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Akira is a DPhil Student in Anthropology affiliated with the School of Anthropology & Museum Ethnography, and associated with both the Department of Education and Nissan Institute of Japanese Studies. He is supervised by David Mills and Roger Goodman.

Akira’s doctoral research rests with the concepts of ‘international’ and ‘global education,’ and is grounded in the recent emergence and growth of International Baccalaureate (IB) education in Japan. Focused on IB educator training across several higher education institutions (HEIs), Akira aims – solely through digital anthropological approaches – to contextualize the everyday negotiations of ‘international’ and ‘global’ knowledge, both by those receiving and administering its training. Considering social, political, economic and cognitive aspects, one key objective of this research hopes to inform educational practitioners and policy-makers of some of the conceptual and social challenges that emerge with dissonant notions of cultivating ‘international’ and ‘global people.’

Akira has been an Associate Researcher at the Graduate School of Teacher Education, Tokyo Gakugei University since autumn 2020, a post he continues to hold until the end of his doctoral degree. He also currently works as an Anthropological Analyst for Contemplative Spaces, a consultancy focused on designing and delivering a range of leadership development initiatives for individuals, groups, and organizational bodies. His future career plans include further anthropological research and establishing consultancy services dedicated to various inclusion-based development initiatives.

Amelia is passionate about access to and the effects of environmental education globally, particularly in the Galápagos Islands of Ecuador.

Because she experienced a wealth of informal and non-formal environmental education from her parents and from explorations growing up in Southern Oregon, she is interested in researching how environmental education manifests in global communities. She fell in love with the Galápagos on a structured university-led trip during her undergraduate studies and realized that there was a dearth of research on social aspects of the communities living on the islands.  Because of this, she pursued research in the Galápagos in 2014 on the prevalence of and access to both formal and informal (provided by numerous NGOs and government agencies) environmental education for students on the islands, and on the level of student environmental literacy in 28 schools.

Her Dphil research focus, under the supervision of Dr. Ann Childs and Dr. Steve Puttick, is on access to and effects of Experiential Environmental Education for students living in the Galápagos Islands, and on the production of research on the social sphere in Galápagos.

Prior to starting her Dphil at Oxford, she worked in alliances and partnerships at tech companies in the San Francisco Bay Area. Most recently, she was the Director of Global Partnerships at Conversica, a conversational AI platform, and cultivated, trained, and drove pipeline with select international resellers in APAC, EMEA, and LATAM, and with regional resellers in the United States. She also assisted with the design and construction of the Conversica partner program.

In her free time, she is a free-lance food photographer, food stylist, food blogger, recipe developer, and gluten free baker for her online blog and social handle, Sisters Sans Gluten (www.sisterssansgluten), which she created with her sister in 2018. She also continues to sing informally and takes voice lessons remotely with instructor Corey Head of San Francisco.

She holds a BA in both Anthropology and Music (vocal performance), and an MA in Latin American Studies from Stanford University. Highlights from Stanford include: playing and touring as a performing member of Stanford Taiko (Japanese ensemble drumming) for four years; singing with the Stanford Chamber Chorale led by Professor Steve Sano; studying voice with Wendy Hillhouse; participating in music department operas; performing in self-organized recitals showcasing western art songs, western musical theater, and Latin American art songs; studying abroad in Santiago, Chile; and learning Quechua during her masters program with Marisol Necochea.

Abdul Karim has completed a Bachelor of Science in Bioengineering and Computational Medicine (Imperial College London), a Bachelor of Medicine and Bachelor of Surgery (Queen Mary University of London), and Master of Science in the Philosophy of Science and Economics (The London School of Economics).

He has delivered lectures on the Philosophy of Human Nature and the History of Metaethics at the University of Cambridge and for Health Education East Midlands. This, in addition to the current positions he holds as a Hospital Doctor and Health Policy and Management Advisor at the University Hospitals of Leicester NHS Trust.

Abdul Karim’s current areas of interest include the biological definition of psychological states relevant to the learning environment, and the influence of language on the variable interpretation of a particular social context. For the latter of which he has published primary research.

Another is the appraisal and deployment of physiological measurement devices in learning environments as a means of quantitatively evaluating psychological states. Such research areas hold promise in enhancing the questionnaire-based evidences of contemporary theories in education, such as those regarding motivation, self-determination and engagement. This will to contribute to the evidence-based public policy optimisation in education and social care.

 

Publications

Ismail, A.K. 2017. A Cross Sectional Study to Explore the Effect of the Linguistic Origin and Evolution of a Language on Patient Interpretation of Haematological Cancers. Advances in Biological Research. 11 (4): 225-232.

Ismail, A.K. 2017. The Origin of the Arabic Medical Term for Cancer. Advances in Biological Research. 11 (4): 198-201.

Ismail, A.K. 2018. The Impact of da Vinci’s Anatomical Drawings and Calculations on Foundation of Orthopaedics. Advances in Biological Research. 12 (1): 26-30.

As a mathematics teacher who believes that anyone can understand mathematics, Ashley is keenly interested in developing interventions and resources for learners who struggle with the subject. More specifically, she is focusing on the transitionary moment in the classroom when discussions have ceased, and practice begins and how this transition can become more fluid for learners.

By drawing on research from education, psychology and cognitive neuroscience, Ashley hopes to gain insights into how the brain and mind process information and how this knowledge can inform teacher practice and, ultimately, help learners understand mathematics.

After having taught for over ten years, Ashley completed her MSc, with Distinction, at the Department of Education, and her dissertation was “Highly Commended” by the British Educational Research Association (BERA). She is committed to making mathematics more accessible for all learners and strives for research that is not only impactful but also directly applicable to the classroom.

I am a Research Project Coordinator and Co-PI at the Department of Education for a project on Education, Purpose and Human Flourishing in Times of Uncertainty (EPHF), and the Templeton World Charity Foundation Fellow in Comparative Education at St Antony’s College, Oxford.

I have a multi-disciplinary background and experience. Academically I am an Art Historian specialising in late 18th and early 19th-century French aesthetics, and prior to my return to academia I had a career in the international finance, entrepreneurial business and high net worth family business sectors. I have published and taught at the University of Oxford on late eighteenth-and early nineteenth century art, history and aesthetics. Drawing on my experience as Lay Chaplain at Somerville College, Oxford I have also published on religious education. In addition to my position in the Education Department I am the Principal Advisor for Strategic Relationships and Partnerships at the Templeton World Charity Foundation Inc where I work closely with other foundations, INGOs and public policy organisations.

Publications List

Xiaona Wang is a DPhil student in Education, at St. Antony’s College, the University of Oxford. Xiaona’s doctoral research is fully funded by the University of Oxford (Clarendon Fund Scholarship and St. Antony’s College The Warden’s Scholarship). She is also a member at the Center for Global Higher Education.

Before her DPhil, Xiaona obtained her M.A degree in Higher Education at Graduate School of Education at Peking University, and B.A at the Faulty of Education from Beijing Normal University in China with first-class honour. She also studied at the University of Manchester as an exchange student in the School of Social Science.

Previously, Xiaona worked at Global Education Cluster in UNICEF, Geneva, where she began her research on the international scientific collaboration between China and Switzerland, and this experience later became the starting point of her master thesis. In her master’s thesis, Xiaona used a longitudinal research method in following a group of Chinese scientists who studied and worked in Switzerland. Through semi-structured interviews, she explored how collaborative relationships between individual scientists began and developed.

Xiaona has strong research interests in the science studies, internationalization and globalization of higher education. Her doctoral research is going to continue to explore the scientific knowledge networks between China and Switzerland under the influence of geopolitical factors.

Wanlin Cai is a DPhil student in higher education and a member of CGHE research group at the Department of Education.

Wanlin’s research interest lies in international higher education, higher education policies and economy, with a specific focus on World-Class Universities.

She is also a member of South China Global Talent Institute, Center for China and Globalisation, where she focuses on the research of talent policy and development in the Great Bay Area in China.

Prior to her beginning as a DPhil student, Wanlin read for the M.Sc in Higher Education at the University of Oxford and the M.Sc in Management and Enterprise Growth at the University of Glasgow.

Naosuke is a DPhil student whose research interests are Global Englishes and mutual intelligibility in English communication.

Naosuke finished an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition at the University of Oxford with distinction in 2019. His DPhil research focuses on the intelligibility of non-native English speakers. Specifically, he would like to seek what kind of English pronunciation features are critical for successful English communication between non-native English speakers.

Adam, from Ethiopia, is interested in looking at the role of education in peacebuilding and conflicts.

Akira is a DPhil Student in Anthropology affiliated with the School of Anthropology & Museum Ethnography, and associated with both the Department of Education and Nissan Institute of Japanese Studies. He is supervised by David Mills and Roger Goodman.

Akira’s doctoral research rests with the concepts of ‘international’ and ‘global education,’ and is grounded in the recent emergence and growth of International Baccalaureate (IB) education in Japan. Focused on IB educator training across several higher education institutions (HEIs), Akira aims – solely through digital anthropological approaches – to contextualize the everyday negotiations of ‘international’ and ‘global’ knowledge, both by those receiving and administering its training. Considering social, political, economic and cognitive aspects, one key objective of this research hopes to inform educational practitioners and policy-makers of some of the conceptual and social challenges that emerge with dissonant notions of cultivating ‘international’ and ‘global people.’

Akira has been an Associate Researcher at the Graduate School of Teacher Education, Tokyo Gakugei University since autumn 2020, a post he continues to hold until the end of his doctoral degree. He also currently works as an Anthropological Analyst for Contemplative Spaces, a consultancy focused on designing and delivering a range of leadership development initiatives for individuals, groups, and organizational bodies. His future career plans include further anthropological research and establishing consultancy services dedicated to various inclusion-based development initiatives.

Amelia is passionate about access to and the effects of environmental education globally, particularly in the Galápagos Islands of Ecuador.

Because she experienced a wealth of informal and non-formal environmental education from her parents and from explorations growing up in Southern Oregon, she is interested in researching how environmental education manifests in global communities. She fell in love with the Galápagos on a structured university-led trip during her undergraduate studies and realized that there was a dearth of research on social aspects of the communities living on the islands.  Because of this, she pursued research in the Galápagos in 2014 on the prevalence of and access to both formal and informal (provided by numerous NGOs and government agencies) environmental education for students on the islands, and on the level of student environmental literacy in 28 schools.

Her Dphil research focus, under the supervision of Dr. Ann Childs and Dr. Steve Puttick, is on access to and effects of Experiential Environmental Education for students living in the Galápagos Islands, and on the production of research on the social sphere in Galápagos.

Prior to starting her Dphil at Oxford, she worked in alliances and partnerships at tech companies in the San Francisco Bay Area. Most recently, she was the Director of Global Partnerships at Conversica, a conversational AI platform, and cultivated, trained, and drove pipeline with select international resellers in APAC, EMEA, and LATAM, and with regional resellers in the United States. She also assisted with the design and construction of the Conversica partner program.

In her free time, she is a free-lance food photographer, food stylist, food blogger, recipe developer, and gluten free baker for her online blog and social handle, Sisters Sans Gluten (www.sisterssansgluten), which she created with her sister in 2018. She also continues to sing informally and takes voice lessons remotely with instructor Corey Head of San Francisco.

She holds a BA in both Anthropology and Music (vocal performance), and an MA in Latin American Studies from Stanford University. Highlights from Stanford include: playing and touring as a performing member of Stanford Taiko (Japanese ensemble drumming) for four years; singing with the Stanford Chamber Chorale led by Professor Steve Sano; studying voice with Wendy Hillhouse; participating in music department operas; performing in self-organized recitals showcasing western art songs, western musical theater, and Latin American art songs; studying abroad in Santiago, Chile; and learning Quechua during her masters program with Marisol Necochea.

Abdul Karim has completed a Bachelor of Science in Bioengineering and Computational Medicine (Imperial College London), a Bachelor of Medicine and Bachelor of Surgery (Queen Mary University of London), and Master of Science in the Philosophy of Science and Economics (The London School of Economics).

He has delivered lectures on the Philosophy of Human Nature and the History of Metaethics at the University of Cambridge and for Health Education East Midlands. This, in addition to the current positions he holds as a Hospital Doctor and Health Policy and Management Advisor at the University Hospitals of Leicester NHS Trust.

Abdul Karim’s current areas of interest include the biological definition of psychological states relevant to the learning environment, and the influence of language on the variable interpretation of a particular social context. For the latter of which he has published primary research.

Another is the appraisal and deployment of physiological measurement devices in learning environments as a means of quantitatively evaluating psychological states. Such research areas hold promise in enhancing the questionnaire-based evidences of contemporary theories in education, such as those regarding motivation, self-determination and engagement. This will to contribute to the evidence-based public policy optimisation in education and social care.

 

Publications

Ismail, A.K. 2017. A Cross Sectional Study to Explore the Effect of the Linguistic Origin and Evolution of a Language on Patient Interpretation of Haematological Cancers. Advances in Biological Research. 11 (4): 225-232.

Ismail, A.K. 2017. The Origin of the Arabic Medical Term for Cancer. Advances in Biological Research. 11 (4): 198-201.

Ismail, A.K. 2018. The Impact of da Vinci’s Anatomical Drawings and Calculations on Foundation of Orthopaedics. Advances in Biological Research. 12 (1): 26-30.

As a mathematics teacher who believes that anyone can understand mathematics, Ashley is keenly interested in developing interventions and resources for learners who struggle with the subject. More specifically, she is focusing on the transitionary moment in the classroom when discussions have ceased, and practice begins and how this transition can become more fluid for learners.

By drawing on research from education, psychology and cognitive neuroscience, Ashley hopes to gain insights into how the brain and mind process information and how this knowledge can inform teacher practice and, ultimately, help learners understand mathematics.

After having taught for over ten years, Ashley completed her MSc, with Distinction, at the Department of Education, and her dissertation was “Highly Commended” by the British Educational Research Association (BERA). She is committed to making mathematics more accessible for all learners and strives for research that is not only impactful but also directly applicable to the classroom.

I am a Research Project Coordinator and Co-PI at the Department of Education for a project on Education, Purpose and Human Flourishing in Times of Uncertainty (EPHF), and the Templeton World Charity Foundation Fellow in Comparative Education at St Antony’s College, Oxford.

I have a multi-disciplinary background and experience. Academically I am an Art Historian specialising in late 18th and early 19th-century French aesthetics, and prior to my return to academia I had a career in the international finance, entrepreneurial business and high net worth family business sectors. I have published and taught at the University of Oxford on late eighteenth-and early nineteenth century art, history and aesthetics. Drawing on my experience as Lay Chaplain at Somerville College, Oxford I have also published on religious education. In addition to my position in the Education Department I am the Principal Advisor for Strategic Relationships and Partnerships at the Templeton World Charity Foundation Inc where I work closely with other foundations, INGOs and public policy organisations.

Publications List

Xiaona Wang is a DPhil student in Education, at St. Antony’s College, the University of Oxford. Xiaona’s doctoral research is fully funded by the University of Oxford (Clarendon Fund Scholarship and St. Antony’s College The Warden’s Scholarship). She is also a member at the Center for Global Higher Education.

Before her DPhil, Xiaona obtained her M.A degree in Higher Education at Graduate School of Education at Peking University, and B.A at the Faulty of Education from Beijing Normal University in China with first-class honour. She also studied at the University of Manchester as an exchange student in the School of Social Science.

Previously, Xiaona worked at Global Education Cluster in UNICEF, Geneva, where she began her research on the international scientific collaboration between China and Switzerland, and this experience later became the starting point of her master thesis. In her master’s thesis, Xiaona used a longitudinal research method in following a group of Chinese scientists who studied and worked in Switzerland. Through semi-structured interviews, she explored how collaborative relationships between individual scientists began and developed.

Xiaona has strong research interests in the science studies, internationalization and globalization of higher education. Her doctoral research is going to continue to explore the scientific knowledge networks between China and Switzerland under the influence of geopolitical factors.

Wanlin Cai is a DPhil student in higher education and a member of CGHE research group at the Department of Education.

Wanlin’s research interest lies in international higher education, higher education policies and economy, with a specific focus on World-Class Universities.

She is also a member of South China Global Talent Institute, Center for China and Globalisation, where she focuses on the research of talent policy and development in the Great Bay Area in China.

Prior to her beginning as a DPhil student, Wanlin read for the M.Sc in Higher Education at the University of Oxford and the M.Sc in Management and Enterprise Growth at the University of Glasgow.

Naosuke is a DPhil student whose research interests are Global Englishes and mutual intelligibility in English communication.

Naosuke finished an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition at the University of Oxford with distinction in 2019. His DPhil research focuses on the intelligibility of non-native English speakers. Specifically, he would like to seek what kind of English pronunciation features are critical for successful English communication between non-native English speakers.

Adam, from Ethiopia, is interested in looking at the role of education in peacebuilding and conflicts.

Akira is a DPhil Student in Anthropology affiliated with the School of Anthropology & Museum Ethnography, and associated with both the Department of Education and Nissan Institute of Japanese Studies. He is supervised by David Mills and Roger Goodman.

Akira’s doctoral research rests with the concepts of ‘international’ and ‘global education,’ and is grounded in the recent emergence and growth of International Baccalaureate (IB) education in Japan. Focused on IB educator training across several higher education institutions (HEIs), Akira aims – solely through digital anthropological approaches – to contextualize the everyday negotiations of ‘international’ and ‘global’ knowledge, both by those receiving and administering its training. Considering social, political, economic and cognitive aspects, one key objective of this research hopes to inform educational practitioners and policy-makers of some of the conceptual and social challenges that emerge with dissonant notions of cultivating ‘international’ and ‘global people.’

Akira has been an Associate Researcher at the Graduate School of Teacher Education, Tokyo Gakugei University since autumn 2020, a post he continues to hold until the end of his doctoral degree. He also currently works as an Anthropological Analyst for Contemplative Spaces, a consultancy focused on designing and delivering a range of leadership development initiatives for individuals, groups, and organizational bodies. His future career plans include further anthropological research and establishing consultancy services dedicated to various inclusion-based development initiatives.

Amelia is passionate about access to and the effects of environmental education globally, particularly in the Galápagos Islands of Ecuador.

Because she experienced a wealth of informal and non-formal environmental education from her parents and from explorations growing up in Southern Oregon, she is interested in researching how environmental education manifests in global communities. She fell in love with the Galápagos on a structured university-led trip during her undergraduate studies and realized that there was a dearth of research on social aspects of the communities living on the islands.  Because of this, she pursued research in the Galápagos in 2014 on the prevalence of and access to both formal and informal (provided by numerous NGOs and government agencies) environmental education for students on the islands, and on the level of student environmental literacy in 28 schools.

Her Dphil research focus, under the supervision of Dr. Ann Childs and Dr. Steve Puttick, is on access to and effects of Experiential Environmental Education for students living in the Galápagos Islands, and on the production of research on the social sphere in Galápagos.

Prior to starting her Dphil at Oxford, she worked in alliances and partnerships at tech companies in the San Francisco Bay Area. Most recently, she was the Director of Global Partnerships at Conversica, a conversational AI platform, and cultivated, trained, and drove pipeline with select international resellers in APAC, EMEA, and LATAM, and with regional resellers in the United States. She also assisted with the design and construction of the Conversica partner program.

In her free time, she is a free-lance food photographer, food stylist, food blogger, recipe developer, and gluten free baker for her online blog and social handle, Sisters Sans Gluten (www.sisterssansgluten), which she created with her sister in 2018. She also continues to sing informally and takes voice lessons remotely with instructor Corey Head of San Francisco.

She holds a BA in both Anthropology and Music (vocal performance), and an MA in Latin American Studies from Stanford University. Highlights from Stanford include: playing and touring as a performing member of Stanford Taiko (Japanese ensemble drumming) for four years; singing with the Stanford Chamber Chorale led by Professor Steve Sano; studying voice with Wendy Hillhouse; participating in music department operas; performing in self-organized recitals showcasing western art songs, western musical theater, and Latin American art songs; studying abroad in Santiago, Chile; and learning Quechua during her masters program with Marisol Necochea.

Abdul Karim has completed a Bachelor of Science in Bioengineering and Computational Medicine (Imperial College London), a Bachelor of Medicine and Bachelor of Surgery (Queen Mary University of London), and Master of Science in the Philosophy of Science and Economics (The London School of Economics).

He has delivered lectures on the Philosophy of Human Nature and the History of Metaethics at the University of Cambridge and for Health Education East Midlands. This, in addition to the current positions he holds as a Hospital Doctor and Health Policy and Management Advisor at the University Hospitals of Leicester NHS Trust.

Abdul Karim’s current areas of interest include the biological definition of psychological states relevant to the learning environment, and the influence of language on the variable interpretation of a particular social context. For the latter of which he has published primary research.

Another is the appraisal and deployment of physiological measurement devices in learning environments as a means of quantitatively evaluating psychological states. Such research areas hold promise in enhancing the questionnaire-based evidences of contemporary theories in education, such as those regarding motivation, self-determination and engagement. This will to contribute to the evidence-based public policy optimisation in education and social care.

 

Publications

Ismail, A.K. 2017. A Cross Sectional Study to Explore the Effect of the Linguistic Origin and Evolution of a Language on Patient Interpretation of Haematological Cancers. Advances in Biological Research. 11 (4): 225-232.

Ismail, A.K. 2017. The Origin of the Arabic Medical Term for Cancer. Advances in Biological Research. 11 (4): 198-201.

Ismail, A.K. 2018. The Impact of da Vinci’s Anatomical Drawings and Calculations on Foundation of Orthopaedics. Advances in Biological Research. 12 (1): 26-30.

As a mathematics teacher who believes that anyone can understand mathematics, Ashley is keenly interested in developing interventions and resources for learners who struggle with the subject. More specifically, she is focusing on the transitionary moment in the classroom when discussions have ceased, and practice begins and how this transition can become more fluid for learners.

By drawing on research from education, psychology and cognitive neuroscience, Ashley hopes to gain insights into how the brain and mind process information and how this knowledge can inform teacher practice and, ultimately, help learners understand mathematics.

After having taught for over ten years, Ashley completed her MSc, with Distinction, at the Department of Education, and her dissertation was “Highly Commended” by the British Educational Research Association (BERA). She is committed to making mathematics more accessible for all learners and strives for research that is not only impactful but also directly applicable to the classroom.

I am a Research Project Coordinator and Co-PI at the Department of Education for a project on Education, Purpose and Human Flourishing in Times of Uncertainty (EPHF), and the Templeton World Charity Foundation Fellow in Comparative Education at St Antony’s College, Oxford.

I have a multi-disciplinary background and experience. Academically I am an Art Historian specialising in late 18th and early 19th-century French aesthetics, and prior to my return to academia I had a career in the international finance, entrepreneurial business and high net worth family business sectors. I have published and taught at the University of Oxford on late eighteenth-and early nineteenth century art, history and aesthetics. Drawing on my experience as Lay Chaplain at Somerville College, Oxford I have also published on religious education. In addition to my position in the Education Department I am the Principal Advisor for Strategic Relationships and Partnerships at the Templeton World Charity Foundation Inc where I work closely with other foundations, INGOs and public policy organisations.

Publications List

Xiaona Wang is a DPhil student in Education, at St. Antony’s College, the University of Oxford. Xiaona’s doctoral research is fully funded by the University of Oxford (Clarendon Fund Scholarship and St. Antony’s College The Warden’s Scholarship). She is also a member at the Center for Global Higher Education.

Before her DPhil, Xiaona obtained her M.A degree in Higher Education at Graduate School of Education at Peking University, and B.A at the Faulty of Education from Beijing Normal University in China with first-class honour. She also studied at the University of Manchester as an exchange student in the School of Social Science.

Previously, Xiaona worked at Global Education Cluster in UNICEF, Geneva, where she began her research on the international scientific collaboration between China and Switzerland, and this experience later became the starting point of her master thesis. In her master’s thesis, Xiaona used a longitudinal research method in following a group of Chinese scientists who studied and worked in Switzerland. Through semi-structured interviews, she explored how collaborative relationships between individual scientists began and developed.

Xiaona has strong research interests in the science studies, internationalization and globalization of higher education. Her doctoral research is going to continue to explore the scientific knowledge networks between China and Switzerland under the influence of geopolitical factors.

Wanlin Cai is a DPhil student in higher education and a member of CGHE research group at the Department of Education.

Wanlin’s research interest lies in international higher education, higher education policies and economy, with a specific focus on World-Class Universities.

She is also a member of South China Global Talent Institute, Center for China and Globalisation, where she focuses on the research of talent policy and development in the Great Bay Area in China.

Prior to her beginning as a DPhil student, Wanlin read for the M.Sc in Higher Education at the University of Oxford and the M.Sc in Management and Enterprise Growth at the University of Glasgow.

Naosuke is a DPhil student whose research interests are Global Englishes and mutual intelligibility in English communication.

Naosuke finished an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition at the University of Oxford with distinction in 2019. His DPhil research focuses on the intelligibility of non-native English speakers. Specifically, he would like to seek what kind of English pronunciation features are critical for successful English communication between non-native English speakers.

Adam, from Ethiopia, is interested in looking at the role of education in peacebuilding and conflicts.

Akira is a DPhil Student in Anthropology affiliated with the School of Anthropology & Museum Ethnography, and associated with both the Department of Education and Nissan Institute of Japanese Studies. He is supervised by David Mills and Roger Goodman.

Akira’s doctoral research rests with the concepts of ‘international’ and ‘global education,’ and is grounded in the recent emergence and growth of International Baccalaureate (IB) education in Japan. Focused on IB educator training across several higher education institutions (HEIs), Akira aims – solely through digital anthropological approaches – to contextualize the everyday negotiations of ‘international’ and ‘global’ knowledge, both by those receiving and administering its training. Considering social, political, economic and cognitive aspects, one key objective of this research hopes to inform educational practitioners and policy-makers of some of the conceptual and social challenges that emerge with dissonant notions of cultivating ‘international’ and ‘global people.’

Akira has been an Associate Researcher at the Graduate School of Teacher Education, Tokyo Gakugei University since autumn 2020, a post he continues to hold until the end of his doctoral degree. He also currently works as an Anthropological Analyst for Contemplative Spaces, a consultancy focused on designing and delivering a range of leadership development initiatives for individuals, groups, and organizational bodies. His future career plans include further anthropological research and establishing consultancy services dedicated to various inclusion-based development initiatives.

Amelia is passionate about access to and the effects of environmental education globally, particularly in the Galápagos Islands of Ecuador.

Because she experienced a wealth of informal and non-formal environmental education from her parents and from explorations growing up in Southern Oregon, she is interested in researching how environmental education manifests in global communities. She fell in love with the Galápagos on a structured university-led trip during her undergraduate studies and realized that there was a dearth of research on social aspects of the communities living on the islands.  Because of this, she pursued research in the Galápagos in 2014 on the prevalence of and access to both formal and informal (provided by numerous NGOs and government agencies) environmental education for students on the islands, and on the level of student environmental literacy in 28 schools.

Her Dphil research focus, under the supervision of Dr. Ann Childs and Dr. Steve Puttick, is on access to and effects of Experiential Environmental Education for students living in the Galápagos Islands, and on the production of research on the social sphere in Galápagos.

Prior to starting her Dphil at Oxford, she worked in alliances and partnerships at tech companies in the San Francisco Bay Area. Most recently, she was the Director of Global Partnerships at Conversica, a conversational AI platform, and cultivated, trained, and drove pipeline with select international resellers in APAC, EMEA, and LATAM, and with regional resellers in the United States. She also assisted with the design and construction of the Conversica partner program.

In her free time, she is a free-lance food photographer, food stylist, food blogger, recipe developer, and gluten free baker for her online blog and social handle, Sisters Sans Gluten (www.sisterssansgluten), which she created with her sister in 2018. She also continues to sing informally and takes voice lessons remotely with instructor Corey Head of San Francisco.

She holds a BA in both Anthropology and Music (vocal performance), and an MA in Latin American Studies from Stanford University. Highlights from Stanford include: playing and touring as a performing member of Stanford Taiko (Japanese ensemble drumming) for four years; singing with the Stanford Chamber Chorale led by Professor Steve Sano; studying voice with Wendy Hillhouse; participating in music department operas; performing in self-organized recitals showcasing western art songs, western musical theater, and Latin American art songs; studying abroad in Santiago, Chile; and learning Quechua during her masters program with Marisol Necochea.

Abdul Karim has completed a Bachelor of Science in Bioengineering and Computational Medicine (Imperial College London), a Bachelor of Medicine and Bachelor of Surgery (Queen Mary University of London), and Master of Science in the Philosophy of Science and Economics (The London School of Economics).

He has delivered lectures on the Philosophy of Human Nature and the History of Metaethics at the University of Cambridge and for Health Education East Midlands. This, in addition to the current positions he holds as a Hospital Doctor and Health Policy and Management Advisor at the University Hospitals of Leicester NHS Trust.

Abdul Karim’s current areas of interest include the biological definition of psychological states relevant to the learning environment, and the influence of language on the variable interpretation of a particular social context. For the latter of which he has published primary research.

Another is the appraisal and deployment of physiological measurement devices in learning environments as a means of quantitatively evaluating psychological states. Such research areas hold promise in enhancing the questionnaire-based evidences of contemporary theories in education, such as those regarding motivation, self-determination and engagement. This will to contribute to the evidence-based public policy optimisation in education and social care.

 

Publications

Ismail, A.K. 2017. A Cross Sectional Study to Explore the Effect of the Linguistic Origin and Evolution of a Language on Patient Interpretation of Haematological Cancers. Advances in Biological Research. 11 (4): 225-232.

Ismail, A.K. 2017. The Origin of the Arabic Medical Term for Cancer. Advances in Biological Research. 11 (4): 198-201.

Ismail, A.K. 2018. The Impact of da Vinci’s Anatomical Drawings and Calculations on Foundation of Orthopaedics. Advances in Biological Research. 12 (1): 26-30.

As a mathematics teacher who believes that anyone can understand mathematics, Ashley is keenly interested in developing interventions and resources for learners who struggle with the subject. More specifically, she is focusing on the transitionary moment in the classroom when discussions have ceased, and practice begins and how this transition can become more fluid for learners.

By drawing on research from education, psychology and cognitive neuroscience, Ashley hopes to gain insights into how the brain and mind process information and how this knowledge can inform teacher practice and, ultimately, help learners understand mathematics.

After having taught for over ten years, Ashley completed her MSc, with Distinction, at the Department of Education, and her dissertation was “Highly Commended” by the British Educational Research Association (BERA). She is committed to making mathematics more accessible for all learners and strives for research that is not only impactful but also directly applicable to the classroom.

I am a Research Project Coordinator and Co-PI at the Department of Education for a project on Education, Purpose and Human Flourishing in Times of Uncertainty (EPHF), and the Templeton World Charity Foundation Fellow in Comparative Education at St Antony’s College, Oxford.

I have a multi-disciplinary background and experience. Academically I am an Art Historian specialising in late 18th and early 19th-century French aesthetics, and prior to my return to academia I had a career in the international finance, entrepreneurial business and high net worth family business sectors. I have published and taught at the University of Oxford on late eighteenth-and early nineteenth century art, history and aesthetics. Drawing on my experience as Lay Chaplain at Somerville College, Oxford I have also published on religious education. In addition to my position in the Education Department I am the Principal Advisor for Strategic Relationships and Partnerships at the Templeton World Charity Foundation Inc where I work closely with other foundations, INGOs and public policy organisations.

Publications List

Xiaona Wang is a DPhil student in Education, at St. Antony’s College, the University of Oxford. Xiaona’s doctoral research is fully funded by the University of Oxford (Clarendon Fund Scholarship and St. Antony’s College The Warden’s Scholarship). She is also a member at the Center for Global Higher Education.

Before her DPhil, Xiaona obtained her M.A degree in Higher Education at Graduate School of Education at Peking University, and B.A at the Faulty of Education from Beijing Normal University in China with first-class honour. She also studied at the University of Manchester as an exchange student in the School of Social Science.

Previously, Xiaona worked at Global Education Cluster in UNICEF, Geneva, where she began her research on the international scientific collaboration between China and Switzerland, and this experience later became the starting point of her master thesis. In her master’s thesis, Xiaona used a longitudinal research method in following a group of Chinese scientists who studied and worked in Switzerland. Through semi-structured interviews, she explored how collaborative relationships between individual scientists began and developed.

Xiaona has strong research interests in the science studies, internationalization and globalization of higher education. Her doctoral research is going to continue to explore the scientific knowledge networks between China and Switzerland under the influence of geopolitical factors.

Wanlin Cai is a DPhil student in higher education and a member of CGHE research group at the Department of Education.

Wanlin’s research interest lies in international higher education, higher education policies and economy, with a specific focus on World-Class Universities.

She is also a member of South China Global Talent Institute, Center for China and Globalisation, where she focuses on the research of talent policy and development in the Great Bay Area in China.

Prior to her beginning as a DPhil student, Wanlin read for the M.Sc in Higher Education at the University of Oxford and the M.Sc in Management and Enterprise Growth at the University of Glasgow.

Naosuke is a DPhil student whose research interests are Global Englishes and mutual intelligibility in English communication.

Naosuke finished an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition at the University of Oxford with distinction in 2019. His DPhil research focuses on the intelligibility of non-native English speakers. Specifically, he would like to seek what kind of English pronunciation features are critical for successful English communication between non-native English speakers.

Adam, from Ethiopia, is interested in looking at the role of education in peacebuilding and conflicts.

Akira is a DPhil Student in Anthropology affiliated with the School of Anthropology & Museum Ethnography, and associated with both the Department of Education and Nissan Institute of Japanese Studies. He is supervised by David Mills and Roger Goodman.

Akira’s doctoral research rests with the concepts of ‘international’ and ‘global education,’ and is grounded in the recent emergence and growth of International Baccalaureate (IB) education in Japan. Focused on IB educator training across several higher education institutions (HEIs), Akira aims – solely through digital anthropological approaches – to contextualize the everyday negotiations of ‘international’ and ‘global’ knowledge, both by those receiving and administering its training. Considering social, political, economic and cognitive aspects, one key objective of this research hopes to inform educational practitioners and policy-makers of some of the conceptual and social challenges that emerge with dissonant notions of cultivating ‘international’ and ‘global people.’

Akira has been an Associate Researcher at the Graduate School of Teacher Education, Tokyo Gakugei University since autumn 2020, a post he continues to hold until the end of his doctoral degree. He also currently works as an Anthropological Analyst for Contemplative Spaces, a consultancy focused on designing and delivering a range of leadership development initiatives for individuals, groups, and organizational bodies. His future career plans include further anthropological research and establishing consultancy services dedicated to various inclusion-based development initiatives.

Amelia is passionate about access to and the effects of environmental education globally, particularly in the Galápagos Islands of Ecuador.

Because she experienced a wealth of informal and non-formal environmental education from her parents and from explorations growing up in Southern Oregon, she is interested in researching how environmental education manifests in global communities. She fell in love with the Galápagos on a structured university-led trip during her undergraduate studies and realized that there was a dearth of research on social aspects of the communities living on the islands.  Because of this, she pursued research in the Galápagos in 2014 on the prevalence of and access to both formal and informal (provided by numerous NGOs and government agencies) environmental education for students on the islands, and on the level of student environmental literacy in 28 schools.

Her Dphil research focus, under the supervision of Dr. Ann Childs and Dr. Steve Puttick, is on access to and effects of Experiential Environmental Education for students living in the Galápagos Islands, and on the production of research on the social sphere in Galápagos.

Prior to starting her Dphil at Oxford, she worked in alliances and partnerships at tech companies in the San Francisco Bay Area. Most recently, she was the Director of Global Partnerships at Conversica, a conversational AI platform, and cultivated, trained, and drove pipeline with select international resellers in APAC, EMEA, and LATAM, and with regional resellers in the United States. She also assisted with the design and construction of the Conversica partner program.

In her free time, she is a free-lance food photographer, food stylist, food blogger, recipe developer, and gluten free baker for her online blog and social handle, Sisters Sans Gluten (www.sisterssansgluten), which she created with her sister in 2018. She also continues to sing informally and takes voice lessons remotely with instructor Corey Head of San Francisco.

She holds a BA in both Anthropology and Music (vocal performance), and an MA in Latin American Studies from Stanford University. Highlights from Stanford include: playing and touring as a performing member of Stanford Taiko (Japanese ensemble drumming) for four years; singing with the Stanford Chamber Chorale led by Professor Steve Sano; studying voice with Wendy Hillhouse; participating in music department operas; performing in self-organized recitals showcasing western art songs, western musical theater, and Latin American art songs; studying abroad in Santiago, Chile; and learning Quechua during her masters program with Marisol Necochea.

Abdul Karim has completed a Bachelor of Science in Bioengineering and Computational Medicine (Imperial College London), a Bachelor of Medicine and Bachelor of Surgery (Queen Mary University of London), and Master of Science in the Philosophy of Science and Economics (The London School of Economics).

He has delivered lectures on the Philosophy of Human Nature and the History of Metaethics at the University of Cambridge and for Health Education East Midlands. This, in addition to the current positions he holds as a Hospital Doctor and Health Policy and Management Advisor at the University Hospitals of Leicester NHS Trust.

Abdul Karim’s current areas of interest include the biological definition of psychological states relevant to the learning environment, and the influence of language on the variable interpretation of a particular social context. For the latter of which he has published primary research.

Another is the appraisal and deployment of physiological measurement devices in learning environments as a means of quantitatively evaluating psychological states. Such research areas hold promise in enhancing the questionnaire-based evidences of contemporary theories in education, such as those regarding motivation, self-determination and engagement. This will to contribute to the evidence-based public policy optimisation in education and social care.

 

Publications

Ismail, A.K. 2017. A Cross Sectional Study to Explore the Effect of the Linguistic Origin and Evolution of a Language on Patient Interpretation of Haematological Cancers. Advances in Biological Research. 11 (4): 225-232.

Ismail, A.K. 2017. The Origin of the Arabic Medical Term for Cancer. Advances in Biological Research. 11 (4): 198-201.

Ismail, A.K. 2018. The Impact of da Vinci’s Anatomical Drawings and Calculations on Foundation of Orthopaedics. Advances in Biological Research. 12 (1): 26-30.

As a mathematics teacher who believes that anyone can understand mathematics, Ashley is keenly interested in developing interventions and resources for learners who struggle with the subject. More specifically, she is focusing on the transitionary moment in the classroom when discussions have ceased, and practice begins and how this transition can become more fluid for learners.

By drawing on research from education, psychology and cognitive neuroscience, Ashley hopes to gain insights into how the brain and mind process information and how this knowledge can inform teacher practice and, ultimately, help learners understand mathematics.

After having taught for over ten years, Ashley completed her MSc, with Distinction, at the Department of Education, and her dissertation was “Highly Commended” by the British Educational Research Association (BERA). She is committed to making mathematics more accessible for all learners and strives for research that is not only impactful but also directly applicable to the classroom.

I am a Research Project Coordinator and Co-PI at the Department of Education for a project on Education, Purpose and Human Flourishing in Times of Uncertainty (EPHF), and the Templeton World Charity Foundation Fellow in Comparative Education at St Antony’s College, Oxford.

I have a multi-disciplinary background and experience. Academically I am an Art Historian specialising in late 18th and early 19th-century French aesthetics, and prior to my return to academia I had a career in the international finance, entrepreneurial business and high net worth family business sectors. I have published and taught at the University of Oxford on late eighteenth-and early nineteenth century art, history and aesthetics. Drawing on my experience as Lay Chaplain at Somerville College, Oxford I have also published on religious education. In addition to my position in the Education Department I am the Principal Advisor for Strategic Relationships and Partnerships at the Templeton World Charity Foundation Inc where I work closely with other foundations, INGOs and public policy organisations.

Publications List

Xiaona Wang is a DPhil student in Education, at St. Antony’s College, the University of Oxford. Xiaona’s doctoral research is fully funded by the University of Oxford (Clarendon Fund Scholarship and St. Antony’s College The Warden’s Scholarship). She is also a member at the Center for Global Higher Education.

Before her DPhil, Xiaona obtained her M.A degree in Higher Education at Graduate School of Education at Peking University, and B.A at the Faulty of Education from Beijing Normal University in China with first-class honour. She also studied at the University of Manchester as an exchange student in the School of Social Science.

Previously, Xiaona worked at Global Education Cluster in UNICEF, Geneva, where she began her research on the international scientific collaboration between China and Switzerland, and this experience later became the starting point of her master thesis. In her master’s thesis, Xiaona used a longitudinal research method in following a group of Chinese scientists who studied and worked in Switzerland. Through semi-structured interviews, she explored how collaborative relationships between individual scientists began and developed.

Xiaona has strong research interests in the science studies, internationalization and globalization of higher education. Her doctoral research is going to continue to explore the scientific knowledge networks between China and Switzerland under the influence of geopolitical factors.

Wanlin Cai is a DPhil student in higher education and a member of CGHE research group at the Department of Education.

Wanlin’s research interest lies in international higher education, higher education policies and economy, with a specific focus on World-Class Universities.

She is also a member of South China Global Talent Institute, Center for China and Globalisation, where she focuses on the research of talent policy and development in the Great Bay Area in China.

Prior to her beginning as a DPhil student, Wanlin read for the M.Sc in Higher Education at the University of Oxford and the M.Sc in Management and Enterprise Growth at the University of Glasgow.

Naosuke is a DPhil student whose research interests are Global Englishes and mutual intelligibility in English communication.

Naosuke finished an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition at the University of Oxford with distinction in 2019. His DPhil research focuses on the intelligibility of non-native English speakers. Specifically, he would like to seek what kind of English pronunciation features are critical for successful English communication between non-native English speakers.

Adam, from Ethiopia, is interested in looking at the role of education in peacebuilding and conflicts.

Akira is a DPhil Student in Anthropology affiliated with the School of Anthropology & Museum Ethnography, and associated with both the Department of Education and Nissan Institute of Japanese Studies. He is supervised by David Mills and Roger Goodman.

Akira’s doctoral research rests with the concepts of ‘international’ and ‘global education,’ and is grounded in the recent emergence and growth of International Baccalaureate (IB) education in Japan. Focused on IB educator training across several higher education institutions (HEIs), Akira aims – solely through digital anthropological approaches – to contextualize the everyday negotiations of ‘international’ and ‘global’ knowledge, both by those receiving and administering its training. Considering social, political, economic and cognitive aspects, one key objective of this research hopes to inform educational practitioners and policy-makers of some of the conceptual and social challenges that emerge with dissonant notions of cultivating ‘international’ and ‘global people.’

Akira has been an Associate Researcher at the Graduate School of Teacher Education, Tokyo Gakugei University since autumn 2020, a post he continues to hold until the end of his doctoral degree. He also currently works as an Anthropological Analyst for Contemplative Spaces, a consultancy focused on designing and delivering a range of leadership development initiatives for individuals, groups, and organizational bodies. His future career plans include further anthropological research and establishing consultancy services dedicated to various inclusion-based development initiatives.

Amelia is passionate about access to and the effects of environmental education globally, particularly in the Galápagos Islands of Ecuador.

Because she experienced a wealth of informal and non-formal environmental education from her parents and from explorations growing up in Southern Oregon, she is interested in researching how environmental education manifests in global communities. She fell in love with the Galápagos on a structured university-led trip during her undergraduate studies and realized that there was a dearth of research on social aspects of the communities living on the islands.  Because of this, she pursued research in the Galápagos in 2014 on the prevalence of and access to both formal and informal (provided by numerous NGOs and government agencies) environmental education for students on the islands, and on the level of student environmental literacy in 28 schools.

Her Dphil research focus, under the supervision of Dr. Ann Childs and Dr. Steve Puttick, is on access to and effects of Experiential Environmental Education for students living in the Galápagos Islands, and on the production of research on the social sphere in Galápagos.

Prior to starting her Dphil at Oxford, she worked in alliances and partnerships at tech companies in the San Francisco Bay Area. Most recently, she was the Director of Global Partnerships at Conversica, a conversational AI platform, and cultivated, trained, and drove pipeline with select international resellers in APAC, EMEA, and LATAM, and with regional resellers in the United States. She also assisted with the design and construction of the Conversica partner program.

In her free time, she is a free-lance food photographer, food stylist, food blogger, recipe developer, and gluten free baker for her online blog and social handle, Sisters Sans Gluten (www.sisterssansgluten), which she created with her sister in 2018. She also continues to sing informally and takes voice lessons remotely with instructor Corey Head of San Francisco.

She holds a BA in both Anthropology and Music (vocal performance), and an MA in Latin American Studies from Stanford University. Highlights from Stanford include: playing and touring as a performing member of Stanford Taiko (Japanese ensemble drumming) for four years; singing with the Stanford Chamber Chorale led by Professor Steve Sano; studying voice with Wendy Hillhouse; participating in music department operas; performing in self-organized recitals showcasing western art songs, western musical theater, and Latin American art songs; studying abroad in Santiago, Chile; and learning Quechua during her masters program with Marisol Necochea.

Abdul Karim has completed a Bachelor of Science in Bioengineering and Computational Medicine (Imperial College London), a Bachelor of Medicine and Bachelor of Surgery (Queen Mary University of London), and Master of Science in the Philosophy of Science and Economics (The London School of Economics).

He has delivered lectures on the Philosophy of Human Nature and the History of Metaethics at the University of Cambridge and for Health Education East Midlands. This, in addition to the current positions he holds as a Hospital Doctor and Health Policy and Management Advisor at the University Hospitals of Leicester NHS Trust.

Abdul Karim’s current areas of interest include the biological definition of psychological states relevant to the learning environment, and the influence of language on the variable interpretation of a particular social context. For the latter of which he has published primary research.

Another is the appraisal and deployment of physiological measurement devices in learning environments as a means of quantitatively evaluating psychological states. Such research areas hold promise in enhancing the questionnaire-based evidences of contemporary theories in education, such as those regarding motivation, self-determination and engagement. This will to contribute to the evidence-based public policy optimisation in education and social care.

 

Publications

Ismail, A.K. 2017. A Cross Sectional Study to Explore the Effect of the Linguistic Origin and Evolution of a Language on Patient Interpretation of Haematological Cancers. Advances in Biological Research. 11 (4): 225-232.

Ismail, A.K. 2017. The Origin of the Arabic Medical Term for Cancer. Advances in Biological Research. 11 (4): 198-201.

Ismail, A.K. 2018. The Impact of da Vinci’s Anatomical Drawings and Calculations on Foundation of Orthopaedics. Advances in Biological Research. 12 (1): 26-30.

As a mathematics teacher who believes that anyone can understand mathematics, Ashley is keenly interested in developing interventions and resources for learners who struggle with the subject. More specifically, she is focusing on the transitionary moment in the classroom when discussions have ceased, and practice begins and how this transition can become more fluid for learners.

By drawing on research from education, psychology and cognitive neuroscience, Ashley hopes to gain insights into how the brain and mind process information and how this knowledge can inform teacher practice and, ultimately, help learners understand mathematics.

After having taught for over ten years, Ashley completed her MSc, with Distinction, at the Department of Education, and her dissertation was “Highly Commended” by the British Educational Research Association (BERA). She is committed to making mathematics more accessible for all learners and strives for research that is not only impactful but also directly applicable to the classroom.

I am a Research Project Coordinator and Co-PI at the Department of Education for a project on Education, Purpose and Human Flourishing in Times of Uncertainty (EPHF), and the Templeton World Charity Foundation Fellow in Comparative Education at St Antony’s College, Oxford.

I have a multi-disciplinary background and experience. Academically I am an Art Historian specialising in late 18th and early 19th-century French aesthetics, and prior to my return to academia I had a career in the international finance, entrepreneurial business and high net worth family business sectors. I have published and taught at the University of Oxford on late eighteenth-and early nineteenth century art, history and aesthetics. Drawing on my experience as Lay Chaplain at Somerville College, Oxford I have also published on religious education. In addition to my position in the Education Department I am the Principal Advisor for Strategic Relationships and Partnerships at the Templeton World Charity Foundation Inc where I work closely with other foundations, INGOs and public policy organisations.

Publications List

Xiaona Wang is a DPhil student in Education, at St. Antony’s College, the University of Oxford. Xiaona’s doctoral research is fully funded by the University of Oxford (Clarendon Fund Scholarship and St. Antony’s College The Warden’s Scholarship). She is also a member at the Center for Global Higher Education.

Before her DPhil, Xiaona obtained her M.A degree in Higher Education at Graduate School of Education at Peking University, and B.A at the Faulty of Education from Beijing Normal University in China with first-class honour. She also studied at the University of Manchester as an exchange student in the School of Social Science.

Previously, Xiaona worked at Global Education Cluster in UNICEF, Geneva, where she began her research on the international scientific collaboration between China and Switzerland, and this experience later became the starting point of her master thesis. In her master’s thesis, Xiaona used a longitudinal research method in following a group of Chinese scientists who studied and worked in Switzerland. Through semi-structured interviews, she explored how collaborative relationships between individual scientists began and developed.

Xiaona has strong research interests in the science studies, internationalization and globalization of higher education. Her doctoral research is going to continue to explore the scientific knowledge networks between China and Switzerland under the influence of geopolitical factors.

Wanlin Cai is a DPhil student in higher education and a member of CGHE research group at the Department of Education.

Wanlin’s research interest lies in international higher education, higher education policies and economy, with a specific focus on World-Class Universities.

She is also a member of South China Global Talent Institute, Center for China and Globalisation, where she focuses on the research of talent policy and development in the Great Bay Area in China.

Prior to her beginning as a DPhil student, Wanlin read for the M.Sc in Higher Education at the University of Oxford and the M.Sc in Management and Enterprise Growth at the University of Glasgow.

Naosuke is a DPhil student whose research interests are Global Englishes and mutual intelligibility in English communication.

Naosuke finished an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition at the University of Oxford with distinction in 2019. His DPhil research focuses on the intelligibility of non-native English speakers. Specifically, he would like to seek what kind of English pronunciation features are critical for successful English communication between non-native English speakers.

Adam, from Ethiopia, is interested in looking at the role of education in peacebuilding and conflicts.

Akira is a DPhil Student in Anthropology affiliated with the School of Anthropology & Museum Ethnography, and associated with both the Department of Education and Nissan Institute of Japanese Studies. He is supervised by David Mills and Roger Goodman.

Akira’s doctoral research rests with the concepts of ‘international’ and ‘global education,’ and is grounded in the recent emergence and growth of International Baccalaureate (IB) education in Japan. Focused on IB educator training across several higher education institutions (HEIs), Akira aims – solely through digital anthropological approaches – to contextualize the everyday negotiations of ‘international’ and ‘global’ knowledge, both by those receiving and administering its training. Considering social, political, economic and cognitive aspects, one key objective of this research hopes to inform educational practitioners and policy-makers of some of the conceptual and social challenges that emerge with dissonant notions of cultivating ‘international’ and ‘global people.’

Akira has been an Associate Researcher at the Graduate School of Teacher Education, Tokyo Gakugei University since autumn 2020, a post he continues to hold until the end of his doctoral degree. He also currently works as an Anthropological Analyst for Contemplative Spaces, a consultancy focused on designing and delivering a range of leadership development initiatives for individuals, groups, and organizational bodies. His future career plans include further anthropological research and establishing consultancy services dedicated to various inclusion-based development initiatives.

Amelia is passionate about access to and the effects of environmental education globally, particularly in the Galápagos Islands of Ecuador.

Because she experienced a wealth of informal and non-formal environmental education from her parents and from explorations growing up in Southern Oregon, she is interested in researching how environmental education manifests in global communities. She fell in love with the Galápagos on a structured university-led trip during her undergraduate studies and realized that there was a dearth of research on social aspects of the communities living on the islands.  Because of this, she pursued research in the Galápagos in 2014 on the prevalence of and access to both formal and informal (provided by numerous NGOs and government agencies) environmental education for students on the islands, and on the level of student environmental literacy in 28 schools.

Her Dphil research focus, under the supervision of Dr. Ann Childs and Dr. Steve Puttick, is on access to and effects of Experiential Environmental Education for students living in the Galápagos Islands, and on the production of research on the social sphere in Galápagos.

Prior to starting her Dphil at Oxford, she worked in alliances and partnerships at tech companies in the San Francisco Bay Area. Most recently, she was the Director of Global Partnerships at Conversica, a conversational AI platform, and cultivated, trained, and drove pipeline with select international resellers in APAC, EMEA, and LATAM, and with regional resellers in the United States. She also assisted with the design and construction of the Conversica partner program.

In her free time, she is a free-lance food photographer, food stylist, food blogger, recipe developer, and gluten free baker for her online blog and social handle, Sisters Sans Gluten (www.sisterssansgluten), which she created with her sister in 2018. She also continues to sing informally and takes voice lessons remotely with instructor Corey Head of San Francisco.

She holds a BA in both Anthropology and Music (vocal performance), and an MA in Latin American Studies from Stanford University. Highlights from Stanford include: playing and touring as a performing member of Stanford Taiko (Japanese ensemble drumming) for four years; singing with the Stanford Chamber Chorale led by Professor Steve Sano; studying voice with Wendy Hillhouse; participating in music department operas; performing in self-organized recitals showcasing western art songs, western musical theater, and Latin American art songs; studying abroad in Santiago, Chile; and learning Quechua during her masters program with Marisol Necochea.

Abdul Karim has completed a Bachelor of Science in Bioengineering and Computational Medicine (Imperial College London), a Bachelor of Medicine and Bachelor of Surgery (Queen Mary University of London), and Master of Science in the Philosophy of Science and Economics (The London School of Economics).

He has delivered lectures on the Philosophy of Human Nature and the History of Metaethics at the University of Cambridge and for Health Education East Midlands. This, in addition to the current positions he holds as a Hospital Doctor and Health Policy and Management Advisor at the University Hospitals of Leicester NHS Trust.

Abdul Karim’s current areas of interest include the biological definition of psychological states relevant to the learning environment, and the influence of language on the variable interpretation of a particular social context. For the latter of which he has published primary research.

Another is the appraisal and deployment of physiological measurement devices in learning environments as a means of quantitatively evaluating psychological states. Such research areas hold promise in enhancing the questionnaire-based evidences of contemporary theories in education, such as those regarding motivation, self-determination and engagement. This will to contribute to the evidence-based public policy optimisation in education and social care.

 

Publications

Ismail, A.K. 2017. A Cross Sectional Study to Explore the Effect of the Linguistic Origin and Evolution of a Language on Patient Interpretation of Haematological Cancers. Advances in Biological Research. 11 (4): 225-232.

Ismail, A.K. 2017. The Origin of the Arabic Medical Term for Cancer. Advances in Biological Research. 11 (4): 198-201.

Ismail, A.K. 2018. The Impact of da Vinci’s Anatomical Drawings and Calculations on Foundation of Orthopaedics. Advances in Biological Research. 12 (1): 26-30.

As a mathematics teacher who believes that anyone can understand mathematics, Ashley is keenly interested in developing interventions and resources for learners who struggle with the subject. More specifically, she is focusing on the transitionary moment in the classroom when discussions have ceased, and practice begins and how this transition can become more fluid for learners.

By drawing on research from education, psychology and cognitive neuroscience, Ashley hopes to gain insights into how the brain and mind process information and how this knowledge can inform teacher practice and, ultimately, help learners understand mathematics.

After having taught for over ten years, Ashley completed her MSc, with Distinction, at the Department of Education, and her dissertation was “Highly Commended” by the British Educational Research Association (BERA). She is committed to making mathematics more accessible for all learners and strives for research that is not only impactful but also directly applicable to the classroom.

I am a Research Project Coordinator and Co-PI at the Department of Education for a project on Education, Purpose and Human Flourishing in Times of Uncertainty (EPHF), and the Templeton World Charity Foundation Fellow in Comparative Education at St Antony’s College, Oxford.

I have a multi-disciplinary background and experience. Academically I am an Art Historian specialising in late 18th and early 19th-century French aesthetics, and prior to my return to academia I had a career in the international finance, entrepreneurial business and high net worth family business sectors. I have published and taught at the University of Oxford on late eighteenth-and early nineteenth century art, history and aesthetics. Drawing on my experience as Lay Chaplain at Somerville College, Oxford I have also published on religious education. In addition to my position in the Education Department I am the Principal Advisor for Strategic Relationships and Partnerships at the Templeton World Charity Foundation Inc where I work closely with other foundations, INGOs and public policy organisations.

Publications List

Xiaona Wang is a DPhil student in Education, at St. Antony’s College, the University of Oxford. Xiaona’s doctoral research is fully funded by the University of Oxford (Clarendon Fund Scholarship and St. Antony’s College The Warden’s Scholarship). She is also a member at the Center for Global Higher Education.

Before her DPhil, Xiaona obtained her M.A degree in Higher Education at Graduate School of Education at Peking University, and B.A at the Faulty of Education from Beijing Normal University in China with first-class honour. She also studied at the University of Manchester as an exchange student in the School of Social Science.

Previously, Xiaona worked at Global Education Cluster in UNICEF, Geneva, where she began her research on the international scientific collaboration between China and Switzerland, and this experience later became the starting point of her master thesis. In her master’s thesis, Xiaona used a longitudinal research method in following a group of Chinese scientists who studied and worked in Switzerland. Through semi-structured interviews, she explored how collaborative relationships between individual scientists began and developed.

Xiaona has strong research interests in the science studies, internationalization and globalization of higher education. Her doctoral research is going to continue to explore the scientific knowledge networks between China and Switzerland under the influence of geopolitical factors.

Wanlin Cai is a DPhil student in higher education and a member of CGHE research group at the Department of Education.

Wanlin’s research interest lies in international higher education, higher education policies and economy, with a specific focus on World-Class Universities.

She is also a member of South China Global Talent Institute, Center for China and Globalisation, where she focuses on the research of talent policy and development in the Great Bay Area in China.

Prior to her beginning as a DPhil student, Wanlin read for the M.Sc in Higher Education at the University of Oxford and the M.Sc in Management and Enterprise Growth at the University of Glasgow.

Naosuke is a DPhil student whose research interests are Global Englishes and mutual intelligibility in English communication.

Naosuke finished an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition at the University of Oxford with distinction in 2019. His DPhil research focuses on the intelligibility of non-native English speakers. Specifically, he would like to seek what kind of English pronunciation features are critical for successful English communication between non-native English speakers.

Adam, from Ethiopia, is interested in looking at the role of education in peacebuilding and conflicts.

Akira is a DPhil Student in Anthropology affiliated with the School of Anthropology & Museum Ethnography, and associated with both the Department of Education and Nissan Institute of Japanese Studies. He is supervised by David Mills and Roger Goodman.

Akira’s doctoral research rests with the concepts of ‘international’ and ‘global education,’ and is grounded in the recent emergence and growth of International Baccalaureate (IB) education in Japan. Focused on IB educator training across several higher education institutions (HEIs), Akira aims – solely through digital anthropological approaches – to contextualize the everyday negotiations of ‘international’ and ‘global’ knowledge, both by those receiving and administering its training. Considering social, political, economic and cognitive aspects, one key objective of this research hopes to inform educational practitioners and policy-makers of some of the conceptual and social challenges that emerge with dissonant notions of cultivating ‘international’ and ‘global people.’

Akira has been an Associate Researcher at the Graduate School of Teacher Education, Tokyo Gakugei University since autumn 2020, a post he continues to hold until the end of his doctoral degree. He also currently works as an Anthropological Analyst for Contemplative Spaces, a consultancy focused on designing and delivering a range of leadership development initiatives for individuals, groups, and organizational bodies. His future career plans include further anthropological research and establishing consultancy services dedicated to various inclusion-based development initiatives.

Amelia is passionate about access to and the effects of environmental education globally, particularly in the Galápagos Islands of Ecuador.

Because she experienced a wealth of informal and non-formal environmental education from her parents and from explorations growing up in Southern Oregon, she is interested in researching how environmental education manifests in global communities. She fell in love with the Galápagos on a structured university-led trip during her undergraduate studies and realized that there was a dearth of research on social aspects of the communities living on the islands.  Because of this, she pursued research in the Galápagos in 2014 on the prevalence of and access to both formal and informal (provided by numerous NGOs and government agencies) environmental education for students on the islands, and on the level of student environmental literacy in 28 schools.

Her Dphil research focus, under the supervision of Dr. Ann Childs and Dr. Steve Puttick, is on access to and effects of Experiential Environmental Education for students living in the Galápagos Islands, and on the production of research on the social sphere in Galápagos.

Prior to starting her Dphil at Oxford, she worked in alliances and partnerships at tech companies in the San Francisco Bay Area. Most recently, she was the Director of Global Partnerships at Conversica, a conversational AI platform, and cultivated, trained, and drove pipeline with select international resellers in APAC, EMEA, and LATAM, and with regional resellers in the United States. She also assisted with the design and construction of the Conversica partner program.

In her free time, she is a free-lance food photographer, food stylist, food blogger, recipe developer, and gluten free baker for her online blog and social handle, Sisters Sans Gluten (www.sisterssansgluten), which she created with her sister in 2018. She also continues to sing informally and takes voice lessons remotely with instructor Corey Head of San Francisco.

She holds a BA in both Anthropology and Music (vocal performance), and an MA in Latin American Studies from Stanford University. Highlights from Stanford include: playing and touring as a performing member of Stanford Taiko (Japanese ensemble drumming) for four years; singing with the Stanford Chamber Chorale led by Professor Steve Sano; studying voice with Wendy Hillhouse; participating in music department operas; performing in self-organized recitals showcasing western art songs, western musical theater, and Latin American art songs; studying abroad in Santiago, Chile; and learning Quechua during her masters program with Marisol Necochea.

Abdul Karim has completed a Bachelor of Science in Bioengineering and Computational Medicine (Imperial College London), a Bachelor of Medicine and Bachelor of Surgery (Queen Mary University of London), and Master of Science in the Philosophy of Science and Economics (The London School of Economics).

He has delivered lectures on the Philosophy of Human Nature and the History of Metaethics at the University of Cambridge and for Health Education East Midlands. This, in addition to the current positions he holds as a Hospital Doctor and Health Policy and Management Advisor at the University Hospitals of Leicester NHS Trust.

Abdul Karim’s current areas of interest include the biological definition of psychological states relevant to the learning environment, and the influence of language on the variable interpretation of a particular social context. For the latter of which he has published primary research.

