in Education: principles, policy & practice.  She has been a Visiting Professor at the universities of Bergen and Queen’s (Belfast).  From 2013 to 2015 she was President of the Association for Educational Assessment – Europe.

Qualifications
  • B.A.H. Linguistics/Psychology – Queen’s University, Kingston On, Canada
  • M.A. Educational Psychology – McGill University, Canada
  • Ph.D. – Second Language Education – McGill University Canada

Victoria Murphy would welcome informal contacts from prospective doctoral students interested in the following topics:

  • Language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/ Language Minority) children
  • Child L2 and bilingualism
  • Foreign language learning in primary school
  • Lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Research

Victoria is active in the following research areas, and would welcome DPhil applications on any of these, particularly those relating to EAL (language minority) children and child L2 learning and foreign language learning in primary school.  She is also the convenor of the Research in English as an Additional Language (REAL) group.  Her research is currently being funded by the ESRC, Leverhulme Trust and Nuffield Foundation.

  • language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/Language minority) children
  • child L2 learning and bilingualism
  • foreign language learning in primary school
  • cognitive processes underlying L1 and L2 learning
  • lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Current Research Project(s)

Joanna is a Doctoral Student, and ESRC Grand Union DTP Scholar, researching in-class support for multilingualism in UK schools.

She has over 12 years of experience as a teaching professional, having worked as a class teacher, EAL specialist and Teaching Assistant in the UK, China, Brazil and Italy. Her main area of interest is school-based education (3-18), specifically the support for multilingual pupils and their language practices, as well as the relationship between teaching assistants and both teachers and children in schools.

Joanna holds a BA in Jurisprudence and a MSc in Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching, both from the University of Oxford. She also has a PGCE, and a PGDip in French.

Joining the Department of Education in 2020 after teaching English and foreign languages in secondary schools and early years settings for 15 years, Catherine completed the MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition in 2021. Her doctoral research investigates the effectiveness of using songs as pedagogical tools with young second language learners in formal educational settings.

Additionally, Catherine hosts The Language Revolution podcast, exploring how linguistics and language awareness might inform/transform languages teaching with guests including Michael Rosen and David Crystal. She also project manages the annual conference for NALDIC, the national subject association for EAL.

Publications

Multilingual is Normal: An anthology of voices, talking about talking (2020)

Renyu completed her BA degree in Psychology at the University of British Columbia (Vancouver, Canada) and her MPhil degree in Education at University of Cambridge.

During her MPhil study, she worked with children aged 4 to 6 years to investigate the relationship between bilingualism, vocabulary size, and inhibitory control, and also to validate a novel app designed to assess early language development. For her Dphil study at Oxford, Renyu aims to explore the factors that might affect L2 pronunciation learning in young children and the interaction between children’s L1 and L2. She is particularly interested in the psychological factors that might influence a child’s L2 pronunciation.

Prior to studying at Oxford, Renyu worked as Research Assistant at the Assessment Research Group at British Council for one year and a half. She was involved in various projects, including gap analysis on reading demand and reading ability, participant feedback questionnaire design and analysis, design and recruitment for a new EAP task study, etc.

Bernard holds a PhD in Marketing from the University of Nottingham and a DBA from the University of Newcastle.

His research to date explores the leadership in HE. Prior to coming to Oxford, he worked in various HEIs and served as the supervisor of a secondary school.

Publications

Lee, B., Tsui, A. & Yau, O.H.M. (2019), Higher-order Goals, Trust-in-leader, and Self-efficacy as Moderators of Transformational Leadership Performance: The Case of Multi-level Marketing Organizations in China, Journal of Euromarketing, Vol.28 (3-4), 76-97. (2011 RG Impact factor: 0.83).

Conferences

Lee, B. (2020), “Self-formation for the Underprivileged,” 2020 International Online Symposium, Toward a New Paradigm of Economics,organized by Macau Ricci Institute, The University of Saint Joseph, 15 & 16 October. (Online Conference Platform Presentation).

Steve is Associate Professor of Teacher Education. He is a curriculum tutor for the Geography PGCE and MSc Learning and Teaching.

Steve is a qualified geography teacher and was previously the head of department at a comprehensive secondary school in Oxfordshire, and Head of Programmes at Bishop Grosseteste University, Lincoln.

He holds an MA in Educational Leadership and Innovation from Warwick University, an MSc in Educational Research Methodology and DPhil in Education from the University of Oxford which were funded by an ESRC Studentship. He is a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

He researches at the intersection between the academic discipline and school subject of geography, including recent collaborations developing through the Smart Cities Network for Sustainable Urban Future project which was shortlisted for the 2017 Newton Prize (India). He is currently leading research on Climate Change Education Futures in India (GCRF) in collaboration with colleagues at IISER, Pune, and on the role of cultural heritage in curriculum making in Kolkata.

Collaborations with colleagues in the School of Geography and the Environment are contributing to anti-racist curriculum futures, including in the school subject, and in postgraduate teaching through the TDEP-funded Oxford-UNISA course ‘Decolonising Research Methods’.

His research on teacher education focuses on the contribution that geography education research offers to the conceptualisation and practice of teaching. This work includes ethnographic research on teachers’ curriculum making exploring the journeys through which information travels into school classrooms, beginning teachers’ experiences of school subject departments, and the role of written lesson observation feedback in constructing ‘good teaching’.

Steve serves on the editorial board of the journal Geography, and is Chair of the Geography Education Research Collective (GEReCo/IGU-CGE).

 

Caitlin is a Doctoral student in the Department of Education working on how teachers interact with refugee and unaccompanied asylum-seeking pupils in UK schools.

Her Doctoral study uses survey data, interviews, observation, and document analysis to examine teacher knowledge, attitudes, and practices in relation to refugee pupils. Previously, Caitlin worked as a primary school teacher in Aberdeen, London, and at Rose Hill Primary School in Oxford. She completed an MA (Gaelic Medium Education, Oral History) and a PGDE (Primary Education) at the University of Aberdeen, and a BA (Human Geography, Environmental Studies) at Middlebury College in the US. She has a general interest in improving inclusion and equity in education.

Helen’s academic interest in higher education policy developed from more than 20 years of professional experience of university administration – in public relations and admissions.

She gained her doctorate from Oxford in 2010 (a study of the market created by the introduction of £3000 fees for Home/EU undergraduates at English universities in 2006); since then, she has conducted research into the impacts of student fees and funding on institutions, students, graduates and applicants within the higher education sector in England. She also works as a consultant to higher education institutions.

Helen was Pathway Convenor for the MSc Education (HE) for two years and has taught on this course since completing her DPhil. As an inspector for the British Accreditation Council, Helen has the opportunity to gain insights into the operation of higher education providers globally. She is also an Associate of the SKOPE, the department’s research centre for Skills, Knowledge and Organisational Performance.

From 2012-17, Helen was a member of the governing council of the Society for Research into Higher Education (SRHE), serving as Vice-Chair from 2014-17.

 

Jo-Anne is Director of the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment.  She completed a six-year term as Head of the Department of Education, has been Standing Adviser to the House of Commons Education Select Committee, a member of Ofqual’s Standing Advisory Group on Standards, Chair of the National Reference Test Expert Group, and a member of the Welsh Government’s Curriculum and Assessment Group.  Before coming to Oxford, Jo-Anne held academic posts at the Institute of Education, University of London and the University of Bristol. Her first degree and doctorate were in psychology and she has an MBA.  Her current research projects include Setting and Maintaining Standards in national examinations, Examination reform: the impact of modular and linear examinations at GCSE, Assessment for Learning in Africa (AFLA), intelligent accountability and the Progress in International Reading Literacy Study England national centre.

Her research interests are in educational assessment, including system-wide structures and processes, examination standards, marking and assessment design.  Jo-Anne conducts a lot of work with government and industry partners, including acting as the Standing Adviser to the House of Commons Education Select Committee, a member of Ofqual’s Standing Advisory Group and membership of the Welsh Government’s Curriculum and Assessment Group.  She is a member of the Editorial Board of the Oxford Review of Education journal and the International Advisory Board of Assessment in Education: principles, policy & practice.  She has been a Visiting Professor at the universities of Bergen and Queen’s (Belfast).  From 2013 to 2015 she was President of the Association for Educational Assessment – Europe.

Qualifications
  • B.A.H. Linguistics/Psychology – Queen’s University, Kingston On, Canada
  • M.A. Educational Psychology – McGill University, Canada
  • Ph.D. – Second Language Education – McGill University Canada

Victoria Murphy would welcome informal contacts from prospective doctoral students interested in the following topics:

  • Language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/ Language Minority) children
  • Child L2 and bilingualism
  • Foreign language learning in primary school
  • Lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Research

Victoria is active in the following research areas, and would welcome DPhil applications on any of these, particularly those relating to EAL (language minority) children and child L2 learning and foreign language learning in primary school.  She is also the convenor of the Research in English as an Additional Language (REAL) group.  Her research is currently being funded by the ESRC, Leverhulme Trust and Nuffield Foundation.

  • language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/Language minority) children
  • child L2 learning and bilingualism
  • foreign language learning in primary school
  • cognitive processes underlying L1 and L2 learning
  • lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Current Research Project(s)

Joanna is a Doctoral Student, and ESRC Grand Union DTP Scholar, researching in-class support for multilingualism in UK schools.

She has over 12 years of experience as a teaching professional, having worked as a class teacher, EAL specialist and Teaching Assistant in the UK, China, Brazil and Italy. Her main area of interest is school-based education (3-18), specifically the support for multilingual pupils and their language practices, as well as the relationship between teaching assistants and both teachers and children in schools.

Joanna holds a BA in Jurisprudence and a MSc in Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching, both from the University of Oxford. She also has a PGCE, and a PGDip in French.

Joining the Department of Education in 2020 after teaching English and foreign languages in secondary schools and early years settings for 15 years, Catherine completed the MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition in 2021. Her doctoral research investigates the effectiveness of using songs as pedagogical tools with young second language learners in formal educational settings.

Additionally, Catherine hosts The Language Revolution podcast, exploring how linguistics and language awareness might inform/transform languages teaching with guests including Michael Rosen and David Crystal. She also project manages the annual conference for NALDIC, the national subject association for EAL.

Publications

Multilingual is Normal: An anthology of voices, talking about talking (2020)

Renyu completed her BA degree in Psychology at the University of British Columbia (Vancouver, Canada) and her MPhil degree in Education at University of Cambridge.

During her MPhil study, she worked with children aged 4 to 6 years to investigate the relationship between bilingualism, vocabulary size, and inhibitory control, and also to validate a novel app designed to assess early language development. For her Dphil study at Oxford, Renyu aims to explore the factors that might affect L2 pronunciation learning in young children and the interaction between children’s L1 and L2. She is particularly interested in the psychological factors that might influence a child’s L2 pronunciation.

Prior to studying at Oxford, Renyu worked as Research Assistant at the Assessment Research Group at British Council for one year and a half. She was involved in various projects, including gap analysis on reading demand and reading ability, participant feedback questionnaire design and analysis, design and recruitment for a new EAP task study, etc.

Bernard holds a PhD in Marketing from the University of Nottingham and a DBA from the University of Newcastle.

His research to date explores the leadership in HE. Prior to coming to Oxford, he worked in various HEIs and served as the supervisor of a secondary school.

Publications

Lee, B., Tsui, A. & Yau, O.H.M. (2019), Higher-order Goals, Trust-in-leader, and Self-efficacy as Moderators of Transformational Leadership Performance: The Case of Multi-level Marketing Organizations in China, Journal of Euromarketing, Vol.28 (3-4), 76-97. (2011 RG Impact factor: 0.83).

Conferences

Lee, B. (2020), “Self-formation for the Underprivileged,” 2020 International Online Symposium, Toward a New Paradigm of Economics,organized by Macau Ricci Institute, The University of Saint Joseph, 15 & 16 October. (Online Conference Platform Presentation).

Steve is Associate Professor of Teacher Education. He is a curriculum tutor for the Geography PGCE and MSc Learning and Teaching.

Steve is a qualified geography teacher and was previously the head of department at a comprehensive secondary school in Oxfordshire, and Head of Programmes at Bishop Grosseteste University, Lincoln.

He holds an MA in Educational Leadership and Innovation from Warwick University, an MSc in Educational Research Methodology and DPhil in Education from the University of Oxford which were funded by an ESRC Studentship. He is a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

He researches at the intersection between the academic discipline and school subject of geography, including recent collaborations developing through the Smart Cities Network for Sustainable Urban Future project which was shortlisted for the 2017 Newton Prize (India). He is currently leading research on Climate Change Education Futures in India (GCRF) in collaboration with colleagues at IISER, Pune, and on the role of cultural heritage in curriculum making in Kolkata.

Collaborations with colleagues in the School of Geography and the Environment are contributing to anti-racist curriculum futures, including in the school subject, and in postgraduate teaching through the TDEP-funded Oxford-UNISA course ‘Decolonising Research Methods’.

His research on teacher education focuses on the contribution that geography education research offers to the conceptualisation and practice of teaching. This work includes ethnographic research on teachers’ curriculum making exploring the journeys through which information travels into school classrooms, beginning teachers’ experiences of school subject departments, and the role of written lesson observation feedback in constructing ‘good teaching’.

Steve serves on the editorial board of the journal Geography, and is Chair of the Geography Education Research Collective (GEReCo/IGU-CGE).

 

Caitlin is a Doctoral student in the Department of Education working on how teachers interact with refugee and unaccompanied asylum-seeking pupils in UK schools.

Her Doctoral study uses survey data, interviews, observation, and document analysis to examine teacher knowledge, attitudes, and practices in relation to refugee pupils. Previously, Caitlin worked as a primary school teacher in Aberdeen, London, and at Rose Hill Primary School in Oxford. She completed an MA (Gaelic Medium Education, Oral History) and a PGDE (Primary Education) at the University of Aberdeen, and a BA (Human Geography, Environmental Studies) at Middlebury College in the US. She has a general interest in improving inclusion and equity in education.

Helen’s academic interest in higher education policy developed from more than 20 years of professional experience of university administration – in public relations and admissions.

She gained her doctorate from Oxford in 2010 (a study of the market created by the introduction of £3000 fees for Home/EU undergraduates at English universities in 2006); since then, she has conducted research into the impacts of student fees and funding on institutions, students, graduates and applicants within the higher education sector in England. She also works as a consultant to higher education institutions.

Helen was Pathway Convenor for the MSc Education (HE) for two years and has taught on this course since completing her DPhil. As an inspector for the British Accreditation Council, Helen has the opportunity to gain insights into the operation of higher education providers globally. She is also an Associate of the SKOPE, the department’s research centre for Skills, Knowledge and Organisational Performance.

From 2012-17, Helen was a member of the governing council of the Society for Research into Higher Education (SRHE), serving as Vice-Chair from 2014-17.

 

Jo-Anne is Director of the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment.  She completed a six-year term as Head of the Department of Education, has been Standing Adviser to the House of Commons Education Select Committee, a member of Ofqual’s Standing Advisory Group on Standards, Chair of the National Reference Test Expert Group, and a member of the Welsh Government’s Curriculum and Assessment Group.  Before coming to Oxford, Jo-Anne held academic posts at the Institute of Education, University of London and the University of Bristol. Her first degree and doctorate were in psychology and she has an MBA.  Her current research projects include Setting and Maintaining Standards in national examinations, Examination reform: the impact of modular and linear examinations at GCSE, Assessment for Learning in Africa (AFLA), intelligent accountability and the Progress in International Reading Literacy Study England national centre.

Her research interests are in educational assessment, including system-wide structures and processes, examination standards, marking and assessment design.  Jo-Anne conducts a lot of work with government and industry partners, including acting as the Standing Adviser to the House of Commons Education Select Committee, a member of Ofqual’s Standing Advisory Group and membership of the Welsh Government’s Curriculum and Assessment Group.  She is a member of the Editorial Board of the Oxford Review of Education journal and the International Advisory Board of Assessment in Education: principles, policy & practice.  She has been a Visiting Professor at the universities of Bergen and Queen’s (Belfast).  From 2013 to 2015 she was President of the Association for Educational Assessment – Europe.

Qualifications
  • B.A.H. Linguistics/Psychology – Queen’s University, Kingston On, Canada
  • M.A. Educational Psychology – McGill University, Canada
  • Ph.D. – Second Language Education – McGill University Canada

Victoria Murphy would welcome informal contacts from prospective doctoral students interested in the following topics:

  • Language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/ Language Minority) children
  • Child L2 and bilingualism
  • Foreign language learning in primary school
  • Lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Research

Victoria is active in the following research areas, and would welcome DPhil applications on any of these, particularly those relating to EAL (language minority) children and child L2 learning and foreign language learning in primary school.  She is also the convenor of the Research in English as an Additional Language (REAL) group.  Her research is currently being funded by the ESRC, Leverhulme Trust and Nuffield Foundation.

  • language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/Language minority) children
  • child L2 learning and bilingualism
  • foreign language learning in primary school
  • cognitive processes underlying L1 and L2 learning
  • lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Current Research Project(s)

Joanna is a Doctoral Student, and ESRC Grand Union DTP Scholar, researching in-class support for multilingualism in UK schools.

She has over 12 years of experience as a teaching professional, having worked as a class teacher, EAL specialist and Teaching Assistant in the UK, China, Brazil and Italy. Her main area of interest is school-based education (3-18), specifically the support for multilingual pupils and their language practices, as well as the relationship between teaching assistants and both teachers and children in schools.

Joanna holds a BA in Jurisprudence and a MSc in Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching, both from the University of Oxford. She also has a PGCE, and a PGDip in French.

Joining the Department of Education in 2020 after teaching English and foreign languages in secondary schools and early years settings for 15 years, Catherine completed the MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition in 2021. Her doctoral research investigates the effectiveness of using songs as pedagogical tools with young second language learners in formal educational settings.

Additionally, Catherine hosts The Language Revolution podcast, exploring how linguistics and language awareness might inform/transform languages teaching with guests including Michael Rosen and David Crystal. She also project manages the annual conference for NALDIC, the national subject association for EAL.

Publications

Multilingual is Normal: An anthology of voices, talking about talking (2020)

Renyu completed her BA degree in Psychology at the University of British Columbia (Vancouver, Canada) and her MPhil degree in Education at University of Cambridge.

During her MPhil study, she worked with children aged 4 to 6 years to investigate the relationship between bilingualism, vocabulary size, and inhibitory control, and also to validate a novel app designed to assess early language development. For her Dphil study at Oxford, Renyu aims to explore the factors that might affect L2 pronunciation learning in young children and the interaction between children’s L1 and L2. She is particularly interested in the psychological factors that might influence a child’s L2 pronunciation.

Prior to studying at Oxford, Renyu worked as Research Assistant at the Assessment Research Group at British Council for one year and a half. She was involved in various projects, including gap analysis on reading demand and reading ability, participant feedback questionnaire design and analysis, design and recruitment for a new EAP task study, etc.

Bernard holds a PhD in Marketing from the University of Nottingham and a DBA from the University of Newcastle.

His research to date explores the leadership in HE. Prior to coming to Oxford, he worked in various HEIs and served as the supervisor of a secondary school.

Publications

Lee, B., Tsui, A. & Yau, O.H.M. (2019), Higher-order Goals, Trust-in-leader, and Self-efficacy as Moderators of Transformational Leadership Performance: The Case of Multi-level Marketing Organizations in China, Journal of Euromarketing, Vol.28 (3-4), 76-97. (2011 RG Impact factor: 0.83).

Conferences

Lee, B. (2020), “Self-formation for the Underprivileged,” 2020 International Online Symposium, Toward a New Paradigm of Economics,organized by Macau Ricci Institute, The University of Saint Joseph, 15 & 16 October. (Online Conference Platform Presentation).

Steve is Associate Professor of Teacher Education. He is a curriculum tutor for the Geography PGCE and MSc Learning and Teaching.

Steve is a qualified geography teacher and was previously the head of department at a comprehensive secondary school in Oxfordshire, and Head of Programmes at Bishop Grosseteste University, Lincoln.

He holds an MA in Educational Leadership and Innovation from Warwick University, an MSc in Educational Research Methodology and DPhil in Education from the University of Oxford which were funded by an ESRC Studentship. He is a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

He researches at the intersection between the academic discipline and school subject of geography, including recent collaborations developing through the Smart Cities Network for Sustainable Urban Future project which was shortlisted for the 2017 Newton Prize (India). He is currently leading research on Climate Change Education Futures in India (GCRF) in collaboration with colleagues at IISER, Pune, and on the role of cultural heritage in curriculum making in Kolkata.

Collaborations with colleagues in the School of Geography and the Environment are contributing to anti-racist curriculum futures, including in the school subject, and in postgraduate teaching through the TDEP-funded Oxford-UNISA course ‘Decolonising Research Methods’.

His research on teacher education focuses on the contribution that geography education research offers to the conceptualisation and practice of teaching. This work includes ethnographic research on teachers’ curriculum making exploring the journeys through which information travels into school classrooms, beginning teachers’ experiences of school subject departments, and the role of written lesson observation feedback in constructing ‘good teaching’.

Steve serves on the editorial board of the journal Geography, and is Chair of the Geography Education Research Collective (GEReCo/IGU-CGE).

 

Caitlin is a Doctoral student in the Department of Education working on how teachers interact with refugee and unaccompanied asylum-seeking pupils in UK schools.

Her Doctoral study uses survey data, interviews, observation, and document analysis to examine teacher knowledge, attitudes, and practices in relation to refugee pupils. Previously, Caitlin worked as a primary school teacher in Aberdeen, London, and at Rose Hill Primary School in Oxford. She completed an MA (Gaelic Medium Education, Oral History) and a PGDE (Primary Education) at the University of Aberdeen, and a BA (Human Geography, Environmental Studies) at Middlebury College in the US. She has a general interest in improving inclusion and equity in education.

Helen’s academic interest in higher education policy developed from more than 20 years of professional experience of university administration – in public relations and admissions.

She gained her doctorate from Oxford in 2010 (a study of the market created by the introduction of £3000 fees for Home/EU undergraduates at English universities in 2006); since then, she has conducted research into the impacts of student fees and funding on institutions, students, graduates and applicants within the higher education sector in England. She also works as a consultant to higher education institutions.

Helen was Pathway Convenor for the MSc Education (HE) for two years and has taught on this course since completing her DPhil. As an inspector for the British Accreditation Council, Helen has the opportunity to gain insights into the operation of higher education providers globally. She is also an Associate of the SKOPE, the department’s research centre for Skills, Knowledge and Organisational Performance.

From 2012-17, Helen was a member of the governing council of the Society for Research into Higher Education (SRHE), serving as Vice-Chair from 2014-17.

 

Jo-Anne is Director of the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment.  She completed a six-year term as Head of the Department of Education, has been Standing Adviser to the House of Commons Education Select Committee, a member of Ofqual’s Standing Advisory Group on Standards, Chair of the National Reference Test Expert Group, and a member of the Welsh Government’s Curriculum and Assessment Group.  Before coming to Oxford, Jo-Anne held academic posts at the Institute of Education, University of London and the University of Bristol. Her first degree and doctorate were in psychology and she has an MBA.  Her current research projects include Setting and Maintaining Standards in national examinations, Examination reform: the impact of modular and linear examinations at GCSE, Assessment for Learning in Africa (AFLA), intelligent accountability and the Progress in International Reading Literacy Study England national centre.

Her research interests are in educational assessment, including system-wide structures and processes, examination standards, marking and assessment design.  Jo-Anne conducts a lot of work with government and industry partners, including acting as the Standing Adviser to the House of Commons Education Select Committee, a member of Ofqual’s Standing Advisory Group and membership of the Welsh Government’s Curriculum and Assessment Group.  She is a member of the Editorial Board of the Oxford Review of Education journal and the International Advisory Board of Assessment in Education: principles, policy & practice.  She has been a Visiting Professor at the universities of Bergen and Queen’s (Belfast).  From 2013 to 2015 she was President of the Association for Educational Assessment – Europe.

Qualifications
  • B.A.H. Linguistics/Psychology – Queen’s University, Kingston On, Canada
  • M.A. Educational Psychology – McGill University, Canada
  • Ph.D. – Second Language Education – McGill University Canada

Victoria Murphy would welcome informal contacts from prospective doctoral students interested in the following topics:

  • Language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/ Language Minority) children
  • Child L2 and bilingualism
  • Foreign language learning in primary school
  • Lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Research

Victoria is active in the following research areas, and would welcome DPhil applications on any of these, particularly those relating to EAL (language minority) children and child L2 learning and foreign language learning in primary school.  She is also the convenor of the Research in English as an Additional Language (REAL) group.  Her research is currently being funded by the ESRC, Leverhulme Trust and Nuffield Foundation.

  • language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/Language minority) children
  • child L2 learning and bilingualism
  • foreign language learning in primary school
  • cognitive processes underlying L1 and L2 learning
  • lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Current Research Project(s)

Joanna is a Doctoral Student, and ESRC Grand Union DTP Scholar, researching in-class support for multilingualism in UK schools.

She has over 12 years of experience as a teaching professional, having worked as a class teacher, EAL specialist and Teaching Assistant in the UK, China, Brazil and Italy. Her main area of interest is school-based education (3-18), specifically the support for multilingual pupils and their language practices, as well as the relationship between teaching assistants and both teachers and children in schools.

Joanna holds a BA in Jurisprudence and a MSc in Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching, both from the University of Oxford. She also has a PGCE, and a PGDip in French.

Joining the Department of Education in 2020 after teaching English and foreign languages in secondary schools and early years settings for 15 years, Catherine completed the MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition in 2021. Her doctoral research investigates the effectiveness of using songs as pedagogical tools with young second language learners in formal educational settings.

Additionally, Catherine hosts The Language Revolution podcast, exploring how linguistics and language awareness might inform/transform languages teaching with guests including Michael Rosen and David Crystal. She also project manages the annual conference for NALDIC, the national subject association for EAL.

Publications

Multilingual is Normal: An anthology of voices, talking about talking (2020)

Renyu completed her BA degree in Psychology at the University of British Columbia (Vancouver, Canada) and her MPhil degree in Education at University of Cambridge.

During her MPhil study, she worked with children aged 4 to 6 years to investigate the relationship between bilingualism, vocabulary size, and inhibitory control, and also to validate a novel app designed to assess early language development. For her Dphil study at Oxford, Renyu aims to explore the factors that might affect L2 pronunciation learning in young children and the interaction between children’s L1 and L2. She is particularly interested in the psychological factors that might influence a child’s L2 pronunciation.

Prior to studying at Oxford, Renyu worked as Research Assistant at the Assessment Research Group at British Council for one year and a half. She was involved in various projects, including gap analysis on reading demand and reading ability, participant feedback questionnaire design and analysis, design and recruitment for a new EAP task study, etc.

Bernard holds a PhD in Marketing from the University of Nottingham and a DBA from the University of Newcastle.

His research to date explores the leadership in HE. Prior to coming to Oxford, he worked in various HEIs and served as the supervisor of a secondary school.

Publications

Lee, B., Tsui, A. & Yau, O.H.M. (2019), Higher-order Goals, Trust-in-leader, and Self-efficacy as Moderators of Transformational Leadership Performance: The Case of Multi-level Marketing Organizations in China, Journal of Euromarketing, Vol.28 (3-4), 76-97. (2011 RG Impact factor: 0.83).

Conferences

Lee, B. (2020), “Self-formation for the Underprivileged,” 2020 International Online Symposium, Toward a New Paradigm of Economics,organized by Macau Ricci Institute, The University of Saint Joseph, 15 & 16 October. (Online Conference Platform Presentation).

Steve is Associate Professor of Teacher Education. He is a curriculum tutor for the Geography PGCE and MSc Learning and Teaching.

Steve is a qualified geography teacher and was previously the head of department at a comprehensive secondary school in Oxfordshire, and Head of Programmes at Bishop Grosseteste University, Lincoln.

He holds an MA in Educational Leadership and Innovation from Warwick University, an MSc in Educational Research Methodology and DPhil in Education from the University of Oxford which were funded by an ESRC Studentship. He is a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

He researches at the intersection between the academic discipline and school subject of geography, including recent collaborations developing through the Smart Cities Network for Sustainable Urban Future project which was shortlisted for the 2017 Newton Prize (India). He is currently leading research on Climate Change Education Futures in India (GCRF) in collaboration with colleagues at IISER, Pune, and on the role of cultural heritage in curriculum making in Kolkata.

Collaborations with colleagues in the School of Geography and the Environment are contributing to anti-racist curriculum futures, including in the school subject, and in postgraduate teaching through the TDEP-funded Oxford-UNISA course ‘Decolonising Research Methods’.

His research on teacher education focuses on the contribution that geography education research offers to the conceptualisation and practice of teaching. This work includes ethnographic research on teachers’ curriculum making exploring the journeys through which information travels into school classrooms, beginning teachers’ experiences of school subject departments, and the role of written lesson observation feedback in constructing ‘good teaching’.

Steve serves on the editorial board of the journal Geography, and is Chair of the Geography Education Research Collective (GEReCo/IGU-CGE).

 

Caitlin is a Doctoral student in the Department of Education working on how teachers interact with refugee and unaccompanied asylum-seeking pupils in UK schools.

Her Doctoral study uses survey data, interviews, observation, and document analysis to examine teacher knowledge, attitudes, and practices in relation to refugee pupils. Previously, Caitlin worked as a primary school teacher in Aberdeen, London, and at Rose Hill Primary School in Oxford. She completed an MA (Gaelic Medium Education, Oral History) and a PGDE (Primary Education) at the University of Aberdeen, and a BA (Human Geography, Environmental Studies) at Middlebury College in the US. She has a general interest in improving inclusion and equity in education.

Helen’s academic interest in higher education policy developed from more than 20 years of professional experience of university administration – in public relations and admissions.

She gained her doctorate from Oxford in 2010 (a study of the market created by the introduction of £3000 fees for Home/EU undergraduates at English universities in 2006); since then, she has conducted research into the impacts of student fees and funding on institutions, students, graduates and applicants within the higher education sector in England. She also works as a consultant to higher education institutions.

Helen was Pathway Convenor for the MSc Education (HE) for two years and has taught on this course since completing her DPhil. As an inspector for the British Accreditation Council, Helen has the opportunity to gain insights into the operation of higher education providers globally. She is also an Associate of the SKOPE, the department’s research centre for Skills, Knowledge and Organisational Performance.

From 2012-17, Helen was a member of the governing council of the Society for Research into Higher Education (SRHE), serving as Vice-Chair from 2014-17.

 

Jo-Anne is Director of the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment.  She completed a six-year term as Head of the Department of Education, has been Standing Adviser to the House of Commons Education Select Committee, a member of Ofqual’s Standing Advisory Group on Standards, Chair of the National Reference Test Expert Group, and a member of the Welsh Government’s Curriculum and Assessment Group.  Before coming to Oxford, Jo-Anne held academic posts at the Institute of Education, University of London and the University of Bristol. Her first degree and doctorate were in psychology and she has an MBA.  Her current research projects include Setting and Maintaining Standards in national examinations, Examination reform: the impact of modular and linear examinations at GCSE, Assessment for Learning in Africa (AFLA), intelligent accountability and the Progress in International Reading Literacy Study England national centre.

Her research interests are in educational assessment, including system-wide structures and processes, examination standards, marking and assessment design.  Jo-Anne conducts a lot of work with government and industry partners, including acting as the Standing Adviser to the House of Commons Education Select Committee, a member of Ofqual’s Standing Advisory Group and membership of the Welsh Government’s Curriculum and Assessment Group.  She is a member of the Editorial Board of the Oxford Review of Education journal and the International Advisory Board of Assessment in Education: principles, policy & practice.  She has been a Visiting Professor at the universities of Bergen and Queen’s (Belfast).  From 2013 to 2015 she was President of the Association for Educational Assessment – Europe.