Another is the appraisal and deployment of physiological measurement devices in learning environments as a means of quantitatively evaluating psychological states. Such research areas hold promise in enhancing the questionnaire-based evidences of contemporary theories in education, such as those regarding motivation, self-determination and engagement. This will to contribute to the evidence-based public policy optimisation in education and social care.

 

Publications

Ismail, A.K. 2017. A Cross Sectional Study to Explore the Effect of the Linguistic Origin and Evolution of a Language on Patient Interpretation of Haematological Cancers. Advances in Biological Research. 11 (4): 225-232.

Ismail, A.K. 2017. The Origin of the Arabic Medical Term for Cancer. Advances in Biological Research. 11 (4): 198-201.

Ismail, A.K. 2018. The Impact of da Vinci’s Anatomical Drawings and Calculations on Foundation of Orthopaedics. Advances in Biological Research. 12 (1): 26-30.

As a mathematics teacher who believes that anyone can understand mathematics, Ashley is keenly interested in developing interventions and resources for learners who struggle with the subject. More specifically, she is focusing on the transitionary moment in the classroom when discussions have ceased, and practice begins and how this transition can become more fluid for learners.

By drawing on research from education, psychology and cognitive neuroscience, Ashley hopes to gain insights into how the brain and mind process information and how this knowledge can inform teacher practice and, ultimately, help learners understand mathematics.

After having taught for over ten years, Ashley completed her MSc, with Distinction, at the Department of Education, and her dissertation was “Highly Commended” by the British Educational Research Association (BERA). She is committed to making mathematics more accessible for all learners and strives for research that is not only impactful but also directly applicable to the classroom.

I am a Research Project Coordinator and Co-PI at the Department of Education for a project on Education, Purpose and Human Flourishing in Times of Uncertainty (EPHF), and the Templeton World Charity Foundation Fellow in Comparative Education at St Antony’s College, Oxford.

I have a multi-disciplinary background and experience. Academically I am an Art Historian specialising in late 18th and early 19th-century French aesthetics, and prior to my return to academia I had a career in the international finance, entrepreneurial business and high net worth family business sectors. I have published and taught at the University of Oxford on late eighteenth-and early nineteenth century art, history and aesthetics. Drawing on my experience as Lay Chaplain at Somerville College, Oxford I have also published on religious education. In addition to my position in the Education Department I am the Principal Advisor for Strategic Relationships and Partnerships at the Templeton World Charity Foundation Inc where I work closely with other foundations, INGOs and public policy organisations.

Publications List

Xiaona Wang is a DPhil student in Education, at St. Antony’s College, the University of Oxford. Xiaona’s doctoral research is fully funded by the University of Oxford (Clarendon Fund Scholarship and St. Antony’s College The Warden’s Scholarship). She is also a member at the Center for Global Higher Education.

Before her DPhil, Xiaona obtained her M.A degree in Higher Education at Graduate School of Education at Peking University, and B.A at the Faulty of Education from Beijing Normal University in China with first-class honour. She also studied at the University of Manchester as an exchange student in the School of Social Science.

Previously, Xiaona worked at Global Education Cluster in UNICEF, Geneva, where she began her research on the international scientific collaboration between China and Switzerland, and this experience later became the starting point of her master thesis. In her master’s thesis, Xiaona used a longitudinal research method in following a group of Chinese scientists who studied and worked in Switzerland. Through semi-structured interviews, she explored how collaborative relationships between individual scientists began and developed.

Xiaona has strong research interests in the science studies, internationalization and globalization of higher education. Her doctoral research is going to continue to explore the scientific knowledge networks between China and Switzerland under the influence of geopolitical factors.

Wanlin Cai is a DPhil student in higher education and a member of CGHE research group at the Department of Education.

Wanlin’s research interest lies in international higher education, higher education policies and economy, with a specific focus on World-Class Universities.

She is also a member of South China Global Talent Institute, Center for China and Globalisation, where she focuses on the research of talent policy and development in the Great Bay Area in China.

Prior to her beginning as a DPhil student, Wanlin read for the M.Sc in Higher Education at the University of Oxford and the M.Sc in Management and Enterprise Growth at the University of Glasgow.

Naosuke is a DPhil student whose research interests are Global Englishes and mutual intelligibility in English communication.

Naosuke finished an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition at the University of Oxford with distinction in 2019. His DPhil research focuses on the intelligibility of non-native English speakers. Specifically, he would like to seek what kind of English pronunciation features are critical for successful English communication between non-native English speakers.

Adam, from Ethiopia, is interested in looking at the role of education in peacebuilding and conflicts.

Akira is a DPhil Student in Anthropology affiliated with the School of Anthropology & Museum Ethnography, and associated with both the Department of Education and Nissan Institute of Japanese Studies. He is supervised by David Mills and Roger Goodman.

Akira’s doctoral research rests with the concepts of ‘international’ and ‘global education,’ and is grounded in the recent emergence and growth of International Baccalaureate (IB) education in Japan. Focused on IB educator training across several higher education institutions (HEIs), Akira aims – solely through digital anthropological approaches – to contextualize the everyday negotiations of ‘international’ and ‘global’ knowledge, both by those receiving and administering its training. Considering social, political, economic and cognitive aspects, one key objective of this research hopes to inform educational practitioners and policy-makers of some of the conceptual and social challenges that emerge with dissonant notions of cultivating ‘international’ and ‘global people.’

Akira has been an Associate Researcher at the Graduate School of Teacher Education, Tokyo Gakugei University since autumn 2020, a post he continues to hold until the end of his doctoral degree. He also currently works as an Anthropological Analyst for Contemplative Spaces, a consultancy focused on designing and delivering a range of leadership development initiatives for individuals, groups, and organizational bodies. His future career plans include further anthropological research and establishing consultancy services dedicated to various inclusion-based development initiatives.

Amelia is passionate about access to and the effects of environmental education globally, particularly in the Galápagos Islands of Ecuador.

Because she experienced a wealth of informal and non-formal environmental education from her parents and from explorations growing up in Southern Oregon, she is interested in researching how environmental education manifests in global communities. She fell in love with the Galápagos on a structured university-led trip during her undergraduate studies and realized that there was a dearth of research on social aspects of the communities living on the islands.  Because of this, she pursued research in the Galápagos in 2014 on the prevalence of and access to both formal and informal (provided by numerous NGOs and government agencies) environmental education for students on the islands, and on the level of student environmental literacy in 28 schools.

Her Dphil research focus, under the supervision of Dr. Ann Childs and Dr. Steve Puttick, is on access to and effects of Experiential Environmental Education for students living in the Galápagos Islands, and on the production of research on the social sphere in Galápagos.

Prior to starting her Dphil at Oxford, she worked in alliances and partnerships at tech companies in the San Francisco Bay Area. Most recently, she was the Director of Global Partnerships at Conversica, a conversational AI platform, and cultivated, trained, and drove pipeline with select international resellers in APAC, EMEA, and LATAM, and with regional resellers in the United States. She also assisted with the design and construction of the Conversica partner program.

In her free time, she is a free-lance food photographer, food stylist, food blogger, recipe developer, and gluten free baker for her online blog and social handle, Sisters Sans Gluten (www.sisterssansgluten), which she created with her sister in 2018. She also continues to sing informally and takes voice lessons remotely with instructor Corey Head of San Francisco.

She holds a BA in both Anthropology and Music (vocal performance), and an MA in Latin American Studies from Stanford University. Highlights from Stanford include: playing and touring as a performing member of Stanford Taiko (Japanese ensemble drumming) for four years; singing with the Stanford Chamber Chorale led by Professor Steve Sano; studying voice with Wendy Hillhouse; participating in music department operas; performing in self-organized recitals showcasing western art songs, western musical theater, and Latin American art songs; studying abroad in Santiago, Chile; and learning Quechua during her masters program with Marisol Necochea.

Abdul Karim has completed a Bachelor of Science in Bioengineering and Computational Medicine (Imperial College London), a Bachelor of Medicine and Bachelor of Surgery (Queen Mary University of London), and Master of Science in the Philosophy of Science and Economics (The London School of Economics).

He has delivered lectures on the Philosophy of Human Nature and the History of Metaethics at the University of Cambridge and for Health Education East Midlands. This, in addition to the current positions he holds as a Hospital Doctor and Health Policy and Management Advisor at the University Hospitals of Leicester NHS Trust.

Abdul Karim’s current areas of interest include the biological definition of psychological states relevant to the learning environment, and the influence of language on the variable interpretation of a particular social context. For the latter of which he has published primary research.

Another is the appraisal and deployment of physiological measurement devices in learning environments as a means of quantitatively evaluating psychological states. Such research areas hold promise in enhancing the questionnaire-based evidences of contemporary theories in education, such as those regarding motivation, self-determination and engagement. This will to contribute to the evidence-based public policy optimisation in education and social care.

 

Publications

Ismail, A.K. 2017. A Cross Sectional Study to Explore the Effect of the Linguistic Origin and Evolution of a Language on Patient Interpretation of Haematological Cancers. Advances in Biological Research. 11 (4): 225-232.

Ismail, A.K. 2017. The Origin of the Arabic Medical Term for Cancer. Advances in Biological Research. 11 (4): 198-201.

Ismail, A.K. 2018. The Impact of da Vinci’s Anatomical Drawings and Calculations on Foundation of Orthopaedics. Advances in Biological Research. 12 (1): 26-30.

As a mathematics teacher who believes that anyone can understand mathematics, Ashley is keenly interested in developing interventions and resources for learners who struggle with the subject. More specifically, she is focusing on the transitionary moment in the classroom when discussions have ceased, and practice begins and how this transition can become more fluid for learners.

By drawing on research from education, psychology and cognitive neuroscience, Ashley hopes to gain insights into how the brain and mind process information and how this knowledge can inform teacher practice and, ultimately, help learners understand mathematics.

After having taught for over ten years, Ashley completed her MSc, with Distinction, at the Department of Education, and her dissertation was “Highly Commended” by the British Educational Research Association (BERA). She is committed to making mathematics more accessible for all learners and strives for research that is not only impactful but also directly applicable to the classroom.

I am a Research Project Coordinator and Co-PI at the Department of Education for a project on Education, Purpose and Human Flourishing in Times of Uncertainty (EPHF), and the Templeton World Charity Foundation Fellow in Comparative Education at St Antony’s College, Oxford.

I have a multi-disciplinary background and experience. Academically I am an Art Historian specialising in late 18th and early 19th-century French aesthetics, and prior to my return to academia I had a career in the international finance, entrepreneurial business and high net worth family business sectors. I have published and taught at the University of Oxford on late eighteenth-and early nineteenth century art, history and aesthetics. Drawing on my experience as Lay Chaplain at Somerville College, Oxford I have also published on religious education. In addition to my position in the Education Department I am the Principal Advisor for Strategic Relationships and Partnerships at the Templeton World Charity Foundation Inc where I work closely with other foundations, INGOs and public policy organisations.

Publications List

Xiaona Wang is a DPhil student in Education, at St. Antony’s College, the University of Oxford. Xiaona’s doctoral research is fully funded by the University of Oxford (Clarendon Fund Scholarship and St. Antony’s College The Warden’s Scholarship). She is also a member at the Center for Global Higher Education.

Before her DPhil, Xiaona obtained her M.A degree in Higher Education at Graduate School of Education at Peking University, and B.A at the Faulty of Education from Beijing Normal University in China with first-class honour. She also studied at the University of Manchester as an exchange student in the School of Social Science.

Previously, Xiaona worked at Global Education Cluster in UNICEF, Geneva, where she began her research on the international scientific collaboration between China and Switzerland, and this experience later became the starting point of her master thesis. In her master’s thesis, Xiaona used a longitudinal research method in following a group of Chinese scientists who studied and worked in Switzerland. Through semi-structured interviews, she explored how collaborative relationships between individual scientists began and developed.

Xiaona has strong research interests in the science studies, internationalization and globalization of higher education. Her doctoral research is going to continue to explore the scientific knowledge networks between China and Switzerland under the influence of geopolitical factors.

Wanlin Cai is a DPhil student in higher education and a member of CGHE research group at the Department of Education.

Wanlin’s research interest lies in international higher education, higher education policies and economy, with a specific focus on World-Class Universities.

She is also a member of South China Global Talent Institute, Center for China and Globalisation, where she focuses on the research of talent policy and development in the Great Bay Area in China.

Prior to her beginning as a DPhil student, Wanlin read for the M.Sc in Higher Education at the University of Oxford and the M.Sc in Management and Enterprise Growth at the University of Glasgow.

Naosuke is a DPhil student whose research interests are Global Englishes and mutual intelligibility in English communication.

Naosuke finished an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition at the University of Oxford with distinction in 2019. His DPhil research focuses on the intelligibility of non-native English speakers. Specifically, he would like to seek what kind of English pronunciation features are critical for successful English communication between non-native English speakers.

Adam, from Ethiopia, is interested in looking at the role of education in peacebuilding and conflicts.

Akira is a DPhil Student in Anthropology affiliated with the School of Anthropology & Museum Ethnography, and associated with both the Department of Education and Nissan Institute of Japanese Studies. He is supervised by David Mills and Roger Goodman.

Akira’s doctoral research rests with the concepts of ‘international’ and ‘global education,’ and is grounded in the recent emergence and growth of International Baccalaureate (IB) education in Japan. Focused on IB educator training across several higher education institutions (HEIs), Akira aims – solely through digital anthropological approaches – to contextualize the everyday negotiations of ‘international’ and ‘global’ knowledge, both by those receiving and administering its training. Considering social, political, economic and cognitive aspects, one key objective of this research hopes to inform educational practitioners and policy-makers of some of the conceptual and social challenges that emerge with dissonant notions of cultivating ‘international’ and ‘global people.’

Akira has been an Associate Researcher at the Graduate School of Teacher Education, Tokyo Gakugei University since autumn 2020, a post he continues to hold until the end of his doctoral degree. He also currently works as an Anthropological Analyst for Contemplative Spaces, a consultancy focused on designing and delivering a range of leadership development initiatives for individuals, groups, and organizational bodies. His future career plans include further anthropological research and establishing consultancy services dedicated to various inclusion-based development initiatives.

Amelia is passionate about access to and the effects of environmental education globally, particularly in the Galápagos Islands of Ecuador.

Because she experienced a wealth of informal and non-formal environmental education from her parents and from explorations growing up in Southern Oregon, she is interested in researching how environmental education manifests in global communities. She fell in love with the Galápagos on a structured university-led trip during her undergraduate studies and realized that there was a dearth of research on social aspects of the communities living on the islands.  Because of this, she pursued research in the Galápagos in 2014 on the prevalence of and access to both formal and informal (provided by numerous NGOs and government agencies) environmental education for students on the islands, and on the level of student environmental literacy in 28 schools.

Her Dphil research focus, under the supervision of Dr. Ann Childs and Dr. Steve Puttick, is on access to and effects of Experiential Environmental Education for students living in the Galápagos Islands, and on the production of research on the social sphere in Galápagos.

Prior to starting her Dphil at Oxford, she worked in alliances and partnerships at tech companies in the San Francisco Bay Area. Most recently, she was the Director of Global Partnerships at Conversica, a conversational AI platform, and cultivated, trained, and drove pipeline with select international resellers in APAC, EMEA, and LATAM, and with regional resellers in the United States. She also assisted with the design and construction of the Conversica partner program.

In her free time, she is a free-lance food photographer, food stylist, food blogger, recipe developer, and gluten free baker for her online blog and social handle, Sisters Sans Gluten (www.sisterssansgluten), which she created with her sister in 2018. She also continues to sing informally and takes voice lessons remotely with instructor Corey Head of San Francisco.

She holds a BA in both Anthropology and Music (vocal performance), and an MA in Latin American Studies from Stanford University. Highlights from Stanford include: playing and touring as a performing member of Stanford Taiko (Japanese ensemble drumming) for four years; singing with the Stanford Chamber Chorale led by Professor Steve Sano; studying voice with Wendy Hillhouse; participating in music department operas; performing in self-organized recitals showcasing western art songs, western musical theater, and Latin American art songs; studying abroad in Santiago, Chile; and learning Quechua during her masters program with Marisol Necochea.

Abdul Karim has completed a Bachelor of Science in Bioengineering and Computational Medicine (Imperial College London), a Bachelor of Medicine and Bachelor of Surgery (Queen Mary University of London), and Master of Science in the Philosophy of Science and Economics (The London School of Economics).

He has delivered lectures on the Philosophy of Human Nature and the History of Metaethics at the University of Cambridge and for Health Education East Midlands. This, in addition to the current positions he holds as a Hospital Doctor and Health Policy and Management Advisor at the University Hospitals of Leicester NHS Trust.

Abdul Karim’s current areas of interest include the biological definition of psychological states relevant to the learning environment, and the influence of language on the variable interpretation of a particular social context. For the latter of which he has published primary research.

Another is the appraisal and deployment of physiological measurement devices in learning environments as a means of quantitatively evaluating psychological states. Such research areas hold promise in enhancing the questionnaire-based evidences of contemporary theories in education, such as those regarding motivation, self-determination and engagement. This will to contribute to the evidence-based public policy optimisation in education and social care.

 

Publications

Ismail, A.K. 2017. A Cross Sectional Study to Explore the Effect of the Linguistic Origin and Evolution of a Language on Patient Interpretation of Haematological Cancers. Advances in Biological Research. 11 (4): 225-232.

Ismail, A.K. 2017. The Origin of the Arabic Medical Term for Cancer. Advances in Biological Research. 11 (4): 198-201.

Ismail, A.K. 2018. The Impact of da Vinci’s Anatomical Drawings and Calculations on Foundation of Orthopaedics. Advances in Biological Research. 12 (1): 26-30.

As a mathematics teacher who believes that anyone can understand mathematics, Ashley is keenly interested in developing interventions and resources for learners who struggle with the subject. More specifically, she is focusing on the transitionary moment in the classroom when discussions have ceased, and practice begins and how this transition can become more fluid for learners.

By drawing on research from education, psychology and cognitive neuroscience, Ashley hopes to gain insights into how the brain and mind process information and how this knowledge can inform teacher practice and, ultimately, help learners understand mathematics.

After having taught for over ten years, Ashley completed her MSc, with Distinction, at the Department of Education, and her dissertation was “Highly Commended” by the British Educational Research Association (BERA). She is committed to making mathematics more accessible for all learners and strives for research that is not only impactful but also directly applicable to the classroom.

I am a Research Project Coordinator and Co-PI at the Department of Education for a project on Education, Purpose and Human Flourishing in Times of Uncertainty (EPHF), and the Templeton World Charity Foundation Fellow in Comparative Education at St Antony’s College, Oxford.

I have a multi-disciplinary background and experience. Academically I am an Art Historian specialising in late 18th and early 19th-century French aesthetics, and prior to my return to academia I had a career in the international finance, entrepreneurial business and high net worth family business sectors. I have published and taught at the University of Oxford on late eighteenth-and early nineteenth century art, history and aesthetics. Drawing on my experience as Lay Chaplain at Somerville College, Oxford I have also published on religious education. In addition to my position in the Education Department I am the Principal Advisor for Strategic Relationships and Partnerships at the Templeton World Charity Foundation Inc where I work closely with other foundations, INGOs and public policy organisations.

Publications List

Xiaona Wang is a DPhil student in Education, at St. Antony’s College, the University of Oxford. Xiaona’s doctoral research is fully funded by the University of Oxford (Clarendon Fund Scholarship and St. Antony’s College The Warden’s Scholarship). She is also a member at the Center for Global Higher Education.

Before her DPhil, Xiaona obtained her M.A degree in Higher Education at Graduate School of Education at Peking University, and B.A at the Faulty of Education from Beijing Normal University in China with first-class honour. She also studied at the University of Manchester as an exchange student in the School of Social Science.

Previously, Xiaona worked at Global Education Cluster in UNICEF, Geneva, where she began her research on the international scientific collaboration between China and Switzerland, and this experience later became the starting point of her master thesis. In her master’s thesis, Xiaona used a longitudinal research method in following a group of Chinese scientists who studied and worked in Switzerland. Through semi-structured interviews, she explored how collaborative relationships between individual scientists began and developed.

Xiaona has strong research interests in the science studies, internationalization and globalization of higher education. Her doctoral research is going to continue to explore the scientific knowledge networks between China and Switzerland under the influence of geopolitical factors.

Wanlin Cai is a DPhil student in higher education and a member of CGHE research group at the Department of Education.

Wanlin’s research interest lies in international higher education, higher education policies and economy, with a specific focus on World-Class Universities.

She is also a member of South China Global Talent Institute, Center for China and Globalisation, where she focuses on the research of talent policy and development in the Great Bay Area in China.

Prior to her beginning as a DPhil student, Wanlin read for the M.Sc in Higher Education at the University of Oxford and the M.Sc in Management and Enterprise Growth at the University of Glasgow.

Naosuke is a DPhil student whose research interests are Global Englishes and mutual intelligibility in English communication.

Naosuke finished an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition at the University of Oxford with distinction in 2019. His DPhil research focuses on the intelligibility of non-native English speakers. Specifically, he would like to seek what kind of English pronunciation features are critical for successful English communication between non-native English speakers.

Adam, from Ethiopia, is interested in looking at the role of education in peacebuilding and conflicts.

Akira is a DPhil Student in Anthropology affiliated with the School of Anthropology & Museum Ethnography, and associated with both the Department of Education and Nissan Institute of Japanese Studies. He is supervised by David Mills and Roger Goodman.

Akira’s doctoral research rests with the concepts of ‘international’ and ‘global education,’ and is grounded in the recent emergence and growth of International Baccalaureate (IB) education in Japan. Focused on IB educator training across several higher education institutions (HEIs), Akira aims – solely through digital anthropological approaches – to contextualize the everyday negotiations of ‘international’ and ‘global’ knowledge, both by those receiving and administering its training. Considering social, political, economic and cognitive aspects, one key objective of this research hopes to inform educational practitioners and policy-makers of some of the conceptual and social challenges that emerge with dissonant notions of cultivating ‘international’ and ‘global people.’

Akira has been an Associate Researcher at the Graduate School of Teacher Education, Tokyo Gakugei University since autumn 2020, a post he continues to hold until the end of his doctoral degree. He also currently works as an Anthropological Analyst for Contemplative Spaces, a consultancy focused on designing and delivering a range of leadership development initiatives for individuals, groups, and organizational bodies. His future career plans include further anthropological research and establishing consultancy services dedicated to various inclusion-based development initiatives.

Amelia is passionate about access to and the effects of environmental education globally, particularly in the Galápagos Islands of Ecuador.

Because she experienced a wealth of informal and non-formal environmental education from her parents and from explorations growing up in Southern Oregon, she is interested in researching how environmental education manifests in global communities. She fell in love with the Galápagos on a structured university-led trip during her undergraduate studies and realized that there was a dearth of research on social aspects of the communities living on the islands.  Because of this, she pursued research in the Galápagos in 2014 on the prevalence of and access to both formal and informal (provided by numerous NGOs and government agencies) environmental education for students on the islands, and on the level of student environmental literacy in 28 schools.

Her Dphil research focus, under the supervision of Dr. Ann Childs and Dr. Steve Puttick, is on access to and effects of Experiential Environmental Education for students living in the Galápagos Islands, and on the production of research on the social sphere in Galápagos.

Prior to starting her Dphil at Oxford, she worked in alliances and partnerships at tech companies in the San Francisco Bay Area. Most recently, she was the Director of Global Partnerships at Conversica, a conversational AI platform, and cultivated, trained, and drove pipeline with select international resellers in APAC, EMEA, and LATAM, and with regional resellers in the United States. She also assisted with the design and construction of the Conversica partner program.

In her free time, she is a free-lance food photographer, food stylist, food blogger, recipe developer, and gluten free baker for her online blog and social handle, Sisters Sans Gluten (www.sisterssansgluten), which she created with her sister in 2018. She also continues to sing informally and takes voice lessons remotely with instructor Corey Head of San Francisco.

She holds a BA in both Anthropology and Music (vocal performance), and an MA in Latin American Studies from Stanford University. Highlights from Stanford include: playing and touring as a performing member of Stanford Taiko (Japanese ensemble drumming) for four years; singing with the Stanford Chamber Chorale led by Professor Steve Sano; studying voice with Wendy Hillhouse; participating in music department operas; performing in self-organized recitals showcasing western art songs, western musical theater, and Latin American art songs; studying abroad in Santiago, Chile; and learning Quechua during her masters program with Marisol Necochea.

Abdul Karim has completed a Bachelor of Science in Bioengineering and Computational Medicine (Imperial College London), a Bachelor of Medicine and Bachelor of Surgery (Queen Mary University of London), and Master of Science in the Philosophy of Science and Economics (The London School of Economics).

He has delivered lectures on the Philosophy of Human Nature and the History of Metaethics at the University of Cambridge and for Health Education East Midlands. This, in addition to the current positions he holds as a Hospital Doctor and Health Policy and Management Advisor at the University Hospitals of Leicester NHS Trust.

Abdul Karim’s current areas of interest include the biological definition of psychological states relevant to the learning environment, and the influence of language on the variable interpretation of a particular social context. For the latter of which he has published primary research.

Another is the appraisal and deployment of physiological measurement devices in learning environments as a means of quantitatively evaluating psychological states. Such research areas hold promise in enhancing the questionnaire-based evidences of contemporary theories in education, such as those regarding motivation, self-determination and engagement. This will to contribute to the evidence-based public policy optimisation in education and social care.

 

Publications

Ismail, A.K. 2017. A Cross Sectional Study to Explore the Effect of the Linguistic Origin and Evolution of a Language on Patient Interpretation of Haematological Cancers. Advances in Biological Research. 11 (4): 225-232.

Ismail, A.K. 2017. The Origin of the Arabic Medical Term for Cancer. Advances in Biological Research. 11 (4): 198-201.

Ismail, A.K. 2018. The Impact of da Vinci’s Anatomical Drawings and Calculations on Foundation of Orthopaedics. Advances in Biological Research. 12 (1): 26-30.

As a mathematics teacher who believes that anyone can understand mathematics, Ashley is keenly interested in developing interventions and resources for learners who struggle with the subject. More specifically, she is focusing on the transitionary moment in the classroom when discussions have ceased, and practice begins and how this transition can become more fluid for learners.

By drawing on research from education, psychology and cognitive neuroscience, Ashley hopes to gain insights into how the brain and mind process information and how this knowledge can inform teacher practice and, ultimately, help learners understand mathematics.

After having taught for over ten years, Ashley completed her MSc, with Distinction, at the Department of Education, and her dissertation was “Highly Commended” by the British Educational Research Association (BERA). She is committed to making mathematics more accessible for all learners and strives for research that is not only impactful but also directly applicable to the classroom.

I am a Research Project Coordinator and Co-PI at the Department of Education for a project on Education, Purpose and Human Flourishing in Times of Uncertainty (EPHF), and the Templeton World Charity Foundation Fellow in Comparative Education at St Antony’s College, Oxford.

I have a multi-disciplinary background and experience. Academically I am an Art Historian specialising in late 18th and early 19th-century French aesthetics, and prior to my return to academia I had a career in the international finance, entrepreneurial business and high net worth family business sectors. I have published and taught at the University of Oxford on late eighteenth-and early nineteenth century art, history and aesthetics. Drawing on my experience as Lay Chaplain at Somerville College, Oxford I have also published on religious education. In addition to my position in the Education Department I am the Principal Advisor for Strategic Relationships and Partnerships at the Templeton World Charity Foundation Inc where I work closely with other foundations, INGOs and public policy organisations.

Publications List

Xiaona Wang is a DPhil student in Education, at St. Antony’s College, the University of Oxford. Xiaona’s doctoral research is fully funded by the University of Oxford (Clarendon Fund Scholarship and St. Antony’s College The Warden’s Scholarship). She is also a member at the Center for Global Higher Education.

Before her DPhil, Xiaona obtained her M.A degree in Higher Education at Graduate School of Education at Peking University, and B.A at the Faulty of Education from Beijing Normal University in China with first-class honour. She also studied at the University of Manchester as an exchange student in the School of Social Science.

Previously, Xiaona worked at Global Education Cluster in UNICEF, Geneva, where she began her research on the international scientific collaboration between China and Switzerland, and this experience later became the starting point of her master thesis. In her master’s thesis, Xiaona used a longitudinal research method in following a group of Chinese scientists who studied and worked in Switzerland. Through semi-structured interviews, she explored how collaborative relationships between individual scientists began and developed.

Xiaona has strong research interests in the science studies, internationalization and globalization of higher education. Her doctoral research is going to continue to explore the scientific knowledge networks between China and Switzerland under the influence of geopolitical factors.

Wanlin Cai is a DPhil student in higher education and a member of CGHE research group at the Department of Education.

Wanlin’s research interest lies in international higher education, higher education policies and economy, with a specific focus on World-Class Universities.

She is also a member of South China Global Talent Institute, Center for China and Globalisation, where she focuses on the research of talent policy and development in the Great Bay Area in China.

Prior to her beginning as a DPhil student, Wanlin read for the M.Sc in Higher Education at the University of Oxford and the M.Sc in Management and Enterprise Growth at the University of Glasgow.

Naosuke is a DPhil student whose research interests are Global Englishes and mutual intelligibility in English communication.

Naosuke finished an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition at the University of Oxford with distinction in 2019. His DPhil research focuses on the intelligibility of non-native English speakers. Specifically, he would like to seek what kind of English pronunciation features are critical for successful English communication between non-native English speakers.

Adam, from Ethiopia, is interested in looking at the role of education in peacebuilding and conflicts.

Akira is a DPhil Student in Anthropology affiliated with the School of Anthropology & Museum Ethnography, and associated with both the Department of Education and Nissan Institute of Japanese Studies. He is supervised by David Mills and Roger Goodman.

Akira’s doctoral research rests with the concepts of ‘international’ and ‘global education,’ and is grounded in the recent emergence and growth of International Baccalaureate (IB) education in Japan. Focused on IB educator training across several higher education institutions (HEIs), Akira aims – solely through digital anthropological approaches – to contextualize the everyday negotiations of ‘international’ and ‘global’ knowledge, both by those receiving and administering its training. Considering social, political, economic and cognitive aspects, one key objective of this research hopes to inform educational practitioners and policy-makers of some of the conceptual and social challenges that emerge with dissonant notions of cultivating ‘international’ and ‘global people.’

Akira has been an Associate Researcher at the Graduate School of Teacher Education, Tokyo Gakugei University since autumn 2020, a post he continues to hold until the end of his doctoral degree. He also currently works as an Anthropological Analyst for Contemplative Spaces, a consultancy focused on designing and delivering a range of leadership development initiatives for individuals, groups, and organizational bodies. His future career plans include further anthropological research and establishing consultancy services dedicated to various inclusion-based development initiatives.

Amelia is passionate about access to and the effects of environmental education globally, particularly in the Galápagos Islands of Ecuador.

Because she experienced a wealth of informal and non-formal environmental education from her parents and from explorations growing up in Southern Oregon, she is interested in researching how environmental education manifests in global communities. She fell in love with the Galápagos on a structured university-led trip during her undergraduate studies and realized that there was a dearth of research on social aspects of the communities living on the islands.  Because of this, she pursued research in the Galápagos in 2014 on the prevalence of and access to both formal and informal (provided by numerous NGOs and government agencies) environmental education for students on the islands, and on the level of student environmental literacy in 28 schools.

Her Dphil research focus, under the supervision of Dr. Ann Childs and Dr. Steve Puttick, is on access to and effects of Experiential Environmental Education for students living in the Galápagos Islands, and on the production of research on the social sphere in Galápagos.

Prior to starting her Dphil at Oxford, she worked in alliances and partnerships at tech companies in the San Francisco Bay Area. Most recently, she was the Director of Global Partnerships at Conversica, a conversational AI platform, and cultivated, trained, and drove pipeline with select international resellers in APAC, EMEA, and LATAM, and with regional resellers in the United States. She also assisted with the design and construction of the Conversica partner program.

In her free time, she is a free-lance food photographer, food stylist, food blogger, recipe developer, and gluten free baker for her online blog and social handle, Sisters Sans Gluten (www.sisterssansgluten), which she created with her sister in 2018. She also continues to sing informally and takes voice lessons remotely with instructor Corey Head of San Francisco.

She holds a BA in both Anthropology and Music (vocal performance), and an MA in Latin American Studies from Stanford University. Highlights from Stanford include: playing and touring as a performing member of Stanford Taiko (Japanese ensemble drumming) for four years; singing with the Stanford Chamber Chorale led by Professor Steve Sano; studying voice with Wendy Hillhouse; participating in music department operas; performing in self-organized recitals showcasing western art songs, western musical theater, and Latin American art songs; studying abroad in Santiago, Chile; and learning Quechua during her masters program with Marisol Necochea.

Abdul Karim has completed a Bachelor of Science in Bioengineering and Computational Medicine (Imperial College London), a Bachelor of Medicine and Bachelor of Surgery (Queen Mary University of London), and Master of Science in the Philosophy of Science and Economics (The London School of Economics).

He has delivered lectures on the Philosophy of Human Nature and the History of Metaethics at the University of Cambridge and for Health Education East Midlands. This, in addition to the current positions he holds as a Hospital Doctor and Health Policy and Management Advisor at the University Hospitals of Leicester NHS Trust.

Abdul Karim’s current areas of interest include the biological definition of psychological states relevant to the learning environment, and the influence of language on the variable interpretation of a particular social context. For the latter of which he has published primary research.

Another is the appraisal and deployment of physiological measurement devices in learning environments as a means of quantitatively evaluating psychological states. Such research areas hold promise in enhancing the questionnaire-based evidences of contemporary theories in education, such as those regarding motivation, self-determination and engagement. This will to contribute to the evidence-based public policy optimisation in education and social care.

 

Publications

Ismail, A.K. 2017. A Cross Sectional Study to Explore the Effect of the Linguistic Origin and Evolution of a Language on Patient Interpretation of Haematological Cancers. Advances in Biological Research. 11 (4): 225-232.

Ismail, A.K. 2017. The Origin of the Arabic Medical Term for Cancer. Advances in Biological Research. 11 (4): 198-201.

Ismail, A.K. 2018. The Impact of da Vinci’s Anatomical Drawings and Calculations on Foundation of Orthopaedics. Advances in Biological Research. 12 (1): 26-30.

As a mathematics teacher who believes that anyone can understand mathematics, Ashley is keenly interested in developing interventions and resources for learners who struggle with the subject. More specifically, she is focusing on the transitionary moment in the classroom when discussions have ceased, and practice begins and how this transition can become more fluid for learners.

By drawing on research from education, psychology and cognitive neuroscience, Ashley hopes to gain insights into how the brain and mind process information and how this knowledge can inform teacher practice and, ultimately, help learners understand mathematics.

After having taught for over ten years, Ashley completed her MSc, with Distinction, at the Department of Education, and her dissertation was “Highly Commended” by the British Educational Research Association (BERA). She is committed to making mathematics more accessible for all learners and strives for research that is not only impactful but also directly applicable to the classroom.

I am a Research Project Coordinator and Co-PI at the Department of Education for a project on Education, Purpose and Human Flourishing in Times of Uncertainty (EPHF), and the Templeton World Charity Foundation Fellow in Comparative Education at St Antony’s College, Oxford.

I have a multi-disciplinary background and experience. Academically I am an Art Historian specialising in late 18th and early 19th-century French aesthetics, and prior to my return to academia I had a career in the international finance, entrepreneurial business and high net worth family business sectors. I have published and taught at the University of Oxford on late eighteenth-and early nineteenth century art, history and aesthetics. Drawing on my experience as Lay Chaplain at Somerville College, Oxford I have also published on religious education. In addition to my position in the Education Department I am the Principal Advisor for Strategic Relationships and Partnerships at the Templeton World Charity Foundation Inc where I work closely with other foundations, INGOs and public policy organisations.

Publications List

Xiaona Wang is a DPhil student in Education, at St. Antony’s College, the University of Oxford. Xiaona’s doctoral research is fully funded by the University of Oxford (Clarendon Fund Scholarship and St. Antony’s College The Warden’s Scholarship). She is also a member at the Center for Global Higher Education.

Before her DPhil, Xiaona obtained her M.A degree in Higher Education at Graduate School of Education at Peking University, and B.A at the Faulty of Education from Beijing Normal University in China with first-class honour. She also studied at the University of Manchester as an exchange student in the School of Social Science.

Previously, Xiaona worked at Global Education Cluster in UNICEF, Geneva, where she began her research on the international scientific collaboration between China and Switzerland, and this experience later became the starting point of her master thesis. In her master’s thesis, Xiaona used a longitudinal research method in following a group of Chinese scientists who studied and worked in Switzerland. Through semi-structured interviews, she explored how collaborative relationships between individual scientists began and developed.

Xiaona has strong research interests in the science studies, internationalization and globalization of higher education. Her doctoral research is going to continue to explore the scientific knowledge networks between China and Switzerland under the influence of geopolitical factors.

Wanlin Cai is a DPhil student in higher education and a member of CGHE research group at the Department of Education.

Wanlin’s research interest lies in international higher education, higher education policies and economy, with a specific focus on World-Class Universities.

She is also a member of South China Global Talent Institute, Center for China and Globalisation, where she focuses on the research of talent policy and development in the Great Bay Area in China.

Prior to her beginning as a DPhil student, Wanlin read for the M.Sc in Higher Education at the University of Oxford and the M.Sc in Management and Enterprise Growth at the University of Glasgow.

Naosuke is a DPhil student whose research interests are Global Englishes and mutual intelligibility in English communication.

Naosuke finished an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition at the University of Oxford with distinction in 2019. His DPhil research focuses on the intelligibility of non-native English speakers. Specifically, he would like to seek what kind of English pronunciation features are critical for successful English communication between non-native English speakers.

Adam, from Ethiopia, is interested in looking at the role of education in peacebuilding and conflicts.

Akira is a DPhil Student in Anthropology affiliated with the School of Anthropology & Museum Ethnography, and associated with both the Department of Education and Nissan Institute of Japanese Studies. He is supervised by David Mills and Roger Goodman.

Akira’s doctoral research rests with the concepts of ‘international’ and ‘global education,’ and is grounded in the recent emergence and growth of International Baccalaureate (IB) education in Japan. Focused on IB educator training across several higher education institutions (HEIs), Akira aims – solely through digital anthropological approaches – to contextualize the everyday negotiations of ‘international’ and ‘global’ knowledge, both by those receiving and administering its training. Considering social, political, economic and cognitive aspects, one key objective of this research hopes to inform educational practitioners and policy-makers of some of the conceptual and social challenges that emerge with dissonant notions of cultivating ‘international’ and ‘global people.’

Akira has been an Associate Researcher at the Graduate School of Teacher Education, Tokyo Gakugei University since autumn 2020, a post he continues to hold until the end of his doctoral degree. He also currently works as an Anthropological Analyst for Contemplative Spaces, a consultancy focused on designing and delivering a range of leadership development initiatives for individuals, groups, and organizational bodies. His future career plans include further anthropological research and establishing consultancy services dedicated to various inclusion-based development initiatives.

Amelia is passionate about access to and the effects of environmental education globally, particularly in the Galápagos Islands of Ecuador.

Because she experienced a wealth of informal and non-formal environmental education from her parents and from explorations growing up in Southern Oregon, she is interested in researching how environmental education manifests in global communities. She fell in love with the Galápagos on a structured university-led trip during her undergraduate studies and realized that there was a dearth of research on social aspects of the communities living on the islands.  Because of this, she pursued research in the Galápagos in 2014 on the prevalence of and access to both formal and informal (provided by numerous NGOs and government agencies) environmental education for students on the islands, and on the level of student environmental literacy in 28 schools.

Her Dphil research focus, under the supervision of Dr. Ann Childs and Dr. Steve Puttick, is on access to and effects of Experiential Environmental Education for students living in the Galápagos Islands, and on the production of research on the social sphere in Galápagos.

Prior to starting her Dphil at Oxford, she worked in alliances and partnerships at tech companies in the San Francisco Bay Area. Most recently, she was the Director of Global Partnerships at Conversica, a conversational AI platform, and cultivated, trained, and drove pipeline with select international resellers in APAC, EMEA, and LATAM, and with regional resellers in the United States. She also assisted with the design and construction of the Conversica partner program.

In her free time, she is a free-lance food photographer, food stylist, food blogger, recipe developer, and gluten free baker for her online blog and social handle, Sisters Sans Gluten (www.sisterssansgluten), which she created with her sister in 2018. She also continues to sing informally and takes voice lessons remotely with instructor Corey Head of San Francisco.

She holds a BA in both Anthropology and Music (vocal performance), and an MA in Latin American Studies from Stanford University. Highlights from Stanford include: playing and touring as a performing member of Stanford Taiko (Japanese ensemble drumming) for four years; singing with the Stanford Chamber Chorale led by Professor Steve Sano; studying voice with Wendy Hillhouse; participating in music department operas; performing in self-organized recitals showcasing western art songs, western musical theater, and Latin American art songs; studying abroad in Santiago, Chile; and learning Quechua during her masters program with Marisol Necochea.

Abdul Karim has completed a Bachelor of Science in Bioengineering and Computational Medicine (Imperial College London), a Bachelor of Medicine and Bachelor of Surgery (Queen Mary University of London), and Master of Science in the Philosophy of Science and Economics (The London School of Economics).

He has delivered lectures on the Philosophy of Human Nature and the History of Metaethics at the University of Cambridge and for Health Education East Midlands. This, in addition to the current positions he holds as a Hospital Doctor and Health Policy and Management Advisor at the University Hospitals of Leicester NHS Trust.

Abdul Karim’s current areas of interest include the biological definition of psychological states relevant to the learning environment, and the influence of language on the variable interpretation of a particular social context. For the latter of which he has published primary research.

Another is the appraisal and deployment of physiological measurement devices in learning environments as a means of quantitatively evaluating psychological states. Such research areas hold promise in enhancing the questionnaire-based evidences of contemporary theories in education, such as those regarding motivation, self-determination and engagement. This will to contribute to the evidence-based public policy optimisation in education and social care.

 

Publications

Ismail, A.K. 2017. A Cross Sectional Study to Explore the Effect of the Linguistic Origin and Evolution of a Language on Patient Interpretation of Haematological Cancers. Advances in Biological Research. 11 (4): 225-232.

Ismail, A.K. 2017. The Origin of the Arabic Medical Term for Cancer. Advances in Biological Research. 11 (4): 198-201.

Ismail, A.K. 2018. The Impact of da Vinci’s Anatomical Drawings and Calculations on Foundation of Orthopaedics. Advances in Biological Research. 12 (1): 26-30.

As a mathematics teacher who believes that anyone can understand mathematics, Ashley is keenly interested in developing interventions and resources for learners who struggle with the subject. More specifically, she is focusing on the transitionary moment in the classroom when discussions have ceased, and practice begins and how this transition can become more fluid for learners.

By drawing on research from education, psychology and cognitive neuroscience, Ashley hopes to gain insights into how the brain and mind process information and how this knowledge can inform teacher practice and, ultimately, help learners understand mathematics.

After having taught for over ten years, Ashley completed her MSc, with Distinction, at the Department of Education, and her dissertation was “Highly Commended” by the British Educational Research Association (BERA). She is committed to making mathematics more accessible for all learners and strives for research that is not only impactful but also directly applicable to the classroom.

I am a Research Project Coordinator and Co-PI at the Department of Education for a project on Education, Purpose and Human Flourishing in Times of Uncertainty (EPHF), and the Templeton World Charity Foundation Fellow in Comparative Education at St Antony’s College, Oxford.

I have a multi-disciplinary background and experience. Academically I am an Art Historian specialising in late 18th and early 19th-century French aesthetics, and prior to my return to academia I had a career in the international finance, entrepreneurial business and high net worth family business sectors. I have published and taught at the University of Oxford on late eighteenth-and early nineteenth century art, history and aesthetics. Drawing on my experience as Lay Chaplain at Somerville College, Oxford I have also published on religious education. In addition to my position in the Education Department I am the Principal Advisor for Strategic Relationships and Partnerships at the Templeton World Charity Foundation Inc where I work closely with other foundations, INGOs and public policy organisations.

Publications List

Xiaona Wang is a DPhil student in Education, at St. Antony’s College, the University of Oxford. Xiaona’s doctoral research is fully funded by the University of Oxford (Clarendon Fund Scholarship and St. Antony’s College The Warden’s Scholarship). She is also a member at the Center for Global Higher Education.

Before her DPhil, Xiaona obtained her M.A degree in Higher Education at Graduate School of Education at Peking University, and B.A at the Faulty of Education from Beijing Normal University in China with first-class honour. She also studied at the University of Manchester as an exchange student in the School of Social Science.

Previously, Xiaona worked at Global Education Cluster in UNICEF, Geneva, where she began her research on the international scientific collaboration between China and Switzerland, and this experience later became the starting point of her master thesis. In her master’s thesis, Xiaona used a longitudinal research method in following a group of Chinese scientists who studied and worked in Switzerland. Through semi-structured interviews, she explored how collaborative relationships between individual scientists began and developed.

Xiaona has strong research interests in the science studies, internationalization and globalization of higher education. Her doctoral research is going to continue to explore the scientific knowledge networks between China and Switzerland under the influence of geopolitical factors.

Wanlin Cai is a DPhil student in higher education and a member of CGHE research group at the Department of Education.

Wanlin’s research interest lies in international higher education, higher education policies and economy, with a specific focus on World-Class Universities.

She is also a member of South China Global Talent Institute, Center for China and Globalisation, where she focuses on the research of talent policy and development in the Great Bay Area in China.

Prior to her beginning as a DPhil student, Wanlin read for the M.Sc in Higher Education at the University of Oxford and the M.Sc in Management and Enterprise Growth at the University of Glasgow.

Naosuke is a DPhil student whose research interests are Global Englishes and mutual intelligibility in English communication.

Naosuke finished an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition at the University of Oxford with distinction in 2019. His DPhil research focuses on the intelligibility of non-native English speakers. Specifically, he would like to seek what kind of English pronunciation features are critical for successful English communication between non-native English speakers.

Adam, from Ethiopia, is interested in looking at the role of education in peacebuilding and conflicts.

Akira is a DPhil Student in Anthropology affiliated with the School of Anthropology & Museum Ethnography, and associated with both the Department of Education and Nissan Institute of Japanese Studies. He is supervised by David Mills and Roger Goodman.

Akira’s doctoral research rests with the concepts of ‘international’ and ‘global education,’ and is grounded in the recent emergence and growth of International Baccalaureate (IB) education in Japan. Focused on IB educator training across several higher education institutions (HEIs), Akira aims – solely through digital anthropological approaches – to contextualize the everyday negotiations of ‘international’ and ‘global’ knowledge, both by those receiving and administering its training. Considering social, political, economic and cognitive aspects, one key objective of this research hopes to inform educational practitioners and policy-makers of some of the conceptual and social challenges that emerge with dissonant notions of cultivating ‘international’ and ‘global people.’

Akira has been an Associate Researcher at the Graduate School of Teacher Education, Tokyo Gakugei University since autumn 2020, a post he continues to hold until the end of his doctoral degree. He also currently works as an Anthropological Analyst for Contemplative Spaces, a consultancy focused on designing and delivering a range of leadership development initiatives for individuals, groups, and organizational bodies. His future career plans include further anthropological research and establishing consultancy services dedicated to various inclusion-based development initiatives.

Amelia is passionate about access to and the effects of environmental education globally, particularly in the Galápagos Islands of Ecuador.

Because she experienced a wealth of informal and non-formal environmental education from her parents and from explorations growing up in Southern Oregon, she is interested in researching how environmental education manifests in global communities. She fell in love with the Galápagos on a structured university-led trip during her undergraduate studies and realized that there was a dearth of research on social aspects of the communities living on the islands.  Because of this, she pursued research in the Galápagos in 2014 on the prevalence of and access to both formal and informal (provided by numerous NGOs and government agencies) environmental education for students on the islands, and on the level of student environmental literacy in 28 schools.

Her Dphil research focus, under the supervision of Dr. Ann Childs and Dr. Steve Puttick, is on access to and effects of Experiential Environmental Education for students living in the Galápagos Islands, and on the production of research on the social sphere in Galápagos.

Prior to starting her Dphil at Oxford, she worked in alliances and partnerships at tech companies in the San Francisco Bay Area. Most recently, she was the Director of Global Partnerships at Conversica, a conversational AI platform, and cultivated, trained, and drove pipeline with select international resellers in APAC, EMEA, and LATAM, and with regional resellers in the United States. She also assisted with the design and construction of the Conversica partner program.

In her free time, she is a free-lance food photographer, food stylist, food blogger, recipe developer, and gluten free baker for her online blog and social handle, Sisters Sans Gluten (www.sisterssansgluten), which she created with her sister in 2018. She also continues to sing informally and takes voice lessons remotely with instructor Corey Head of San Francisco.

She holds a BA in both Anthropology and Music (vocal performance), and an MA in Latin American Studies from Stanford University. Highlights from Stanford include: playing and touring as a performing member of Stanford Taiko (Japanese ensemble drumming) for four years; singing with the Stanford Chamber Chorale led by Professor Steve Sano; studying voice with Wendy Hillhouse; participating in music department operas; performing in self-organized recitals showcasing western art songs, western musical theater, and Latin American art songs; studying abroad in Santiago, Chile; and learning Quechua during her masters program with Marisol Necochea.

Abdul Karim has completed a Bachelor of Science in Bioengineering and Computational Medicine (Imperial College London), a Bachelor of Medicine and Bachelor of Surgery (Queen Mary University of London), and Master of Science in the Philosophy of Science and Economics (The London School of Economics).

He has delivered lectures on the Philosophy of Human Nature and the History of Metaethics at the University of Cambridge and for Health Education East Midlands. This, in addition to the current positions he holds as a Hospital Doctor and Health Policy and Management Advisor at the University Hospitals of Leicester NHS Trust.

Abdul Karim’s current areas of interest include the biological definition of psychological states relevant to the learning environment, and the influence of language on the variable interpretation of a particular social context. For the latter of which he has published primary research.

Another is the appraisal and deployment of physiological measurement devices in learning environments as a means of quantitatively evaluating psychological states. Such research areas hold promise in enhancing the questionnaire-based evidences of contemporary theories in education, such as those regarding motivation, self-determination and engagement. This will to contribute to the evidence-based public policy optimisation in education and social care.

 

Publications

Ismail, A.K. 2017. A Cross Sectional Study to Explore the Effect of the Linguistic Origin and Evolution of a Language on Patient Interpretation of Haematological Cancers. Advances in Biological Research. 11 (4): 225-232.

Ismail, A.K. 2017. The Origin of the Arabic Medical Term for Cancer. Advances in Biological Research. 11 (4): 198-201.

Ismail, A.K. 2018. The Impact of da Vinci’s Anatomical Drawings and Calculations on Foundation of Orthopaedics. Advances in Biological Research. 12 (1): 26-30.

As a mathematics teacher who believes that anyone can understand mathematics, Ashley is keenly interested in developing interventions and resources for learners who struggle with the subject. More specifically, she is focusing on the transitionary moment in the classroom when discussions have ceased, and practice begins and how this transition can become more fluid for learners.

By drawing on research from education, psychology and cognitive neuroscience, Ashley hopes to gain insights into how the brain and mind process information and how this knowledge can inform teacher practice and, ultimately, help learners understand mathematics.

After having taught for over ten years, Ashley completed her MSc, with Distinction, at the Department of Education, and her dissertation was “Highly Commended” by the British Educational Research Association (BERA). She is committed to making mathematics more accessible for all learners and strives for research that is not only impactful but also directly applicable to the classroom.

I am a Research Project Coordinator and Co-PI at the Department of Education for a project on Education, Purpose and Human Flourishing in Times of Uncertainty (EPHF), and the Templeton World Charity Foundation Fellow in Comparative Education at St Antony’s College, Oxford.

I have a multi-disciplinary background and experience. Academically I am an Art Historian specialising in late 18th and early 19th-century French aesthetics, and prior to my return to academia I had a career in the international finance, entrepreneurial business and high net worth family business sectors. I have published and taught at the University of Oxford on late eighteenth-and early nineteenth century art, history and aesthetics. Drawing on my experience as Lay Chaplain at Somerville College, Oxford I have also published on religious education. In addition to my position in the Education Department I am the Principal Advisor for Strategic Relationships and Partnerships at the Templeton World Charity Foundation Inc where I work closely with other foundations, INGOs and public policy organisations.

Publications List

Xiaona Wang is a DPhil student in Education, at St. Antony’s College, the University of Oxford. Xiaona’s doctoral research is fully funded by the University of Oxford (Clarendon Fund Scholarship and St. Antony’s College The Warden’s Scholarship). She is also a member at the Center for Global Higher Education.

Before her DPhil, Xiaona obtained her M.A degree in Higher Education at Graduate School of Education at Peking University, and B.A at the Faulty of Education from Beijing Normal University in China with first-class honour. She also studied at the University of Manchester as an exchange student in the School of Social Science.

Previously, Xiaona worked at Global Education Cluster in UNICEF, Geneva, where she began her research on the international scientific collaboration between China and Switzerland, and this experience later became the starting point of her master thesis. In her master’s thesis, Xiaona used a longitudinal research method in following a group of Chinese scientists who studied and worked in Switzerland. Through semi-structured interviews, she explored how collaborative relationships between individual scientists began and developed.

Xiaona has strong research interests in the science studies, internationalization and globalization of higher education. Her doctoral research is going to continue to explore the scientific knowledge networks between China and Switzerland under the influence of geopolitical factors.

Wanlin Cai is a DPhil student in higher education and a member of CGHE research group at the Department of Education.

Wanlin’s research interest lies in international higher education, higher education policies and economy, with a specific focus on World-Class Universities.

She is also a member of South China Global Talent Institute, Center for China and Globalisation, where she focuses on the research of talent policy and development in the Great Bay Area in China.

Prior to her beginning as a DPhil student, Wanlin read for the M.Sc in Higher Education at the University of Oxford and the M.Sc in Management and Enterprise Growth at the University of Glasgow.

Naosuke is a DPhil student whose research interests are Global Englishes and mutual intelligibility in English communication.

Naosuke finished an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition at the University of Oxford with distinction in 2019. His DPhil research focuses on the intelligibility of non-native English speakers. Specifically, he would like to seek what kind of English pronunciation features are critical for successful English communication between non-native English speakers.

Adam, from Ethiopia, is interested in looking at the role of education in peacebuilding and conflicts.

Akira is a DPhil Student in Anthropology affiliated with the School of Anthropology & Museum Ethnography, and associated with both the Department of Education and Nissan Institute of Japanese Studies. He is supervised by David Mills and Roger Goodman.

Akira’s doctoral research rests with the concepts of ‘international’ and ‘global education,’ and is grounded in the recent emergence and growth of International Baccalaureate (IB) education in Japan. Focused on IB educator training across several higher education institutions (HEIs), Akira aims – solely through digital anthropological approaches – to contextualize the everyday negotiations of ‘international’ and ‘global’ knowledge, both by those receiving and administering its training. Considering social, political, economic and cognitive aspects, one key objective of this research hopes to inform educational practitioners and policy-makers of some of the conceptual and social challenges that emerge with dissonant notions of cultivating ‘international’ and ‘global people.’

Akira has been an Associate Researcher at the Graduate School of Teacher Education, Tokyo Gakugei University since autumn 2020, a post he continues to hold until the end of his doctoral degree. He also currently works as an Anthropological Analyst for Contemplative Spaces, a consultancy focused on designing and delivering a range of leadership development initiatives for individuals, groups, and organizational bodies. His future career plans include further anthropological research and establishing consultancy services dedicated to various inclusion-based development initiatives.

Amelia is passionate about access to and the effects of environmental education globally, particularly in the Galápagos Islands of Ecuador.

Because she experienced a wealth of informal and non-formal environmental education from her parents and from explorations growing up in Southern Oregon, she is interested in researching how environmental education manifests in global communities. She fell in love with the Galápagos on a structured university-led trip during her undergraduate studies and realized that there was a dearth of research on social aspects of the communities living on the islands.  Because of this, she pursued research in the Galápagos in 2014 on the prevalence of and access to both formal and informal (provided by numerous NGOs and government agencies) environmental education for students on the islands, and on the level of student environmental literacy in 28 schools.

Her Dphil research focus, under the supervision of Dr. Ann Childs and Dr. Steve Puttick, is on access to and effects of Experiential Environmental Education for students living in the Galápagos Islands, and on the production of research on the social sphere in Galápagos.

Prior to starting her Dphil at Oxford, she worked in alliances and partnerships at tech companies in the San Francisco Bay Area. Most recently, she was the Director of Global Partnerships at Conversica, a conversational AI platform, and cultivated, trained, and drove pipeline with select international resellers in APAC, EMEA, and LATAM, and with regional resellers in the United States. She also assisted with the design and construction of the Conversica partner program.

In her free time, she is a free-lance food photographer, food stylist, food blogger, recipe developer, and gluten free baker for her online blog and social handle, Sisters Sans Gluten (www.sisterssansgluten), which she created with her sister in 2018. She also continues to sing informally and takes voice lessons remotely with instructor Corey Head of San Francisco.

She holds a BA in both Anthropology and Music (vocal performance), and an MA in Latin American Studies from Stanford University. Highlights from Stanford include: playing and touring as a performing member of Stanford Taiko (Japanese ensemble drumming) for four years; singing with the Stanford Chamber Chorale led by Professor Steve Sano; studying voice with Wendy Hillhouse; participating in music department operas; performing in self-organized recitals showcasing western art songs, western musical theater, and Latin American art songs; studying abroad in Santiago, Chile; and learning Quechua during her masters program with Marisol Necochea.

Abdul Karim has completed a Bachelor of Science in Bioengineering and Computational Medicine (Imperial College London), a Bachelor of Medicine and Bachelor of Surgery (Queen Mary University of London), and Master of Science in the Philosophy of Science and Economics (The London School of Economics).

He has delivered lectures on the Philosophy of Human Nature and the History of Metaethics at the University of Cambridge and for Health Education East Midlands. This, in addition to the current positions he holds as a Hospital Doctor and Health Policy and Management Advisor at the University Hospitals of Leicester NHS Trust.

Abdul Karim’s current areas of interest include the biological definition of psychological states relevant to the learning environment, and the influence of language on the variable interpretation of a particular social context. For the latter of which he has published primary research.

Another is the appraisal and deployment of physiological measurement devices in learning environments as a means of quantitatively evaluating psychological states. Such research areas hold promise in enhancing the questionnaire-based evidences of contemporary theories in education, such as those regarding motivation, self-determination and engagement. This will to contribute to the evidence-based public policy optimisation in education and social care.

 

Publications

Ismail, A.K. 2017. A Cross Sectional Study to Explore the Effect of the Linguistic Origin and Evolution of a Language on Patient Interpretation of Haematological Cancers. Advances in Biological Research. 11 (4): 225-232.

Ismail, A.K. 2017. The Origin of the Arabic Medical Term for Cancer. Advances in Biological Research. 11 (4): 198-201.

Ismail, A.K. 2018. The Impact of da Vinci’s Anatomical Drawings and Calculations on Foundation of Orthopaedics. Advances in Biological Research. 12 (1): 26-30.

As a mathematics teacher who believes that anyone can understand mathematics, Ashley is keenly interested in developing interventions and resources for learners who struggle with the subject. More specifically, she is focusing on the transitionary moment in the classroom when discussions have ceased, and practice begins and how this transition can become more fluid for learners.

By drawing on research from education, psychology and cognitive neuroscience, Ashley hopes to gain insights into how the brain and mind process information and how this knowledge can inform teacher practice and, ultimately, help learners understand mathematics.

After having taught for over ten years, Ashley completed her MSc, with Distinction, at the Department of Education, and her dissertation was “Highly Commended” by the British Educational Research Association (BERA). She is committed to making mathematics more accessible for all learners and strives for research that is not only impactful but also directly applicable to the classroom.

I am a Research Project Coordinator and Co-PI at the Department of Education for a project on Education, Purpose and Human Flourishing in Times of Uncertainty (EPHF), and the Templeton World Charity Foundation Fellow in Comparative Education at St Antony’s College, Oxford.

I have a multi-disciplinary background and experience. Academically I am an Art Historian specialising in late 18th and early 19th-century French aesthetics, and prior to my return to academia I had a career in the international finance, entrepreneurial business and high net worth family business sectors. I have published and taught at the University of Oxford on late eighteenth-and early nineteenth century art, history and aesthetics. Drawing on my experience as Lay Chaplain at Somerville College, Oxford I have also published on religious education. In addition to my position in the Education Department I am the Principal Advisor for Strategic Relationships and Partnerships at the Templeton World Charity Foundation Inc where I work closely with other foundations, INGOs and public policy organisations.

Publications List

Xiaona Wang is a DPhil student in Education, at St. Antony’s College, the University of Oxford. Xiaona’s doctoral research is fully funded by the University of Oxford (Clarendon Fund Scholarship and St. Antony’s College The Warden’s Scholarship). She is also a member at the Center for Global Higher Education.

Before her DPhil, Xiaona obtained her M.A degree in Higher Education at Graduate School of Education at Peking University, and B.A at the Faulty of Education from Beijing Normal University in China with first-class honour. She also studied at the University of Manchester as an exchange student in the School of Social Science.

Previously, Xiaona worked at Global Education Cluster in UNICEF, Geneva, where she began her research on the international scientific collaboration between China and Switzerland, and this experience later became the starting point of her master thesis. In her master’s thesis, Xiaona used a longitudinal research method in following a group of Chinese scientists who studied and worked in Switzerland. Through semi-structured interviews, she explored how collaborative relationships between individual scientists began and developed.

Xiaona has strong research interests in the science studies, internationalization and globalization of higher education. Her doctoral research is going to continue to explore the scientific knowledge networks between China and Switzerland under the influence of geopolitical factors.

Wanlin Cai is a DPhil student in higher education and a member of CGHE research group at the Department of Education.

Wanlin’s research interest lies in international higher education, higher education policies and economy, with a specific focus on World-Class Universities.

She is also a member of South China Global Talent Institute, Center for China and Globalisation, where she focuses on the research of talent policy and development in the Great Bay Area in China.

Prior to her beginning as a DPhil student, Wanlin read for the M.Sc in Higher Education at the University of Oxford and the M.Sc in Management and Enterprise Growth at the University of Glasgow.

Naosuke is a DPhil student whose research interests are Global Englishes and mutual intelligibility in English communication.

Naosuke finished an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition at the University of Oxford with distinction in 2019. His DPhil research focuses on the intelligibility of non-native English speakers. Specifically, he would like to seek what kind of English pronunciation features are critical for successful English communication between non-native English speakers.

Adam, from Ethiopia, is interested in looking at the role of education in peacebuilding and conflicts.

Akira is a DPhil Student in Anthropology affiliated with the School of Anthropology & Museum Ethnography, and associated with both the Department of Education and Nissan Institute of Japanese Studies. He is supervised by David Mills and Roger Goodman.

Akira’s doctoral research rests with the concepts of ‘international’ and ‘global education,’ and is grounded in the recent emergence and growth of International Baccalaureate (IB) education in Japan. Focused on IB educator training across several higher education institutions (HEIs), Akira aims – solely through digital anthropological approaches – to contextualize the everyday negotiations of ‘international’ and ‘global’ knowledge, both by those receiving and administering its training. Considering social, political, economic and cognitive aspects, one key objective of this research hopes to inform educational practitioners and policy-makers of some of the conceptual and social challenges that emerge with dissonant notions of cultivating ‘international’ and ‘global people.’

Akira has been an Associate Researcher at the Graduate School of Teacher Education, Tokyo Gakugei University since autumn 2020, a post he continues to hold until the end of his doctoral degree. He also currently works as an Anthropological Analyst for Contemplative Spaces, a consultancy focused on designing and delivering a range of leadership development initiatives for individuals, groups, and organizational bodies. His future career plans include further anthropological research and establishing consultancy services dedicated to various inclusion-based development initiatives.

Amelia is passionate about access to and the effects of environmental education globally, particularly in the Galápagos Islands of Ecuador.

Because she experienced a wealth of informal and non-formal environmental education from her parents and from explorations growing up in Southern Oregon, she is interested in researching how environmental education manifests in global communities. She fell in love with the Galápagos on a structured university-led trip during her undergraduate studies and realized that there was a dearth of research on social aspects of the communities living on the islands.  Because of this, she pursued research in the Galápagos in 2014 on the prevalence of and access to both formal and informal (provided by numerous NGOs and government agencies) environmental education for students on the islands, and on the level of student environmental literacy in 28 schools.

Her Dphil research focus, under the supervision of Dr. Ann Childs and Dr. Steve Puttick, is on access to and effects of Experiential Environmental Education for students living in the Galápagos Islands, and on the production of research on the social sphere in Galápagos.

Prior to starting her Dphil at Oxford, she worked in alliances and partnerships at tech companies in the San Francisco Bay Area. Most recently, she was the Director of Global Partnerships at Conversica, a conversational AI platform, and cultivated, trained, and drove pipeline with select international resellers in APAC, EMEA, and LATAM, and with regional resellers in the United States. She also assisted with the design and construction of the Conversica partner program.

In her free time, she is a free-lance food photographer, food stylist, food blogger, recipe developer, and gluten free baker for her online blog and social handle, Sisters Sans Gluten (www.sisterssansgluten), which she created with her sister in 2018. She also continues to sing informally and takes voice lessons remotely with instructor Corey Head of San Francisco.

She holds a BA in both Anthropology and Music (vocal performance), and an MA in Latin American Studies from Stanford University. Highlights from Stanford include: playing and touring as a performing member of Stanford Taiko (Japanese ensemble drumming) for four years; singing with the Stanford Chamber Chorale led by Professor Steve Sano; studying voice with Wendy Hillhouse; participating in music department operas; performing in self-organized recitals showcasing western art songs, western musical theater, and Latin American art songs; studying abroad in Santiago, Chile; and learning Quechua during her masters program with Marisol Necochea.

Abdul Karim has completed a Bachelor of Science in Bioengineering and Computational Medicine (Imperial College London), a Bachelor of Medicine and Bachelor of Surgery (Queen Mary University of London), and Master of Science in the Philosophy of Science and Economics (The London School of Economics).

He has delivered lectures on the Philosophy of Human Nature and the History of Metaethics at the University of Cambridge and for Health Education East Midlands. This, in addition to the current positions he holds as a Hospital Doctor and Health Policy and Management Advisor at the University Hospitals of Leicester NHS Trust.

Abdul Karim’s current areas of interest include the biological definition of psychological states relevant to the learning environment, and the influence of language on the variable interpretation of a particular social context. For the latter of which he has published primary research.

Another is the appraisal and deployment of physiological measurement devices in learning environments as a means of quantitatively evaluating psychological states. Such research areas hold promise in enhancing the questionnaire-based evidences of contemporary theories in education, such as those regarding motivation, self-determination and engagement. This will to contribute to the evidence-based public policy optimisation in education and social care.

 

Publications

Ismail, A.K. 2017. A Cross Sectional Study to Explore the Effect of the Linguistic Origin and Evolution of a Language on Patient Interpretation of Haematological Cancers. Advances in Biological Research. 11 (4): 225-232.

Ismail, A.K. 2017. The Origin of the Arabic Medical Term for Cancer. Advances in Biological Research. 11 (4): 198-201.

Ismail, A.K. 2018. The Impact of da Vinci’s Anatomical Drawings and Calculations on Foundation of Orthopaedics. Advances in Biological Research. 12 (1): 26-30.

As a mathematics teacher who believes that anyone can understand mathematics, Ashley is keenly interested in developing interventions and resources for learners who struggle with the subject. More specifically, she is focusing on the transitionary moment in the classroom when discussions have ceased, and practice begins and how this transition can become more fluid for learners.

By drawing on research from education, psychology and cognitive neuroscience, Ashley hopes to gain insights into how the brain and mind process information and how this knowledge can inform teacher practice and, ultimately, help learners understand mathematics.

After having taught for over ten years, Ashley completed her MSc, with Distinction, at the Department of Education, and her dissertation was “Highly Commended” by the British Educational Research Association (BERA). She is committed to making mathematics more accessible for all learners and strives for research that is not only impactful but also directly applicable to the classroom.

I am a Research Project Coordinator and Co-PI at the Department of Education for a project on Education, Purpose and Human Flourishing in Times of Uncertainty (EPHF), and the Templeton World Charity Foundation Fellow in Comparative Education at St Antony’s College, Oxford.

I have a multi-disciplinary background and experience. Academically I am an Art Historian specialising in late 18th and early 19th-century French aesthetics, and prior to my return to academia I had a career in the international finance, entrepreneurial business and high net worth family business sectors. I have published and taught at the University of Oxford on late eighteenth-and early nineteenth century art, history and aesthetics. Drawing on my experience as Lay Chaplain at Somerville College, Oxford I have also published on religious education. In addition to my position in the Education Department I am the Principal Advisor for Strategic Relationships and Partnerships at the Templeton World Charity Foundation Inc where I work closely with other foundations, INGOs and public policy organisations.

Publications List

Xiaona Wang is a DPhil student in Education, at St. Antony’s College, the University of Oxford. Xiaona’s doctoral research is fully funded by the University of Oxford (Clarendon Fund Scholarship and St. Antony’s College The Warden’s Scholarship). She is also a member at the Center for Global Higher Education.

Before her DPhil, Xiaona obtained her M.A degree in Higher Education at Graduate School of Education at Peking University, and B.A at the Faulty of Education from Beijing Normal University in China with first-class honour. She also studied at the University of Manchester as an exchange student in the School of Social Science.

Previously, Xiaona worked at Global Education Cluster in UNICEF, Geneva, where she began her research on the international scientific collaboration between China and Switzerland, and this experience later became the starting point of her master thesis. In her master’s thesis, Xiaona used a longitudinal research method in following a group of Chinese scientists who studied and worked in Switzerland. Through semi-structured interviews, she explored how collaborative relationships between individual scientists began and developed.

Xiaona has strong research interests in the science studies, internationalization and globalization of higher education. Her doctoral research is going to continue to explore the scientific knowledge networks between China and Switzerland under the influence of geopolitical factors.

Wanlin Cai is a DPhil student in higher education and a member of CGHE research group at the Department of Education.

Wanlin’s research interest lies in international higher education, higher education policies and economy, with a specific focus on World-Class Universities.

She is also a member of South China Global Talent Institute, Center for China and Globalisation, where she focuses on the research of talent policy and development in the Great Bay Area in China.

Prior to her beginning as a DPhil student, Wanlin read for the M.Sc in Higher Education at the University of Oxford and the M.Sc in Management and Enterprise Growth at the University of Glasgow.

Naosuke is a DPhil student whose research interests are Global Englishes and mutual intelligibility in English communication.

Naosuke finished an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition at the University of Oxford with distinction in 2019. His DPhil research focuses on the intelligibility of non-native English speakers. Specifically, he would like to seek what kind of English pronunciation features are critical for successful English communication between non-native English speakers.

Adam, from Ethiopia, is interested in looking at the role of education in peacebuilding and conflicts.

Akira is a DPhil Student in Anthropology affiliated with the School of Anthropology & Museum Ethnography, and associated with both the Department of Education and Nissan Institute of Japanese Studies. He is supervised by David Mills and Roger Goodman.

Akira’s doctoral research rests with the concepts of ‘international’ and ‘global education,’ and is grounded in the recent emergence and growth of International Baccalaureate (IB) education in Japan. Focused on IB educator training across several higher education institutions (HEIs), Akira aims – solely through digital anthropological approaches – to contextualize the everyday negotiations of ‘international’ and ‘global’ knowledge, both by those receiving and administering its training. Considering social, political, economic and cognitive aspects, one key objective of this research hopes to inform educational practitioners and policy-makers of some of the conceptual and social challenges that emerge with dissonant notions of cultivating ‘international’ and ‘global people.’

Akira has been an Associate Researcher at the Graduate School of Teacher Education, Tokyo Gakugei University since autumn 2020, a post he continues to hold until the end of his doctoral degree. He also currently works as an Anthropological Analyst for Contemplative Spaces, a consultancy focused on designing and delivering a range of leadership development initiatives for individuals, groups, and organizational bodies. His future career plans include further anthropological research and establishing consultancy services dedicated to various inclusion-based development initiatives.

Amelia is passionate about access to and the effects of environmental education globally, particularly in the Galápagos Islands of Ecuador.

Because she experienced a wealth of informal and non-formal environmental education from her parents and from explorations growing up in Southern Oregon, she is interested in researching how environmental education manifests in global communities. She fell in love with the Galápagos on a structured university-led trip during her undergraduate studies and realized that there was a dearth of research on social aspects of the communities living on the islands.  Because of this, she pursued research in the Galápagos in 2014 on the prevalence of and access to both formal and informal (provided by numerous NGOs and government agencies) environmental education for students on the islands, and on the level of student environmental literacy in 28 schools.

Her Dphil research focus, under the supervision of Dr. Ann Childs and Dr. Steve Puttick, is on access to and effects of Experiential Environmental Education for students living in the Galápagos Islands, and on the production of research on the social sphere in Galápagos.

Prior to starting her Dphil at Oxford, she worked in alliances and partnerships at tech companies in the San Francisco Bay Area. Most recently, she was the Director of Global Partnerships at Conversica, a conversational AI platform, and cultivated, trained, and drove pipeline with select international resellers in APAC, EMEA, and LATAM, and with regional resellers in the United States. She also assisted with the design and construction of the Conversica partner program.

In her free time, she is a free-lance food photographer, food stylist, food blogger, recipe developer, and gluten free baker for her online blog and social handle, Sisters Sans Gluten (www.sisterssansgluten), which she created with her sister in 2018. She also continues to sing informally and takes voice lessons remotely with instructor Corey Head of San Francisco.

She holds a BA in both Anthropology and Music (vocal performance), and an MA in Latin American Studies from Stanford University. Highlights from Stanford include: playing and touring as a performing member of Stanford Taiko (Japanese ensemble drumming) for four years; singing with the Stanford Chamber Chorale led by Professor Steve Sano; studying voice with Wendy Hillhouse; participating in music department operas; performing in self-organized recitals showcasing western art songs, western musical theater, and Latin American art songs; studying abroad in Santiago, Chile; and learning Quechua during her masters program with Marisol Necochea.

Abdul Karim has completed a Bachelor of Science in Bioengineering and Computational Medicine (Imperial College London), a Bachelor of Medicine and Bachelor of Surgery (Queen Mary University of London), and Master of Science in the Philosophy of Science and Economics (The London School of Economics).

He has delivered lectures on the Philosophy of Human Nature and the History of Metaethics at the University of Cambridge and for Health Education East Midlands. This, in addition to the current positions he holds as a Hospital Doctor and Health Policy and Management Advisor at the University Hospitals of Leicester NHS Trust.

Abdul Karim’s current areas of interest include the biological definition of psychological states relevant to the learning environment, and the influence of language on the variable interpretation of a particular social context. For the latter of which he has published primary research.

Another is the appraisal and deployment of physiological measurement devices in learning environments as a means of quantitatively evaluating psychological states. Such research areas hold promise in enhancing the questionnaire-based evidences of contemporary theories in education, such as those regarding motivation, self-determination and engagement. This will to contribute to the evidence-based public policy optimisation in education and social care.

 

Publications

Ismail, A.K. 2017. A Cross Sectional Study to Explore the Effect of the Linguistic Origin and Evolution of a Language on Patient Interpretation of Haematological Cancers. Advances in Biological Research. 11 (4): 225-232.

Ismail, A.K. 2017. The Origin of the Arabic Medical Term for Cancer. Advances in Biological Research. 11 (4): 198-201.

Ismail, A.K. 2018. The Impact of da Vinci’s Anatomical Drawings and Calculations on Foundation of Orthopaedics. Advances in Biological Research. 12 (1): 26-30.

As a mathematics teacher who believes that anyone can understand mathematics, Ashley is keenly interested in developing interventions and resources for learners who struggle with the subject. More specifically, she is focusing on the transitionary moment in the classroom when discussions have ceased, and practice begins and how this transition can become more fluid for learners.

By drawing on research from education, psychology and cognitive neuroscience, Ashley hopes to gain insights into how the brain and mind process information and how this knowledge can inform teacher practice and, ultimately, help learners understand mathematics.

After having taught for over ten years, Ashley completed her MSc, with Distinction, at the Department of Education, and her dissertation was “Highly Commended” by the British Educational Research Association (BERA). She is committed to making mathematics more accessible for all learners and strives for research that is not only impactful but also directly applicable to the classroom.

I am a Research Project Coordinator and Co-PI at the Department of Education for a project on Education, Purpose and Human Flourishing in Times of Uncertainty (EPHF), and the Templeton World Charity Foundation Fellow in Comparative Education at St Antony’s College, Oxford.

I have a multi-disciplinary background and experience. Academically I am an Art Historian specialising in late 18th and early 19th-century French aesthetics, and prior to my return to academia I had a career in the international finance, entrepreneurial business and high net worth family business sectors. I have published and taught at the University of Oxford on late eighteenth-and early nineteenth century art, history and aesthetics. Drawing on my experience as Lay Chaplain at Somerville College, Oxford I have also published on religious education. In addition to my position in the Education Department I am the Principal Advisor for Strategic Relationships and Partnerships at the Templeton World Charity Foundation Inc where I work closely with other foundations, INGOs and public policy organisations.

Publications List

Xiaona Wang is a DPhil student in Education, at St. Antony’s College, the University of Oxford. Xiaona’s doctoral research is fully funded by the University of Oxford (Clarendon Fund Scholarship and St. Antony’s College The Warden’s Scholarship). She is also a member at the Center for Global Higher Education.

Before her DPhil, Xiaona obtained her M.A degree in Higher Education at Graduate School of Education at Peking University, and B.A at the Faulty of Education from Beijing Normal University in China with first-class honour. She also studied at the University of Manchester as an exchange student in the School of Social Science.

Previously, Xiaona worked at Global Education Cluster in UNICEF, Geneva, where she began her research on the international scientific collaboration between China and Switzerland, and this experience later became the starting point of her master thesis. In her master’s thesis, Xiaona used a longitudinal research method in following a group of Chinese scientists who studied and worked in Switzerland. Through semi-structured interviews, she explored how collaborative relationships between individual scientists began and developed.

Xiaona has strong research interests in the science studies, internationalization and globalization of higher education. Her doctoral research is going to continue to explore the scientific knowledge networks between China and Switzerland under the influence of geopolitical factors.

Wanlin Cai is a DPhil student in higher education and a member of CGHE research group at the Department of Education.

Wanlin’s research interest lies in international higher education, higher education policies and economy, with a specific focus on World-Class Universities.

She is also a member of South China Global Talent Institute, Center for China and Globalisation, where she focuses on the research of talent policy and development in the Great Bay Area in China.

Prior to her beginning as a DPhil student, Wanlin read for the M.Sc in Higher Education at the University of Oxford and the M.Sc in Management and Enterprise Growth at the University of Glasgow.

Naosuke is a DPhil student whose research interests are Global Englishes and mutual intelligibility in English communication.

Naosuke finished an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition at the University of Oxford with distinction in 2019. His DPhil research focuses on the intelligibility of non-native English speakers. Specifically, he would like to seek what kind of English pronunciation features are critical for successful English communication between non-native English speakers.

Adam, from Ethiopia, is interested in looking at the role of education in peacebuilding and conflicts.

Akira is a DPhil Student in Anthropology affiliated with the School of Anthropology & Museum Ethnography, and associated with both the Department of Education and Nissan Institute of Japanese Studies. He is supervised by David Mills and Roger Goodman.

Akira’s doctoral research rests with the concepts of ‘international’ and ‘global education,’ and is grounded in the recent emergence and growth of International Baccalaureate (IB) education in Japan. Focused on IB educator training across several higher education institutions (HEIs), Akira aims – solely through digital anthropological approaches – to contextualize the everyday negotiations of ‘international’ and ‘global’ knowledge, both by those receiving and administering its training. Considering social, political, economic and cognitive aspects, one key objective of this research hopes to inform educational practitioners and policy-makers of some of the conceptual and social challenges that emerge with dissonant notions of cultivating ‘international’ and ‘global people.’

Akira has been an Associate Researcher at the Graduate School of Teacher Education, Tokyo Gakugei University since autumn 2020, a post he continues to hold until the end of his doctoral degree. He also currently works as an Anthropological Analyst for Contemplative Spaces, a consultancy focused on designing and delivering a range of leadership development initiatives for individuals, groups, and organizational bodies. His future career plans include further anthropological research and establishing consultancy services dedicated to various inclusion-based development initiatives.

Amelia is passionate about access to and the effects of environmental education globally, particularly in the Galápagos Islands of Ecuador.

Because she experienced a wealth of informal and non-formal environmental education from her parents and from explorations growing up in Southern Oregon, she is interested in researching how environmental education manifests in global communities. She fell in love with the Galápagos on a structured university-led trip during her undergraduate studies and realized that there was a dearth of research on social aspects of the communities living on the islands.  Because of this, she pursued research in the Galápagos in 2014 on the prevalence of and access to both formal and informal (provided by numerous NGOs and government agencies) environmental education for students on the islands, and on the level of student environmental literacy in 28 schools.

Her Dphil research focus, under the supervision of Dr. Ann Childs and Dr. Steve Puttick, is on access to and effects of Experiential Environmental Education for students living in the Galápagos Islands, and on the production of research on the social sphere in Galápagos.

Prior to starting her Dphil at Oxford, she worked in alliances and partnerships at tech companies in the San Francisco Bay Area. Most recently, she was the Director of Global Partnerships at Conversica, a conversational AI platform, and cultivated, trained, and drove pipeline with select international resellers in APAC, EMEA, and LATAM, and with regional resellers in the United States. She also assisted with the design and construction of the Conversica partner program.

In her free time, she is a free-lance food photographer, food stylist, food blogger, recipe developer, and gluten free baker for her online blog and social handle, Sisters Sans Gluten (www.sisterssansgluten), which she created with her sister in 2018. She also continues to sing informally and takes voice lessons remotely with instructor Corey Head of San Francisco.

She holds a BA in both Anthropology and Music (vocal performance), and an MA in Latin American Studies from Stanford University. Highlights from Stanford include: playing and touring as a performing member of Stanford Taiko (Japanese ensemble drumming) for four years; singing with the Stanford Chamber Chorale led by Professor Steve Sano; studying voice with Wendy Hillhouse; participating in music department operas; performing in self-organized recitals showcasing western art songs, western musical theater, and Latin American art songs; studying abroad in Santiago, Chile; and learning Quechua during her masters program with Marisol Necochea.

Abdul Karim has completed a Bachelor of Science in Bioengineering and Computational Medicine (Imperial College London), a Bachelor of Medicine and Bachelor of Surgery (Queen Mary University of London), and Master of Science in the Philosophy of Science and Economics (The London School of Economics).

He has delivered lectures on the Philosophy of Human Nature and the History of Metaethics at the University of Cambridge and for Health Education East Midlands. This, in addition to the current positions he holds as a Hospital Doctor and Health Policy and Management Advisor at the University Hospitals of Leicester NHS Trust.

Abdul Karim’s current areas of interest include the biological definition of psychological states relevant to the learning environment, and the influence of language on the variable interpretation of a particular social context. For the latter of which he has published primary research.

Another is the appraisal and deployment of physiological measurement devices in learning environments as a means of quantitatively evaluating psychological states. Such research areas hold promise in enhancing the questionnaire-based evidences of contemporary theories in education, such as those regarding motivation, self-determination and engagement. This will to contribute to the evidence-based public policy optimisation in education and social care.

 

Publications

Ismail, A.K. 2017. A Cross Sectional Study to Explore the Effect of the Linguistic Origin and Evolution of a Language on Patient Interpretation of Haematological Cancers. Advances in Biological Research. 11 (4): 225-232.

Ismail, A.K. 2017. The Origin of the Arabic Medical Term for Cancer. Advances in Biological Research. 11 (4): 198-201.

Ismail, A.K. 2018. The Impact of da Vinci’s Anatomical Drawings and Calculations on Foundation of Orthopaedics. Advances in Biological Research. 12 (1): 26-30.

As a mathematics teacher who believes that anyone can understand mathematics, Ashley is keenly interested in developing interventions and resources for learners who struggle with the subject. More specifically, she is focusing on the transitionary moment in the classroom when discussions have ceased, and practice begins and how this transition can become more fluid for learners.

By drawing on research from education, psychology and cognitive neuroscience, Ashley hopes to gain insights into how the brain and mind process information and how this knowledge can inform teacher practice and, ultimately, help learners understand mathematics.

After having taught for over ten years, Ashley completed her MSc, with Distinction, at the Department of Education, and her dissertation was “Highly Commended” by the British Educational Research Association (BERA). She is committed to making mathematics more accessible for all learners and strives for research that is not only impactful but also directly applicable to the classroom.

I am a Research Project Coordinator and Co-PI at the Department of Education for a project on Education, Purpose and Human Flourishing in Times of Uncertainty (EPHF), and the Templeton World Charity Foundation Fellow in Comparative Education at St Antony’s College, Oxford.

I have a multi-disciplinary background and experience. Academically I am an Art Historian specialising in late 18th and early 19th-century French aesthetics, and prior to my return to academia I had a career in the international finance, entrepreneurial business and high net worth family business sectors. I have published and taught at the University of Oxford on late eighteenth-and early nineteenth century art, history and aesthetics. Drawing on my experience as Lay Chaplain at Somerville College, Oxford I have also published on religious education. In addition to my position in the Education Department I am the Principal Advisor for Strategic Relationships and Partnerships at the Templeton World Charity Foundation Inc where I work closely with other foundations, INGOs and public policy organisations.

Publications List

Xiaona Wang is a DPhil student in Education, at St. Antony’s College, the University of Oxford. Xiaona’s doctoral research is fully funded by the University of Oxford (Clarendon Fund Scholarship and St. Antony’s College The Warden’s Scholarship). She is also a member at the Center for Global Higher Education.

Before her DPhil, Xiaona obtained her M.A degree in Higher Education at Graduate School of Education at Peking University, and B.A at the Faulty of Education from Beijing Normal University in China with first-class honour. She also studied at the University of Manchester as an exchange student in the School of Social Science.

Previously, Xiaona worked at Global Education Cluster in UNICEF, Geneva, where she began her research on the international scientific collaboration between China and Switzerland, and this experience later became the starting point of her master thesis. In her master’s thesis, Xiaona used a longitudinal research method in following a group of Chinese scientists who studied and worked in Switzerland. Through semi-structured interviews, she explored how collaborative relationships between individual scientists began and developed.

Xiaona has strong research interests in the science studies, internationalization and globalization of higher education. Her doctoral research is going to continue to explore the scientific knowledge networks between China and Switzerland under the influence of geopolitical factors.

Wanlin Cai is a DPhil student in higher education and a member of CGHE research group at the Department of Education.

Wanlin’s research interest lies in international higher education, higher education policies and economy, with a specific focus on World-Class Universities.

She is also a member of South China Global Talent Institute, Center for China and Globalisation, where she focuses on the research of talent policy and development in the Great Bay Area in China.

Prior to her beginning as a DPhil student, Wanlin read for the M.Sc in Higher Education at the University of Oxford and the M.Sc in Management and Enterprise Growth at the University of Glasgow.

Naosuke is a DPhil student whose research interests are Global Englishes and mutual intelligibility in English communication.

Naosuke finished an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition at the University of Oxford with distinction in 2019. His DPhil research focuses on the intelligibility of non-native English speakers. Specifically, he would like to seek what kind of English pronunciation features are critical for successful English communication between non-native English speakers.

Adam, from Ethiopia, is interested in looking at the role of education in peacebuilding and conflicts.

Akira is a DPhil Student in Anthropology affiliated with the School of Anthropology & Museum Ethnography, and associated with both the Department of Education and Nissan Institute of Japanese Studies. He is supervised by David Mills and Roger Goodman.

Akira’s doctoral research rests with the concepts of ‘international’ and ‘global education,’ and is grounded in the recent emergence and growth of International Baccalaureate (IB) education in Japan. Focused on IB educator training across several higher education institutions (HEIs), Akira aims – solely through digital anthropological approaches – to contextualize the everyday negotiations of ‘international’ and ‘global’ knowledge, both by those receiving and administering its training. Considering social, political, economic and cognitive aspects, one key objective of this research hopes to inform educational practitioners and policy-makers of some of the conceptual and social challenges that emerge with dissonant notions of cultivating ‘international’ and ‘global people.’

Akira has been an Associate Researcher at the Graduate School of Teacher Education, Tokyo Gakugei University since autumn 2020, a post he continues to hold until the end of his doctoral degree. He also currently works as an Anthropological Analyst for Contemplative Spaces, a consultancy focused on designing and delivering a range of leadership development initiatives for individuals, groups, and organizational bodies. His future career plans include further anthropological research and establishing consultancy services dedicated to various inclusion-based development initiatives.

Amelia is passionate about access to and the effects of environmental education globally, particularly in the Galápagos Islands of Ecuador.

Because she experienced a wealth of informal and non-formal environmental education from her parents and from explorations growing up in Southern Oregon, she is interested in researching how environmental education manifests in global communities. She fell in love with the Galápagos on a structured university-led trip during her undergraduate studies and realized that there was a dearth of research on social aspects of the communities living on the islands.  Because of this, she pursued research in the Galápagos in 2014 on the prevalence of and access to both formal and informal (provided by numerous NGOs and government agencies) environmental education for students on the islands, and on the level of student environmental literacy in 28 schools.

Her Dphil research focus, under the supervision of Dr. Ann Childs and Dr. Steve Puttick, is on access to and effects of Experiential Environmental Education for students living in the Galápagos Islands, and on the production of research on the social sphere in Galápagos.

Prior to starting her Dphil at Oxford, she worked in alliances and partnerships at tech companies in the San Francisco Bay Area. Most recently, she was the Director of Global Partnerships at Conversica, a conversational AI platform, and cultivated, trained, and drove pipeline with select international resellers in APAC, EMEA, and LATAM, and with regional resellers in the United States. She also assisted with the design and construction of the Conversica partner program.

In her free time, she is a free-lance food photographer, food stylist, food blogger, recipe developer, and gluten free baker for her online blog and social handle, Sisters Sans Gluten (www.sisterssansgluten), which she created with her sister in 2018. She also continues to sing informally and takes voice lessons remotely with instructor Corey Head of San Francisco.

She holds a BA in both Anthropology and Music (vocal performance), and an MA in Latin American Studies from Stanford University. Highlights from Stanford include: playing and touring as a performing member of Stanford Taiko (Japanese ensemble drumming) for four years; singing with the Stanford Chamber Chorale led by Professor Steve Sano; studying voice with Wendy Hillhouse; participating in music department operas; performing in self-organized recitals showcasing western art songs, western musical theater, and Latin American art songs; studying abroad in Santiago, Chile; and learning Quechua during her masters program with Marisol Necochea.

Abdul Karim has completed a Bachelor of Science in Bioengineering and Computational Medicine (Imperial College London), a Bachelor of Medicine and Bachelor of Surgery (Queen Mary University of London), and Master of Science in the Philosophy of Science and Economics (The London School of Economics).

He has delivered lectures on the Philosophy of Human Nature and the History of Metaethics at the University of Cambridge and for Health Education East Midlands. This, in addition to the current positions he holds as a Hospital Doctor and Health Policy and Management Advisor at the University Hospitals of Leicester NHS Trust.

Abdul Karim’s current areas of interest include the biological definition of psychological states relevant to the learning environment, and the influence of language on the variable interpretation of a particular social context. For the latter of which he has published primary research.

Another is the appraisal and deployment of physiological measurement devices in learning environments as a means of quantitatively evaluating psychological states. Such research areas hold promise in enhancing the questionnaire-based evidences of contemporary theories in education, such as those regarding motivation, self-determination and engagement. This will to contribute to the evidence-based public policy optimisation in education and social care.

 

Publications

Ismail, A.K. 2017. A Cross Sectional Study to Explore the Effect of the Linguistic Origin and Evolution of a Language on Patient Interpretation of Haematological Cancers. Advances in Biological Research. 11 (4): 225-232.

Ismail, A.K. 2017. The Origin of the Arabic Medical Term for Cancer. Advances in Biological Research. 11 (4): 198-201.

Ismail, A.K. 2018. The Impact of da Vinci’s Anatomical Drawings and Calculations on Foundation of Orthopaedics. Advances in Biological Research. 12 (1): 26-30.

As a mathematics teacher who believes that anyone can understand mathematics, Ashley is keenly interested in developing interventions and resources for learners who struggle with the subject. More specifically, she is focusing on the transitionary moment in the classroom when discussions have ceased, and practice begins and how this transition can become more fluid for learners.

By drawing on research from education, psychology and cognitive neuroscience, Ashley hopes to gain insights into how the brain and mind process information and how this knowledge can inform teacher practice and, ultimately, help learners understand mathematics.

After having taught for over ten years, Ashley completed her MSc, with Distinction, at the Department of Education, and her dissertation was “Highly Commended” by the British Educational Research Association (BERA). She is committed to making mathematics more accessible for all learners and strives for research that is not only impactful but also directly applicable to the classroom.

I am a Research Project Coordinator and Co-PI at the Department of Education for a project on Education, Purpose and Human Flourishing in Times of Uncertainty (EPHF), and the Templeton World Charity Foundation Fellow in Comparative Education at St Antony’s College, Oxford.

I have a multi-disciplinary background and experience. Academically I am an Art Historian specialising in late 18th and early 19th-century French aesthetics, and prior to my return to academia I had a career in the international finance, entrepreneurial business and high net worth family business sectors. I have published and taught at the University of Oxford on late eighteenth-and early nineteenth century art, history and aesthetics. Drawing on my experience as Lay Chaplain at Somerville College, Oxford I have also published on religious education. In addition to my position in the Education Department I am the Principal Advisor for Strategic Relationships and Partnerships at the Templeton World Charity Foundation Inc where I work closely with other foundations, INGOs and public policy organisations.

Publications List

Xiaona Wang is a DPhil student in Education, at St. Antony’s College, the University of Oxford. Xiaona’s doctoral research is fully funded by the University of Oxford (Clarendon Fund Scholarship and St. Antony’s College The Warden’s Scholarship). She is also a member at the Center for Global Higher Education.

Before her DPhil, Xiaona obtained her M.A degree in Higher Education at Graduate School of Education at Peking University, and B.A at the Faulty of Education from Beijing Normal University in China with first-class honour. She also studied at the University of Manchester as an exchange student in the School of Social Science.

Previously, Xiaona worked at Global Education Cluster in UNICEF, Geneva, where she began her research on the international scientific collaboration between China and Switzerland, and this experience later became the starting point of her master thesis. In her master’s thesis, Xiaona used a longitudinal research method in following a group of Chinese scientists who studied and worked in Switzerland. Through semi-structured interviews, she explored how collaborative relationships between individual scientists began and developed.

Xiaona has strong research interests in the science studies, internationalization and globalization of higher education. Her doctoral research is going to continue to explore the scientific knowledge networks between China and Switzerland under the influence of geopolitical factors.

Wanlin Cai is a DPhil student in higher education and a member of CGHE research group at the Department of Education.

Wanlin’s research interest lies in international higher education, higher education policies and economy, with a specific focus on World-Class Universities.

She is also a member of South China Global Talent Institute, Center for China and Globalisation, where she focuses on the research of talent policy and development in the Great Bay Area in China.

Prior to her beginning as a DPhil student, Wanlin read for the M.Sc in Higher Education at the University of Oxford and the M.Sc in Management and Enterprise Growth at the University of Glasgow.

Naosuke is a DPhil student whose research interests are Global Englishes and mutual intelligibility in English communication.

Naosuke finished an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition at the University of Oxford with distinction in 2019. His DPhil research focuses on the intelligibility of non-native English speakers. Specifically, he would like to seek what kind of English pronunciation features are critical for successful English communication between non-native English speakers.

Adam, from Ethiopia, is interested in looking at the role of education in peacebuilding and conflicts.

Akira is a DPhil Student in Anthropology affiliated with the School of Anthropology & Museum Ethnography, and associated with both the Department of Education and Nissan Institute of Japanese Studies. He is supervised by David Mills and Roger Goodman.

Akira’s doctoral research rests with the concepts of ‘international’ and ‘global education,’ and is grounded in the recent emergence and growth of International Baccalaureate (IB) education in Japan. Focused on IB educator training across several higher education institutions (HEIs), Akira aims – solely through digital anthropological approaches – to contextualize the everyday negotiations of ‘international’ and ‘global’ knowledge, both by those receiving and administering its training. Considering social, political, economic and cognitive aspects, one key objective of this research hopes to inform educational practitioners and policy-makers of some of the conceptual and social challenges that emerge with dissonant notions of cultivating ‘international’ and ‘global people.’

Akira has been an Associate Researcher at the Graduate School of Teacher Education, Tokyo Gakugei University since autumn 2020, a post he continues to hold until the end of his doctoral degree. He also currently works as an Anthropological Analyst for Contemplative Spaces, a consultancy focused on designing and delivering a range of leadership development initiatives for individuals, groups, and organizational bodies. His future career plans include further anthropological research and establishing consultancy services dedicated to various inclusion-based development initiatives.

Amelia is passionate about access to and the effects of environmental education globally, particularly in the Galápagos Islands of Ecuador.

Because she experienced a wealth of informal and non-formal environmental education from her parents and from explorations growing up in Southern Oregon, she is interested in researching how environmental education manifests in global communities. She fell in love with the Galápagos on a structured university-led trip during her undergraduate studies and realized that there was a dearth of research on social aspects of the communities living on the islands.  Because of this, she pursued research in the Galápagos in 2014 on the prevalence of and access to both formal and informal (provided by numerous NGOs and government agencies) environmental education for students on the islands, and on the level of student environmental literacy in 28 schools.

Her Dphil research focus, under the supervision of Dr. Ann Childs and Dr. Steve Puttick, is on access to and effects of Experiential Environmental Education for students living in the Galápagos Islands, and on the production of research on the social sphere in Galápagos.

Prior to starting her Dphil at Oxford, she worked in alliances and partnerships at tech companies in the San Francisco Bay Area. Most recently, she was the Director of Global Partnerships at Conversica, a conversational AI platform, and cultivated, trained, and drove pipeline with select international resellers in APAC, EMEA, and LATAM, and with regional resellers in the United States. She also assisted with the design and construction of the Conversica partner program.

In her free time, she is a free-lance food photographer, food stylist, food blogger, recipe developer, and gluten free baker for her online blog and social handle, Sisters Sans Gluten (www.sisterssansgluten), which she created with her sister in 2018. She also continues to sing informally and takes voice lessons remotely with instructor Corey Head of San Francisco.

She holds a BA in both Anthropology and Music (vocal performance), and an MA in Latin American Studies from Stanford University. Highlights from Stanford include: playing and touring as a performing member of Stanford Taiko (Japanese ensemble drumming) for four years; singing with the Stanford Chamber Chorale led by Professor Steve Sano; studying voice with Wendy Hillhouse; participating in music department operas; performing in self-organized recitals showcasing western art songs, western musical theater, and Latin American art songs; studying abroad in Santiago, Chile; and learning Quechua during her masters program with Marisol Necochea.

Abdul Karim has completed a Bachelor of Science in Bioengineering and Computational Medicine (Imperial College London), a Bachelor of Medicine and Bachelor of Surgery (Queen Mary University of London), and Master of Science in the Philosophy of Science and Economics (The London School of Economics).

He has delivered lectures on the Philosophy of Human Nature and the History of Metaethics at the University of Cambridge and for Health Education East Midlands. This, in addition to the current positions he holds as a Hospital Doctor and Health Policy and Management Advisor at the University Hospitals of Leicester NHS Trust.

Abdul Karim’s current areas of interest include the biological definition of psychological states relevant to the learning environment, and the influence of language on the variable interpretation of a particular social context. For the latter of which he has published primary research.

Another is the appraisal and deployment of physiological measurement devices in learning environments as a means of quantitatively evaluating psychological states. Such research areas hold promise in enhancing the questionnaire-based evidences of contemporary theories in education, such as those regarding motivation, self-determination and engagement. This will to contribute to the evidence-based public policy optimisation in education and social care.

 

Publications

Ismail, A.K. 2017. A Cross Sectional Study to Explore the Effect of the Linguistic Origin and Evolution of a Language on Patient Interpretation of Haematological Cancers. Advances in Biological Research. 11 (4): 225-232.

Ismail, A.K. 2017. The Origin of the Arabic Medical Term for Cancer. Advances in Biological Research. 11 (4): 198-201.

Ismail, A.K. 2018. The Impact of da Vinci’s Anatomical Drawings and Calculations on Foundation of Orthopaedics. Advances in Biological Research. 12 (1): 26-30.

As a mathematics teacher who believes that anyone can understand mathematics, Ashley is keenly interested in developing interventions and resources for learners who struggle with the subject. More specifically, she is focusing on the transitionary moment in the classroom when discussions have ceased, and practice begins and how this transition can become more fluid for learners.

By drawing on research from education, psychology and cognitive neuroscience, Ashley hopes to gain insights into how the brain and mind process information and how this knowledge can inform teacher practice and, ultimately, help learners understand mathematics.

After having taught for over ten years, Ashley completed her MSc, with Distinction, at the Department of Education, and her dissertation was “Highly Commended” by the British Educational Research Association (BERA). She is committed to making mathematics more accessible for all learners and strives for research that is not only impactful but also directly applicable to the classroom.

I am a Research Project Coordinator and Co-PI at the Department of Education for a project on Education, Purpose and Human Flourishing in Times of Uncertainty (EPHF), and the Templeton World Charity Foundation Fellow in Comparative Education at St Antony’s College, Oxford.

I have a multi-disciplinary background and experience. Academically I am an Art Historian specialising in late 18th and early 19th-century French aesthetics, and prior to my return to academia I had a career in the international finance, entrepreneurial business and high net worth family business sectors. I have published and taught at the University of Oxford on late eighteenth-and early nineteenth century art, history and aesthetics. Drawing on my experience as Lay Chaplain at Somerville College, Oxford I have also published on religious education. In addition to my position in the Education Department I am the Principal Advisor for Strategic Relationships and Partnerships at the Templeton World Charity Foundation Inc where I work closely with other foundations, INGOs and public policy organisations.

Publications List

Xiaona Wang is a DPhil student in Education, at St. Antony’s College, the University of Oxford. Xiaona’s doctoral research is fully funded by the University of Oxford (Clarendon Fund Scholarship and St. Antony’s College The Warden’s Scholarship). She is also a member at the Center for Global Higher Education.

Before her DPhil, Xiaona obtained her M.A degree in Higher Education at Graduate School of Education at Peking University, and B.A at the Faulty of Education from Beijing Normal University in China with first-class honour. She also studied at the University of Manchester as an exchange student in the School of Social Science.

Previously, Xiaona worked at Global Education Cluster in UNICEF, Geneva, where she began her research on the international scientific collaboration between China and Switzerland, and this experience later became the starting point of her master thesis. In her master’s thesis, Xiaona used a longitudinal research method in following a group of Chinese scientists who studied and worked in Switzerland. Through semi-structured interviews, she explored how collaborative relationships between individual scientists began and developed.

Xiaona has strong research interests in the science studies, internationalization and globalization of higher education. Her doctoral research is going to continue to explore the scientific knowledge networks between China and Switzerland under the influence of geopolitical factors.

Wanlin Cai is a DPhil student in higher education and a member of CGHE research group at the Department of Education.

Wanlin’s research interest lies in international higher education, higher education policies and economy, with a specific focus on World-Class Universities.

She is also a member of South China Global Talent Institute, Center for China and Globalisation, where she focuses on the research of talent policy and development in the Great Bay Area in China.

Prior to her beginning as a DPhil student, Wanlin read for the M.Sc in Higher Education at the University of Oxford and the M.Sc in Management and Enterprise Growth at the University of Glasgow.

Naosuke is a DPhil student whose research interests are Global Englishes and mutual intelligibility in English communication.

Naosuke finished an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition at the University of Oxford with distinction in 2019. His DPhil research focuses on the intelligibility of non-native English speakers. Specifically, he would like to seek what kind of English pronunciation features are critical for successful English communication between non-native English speakers.

Adam, from Ethiopia, is interested in looking at the role of education in peacebuilding and conflicts.

Akira is a DPhil Student in Anthropology affiliated with the School of Anthropology & Museum Ethnography, and associated with both the Department of Education and Nissan Institute of Japanese Studies. He is supervised by David Mills and Roger Goodman.

Akira’s doctoral research rests with the concepts of ‘international’ and ‘global education,’ and is grounded in the recent emergence and growth of International Baccalaureate (IB) education in Japan. Focused on IB educator training across several higher education institutions (HEIs), Akira aims – solely through digital anthropological approaches – to contextualize the everyday negotiations of ‘international’ and ‘global’ knowledge, both by those receiving and administering its training. Considering social, political, economic and cognitive aspects, one key objective of this research hopes to inform educational practitioners and policy-makers of some of the conceptual and social challenges that emerge with dissonant notions of cultivating ‘international’ and ‘global people.’

Akira has been an Associate Researcher at the Graduate School of Teacher Education, Tokyo Gakugei University since autumn 2020, a post he continues to hold until the end of his doctoral degree. He also currently works as an Anthropological Analyst for Contemplative Spaces, a consultancy focused on designing and delivering a range of leadership development initiatives for individuals, groups, and organizational bodies. His future career plans include further anthropological research and establishing consultancy services dedicated to various inclusion-based development initiatives.

Amelia is passionate about access to and the effects of environmental education globally, particularly in the Galápagos Islands of Ecuador.

Because she experienced a wealth of informal and non-formal environmental education from her parents and from explorations growing up in Southern Oregon, she is interested in researching how environmental education manifests in global communities. She fell in love with the Galápagos on a structured university-led trip during her undergraduate studies and realized that there was a dearth of research on social aspects of the communities living on the islands.  Because of this, she pursued research in the Galápagos in 2014 on the prevalence of and access to both formal and informal (provided by numerous NGOs and government agencies) environmental education for students on the islands, and on the level of student environmental literacy in 28 schools.

Her Dphil research focus, under the supervision of Dr. Ann Childs and Dr. Steve Puttick, is on access to and effects of Experiential Environmental Education for students living in the Galápagos Islands, and on the production of research on the social sphere in Galápagos.

Prior to starting her Dphil at Oxford, she worked in alliances and partnerships at tech companies in the San Francisco Bay Area. Most recently, she was the Director of Global Partnerships at Conversica, a conversational AI platform, and cultivated, trained, and drove pipeline with select international resellers in APAC, EMEA, and LATAM, and with regional resellers in the United States. She also assisted with the design and construction of the Conversica partner program.

In her free time, she is a free-lance food photographer, food stylist, food blogger, recipe developer, and gluten free baker for her online blog and social handle, Sisters Sans Gluten (www.sisterssansgluten), which she created with her sister in 2018. She also continues to sing informally and takes voice lessons remotely with instructor Corey Head of San Francisco.

She holds a BA in both Anthropology and Music (vocal performance), and an MA in Latin American Studies from Stanford University. Highlights from Stanford include: playing and touring as a performing member of Stanford Taiko (Japanese ensemble drumming) for four years; singing with the Stanford Chamber Chorale led by Professor Steve Sano; studying voice with Wendy Hillhouse; participating in music department operas; performing in self-organized recitals showcasing western art songs, western musical theater, and Latin American art songs; studying abroad in Santiago, Chile; and learning Quechua during her masters program with Marisol Necochea.

Abdul Karim has completed a Bachelor of Science in Bioengineering and Computational Medicine (Imperial College London), a Bachelor of Medicine and Bachelor of Surgery (Queen Mary University of London), and Master of Science in the Philosophy of Science and Economics (The London School of Economics).

He has delivered lectures on the Philosophy of Human Nature and the History of Metaethics at the University of Cambridge and for Health Education East Midlands. This, in addition to the current positions he holds as a Hospital Doctor and Health Policy and Management Advisor at the University Hospitals of Leicester NHS Trust.

Abdul Karim’s current areas of interest include the biological definition of psychological states relevant to the learning environment, and the influence of language on the variable interpretation of a particular social context. For the latter of which he has published primary research.

Another is the appraisal and deployment of physiological measurement devices in learning environments as a means of quantitatively evaluating psychological states. Such research areas hold promise in enhancing the questionnaire-based evidences of contemporary theories in education, such as those regarding motivation, self-determination and engagement. This will to contribute to the evidence-based public policy optimisation in education and social care.

 

Publications

Ismail, A.K. 2017. A Cross Sectional Study to Explore the Effect of the Linguistic Origin and Evolution of a Language on Patient Interpretation of Haematological Cancers. Advances in Biological Research. 11 (4): 225-232.

Ismail, A.K. 2017. The Origin of the Arabic Medical Term for Cancer. Advances in Biological Research. 11 (4): 198-201.

Ismail, A.K. 2018. The Impact of da Vinci’s Anatomical Drawings and Calculations on Foundation of Orthopaedics. Advances in Biological Research. 12 (1): 26-30.

As a mathematics teacher who believes that anyone can understand mathematics, Ashley is keenly interested in developing interventions and resources for learners who struggle with the subject. More specifically, she is focusing on the transitionary moment in the classroom when discussions have ceased, and practice begins and how this transition can become more fluid for learners.

By drawing on research from education, psychology and cognitive neuroscience, Ashley hopes to gain insights into how the brain and mind process information and how this knowledge can inform teacher practice and, ultimately, help learners understand mathematics.

After having taught for over ten years, Ashley completed her MSc, with Distinction, at the Department of Education, and her dissertation was “Highly Commended” by the British Educational Research Association (BERA). She is committed to making mathematics more accessible for all learners and strives for research that is not only impactful but also directly applicable to the classroom.

I am a Research Project Coordinator and Co-PI at the Department of Education for a project on Education, Purpose and Human Flourishing in Times of Uncertainty (EPHF), and the Templeton World Charity Foundation Fellow in Comparative Education at St Antony’s College, Oxford.

I have a multi-disciplinary background and experience. Academically I am an Art Historian specialising in late 18th and early 19th-century French aesthetics, and prior to my return to academia I had a career in the international finance, entrepreneurial business and high net worth family business sectors. I have published and taught at the University of Oxford on late eighteenth-and early nineteenth century art, history and aesthetics. Drawing on my experience as Lay Chaplain at Somerville College, Oxford I have also published on religious education. In addition to my position in the Education Department I am the Principal Advisor for Strategic Relationships and Partnerships at the Templeton World Charity Foundation Inc where I work closely with other foundations, INGOs and public policy organisations.

Publications List

Xiaona Wang is a DPhil student in Education, at St. Antony’s College, the University of Oxford. Xiaona’s doctoral research is fully funded by the University of Oxford (Clarendon Fund Scholarship and St. Antony’s College The Warden’s Scholarship). She is also a member at the Center for Global Higher Education.

Before her DPhil, Xiaona obtained her M.A degree in Higher Education at Graduate School of Education at Peking University, and B.A at the Faulty of Education from Beijing Normal University in China with first-class honour. She also studied at the University of Manchester as an exchange student in the School of Social Science.

Previously, Xiaona worked at Global Education Cluster in UNICEF, Geneva, where she began her research on the international scientific collaboration between China and Switzerland, and this experience later became the starting point of her master thesis. In her master’s thesis, Xiaona used a longitudinal research method in following a group of Chinese scientists who studied and worked in Switzerland. Through semi-structured interviews, she explored how collaborative relationships between individual scientists began and developed.

Xiaona has strong research interests in the science studies, internationalization and globalization of higher education. Her doctoral research is going to continue to explore the scientific knowledge networks between China and Switzerland under the influence of geopolitical factors.

Wanlin Cai is a DPhil student in higher education and a member of CGHE research group at the Department of Education.

Wanlin’s research interest lies in international higher education, higher education policies and economy, with a specific focus on World-Class Universities.

She is also a member of South China Global Talent Institute, Center for China and Globalisation, where she focuses on the research of talent policy and development in the Great Bay Area in China.

Prior to her beginning as a DPhil student, Wanlin read for the M.Sc in Higher Education at the University of Oxford and the M.Sc in Management and Enterprise Growth at the University of Glasgow.

Naosuke is a DPhil student whose research interests are Global Englishes and mutual intelligibility in English communication.

Naosuke finished an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition at the University of Oxford with distinction in 2019. His DPhil research focuses on the intelligibility of non-native English speakers. Specifically, he would like to seek what kind of English pronunciation features are critical for successful English communication between non-native English speakers.

Adam, from Ethiopia, is interested in looking at the role of education in peacebuilding and conflicts.

Akira is a DPhil Student in Anthropology affiliated with the School of Anthropology & Museum Ethnography, and associated with both the Department of Education and Nissan Institute of Japanese Studies. He is supervised by David Mills and Roger Goodman.

Akira’s doctoral research rests with the concepts of ‘international’ and ‘global education,’ and is grounded in the recent emergence and growth of International Baccalaureate (IB) education in Japan. Focused on IB educator training across several higher education institutions (HEIs), Akira aims – solely through digital anthropological approaches – to contextualize the everyday negotiations of ‘international’ and ‘global’ knowledge, both by those receiving and administering its training. Considering social, political, economic and cognitive aspects, one key objective of this research hopes to inform educational practitioners and policy-makers of some of the conceptual and social challenges that emerge with dissonant notions of cultivating ‘international’ and ‘global people.’

Akira has been an Associate Researcher at the Graduate School of Teacher Education, Tokyo Gakugei University since autumn 2020, a post he continues to hold until the end of his doctoral degree. He also currently works as an Anthropological Analyst for Contemplative Spaces, a consultancy focused on designing and delivering a range of leadership development initiatives for individuals, groups, and organizational bodies. His future career plans include further anthropological research and establishing consultancy services dedicated to various inclusion-based development initiatives.

Amelia is passionate about access to and the effects of environmental education globally, particularly in the Galápagos Islands of Ecuador.

Because she experienced a wealth of informal and non-formal environmental education from her parents and from explorations growing up in Southern Oregon, she is interested in researching how environmental education manifests in global communities. She fell in love with the Galápagos on a structured university-led trip during her undergraduate studies and realized that there was a dearth of research on social aspects of the communities living on the islands.  Because of this, she pursued research in the Galápagos in 2014 on the prevalence of and access to both formal and informal (provided by numerous NGOs and government agencies) environmental education for students on the islands, and on the level of student environmental literacy in 28 schools.

Her Dphil research focus, under the supervision of Dr. Ann Childs and Dr. Steve Puttick, is on access to and effects of Experiential Environmental Education for students living in the Galápagos Islands, and on the production of research on the social sphere in Galápagos.

Prior to starting her Dphil at Oxford, she worked in alliances and partnerships at tech companies in the San Francisco Bay Area. Most recently, she was the Director of Global Partnerships at Conversica, a conversational AI platform, and cultivated, trained, and drove pipeline with select international resellers in APAC, EMEA, and LATAM, and with regional resellers in the United States. She also assisted with the design and construction of the Conversica partner program.

In her free time, she is a free-lance food photographer, food stylist, food blogger, recipe developer, and gluten free baker for her online blog and social handle, Sisters Sans Gluten (www.sisterssansgluten), which she created with her sister in 2018. She also continues to sing informally and takes voice lessons remotely with instructor Corey Head of San Francisco.

She holds a BA in both Anthropology and Music (vocal performance), and an MA in Latin American Studies from Stanford University. Highlights from Stanford include: playing and touring as a performing member of Stanford Taiko (Japanese ensemble drumming) for four years; singing with the Stanford Chamber Chorale led by Professor Steve Sano; studying voice with Wendy Hillhouse; participating in music department operas; performing in self-organized recitals showcasing western art songs, western musical theater, and Latin American art songs; studying abroad in Santiago, Chile; and learning Quechua during her masters program with Marisol Necochea.

Abdul Karim has completed a Bachelor of Science in Bioengineering and Computational Medicine (Imperial College London), a Bachelor of Medicine and Bachelor of Surgery (Queen Mary University of London), and Master of Science in the Philosophy of Science and Economics (The London School of Economics).

He has delivered lectures on the Philosophy of Human Nature and the History of Metaethics at the University of Cambridge and for Health Education East Midlands. This, in addition to the current positions he holds as a Hospital Doctor and Health Policy and Management Advisor at the University Hospitals of Leicester NHS Trust.

Abdul Karim’s current areas of interest include the biological definition of psychological states relevant to the learning environment, and the influence of language on the variable interpretation of a particular social context. For the latter of which he has published primary research.

Another is the appraisal and deployment of physiological measurement devices in learning environments as a means of quantitatively evaluating psychological states. Such research areas hold promise in enhancing the questionnaire-based evidences of contemporary theories in education, such as those regarding motivation, self-determination and engagement. This will to contribute to the evidence-based public policy optimisation in education and social care.

 

Publications

Ismail, A.K. 2017. A Cross Sectional Study to Explore the Effect of the Linguistic Origin and Evolution of a Language on Patient Interpretation of Haematological Cancers. Advances in Biological Research. 11 (4): 225-232.

Ismail, A.K. 2017. The Origin of the Arabic Medical Term for Cancer. Advances in Biological Research. 11 (4): 198-201.

Ismail, A.K. 2018. The Impact of da Vinci’s Anatomical Drawings and Calculations on Foundation of Orthopaedics. Advances in Biological Research. 12 (1): 26-30.

As a mathematics teacher who believes that anyone can understand mathematics, Ashley is keenly interested in developing interventions and resources for learners who struggle with the subject. More specifically, she is focusing on the transitionary moment in the classroom when discussions have ceased, and practice begins and how this transition can become more fluid for learners.

By drawing on research from education, psychology and cognitive neuroscience, Ashley hopes to gain insights into how the brain and mind process information and how this knowledge can inform teacher practice and, ultimately, help learners understand mathematics.

After having taught for over ten years, Ashley completed her MSc, with Distinction, at the Department of Education, and her dissertation was “Highly Commended” by the British Educational Research Association (BERA). She is committed to making mathematics more accessible for all learners and strives for research that is not only impactful but also directly applicable to the classroom.

I am a Research Project Coordinator and Co-PI at the Department of Education for a project on Education, Purpose and Human Flourishing in Times of Uncertainty (EPHF), and the Templeton World Charity Foundation Fellow in Comparative Education at St Antony’s College, Oxford.

I have a multi-disciplinary background and experience. Academically I am an Art Historian specialising in late 18th and early 19th-century French aesthetics, and prior to my return to academia I had a career in the international finance, entrepreneurial business and high net worth family business sectors. I have published and taught at the University of Oxford on late eighteenth-and early nineteenth century art, history and aesthetics. Drawing on my experience as Lay Chaplain at Somerville College, Oxford I have also published on religious education. In addition to my position in the Education Department I am the Principal Advisor for Strategic Relationships and Partnerships at the Templeton World Charity Foundation Inc where I work closely with other foundations, INGOs and public policy organisations.

Publications List

Xiaona Wang is a DPhil student in Education, at St. Antony’s College, the University of Oxford. Xiaona’s doctoral research is fully funded by the University of Oxford (Clarendon Fund Scholarship and St. Antony’s College The Warden’s Scholarship). She is also a member at the Center for Global Higher Education.

Before her DPhil, Xiaona obtained her M.A degree in Higher Education at Graduate School of Education at Peking University, and B.A at the Faulty of Education from Beijing Normal University in China with first-class honour. She also studied at the University of Manchester as an exchange student in the School of Social Science.

Previously, Xiaona worked at Global Education Cluster in UNICEF, Geneva, where she began her research on the international scientific collaboration between China and Switzerland, and this experience later became the starting point of her master thesis. In her master’s thesis, Xiaona used a longitudinal research method in following a group of Chinese scientists who studied and worked in Switzerland. Through semi-structured interviews, she explored how collaborative relationships between individual scientists began and developed.

Xiaona has strong research interests in the science studies, internationalization and globalization of higher education. Her doctoral research is going to continue to explore the scientific knowledge networks between China and Switzerland under the influence of geopolitical factors.

Wanlin Cai is a DPhil student in higher education and a member of CGHE research group at the Department of Education.

Wanlin’s research interest lies in international higher education, higher education policies and economy, with a specific focus on World-Class Universities.

She is also a member of South China Global Talent Institute, Center for China and Globalisation, where she focuses on the research of talent policy and development in the Great Bay Area in China.

Prior to her beginning as a DPhil student, Wanlin read for the M.Sc in Higher Education at the University of Oxford and the M.Sc in Management and Enterprise Growth at the University of Glasgow.

Naosuke is a DPhil student whose research interests are Global Englishes and mutual intelligibility in English communication.

Naosuke finished an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition at the University of Oxford with distinction in 2019. His DPhil research focuses on the intelligibility of non-native English speakers. Specifically, he would like to seek what kind of English pronunciation features are critical for successful English communication between non-native English speakers.

Adam, from Ethiopia, is interested in looking at the role of education in peacebuilding and conflicts.

Akira is a DPhil Student in Anthropology affiliated with the School of Anthropology & Museum Ethnography, and associated with both the Department of Education and Nissan Institute of Japanese Studies. He is supervised by David Mills and Roger Goodman.

Akira’s doctoral research rests with the concepts of ‘international’ and ‘global education,’ and is grounded in the recent emergence and growth of International Baccalaureate (IB) education in Japan. Focused on IB educator training across several higher education institutions (HEIs), Akira aims – solely through digital anthropological approaches – to contextualize the everyday negotiations of ‘international’ and ‘global’ knowledge, both by those receiving and administering its training. Considering social, political, economic and cognitive aspects, one key objective of this research hopes to inform educational practitioners and policy-makers of some of the conceptual and social challenges that emerge with dissonant notions of cultivating ‘international’ and ‘global people.’

Akira has been an Associate Researcher at the Graduate School of Teacher Education, Tokyo Gakugei University since autumn 2020, a post he continues to hold until the end of his doctoral degree. He also currently works as an Anthropological Analyst for Contemplative Spaces, a consultancy focused on designing and delivering a range of leadership development initiatives for individuals, groups, and organizational bodies. His future career plans include further anthropological research and establishing consultancy services dedicated to various inclusion-based development initiatives.

Amelia is passionate about access to and the effects of environmental education globally, particularly in the Galápagos Islands of Ecuador.

Because she experienced a wealth of informal and non-formal environmental education from her parents and from explorations growing up in Southern Oregon, she is interested in researching how environmental education manifests in global communities. She fell in love with the Galápagos on a structured university-led trip during her undergraduate studies and realized that there was a dearth of research on social aspects of the communities living on the islands.  Because of this, she pursued research in the Galápagos in 2014 on the prevalence of and access to both formal and informal (provided by numerous NGOs and government agencies) environmental education for students on the islands, and on the level of student environmental literacy in 28 schools.

Her Dphil research focus, under the supervision of Dr. Ann Childs and Dr. Steve Puttick, is on access to and effects of Experiential Environmental Education for students living in the Galápagos Islands, and on the production of research on the social sphere in Galápagos.

Prior to starting her Dphil at Oxford, she worked in alliances and partnerships at tech companies in the San Francisco Bay Area. Most recently, she was the Director of Global Partnerships at Conversica, a conversational AI platform, and cultivated, trained, and drove pipeline with select international resellers in APAC, EMEA, and LATAM, and with regional resellers in the United States. She also assisted with the design and construction of the Conversica partner program.

In her free time, she is a free-lance food photographer, food stylist, food blogger, recipe developer, and gluten free baker for her online blog and social handle, Sisters Sans Gluten (www.sisterssansgluten), which she created with her sister in 2018. She also continues to sing informally and takes voice lessons remotely with instructor Corey Head of San Francisco.

She holds a BA in both Anthropology and Music (vocal performance), and an MA in Latin American Studies from Stanford University. Highlights from Stanford include: playing and touring as a performing member of Stanford Taiko (Japanese ensemble drumming) for four years; singing with the Stanford Chamber Chorale led by Professor Steve Sano; studying voice with Wendy Hillhouse; participating in music department operas; performing in self-organized recitals showcasing western art songs, western musical theater, and Latin American art songs; studying abroad in Santiago, Chile; and learning Quechua during her masters program with Marisol Necochea.

Abdul Karim has completed a Bachelor of Science in Bioengineering and Computational Medicine (Imperial College London), a Bachelor of Medicine and Bachelor of Surgery (Queen Mary University of London), and Master of Science in the Philosophy of Science and Economics (The London School of Economics).