Qualifications
  • B.A.H. Linguistics/Psychology – Queen’s University, Kingston On, Canada
  • M.A. Educational Psychology – McGill University, Canada
  • Ph.D. – Second Language Education – McGill University Canada

Victoria Murphy would welcome informal contacts from prospective doctoral students interested in the following topics:

  • Language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/ Language Minority) children
  • Child L2 and bilingualism
  • Foreign language learning in primary school
  • Lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Research

Victoria is active in the following research areas, and would welcome DPhil applications on any of these, particularly those relating to EAL (language minority) children and child L2 learning and foreign language learning in primary school.  She is also the convenor of the Research in English as an Additional Language (REAL) group.  Her research is currently being funded by the ESRC, Leverhulme Trust and Nuffield Foundation.

  • language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/Language minority) children
  • child L2 learning and bilingualism
  • foreign language learning in primary school
  • cognitive processes underlying L1 and L2 learning
  • lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Current Research Project(s)

Joanna is a Doctoral Student, and ESRC Grand Union DTP Scholar, researching in-class support for multilingualism in UK schools.

She has over 12 years of experience as a teaching professional, having worked as a class teacher, EAL specialist and Teaching Assistant in the UK, China, Brazil and Italy. Her main area of interest is school-based education (3-18), specifically the support for multilingual pupils and their language practices, as well as the relationship between teaching assistants and both teachers and children in schools.

Joanna holds a BA in Jurisprudence and a MSc in Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching, both from the University of Oxford. She also has a PGCE, and a PGDip in French.

Joining the Department of Education in 2020 after teaching English and foreign languages in secondary schools and early years settings for 15 years, Catherine completed the MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition in 2021. Her doctoral research investigates the effectiveness of using songs as pedagogical tools with young second language learners in formal educational settings.

Additionally, Catherine hosts The Language Revolution podcast, exploring how linguistics and language awareness might inform/transform languages teaching with guests including Michael Rosen and David Crystal. She also project manages the annual conference for NALDIC, the national subject association for EAL.

Publications

Multilingual is Normal: An anthology of voices, talking about talking (2020)

Renyu completed her BA degree in Psychology at the University of British Columbia (Vancouver, Canada) and her MPhil degree in Education at University of Cambridge.

During her MPhil study, she worked with children aged 4 to 6 years to investigate the relationship between bilingualism, vocabulary size, and inhibitory control, and also to validate a novel app designed to assess early language development. For her Dphil study at Oxford, Renyu aims to explore the factors that might affect L2 pronunciation learning in young children and the interaction between children’s L1 and L2. She is particularly interested in the psychological factors that might influence a child’s L2 pronunciation.

Prior to studying at Oxford, Renyu worked as Research Assistant at the Assessment Research Group at British Council for one year and a half. She was involved in various projects, including gap analysis on reading demand and reading ability, participant feedback questionnaire design and analysis, design and recruitment for a new EAP task study, etc.

Bernard holds a PhD in Marketing from the University of Nottingham and a DBA from the University of Newcastle.

His research to date explores the leadership in HE. Prior to coming to Oxford, he worked in various HEIs and served as the supervisor of a secondary school.

Publications

Lee, B., Tsui, A. & Yau, O.H.M. (2019), Higher-order Goals, Trust-in-leader, and Self-efficacy as Moderators of Transformational Leadership Performance: The Case of Multi-level Marketing Organizations in China, Journal of Euromarketing, Vol.28 (3-4), 76-97. (2011 RG Impact factor: 0.83).

Conferences

Lee, B. (2020), “Self-formation for the Underprivileged,” 2020 International Online Symposium, Toward a New Paradigm of Economics,organized by Macau Ricci Institute, The University of Saint Joseph, 15 & 16 October. (Online Conference Platform Presentation).

Steve is Associate Professor of Teacher Education. He is a curriculum tutor for the Geography PGCE and MSc Learning and Teaching.

Steve is a qualified geography teacher and was previously the head of department at a comprehensive secondary school in Oxfordshire, and Head of Programmes at Bishop Grosseteste University, Lincoln.

He holds an MA in Educational Leadership and Innovation from Warwick University, an MSc in Educational Research Methodology and DPhil in Education from the University of Oxford which were funded by an ESRC Studentship. He is a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

He researches at the intersection between the academic discipline and school subject of geography, including recent collaborations developing through the Smart Cities Network for Sustainable Urban Future project which was shortlisted for the 2017 Newton Prize (India). He is currently leading research on Climate Change Education Futures in India (GCRF) in collaboration with colleagues at IISER, Pune, and on the role of cultural heritage in curriculum making in Kolkata.

Collaborations with colleagues in the School of Geography and the Environment are contributing to anti-racist curriculum futures, including in the school subject, and in postgraduate teaching through the TDEP-funded Oxford-UNISA course ‘Decolonising Research Methods’.

His research on teacher education focuses on the contribution that geography education research offers to the conceptualisation and practice of teaching. This work includes ethnographic research on teachers’ curriculum making exploring the journeys through which information travels into school classrooms, beginning teachers’ experiences of school subject departments, and the role of written lesson observation feedback in constructing ‘good teaching’.

Steve serves on the editorial board of the journal Geography, and is Chair of the Geography Education Research Collective (GEReCo/IGU-CGE).

 

Caitlin is a Doctoral student in the Department of Education working on how teachers interact with refugee and unaccompanied asylum-seeking pupils in UK schools.

Her Doctoral study uses survey data, interviews, observation, and document analysis to examine teacher knowledge, attitudes, and practices in relation to refugee pupils. Previously, Caitlin worked as a primary school teacher in Aberdeen, London, and at Rose Hill Primary School in Oxford. She completed an MA (Gaelic Medium Education, Oral History) and a PGDE (Primary Education) at the University of Aberdeen, and a BA (Human Geography, Environmental Studies) at Middlebury College in the US. She has a general interest in improving inclusion and equity in education.

Helen’s academic interest in higher education policy developed from more than 20 years of professional experience of university administration – in public relations and admissions.

She gained her doctorate from Oxford in 2010 (a study of the market created by the introduction of £3000 fees for Home/EU undergraduates at English universities in 2006); since then, she has conducted research into the impacts of student fees and funding on institutions, students, graduates and applicants within the higher education sector in England. She also works as a consultant to higher education institutions.

Helen was Pathway Convenor for the MSc Education (HE) for two years and has taught on this course since completing her DPhil. As an inspector for the British Accreditation Council, Helen has the opportunity to gain insights into the operation of higher education providers globally. She is also an Associate of the SKOPE, the department’s research centre for Skills, Knowledge and Organisational Performance.

From 2012-17, Helen was a member of the governing council of the Society for Research into Higher Education (SRHE), serving as Vice-Chair from 2014-17.

 

Jo-Anne is Director of the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment.  She completed a six-year term as Head of the Department of Education, has been Standing Adviser to the House of Commons Education Select Committee, a member of Ofqual’s Standing Advisory Group on Standards, Chair of the National Reference Test Expert Group, and a member of the Welsh Government’s Curriculum and Assessment Group.  Before coming to Oxford, Jo-Anne held academic posts at the Institute of Education, University of London and the University of Bristol. Her first degree and doctorate were in psychology and she has an MBA.  Her current research projects include Setting and Maintaining Standards in national examinations, Examination reform: the impact of modular and linear examinations at GCSE, Assessment for Learning in Africa (AFLA), intelligent accountability and the Progress in International Reading Literacy Study England national centre.

Her research interests are in educational assessment, including system-wide structures and processes, examination standards, marking and assessment design.  Jo-Anne conducts a lot of work with government and industry partners, including acting as the Standing Adviser to the House of Commons Education Select Committee, a member of Ofqual’s Standing Advisory Group and membership of the Welsh Government’s Curriculum and Assessment Group.  She is a member of the Editorial Board of the Oxford Review of Education journal and the International Advisory Board of Assessment in Education: principles, policy & practice.  She has been a Visiting Professor at the universities of Bergen and Queen’s (Belfast).  From 2013 to 2015 she was President of the Association for Educational Assessment – Europe.

Qualifications
  • B.A.H. Linguistics/Psychology – Queen’s University, Kingston On, Canada
  • M.A. Educational Psychology – McGill University, Canada
  • Ph.D. – Second Language Education – McGill University Canada

Victoria Murphy would welcome informal contacts from prospective doctoral students interested in the following topics:

  • Language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/ Language Minority) children
  • Child L2 and bilingualism
  • Foreign language learning in primary school
  • Lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Research

Victoria is active in the following research areas, and would welcome DPhil applications on any of these, particularly those relating to EAL (language minority) children and child L2 learning and foreign language learning in primary school.  She is also the convenor of the Research in English as an Additional Language (REAL) group.  Her research is currently being funded by the ESRC, Leverhulme Trust and Nuffield Foundation.

  • language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/Language minority) children
  • child L2 learning and bilingualism
  • foreign language learning in primary school
  • cognitive processes underlying L1 and L2 learning
  • lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Current Research Project(s)

Joanna is a Doctoral Student, and ESRC Grand Union DTP Scholar, researching in-class support for multilingualism in UK schools.

She has over 12 years of experience as a teaching professional, having worked as a class teacher, EAL specialist and Teaching Assistant in the UK, China, Brazil and Italy. Her main area of interest is school-based education (3-18), specifically the support for multilingual pupils and their language practices, as well as the relationship between teaching assistants and both teachers and children in schools.

Joanna holds a BA in Jurisprudence and a MSc in Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching, both from the University of Oxford. She also has a PGCE, and a PGDip in French.

Joining the Department of Education in 2020 after teaching English and foreign languages in secondary schools and early years settings for 15 years, Catherine completed the MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition in 2021. Her doctoral research investigates the effectiveness of using songs as pedagogical tools with young second language learners in formal educational settings.

Additionally, Catherine hosts The Language Revolution podcast, exploring how linguistics and language awareness might inform/transform languages teaching with guests including Michael Rosen and David Crystal. She also project manages the annual conference for NALDIC, the national subject association for EAL.

Publications

Multilingual is Normal: An anthology of voices, talking about talking (2020)

Renyu completed her BA degree in Psychology at the University of British Columbia (Vancouver, Canada) and her MPhil degree in Education at University of Cambridge.

During her MPhil study, she worked with children aged 4 to 6 years to investigate the relationship between bilingualism, vocabulary size, and inhibitory control, and also to validate a novel app designed to assess early language development. For her Dphil study at Oxford, Renyu aims to explore the factors that might affect L2 pronunciation learning in young children and the interaction between children’s L1 and L2. She is particularly interested in the psychological factors that might influence a child’s L2 pronunciation.

Prior to studying at Oxford, Renyu worked as Research Assistant at the Assessment Research Group at British Council for one year and a half. She was involved in various projects, including gap analysis on reading demand and reading ability, participant feedback questionnaire design and analysis, design and recruitment for a new EAP task study, etc.

Bernard holds a PhD in Marketing from the University of Nottingham and a DBA from the University of Newcastle.

His research to date explores the leadership in HE. Prior to coming to Oxford, he worked in various HEIs and served as the supervisor of a secondary school.

Publications

Lee, B., Tsui, A. & Yau, O.H.M. (2019), Higher-order Goals, Trust-in-leader, and Self-efficacy as Moderators of Transformational Leadership Performance: The Case of Multi-level Marketing Organizations in China, Journal of Euromarketing, Vol.28 (3-4), 76-97. (2011 RG Impact factor: 0.83).

Conferences

Lee, B. (2020), “Self-formation for the Underprivileged,” 2020 International Online Symposium, Toward a New Paradigm of Economics,organized by Macau Ricci Institute, The University of Saint Joseph, 15 & 16 October. (Online Conference Platform Presentation).

Steve is Associate Professor of Teacher Education. He is a curriculum tutor for the Geography PGCE and MSc Learning and Teaching.

Steve is a qualified geography teacher and was previously the head of department at a comprehensive secondary school in Oxfordshire, and Head of Programmes at Bishop Grosseteste University, Lincoln.

He holds an MA in Educational Leadership and Innovation from Warwick University, an MSc in Educational Research Methodology and DPhil in Education from the University of Oxford which were funded by an ESRC Studentship. He is a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

He researches at the intersection between the academic discipline and school subject of geography, including recent collaborations developing through the Smart Cities Network for Sustainable Urban Future project which was shortlisted for the 2017 Newton Prize (India). He is currently leading research on Climate Change Education Futures in India (GCRF) in collaboration with colleagues at IISER, Pune, and on the role of cultural heritage in curriculum making in Kolkata.

Collaborations with colleagues in the School of Geography and the Environment are contributing to anti-racist curriculum futures, including in the school subject, and in postgraduate teaching through the TDEP-funded Oxford-UNISA course ‘Decolonising Research Methods’.

His research on teacher education focuses on the contribution that geography education research offers to the conceptualisation and practice of teaching. This work includes ethnographic research on teachers’ curriculum making exploring the journeys through which information travels into school classrooms, beginning teachers’ experiences of school subject departments, and the role of written lesson observation feedback in constructing ‘good teaching’.

Steve serves on the editorial board of the journal Geography, and is Chair of the Geography Education Research Collective (GEReCo/IGU-CGE).

 

Caitlin is a Doctoral student in the Department of Education working on how teachers interact with refugee and unaccompanied asylum-seeking pupils in UK schools.

Her Doctoral study uses survey data, interviews, observation, and document analysis to examine teacher knowledge, attitudes, and practices in relation to refugee pupils. Previously, Caitlin worked as a primary school teacher in Aberdeen, London, and at Rose Hill Primary School in Oxford. She completed an MA (Gaelic Medium Education, Oral History) and a PGDE (Primary Education) at the University of Aberdeen, and a BA (Human Geography, Environmental Studies) at Middlebury College in the US. She has a general interest in improving inclusion and equity in education.

Helen’s academic interest in higher education policy developed from more than 20 years of professional experience of university administration – in public relations and admissions.

She gained her doctorate from Oxford in 2010 (a study of the market created by the introduction of £3000 fees for Home/EU undergraduates at English universities in 2006); since then, she has conducted research into the impacts of student fees and funding on institutions, students, graduates and applicants within the higher education sector in England. She also works as a consultant to higher education institutions.

Helen was Pathway Convenor for the MSc Education (HE) for two years and has taught on this course since completing her DPhil. As an inspector for the British Accreditation Council, Helen has the opportunity to gain insights into the operation of higher education providers globally. She is also an Associate of the SKOPE, the department’s research centre for Skills, Knowledge and Organisational Performance.

From 2012-17, Helen was a member of the governing council of the Society for Research into Higher Education (SRHE), serving as Vice-Chair from 2014-17.

 

Jo-Anne is Director of the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment.  She completed a six-year term as Head of the Department of Education, has been Standing Adviser to the House of Commons Education Select Committee, a member of Ofqual’s Standing Advisory Group on Standards, Chair of the National Reference Test Expert Group, and a member of the Welsh Government’s Curriculum and Assessment Group.  Before coming to Oxford, Jo-Anne held academic posts at the Institute of Education, University of London and the University of Bristol. Her first degree and doctorate were in psychology and she has an MBA.  Her current research projects include Setting and Maintaining Standards in national examinations, Examination reform: the impact of modular and linear examinations at GCSE, Assessment for Learning in Africa (AFLA), intelligent accountability and the Progress in International Reading Literacy Study England national centre.

Her research interests are in educational assessment, including system-wide structures and processes, examination standards, marking and assessment design.  Jo-Anne conducts a lot of work with government and industry partners, including acting as the Standing Adviser to the House of Commons Education Select Committee, a member of Ofqual’s Standing Advisory Group and membership of the Welsh Government’s Curriculum and Assessment Group.  She is a member of the Editorial Board of the Oxford Review of Education journal and the International Advisory Board of Assessment in Education: principles, policy & practice.  She has been a Visiting Professor at the universities of Bergen and Queen’s (Belfast).  From 2013 to 2015 she was President of the Association for Educational Assessment – Europe.

Qualifications
  • B.A.H. Linguistics/Psychology – Queen’s University, Kingston On, Canada
  • M.A. Educational Psychology – McGill University, Canada
  • Ph.D. – Second Language Education – McGill University Canada

Victoria Murphy would welcome informal contacts from prospective doctoral students interested in the following topics:

  • Language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/ Language Minority) children
  • Child L2 and bilingualism
  • Foreign language learning in primary school
  • Lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Research

Victoria is active in the following research areas, and would welcome DPhil applications on any of these, particularly those relating to EAL (language minority) children and child L2 learning and foreign language learning in primary school.  She is also the convenor of the Research in English as an Additional Language (REAL) group.  Her research is currently being funded by the ESRC, Leverhulme Trust and Nuffield Foundation.

  • language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/Language minority) children
  • child L2 learning and bilingualism
  • foreign language learning in primary school
  • cognitive processes underlying L1 and L2 learning
  • lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Current Research Project(s)

Joanna is a Doctoral Student, and ESRC Grand Union DTP Scholar, researching in-class support for multilingualism in UK schools.

She has over 12 years of experience as a teaching professional, having worked as a class teacher, EAL specialist and Teaching Assistant in the UK, China, Brazil and Italy. Her main area of interest is school-based education (3-18), specifically the support for multilingual pupils and their language practices, as well as the relationship between teaching assistants and both teachers and children in schools.

Joanna holds a BA in Jurisprudence and a MSc in Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching, both from the University of Oxford. She also has a PGCE, and a PGDip in French.

Joining the Department of Education in 2020 after teaching English and foreign languages in secondary schools and early years settings for 15 years, Catherine completed the MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition in 2021. Her doctoral research investigates the effectiveness of using songs as pedagogical tools with young second language learners in formal educational settings.

Additionally, Catherine hosts The Language Revolution podcast, exploring how linguistics and language awareness might inform/transform languages teaching with guests including Michael Rosen and David Crystal. She also project manages the annual conference for NALDIC, the national subject association for EAL.

Publications

Multilingual is Normal: An anthology of voices, talking about talking (2020)

Renyu completed her BA degree in Psychology at the University of British Columbia (Vancouver, Canada) and her MPhil degree in Education at University of Cambridge.

During her MPhil study, she worked with children aged 4 to 6 years to investigate the relationship between bilingualism, vocabulary size, and inhibitory control, and also to validate a novel app designed to assess early language development. For her Dphil study at Oxford, Renyu aims to explore the factors that might affect L2 pronunciation learning in young children and the interaction between children’s L1 and L2. She is particularly interested in the psychological factors that might influence a child’s L2 pronunciation.

Prior to studying at Oxford, Renyu worked as Research Assistant at the Assessment Research Group at British Council for one year and a half. She was involved in various projects, including gap analysis on reading demand and reading ability, participant feedback questionnaire design and analysis, design and recruitment for a new EAP task study, etc.

Bernard holds a PhD in Marketing from the University of Nottingham and a DBA from the University of Newcastle.

His research to date explores the leadership in HE. Prior to coming to Oxford, he worked in various HEIs and served as the supervisor of a secondary school.

Publications

Lee, B., Tsui, A. & Yau, O.H.M. (2019), Higher-order Goals, Trust-in-leader, and Self-efficacy as Moderators of Transformational Leadership Performance: The Case of Multi-level Marketing Organizations in China, Journal of Euromarketing, Vol.28 (3-4), 76-97. (2011 RG Impact factor: 0.83).

Conferences

Lee, B. (2020), “Self-formation for the Underprivileged,” 2020 International Online Symposium, Toward a New Paradigm of Economics,organized by Macau Ricci Institute, The University of Saint Joseph, 15 & 16 October. (Online Conference Platform Presentation).

Steve is Associate Professor of Teacher Education. He is a curriculum tutor for the Geography PGCE and MSc Learning and Teaching.

Steve is a qualified geography teacher and was previously the head of department at a comprehensive secondary school in Oxfordshire, and Head of Programmes at Bishop Grosseteste University, Lincoln.

He holds an MA in Educational Leadership and Innovation from Warwick University, an MSc in Educational Research Methodology and DPhil in Education from the University of Oxford which were funded by an ESRC Studentship. He is a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

He researches at the intersection between the academic discipline and school subject of geography, including recent collaborations developing through the Smart Cities Network for Sustainable Urban Future project which was shortlisted for the 2017 Newton Prize (India). He is currently leading research on Climate Change Education Futures in India (GCRF) in collaboration with colleagues at IISER, Pune, and on the role of cultural heritage in curriculum making in Kolkata.

Collaborations with colleagues in the School of Geography and the Environment are contributing to anti-racist curriculum futures, including in the school subject, and in postgraduate teaching through the TDEP-funded Oxford-UNISA course ‘Decolonising Research Methods’.

His research on teacher education focuses on the contribution that geography education research offers to the conceptualisation and practice of teaching. This work includes ethnographic research on teachers’ curriculum making exploring the journeys through which information travels into school classrooms, beginning teachers’ experiences of school subject departments, and the role of written lesson observation feedback in constructing ‘good teaching’.

Steve serves on the editorial board of the journal Geography, and is Chair of the Geography Education Research Collective (GEReCo/IGU-CGE).

 

Caitlin is a Doctoral student in the Department of Education working on how teachers interact with refugee and unaccompanied asylum-seeking pupils in UK schools.

Her Doctoral study uses survey data, interviews, observation, and document analysis to examine teacher knowledge, attitudes, and practices in relation to refugee pupils. Previously, Caitlin worked as a primary school teacher in Aberdeen, London, and at Rose Hill Primary School in Oxford. She completed an MA (Gaelic Medium Education, Oral History) and a PGDE (Primary Education) at the University of Aberdeen, and a BA (Human Geography, Environmental Studies) at Middlebury College in the US. She has a general interest in improving inclusion and equity in education.

Helen’s academic interest in higher education policy developed from more than 20 years of professional experience of university administration – in public relations and admissions.

She gained her doctorate from Oxford in 2010 (a study of the market created by the introduction of £3000 fees for Home/EU undergraduates at English universities in 2006); since then, she has conducted research into the impacts of student fees and funding on institutions, students, graduates and applicants within the higher education sector in England. She also works as a consultant to higher education institutions.

Helen was Pathway Convenor for the MSc Education (HE) for two years and has taught on this course since completing her DPhil. As an inspector for the British Accreditation Council, Helen has the opportunity to gain insights into the operation of higher education providers globally. She is also an Associate of the SKOPE, the department’s research centre for Skills, Knowledge and Organisational Performance.

From 2012-17, Helen was a member of the governing council of the Society for Research into Higher Education (SRHE), serving as Vice-Chair from 2014-17.

 

Jo-Anne is Director of the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment.  She completed a six-year term as Head of the Department of Education, has been Standing Adviser to the House of Commons Education Select Committee, a member of Ofqual’s Standing Advisory Group on Standards, Chair of the National Reference Test Expert Group, and a member of the Welsh Government’s Curriculum and Assessment Group.  Before coming to Oxford, Jo-Anne held academic posts at the Institute of Education, University of London and the University of Bristol. Her first degree and doctorate were in psychology and she has an MBA.  Her current research projects include Setting and Maintaining Standards in national examinations, Examination reform: the impact of modular and linear examinations at GCSE, Assessment for Learning in Africa (AFLA), intelligent accountability and the Progress in International Reading Literacy Study England national centre.

Her research interests are in educational assessment, including system-wide structures and processes, examination standards, marking and assessment design.  Jo-Anne conducts a lot of work with government and industry partners, including acting as the Standing Adviser to the House of Commons Education Select Committee, a member of Ofqual’s Standing Advisory Group and membership of the Welsh Government’s Curriculum and Assessment Group.  She is a member of the Editorial Board of the Oxford Review of Education journal and the International Advisory Board of Assessment in Education: principles, policy & practice.  She has been a Visiting Professor at the universities of Bergen and Queen’s (Belfast).  From 2013 to 2015 she was President of the Association for Educational Assessment – Europe.

Qualifications
  • B.A.H. Linguistics/Psychology – Queen’s University, Kingston On, Canada
  • M.A. Educational Psychology – McGill University, Canada
  • Ph.D. – Second Language Education – McGill University Canada

Victoria Murphy would welcome informal contacts from prospective doctoral students interested in the following topics:

  • Language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/ Language Minority) children
  • Child L2 and bilingualism
  • Foreign language learning in primary school
  • Lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Research

Victoria is active in the following research areas, and would welcome DPhil applications on any of these, particularly those relating to EAL (language minority) children and child L2 learning and foreign language learning in primary school.  She is also the convenor of the Research in English as an Additional Language (REAL) group.  Her research is currently being funded by the ESRC, Leverhulme Trust and Nuffield Foundation.

  • language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/Language minority) children
  • child L2 learning and bilingualism
  • foreign language learning in primary school
  • cognitive processes underlying L1 and L2 learning
  • lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Current Research Project(s)

Joanna is a Doctoral Student, and ESRC Grand Union DTP Scholar, researching in-class support for multilingualism in UK schools.

She has over 12 years of experience as a teaching professional, having worked as a class teacher, EAL specialist and Teaching Assistant in the UK, China, Brazil and Italy. Her main area of interest is school-based education (3-18), specifically the support for multilingual pupils and their language practices, as well as the relationship between teaching assistants and both teachers and children in schools.

Joanna holds a BA in Jurisprudence and a MSc in Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching, both from the University of Oxford. She also has a PGCE, and a PGDip in French.

Joining the Department of Education in 2020 after teaching English and foreign languages in secondary schools and early years settings for 15 years, Catherine completed the MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition in 2021. Her doctoral research investigates the effectiveness of using songs as pedagogical tools with young second language learners in formal educational settings.

Additionally, Catherine hosts The Language Revolution podcast, exploring how linguistics and language awareness might inform/transform languages teaching with guests including Michael Rosen and David Crystal. She also project manages the annual conference for NALDIC, the national subject association for EAL.

Publications

Multilingual is Normal: An anthology of voices, talking about talking (2020)

Renyu completed her BA degree in Psychology at the University of British Columbia (Vancouver, Canada) and her MPhil degree in Education at University of Cambridge.

During her MPhil study, she worked with children aged 4 to 6 years to investigate the relationship between bilingualism, vocabulary size, and inhibitory control, and also to validate a novel app designed to assess early language development. For her Dphil study at Oxford, Renyu aims to explore the factors that might affect L2 pronunciation learning in young children and the interaction between children’s L1 and L2. She is particularly interested in the psychological factors that might influence a child’s L2 pronunciation.

Prior to studying at Oxford, Renyu worked as Research Assistant at the Assessment Research Group at British Council for one year and a half. She was involved in various projects, including gap analysis on reading demand and reading ability, participant feedback questionnaire design and analysis, design and recruitment for a new EAP task study, etc.

Bernard holds a PhD in Marketing from the University of Nottingham and a DBA from the University of Newcastle.

His research to date explores the leadership in HE. Prior to coming to Oxford, he worked in various HEIs and served as the supervisor of a secondary school.

Publications

Lee, B., Tsui, A. & Yau, O.H.M. (2019), Higher-order Goals, Trust-in-leader, and Self-efficacy as Moderators of Transformational Leadership Performance: The Case of Multi-level Marketing Organizations in China, Journal of Euromarketing, Vol.28 (3-4), 76-97. (2011 RG Impact factor: 0.83).

Conferences

Lee, B. (2020), “Self-formation for the Underprivileged,” 2020 International Online Symposium, Toward a New Paradigm of Economics,organized by Macau Ricci Institute, The University of Saint Joseph, 15 & 16 October. (Online Conference Platform Presentation).

Steve is Associate Professor of Teacher Education. He is a curriculum tutor for the Geography PGCE and MSc Learning and Teaching.

Steve is a qualified geography teacher and was previously the head of department at a comprehensive secondary school in Oxfordshire, and Head of Programmes at Bishop Grosseteste University, Lincoln.

He holds an MA in Educational Leadership and Innovation from Warwick University, an MSc in Educational Research Methodology and DPhil in Education from the University of Oxford which were funded by an ESRC Studentship. He is a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

He researches at the intersection between the academic discipline and school subject of geography, including recent collaborations developing through the Smart Cities Network for Sustainable Urban Future project which was shortlisted for the 2017 Newton Prize (India). He is currently leading research on Climate Change Education Futures in India (GCRF) in collaboration with colleagues at IISER, Pune, and on the role of cultural heritage in curriculum making in Kolkata.

Collaborations with colleagues in the School of Geography and the Environment are contributing to anti-racist curriculum futures, including in the school subject, and in postgraduate teaching through the TDEP-funded Oxford-UNISA course ‘Decolonising Research Methods’.

His research on teacher education focuses on the contribution that geography education research offers to the conceptualisation and practice of teaching. This work includes ethnographic research on teachers’ curriculum making exploring the journeys through which information travels into school classrooms, beginning teachers’ experiences of school subject departments, and the role of written lesson observation feedback in constructing ‘good teaching’.

Steve serves on the editorial board of the journal Geography, and is Chair of the Geography Education Research Collective (GEReCo/IGU-CGE).

 

Caitlin is a Doctoral student in the Department of Education working on how teachers interact with refugee and unaccompanied asylum-seeking pupils in UK schools.

Her Doctoral study uses survey data, interviews, observation, and document analysis to examine teacher knowledge, attitudes, and practices in relation to refugee pupils. Previously, Caitlin worked as a primary school teacher in Aberdeen, London, and at Rose Hill Primary School in Oxford. She completed an MA (Gaelic Medium Education, Oral History) and a PGDE (Primary Education) at the University of Aberdeen, and a BA (Human Geography, Environmental Studies) at Middlebury College in the US. She has a general interest in improving inclusion and equity in education.

Helen’s academic interest in higher education policy developed from more than 20 years of professional experience of university administration – in public relations and admissions.

She gained her doctorate from Oxford in 2010 (a study of the market created by the introduction of £3000 fees for Home/EU undergraduates at English universities in 2006); since then, she has conducted research into the impacts of student fees and funding on institutions, students, graduates and applicants within the higher education sector in England. She also works as a consultant to higher education institutions.

Helen was Pathway Convenor for the MSc Education (HE) for two years and has taught on this course since completing her DPhil. As an inspector for the British Accreditation Council, Helen has the opportunity to gain insights into the operation of higher education providers globally. She is also an Associate of the SKOPE, the department’s research centre for Skills, Knowledge and Organisational Performance.

From 2012-17, Helen was a member of the governing council of the Society for Research into Higher Education (SRHE), serving as Vice-Chair from 2014-17.

 

Jo-Anne is Director of the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment.  She completed a six-year term as Head of the Department of Education, has been Standing Adviser to the House of Commons Education Select Committee, a member of Ofqual’s Standing Advisory Group on Standards, Chair of the National Reference Test Expert Group, and a member of the Welsh Government’s Curriculum and Assessment Group.  Before coming to Oxford, Jo-Anne held academic posts at the Institute of Education, University of London and the University of Bristol. Her first degree and doctorate were in psychology and she has an MBA.  Her current research projects include Setting and Maintaining Standards in national examinations, Examination reform: the impact of modular and linear examinations at GCSE, Assessment for Learning in Africa (AFLA), intelligent accountability and the Progress in International Reading Literacy Study England national centre.

Her research interests are in educational assessment, including system-wide structures and processes, examination standards, marking and assessment design.  Jo-Anne conducts a lot of work with government and industry partners, including acting as the Standing Adviser to the House of Commons Education Select Committee, a member of Ofqual’s Standing Advisory Group and membership of the Welsh Government’s Curriculum and Assessment Group.  She is a member of the Editorial Board of the Oxford Review of Education journal and the International Advisory Board of Assessment in Education: principles, policy & practice.  She has been a Visiting Professor at the universities of Bergen and Queen’s (Belfast).  From 2013 to 2015 she was President of the Association for Educational Assessment – Europe.

Qualifications
  • B.A.H. Linguistics/Psychology – Queen’s University, Kingston On, Canada
  • M.A. Educational Psychology – McGill University, Canada
  • Ph.D. – Second Language Education – McGill University Canada

Victoria Murphy would welcome informal contacts from prospective doctoral students interested in the following topics:

  • Language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/ Language Minority) children
  • Child L2 and bilingualism
  • Foreign language learning in primary school
  • Lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Research

Victoria is active in the following research areas, and would welcome DPhil applications on any of these, particularly those relating to EAL (language minority) children and child L2 learning and foreign language learning in primary school.  She is also the convenor of the Research in English as an Additional Language (REAL) group.  Her research is currently being funded by the ESRC, Leverhulme Trust and Nuffield Foundation.

  • language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/Language minority) children
  • child L2 learning and bilingualism
  • foreign language learning in primary school
  • cognitive processes underlying L1 and L2 learning
  • lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Current Research Project(s)

Joanna is a Doctoral Student, and ESRC Grand Union DTP Scholar, researching in-class support for multilingualism in UK schools.

She has over 12 years of experience as a teaching professional, having worked as a class teacher, EAL specialist and Teaching Assistant in the UK, China, Brazil and Italy. Her main area of interest is school-based education (3-18), specifically the support for multilingual pupils and their language practices, as well as the relationship between teaching assistants and both teachers and children in schools.

Joanna holds a BA in Jurisprudence and a MSc in Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching, both from the University of Oxford. She also has a PGCE, and a PGDip in French.

Joining the Department of Education in 2020 after teaching English and foreign languages in secondary schools and early years settings for 15 years, Catherine completed the MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition in 2021. Her doctoral research investigates the effectiveness of using songs as pedagogical tools with young second language learners in formal educational settings.

Additionally, Catherine hosts The Language Revolution podcast, exploring how linguistics and language awareness might inform/transform languages teaching with guests including Michael Rosen and David Crystal. She also project manages the annual conference for NALDIC, the national subject association for EAL.

Publications

Multilingual is Normal: An anthology of voices, talking about talking (2020)

Renyu completed her BA degree in Psychology at the University of British Columbia (Vancouver, Canada) and her MPhil degree in Education at University of Cambridge.

During her MPhil study, she worked with children aged 4 to 6 years to investigate the relationship between bilingualism, vocabulary size, and inhibitory control, and also to validate a novel app designed to assess early language development. For her Dphil study at Oxford, Renyu aims to explore the factors that might affect L2 pronunciation learning in young children and the interaction between children’s L1 and L2. She is particularly interested in the psychological factors that might influence a child’s L2 pronunciation.

Prior to studying at Oxford, Renyu worked as Research Assistant at the Assessment Research Group at British Council for one year and a half. She was involved in various projects, including gap analysis on reading demand and reading ability, participant feedback questionnaire design and analysis, design and recruitment for a new EAP task study, etc.

Bernard holds a PhD in Marketing from the University of Nottingham and a DBA from the University of Newcastle.

His research to date explores the leadership in HE. Prior to coming to Oxford, he worked in various HEIs and served as the supervisor of a secondary school.

Publications

Lee, B., Tsui, A. & Yau, O.H.M. (2019), Higher-order Goals, Trust-in-leader, and Self-efficacy as Moderators of Transformational Leadership Performance: The Case of Multi-level Marketing Organizations in China, Journal of Euromarketing, Vol.28 (3-4), 76-97. (2011 RG Impact factor: 0.83).

Conferences

Lee, B. (2020), “Self-formation for the Underprivileged,” 2020 International Online Symposium, Toward a New Paradigm of Economics,organized by Macau Ricci Institute, The University of Saint Joseph, 15 & 16 October. (Online Conference Platform Presentation).

Steve is Associate Professor of Teacher Education. He is a curriculum tutor for the Geography PGCE and MSc Learning and Teaching.

Steve is a qualified geography teacher and was previously the head of department at a comprehensive secondary school in Oxfordshire, and Head of Programmes at Bishop Grosseteste University, Lincoln.

He holds an MA in Educational Leadership and Innovation from Warwick University, an MSc in Educational Research Methodology and DPhil in Education from the University of Oxford which were funded by an ESRC Studentship. He is a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

He researches at the intersection between the academic discipline and school subject of geography, including recent collaborations developing through the Smart Cities Network for Sustainable Urban Future project which was shortlisted for the 2017 Newton Prize (India). He is currently leading research on Climate Change Education Futures in India (GCRF) in collaboration with colleagues at IISER, Pune, and on the role of cultural heritage in curriculum making in Kolkata.

Collaborations with colleagues in the School of Geography and the Environment are contributing to anti-racist curriculum futures, including in the school subject, and in postgraduate teaching through the TDEP-funded Oxford-UNISA course ‘Decolonising Research Methods’.

His research on teacher education focuses on the contribution that geography education research offers to the conceptualisation and practice of teaching. This work includes ethnographic research on teachers’ curriculum making exploring the journeys through which information travels into school classrooms, beginning teachers’ experiences of school subject departments, and the role of written lesson observation feedback in constructing ‘good teaching’.

Steve serves on the editorial board of the journal Geography, and is Chair of the Geography Education Research Collective (GEReCo/IGU-CGE).

 

Caitlin is a Doctoral student in the Department of Education working on how teachers interact with refugee and unaccompanied asylum-seeking pupils in UK schools.

Her Doctoral study uses survey data, interviews, observation, and document analysis to examine teacher knowledge, attitudes, and practices in relation to refugee pupils. Previously, Caitlin worked as a primary school teacher in Aberdeen, London, and at Rose Hill Primary School in Oxford. She completed an MA (Gaelic Medium Education, Oral History) and a PGDE (Primary Education) at the University of Aberdeen, and a BA (Human Geography, Environmental Studies) at Middlebury College in the US. She has a general interest in improving inclusion and equity in education.

Helen’s academic interest in higher education policy developed from more than 20 years of professional experience of university administration – in public relations and admissions.

She gained her doctorate from Oxford in 2010 (a study of the market created by the introduction of £3000 fees for Home/EU undergraduates at English universities in 2006); since then, she has conducted research into the impacts of student fees and funding on institutions, students, graduates and applicants within the higher education sector in England. She also works as a consultant to higher education institutions.

Helen was Pathway Convenor for the MSc Education (HE) for two years and has taught on this course since completing her DPhil. As an inspector for the British Accreditation Council, Helen has the opportunity to gain insights into the operation of higher education providers globally. She is also an Associate of the SKOPE, the department’s research centre for Skills, Knowledge and Organisational Performance.

From 2012-17, Helen was a member of the governing council of the Society for Research into Higher Education (SRHE), serving as Vice-Chair from 2014-17.

 

Jo-Anne is Director of the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment.  She completed a six-year term as Head of the Department of Education, has been Standing Adviser to the House of Commons Education Select Committee, a member of Ofqual’s Standing Advisory Group on Standards, Chair of the National Reference Test Expert Group, and a member of the Welsh Government’s Curriculum and Assessment Group.  Before coming to Oxford, Jo-Anne held academic posts at the Institute of Education, University of London and the University of Bristol. Her first degree and doctorate were in psychology and she has an MBA.  Her current research projects include Setting and Maintaining Standards in national examinations, Examination reform: the impact of modular and linear examinations at GCSE, Assessment for Learning in Africa (AFLA), intelligent accountability and the Progress in International Reading Literacy Study England national centre.

Her research interests are in educational assessment, including system-wide structures and processes, examination standards, marking and assessment design.  Jo-Anne conducts a lot of work with government and industry partners, including acting as the Standing Adviser to the House of Commons Education Select Committee, a member of Ofqual’s Standing Advisory Group and membership of the Welsh Government’s Curriculum and Assessment Group.  She is a member of the Editorial Board of the Oxford Review of Education journal and the International Advisory Board of Assessment in Education: principles, policy & practice.  She has been a Visiting Professor at the universities of Bergen and Queen’s (Belfast).  From 2013 to 2015 she was President of the Association for Educational Assessment – Europe.

Qualifications
  • B.A.H. Linguistics/Psychology – Queen’s University, Kingston On, Canada
  • M.A. Educational Psychology – McGill University, Canada
  • Ph.D. – Second Language Education – McGill University Canada

Victoria Murphy would welcome informal contacts from prospective doctoral students interested in the following topics:

  • Language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/ Language Minority) children
  • Child L2 and bilingualism
  • Foreign language learning in primary school
  • Lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Research

Victoria is active in the following research areas, and would welcome DPhil applications on any of these, particularly those relating to EAL (language minority) children and child L2 learning and foreign language learning in primary school.  She is also the convenor of the Research in English as an Additional Language (REAL) group.  Her research is currently being funded by the ESRC, Leverhulme Trust and Nuffield Foundation.

  • language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/Language minority) children
  • child L2 learning and bilingualism
  • foreign language learning in primary school
  • cognitive processes underlying L1 and L2 learning
  • lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Current Research Project(s)

Joanna is a Doctoral Student, and ESRC Grand Union DTP Scholar, researching in-class support for multilingualism in UK schools.

She has over 12 years of experience as a teaching professional, having worked as a class teacher, EAL specialist and Teaching Assistant in the UK, China, Brazil and Italy. Her main area of interest is school-based education (3-18), specifically the support for multilingual pupils and their language practices, as well as the relationship between teaching assistants and both teachers and children in schools.

Joanna holds a BA in Jurisprudence and a MSc in Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching, both from the University of Oxford. She also has a PGCE, and a PGDip in French.

Joining the Department of Education in 2020 after teaching English and foreign languages in secondary schools and early years settings for 15 years, Catherine completed the MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition in 2021. Her doctoral research investigates the effectiveness of using songs as pedagogical tools with young second language learners in formal educational settings.

Additionally, Catherine hosts The Language Revolution podcast, exploring how linguistics and language awareness might inform/transform languages teaching with guests including Michael Rosen and David Crystal. She also project manages the annual conference for NALDIC, the national subject association for EAL.

Publications

Multilingual is Normal: An anthology of voices, talking about talking (2020)

Renyu completed her BA degree in Psychology at the University of British Columbia (Vancouver, Canada) and her MPhil degree in Education at University of Cambridge.

During her MPhil study, she worked with children aged 4 to 6 years to investigate the relationship between bilingualism, vocabulary size, and inhibitory control, and also to validate a novel app designed to assess early language development. For her Dphil study at Oxford, Renyu aims to explore the factors that might affect L2 pronunciation learning in young children and the interaction between children’s L1 and L2. She is particularly interested in the psychological factors that might influence a child’s L2 pronunciation.

Prior to studying at Oxford, Renyu worked as Research Assistant at the Assessment Research Group at British Council for one year and a half. She was involved in various projects, including gap analysis on reading demand and reading ability, participant feedback questionnaire design and analysis, design and recruitment for a new EAP task study, etc.

Bernard holds a PhD in Marketing from the University of Nottingham and a DBA from the University of Newcastle.

His research to date explores the leadership in HE. Prior to coming to Oxford, he worked in various HEIs and served as the supervisor of a secondary school.

Publications

Lee, B., Tsui, A. & Yau, O.H.M. (2019), Higher-order Goals, Trust-in-leader, and Self-efficacy as Moderators of Transformational Leadership Performance: The Case of Multi-level Marketing Organizations in China, Journal of Euromarketing, Vol.28 (3-4), 76-97. (2011 RG Impact factor: 0.83).

Conferences

Lee, B. (2020), “Self-formation for the Underprivileged,” 2020 International Online Symposium, Toward a New Paradigm of Economics,organized by Macau Ricci Institute, The University of Saint Joseph, 15 & 16 October. (Online Conference Platform Presentation).

Steve is Associate Professor of Teacher Education. He is a curriculum tutor for the Geography PGCE and MSc Learning and Teaching.

Steve is a qualified geography teacher and was previously the head of department at a comprehensive secondary school in Oxfordshire, and Head of Programmes at Bishop Grosseteste University, Lincoln.

He holds an MA in Educational Leadership and Innovation from Warwick University, an MSc in Educational Research Methodology and DPhil in Education from the University of Oxford which were funded by an ESRC Studentship. He is a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

He researches at the intersection between the academic discipline and school subject of geography, including recent collaborations developing through the Smart Cities Network for Sustainable Urban Future project which was shortlisted for the 2017 Newton Prize (India). He is currently leading research on Climate Change Education Futures in India (GCRF) in collaboration with colleagues at IISER, Pune, and on the role of cultural heritage in curriculum making in Kolkata.

Collaborations with colleagues in the School of Geography and the Environment are contributing to anti-racist curriculum futures, including in the school subject, and in postgraduate teaching through the TDEP-funded Oxford-UNISA course ‘Decolonising Research Methods’.

His research on teacher education focuses on the contribution that geography education research offers to the conceptualisation and practice of teaching. This work includes ethnographic research on teachers’ curriculum making exploring the journeys through which information travels into school classrooms, beginning teachers’ experiences of school subject departments, and the role of written lesson observation feedback in constructing ‘good teaching’.

Steve serves on the editorial board of the journal Geography, and is Chair of the Geography Education Research Collective (GEReCo/IGU-CGE).

 

Caitlin is a Doctoral student in the Department of Education working on how teachers interact with refugee and unaccompanied asylum-seeking pupils in UK schools.

Her Doctoral study uses survey data, interviews, observation, and document analysis to examine teacher knowledge, attitudes, and practices in relation to refugee pupils. Previously, Caitlin worked as a primary school teacher in Aberdeen, London, and at Rose Hill Primary School in Oxford. She completed an MA (Gaelic Medium Education, Oral History) and a PGDE (Primary Education) at the University of Aberdeen, and a BA (Human Geography, Environmental Studies) at Middlebury College in the US. She has a general interest in improving inclusion and equity in education.

Helen’s academic interest in higher education policy developed from more than 20 years of professional experience of university administration – in public relations and admissions.

She gained her doctorate from Oxford in 2010 (a study of the market created by the introduction of £3000 fees for Home/EU undergraduates at English universities in 2006); since then, she has conducted research into the impacts of student fees and funding on institutions, students, graduates and applicants within the higher education sector in England. She also works as a consultant to higher education institutions.

Helen was Pathway Convenor for the MSc Education (HE) for two years and has taught on this course since completing her DPhil. As an inspector for the British Accreditation Council, Helen has the opportunity to gain insights into the operation of higher education providers globally. She is also an Associate of the SKOPE, the department’s research centre for Skills, Knowledge and Organisational Performance.

From 2012-17, Helen was a member of the governing council of the Society for Research into Higher Education (SRHE), serving as Vice-Chair from 2014-17.

 

Jo-Anne is Director of the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment.  She completed a six-year term as Head of the Department of Education, has been Standing Adviser to the House of Commons Education Select Committee, a member of Ofqual’s Standing Advisory Group on Standards, Chair of the National Reference Test Expert Group, and a member of the Welsh Government’s Curriculum and Assessment Group.  Before coming to Oxford, Jo-Anne held academic posts at the Institute of Education, University of London and the University of Bristol. Her first degree and doctorate were in psychology and she has an MBA.  Her current research projects include Setting and Maintaining Standards in national examinations, Examination reform: the impact of modular and linear examinations at GCSE, Assessment for Learning in Africa (AFLA), intelligent accountability and the Progress in International Reading Literacy Study England national centre.

Her research interests are in educational assessment, including system-wide structures and processes, examination standards, marking and assessment design.  Jo-Anne conducts a lot of work with government and industry partners, including acting as the Standing Adviser to the House of Commons Education Select Committee, a member of Ofqual’s Standing Advisory Group and membership of the Welsh Government’s Curriculum and Assessment Group.  She is a member of the Editorial Board of the Oxford Review of Education journal and the International Advisory Board of Assessment in Education: principles, policy & practice.  She has been a Visiting Professor at the universities of Bergen and Queen’s (Belfast).  From 2013 to 2015 she was President of the Association for Educational Assessment – Europe.

Qualifications
  • B.A.H. Linguistics/Psychology – Queen’s University, Kingston On, Canada
  • M.A. Educational Psychology – McGill University, Canada
  • Ph.D. – Second Language Education – McGill University Canada

Victoria Murphy would welcome informal contacts from prospective doctoral students interested in the following topics:

  • Language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/ Language Minority) children
  • Child L2 and bilingualism
  • Foreign language learning in primary school
  • Lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Research

Victoria is active in the following research areas, and would welcome DPhil applications on any of these, particularly those relating to EAL (language minority) children and child L2 learning and foreign language learning in primary school.  She is also the convenor of the Research in English as an Additional Language (REAL) group.  Her research is currently being funded by the ESRC, Leverhulme Trust and Nuffield Foundation.

  • language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/Language minority) children
  • child L2 learning and bilingualism
  • foreign language learning in primary school
  • cognitive processes underlying L1 and L2 learning
  • lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Current Research Project(s)

Joanna is a Doctoral Student, and ESRC Grand Union DTP Scholar, researching in-class support for multilingualism in UK schools.

She has over 12 years of experience as a teaching professional, having worked as a class teacher, EAL specialist and Teaching Assistant in the UK, China, Brazil and Italy. Her main area of interest is school-based education (3-18), specifically the support for multilingual pupils and their language practices, as well as the relationship between teaching assistants and both teachers and children in schools.

Joanna holds a BA in Jurisprudence and a MSc in Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching, both from the University of Oxford. She also has a PGCE, and a PGDip in French.

Joining the Department of Education in 2020 after teaching English and foreign languages in secondary schools and early years settings for 15 years, Catherine completed the MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition in 2021. Her doctoral research investigates the effectiveness of using songs as pedagogical tools with young second language learners in formal educational settings.

Additionally, Catherine hosts The Language Revolution podcast, exploring how linguistics and language awareness might inform/transform languages teaching with guests including Michael Rosen and David Crystal. She also project manages the annual conference for NALDIC, the national subject association for EAL.

Publications

Multilingual is Normal: An anthology of voices, talking about talking (2020)

Renyu completed her BA degree in Psychology at the University of British Columbia (Vancouver, Canada) and her MPhil degree in Education at University of Cambridge.

During her MPhil study, she worked with children aged 4 to 6 years to investigate the relationship between bilingualism, vocabulary size, and inhibitory control, and also to validate a novel app designed to assess early language development. For her Dphil study at Oxford, Renyu aims to explore the factors that might affect L2 pronunciation learning in young children and the interaction between children’s L1 and L2. She is particularly interested in the psychological factors that might influence a child’s L2 pronunciation.

Prior to studying at Oxford, Renyu worked as Research Assistant at the Assessment Research Group at British Council for one year and a half. She was involved in various projects, including gap analysis on reading demand and reading ability, participant feedback questionnaire design and analysis, design and recruitment for a new EAP task study, etc.

Bernard holds a PhD in Marketing from the University of Nottingham and a DBA from the University of Newcastle.

His research to date explores the leadership in HE. Prior to coming to Oxford, he worked in various HEIs and served as the supervisor of a secondary school.

Publications

Lee, B., Tsui, A. & Yau, O.H.M. (2019), Higher-order Goals, Trust-in-leader, and Self-efficacy as Moderators of Transformational Leadership Performance: The Case of Multi-level Marketing Organizations in China, Journal of Euromarketing, Vol.28 (3-4), 76-97. (2011 RG Impact factor: 0.83).

Conferences

Lee, B. (2020), “Self-formation for the Underprivileged,” 2020 International Online Symposium, Toward a New Paradigm of Economics,organized by Macau Ricci Institute, The University of Saint Joseph, 15 & 16 October. (Online Conference Platform Presentation).

Steve is Associate Professor of Teacher Education. He is a curriculum tutor for the Geography PGCE and MSc Learning and Teaching.

Steve is a qualified geography teacher and was previously the head of department at a comprehensive secondary school in Oxfordshire, and Head of Programmes at Bishop Grosseteste University, Lincoln.

He holds an MA in Educational Leadership and Innovation from Warwick University, an MSc in Educational Research Methodology and DPhil in Education from the University of Oxford which were funded by an ESRC Studentship. He is a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

He researches at the intersection between the academic discipline and school subject of geography, including recent collaborations developing through the Smart Cities Network for Sustainable Urban Future project which was shortlisted for the 2017 Newton Prize (India). He is currently leading research on Climate Change Education Futures in India (GCRF) in collaboration with colleagues at IISER, Pune, and on the role of cultural heritage in curriculum making in Kolkata.

Collaborations with colleagues in the School of Geography and the Environment are contributing to anti-racist curriculum futures, including in the school subject, and in postgraduate teaching through the TDEP-funded Oxford-UNISA course ‘Decolonising Research Methods’.

His research on teacher education focuses on the contribution that geography education research offers to the conceptualisation and practice of teaching. This work includes ethnographic research on teachers’ curriculum making exploring the journeys through which information travels into school classrooms, beginning teachers’ experiences of school subject departments, and the role of written lesson observation feedback in constructing ‘good teaching’.

Steve serves on the editorial board of the journal Geography, and is Chair of the Geography Education Research Collective (GEReCo/IGU-CGE).

 

Caitlin is a Doctoral student in the Department of Education working on how teachers interact with refugee and unaccompanied asylum-seeking pupils in UK schools.

Her Doctoral study uses survey data, interviews, observation, and document analysis to examine teacher knowledge, attitudes, and practices in relation to refugee pupils. Previously, Caitlin worked as a primary school teacher in Aberdeen, London, and at Rose Hill Primary School in Oxford. She completed an MA (Gaelic Medium Education, Oral History) and a PGDE (Primary Education) at the University of Aberdeen, and a BA (Human Geography, Environmental Studies) at Middlebury College in the US. She has a general interest in improving inclusion and equity in education.

Helen’s academic interest in higher education policy developed from more than 20 years of professional experience of university administration – in public relations and admissions.

She gained her doctorate from Oxford in 2010 (a study of the market created by the introduction of £3000 fees for Home/EU undergraduates at English universities in 2006); since then, she has conducted research into the impacts of student fees and funding on institutions, students, graduates and applicants within the higher education sector in England. She also works as a consultant to higher education institutions.

Helen was Pathway Convenor for the MSc Education (HE) for two years and has taught on this course since completing her DPhil. As an inspector for the British Accreditation Council, Helen has the opportunity to gain insights into the operation of higher education providers globally. She is also an Associate of the SKOPE, the department’s research centre for Skills, Knowledge and Organisational Performance.

From 2012-17, Helen was a member of the governing council of the Society for Research into Higher Education (SRHE), serving as Vice-Chair from 2014-17.

 

Jo-Anne is Director of the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment.  She completed a six-year term as Head of the Department of Education, has been Standing Adviser to the House of Commons Education Select Committee, a member of Ofqual’s Standing Advisory Group on Standards, Chair of the National Reference Test Expert Group, and a member of the Welsh Government’s Curriculum and Assessment Group.  Before coming to Oxford, Jo-Anne held academic posts at the Institute of Education, University of London and the University of Bristol. Her first degree and doctorate were in psychology and she has an MBA.  Her current research projects include Setting and Maintaining Standards in national examinations, Examination reform: the impact of modular and linear examinations at GCSE, Assessment for Learning in Africa (AFLA), intelligent accountability and the Progress in International Reading Literacy Study England national centre.

Her research interests are in educational assessment, including system-wide structures and processes, examination standards, marking and assessment design.  Jo-Anne conducts a lot of work with government and industry partners, including acting as the Standing Adviser to the House of Commons Education Select Committee, a member of Ofqual’s Standing Advisory Group and membership of the Welsh Government’s Curriculum and Assessment Group.  She is a member of the Editorial Board of the Oxford Review of Education journal and the International Advisory Board of Assessment in Education: principles, policy & practice.  She has been a Visiting Professor at the universities of Bergen and Queen’s (Belfast).  From 2013 to 2015 she was President of the Association for Educational Assessment – Europe.

Qualifications
  • B.A.H. Linguistics/Psychology – Queen’s University, Kingston On, Canada
  • M.A. Educational Psychology – McGill University, Canada
  • Ph.D. – Second Language Education – McGill University Canada

Victoria Murphy would welcome informal contacts from prospective doctoral students interested in the following topics:

  • Language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/ Language Minority) children
  • Child L2 and bilingualism
  • Foreign language learning in primary school
  • Lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Research

Victoria is active in the following research areas, and would welcome DPhil applications on any of these, particularly those relating to EAL (language minority) children and child L2 learning and foreign language learning in primary school.  She is also the convenor of the Research in English as an Additional Language (REAL) group.  Her research is currently being funded by the ESRC, Leverhulme Trust and Nuffield Foundation.

  • language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/Language minority) children
  • child L2 learning and bilingualism
  • foreign language learning in primary school
  • cognitive processes underlying L1 and L2 learning
  • lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Current Research Project(s)

Joanna is a Doctoral Student, and ESRC Grand Union DTP Scholar, researching in-class support for multilingualism in UK schools.

She has over 12 years of experience as a teaching professional, having worked as a class teacher, EAL specialist and Teaching Assistant in the UK, China, Brazil and Italy. Her main area of interest is school-based education (3-18), specifically the support for multilingual pupils and their language practices, as well as the relationship between teaching assistants and both teachers and children in schools.

Joanna holds a BA in Jurisprudence and a MSc in Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching, both from the University of Oxford. She also has a PGCE, and a PGDip in French.

Joining the Department of Education in 2020 after teaching English and foreign languages in secondary schools and early years settings for 15 years, Catherine completed the MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition in 2021. Her doctoral research investigates the effectiveness of using songs as pedagogical tools with young second language learners in formal educational settings.

Additionally, Catherine hosts The Language Revolution podcast, exploring how linguistics and language awareness might inform/transform languages teaching with guests including Michael Rosen and David Crystal. She also project manages the annual conference for NALDIC, the national subject association for EAL.

Publications

Multilingual is Normal: An anthology of voices, talking about talking (2020)

Renyu completed her BA degree in Psychology at the University of British Columbia (Vancouver, Canada) and her MPhil degree in Education at University of Cambridge.

During her MPhil study, she worked with children aged 4 to 6 years to investigate the relationship between bilingualism, vocabulary size, and inhibitory control, and also to validate a novel app designed to assess early language development. For her Dphil study at Oxford, Renyu aims to explore the factors that might affect L2 pronunciation learning in young children and the interaction between children’s L1 and L2. She is particularly interested in the psychological factors that might influence a child’s L2 pronunciation.

Prior to studying at Oxford, Renyu worked as Research Assistant at the Assessment Research Group at British Council for one year and a half. She was involved in various projects, including gap analysis on reading demand and reading ability, participant feedback questionnaire design and analysis, design and recruitment for a new EAP task study, etc.

Bernard holds a PhD in Marketing from the University of Nottingham and a DBA from the University of Newcastle.

His research to date explores the leadership in HE. Prior to coming to Oxford, he worked in various HEIs and served as the supervisor of a secondary school.

Publications

Lee, B., Tsui, A. & Yau, O.H.M. (2019), Higher-order Goals, Trust-in-leader, and Self-efficacy as Moderators of Transformational Leadership Performance: The Case of Multi-level Marketing Organizations in China, Journal of Euromarketing, Vol.28 (3-4), 76-97. (2011 RG Impact factor: 0.83).

Conferences

Lee, B. (2020), “Self-formation for the Underprivileged,” 2020 International Online Symposium, Toward a New Paradigm of Economics,organized by Macau Ricci Institute, The University of Saint Joseph, 15 & 16 October. (Online Conference Platform Presentation).

Steve is Associate Professor of Teacher Education. He is a curriculum tutor for the Geography PGCE and MSc Learning and Teaching.

Steve is a qualified geography teacher and was previously the head of department at a comprehensive secondary school in Oxfordshire, and Head of Programmes at Bishop Grosseteste University, Lincoln.

He holds an MA in Educational Leadership and Innovation from Warwick University, an MSc in Educational Research Methodology and DPhil in Education from the University of Oxford which were funded by an ESRC Studentship. He is a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

He researches at the intersection between the academic discipline and school subject of geography, including recent collaborations developing through the Smart Cities Network for Sustainable Urban Future project which was shortlisted for the 2017 Newton Prize (India). He is currently leading research on Climate Change Education Futures in India (GCRF) in collaboration with colleagues at IISER, Pune, and on the role of cultural heritage in curriculum making in Kolkata.

Collaborations with colleagues in the School of Geography and the Environment are contributing to anti-racist curriculum futures, including in the school subject, and in postgraduate teaching through the TDEP-funded Oxford-UNISA course ‘Decolonising Research Methods’.

His research on teacher education focuses on the contribution that geography education research offers to the conceptualisation and practice of teaching. This work includes ethnographic research on teachers’ curriculum making exploring the journeys through which information travels into school classrooms, beginning teachers’ experiences of school subject departments, and the role of written lesson observation feedback in constructing ‘good teaching’.

Steve serves on the editorial board of the journal Geography, and is Chair of the Geography Education Research Collective (GEReCo/IGU-CGE).

 

Caitlin is a Doctoral student in the Department of Education working on how teachers interact with refugee and unaccompanied asylum-seeking pupils in UK schools.

Her Doctoral study uses survey data, interviews, observation, and document analysis to examine teacher knowledge, attitudes, and practices in relation to refugee pupils. Previously, Caitlin worked as a primary school teacher in Aberdeen, London, and at Rose Hill Primary School in Oxford. She completed an MA (Gaelic Medium Education, Oral History) and a PGDE (Primary Education) at the University of Aberdeen, and a BA (Human Geography, Environmental Studies) at Middlebury College in the US. She has a general interest in improving inclusion and equity in education.

Helen’s academic interest in higher education policy developed from more than 20 years of professional experience of university administration – in public relations and admissions.

She gained her doctorate from Oxford in 2010 (a study of the market created by the introduction of £3000 fees for Home/EU undergraduates at English universities in 2006); since then, she has conducted research into the impacts of student fees and funding on institutions, students, graduates and applicants within the higher education sector in England. She also works as a consultant to higher education institutions.

Helen was Pathway Convenor for the MSc Education (HE) for two years and has taught on this course since completing her DPhil. As an inspector for the British Accreditation Council, Helen has the opportunity to gain insights into the operation of higher education providers globally. She is also an Associate of the SKOPE, the department’s research centre for Skills, Knowledge and Organisational Performance.

From 2012-17, Helen was a member of the governing council of the Society for Research into Higher Education (SRHE), serving as Vice-Chair from 2014-17.

 

Jo-Anne is Director of the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment.  She completed a six-year term as Head of the Department of Education, has been Standing Adviser to the House of Commons Education Select Committee, a member of Ofqual’s Standing Advisory Group on Standards, Chair of the National Reference Test Expert Group, and a member of the Welsh Government’s Curriculum and Assessment Group.  Before coming to Oxford, Jo-Anne held academic posts at the Institute of Education, University of London and the University of Bristol. Her first degree and doctorate were in psychology and she has an MBA.  Her current research projects include Setting and Maintaining Standards in national examinations, Examination reform: the impact of modular and linear examinations at GCSE, Assessment for Learning in Africa (AFLA), intelligent accountability and the Progress in International Reading Literacy Study England national centre.

Her research interests are in educational assessment, including system-wide structures and processes, examination standards, marking and assessment design.  Jo-Anne conducts a lot of work with government and industry partners, including acting as the Standing Adviser to the House of Commons Education Select Committee, a member of Ofqual’s Standing Advisory Group and membership of the Welsh Government’s Curriculum and Assessment Group.  She is a member of the Editorial Board of the Oxford Review of Education journal and the International Advisory Board of Assessment in Education: principles, policy & practice.  She has been a Visiting Professor at the universities of Bergen and Queen’s (Belfast).  From 2013 to 2015 she was President of the Association for Educational Assessment – Europe.

Qualifications
  • B.A.H. Linguistics/Psychology – Queen’s University, Kingston On, Canada
  • M.A. Educational Psychology – McGill University, Canada
  • Ph.D. – Second Language Education – McGill University Canada

Victoria Murphy would welcome informal contacts from prospective doctoral students interested in the following topics:

  • Language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/ Language Minority) children
  • Child L2 and bilingualism
  • Foreign language learning in primary school
  • Lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Research

Victoria is active in the following research areas, and would welcome DPhil applications on any of these, particularly those relating to EAL (language minority) children and child L2 learning and foreign language learning in primary school.  She is also the convenor of the Research in English as an Additional Language (REAL) group.  Her research is currently being funded by the ESRC, Leverhulme Trust and Nuffield Foundation.

  • language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/Language minority) children
  • child L2 learning and bilingualism
  • foreign language learning in primary school
  • cognitive processes underlying L1 and L2 learning
  • lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Current Research Project(s)

Joanna is a Doctoral Student, and ESRC Grand Union DTP Scholar, researching in-class support for multilingualism in UK schools.

She has over 12 years of experience as a teaching professional, having worked as a class teacher, EAL specialist and Teaching Assistant in the UK, China, Brazil and Italy. Her main area of interest is school-based education (3-18), specifically the support for multilingual pupils and their language practices, as well as the relationship between teaching assistants and both teachers and children in schools.