He has delivered lectures on the Philosophy of Human Nature and the History of Metaethics at the University of Cambridge and for Health Education East Midlands. This, in addition to the current positions he holds as a Hospital Doctor and Health Policy and Management Advisor at the University Hospitals of Leicester NHS Trust.

Abdul Karim’s current areas of interest include the biological definition of psychological states relevant to the learning environment, and the influence of language on the variable interpretation of a particular social context. For the latter of which he has published primary research.

Another is the appraisal and deployment of physiological measurement devices in learning environments as a means of quantitatively evaluating psychological states. Such research areas hold promise in enhancing the questionnaire-based evidences of contemporary theories in education, such as those regarding motivation, self-determination and engagement. This will to contribute to the evidence-based public policy optimisation in education and social care.

 

Publications

Ismail, A.K. 2017. A Cross Sectional Study to Explore the Effect of the Linguistic Origin and Evolution of a Language on Patient Interpretation of Haematological Cancers. Advances in Biological Research. 11 (4): 225-232.

Ismail, A.K. 2017. The Origin of the Arabic Medical Term for Cancer. Advances in Biological Research. 11 (4): 198-201.

Ismail, A.K. 2018. The Impact of da Vinci’s Anatomical Drawings and Calculations on Foundation of Orthopaedics. Advances in Biological Research. 12 (1): 26-30.

As a mathematics teacher who believes that anyone can understand mathematics, Ashley is keenly interested in developing interventions and resources for learners who struggle with the subject. More specifically, she is focusing on the transitionary moment in the classroom when discussions have ceased, and practice begins and how this transition can become more fluid for learners.

By drawing on research from education, psychology and cognitive neuroscience, Ashley hopes to gain insights into how the brain and mind process information and how this knowledge can inform teacher practice and, ultimately, help learners understand mathematics.

After having taught for over ten years, Ashley completed her MSc, with Distinction, at the Department of Education, and her dissertation was “Highly Commended” by the British Educational Research Association (BERA). She is committed to making mathematics more accessible for all learners and strives for research that is not only impactful but also directly applicable to the classroom.

I am a Research Project Coordinator and Co-PI at the Department of Education for a project on Education, Purpose and Human Flourishing in Times of Uncertainty (EPHF), and the Templeton World Charity Foundation Fellow in Comparative Education at St Antony’s College, Oxford.

I have a multi-disciplinary background and experience. Academically I am an Art Historian specialising in late 18th and early 19th-century French aesthetics, and prior to my return to academia I had a career in the international finance, entrepreneurial business and high net worth family business sectors. I have published and taught at the University of Oxford on late eighteenth-and early nineteenth century art, history and aesthetics. Drawing on my experience as Lay Chaplain at Somerville College, Oxford I have also published on religious education. In addition to my position in the Education Department I am the Principal Advisor for Strategic Relationships and Partnerships at the Templeton World Charity Foundation Inc where I work closely with other foundations, INGOs and public policy organisations.

Publications List

Xiaona Wang is a DPhil student in Education, at St. Antony’s College, the University of Oxford. Xiaona’s doctoral research is fully funded by the University of Oxford (Clarendon Fund Scholarship and St. Antony’s College The Warden’s Scholarship). She is also a member at the Center for Global Higher Education.

Before her DPhil, Xiaona obtained her M.A degree in Higher Education at Graduate School of Education at Peking University, and B.A at the Faulty of Education from Beijing Normal University in China with first-class honour. She also studied at the University of Manchester as an exchange student in the School of Social Science.

Previously, Xiaona worked at Global Education Cluster in UNICEF, Geneva, where she began her research on the international scientific collaboration between China and Switzerland, and this experience later became the starting point of her master thesis. In her master’s thesis, Xiaona used a longitudinal research method in following a group of Chinese scientists who studied and worked in Switzerland. Through semi-structured interviews, she explored how collaborative relationships between individual scientists began and developed.

Xiaona has strong research interests in the science studies, internationalization and globalization of higher education. Her doctoral research is going to continue to explore the scientific knowledge networks between China and Switzerland under the influence of geopolitical factors.

Wanlin Cai is a DPhil student in higher education and a member of CGHE research group at the Department of Education.

Wanlin’s research interest lies in international higher education, higher education policies and economy, with a specific focus on World-Class Universities.

She is also a member of South China Global Talent Institute, Center for China and Globalisation, where she focuses on the research of talent policy and development in the Great Bay Area in China.

Prior to her beginning as a DPhil student, Wanlin read for the M.Sc in Higher Education at the University of Oxford and the M.Sc in Management and Enterprise Growth at the University of Glasgow.

Naosuke is a DPhil student whose research interests are Global Englishes and mutual intelligibility in English communication.

Naosuke finished an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition at the University of Oxford with distinction in 2019. His DPhil research focuses on the intelligibility of non-native English speakers. Specifically, he would like to seek what kind of English pronunciation features are critical for successful English communication between non-native English speakers.

Adam, from Ethiopia, is interested in looking at the role of education in peacebuilding and conflicts.

Akira is a DPhil Student in Anthropology affiliated with the School of Anthropology & Museum Ethnography, and associated with both the Department of Education and Nissan Institute of Japanese Studies. He is supervised by David Mills and Roger Goodman.

Akira’s doctoral research rests with the concepts of ‘international’ and ‘global education,’ and is grounded in the recent emergence and growth of International Baccalaureate (IB) education in Japan. Focused on IB educator training across several higher education institutions (HEIs), Akira aims – solely through digital anthropological approaches – to contextualize the everyday negotiations of ‘international’ and ‘global’ knowledge, both by those receiving and administering its training. Considering social, political, economic and cognitive aspects, one key objective of this research hopes to inform educational practitioners and policy-makers of some of the conceptual and social challenges that emerge with dissonant notions of cultivating ‘international’ and ‘global people.’

Akira has been an Associate Researcher at the Graduate School of Teacher Education, Tokyo Gakugei University since autumn 2020, a post he continues to hold until the end of his doctoral degree. He also currently works as an Anthropological Analyst for Contemplative Spaces, a consultancy focused on designing and delivering a range of leadership development initiatives for individuals, groups, and organizational bodies. His future career plans include further anthropological research and establishing consultancy services dedicated to various inclusion-based development initiatives.

Amelia is passionate about access to and the effects of environmental education globally, particularly in the Galápagos Islands of Ecuador.

Because she experienced a wealth of informal and non-formal environmental education from her parents and from explorations growing up in Southern Oregon, she is interested in researching how environmental education manifests in global communities. She fell in love with the Galápagos on a structured university-led trip during her undergraduate studies and realized that there was a dearth of research on social aspects of the communities living on the islands.  Because of this, she pursued research in the Galápagos in 2014 on the prevalence of and access to both formal and informal (provided by numerous NGOs and government agencies) environmental education for students on the islands, and on the level of student environmental literacy in 28 schools.

Her Dphil research focus, under the supervision of Dr. Ann Childs and Dr. Steve Puttick, is on access to and effects of Experiential Environmental Education for students living in the Galápagos Islands, and on the production of research on the social sphere in Galápagos.

Prior to starting her Dphil at Oxford, she worked in alliances and partnerships at tech companies in the San Francisco Bay Area. Most recently, she was the Director of Global Partnerships at Conversica, a conversational AI platform, and cultivated, trained, and drove pipeline with select international resellers in APAC, EMEA, and LATAM, and with regional resellers in the United States. She also assisted with the design and construction of the Conversica partner program.

In her free time, she is a free-lance food photographer, food stylist, food blogger, recipe developer, and gluten free baker for her online blog and social handle, Sisters Sans Gluten (www.sisterssansgluten), which she created with her sister in 2018. She also continues to sing informally and takes voice lessons remotely with instructor Corey Head of San Francisco.

She holds a BA in both Anthropology and Music (vocal performance), and an MA in Latin American Studies from Stanford University. Highlights from Stanford include: playing and touring as a performing member of Stanford Taiko (Japanese ensemble drumming) for four years; singing with the Stanford Chamber Chorale led by Professor Steve Sano; studying voice with Wendy Hillhouse; participating in music department operas; performing in self-organized recitals showcasing western art songs, western musical theater, and Latin American art songs; studying abroad in Santiago, Chile; and learning Quechua during her masters program with Marisol Necochea.

Abdul Karim has completed a Bachelor of Science in Bioengineering and Computational Medicine (Imperial College London), a Bachelor of Medicine and Bachelor of Surgery (Queen Mary University of London), and Master of Science in the Philosophy of Science and Economics (The London School of Economics).

He has delivered lectures on the Philosophy of Human Nature and the History of Metaethics at the University of Cambridge and for Health Education East Midlands. This, in addition to the current positions he holds as a Hospital Doctor and Health Policy and Management Advisor at the University Hospitals of Leicester NHS Trust.

Abdul Karim’s current areas of interest include the biological definition of psychological states relevant to the learning environment, and the influence of language on the variable interpretation of a particular social context. For the latter of which he has published primary research.

Another is the appraisal and deployment of physiological measurement devices in learning environments as a means of quantitatively evaluating psychological states. Such research areas hold promise in enhancing the questionnaire-based evidences of contemporary theories in education, such as those regarding motivation, self-determination and engagement. This will to contribute to the evidence-based public policy optimisation in education and social care.

 

Publications

Ismail, A.K. 2017. A Cross Sectional Study to Explore the Effect of the Linguistic Origin and Evolution of a Language on Patient Interpretation of Haematological Cancers. Advances in Biological Research. 11 (4): 225-232.

Ismail, A.K. 2017. The Origin of the Arabic Medical Term for Cancer. Advances in Biological Research. 11 (4): 198-201.

Ismail, A.K. 2018. The Impact of da Vinci’s Anatomical Drawings and Calculations on Foundation of Orthopaedics. Advances in Biological Research. 12 (1): 26-30.

As a mathematics teacher who believes that anyone can understand mathematics, Ashley is keenly interested in developing interventions and resources for learners who struggle with the subject. More specifically, she is focusing on the transitionary moment in the classroom when discussions have ceased, and practice begins and how this transition can become more fluid for learners.

By drawing on research from education, psychology and cognitive neuroscience, Ashley hopes to gain insights into how the brain and mind process information and how this knowledge can inform teacher practice and, ultimately, help learners understand mathematics.

After having taught for over ten years, Ashley completed her MSc, with Distinction, at the Department of Education, and her dissertation was “Highly Commended” by the British Educational Research Association (BERA). She is committed to making mathematics more accessible for all learners and strives for research that is not only impactful but also directly applicable to the classroom.

I am a Research Project Coordinator and Co-PI at the Department of Education for a project on Education, Purpose and Human Flourishing in Times of Uncertainty (EPHF), and the Templeton World Charity Foundation Fellow in Comparative Education at St Antony’s College, Oxford.

I have a multi-disciplinary background and experience. Academically I am an Art Historian specialising in late 18th and early 19th-century French aesthetics, and prior to my return to academia I had a career in the international finance, entrepreneurial business and high net worth family business sectors. I have published and taught at the University of Oxford on late eighteenth-and early nineteenth century art, history and aesthetics. Drawing on my experience as Lay Chaplain at Somerville College, Oxford I have also published on religious education. In addition to my position in the Education Department I am the Principal Advisor for Strategic Relationships and Partnerships at the Templeton World Charity Foundation Inc where I work closely with other foundations, INGOs and public policy organisations.

Publications List

Xiaona Wang is a DPhil student in Education, at St. Antony’s College, the University of Oxford. Xiaona’s doctoral research is fully funded by the University of Oxford (Clarendon Fund Scholarship and St. Antony’s College The Warden’s Scholarship). She is also a member at the Center for Global Higher Education.

Before her DPhil, Xiaona obtained her M.A degree in Higher Education at Graduate School of Education at Peking University, and B.A at the Faulty of Education from Beijing Normal University in China with first-class honour. She also studied at the University of Manchester as an exchange student in the School of Social Science.

Previously, Xiaona worked at Global Education Cluster in UNICEF, Geneva, where she began her research on the international scientific collaboration between China and Switzerland, and this experience later became the starting point of her master thesis. In her master’s thesis, Xiaona used a longitudinal research method in following a group of Chinese scientists who studied and worked in Switzerland. Through semi-structured interviews, she explored how collaborative relationships between individual scientists began and developed.

Xiaona has strong research interests in the science studies, internationalization and globalization of higher education. Her doctoral research is going to continue to explore the scientific knowledge networks between China and Switzerland under the influence of geopolitical factors.

Wanlin Cai is a DPhil student in higher education and a member of CGHE research group at the Department of Education.

Wanlin’s research interest lies in international higher education, higher education policies and economy, with a specific focus on World-Class Universities.

She is also a member of South China Global Talent Institute, Center for China and Globalisation, where she focuses on the research of talent policy and development in the Great Bay Area in China.

Prior to her beginning as a DPhil student, Wanlin read for the M.Sc in Higher Education at the University of Oxford and the M.Sc in Management and Enterprise Growth at the University of Glasgow.

Naosuke is a DPhil student whose research interests are Global Englishes and mutual intelligibility in English communication.

Naosuke finished an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition at the University of Oxford with distinction in 2019. His DPhil research focuses on the intelligibility of non-native English speakers. Specifically, he would like to seek what kind of English pronunciation features are critical for successful English communication between non-native English speakers.

Adam, from Ethiopia, is interested in looking at the role of education in peacebuilding and conflicts.

Akira is a DPhil Student in Anthropology affiliated with the School of Anthropology & Museum Ethnography, and associated with both the Department of Education and Nissan Institute of Japanese Studies. He is supervised by David Mills and Roger Goodman.

Akira’s doctoral research rests with the concepts of ‘international’ and ‘global education,’ and is grounded in the recent emergence and growth of International Baccalaureate (IB) education in Japan. Focused on IB educator training across several higher education institutions (HEIs), Akira aims – solely through digital anthropological approaches – to contextualize the everyday negotiations of ‘international’ and ‘global’ knowledge, both by those receiving and administering its training. Considering social, political, economic and cognitive aspects, one key objective of this research hopes to inform educational practitioners and policy-makers of some of the conceptual and social challenges that emerge with dissonant notions of cultivating ‘international’ and ‘global people.’

Akira has been an Associate Researcher at the Graduate School of Teacher Education, Tokyo Gakugei University since autumn 2020, a post he continues to hold until the end of his doctoral degree. He also currently works as an Anthropological Analyst for Contemplative Spaces, a consultancy focused on designing and delivering a range of leadership development initiatives for individuals, groups, and organizational bodies. His future career plans include further anthropological research and establishing consultancy services dedicated to various inclusion-based development initiatives.

Amelia is passionate about access to and the effects of environmental education globally, particularly in the Galápagos Islands of Ecuador.

Because she experienced a wealth of informal and non-formal environmental education from her parents and from explorations growing up in Southern Oregon, she is interested in researching how environmental education manifests in global communities. She fell in love with the Galápagos on a structured university-led trip during her undergraduate studies and realized that there was a dearth of research on social aspects of the communities living on the islands.  Because of this, she pursued research in the Galápagos in 2014 on the prevalence of and access to both formal and informal (provided by numerous NGOs and government agencies) environmental education for students on the islands, and on the level of student environmental literacy in 28 schools.

Her Dphil research focus, under the supervision of Dr. Ann Childs and Dr. Steve Puttick, is on access to and effects of Experiential Environmental Education for students living in the Galápagos Islands, and on the production of research on the social sphere in Galápagos.

Prior to starting her Dphil at Oxford, she worked in alliances and partnerships at tech companies in the San Francisco Bay Area. Most recently, she was the Director of Global Partnerships at Conversica, a conversational AI platform, and cultivated, trained, and drove pipeline with select international resellers in APAC, EMEA, and LATAM, and with regional resellers in the United States. She also assisted with the design and construction of the Conversica partner program.

In her free time, she is a free-lance food photographer, food stylist, food blogger, recipe developer, and gluten free baker for her online blog and social handle, Sisters Sans Gluten (www.sisterssansgluten), which she created with her sister in 2018. She also continues to sing informally and takes voice lessons remotely with instructor Corey Head of San Francisco.

She holds a BA in both Anthropology and Music (vocal performance), and an MA in Latin American Studies from Stanford University. Highlights from Stanford include: playing and touring as a performing member of Stanford Taiko (Japanese ensemble drumming) for four years; singing with the Stanford Chamber Chorale led by Professor Steve Sano; studying voice with Wendy Hillhouse; participating in music department operas; performing in self-organized recitals showcasing western art songs, western musical theater, and Latin American art songs; studying abroad in Santiago, Chile; and learning Quechua during her masters program with Marisol Necochea.

Abdul Karim has completed a Bachelor of Science in Bioengineering and Computational Medicine (Imperial College London), a Bachelor of Medicine and Bachelor of Surgery (Queen Mary University of London), and Master of Science in the Philosophy of Science and Economics (The London School of Economics).

He has delivered lectures on the Philosophy of Human Nature and the History of Metaethics at the University of Cambridge and for Health Education East Midlands. This, in addition to the current positions he holds as a Hospital Doctor and Health Policy and Management Advisor at the University Hospitals of Leicester NHS Trust.

Abdul Karim’s current areas of interest include the biological definition of psychological states relevant to the learning environment, and the influence of language on the variable interpretation of a particular social context. For the latter of which he has published primary research.

Another is the appraisal and deployment of physiological measurement devices in learning environments as a means of quantitatively evaluating psychological states. Such research areas hold promise in enhancing the questionnaire-based evidences of contemporary theories in education, such as those regarding motivation, self-determination and engagement. This will to contribute to the evidence-based public policy optimisation in education and social care.

 

Publications

Ismail, A.K. 2017. A Cross Sectional Study to Explore the Effect of the Linguistic Origin and Evolution of a Language on Patient Interpretation of Haematological Cancers. Advances in Biological Research. 11 (4): 225-232.

Ismail, A.K. 2017. The Origin of the Arabic Medical Term for Cancer. Advances in Biological Research. 11 (4): 198-201.

Ismail, A.K. 2018. The Impact of da Vinci’s Anatomical Drawings and Calculations on Foundation of Orthopaedics. Advances in Biological Research. 12 (1): 26-30.

As a mathematics teacher who believes that anyone can understand mathematics, Ashley is keenly interested in developing interventions and resources for learners who struggle with the subject. More specifically, she is focusing on the transitionary moment in the classroom when discussions have ceased, and practice begins and how this transition can become more fluid for learners.

By drawing on research from education, psychology and cognitive neuroscience, Ashley hopes to gain insights into how the brain and mind process information and how this knowledge can inform teacher practice and, ultimately, help learners understand mathematics.

After having taught for over ten years, Ashley completed her MSc, with Distinction, at the Department of Education, and her dissertation was “Highly Commended” by the British Educational Research Association (BERA). She is committed to making mathematics more accessible for all learners and strives for research that is not only impactful but also directly applicable to the classroom.

I am a Research Project Coordinator and Co-PI at the Department of Education for a project on Education, Purpose and Human Flourishing in Times of Uncertainty (EPHF), and the Templeton World Charity Foundation Fellow in Comparative Education at St Antony’s College, Oxford.

I have a multi-disciplinary background and experience. Academically I am an Art Historian specialising in late 18th and early 19th-century French aesthetics, and prior to my return to academia I had a career in the international finance, entrepreneurial business and high net worth family business sectors. I have published and taught at the University of Oxford on late eighteenth-and early nineteenth century art, history and aesthetics. Drawing on my experience as Lay Chaplain at Somerville College, Oxford I have also published on religious education. In addition to my position in the Education Department I am the Principal Advisor for Strategic Relationships and Partnerships at the Templeton World Charity Foundation Inc where I work closely with other foundations, INGOs and public policy organisations.

Publications List

Xiaona Wang is a DPhil student in Education, at St. Antony’s College, the University of Oxford. Xiaona’s doctoral research is fully funded by the University of Oxford (Clarendon Fund Scholarship and St. Antony’s College The Warden’s Scholarship). She is also a member at the Center for Global Higher Education.

Before her DPhil, Xiaona obtained her M.A degree in Higher Education at Graduate School of Education at Peking University, and B.A at the Faulty of Education from Beijing Normal University in China with first-class honour. She also studied at the University of Manchester as an exchange student in the School of Social Science.

Previously, Xiaona worked at Global Education Cluster in UNICEF, Geneva, where she began her research on the international scientific collaboration between China and Switzerland, and this experience later became the starting point of her master thesis. In her master’s thesis, Xiaona used a longitudinal research method in following a group of Chinese scientists who studied and worked in Switzerland. Through semi-structured interviews, she explored how collaborative relationships between individual scientists began and developed.

Xiaona has strong research interests in the science studies, internationalization and globalization of higher education. Her doctoral research is going to continue to explore the scientific knowledge networks between China and Switzerland under the influence of geopolitical factors.

Wanlin Cai is a DPhil student in higher education and a member of CGHE research group at the Department of Education.

Wanlin’s research interest lies in international higher education, higher education policies and economy, with a specific focus on World-Class Universities.

She is also a member of South China Global Talent Institute, Center for China and Globalisation, where she focuses on the research of talent policy and development in the Great Bay Area in China.

Prior to her beginning as a DPhil student, Wanlin read for the M.Sc in Higher Education at the University of Oxford and the M.Sc in Management and Enterprise Growth at the University of Glasgow.

Naosuke is a DPhil student whose research interests are Global Englishes and mutual intelligibility in English communication.

Naosuke finished an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition at the University of Oxford with distinction in 2019. His DPhil research focuses on the intelligibility of non-native English speakers. Specifically, he would like to seek what kind of English pronunciation features are critical for successful English communication between non-native English speakers.

Adam, from Ethiopia, is interested in looking at the role of education in peacebuilding and conflicts.

Akira is a DPhil Student in Anthropology affiliated with the School of Anthropology & Museum Ethnography, and associated with both the Department of Education and Nissan Institute of Japanese Studies. He is supervised by David Mills and Roger Goodman.

Akira’s doctoral research rests with the concepts of ‘international’ and ‘global education,’ and is grounded in the recent emergence and growth of International Baccalaureate (IB) education in Japan. Focused on IB educator training across several higher education institutions (HEIs), Akira aims – solely through digital anthropological approaches – to contextualize the everyday negotiations of ‘international’ and ‘global’ knowledge, both by those receiving and administering its training. Considering social, political, economic and cognitive aspects, one key objective of this research hopes to inform educational practitioners and policy-makers of some of the conceptual and social challenges that emerge with dissonant notions of cultivating ‘international’ and ‘global people.’

Akira has been an Associate Researcher at the Graduate School of Teacher Education, Tokyo Gakugei University since autumn 2020, a post he continues to hold until the end of his doctoral degree. He also currently works as an Anthropological Analyst for Contemplative Spaces, a consultancy focused on designing and delivering a range of leadership development initiatives for individuals, groups, and organizational bodies. His future career plans include further anthropological research and establishing consultancy services dedicated to various inclusion-based development initiatives.

Amelia is passionate about access to and the effects of environmental education globally, particularly in the Galápagos Islands of Ecuador.

Because she experienced a wealth of informal and non-formal environmental education from her parents and from explorations growing up in Southern Oregon, she is interested in researching how environmental education manifests in global communities. She fell in love with the Galápagos on a structured university-led trip during her undergraduate studies and realized that there was a dearth of research on social aspects of the communities living on the islands.  Because of this, she pursued research in the Galápagos in 2014 on the prevalence of and access to both formal and informal (provided by numerous NGOs and government agencies) environmental education for students on the islands, and on the level of student environmental literacy in 28 schools.

Her Dphil research focus, under the supervision of Dr. Ann Childs and Dr. Steve Puttick, is on access to and effects of Experiential Environmental Education for students living in the Galápagos Islands, and on the production of research on the social sphere in Galápagos.

Prior to starting her Dphil at Oxford, she worked in alliances and partnerships at tech companies in the San Francisco Bay Area. Most recently, she was the Director of Global Partnerships at Conversica, a conversational AI platform, and cultivated, trained, and drove pipeline with select international resellers in APAC, EMEA, and LATAM, and with regional resellers in the United States. She also assisted with the design and construction of the Conversica partner program.

In her free time, she is a free-lance food photographer, food stylist, food blogger, recipe developer, and gluten free baker for her online blog and social handle, Sisters Sans Gluten (www.sisterssansgluten), which she created with her sister in 2018. She also continues to sing informally and takes voice lessons remotely with instructor Corey Head of San Francisco.

She holds a BA in both Anthropology and Music (vocal performance), and an MA in Latin American Studies from Stanford University. Highlights from Stanford include: playing and touring as a performing member of Stanford Taiko (Japanese ensemble drumming) for four years; singing with the Stanford Chamber Chorale led by Professor Steve Sano; studying voice with Wendy Hillhouse; participating in music department operas; performing in self-organized recitals showcasing western art songs, western musical theater, and Latin American art songs; studying abroad in Santiago, Chile; and learning Quechua during her masters program with Marisol Necochea.

Abdul Karim has completed a Bachelor of Science in Bioengineering and Computational Medicine (Imperial College London), a Bachelor of Medicine and Bachelor of Surgery (Queen Mary University of London), and Master of Science in the Philosophy of Science and Economics (The London School of Economics).

He has delivered lectures on the Philosophy of Human Nature and the History of Metaethics at the University of Cambridge and for Health Education East Midlands. This, in addition to the current positions he holds as a Hospital Doctor and Health Policy and Management Advisor at the University Hospitals of Leicester NHS Trust.

Abdul Karim’s current areas of interest include the biological definition of psychological states relevant to the learning environment, and the influence of language on the variable interpretation of a particular social context. For the latter of which he has published primary research.

Another is the appraisal and deployment of physiological measurement devices in learning environments as a means of quantitatively evaluating psychological states. Such research areas hold promise in enhancing the questionnaire-based evidences of contemporary theories in education, such as those regarding motivation, self-determination and engagement. This will to contribute to the evidence-based public policy optimisation in education and social care.

 

Publications

Ismail, A.K. 2017. A Cross Sectional Study to Explore the Effect of the Linguistic Origin and Evolution of a Language on Patient Interpretation of Haematological Cancers. Advances in Biological Research. 11 (4): 225-232.

Ismail, A.K. 2017. The Origin of the Arabic Medical Term for Cancer. Advances in Biological Research. 11 (4): 198-201.

Ismail, A.K. 2018. The Impact of da Vinci’s Anatomical Drawings and Calculations on Foundation of Orthopaedics. Advances in Biological Research. 12 (1): 26-30.

As a mathematics teacher who believes that anyone can understand mathematics, Ashley is keenly interested in developing interventions and resources for learners who struggle with the subject. More specifically, she is focusing on the transitionary moment in the classroom when discussions have ceased, and practice begins and how this transition can become more fluid for learners.

By drawing on research from education, psychology and cognitive neuroscience, Ashley hopes to gain insights into how the brain and mind process information and how this knowledge can inform teacher practice and, ultimately, help learners understand mathematics.

After having taught for over ten years, Ashley completed her MSc, with Distinction, at the Department of Education, and her dissertation was “Highly Commended” by the British Educational Research Association (BERA). She is committed to making mathematics more accessible for all learners and strives for research that is not only impactful but also directly applicable to the classroom.

I am a Research Project Coordinator and Co-PI at the Department of Education for a project on Education, Purpose and Human Flourishing in Times of Uncertainty (EPHF), and the Templeton World Charity Foundation Fellow in Comparative Education at St Antony’s College, Oxford.

I have a multi-disciplinary background and experience. Academically I am an Art Historian specialising in late 18th and early 19th-century French aesthetics, and prior to my return to academia I had a career in the international finance, entrepreneurial business and high net worth family business sectors. I have published and taught at the University of Oxford on late eighteenth-and early nineteenth century art, history and aesthetics. Drawing on my experience as Lay Chaplain at Somerville College, Oxford I have also published on religious education. In addition to my position in the Education Department I am the Principal Advisor for Strategic Relationships and Partnerships at the Templeton World Charity Foundation Inc where I work closely with other foundations, INGOs and public policy organisations.

Publications List

Xiaona Wang is a DPhil student in Education, at St. Antony’s College, the University of Oxford. Xiaona’s doctoral research is fully funded by the University of Oxford (Clarendon Fund Scholarship and St. Antony’s College The Warden’s Scholarship). She is also a member at the Center for Global Higher Education.

Before her DPhil, Xiaona obtained her M.A degree in Higher Education at Graduate School of Education at Peking University, and B.A at the Faulty of Education from Beijing Normal University in China with first-class honour. She also studied at the University of Manchester as an exchange student in the School of Social Science.

Previously, Xiaona worked at Global Education Cluster in UNICEF, Geneva, where she began her research on the international scientific collaboration between China and Switzerland, and this experience later became the starting point of her master thesis. In her master’s thesis, Xiaona used a longitudinal research method in following a group of Chinese scientists who studied and worked in Switzerland. Through semi-structured interviews, she explored how collaborative relationships between individual scientists began and developed.

Xiaona has strong research interests in the science studies, internationalization and globalization of higher education. Her doctoral research is going to continue to explore the scientific knowledge networks between China and Switzerland under the influence of geopolitical factors.

Wanlin Cai is a DPhil student in higher education and a member of CGHE research group at the Department of Education.

Wanlin’s research interest lies in international higher education, higher education policies and economy, with a specific focus on World-Class Universities.

She is also a member of South China Global Talent Institute, Center for China and Globalisation, where she focuses on the research of talent policy and development in the Great Bay Area in China.

Prior to her beginning as a DPhil student, Wanlin read for the M.Sc in Higher Education at the University of Oxford and the M.Sc in Management and Enterprise Growth at the University of Glasgow.

Naosuke is a DPhil student whose research interests are Global Englishes and mutual intelligibility in English communication.

Naosuke finished an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition at the University of Oxford with distinction in 2019. His DPhil research focuses on the intelligibility of non-native English speakers. Specifically, he would like to seek what kind of English pronunciation features are critical for successful English communication between non-native English speakers.

Adam, from Ethiopia, is interested in looking at the role of education in peacebuilding and conflicts.

Akira is a DPhil Student in Anthropology affiliated with the School of Anthropology & Museum Ethnography, and associated with both the Department of Education and Nissan Institute of Japanese Studies. He is supervised by David Mills and Roger Goodman.

Akira’s doctoral research rests with the concepts of ‘international’ and ‘global education,’ and is grounded in the recent emergence and growth of International Baccalaureate (IB) education in Japan. Focused on IB educator training across several higher education institutions (HEIs), Akira aims – solely through digital anthropological approaches – to contextualize the everyday negotiations of ‘international’ and ‘global’ knowledge, both by those receiving and administering its training. Considering social, political, economic and cognitive aspects, one key objective of this research hopes to inform educational practitioners and policy-makers of some of the conceptual and social challenges that emerge with dissonant notions of cultivating ‘international’ and ‘global people.’

Akira has been an Associate Researcher at the Graduate School of Teacher Education, Tokyo Gakugei University since autumn 2020, a post he continues to hold until the end of his doctoral degree. He also currently works as an Anthropological Analyst for Contemplative Spaces, a consultancy focused on designing and delivering a range of leadership development initiatives for individuals, groups, and organizational bodies. His future career plans include further anthropological research and establishing consultancy services dedicated to various inclusion-based development initiatives.

Amelia is passionate about access to and the effects of environmental education globally, particularly in the Galápagos Islands of Ecuador.

Because she experienced a wealth of informal and non-formal environmental education from her parents and from explorations growing up in Southern Oregon, she is interested in researching how environmental education manifests in global communities. She fell in love with the Galápagos on a structured university-led trip during her undergraduate studies and realized that there was a dearth of research on social aspects of the communities living on the islands.  Because of this, she pursued research in the Galápagos in 2014 on the prevalence of and access to both formal and informal (provided by numerous NGOs and government agencies) environmental education for students on the islands, and on the level of student environmental literacy in 28 schools.

Her Dphil research focus, under the supervision of Dr. Ann Childs and Dr. Steve Puttick, is on access to and effects of Experiential Environmental Education for students living in the Galápagos Islands, and on the production of research on the social sphere in Galápagos.

Prior to starting her Dphil at Oxford, she worked in alliances and partnerships at tech companies in the San Francisco Bay Area. Most recently, she was the Director of Global Partnerships at Conversica, a conversational AI platform, and cultivated, trained, and drove pipeline with select international resellers in APAC, EMEA, and LATAM, and with regional resellers in the United States. She also assisted with the design and construction of the Conversica partner program.

In her free time, she is a free-lance food photographer, food stylist, food blogger, recipe developer, and gluten free baker for her online blog and social handle, Sisters Sans Gluten (www.sisterssansgluten), which she created with her sister in 2018. She also continues to sing informally and takes voice lessons remotely with instructor Corey Head of San Francisco.

She holds a BA in both Anthropology and Music (vocal performance), and an MA in Latin American Studies from Stanford University. Highlights from Stanford include: playing and touring as a performing member of Stanford Taiko (Japanese ensemble drumming) for four years; singing with the Stanford Chamber Chorale led by Professor Steve Sano; studying voice with Wendy Hillhouse; participating in music department operas; performing in self-organized recitals showcasing western art songs, western musical theater, and Latin American art songs; studying abroad in Santiago, Chile; and learning Quechua during her masters program with Marisol Necochea.

Abdul Karim has completed a Bachelor of Science in Bioengineering and Computational Medicine (Imperial College London), a Bachelor of Medicine and Bachelor of Surgery (Queen Mary University of London), and Master of Science in the Philosophy of Science and Economics (The London School of Economics).

He has delivered lectures on the Philosophy of Human Nature and the History of Metaethics at the University of Cambridge and for Health Education East Midlands. This, in addition to the current positions he holds as a Hospital Doctor and Health Policy and Management Advisor at the University Hospitals of Leicester NHS Trust.

Abdul Karim’s current areas of interest include the biological definition of psychological states relevant to the learning environment, and the influence of language on the variable interpretation of a particular social context. For the latter of which he has published primary research.

Another is the appraisal and deployment of physiological measurement devices in learning environments as a means of quantitatively evaluating psychological states. Such research areas hold promise in enhancing the questionnaire-based evidences of contemporary theories in education, such as those regarding motivation, self-determination and engagement. This will to contribute to the evidence-based public policy optimisation in education and social care.

 

Publications

Ismail, A.K. 2017. A Cross Sectional Study to Explore the Effect of the Linguistic Origin and Evolution of a Language on Patient Interpretation of Haematological Cancers. Advances in Biological Research. 11 (4): 225-232.

Ismail, A.K. 2017. The Origin of the Arabic Medical Term for Cancer. Advances in Biological Research. 11 (4): 198-201.

Ismail, A.K. 2018. The Impact of da Vinci’s Anatomical Drawings and Calculations on Foundation of Orthopaedics. Advances in Biological Research. 12 (1): 26-30.

As a mathematics teacher who believes that anyone can understand mathematics, Ashley is keenly interested in developing interventions and resources for learners who struggle with the subject. More specifically, she is focusing on the transitionary moment in the classroom when discussions have ceased, and practice begins and how this transition can become more fluid for learners.

By drawing on research from education, psychology and cognitive neuroscience, Ashley hopes to gain insights into how the brain and mind process information and how this knowledge can inform teacher practice and, ultimately, help learners understand mathematics.

After having taught for over ten years, Ashley completed her MSc, with Distinction, at the Department of Education, and her dissertation was “Highly Commended” by the British Educational Research Association (BERA). She is committed to making mathematics more accessible for all learners and strives for research that is not only impactful but also directly applicable to the classroom.

I am a Research Project Coordinator and Co-PI at the Department of Education for a project on Education, Purpose and Human Flourishing in Times of Uncertainty (EPHF), and the Templeton World Charity Foundation Fellow in Comparative Education at St Antony’s College, Oxford.

I have a multi-disciplinary background and experience. Academically I am an Art Historian specialising in late 18th and early 19th-century French aesthetics, and prior to my return to academia I had a career in the international finance, entrepreneurial business and high net worth family business sectors. I have published and taught at the University of Oxford on late eighteenth-and early nineteenth century art, history and aesthetics. Drawing on my experience as Lay Chaplain at Somerville College, Oxford I have also published on religious education. In addition to my position in the Education Department I am the Principal Advisor for Strategic Relationships and Partnerships at the Templeton World Charity Foundation Inc where I work closely with other foundations, INGOs and public policy organisations.

Publications List

Xiaona Wang is a DPhil student in Education, at St. Antony’s College, the University of Oxford. Xiaona’s doctoral research is fully funded by the University of Oxford (Clarendon Fund Scholarship and St. Antony’s College The Warden’s Scholarship). She is also a member at the Center for Global Higher Education.

Before her DPhil, Xiaona obtained her M.A degree in Higher Education at Graduate School of Education at Peking University, and B.A at the Faulty of Education from Beijing Normal University in China with first-class honour. She also studied at the University of Manchester as an exchange student in the School of Social Science.

Previously, Xiaona worked at Global Education Cluster in UNICEF, Geneva, where she began her research on the international scientific collaboration between China and Switzerland, and this experience later became the starting point of her master thesis. In her master’s thesis, Xiaona used a longitudinal research method in following a group of Chinese scientists who studied and worked in Switzerland. Through semi-structured interviews, she explored how collaborative relationships between individual scientists began and developed.

Xiaona has strong research interests in the science studies, internationalization and globalization of higher education. Her doctoral research is going to continue to explore the scientific knowledge networks between China and Switzerland under the influence of geopolitical factors.

Wanlin Cai is a DPhil student in higher education and a member of CGHE research group at the Department of Education.

Wanlin’s research interest lies in international higher education, higher education policies and economy, with a specific focus on World-Class Universities.

She is also a member of South China Global Talent Institute, Center for China and Globalisation, where she focuses on the research of talent policy and development in the Great Bay Area in China.

Prior to her beginning as a DPhil student, Wanlin read for the M.Sc in Higher Education at the University of Oxford and the M.Sc in Management and Enterprise Growth at the University of Glasgow.

Naosuke is a DPhil student whose research interests are Global Englishes and mutual intelligibility in English communication.

Naosuke finished an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition at the University of Oxford with distinction in 2019. His DPhil research focuses on the intelligibility of non-native English speakers. Specifically, he would like to seek what kind of English pronunciation features are critical for successful English communication between non-native English speakers.

Adam, from Ethiopia, is interested in looking at the role of education in peacebuilding and conflicts.

Akira is a DPhil Student in Anthropology affiliated with the School of Anthropology & Museum Ethnography, and associated with both the Department of Education and Nissan Institute of Japanese Studies. He is supervised by David Mills and Roger Goodman.

Akira’s doctoral research rests with the concepts of ‘international’ and ‘global education,’ and is grounded in the recent emergence and growth of International Baccalaureate (IB) education in Japan. Focused on IB educator training across several higher education institutions (HEIs), Akira aims – solely through digital anthropological approaches – to contextualize the everyday negotiations of ‘international’ and ‘global’ knowledge, both by those receiving and administering its training. Considering social, political, economic and cognitive aspects, one key objective of this research hopes to inform educational practitioners and policy-makers of some of the conceptual and social challenges that emerge with dissonant notions of cultivating ‘international’ and ‘global people.’

Akira has been an Associate Researcher at the Graduate School of Teacher Education, Tokyo Gakugei University since autumn 2020, a post he continues to hold until the end of his doctoral degree. He also currently works as an Anthropological Analyst for Contemplative Spaces, a consultancy focused on designing and delivering a range of leadership development initiatives for individuals, groups, and organizational bodies. His future career plans include further anthropological research and establishing consultancy services dedicated to various inclusion-based development initiatives.

Amelia is passionate about access to and the effects of environmental education globally, particularly in the Galápagos Islands of Ecuador.

Because she experienced a wealth of informal and non-formal environmental education from her parents and from explorations growing up in Southern Oregon, she is interested in researching how environmental education manifests in global communities. She fell in love with the Galápagos on a structured university-led trip during her undergraduate studies and realized that there was a dearth of research on social aspects of the communities living on the islands.  Because of this, she pursued research in the Galápagos in 2014 on the prevalence of and access to both formal and informal (provided by numerous NGOs and government agencies) environmental education for students on the islands, and on the level of student environmental literacy in 28 schools.

Her Dphil research focus, under the supervision of Dr. Ann Childs and Dr. Steve Puttick, is on access to and effects of Experiential Environmental Education for students living in the Galápagos Islands, and on the production of research on the social sphere in Galápagos.

Prior to starting her Dphil at Oxford, she worked in alliances and partnerships at tech companies in the San Francisco Bay Area. Most recently, she was the Director of Global Partnerships at Conversica, a conversational AI platform, and cultivated, trained, and drove pipeline with select international resellers in APAC, EMEA, and LATAM, and with regional resellers in the United States. She also assisted with the design and construction of the Conversica partner program.

In her free time, she is a free-lance food photographer, food stylist, food blogger, recipe developer, and gluten free baker for her online blog and social handle, Sisters Sans Gluten (www.sisterssansgluten), which she created with her sister in 2018. She also continues to sing informally and takes voice lessons remotely with instructor Corey Head of San Francisco.

She holds a BA in both Anthropology and Music (vocal performance), and an MA in Latin American Studies from Stanford University. Highlights from Stanford include: playing and touring as a performing member of Stanford Taiko (Japanese ensemble drumming) for four years; singing with the Stanford Chamber Chorale led by Professor Steve Sano; studying voice with Wendy Hillhouse; participating in music department operas; performing in self-organized recitals showcasing western art songs, western musical theater, and Latin American art songs; studying abroad in Santiago, Chile; and learning Quechua during her masters program with Marisol Necochea.

Abdul Karim has completed a Bachelor of Science in Bioengineering and Computational Medicine (Imperial College London), a Bachelor of Medicine and Bachelor of Surgery (Queen Mary University of London), and Master of Science in the Philosophy of Science and Economics (The London School of Economics).

He has delivered lectures on the Philosophy of Human Nature and the History of Metaethics at the University of Cambridge and for Health Education East Midlands. This, in addition to the current positions he holds as a Hospital Doctor and Health Policy and Management Advisor at the University Hospitals of Leicester NHS Trust.

Abdul Karim’s current areas of interest include the biological definition of psychological states relevant to the learning environment, and the influence of language on the variable interpretation of a particular social context. For the latter of which he has published primary research.

Another is the appraisal and deployment of physiological measurement devices in learning environments as a means of quantitatively evaluating psychological states. Such research areas hold promise in enhancing the questionnaire-based evidences of contemporary theories in education, such as those regarding motivation, self-determination and engagement. This will to contribute to the evidence-based public policy optimisation in education and social care.

 

Publications

Ismail, A.K. 2017. A Cross Sectional Study to Explore the Effect of the Linguistic Origin and Evolution of a Language on Patient Interpretation of Haematological Cancers. Advances in Biological Research. 11 (4): 225-232.

Ismail, A.K. 2017. The Origin of the Arabic Medical Term for Cancer. Advances in Biological Research. 11 (4): 198-201.

Ismail, A.K. 2018. The Impact of da Vinci’s Anatomical Drawings and Calculations on Foundation of Orthopaedics. Advances in Biological Research. 12 (1): 26-30.

As a mathematics teacher who believes that anyone can understand mathematics, Ashley is keenly interested in developing interventions and resources for learners who struggle with the subject. More specifically, she is focusing on the transitionary moment in the classroom when discussions have ceased, and practice begins and how this transition can become more fluid for learners.

By drawing on research from education, psychology and cognitive neuroscience, Ashley hopes to gain insights into how the brain and mind process information and how this knowledge can inform teacher practice and, ultimately, help learners understand mathematics.

After having taught for over ten years, Ashley completed her MSc, with Distinction, at the Department of Education, and her dissertation was “Highly Commended” by the British Educational Research Association (BERA). She is committed to making mathematics more accessible for all learners and strives for research that is not only impactful but also directly applicable to the classroom.

I am a Research Project Coordinator and Co-PI at the Department of Education for a project on Education, Purpose and Human Flourishing in Times of Uncertainty (EPHF), and the Templeton World Charity Foundation Fellow in Comparative Education at St Antony’s College, Oxford.

I have a multi-disciplinary background and experience. Academically I am an Art Historian specialising in late 18th and early 19th-century French aesthetics, and prior to my return to academia I had a career in the international finance, entrepreneurial business and high net worth family business sectors. I have published and taught at the University of Oxford on late eighteenth-and early nineteenth century art, history and aesthetics. Drawing on my experience as Lay Chaplain at Somerville College, Oxford I have also published on religious education. In addition to my position in the Education Department I am the Principal Advisor for Strategic Relationships and Partnerships at the Templeton World Charity Foundation Inc where I work closely with other foundations, INGOs and public policy organisations.

Publications List

Xiaona Wang is a DPhil student in Education, at St. Antony’s College, the University of Oxford. Xiaona’s doctoral research is fully funded by the University of Oxford (Clarendon Fund Scholarship and St. Antony’s College The Warden’s Scholarship). She is also a member at the Center for Global Higher Education.

Before her DPhil, Xiaona obtained her M.A degree in Higher Education at Graduate School of Education at Peking University, and B.A at the Faulty of Education from Beijing Normal University in China with first-class honour. She also studied at the University of Manchester as an exchange student in the School of Social Science.

Previously, Xiaona worked at Global Education Cluster in UNICEF, Geneva, where she began her research on the international scientific collaboration between China and Switzerland, and this experience later became the starting point of her master thesis. In her master’s thesis, Xiaona used a longitudinal research method in following a group of Chinese scientists who studied and worked in Switzerland. Through semi-structured interviews, she explored how collaborative relationships between individual scientists began and developed.

Xiaona has strong research interests in the science studies, internationalization and globalization of higher education. Her doctoral research is going to continue to explore the scientific knowledge networks between China and Switzerland under the influence of geopolitical factors.

Wanlin Cai is a DPhil student in higher education and a member of CGHE research group at the Department of Education.

Wanlin’s research interest lies in international higher education, higher education policies and economy, with a specific focus on World-Class Universities.

She is also a member of South China Global Talent Institute, Center for China and Globalisation, where she focuses on the research of talent policy and development in the Great Bay Area in China.

Prior to her beginning as a DPhil student, Wanlin read for the M.Sc in Higher Education at the University of Oxford and the M.Sc in Management and Enterprise Growth at the University of Glasgow.

Naosuke is a DPhil student whose research interests are Global Englishes and mutual intelligibility in English communication.

Naosuke finished an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition at the University of Oxford with distinction in 2019. His DPhil research focuses on the intelligibility of non-native English speakers. Specifically, he would like to seek what kind of English pronunciation features are critical for successful English communication between non-native English speakers.

Adam, from Ethiopia, is interested in looking at the role of education in peacebuilding and conflicts.

Akira is a DPhil Student in Anthropology affiliated with the School of Anthropology & Museum Ethnography, and associated with both the Department of Education and Nissan Institute of Japanese Studies. He is supervised by David Mills and Roger Goodman.

Akira’s doctoral research rests with the concepts of ‘international’ and ‘global education,’ and is grounded in the recent emergence and growth of International Baccalaureate (IB) education in Japan. Focused on IB educator training across several higher education institutions (HEIs), Akira aims – solely through digital anthropological approaches – to contextualize the everyday negotiations of ‘international’ and ‘global’ knowledge, both by those receiving and administering its training. Considering social, political, economic and cognitive aspects, one key objective of this research hopes to inform educational practitioners and policy-makers of some of the conceptual and social challenges that emerge with dissonant notions of cultivating ‘international’ and ‘global people.’

Akira has been an Associate Researcher at the Graduate School of Teacher Education, Tokyo Gakugei University since autumn 2020, a post he continues to hold until the end of his doctoral degree. He also currently works as an Anthropological Analyst for Contemplative Spaces, a consultancy focused on designing and delivering a range of leadership development initiatives for individuals, groups, and organizational bodies. His future career plans include further anthropological research and establishing consultancy services dedicated to various inclusion-based development initiatives.

Amelia is passionate about access to and the effects of environmental education globally, particularly in the Galápagos Islands of Ecuador.

Because she experienced a wealth of informal and non-formal environmental education from her parents and from explorations growing up in Southern Oregon, she is interested in researching how environmental education manifests in global communities. She fell in love with the Galápagos on a structured university-led trip during her undergraduate studies and realized that there was a dearth of research on social aspects of the communities living on the islands.  Because of this, she pursued research in the Galápagos in 2014 on the prevalence of and access to both formal and informal (provided by numerous NGOs and government agencies) environmental education for students on the islands, and on the level of student environmental literacy in 28 schools.

Her Dphil research focus, under the supervision of Dr. Ann Childs and Dr. Steve Puttick, is on access to and effects of Experiential Environmental Education for students living in the Galápagos Islands, and on the production of research on the social sphere in Galápagos.

Prior to starting her Dphil at Oxford, she worked in alliances and partnerships at tech companies in the San Francisco Bay Area. Most recently, she was the Director of Global Partnerships at Conversica, a conversational AI platform, and cultivated, trained, and drove pipeline with select international resellers in APAC, EMEA, and LATAM, and with regional resellers in the United States. She also assisted with the design and construction of the Conversica partner program.

In her free time, she is a free-lance food photographer, food stylist, food blogger, recipe developer, and gluten free baker for her online blog and social handle, Sisters Sans Gluten (www.sisterssansgluten), which she created with her sister in 2018. She also continues to sing informally and takes voice lessons remotely with instructor Corey Head of San Francisco.

She holds a BA in both Anthropology and Music (vocal performance), and an MA in Latin American Studies from Stanford University. Highlights from Stanford include: playing and touring as a performing member of Stanford Taiko (Japanese ensemble drumming) for four years; singing with the Stanford Chamber Chorale led by Professor Steve Sano; studying voice with Wendy Hillhouse; participating in music department operas; performing in self-organized recitals showcasing western art songs, western musical theater, and Latin American art songs; studying abroad in Santiago, Chile; and learning Quechua during her masters program with Marisol Necochea.

Abdul Karim has completed a Bachelor of Science in Bioengineering and Computational Medicine (Imperial College London), a Bachelor of Medicine and Bachelor of Surgery (Queen Mary University of London), and Master of Science in the Philosophy of Science and Economics (The London School of Economics).

He has delivered lectures on the Philosophy of Human Nature and the History of Metaethics at the University of Cambridge and for Health Education East Midlands. This, in addition to the current positions he holds as a Hospital Doctor and Health Policy and Management Advisor at the University Hospitals of Leicester NHS Trust.

Abdul Karim’s current areas of interest include the biological definition of psychological states relevant to the learning environment, and the influence of language on the variable interpretation of a particular social context. For the latter of which he has published primary research.

Another is the appraisal and deployment of physiological measurement devices in learning environments as a means of quantitatively evaluating psychological states. Such research areas hold promise in enhancing the questionnaire-based evidences of contemporary theories in education, such as those regarding motivation, self-determination and engagement. This will to contribute to the evidence-based public policy optimisation in education and social care.

 

Publications

Ismail, A.K. 2017. A Cross Sectional Study to Explore the Effect of the Linguistic Origin and Evolution of a Language on Patient Interpretation of Haematological Cancers. Advances in Biological Research. 11 (4): 225-232.

Ismail, A.K. 2017. The Origin of the Arabic Medical Term for Cancer. Advances in Biological Research. 11 (4): 198-201.

Ismail, A.K. 2018. The Impact of da Vinci’s Anatomical Drawings and Calculations on Foundation of Orthopaedics. Advances in Biological Research. 12 (1): 26-30.

As a mathematics teacher who believes that anyone can understand mathematics, Ashley is keenly interested in developing interventions and resources for learners who struggle with the subject. More specifically, she is focusing on the transitionary moment in the classroom when discussions have ceased, and practice begins and how this transition can become more fluid for learners.

By drawing on research from education, psychology and cognitive neuroscience, Ashley hopes to gain insights into how the brain and mind process information and how this knowledge can inform teacher practice and, ultimately, help learners understand mathematics.

After having taught for over ten years, Ashley completed her MSc, with Distinction, at the Department of Education, and her dissertation was “Highly Commended” by the British Educational Research Association (BERA). She is committed to making mathematics more accessible for all learners and strives for research that is not only impactful but also directly applicable to the classroom.

I am a Research Project Coordinator and Co-PI at the Department of Education for a project on Education, Purpose and Human Flourishing in Times of Uncertainty (EPHF), and the Templeton World Charity Foundation Fellow in Comparative Education at St Antony’s College, Oxford.

I have a multi-disciplinary background and experience. Academically I am an Art Historian specialising in late 18th and early 19th-century French aesthetics, and prior to my return to academia I had a career in the international finance, entrepreneurial business and high net worth family business sectors. I have published and taught at the University of Oxford on late eighteenth-and early nineteenth century art, history and aesthetics. Drawing on my experience as Lay Chaplain at Somerville College, Oxford I have also published on religious education. In addition to my position in the Education Department I am the Principal Advisor for Strategic Relationships and Partnerships at the Templeton World Charity Foundation Inc where I work closely with other foundations, INGOs and public policy organisations.

Publications List

Xiaona Wang is a DPhil student in Education, at St. Antony’s College, the University of Oxford. Xiaona’s doctoral research is fully funded by the University of Oxford (Clarendon Fund Scholarship and St. Antony’s College The Warden’s Scholarship). She is also a member at the Center for Global Higher Education.

Before her DPhil, Xiaona obtained her M.A degree in Higher Education at Graduate School of Education at Peking University, and B.A at the Faulty of Education from Beijing Normal University in China with first-class honour. She also studied at the University of Manchester as an exchange student in the School of Social Science.

Previously, Xiaona worked at Global Education Cluster in UNICEF, Geneva, where she began her research on the international scientific collaboration between China and Switzerland, and this experience later became the starting point of her master thesis. In her master’s thesis, Xiaona used a longitudinal research method in following a group of Chinese scientists who studied and worked in Switzerland. Through semi-structured interviews, she explored how collaborative relationships between individual scientists began and developed.

Xiaona has strong research interests in the science studies, internationalization and globalization of higher education. Her doctoral research is going to continue to explore the scientific knowledge networks between China and Switzerland under the influence of geopolitical factors.

Wanlin Cai is a DPhil student in higher education and a member of CGHE research group at the Department of Education.

Wanlin’s research interest lies in international higher education, higher education policies and economy, with a specific focus on World-Class Universities.

She is also a member of South China Global Talent Institute, Center for China and Globalisation, where she focuses on the research of talent policy and development in the Great Bay Area in China.

Prior to her beginning as a DPhil student, Wanlin read for the M.Sc in Higher Education at the University of Oxford and the M.Sc in Management and Enterprise Growth at the University of Glasgow.

Naosuke is a DPhil student whose research interests are Global Englishes and mutual intelligibility in English communication.

Naosuke finished an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition at the University of Oxford with distinction in 2019. His DPhil research focuses on the intelligibility of non-native English speakers. Specifically, he would like to seek what kind of English pronunciation features are critical for successful English communication between non-native English speakers.

Adam, from Ethiopia, is interested in looking at the role of education in peacebuilding and conflicts.

Akira is a DPhil Student in Anthropology affiliated with the School of Anthropology & Museum Ethnography, and associated with both the Department of Education and Nissan Institute of Japanese Studies. He is supervised by David Mills and Roger Goodman.

Akira’s doctoral research rests with the concepts of ‘international’ and ‘global education,’ and is grounded in the recent emergence and growth of International Baccalaureate (IB) education in Japan. Focused on IB educator training across several higher education institutions (HEIs), Akira aims – solely through digital anthropological approaches – to contextualize the everyday negotiations of ‘international’ and ‘global’ knowledge, both by those receiving and administering its training. Considering social, political, economic and cognitive aspects, one key objective of this research hopes to inform educational practitioners and policy-makers of some of the conceptual and social challenges that emerge with dissonant notions of cultivating ‘international’ and ‘global people.’

Akira has been an Associate Researcher at the Graduate School of Teacher Education, Tokyo Gakugei University since autumn 2020, a post he continues to hold until the end of his doctoral degree. He also currently works as an Anthropological Analyst for Contemplative Spaces, a consultancy focused on designing and delivering a range of leadership development initiatives for individuals, groups, and organizational bodies. His future career plans include further anthropological research and establishing consultancy services dedicated to various inclusion-based development initiatives.

Amelia is passionate about access to and the effects of environmental education globally, particularly in the Galápagos Islands of Ecuador.

Because she experienced a wealth of informal and non-formal environmental education from her parents and from explorations growing up in Southern Oregon, she is interested in researching how environmental education manifests in global communities. She fell in love with the Galápagos on a structured university-led trip during her undergraduate studies and realized that there was a dearth of research on social aspects of the communities living on the islands.  Because of this, she pursued research in the Galápagos in 2014 on the prevalence of and access to both formal and informal (provided by numerous NGOs and government agencies) environmental education for students on the islands, and on the level of student environmental literacy in 28 schools.

Her Dphil research focus, under the supervision of Dr. Ann Childs and Dr. Steve Puttick, is on access to and effects of Experiential Environmental Education for students living in the Galápagos Islands, and on the production of research on the social sphere in Galápagos.

Prior to starting her Dphil at Oxford, she worked in alliances and partnerships at tech companies in the San Francisco Bay Area. Most recently, she was the Director of Global Partnerships at Conversica, a conversational AI platform, and cultivated, trained, and drove pipeline with select international resellers in APAC, EMEA, and LATAM, and with regional resellers in the United States. She also assisted with the design and construction of the Conversica partner program.

In her free time, she is a free-lance food photographer, food stylist, food blogger, recipe developer, and gluten free baker for her online blog and social handle, Sisters Sans Gluten (www.sisterssansgluten), which she created with her sister in 2018. She also continues to sing informally and takes voice lessons remotely with instructor Corey Head of San Francisco.

She holds a BA in both Anthropology and Music (vocal performance), and an MA in Latin American Studies from Stanford University. Highlights from Stanford include: playing and touring as a performing member of Stanford Taiko (Japanese ensemble drumming) for four years; singing with the Stanford Chamber Chorale led by Professor Steve Sano; studying voice with Wendy Hillhouse; participating in music department operas; performing in self-organized recitals showcasing western art songs, western musical theater, and Latin American art songs; studying abroad in Santiago, Chile; and learning Quechua during her masters program with Marisol Necochea.

Abdul Karim has completed a Bachelor of Science in Bioengineering and Computational Medicine (Imperial College London), a Bachelor of Medicine and Bachelor of Surgery (Queen Mary University of London), and Master of Science in the Philosophy of Science and Economics (The London School of Economics).

He has delivered lectures on the Philosophy of Human Nature and the History of Metaethics at the University of Cambridge and for Health Education East Midlands. This, in addition to the current positions he holds as a Hospital Doctor and Health Policy and Management Advisor at the University Hospitals of Leicester NHS Trust.

Abdul Karim’s current areas of interest include the biological definition of psychological states relevant to the learning environment, and the influence of language on the variable interpretation of a particular social context. For the latter of which he has published primary research.

Another is the appraisal and deployment of physiological measurement devices in learning environments as a means of quantitatively evaluating psychological states. Such research areas hold promise in enhancing the questionnaire-based evidences of contemporary theories in education, such as those regarding motivation, self-determination and engagement. This will to contribute to the evidence-based public policy optimisation in education and social care.

 

Publications

Ismail, A.K. 2017. A Cross Sectional Study to Explore the Effect of the Linguistic Origin and Evolution of a Language on Patient Interpretation of Haematological Cancers. Advances in Biological Research. 11 (4): 225-232.

Ismail, A.K. 2017. The Origin of the Arabic Medical Term for Cancer. Advances in Biological Research. 11 (4): 198-201.

Ismail, A.K. 2018. The Impact of da Vinci’s Anatomical Drawings and Calculations on Foundation of Orthopaedics. Advances in Biological Research. 12 (1): 26-30.

As a mathematics teacher who believes that anyone can understand mathematics, Ashley is keenly interested in developing interventions and resources for learners who struggle with the subject. More specifically, she is focusing on the transitionary moment in the classroom when discussions have ceased, and practice begins and how this transition can become more fluid for learners.

By drawing on research from education, psychology and cognitive neuroscience, Ashley hopes to gain insights into how the brain and mind process information and how this knowledge can inform teacher practice and, ultimately, help learners understand mathematics.

After having taught for over ten years, Ashley completed her MSc, with Distinction, at the Department of Education, and her dissertation was “Highly Commended” by the British Educational Research Association (BERA). She is committed to making mathematics more accessible for all learners and strives for research that is not only impactful but also directly applicable to the classroom.

I am a Research Project Coordinator and Co-PI at the Department of Education for a project on Education, Purpose and Human Flourishing in Times of Uncertainty (EPHF), and the Templeton World Charity Foundation Fellow in Comparative Education at St Antony’s College, Oxford.

I have a multi-disciplinary background and experience. Academically I am an Art Historian specialising in late 18th and early 19th-century French aesthetics, and prior to my return to academia I had a career in the international finance, entrepreneurial business and high net worth family business sectors. I have published and taught at the University of Oxford on late eighteenth-and early nineteenth century art, history and aesthetics. Drawing on my experience as Lay Chaplain at Somerville College, Oxford I have also published on religious education. In addition to my position in the Education Department I am the Principal Advisor for Strategic Relationships and Partnerships at the Templeton World Charity Foundation Inc where I work closely with other foundations, INGOs and public policy organisations.

Publications List

Xiaona Wang is a DPhil student in Education, at St. Antony’s College, the University of Oxford. Xiaona’s doctoral research is fully funded by the University of Oxford (Clarendon Fund Scholarship and St. Antony’s College The Warden’s Scholarship). She is also a member at the Center for Global Higher Education.

Before her DPhil, Xiaona obtained her M.A degree in Higher Education at Graduate School of Education at Peking University, and B.A at the Faulty of Education from Beijing Normal University in China with first-class honour. She also studied at the University of Manchester as an exchange student in the School of Social Science.

Previously, Xiaona worked at Global Education Cluster in UNICEF, Geneva, where she began her research on the international scientific collaboration between China and Switzerland, and this experience later became the starting point of her master thesis. In her master’s thesis, Xiaona used a longitudinal research method in following a group of Chinese scientists who studied and worked in Switzerland. Through semi-structured interviews, she explored how collaborative relationships between individual scientists began and developed.

Xiaona has strong research interests in the science studies, internationalization and globalization of higher education. Her doctoral research is going to continue to explore the scientific knowledge networks between China and Switzerland under the influence of geopolitical factors.

Wanlin Cai is a DPhil student in higher education and a member of CGHE research group at the Department of Education.

Wanlin’s research interest lies in international higher education, higher education policies and economy, with a specific focus on World-Class Universities.

She is also a member of South China Global Talent Institute, Center for China and Globalisation, where she focuses on the research of talent policy and development in the Great Bay Area in China.

Prior to her beginning as a DPhil student, Wanlin read for the M.Sc in Higher Education at the University of Oxford and the M.Sc in Management and Enterprise Growth at the University of Glasgow.

Naosuke is a DPhil student whose research interests are Global Englishes and mutual intelligibility in English communication.

Naosuke finished an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition at the University of Oxford with distinction in 2019. His DPhil research focuses on the intelligibility of non-native English speakers. Specifically, he would like to seek what kind of English pronunciation features are critical for successful English communication between non-native English speakers.

Adam, from Ethiopia, is interested in looking at the role of education in peacebuilding and conflicts.

Akira is a DPhil Student in Anthropology affiliated with the School of Anthropology & Museum Ethnography, and associated with both the Department of Education and Nissan Institute of Japanese Studies. He is supervised by David Mills and Roger Goodman.

Akira’s doctoral research rests with the concepts of ‘international’ and ‘global education,’ and is grounded in the recent emergence and growth of International Baccalaureate (IB) education in Japan. Focused on IB educator training across several higher education institutions (HEIs), Akira aims – solely through digital anthropological approaches – to contextualize the everyday negotiations of ‘international’ and ‘global’ knowledge, both by those receiving and administering its training. Considering social, political, economic and cognitive aspects, one key objective of this research hopes to inform educational practitioners and policy-makers of some of the conceptual and social challenges that emerge with dissonant notions of cultivating ‘international’ and ‘global people.’

Akira has been an Associate Researcher at the Graduate School of Teacher Education, Tokyo Gakugei University since autumn 2020, a post he continues to hold until the end of his doctoral degree. He also currently works as an Anthropological Analyst for Contemplative Spaces, a consultancy focused on designing and delivering a range of leadership development initiatives for individuals, groups, and organizational bodies. His future career plans include further anthropological research and establishing consultancy services dedicated to various inclusion-based development initiatives.

Amelia is passionate about access to and the effects of environmental education globally, particularly in the Galápagos Islands of Ecuador.

Because she experienced a wealth of informal and non-formal environmental education from her parents and from explorations growing up in Southern Oregon, she is interested in researching how environmental education manifests in global communities. She fell in love with the Galápagos on a structured university-led trip during her undergraduate studies and realized that there was a dearth of research on social aspects of the communities living on the islands.  Because of this, she pursued research in the Galápagos in 2014 on the prevalence of and access to both formal and informal (provided by numerous NGOs and government agencies) environmental education for students on the islands, and on the level of student environmental literacy in 28 schools.

Her Dphil research focus, under the supervision of Dr. Ann Childs and Dr. Steve Puttick, is on access to and effects of Experiential Environmental Education for students living in the Galápagos Islands, and on the production of research on the social sphere in Galápagos.

Prior to starting her Dphil at Oxford, she worked in alliances and partnerships at tech companies in the San Francisco Bay Area. Most recently, she was the Director of Global Partnerships at Conversica, a conversational AI platform, and cultivated, trained, and drove pipeline with select international resellers in APAC, EMEA, and LATAM, and with regional resellers in the United States. She also assisted with the design and construction of the Conversica partner program.

In her free time, she is a free-lance food photographer, food stylist, food blogger, recipe developer, and gluten free baker for her online blog and social handle, Sisters Sans Gluten (www.sisterssansgluten), which she created with her sister in 2018. She also continues to sing informally and takes voice lessons remotely with instructor Corey Head of San Francisco.

She holds a BA in both Anthropology and Music (vocal performance), and an MA in Latin American Studies from Stanford University. Highlights from Stanford include: playing and touring as a performing member of Stanford Taiko (Japanese ensemble drumming) for four years; singing with the Stanford Chamber Chorale led by Professor Steve Sano; studying voice with Wendy Hillhouse; participating in music department operas; performing in self-organized recitals showcasing western art songs, western musical theater, and Latin American art songs; studying abroad in Santiago, Chile; and learning Quechua during her masters program with Marisol Necochea.

Abdul Karim has completed a Bachelor of Science in Bioengineering and Computational Medicine (Imperial College London), a Bachelor of Medicine and Bachelor of Surgery (Queen Mary University of London), and Master of Science in the Philosophy of Science and Economics (The London School of Economics).

He has delivered lectures on the Philosophy of Human Nature and the History of Metaethics at the University of Cambridge and for Health Education East Midlands. This, in addition to the current positions he holds as a Hospital Doctor and Health Policy and Management Advisor at the University Hospitals of Leicester NHS Trust.

Abdul Karim’s current areas of interest include the biological definition of psychological states relevant to the learning environment, and the influence of language on the variable interpretation of a particular social context. For the latter of which he has published primary research.

Another is the appraisal and deployment of physiological measurement devices in learning environments as a means of quantitatively evaluating psychological states. Such research areas hold promise in enhancing the questionnaire-based evidences of contemporary theories in education, such as those regarding motivation, self-determination and engagement. This will to contribute to the evidence-based public policy optimisation in education and social care.

 

Publications

Ismail, A.K. 2017. A Cross Sectional Study to Explore the Effect of the Linguistic Origin and Evolution of a Language on Patient Interpretation of Haematological Cancers. Advances in Biological Research. 11 (4): 225-232.

Ismail, A.K. 2017. The Origin of the Arabic Medical Term for Cancer. Advances in Biological Research. 11 (4): 198-201.

Ismail, A.K. 2018. The Impact of da Vinci’s Anatomical Drawings and Calculations on Foundation of Orthopaedics. Advances in Biological Research. 12 (1): 26-30.

As a mathematics teacher who believes that anyone can understand mathematics, Ashley is keenly interested in developing interventions and resources for learners who struggle with the subject. More specifically, she is focusing on the transitionary moment in the classroom when discussions have ceased, and practice begins and how this transition can become more fluid for learners.

By drawing on research from education, psychology and cognitive neuroscience, Ashley hopes to gain insights into how the brain and mind process information and how this knowledge can inform teacher practice and, ultimately, help learners understand mathematics.

After having taught for over ten years, Ashley completed her MSc, with Distinction, at the Department of Education, and her dissertation was “Highly Commended” by the British Educational Research Association (BERA). She is committed to making mathematics more accessible for all learners and strives for research that is not only impactful but also directly applicable to the classroom.

I am a Research Project Coordinator and Co-PI at the Department of Education for a project on Education, Purpose and Human Flourishing in Times of Uncertainty (EPHF), and the Templeton World Charity Foundation Fellow in Comparative Education at St Antony’s College, Oxford.

I have a multi-disciplinary background and experience. Academically I am an Art Historian specialising in late 18th and early 19th-century French aesthetics, and prior to my return to academia I had a career in the international finance, entrepreneurial business and high net worth family business sectors. I have published and taught at the University of Oxford on late eighteenth-and early nineteenth century art, history and aesthetics. Drawing on my experience as Lay Chaplain at Somerville College, Oxford I have also published on religious education. In addition to my position in the Education Department I am the Principal Advisor for Strategic Relationships and Partnerships at the Templeton World Charity Foundation Inc where I work closely with other foundations, INGOs and public policy organisations.

Publications List

Xiaona Wang is a DPhil student in Education, at St. Antony’s College, the University of Oxford. Xiaona’s doctoral research is fully funded by the University of Oxford (Clarendon Fund Scholarship and St. Antony’s College The Warden’s Scholarship). She is also a member at the Center for Global Higher Education.

Before her DPhil, Xiaona obtained her M.A degree in Higher Education at Graduate School of Education at Peking University, and B.A at the Faulty of Education from Beijing Normal University in China with first-class honour. She also studied at the University of Manchester as an exchange student in the School of Social Science.

Previously, Xiaona worked at Global Education Cluster in UNICEF, Geneva, where she began her research on the international scientific collaboration between China and Switzerland, and this experience later became the starting point of her master thesis. In her master’s thesis, Xiaona used a longitudinal research method in following a group of Chinese scientists who studied and worked in Switzerland. Through semi-structured interviews, she explored how collaborative relationships between individual scientists began and developed.

Xiaona has strong research interests in the science studies, internationalization and globalization of higher education. Her doctoral research is going to continue to explore the scientific knowledge networks between China and Switzerland under the influence of geopolitical factors.

Wanlin Cai is a DPhil student in higher education and a member of CGHE research group at the Department of Education.

Wanlin’s research interest lies in international higher education, higher education policies and economy, with a specific focus on World-Class Universities.

She is also a member of South China Global Talent Institute, Center for China and Globalisation, where she focuses on the research of talent policy and development in the Great Bay Area in China.

Prior to her beginning as a DPhil student, Wanlin read for the M.Sc in Higher Education at the University of Oxford and the M.Sc in Management and Enterprise Growth at the University of Glasgow.

Naosuke is a DPhil student whose research interests are Global Englishes and mutual intelligibility in English communication.

Naosuke finished an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition at the University of Oxford with distinction in 2019. His DPhil research focuses on the intelligibility of non-native English speakers. Specifically, he would like to seek what kind of English pronunciation features are critical for successful English communication between non-native English speakers.

Adam, from Ethiopia, is interested in looking at the role of education in peacebuilding and conflicts.

Akira is a DPhil Student in Anthropology affiliated with the School of Anthropology & Museum Ethnography, and associated with both the Department of Education and Nissan Institute of Japanese Studies. He is supervised by David Mills and Roger Goodman.

Akira’s doctoral research rests with the concepts of ‘international’ and ‘global education,’ and is grounded in the recent emergence and growth of International Baccalaureate (IB) education in Japan. Focused on IB educator training across several higher education institutions (HEIs), Akira aims – solely through digital anthropological approaches – to contextualize the everyday negotiations of ‘international’ and ‘global’ knowledge, both by those receiving and administering its training. Considering social, political, economic and cognitive aspects, one key objective of this research hopes to inform educational practitioners and policy-makers of some of the conceptual and social challenges that emerge with dissonant notions of cultivating ‘international’ and ‘global people.’

Akira has been an Associate Researcher at the Graduate School of Teacher Education, Tokyo Gakugei University since autumn 2020, a post he continues to hold until the end of his doctoral degree. He also currently works as an Anthropological Analyst for Contemplative Spaces, a consultancy focused on designing and delivering a range of leadership development initiatives for individuals, groups, and organizational bodies. His future career plans include further anthropological research and establishing consultancy services dedicated to various inclusion-based development initiatives.

Amelia is passionate about access to and the effects of environmental education globally, particularly in the Galápagos Islands of Ecuador.

Because she experienced a wealth of informal and non-formal environmental education from her parents and from explorations growing up in Southern Oregon, she is interested in researching how environmental education manifests in global communities. She fell in love with the Galápagos on a structured university-led trip during her undergraduate studies and realized that there was a dearth of research on social aspects of the communities living on the islands.  Because of this, she pursued research in the Galápagos in 2014 on the prevalence of and access to both formal and informal (provided by numerous NGOs and government agencies) environmental education for students on the islands, and on the level of student environmental literacy in 28 schools.

Her Dphil research focus, under the supervision of Dr. Ann Childs and Dr. Steve Puttick, is on access to and effects of Experiential Environmental Education for students living in the Galápagos Islands, and on the production of research on the social sphere in Galápagos.

Prior to starting her Dphil at Oxford, she worked in alliances and partnerships at tech companies in the San Francisco Bay Area. Most recently, she was the Director of Global Partnerships at Conversica, a conversational AI platform, and cultivated, trained, and drove pipeline with select international resellers in APAC, EMEA, and LATAM, and with regional resellers in the United States. She also assisted with the design and construction of the Conversica partner program.

In her free time, she is a free-lance food photographer, food stylist, food blogger, recipe developer, and gluten free baker for her online blog and social handle, Sisters Sans Gluten (www.sisterssansgluten), which she created with her sister in 2018. She also continues to sing informally and takes voice lessons remotely with instructor Corey Head of San Francisco.

She holds a BA in both Anthropology and Music (vocal performance), and an MA in Latin American Studies from Stanford University. Highlights from Stanford include: playing and touring as a performing member of Stanford Taiko (Japanese ensemble drumming) for four years; singing with the Stanford Chamber Chorale led by Professor Steve Sano; studying voice with Wendy Hillhouse; participating in music department operas; performing in self-organized recitals showcasing western art songs, western musical theater, and Latin American art songs; studying abroad in Santiago, Chile; and learning Quechua during her masters program with Marisol Necochea.

Abdul Karim has completed a Bachelor of Science in Bioengineering and Computational Medicine (Imperial College London), a Bachelor of Medicine and Bachelor of Surgery (Queen Mary University of London), and Master of Science in the Philosophy of Science and Economics (The London School of Economics).

He has delivered lectures on the Philosophy of Human Nature and the History of Metaethics at the University of Cambridge and for Health Education East Midlands. This, in addition to the current positions he holds as a Hospital Doctor and Health Policy and Management Advisor at the University Hospitals of Leicester NHS Trust.

Abdul Karim’s current areas of interest include the biological definition of psychological states relevant to the learning environment, and the influence of language on the variable interpretation of a particular social context. For the latter of which he has published primary research.

Another is the appraisal and deployment of physiological measurement devices in learning environments as a means of quantitatively evaluating psychological states. Such research areas hold promise in enhancing the questionnaire-based evidences of contemporary theories in education, such as those regarding motivation, self-determination and engagement. This will to contribute to the evidence-based public policy optimisation in education and social care.

 

Publications

Ismail, A.K. 2017. A Cross Sectional Study to Explore the Effect of the Linguistic Origin and Evolution of a Language on Patient Interpretation of Haematological Cancers. Advances in Biological Research. 11 (4): 225-232.

Ismail, A.K. 2017. The Origin of the Arabic Medical Term for Cancer. Advances in Biological Research. 11 (4): 198-201.

Ismail, A.K. 2018. The Impact of da Vinci’s Anatomical Drawings and Calculations on Foundation of Orthopaedics. Advances in Biological Research. 12 (1): 26-30.

As a mathematics teacher who believes that anyone can understand mathematics, Ashley is keenly interested in developing interventions and resources for learners who struggle with the subject. More specifically, she is focusing on the transitionary moment in the classroom when discussions have ceased, and practice begins and how this transition can become more fluid for learners.

By drawing on research from education, psychology and cognitive neuroscience, Ashley hopes to gain insights into how the brain and mind process information and how this knowledge can inform teacher practice and, ultimately, help learners understand mathematics.

After having taught for over ten years, Ashley completed her MSc, with Distinction, at the Department of Education, and her dissertation was “Highly Commended” by the British Educational Research Association (BERA). She is committed to making mathematics more accessible for all learners and strives for research that is not only impactful but also directly applicable to the classroom.

I am a Research Project Coordinator and Co-PI at the Department of Education for a project on Education, Purpose and Human Flourishing in Times of Uncertainty (EPHF), and the Templeton World Charity Foundation Fellow in Comparative Education at St Antony’s College, Oxford.

I have a multi-disciplinary background and experience. Academically I am an Art Historian specialising in late 18th and early 19th-century French aesthetics, and prior to my return to academia I had a career in the international finance, entrepreneurial business and high net worth family business sectors. I have published and taught at the University of Oxford on late eighteenth-and early nineteenth century art, history and aesthetics. Drawing on my experience as Lay Chaplain at Somerville College, Oxford I have also published on religious education. In addition to my position in the Education Department I am the Principal Advisor for Strategic Relationships and Partnerships at the Templeton World Charity Foundation Inc where I work closely with other foundations, INGOs and public policy organisations.

Publications List

Xiaona Wang is a DPhil student in Education, at St. Antony’s College, the University of Oxford. Xiaona’s doctoral research is fully funded by the University of Oxford (Clarendon Fund Scholarship and St. Antony’s College The Warden’s Scholarship). She is also a member at the Center for Global Higher Education.

Before her DPhil, Xiaona obtained her M.A degree in Higher Education at Graduate School of Education at Peking University, and B.A at the Faulty of Education from Beijing Normal University in China with first-class honour. She also studied at the University of Manchester as an exchange student in the School of Social Science.

Previously, Xiaona worked at Global Education Cluster in UNICEF, Geneva, where she began her research on the international scientific collaboration between China and Switzerland, and this experience later became the starting point of her master thesis. In her master’s thesis, Xiaona used a longitudinal research method in following a group of Chinese scientists who studied and worked in Switzerland. Through semi-structured interviews, she explored how collaborative relationships between individual scientists began and developed.

Xiaona has strong research interests in the science studies, internationalization and globalization of higher education. Her doctoral research is going to continue to explore the scientific knowledge networks between China and Switzerland under the influence of geopolitical factors.

Wanlin Cai is a DPhil student in higher education and a member of CGHE research group at the Department of Education.

Wanlin’s research interest lies in international higher education, higher education policies and economy, with a specific focus on World-Class Universities.

She is also a member of South China Global Talent Institute, Center for China and Globalisation, where she focuses on the research of talent policy and development in the Great Bay Area in China.

Prior to her beginning as a DPhil student, Wanlin read for the M.Sc in Higher Education at the University of Oxford and the M.Sc in Management and Enterprise Growth at the University of Glasgow.

Naosuke is a DPhil student whose research interests are Global Englishes and mutual intelligibility in English communication.

Naosuke finished an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition at the University of Oxford with distinction in 2019. His DPhil research focuses on the intelligibility of non-native English speakers. Specifically, he would like to seek what kind of English pronunciation features are critical for successful English communication between non-native English speakers.

Adam, from Ethiopia, is interested in looking at the role of education in peacebuilding and conflicts.

Akira is a DPhil Student in Anthropology affiliated with the School of Anthropology & Museum Ethnography, and associated with both the Department of Education and Nissan Institute of Japanese Studies. He is supervised by David Mills and Roger Goodman.

Akira’s doctoral research rests with the concepts of ‘international’ and ‘global education,’ and is grounded in the recent emergence and growth of International Baccalaureate (IB) education in Japan. Focused on IB educator training across several higher education institutions (HEIs), Akira aims – solely through digital anthropological approaches – to contextualize the everyday negotiations of ‘international’ and ‘global’ knowledge, both by those receiving and administering its training. Considering social, political, economic and cognitive aspects, one key objective of this research hopes to inform educational practitioners and policy-makers of some of the conceptual and social challenges that emerge with dissonant notions of cultivating ‘international’ and ‘global people.’

Akira has been an Associate Researcher at the Graduate School of Teacher Education, Tokyo Gakugei University since autumn 2020, a post he continues to hold until the end of his doctoral degree. He also currently works as an Anthropological Analyst for Contemplative Spaces, a consultancy focused on designing and delivering a range of leadership development initiatives for individuals, groups, and organizational bodies. His future career plans include further anthropological research and establishing consultancy services dedicated to various inclusion-based development initiatives.

Amelia is passionate about access to and the effects of environmental education globally, particularly in the Galápagos Islands of Ecuador.

Because she experienced a wealth of informal and non-formal environmental education from her parents and from explorations growing up in Southern Oregon, she is interested in researching how environmental education manifests in global communities. She fell in love with the Galápagos on a structured university-led trip during her undergraduate studies and realized that there was a dearth of research on social aspects of the communities living on the islands.  Because of this, she pursued research in the Galápagos in 2014 on the prevalence of and access to both formal and informal (provided by numerous NGOs and government agencies) environmental education for students on the islands, and on the level of student environmental literacy in 28 schools.

Her Dphil research focus, under the supervision of Dr. Ann Childs and Dr. Steve Puttick, is on access to and effects of Experiential Environmental Education for students living in the Galápagos Islands, and on the production of research on the social sphere in Galápagos.

Prior to starting her Dphil at Oxford, she worked in alliances and partnerships at tech companies in the San Francisco Bay Area. Most recently, she was the Director of Global Partnerships at Conversica, a conversational AI platform, and cultivated, trained, and drove pipeline with select international resellers in APAC, EMEA, and LATAM, and with regional resellers in the United States. She also assisted with the design and construction of the Conversica partner program.

In her free time, she is a free-lance food photographer, food stylist, food blogger, recipe developer, and gluten free baker for her online blog and social handle, Sisters Sans Gluten (www.sisterssansgluten), which she created with her sister in 2018. She also continues to sing informally and takes voice lessons remotely with instructor Corey Head of San Francisco.

She holds a BA in both Anthropology and Music (vocal performance), and an MA in Latin American Studies from Stanford University. Highlights from Stanford include: playing and touring as a performing member of Stanford Taiko (Japanese ensemble drumming) for four years; singing with the Stanford Chamber Chorale led by Professor Steve Sano; studying voice with Wendy Hillhouse; participating in music department operas; performing in self-organized recitals showcasing western art songs, western musical theater, and Latin American art songs; studying abroad in Santiago, Chile; and learning Quechua during her masters program with Marisol Necochea.

Abdul Karim has completed a Bachelor of Science in Bioengineering and Computational Medicine (Imperial College London), a Bachelor of Medicine and Bachelor of Surgery (Queen Mary University of London), and Master of Science in the Philosophy of Science and Economics (The London School of Economics).

He has delivered lectures on the Philosophy of Human Nature and the History of Metaethics at the University of Cambridge and for Health Education East Midlands. This, in addition to the current positions he holds as a Hospital Doctor and Health Policy and Management Advisor at the University Hospitals of Leicester NHS Trust.

Abdul Karim’s current areas of interest include the biological definition of psychological states relevant to the learning environment, and the influence of language on the variable interpretation of a particular social context. For the latter of which he has published primary research.

Another is the appraisal and deployment of physiological measurement devices in learning environments as a means of quantitatively evaluating psychological states. Such research areas hold promise in enhancing the questionnaire-based evidences of contemporary theories in education, such as those regarding motivation, self-determination and engagement. This will to contribute to the evidence-based public policy optimisation in education and social care.

 

Publications

Ismail, A.K. 2017. A Cross Sectional Study to Explore the Effect of the Linguistic Origin and Evolution of a Language on Patient Interpretation of Haematological Cancers. Advances in Biological Research. 11 (4): 225-232.

Ismail, A.K. 2017. The Origin of the Arabic Medical Term for Cancer. Advances in Biological Research. 11 (4): 198-201.

Ismail, A.K. 2018. The Impact of da Vinci’s Anatomical Drawings and Calculations on Foundation of Orthopaedics. Advances in Biological Research. 12 (1): 26-30.

As a mathematics teacher who believes that anyone can understand mathematics, Ashley is keenly interested in developing interventions and resources for learners who struggle with the subject. More specifically, she is focusing on the transitionary moment in the classroom when discussions have ceased, and practice begins and how this transition can become more fluid for learners.

By drawing on research from education, psychology and cognitive neuroscience, Ashley hopes to gain insights into how the brain and mind process information and how this knowledge can inform teacher practice and, ultimately, help learners understand mathematics.

After having taught for over ten years, Ashley completed her MSc, with Distinction, at the Department of Education, and her dissertation was “Highly Commended” by the British Educational Research Association (BERA). She is committed to making mathematics more accessible for all learners and strives for research that is not only impactful but also directly applicable to the classroom.

I am a Research Project Coordinator and Co-PI at the Department of Education for a project on Education, Purpose and Human Flourishing in Times of Uncertainty (EPHF), and the Templeton World Charity Foundation Fellow in Comparative Education at St Antony’s College, Oxford.

I have a multi-disciplinary background and experience. Academically I am an Art Historian specialising in late 18th and early 19th-century French aesthetics, and prior to my return to academia I had a career in the international finance, entrepreneurial business and high net worth family business sectors. I have published and taught at the University of Oxford on late eighteenth-and early nineteenth century art, history and aesthetics. Drawing on my experience as Lay Chaplain at Somerville College, Oxford I have also published on religious education. In addition to my position in the Education Department I am the Principal Advisor for Strategic Relationships and Partnerships at the Templeton World Charity Foundation Inc where I work closely with other foundations, INGOs and public policy organisations.

Publications List

Xiaona Wang is a DPhil student in Education, at St. Antony’s College, the University of Oxford. Xiaona’s doctoral research is fully funded by the University of Oxford (Clarendon Fund Scholarship and St. Antony’s College The Warden’s Scholarship). She is also a member at the Center for Global Higher Education.

Before her DPhil, Xiaona obtained her M.A degree in Higher Education at Graduate School of Education at Peking University, and B.A at the Faulty of Education from Beijing Normal University in China with first-class honour. She also studied at the University of Manchester as an exchange student in the School of Social Science.

Previously, Xiaona worked at Global Education Cluster in UNICEF, Geneva, where she began her research on the international scientific collaboration between China and Switzerland, and this experience later became the starting point of her master thesis. In her master’s thesis, Xiaona used a longitudinal research method in following a group of Chinese scientists who studied and worked in Switzerland. Through semi-structured interviews, she explored how collaborative relationships between individual scientists began and developed.

Xiaona has strong research interests in the science studies, internationalization and globalization of higher education. Her doctoral research is going to continue to explore the scientific knowledge networks between China and Switzerland under the influence of geopolitical factors.

Wanlin Cai is a DPhil student in higher education and a member of CGHE research group at the Department of Education.

Wanlin’s research interest lies in international higher education, higher education policies and economy, with a specific focus on World-Class Universities.

She is also a member of South China Global Talent Institute, Center for China and Globalisation, where she focuses on the research of talent policy and development in the Great Bay Area in China.

Prior to her beginning as a DPhil student, Wanlin read for the M.Sc in Higher Education at the University of Oxford and the M.Sc in Management and Enterprise Growth at the University of Glasgow.

Naosuke is a DPhil student whose research interests are Global Englishes and mutual intelligibility in English communication.

Naosuke finished an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition at the University of Oxford with distinction in 2019. His DPhil research focuses on the intelligibility of non-native English speakers. Specifically, he would like to seek what kind of English pronunciation features are critical for successful English communication between non-native English speakers.

Adam, from Ethiopia, is interested in looking at the role of education in peacebuilding and conflicts.

Akira is a DPhil Student in Anthropology affiliated with the School of Anthropology & Museum Ethnography, and associated with both the Department of Education and Nissan Institute of Japanese Studies. He is supervised by David Mills and Roger Goodman.

Akira’s doctoral research rests with the concepts of ‘international’ and ‘global education,’ and is grounded in the recent emergence and growth of International Baccalaureate (IB) education in Japan. Focused on IB educator training across several higher education institutions (HEIs), Akira aims – solely through digital anthropological approaches – to contextualize the everyday negotiations of ‘international’ and ‘global’ knowledge, both by those receiving and administering its training. Considering social, political, economic and cognitive aspects, one key objective of this research hopes to inform educational practitioners and policy-makers of some of the conceptual and social challenges that emerge with dissonant notions of cultivating ‘international’ and ‘global people.’

Akira has been an Associate Researcher at the Graduate School of Teacher Education, Tokyo Gakugei University since autumn 2020, a post he continues to hold until the end of his doctoral degree. He also currently works as an Anthropological Analyst for Contemplative Spaces, a consultancy focused on designing and delivering a range of leadership development initiatives for individuals, groups, and organizational bodies. His future career plans include further anthropological research and establishing consultancy services dedicated to various inclusion-based development initiatives.

Amelia is passionate about access to and the effects of environmental education globally, particularly in the Galápagos Islands of Ecuador.

Because she experienced a wealth of informal and non-formal environmental education from her parents and from explorations growing up in Southern Oregon, she is interested in researching how environmental education manifests in global communities. She fell in love with the Galápagos on a structured university-led trip during her undergraduate studies and realized that there was a dearth of research on social aspects of the communities living on the islands.  Because of this, she pursued research in the Galápagos in 2014 on the prevalence of and access to both formal and informal (provided by numerous NGOs and government agencies) environmental education for students on the islands, and on the level of student environmental literacy in 28 schools.

Her Dphil research focus, under the supervision of Dr. Ann Childs and Dr. Steve Puttick, is on access to and effects of Experiential Environmental Education for students living in the Galápagos Islands, and on the production of research on the social sphere in Galápagos.

Prior to starting her Dphil at Oxford, she worked in alliances and partnerships at tech companies in the San Francisco Bay Area. Most recently, she was the Director of Global Partnerships at Conversica, a conversational AI platform, and cultivated, trained, and drove pipeline with select international resellers in APAC, EMEA, and LATAM, and with regional resellers in the United States. She also assisted with the design and construction of the Conversica partner program.

In her free time, she is a free-lance food photographer, food stylist, food blogger, recipe developer, and gluten free baker for her online blog and social handle, Sisters Sans Gluten (www.sisterssansgluten), which she created with her sister in 2018. She also continues to sing informally and takes voice lessons remotely with instructor Corey Head of San Francisco.

She holds a BA in both Anthropology and Music (vocal performance), and an MA in Latin American Studies from Stanford University. Highlights from Stanford include: playing and touring as a performing member of Stanford Taiko (Japanese ensemble drumming) for four years; singing with the Stanford Chamber Chorale led by Professor Steve Sano; studying voice with Wendy Hillhouse; participating in music department operas; performing in self-organized recitals showcasing western art songs, western musical theater, and Latin American art songs; studying abroad in Santiago, Chile; and learning Quechua during her masters program with Marisol Necochea.

Abdul Karim has completed a Bachelor of Science in Bioengineering and Computational Medicine (Imperial College London), a Bachelor of Medicine and Bachelor of Surgery (Queen Mary University of London), and Master of Science in the Philosophy of Science and Economics (The London School of Economics).

He has delivered lectures on the Philosophy of Human Nature and the History of Metaethics at the University of Cambridge and for Health Education East Midlands. This, in addition to the current positions he holds as a Hospital Doctor and Health Policy and Management Advisor at the University Hospitals of Leicester NHS Trust.

Abdul Karim’s current areas of interest include the biological definition of psychological states relevant to the learning environment, and the influence of language on the variable interpretation of a particular social context. For the latter of which he has published primary research.

Another is the appraisal and deployment of physiological measurement devices in learning environments as a means of quantitatively evaluating psychological states. Such research areas hold promise in enhancing the questionnaire-based evidences of contemporary theories in education, such as those regarding motivation, self-determination and engagement. This will to contribute to the evidence-based public policy optimisation in education and social care.

 

Publications

Ismail, A.K. 2017. A Cross Sectional Study to Explore the Effect of the Linguistic Origin and Evolution of a Language on Patient Interpretation of Haematological Cancers. Advances in Biological Research. 11 (4): 225-232.

Ismail, A.K. 2017. The Origin of the Arabic Medical Term for Cancer. Advances in Biological Research. 11 (4): 198-201.

Ismail, A.K. 2018. The Impact of da Vinci’s Anatomical Drawings and Calculations on Foundation of Orthopaedics. Advances in Biological Research. 12 (1): 26-30.

As a mathematics teacher who believes that anyone can understand mathematics, Ashley is keenly interested in developing interventions and resources for learners who struggle with the subject. More specifically, she is focusing on the transitionary moment in the classroom when discussions have ceased, and practice begins and how this transition can become more fluid for learners.

By drawing on research from education, psychology and cognitive neuroscience, Ashley hopes to gain insights into how the brain and mind process information and how this knowledge can inform teacher practice and, ultimately, help learners understand mathematics.

After having taught for over ten years, Ashley completed her MSc, with Distinction, at the Department of Education, and her dissertation was “Highly Commended” by the British Educational Research Association (BERA). She is committed to making mathematics more accessible for all learners and strives for research that is not only impactful but also directly applicable to the classroom.

I am a Research Project Coordinator and Co-PI at the Department of Education for a project on Education, Purpose and Human Flourishing in Times of Uncertainty (EPHF), and the Templeton World Charity Foundation Fellow in Comparative Education at St Antony’s College, Oxford.

I have a multi-disciplinary background and experience. Academically I am an Art Historian specialising in late 18th and early 19th-century French aesthetics, and prior to my return to academia I had a career in the international finance, entrepreneurial business and high net worth family business sectors. I have published and taught at the University of Oxford on late eighteenth-and early nineteenth century art, history and aesthetics. Drawing on my experience as Lay Chaplain at Somerville College, Oxford I have also published on religious education. In addition to my position in the Education Department I am the Principal Advisor for Strategic Relationships and Partnerships at the Templeton World Charity Foundation Inc where I work closely with other foundations, INGOs and public policy organisations.

Publications List

Xiaona Wang is a DPhil student in Education, at St. Antony’s College, the University of Oxford. Xiaona’s doctoral research is fully funded by the University of Oxford (Clarendon Fund Scholarship and St. Antony’s College The Warden’s Scholarship). She is also a member at the Center for Global Higher Education.

Before her DPhil, Xiaona obtained her M.A degree in Higher Education at Graduate School of Education at Peking University, and B.A at the Faulty of Education from Beijing Normal University in China with first-class honour. She also studied at the University of Manchester as an exchange student in the School of Social Science.

Previously, Xiaona worked at Global Education Cluster in UNICEF, Geneva, where she began her research on the international scientific collaboration between China and Switzerland, and this experience later became the starting point of her master thesis. In her master’s thesis, Xiaona used a longitudinal research method in following a group of Chinese scientists who studied and worked in Switzerland. Through semi-structured interviews, she explored how collaborative relationships between individual scientists began and developed.

Xiaona has strong research interests in the science studies, internationalization and globalization of higher education. Her doctoral research is going to continue to explore the scientific knowledge networks between China and Switzerland under the influence of geopolitical factors.

Wanlin Cai is a DPhil student in higher education and a member of CGHE research group at the Department of Education.

Wanlin’s research interest lies in international higher education, higher education policies and economy, with a specific focus on World-Class Universities.

She is also a member of South China Global Talent Institute, Center for China and Globalisation, where she focuses on the research of talent policy and development in the Great Bay Area in China.

Prior to her beginning as a DPhil student, Wanlin read for the M.Sc in Higher Education at the University of Oxford and the M.Sc in Management and Enterprise Growth at the University of Glasgow.

Naosuke is a DPhil student whose research interests are Global Englishes and mutual intelligibility in English communication.

Naosuke finished an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition at the University of Oxford with distinction in 2019. His DPhil research focuses on the intelligibility of non-native English speakers. Specifically, he would like to seek what kind of English pronunciation features are critical for successful English communication between non-native English speakers.

Adam, from Ethiopia, is interested in looking at the role of education in peacebuilding and conflicts.

Akira is a DPhil Student in Anthropology affiliated with the School of Anthropology & Museum Ethnography, and associated with both the Department of Education and Nissan Institute of Japanese Studies. He is supervised by David Mills and Roger Goodman.

Akira’s doctoral research rests with the concepts of ‘international’ and ‘global education,’ and is grounded in the recent emergence and growth of International Baccalaureate (IB) education in Japan. Focused on IB educator training across several higher education institutions (HEIs), Akira aims – solely through digital anthropological approaches – to contextualize the everyday negotiations of ‘international’ and ‘global’ knowledge, both by those receiving and administering its training. Considering social, political, economic and cognitive aspects, one key objective of this research hopes to inform educational practitioners and policy-makers of some of the conceptual and social challenges that emerge with dissonant notions of cultivating ‘international’ and ‘global people.’

Akira has been an Associate Researcher at the Graduate School of Teacher Education, Tokyo Gakugei University since autumn 2020, a post he continues to hold until the end of his doctoral degree. He also currently works as an Anthropological Analyst for Contemplative Spaces, a consultancy focused on designing and delivering a range of leadership development initiatives for individuals, groups, and organizational bodies. His future career plans include further anthropological research and establishing consultancy services dedicated to various inclusion-based development initiatives.

Amelia is passionate about access to and the effects of environmental education globally, particularly in the Galápagos Islands of Ecuador.

Because she experienced a wealth of informal and non-formal environmental education from her parents and from explorations growing up in Southern Oregon, she is interested in researching how environmental education manifests in global communities. She fell in love with the Galápagos on a structured university-led trip during her undergraduate studies and realized that there was a dearth of research on social aspects of the communities living on the islands.  Because of this, she pursued research in the Galápagos in 2014 on the prevalence of and access to both formal and informal (provided by numerous NGOs and government agencies) environmental education for students on the islands, and on the level of student environmental literacy in 28 schools.

Her Dphil research focus, under the supervision of Dr. Ann Childs and Dr. Steve Puttick, is on access to and effects of Experiential Environmental Education for students living in the Galápagos Islands, and on the production of research on the social sphere in Galápagos.

Prior to starting her Dphil at Oxford, she worked in alliances and partnerships at tech companies in the San Francisco Bay Area. Most recently, she was the Director of Global Partnerships at Conversica, a conversational AI platform, and cultivated, trained, and drove pipeline with select international resellers in APAC, EMEA, and LATAM, and with regional resellers in the United States. She also assisted with the design and construction of the Conversica partner program.

In her free time, she is a free-lance food photographer, food stylist, food blogger, recipe developer, and gluten free baker for her online blog and social handle, Sisters Sans Gluten (www.sisterssansgluten), which she created with her sister in 2018. She also continues to sing informally and takes voice lessons remotely with instructor Corey Head of San Francisco.

She holds a BA in both Anthropology and Music (vocal performance), and an MA in Latin American Studies from Stanford University. Highlights from Stanford include: playing and touring as a performing member of Stanford Taiko (Japanese ensemble drumming) for four years; singing with the Stanford Chamber Chorale led by Professor Steve Sano; studying voice with Wendy Hillhouse; participating in music department operas; performing in self-organized recitals showcasing western art songs, western musical theater, and Latin American art songs; studying abroad in Santiago, Chile; and learning Quechua during her masters program with Marisol Necochea.

Abdul Karim has completed a Bachelor of Science in Bioengineering and Computational Medicine (Imperial College London), a Bachelor of Medicine and Bachelor of Surgery (Queen Mary University of London), and Master of Science in the Philosophy of Science and Economics (The London School of Economics).

He has delivered lectures on the Philosophy of Human Nature and the History of Metaethics at the University of Cambridge and for Health Education East Midlands. This, in addition to the current positions he holds as a Hospital Doctor and Health Policy and Management Advisor at the University Hospitals of Leicester NHS Trust.

Abdul Karim’s current areas of interest include the biological definition of psychological states relevant to the learning environment, and the influence of language on the variable interpretation of a particular social context. For the latter of which he has published primary research.

Another is the appraisal and deployment of physiological measurement devices in learning environments as a means of quantitatively evaluating psychological states. Such research areas hold promise in enhancing the questionnaire-based evidences of contemporary theories in education, such as those regarding motivation, self-determination and engagement. This will to contribute to the evidence-based public policy optimisation in education and social care.

 

Publications

Ismail, A.K. 2017. A Cross Sectional Study to Explore the Effect of the Linguistic Origin and Evolution of a Language on Patient Interpretation of Haematological Cancers. Advances in Biological Research. 11 (4): 225-232.

Ismail, A.K. 2017. The Origin of the Arabic Medical Term for Cancer. Advances in Biological Research. 11 (4): 198-201.

Ismail, A.K. 2018. The Impact of da Vinci’s Anatomical Drawings and Calculations on Foundation of Orthopaedics. Advances in Biological Research. 12 (1): 26-30.

As a mathematics teacher who believes that anyone can understand mathematics, Ashley is keenly interested in developing interventions and resources for learners who struggle with the subject. More specifically, she is focusing on the transitionary moment in the classroom when discussions have ceased, and practice begins and how this transition can become more fluid for learners.

By drawing on research from education, psychology and cognitive neuroscience, Ashley hopes to gain insights into how the brain and mind process information and how this knowledge can inform teacher practice and, ultimately, help learners understand mathematics.

After having taught for over ten years, Ashley completed her MSc, with Distinction, at the Department of Education, and her dissertation was “Highly Commended” by the British Educational Research Association (BERA). She is committed to making mathematics more accessible for all learners and strives for research that is not only impactful but also directly applicable to the classroom.

I am a Research Project Coordinator and Co-PI at the Department of Education for a project on Education, Purpose and Human Flourishing in Times of Uncertainty (EPHF), and the Templeton World Charity Foundation Fellow in Comparative Education at St Antony’s College, Oxford.

I have a multi-disciplinary background and experience. Academically I am an Art Historian specialising in late 18th and early 19th-century French aesthetics, and prior to my return to academia I had a career in the international finance, entrepreneurial business and high net worth family business sectors. I have published and taught at the University of Oxford on late eighteenth-and early nineteenth century art, history and aesthetics. Drawing on my experience as Lay Chaplain at Somerville College, Oxford I have also published on religious education. In addition to my position in the Education Department I am the Principal Advisor for Strategic Relationships and Partnerships at the Templeton World Charity Foundation Inc where I work closely with other foundations, INGOs and public policy organisations.

Publications List

Xiaona Wang is a DPhil student in Education, at St. Antony’s College, the University of Oxford. Xiaona’s doctoral research is fully funded by the University of Oxford (Clarendon Fund Scholarship and St. Antony’s College The Warden’s Scholarship). She is also a member at the Center for Global Higher Education.

Before her DPhil, Xiaona obtained her M.A degree in Higher Education at Graduate School of Education at Peking University, and B.A at the Faulty of Education from Beijing Normal University in China with first-class honour. She also studied at the University of Manchester as an exchange student in the School of Social Science.

Previously, Xiaona worked at Global Education Cluster in UNICEF, Geneva, where she began her research on the international scientific collaboration between China and Switzerland, and this experience later became the starting point of her master thesis. In her master’s thesis, Xiaona used a longitudinal research method in following a group of Chinese scientists who studied and worked in Switzerland. Through semi-structured interviews, she explored how collaborative relationships between individual scientists began and developed.

Xiaona has strong research interests in the science studies, internationalization and globalization of higher education. Her doctoral research is going to continue to explore the scientific knowledge networks between China and Switzerland under the influence of geopolitical factors.

Wanlin Cai is a DPhil student in higher education and a member of CGHE research group at the Department of Education.

Wanlin’s research interest lies in international higher education, higher education policies and economy, with a specific focus on World-Class Universities.

She is also a member of South China Global Talent Institute, Center for China and Globalisation, where she focuses on the research of talent policy and development in the Great Bay Area in China.

Prior to her beginning as a DPhil student, Wanlin read for the M.Sc in Higher Education at the University of Oxford and the M.Sc in Management and Enterprise Growth at the University of Glasgow.

Naosuke is a DPhil student whose research interests are Global Englishes and mutual intelligibility in English communication.

Naosuke finished an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition at the University of Oxford with distinction in 2019. His DPhil research focuses on the intelligibility of non-native English speakers. Specifically, he would like to seek what kind of English pronunciation features are critical for successful English communication between non-native English speakers.

Adam, from Ethiopia, is interested in looking at the role of education in peacebuilding and conflicts.

Akira is a DPhil Student in Anthropology affiliated with the School of Anthropology & Museum Ethnography, and associated with both the Department of Education and Nissan Institute of Japanese Studies. He is supervised by David Mills and Roger Goodman.

Akira’s doctoral research rests with the concepts of ‘international’ and ‘global education,’ and is grounded in the recent emergence and growth of International Baccalaureate (IB) education in Japan. Focused on IB educator training across several higher education institutions (HEIs), Akira aims – solely through digital anthropological approaches – to contextualize the everyday negotiations of ‘international’ and ‘global’ knowledge, both by those receiving and administering its training. Considering social, political, economic and cognitive aspects, one key objective of this research hopes to inform educational practitioners and policy-makers of some of the conceptual and social challenges that emerge with dissonant notions of cultivating ‘international’ and ‘global people.’

Akira has been an Associate Researcher at the Graduate School of Teacher Education, Tokyo Gakugei University since autumn 2020, a post he continues to hold until the end of his doctoral degree. He also currently works as an Anthropological Analyst for Contemplative Spaces, a consultancy focused on designing and delivering a range of leadership development initiatives for individuals, groups, and organizational bodies. His future career plans include further anthropological research and establishing consultancy services dedicated to various inclusion-based development initiatives.

Amelia is passionate about access to and the effects of environmental education globally, particularly in the Galápagos Islands of Ecuador.

Because she experienced a wealth of informal and non-formal environmental education from her parents and from explorations growing up in Southern Oregon, she is interested in researching how environmental education manifests in global communities. She fell in love with the Galápagos on a structured university-led trip during her undergraduate studies and realized that there was a dearth of research on social aspects of the communities living on the islands.  Because of this, she pursued research in the Galápagos in 2014 on the prevalence of and access to both formal and informal (provided by numerous NGOs and government agencies) environmental education for students on the islands, and on the level of student environmental literacy in 28 schools.

Her Dphil research focus, under the supervision of Dr. Ann Childs and Dr. Steve Puttick, is on access to and effects of Experiential Environmental Education for students living in the Galápagos Islands, and on the production of research on the social sphere in Galápagos.

Prior to starting her Dphil at Oxford, she worked in alliances and partnerships at tech companies in the San Francisco Bay Area. Most recently, she was the Director of Global Partnerships at Conversica, a conversational AI platform, and cultivated, trained, and drove pipeline with select international resellers in APAC, EMEA, and LATAM, and with regional resellers in the United States. She also assisted with the design and construction of the Conversica partner program.

In her free time, she is a free-lance food photographer, food stylist, food blogger, recipe developer, and gluten free baker for her online blog and social handle, Sisters Sans Gluten (www.sisterssansgluten), which she created with her sister in 2018. She also continues to sing informally and takes voice lessons remotely with instructor Corey Head of San Francisco.

She holds a BA in both Anthropology and Music (vocal performance), and an MA in Latin American Studies from Stanford University. Highlights from Stanford include: playing and touring as a performing member of Stanford Taiko (Japanese ensemble drumming) for four years; singing with the Stanford Chamber Chorale led by Professor Steve Sano; studying voice with Wendy Hillhouse; participating in music department operas; performing in self-organized recitals showcasing western art songs, western musical theater, and Latin American art songs; studying abroad in Santiago, Chile; and learning Quechua during her masters program with Marisol Necochea.

Abdul Karim has completed a Bachelor of Science in Bioengineering and Computational Medicine (Imperial College London), a Bachelor of Medicine and Bachelor of Surgery (Queen Mary University of London), and Master of Science in the Philosophy of Science and Economics (The London School of Economics).

He has delivered lectures on the Philosophy of Human Nature and the History of Metaethics at the University of Cambridge and for Health Education East Midlands. This, in addition to the current positions he holds as a Hospital Doctor and Health Policy and Management Advisor at the University Hospitals of Leicester NHS Trust.

Abdul Karim’s current areas of interest include the biological definition of psychological states relevant to the learning environment, and the influence of language on the variable interpretation of a particular social context. For the latter of which he has published primary research.

Another is the appraisal and deployment of physiological measurement devices in learning environments as a means of quantitatively evaluating psychological states. Such research areas hold promise in enhancing the questionnaire-based evidences of contemporary theories in education, such as those regarding motivation, self-determination and engagement. This will to contribute to the evidence-based public policy optimisation in education and social care.

 

Publications

Ismail, A.K. 2017. A Cross Sectional Study to Explore the Effect of the Linguistic Origin and Evolution of a Language on Patient Interpretation of Haematological Cancers. Advances in Biological Research. 11 (4): 225-232.

Ismail, A.K. 2017. The Origin of the Arabic Medical Term for Cancer. Advances in Biological Research. 11 (4): 198-201.

Ismail, A.K. 2018. The Impact of da Vinci’s Anatomical Drawings and Calculations on Foundation of Orthopaedics. Advances in Biological Research. 12 (1): 26-30.

As a mathematics teacher who believes that anyone can understand mathematics, Ashley is keenly interested in developing interventions and resources for learners who struggle with the subject. More specifically, she is focusing on the transitionary moment in the classroom when discussions have ceased, and practice begins and how this transition can become more fluid for learners.

By drawing on research from education, psychology and cognitive neuroscience, Ashley hopes to gain insights into how the brain and mind process information and how this knowledge can inform teacher practice and, ultimately, help learners understand mathematics.

After having taught for over ten years, Ashley completed her MSc, with Distinction, at the Department of Education, and her dissertation was “Highly Commended” by the British Educational Research Association (BERA). She is committed to making mathematics more accessible for all learners and strives for research that is not only impactful but also directly applicable to the classroom.

I am a Research Project Coordinator and Co-PI at the Department of Education for a project on Education, Purpose and Human Flourishing in Times of Uncertainty (EPHF), and the Templeton World Charity Foundation Fellow in Comparative Education at St Antony’s College, Oxford.

I have a multi-disciplinary background and experience. Academically I am an Art Historian specialising in late 18th and early 19th-century French aesthetics, and prior to my return to academia I had a career in the international finance, entrepreneurial business and high net worth family business sectors. I have published and taught at the University of Oxford on late eighteenth-and early nineteenth century art, history and aesthetics. Drawing on my experience as Lay Chaplain at Somerville College, Oxford I have also published on religious education. In addition to my position in the Education Department I am the Principal Advisor for Strategic Relationships and Partnerships at the Templeton World Charity Foundation Inc where I work closely with other foundations, INGOs and public policy organisations.

Publications List

Xiaona Wang is a DPhil student in Education, at St. Antony’s College, the University of Oxford. Xiaona’s doctoral research is fully funded by the University of Oxford (Clarendon Fund Scholarship and St. Antony’s College The Warden’s Scholarship). She is also a member at the Center for Global Higher Education.

Before her DPhil, Xiaona obtained her M.A degree in Higher Education at Graduate School of Education at Peking University, and B.A at the Faulty of Education from Beijing Normal University in China with first-class honour. She also studied at the University of Manchester as an exchange student in the School of Social Science.

Previously, Xiaona worked at Global Education Cluster in UNICEF, Geneva, where she began her research on the international scientific collaboration between China and Switzerland, and this experience later became the starting point of her master thesis. In her master’s thesis, Xiaona used a longitudinal research method in following a group of Chinese scientists who studied and worked in Switzerland. Through semi-structured interviews, she explored how collaborative relationships between individual scientists began and developed.

Xiaona has strong research interests in the science studies, internationalization and globalization of higher education. Her doctoral research is going to continue to explore the scientific knowledge networks between China and Switzerland under the influence of geopolitical factors.

Wanlin Cai is a DPhil student in higher education and a member of CGHE research group at the Department of Education.

Wanlin’s research interest lies in international higher education, higher education policies and economy, with a specific focus on World-Class Universities.

She is also a member of South China Global Talent Institute, Center for China and Globalisation, where she focuses on the research of talent policy and development in the Great Bay Area in China.

Prior to her beginning as a DPhil student, Wanlin read for the M.Sc in Higher Education at the University of Oxford and the M.Sc in Management and Enterprise Growth at the University of Glasgow.

Naosuke is a DPhil student whose research interests are Global Englishes and mutual intelligibility in English communication.

Naosuke finished an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition at the University of Oxford with distinction in 2019. His DPhil research focuses on the intelligibility of non-native English speakers. Specifically, he would like to seek what kind of English pronunciation features are critical for successful English communication between non-native English speakers.

Adam, from Ethiopia, is interested in looking at the role of education in peacebuilding and conflicts.

Akira is a DPhil Student in Anthropology affiliated with the School of Anthropology & Museum Ethnography, and associated with both the Department of Education and Nissan Institute of Japanese Studies. He is supervised by David Mills and Roger Goodman.

Akira’s doctoral research rests with the concepts of ‘international’ and ‘global education,’ and is grounded in the recent emergence and growth of International Baccalaureate (IB) education in Japan. Focused on IB educator training across several higher education institutions (HEIs), Akira aims – solely through digital anthropological approaches – to contextualize the everyday negotiations of ‘international’ and ‘global’ knowledge, both by those receiving and administering its training. Considering social, political, economic and cognitive aspects, one key objective of this research hopes to inform educational practitioners and policy-makers of some of the conceptual and social challenges that emerge with dissonant notions of cultivating ‘international’ and ‘global people.’

Akira has been an Associate Researcher at the Graduate School of Teacher Education, Tokyo Gakugei University since autumn 2020, a post he continues to hold until the end of his doctoral degree. He also currently works as an Anthropological Analyst for Contemplative Spaces, a consultancy focused on designing and delivering a range of leadership development initiatives for individuals, groups, and organizational bodies. His future career plans include further anthropological research and establishing consultancy services dedicated to various inclusion-based development initiatives.

Amelia is passionate about access to and the effects of environmental education globally, particularly in the Galápagos Islands of Ecuador.

Because she experienced a wealth of informal and non-formal environmental education from her parents and from explorations growing up in Southern Oregon, she is interested in researching how environmental education manifests in global communities. She fell in love with the Galápagos on a structured university-led trip during her undergraduate studies and realized that there was a dearth of research on social aspects of the communities living on the islands.  Because of this, she pursued research in the Galápagos in 2014 on the prevalence of and access to both formal and informal (provided by numerous NGOs and government agencies) environmental education for students on the islands, and on the level of student environmental literacy in 28 schools.

Her Dphil research focus, under the supervision of Dr. Ann Childs and Dr. Steve Puttick, is on access to and effects of Experiential Environmental Education for students living in the Galápagos Islands, and on the production of research on the social sphere in Galápagos.

Prior to starting her Dphil at Oxford, she worked in alliances and partnerships at tech companies in the San Francisco Bay Area. Most recently, she was the Director of Global Partnerships at Conversica, a conversational AI platform, and cultivated, trained, and drove pipeline with select international resellers in APAC, EMEA, and LATAM, and with regional resellers in the United States. She also assisted with the design and construction of the Conversica partner program.

In her free time, she is a free-lance food photographer, food stylist, food blogger, recipe developer, and gluten free baker for her online blog and social handle, Sisters Sans Gluten (www.sisterssansgluten), which she created with her sister in 2018. She also continues to sing informally and takes voice lessons remotely with instructor Corey Head of San Francisco.

She holds a BA in both Anthropology and Music (vocal performance), and an MA in Latin American Studies from Stanford University. Highlights from Stanford include: playing and touring as a performing member of Stanford Taiko (Japanese ensemble drumming) for four years; singing with the Stanford Chamber Chorale led by Professor Steve Sano; studying voice with Wendy Hillhouse; participating in music department operas; performing in self-organized recitals showcasing western art songs, western musical theater, and Latin American art songs; studying abroad in Santiago, Chile; and learning Quechua during her masters program with Marisol Necochea.

Abdul Karim has completed a Bachelor of Science in Bioengineering and Computational Medicine (Imperial College London), a Bachelor of Medicine and Bachelor of Surgery (Queen Mary University of London), and Master of Science in the Philosophy of Science and Economics (The London School of Economics).

He has delivered lectures on the Philosophy of Human Nature and the History of Metaethics at the University of Cambridge and for Health Education East Midlands. This, in addition to the current positions he holds as a Hospital Doctor and Health Policy and Management Advisor at the University Hospitals of Leicester NHS Trust.

Abdul Karim’s current areas of interest include the biological definition of psychological states relevant to the learning environment, and the influence of language on the variable interpretation of a particular social context. For the latter of which he has published primary research.

Another is the appraisal and deployment of physiological measurement devices in learning environments as a means of quantitatively evaluating psychological states. Such research areas hold promise in enhancing the questionnaire-based evidences of contemporary theories in education, such as those regarding motivation, self-determination and engagement. This will to contribute to the evidence-based public policy optimisation in education and social care.

 

Publications

Ismail, A.K. 2017. A Cross Sectional Study to Explore the Effect of the Linguistic Origin and Evolution of a Language on Patient Interpretation of Haematological Cancers. Advances in Biological Research. 11 (4): 225-232.

Ismail, A.K. 2017. The Origin of the Arabic Medical Term for Cancer. Advances in Biological Research. 11 (4): 198-201.

Ismail, A.K. 2018. The Impact of da Vinci’s Anatomical Drawings and Calculations on Foundation of Orthopaedics. Advances in Biological Research. 12 (1): 26-30.

As a mathematics teacher who believes that anyone can understand mathematics, Ashley is keenly interested in developing interventions and resources for learners who struggle with the subject. More specifically, she is focusing on the transitionary moment in the classroom when discussions have ceased, and practice begins and how this transition can become more fluid for learners.

By drawing on research from education, psychology and cognitive neuroscience, Ashley hopes to gain insights into how the brain and mind process information and how this knowledge can inform teacher practice and, ultimately, help learners understand mathematics.

After having taught for over ten years, Ashley completed her MSc, with Distinction, at the Department of Education, and her dissertation was “Highly Commended” by the British Educational Research Association (BERA). She is committed to making mathematics more accessible for all learners and strives for research that is not only impactful but also directly applicable to the classroom.

I am a Research Project Coordinator and Co-PI at the Department of Education for a project on Education, Purpose and Human Flourishing in Times of Uncertainty (EPHF), and the Templeton World Charity Foundation Fellow in Comparative Education at St Antony’s College, Oxford.

I have a multi-disciplinary background and experience. Academically I am an Art Historian specialising in late 18th and early 19th-century French aesthetics, and prior to my return to academia I had a career in the international finance, entrepreneurial business and high net worth family business sectors. I have published and taught at the University of Oxford on late eighteenth-and early nineteenth century art, history and aesthetics. Drawing on my experience as Lay Chaplain at Somerville College, Oxford I have also published on religious education. In addition to my position in the Education Department I am the Principal Advisor for Strategic Relationships and Partnerships at the Templeton World Charity Foundation Inc where I work closely with other foundations, INGOs and public policy organisations.

Publications List

Xiaona Wang is a DPhil student in Education, at St. Antony’s College, the University of Oxford. Xiaona’s doctoral research is fully funded by the University of Oxford (Clarendon Fund Scholarship and St. Antony’s College The Warden’s Scholarship). She is also a member at the Center for Global Higher Education.

Before her DPhil, Xiaona obtained her M.A degree in Higher Education at Graduate School of Education at Peking University, and B.A at the Faulty of Education from Beijing Normal University in China with first-class honour. She also studied at the University of Manchester as an exchange student in the School of Social Science.

Previously, Xiaona worked at Global Education Cluster in UNICEF, Geneva, where she began her research on the international scientific collaboration between China and Switzerland, and this experience later became the starting point of her master thesis. In her master’s thesis, Xiaona used a longitudinal research method in following a group of Chinese scientists who studied and worked in Switzerland. Through semi-structured interviews, she explored how collaborative relationships between individual scientists began and developed.

Xiaona has strong research interests in the science studies, internationalization and globalization of higher education. Her doctoral research is going to continue to explore the scientific knowledge networks between China and Switzerland under the influence of geopolitical factors.

Wanlin Cai is a DPhil student in higher education and a member of CGHE research group at the Department of Education.

Wanlin’s research interest lies in international higher education, higher education policies and economy, with a specific focus on World-Class Universities.

She is also a member of South China Global Talent Institute, Center for China and Globalisation, where she focuses on the research of talent policy and development in the Great Bay Area in China.

Prior to her beginning as a DPhil student, Wanlin read for the M.Sc in Higher Education at the University of Oxford and the M.Sc in Management and Enterprise Growth at the University of Glasgow.

Naosuke is a DPhil student whose research interests are Global Englishes and mutual intelligibility in English communication.

Naosuke finished an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition at the University of Oxford with distinction in 2019. His DPhil research focuses on the intelligibility of non-native English speakers. Specifically, he would like to seek what kind of English pronunciation features are critical for successful English communication between non-native English speakers.

Adam, from Ethiopia, is interested in looking at the role of education in peacebuilding and conflicts.

Akira is a DPhil Student in Anthropology affiliated with the School of Anthropology & Museum Ethnography, and associated with both the Department of Education and Nissan Institute of Japanese Studies. He is supervised by David Mills and Roger Goodman.

Akira’s doctoral research rests with the concepts of ‘international’ and ‘global education,’ and is grounded in the recent emergence and growth of International Baccalaureate (IB) education in Japan. Focused on IB educator training across several higher education institutions (HEIs), Akira aims – solely through digital anthropological approaches – to contextualize the everyday negotiations of ‘international’ and ‘global’ knowledge, both by those receiving and administering its training. Considering social, political, economic and cognitive aspects, one key objective of this research hopes to inform educational practitioners and policy-makers of some of the conceptual and social challenges that emerge with dissonant notions of cultivating ‘international’ and ‘global people.’

Akira has been an Associate Researcher at the Graduate School of Teacher Education, Tokyo Gakugei University since autumn 2020, a post he continues to hold until the end of his doctoral degree. He also currently works as an Anthropological Analyst for Contemplative Spaces, a consultancy focused on designing and delivering a range of leadership development initiatives for individuals, groups, and organizational bodies. His future career plans include further anthropological research and establishing consultancy services dedicated to various inclusion-based development initiatives.

Amelia is passionate about access to and the effects of environmental education globally, particularly in the Galápagos Islands of Ecuador.

Because she experienced a wealth of informal and non-formal environmental education from her parents and from explorations growing up in Southern Oregon, she is interested in researching how environmental education manifests in global communities. She fell in love with the Galápagos on a structured university-led trip during her undergraduate studies and realized that there was a dearth of research on social aspects of the communities living on the islands.  Because of this, she pursued research in the Galápagos in 2014 on the prevalence of and access to both formal and informal (provided by numerous NGOs and government agencies) environmental education for students on the islands, and on the level of student environmental literacy in 28 schools.

Her Dphil research focus, under the supervision of Dr. Ann Childs and Dr. Steve Puttick, is on access to and effects of Experiential Environmental Education for students living in the Galápagos Islands, and on the production of research on the social sphere in Galápagos.

Prior to starting her Dphil at Oxford, she worked in alliances and partnerships at tech companies in the San Francisco Bay Area. Most recently, she was the Director of Global Partnerships at Conversica, a conversational AI platform, and cultivated, trained, and drove pipeline with select international resellers in APAC, EMEA, and LATAM, and with regional resellers in the United States. She also assisted with the design and construction of the Conversica partner program.

In her free time, she is a free-lance food photographer, food stylist, food blogger, recipe developer, and gluten free baker for her online blog and social handle, Sisters Sans Gluten (www.sisterssansgluten), which she created with her sister in 2018. She also continues to sing informally and takes voice lessons remotely with instructor Corey Head of San Francisco.