Joanna holds a BA in Jurisprudence and a MSc in Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching, both from the University of Oxford. She also has a PGCE, and a PGDip in French.

Joining the Department of Education in 2020 after teaching English and foreign languages in secondary schools and early years settings for 15 years, Catherine completed the MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition in 2021. Her doctoral research investigates the effectiveness of using songs as pedagogical tools with young second language learners in formal educational settings.

Additionally, Catherine hosts The Language Revolution podcast, exploring how linguistics and language awareness might inform/transform languages teaching with guests including Michael Rosen and David Crystal. She also project manages the annual conference for NALDIC, the national subject association for EAL.

Publications

Multilingual is Normal: An anthology of voices, talking about talking (2020)

Renyu completed her BA degree in Psychology at the University of British Columbia (Vancouver, Canada) and her MPhil degree in Education at University of Cambridge.

During her MPhil study, she worked with children aged 4 to 6 years to investigate the relationship between bilingualism, vocabulary size, and inhibitory control, and also to validate a novel app designed to assess early language development. For her Dphil study at Oxford, Renyu aims to explore the factors that might affect L2 pronunciation learning in young children and the interaction between children’s L1 and L2. She is particularly interested in the psychological factors that might influence a child’s L2 pronunciation.

Prior to studying at Oxford, Renyu worked as Research Assistant at the Assessment Research Group at British Council for one year and a half. She was involved in various projects, including gap analysis on reading demand and reading ability, participant feedback questionnaire design and analysis, design and recruitment for a new EAP task study, etc.

Bernard holds a PhD in Marketing from the University of Nottingham and a DBA from the University of Newcastle.

His research to date explores the leadership in HE. Prior to coming to Oxford, he worked in various HEIs and served as the supervisor of a secondary school.

Publications

Lee, B., Tsui, A. & Yau, O.H.M. (2019), Higher-order Goals, Trust-in-leader, and Self-efficacy as Moderators of Transformational Leadership Performance: The Case of Multi-level Marketing Organizations in China, Journal of Euromarketing, Vol.28 (3-4), 76-97. (2011 RG Impact factor: 0.83).

Conferences

Lee, B. (2020), “Self-formation for the Underprivileged,” 2020 International Online Symposium, Toward a New Paradigm of Economics,organized by Macau Ricci Institute, The University of Saint Joseph, 15 & 16 October. (Online Conference Platform Presentation).

Steve is Associate Professor of Teacher Education. He is a curriculum tutor for the Geography PGCE and MSc Learning and Teaching.

Steve is a qualified geography teacher and was previously the head of department at a comprehensive secondary school in Oxfordshire, and Head of Programmes at Bishop Grosseteste University, Lincoln.

He holds an MA in Educational Leadership and Innovation from Warwick University, an MSc in Educational Research Methodology and DPhil in Education from the University of Oxford which were funded by an ESRC Studentship. He is a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

He researches at the intersection between the academic discipline and school subject of geography, including recent collaborations developing through the Smart Cities Network for Sustainable Urban Future project which was shortlisted for the 2017 Newton Prize (India). He is currently leading research on Climate Change Education Futures in India (GCRF) in collaboration with colleagues at IISER, Pune, and on the role of cultural heritage in curriculum making in Kolkata.

Collaborations with colleagues in the School of Geography and the Environment are contributing to anti-racist curriculum futures, including in the school subject, and in postgraduate teaching through the TDEP-funded Oxford-UNISA course ‘Decolonising Research Methods’.

His research on teacher education focuses on the contribution that geography education research offers to the conceptualisation and practice of teaching. This work includes ethnographic research on teachers’ curriculum making exploring the journeys through which information travels into school classrooms, beginning teachers’ experiences of school subject departments, and the role of written lesson observation feedback in constructing ‘good teaching’.

Steve serves on the editorial board of the journal Geography, and is Chair of the Geography Education Research Collective (GEReCo/IGU-CGE).

 

Caitlin is a Doctoral student in the Department of Education working on how teachers interact with refugee and unaccompanied asylum-seeking pupils in UK schools.

Her Doctoral study uses survey data, interviews, observation, and document analysis to examine teacher knowledge, attitudes, and practices in relation to refugee pupils. Previously, Caitlin worked as a primary school teacher in Aberdeen, London, and at Rose Hill Primary School in Oxford. She completed an MA (Gaelic Medium Education, Oral History) and a PGDE (Primary Education) at the University of Aberdeen, and a BA (Human Geography, Environmental Studies) at Middlebury College in the US. She has a general interest in improving inclusion and equity in education.

Helen’s academic interest in higher education policy developed from more than 20 years of professional experience of university administration – in public relations and admissions.

She gained her doctorate from Oxford in 2010 (a study of the market created by the introduction of £3000 fees for Home/EU undergraduates at English universities in 2006); since then, she has conducted research into the impacts of student fees and funding on institutions, students, graduates and applicants within the higher education sector in England. She also works as a consultant to higher education institutions.

Helen was Pathway Convenor for the MSc Education (HE) for two years and has taught on this course since completing her DPhil. As an inspector for the British Accreditation Council, Helen has the opportunity to gain insights into the operation of higher education providers globally. She is also an Associate of the SKOPE, the department’s research centre for Skills, Knowledge and Organisational Performance.

From 2012-17, Helen was a member of the governing council of the Society for Research into Higher Education (SRHE), serving as Vice-Chair from 2014-17.

 

Jo-Anne is Director of the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment.  She completed a six-year term as Head of the Department of Education, has been Standing Adviser to the House of Commons Education Select Committee, a member of Ofqual’s Standing Advisory Group on Standards, Chair of the National Reference Test Expert Group, and a member of the Welsh Government’s Curriculum and Assessment Group.  Before coming to Oxford, Jo-Anne held academic posts at the Institute of Education, University of London and the University of Bristol. Her first degree and doctorate were in psychology and she has an MBA.  Her current research projects include Setting and Maintaining Standards in national examinations, Examination reform: the impact of modular and linear examinations at GCSE, Assessment for Learning in Africa (AFLA), intelligent accountability and the Progress in International Reading Literacy Study England national centre.

Her research interests are in educational assessment, including system-wide structures and processes, examination standards, marking and assessment design.  Jo-Anne conducts a lot of work with government and industry partners, including acting as the Standing Adviser to the House of Commons Education Select Committee, a member of Ofqual’s Standing Advisory Group and membership of the Welsh Government’s Curriculum and Assessment Group.  She is a member of the Editorial Board of the Oxford Review of Education journal and the International Advisory Board of Assessment in Education: principles, policy & practice.  She has been a Visiting Professor at the universities of Bergen and Queen’s (Belfast).  From 2013 to 2015 she was President of the Association for Educational Assessment – Europe.

Qualifications
  • B.A.H. Linguistics/Psychology – Queen’s University, Kingston On, Canada
  • M.A. Educational Psychology – McGill University, Canada
  • Ph.D. – Second Language Education – McGill University Canada

Victoria Murphy would welcome informal contacts from prospective doctoral students interested in the following topics:

  • Language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/ Language Minority) children
  • Child L2 and bilingualism
  • Foreign language learning in primary school
  • Lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Research

Victoria is active in the following research areas, and would welcome DPhil applications on any of these, particularly those relating to EAL (language minority) children and child L2 learning and foreign language learning in primary school.  She is also the convenor of the Research in English as an Additional Language (REAL) group.  Her research is currently being funded by the ESRC, Leverhulme Trust and Nuffield Foundation.

  • language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/Language minority) children
  • child L2 learning and bilingualism
  • foreign language learning in primary school
  • cognitive processes underlying L1 and L2 learning
  • lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Current Research Project(s)

Joanna is a Doctoral Student, and ESRC Grand Union DTP Scholar, researching in-class support for multilingualism in UK schools.

She has over 12 years of experience as a teaching professional, having worked as a class teacher, EAL specialist and Teaching Assistant in the UK, China, Brazil and Italy. Her main area of interest is school-based education (3-18), specifically the support for multilingual pupils and their language practices, as well as the relationship between teaching assistants and both teachers and children in schools.

Joanna holds a BA in Jurisprudence and a MSc in Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching, both from the University of Oxford. She also has a PGCE, and a PGDip in French.

Joining the Department of Education in 2020 after teaching English and foreign languages in secondary schools and early years settings for 15 years, Catherine completed the MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition in 2021. Her doctoral research investigates the effectiveness of using songs as pedagogical tools with young second language learners in formal educational settings.

Additionally, Catherine hosts The Language Revolution podcast, exploring how linguistics and language awareness might inform/transform languages teaching with guests including Michael Rosen and David Crystal. She also project manages the annual conference for NALDIC, the national subject association for EAL.

Publications

Multilingual is Normal: An anthology of voices, talking about talking (2020)

Renyu completed her BA degree in Psychology at the University of British Columbia (Vancouver, Canada) and her MPhil degree in Education at University of Cambridge.

During her MPhil study, she worked with children aged 4 to 6 years to investigate the relationship between bilingualism, vocabulary size, and inhibitory control, and also to validate a novel app designed to assess early language development. For her Dphil study at Oxford, Renyu aims to explore the factors that might affect L2 pronunciation learning in young children and the interaction between children’s L1 and L2. She is particularly interested in the psychological factors that might influence a child’s L2 pronunciation.

Prior to studying at Oxford, Renyu worked as Research Assistant at the Assessment Research Group at British Council for one year and a half. She was involved in various projects, including gap analysis on reading demand and reading ability, participant feedback questionnaire design and analysis, design and recruitment for a new EAP task study, etc.

Bernard holds a PhD in Marketing from the University of Nottingham and a DBA from the University of Newcastle.

His research to date explores the leadership in HE. Prior to coming to Oxford, he worked in various HEIs and served as the supervisor of a secondary school.

Publications

Lee, B., Tsui, A. & Yau, O.H.M. (2019), Higher-order Goals, Trust-in-leader, and Self-efficacy as Moderators of Transformational Leadership Performance: The Case of Multi-level Marketing Organizations in China, Journal of Euromarketing, Vol.28 (3-4), 76-97. (2011 RG Impact factor: 0.83).

Conferences

Lee, B. (2020), “Self-formation for the Underprivileged,” 2020 International Online Symposium, Toward a New Paradigm of Economics,organized by Macau Ricci Institute, The University of Saint Joseph, 15 & 16 October. (Online Conference Platform Presentation).

Steve is Associate Professor of Teacher Education. He is a curriculum tutor for the Geography PGCE and MSc Learning and Teaching.

Steve is a qualified geography teacher and was previously the head of department at a comprehensive secondary school in Oxfordshire, and Head of Programmes at Bishop Grosseteste University, Lincoln.

He holds an MA in Educational Leadership and Innovation from Warwick University, an MSc in Educational Research Methodology and DPhil in Education from the University of Oxford which were funded by an ESRC Studentship. He is a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

He researches at the intersection between the academic discipline and school subject of geography, including recent collaborations developing through the Smart Cities Network for Sustainable Urban Future project which was shortlisted for the 2017 Newton Prize (India). He is currently leading research on Climate Change Education Futures in India (GCRF) in collaboration with colleagues at IISER, Pune, and on the role of cultural heritage in curriculum making in Kolkata.

Collaborations with colleagues in the School of Geography and the Environment are contributing to anti-racist curriculum futures, including in the school subject, and in postgraduate teaching through the TDEP-funded Oxford-UNISA course ‘Decolonising Research Methods’.

His research on teacher education focuses on the contribution that geography education research offers to the conceptualisation and practice of teaching. This work includes ethnographic research on teachers’ curriculum making exploring the journeys through which information travels into school classrooms, beginning teachers’ experiences of school subject departments, and the role of written lesson observation feedback in constructing ‘good teaching’.

Steve serves on the editorial board of the journal Geography, and is Chair of the Geography Education Research Collective (GEReCo/IGU-CGE).

 

Caitlin is a Doctoral student in the Department of Education working on how teachers interact with refugee and unaccompanied asylum-seeking pupils in UK schools.

Her Doctoral study uses survey data, interviews, observation, and document analysis to examine teacher knowledge, attitudes, and practices in relation to refugee pupils. Previously, Caitlin worked as a primary school teacher in Aberdeen, London, and at Rose Hill Primary School in Oxford. She completed an MA (Gaelic Medium Education, Oral History) and a PGDE (Primary Education) at the University of Aberdeen, and a BA (Human Geography, Environmental Studies) at Middlebury College in the US. She has a general interest in improving inclusion and equity in education.

Helen’s academic interest in higher education policy developed from more than 20 years of professional experience of university administration – in public relations and admissions.

She gained her doctorate from Oxford in 2010 (a study of the market created by the introduction of £3000 fees for Home/EU undergraduates at English universities in 2006); since then, she has conducted research into the impacts of student fees and funding on institutions, students, graduates and applicants within the higher education sector in England. She also works as a consultant to higher education institutions.

Helen was Pathway Convenor for the MSc Education (HE) for two years and has taught on this course since completing her DPhil. As an inspector for the British Accreditation Council, Helen has the opportunity to gain insights into the operation of higher education providers globally. She is also an Associate of the SKOPE, the department’s research centre for Skills, Knowledge and Organisational Performance.

From 2012-17, Helen was a member of the governing council of the Society for Research into Higher Education (SRHE), serving as Vice-Chair from 2014-17.

 

Jo-Anne is Director of the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment.  She completed a six-year term as Head of the Department of Education, has been Standing Adviser to the House of Commons Education Select Committee, a member of Ofqual’s Standing Advisory Group on Standards, Chair of the National Reference Test Expert Group, and a member of the Welsh Government’s Curriculum and Assessment Group.  Before coming to Oxford, Jo-Anne held academic posts at the Institute of Education, University of London and the University of Bristol. Her first degree and doctorate were in psychology and she has an MBA.  Her current research projects include Setting and Maintaining Standards in national examinations, Examination reform: the impact of modular and linear examinations at GCSE, Assessment for Learning in Africa (AFLA), intelligent accountability and the Progress in International Reading Literacy Study England national centre.

Her research interests are in educational assessment, including system-wide structures and processes, examination standards, marking and assessment design.  Jo-Anne conducts a lot of work with government and industry partners, including acting as the Standing Adviser to the House of Commons Education Select Committee, a member of Ofqual’s Standing Advisory Group and membership of the Welsh Government’s Curriculum and Assessment Group.  She is a member of the Editorial Board of the Oxford Review of Education journal and the International Advisory Board of Assessment in Education: principles, policy & practice.  She has been a Visiting Professor at the universities of Bergen and Queen’s (Belfast).  From 2013 to 2015 she was President of the Association for Educational Assessment – Europe.

Qualifications
  • B.A.H. Linguistics/Psychology – Queen’s University, Kingston On, Canada
  • M.A. Educational Psychology – McGill University, Canada
  • Ph.D. – Second Language Education – McGill University Canada

Victoria Murphy would welcome informal contacts from prospective doctoral students interested in the following topics:

  • Language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/ Language Minority) children
  • Child L2 and bilingualism
  • Foreign language learning in primary school
  • Lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Research

Victoria is active in the following research areas, and would welcome DPhil applications on any of these, particularly those relating to EAL (language minority) children and child L2 learning and foreign language learning in primary school.  She is also the convenor of the Research in English as an Additional Language (REAL) group.  Her research is currently being funded by the ESRC, Leverhulme Trust and Nuffield Foundation.

  • language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/Language minority) children
  • child L2 learning and bilingualism
  • foreign language learning in primary school
  • cognitive processes underlying L1 and L2 learning
  • lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Current Research Project(s)

Joanna is a Doctoral Student, and ESRC Grand Union DTP Scholar, researching in-class support for multilingualism in UK schools.

She has over 12 years of experience as a teaching professional, having worked as a class teacher, EAL specialist and Teaching Assistant in the UK, China, Brazil and Italy. Her main area of interest is school-based education (3-18), specifically the support for multilingual pupils and their language practices, as well as the relationship between teaching assistants and both teachers and children in schools.

Joanna holds a BA in Jurisprudence and a MSc in Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching, both from the University of Oxford. She also has a PGCE, and a PGDip in French.

Joining the Department of Education in 2020 after teaching English and foreign languages in secondary schools and early years settings for 15 years, Catherine completed the MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition in 2021. Her doctoral research investigates the effectiveness of using songs as pedagogical tools with young second language learners in formal educational settings.

Additionally, Catherine hosts The Language Revolution podcast, exploring how linguistics and language awareness might inform/transform languages teaching with guests including Michael Rosen and David Crystal. She also project manages the annual conference for NALDIC, the national subject association for EAL.

Publications

Multilingual is Normal: An anthology of voices, talking about talking (2020)

Renyu completed her BA degree in Psychology at the University of British Columbia (Vancouver, Canada) and her MPhil degree in Education at University of Cambridge.

During her MPhil study, she worked with children aged 4 to 6 years to investigate the relationship between bilingualism, vocabulary size, and inhibitory control, and also to validate a novel app designed to assess early language development. For her Dphil study at Oxford, Renyu aims to explore the factors that might affect L2 pronunciation learning in young children and the interaction between children’s L1 and L2. She is particularly interested in the psychological factors that might influence a child’s L2 pronunciation.

Prior to studying at Oxford, Renyu worked as Research Assistant at the Assessment Research Group at British Council for one year and a half. She was involved in various projects, including gap analysis on reading demand and reading ability, participant feedback questionnaire design and analysis, design and recruitment for a new EAP task study, etc.

Bernard holds a PhD in Marketing from the University of Nottingham and a DBA from the University of Newcastle.

His research to date explores the leadership in HE. Prior to coming to Oxford, he worked in various HEIs and served as the supervisor of a secondary school.

Publications

Lee, B., Tsui, A. & Yau, O.H.M. (2019), Higher-order Goals, Trust-in-leader, and Self-efficacy as Moderators of Transformational Leadership Performance: The Case of Multi-level Marketing Organizations in China, Journal of Euromarketing, Vol.28 (3-4), 76-97. (2011 RG Impact factor: 0.83).

Conferences

Lee, B. (2020), “Self-formation for the Underprivileged,” 2020 International Online Symposium, Toward a New Paradigm of Economics,organized by Macau Ricci Institute, The University of Saint Joseph, 15 & 16 October. (Online Conference Platform Presentation).

Steve is Associate Professor of Teacher Education. He is a curriculum tutor for the Geography PGCE and MSc Learning and Teaching.

Steve is a qualified geography teacher and was previously the head of department at a comprehensive secondary school in Oxfordshire, and Head of Programmes at Bishop Grosseteste University, Lincoln.

He holds an MA in Educational Leadership and Innovation from Warwick University, an MSc in Educational Research Methodology and DPhil in Education from the University of Oxford which were funded by an ESRC Studentship. He is a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

He researches at the intersection between the academic discipline and school subject of geography, including recent collaborations developing through the Smart Cities Network for Sustainable Urban Future project which was shortlisted for the 2017 Newton Prize (India). He is currently leading research on Climate Change Education Futures in India (GCRF) in collaboration with colleagues at IISER, Pune, and on the role of cultural heritage in curriculum making in Kolkata.

Collaborations with colleagues in the School of Geography and the Environment are contributing to anti-racist curriculum futures, including in the school subject, and in postgraduate teaching through the TDEP-funded Oxford-UNISA course ‘Decolonising Research Methods’.

His research on teacher education focuses on the contribution that geography education research offers to the conceptualisation and practice of teaching. This work includes ethnographic research on teachers’ curriculum making exploring the journeys through which information travels into school classrooms, beginning teachers’ experiences of school subject departments, and the role of written lesson observation feedback in constructing ‘good teaching’.

Steve serves on the editorial board of the journal Geography, and is Chair of the Geography Education Research Collective (GEReCo/IGU-CGE).

 

Caitlin is a Doctoral student in the Department of Education working on how teachers interact with refugee and unaccompanied asylum-seeking pupils in UK schools.

Her Doctoral study uses survey data, interviews, observation, and document analysis to examine teacher knowledge, attitudes, and practices in relation to refugee pupils. Previously, Caitlin worked as a primary school teacher in Aberdeen, London, and at Rose Hill Primary School in Oxford. She completed an MA (Gaelic Medium Education, Oral History) and a PGDE (Primary Education) at the University of Aberdeen, and a BA (Human Geography, Environmental Studies) at Middlebury College in the US. She has a general interest in improving inclusion and equity in education.

Helen’s academic interest in higher education policy developed from more than 20 years of professional experience of university administration – in public relations and admissions.

She gained her doctorate from Oxford in 2010 (a study of the market created by the introduction of £3000 fees for Home/EU undergraduates at English universities in 2006); since then, she has conducted research into the impacts of student fees and funding on institutions, students, graduates and applicants within the higher education sector in England. She also works as a consultant to higher education institutions.

Helen was Pathway Convenor for the MSc Education (HE) for two years and has taught on this course since completing her DPhil. As an inspector for the British Accreditation Council, Helen has the opportunity to gain insights into the operation of higher education providers globally. She is also an Associate of the SKOPE, the department’s research centre for Skills, Knowledge and Organisational Performance.

From 2012-17, Helen was a member of the governing council of the Society for Research into Higher Education (SRHE), serving as Vice-Chair from 2014-17.

 

Jo-Anne is Director of the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment.  She completed a six-year term as Head of the Department of Education, has been Standing Adviser to the House of Commons Education Select Committee, a member of Ofqual’s Standing Advisory Group on Standards, Chair of the National Reference Test Expert Group, and a member of the Welsh Government’s Curriculum and Assessment Group.  Before coming to Oxford, Jo-Anne held academic posts at the Institute of Education, University of London and the University of Bristol. Her first degree and doctorate were in psychology and she has an MBA.  Her current research projects include Setting and Maintaining Standards in national examinations, Examination reform: the impact of modular and linear examinations at GCSE, Assessment for Learning in Africa (AFLA), intelligent accountability and the Progress in International Reading Literacy Study England national centre.

Her research interests are in educational assessment, including system-wide structures and processes, examination standards, marking and assessment design.  Jo-Anne conducts a lot of work with government and industry partners, including acting as the Standing Adviser to the House of Commons Education Select Committee, a member of Ofqual’s Standing Advisory Group and membership of the Welsh Government’s Curriculum and Assessment Group.  She is a member of the Editorial Board of the Oxford Review of Education journal and the International Advisory Board of Assessment in Education: principles, policy & practice.  She has been a Visiting Professor at the universities of Bergen and Queen’s (Belfast).  From 2013 to 2015 she was President of the Association for Educational Assessment – Europe.

Qualifications
  • B.A.H. Linguistics/Psychology – Queen’s University, Kingston On, Canada
  • M.A. Educational Psychology – McGill University, Canada
  • Ph.D. – Second Language Education – McGill University Canada

Victoria Murphy would welcome informal contacts from prospective doctoral students interested in the following topics:

  • Language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/ Language Minority) children
  • Child L2 and bilingualism
  • Foreign language learning in primary school
  • Lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Research

Victoria is active in the following research areas, and would welcome DPhil applications on any of these, particularly those relating to EAL (language minority) children and child L2 learning and foreign language learning in primary school.  She is also the convenor of the Research in English as an Additional Language (REAL) group.  Her research is currently being funded by the ESRC, Leverhulme Trust and Nuffield Foundation.

  • language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/Language minority) children
  • child L2 learning and bilingualism
  • foreign language learning in primary school
  • cognitive processes underlying L1 and L2 learning
  • lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Current Research Project(s)

Joanna is a Doctoral Student, and ESRC Grand Union DTP Scholar, researching in-class support for multilingualism in UK schools.

She has over 12 years of experience as a teaching professional, having worked as a class teacher, EAL specialist and Teaching Assistant in the UK, China, Brazil and Italy. Her main area of interest is school-based education (3-18), specifically the support for multilingual pupils and their language practices, as well as the relationship between teaching assistants and both teachers and children in schools.

Joanna holds a BA in Jurisprudence and a MSc in Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching, both from the University of Oxford. She also has a PGCE, and a PGDip in French.

Joining the Department of Education in 2020 after teaching English and foreign languages in secondary schools and early years settings for 15 years, Catherine completed the MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition in 2021. Her doctoral research investigates the effectiveness of using songs as pedagogical tools with young second language learners in formal educational settings.

Additionally, Catherine hosts The Language Revolution podcast, exploring how linguistics and language awareness might inform/transform languages teaching with guests including Michael Rosen and David Crystal. She also project manages the annual conference for NALDIC, the national subject association for EAL.

Publications

Multilingual is Normal: An anthology of voices, talking about talking (2020)

Renyu completed her BA degree in Psychology at the University of British Columbia (Vancouver, Canada) and her MPhil degree in Education at University of Cambridge.

During her MPhil study, she worked with children aged 4 to 6 years to investigate the relationship between bilingualism, vocabulary size, and inhibitory control, and also to validate a novel app designed to assess early language development. For her Dphil study at Oxford, Renyu aims to explore the factors that might affect L2 pronunciation learning in young children and the interaction between children’s L1 and L2. She is particularly interested in the psychological factors that might influence a child’s L2 pronunciation.

Prior to studying at Oxford, Renyu worked as Research Assistant at the Assessment Research Group at British Council for one year and a half. She was involved in various projects, including gap analysis on reading demand and reading ability, participant feedback questionnaire design and analysis, design and recruitment for a new EAP task study, etc.

Bernard holds a PhD in Marketing from the University of Nottingham and a DBA from the University of Newcastle.

His research to date explores the leadership in HE. Prior to coming to Oxford, he worked in various HEIs and served as the supervisor of a secondary school.

Publications

Lee, B., Tsui, A. & Yau, O.H.M. (2019), Higher-order Goals, Trust-in-leader, and Self-efficacy as Moderators of Transformational Leadership Performance: The Case of Multi-level Marketing Organizations in China, Journal of Euromarketing, Vol.28 (3-4), 76-97. (2011 RG Impact factor: 0.83).

Conferences

Lee, B. (2020), “Self-formation for the Underprivileged,” 2020 International Online Symposium, Toward a New Paradigm of Economics,organized by Macau Ricci Institute, The University of Saint Joseph, 15 & 16 October. (Online Conference Platform Presentation).

Steve is Associate Professor of Teacher Education. He is a curriculum tutor for the Geography PGCE and MSc Learning and Teaching.

Steve is a qualified geography teacher and was previously the head of department at a comprehensive secondary school in Oxfordshire, and Head of Programmes at Bishop Grosseteste University, Lincoln.

He holds an MA in Educational Leadership and Innovation from Warwick University, an MSc in Educational Research Methodology and DPhil in Education from the University of Oxford which were funded by an ESRC Studentship. He is a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

He researches at the intersection between the academic discipline and school subject of geography, including recent collaborations developing through the Smart Cities Network for Sustainable Urban Future project which was shortlisted for the 2017 Newton Prize (India). He is currently leading research on Climate Change Education Futures in India (GCRF) in collaboration with colleagues at IISER, Pune, and on the role of cultural heritage in curriculum making in Kolkata.

Collaborations with colleagues in the School of Geography and the Environment are contributing to anti-racist curriculum futures, including in the school subject, and in postgraduate teaching through the TDEP-funded Oxford-UNISA course ‘Decolonising Research Methods’.

His research on teacher education focuses on the contribution that geography education research offers to the conceptualisation and practice of teaching. This work includes ethnographic research on teachers’ curriculum making exploring the journeys through which information travels into school classrooms, beginning teachers’ experiences of school subject departments, and the role of written lesson observation feedback in constructing ‘good teaching’.

Steve serves on the editorial board of the journal Geography, and is Chair of the Geography Education Research Collective (GEReCo/IGU-CGE).

 

Caitlin is a Doctoral student in the Department of Education working on how teachers interact with refugee and unaccompanied asylum-seeking pupils in UK schools.

Her Doctoral study uses survey data, interviews, observation, and document analysis to examine teacher knowledge, attitudes, and practices in relation to refugee pupils. Previously, Caitlin worked as a primary school teacher in Aberdeen, London, and at Rose Hill Primary School in Oxford. She completed an MA (Gaelic Medium Education, Oral History) and a PGDE (Primary Education) at the University of Aberdeen, and a BA (Human Geography, Environmental Studies) at Middlebury College in the US. She has a general interest in improving inclusion and equity in education.

Helen’s academic interest in higher education policy developed from more than 20 years of professional experience of university administration – in public relations and admissions.

She gained her doctorate from Oxford in 2010 (a study of the market created by the introduction of £3000 fees for Home/EU undergraduates at English universities in 2006); since then, she has conducted research into the impacts of student fees and funding on institutions, students, graduates and applicants within the higher education sector in England. She also works as a consultant to higher education institutions.

Helen was Pathway Convenor for the MSc Education (HE) for two years and has taught on this course since completing her DPhil. As an inspector for the British Accreditation Council, Helen has the opportunity to gain insights into the operation of higher education providers globally. She is also an Associate of the SKOPE, the department’s research centre for Skills, Knowledge and Organisational Performance.

From 2012-17, Helen was a member of the governing council of the Society for Research into Higher Education (SRHE), serving as Vice-Chair from 2014-17.

 

Jo-Anne is Director of the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment.  She completed a six-year term as Head of the Department of Education, has been Standing Adviser to the House of Commons Education Select Committee, a member of Ofqual’s Standing Advisory Group on Standards, Chair of the National Reference Test Expert Group, and a member of the Welsh Government’s Curriculum and Assessment Group.  Before coming to Oxford, Jo-Anne held academic posts at the Institute of Education, University of London and the University of Bristol. Her first degree and doctorate were in psychology and she has an MBA.  Her current research projects include Setting and Maintaining Standards in national examinations, Examination reform: the impact of modular and linear examinations at GCSE, Assessment for Learning in Africa (AFLA), intelligent accountability and the Progress in International Reading Literacy Study England national centre.

Her research interests are in educational assessment, including system-wide structures and processes, examination standards, marking and assessment design.  Jo-Anne conducts a lot of work with government and industry partners, including acting as the Standing Adviser to the House of Commons Education Select Committee, a member of Ofqual’s Standing Advisory Group and membership of the Welsh Government’s Curriculum and Assessment Group.  She is a member of the Editorial Board of the Oxford Review of Education journal and the International Advisory Board of Assessment in Education: principles, policy & practice.  She has been a Visiting Professor at the universities of Bergen and Queen’s (Belfast).  From 2013 to 2015 she was President of the Association for Educational Assessment – Europe.

Qualifications
  • B.A.H. Linguistics/Psychology – Queen’s University, Kingston On, Canada
  • M.A. Educational Psychology – McGill University, Canada
  • Ph.D. – Second Language Education – McGill University Canada

Victoria Murphy would welcome informal contacts from prospective doctoral students interested in the following topics:

  • Language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/ Language Minority) children
  • Child L2 and bilingualism
  • Foreign language learning in primary school
  • Lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Research

Victoria is active in the following research areas, and would welcome DPhil applications on any of these, particularly those relating to EAL (language minority) children and child L2 learning and foreign language learning in primary school.  She is also the convenor of the Research in English as an Additional Language (REAL) group.  Her research is currently being funded by the ESRC, Leverhulme Trust and Nuffield Foundation.

  • language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/Language minority) children
  • child L2 learning and bilingualism
  • foreign language learning in primary school
  • cognitive processes underlying L1 and L2 learning
  • lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Current Research Project(s)

Joanna is a Doctoral Student, and ESRC Grand Union DTP Scholar, researching in-class support for multilingualism in UK schools.

She has over 12 years of experience as a teaching professional, having worked as a class teacher, EAL specialist and Teaching Assistant in the UK, China, Brazil and Italy. Her main area of interest is school-based education (3-18), specifically the support for multilingual pupils and their language practices, as well as the relationship between teaching assistants and both teachers and children in schools.

Joanna holds a BA in Jurisprudence and a MSc in Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching, both from the University of Oxford. She also has a PGCE, and a PGDip in French.

Joining the Department of Education in 2020 after teaching English and foreign languages in secondary schools and early years settings for 15 years, Catherine completed the MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition in 2021. Her doctoral research investigates the effectiveness of using songs as pedagogical tools with young second language learners in formal educational settings.

Additionally, Catherine hosts The Language Revolution podcast, exploring how linguistics and language awareness might inform/transform languages teaching with guests including Michael Rosen and David Crystal. She also project manages the annual conference for NALDIC, the national subject association for EAL.

Publications

Multilingual is Normal: An anthology of voices, talking about talking (2020)

Renyu completed her BA degree in Psychology at the University of British Columbia (Vancouver, Canada) and her MPhil degree in Education at University of Cambridge.

During her MPhil study, she worked with children aged 4 to 6 years to investigate the relationship between bilingualism, vocabulary size, and inhibitory control, and also to validate a novel app designed to assess early language development. For her Dphil study at Oxford, Renyu aims to explore the factors that might affect L2 pronunciation learning in young children and the interaction between children’s L1 and L2. She is particularly interested in the psychological factors that might influence a child’s L2 pronunciation.

Prior to studying at Oxford, Renyu worked as Research Assistant at the Assessment Research Group at British Council for one year and a half. She was involved in various projects, including gap analysis on reading demand and reading ability, participant feedback questionnaire design and analysis, design and recruitment for a new EAP task study, etc.

Bernard holds a PhD in Marketing from the University of Nottingham and a DBA from the University of Newcastle.

His research to date explores the leadership in HE. Prior to coming to Oxford, he worked in various HEIs and served as the supervisor of a secondary school.

Publications

Lee, B., Tsui, A. & Yau, O.H.M. (2019), Higher-order Goals, Trust-in-leader, and Self-efficacy as Moderators of Transformational Leadership Performance: The Case of Multi-level Marketing Organizations in China, Journal of Euromarketing, Vol.28 (3-4), 76-97. (2011 RG Impact factor: 0.83).

Conferences

Lee, B. (2020), “Self-formation for the Underprivileged,” 2020 International Online Symposium, Toward a New Paradigm of Economics,organized by Macau Ricci Institute, The University of Saint Joseph, 15 & 16 October. (Online Conference Platform Presentation).

Steve is Associate Professor of Teacher Education. He is a curriculum tutor for the Geography PGCE and MSc Learning and Teaching.

Steve is a qualified geography teacher and was previously the head of department at a comprehensive secondary school in Oxfordshire, and Head of Programmes at Bishop Grosseteste University, Lincoln.

He holds an MA in Educational Leadership and Innovation from Warwick University, an MSc in Educational Research Methodology and DPhil in Education from the University of Oxford which were funded by an ESRC Studentship. He is a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

He researches at the intersection between the academic discipline and school subject of geography, including recent collaborations developing through the Smart Cities Network for Sustainable Urban Future project which was shortlisted for the 2017 Newton Prize (India). He is currently leading research on Climate Change Education Futures in India (GCRF) in collaboration with colleagues at IISER, Pune, and on the role of cultural heritage in curriculum making in Kolkata.

Collaborations with colleagues in the School of Geography and the Environment are contributing to anti-racist curriculum futures, including in the school subject, and in postgraduate teaching through the TDEP-funded Oxford-UNISA course ‘Decolonising Research Methods’.

His research on teacher education focuses on the contribution that geography education research offers to the conceptualisation and practice of teaching. This work includes ethnographic research on teachers’ curriculum making exploring the journeys through which information travels into school classrooms, beginning teachers’ experiences of school subject departments, and the role of written lesson observation feedback in constructing ‘good teaching’.

Steve serves on the editorial board of the journal Geography, and is Chair of the Geography Education Research Collective (GEReCo/IGU-CGE).

 

Caitlin is a Doctoral student in the Department of Education working on how teachers interact with refugee and unaccompanied asylum-seeking pupils in UK schools.

Her Doctoral study uses survey data, interviews, observation, and document analysis to examine teacher knowledge, attitudes, and practices in relation to refugee pupils. Previously, Caitlin worked as a primary school teacher in Aberdeen, London, and at Rose Hill Primary School in Oxford. She completed an MA (Gaelic Medium Education, Oral History) and a PGDE (Primary Education) at the University of Aberdeen, and a BA (Human Geography, Environmental Studies) at Middlebury College in the US. She has a general interest in improving inclusion and equity in education.

Helen’s academic interest in higher education policy developed from more than 20 years of professional experience of university administration – in public relations and admissions.

She gained her doctorate from Oxford in 2010 (a study of the market created by the introduction of £3000 fees for Home/EU undergraduates at English universities in 2006); since then, she has conducted research into the impacts of student fees and funding on institutions, students, graduates and applicants within the higher education sector in England. She also works as a consultant to higher education institutions.

Helen was Pathway Convenor for the MSc Education (HE) for two years and has taught on this course since completing her DPhil. As an inspector for the British Accreditation Council, Helen has the opportunity to gain insights into the operation of higher education providers globally. She is also an Associate of the SKOPE, the department’s research centre for Skills, Knowledge and Organisational Performance.

From 2012-17, Helen was a member of the governing council of the Society for Research into Higher Education (SRHE), serving as Vice-Chair from 2014-17.

 

Jo-Anne is Director of the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment.  She completed a six-year term as Head of the Department of Education, has been Standing Adviser to the House of Commons Education Select Committee, a member of Ofqual’s Standing Advisory Group on Standards, Chair of the National Reference Test Expert Group, and a member of the Welsh Government’s Curriculum and Assessment Group.  Before coming to Oxford, Jo-Anne held academic posts at the Institute of Education, University of London and the University of Bristol. Her first degree and doctorate were in psychology and she has an MBA.  Her current research projects include Setting and Maintaining Standards in national examinations, Examination reform: the impact of modular and linear examinations at GCSE, Assessment for Learning in Africa (AFLA), intelligent accountability and the Progress in International Reading Literacy Study England national centre.

Her research interests are in educational assessment, including system-wide structures and processes, examination standards, marking and assessment design.  Jo-Anne conducts a lot of work with government and industry partners, including acting as the Standing Adviser to the House of Commons Education Select Committee, a member of Ofqual’s Standing Advisory Group and membership of the Welsh Government’s Curriculum and Assessment Group.  She is a member of the Editorial Board of the Oxford Review of Education journal and the International Advisory Board of Assessment in Education: principles, policy & practice.  She has been a Visiting Professor at the universities of Bergen and Queen’s (Belfast).  From 2013 to 2015 she was President of the Association for Educational Assessment – Europe.

Qualifications
  • B.A.H. Linguistics/Psychology – Queen’s University, Kingston On, Canada
  • M.A. Educational Psychology – McGill University, Canada
  • Ph.D. – Second Language Education – McGill University Canada

Victoria Murphy would welcome informal contacts from prospective doctoral students interested in the following topics:

  • Language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/ Language Minority) children
  • Child L2 and bilingualism
  • Foreign language learning in primary school
  • Lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Research

Victoria is active in the following research areas, and would welcome DPhil applications on any of these, particularly those relating to EAL (language minority) children and child L2 learning and foreign language learning in primary school.  She is also the convenor of the Research in English as an Additional Language (REAL) group.  Her research is currently being funded by the ESRC, Leverhulme Trust and Nuffield Foundation.

  • language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/Language minority) children
  • child L2 learning and bilingualism
  • foreign language learning in primary school
  • cognitive processes underlying L1 and L2 learning
  • lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Current Research Project(s)

Joanna is a Doctoral Student, and ESRC Grand Union DTP Scholar, researching in-class support for multilingualism in UK schools.

She has over 12 years of experience as a teaching professional, having worked as a class teacher, EAL specialist and Teaching Assistant in the UK, China, Brazil and Italy. Her main area of interest is school-based education (3-18), specifically the support for multilingual pupils and their language practices, as well as the relationship between teaching assistants and both teachers and children in schools.

Joanna holds a BA in Jurisprudence and a MSc in Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching, both from the University of Oxford. She also has a PGCE, and a PGDip in French.

Joining the Department of Education in 2020 after teaching English and foreign languages in secondary schools and early years settings for 15 years, Catherine completed the MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition in 2021. Her doctoral research investigates the effectiveness of using songs as pedagogical tools with young second language learners in formal educational settings.

Additionally, Catherine hosts The Language Revolution podcast, exploring how linguistics and language awareness might inform/transform languages teaching with guests including Michael Rosen and David Crystal. She also project manages the annual conference for NALDIC, the national subject association for EAL.

Publications

Multilingual is Normal: An anthology of voices, talking about talking (2020)

Renyu completed her BA degree in Psychology at the University of British Columbia (Vancouver, Canada) and her MPhil degree in Education at University of Cambridge.

During her MPhil study, she worked with children aged 4 to 6 years to investigate the relationship between bilingualism, vocabulary size, and inhibitory control, and also to validate a novel app designed to assess early language development. For her Dphil study at Oxford, Renyu aims to explore the factors that might affect L2 pronunciation learning in young children and the interaction between children’s L1 and L2. She is particularly interested in the psychological factors that might influence a child’s L2 pronunciation.

Prior to studying at Oxford, Renyu worked as Research Assistant at the Assessment Research Group at British Council for one year and a half. She was involved in various projects, including gap analysis on reading demand and reading ability, participant feedback questionnaire design and analysis, design and recruitment for a new EAP task study, etc.

Bernard holds a PhD in Marketing from the University of Nottingham and a DBA from the University of Newcastle.

His research to date explores the leadership in HE. Prior to coming to Oxford, he worked in various HEIs and served as the supervisor of a secondary school.

Publications

Lee, B., Tsui, A. & Yau, O.H.M. (2019), Higher-order Goals, Trust-in-leader, and Self-efficacy as Moderators of Transformational Leadership Performance: The Case of Multi-level Marketing Organizations in China, Journal of Euromarketing, Vol.28 (3-4), 76-97. (2011 RG Impact factor: 0.83).

Conferences

Lee, B. (2020), “Self-formation for the Underprivileged,” 2020 International Online Symposium, Toward a New Paradigm of Economics,organized by Macau Ricci Institute, The University of Saint Joseph, 15 & 16 October. (Online Conference Platform Presentation).

Steve is Associate Professor of Teacher Education. He is a curriculum tutor for the Geography PGCE and MSc Learning and Teaching.

Steve is a qualified geography teacher and was previously the head of department at a comprehensive secondary school in Oxfordshire, and Head of Programmes at Bishop Grosseteste University, Lincoln.

He holds an MA in Educational Leadership and Innovation from Warwick University, an MSc in Educational Research Methodology and DPhil in Education from the University of Oxford which were funded by an ESRC Studentship. He is a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

He researches at the intersection between the academic discipline and school subject of geography, including recent collaborations developing through the Smart Cities Network for Sustainable Urban Future project which was shortlisted for the 2017 Newton Prize (India). He is currently leading research on Climate Change Education Futures in India (GCRF) in collaboration with colleagues at IISER, Pune, and on the role of cultural heritage in curriculum making in Kolkata.

Collaborations with colleagues in the School of Geography and the Environment are contributing to anti-racist curriculum futures, including in the school subject, and in postgraduate teaching through the TDEP-funded Oxford-UNISA course ‘Decolonising Research Methods’.

His research on teacher education focuses on the contribution that geography education research offers to the conceptualisation and practice of teaching. This work includes ethnographic research on teachers’ curriculum making exploring the journeys through which information travels into school classrooms, beginning teachers’ experiences of school subject departments, and the role of written lesson observation feedback in constructing ‘good teaching’.

Steve serves on the editorial board of the journal Geography, and is Chair of the Geography Education Research Collective (GEReCo/IGU-CGE).

 

Caitlin is a Doctoral student in the Department of Education working on how teachers interact with refugee and unaccompanied asylum-seeking pupils in UK schools.

Her Doctoral study uses survey data, interviews, observation, and document analysis to examine teacher knowledge, attitudes, and practices in relation to refugee pupils. Previously, Caitlin worked as a primary school teacher in Aberdeen, London, and at Rose Hill Primary School in Oxford. She completed an MA (Gaelic Medium Education, Oral History) and a PGDE (Primary Education) at the University of Aberdeen, and a BA (Human Geography, Environmental Studies) at Middlebury College in the US. She has a general interest in improving inclusion and equity in education.

Helen’s academic interest in higher education policy developed from more than 20 years of professional experience of university administration – in public relations and admissions.

She gained her doctorate from Oxford in 2010 (a study of the market created by the introduction of £3000 fees for Home/EU undergraduates at English universities in 2006); since then, she has conducted research into the impacts of student fees and funding on institutions, students, graduates and applicants within the higher education sector in England. She also works as a consultant to higher education institutions.

Helen was Pathway Convenor for the MSc Education (HE) for two years and has taught on this course since completing her DPhil. As an inspector for the British Accreditation Council, Helen has the opportunity to gain insights into the operation of higher education providers globally. She is also an Associate of the SKOPE, the department’s research centre for Skills, Knowledge and Organisational Performance.

From 2012-17, Helen was a member of the governing council of the Society for Research into Higher Education (SRHE), serving as Vice-Chair from 2014-17.

 

Jo-Anne is Director of the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment.  She completed a six-year term as Head of the Department of Education, has been Standing Adviser to the House of Commons Education Select Committee, a member of Ofqual’s Standing Advisory Group on Standards, Chair of the National Reference Test Expert Group, and a member of the Welsh Government’s Curriculum and Assessment Group.  Before coming to Oxford, Jo-Anne held academic posts at the Institute of Education, University of London and the University of Bristol. Her first degree and doctorate were in psychology and she has an MBA.  Her current research projects include Setting and Maintaining Standards in national examinations, Examination reform: the impact of modular and linear examinations at GCSE, Assessment for Learning in Africa (AFLA), intelligent accountability and the Progress in International Reading Literacy Study England national centre.

Her research interests are in educational assessment, including system-wide structures and processes, examination standards, marking and assessment design.  Jo-Anne conducts a lot of work with government and industry partners, including acting as the Standing Adviser to the House of Commons Education Select Committee, a member of Ofqual’s Standing Advisory Group and membership of the Welsh Government’s Curriculum and Assessment Group.  She is a member of the Editorial Board of the Oxford Review of Education journal and the International Advisory Board of Assessment in Education: principles, policy & practice.  She has been a Visiting Professor at the universities of Bergen and Queen’s (Belfast).  From 2013 to 2015 she was President of the Association for Educational Assessment – Europe.

Qualifications
  • B.A.H. Linguistics/Psychology – Queen’s University, Kingston On, Canada
  • M.A. Educational Psychology – McGill University, Canada
  • Ph.D. – Second Language Education – McGill University Canada

Victoria Murphy would welcome informal contacts from prospective doctoral students interested in the following topics:

  • Language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/ Language Minority) children
  • Child L2 and bilingualism
  • Foreign language learning in primary school
  • Lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Research

Victoria is active in the following research areas, and would welcome DPhil applications on any of these, particularly those relating to EAL (language minority) children and child L2 learning and foreign language learning in primary school.  She is also the convenor of the Research in English as an Additional Language (REAL) group.  Her research is currently being funded by the ESRC, Leverhulme Trust and Nuffield Foundation.

  • language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/Language minority) children
  • child L2 learning and bilingualism
  • foreign language learning in primary school
  • cognitive processes underlying L1 and L2 learning
  • lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Current Research Project(s)

Joanna is a Doctoral Student, and ESRC Grand Union DTP Scholar, researching in-class support for multilingualism in UK schools.

She has over 12 years of experience as a teaching professional, having worked as a class teacher, EAL specialist and Teaching Assistant in the UK, China, Brazil and Italy. Her main area of interest is school-based education (3-18), specifically the support for multilingual pupils and their language practices, as well as the relationship between teaching assistants and both teachers and children in schools.

Joanna holds a BA in Jurisprudence and a MSc in Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching, both from the University of Oxford. She also has a PGCE, and a PGDip in French.

Joining the Department of Education in 2020 after teaching English and foreign languages in secondary schools and early years settings for 15 years, Catherine completed the MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition in 2021. Her doctoral research investigates the effectiveness of using songs as pedagogical tools with young second language learners in formal educational settings.

Additionally, Catherine hosts The Language Revolution podcast, exploring how linguistics and language awareness might inform/transform languages teaching with guests including Michael Rosen and David Crystal. She also project manages the annual conference for NALDIC, the national subject association for EAL.

Publications

Multilingual is Normal: An anthology of voices, talking about talking (2020)

Renyu completed her BA degree in Psychology at the University of British Columbia (Vancouver, Canada) and her MPhil degree in Education at University of Cambridge.

During her MPhil study, she worked with children aged 4 to 6 years to investigate the relationship between bilingualism, vocabulary size, and inhibitory control, and also to validate a novel app designed to assess early language development. For her Dphil study at Oxford, Renyu aims to explore the factors that might affect L2 pronunciation learning in young children and the interaction between children’s L1 and L2. She is particularly interested in the psychological factors that might influence a child’s L2 pronunciation.

Prior to studying at Oxford, Renyu worked as Research Assistant at the Assessment Research Group at British Council for one year and a half. She was involved in various projects, including gap analysis on reading demand and reading ability, participant feedback questionnaire design and analysis, design and recruitment for a new EAP task study, etc.

Bernard holds a PhD in Marketing from the University of Nottingham and a DBA from the University of Newcastle.

His research to date explores the leadership in HE. Prior to coming to Oxford, he worked in various HEIs and served as the supervisor of a secondary school.

Publications

Lee, B., Tsui, A. & Yau, O.H.M. (2019), Higher-order Goals, Trust-in-leader, and Self-efficacy as Moderators of Transformational Leadership Performance: The Case of Multi-level Marketing Organizations in China, Journal of Euromarketing, Vol.28 (3-4), 76-97. (2011 RG Impact factor: 0.83).

Conferences

Lee, B. (2020), “Self-formation for the Underprivileged,” 2020 International Online Symposium, Toward a New Paradigm of Economics,organized by Macau Ricci Institute, The University of Saint Joseph, 15 & 16 October. (Online Conference Platform Presentation).

Steve is Associate Professor of Teacher Education. He is a curriculum tutor for the Geography PGCE and MSc Learning and Teaching.

Steve is a qualified geography teacher and was previously the head of department at a comprehensive secondary school in Oxfordshire, and Head of Programmes at Bishop Grosseteste University, Lincoln.

He holds an MA in Educational Leadership and Innovation from Warwick University, an MSc in Educational Research Methodology and DPhil in Education from the University of Oxford which were funded by an ESRC Studentship. He is a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

He researches at the intersection between the academic discipline and school subject of geography, including recent collaborations developing through the Smart Cities Network for Sustainable Urban Future project which was shortlisted for the 2017 Newton Prize (India). He is currently leading research on Climate Change Education Futures in India (GCRF) in collaboration with colleagues at IISER, Pune, and on the role of cultural heritage in curriculum making in Kolkata.

Collaborations with colleagues in the School of Geography and the Environment are contributing to anti-racist curriculum futures, including in the school subject, and in postgraduate teaching through the TDEP-funded Oxford-UNISA course ‘Decolonising Research Methods’.

His research on teacher education focuses on the contribution that geography education research offers to the conceptualisation and practice of teaching. This work includes ethnographic research on teachers’ curriculum making exploring the journeys through which information travels into school classrooms, beginning teachers’ experiences of school subject departments, and the role of written lesson observation feedback in constructing ‘good teaching’.

Steve serves on the editorial board of the journal Geography, and is Chair of the Geography Education Research Collective (GEReCo/IGU-CGE).

 

Caitlin is a Doctoral student in the Department of Education working on how teachers interact with refugee and unaccompanied asylum-seeking pupils in UK schools.

Her Doctoral study uses survey data, interviews, observation, and document analysis to examine teacher knowledge, attitudes, and practices in relation to refugee pupils. Previously, Caitlin worked as a primary school teacher in Aberdeen, London, and at Rose Hill Primary School in Oxford. She completed an MA (Gaelic Medium Education, Oral History) and a PGDE (Primary Education) at the University of Aberdeen, and a BA (Human Geography, Environmental Studies) at Middlebury College in the US. She has a general interest in improving inclusion and equity in education.

Helen’s academic interest in higher education policy developed from more than 20 years of professional experience of university administration – in public relations and admissions.

She gained her doctorate from Oxford in 2010 (a study of the market created by the introduction of £3000 fees for Home/EU undergraduates at English universities in 2006); since then, she has conducted research into the impacts of student fees and funding on institutions, students, graduates and applicants within the higher education sector in England. She also works as a consultant to higher education institutions.

Helen was Pathway Convenor for the MSc Education (HE) for two years and has taught on this course since completing her DPhil. As an inspector for the British Accreditation Council, Helen has the opportunity to gain insights into the operation of higher education providers globally. She is also an Associate of the SKOPE, the department’s research centre for Skills, Knowledge and Organisational Performance.

From 2012-17, Helen was a member of the governing council of the Society for Research into Higher Education (SRHE), serving as Vice-Chair from 2014-17.

 

Jo-Anne is Director of the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment.  She completed a six-year term as Head of the Department of Education, has been Standing Adviser to the House of Commons Education Select Committee, a member of Ofqual’s Standing Advisory Group on Standards, Chair of the National Reference Test Expert Group, and a member of the Welsh Government’s Curriculum and Assessment Group.  Before coming to Oxford, Jo-Anne held academic posts at the Institute of Education, University of London and the University of Bristol. Her first degree and doctorate were in psychology and she has an MBA.  Her current research projects include Setting and Maintaining Standards in national examinations, Examination reform: the impact of modular and linear examinations at GCSE, Assessment for Learning in Africa (AFLA), intelligent accountability and the Progress in International Reading Literacy Study England national centre.

Her research interests are in educational assessment, including system-wide structures and processes, examination standards, marking and assessment design.  Jo-Anne conducts a lot of work with government and industry partners, including acting as the Standing Adviser to the House of Commons Education Select Committee, a member of Ofqual’s Standing Advisory Group and membership of the Welsh Government’s Curriculum and Assessment Group.  She is a member of the Editorial Board of the Oxford Review of Education journal and the International Advisory Board of Assessment in Education: principles, policy & practice.  She has been a Visiting Professor at the universities of Bergen and Queen’s (Belfast).  From 2013 to 2015 she was President of the Association for Educational Assessment – Europe.

Qualifications
  • B.A.H. Linguistics/Psychology – Queen’s University, Kingston On, Canada
  • M.A. Educational Psychology – McGill University, Canada
  • Ph.D. – Second Language Education – McGill University Canada

Victoria Murphy would welcome informal contacts from prospective doctoral students interested in the following topics:

  • Language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/ Language Minority) children
  • Child L2 and bilingualism
  • Foreign language learning in primary school
  • Lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Research

Victoria is active in the following research areas, and would welcome DPhil applications on any of these, particularly those relating to EAL (language minority) children and child L2 learning and foreign language learning in primary school.  She is also the convenor of the Research in English as an Additional Language (REAL) group.  Her research is currently being funded by the ESRC, Leverhulme Trust and Nuffield Foundation.

  • language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/Language minority) children
  • child L2 learning and bilingualism
  • foreign language learning in primary school
  • cognitive processes underlying L1 and L2 learning
  • lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Current Research Project(s)

Joanna is a Doctoral Student, and ESRC Grand Union DTP Scholar, researching in-class support for multilingualism in UK schools.

She has over 12 years of experience as a teaching professional, having worked as a class teacher, EAL specialist and Teaching Assistant in the UK, China, Brazil and Italy. Her main area of interest is school-based education (3-18), specifically the support for multilingual pupils and their language practices, as well as the relationship between teaching assistants and both teachers and children in schools.

Joanna holds a BA in Jurisprudence and a MSc in Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching, both from the University of Oxford. She also has a PGCE, and a PGDip in French.

Joining the Department of Education in 2020 after teaching English and foreign languages in secondary schools and early years settings for 15 years, Catherine completed the MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition in 2021. Her doctoral research investigates the effectiveness of using songs as pedagogical tools with young second language learners in formal educational settings.

Additionally, Catherine hosts The Language Revolution podcast, exploring how linguistics and language awareness might inform/transform languages teaching with guests including Michael Rosen and David Crystal. She also project manages the annual conference for NALDIC, the national subject association for EAL.

Publications

Multilingual is Normal: An anthology of voices, talking about talking (2020)

Renyu completed her BA degree in Psychology at the University of British Columbia (Vancouver, Canada) and her MPhil degree in Education at University of Cambridge.

During her MPhil study, she worked with children aged 4 to 6 years to investigate the relationship between bilingualism, vocabulary size, and inhibitory control, and also to validate a novel app designed to assess early language development. For her Dphil study at Oxford, Renyu aims to explore the factors that might affect L2 pronunciation learning in young children and the interaction between children’s L1 and L2. She is particularly interested in the psychological factors that might influence a child’s L2 pronunciation.

Prior to studying at Oxford, Renyu worked as Research Assistant at the Assessment Research Group at British Council for one year and a half. She was involved in various projects, including gap analysis on reading demand and reading ability, participant feedback questionnaire design and analysis, design and recruitment for a new EAP task study, etc.

Bernard holds a PhD in Marketing from the University of Nottingham and a DBA from the University of Newcastle.

His research to date explores the leadership in HE. Prior to coming to Oxford, he worked in various HEIs and served as the supervisor of a secondary school.

Publications

Lee, B., Tsui, A. & Yau, O.H.M. (2019), Higher-order Goals, Trust-in-leader, and Self-efficacy as Moderators of Transformational Leadership Performance: The Case of Multi-level Marketing Organizations in China, Journal of Euromarketing, Vol.28 (3-4), 76-97. (2011 RG Impact factor: 0.83).

Conferences

Lee, B. (2020), “Self-formation for the Underprivileged,” 2020 International Online Symposium, Toward a New Paradigm of Economics,organized by Macau Ricci Institute, The University of Saint Joseph, 15 & 16 October. (Online Conference Platform Presentation).

Steve is Associate Professor of Teacher Education. He is a curriculum tutor for the Geography PGCE and MSc Learning and Teaching.

Steve is a qualified geography teacher and was previously the head of department at a comprehensive secondary school in Oxfordshire, and Head of Programmes at Bishop Grosseteste University, Lincoln.

He holds an MA in Educational Leadership and Innovation from Warwick University, an MSc in Educational Research Methodology and DPhil in Education from the University of Oxford which were funded by an ESRC Studentship. He is a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

He researches at the intersection between the academic discipline and school subject of geography, including recent collaborations developing through the Smart Cities Network for Sustainable Urban Future project which was shortlisted for the 2017 Newton Prize (India). He is currently leading research on Climate Change Education Futures in India (GCRF) in collaboration with colleagues at IISER, Pune, and on the role of cultural heritage in curriculum making in Kolkata.

Collaborations with colleagues in the School of Geography and the Environment are contributing to anti-racist curriculum futures, including in the school subject, and in postgraduate teaching through the TDEP-funded Oxford-UNISA course ‘Decolonising Research Methods’.

His research on teacher education focuses on the contribution that geography education research offers to the conceptualisation and practice of teaching. This work includes ethnographic research on teachers’ curriculum making exploring the journeys through which information travels into school classrooms, beginning teachers’ experiences of school subject departments, and the role of written lesson observation feedback in constructing ‘good teaching’.

Steve serves on the editorial board of the journal Geography, and is Chair of the Geography Education Research Collective (GEReCo/IGU-CGE).

 

Caitlin is a Doctoral student in the Department of Education working on how teachers interact with refugee and unaccompanied asylum-seeking pupils in UK schools.

Her Doctoral study uses survey data, interviews, observation, and document analysis to examine teacher knowledge, attitudes, and practices in relation to refugee pupils. Previously, Caitlin worked as a primary school teacher in Aberdeen, London, and at Rose Hill Primary School in Oxford. She completed an MA (Gaelic Medium Education, Oral History) and a PGDE (Primary Education) at the University of Aberdeen, and a BA (Human Geography, Environmental Studies) at Middlebury College in the US. She has a general interest in improving inclusion and equity in education.

Helen’s academic interest in higher education policy developed from more than 20 years of professional experience of university administration – in public relations and admissions.

She gained her doctorate from Oxford in 2010 (a study of the market created by the introduction of £3000 fees for Home/EU undergraduates at English universities in 2006); since then, she has conducted research into the impacts of student fees and funding on institutions, students, graduates and applicants within the higher education sector in England. She also works as a consultant to higher education institutions.

Helen was Pathway Convenor for the MSc Education (HE) for two years and has taught on this course since completing her DPhil. As an inspector for the British Accreditation Council, Helen has the opportunity to gain insights into the operation of higher education providers globally. She is also an Associate of the SKOPE, the department’s research centre for Skills, Knowledge and Organisational Performance.

From 2012-17, Helen was a member of the governing council of the Society for Research into Higher Education (SRHE), serving as Vice-Chair from 2014-17.

 

Jo-Anne is Director of the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment.  She completed a six-year term as Head of the Department of Education, has been Standing Adviser to the House of Commons Education Select Committee, a member of Ofqual’s Standing Advisory Group on Standards, Chair of the National Reference Test Expert Group, and a member of the Welsh Government’s Curriculum and Assessment Group.  Before coming to Oxford, Jo-Anne held academic posts at the Institute of Education, University of London and the University of Bristol. Her first degree and doctorate were in psychology and she has an MBA.  Her current research projects include Setting and Maintaining Standards in national examinations, Examination reform: the impact of modular and linear examinations at GCSE, Assessment for Learning in Africa (AFLA), intelligent accountability and the Progress in International Reading Literacy Study England national centre.

Her research interests are in educational assessment, including system-wide structures and processes, examination standards, marking and assessment design.  Jo-Anne conducts a lot of work with government and industry partners, including acting as the Standing Adviser to the House of Commons Education Select Committee, a member of Ofqual’s Standing Advisory Group and membership of the Welsh Government’s Curriculum and Assessment Group.  She is a member of the Editorial Board of the Oxford Review of Education journal and the International Advisory Board of Assessment in Education: principles, policy & practice.  She has been a Visiting Professor at the universities of Bergen and Queen’s (Belfast).  From 2013 to 2015 she was President of the Association for Educational Assessment – Europe.

Qualifications
  • B.A.H. Linguistics/Psychology – Queen’s University, Kingston On, Canada
  • M.A. Educational Psychology – McGill University, Canada
  • Ph.D. – Second Language Education – McGill University Canada

Victoria Murphy would welcome informal contacts from prospective doctoral students interested in the following topics:

  • Language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/ Language Minority) children
  • Child L2 and bilingualism
  • Foreign language learning in primary school
  • Lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Research

Victoria is active in the following research areas, and would welcome DPhil applications on any of these, particularly those relating to EAL (language minority) children and child L2 learning and foreign language learning in primary school.  She is also the convenor of the Research in English as an Additional Language (REAL) group.  Her research is currently being funded by the ESRC, Leverhulme Trust and Nuffield Foundation.

  • language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/Language minority) children
  • child L2 learning and bilingualism
  • foreign language learning in primary school
  • cognitive processes underlying L1 and L2 learning
  • lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Current Research Project(s)

Joanna is a Doctoral Student, and ESRC Grand Union DTP Scholar, researching in-class support for multilingualism in UK schools.

She has over 12 years of experience as a teaching professional, having worked as a class teacher, EAL specialist and Teaching Assistant in the UK, China, Brazil and Italy. Her main area of interest is school-based education (3-18), specifically the support for multilingual pupils and their language practices, as well as the relationship between teaching assistants and both teachers and children in schools.

Joanna holds a BA in Jurisprudence and a MSc in Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching, both from the University of Oxford. She also has a PGCE, and a PGDip in French.

Joining the Department of Education in 2020 after teaching English and foreign languages in secondary schools and early years settings for 15 years, Catherine completed the MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition in 2021. Her doctoral research investigates the effectiveness of using songs as pedagogical tools with young second language learners in formal educational settings.

Additionally, Catherine hosts The Language Revolution podcast, exploring how linguistics and language awareness might inform/transform languages teaching with guests including Michael Rosen and David Crystal. She also project manages the annual conference for NALDIC, the national subject association for EAL.

Publications

Multilingual is Normal: An anthology of voices, talking about talking (2020)

Renyu completed her BA degree in Psychology at the University of British Columbia (Vancouver, Canada) and her MPhil degree in Education at University of Cambridge.