She holds a BA in both Anthropology and Music (vocal performance), and an MA in Latin American Studies from Stanford University. Highlights from Stanford include: playing and touring as a performing member of Stanford Taiko (Japanese ensemble drumming) for four years; singing with the Stanford Chamber Chorale led by Professor Steve Sano; studying voice with Wendy Hillhouse; participating in music department operas; performing in self-organized recitals showcasing western art songs, western musical theater, and Latin American art songs; studying abroad in Santiago, Chile; and learning Quechua during her masters program with Marisol Necochea.

Abdul Karim has completed a Bachelor of Science in Bioengineering and Computational Medicine (Imperial College London), a Bachelor of Medicine and Bachelor of Surgery (Queen Mary University of London), and Master of Science in the Philosophy of Science and Economics (The London School of Economics).

He has delivered lectures on the Philosophy of Human Nature and the History of Metaethics at the University of Cambridge and for Health Education East Midlands. This, in addition to the current positions he holds as a Hospital Doctor and Health Policy and Management Advisor at the University Hospitals of Leicester NHS Trust.

Abdul Karim’s current areas of interest include the biological definition of psychological states relevant to the learning environment, and the influence of language on the variable interpretation of a particular social context. For the latter of which he has published primary research.

Another is the appraisal and deployment of physiological measurement devices in learning environments as a means of quantitatively evaluating psychological states. Such research areas hold promise in enhancing the questionnaire-based evidences of contemporary theories in education, such as those regarding motivation, self-determination and engagement. This will to contribute to the evidence-based public policy optimisation in education and social care.

 

Publications

Ismail, A.K. 2017. A Cross Sectional Study to Explore the Effect of the Linguistic Origin and Evolution of a Language on Patient Interpretation of Haematological Cancers. Advances in Biological Research. 11 (4): 225-232.

Ismail, A.K. 2017. The Origin of the Arabic Medical Term for Cancer. Advances in Biological Research. 11 (4): 198-201.

Ismail, A.K. 2018. The Impact of da Vinci’s Anatomical Drawings and Calculations on Foundation of Orthopaedics. Advances in Biological Research. 12 (1): 26-30.

As a mathematics teacher who believes that anyone can understand mathematics, Ashley is keenly interested in developing interventions and resources for learners who struggle with the subject. More specifically, she is focusing on the transitionary moment in the classroom when discussions have ceased, and practice begins and how this transition can become more fluid for learners.

By drawing on research from education, psychology and cognitive neuroscience, Ashley hopes to gain insights into how the brain and mind process information and how this knowledge can inform teacher practice and, ultimately, help learners understand mathematics.

After having taught for over ten years, Ashley completed her MSc, with Distinction, at the Department of Education, and her dissertation was “Highly Commended” by the British Educational Research Association (BERA). She is committed to making mathematics more accessible for all learners and strives for research that is not only impactful but also directly applicable to the classroom.

I am a Research Project Coordinator and Co-PI at the Department of Education for a project on Education, Purpose and Human Flourishing in Times of Uncertainty (EPHF), and the Templeton World Charity Foundation Fellow in Comparative Education at St Antony’s College, Oxford.

I have a multi-disciplinary background and experience. Academically I am an Art Historian specialising in late 18th and early 19th-century French aesthetics, and prior to my return to academia I had a career in the international finance, entrepreneurial business and high net worth family business sectors. I have published and taught at the University of Oxford on late eighteenth-and early nineteenth century art, history and aesthetics. Drawing on my experience as Lay Chaplain at Somerville College, Oxford I have also published on religious education. In addition to my position in the Education Department I am the Principal Advisor for Strategic Relationships and Partnerships at the Templeton World Charity Foundation Inc where I work closely with other foundations, INGOs and public policy organisations.

Publications List

Xiaona Wang is a DPhil student in Education, at St. Antony’s College, the University of Oxford. Xiaona’s doctoral research is fully funded by the University of Oxford (Clarendon Fund Scholarship and St. Antony’s College The Warden’s Scholarship). She is also a member at the Center for Global Higher Education.

Before her DPhil, Xiaona obtained her M.A degree in Higher Education at Graduate School of Education at Peking University, and B.A at the Faulty of Education from Beijing Normal University in China with first-class honour. She also studied at the University of Manchester as an exchange student in the School of Social Science.

Previously, Xiaona worked at Global Education Cluster in UNICEF, Geneva, where she began her research on the international scientific collaboration between China and Switzerland, and this experience later became the starting point of her master thesis. In her master’s thesis, Xiaona used a longitudinal research method in following a group of Chinese scientists who studied and worked in Switzerland. Through semi-structured interviews, she explored how collaborative relationships between individual scientists began and developed.

Xiaona has strong research interests in the science studies, internationalization and globalization of higher education. Her doctoral research is going to continue to explore the scientific knowledge networks between China and Switzerland under the influence of geopolitical factors.

Wanlin Cai is a DPhil student in higher education and a member of CGHE research group at the Department of Education.

Wanlin’s research interest lies in international higher education, higher education policies and economy, with a specific focus on World-Class Universities.

She is also a member of South China Global Talent Institute, Center for China and Globalisation, where she focuses on the research of talent policy and development in the Great Bay Area in China.

Prior to her beginning as a DPhil student, Wanlin read for the M.Sc in Higher Education at the University of Oxford and the M.Sc in Management and Enterprise Growth at the University of Glasgow.

Naosuke is a DPhil student whose research interests are Global Englishes and mutual intelligibility in English communication.

Naosuke finished an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition at the University of Oxford with distinction in 2019. His DPhil research focuses on the intelligibility of non-native English speakers. Specifically, he would like to seek what kind of English pronunciation features are critical for successful English communication between non-native English speakers.

Adam, from Ethiopia, is interested in looking at the role of education in peacebuilding and conflicts.

Akira is a DPhil Student in Anthropology affiliated with the School of Anthropology & Museum Ethnography, and associated with both the Department of Education and Nissan Institute of Japanese Studies. He is supervised by David Mills and Roger Goodman.

Akira’s doctoral research rests with the concepts of ‘international’ and ‘global education,’ and is grounded in the recent emergence and growth of International Baccalaureate (IB) education in Japan. Focused on IB educator training across several higher education institutions (HEIs), Akira aims – solely through digital anthropological approaches – to contextualize the everyday negotiations of ‘international’ and ‘global’ knowledge, both by those receiving and administering its training. Considering social, political, economic and cognitive aspects, one key objective of this research hopes to inform educational practitioners and policy-makers of some of the conceptual and social challenges that emerge with dissonant notions of cultivating ‘international’ and ‘global people.’

Akira has been an Associate Researcher at the Graduate School of Teacher Education, Tokyo Gakugei University since autumn 2020, a post he continues to hold until the end of his doctoral degree. He also currently works as an Anthropological Analyst for Contemplative Spaces, a consultancy focused on designing and delivering a range of leadership development initiatives for individuals, groups, and organizational bodies. His future career plans include further anthropological research and establishing consultancy services dedicated to various inclusion-based development initiatives.

Amelia is passionate about access to and the effects of environmental education globally, particularly in the Galápagos Islands of Ecuador.

Because she experienced a wealth of informal and non-formal environmental education from her parents and from explorations growing up in Southern Oregon, she is interested in researching how environmental education manifests in global communities. She fell in love with the Galápagos on a structured university-led trip during her undergraduate studies and realized that there was a dearth of research on social aspects of the communities living on the islands.  Because of this, she pursued research in the Galápagos in 2014 on the prevalence of and access to both formal and informal (provided by numerous NGOs and government agencies) environmental education for students on the islands, and on the level of student environmental literacy in 28 schools.

Her Dphil research focus, under the supervision of Dr. Ann Childs and Dr. Steve Puttick, is on access to and effects of Experiential Environmental Education for students living in the Galápagos Islands, and on the production of research on the social sphere in Galápagos.

Prior to starting her Dphil at Oxford, she worked in alliances and partnerships at tech companies in the San Francisco Bay Area. Most recently, she was the Director of Global Partnerships at Conversica, a conversational AI platform, and cultivated, trained, and drove pipeline with select international resellers in APAC, EMEA, and LATAM, and with regional resellers in the United States. She also assisted with the design and construction of the Conversica partner program.

In her free time, she is a free-lance food photographer, food stylist, food blogger, recipe developer, and gluten free baker for her online blog and social handle, Sisters Sans Gluten (www.sisterssansgluten), which she created with her sister in 2018. She also continues to sing informally and takes voice lessons remotely with instructor Corey Head of San Francisco.

She holds a BA in both Anthropology and Music (vocal performance), and an MA in Latin American Studies from Stanford University. Highlights from Stanford include: playing and touring as a performing member of Stanford Taiko (Japanese ensemble drumming) for four years; singing with the Stanford Chamber Chorale led by Professor Steve Sano; studying voice with Wendy Hillhouse; participating in music department operas; performing in self-organized recitals showcasing western art songs, western musical theater, and Latin American art songs; studying abroad in Santiago, Chile; and learning Quechua during her masters program with Marisol Necochea.

Abdul Karim has completed a Bachelor of Science in Bioengineering and Computational Medicine (Imperial College London), a Bachelor of Medicine and Bachelor of Surgery (Queen Mary University of London), and Master of Science in the Philosophy of Science and Economics (The London School of Economics).

He has delivered lectures on the Philosophy of Human Nature and the History of Metaethics at the University of Cambridge and for Health Education East Midlands. This, in addition to the current positions he holds as a Hospital Doctor and Health Policy and Management Advisor at the University Hospitals of Leicester NHS Trust.

Abdul Karim’s current areas of interest include the biological definition of psychological states relevant to the learning environment, and the influence of language on the variable interpretation of a particular social context. For the latter of which he has published primary research.

Another is the appraisal and deployment of physiological measurement devices in learning environments as a means of quantitatively evaluating psychological states. Such research areas hold promise in enhancing the questionnaire-based evidences of contemporary theories in education, such as those regarding motivation, self-determination and engagement. This will to contribute to the evidence-based public policy optimisation in education and social care.

 

Publications

Ismail, A.K. 2017. A Cross Sectional Study to Explore the Effect of the Linguistic Origin and Evolution of a Language on Patient Interpretation of Haematological Cancers. Advances in Biological Research. 11 (4): 225-232.

Ismail, A.K. 2017. The Origin of the Arabic Medical Term for Cancer. Advances in Biological Research. 11 (4): 198-201.

Ismail, A.K. 2018. The Impact of da Vinci’s Anatomical Drawings and Calculations on Foundation of Orthopaedics. Advances in Biological Research. 12 (1): 26-30.

As a mathematics teacher who believes that anyone can understand mathematics, Ashley is keenly interested in developing interventions and resources for learners who struggle with the subject. More specifically, she is focusing on the transitionary moment in the classroom when discussions have ceased, and practice begins and how this transition can become more fluid for learners.

By drawing on research from education, psychology and cognitive neuroscience, Ashley hopes to gain insights into how the brain and mind process information and how this knowledge can inform teacher practice and, ultimately, help learners understand mathematics.

After having taught for over ten years, Ashley completed her MSc, with Distinction, at the Department of Education, and her dissertation was “Highly Commended” by the British Educational Research Association (BERA). She is committed to making mathematics more accessible for all learners and strives for research that is not only impactful but also directly applicable to the classroom.

I am a Research Project Coordinator and Co-PI at the Department of Education for a project on Education, Purpose and Human Flourishing in Times of Uncertainty (EPHF), and the Templeton World Charity Foundation Fellow in Comparative Education at St Antony’s College, Oxford.

I have a multi-disciplinary background and experience. Academically I am an Art Historian specialising in late 18th and early 19th-century French aesthetics, and prior to my return to academia I had a career in the international finance, entrepreneurial business and high net worth family business sectors. I have published and taught at the University of Oxford on late eighteenth-and early nineteenth century art, history and aesthetics. Drawing on my experience as Lay Chaplain at Somerville College, Oxford I have also published on religious education. In addition to my position in the Education Department I am the Principal Advisor for Strategic Relationships and Partnerships at the Templeton World Charity Foundation Inc where I work closely with other foundations, INGOs and public policy organisations.

Publications List

Xiaona Wang is a DPhil student in Education, at St. Antony’s College, the University of Oxford. Xiaona’s doctoral research is fully funded by the University of Oxford (Clarendon Fund Scholarship and St. Antony’s College The Warden’s Scholarship). She is also a member at the Center for Global Higher Education.

Before her DPhil, Xiaona obtained her M.A degree in Higher Education at Graduate School of Education at Peking University, and B.A at the Faulty of Education from Beijing Normal University in China with first-class honour. She also studied at the University of Manchester as an exchange student in the School of Social Science.

Previously, Xiaona worked at Global Education Cluster in UNICEF, Geneva, where she began her research on the international scientific collaboration between China and Switzerland, and this experience later became the starting point of her master thesis. In her master’s thesis, Xiaona used a longitudinal research method in following a group of Chinese scientists who studied and worked in Switzerland. Through semi-structured interviews, she explored how collaborative relationships between individual scientists began and developed.

Xiaona has strong research interests in the science studies, internationalization and globalization of higher education. Her doctoral research is going to continue to explore the scientific knowledge networks between China and Switzerland under the influence of geopolitical factors.

Wanlin Cai is a DPhil student in higher education and a member of CGHE research group at the Department of Education.

Wanlin’s research interest lies in international higher education, higher education policies and economy, with a specific focus on World-Class Universities.

She is also a member of South China Global Talent Institute, Center for China and Globalisation, where she focuses on the research of talent policy and development in the Great Bay Area in China.

Prior to her beginning as a DPhil student, Wanlin read for the M.Sc in Higher Education at the University of Oxford and the M.Sc in Management and Enterprise Growth at the University of Glasgow.

Naosuke is a DPhil student whose research interests are Global Englishes and mutual intelligibility in English communication.

Naosuke finished an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition at the University of Oxford with distinction in 2019. His DPhil research focuses on the intelligibility of non-native English speakers. Specifically, he would like to seek what kind of English pronunciation features are critical for successful English communication between non-native English speakers.

Adam, from Ethiopia, is interested in looking at the role of education in peacebuilding and conflicts.

Akira is a DPhil Student in Anthropology affiliated with the School of Anthropology & Museum Ethnography, and associated with both the Department of Education and Nissan Institute of Japanese Studies. He is supervised by David Mills and Roger Goodman.

Akira’s doctoral research rests with the concepts of ‘international’ and ‘global education,’ and is grounded in the recent emergence and growth of International Baccalaureate (IB) education in Japan. Focused on IB educator training across several higher education institutions (HEIs), Akira aims – solely through digital anthropological approaches – to contextualize the everyday negotiations of ‘international’ and ‘global’ knowledge, both by those receiving and administering its training. Considering social, political, economic and cognitive aspects, one key objective of this research hopes to inform educational practitioners and policy-makers of some of the conceptual and social challenges that emerge with dissonant notions of cultivating ‘international’ and ‘global people.’

Akira has been an Associate Researcher at the Graduate School of Teacher Education, Tokyo Gakugei University since autumn 2020, a post he continues to hold until the end of his doctoral degree. He also currently works as an Anthropological Analyst for Contemplative Spaces, a consultancy focused on designing and delivering a range of leadership development initiatives for individuals, groups, and organizational bodies. His future career plans include further anthropological research and establishing consultancy services dedicated to various inclusion-based development initiatives.

Amelia is passionate about access to and the effects of environmental education globally, particularly in the Galápagos Islands of Ecuador.

Because she experienced a wealth of informal and non-formal environmental education from her parents and from explorations growing up in Southern Oregon, she is interested in researching how environmental education manifests in global communities. She fell in love with the Galápagos on a structured university-led trip during her undergraduate studies and realized that there was a dearth of research on social aspects of the communities living on the islands.  Because of this, she pursued research in the Galápagos in 2014 on the prevalence of and access to both formal and informal (provided by numerous NGOs and government agencies) environmental education for students on the islands, and on the level of student environmental literacy in 28 schools.

Her Dphil research focus, under the supervision of Dr. Ann Childs and Dr. Steve Puttick, is on access to and effects of Experiential Environmental Education for students living in the Galápagos Islands, and on the production of research on the social sphere in Galápagos.

Prior to starting her Dphil at Oxford, she worked in alliances and partnerships at tech companies in the San Francisco Bay Area. Most recently, she was the Director of Global Partnerships at Conversica, a conversational AI platform, and cultivated, trained, and drove pipeline with select international resellers in APAC, EMEA, and LATAM, and with regional resellers in the United States. She also assisted with the design and construction of the Conversica partner program.

In her free time, she is a free-lance food photographer, food stylist, food blogger, recipe developer, and gluten free baker for her online blog and social handle, Sisters Sans Gluten (www.sisterssansgluten), which she created with her sister in 2018. She also continues to sing informally and takes voice lessons remotely with instructor Corey Head of San Francisco.

She holds a BA in both Anthropology and Music (vocal performance), and an MA in Latin American Studies from Stanford University. Highlights from Stanford include: playing and touring as a performing member of Stanford Taiko (Japanese ensemble drumming) for four years; singing with the Stanford Chamber Chorale led by Professor Steve Sano; studying voice with Wendy Hillhouse; participating in music department operas; performing in self-organized recitals showcasing western art songs, western musical theater, and Latin American art songs; studying abroad in Santiago, Chile; and learning Quechua during her masters program with Marisol Necochea.

Abdul Karim has completed a Bachelor of Science in Bioengineering and Computational Medicine (Imperial College London), a Bachelor of Medicine and Bachelor of Surgery (Queen Mary University of London), and Master of Science in the Philosophy of Science and Economics (The London School of Economics).

He has delivered lectures on the Philosophy of Human Nature and the History of Metaethics at the University of Cambridge and for Health Education East Midlands. This, in addition to the current positions he holds as a Hospital Doctor and Health Policy and Management Advisor at the University Hospitals of Leicester NHS Trust.

Abdul Karim’s current areas of interest include the biological definition of psychological states relevant to the learning environment, and the influence of language on the variable interpretation of a particular social context. For the latter of which he has published primary research.

Another is the appraisal and deployment of physiological measurement devices in learning environments as a means of quantitatively evaluating psychological states. Such research areas hold promise in enhancing the questionnaire-based evidences of contemporary theories in education, such as those regarding motivation, self-determination and engagement. This will to contribute to the evidence-based public policy optimisation in education and social care.

 

Publications

Ismail, A.K. 2017. A Cross Sectional Study to Explore the Effect of the Linguistic Origin and Evolution of a Language on Patient Interpretation of Haematological Cancers. Advances in Biological Research. 11 (4): 225-232.

Ismail, A.K. 2017. The Origin of the Arabic Medical Term for Cancer. Advances in Biological Research. 11 (4): 198-201.

Ismail, A.K. 2018. The Impact of da Vinci’s Anatomical Drawings and Calculations on Foundation of Orthopaedics. Advances in Biological Research. 12 (1): 26-30.

As a mathematics teacher who believes that anyone can understand mathematics, Ashley is keenly interested in developing interventions and resources for learners who struggle with the subject. More specifically, she is focusing on the transitionary moment in the classroom when discussions have ceased, and practice begins and how this transition can become more fluid for learners.

By drawing on research from education, psychology and cognitive neuroscience, Ashley hopes to gain insights into how the brain and mind process information and how this knowledge can inform teacher practice and, ultimately, help learners understand mathematics.

After having taught for over ten years, Ashley completed her MSc, with Distinction, at the Department of Education, and her dissertation was “Highly Commended” by the British Educational Research Association (BERA). She is committed to making mathematics more accessible for all learners and strives for research that is not only impactful but also directly applicable to the classroom.

I am a Research Project Coordinator and Co-PI at the Department of Education for a project on Education, Purpose and Human Flourishing in Times of Uncertainty (EPHF), and the Templeton World Charity Foundation Fellow in Comparative Education at St Antony’s College, Oxford.

I have a multi-disciplinary background and experience. Academically I am an Art Historian specialising in late 18th and early 19th-century French aesthetics, and prior to my return to academia I had a career in the international finance, entrepreneurial business and high net worth family business sectors. I have published and taught at the University of Oxford on late eighteenth-and early nineteenth century art, history and aesthetics. Drawing on my experience as Lay Chaplain at Somerville College, Oxford I have also published on religious education. In addition to my position in the Education Department I am the Principal Advisor for Strategic Relationships and Partnerships at the Templeton World Charity Foundation Inc where I work closely with other foundations, INGOs and public policy organisations.

Publications List

Xiaona Wang is a DPhil student in Education, at St. Antony’s College, the University of Oxford. Xiaona’s doctoral research is fully funded by the University of Oxford (Clarendon Fund Scholarship and St. Antony’s College The Warden’s Scholarship). She is also a member at the Center for Global Higher Education.

Before her DPhil, Xiaona obtained her M.A degree in Higher Education at Graduate School of Education at Peking University, and B.A at the Faulty of Education from Beijing Normal University in China with first-class honour. She also studied at the University of Manchester as an exchange student in the School of Social Science.

Previously, Xiaona worked at Global Education Cluster in UNICEF, Geneva, where she began her research on the international scientific collaboration between China and Switzerland, and this experience later became the starting point of her master thesis. In her master’s thesis, Xiaona used a longitudinal research method in following a group of Chinese scientists who studied and worked in Switzerland. Through semi-structured interviews, she explored how collaborative relationships between individual scientists began and developed.

Xiaona has strong research interests in the science studies, internationalization and globalization of higher education. Her doctoral research is going to continue to explore the scientific knowledge networks between China and Switzerland under the influence of geopolitical factors.

Wanlin Cai is a DPhil student in higher education and a member of CGHE research group at the Department of Education.

Wanlin’s research interest lies in international higher education, higher education policies and economy, with a specific focus on World-Class Universities.

She is also a member of South China Global Talent Institute, Center for China and Globalisation, where she focuses on the research of talent policy and development in the Great Bay Area in China.

Prior to her beginning as a DPhil student, Wanlin read for the M.Sc in Higher Education at the University of Oxford and the M.Sc in Management and Enterprise Growth at the University of Glasgow.

Naosuke is a DPhil student whose research interests are Global Englishes and mutual intelligibility in English communication.

Naosuke finished an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition at the University of Oxford with distinction in 2019. His DPhil research focuses on the intelligibility of non-native English speakers. Specifically, he would like to seek what kind of English pronunciation features are critical for successful English communication between non-native English speakers.

Adam, from Ethiopia, is interested in looking at the role of education in peacebuilding and conflicts.

Akira is a DPhil Student in Anthropology affiliated with the School of Anthropology & Museum Ethnography, and associated with both the Department of Education and Nissan Institute of Japanese Studies. He is supervised by David Mills and Roger Goodman.

Akira’s doctoral research rests with the concepts of ‘international’ and ‘global education,’ and is grounded in the recent emergence and growth of International Baccalaureate (IB) education in Japan. Focused on IB educator training across several higher education institutions (HEIs), Akira aims – solely through digital anthropological approaches – to contextualize the everyday negotiations of ‘international’ and ‘global’ knowledge, both by those receiving and administering its training. Considering social, political, economic and cognitive aspects, one key objective of this research hopes to inform educational practitioners and policy-makers of some of the conceptual and social challenges that emerge with dissonant notions of cultivating ‘international’ and ‘global people.’

Akira has been an Associate Researcher at the Graduate School of Teacher Education, Tokyo Gakugei University since autumn 2020, a post he continues to hold until the end of his doctoral degree. He also currently works as an Anthropological Analyst for Contemplative Spaces, a consultancy focused on designing and delivering a range of leadership development initiatives for individuals, groups, and organizational bodies. His future career plans include further anthropological research and establishing consultancy services dedicated to various inclusion-based development initiatives.

Amelia is passionate about access to and the effects of environmental education globally, particularly in the Galápagos Islands of Ecuador.

Because she experienced a wealth of informal and non-formal environmental education from her parents and from explorations growing up in Southern Oregon, she is interested in researching how environmental education manifests in global communities. She fell in love with the Galápagos on a structured university-led trip during her undergraduate studies and realized that there was a dearth of research on social aspects of the communities living on the islands.  Because of this, she pursued research in the Galápagos in 2014 on the prevalence of and access to both formal and informal (provided by numerous NGOs and government agencies) environmental education for students on the islands, and on the level of student environmental literacy in 28 schools.

Her Dphil research focus, under the supervision of Dr. Ann Childs and Dr. Steve Puttick, is on access to and effects of Experiential Environmental Education for students living in the Galápagos Islands, and on the production of research on the social sphere in Galápagos.

Prior to starting her Dphil at Oxford, she worked in alliances and partnerships at tech companies in the San Francisco Bay Area. Most recently, she was the Director of Global Partnerships at Conversica, a conversational AI platform, and cultivated, trained, and drove pipeline with select international resellers in APAC, EMEA, and LATAM, and with regional resellers in the United States. She also assisted with the design and construction of the Conversica partner program.

In her free time, she is a free-lance food photographer, food stylist, food blogger, recipe developer, and gluten free baker for her online blog and social handle, Sisters Sans Gluten (www.sisterssansgluten), which she created with her sister in 2018. She also continues to sing informally and takes voice lessons remotely with instructor Corey Head of San Francisco.

She holds a BA in both Anthropology and Music (vocal performance), and an MA in Latin American Studies from Stanford University. Highlights from Stanford include: playing and touring as a performing member of Stanford Taiko (Japanese ensemble drumming) for four years; singing with the Stanford Chamber Chorale led by Professor Steve Sano; studying voice with Wendy Hillhouse; participating in music department operas; performing in self-organized recitals showcasing western art songs, western musical theater, and Latin American art songs; studying abroad in Santiago, Chile; and learning Quechua during her masters program with Marisol Necochea.

Abdul Karim has completed a Bachelor of Science in Bioengineering and Computational Medicine (Imperial College London), a Bachelor of Medicine and Bachelor of Surgery (Queen Mary University of London), and Master of Science in the Philosophy of Science and Economics (The London School of Economics).

He has delivered lectures on the Philosophy of Human Nature and the History of Metaethics at the University of Cambridge and for Health Education East Midlands. This, in addition to the current positions he holds as a Hospital Doctor and Health Policy and Management Advisor at the University Hospitals of Leicester NHS Trust.

Abdul Karim’s current areas of interest include the biological definition of psychological states relevant to the learning environment, and the influence of language on the variable interpretation of a particular social context. For the latter of which he has published primary research.

Another is the appraisal and deployment of physiological measurement devices in learning environments as a means of quantitatively evaluating psychological states. Such research areas hold promise in enhancing the questionnaire-based evidences of contemporary theories in education, such as those regarding motivation, self-determination and engagement. This will to contribute to the evidence-based public policy optimisation in education and social care.

 

Publications

Ismail, A.K. 2017. A Cross Sectional Study to Explore the Effect of the Linguistic Origin and Evolution of a Language on Patient Interpretation of Haematological Cancers. Advances in Biological Research. 11 (4): 225-232.

Ismail, A.K. 2017. The Origin of the Arabic Medical Term for Cancer. Advances in Biological Research. 11 (4): 198-201.

Ismail, A.K. 2018. The Impact of da Vinci’s Anatomical Drawings and Calculations on Foundation of Orthopaedics. Advances in Biological Research. 12 (1): 26-30.

As a mathematics teacher who believes that anyone can understand mathematics, Ashley is keenly interested in developing interventions and resources for learners who struggle with the subject. More specifically, she is focusing on the transitionary moment in the classroom when discussions have ceased, and practice begins and how this transition can become more fluid for learners.

By drawing on research from education, psychology and cognitive neuroscience, Ashley hopes to gain insights into how the brain and mind process information and how this knowledge can inform teacher practice and, ultimately, help learners understand mathematics.

After having taught for over ten years, Ashley completed her MSc, with Distinction, at the Department of Education, and her dissertation was “Highly Commended” by the British Educational Research Association (BERA). She is committed to making mathematics more accessible for all learners and strives for research that is not only impactful but also directly applicable to the classroom.

I am a Research Project Coordinator and Co-PI at the Department of Education for a project on Education, Purpose and Human Flourishing in Times of Uncertainty (EPHF), and the Templeton World Charity Foundation Fellow in Comparative Education at St Antony’s College, Oxford.

I have a multi-disciplinary background and experience. Academically I am an Art Historian specialising in late 18th and early 19th-century French aesthetics, and prior to my return to academia I had a career in the international finance, entrepreneurial business and high net worth family business sectors. I have published and taught at the University of Oxford on late eighteenth-and early nineteenth century art, history and aesthetics. Drawing on my experience as Lay Chaplain at Somerville College, Oxford I have also published on religious education. In addition to my position in the Education Department I am the Principal Advisor for Strategic Relationships and Partnerships at the Templeton World Charity Foundation Inc where I work closely with other foundations, INGOs and public policy organisations.

Publications List

Xiaona Wang is a DPhil student in Education, at St. Antony’s College, the University of Oxford. Xiaona’s doctoral research is fully funded by the University of Oxford (Clarendon Fund Scholarship and St. Antony’s College The Warden’s Scholarship). She is also a member at the Center for Global Higher Education.

Before her DPhil, Xiaona obtained her M.A degree in Higher Education at Graduate School of Education at Peking University, and B.A at the Faulty of Education from Beijing Normal University in China with first-class honour. She also studied at the University of Manchester as an exchange student in the School of Social Science.

Previously, Xiaona worked at Global Education Cluster in UNICEF, Geneva, where she began her research on the international scientific collaboration between China and Switzerland, and this experience later became the starting point of her master thesis. In her master’s thesis, Xiaona used a longitudinal research method in following a group of Chinese scientists who studied and worked in Switzerland. Through semi-structured interviews, she explored how collaborative relationships between individual scientists began and developed.

Xiaona has strong research interests in the science studies, internationalization and globalization of higher education. Her doctoral research is going to continue to explore the scientific knowledge networks between China and Switzerland under the influence of geopolitical factors.

Wanlin Cai is a DPhil student in higher education and a member of CGHE research group at the Department of Education.

Wanlin’s research interest lies in international higher education, higher education policies and economy, with a specific focus on World-Class Universities.

She is also a member of South China Global Talent Institute, Center for China and Globalisation, where she focuses on the research of talent policy and development in the Great Bay Area in China.

Prior to her beginning as a DPhil student, Wanlin read for the M.Sc in Higher Education at the University of Oxford and the M.Sc in Management and Enterprise Growth at the University of Glasgow.

Naosuke is a DPhil student whose research interests are Global Englishes and mutual intelligibility in English communication.

Naosuke finished an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition at the University of Oxford with distinction in 2019. His DPhil research focuses on the intelligibility of non-native English speakers. Specifically, he would like to seek what kind of English pronunciation features are critical for successful English communication between non-native English speakers.

Adam, from Ethiopia, is interested in looking at the role of education in peacebuilding and conflicts.

Akira is a DPhil Student in Anthropology affiliated with the School of Anthropology & Museum Ethnography, and associated with both the Department of Education and Nissan Institute of Japanese Studies. He is supervised by David Mills and Roger Goodman.

Akira’s doctoral research rests with the concepts of ‘international’ and ‘global education,’ and is grounded in the recent emergence and growth of International Baccalaureate (IB) education in Japan. Focused on IB educator training across several higher education institutions (HEIs), Akira aims – solely through digital anthropological approaches – to contextualize the everyday negotiations of ‘international’ and ‘global’ knowledge, both by those receiving and administering its training. Considering social, political, economic and cognitive aspects, one key objective of this research hopes to inform educational practitioners and policy-makers of some of the conceptual and social challenges that emerge with dissonant notions of cultivating ‘international’ and ‘global people.’

Akira has been an Associate Researcher at the Graduate School of Teacher Education, Tokyo Gakugei University since autumn 2020, a post he continues to hold until the end of his doctoral degree. He also currently works as an Anthropological Analyst for Contemplative Spaces, a consultancy focused on designing and delivering a range of leadership development initiatives for individuals, groups, and organizational bodies. His future career plans include further anthropological research and establishing consultancy services dedicated to various inclusion-based development initiatives.

Amelia is passionate about access to and the effects of environmental education globally, particularly in the Galápagos Islands of Ecuador.

Because she experienced a wealth of informal and non-formal environmental education from her parents and from explorations growing up in Southern Oregon, she is interested in researching how environmental education manifests in global communities. She fell in love with the Galápagos on a structured university-led trip during her undergraduate studies and realized that there was a dearth of research on social aspects of the communities living on the islands.  Because of this, she pursued research in the Galápagos in 2014 on the prevalence of and access to both formal and informal (provided by numerous NGOs and government agencies) environmental education for students on the islands, and on the level of student environmental literacy in 28 schools.

Her Dphil research focus, under the supervision of Dr. Ann Childs and Dr. Steve Puttick, is on access to and effects of Experiential Environmental Education for students living in the Galápagos Islands, and on the production of research on the social sphere in Galápagos.

Prior to starting her Dphil at Oxford, she worked in alliances and partnerships at tech companies in the San Francisco Bay Area. Most recently, she was the Director of Global Partnerships at Conversica, a conversational AI platform, and cultivated, trained, and drove pipeline with select international resellers in APAC, EMEA, and LATAM, and with regional resellers in the United States. She also assisted with the design and construction of the Conversica partner program.

In her free time, she is a free-lance food photographer, food stylist, food blogger, recipe developer, and gluten free baker for her online blog and social handle, Sisters Sans Gluten (www.sisterssansgluten), which she created with her sister in 2018. She also continues to sing informally and takes voice lessons remotely with instructor Corey Head of San Francisco.

She holds a BA in both Anthropology and Music (vocal performance), and an MA in Latin American Studies from Stanford University. Highlights from Stanford include: playing and touring as a performing member of Stanford Taiko (Japanese ensemble drumming) for four years; singing with the Stanford Chamber Chorale led by Professor Steve Sano; studying voice with Wendy Hillhouse; participating in music department operas; performing in self-organized recitals showcasing western art songs, western musical theater, and Latin American art songs; studying abroad in Santiago, Chile; and learning Quechua during her masters program with Marisol Necochea.

Abdul Karim has completed a Bachelor of Science in Bioengineering and Computational Medicine (Imperial College London), a Bachelor of Medicine and Bachelor of Surgery (Queen Mary University of London), and Master of Science in the Philosophy of Science and Economics (The London School of Economics).

He has delivered lectures on the Philosophy of Human Nature and the History of Metaethics at the University of Cambridge and for Health Education East Midlands. This, in addition to the current positions he holds as a Hospital Doctor and Health Policy and Management Advisor at the University Hospitals of Leicester NHS Trust.

Abdul Karim’s current areas of interest include the biological definition of psychological states relevant to the learning environment, and the influence of language on the variable interpretation of a particular social context. For the latter of which he has published primary research.

Another is the appraisal and deployment of physiological measurement devices in learning environments as a means of quantitatively evaluating psychological states. Such research areas hold promise in enhancing the questionnaire-based evidences of contemporary theories in education, such as those regarding motivation, self-determination and engagement. This will to contribute to the evidence-based public policy optimisation in education and social care.

 

Publications

Ismail, A.K. 2017. A Cross Sectional Study to Explore the Effect of the Linguistic Origin and Evolution of a Language on Patient Interpretation of Haematological Cancers. Advances in Biological Research. 11 (4): 225-232.

Ismail, A.K. 2017. The Origin of the Arabic Medical Term for Cancer. Advances in Biological Research. 11 (4): 198-201.

Ismail, A.K. 2018. The Impact of da Vinci’s Anatomical Drawings and Calculations on Foundation of Orthopaedics. Advances in Biological Research. 12 (1): 26-30.

As a mathematics teacher who believes that anyone can understand mathematics, Ashley is keenly interested in developing interventions and resources for learners who struggle with the subject. More specifically, she is focusing on the transitionary moment in the classroom when discussions have ceased, and practice begins and how this transition can become more fluid for learners.

By drawing on research from education, psychology and cognitive neuroscience, Ashley hopes to gain insights into how the brain and mind process information and how this knowledge can inform teacher practice and, ultimately, help learners understand mathematics.

After having taught for over ten years, Ashley completed her MSc, with Distinction, at the Department of Education, and her dissertation was “Highly Commended” by the British Educational Research Association (BERA). She is committed to making mathematics more accessible for all learners and strives for research that is not only impactful but also directly applicable to the classroom.

I am a Research Project Coordinator and Co-PI at the Department of Education for a project on Education, Purpose and Human Flourishing in Times of Uncertainty (EPHF), and the Templeton World Charity Foundation Fellow in Comparative Education at St Antony’s College, Oxford.

I have a multi-disciplinary background and experience. Academically I am an Art Historian specialising in late 18th and early 19th-century French aesthetics, and prior to my return to academia I had a career in the international finance, entrepreneurial business and high net worth family business sectors. I have published and taught at the University of Oxford on late eighteenth-and early nineteenth century art, history and aesthetics. Drawing on my experience as Lay Chaplain at Somerville College, Oxford I have also published on religious education. In addition to my position in the Education Department I am the Principal Advisor for Strategic Relationships and Partnerships at the Templeton World Charity Foundation Inc where I work closely with other foundations, INGOs and public policy organisations.

Publications List

Xiaona Wang is a DPhil student in Education, at St. Antony’s College, the University of Oxford. Xiaona’s doctoral research is fully funded by the University of Oxford (Clarendon Fund Scholarship and St. Antony’s College The Warden’s Scholarship). She is also a member at the Center for Global Higher Education.

Before her DPhil, Xiaona obtained her M.A degree in Higher Education at Graduate School of Education at Peking University, and B.A at the Faulty of Education from Beijing Normal University in China with first-class honour. She also studied at the University of Manchester as an exchange student in the School of Social Science.

Previously, Xiaona worked at Global Education Cluster in UNICEF, Geneva, where she began her research on the international scientific collaboration between China and Switzerland, and this experience later became the starting point of her master thesis. In her master’s thesis, Xiaona used a longitudinal research method in following a group of Chinese scientists who studied and worked in Switzerland. Through semi-structured interviews, she explored how collaborative relationships between individual scientists began and developed.

Xiaona has strong research interests in the science studies, internationalization and globalization of higher education. Her doctoral research is going to continue to explore the scientific knowledge networks between China and Switzerland under the influence of geopolitical factors.

Wanlin Cai is a DPhil student in higher education and a member of CGHE research group at the Department of Education.

Wanlin’s research interest lies in international higher education, higher education policies and economy, with a specific focus on World-Class Universities.

She is also a member of South China Global Talent Institute, Center for China and Globalisation, where she focuses on the research of talent policy and development in the Great Bay Area in China.

Prior to her beginning as a DPhil student, Wanlin read for the M.Sc in Higher Education at the University of Oxford and the M.Sc in Management and Enterprise Growth at the University of Glasgow.

Naosuke is a DPhil student whose research interests are Global Englishes and mutual intelligibility in English communication.

Naosuke finished an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition at the University of Oxford with distinction in 2019. His DPhil research focuses on the intelligibility of non-native English speakers. Specifically, he would like to seek what kind of English pronunciation features are critical for successful English communication between non-native English speakers.

Adam, from Ethiopia, is interested in looking at the role of education in peacebuilding and conflicts.

Akira is a DPhil Student in Anthropology affiliated with the School of Anthropology & Museum Ethnography, and associated with both the Department of Education and Nissan Institute of Japanese Studies. He is supervised by David Mills and Roger Goodman.

Akira’s doctoral research rests with the concepts of ‘international’ and ‘global education,’ and is grounded in the recent emergence and growth of International Baccalaureate (IB) education in Japan. Focused on IB educator training across several higher education institutions (HEIs), Akira aims – solely through digital anthropological approaches – to contextualize the everyday negotiations of ‘international’ and ‘global’ knowledge, both by those receiving and administering its training. Considering social, political, economic and cognitive aspects, one key objective of this research hopes to inform educational practitioners and policy-makers of some of the conceptual and social challenges that emerge with dissonant notions of cultivating ‘international’ and ‘global people.’

Akira has been an Associate Researcher at the Graduate School of Teacher Education, Tokyo Gakugei University since autumn 2020, a post he continues to hold until the end of his doctoral degree. He also currently works as an Anthropological Analyst for Contemplative Spaces, a consultancy focused on designing and delivering a range of leadership development initiatives for individuals, groups, and organizational bodies. His future career plans include further anthropological research and establishing consultancy services dedicated to various inclusion-based development initiatives.

Amelia is passionate about access to and the effects of environmental education globally, particularly in the Galápagos Islands of Ecuador.

Because she experienced a wealth of informal and non-formal environmental education from her parents and from explorations growing up in Southern Oregon, she is interested in researching how environmental education manifests in global communities. She fell in love with the Galápagos on a structured university-led trip during her undergraduate studies and realized that there was a dearth of research on social aspects of the communities living on the islands.  Because of this, she pursued research in the Galápagos in 2014 on the prevalence of and access to both formal and informal (provided by numerous NGOs and government agencies) environmental education for students on the islands, and on the level of student environmental literacy in 28 schools.

Her Dphil research focus, under the supervision of Dr. Ann Childs and Dr. Steve Puttick, is on access to and effects of Experiential Environmental Education for students living in the Galápagos Islands, and on the production of research on the social sphere in Galápagos.

Prior to starting her Dphil at Oxford, she worked in alliances and partnerships at tech companies in the San Francisco Bay Area. Most recently, she was the Director of Global Partnerships at Conversica, a conversational AI platform, and cultivated, trained, and drove pipeline with select international resellers in APAC, EMEA, and LATAM, and with regional resellers in the United States. She also assisted with the design and construction of the Conversica partner program.

In her free time, she is a free-lance food photographer, food stylist, food blogger, recipe developer, and gluten free baker for her online blog and social handle, Sisters Sans Gluten (www.sisterssansgluten), which she created with her sister in 2018. She also continues to sing informally and takes voice lessons remotely with instructor Corey Head of San Francisco.

She holds a BA in both Anthropology and Music (vocal performance), and an MA in Latin American Studies from Stanford University. Highlights from Stanford include: playing and touring as a performing member of Stanford Taiko (Japanese ensemble drumming) for four years; singing with the Stanford Chamber Chorale led by Professor Steve Sano; studying voice with Wendy Hillhouse; participating in music department operas; performing in self-organized recitals showcasing western art songs, western musical theater, and Latin American art songs; studying abroad in Santiago, Chile; and learning Quechua during her masters program with Marisol Necochea.

Abdul Karim has completed a Bachelor of Science in Bioengineering and Computational Medicine (Imperial College London), a Bachelor of Medicine and Bachelor of Surgery (Queen Mary University of London), and Master of Science in the Philosophy of Science and Economics (The London School of Economics).

He has delivered lectures on the Philosophy of Human Nature and the History of Metaethics at the University of Cambridge and for Health Education East Midlands. This, in addition to the current positions he holds as a Hospital Doctor and Health Policy and Management Advisor at the University Hospitals of Leicester NHS Trust.

Abdul Karim’s current areas of interest include the biological definition of psychological states relevant to the learning environment, and the influence of language on the variable interpretation of a particular social context. For the latter of which he has published primary research.

Another is the appraisal and deployment of physiological measurement devices in learning environments as a means of quantitatively evaluating psychological states. Such research areas hold promise in enhancing the questionnaire-based evidences of contemporary theories in education, such as those regarding motivation, self-determination and engagement. This will to contribute to the evidence-based public policy optimisation in education and social care.

 

Publications

Ismail, A.K. 2017. A Cross Sectional Study to Explore the Effect of the Linguistic Origin and Evolution of a Language on Patient Interpretation of Haematological Cancers. Advances in Biological Research. 11 (4): 225-232.

Ismail, A.K. 2017. The Origin of the Arabic Medical Term for Cancer. Advances in Biological Research. 11 (4): 198-201.

Ismail, A.K. 2018. The Impact of da Vinci’s Anatomical Drawings and Calculations on Foundation of Orthopaedics. Advances in Biological Research. 12 (1): 26-30.

As a mathematics teacher who believes that anyone can understand mathematics, Ashley is keenly interested in developing interventions and resources for learners who struggle with the subject. More specifically, she is focusing on the transitionary moment in the classroom when discussions have ceased, and practice begins and how this transition can become more fluid for learners.

By drawing on research from education, psychology and cognitive neuroscience, Ashley hopes to gain insights into how the brain and mind process information and how this knowledge can inform teacher practice and, ultimately, help learners understand mathematics.

After having taught for over ten years, Ashley completed her MSc, with Distinction, at the Department of Education, and her dissertation was “Highly Commended” by the British Educational Research Association (BERA). She is committed to making mathematics more accessible for all learners and strives for research that is not only impactful but also directly applicable to the classroom.

I am a Research Project Coordinator and Co-PI at the Department of Education for a project on Education, Purpose and Human Flourishing in Times of Uncertainty (EPHF), and the Templeton World Charity Foundation Fellow in Comparative Education at St Antony’s College, Oxford.

I have a multi-disciplinary background and experience. Academically I am an Art Historian specialising in late 18th and early 19th-century French aesthetics, and prior to my return to academia I had a career in the international finance, entrepreneurial business and high net worth family business sectors. I have published and taught at the University of Oxford on late eighteenth-and early nineteenth century art, history and aesthetics. Drawing on my experience as Lay Chaplain at Somerville College, Oxford I have also published on religious education. In addition to my position in the Education Department I am the Principal Advisor for Strategic Relationships and Partnerships at the Templeton World Charity Foundation Inc where I work closely with other foundations, INGOs and public policy organisations.

Publications List

Xiaona Wang is a DPhil student in Education, at St. Antony’s College, the University of Oxford. Xiaona’s doctoral research is fully funded by the University of Oxford (Clarendon Fund Scholarship and St. Antony’s College The Warden’s Scholarship). She is also a member at the Center for Global Higher Education.

Before her DPhil, Xiaona obtained her M.A degree in Higher Education at Graduate School of Education at Peking University, and B.A at the Faulty of Education from Beijing Normal University in China with first-class honour. She also studied at the University of Manchester as an exchange student in the School of Social Science.

Previously, Xiaona worked at Global Education Cluster in UNICEF, Geneva, where she began her research on the international scientific collaboration between China and Switzerland, and this experience later became the starting point of her master thesis. In her master’s thesis, Xiaona used a longitudinal research method in following a group of Chinese scientists who studied and worked in Switzerland. Through semi-structured interviews, she explored how collaborative relationships between individual scientists began and developed.

Xiaona has strong research interests in the science studies, internationalization and globalization of higher education. Her doctoral research is going to continue to explore the scientific knowledge networks between China and Switzerland under the influence of geopolitical factors.

Wanlin Cai is a DPhil student in higher education and a member of CGHE research group at the Department of Education.

Wanlin’s research interest lies in international higher education, higher education policies and economy, with a specific focus on World-Class Universities.

She is also a member of South China Global Talent Institute, Center for China and Globalisation, where she focuses on the research of talent policy and development in the Great Bay Area in China.

Prior to her beginning as a DPhil student, Wanlin read for the M.Sc in Higher Education at the University of Oxford and the M.Sc in Management and Enterprise Growth at the University of Glasgow.

Naosuke is a DPhil student whose research interests are Global Englishes and mutual intelligibility in English communication.

Naosuke finished an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition at the University of Oxford with distinction in 2019. His DPhil research focuses on the intelligibility of non-native English speakers. Specifically, he would like to seek what kind of English pronunciation features are critical for successful English communication between non-native English speakers.

Adam, from Ethiopia, is interested in looking at the role of education in peacebuilding and conflicts.

Akira is a DPhil Student in Anthropology affiliated with the School of Anthropology & Museum Ethnography, and associated with both the Department of Education and Nissan Institute of Japanese Studies. He is supervised by David Mills and Roger Goodman.

Akira’s doctoral research rests with the concepts of ‘international’ and ‘global education,’ and is grounded in the recent emergence and growth of International Baccalaureate (IB) education in Japan. Focused on IB educator training across several higher education institutions (HEIs), Akira aims – solely through digital anthropological approaches – to contextualize the everyday negotiations of ‘international’ and ‘global’ knowledge, both by those receiving and administering its training. Considering social, political, economic and cognitive aspects, one key objective of this research hopes to inform educational practitioners and policy-makers of some of the conceptual and social challenges that emerge with dissonant notions of cultivating ‘international’ and ‘global people.’

Akira has been an Associate Researcher at the Graduate School of Teacher Education, Tokyo Gakugei University since autumn 2020, a post he continues to hold until the end of his doctoral degree. He also currently works as an Anthropological Analyst for Contemplative Spaces, a consultancy focused on designing and delivering a range of leadership development initiatives for individuals, groups, and organizational bodies. His future career plans include further anthropological research and establishing consultancy services dedicated to various inclusion-based development initiatives.

Amelia is passionate about access to and the effects of environmental education globally, particularly in the Galápagos Islands of Ecuador.

Because she experienced a wealth of informal and non-formal environmental education from her parents and from explorations growing up in Southern Oregon, she is interested in researching how environmental education manifests in global communities. She fell in love with the Galápagos on a structured university-led trip during her undergraduate studies and realized that there was a dearth of research on social aspects of the communities living on the islands.  Because of this, she pursued research in the Galápagos in 2014 on the prevalence of and access to both formal and informal (provided by numerous NGOs and government agencies) environmental education for students on the islands, and on the level of student environmental literacy in 28 schools.

Her Dphil research focus, under the supervision of Dr. Ann Childs and Dr. Steve Puttick, is on access to and effects of Experiential Environmental Education for students living in the Galápagos Islands, and on the production of research on the social sphere in Galápagos.

Prior to starting her Dphil at Oxford, she worked in alliances and partnerships at tech companies in the San Francisco Bay Area. Most recently, she was the Director of Global Partnerships at Conversica, a conversational AI platform, and cultivated, trained, and drove pipeline with select international resellers in APAC, EMEA, and LATAM, and with regional resellers in the United States. She also assisted with the design and construction of the Conversica partner program.

In her free time, she is a free-lance food photographer, food stylist, food blogger, recipe developer, and gluten free baker for her online blog and social handle, Sisters Sans Gluten (www.sisterssansgluten), which she created with her sister in 2018. She also continues to sing informally and takes voice lessons remotely with instructor Corey Head of San Francisco.

She holds a BA in both Anthropology and Music (vocal performance), and an MA in Latin American Studies from Stanford University. Highlights from Stanford include: playing and touring as a performing member of Stanford Taiko (Japanese ensemble drumming) for four years; singing with the Stanford Chamber Chorale led by Professor Steve Sano; studying voice with Wendy Hillhouse; participating in music department operas; performing in self-organized recitals showcasing western art songs, western musical theater, and Latin American art songs; studying abroad in Santiago, Chile; and learning Quechua during her masters program with Marisol Necochea.

Abdul Karim has completed a Bachelor of Science in Bioengineering and Computational Medicine (Imperial College London), a Bachelor of Medicine and Bachelor of Surgery (Queen Mary University of London), and Master of Science in the Philosophy of Science and Economics (The London School of Economics).

He has delivered lectures on the Philosophy of Human Nature and the History of Metaethics at the University of Cambridge and for Health Education East Midlands. This, in addition to the current positions he holds as a Hospital Doctor and Health Policy and Management Advisor at the University Hospitals of Leicester NHS Trust.

Abdul Karim’s current areas of interest include the biological definition of psychological states relevant to the learning environment, and the influence of language on the variable interpretation of a particular social context. For the latter of which he has published primary research.

Another is the appraisal and deployment of physiological measurement devices in learning environments as a means of quantitatively evaluating psychological states. Such research areas hold promise in enhancing the questionnaire-based evidences of contemporary theories in education, such as those regarding motivation, self-determination and engagement. This will to contribute to the evidence-based public policy optimisation in education and social care.

 

Publications

Ismail, A.K. 2017. A Cross Sectional Study to Explore the Effect of the Linguistic Origin and Evolution of a Language on Patient Interpretation of Haematological Cancers. Advances in Biological Research. 11 (4): 225-232.

Ismail, A.K. 2017. The Origin of the Arabic Medical Term for Cancer. Advances in Biological Research. 11 (4): 198-201.

Ismail, A.K. 2018. The Impact of da Vinci’s Anatomical Drawings and Calculations on Foundation of Orthopaedics. Advances in Biological Research. 12 (1): 26-30.

As a mathematics teacher who believes that anyone can understand mathematics, Ashley is keenly interested in developing interventions and resources for learners who struggle with the subject. More specifically, she is focusing on the transitionary moment in the classroom when discussions have ceased, and practice begins and how this transition can become more fluid for learners.

By drawing on research from education, psychology and cognitive neuroscience, Ashley hopes to gain insights into how the brain and mind process information and how this knowledge can inform teacher practice and, ultimately, help learners understand mathematics.

After having taught for over ten years, Ashley completed her MSc, with Distinction, at the Department of Education, and her dissertation was “Highly Commended” by the British Educational Research Association (BERA). She is committed to making mathematics more accessible for all learners and strives for research that is not only impactful but also directly applicable to the classroom.

I am a Research Project Coordinator and Co-PI at the Department of Education for a project on Education, Purpose and Human Flourishing in Times of Uncertainty (EPHF), and the Templeton World Charity Foundation Fellow in Comparative Education at St Antony’s College, Oxford.

I have a multi-disciplinary background and experience. Academically I am an Art Historian specialising in late 18th and early 19th-century French aesthetics, and prior to my return to academia I had a career in the international finance, entrepreneurial business and high net worth family business sectors. I have published and taught at the University of Oxford on late eighteenth-and early nineteenth century art, history and aesthetics. Drawing on my experience as Lay Chaplain at Somerville College, Oxford I have also published on religious education. In addition to my position in the Education Department I am the Principal Advisor for Strategic Relationships and Partnerships at the Templeton World Charity Foundation Inc where I work closely with other foundations, INGOs and public policy organisations.

Publications List

Xiaona Wang is a DPhil student in Education, at St. Antony’s College, the University of Oxford. Xiaona’s doctoral research is fully funded by the University of Oxford (Clarendon Fund Scholarship and St. Antony’s College The Warden’s Scholarship). She is also a member at the Center for Global Higher Education.

Before her DPhil, Xiaona obtained her M.A degree in Higher Education at Graduate School of Education at Peking University, and B.A at the Faulty of Education from Beijing Normal University in China with first-class honour. She also studied at the University of Manchester as an exchange student in the School of Social Science.

Previously, Xiaona worked at Global Education Cluster in UNICEF, Geneva, where she began her research on the international scientific collaboration between China and Switzerland, and this experience later became the starting point of her master thesis. In her master’s thesis, Xiaona used a longitudinal research method in following a group of Chinese scientists who studied and worked in Switzerland. Through semi-structured interviews, she explored how collaborative relationships between individual scientists began and developed.

Xiaona has strong research interests in the science studies, internationalization and globalization of higher education. Her doctoral research is going to continue to explore the scientific knowledge networks between China and Switzerland under the influence of geopolitical factors.

Wanlin Cai is a DPhil student in higher education and a member of CGHE research group at the Department of Education.

Wanlin’s research interest lies in international higher education, higher education policies and economy, with a specific focus on World-Class Universities.

She is also a member of South China Global Talent Institute, Center for China and Globalisation, where she focuses on the research of talent policy and development in the Great Bay Area in China.

Prior to her beginning as a DPhil student, Wanlin read for the M.Sc in Higher Education at the University of Oxford and the M.Sc in Management and Enterprise Growth at the University of Glasgow.

Naosuke is a DPhil student whose research interests are Global Englishes and mutual intelligibility in English communication.

Naosuke finished an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition at the University of Oxford with distinction in 2019. His DPhil research focuses on the intelligibility of non-native English speakers. Specifically, he would like to seek what kind of English pronunciation features are critical for successful English communication between non-native English speakers.

Adam, from Ethiopia, is interested in looking at the role of education in peacebuilding and conflicts.

Akira is a DPhil Student in Anthropology affiliated with the School of Anthropology & Museum Ethnography, and associated with both the Department of Education and Nissan Institute of Japanese Studies. He is supervised by David Mills and Roger Goodman.

Akira’s doctoral research rests with the concepts of ‘international’ and ‘global education,’ and is grounded in the recent emergence and growth of International Baccalaureate (IB) education in Japan. Focused on IB educator training across several higher education institutions (HEIs), Akira aims – solely through digital anthropological approaches – to contextualize the everyday negotiations of ‘international’ and ‘global’ knowledge, both by those receiving and administering its training. Considering social, political, economic and cognitive aspects, one key objective of this research hopes to inform educational practitioners and policy-makers of some of the conceptual and social challenges that emerge with dissonant notions of cultivating ‘international’ and ‘global people.’

Akira has been an Associate Researcher at the Graduate School of Teacher Education, Tokyo Gakugei University since autumn 2020, a post he continues to hold until the end of his doctoral degree. He also currently works as an Anthropological Analyst for Contemplative Spaces, a consultancy focused on designing and delivering a range of leadership development initiatives for individuals, groups, and organizational bodies. His future career plans include further anthropological research and establishing consultancy services dedicated to various inclusion-based development initiatives.

Amelia is passionate about access to and the effects of environmental education globally, particularly in the Galápagos Islands of Ecuador.

Because she experienced a wealth of informal and non-formal environmental education from her parents and from explorations growing up in Southern Oregon, she is interested in researching how environmental education manifests in global communities. She fell in love with the Galápagos on a structured university-led trip during her undergraduate studies and realized that there was a dearth of research on social aspects of the communities living on the islands.  Because of this, she pursued research in the Galápagos in 2014 on the prevalence of and access to both formal and informal (provided by numerous NGOs and government agencies) environmental education for students on the islands, and on the level of student environmental literacy in 28 schools.

Her Dphil research focus, under the supervision of Dr. Ann Childs and Dr. Steve Puttick, is on access to and effects of Experiential Environmental Education for students living in the Galápagos Islands, and on the production of research on the social sphere in Galápagos.

Prior to starting her Dphil at Oxford, she worked in alliances and partnerships at tech companies in the San Francisco Bay Area. Most recently, she was the Director of Global Partnerships at Conversica, a conversational AI platform, and cultivated, trained, and drove pipeline with select international resellers in APAC, EMEA, and LATAM, and with regional resellers in the United States. She also assisted with the design and construction of the Conversica partner program.

In her free time, she is a free-lance food photographer, food stylist, food blogger, recipe developer, and gluten free baker for her online blog and social handle, Sisters Sans Gluten (www.sisterssansgluten), which she created with her sister in 2018. She also continues to sing informally and takes voice lessons remotely with instructor Corey Head of San Francisco.

She holds a BA in both Anthropology and Music (vocal performance), and an MA in Latin American Studies from Stanford University. Highlights from Stanford include: playing and touring as a performing member of Stanford Taiko (Japanese ensemble drumming) for four years; singing with the Stanford Chamber Chorale led by Professor Steve Sano; studying voice with Wendy Hillhouse; participating in music department operas; performing in self-organized recitals showcasing western art songs, western musical theater, and Latin American art songs; studying abroad in Santiago, Chile; and learning Quechua during her masters program with Marisol Necochea.

Abdul Karim has completed a Bachelor of Science in Bioengineering and Computational Medicine (Imperial College London), a Bachelor of Medicine and Bachelor of Surgery (Queen Mary University of London), and Master of Science in the Philosophy of Science and Economics (The London School of Economics).

He has delivered lectures on the Philosophy of Human Nature and the History of Metaethics at the University of Cambridge and for Health Education East Midlands. This, in addition to the current positions he holds as a Hospital Doctor and Health Policy and Management Advisor at the University Hospitals of Leicester NHS Trust.

Abdul Karim’s current areas of interest include the biological definition of psychological states relevant to the learning environment, and the influence of language on the variable interpretation of a particular social context. For the latter of which he has published primary research.

Another is the appraisal and deployment of physiological measurement devices in learning environments as a means of quantitatively evaluating psychological states. Such research areas hold promise in enhancing the questionnaire-based evidences of contemporary theories in education, such as those regarding motivation, self-determination and engagement. This will to contribute to the evidence-based public policy optimisation in education and social care.

 

Publications

Ismail, A.K. 2017. A Cross Sectional Study to Explore the Effect of the Linguistic Origin and Evolution of a Language on Patient Interpretation of Haematological Cancers. Advances in Biological Research. 11 (4): 225-232.

Ismail, A.K. 2017. The Origin of the Arabic Medical Term for Cancer. Advances in Biological Research. 11 (4): 198-201.

Ismail, A.K. 2018. The Impact of da Vinci’s Anatomical Drawings and Calculations on Foundation of Orthopaedics. Advances in Biological Research. 12 (1): 26-30.

As a mathematics teacher who believes that anyone can understand mathematics, Ashley is keenly interested in developing interventions and resources for learners who struggle with the subject. More specifically, she is focusing on the transitionary moment in the classroom when discussions have ceased, and practice begins and how this transition can become more fluid for learners.

By drawing on research from education, psychology and cognitive neuroscience, Ashley hopes to gain insights into how the brain and mind process information and how this knowledge can inform teacher practice and, ultimately, help learners understand mathematics.

After having taught for over ten years, Ashley completed her MSc, with Distinction, at the Department of Education, and her dissertation was “Highly Commended” by the British Educational Research Association (BERA). She is committed to making mathematics more accessible for all learners and strives for research that is not only impactful but also directly applicable to the classroom.

I am a Research Project Coordinator and Co-PI at the Department of Education for a project on Education, Purpose and Human Flourishing in Times of Uncertainty (EPHF), and the Templeton World Charity Foundation Fellow in Comparative Education at St Antony’s College, Oxford.

I have a multi-disciplinary background and experience. Academically I am an Art Historian specialising in late 18th and early 19th-century French aesthetics, and prior to my return to academia I had a career in the international finance, entrepreneurial business and high net worth family business sectors. I have published and taught at the University of Oxford on late eighteenth-and early nineteenth century art, history and aesthetics. Drawing on my experience as Lay Chaplain at Somerville College, Oxford I have also published on religious education. In addition to my position in the Education Department I am the Principal Advisor for Strategic Relationships and Partnerships at the Templeton World Charity Foundation Inc where I work closely with other foundations, INGOs and public policy organisations.

Publications List

Xiaona Wang is a DPhil student in Education, at St. Antony’s College, the University of Oxford. Xiaona’s doctoral research is fully funded by the University of Oxford (Clarendon Fund Scholarship and St. Antony’s College The Warden’s Scholarship). She is also a member at the Center for Global Higher Education.

Before her DPhil, Xiaona obtained her M.A degree in Higher Education at Graduate School of Education at Peking University, and B.A at the Faulty of Education from Beijing Normal University in China with first-class honour. She also studied at the University of Manchester as an exchange student in the School of Social Science.

Previously, Xiaona worked at Global Education Cluster in UNICEF, Geneva, where she began her research on the international scientific collaboration between China and Switzerland, and this experience later became the starting point of her master thesis. In her master’s thesis, Xiaona used a longitudinal research method in following a group of Chinese scientists who studied and worked in Switzerland. Through semi-structured interviews, she explored how collaborative relationships between individual scientists began and developed.

Xiaona has strong research interests in the science studies, internationalization and globalization of higher education. Her doctoral research is going to continue to explore the scientific knowledge networks between China and Switzerland under the influence of geopolitical factors.

Wanlin Cai is a DPhil student in higher education and a member of CGHE research group at the Department of Education.

Wanlin’s research interest lies in international higher education, higher education policies and economy, with a specific focus on World-Class Universities.

She is also a member of South China Global Talent Institute, Center for China and Globalisation, where she focuses on the research of talent policy and development in the Great Bay Area in China.

Prior to her beginning as a DPhil student, Wanlin read for the M.Sc in Higher Education at the University of Oxford and the M.Sc in Management and Enterprise Growth at the University of Glasgow.

Naosuke is a DPhil student whose research interests are Global Englishes and mutual intelligibility in English communication.

Naosuke finished an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition at the University of Oxford with distinction in 2019. His DPhil research focuses on the intelligibility of non-native English speakers. Specifically, he would like to seek what kind of English pronunciation features are critical for successful English communication between non-native English speakers.

Adam, from Ethiopia, is interested in looking at the role of education in peacebuilding and conflicts.

Akira is a DPhil Student in Anthropology affiliated with the School of Anthropology & Museum Ethnography, and associated with both the Department of Education and Nissan Institute of Japanese Studies. He is supervised by David Mills and Roger Goodman.

Akira’s doctoral research rests with the concepts of ‘international’ and ‘global education,’ and is grounded in the recent emergence and growth of International Baccalaureate (IB) education in Japan. Focused on IB educator training across several higher education institutions (HEIs), Akira aims – solely through digital anthropological approaches – to contextualize the everyday negotiations of ‘international’ and ‘global’ knowledge, both by those receiving and administering its training. Considering social, political, economic and cognitive aspects, one key objective of this research hopes to inform educational practitioners and policy-makers of some of the conceptual and social challenges that emerge with dissonant notions of cultivating ‘international’ and ‘global people.’

Akira has been an Associate Researcher at the Graduate School of Teacher Education, Tokyo Gakugei University since autumn 2020, a post he continues to hold until the end of his doctoral degree. He also currently works as an Anthropological Analyst for Contemplative Spaces, a consultancy focused on designing and delivering a range of leadership development initiatives for individuals, groups, and organizational bodies. His future career plans include further anthropological research and establishing consultancy services dedicated to various inclusion-based development initiatives.

Amelia is passionate about access to and the effects of environmental education globally, particularly in the Galápagos Islands of Ecuador.

Because she experienced a wealth of informal and non-formal environmental education from her parents and from explorations growing up in Southern Oregon, she is interested in researching how environmental education manifests in global communities. She fell in love with the Galápagos on a structured university-led trip during her undergraduate studies and realized that there was a dearth of research on social aspects of the communities living on the islands.  Because of this, she pursued research in the Galápagos in 2014 on the prevalence of and access to both formal and informal (provided by numerous NGOs and government agencies) environmental education for students on the islands, and on the level of student environmental literacy in 28 schools.

Her Dphil research focus, under the supervision of Dr. Ann Childs and Dr. Steve Puttick, is on access to and effects of Experiential Environmental Education for students living in the Galápagos Islands, and on the production of research on the social sphere in Galápagos.

Prior to starting her Dphil at Oxford, she worked in alliances and partnerships at tech companies in the San Francisco Bay Area. Most recently, she was the Director of Global Partnerships at Conversica, a conversational AI platform, and cultivated, trained, and drove pipeline with select international resellers in APAC, EMEA, and LATAM, and with regional resellers in the United States. She also assisted with the design and construction of the Conversica partner program.

In her free time, she is a free-lance food photographer, food stylist, food blogger, recipe developer, and gluten free baker for her online blog and social handle, Sisters Sans Gluten (www.sisterssansgluten), which she created with her sister in 2018. She also continues to sing informally and takes voice lessons remotely with instructor Corey Head of San Francisco.

She holds a BA in both Anthropology and Music (vocal performance), and an MA in Latin American Studies from Stanford University. Highlights from Stanford include: playing and touring as a performing member of Stanford Taiko (Japanese ensemble drumming) for four years; singing with the Stanford Chamber Chorale led by Professor Steve Sano; studying voice with Wendy Hillhouse; participating in music department operas; performing in self-organized recitals showcasing western art songs, western musical theater, and Latin American art songs; studying abroad in Santiago, Chile; and learning Quechua during her masters program with Marisol Necochea.

Abdul Karim has completed a Bachelor of Science in Bioengineering and Computational Medicine (Imperial College London), a Bachelor of Medicine and Bachelor of Surgery (Queen Mary University of London), and Master of Science in the Philosophy of Science and Economics (The London School of Economics).

He has delivered lectures on the Philosophy of Human Nature and the History of Metaethics at the University of Cambridge and for Health Education East Midlands. This, in addition to the current positions he holds as a Hospital Doctor and Health Policy and Management Advisor at the University Hospitals of Leicester NHS Trust.

Abdul Karim’s current areas of interest include the biological definition of psychological states relevant to the learning environment, and the influence of language on the variable interpretation of a particular social context. For the latter of which he has published primary research.

Another is the appraisal and deployment of physiological measurement devices in learning environments as a means of quantitatively evaluating psychological states. Such research areas hold promise in enhancing the questionnaire-based evidences of contemporary theories in education, such as those regarding motivation, self-determination and engagement. This will to contribute to the evidence-based public policy optimisation in education and social care.

 

Publications

Ismail, A.K. 2017. A Cross Sectional Study to Explore the Effect of the Linguistic Origin and Evolution of a Language on Patient Interpretation of Haematological Cancers. Advances in Biological Research. 11 (4): 225-232.

Ismail, A.K. 2017. The Origin of the Arabic Medical Term for Cancer. Advances in Biological Research. 11 (4): 198-201.

Ismail, A.K. 2018. The Impact of da Vinci’s Anatomical Drawings and Calculations on Foundation of Orthopaedics. Advances in Biological Research. 12 (1): 26-30.

As a mathematics teacher who believes that anyone can understand mathematics, Ashley is keenly interested in developing interventions and resources for learners who struggle with the subject. More specifically, she is focusing on the transitionary moment in the classroom when discussions have ceased, and practice begins and how this transition can become more fluid for learners.

By drawing on research from education, psychology and cognitive neuroscience, Ashley hopes to gain insights into how the brain and mind process information and how this knowledge can inform teacher practice and, ultimately, help learners understand mathematics.

After having taught for over ten years, Ashley completed her MSc, with Distinction, at the Department of Education, and her dissertation was “Highly Commended” by the British Educational Research Association (BERA). She is committed to making mathematics more accessible for all learners and strives for research that is not only impactful but also directly applicable to the classroom.

I am a Research Project Coordinator and Co-PI at the Department of Education for a project on Education, Purpose and Human Flourishing in Times of Uncertainty (EPHF), and the Templeton World Charity Foundation Fellow in Comparative Education at St Antony’s College, Oxford.

I have a multi-disciplinary background and experience. Academically I am an Art Historian specialising in late 18th and early 19th-century French aesthetics, and prior to my return to academia I had a career in the international finance, entrepreneurial business and high net worth family business sectors. I have published and taught at the University of Oxford on late eighteenth-and early nineteenth century art, history and aesthetics. Drawing on my experience as Lay Chaplain at Somerville College, Oxford I have also published on religious education. In addition to my position in the Education Department I am the Principal Advisor for Strategic Relationships and Partnerships at the Templeton World Charity Foundation Inc where I work closely with other foundations, INGOs and public policy organisations.

Publications List

Xiaona Wang is a DPhil student in Education, at St. Antony’s College, the University of Oxford. Xiaona’s doctoral research is fully funded by the University of Oxford (Clarendon Fund Scholarship and St. Antony’s College The Warden’s Scholarship). She is also a member at the Center for Global Higher Education.

Before her DPhil, Xiaona obtained her M.A degree in Higher Education at Graduate School of Education at Peking University, and B.A at the Faulty of Education from Beijing Normal University in China with first-class honour. She also studied at the University of Manchester as an exchange student in the School of Social Science.

Previously, Xiaona worked at Global Education Cluster in UNICEF, Geneva, where she began her research on the international scientific collaboration between China and Switzerland, and this experience later became the starting point of her master thesis. In her master’s thesis, Xiaona used a longitudinal research method in following a group of Chinese scientists who studied and worked in Switzerland. Through semi-structured interviews, she explored how collaborative relationships between individual scientists began and developed.

Xiaona has strong research interests in the science studies, internationalization and globalization of higher education. Her doctoral research is going to continue to explore the scientific knowledge networks between China and Switzerland under the influence of geopolitical factors.

Wanlin Cai is a DPhil student in higher education and a member of CGHE research group at the Department of Education.

Wanlin’s research interest lies in international higher education, higher education policies and economy, with a specific focus on World-Class Universities.

She is also a member of South China Global Talent Institute, Center for China and Globalisation, where she focuses on the research of talent policy and development in the Great Bay Area in China.

Prior to her beginning as a DPhil student, Wanlin read for the M.Sc in Higher Education at the University of Oxford and the M.Sc in Management and Enterprise Growth at the University of Glasgow.

Naosuke is a DPhil student whose research interests are Global Englishes and mutual intelligibility in English communication.

Naosuke finished an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition at the University of Oxford with distinction in 2019. His DPhil research focuses on the intelligibility of non-native English speakers. Specifically, he would like to seek what kind of English pronunciation features are critical for successful English communication between non-native English speakers.

Adam, from Ethiopia, is interested in looking at the role of education in peacebuilding and conflicts.

Akira is a DPhil Student in Anthropology affiliated with the School of Anthropology & Museum Ethnography, and associated with both the Department of Education and Nissan Institute of Japanese Studies. He is supervised by David Mills and Roger Goodman.

Akira’s doctoral research rests with the concepts of ‘international’ and ‘global education,’ and is grounded in the recent emergence and growth of International Baccalaureate (IB) education in Japan. Focused on IB educator training across several higher education institutions (HEIs), Akira aims – solely through digital anthropological approaches – to contextualize the everyday negotiations of ‘international’ and ‘global’ knowledge, both by those receiving and administering its training. Considering social, political, economic and cognitive aspects, one key objective of this research hopes to inform educational practitioners and policy-makers of some of the conceptual and social challenges that emerge with dissonant notions of cultivating ‘international’ and ‘global people.’

Akira has been an Associate Researcher at the Graduate School of Teacher Education, Tokyo Gakugei University since autumn 2020, a post he continues to hold until the end of his doctoral degree. He also currently works as an Anthropological Analyst for Contemplative Spaces, a consultancy focused on designing and delivering a range of leadership development initiatives for individuals, groups, and organizational bodies. His future career plans include further anthropological research and establishing consultancy services dedicated to various inclusion-based development initiatives.

Amelia is passionate about access to and the effects of environmental education globally, particularly in the Galápagos Islands of Ecuador.

Because she experienced a wealth of informal and non-formal environmental education from her parents and from explorations growing up in Southern Oregon, she is interested in researching how environmental education manifests in global communities. She fell in love with the Galápagos on a structured university-led trip during her undergraduate studies and realized that there was a dearth of research on social aspects of the communities living on the islands.  Because of this, she pursued research in the Galápagos in 2014 on the prevalence of and access to both formal and informal (provided by numerous NGOs and government agencies) environmental education for students on the islands, and on the level of student environmental literacy in 28 schools.

Her Dphil research focus, under the supervision of Dr. Ann Childs and Dr. Steve Puttick, is on access to and effects of Experiential Environmental Education for students living in the Galápagos Islands, and on the production of research on the social sphere in Galápagos.

Prior to starting her Dphil at Oxford, she worked in alliances and partnerships at tech companies in the San Francisco Bay Area. Most recently, she was the Director of Global Partnerships at Conversica, a conversational AI platform, and cultivated, trained, and drove pipeline with select international resellers in APAC, EMEA, and LATAM, and with regional resellers in the United States. She also assisted with the design and construction of the Conversica partner program.

In her free time, she is a free-lance food photographer, food stylist, food blogger, recipe developer, and gluten free baker for her online blog and social handle, Sisters Sans Gluten (www.sisterssansgluten), which she created with her sister in 2018. She also continues to sing informally and takes voice lessons remotely with instructor Corey Head of San Francisco.

She holds a BA in both Anthropology and Music (vocal performance), and an MA in Latin American Studies from Stanford University. Highlights from Stanford include: playing and touring as a performing member of Stanford Taiko (Japanese ensemble drumming) for four years; singing with the Stanford Chamber Chorale led by Professor Steve Sano; studying voice with Wendy Hillhouse; participating in music department operas; performing in self-organized recitals showcasing western art songs, western musical theater, and Latin American art songs; studying abroad in Santiago, Chile; and learning Quechua during her masters program with Marisol Necochea.

Abdul Karim has completed a Bachelor of Science in Bioengineering and Computational Medicine (Imperial College London), a Bachelor of Medicine and Bachelor of Surgery (Queen Mary University of London), and Master of Science in the Philosophy of Science and Economics (The London School of Economics).

He has delivered lectures on the Philosophy of Human Nature and the History of Metaethics at the University of Cambridge and for Health Education East Midlands. This, in addition to the current positions he holds as a Hospital Doctor and Health Policy and Management Advisor at the University Hospitals of Leicester NHS Trust.

Abdul Karim’s current areas of interest include the biological definition of psychological states relevant to the learning environment, and the influence of language on the variable interpretation of a particular social context. For the latter of which he has published primary research.

Another is the appraisal and deployment of physiological measurement devices in learning environments as a means of quantitatively evaluating psychological states. Such research areas hold promise in enhancing the questionnaire-based evidences of contemporary theories in education, such as those regarding motivation, self-determination and engagement. This will to contribute to the evidence-based public policy optimisation in education and social care.

 

Publications

Ismail, A.K. 2017. A Cross Sectional Study to Explore the Effect of the Linguistic Origin and Evolution of a Language on Patient Interpretation of Haematological Cancers. Advances in Biological Research. 11 (4): 225-232.

Ismail, A.K. 2017. The Origin of the Arabic Medical Term for Cancer. Advances in Biological Research. 11 (4): 198-201.

Ismail, A.K. 2018. The Impact of da Vinci’s Anatomical Drawings and Calculations on Foundation of Orthopaedics. Advances in Biological Research. 12 (1): 26-30.

As a mathematics teacher who believes that anyone can understand mathematics, Ashley is keenly interested in developing interventions and resources for learners who struggle with the subject. More specifically, she is focusing on the transitionary moment in the classroom when discussions have ceased, and practice begins and how this transition can become more fluid for learners.

By drawing on research from education, psychology and cognitive neuroscience, Ashley hopes to gain insights into how the brain and mind process information and how this knowledge can inform teacher practice and, ultimately, help learners understand mathematics.

After having taught for over ten years, Ashley completed her MSc, with Distinction, at the Department of Education, and her dissertation was “Highly Commended” by the British Educational Research Association (BERA). She is committed to making mathematics more accessible for all learners and strives for research that is not only impactful but also directly applicable to the classroom.

I am a Research Project Coordinator and Co-PI at the Department of Education for a project on Education, Purpose and Human Flourishing in Times of Uncertainty (EPHF), and the Templeton World Charity Foundation Fellow in Comparative Education at St Antony’s College, Oxford.

I have a multi-disciplinary background and experience. Academically I am an Art Historian specialising in late 18th and early 19th-century French aesthetics, and prior to my return to academia I had a career in the international finance, entrepreneurial business and high net worth family business sectors. I have published and taught at the University of Oxford on late eighteenth-and early nineteenth century art, history and aesthetics. Drawing on my experience as Lay Chaplain at Somerville College, Oxford I have also published on religious education. In addition to my position in the Education Department I am the Principal Advisor for Strategic Relationships and Partnerships at the Templeton World Charity Foundation Inc where I work closely with other foundations, INGOs and public policy organisations.

Publications List

Xiaona Wang is a DPhil student in Education, at St. Antony’s College, the University of Oxford. Xiaona’s doctoral research is fully funded by the University of Oxford (Clarendon Fund Scholarship and St. Antony’s College The Warden’s Scholarship). She is also a member at the Center for Global Higher Education.

Before her DPhil, Xiaona obtained her M.A degree in Higher Education at Graduate School of Education at Peking University, and B.A at the Faulty of Education from Beijing Normal University in China with first-class honour. She also studied at the University of Manchester as an exchange student in the School of Social Science.

Previously, Xiaona worked at Global Education Cluster in UNICEF, Geneva, where she began her research on the international scientific collaboration between China and Switzerland, and this experience later became the starting point of her master thesis. In her master’s thesis, Xiaona used a longitudinal research method in following a group of Chinese scientists who studied and worked in Switzerland. Through semi-structured interviews, she explored how collaborative relationships between individual scientists began and developed.

Xiaona has strong research interests in the science studies, internationalization and globalization of higher education. Her doctoral research is going to continue to explore the scientific knowledge networks between China and Switzerland under the influence of geopolitical factors.

Wanlin Cai is a DPhil student in higher education and a member of CGHE research group at the Department of Education.

Wanlin’s research interest lies in international higher education, higher education policies and economy, with a specific focus on World-Class Universities.

She is also a member of South China Global Talent Institute, Center for China and Globalisation, where she focuses on the research of talent policy and development in the Great Bay Area in China.

Prior to her beginning as a DPhil student, Wanlin read for the M.Sc in Higher Education at the University of Oxford and the M.Sc in Management and Enterprise Growth at the University of Glasgow.

Naosuke is a DPhil student whose research interests are Global Englishes and mutual intelligibility in English communication.

Naosuke finished an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition at the University of Oxford with distinction in 2019. His DPhil research focuses on the intelligibility of non-native English speakers. Specifically, he would like to seek what kind of English pronunciation features are critical for successful English communication between non-native English speakers.

Adam, from Ethiopia, is interested in looking at the role of education in peacebuilding and conflicts.

Akira is a DPhil Student in Anthropology affiliated with the School of Anthropology & Museum Ethnography, and associated with both the Department of Education and Nissan Institute of Japanese Studies. He is supervised by David Mills and Roger Goodman.

Akira’s doctoral research rests with the concepts of ‘international’ and ‘global education,’ and is grounded in the recent emergence and growth of International Baccalaureate (IB) education in Japan. Focused on IB educator training across several higher education institutions (HEIs), Akira aims – solely through digital anthropological approaches – to contextualize the everyday negotiations of ‘international’ and ‘global’ knowledge, both by those receiving and administering its training. Considering social, political, economic and cognitive aspects, one key objective of this research hopes to inform educational practitioners and policy-makers of some of the conceptual and social challenges that emerge with dissonant notions of cultivating ‘international’ and ‘global people.’

Akira has been an Associate Researcher at the Graduate School of Teacher Education, Tokyo Gakugei University since autumn 2020, a post he continues to hold until the end of his doctoral degree. He also currently works as an Anthropological Analyst for Contemplative Spaces, a consultancy focused on designing and delivering a range of leadership development initiatives for individuals, groups, and organizational bodies. His future career plans include further anthropological research and establishing consultancy services dedicated to various inclusion-based development initiatives.

Amelia is passionate about access to and the effects of environmental education globally, particularly in the Galápagos Islands of Ecuador.

Because she experienced a wealth of informal and non-formal environmental education from her parents and from explorations growing up in Southern Oregon, she is interested in researching how environmental education manifests in global communities. She fell in love with the Galápagos on a structured university-led trip during her undergraduate studies and realized that there was a dearth of research on social aspects of the communities living on the islands.  Because of this, she pursued research in the Galápagos in 2014 on the prevalence of and access to both formal and informal (provided by numerous NGOs and government agencies) environmental education for students on the islands, and on the level of student environmental literacy in 28 schools.

Her Dphil research focus, under the supervision of Dr. Ann Childs and Dr. Steve Puttick, is on access to and effects of Experiential Environmental Education for students living in the Galápagos Islands, and on the production of research on the social sphere in Galápagos.

Prior to starting her Dphil at Oxford, she worked in alliances and partnerships at tech companies in the San Francisco Bay Area. Most recently, she was the Director of Global Partnerships at Conversica, a conversational AI platform, and cultivated, trained, and drove pipeline with select international resellers in APAC, EMEA, and LATAM, and with regional resellers in the United States. She also assisted with the design and construction of the Conversica partner program.

In her free time, she is a free-lance food photographer, food stylist, food blogger, recipe developer, and gluten free baker for her online blog and social handle, Sisters Sans Gluten (www.sisterssansgluten), which she created with her sister in 2018. She also continues to sing informally and takes voice lessons remotely with instructor Corey Head of San Francisco.

She holds a BA in both Anthropology and Music (vocal performance), and an MA in Latin American Studies from Stanford University. Highlights from Stanford include: playing and touring as a performing member of Stanford Taiko (Japanese ensemble drumming) for four years; singing with the Stanford Chamber Chorale led by Professor Steve Sano; studying voice with Wendy Hillhouse; participating in music department operas; performing in self-organized recitals showcasing western art songs, western musical theater, and Latin American art songs; studying abroad in Santiago, Chile; and learning Quechua during her masters program with Marisol Necochea.

Abdul Karim has completed a Bachelor of Science in Bioengineering and Computational Medicine (Imperial College London), a Bachelor of Medicine and Bachelor of Surgery (Queen Mary University of London), and Master of Science in the Philosophy of Science and Economics (The London School of Economics).

He has delivered lectures on the Philosophy of Human Nature and the History of Metaethics at the University of Cambridge and for Health Education East Midlands. This, in addition to the current positions he holds as a Hospital Doctor and Health Policy and Management Advisor at the University Hospitals of Leicester NHS Trust.

Abdul Karim’s current areas of interest include the biological definition of psychological states relevant to the learning environment, and the influence of language on the variable interpretation of a particular social context. For the latter of which he has published primary research.

Another is the appraisal and deployment of physiological measurement devices in learning environments as a means of quantitatively evaluating psychological states. Such research areas hold promise in enhancing the questionnaire-based evidences of contemporary theories in education, such as those regarding motivation, self-determination and engagement. This will to contribute to the evidence-based public policy optimisation in education and social care.

 

Publications

Ismail, A.K. 2017. A Cross Sectional Study to Explore the Effect of the Linguistic Origin and Evolution of a Language on Patient Interpretation of Haematological Cancers. Advances in Biological Research. 11 (4): 225-232.

Ismail, A.K. 2017. The Origin of the Arabic Medical Term for Cancer. Advances in Biological Research. 11 (4): 198-201.

Ismail, A.K. 2018. The Impact of da Vinci’s Anatomical Drawings and Calculations on Foundation of Orthopaedics. Advances in Biological Research. 12 (1): 26-30.

As a mathematics teacher who believes that anyone can understand mathematics, Ashley is keenly interested in developing interventions and resources for learners who struggle with the subject. More specifically, she is focusing on the transitionary moment in the classroom when discussions have ceased, and practice begins and how this transition can become more fluid for learners.

By drawing on research from education, psychology and cognitive neuroscience, Ashley hopes to gain insights into how the brain and mind process information and how this knowledge can inform teacher practice and, ultimately, help learners understand mathematics.

After having taught for over ten years, Ashley completed her MSc, with Distinction, at the Department of Education, and her dissertation was “Highly Commended” by the British Educational Research Association (BERA). She is committed to making mathematics more accessible for all learners and strives for research that is not only impactful but also directly applicable to the classroom.

I am a Research Project Coordinator and Co-PI at the Department of Education for a project on Education, Purpose and Human Flourishing in Times of Uncertainty (EPHF), and the Templeton World Charity Foundation Fellow in Comparative Education at St Antony’s College, Oxford.

I have a multi-disciplinary background and experience. Academically I am an Art Historian specialising in late 18th and early 19th-century French aesthetics, and prior to my return to academia I had a career in the international finance, entrepreneurial business and high net worth family business sectors. I have published and taught at the University of Oxford on late eighteenth-and early nineteenth century art, history and aesthetics. Drawing on my experience as Lay Chaplain at Somerville College, Oxford I have also published on religious education. In addition to my position in the Education Department I am the Principal Advisor for Strategic Relationships and Partnerships at the Templeton World Charity Foundation Inc where I work closely with other foundations, INGOs and public policy organisations.

Publications List

Xiaona Wang is a DPhil student in Education, at St. Antony’s College, the University of Oxford. Xiaona’s doctoral research is fully funded by the University of Oxford (Clarendon Fund Scholarship and St. Antony’s College The Warden’s Scholarship). She is also a member at the Center for Global Higher Education.

Before her DPhil, Xiaona obtained her M.A degree in Higher Education at Graduate School of Education at Peking University, and B.A at the Faulty of Education from Beijing Normal University in China with first-class honour. She also studied at the University of Manchester as an exchange student in the School of Social Science.

Previously, Xiaona worked at Global Education Cluster in UNICEF, Geneva, where she began her research on the international scientific collaboration between China and Switzerland, and this experience later became the starting point of her master thesis. In her master’s thesis, Xiaona used a longitudinal research method in following a group of Chinese scientists who studied and worked in Switzerland. Through semi-structured interviews, she explored how collaborative relationships between individual scientists began and developed.

Xiaona has strong research interests in the science studies, internationalization and globalization of higher education. Her doctoral research is going to continue to explore the scientific knowledge networks between China and Switzerland under the influence of geopolitical factors.

Wanlin Cai is a DPhil student in higher education and a member of CGHE research group at the Department of Education.

Wanlin’s research interest lies in international higher education, higher education policies and economy, with a specific focus on World-Class Universities.

She is also a member of South China Global Talent Institute, Center for China and Globalisation, where she focuses on the research of talent policy and development in the Great Bay Area in China.

Prior to her beginning as a DPhil student, Wanlin read for the M.Sc in Higher Education at the University of Oxford and the M.Sc in Management and Enterprise Growth at the University of Glasgow.

Naosuke is a DPhil student whose research interests are Global Englishes and mutual intelligibility in English communication.

Naosuke finished an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition at the University of Oxford with distinction in 2019. His DPhil research focuses on the intelligibility of non-native English speakers. Specifically, he would like to seek what kind of English pronunciation features are critical for successful English communication between non-native English speakers.

Adam, from Ethiopia, is interested in looking at the role of education in peacebuilding and conflicts.

Akira is a DPhil Student in Anthropology affiliated with the School of Anthropology & Museum Ethnography, and associated with both the Department of Education and Nissan Institute of Japanese Studies. He is supervised by David Mills and Roger Goodman.

Akira’s doctoral research rests with the concepts of ‘international’ and ‘global education,’ and is grounded in the recent emergence and growth of International Baccalaureate (IB) education in Japan. Focused on IB educator training across several higher education institutions (HEIs), Akira aims – solely through digital anthropological approaches – to contextualize the everyday negotiations of ‘international’ and ‘global’ knowledge, both by those receiving and administering its training. Considering social, political, economic and cognitive aspects, one key objective of this research hopes to inform educational practitioners and policy-makers of some of the conceptual and social challenges that emerge with dissonant notions of cultivating ‘international’ and ‘global people.’

Akira has been an Associate Researcher at the Graduate School of Teacher Education, Tokyo Gakugei University since autumn 2020, a post he continues to hold until the end of his doctoral degree. He also currently works as an Anthropological Analyst for Contemplative Spaces, a consultancy focused on designing and delivering a range of leadership development initiatives for individuals, groups, and organizational bodies. His future career plans include further anthropological research and establishing consultancy services dedicated to various inclusion-based development initiatives.

Amelia is passionate about access to and the effects of environmental education globally, particularly in the Galápagos Islands of Ecuador.

Because she experienced a wealth of informal and non-formal environmental education from her parents and from explorations growing up in Southern Oregon, she is interested in researching how environmental education manifests in global communities. She fell in love with the Galápagos on a structured university-led trip during her undergraduate studies and realized that there was a dearth of research on social aspects of the communities living on the islands.  Because of this, she pursued research in the Galápagos in 2014 on the prevalence of and access to both formal and informal (provided by numerous NGOs and government agencies) environmental education for students on the islands, and on the level of student environmental literacy in 28 schools.

Her Dphil research focus, under the supervision of Dr. Ann Childs and Dr. Steve Puttick, is on access to and effects of Experiential Environmental Education for students living in the Galápagos Islands, and on the production of research on the social sphere in Galápagos.

Prior to starting her Dphil at Oxford, she worked in alliances and partnerships at tech companies in the San Francisco Bay Area. Most recently, she was the Director of Global Partnerships at Conversica, a conversational AI platform, and cultivated, trained, and drove pipeline with select international resellers in APAC, EMEA, and LATAM, and with regional resellers in the United States. She also assisted with the design and construction of the Conversica partner program.

In her free time, she is a free-lance food photographer, food stylist, food blogger, recipe developer, and gluten free baker for her online blog and social handle, Sisters Sans Gluten (www.sisterssansgluten), which she created with her sister in 2018. She also continues to sing informally and takes voice lessons remotely with instructor Corey Head of San Francisco.

She holds a BA in both Anthropology and Music (vocal performance), and an MA in Latin American Studies from Stanford University. Highlights from Stanford include: playing and touring as a performing member of Stanford Taiko (Japanese ensemble drumming) for four years; singing with the Stanford Chamber Chorale led by Professor Steve Sano; studying voice with Wendy Hillhouse; participating in music department operas; performing in self-organized recitals showcasing western art songs, western musical theater, and Latin American art songs; studying abroad in Santiago, Chile; and learning Quechua during her masters program with Marisol Necochea.

Abdul Karim has completed a Bachelor of Science in Bioengineering and Computational Medicine (Imperial College London), a Bachelor of Medicine and Bachelor of Surgery (Queen Mary University of London), and Master of Science in the Philosophy of Science and Economics (The London School of Economics).

He has delivered lectures on the Philosophy of Human Nature and the History of Metaethics at the University of Cambridge and for Health Education East Midlands. This, in addition to the current positions he holds as a Hospital Doctor and Health Policy and Management Advisor at the University Hospitals of Leicester NHS Trust.

Abdul Karim’s current areas of interest include the biological definition of psychological states relevant to the learning environment, and the influence of language on the variable interpretation of a particular social context. For the latter of which he has published primary research.

Another is the appraisal and deployment of physiological measurement devices in learning environments as a means of quantitatively evaluating psychological states. Such research areas hold promise in enhancing the questionnaire-based evidences of contemporary theories in education, such as those regarding motivation, self-determination and engagement. This will to contribute to the evidence-based public policy optimisation in education and social care.

 

Publications

Ismail, A.K. 2017. A Cross Sectional Study to Explore the Effect of the Linguistic Origin and Evolution of a Language on Patient Interpretation of Haematological Cancers. Advances in Biological Research. 11 (4): 225-232.

Ismail, A.K. 2017. The Origin of the Arabic Medical Term for Cancer. Advances in Biological Research. 11 (4): 198-201.

Ismail, A.K. 2018. The Impact of da Vinci’s Anatomical Drawings and Calculations on Foundation of Orthopaedics. Advances in Biological Research. 12 (1): 26-30.

As a mathematics teacher who believes that anyone can understand mathematics, Ashley is keenly interested in developing interventions and resources for learners who struggle with the subject. More specifically, she is focusing on the transitionary moment in the classroom when discussions have ceased, and practice begins and how this transition can become more fluid for learners.

By drawing on research from education, psychology and cognitive neuroscience, Ashley hopes to gain insights into how the brain and mind process information and how this knowledge can inform teacher practice and, ultimately, help learners understand mathematics.

After having taught for over ten years, Ashley completed her MSc, with Distinction, at the Department of Education, and her dissertation was “Highly Commended” by the British Educational Research Association (BERA). She is committed to making mathematics more accessible for all learners and strives for research that is not only impactful but also directly applicable to the classroom.

I am a Research Project Coordinator and Co-PI at the Department of Education for a project on Education, Purpose and Human Flourishing in Times of Uncertainty (EPHF), and the Templeton World Charity Foundation Fellow in Comparative Education at St Antony’s College, Oxford.

I have a multi-disciplinary background and experience. Academically I am an Art Historian specialising in late 18th and early 19th-century French aesthetics, and prior to my return to academia I had a career in the international finance, entrepreneurial business and high net worth family business sectors. I have published and taught at the University of Oxford on late eighteenth-and early nineteenth century art, history and aesthetics. Drawing on my experience as Lay Chaplain at Somerville College, Oxford I have also published on religious education. In addition to my position in the Education Department I am the Principal Advisor for Strategic Relationships and Partnerships at the Templeton World Charity Foundation Inc where I work closely with other foundations, INGOs and public policy organisations.

Publications List

Xiaona Wang is a DPhil student in Education, at St. Antony’s College, the University of Oxford. Xiaona’s doctoral research is fully funded by the University of Oxford (Clarendon Fund Scholarship and St. Antony’s College The Warden’s Scholarship). She is also a member at the Center for Global Higher Education.

Before her DPhil, Xiaona obtained her M.A degree in Higher Education at Graduate School of Education at Peking University, and B.A at the Faulty of Education from Beijing Normal University in China with first-class honour. She also studied at the University of Manchester as an exchange student in the School of Social Science.

Previously, Xiaona worked at Global Education Cluster in UNICEF, Geneva, where she began her research on the international scientific collaboration between China and Switzerland, and this experience later became the starting point of her master thesis. In her master’s thesis, Xiaona used a longitudinal research method in following a group of Chinese scientists who studied and worked in Switzerland. Through semi-structured interviews, she explored how collaborative relationships between individual scientists began and developed.

Xiaona has strong research interests in the science studies, internationalization and globalization of higher education. Her doctoral research is going to continue to explore the scientific knowledge networks between China and Switzerland under the influence of geopolitical factors.

Wanlin Cai is a DPhil student in higher education and a member of CGHE research group at the Department of Education.

Wanlin’s research interest lies in international higher education, higher education policies and economy, with a specific focus on World-Class Universities.

She is also a member of South China Global Talent Institute, Center for China and Globalisation, where she focuses on the research of talent policy and development in the Great Bay Area in China.

Prior to her beginning as a DPhil student, Wanlin read for the M.Sc in Higher Education at the University of Oxford and the M.Sc in Management and Enterprise Growth at the University of Glasgow.

Naosuke is a DPhil student whose research interests are Global Englishes and mutual intelligibility in English communication.

Naosuke finished an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition at the University of Oxford with distinction in 2019. His DPhil research focuses on the intelligibility of non-native English speakers. Specifically, he would like to seek what kind of English pronunciation features are critical for successful English communication between non-native English speakers.

Adam, from Ethiopia, is interested in looking at the role of education in peacebuilding and conflicts.

Akira is a DPhil Student in Anthropology affiliated with the School of Anthropology & Museum Ethnography, and associated with both the Department of Education and Nissan Institute of Japanese Studies. He is supervised by David Mills and Roger Goodman.

Akira’s doctoral research rests with the concepts of ‘international’ and ‘global education,’ and is grounded in the recent emergence and growth of International Baccalaureate (IB) education in Japan. Focused on IB educator training across several higher education institutions (HEIs), Akira aims – solely through digital anthropological approaches – to contextualize the everyday negotiations of ‘international’ and ‘global’ knowledge, both by those receiving and administering its training. Considering social, political, economic and cognitive aspects, one key objective of this research hopes to inform educational practitioners and policy-makers of some of the conceptual and social challenges that emerge with dissonant notions of cultivating ‘international’ and ‘global people.’

Akira has been an Associate Researcher at the Graduate School of Teacher Education, Tokyo Gakugei University since autumn 2020, a post he continues to hold until the end of his doctoral degree. He also currently works as an Anthropological Analyst for Contemplative Spaces, a consultancy focused on designing and delivering a range of leadership development initiatives for individuals, groups, and organizational bodies. His future career plans include further anthropological research and establishing consultancy services dedicated to various inclusion-based development initiatives.

Amelia is passionate about access to and the effects of environmental education globally, particularly in the Galápagos Islands of Ecuador.

Because she experienced a wealth of informal and non-formal environmental education from her parents and from explorations growing up in Southern Oregon, she is interested in researching how environmental education manifests in global communities. She fell in love with the Galápagos on a structured university-led trip during her undergraduate studies and realized that there was a dearth of research on social aspects of the communities living on the islands.  Because of this, she pursued research in the Galápagos in 2014 on the prevalence of and access to both formal and informal (provided by numerous NGOs and government agencies) environmental education for students on the islands, and on the level of student environmental literacy in 28 schools.

Her Dphil research focus, under the supervision of Dr. Ann Childs and Dr. Steve Puttick, is on access to and effects of Experiential Environmental Education for students living in the Galápagos Islands, and on the production of research on the social sphere in Galápagos.

Prior to starting her Dphil at Oxford, she worked in alliances and partnerships at tech companies in the San Francisco Bay Area. Most recently, she was the Director of Global Partnerships at Conversica, a conversational AI platform, and cultivated, trained, and drove pipeline with select international resellers in APAC, EMEA, and LATAM, and with regional resellers in the United States. She also assisted with the design and construction of the Conversica partner program.

In her free time, she is a free-lance food photographer, food stylist, food blogger, recipe developer, and gluten free baker for her online blog and social handle, Sisters Sans Gluten (www.sisterssansgluten), which she created with her sister in 2018. She also continues to sing informally and takes voice lessons remotely with instructor Corey Head of San Francisco.

She holds a BA in both Anthropology and Music (vocal performance), and an MA in Latin American Studies from Stanford University. Highlights from Stanford include: playing and touring as a performing member of Stanford Taiko (Japanese ensemble drumming) for four years; singing with the Stanford Chamber Chorale led by Professor Steve Sano; studying voice with Wendy Hillhouse; participating in music department operas; performing in self-organized recitals showcasing western art songs, western musical theater, and Latin American art songs; studying abroad in Santiago, Chile; and learning Quechua during her masters program with Marisol Necochea.

Abdul Karim has completed a Bachelor of Science in Bioengineering and Computational Medicine (Imperial College London), a Bachelor of Medicine and Bachelor of Surgery (Queen Mary University of London), and Master of Science in the Philosophy of Science and Economics (The London School of Economics).

He has delivered lectures on the Philosophy of Human Nature and the History of Metaethics at the University of Cambridge and for Health Education East Midlands. This, in addition to the current positions he holds as a Hospital Doctor and Health Policy and Management Advisor at the University Hospitals of Leicester NHS Trust.

Abdul Karim’s current areas of interest include the biological definition of psychological states relevant to the learning environment, and the influence of language on the variable interpretation of a particular social context. For the latter of which he has published primary research.

Another is the appraisal and deployment of physiological measurement devices in learning environments as a means of quantitatively evaluating psychological states. Such research areas hold promise in enhancing the questionnaire-based evidences of contemporary theories in education, such as those regarding motivation, self-determination and engagement. This will to contribute to the evidence-based public policy optimisation in education and social care.

 

Publications

Ismail, A.K. 2017. A Cross Sectional Study to Explore the Effect of the Linguistic Origin and Evolution of a Language on Patient Interpretation of Haematological Cancers. Advances in Biological Research. 11 (4): 225-232.

Ismail, A.K. 2017. The Origin of the Arabic Medical Term for Cancer. Advances in Biological Research. 11 (4): 198-201.

Ismail, A.K. 2018. The Impact of da Vinci’s Anatomical Drawings and Calculations on Foundation of Orthopaedics. Advances in Biological Research. 12 (1): 26-30.

As a mathematics teacher who believes that anyone can understand mathematics, Ashley is keenly interested in developing interventions and resources for learners who struggle with the subject. More specifically, she is focusing on the transitionary moment in the classroom when discussions have ceased, and practice begins and how this transition can become more fluid for learners.

By drawing on research from education, psychology and cognitive neuroscience, Ashley hopes to gain insights into how the brain and mind process information and how this knowledge can inform teacher practice and, ultimately, help learners understand mathematics.

After having taught for over ten years, Ashley completed her MSc, with Distinction, at the Department of Education, and her dissertation was “Highly Commended” by the British Educational Research Association (BERA). She is committed to making mathematics more accessible for all learners and strives for research that is not only impactful but also directly applicable to the classroom.

I am a Research Project Coordinator and Co-PI at the Department of Education for a project on Education, Purpose and Human Flourishing in Times of Uncertainty (EPHF), and the Templeton World Charity Foundation Fellow in Comparative Education at St Antony’s College, Oxford.

I have a multi-disciplinary background and experience. Academically I am an Art Historian specialising in late 18th and early 19th-century French aesthetics, and prior to my return to academia I had a career in the international finance, entrepreneurial business and high net worth family business sectors. I have published and taught at the University of Oxford on late eighteenth-and early nineteenth century art, history and aesthetics. Drawing on my experience as Lay Chaplain at Somerville College, Oxford I have also published on religious education. In addition to my position in the Education Department I am the Principal Advisor for Strategic Relationships and Partnerships at the Templeton World Charity Foundation Inc where I work closely with other foundations, INGOs and public policy organisations.

Publications List

Xiaona Wang is a DPhil student in Education, at St. Antony’s College, the University of Oxford. Xiaona’s doctoral research is fully funded by the University of Oxford (Clarendon Fund Scholarship and St. Antony’s College The Warden’s Scholarship). She is also a member at the Center for Global Higher Education.

Before her DPhil, Xiaona obtained her M.A degree in Higher Education at Graduate School of Education at Peking University, and B.A at the Faulty of Education from Beijing Normal University in China with first-class honour. She also studied at the University of Manchester as an exchange student in the School of Social Science.

Previously, Xiaona worked at Global Education Cluster in UNICEF, Geneva, where she began her research on the international scientific collaboration between China and Switzerland, and this experience later became the starting point of her master thesis. In her master’s thesis, Xiaona used a longitudinal research method in following a group of Chinese scientists who studied and worked in Switzerland. Through semi-structured interviews, she explored how collaborative relationships between individual scientists began and developed.

Xiaona has strong research interests in the science studies, internationalization and globalization of higher education. Her doctoral research is going to continue to explore the scientific knowledge networks between China and Switzerland under the influence of geopolitical factors.

Wanlin Cai is a DPhil student in higher education and a member of CGHE research group at the Department of Education.

Wanlin’s research interest lies in international higher education, higher education policies and economy, with a specific focus on World-Class Universities.

She is also a member of South China Global Talent Institute, Center for China and Globalisation, where she focuses on the research of talent policy and development in the Great Bay Area in China.

Prior to her beginning as a DPhil student, Wanlin read for the M.Sc in Higher Education at the University of Oxford and the M.Sc in Management and Enterprise Growth at the University of Glasgow.

Naosuke is a DPhil student whose research interests are Global Englishes and mutual intelligibility in English communication.

Naosuke finished an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition at the University of Oxford with distinction in 2019. His DPhil research focuses on the intelligibility of non-native English speakers. Specifically, he would like to seek what kind of English pronunciation features are critical for successful English communication between non-native English speakers.

Adam, from Ethiopia, is interested in looking at the role of education in peacebuilding and conflicts.

Akira is a DPhil Student in Anthropology affiliated with the School of Anthropology & Museum Ethnography, and associated with both the Department of Education and Nissan Institute of Japanese Studies. He is supervised by David Mills and Roger Goodman.

Akira’s doctoral research rests with the concepts of ‘international’ and ‘global education,’ and is grounded in the recent emergence and growth of International Baccalaureate (IB) education in Japan. Focused on IB educator training across several higher education institutions (HEIs), Akira aims – solely through digital anthropological approaches – to contextualize the everyday negotiations of ‘international’ and ‘global’ knowledge, both by those receiving and administering its training. Considering social, political, economic and cognitive aspects, one key objective of this research hopes to inform educational practitioners and policy-makers of some of the conceptual and social challenges that emerge with dissonant notions of cultivating ‘international’ and ‘global people.’

Akira has been an Associate Researcher at the Graduate School of Teacher Education, Tokyo Gakugei University since autumn 2020, a post he continues to hold until the end of his doctoral degree. He also currently works as an Anthropological Analyst for Contemplative Spaces, a consultancy focused on designing and delivering a range of leadership development initiatives for individuals, groups, and organizational bodies. His future career plans include further anthropological research and establishing consultancy services dedicated to various inclusion-based development initiatives.

Amelia is passionate about access to and the effects of environmental education globally, particularly in the Galápagos Islands of Ecuador.

Because she experienced a wealth of informal and non-formal environmental education from her parents and from explorations growing up in Southern Oregon, she is interested in researching how environmental education manifests in global communities. She fell in love with the Galápagos on a structured university-led trip during her undergraduate studies and realized that there was a dearth of research on social aspects of the communities living on the islands.  Because of this, she pursued research in the Galápagos in 2014 on the prevalence of and access to both formal and informal (provided by numerous NGOs and government agencies) environmental education for students on the islands, and on the level of student environmental literacy in 28 schools.

Her Dphil research focus, under the supervision of Dr. Ann Childs and Dr. Steve Puttick, is on access to and effects of Experiential Environmental Education for students living in the Galápagos Islands, and on the production of research on the social sphere in Galápagos.

Prior to starting her Dphil at Oxford, she worked in alliances and partnerships at tech companies in the San Francisco Bay Area. Most recently, she was the Director of Global Partnerships at Conversica, a conversational AI platform, and cultivated, trained, and drove pipeline with select international resellers in APAC, EMEA, and LATAM, and with regional resellers in the United States. She also assisted with the design and construction of the Conversica partner program.

In her free time, she is a free-lance food photographer, food stylist, food blogger, recipe developer, and gluten free baker for her online blog and social handle, Sisters Sans Gluten (www.sisterssansgluten), which she created with her sister in 2018. She also continues to sing informally and takes voice lessons remotely with instructor Corey Head of San Francisco.

She holds a BA in both Anthropology and Music (vocal performance), and an MA in Latin American Studies from Stanford University. Highlights from Stanford include: playing and touring as a performing member of Stanford Taiko (Japanese ensemble drumming) for four years; singing with the Stanford Chamber Chorale led by Professor Steve Sano; studying voice with Wendy Hillhouse; participating in music department operas; performing in self-organized recitals showcasing western art songs, western musical theater, and Latin American art songs; studying abroad in Santiago, Chile; and learning Quechua during her masters program with Marisol Necochea.

Abdul Karim has completed a Bachelor of Science in Bioengineering and Computational Medicine (Imperial College London), a Bachelor of Medicine and Bachelor of Surgery (Queen Mary University of London), and Master of Science in the Philosophy of Science and Economics (The London School of Economics).

He has delivered lectures on the Philosophy of Human Nature and the History of Metaethics at the University of Cambridge and for Health Education East Midlands. This, in addition to the current positions he holds as a Hospital Doctor and Health Policy and Management Advisor at the University Hospitals of Leicester NHS Trust.

Abdul Karim’s current areas of interest include the biological definition of psychological states relevant to the learning environment, and the influence of language on the variable interpretation of a particular social context. For the latter of which he has published primary research.

Another is the appraisal and deployment of physiological measurement devices in learning environments as a means of quantitatively evaluating psychological states. Such research areas hold promise in enhancing the questionnaire-based evidences of contemporary theories in education, such as those regarding motivation, self-determination and engagement. This will to contribute to the evidence-based public policy optimisation in education and social care.

 

Publications

Ismail, A.K. 2017. A Cross Sectional Study to Explore the Effect of the Linguistic Origin and Evolution of a Language on Patient Interpretation of Haematological Cancers. Advances in Biological Research. 11 (4): 225-232.

Ismail, A.K. 2017. The Origin of the Arabic Medical Term for Cancer. Advances in Biological Research. 11 (4): 198-201.

Ismail, A.K. 2018. The Impact of da Vinci’s Anatomical Drawings and Calculations on Foundation of Orthopaedics. Advances in Biological Research. 12 (1): 26-30.

As a mathematics teacher who believes that anyone can understand mathematics, Ashley is keenly interested in developing interventions and resources for learners who struggle with the subject. More specifically, she is focusing on the transitionary moment in the classroom when discussions have ceased, and practice begins and how this transition can become more fluid for learners.

By drawing on research from education, psychology and cognitive neuroscience, Ashley hopes to gain insights into how the brain and mind process information and how this knowledge can inform teacher practice and, ultimately, help learners understand mathematics.

After having taught for over ten years, Ashley completed her MSc, with Distinction, at the Department of Education, and her dissertation was “Highly Commended” by the British Educational Research Association (BERA). She is committed to making mathematics more accessible for all learners and strives for research that is not only impactful but also directly applicable to the classroom.

I am a Research Project Coordinator and Co-PI at the Department of Education for a project on Education, Purpose and Human Flourishing in Times of Uncertainty (EPHF), and the Templeton World Charity Foundation Fellow in Comparative Education at St Antony’s College, Oxford.

I have a multi-disciplinary background and experience. Academically I am an Art Historian specialising in late 18th and early 19th-century French aesthetics, and prior to my return to academia I had a career in the international finance, entrepreneurial business and high net worth family business sectors. I have published and taught at the University of Oxford on late eighteenth-and early nineteenth century art, history and aesthetics. Drawing on my experience as Lay Chaplain at Somerville College, Oxford I have also published on religious education. In addition to my position in the Education Department I am the Principal Advisor for Strategic Relationships and Partnerships at the Templeton World Charity Foundation Inc where I work closely with other foundations, INGOs and public policy organisations.

Publications List

Xiaona Wang is a DPhil student in Education, at St. Antony’s College, the University of Oxford. Xiaona’s doctoral research is fully funded by the University of Oxford (Clarendon Fund Scholarship and St. Antony’s College The Warden’s Scholarship). She is also a member at the Center for Global Higher Education.

Before her DPhil, Xiaona obtained her M.A degree in Higher Education at Graduate School of Education at Peking University, and B.A at the Faulty of Education from Beijing Normal University in China with first-class honour. She also studied at the University of Manchester as an exchange student in the School of Social Science.

Previously, Xiaona worked at Global Education Cluster in UNICEF, Geneva, where she began her research on the international scientific collaboration between China and Switzerland, and this experience later became the starting point of her master thesis. In her master’s thesis, Xiaona used a longitudinal research method in following a group of Chinese scientists who studied and worked in Switzerland. Through semi-structured interviews, she explored how collaborative relationships between individual scientists began and developed.

Xiaona has strong research interests in the science studies, internationalization and globalization of higher education. Her doctoral research is going to continue to explore the scientific knowledge networks between China and Switzerland under the influence of geopolitical factors.

Wanlin Cai is a DPhil student in higher education and a member of CGHE research group at the Department of Education.

Wanlin’s research interest lies in international higher education, higher education policies and economy, with a specific focus on World-Class Universities.

She is also a member of South China Global Talent Institute, Center for China and Globalisation, where she focuses on the research of talent policy and development in the Great Bay Area in China.

Prior to her beginning as a DPhil student, Wanlin read for the M.Sc in Higher Education at the University of Oxford and the M.Sc in Management and Enterprise Growth at the University of Glasgow.

Naosuke is a DPhil student whose research interests are Global Englishes and mutual intelligibility in English communication.

Naosuke finished an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition at the University of Oxford with distinction in 2019. His DPhil research focuses on the intelligibility of non-native English speakers. Specifically, he would like to seek what kind of English pronunciation features are critical for successful English communication between non-native English speakers.

Adam, from Ethiopia, is interested in looking at the role of education in peacebuilding and conflicts.

Akira is a DPhil Student in Anthropology affiliated with the School of Anthropology & Museum Ethnography, and associated with both the Department of Education and Nissan Institute of Japanese Studies. He is supervised by David Mills and Roger Goodman.

Akira’s doctoral research rests with the concepts of ‘international’ and ‘global education,’ and is grounded in the recent emergence and growth of International Baccalaureate (IB) education in Japan. Focused on IB educator training across several higher education institutions (HEIs), Akira aims – solely through digital anthropological approaches – to contextualize the everyday negotiations of ‘international’ and ‘global’ knowledge, both by those receiving and administering its training. Considering social, political, economic and cognitive aspects, one key objective of this research hopes to inform educational practitioners and policy-makers of some of the conceptual and social challenges that emerge with dissonant notions of cultivating ‘international’ and ‘global people.’

Akira has been an Associate Researcher at the Graduate School of Teacher Education, Tokyo Gakugei University since autumn 2020, a post he continues to hold until the end of his doctoral degree. He also currently works as an Anthropological Analyst for Contemplative Spaces, a consultancy focused on designing and delivering a range of leadership development initiatives for individuals, groups, and organizational bodies. His future career plans include further anthropological research and establishing consultancy services dedicated to various inclusion-based development initiatives.

Amelia is passionate about access to and the effects of environmental education globally, particularly in the Galápagos Islands of Ecuador.

Because she experienced a wealth of informal and non-formal environmental education from her parents and from explorations growing up in Southern Oregon, she is interested in researching how environmental education manifests in global communities. She fell in love with the Galápagos on a structured university-led trip during her undergraduate studies and realized that there was a dearth of research on social aspects of the communities living on the islands.  Because of this, she pursued research in the Galápagos in 2014 on the prevalence of and access to both formal and informal (provided by numerous NGOs and government agencies) environmental education for students on the islands, and on the level of student environmental literacy in 28 schools.

Her Dphil research focus, under the supervision of Dr. Ann Childs and Dr. Steve Puttick, is on access to and effects of Experiential Environmental Education for students living in the Galápagos Islands, and on the production of research on the social sphere in Galápagos.

Prior to starting her Dphil at Oxford, she worked in alliances and partnerships at tech companies in the San Francisco Bay Area. Most recently, she was the Director of Global Partnerships at Conversica, a conversational AI platform, and cultivated, trained, and drove pipeline with select international resellers in APAC, EMEA, and LATAM, and with regional resellers in the United States. She also assisted with the design and construction of the Conversica partner program.

In her free time, she is a free-lance food photographer, food stylist, food blogger, recipe developer, and gluten free baker for her online blog and social handle, Sisters Sans Gluten (www.sisterssansgluten), which she created with her sister in 2018. She also continues to sing informally and takes voice lessons remotely with instructor Corey Head of San Francisco.

She holds a BA in both Anthropology and Music (vocal performance), and an MA in Latin American Studies from Stanford University. Highlights from Stanford include: playing and touring as a performing member of Stanford Taiko (Japanese ensemble drumming) for four years; singing with the Stanford Chamber Chorale led by Professor Steve Sano; studying voice with Wendy Hillhouse; participating in music department operas; performing in self-organized recitals showcasing western art songs, western musical theater, and Latin American art songs; studying abroad in Santiago, Chile; and learning Quechua during her masters program with Marisol Necochea.

Abdul Karim has completed a Bachelor of Science in Bioengineering and Computational Medicine (Imperial College London), a Bachelor of Medicine and Bachelor of Surgery (Queen Mary University of London), and Master of Science in the Philosophy of Science and Economics (The London School of Economics).

He has delivered lectures on the Philosophy of Human Nature and the History of Metaethics at the University of Cambridge and for Health Education East Midlands. This, in addition to the current positions he holds as a Hospital Doctor and Health Policy and Management Advisor at the University Hospitals of Leicester NHS Trust.

Abdul Karim’s current areas of interest include the biological definition of psychological states relevant to the learning environment, and the influence of language on the variable interpretation of a particular social context. For the latter of which he has published primary research.

Another is the appraisal and deployment of physiological measurement devices in learning environments as a means of quantitatively evaluating psychological states. Such research areas hold promise in enhancing the questionnaire-based evidences of contemporary theories in education, such as those regarding motivation, self-determination and engagement. This will to contribute to the evidence-based public policy optimisation in education and social care.

 

Publications

Ismail, A.K. 2017. A Cross Sectional Study to Explore the Effect of the Linguistic Origin and Evolution of a Language on Patient Interpretation of Haematological Cancers. Advances in Biological Research. 11 (4): 225-232.

Ismail, A.K. 2017. The Origin of the Arabic Medical Term for Cancer. Advances in Biological Research. 11 (4): 198-201.

Ismail, A.K. 2018. The Impact of da Vinci’s Anatomical Drawings and Calculations on Foundation of Orthopaedics. Advances in Biological Research. 12 (1): 26-30.

As a mathematics teacher who believes that anyone can understand mathematics, Ashley is keenly interested in developing interventions and resources for learners who struggle with the subject. More specifically, she is focusing on the transitionary moment in the classroom when discussions have ceased, and practice begins and how this transition can become more fluid for learners.

By drawing on research from education, psychology and cognitive neuroscience, Ashley hopes to gain insights into how the brain and mind process information and how this knowledge can inform teacher practice and, ultimately, help learners understand mathematics.

After having taught for over ten years, Ashley completed her MSc, with Distinction, at the Department of Education, and her dissertation was “Highly Commended” by the British Educational Research Association (BERA). She is committed to making mathematics more accessible for all learners and strives for research that is not only impactful but also directly applicable to the classroom.

I am a Research Project Coordinator and Co-PI at the Department of Education for a project on Education, Purpose and Human Flourishing in Times of Uncertainty (EPHF), and the Templeton World Charity Foundation Fellow in Comparative Education at St Antony’s College, Oxford.

I have a multi-disciplinary background and experience. Academically I am an Art Historian specialising in late 18th and early 19th-century French aesthetics, and prior to my return to academia I had a career in the international finance, entrepreneurial business and high net worth family business sectors. I have published and taught at the University of Oxford on late eighteenth-and early nineteenth century art, history and aesthetics. Drawing on my experience as Lay Chaplain at Somerville College, Oxford I have also published on religious education. In addition to my position in the Education Department I am the Principal Advisor for Strategic Relationships and Partnerships at the Templeton World Charity Foundation Inc where I work closely with other foundations, INGOs and public policy organisations.

Publications List

Xiaona Wang is a DPhil student in Education, at St. Antony’s College, the University of Oxford. Xiaona’s doctoral research is fully funded by the University of Oxford (Clarendon Fund Scholarship and St. Antony’s College The Warden’s Scholarship). She is also a member at the Center for Global Higher Education.

Before her DPhil, Xiaona obtained her M.A degree in Higher Education at Graduate School of Education at Peking University, and B.A at the Faulty of Education from Beijing Normal University in China with first-class honour. She also studied at the University of Manchester as an exchange student in the School of Social Science.

Previously, Xiaona worked at Global Education Cluster in UNICEF, Geneva, where she began her research on the international scientific collaboration between China and Switzerland, and this experience later became the starting point of her master thesis. In her master’s thesis, Xiaona used a longitudinal research method in following a group of Chinese scientists who studied and worked in Switzerland. Through semi-structured interviews, she explored how collaborative relationships between individual scientists began and developed.

Xiaona has strong research interests in the science studies, internationalization and globalization of higher education. Her doctoral research is going to continue to explore the scientific knowledge networks between China and Switzerland under the influence of geopolitical factors.

Wanlin Cai is a DPhil student in higher education and a member of CGHE research group at the Department of Education.

Wanlin’s research interest lies in international higher education, higher education policies and economy, with a specific focus on World-Class Universities.

She is also a member of South China Global Talent Institute, Center for China and Globalisation, where she focuses on the research of talent policy and development in the Great Bay Area in China.

Prior to her beginning as a DPhil student, Wanlin read for the M.Sc in Higher Education at the University of Oxford and the M.Sc in Management and Enterprise Growth at the University of Glasgow.

Naosuke is a DPhil student whose research interests are Global Englishes and mutual intelligibility in English communication.

Naosuke finished an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition at the University of Oxford with distinction in 2019. His DPhil research focuses on the intelligibility of non-native English speakers. Specifically, he would like to seek what kind of English pronunciation features are critical for successful English communication between non-native English speakers.

Adam, from Ethiopia, is interested in looking at the role of education in peacebuilding and conflicts.

Akira is a DPhil Student in Anthropology affiliated with the School of Anthropology & Museum Ethnography, and associated with both the Department of Education and Nissan Institute of Japanese Studies. He is supervised by David Mills and Roger Goodman.

Akira’s doctoral research rests with the concepts of ‘international’ and ‘global education,’ and is grounded in the recent emergence and growth of International Baccalaureate (IB) education in Japan. Focused on IB educator training across several higher education institutions (HEIs), Akira aims – solely through digital anthropological approaches – to contextualize the everyday negotiations of ‘international’ and ‘global’ knowledge, both by those receiving and administering its training. Considering social, political, economic and cognitive aspects, one key objective of this research hopes to inform educational practitioners and policy-makers of some of the conceptual and social challenges that emerge with dissonant notions of cultivating ‘international’ and ‘global people.’

Akira has been an Associate Researcher at the Graduate School of Teacher Education, Tokyo Gakugei University since autumn 2020, a post he continues to hold until the end of his doctoral degree. He also currently works as an Anthropological Analyst for Contemplative Spaces, a consultancy focused on designing and delivering a range of leadership development initiatives for individuals, groups, and organizational bodies. His future career plans include further anthropological research and establishing consultancy services dedicated to various inclusion-based development initiatives.

Amelia is passionate about access to and the effects of environmental education globally, particularly in the Galápagos Islands of Ecuador.

Because she experienced a wealth of informal and non-formal environmental education from her parents and from explorations growing up in Southern Oregon, she is interested in researching how environmental education manifests in global communities. She fell in love with the Galápagos on a structured university-led trip during her undergraduate studies and realized that there was a dearth of research on social aspects of the communities living on the islands.  Because of this, she pursued research in the Galápagos in 2014 on the prevalence of and access to both formal and informal (provided by numerous NGOs and government agencies) environmental education for students on the islands, and on the level of student environmental literacy in 28 schools.

Her Dphil research focus, under the supervision of Dr. Ann Childs and Dr. Steve Puttick, is on access to and effects of Experiential Environmental Education for students living in the Galápagos Islands, and on the production of research on the social sphere in Galápagos.

Prior to starting her Dphil at Oxford, she worked in alliances and partnerships at tech companies in the San Francisco Bay Area. Most recently, she was the Director of Global Partnerships at Conversica, a conversational AI platform, and cultivated, trained, and drove pipeline with select international resellers in APAC, EMEA, and LATAM, and with regional resellers in the United States. She also assisted with the design and construction of the Conversica partner program.