During her MPhil study, she worked with children aged 4 to 6 years to investigate the relationship between bilingualism, vocabulary size, and inhibitory control, and also to validate a novel app designed to assess early language development. For her Dphil study at Oxford, Renyu aims to explore the factors that might affect L2 pronunciation learning in young children and the interaction between children’s L1 and L2. She is particularly interested in the psychological factors that might influence a child’s L2 pronunciation.

Prior to studying at Oxford, Renyu worked as Research Assistant at the Assessment Research Group at British Council for one year and a half. She was involved in various projects, including gap analysis on reading demand and reading ability, participant feedback questionnaire design and analysis, design and recruitment for a new EAP task study, etc.

Bernard holds a PhD in Marketing from the University of Nottingham and a DBA from the University of Newcastle.

His research to date explores the leadership in HE. Prior to coming to Oxford, he worked in various HEIs and served as the supervisor of a secondary school.

Publications

Lee, B., Tsui, A. & Yau, O.H.M. (2019), Higher-order Goals, Trust-in-leader, and Self-efficacy as Moderators of Transformational Leadership Performance: The Case of Multi-level Marketing Organizations in China, Journal of Euromarketing, Vol.28 (3-4), 76-97. (2011 RG Impact factor: 0.83).

Conferences

Lee, B. (2020), “Self-formation for the Underprivileged,” 2020 International Online Symposium, Toward a New Paradigm of Economics,organized by Macau Ricci Institute, The University of Saint Joseph, 15 & 16 October. (Online Conference Platform Presentation).

Steve is Associate Professor of Teacher Education. He is a curriculum tutor for the Geography PGCE and MSc Learning and Teaching.

Steve is a qualified geography teacher and was previously the head of department at a comprehensive secondary school in Oxfordshire, and Head of Programmes at Bishop Grosseteste University, Lincoln.

He holds an MA in Educational Leadership and Innovation from Warwick University, an MSc in Educational Research Methodology and DPhil in Education from the University of Oxford which were funded by an ESRC Studentship. He is a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

He researches at the intersection between the academic discipline and school subject of geography, including recent collaborations developing through the Smart Cities Network for Sustainable Urban Future project which was shortlisted for the 2017 Newton Prize (India). He is currently leading research on Climate Change Education Futures in India (GCRF) in collaboration with colleagues at IISER, Pune, and on the role of cultural heritage in curriculum making in Kolkata.

Collaborations with colleagues in the School of Geography and the Environment are contributing to anti-racist curriculum futures, including in the school subject, and in postgraduate teaching through the TDEP-funded Oxford-UNISA course ‘Decolonising Research Methods’.

His research on teacher education focuses on the contribution that geography education research offers to the conceptualisation and practice of teaching. This work includes ethnographic research on teachers’ curriculum making exploring the journeys through which information travels into school classrooms, beginning teachers’ experiences of school subject departments, and the role of written lesson observation feedback in constructing ‘good teaching’.

Steve serves on the editorial board of the journal Geography, and is Chair of the Geography Education Research Collective (GEReCo/IGU-CGE).

 

Caitlin is a Doctoral student in the Department of Education working on how teachers interact with refugee and unaccompanied asylum-seeking pupils in UK schools.

Her Doctoral study uses survey data, interviews, observation, and document analysis to examine teacher knowledge, attitudes, and practices in relation to refugee pupils. Previously, Caitlin worked as a primary school teacher in Aberdeen, London, and at Rose Hill Primary School in Oxford. She completed an MA (Gaelic Medium Education, Oral History) and a PGDE (Primary Education) at the University of Aberdeen, and a BA (Human Geography, Environmental Studies) at Middlebury College in the US. She has a general interest in improving inclusion and equity in education.

Helen’s academic interest in higher education policy developed from more than 20 years of professional experience of university administration – in public relations and admissions.

She gained her doctorate from Oxford in 2010 (a study of the market created by the introduction of £3000 fees for Home/EU undergraduates at English universities in 2006); since then, she has conducted research into the impacts of student fees and funding on institutions, students, graduates and applicants within the higher education sector in England. She also works as a consultant to higher education institutions.

Helen was Pathway Convenor for the MSc Education (HE) for two years and has taught on this course since completing her DPhil. As an inspector for the British Accreditation Council, Helen has the opportunity to gain insights into the operation of higher education providers globally. She is also an Associate of the SKOPE, the department’s research centre for Skills, Knowledge and Organisational Performance.

From 2012-17, Helen was a member of the governing council of the Society for Research into Higher Education (SRHE), serving as Vice-Chair from 2014-17.

 

Jo-Anne is Director of the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment.  She completed a six-year term as Head of the Department of Education, has been Standing Adviser to the House of Commons Education Select Committee, a member of Ofqual’s Standing Advisory Group on Standards, Chair of the National Reference Test Expert Group, and a member of the Welsh Government’s Curriculum and Assessment Group.  Before coming to Oxford, Jo-Anne held academic posts at the Institute of Education, University of London and the University of Bristol. Her first degree and doctorate were in psychology and she has an MBA.  Her current research projects include Setting and Maintaining Standards in national examinations, Examination reform: the impact of modular and linear examinations at GCSE, Assessment for Learning in Africa (AFLA), intelligent accountability and the Progress in International Reading Literacy Study England national centre.

Her research interests are in educational assessment, including system-wide structures and processes, examination standards, marking and assessment design.  Jo-Anne conducts a lot of work with government and industry partners, including acting as the Standing Adviser to the House of Commons Education Select Committee, a member of Ofqual’s Standing Advisory Group and membership of the Welsh Government’s Curriculum and Assessment Group.  She is a member of the Editorial Board of the Oxford Review of Education journal and the International Advisory Board of Assessment in Education: principles, policy & practice.  She has been a Visiting Professor at the universities of Bergen and Queen’s (Belfast).  From 2013 to 2015 she was President of the Association for Educational Assessment – Europe.

Qualifications
  • B.A.H. Linguistics/Psychology – Queen’s University, Kingston On, Canada
  • M.A. Educational Psychology – McGill University, Canada
  • Ph.D. – Second Language Education – McGill University Canada

Victoria Murphy would welcome informal contacts from prospective doctoral students interested in the following topics:

  • Language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/ Language Minority) children
  • Child L2 and bilingualism
  • Foreign language learning in primary school
  • Lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Research

Victoria is active in the following research areas, and would welcome DPhil applications on any of these, particularly those relating to EAL (language minority) children and child L2 learning and foreign language learning in primary school.  She is also the convenor of the Research in English as an Additional Language (REAL) group.  Her research is currently being funded by the ESRC, Leverhulme Trust and Nuffield Foundation.

  • language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/Language minority) children
  • child L2 learning and bilingualism
  • foreign language learning in primary school
  • cognitive processes underlying L1 and L2 learning
  • lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Current Research Project(s)

Joanna is a Doctoral Student, and ESRC Grand Union DTP Scholar, researching in-class support for multilingualism in UK schools.

She has over 12 years of experience as a teaching professional, having worked as a class teacher, EAL specialist and Teaching Assistant in the UK, China, Brazil and Italy. Her main area of interest is school-based education (3-18), specifically the support for multilingual pupils and their language practices, as well as the relationship between teaching assistants and both teachers and children in schools.

Joanna holds a BA in Jurisprudence and a MSc in Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching, both from the University of Oxford. She also has a PGCE, and a PGDip in French.

Joining the Department of Education in 2020 after teaching English and foreign languages in secondary schools and early years settings for 15 years, Catherine completed the MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition in 2021. Her doctoral research investigates the effectiveness of using songs as pedagogical tools with young second language learners in formal educational settings.

Additionally, Catherine hosts The Language Revolution podcast, exploring how linguistics and language awareness might inform/transform languages teaching with guests including Michael Rosen and David Crystal. She also project manages the annual conference for NALDIC, the national subject association for EAL.

Publications

Multilingual is Normal: An anthology of voices, talking about talking (2020)

Renyu completed her BA degree in Psychology at the University of British Columbia (Vancouver, Canada) and her MPhil degree in Education at University of Cambridge.

During her MPhil study, she worked with children aged 4 to 6 years to investigate the relationship between bilingualism, vocabulary size, and inhibitory control, and also to validate a novel app designed to assess early language development. For her Dphil study at Oxford, Renyu aims to explore the factors that might affect L2 pronunciation learning in young children and the interaction between children’s L1 and L2. She is particularly interested in the psychological factors that might influence a child’s L2 pronunciation.

Prior to studying at Oxford, Renyu worked as Research Assistant at the Assessment Research Group at British Council for one year and a half. She was involved in various projects, including gap analysis on reading demand and reading ability, participant feedback questionnaire design and analysis, design and recruitment for a new EAP task study, etc.

Bernard holds a PhD in Marketing from the University of Nottingham and a DBA from the University of Newcastle.

His research to date explores the leadership in HE. Prior to coming to Oxford, he worked in various HEIs and served as the supervisor of a secondary school.

Publications

Lee, B., Tsui, A. & Yau, O.H.M. (2019), Higher-order Goals, Trust-in-leader, and Self-efficacy as Moderators of Transformational Leadership Performance: The Case of Multi-level Marketing Organizations in China, Journal of Euromarketing, Vol.28 (3-4), 76-97. (2011 RG Impact factor: 0.83).

Conferences

Lee, B. (2020), “Self-formation for the Underprivileged,” 2020 International Online Symposium, Toward a New Paradigm of Economics,organized by Macau Ricci Institute, The University of Saint Joseph, 15 & 16 October. (Online Conference Platform Presentation).

Steve is Associate Professor of Teacher Education. He is a curriculum tutor for the Geography PGCE and MSc Learning and Teaching.

Steve is a qualified geography teacher and was previously the head of department at a comprehensive secondary school in Oxfordshire, and Head of Programmes at Bishop Grosseteste University, Lincoln.

He holds an MA in Educational Leadership and Innovation from Warwick University, an MSc in Educational Research Methodology and DPhil in Education from the University of Oxford which were funded by an ESRC Studentship. He is a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

He researches at the intersection between the academic discipline and school subject of geography, including recent collaborations developing through the Smart Cities Network for Sustainable Urban Future project which was shortlisted for the 2017 Newton Prize (India). He is currently leading research on Climate Change Education Futures in India (GCRF) in collaboration with colleagues at IISER, Pune, and on the role of cultural heritage in curriculum making in Kolkata.

Collaborations with colleagues in the School of Geography and the Environment are contributing to anti-racist curriculum futures, including in the school subject, and in postgraduate teaching through the TDEP-funded Oxford-UNISA course ‘Decolonising Research Methods’.

His research on teacher education focuses on the contribution that geography education research offers to the conceptualisation and practice of teaching. This work includes ethnographic research on teachers’ curriculum making exploring the journeys through which information travels into school classrooms, beginning teachers’ experiences of school subject departments, and the role of written lesson observation feedback in constructing ‘good teaching’.

Steve serves on the editorial board of the journal Geography, and is Chair of the Geography Education Research Collective (GEReCo/IGU-CGE).

 

Caitlin is a Doctoral student in the Department of Education working on how teachers interact with refugee and unaccompanied asylum-seeking pupils in UK schools.

Her Doctoral study uses survey data, interviews, observation, and document analysis to examine teacher knowledge, attitudes, and practices in relation to refugee pupils. Previously, Caitlin worked as a primary school teacher in Aberdeen, London, and at Rose Hill Primary School in Oxford. She completed an MA (Gaelic Medium Education, Oral History) and a PGDE (Primary Education) at the University of Aberdeen, and a BA (Human Geography, Environmental Studies) at Middlebury College in the US. She has a general interest in improving inclusion and equity in education.

Helen’s academic interest in higher education policy developed from more than 20 years of professional experience of university administration – in public relations and admissions.

She gained her doctorate from Oxford in 2010 (a study of the market created by the introduction of £3000 fees for Home/EU undergraduates at English universities in 2006); since then, she has conducted research into the impacts of student fees and funding on institutions, students, graduates and applicants within the higher education sector in England. She also works as a consultant to higher education institutions.

Helen was Pathway Convenor for the MSc Education (HE) for two years and has taught on this course since completing her DPhil. As an inspector for the British Accreditation Council, Helen has the opportunity to gain insights into the operation of higher education providers globally. She is also an Associate of the SKOPE, the department’s research centre for Skills, Knowledge and Organisational Performance.

From 2012-17, Helen was a member of the governing council of the Society for Research into Higher Education (SRHE), serving as Vice-Chair from 2014-17.

 

Jo-Anne is Director of the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment.  She completed a six-year term as Head of the Department of Education, has been Standing Adviser to the House of Commons Education Select Committee, a member of Ofqual’s Standing Advisory Group on Standards, Chair of the National Reference Test Expert Group, and a member of the Welsh Government’s Curriculum and Assessment Group.  Before coming to Oxford, Jo-Anne held academic posts at the Institute of Education, University of London and the University of Bristol. Her first degree and doctorate were in psychology and she has an MBA.  Her current research projects include Setting and Maintaining Standards in national examinations, Examination reform: the impact of modular and linear examinations at GCSE, Assessment for Learning in Africa (AFLA), intelligent accountability and the Progress in International Reading Literacy Study England national centre.

Her research interests are in educational assessment, including system-wide structures and processes, examination standards, marking and assessment design.  Jo-Anne conducts a lot of work with government and industry partners, including acting as the Standing Adviser to the House of Commons Education Select Committee, a member of Ofqual’s Standing Advisory Group and membership of the Welsh Government’s Curriculum and Assessment Group.  She is a member of the Editorial Board of the Oxford Review of Education journal and the International Advisory Board of Assessment in Education: principles, policy & practice.  She has been a Visiting Professor at the universities of Bergen and Queen’s (Belfast).  From 2013 to 2015 she was President of the Association for Educational Assessment – Europe.

Qualifications
  • B.A.H. Linguistics/Psychology – Queen’s University, Kingston On, Canada
  • M.A. Educational Psychology – McGill University, Canada
  • Ph.D. – Second Language Education – McGill University Canada

Victoria Murphy would welcome informal contacts from prospective doctoral students interested in the following topics:

  • Language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/ Language Minority) children
  • Child L2 and bilingualism
  • Foreign language learning in primary school
  • Lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Research

Victoria is active in the following research areas, and would welcome DPhil applications on any of these, particularly those relating to EAL (language minority) children and child L2 learning and foreign language learning in primary school.  She is also the convenor of the Research in English as an Additional Language (REAL) group.  Her research is currently being funded by the ESRC, Leverhulme Trust and Nuffield Foundation.

  • language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/Language minority) children
  • child L2 learning and bilingualism
  • foreign language learning in primary school
  • cognitive processes underlying L1 and L2 learning
  • lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Current Research Project(s)

Joanna is a Doctoral Student, and ESRC Grand Union DTP Scholar, researching in-class support for multilingualism in UK schools.

She has over 12 years of experience as a teaching professional, having worked as a class teacher, EAL specialist and Teaching Assistant in the UK, China, Brazil and Italy. Her main area of interest is school-based education (3-18), specifically the support for multilingual pupils and their language practices, as well as the relationship between teaching assistants and both teachers and children in schools.

Joanna holds a BA in Jurisprudence and a MSc in Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching, both from the University of Oxford. She also has a PGCE, and a PGDip in French.

Joining the Department of Education in 2020 after teaching English and foreign languages in secondary schools and early years settings for 15 years, Catherine completed the MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition in 2021. Her doctoral research investigates the effectiveness of using songs as pedagogical tools with young second language learners in formal educational settings.

Additionally, Catherine hosts The Language Revolution podcast, exploring how linguistics and language awareness might inform/transform languages teaching with guests including Michael Rosen and David Crystal. She also project manages the annual conference for NALDIC, the national subject association for EAL.

Publications

Multilingual is Normal: An anthology of voices, talking about talking (2020)

Renyu completed her BA degree in Psychology at the University of British Columbia (Vancouver, Canada) and her MPhil degree in Education at University of Cambridge.

During her MPhil study, she worked with children aged 4 to 6 years to investigate the relationship between bilingualism, vocabulary size, and inhibitory control, and also to validate a novel app designed to assess early language development. For her Dphil study at Oxford, Renyu aims to explore the factors that might affect L2 pronunciation learning in young children and the interaction between children’s L1 and L2. She is particularly interested in the psychological factors that might influence a child’s L2 pronunciation.

Prior to studying at Oxford, Renyu worked as Research Assistant at the Assessment Research Group at British Council for one year and a half. She was involved in various projects, including gap analysis on reading demand and reading ability, participant feedback questionnaire design and analysis, design and recruitment for a new EAP task study, etc.

Bernard holds a PhD in Marketing from the University of Nottingham and a DBA from the University of Newcastle.

His research to date explores the leadership in HE. Prior to coming to Oxford, he worked in various HEIs and served as the supervisor of a secondary school.

Publications

Lee, B., Tsui, A. & Yau, O.H.M. (2019), Higher-order Goals, Trust-in-leader, and Self-efficacy as Moderators of Transformational Leadership Performance: The Case of Multi-level Marketing Organizations in China, Journal of Euromarketing, Vol.28 (3-4), 76-97. (2011 RG Impact factor: 0.83).

Conferences

Lee, B. (2020), “Self-formation for the Underprivileged,” 2020 International Online Symposium, Toward a New Paradigm of Economics,organized by Macau Ricci Institute, The University of Saint Joseph, 15 & 16 October. (Online Conference Platform Presentation).

Steve is Associate Professor of Teacher Education. He is a curriculum tutor for the Geography PGCE and MSc Learning and Teaching.

Steve is a qualified geography teacher and was previously the head of department at a comprehensive secondary school in Oxfordshire, and Head of Programmes at Bishop Grosseteste University, Lincoln.

He holds an MA in Educational Leadership and Innovation from Warwick University, an MSc in Educational Research Methodology and DPhil in Education from the University of Oxford which were funded by an ESRC Studentship. He is a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

He researches at the intersection between the academic discipline and school subject of geography, including recent collaborations developing through the Smart Cities Network for Sustainable Urban Future project which was shortlisted for the 2017 Newton Prize (India). He is currently leading research on Climate Change Education Futures in India (GCRF) in collaboration with colleagues at IISER, Pune, and on the role of cultural heritage in curriculum making in Kolkata.

Collaborations with colleagues in the School of Geography and the Environment are contributing to anti-racist curriculum futures, including in the school subject, and in postgraduate teaching through the TDEP-funded Oxford-UNISA course ‘Decolonising Research Methods’.

His research on teacher education focuses on the contribution that geography education research offers to the conceptualisation and practice of teaching. This work includes ethnographic research on teachers’ curriculum making exploring the journeys through which information travels into school classrooms, beginning teachers’ experiences of school subject departments, and the role of written lesson observation feedback in constructing ‘good teaching’.

Steve serves on the editorial board of the journal Geography, and is Chair of the Geography Education Research Collective (GEReCo/IGU-CGE).

 

Caitlin is a Doctoral student in the Department of Education working on how teachers interact with refugee and unaccompanied asylum-seeking pupils in UK schools.

Her Doctoral study uses survey data, interviews, observation, and document analysis to examine teacher knowledge, attitudes, and practices in relation to refugee pupils. Previously, Caitlin worked as a primary school teacher in Aberdeen, London, and at Rose Hill Primary School in Oxford. She completed an MA (Gaelic Medium Education, Oral History) and a PGDE (Primary Education) at the University of Aberdeen, and a BA (Human Geography, Environmental Studies) at Middlebury College in the US. She has a general interest in improving inclusion and equity in education.

Helen’s academic interest in higher education policy developed from more than 20 years of professional experience of university administration – in public relations and admissions.

She gained her doctorate from Oxford in 2010 (a study of the market created by the introduction of £3000 fees for Home/EU undergraduates at English universities in 2006); since then, she has conducted research into the impacts of student fees and funding on institutions, students, graduates and applicants within the higher education sector in England. She also works as a consultant to higher education institutions.

Helen was Pathway Convenor for the MSc Education (HE) for two years and has taught on this course since completing her DPhil. As an inspector for the British Accreditation Council, Helen has the opportunity to gain insights into the operation of higher education providers globally. She is also an Associate of the SKOPE, the department’s research centre for Skills, Knowledge and Organisational Performance.

From 2012-17, Helen was a member of the governing council of the Society for Research into Higher Education (SRHE), serving as Vice-Chair from 2014-17.

 

Jo-Anne is Director of the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment.  She completed a six-year term as Head of the Department of Education, has been Standing Adviser to the House of Commons Education Select Committee, a member of Ofqual’s Standing Advisory Group on Standards, Chair of the National Reference Test Expert Group, and a member of the Welsh Government’s Curriculum and Assessment Group.  Before coming to Oxford, Jo-Anne held academic posts at the Institute of Education, University of London and the University of Bristol. Her first degree and doctorate were in psychology and she has an MBA.  Her current research projects include Setting and Maintaining Standards in national examinations, Examination reform: the impact of modular and linear examinations at GCSE, Assessment for Learning in Africa (AFLA), intelligent accountability and the Progress in International Reading Literacy Study England national centre.

Her research interests are in educational assessment, including system-wide structures and processes, examination standards, marking and assessment design.  Jo-Anne conducts a lot of work with government and industry partners, including acting as the Standing Adviser to the House of Commons Education Select Committee, a member of Ofqual’s Standing Advisory Group and membership of the Welsh Government’s Curriculum and Assessment Group.  She is a member of the Editorial Board of the Oxford Review of Education journal and the International Advisory Board of Assessment in Education: principles, policy & practice.  She has been a Visiting Professor at the universities of Bergen and Queen’s (Belfast).  From 2013 to 2015 she was President of the Association for Educational Assessment – Europe.

Qualifications
  • B.A.H. Linguistics/Psychology – Queen’s University, Kingston On, Canada
  • M.A. Educational Psychology – McGill University, Canada
  • Ph.D. – Second Language Education – McGill University Canada

Victoria Murphy would welcome informal contacts from prospective doctoral students interested in the following topics:

  • Language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/ Language Minority) children
  • Child L2 and bilingualism
  • Foreign language learning in primary school
  • Lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Research

Victoria is active in the following research areas, and would welcome DPhil applications on any of these, particularly those relating to EAL (language minority) children and child L2 learning and foreign language learning in primary school.  She is also the convenor of the Research in English as an Additional Language (REAL) group.  Her research is currently being funded by the ESRC, Leverhulme Trust and Nuffield Foundation.

  • language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/Language minority) children
  • child L2 learning and bilingualism
  • foreign language learning in primary school
  • cognitive processes underlying L1 and L2 learning
  • lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Current Research Project(s)

Joanna is a Doctoral Student, and ESRC Grand Union DTP Scholar, researching in-class support for multilingualism in UK schools.

She has over 12 years of experience as a teaching professional, having worked as a class teacher, EAL specialist and Teaching Assistant in the UK, China, Brazil and Italy. Her main area of interest is school-based education (3-18), specifically the support for multilingual pupils and their language practices, as well as the relationship between teaching assistants and both teachers and children in schools.

Joanna holds a BA in Jurisprudence and a MSc in Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching, both from the University of Oxford. She also has a PGCE, and a PGDip in French.

Joining the Department of Education in 2020 after teaching English and foreign languages in secondary schools and early years settings for 15 years, Catherine completed the MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition in 2021. Her doctoral research investigates the effectiveness of using songs as pedagogical tools with young second language learners in formal educational settings.

Additionally, Catherine hosts The Language Revolution podcast, exploring how linguistics and language awareness might inform/transform languages teaching with guests including Michael Rosen and David Crystal. She also project manages the annual conference for NALDIC, the national subject association for EAL.

Publications

Multilingual is Normal: An anthology of voices, talking about talking (2020)

Renyu completed her BA degree in Psychology at the University of British Columbia (Vancouver, Canada) and her MPhil degree in Education at University of Cambridge.

During her MPhil study, she worked with children aged 4 to 6 years to investigate the relationship between bilingualism, vocabulary size, and inhibitory control, and also to validate a novel app designed to assess early language development. For her Dphil study at Oxford, Renyu aims to explore the factors that might affect L2 pronunciation learning in young children and the interaction between children’s L1 and L2. She is particularly interested in the psychological factors that might influence a child’s L2 pronunciation.

Prior to studying at Oxford, Renyu worked as Research Assistant at the Assessment Research Group at British Council for one year and a half. She was involved in various projects, including gap analysis on reading demand and reading ability, participant feedback questionnaire design and analysis, design and recruitment for a new EAP task study, etc.

Bernard holds a PhD in Marketing from the University of Nottingham and a DBA from the University of Newcastle.

His research to date explores the leadership in HE. Prior to coming to Oxford, he worked in various HEIs and served as the supervisor of a secondary school.

Publications

Lee, B., Tsui, A. & Yau, O.H.M. (2019), Higher-order Goals, Trust-in-leader, and Self-efficacy as Moderators of Transformational Leadership Performance: The Case of Multi-level Marketing Organizations in China, Journal of Euromarketing, Vol.28 (3-4), 76-97. (2011 RG Impact factor: 0.83).

Conferences

Lee, B. (2020), “Self-formation for the Underprivileged,” 2020 International Online Symposium, Toward a New Paradigm of Economics,organized by Macau Ricci Institute, The University of Saint Joseph, 15 & 16 October. (Online Conference Platform Presentation).

Steve is Associate Professor of Teacher Education. He is a curriculum tutor for the Geography PGCE and MSc Learning and Teaching.

Steve is a qualified geography teacher and was previously the head of department at a comprehensive secondary school in Oxfordshire, and Head of Programmes at Bishop Grosseteste University, Lincoln.

He holds an MA in Educational Leadership and Innovation from Warwick University, an MSc in Educational Research Methodology and DPhil in Education from the University of Oxford which were funded by an ESRC Studentship. He is a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

He researches at the intersection between the academic discipline and school subject of geography, including recent collaborations developing through the Smart Cities Network for Sustainable Urban Future project which was shortlisted for the 2017 Newton Prize (India). He is currently leading research on Climate Change Education Futures in India (GCRF) in collaboration with colleagues at IISER, Pune, and on the role of cultural heritage in curriculum making in Kolkata.

Collaborations with colleagues in the School of Geography and the Environment are contributing to anti-racist curriculum futures, including in the school subject, and in postgraduate teaching through the TDEP-funded Oxford-UNISA course ‘Decolonising Research Methods’.

His research on teacher education focuses on the contribution that geography education research offers to the conceptualisation and practice of teaching. This work includes ethnographic research on teachers’ curriculum making exploring the journeys through which information travels into school classrooms, beginning teachers’ experiences of school subject departments, and the role of written lesson observation feedback in constructing ‘good teaching’.

Steve serves on the editorial board of the journal Geography, and is Chair of the Geography Education Research Collective (GEReCo/IGU-CGE).

 

Caitlin is a Doctoral student in the Department of Education working on how teachers interact with refugee and unaccompanied asylum-seeking pupils in UK schools.

Her Doctoral study uses survey data, interviews, observation, and document analysis to examine teacher knowledge, attitudes, and practices in relation to refugee pupils. Previously, Caitlin worked as a primary school teacher in Aberdeen, London, and at Rose Hill Primary School in Oxford. She completed an MA (Gaelic Medium Education, Oral History) and a PGDE (Primary Education) at the University of Aberdeen, and a BA (Human Geography, Environmental Studies) at Middlebury College in the US. She has a general interest in improving inclusion and equity in education.

Helen’s academic interest in higher education policy developed from more than 20 years of professional experience of university administration – in public relations and admissions.

She gained her doctorate from Oxford in 2010 (a study of the market created by the introduction of £3000 fees for Home/EU undergraduates at English universities in 2006); since then, she has conducted research into the impacts of student fees and funding on institutions, students, graduates and applicants within the higher education sector in England. She also works as a consultant to higher education institutions.

Helen was Pathway Convenor for the MSc Education (HE) for two years and has taught on this course since completing her DPhil. As an inspector for the British Accreditation Council, Helen has the opportunity to gain insights into the operation of higher education providers globally. She is also an Associate of the SKOPE, the department’s research centre for Skills, Knowledge and Organisational Performance.

From 2012-17, Helen was a member of the governing council of the Society for Research into Higher Education (SRHE), serving as Vice-Chair from 2014-17.

 

Jo-Anne is Director of the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment.  She completed a six-year term as Head of the Department of Education, has been Standing Adviser to the House of Commons Education Select Committee, a member of Ofqual’s Standing Advisory Group on Standards, Chair of the National Reference Test Expert Group, and a member of the Welsh Government’s Curriculum and Assessment Group.  Before coming to Oxford, Jo-Anne held academic posts at the Institute of Education, University of London and the University of Bristol. Her first degree and doctorate were in psychology and she has an MBA.  Her current research projects include Setting and Maintaining Standards in national examinations, Examination reform: the impact of modular and linear examinations at GCSE, Assessment for Learning in Africa (AFLA), intelligent accountability and the Progress in International Reading Literacy Study England national centre.

Her research interests are in educational assessment, including system-wide structures and processes, examination standards, marking and assessment design.  Jo-Anne conducts a lot of work with government and industry partners, including acting as the Standing Adviser to the House of Commons Education Select Committee, a member of Ofqual’s Standing Advisory Group and membership of the Welsh Government’s Curriculum and Assessment Group.  She is a member of the Editorial Board of the Oxford Review of Education journal and the International Advisory Board of Assessment in Education: principles, policy & practice.  She has been a Visiting Professor at the universities of Bergen and Queen’s (Belfast).  From 2013 to 2015 she was President of the Association for Educational Assessment – Europe.

Qualifications
  • B.A.H. Linguistics/Psychology – Queen’s University, Kingston On, Canada
  • M.A. Educational Psychology – McGill University, Canada
  • Ph.D. – Second Language Education – McGill University Canada

Victoria Murphy would welcome informal contacts from prospective doctoral students interested in the following topics:

  • Language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/ Language Minority) children
  • Child L2 and bilingualism
  • Foreign language learning in primary school
  • Lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Research

Victoria is active in the following research areas, and would welcome DPhil applications on any of these, particularly those relating to EAL (language minority) children and child L2 learning and foreign language learning in primary school.  She is also the convenor of the Research in English as an Additional Language (REAL) group.  Her research is currently being funded by the ESRC, Leverhulme Trust and Nuffield Foundation.

  • language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/Language minority) children
  • child L2 learning and bilingualism
  • foreign language learning in primary school
  • cognitive processes underlying L1 and L2 learning
  • lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Current Research Project(s)

Joanna is a Doctoral Student, and ESRC Grand Union DTP Scholar, researching in-class support for multilingualism in UK schools.

She has over 12 years of experience as a teaching professional, having worked as a class teacher, EAL specialist and Teaching Assistant in the UK, China, Brazil and Italy. Her main area of interest is school-based education (3-18), specifically the support for multilingual pupils and their language practices, as well as the relationship between teaching assistants and both teachers and children in schools.

Joanna holds a BA in Jurisprudence and a MSc in Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching, both from the University of Oxford. She also has a PGCE, and a PGDip in French.

Joining the Department of Education in 2020 after teaching English and foreign languages in secondary schools and early years settings for 15 years, Catherine completed the MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition in 2021. Her doctoral research investigates the effectiveness of using songs as pedagogical tools with young second language learners in formal educational settings.

Additionally, Catherine hosts The Language Revolution podcast, exploring how linguistics and language awareness might inform/transform languages teaching with guests including Michael Rosen and David Crystal. She also project manages the annual conference for NALDIC, the national subject association for EAL.

Publications

Multilingual is Normal: An anthology of voices, talking about talking (2020)

Renyu completed her BA degree in Psychology at the University of British Columbia (Vancouver, Canada) and her MPhil degree in Education at University of Cambridge.

During her MPhil study, she worked with children aged 4 to 6 years to investigate the relationship between bilingualism, vocabulary size, and inhibitory control, and also to validate a novel app designed to assess early language development. For her Dphil study at Oxford, Renyu aims to explore the factors that might affect L2 pronunciation learning in young children and the interaction between children’s L1 and L2. She is particularly interested in the psychological factors that might influence a child’s L2 pronunciation.

Prior to studying at Oxford, Renyu worked as Research Assistant at the Assessment Research Group at British Council for one year and a half. She was involved in various projects, including gap analysis on reading demand and reading ability, participant feedback questionnaire design and analysis, design and recruitment for a new EAP task study, etc.

Bernard holds a PhD in Marketing from the University of Nottingham and a DBA from the University of Newcastle.

His research to date explores the leadership in HE. Prior to coming to Oxford, he worked in various HEIs and served as the supervisor of a secondary school.

Publications

Lee, B., Tsui, A. & Yau, O.H.M. (2019), Higher-order Goals, Trust-in-leader, and Self-efficacy as Moderators of Transformational Leadership Performance: The Case of Multi-level Marketing Organizations in China, Journal of Euromarketing, Vol.28 (3-4), 76-97. (2011 RG Impact factor: 0.83).

Conferences

Lee, B. (2020), “Self-formation for the Underprivileged,” 2020 International Online Symposium, Toward a New Paradigm of Economics,organized by Macau Ricci Institute, The University of Saint Joseph, 15 & 16 October. (Online Conference Platform Presentation).

Steve is Associate Professor of Teacher Education. He is a curriculum tutor for the Geography PGCE and MSc Learning and Teaching.

Steve is a qualified geography teacher and was previously the head of department at a comprehensive secondary school in Oxfordshire, and Head of Programmes at Bishop Grosseteste University, Lincoln.

He holds an MA in Educational Leadership and Innovation from Warwick University, an MSc in Educational Research Methodology and DPhil in Education from the University of Oxford which were funded by an ESRC Studentship. He is a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

He researches at the intersection between the academic discipline and school subject of geography, including recent collaborations developing through the Smart Cities Network for Sustainable Urban Future project which was shortlisted for the 2017 Newton Prize (India). He is currently leading research on Climate Change Education Futures in India (GCRF) in collaboration with colleagues at IISER, Pune, and on the role of cultural heritage in curriculum making in Kolkata.

Collaborations with colleagues in the School of Geography and the Environment are contributing to anti-racist curriculum futures, including in the school subject, and in postgraduate teaching through the TDEP-funded Oxford-UNISA course ‘Decolonising Research Methods’.

His research on teacher education focuses on the contribution that geography education research offers to the conceptualisation and practice of teaching. This work includes ethnographic research on teachers’ curriculum making exploring the journeys through which information travels into school classrooms, beginning teachers’ experiences of school subject departments, and the role of written lesson observation feedback in constructing ‘good teaching’.

Steve serves on the editorial board of the journal Geography, and is Chair of the Geography Education Research Collective (GEReCo/IGU-CGE).

 

Caitlin is a Doctoral student in the Department of Education working on how teachers interact with refugee and unaccompanied asylum-seeking pupils in UK schools.

Her Doctoral study uses survey data, interviews, observation, and document analysis to examine teacher knowledge, attitudes, and practices in relation to refugee pupils. Previously, Caitlin worked as a primary school teacher in Aberdeen, London, and at Rose Hill Primary School in Oxford. She completed an MA (Gaelic Medium Education, Oral History) and a PGDE (Primary Education) at the University of Aberdeen, and a BA (Human Geography, Environmental Studies) at Middlebury College in the US. She has a general interest in improving inclusion and equity in education.

Helen’s academic interest in higher education policy developed from more than 20 years of professional experience of university administration – in public relations and admissions.

She gained her doctorate from Oxford in 2010 (a study of the market created by the introduction of £3000 fees for Home/EU undergraduates at English universities in 2006); since then, she has conducted research into the impacts of student fees and funding on institutions, students, graduates and applicants within the higher education sector in England. She also works as a consultant to higher education institutions.

Helen was Pathway Convenor for the MSc Education (HE) for two years and has taught on this course since completing her DPhil. As an inspector for the British Accreditation Council, Helen has the opportunity to gain insights into the operation of higher education providers globally. She is also an Associate of the SKOPE, the department’s research centre for Skills, Knowledge and Organisational Performance.

From 2012-17, Helen was a member of the governing council of the Society for Research into Higher Education (SRHE), serving as Vice-Chair from 2014-17.

 

Jo-Anne is Director of the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment.  She completed a six-year term as Head of the Department of Education, has been Standing Adviser to the House of Commons Education Select Committee, a member of Ofqual’s Standing Advisory Group on Standards, Chair of the National Reference Test Expert Group, and a member of the Welsh Government’s Curriculum and Assessment Group.  Before coming to Oxford, Jo-Anne held academic posts at the Institute of Education, University of London and the University of Bristol. Her first degree and doctorate were in psychology and she has an MBA.  Her current research projects include Setting and Maintaining Standards in national examinations, Examination reform: the impact of modular and linear examinations at GCSE, Assessment for Learning in Africa (AFLA), intelligent accountability and the Progress in International Reading Literacy Study England national centre.

Her research interests are in educational assessment, including system-wide structures and processes, examination standards, marking and assessment design.  Jo-Anne conducts a lot of work with government and industry partners, including acting as the Standing Adviser to the House of Commons Education Select Committee, a member of Ofqual’s Standing Advisory Group and membership of the Welsh Government’s Curriculum and Assessment Group.  She is a member of the Editorial Board of the Oxford Review of Education journal and the International Advisory Board of Assessment in Education: principles, policy & practice.  She has been a Visiting Professor at the universities of Bergen and Queen’s (Belfast).  From 2013 to 2015 she was President of the Association for Educational Assessment – Europe.

Qualifications
  • B.A.H. Linguistics/Psychology – Queen’s University, Kingston On, Canada
  • M.A. Educational Psychology – McGill University, Canada
  • Ph.D. – Second Language Education – McGill University Canada

Victoria Murphy would welcome informal contacts from prospective doctoral students interested in the following topics:

  • Language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/ Language Minority) children
  • Child L2 and bilingualism
  • Foreign language learning in primary school
  • Lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Research

Victoria is active in the following research areas, and would welcome DPhil applications on any of these, particularly those relating to EAL (language minority) children and child L2 learning and foreign language learning in primary school.  She is also the convenor of the Research in English as an Additional Language (REAL) group.  Her research is currently being funded by the ESRC, Leverhulme Trust and Nuffield Foundation.

  • language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/Language minority) children
  • child L2 learning and bilingualism
  • foreign language learning in primary school
  • cognitive processes underlying L1 and L2 learning
  • lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Current Research Project(s)

Joanna is a Doctoral Student, and ESRC Grand Union DTP Scholar, researching in-class support for multilingualism in UK schools.

She has over 12 years of experience as a teaching professional, having worked as a class teacher, EAL specialist and Teaching Assistant in the UK, China, Brazil and Italy. Her main area of interest is school-based education (3-18), specifically the support for multilingual pupils and their language practices, as well as the relationship between teaching assistants and both teachers and children in schools.

Joanna holds a BA in Jurisprudence and a MSc in Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching, both from the University of Oxford. She also has a PGCE, and a PGDip in French.

Joining the Department of Education in 2020 after teaching English and foreign languages in secondary schools and early years settings for 15 years, Catherine completed the MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition in 2021. Her doctoral research investigates the effectiveness of using songs as pedagogical tools with young second language learners in formal educational settings.

Additionally, Catherine hosts The Language Revolution podcast, exploring how linguistics and language awareness might inform/transform languages teaching with guests including Michael Rosen and David Crystal. She also project manages the annual conference for NALDIC, the national subject association for EAL.

Publications

Multilingual is Normal: An anthology of voices, talking about talking (2020)

Renyu completed her BA degree in Psychology at the University of British Columbia (Vancouver, Canada) and her MPhil degree in Education at University of Cambridge.

During her MPhil study, she worked with children aged 4 to 6 years to investigate the relationship between bilingualism, vocabulary size, and inhibitory control, and also to validate a novel app designed to assess early language development. For her Dphil study at Oxford, Renyu aims to explore the factors that might affect L2 pronunciation learning in young children and the interaction between children’s L1 and L2. She is particularly interested in the psychological factors that might influence a child’s L2 pronunciation.

Prior to studying at Oxford, Renyu worked as Research Assistant at the Assessment Research Group at British Council for one year and a half. She was involved in various projects, including gap analysis on reading demand and reading ability, participant feedback questionnaire design and analysis, design and recruitment for a new EAP task study, etc.

Bernard holds a PhD in Marketing from the University of Nottingham and a DBA from the University of Newcastle.

His research to date explores the leadership in HE. Prior to coming to Oxford, he worked in various HEIs and served as the supervisor of a secondary school.

Publications

Lee, B., Tsui, A. & Yau, O.H.M. (2019), Higher-order Goals, Trust-in-leader, and Self-efficacy as Moderators of Transformational Leadership Performance: The Case of Multi-level Marketing Organizations in China, Journal of Euromarketing, Vol.28 (3-4), 76-97. (2011 RG Impact factor: 0.83).

Conferences

Lee, B. (2020), “Self-formation for the Underprivileged,” 2020 International Online Symposium, Toward a New Paradigm of Economics,organized by Macau Ricci Institute, The University of Saint Joseph, 15 & 16 October. (Online Conference Platform Presentation).

Steve is Associate Professor of Teacher Education. He is a curriculum tutor for the Geography PGCE and MSc Learning and Teaching.

Steve is a qualified geography teacher and was previously the head of department at a comprehensive secondary school in Oxfordshire, and Head of Programmes at Bishop Grosseteste University, Lincoln.

He holds an MA in Educational Leadership and Innovation from Warwick University, an MSc in Educational Research Methodology and DPhil in Education from the University of Oxford which were funded by an ESRC Studentship. He is a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

He researches at the intersection between the academic discipline and school subject of geography, including recent collaborations developing through the Smart Cities Network for Sustainable Urban Future project which was shortlisted for the 2017 Newton Prize (India). He is currently leading research on Climate Change Education Futures in India (GCRF) in collaboration with colleagues at IISER, Pune, and on the role of cultural heritage in curriculum making in Kolkata.

Collaborations with colleagues in the School of Geography and the Environment are contributing to anti-racist curriculum futures, including in the school subject, and in postgraduate teaching through the TDEP-funded Oxford-UNISA course ‘Decolonising Research Methods’.

His research on teacher education focuses on the contribution that geography education research offers to the conceptualisation and practice of teaching. This work includes ethnographic research on teachers’ curriculum making exploring the journeys through which information travels into school classrooms, beginning teachers’ experiences of school subject departments, and the role of written lesson observation feedback in constructing ‘good teaching’.

Steve serves on the editorial board of the journal Geography, and is Chair of the Geography Education Research Collective (GEReCo/IGU-CGE).

 

Caitlin is a Doctoral student in the Department of Education working on how teachers interact with refugee and unaccompanied asylum-seeking pupils in UK schools.

Her Doctoral study uses survey data, interviews, observation, and document analysis to examine teacher knowledge, attitudes, and practices in relation to refugee pupils. Previously, Caitlin worked as a primary school teacher in Aberdeen, London, and at Rose Hill Primary School in Oxford. She completed an MA (Gaelic Medium Education, Oral History) and a PGDE (Primary Education) at the University of Aberdeen, and a BA (Human Geography, Environmental Studies) at Middlebury College in the US. She has a general interest in improving inclusion and equity in education.

Helen’s academic interest in higher education policy developed from more than 20 years of professional experience of university administration – in public relations and admissions.

She gained her doctorate from Oxford in 2010 (a study of the market created by the introduction of £3000 fees for Home/EU undergraduates at English universities in 2006); since then, she has conducted research into the impacts of student fees and funding on institutions, students, graduates and applicants within the higher education sector in England. She also works as a consultant to higher education institutions.

Helen was Pathway Convenor for the MSc Education (HE) for two years and has taught on this course since completing her DPhil. As an inspector for the British Accreditation Council, Helen has the opportunity to gain insights into the operation of higher education providers globally. She is also an Associate of the SKOPE, the department’s research centre for Skills, Knowledge and Organisational Performance.

From 2012-17, Helen was a member of the governing council of the Society for Research into Higher Education (SRHE), serving as Vice-Chair from 2014-17.

 

Jo-Anne is Director of the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment.  She completed a six-year term as Head of the Department of Education, has been Standing Adviser to the House of Commons Education Select Committee, a member of Ofqual’s Standing Advisory Group on Standards, Chair of the National Reference Test Expert Group, and a member of the Welsh Government’s Curriculum and Assessment Group.  Before coming to Oxford, Jo-Anne held academic posts at the Institute of Education, University of London and the University of Bristol. Her first degree and doctorate were in psychology and she has an MBA.  Her current research projects include Setting and Maintaining Standards in national examinations, Examination reform: the impact of modular and linear examinations at GCSE, Assessment for Learning in Africa (AFLA), intelligent accountability and the Progress in International Reading Literacy Study England national centre.

Her research interests are in educational assessment, including system-wide structures and processes, examination standards, marking and assessment design.  Jo-Anne conducts a lot of work with government and industry partners, including acting as the Standing Adviser to the House of Commons Education Select Committee, a member of Ofqual’s Standing Advisory Group and membership of the Welsh Government’s Curriculum and Assessment Group.  She is a member of the Editorial Board of the Oxford Review of Education journal and the International Advisory Board of Assessment in Education: principles, policy & practice.  She has been a Visiting Professor at the universities of Bergen and Queen’s (Belfast).  From 2013 to 2015 she was President of the Association for Educational Assessment – Europe.

Qualifications
  • B.A.H. Linguistics/Psychology – Queen’s University, Kingston On, Canada
  • M.A. Educational Psychology – McGill University, Canada
  • Ph.D. – Second Language Education – McGill University Canada

Victoria Murphy would welcome informal contacts from prospective doctoral students interested in the following topics:

  • Language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/ Language Minority) children
  • Child L2 and bilingualism
  • Foreign language learning in primary school
  • Lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Research

Victoria is active in the following research areas, and would welcome DPhil applications on any of these, particularly those relating to EAL (language minority) children and child L2 learning and foreign language learning in primary school.  She is also the convenor of the Research in English as an Additional Language (REAL) group.  Her research is currently being funded by the ESRC, Leverhulme Trust and Nuffield Foundation.

  • language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/Language minority) children
  • child L2 learning and bilingualism
  • foreign language learning in primary school
  • cognitive processes underlying L1 and L2 learning
  • lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Current Research Project(s)

Joanna is a Doctoral Student, and ESRC Grand Union DTP Scholar, researching in-class support for multilingualism in UK schools.

She has over 12 years of experience as a teaching professional, having worked as a class teacher, EAL specialist and Teaching Assistant in the UK, China, Brazil and Italy. Her main area of interest is school-based education (3-18), specifically the support for multilingual pupils and their language practices, as well as the relationship between teaching assistants and both teachers and children in schools.

Joanna holds a BA in Jurisprudence and a MSc in Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching, both from the University of Oxford. She also has a PGCE, and a PGDip in French.

Joining the Department of Education in 2020 after teaching English and foreign languages in secondary schools and early years settings for 15 years, Catherine completed the MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition in 2021. Her doctoral research investigates the effectiveness of using songs as pedagogical tools with young second language learners in formal educational settings.

Additionally, Catherine hosts The Language Revolution podcast, exploring how linguistics and language awareness might inform/transform languages teaching with guests including Michael Rosen and David Crystal. She also project manages the annual conference for NALDIC, the national subject association for EAL.

Publications

Multilingual is Normal: An anthology of voices, talking about talking (2020)

Renyu completed her BA degree in Psychology at the University of British Columbia (Vancouver, Canada) and her MPhil degree in Education at University of Cambridge.

During her MPhil study, she worked with children aged 4 to 6 years to investigate the relationship between bilingualism, vocabulary size, and inhibitory control, and also to validate a novel app designed to assess early language development. For her Dphil study at Oxford, Renyu aims to explore the factors that might affect L2 pronunciation learning in young children and the interaction between children’s L1 and L2. She is particularly interested in the psychological factors that might influence a child’s L2 pronunciation.

Prior to studying at Oxford, Renyu worked as Research Assistant at the Assessment Research Group at British Council for one year and a half. She was involved in various projects, including gap analysis on reading demand and reading ability, participant feedback questionnaire design and analysis, design and recruitment for a new EAP task study, etc.

Bernard holds a PhD in Marketing from the University of Nottingham and a DBA from the University of Newcastle.

His research to date explores the leadership in HE. Prior to coming to Oxford, he worked in various HEIs and served as the supervisor of a secondary school.

Publications

Lee, B., Tsui, A. & Yau, O.H.M. (2019), Higher-order Goals, Trust-in-leader, and Self-efficacy as Moderators of Transformational Leadership Performance: The Case of Multi-level Marketing Organizations in China, Journal of Euromarketing, Vol.28 (3-4), 76-97. (2011 RG Impact factor: 0.83).

Conferences

Lee, B. (2020), “Self-formation for the Underprivileged,” 2020 International Online Symposium, Toward a New Paradigm of Economics,organized by Macau Ricci Institute, The University of Saint Joseph, 15 & 16 October. (Online Conference Platform Presentation).

Steve is Associate Professor of Teacher Education. He is a curriculum tutor for the Geography PGCE and MSc Learning and Teaching.

Steve is a qualified geography teacher and was previously the head of department at a comprehensive secondary school in Oxfordshire, and Head of Programmes at Bishop Grosseteste University, Lincoln.

He holds an MA in Educational Leadership and Innovation from Warwick University, an MSc in Educational Research Methodology and DPhil in Education from the University of Oxford which were funded by an ESRC Studentship. He is a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

He researches at the intersection between the academic discipline and school subject of geography, including recent collaborations developing through the Smart Cities Network for Sustainable Urban Future project which was shortlisted for the 2017 Newton Prize (India). He is currently leading research on Climate Change Education Futures in India (GCRF) in collaboration with colleagues at IISER, Pune, and on the role of cultural heritage in curriculum making in Kolkata.

Collaborations with colleagues in the School of Geography and the Environment are contributing to anti-racist curriculum futures, including in the school subject, and in postgraduate teaching through the TDEP-funded Oxford-UNISA course ‘Decolonising Research Methods’.

His research on teacher education focuses on the contribution that geography education research offers to the conceptualisation and practice of teaching. This work includes ethnographic research on teachers’ curriculum making exploring the journeys through which information travels into school classrooms, beginning teachers’ experiences of school subject departments, and the role of written lesson observation feedback in constructing ‘good teaching’.

Steve serves on the editorial board of the journal Geography, and is Chair of the Geography Education Research Collective (GEReCo/IGU-CGE).

 

Caitlin is a Doctoral student in the Department of Education working on how teachers interact with refugee and unaccompanied asylum-seeking pupils in UK schools.

Her Doctoral study uses survey data, interviews, observation, and document analysis to examine teacher knowledge, attitudes, and practices in relation to refugee pupils. Previously, Caitlin worked as a primary school teacher in Aberdeen, London, and at Rose Hill Primary School in Oxford. She completed an MA (Gaelic Medium Education, Oral History) and a PGDE (Primary Education) at the University of Aberdeen, and a BA (Human Geography, Environmental Studies) at Middlebury College in the US. She has a general interest in improving inclusion and equity in education.

Helen’s academic interest in higher education policy developed from more than 20 years of professional experience of university administration – in public relations and admissions.

She gained her doctorate from Oxford in 2010 (a study of the market created by the introduction of £3000 fees for Home/EU undergraduates at English universities in 2006); since then, she has conducted research into the impacts of student fees and funding on institutions, students, graduates and applicants within the higher education sector in England. She also works as a consultant to higher education institutions.

Helen was Pathway Convenor for the MSc Education (HE) for two years and has taught on this course since completing her DPhil. As an inspector for the British Accreditation Council, Helen has the opportunity to gain insights into the operation of higher education providers globally. She is also an Associate of the SKOPE, the department’s research centre for Skills, Knowledge and Organisational Performance.

From 2012-17, Helen was a member of the governing council of the Society for Research into Higher Education (SRHE), serving as Vice-Chair from 2014-17.

 

Jo-Anne is Director of the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment.  She completed a six-year term as Head of the Department of Education, has been Standing Adviser to the House of Commons Education Select Committee, a member of Ofqual’s Standing Advisory Group on Standards, Chair of the National Reference Test Expert Group, and a member of the Welsh Government’s Curriculum and Assessment Group.  Before coming to Oxford, Jo-Anne held academic posts at the Institute of Education, University of London and the University of Bristol. Her first degree and doctorate were in psychology and she has an MBA.  Her current research projects include Setting and Maintaining Standards in national examinations, Examination reform: the impact of modular and linear examinations at GCSE, Assessment for Learning in Africa (AFLA), intelligent accountability and the Progress in International Reading Literacy Study England national centre.

Her research interests are in educational assessment, including system-wide structures and processes, examination standards, marking and assessment design.  Jo-Anne conducts a lot of work with government and industry partners, including acting as the Standing Adviser to the House of Commons Education Select Committee, a member of Ofqual’s Standing Advisory Group and membership of the Welsh Government’s Curriculum and Assessment Group.  She is a member of the Editorial Board of the Oxford Review of Education journal and the International Advisory Board of Assessment in Education: principles, policy & practice.  She has been a Visiting Professor at the universities of Bergen and Queen’s (Belfast).  From 2013 to 2015 she was President of the Association for Educational Assessment – Europe.

Qualifications
  • B.A.H. Linguistics/Psychology – Queen’s University, Kingston On, Canada
  • M.A. Educational Psychology – McGill University, Canada
  • Ph.D. – Second Language Education – McGill University Canada

Victoria Murphy would welcome informal contacts from prospective doctoral students interested in the following topics:

  • Language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/ Language Minority) children
  • Child L2 and bilingualism
  • Foreign language learning in primary school
  • Lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Research

Victoria is active in the following research areas, and would welcome DPhil applications on any of these, particularly those relating to EAL (language minority) children and child L2 learning and foreign language learning in primary school.  She is also the convenor of the Research in English as an Additional Language (REAL) group.  Her research is currently being funded by the ESRC, Leverhulme Trust and Nuffield Foundation.

  • language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/Language minority) children
  • child L2 learning and bilingualism
  • foreign language learning in primary school
  • cognitive processes underlying L1 and L2 learning
  • lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Current Research Project(s)

Joanna is a Doctoral Student, and ESRC Grand Union DTP Scholar, researching in-class support for multilingualism in UK schools.

She has over 12 years of experience as a teaching professional, having worked as a class teacher, EAL specialist and Teaching Assistant in the UK, China, Brazil and Italy. Her main area of interest is school-based education (3-18), specifically the support for multilingual pupils and their language practices, as well as the relationship between teaching assistants and both teachers and children in schools.

Joanna holds a BA in Jurisprudence and a MSc in Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching, both from the University of Oxford. She also has a PGCE, and a PGDip in French.

Joining the Department of Education in 2020 after teaching English and foreign languages in secondary schools and early years settings for 15 years, Catherine completed the MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition in 2021. Her doctoral research investigates the effectiveness of using songs as pedagogical tools with young second language learners in formal educational settings.

Additionally, Catherine hosts The Language Revolution podcast, exploring how linguistics and language awareness might inform/transform languages teaching with guests including Michael Rosen and David Crystal. She also project manages the annual conference for NALDIC, the national subject association for EAL.

Publications

Multilingual is Normal: An anthology of voices, talking about talking (2020)

Renyu completed her BA degree in Psychology at the University of British Columbia (Vancouver, Canada) and her MPhil degree in Education at University of Cambridge.

During her MPhil study, she worked with children aged 4 to 6 years to investigate the relationship between bilingualism, vocabulary size, and inhibitory control, and also to validate a novel app designed to assess early language development. For her Dphil study at Oxford, Renyu aims to explore the factors that might affect L2 pronunciation learning in young children and the interaction between children’s L1 and L2. She is particularly interested in the psychological factors that might influence a child’s L2 pronunciation.

Prior to studying at Oxford, Renyu worked as Research Assistant at the Assessment Research Group at British Council for one year and a half. She was involved in various projects, including gap analysis on reading demand and reading ability, participant feedback questionnaire design and analysis, design and recruitment for a new EAP task study, etc.

Bernard holds a PhD in Marketing from the University of Nottingham and a DBA from the University of Newcastle.

His research to date explores the leadership in HE. Prior to coming to Oxford, he worked in various HEIs and served as the supervisor of a secondary school.

Publications

Lee, B., Tsui, A. & Yau, O.H.M. (2019), Higher-order Goals, Trust-in-leader, and Self-efficacy as Moderators of Transformational Leadership Performance: The Case of Multi-level Marketing Organizations in China, Journal of Euromarketing, Vol.28 (3-4), 76-97. (2011 RG Impact factor: 0.83).

Conferences

Lee, B. (2020), “Self-formation for the Underprivileged,” 2020 International Online Symposium, Toward a New Paradigm of Economics,organized by Macau Ricci Institute, The University of Saint Joseph, 15 & 16 October. (Online Conference Platform Presentation).

Steve is Associate Professor of Teacher Education. He is a curriculum tutor for the Geography PGCE and MSc Learning and Teaching.

Steve is a qualified geography teacher and was previously the head of department at a comprehensive secondary school in Oxfordshire, and Head of Programmes at Bishop Grosseteste University, Lincoln.

He holds an MA in Educational Leadership and Innovation from Warwick University, an MSc in Educational Research Methodology and DPhil in Education from the University of Oxford which were funded by an ESRC Studentship. He is a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

He researches at the intersection between the academic discipline and school subject of geography, including recent collaborations developing through the Smart Cities Network for Sustainable Urban Future project which was shortlisted for the 2017 Newton Prize (India). He is currently leading research on Climate Change Education Futures in India (GCRF) in collaboration with colleagues at IISER, Pune, and on the role of cultural heritage in curriculum making in Kolkata.

Collaborations with colleagues in the School of Geography and the Environment are contributing to anti-racist curriculum futures, including in the school subject, and in postgraduate teaching through the TDEP-funded Oxford-UNISA course ‘Decolonising Research Methods’.

His research on teacher education focuses on the contribution that geography education research offers to the conceptualisation and practice of teaching. This work includes ethnographic research on teachers’ curriculum making exploring the journeys through which information travels into school classrooms, beginning teachers’ experiences of school subject departments, and the role of written lesson observation feedback in constructing ‘good teaching’.

Steve serves on the editorial board of the journal Geography, and is Chair of the Geography Education Research Collective (GEReCo/IGU-CGE).

 

Caitlin is a Doctoral student in the Department of Education working on how teachers interact with refugee and unaccompanied asylum-seeking pupils in UK schools.

Her Doctoral study uses survey data, interviews, observation, and document analysis to examine teacher knowledge, attitudes, and practices in relation to refugee pupils. Previously, Caitlin worked as a primary school teacher in Aberdeen, London, and at Rose Hill Primary School in Oxford. She completed an MA (Gaelic Medium Education, Oral History) and a PGDE (Primary Education) at the University of Aberdeen, and a BA (Human Geography, Environmental Studies) at Middlebury College in the US. She has a general interest in improving inclusion and equity in education.

Helen’s academic interest in higher education policy developed from more than 20 years of professional experience of university administration – in public relations and admissions.

She gained her doctorate from Oxford in 2010 (a study of the market created by the introduction of £3000 fees for Home/EU undergraduates at English universities in 2006); since then, she has conducted research into the impacts of student fees and funding on institutions, students, graduates and applicants within the higher education sector in England. She also works as a consultant to higher education institutions.

Helen was Pathway Convenor for the MSc Education (HE) for two years and has taught on this course since completing her DPhil. As an inspector for the British Accreditation Council, Helen has the opportunity to gain insights into the operation of higher education providers globally. She is also an Associate of the SKOPE, the department’s research centre for Skills, Knowledge and Organisational Performance.

From 2012-17, Helen was a member of the governing council of the Society for Research into Higher Education (SRHE), serving as Vice-Chair from 2014-17.

 

Jo-Anne is Director of the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment.  She completed a six-year term as Head of the Department of Education, has been Standing Adviser to the House of Commons Education Select Committee, a member of Ofqual’s Standing Advisory Group on Standards, Chair of the National Reference Test Expert Group, and a member of the Welsh Government’s Curriculum and Assessment Group.  Before coming to Oxford, Jo-Anne held academic posts at the Institute of Education, University of London and the University of Bristol. Her first degree and doctorate were in psychology and she has an MBA.  Her current research projects include Setting and Maintaining Standards in national examinations, Examination reform: the impact of modular and linear examinations at GCSE, Assessment for Learning in Africa (AFLA), intelligent accountability and the Progress in International Reading Literacy Study England national centre.

Her research interests are in educational assessment, including system-wide structures and processes, examination standards, marking and assessment design.  Jo-Anne conducts a lot of work with government and industry partners, including acting as the Standing Adviser to the House of Commons Education Select Committee, a member of Ofqual’s Standing Advisory Group and membership of the Welsh Government’s Curriculum and Assessment Group.  She is a member of the Editorial Board of the Oxford Review of Education journal and the International Advisory Board of Assessment in Education: principles, policy & practice.  She has been a Visiting Professor at the universities of Bergen and Queen’s (Belfast).  From 2013 to 2015 she was President of the Association for Educational Assessment – Europe.

Qualifications
  • B.A.H. Linguistics/Psychology – Queen’s University, Kingston On, Canada
  • M.A. Educational Psychology – McGill University, Canada
  • Ph.D. – Second Language Education – McGill University Canada

Victoria Murphy would welcome informal contacts from prospective doctoral students interested in the following topics:

  • Language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/ Language Minority) children
  • Child L2 and bilingualism
  • Foreign language learning in primary school
  • Lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Research

Victoria is active in the following research areas, and would welcome DPhil applications on any of these, particularly those relating to EAL (language minority) children and child L2 learning and foreign language learning in primary school.  She is also the convenor of the Research in English as an Additional Language (REAL) group.  Her research is currently being funded by the ESRC, Leverhulme Trust and Nuffield Foundation.

  • language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/Language minority) children
  • child L2 learning and bilingualism
  • foreign language learning in primary school
  • cognitive processes underlying L1 and L2 learning
  • lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Current Research Project(s)

Joanna is a Doctoral Student, and ESRC Grand Union DTP Scholar, researching in-class support for multilingualism in UK schools.

She has over 12 years of experience as a teaching professional, having worked as a class teacher, EAL specialist and Teaching Assistant in the UK, China, Brazil and Italy. Her main area of interest is school-based education (3-18), specifically the support for multilingual pupils and their language practices, as well as the relationship between teaching assistants and both teachers and children in schools.

Joanna holds a BA in Jurisprudence and a MSc in Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching, both from the University of Oxford. She also has a PGCE, and a PGDip in French.

Joining the Department of Education in 2020 after teaching English and foreign languages in secondary schools and early years settings for 15 years, Catherine completed the MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition in 2021. Her doctoral research investigates the effectiveness of using songs as pedagogical tools with young second language learners in formal educational settings.

Additionally, Catherine hosts The Language Revolution podcast, exploring how linguistics and language awareness might inform/transform languages teaching with guests including Michael Rosen and David Crystal. She also project manages the annual conference for NALDIC, the national subject association for EAL.

Publications

Multilingual is Normal: An anthology of voices, talking about talking (2020)

Renyu completed her BA degree in Psychology at the University of British Columbia (Vancouver, Canada) and her MPhil degree in Education at University of Cambridge.

During her MPhil study, she worked with children aged 4 to 6 years to investigate the relationship between bilingualism, vocabulary size, and inhibitory control, and also to validate a novel app designed to assess early language development. For her Dphil study at Oxford, Renyu aims to explore the factors that might affect L2 pronunciation learning in young children and the interaction between children’s L1 and L2. She is particularly interested in the psychological factors that might influence a child’s L2 pronunciation.

Prior to studying at Oxford, Renyu worked as Research Assistant at the Assessment Research Group at British Council for one year and a half. She was involved in various projects, including gap analysis on reading demand and reading ability, participant feedback questionnaire design and analysis, design and recruitment for a new EAP task study, etc.

Bernard holds a PhD in Marketing from the University of Nottingham and a DBA from the University of Newcastle.

His research to date explores the leadership in HE. Prior to coming to Oxford, he worked in various HEIs and served as the supervisor of a secondary school.

Publications

Lee, B., Tsui, A. & Yau, O.H.M. (2019), Higher-order Goals, Trust-in-leader, and Self-efficacy as Moderators of Transformational Leadership Performance: The Case of Multi-level Marketing Organizations in China, Journal of Euromarketing, Vol.28 (3-4), 76-97. (2011 RG Impact factor: 0.83).

Conferences

Lee, B. (2020), “Self-formation for the Underprivileged,” 2020 International Online Symposium, Toward a New Paradigm of Economics,organized by Macau Ricci Institute, The University of Saint Joseph, 15 & 16 October. (Online Conference Platform Presentation).

Steve is Associate Professor of Teacher Education. He is a curriculum tutor for the Geography PGCE and MSc Learning and Teaching.

Steve is a qualified geography teacher and was previously the head of department at a comprehensive secondary school in Oxfordshire, and Head of Programmes at Bishop Grosseteste University, Lincoln.

He holds an MA in Educational Leadership and Innovation from Warwick University, an MSc in Educational Research Methodology and DPhil in Education from the University of Oxford which were funded by an ESRC Studentship. He is a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

He researches at the intersection between the academic discipline and school subject of geography, including recent collaborations developing through the Smart Cities Network for Sustainable Urban Future project which was shortlisted for the 2017 Newton Prize (India). He is currently leading research on Climate Change Education Futures in India (GCRF) in collaboration with colleagues at IISER, Pune, and on the role of cultural heritage in curriculum making in Kolkata.

Collaborations with colleagues in the School of Geography and the Environment are contributing to anti-racist curriculum futures, including in the school subject, and in postgraduate teaching through the TDEP-funded Oxford-UNISA course ‘Decolonising Research Methods’.

His research on teacher education focuses on the contribution that geography education research offers to the conceptualisation and practice of teaching. This work includes ethnographic research on teachers’ curriculum making exploring the journeys through which information travels into school classrooms, beginning teachers’ experiences of school subject departments, and the role of written lesson observation feedback in constructing ‘good teaching’.

Steve serves on the editorial board of the journal Geography, and is Chair of the Geography Education Research Collective (GEReCo/IGU-CGE).

 

Caitlin is a Doctoral student in the Department of Education working on how teachers interact with refugee and unaccompanied asylum-seeking pupils in UK schools.

Her Doctoral study uses survey data, interviews, observation, and document analysis to examine teacher knowledge, attitudes, and practices in relation to refugee pupils. Previously, Caitlin worked as a primary school teacher in Aberdeen, London, and at Rose Hill Primary School in Oxford. She completed an MA (Gaelic Medium Education, Oral History) and a PGDE (Primary Education) at the University of Aberdeen, and a BA (Human Geography, Environmental Studies) at Middlebury College in the US. She has a general interest in improving inclusion and equity in education.

Helen’s academic interest in higher education policy developed from more than 20 years of professional experience of university administration – in public relations and admissions.

She gained her doctorate from Oxford in 2010 (a study of the market created by the introduction of £3000 fees for Home/EU undergraduates at English universities in 2006); since then, she has conducted research into the impacts of student fees and funding on institutions, students, graduates and applicants within the higher education sector in England. She also works as a consultant to higher education institutions.

Helen was Pathway Convenor for the MSc Education (HE) for two years and has taught on this course since completing her DPhil. As an inspector for the British Accreditation Council, Helen has the opportunity to gain insights into the operation of higher education providers globally. She is also an Associate of the SKOPE, the department’s research centre for Skills, Knowledge and Organisational Performance.

From 2012-17, Helen was a member of the governing council of the Society for Research into Higher Education (SRHE), serving as Vice-Chair from 2014-17.

 

Jo-Anne is Director of the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment.  She completed a six-year term as Head of the Department of Education, has been Standing Adviser to the House of Commons Education Select Committee, a member of Ofqual’s Standing Advisory Group on Standards, Chair of the National Reference Test Expert Group, and a member of the Welsh Government’s Curriculum and Assessment Group.  Before coming to Oxford, Jo-Anne held academic posts at the Institute of Education, University of London and the University of Bristol. Her first degree and doctorate were in psychology and she has an MBA.  Her current research projects include Setting and Maintaining Standards in national examinations, Examination reform: the impact of modular and linear examinations at GCSE, Assessment for Learning in Africa (AFLA), intelligent accountability and the Progress in International Reading Literacy Study England national centre.

Her research interests are in educational assessment, including system-wide structures and processes, examination standards, marking and assessment design.  Jo-Anne conducts a lot of work with government and industry partners, including acting as the Standing Adviser to the House of Commons Education Select Committee, a member of Ofqual’s Standing Advisory Group and membership of the Welsh Government’s Curriculum and Assessment Group.  She is a member of the Editorial Board of the Oxford Review of Education journal and the International Advisory Board of Assessment in Education: principles, policy & practice.  She has been a Visiting Professor at the universities of Bergen and Queen’s (Belfast).  From 2013 to 2015 she was President of the Association for Educational Assessment – Europe.

Qualifications
  • B.A.H. Linguistics/Psychology – Queen’s University, Kingston On, Canada
  • M.A. Educational Psychology – McGill University, Canada
  • Ph.D. – Second Language Education – McGill University Canada

Victoria Murphy would welcome informal contacts from prospective doctoral students interested in the following topics:

  • Language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/ Language Minority) children
  • Child L2 and bilingualism
  • Foreign language learning in primary school
  • Lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Research

Victoria is active in the following research areas, and would welcome DPhil applications on any of these, particularly those relating to EAL (language minority) children and child L2 learning and foreign language learning in primary school.  She is also the convenor of the Research in English as an Additional Language (REAL) group.  Her research is currently being funded by the ESRC, Leverhulme Trust and Nuffield Foundation.

  • language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/Language minority) children
  • child L2 learning and bilingualism
  • foreign language learning in primary school
  • cognitive processes underlying L1 and L2 learning
  • lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Current Research Project(s)

Joanna is a Doctoral Student, and ESRC Grand Union DTP Scholar, researching in-class support for multilingualism in UK schools.

She has over 12 years of experience as a teaching professional, having worked as a class teacher, EAL specialist and Teaching Assistant in the UK, China, Brazil and Italy. Her main area of interest is school-based education (3-18), specifically the support for multilingual pupils and their language practices, as well as the relationship between teaching assistants and both teachers and children in schools.

Joanna holds a BA in Jurisprudence and a MSc in Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching, both from the University of Oxford. She also has a PGCE, and a PGDip in French.

Joining the Department of Education in 2020 after teaching English and foreign languages in secondary schools and early years settings for 15 years, Catherine completed the MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition in 2021. Her doctoral research investigates the effectiveness of using songs as pedagogical tools with young second language learners in formal educational settings.

Additionally, Catherine hosts The Language Revolution podcast, exploring how linguistics and language awareness might inform/transform languages teaching with guests including Michael Rosen and David Crystal. She also project manages the annual conference for NALDIC, the national subject association for EAL.

Publications

Multilingual is Normal: An anthology of voices, talking about talking (2020)

Renyu completed her BA degree in Psychology at the University of British Columbia (Vancouver, Canada) and her MPhil degree in Education at University of Cambridge.

During her MPhil study, she worked with children aged 4 to 6 years to investigate the relationship between bilingualism, vocabulary size, and inhibitory control, and also to validate a novel app designed to assess early language development. For her Dphil study at Oxford, Renyu aims to explore the factors that might affect L2 pronunciation learning in young children and the interaction between children’s L1 and L2. She is particularly interested in the psychological factors that might influence a child’s L2 pronunciation.

Prior to studying at Oxford, Renyu worked as Research Assistant at the Assessment Research Group at British Council for one year and a half. She was involved in various projects, including gap analysis on reading demand and reading ability, participant feedback questionnaire design and analysis, design and recruitment for a new EAP task study, etc.

Bernard holds a PhD in Marketing from the University of Nottingham and a DBA from the University of Newcastle.

His research to date explores the leadership in HE. Prior to coming to Oxford, he worked in various HEIs and served as the supervisor of a secondary school.

Publications

Lee, B., Tsui, A. & Yau, O.H.M. (2019), Higher-order Goals, Trust-in-leader, and Self-efficacy as Moderators of Transformational Leadership Performance: The Case of Multi-level Marketing Organizations in China, Journal of Euromarketing, Vol.28 (3-4), 76-97. (2011 RG Impact factor: 0.83).

Conferences

Lee, B. (2020), “Self-formation for the Underprivileged,” 2020 International Online Symposium, Toward a New Paradigm of Economics,organized by Macau Ricci Institute, The University of Saint Joseph, 15 & 16 October. (Online Conference Platform Presentation).

Steve is Associate Professor of Teacher Education. He is a curriculum tutor for the Geography PGCE and MSc Learning and Teaching.

Steve is a qualified geography teacher and was previously the head of department at a comprehensive secondary school in Oxfordshire, and Head of Programmes at Bishop Grosseteste University, Lincoln.

He holds an MA in Educational Leadership and Innovation from Warwick University, an MSc in Educational Research Methodology and DPhil in Education from the University of Oxford which were funded by an ESRC Studentship. He is a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

He researches at the intersection between the academic discipline and school subject of geography, including recent collaborations developing through the Smart Cities Network for Sustainable Urban Future project which was shortlisted for the 2017 Newton Prize (India). He is currently leading research on Climate Change Education Futures in India (GCRF) in collaboration with colleagues at IISER, Pune, and on the role of cultural heritage in curriculum making in Kolkata.

Collaborations with colleagues in the School of Geography and the Environment are contributing to anti-racist curriculum futures, including in the school subject, and in postgraduate teaching through the TDEP-funded Oxford-UNISA course ‘Decolonising Research Methods’.

His research on teacher education focuses on the contribution that geography education research offers to the conceptualisation and practice of teaching. This work includes ethnographic research on teachers’ curriculum making exploring the journeys through which information travels into school classrooms, beginning teachers’ experiences of school subject departments, and the role of written lesson observation feedback in constructing ‘good teaching’.

Steve serves on the editorial board of the journal Geography, and is Chair of the Geography Education Research Collective (GEReCo/IGU-CGE).

 

Caitlin is a Doctoral student in the Department of Education working on how teachers interact with refugee and unaccompanied asylum-seeking pupils in UK schools.

Her Doctoral study uses survey data, interviews, observation, and document analysis to examine teacher knowledge, attitudes, and practices in relation to refugee pupils. Previously, Caitlin worked as a primary school teacher in Aberdeen, London, and at Rose Hill Primary School in Oxford. She completed an MA (Gaelic Medium Education, Oral History) and a PGDE (Primary Education) at the University of Aberdeen, and a BA (Human Geography, Environmental Studies) at Middlebury College in the US. She has a general interest in improving inclusion and equity in education.

Helen’s academic interest in higher education policy developed from more than 20 years of professional experience of university administration – in public relations and admissions.

She gained her doctorate from Oxford in 2010 (a study of the market created by the introduction of £3000 fees for Home/EU undergraduates at English universities in 2006); since then, she has conducted research into the impacts of student fees and funding on institutions, students, graduates and applicants within the higher education sector in England. She also works as a consultant to higher education institutions.

Helen was Pathway Convenor for the MSc Education (HE) for two years and has taught on this course since completing her DPhil. As an inspector for the British Accreditation Council, Helen has the opportunity to gain insights into the operation of higher education providers globally. She is also an Associate of the SKOPE, the department’s research centre for Skills, Knowledge and Organisational Performance.

From 2012-17, Helen was a member of the governing council of the Society for Research into Higher Education (SRHE), serving as Vice-Chair from 2014-17.

 

Jo-Anne is Director of the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment.  She completed a six-year term as Head of the Department of Education, has been Standing Adviser to the House of Commons Education Select Committee, a member of Ofqual’s Standing Advisory Group on Standards, Chair of the National Reference Test Expert Group, and a member of the Welsh Government’s Curriculum and Assessment Group.  Before coming to Oxford, Jo-Anne held academic posts at the Institute of Education, University of London and the University of Bristol. Her first degree and doctorate were in psychology and she has an MBA.  Her current research projects include Setting and Maintaining Standards in national examinations, Examination reform: the impact of modular and linear examinations at GCSE, Assessment for Learning in Africa (AFLA), intelligent accountability and the Progress in International Reading Literacy Study England national centre.

Her research interests are in educational assessment, including system-wide structures and processes, examination standards, marking and assessment design.  Jo-Anne conducts a lot of work with government and industry partners, including acting as the Standing Adviser to the House of Commons Education Select Committee, a member of Ofqual’s Standing Advisory Group and membership of the Welsh Government’s Curriculum and Assessment Group.  She is a member of the Editorial Board of the Oxford Review of Education journal and the International Advisory Board of Assessment in Education: principles, policy & practice.  She has been a Visiting Professor at the universities of Bergen and Queen’s (Belfast).  From 2013 to 2015 she was President of the Association for Educational Assessment – Europe.

Qualifications
  • B.A.H. Linguistics/Psychology – Queen’s University, Kingston On, Canada
  • M.A. Educational Psychology – McGill University, Canada
  • Ph.D. – Second Language Education – McGill University Canada

Victoria Murphy would welcome informal contacts from prospective doctoral students interested in the following topics:

  • Language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/ Language Minority) children
  • Child L2 and bilingualism
  • Foreign language learning in primary school
  • Lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Research

Victoria is active in the following research areas, and would welcome DPhil applications on any of these, particularly those relating to EAL (language minority) children and child L2 learning and foreign language learning in primary school.  She is also the convenor of the Research in English as an Additional Language (REAL) group.  Her research is currently being funded by the ESRC, Leverhulme Trust and Nuffield Foundation.

  • language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/Language minority) children
  • child L2 learning and bilingualism
  • foreign language learning in primary school
  • cognitive processes underlying L1 and L2 learning
  • lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Current Research Project(s)

Joanna is a Doctoral Student, and ESRC Grand Union DTP Scholar, researching in-class support for multilingualism in UK schools.

She has over 12 years of experience as a teaching professional, having worked as a class teacher, EAL specialist and Teaching Assistant in the UK, China, Brazil and Italy. Her main area of interest is school-based education (3-18), specifically the support for multilingual pupils and their language practices, as well as the relationship between teaching assistants and both teachers and children in schools.

Joanna holds a BA in Jurisprudence and a MSc in Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching, both from the University of Oxford. She also has a PGCE, and a PGDip in French.

Joining the Department of Education in 2020 after teaching English and foreign languages in secondary schools and early years settings for 15 years, Catherine completed the MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition in 2021. Her doctoral research investigates the effectiveness of using songs as pedagogical tools with young second language learners in formal educational settings.

Additionally, Catherine hosts The Language Revolution podcast, exploring how linguistics and language awareness might inform/transform languages teaching with guests including Michael Rosen and David Crystal. She also project manages the annual conference for NALDIC, the national subject association for EAL.

Publications

Multilingual is Normal: An anthology of voices, talking about talking (2020)

Renyu completed her BA degree in Psychology at the University of British Columbia (Vancouver, Canada) and her MPhil degree in Education at University of Cambridge.

During her MPhil study, she worked with children aged 4 to 6 years to investigate the relationship between bilingualism, vocabulary size, and inhibitory control, and also to validate a novel app designed to assess early language development. For her Dphil study at Oxford, Renyu aims to explore the factors that might affect L2 pronunciation learning in young children and the interaction between children’s L1 and L2. She is particularly interested in the psychological factors that might influence a child’s L2 pronunciation.

Prior to studying at Oxford, Renyu worked as Research Assistant at the Assessment Research Group at British Council for one year and a half. She was involved in various projects, including gap analysis on reading demand and reading ability, participant feedback questionnaire design and analysis, design and recruitment for a new EAP task study, etc.

Bernard holds a PhD in Marketing from the University of Nottingham and a DBA from the University of Newcastle.

His research to date explores the leadership in HE. Prior to coming to Oxford, he worked in various HEIs and served as the supervisor of a secondary school.

Publications

Lee, B., Tsui, A. & Yau, O.H.M. (2019), Higher-order Goals, Trust-in-leader, and Self-efficacy as Moderators of Transformational Leadership Performance: The Case of Multi-level Marketing Organizations in China, Journal of Euromarketing, Vol.28 (3-4), 76-97. (2011 RG Impact factor: 0.83).

Conferences

Lee, B. (2020), “Self-formation for the Underprivileged,” 2020 International Online Symposium, Toward a New Paradigm of Economics,organized by Macau Ricci Institute, The University of Saint Joseph, 15 & 16 October. (Online Conference Platform Presentation).

Steve is Associate Professor of Teacher Education. He is a curriculum tutor for the Geography PGCE and MSc Learning and Teaching.

Steve is a qualified geography teacher and was previously the head of department at a comprehensive secondary school in Oxfordshire, and Head of Programmes at Bishop Grosseteste University, Lincoln.

He holds an MA in Educational Leadership and Innovation from Warwick University, an MSc in Educational Research Methodology and DPhil in Education from the University of Oxford which were funded by an ESRC Studentship. He is a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

He researches at the intersection between the academic discipline and school subject of geography, including recent collaborations developing through the Smart Cities Network for Sustainable Urban Future project which was shortlisted for the 2017 Newton Prize (India). He is currently leading research on Climate Change Education Futures in India (GCRF) in collaboration with colleagues at IISER, Pune, and on the role of cultural heritage in curriculum making in Kolkata.

Collaborations with colleagues in the School of Geography and the Environment are contributing to anti-racist curriculum futures, including in the school subject, and in postgraduate teaching through the TDEP-funded Oxford-UNISA course ‘Decolonising Research Methods’.

His research on teacher education focuses on the contribution that geography education research offers to the conceptualisation and practice of teaching. This work includes ethnographic research on teachers’ curriculum making exploring the journeys through which information travels into school classrooms, beginning teachers’ experiences of school subject departments, and the role of written lesson observation feedback in constructing ‘good teaching’.

Steve serves on the editorial board of the journal Geography, and is Chair of the Geography Education Research Collective (GEReCo/IGU-CGE).

 

Caitlin is a Doctoral student in the Department of Education working on how teachers interact with refugee and unaccompanied asylum-seeking pupils in UK schools.

Her Doctoral study uses survey data, interviews, observation, and document analysis to examine teacher knowledge, attitudes, and practices in relation to refugee pupils. Previously, Caitlin worked as a primary school teacher in Aberdeen, London, and at Rose Hill Primary School in Oxford. She completed an MA (Gaelic Medium Education, Oral History) and a PGDE (Primary Education) at the University of Aberdeen, and a BA (Human Geography, Environmental Studies) at Middlebury College in the US. She has a general interest in improving inclusion and equity in education.

Helen’s academic interest in higher education policy developed from more than 20 years of professional experience of university administration – in public relations and admissions.

She gained her doctorate from Oxford in 2010 (a study of the market created by the introduction of £3000 fees for Home/EU undergraduates at English universities in 2006); since then, she has conducted research into the impacts of student fees and funding on institutions, students, graduates and applicants within the higher education sector in England. She also works as a consultant to higher education institutions.

Helen was Pathway Convenor for the MSc Education (HE) for two years and has taught on this course since completing her DPhil. As an inspector for the British Accreditation Council, Helen has the opportunity to gain insights into the operation of higher education providers globally. She is also an Associate of the SKOPE, the department’s research centre for Skills, Knowledge and Organisational Performance.

From 2012-17, Helen was a member of the governing council of the Society for Research into Higher Education (SRHE), serving as Vice-Chair from 2014-17.

 

Jo-Anne is Director of the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment.  She completed a six-year term as Head of the Department of Education, has been Standing Adviser to the House of Commons Education Select Committee, a member of Ofqual’s Standing Advisory Group on Standards, Chair of the National Reference Test Expert Group, and a member of the Welsh Government’s Curriculum and Assessment Group.  Before coming to Oxford, Jo-Anne held academic posts at the Institute of Education, University of London and the University of Bristol. Her first degree and doctorate were in psychology and she has an MBA.  Her current research projects include Setting and Maintaining Standards in national examinations, Examination reform: the impact of modular and linear examinations at GCSE, Assessment for Learning in Africa (AFLA), intelligent accountability and the Progress in International Reading Literacy Study England national centre.

Her research interests are in educational assessment, including system-wide structures and processes, examination standards, marking and assessment design.  Jo-Anne conducts a lot of work with government and industry partners, including acting as the Standing Adviser to the House of Commons Education Select Committee, a member of Ofqual’s Standing Advisory Group and membership of the Welsh Government’s Curriculum and Assessment Group.  She is a member of the Editorial Board of the Oxford Review of Education journal and the International Advisory Board of Assessment in Education: principles, policy & practice.  She has been a Visiting Professor at the universities of Bergen and Queen’s (Belfast).  From 2013 to 2015 she was President of the Association for Educational Assessment – Europe.

Qualifications
  • B.A.H. Linguistics/Psychology – Queen’s University, Kingston On, Canada
  • M.A. Educational Psychology – McGill University, Canada
  • Ph.D. – Second Language Education – McGill University Canada

Victoria Murphy would welcome informal contacts from prospective doctoral students interested in the following topics:

  • Language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/ Language Minority) children
  • Child L2 and bilingualism
  • Foreign language learning in primary school
  • Lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Research

Victoria is active in the following research areas, and would welcome DPhil applications on any of these, particularly those relating to EAL (language minority) children and child L2 learning and foreign language learning in primary school.  She is also the convenor of the Research in English as an Additional Language (REAL) group.  Her research is currently being funded by the ESRC, Leverhulme Trust and Nuffield Foundation.

  • language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/Language minority) children
  • child L2 learning and bilingualism
  • foreign language learning in primary school
  • cognitive processes underlying L1 and L2 learning
  • lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Current Research Project(s)

Joanna is a Doctoral Student, and ESRC Grand Union DTP Scholar, researching in-class support for multilingualism in UK schools.

She has over 12 years of experience as a teaching professional, having worked as a class teacher, EAL specialist and Teaching Assistant in the UK, China, Brazil and Italy. Her main area of interest is school-based education (3-18), specifically the support for multilingual pupils and their language practices, as well as the relationship between teaching assistants and both teachers and children in schools.

Joanna holds a BA in Jurisprudence and a MSc in Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching, both from the University of Oxford. She also has a PGCE, and a PGDip in French.

Joining the Department of Education in 2020 after teaching English and foreign languages in secondary schools and early years settings for 15 years, Catherine completed the MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition in 2021. Her doctoral research investigates the effectiveness of using songs as pedagogical tools with young second language learners in formal educational settings.

Additionally, Catherine hosts The Language Revolution podcast, exploring how linguistics and language awareness might inform/transform languages teaching with guests including Michael Rosen and David Crystal. She also project manages the annual conference for NALDIC, the national subject association for EAL.

Publications

Multilingual is Normal: An anthology of voices, talking about talking (2020)

Renyu completed her BA degree in Psychology at the University of British Columbia (Vancouver, Canada) and her MPhil degree in Education at University of Cambridge.

During her MPhil study, she worked with children aged 4 to 6 years to investigate the relationship between bilingualism, vocabulary size, and inhibitory control, and also to validate a novel app designed to assess early language development. For her Dphil study at Oxford, Renyu aims to explore the factors that might affect L2 pronunciation learning in young children and the interaction between children’s L1 and L2. She is particularly interested in the psychological factors that might influence a child’s L2 pronunciation.

Prior to studying at Oxford, Renyu worked as Research Assistant at the Assessment Research Group at British Council for one year and a half. She was involved in various projects, including gap analysis on reading demand and reading ability, participant feedback questionnaire design and analysis, design and recruitment for a new EAP task study, etc.

Bernard holds a PhD in Marketing from the University of Nottingham and a DBA from the University of Newcastle.

His research to date explores the leadership in HE. Prior to coming to Oxford, he worked in various HEIs and served as the supervisor of a secondary school.

Publications

Lee, B., Tsui, A. & Yau, O.H.M. (2019), Higher-order Goals, Trust-in-leader, and Self-efficacy as Moderators of Transformational Leadership Performance: The Case of Multi-level Marketing Organizations in China, Journal of Euromarketing, Vol.28 (3-4), 76-97. (2011 RG Impact factor: 0.83).

Conferences

Lee, B. (2020), “Self-formation for the Underprivileged,” 2020 International Online Symposium, Toward a New Paradigm of Economics,organized by Macau Ricci Institute, The University of Saint Joseph, 15 & 16 October. (Online Conference Platform Presentation).

Steve is Associate Professor of Teacher Education. He is a curriculum tutor for the Geography PGCE and MSc Learning and Teaching.

Steve is a qualified geography teacher and was previously the head of department at a comprehensive secondary school in Oxfordshire, and Head of Programmes at Bishop Grosseteste University, Lincoln.

He holds an MA in Educational Leadership and Innovation from Warwick University, an MSc in Educational Research Methodology and DPhil in Education from the University of Oxford which were funded by an ESRC Studentship. He is a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

He researches at the intersection between the academic discipline and school subject of geography, including recent collaborations developing through the Smart Cities Network for Sustainable Urban Future project which was shortlisted for the 2017 Newton Prize (India). He is currently leading research on Climate Change Education Futures in India (GCRF) in collaboration with colleagues at IISER, Pune, and on the role of cultural heritage in curriculum making in Kolkata.

Collaborations with colleagues in the School of Geography and the Environment are contributing to anti-racist curriculum futures, including in the school subject, and in postgraduate teaching through the TDEP-funded Oxford-UNISA course ‘Decolonising Research Methods’.

His research on teacher education focuses on the contribution that geography education research offers to the conceptualisation and practice of teaching. This work includes ethnographic research on teachers’ curriculum making exploring the journeys through which information travels into school classrooms, beginning teachers’ experiences of school subject departments, and the role of written lesson observation feedback in constructing ‘good teaching’.

Steve serves on the editorial board of the journal Geography, and is Chair of the Geography Education Research Collective (GEReCo/IGU-CGE).

 

Caitlin is a Doctoral student in the Department of Education working on how teachers interact with refugee and unaccompanied asylum-seeking pupils in UK schools.

Her Doctoral study uses survey data, interviews, observation, and document analysis to examine teacher knowledge, attitudes, and practices in relation to refugee pupils. Previously, Caitlin worked as a primary school teacher in Aberdeen, London, and at Rose Hill Primary School in Oxford. She completed an MA (Gaelic Medium Education, Oral History) and a PGDE (Primary Education) at the University of Aberdeen, and a BA (Human Geography, Environmental Studies) at Middlebury College in the US. She has a general interest in improving inclusion and equity in education.

Helen’s academic interest in higher education policy developed from more than 20 years of professional experience of university administration – in public relations and admissions.

She gained her doctorate from Oxford in 2010 (a study of the market created by the introduction of £3000 fees for Home/EU undergraduates at English universities in 2006); since then, she has conducted research into the impacts of student fees and funding on institutions, students, graduates and applicants within the higher education sector in England. She also works as a consultant to higher education institutions.

Helen was Pathway Convenor for the MSc Education (HE) for two years and has taught on this course since completing her DPhil. As an inspector for the British Accreditation Council, Helen has the opportunity to gain insights into the operation of higher education providers globally. She is also an Associate of the SKOPE, the department’s research centre for Skills, Knowledge and Organisational Performance.

From 2012-17, Helen was a member of the governing council of the Society for Research into Higher Education (SRHE), serving as Vice-Chair from 2014-17.

 

Jo-Anne is Director of the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment.  She completed a six-year term as Head of the Department of Education, has been Standing Adviser to the House of Commons Education Select Committee, a member of Ofqual’s Standing Advisory Group on Standards, Chair of the National Reference Test Expert Group, and a member of the Welsh Government’s Curriculum and Assessment Group.  Before coming to Oxford, Jo-Anne held academic posts at the Institute of Education, University of London and the University of Bristol. Her first degree and doctorate were in psychology and she has an MBA.  Her current research projects include Setting and Maintaining Standards in national examinations, Examination reform: the impact of modular and linear examinations at GCSE, Assessment for Learning in Africa (AFLA), intelligent accountability and the Progress in International Reading Literacy Study England national centre.

Her research interests are in educational assessment, including system-wide structures and processes, examination standards, marking and assessment design.  Jo-Anne conducts a lot of work with government and industry partners, including acting as the Standing Adviser to the House of Commons Education Select Committee, a member of Ofqual’s Standing Advisory Group and membership of the Welsh Government’s Curriculum and Assessment Group.  She is a member of the Editorial Board of the Oxford Review of Education journal and the International Advisory Board of Assessment in Education: principles, policy & practice.  She has been a Visiting Professor at the universities of Bergen and Queen’s (Belfast).  From 2013 to 2015 she was President of the Association for Educational Assessment – Europe.

Qualifications
  • B.A.H. Linguistics/Psychology – Queen’s University, Kingston On, Canada
  • M.A. Educational Psychology – McGill University, Canada
  • Ph.D. – Second Language Education – McGill University Canada

Victoria Murphy would welcome informal contacts from prospective doctoral students interested in the following topics:

  • Language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/ Language Minority) children
  • Child L2 and bilingualism
  • Foreign language learning in primary school
  • Lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Research

Victoria is active in the following research areas, and would welcome DPhil applications on any of these, particularly those relating to EAL (language minority) children and child L2 learning and foreign language learning in primary school.  She is also the convenor of the Research in English as an Additional Language (REAL) group.  Her research is currently being funded by the ESRC, Leverhulme Trust and Nuffield Foundation.

  • language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/Language minority) children
  • child L2 learning and bilingualism
  • foreign language learning in primary school
  • cognitive processes underlying L1 and L2 learning
  • lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Current Research Project(s)

Joanna is a Doctoral Student, and ESRC Grand Union DTP Scholar, researching in-class support for multilingualism in UK schools.

She has over 12 years of experience as a teaching professional, having worked as a class teacher, EAL specialist and Teaching Assistant in the UK, China, Brazil and Italy. Her main area of interest is school-based education (3-18), specifically the support for multilingual pupils and their language practices, as well as the relationship between teaching assistants and both teachers and children in schools.

Joanna holds a BA in Jurisprudence and a MSc in Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching, both from the University of Oxford. She also has a PGCE, and a PGDip in French.

Joining the Department of Education in 2020 after teaching English and foreign languages in secondary schools and early years settings for 15 years, Catherine completed the MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition in 2021. Her doctoral research investigates the effectiveness of using songs as pedagogical tools with young second language learners in formal educational settings.

Additionally, Catherine hosts The Language Revolution podcast, exploring how linguistics and language awareness might inform/transform languages teaching with guests including Michael Rosen and David Crystal. She also project manages the annual conference for NALDIC, the national subject association for EAL.

Publications

Multilingual is Normal: An anthology of voices, talking about talking (2020)

Renyu completed her BA degree in Psychology at the University of British Columbia (Vancouver, Canada) and her MPhil degree in Education at University of Cambridge.

During her MPhil study, she worked with children aged 4 to 6 years to investigate the relationship between bilingualism, vocabulary size, and inhibitory control, and also to validate a novel app designed to assess early language development. For her Dphil study at Oxford, Renyu aims to explore the factors that might affect L2 pronunciation learning in young children and the interaction between children’s L1 and L2. She is particularly interested in the psychological factors that might influence a child’s L2 pronunciation.

Prior to studying at Oxford, Renyu worked as Research Assistant at the Assessment Research Group at British Council for one year and a half. She was involved in various projects, including gap analysis on reading demand and reading ability, participant feedback questionnaire design and analysis, design and recruitment for a new EAP task study, etc.

Bernard holds a PhD in Marketing from the University of Nottingham and a DBA from the University of Newcastle.

His research to date explores the leadership in HE. Prior to coming to Oxford, he worked in various HEIs and served as the supervisor of a secondary school.

Publications

Lee, B., Tsui, A. & Yau, O.H.M. (2019), Higher-order Goals, Trust-in-leader, and Self-efficacy as Moderators of Transformational Leadership Performance: The Case of Multi-level Marketing Organizations in China, Journal of Euromarketing, Vol.28 (3-4), 76-97. (2011 RG Impact factor: 0.83).

Conferences

Lee, B. (2020), “Self-formation for the Underprivileged,” 2020 International Online Symposium, Toward a New Paradigm of Economics,organized by Macau Ricci Institute, The University of Saint Joseph, 15 & 16 October. (Online Conference Platform Presentation).

Steve is Associate Professor of Teacher Education. He is a curriculum tutor for the Geography PGCE and MSc Learning and Teaching.

Steve is a qualified geography teacher and was previously the head of de