In her free time, she is a free-lance food photographer, food stylist, food blogger, recipe developer, and gluten free baker for her online blog and social handle, Sisters Sans Gluten (www.sisterssansgluten), which she created with her sister in 2018. She also continues to sing informally and takes voice lessons remotely with instructor Corey Head of San Francisco.

She holds a BA in both Anthropology and Music (vocal performance), and an MA in Latin American Studies from Stanford University. Highlights from Stanford include: playing and touring as a performing member of Stanford Taiko (Japanese ensemble drumming) for four years; singing with the Stanford Chamber Chorale led by Professor Steve Sano; studying voice with Wendy Hillhouse; participating in music department operas; performing in self-organized recitals showcasing western art songs, western musical theater, and Latin American art songs; studying abroad in Santiago, Chile; and learning Quechua during her masters program with Marisol Necochea.

Abdul Karim has completed a Bachelor of Science in Bioengineering and Computational Medicine (Imperial College London), a Bachelor of Medicine and Bachelor of Surgery (Queen Mary University of London), and Master of Science in the Philosophy of Science and Economics (The London School of Economics).

He has delivered lectures on the Philosophy of Human Nature and the History of Metaethics at the University of Cambridge and for Health Education East Midlands. This, in addition to the current positions he holds as a Hospital Doctor and Health Policy and Management Advisor at the University Hospitals of Leicester NHS Trust.

Abdul Karim’s current areas of interest include the biological definition of psychological states relevant to the learning environment, and the influence of language on the variable interpretation of a particular social context. For the latter of which he has published primary research.

Another is the appraisal and deployment of physiological measurement devices in learning environments as a means of quantitatively evaluating psychological states. Such research areas hold promise in enhancing the questionnaire-based evidences of contemporary theories in education, such as those regarding motivation, self-determination and engagement. This will to contribute to the evidence-based public policy optimisation in education and social care.

 

Publications

Ismail, A.K. 2017. A Cross Sectional Study to Explore the Effect of the Linguistic Origin and Evolution of a Language on Patient Interpretation of Haematological Cancers. Advances in Biological Research. 11 (4): 225-232.

Ismail, A.K. 2017. The Origin of the Arabic Medical Term for Cancer. Advances in Biological Research. 11 (4): 198-201.

Ismail, A.K. 2018. The Impact of da Vinci’s Anatomical Drawings and Calculations on Foundation of Orthopaedics. Advances in Biological Research. 12 (1): 26-30.

As a mathematics teacher who believes that anyone can understand mathematics, Ashley is keenly interested in developing interventions and resources for learners who struggle with the subject. More specifically, she is focusing on the transitionary moment in the classroom when discussions have ceased, and practice begins and how this transition can become more fluid for learners.

By drawing on research from education, psychology and cognitive neuroscience, Ashley hopes to gain insights into how the brain and mind process information and how this knowledge can inform teacher practice and, ultimately, help learners understand mathematics.

After having taught for over ten years, Ashley completed her MSc, with Distinction, at the Department of Education, and her dissertation was “Highly Commended” by the British Educational Research Association (BERA). She is committed to making mathematics more accessible for all learners and strives for research that is not only impactful but also directly applicable to the classroom.

I am a Research Project Coordinator and Co-PI at the Department of Education for a project on Education, Purpose and Human Flourishing in Times of Uncertainty (EPHF), and the Templeton World Charity Foundation Fellow in Comparative Education at St Antony’s College, Oxford.

I have a multi-disciplinary background and experience. Academically I am an Art Historian specialising in late 18th and early 19th-century French aesthetics, and prior to my return to academia I had a career in the international finance, entrepreneurial business and high net worth family business sectors. I have published and taught at the University of Oxford on late eighteenth-and early nineteenth century art, history and aesthetics. Drawing on my experience as Lay Chaplain at Somerville College, Oxford I have also published on religious education. In addition to my position in the Education Department I am the Principal Advisor for Strategic Relationships and Partnerships at the Templeton World Charity Foundation Inc where I work closely with other foundations, INGOs and public policy organisations.

Publications List

Xiaona Wang is a DPhil student in Education, at St. Antony’s College, the University of Oxford. Xiaona’s doctoral research is fully funded by the University of Oxford (Clarendon Fund Scholarship and St. Antony’s College The Warden’s Scholarship). She is also a member at the Center for Global Higher Education.

Before her DPhil, Xiaona obtained her M.A degree in Higher Education at Graduate School of Education at Peking University, and B.A at the Faulty of Education from Beijing Normal University in China with first-class honour. She also studied at the University of Manchester as an exchange student in the School of Social Science.

Previously, Xiaona worked at Global Education Cluster in UNICEF, Geneva, where she began her research on the international scientific collaboration between China and Switzerland, and this experience later became the starting point of her master thesis. In her master’s thesis, Xiaona used a longitudinal research method in following a group of Chinese scientists who studied and worked in Switzerland. Through semi-structured interviews, she explored how collaborative relationships between individual scientists began and developed.

Xiaona has strong research interests in the science studies, internationalization and globalization of higher education. Her doctoral research is going to continue to explore the scientific knowledge networks between China and Switzerland under the influence of geopolitical factors.

Wanlin Cai is a DPhil student in higher education and a member of CGHE research group at the Department of Education.

Wanlin’s research interest lies in international higher education, higher education policies and economy, with a specific focus on World-Class Universities.

She is also a member of South China Global Talent Institute, Center for China and Globalisation, where she focuses on the research of talent policy and development in the Great Bay Area in China.

Prior to her beginning as a DPhil student, Wanlin read for the M.Sc in Higher Education at the University of Oxford and the M.Sc in Management and Enterprise Growth at the University of Glasgow.

Naosuke is a DPhil student whose research interests are Global Englishes and mutual intelligibility in English communication.

Naosuke finished an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition at the University of Oxford with distinction in 2019. His DPhil research focuses on the intelligibility of non-native English speakers. Specifically, he would like to seek what kind of English pronunciation features are critical for successful English communication between non-native English speakers.

Adam, from Ethiopia, is interested in looking at the role of education in peacebuilding and conflicts.

Akira is a DPhil Student in Anthropology affiliated with the School of Anthropology & Museum Ethnography, and associated with both the Department of Education and Nissan Institute of Japanese Studies. He is supervised by David Mills and Roger Goodman.

Akira’s doctoral research rests with the concepts of ‘international’ and ‘global education,’ and is grounded in the recent emergence and growth of International Baccalaureate (IB) education in Japan. Focused on IB educator training across several higher education institutions (HEIs), Akira aims – solely through digital anthropological approaches – to contextualize the everyday negotiations of ‘international’ and ‘global’ knowledge, both by those receiving and administering its training. Considering social, political, economic and cognitive aspects, one key objective of this research hopes to inform educational practitioners and policy-makers of some of the conceptual and social challenges that emerge with dissonant notions of cultivating ‘international’ and ‘global people.’

Akira has been an Associate Researcher at the Graduate School of Teacher Education, Tokyo Gakugei University since autumn 2020, a post he continues to hold until the end of his doctoral degree. He also currently works as an Anthropological Analyst for Contemplative Spaces, a consultancy focused on designing and delivering a range of leadership development initiatives for individuals, groups, and organizational bodies. His future career plans include further anthropological research and establishing consultancy services dedicated to various inclusion-based development initiatives.

Amelia is passionate about access to and the effects of environmental education globally, particularly in the Galápagos Islands of Ecuador.

Because she experienced a wealth of informal and non-formal environmental education from her parents and from explorations growing up in Southern Oregon, she is interested in researching how environmental education manifests in global communities. She fell in love with the Galápagos on a structured university-led trip during her undergraduate studies and realized that there was a dearth of research on social aspects of the communities living on the islands.  Because of this, she pursued research in the Galápagos in 2014 on the prevalence of and access to both formal and informal (provided by numerous NGOs and government agencies) environmental education for students on the islands, and on the level of student environmental literacy in 28 schools.

Her Dphil research focus, under the supervision of Dr. Ann Childs and Dr. Steve Puttick, is on access to and effects of Experiential Environmental Education for students living in the Galápagos Islands, and on the production of research on the social sphere in Galápagos.

Prior to starting her Dphil at Oxford, she worked in alliances and partnerships at tech companies in the San Francisco Bay Area. Most recently, she was the Director of Global Partnerships at Conversica, a conversational AI platform, and cultivated, trained, and drove pipeline with select international resellers in APAC, EMEA, and LATAM, and with regional resellers in the United States. She also assisted with the design and construction of the Conversica partner program.

In her free time, she is a free-lance food photographer, food stylist, food blogger, recipe developer, and gluten free baker for her online blog and social handle, Sisters Sans Gluten (www.sisterssansgluten), which she created with her sister in 2018. She also continues to sing informally and takes voice lessons remotely with instructor Corey Head of San Francisco.

She holds a BA in both Anthropology and Music (vocal performance), and an MA in Latin American Studies from Stanford University. Highlights from Stanford include: playing and touring as a performing member of Stanford Taiko (Japanese ensemble drumming) for four years; singing with the Stanford Chamber Chorale led by Professor Steve Sano; studying voice with Wendy Hillhouse; participating in music department operas; performing in self-organized recitals showcasing western art songs, western musical theater, and Latin American art songs; studying abroad in Santiago, Chile; and learning Quechua during her masters program with Marisol Necochea.

Abdul Karim has completed a Bachelor of Science in Bioengineering and Computational Medicine (Imperial College London), a Bachelor of Medicine and Bachelor of Surgery (Queen Mary University of London), and Master of Science in the Philosophy of Science and Economics (The London School of Economics).

He has delivered lectures on the Philosophy of Human Nature and the History of Metaethics at the University of Cambridge and for Health Education East Midlands. This, in addition to the current positions he holds as a Hospital Doctor and Health Policy and Management Advisor at the University Hospitals of Leicester NHS Trust.

Abdul Karim’s current areas of interest include the biological definition of psychological states relevant to the learning environment, and the influence of language on the variable interpretation of a particular social context. For the latter of which he has published primary research.

Another is the appraisal and deployment of physiological measurement devices in learning environments as a means of quantitatively evaluating psychological states. Such research areas hold promise in enhancing the questionnaire-based evidences of contemporary theories in education, such as those regarding motivation, self-determination and engagement. This will to contribute to the evidence-based public policy optimisation in education and social care.

 

Publications

Ismail, A.K. 2017. A Cross Sectional Study to Explore the Effect of the Linguistic Origin and Evolution of a Language on Patient Interpretation of Haematological Cancers. Advances in Biological Research. 11 (4): 225-232.

Ismail, A.K. 2017. The Origin of the Arabic Medical Term for Cancer. Advances in Biological Research. 11 (4): 198-201.

Ismail, A.K. 2018. The Impact of da Vinci’s Anatomical Drawings and Calculations on Foundation of Orthopaedics. Advances in Biological Research. 12 (1): 26-30.

As a mathematics teacher who believes that anyone can understand mathematics, Ashley is keenly interested in developing interventions and resources for learners who struggle with the subject. More specifically, she is focusing on the transitionary moment in the classroom when discussions have ceased, and practice begins and how this transition can become more fluid for learners.

By drawing on research from education, psychology and cognitive neuroscience, Ashley hopes to gain insights into how the brain and mind process information and how this knowledge can inform teacher practice and, ultimately, help learners understand mathematics.

After having taught for over ten years, Ashley completed her MSc, with Distinction, at the Department of Education, and her dissertation was “Highly Commended” by the British Educational Research Association (BERA). She is committed to making mathematics more accessible for all learners and strives for research that is not only impactful but also directly applicable to the classroom.

I am a Research Project Coordinator and Co-PI at the Department of Education for a project on Education, Purpose and Human Flourishing in Times of Uncertainty (EPHF), and the Templeton World Charity Foundation Fellow in Comparative Education at St Antony’s College, Oxford.

I have a multi-disciplinary background and experience. Academically I am an Art Historian specialising in late 18th and early 19th-century French aesthetics, and prior to my return to academia I had a career in the international finance, entrepreneurial business and high net worth family business sectors. I have published and taught at the University of Oxford on late eighteenth-and early nineteenth century art, history and aesthetics. Drawing on my experience as Lay Chaplain at Somerville College, Oxford I have also published on religious education. In addition to my position in the Education Department I am the Principal Advisor for Strategic Relationships and Partnerships at the Templeton World Charity Foundation Inc where I work closely with other foundations, INGOs and public policy organisations.

Publications List

Xiaona Wang is a DPhil student in Education, at St. Antony’s College, the University of Oxford. Xiaona’s doctoral research is fully funded by the University of Oxford (Clarendon Fund Scholarship and St. Antony’s College The Warden’s Scholarship). She is also a member at the Center for Global Higher Education.

Before her DPhil, Xiaona obtained her M.A degree in Higher Education at Graduate School of Education at Peking University, and B.A at the Faulty of Education from Beijing Normal University in China with first-class honour. She also studied at the University of Manchester as an exchange student in the School of Social Science.

Previously, Xiaona worked at Global Education Cluster in UNICEF, Geneva, where she began her research on the international scientific collaboration between China and Switzerland, and this experience later became the starting point of her master thesis. In her master’s thesis, Xiaona used a longitudinal research method in following a group of Chinese scientists who studied and worked in Switzerland. Through semi-structured interviews, she explored how collaborative relationships between individual scientists began and developed.

Xiaona has strong research interests in the science studies, internationalization and globalization of higher education. Her doctoral research is going to continue to explore the scientific knowledge networks between China and Switzerland under the influence of geopolitical factors.

Wanlin Cai is a DPhil student in higher education and a member of CGHE research group at the Department of Education.

Wanlin’s research interest lies in international higher education, higher education policies and economy, with a specific focus on World-Class Universities.

She is also a member of South China Global Talent Institute, Center for China and Globalisation, where she focuses on the research of talent policy and development in the Great Bay Area in China.

Prior to her beginning as a DPhil student, Wanlin read for the M.Sc in Higher Education at the University of Oxford and the M.Sc in Management and Enterprise Growth at the University of Glasgow.

Naosuke is a DPhil student whose research interests are Global Englishes and mutual intelligibility in English communication.

Naosuke finished an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition at the University of Oxford with distinction in 2019. His DPhil research focuses on the intelligibility of non-native English speakers. Specifically, he would like to seek what kind of English pronunciation features are critical for successful English communication between non-native English speakers.

Adam, from Ethiopia, is interested in looking at the role of education in peacebuilding and conflicts.

Akira is a DPhil Student in Anthropology affiliated with the School of Anthropology & Museum Ethnography, and associated with both the Department of Education and Nissan Institute of Japanese Studies. He is supervised by David Mills and Roger Goodman.

Akira’s doctoral research rests with the concepts of ‘international’ and ‘global education,’ and is grounded in the recent emergence and growth of International Baccalaureate (IB) education in Japan. Focused on IB educator training across several higher education institutions (HEIs), Akira aims – solely through digital anthropological approaches – to contextualize the everyday negotiations of ‘international’ and ‘global’ knowledge, both by those receiving and administering its training. Considering social, political, economic and cognitive aspects, one key objective of this research hopes to inform educational practitioners and policy-makers of some of the conceptual and social challenges that emerge with dissonant notions of cultivating ‘international’ and ‘global people.’

Akira has been an Associate Researcher at the Graduate School of Teacher Education, Tokyo Gakugei University since autumn 2020, a post he continues to hold until the end of his doctoral degree. He also currently works as an Anthropological Analyst for Contemplative Spaces, a consultancy focused on designing and delivering a range of leadership development initiatives for individuals, groups, and organizational bodies. His future career plans include further anthropological research and establishing consultancy services dedicated to various inclusion-based development initiatives.

Amelia is passionate about access to and the effects of environmental education globally, particularly in the Galápagos Islands of Ecuador.

Because she experienced a wealth of informal and non-formal environmental education from her parents and from explorations growing up in Southern Oregon, she is interested in researching how environmental education manifests in global communities. She fell in love with the Galápagos on a structured university-led trip during her undergraduate studies and realized that there was a dearth of research on social aspects of the communities living on the islands.  Because of this, she pursued research in the Galápagos in 2014 on the prevalence of and access to both formal and informal (provided by numerous NGOs and government agencies) environmental education for students on the islands, and on the level of student environmental literacy in 28 schools.

Her Dphil research focus, under the supervision of Dr. Ann Childs and Dr. Steve Puttick, is on access to and effects of Experiential Environmental Education for students living in the Galápagos Islands, and on the production of research on the social sphere in Galápagos.

Prior to starting her Dphil at Oxford, she worked in alliances and partnerships at tech companies in the San Francisco Bay Area. Most recently, she was the Director of Global Partnerships at Conversica, a conversational AI platform, and cultivated, trained, and drove pipeline with select international resellers in APAC, EMEA, and LATAM, and with regional resellers in the United States. She also assisted with the design and construction of the Conversica partner program.

In her free time, she is a free-lance food photographer, food stylist, food blogger, recipe developer, and gluten free baker for her online blog and social handle, Sisters Sans Gluten (www.sisterssansgluten), which she created with her sister in 2018. She also continues to sing informally and takes voice lessons remotely with instructor Corey Head of San Francisco.

She holds a BA in both Anthropology and Music (vocal performance), and an MA in Latin American Studies from Stanford University. Highlights from Stanford include: playing and touring as a performing member of Stanford Taiko (Japanese ensemble drumming) for four years; singing with the Stanford Chamber Chorale led by Professor Steve Sano; studying voice with Wendy Hillhouse; participating in music department operas; performing in self-organized recitals showcasing western art songs, western musical theater, and Latin American art songs; studying abroad in Santiago, Chile; and learning Quechua during her masters program with Marisol Necochea.

Abdul Karim has completed a Bachelor of Science in Bioengineering and Computational Medicine (Imperial College London), a Bachelor of Medicine and Bachelor of Surgery (Queen Mary University of London), and Master of Science in the Philosophy of Science and Economics (The London School of Economics).

He has delivered lectures on the Philosophy of Human Nature and the History of Metaethics at the University of Cambridge and for Health Education East Midlands. This, in addition to the current positions he holds as a Hospital Doctor and Health Policy and Management Advisor at the University Hospitals of Leicester NHS Trust.

Abdul Karim’s current areas of interest include the biological definition of psychological states relevant to the learning environment, and the influence of language on the variable interpretation of a particular social context. For the latter of which he has published primary research.

Another is the appraisal and deployment of physiological measurement devices in learning environments as a means of quantitatively evaluating psychological states. Such research areas hold promise in enhancing the questionnaire-based evidences of contemporary theories in education, such as those regarding motivation, self-determination and engagement. This will to contribute to the evidence-based public policy optimisation in education and social care.

 

Publications

Ismail, A.K. 2017. A Cross Sectional Study to Explore the Effect of the Linguistic Origin and Evolution of a Language on Patient Interpretation of Haematological Cancers. Advances in Biological Research. 11 (4): 225-232.

Ismail, A.K. 2017. The Origin of the Arabic Medical Term for Cancer. Advances in Biological Research. 11 (4): 198-201.

Ismail, A.K. 2018. The Impact of da Vinci’s Anatomical Drawings and Calculations on Foundation of Orthopaedics. Advances in Biological Research. 12 (1): 26-30.

As a mathematics teacher who believes that anyone can understand mathematics, Ashley is keenly interested in developing interventions and resources for learners who struggle with the subject. More specifically, she is focusing on the transitionary moment in the classroom when discussions have ceased, and practice begins and how this transition can become more fluid for learners.

By drawing on research from education, psychology and cognitive neuroscience, Ashley hopes to gain insights into how the brain and mind process information and how this knowledge can inform teacher practice and, ultimately, help learners understand mathematics.

After having taught for over ten years, Ashley completed her MSc, with Distinction, at the Department of Education, and her dissertation was “Highly Commended” by the British Educational Research Association (BERA). She is committed to making mathematics more accessible for all learners and strives for research that is not only impactful but also directly applicable to the classroom.

I am a Research Project Coordinator and Co-PI at the Department of Education for a project on Education, Purpose and Human Flourishing in Times of Uncertainty (EPHF), and the Templeton World Charity Foundation Fellow in Comparative Education at St Antony’s College, Oxford.

I have a multi-disciplinary background and experience. Academically I am an Art Historian specialising in late 18th and early 19th-century French aesthetics, and prior to my return to academia I had a career in the international finance, entrepreneurial business and high net worth family business sectors. I have published and taught at the University of Oxford on late eighteenth-and early nineteenth century art, history and aesthetics. Drawing on my experience as Lay Chaplain at Somerville College, Oxford I have also published on religious education. In addition to my position in the Education Department I am the Principal Advisor for Strategic Relationships and Partnerships at the Templeton World Charity Foundation Inc where I work closely with other foundations, INGOs and public policy organisations.

Publications List

Xiaona Wang is a DPhil student in Education, at St. Antony’s College, the University of Oxford. Xiaona’s doctoral research is fully funded by the University of Oxford (Clarendon Fund Scholarship and St. Antony’s College The Warden’s Scholarship). She is also a member at the Center for Global Higher Education.

Before her DPhil, Xiaona obtained her M.A degree in Higher Education at Graduate School of Education at Peking University, and B.A at the Faulty of Education from Beijing Normal University in China with first-class honour. She also studied at the University of Manchester as an exchange student in the School of Social Science.

Previously, Xiaona worked at Global Education Cluster in UNICEF, Geneva, where she began her research on the international scientific collaboration between China and Switzerland, and this experience later became the starting point of her master thesis. In her master’s thesis, Xiaona used a longitudinal research method in following a group of Chinese scientists who studied and worked in Switzerland. Through semi-structured interviews, she explored how collaborative relationships between individual scientists began and developed.

Xiaona has strong research interests in the science studies, internationalization and globalization of higher education. Her doctoral research is going to continue to explore the scientific knowledge networks between China and Switzerland under the influence of geopolitical factors.

Wanlin Cai is a DPhil student in higher education and a member of CGHE research group at the Department of Education.

Wanlin’s research interest lies in international higher education, higher education policies and economy, with a specific focus on World-Class Universities.

She is also a member of South China Global Talent Institute, Center for China and Globalisation, where she focuses on the research of talent policy and development in the Great Bay Area in China.

Prior to her beginning as a DPhil student, Wanlin read for the M.Sc in Higher Education at the University of Oxford and the M.Sc in Management and Enterprise Growth at the University of Glasgow.

Naosuke is a DPhil student whose research interests are Global Englishes and mutual intelligibility in English communication.

Naosuke finished an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition at the University of Oxford with distinction in 2019. His DPhil research focuses on the intelligibility of non-native English speakers. Specifically, he would like to seek what kind of English pronunciation features are critical for successful English communication between non-native English speakers.

Adam, from Ethiopia, is interested in looking at the role of education in peacebuilding and conflicts.

Akira is a DPhil Student in Anthropology affiliated with the School of Anthropology & Museum Ethnography, and associated with both the Department of Education and Nissan Institute of Japanese Studies. He is supervised by David Mills and Roger Goodman.

Akira’s doctoral research rests with the concepts of ‘international’ and ‘global education,’ and is grounded in the recent emergence and growth of International Baccalaureate (IB) education in Japan. Focused on IB educator training across several higher education institutions (HEIs), Akira aims – solely through digital anthropological approaches – to contextualize the everyday negotiations of ‘international’ and ‘global’ knowledge, both by those receiving and administering its training. Considering social, political, economic and cognitive aspects, one key objective of this research hopes to inform educational practitioners and policy-makers of some of the conceptual and social challenges that emerge with dissonant notions of cultivating ‘international’ and ‘global people.’

Akira has been an Associate Researcher at the Graduate School of Teacher Education, Tokyo Gakugei University since autumn 2020, a post he continues to hold until the end of his doctoral degree. He also currently works as an Anthropological Analyst for Contemplative Spaces, a consultancy focused on designing and delivering a range of leadership development initiatives for individuals, groups, and organizational bodies. His future career plans include further anthropological research and establishing consultancy services dedicated to various inclusion-based development initiatives.

Amelia is passionate about access to and the effects of environmental education globally, particularly in the Galápagos Islands of Ecuador.

Because she experienced a wealth of informal and non-formal environmental education from her parents and from explorations growing up in Southern Oregon, she is interested in researching how environmental education manifests in global communities. She fell in love with the Galápagos on a structured university-led trip during her undergraduate studies and realized that there was a dearth of research on social aspects of the communities living on the islands.  Because of this, she pursued research in the Galápagos in 2014 on the prevalence of and access to both formal and informal (provided by numerous NGOs and government agencies) environmental education for students on the islands, and on the level of student environmental literacy in 28 schools.

Her Dphil research focus, under the supervision of Dr. Ann Childs and Dr. Steve Puttick, is on access to and effects of Experiential Environmental Education for students living in the Galápagos Islands, and on the production of research on the social sphere in Galápagos.

Prior to starting her Dphil at Oxford, she worked in alliances and partnerships at tech companies in the San Francisco Bay Area. Most recently, she was the Director of Global Partnerships at Conversica, a conversational AI platform, and cultivated, trained, and drove pipeline with select international resellers in APAC, EMEA, and LATAM, and with regional resellers in the United States. She also assisted with the design and construction of the Conversica partner program.

In her free time, she is a free-lance food photographer, food stylist, food blogger, recipe developer, and gluten free baker for her online blog and social handle, Sisters Sans Gluten (www.sisterssansgluten), which she created with her sister in 2018. She also continues to sing informally and takes voice lessons remotely with instructor Corey Head of San Francisco.

She holds a BA in both Anthropology and Music (vocal performance), and an MA in Latin American Studies from Stanford University. Highlights from Stanford include: playing and touring as a performing member of Stanford Taiko (Japanese ensemble drumming) for four years; singing with the Stanford Chamber Chorale led by Professor Steve Sano; studying voice with Wendy Hillhouse; participating in music department operas; performing in self-organized recitals showcasing western art songs, western musical theater, and Latin American art songs; studying abroad in Santiago, Chile; and learning Quechua during her masters program with Marisol Necochea.

Abdul Karim has completed a Bachelor of Science in Bioengineering and Computational Medicine (Imperial College London), a Bachelor of Medicine and Bachelor of Surgery (Queen Mary University of London), and Master of Science in the Philosophy of Science and Economics (The London School of Economics).

He has delivered lectures on the Philosophy of Human Nature and the History of Metaethics at the University of Cambridge and for Health Education East Midlands. This, in addition to the current positions he holds as a Hospital Doctor and Health Policy and Management Advisor at the University Hospitals of Leicester NHS Trust.

Abdul Karim’s current areas of interest include the biological definition of psychological states relevant to the learning environment, and the influence of language on the variable interpretation of a particular social context. For the latter of which he has published primary research.

Another is the appraisal and deployment of physiological measurement devices in learning environments as a means of quantitatively evaluating psychological states. Such research areas hold promise in enhancing the questionnaire-based evidences of contemporary theories in education, such as those regarding motivation, self-determination and engagement. This will to contribute to the evidence-based public policy optimisation in education and social care.

 

Publications

Ismail, A.K. 2017. A Cross Sectional Study to Explore the Effect of the Linguistic Origin and Evolution of a Language on Patient Interpretation of Haematological Cancers. Advances in Biological Research. 11 (4): 225-232.

Ismail, A.K. 2017. The Origin of the Arabic Medical Term for Cancer. Advances in Biological Research. 11 (4): 198-201.

Ismail, A.K. 2018. The Impact of da Vinci’s Anatomical Drawings and Calculations on Foundation of Orthopaedics. Advances in Biological Research. 12 (1): 26-30.

As a mathematics teacher who believes that anyone can understand mathematics, Ashley is keenly interested in developing interventions and resources for learners who struggle with the subject. More specifically, she is focusing on the transitionary moment in the classroom when discussions have ceased, and practice begins and how this transition can become more fluid for learners.

By drawing on research from education, psychology and cognitive neuroscience, Ashley hopes to gain insights into how the brain and mind process information and how this knowledge can inform teacher practice and, ultimately, help learners understand mathematics.

After having taught for over ten years, Ashley completed her MSc, with Distinction, at the Department of Education, and her dissertation was “Highly Commended” by the British Educational Research Association (BERA). She is committed to making mathematics more accessible for all learners and strives for research that is not only impactful but also directly applicable to the classroom.

I am a Research Project Coordinator and Co-PI at the Department of Education for a project on Education, Purpose and Human Flourishing in Times of Uncertainty (EPHF), and the Templeton World Charity Foundation Fellow in Comparative Education at St Antony’s College, Oxford.

I have a multi-disciplinary background and experience. Academically I am an Art Historian specialising in late 18th and early 19th-century French aesthetics, and prior to my return to academia I had a career in the international finance, entrepreneurial business and high net worth family business sectors. I have published and taught at the University of Oxford on late eighteenth-and early nineteenth century art, history and aesthetics. Drawing on my experience as Lay Chaplain at Somerville College, Oxford I have also published on religious education. In addition to my position in the Education Department I am the Principal Advisor for Strategic Relationships and Partnerships at the Templeton World Charity Foundation Inc where I work closely with other foundations, INGOs and public policy organisations.

Publications List

Xiaona Wang is a DPhil student in Education, at St. Antony’s College, the University of Oxford. Xiaona’s doctoral research is fully funded by the University of Oxford (Clarendon Fund Scholarship and St. Antony’s College The Warden’s Scholarship). She is also a member at the Center for Global Higher Education.

Before her DPhil, Xiaona obtained her M.A degree in Higher Education at Graduate School of Education at Peking University, and B.A at the Faulty of Education from Beijing Normal University in China with first-class honour. She also studied at the University of Manchester as an exchange student in the School of Social Science.

Previously, Xiaona worked at Global Education Cluster in UNICEF, Geneva, where she began her research on the international scientific collaboration between China and Switzerland, and this experience later became the starting point of her master thesis. In her master’s thesis, Xiaona used a longitudinal research method in following a group of Chinese scientists who studied and worked in Switzerland. Through semi-structured interviews, she explored how collaborative relationships between individual scientists began and developed.

Xiaona has strong research interests in the science studies, internationalization and globalization of higher education. Her doctoral research is going to continue to explore the scientific knowledge networks between China and Switzerland under the influence of geopolitical factors.

Wanlin Cai is a DPhil student in higher education and a member of CGHE research group at the Department of Education.

Wanlin’s research interest lies in international higher education, higher education policies and economy, with a specific focus on World-Class Universities.

She is also a member of South China Global Talent Institute, Center for China and Globalisation, where she focuses on the research of talent policy and development in the Great Bay Area in China.

Prior to her beginning as a DPhil student, Wanlin read for the M.Sc in Higher Education at the University of Oxford and the M.Sc in Management and Enterprise Growth at the University of Glasgow.

Naosuke is a DPhil student whose research interests are Global Englishes and mutual intelligibility in English communication.

Naosuke finished an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition at the University of Oxford with distinction in 2019. His DPhil research focuses on the intelligibility of non-native English speakers. Specifically, he would like to seek what kind of English pronunciation features are critical for successful English communication between non-native English speakers.

Adam, from Ethiopia, is interested in looking at the role of education in peacebuilding and conflicts.

Akira is a DPhil Student in Anthropology affiliated with the School of Anthropology & Museum Ethnography, and associated with both the Department of Education and Nissan Institute of Japanese Studies. He is supervised by David Mills and Roger Goodman.

Akira’s doctoral research rests with the concepts of ‘international’ and ‘global education,’ and is grounded in the recent emergence and growth of International Baccalaureate (IB) education in Japan. Focused on IB educator training across several higher education institutions (HEIs), Akira aims – solely through digital anthropological approaches – to contextualize the everyday negotiations of ‘international’ and ‘global’ knowledge, both by those receiving and administering its training. Considering social, political, economic and cognitive aspects, one key objective of this research hopes to inform educational practitioners and policy-makers of some of the conceptual and social challenges that emerge with dissonant notions of cultivating ‘international’ and ‘global people.’

Akira has been an Associate Researcher at the Graduate School of Teacher Education, Tokyo Gakugei University since autumn 2020, a post he continues to hold until the end of his doctoral degree. He also currently works as an Anthropological Analyst for Contemplative Spaces, a consultancy focused on designing and delivering a range of leadership development initiatives for individuals, groups, and organizational bodies. His future career plans include further anthropological research and establishing consultancy services dedicated to various inclusion-based development initiatives.

Amelia is passionate about access to and the effects of environmental education globally, particularly in the Galápagos Islands of Ecuador.

Because she experienced a wealth of informal and non-formal environmental education from her parents and from explorations growing up in Southern Oregon, she is interested in researching how environmental education manifests in global communities. She fell in love with the Galápagos on a structured university-led trip during her undergraduate studies and realized that there was a dearth of research on social aspects of the communities living on the islands.  Because of this, she pursued research in the Galápagos in 2014 on the prevalence of and access to both formal and informal (provided by numerous NGOs and government agencies) environmental education for students on the islands, and on the level of student environmental literacy in 28 schools.

Her Dphil research focus, under the supervision of Dr. Ann Childs and Dr. Steve Puttick, is on access to and effects of Experiential Environmental Education for students living in the Galápagos Islands, and on the production of research on the social sphere in Galápagos.

Prior to starting her Dphil at Oxford, she worked in alliances and partnerships at tech companies in the San Francisco Bay Area. Most recently, she was the Director of Global Partnerships at Conversica, a conversational AI platform, and cultivated, trained, and drove pipeline with select international resellers in APAC, EMEA, and LATAM, and with regional resellers in the United States. She also assisted with the design and construction of the Conversica partner program.

In her free time, she is a free-lance food photographer, food stylist, food blogger, recipe developer, and gluten free baker for her online blog and social handle, Sisters Sans Gluten (www.sisterssansgluten), which she created with her sister in 2018. She also continues to sing informally and takes voice lessons remotely with instructor Corey Head of San Francisco.

She holds a BA in both Anthropology and Music (vocal performance), and an MA in Latin American Studies from Stanford University. Highlights from Stanford include: playing and touring as a performing member of Stanford Taiko (Japanese ensemble drumming) for four years; singing with the Stanford Chamber Chorale led by Professor Steve Sano; studying voice with Wendy Hillhouse; participating in music department operas; performing in self-organized recitals showcasing western art songs, western musical theater, and Latin American art songs; studying abroad in Santiago, Chile; and learning Quechua during her masters program with Marisol Necochea.

Abdul Karim has completed a Bachelor of Science in Bioengineering and Computational Medicine (Imperial College London), a Bachelor of Medicine and Bachelor of Surgery (Queen Mary University of London), and Master of Science in the Philosophy of Science and Economics (The London School of Economics).

He has delivered lectures on the Philosophy of Human Nature and the History of Metaethics at the University of Cambridge and for Health Education East Midlands. This, in addition to the current positions he holds as a Hospital Doctor and Health Policy and Management Advisor at the University Hospitals of Leicester NHS Trust.

Abdul Karim’s current areas of interest include the biological definition of psychological states relevant to the learning environment, and the influence of language on the variable interpretation of a particular social context. For the latter of which he has published primary research.

Another is the appraisal and deployment of physiological measurement devices in learning environments as a means of quantitatively evaluating psychological states. Such research areas hold promise in enhancing the questionnaire-based evidences of contemporary theories in education, such as those regarding motivation, self-determination and engagement. This will to contribute to the evidence-based public policy optimisation in education and social care.

 

Publications

Ismail, A.K. 2017. A Cross Sectional Study to Explore the Effect of the Linguistic Origin and Evolution of a Language on Patient Interpretation of Haematological Cancers. Advances in Biological Research. 11 (4): 225-232.

Ismail, A.K. 2017. The Origin of the Arabic Medical Term for Cancer. Advances in Biological Research. 11 (4): 198-201.

Ismail, A.K. 2018. The Impact of da Vinci’s Anatomical Drawings and Calculations on Foundation of Orthopaedics. Advances in Biological Research. 12 (1): 26-30.

As a mathematics teacher who believes that anyone can understand mathematics, Ashley is keenly interested in developing interventions and resources for learners who struggle with the subject. More specifically, she is focusing on the transitionary moment in the classroom when discussions have ceased, and practice begins and how this transition can become more fluid for learners.

By drawing on research from education, psychology and cognitive neuroscience, Ashley hopes to gain insights into how the brain and mind process information and how this knowledge can inform teacher practice and, ultimately, help learners understand mathematics.

After having taught for over ten years, Ashley completed her MSc, with Distinction, at the Department of Education, and her dissertation was “Highly Commended” by the British Educational Research Association (BERA). She is committed to making mathematics more accessible for all learners and strives for research that is not only impactful but also directly applicable to the classroom.

I am a Research Project Coordinator and Co-PI at the Department of Education for a project on Education, Purpose and Human Flourishing in Times of Uncertainty (EPHF), and the Templeton World Charity Foundation Fellow in Comparative Education at St Antony’s College, Oxford.

I have a multi-disciplinary background and experience. Academically I am an Art Historian specialising in late 18th and early 19th-century French aesthetics, and prior to my return to academia I had a career in the international finance, entrepreneurial business and high net worth family business sectors. I have published and taught at the University of Oxford on late eighteenth-and early nineteenth century art, history and aesthetics. Drawing on my experience as Lay Chaplain at Somerville College, Oxford I have also published on religious education. In addition to my position in the Education Department I am the Principal Advisor for Strategic Relationships and Partnerships at the Templeton World Charity Foundation Inc where I work closely with other foundations, INGOs and public policy organisations.

Publications List

Xiaona Wang is a DPhil student in Education, at St. Antony’s College, the University of Oxford. Xiaona’s doctoral research is fully funded by the University of Oxford (Clarendon Fund Scholarship and St. Antony’s College The Warden’s Scholarship). She is also a member at the Center for Global Higher Education.

Before her DPhil, Xiaona obtained her M.A degree in Higher Education at Graduate School of Education at Peking University, and B.A at the Faulty of Education from Beijing Normal University in China with first-class honour. She also studied at the University of Manchester as an exchange student in the School of Social Science.

Previously, Xiaona worked at Global Education Cluster in UNICEF, Geneva, where she began her research on the international scientific collaboration between China and Switzerland, and this experience later became the starting point of her master thesis. In her master’s thesis, Xiaona used a longitudinal research method in following a group of Chinese scientists who studied and worked in Switzerland. Through semi-structured interviews, she explored how collaborative relationships between individual scientists began and developed.

Xiaona has strong research interests in the science studies, internationalization and globalization of higher education. Her doctoral research is going to continue to explore the scientific knowledge networks between China and Switzerland under the influence of geopolitical factors.

Wanlin Cai is a DPhil student in higher education and a member of CGHE research group at the Department of Education.

Wanlin’s research interest lies in international higher education, higher education policies and economy, with a specific focus on World-Class Universities.

She is also a member of South China Global Talent Institute, Center for China and Globalisation, where she focuses on the research of talent policy and development in the Great Bay Area in China.

Prior to her beginning as a DPhil student, Wanlin read for the M.Sc in Higher Education at the University of Oxford and the M.Sc in Management and Enterprise Growth at the University of Glasgow.

Naosuke is a DPhil student whose research interests are Global Englishes and mutual intelligibility in English communication.

Naosuke finished an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition at the University of Oxford with distinction in 2019. His DPhil research focuses on the intelligibility of non-native English speakers. Specifically, he would like to seek what kind of English pronunciation features are critical for successful English communication between non-native English speakers.

Adam, from Ethiopia, is interested in looking at the role of education in peacebuilding and conflicts.

Akira is a DPhil Student in Anthropology affiliated with the School of Anthropology & Museum Ethnography, and associated with both the Department of Education and Nissan Institute of Japanese Studies. He is supervised by David Mills and Roger Goodman.

Akira’s doctoral research rests with the concepts of ‘international’ and ‘global education,’ and is grounded in the recent emergence and growth of International Baccalaureate (IB) education in Japan. Focused on IB educator training across several higher education institutions (HEIs), Akira aims – solely through digital anthropological approaches – to contextualize the everyday negotiations of ‘international’ and ‘global’ knowledge, both by those receiving and administering its training. Considering social, political, economic and cognitive aspects, one key objective of this research hopes to inform educational practitioners and policy-makers of some of the conceptual and social challenges that emerge with dissonant notions of cultivating ‘international’ and ‘global people.’

Akira has been an Associate Researcher at the Graduate School of Teacher Education, Tokyo Gakugei University since autumn 2020, a post he continues to hold until the end of his doctoral degree. He also currently works as an Anthropological Analyst for Contemplative Spaces, a consultancy focused on designing and delivering a range of leadership development initiatives for individuals, groups, and organizational bodies. His future career plans include further anthropological research and establishing consultancy services dedicated to various inclusion-based development initiatives.

Amelia is passionate about access to and the effects of environmental education globally, particularly in the Galápagos Islands of Ecuador.

Because she experienced a wealth of informal and non-formal environmental education from her parents and from explorations growing up in Southern Oregon, she is interested in researching how environmental education manifests in global communities. She fell in love with the Galápagos on a structured university-led trip during her undergraduate studies and realized that there was a dearth of research on social aspects of the communities living on the islands.  Because of this, she pursued research in the Galápagos in 2014 on the prevalence of and access to both formal and informal (provided by numerous NGOs and government agencies) environmental education for students on the islands, and on the level of student environmental literacy in 28 schools.

Her Dphil research focus, under the supervision of Dr. Ann Childs and Dr. Steve Puttick, is on access to and effects of Experiential Environmental Education for students living in the Galápagos Islands, and on the production of research on the social sphere in Galápagos.

Prior to starting her Dphil at Oxford, she worked in alliances and partnerships at tech companies in the San Francisco Bay Area. Most recently, she was the Director of Global Partnerships at Conversica, a conversational AI platform, and cultivated, trained, and drove pipeline with select international resellers in APAC, EMEA, and LATAM, and with regional resellers in the United States. She also assisted with the design and construction of the Conversica partner program.

In her free time, she is a free-lance food photographer, food stylist, food blogger, recipe developer, and gluten free baker for her online blog and social handle, Sisters Sans Gluten (www.sisterssansgluten), which she created with her sister in 2018. She also continues to sing informally and takes voice lessons remotely with instructor Corey Head of San Francisco.

She holds a BA in both Anthropology and Music (vocal performance), and an MA in Latin American Studies from Stanford University. Highlights from Stanford include: playing and touring as a performing member of Stanford Taiko (Japanese ensemble drumming) for four years; singing with the Stanford Chamber Chorale led by Professor Steve Sano; studying voice with Wendy Hillhouse; participating in music department operas; performing in self-organized recitals showcasing western art songs, western musical theater, and Latin American art songs; studying abroad in Santiago, Chile; and learning Quechua during her masters program with Marisol Necochea.

Abdul Karim has completed a Bachelor of Science in Bioengineering and Computational Medicine (Imperial College London), a Bachelor of Medicine and Bachelor of Surgery (Queen Mary University of London), and Master of Science in the Philosophy of Science and Economics (The London School of Economics).

He has delivered lectures on the Philosophy of Human Nature and the History of Metaethics at the University of Cambridge and for Health Education East Midlands. This, in addition to the current positions he holds as a Hospital Doctor and Health Policy and Management Advisor at the University Hospitals of Leicester NHS Trust.

Abdul Karim’s current areas of interest include the biological definition of psychological states relevant to the learning environment, and the influence of language on the variable interpretation of a particular social context. For the latter of which he has published primary research.

Another is the appraisal and deployment of physiological measurement devices in learning environments as a means of quantitatively evaluating psychological states. Such research areas hold promise in enhancing the questionnaire-based evidences of contemporary theories in education, such as those regarding motivation, self-determination and engagement. This will to contribute to the evidence-based public policy optimisation in education and social care.

 

Publications

Ismail, A.K. 2017. A Cross Sectional Study to Explore the Effect of the Linguistic Origin and Evolution of a Language on Patient Interpretation of Haematological Cancers. Advances in Biological Research. 11 (4): 225-232.

Ismail, A.K. 2017. The Origin of the Arabic Medical Term for Cancer. Advances in Biological Research. 11 (4): 198-201.

Ismail, A.K. 2018. The Impact of da Vinci’s Anatomical Drawings and Calculations on Foundation of Orthopaedics. Advances in Biological Research. 12 (1): 26-30.

As a mathematics teacher who believes that anyone can understand mathematics, Ashley is keenly interested in developing interventions and resources for learners who struggle with the subject. More specifically, she is focusing on the transitionary moment in the classroom when discussions have ceased, and practice begins and how this transition can become more fluid for learners.

By drawing on research from education, psychology and cognitive neuroscience, Ashley hopes to gain insights into how the brain and mind process information and how this knowledge can inform teacher practice and, ultimately, help learners understand mathematics.

After having taught for over ten years, Ashley completed her MSc, with Distinction, at the Department of Education, and her dissertation was “Highly Commended” by the British Educational Research Association (BERA). She is committed to making mathematics more accessible for all learners and strives for research that is not only impactful but also directly applicable to the classroom.

I am a Research Project Coordinator and Co-PI at the Department of Education for a project on Education, Purpose and Human Flourishing in Times of Uncertainty (EPHF), and the Templeton World Charity Foundation Fellow in Comparative Education at St Antony’s College, Oxford.

I have a multi-disciplinary background and experience. Academically I am an Art Historian specialising in late 18th and early 19th-century French aesthetics, and prior to my return to academia I had a career in the international finance, entrepreneurial business and high net worth family business sectors. I have published and taught at the University of Oxford on late eighteenth-and early nineteenth century art, history and aesthetics. Drawing on my experience as Lay Chaplain at Somerville College, Oxford I have also published on religious education. In addition to my position in the Education Department I am the Principal Advisor for Strategic Relationships and Partnerships at the Templeton World Charity Foundation Inc where I work closely with other foundations, INGOs and public policy organisations.

Publications List

Xiaona Wang is a DPhil student in Education, at St. Antony’s College, the University of Oxford. Xiaona’s doctoral research is fully funded by the University of Oxford (Clarendon Fund Scholarship and St. Antony’s College The Warden’s Scholarship). She is also a member at the Center for Global Higher Education.

Before her DPhil, Xiaona obtained her M.A degree in Higher Education at Graduate School of Education at Peking University, and B.A at the Faulty of Education from Beijing Normal University in China with first-class honour. She also studied at the University of Manchester as an exchange student in the School of Social Science.

Previously, Xiaona worked at Global Education Cluster in UNICEF, Geneva, where she began her research on the international scientific collaboration between China and Switzerland, and this experience later became the starting point of her master thesis. In her master’s thesis, Xiaona used a longitudinal research method in following a group of Chinese scientists who studied and worked in Switzerland. Through semi-structured interviews, she explored how collaborative relationships between individual scientists began and developed.

Xiaona has strong research interests in the science studies, internationalization and globalization of higher education. Her doctoral research is going to continue to explore the scientific knowledge networks between China and Switzerland under the influence of geopolitical factors.

Wanlin Cai is a DPhil student in higher education and a member of CGHE research group at the Department of Education.

Wanlin’s research interest lies in international higher education, higher education policies and economy, with a specific focus on World-Class Universities.

She is also a member of South China Global Talent Institute, Center for China and Globalisation, where she focuses on the research of talent policy and development in the Great Bay Area in China.

Prior to her beginning as a DPhil student, Wanlin read for the M.Sc in Higher Education at the University of Oxford and the M.Sc in Management and Enterprise Growth at the University of Glasgow.

Naosuke is a DPhil student whose research interests are Global Englishes and mutual intelligibility in English communication.

Naosuke finished an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition at the University of Oxford with distinction in 2019. His DPhil research focuses on the intelligibility of non-native English speakers. Specifically, he would like to seek what kind of English pronunciation features are critical for successful English communication between non-native English speakers.

Adam, from Ethiopia, is interested in looking at the role of education in peacebuilding and conflicts.

Akira is a DPhil Student in Anthropology affiliated with the School of Anthropology & Museum Ethnography, and associated with both the Department of Education and Nissan Institute of Japanese Studies. He is supervised by David Mills and Roger Goodman.

Akira’s doctoral research rests with the concepts of ‘international’ and ‘global education,’ and is grounded in the recent emergence and growth of International Baccalaureate (IB) education in Japan. Focused on IB educator training across several higher education institutions (HEIs), Akira aims – solely through digital anthropological approaches – to contextualize the everyday negotiations of ‘international’ and ‘global’ knowledge, both by those receiving and administering its training. Considering social, political, economic and cognitive aspects, one key objective of this research hopes to inform educational practitioners and policy-makers of some of the conceptual and social challenges that emerge with dissonant notions of cultivating ‘international’ and ‘global people.’

Akira has been an Associate Researcher at the Graduate School of Teacher Education, Tokyo Gakugei University since autumn 2020, a post he continues to hold until the end of his doctoral degree. He also currently works as an Anthropological Analyst for Contemplative Spaces, a consultancy focused on designing and delivering a range of leadership development initiatives for individuals, groups, and organizational bodies. His future career plans include further anthropological research and establishing consultancy services dedicated to various inclusion-based development initiatives.

Amelia is passionate about access to and the effects of environmental education globally, particularly in the Galápagos Islands of Ecuador.

Because she experienced a wealth of informal and non-formal environmental education from her parents and from explorations growing up in Southern Oregon, she is interested in researching how environmental education manifests in global communities. She fell in love with the Galápagos on a structured university-led trip during her undergraduate studies and realized that there was a dearth of research on social aspects of the communities living on the islands.  Because of this, she pursued research in the Galápagos in 2014 on the prevalence of and access to both formal and informal (provided by numerous NGOs and government agencies) environmental education for students on the islands, and on the level of student environmental literacy in 28 schools.

Her Dphil research focus, under the supervision of Dr. Ann Childs and Dr. Steve Puttick, is on access to and effects of Experiential Environmental Education for students living in the Galápagos Islands, and on the production of research on the social sphere in Galápagos.

Prior to starting her Dphil at Oxford, she worked in alliances and partnerships at tech companies in the San Francisco Bay Area. Most recently, she was the Director of Global Partnerships at Conversica, a conversational AI platform, and cultivated, trained, and drove pipeline with select international resellers in APAC, EMEA, and LATAM, and with regional resellers in the United States. She also assisted with the design and construction of the Conversica partner program.

In her free time, she is a free-lance food photographer, food stylist, food blogger, recipe developer, and gluten free baker for her online blog and social handle, Sisters Sans Gluten (www.sisterssansgluten), which she created with her sister in 2018. She also continues to sing informally and takes voice lessons remotely with instructor Corey Head of San Francisco.

She holds a BA in both Anthropology and Music (vocal performance), and an MA in Latin American Studies from Stanford University. Highlights from Stanford include: playing and touring as a performing member of Stanford Taiko (Japanese ensemble drumming) for four years; singing with the Stanford Chamber Chorale led by Professor Steve Sano; studying voice with Wendy Hillhouse; participating in music department operas; performing in self-organized recitals showcasing western art songs, western musical theater, and Latin American art songs; studying abroad in Santiago, Chile; and learning Quechua during her masters program with Marisol Necochea.

Abdul Karim has completed a Bachelor of Science in Bioengineering and Computational Medicine (Imperial College London), a Bachelor of Medicine and Bachelor of Surgery (Queen Mary University of London), and Master of Science in the Philosophy of Science and Economics (The London School of Economics).

He has delivered lectures on the Philosophy of Human Nature and the History of Metaethics at the University of Cambridge and for Health Education East Midlands. This, in addition to the current positions he holds as a Hospital Doctor and Health Policy and Management Advisor at the University Hospitals of Leicester NHS Trust.

Abdul Karim’s current areas of interest include the biological definition of psychological states relevant to the learning environment, and the influence of language on the variable interpretation of a particular social context. For the latter of which he has published primary research.

Another is the appraisal and deployment of physiological measurement devices in learning environments as a means of quantitatively evaluating psychological states. Such research areas hold promise in enhancing the questionnaire-based evidences of contemporary theories in education, such as those regarding motivation, self-determination and engagement. This will to contribute to the evidence-based public policy optimisation in education and social care.

 

Publications

Ismail, A.K. 2017. A Cross Sectional Study to Explore the Effect of the Linguistic Origin and Evolution of a Language on Patient Interpretation of Haematological Cancers. Advances in Biological Research. 11 (4): 225-232.

Ismail, A.K. 2017. The Origin of the Arabic Medical Term for Cancer. Advances in Biological Research. 11 (4): 198-201.

Ismail, A.K. 2018. The Impact of da Vinci’s Anatomical Drawings and Calculations on Foundation of Orthopaedics. Advances in Biological Research. 12 (1): 26-30.

As a mathematics teacher who believes that anyone can understand mathematics, Ashley is keenly interested in developing interventions and resources for learners who struggle with the subject. More specifically, she is focusing on the transitionary moment in the classroom when discussions have ceased, and practice begins and how this transition can become more fluid for learners.

By drawing on research from education, psychology and cognitive neuroscience, Ashley hopes to gain insights into how the brain and mind process information and how this knowledge can inform teacher practice and, ultimately, help learners understand mathematics.

After having taught for over ten years, Ashley completed her MSc, with Distinction, at the Department of Education, and her dissertation was “Highly Commended” by the British Educational Research Association (BERA). She is committed to making mathematics more accessible for all learners and strives for research that is not only impactful but also directly applicable to the classroom.

I am a Research Project Coordinator and Co-PI at the Department of Education for a project on Education, Purpose and Human Flourishing in Times of Uncertainty (EPHF), and the Templeton World Charity Foundation Fellow in Comparative Education at St Antony’s College, Oxford.

I have a multi-disciplinary background and experience. Academically I am an Art Historian specialising in late 18th and early 19th-century French aesthetics, and prior to my return to academia I had a career in the international finance, entrepreneurial business and high net worth family business sectors. I have published and taught at the University of Oxford on late eighteenth-and early nineteenth century art, history and aesthetics. Drawing on my experience as Lay Chaplain at Somerville College, Oxford I have also published on religious education. In addition to my position in the Education Department I am the Principal Advisor for Strategic Relationships and Partnerships at the Templeton World Charity Foundation Inc where I work closely with other foundations, INGOs and public policy organisations.

Publications List

Xiaona Wang is a DPhil student in Education, at St. Antony’s College, the University of Oxford. Xiaona’s doctoral research is fully funded by the University of Oxford (Clarendon Fund Scholarship and St. Antony’s College The Warden’s Scholarship). She is also a member at the Center for Global Higher Education.

Before her DPhil, Xiaona obtained her M.A degree in Higher Education at Graduate School of Education at Peking University, and B.A at the Faulty of Education from Beijing Normal University in China with first-class honour. She also studied at the University of Manchester as an exchange student in the School of Social Science.

Previously, Xiaona worked at Global Education Cluster in UNICEF, Geneva, where she began her research on the international scientific collaboration between China and Switzerland, and this experience later became the starting point of her master thesis. In her master’s thesis, Xiaona used a longitudinal research method in following a group of Chinese scientists who studied and worked in Switzerland. Through semi-structured interviews, she explored how collaborative relationships between individual scientists began and developed.

Xiaona has strong research interests in the science studies, internationalization and globalization of higher education. Her doctoral research is going to continue to explore the scientific knowledge networks between China and Switzerland under the influence of geopolitical factors.

Wanlin Cai is a DPhil student in higher education and a member of CGHE research group at the Department of Education.

Wanlin’s research interest lies in international higher education, higher education policies and economy, with a specific focus on World-Class Universities.

She is also a member of South China Global Talent Institute, Center for China and Globalisation, where she focuses on the research of talent policy and development in the Great Bay Area in China.

Prior to her beginning as a DPhil student, Wanlin read for the M.Sc in Higher Education at the University of Oxford and the M.Sc in Management and Enterprise Growth at the University of Glasgow.

Naosuke is a DPhil student whose research interests are Global Englishes and mutual intelligibility in English communication.

Naosuke finished an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition at the University of Oxford with distinction in 2019. His DPhil research focuses on the intelligibility of non-native English speakers. Specifically, he would like to seek what kind of English pronunciation features are critical for successful English communication between non-native English speakers.

Adam, from Ethiopia, is interested in looking at the role of education in peacebuilding and conflicts.

Akira is a DPhil Student in Anthropology affiliated with the School of Anthropology & Museum Ethnography, and associated with both the Department of Education and Nissan Institute of Japanese Studies. He is supervised by David Mills and Roger Goodman.

Akira’s doctoral research rests with the concepts of ‘international’ and ‘global education,’ and is grounded in the recent emergence and growth of International Baccalaureate (IB) education in Japan. Focused on IB educator training across several higher education institutions (HEIs), Akira aims – solely through digital anthropological approaches – to contextualize the everyday negotiations of ‘international’ and ‘global’ knowledge, both by those receiving and administering its training. Considering social, political, economic and cognitive aspects, one key objective of this research hopes to inform educational practitioners and policy-makers of some of the conceptual and social challenges that emerge with dissonant notions of cultivating ‘international’ and ‘global people.’

Akira has been an Associate Researcher at the Graduate School of Teacher Education, Tokyo Gakugei University since autumn 2020, a post he continues to hold until the end of his doctoral degree. He also currently works as an Anthropological Analyst for Contemplative Spaces, a consultancy focused on designing and delivering a range of leadership development initiatives for individuals, groups, and organizational bodies. His future career plans include further anthropological research and establishing consultancy services dedicated to various inclusion-based development initiatives.

Amelia is passionate about access to and the effects of environmental education globally, particularly in the Galápagos Islands of Ecuador.

Because she experienced a wealth of informal and non-formal environmental education from her parents and from explorations growing up in Southern Oregon, she is interested in researching how environmental education manifests in global communities. She fell in love with the Galápagos on a structured university-led trip during her undergraduate studies and realized that there was a dearth of research on social aspects of the communities living on the islands.  Because of this, she pursued research in the Galápagos in 2014 on the prevalence of and access to both formal and informal (provided by numerous NGOs and government agencies) environmental education for students on the islands, and on the level of student environmental literacy in 28 schools.

Her Dphil research focus, under the supervision of Dr. Ann Childs and Dr. Steve Puttick, is on access to and effects of Experiential Environmental Education for students living in the Galápagos Islands, and on the production of research on the social sphere in Galápagos.

Prior to starting her Dphil at Oxford, she worked in alliances and partnerships at tech companies in the San Francisco Bay Area. Most recently, she was the Director of Global Partnerships at Conversica, a conversational AI platform, and cultivated, trained, and drove pipeline with select international resellers in APAC, EMEA, and LATAM, and with regional resellers in the United States. She also assisted with the design and construction of the Conversica partner program.

In her free time, she is a free-lance food photographer, food stylist, food blogger, recipe developer, and gluten free baker for her online blog and social handle, Sisters Sans Gluten (www.sisterssansgluten), which she created with her sister in 2018. She also continues to sing informally and takes voice lessons remotely with instructor Corey Head of San Francisco.

She holds a BA in both Anthropology and Music (vocal performance), and an MA in Latin American Studies from Stanford University. Highlights from Stanford include: playing and touring as a performing member of Stanford Taiko (Japanese ensemble drumming) for four years; singing with the Stanford Chamber Chorale led by Professor Steve Sano; studying voice with Wendy Hillhouse; participating in music department operas; performing in self-organized recitals showcasing western art songs, western musical theater, and Latin American art songs; studying abroad in Santiago, Chile; and learning Quechua during her masters program with Marisol Necochea.

Abdul Karim has completed a Bachelor of Science in Bioengineering and Computational Medicine (Imperial College London), a Bachelor of Medicine and Bachelor of Surgery (Queen Mary University of London), and Master of Science in the Philosophy of Science and Economics (The London School of Economics).

He has delivered lectures on the Philosophy of Human Nature and the History of Metaethics at the University of Cambridge and for Health Education East Midlands. This, in addition to the current positions he holds as a Hospital Doctor and Health Policy and Management Advisor at the University Hospitals of Leicester NHS Trust.

Abdul Karim’s current areas of interest include the biological definition of psychological states relevant to the learning environment, and the influence of language on the variable interpretation of a particular social context. For the latter of which he has published primary research.

Another is the appraisal and deployment of physiological measurement devices in learning environments as a means of quantitatively evaluating psychological states. Such research areas hold promise in enhancing the questionnaire-based evidences of contemporary theories in education, such as those regarding motivation, self-determination and engagement. This will to contribute to the evidence-based public policy optimisation in education and social care.

 

Publications

Ismail, A.K. 2017. A Cross Sectional Study to Explore the Effect of the Linguistic Origin and Evolution of a Language on Patient Interpretation of Haematological Cancers. Advances in Biological Research. 11 (4): 225-232.

Ismail, A.K. 2017. The Origin of the Arabic Medical Term for Cancer. Advances in Biological Research. 11 (4): 198-201.

Ismail, A.K. 2018. The Impact of da Vinci’s Anatomical Drawings and Calculations on Foundation of Orthopaedics. Advances in Biological Research. 12 (1): 26-30.

As a mathematics teacher who believes that anyone can understand mathematics, Ashley is keenly interested in developing interventions and resources for learners who struggle with the subject. More specifically, she is focusing on the transitionary moment in the classroom when discussions have ceased, and practice begins and how this transition can become more fluid for learners.

By drawing on research from education, psychology and cognitive neuroscience, Ashley hopes to gain insights into how the brain and mind process information and how this knowledge can inform teacher practice and, ultimately, help learners understand mathematics.

After having taught for over ten years, Ashley completed her MSc, with Distinction, at the Department of Education, and her dissertation was “Highly Commended” by the British Educational Research Association (BERA). She is committed to making mathematics more accessible for all learners and strives for research that is not only impactful but also directly applicable to the classroom.

I am a Research Project Coordinator and Co-PI at the Department of Education for a project on Education, Purpose and Human Flourishing in Times of Uncertainty (EPHF), and the Templeton World Charity Foundation Fellow in Comparative Education at St Antony’s College, Oxford.

I have a multi-disciplinary background and experience. Academically I am an Art Historian specialising in late 18th and early 19th-century French aesthetics, and prior to my return to academia I had a career in the international finance, entrepreneurial business and high net worth family business sectors. I have published and taught at the University of Oxford on late eighteenth-and early nineteenth century art, history and aesthetics. Drawing on my experience as Lay Chaplain at Somerville College, Oxford I have also published on religious education. In addition to my position in the Education Department I am the Principal Advisor for Strategic Relationships and Partnerships at the Templeton World Charity Foundation Inc where I work closely with other foundations, INGOs and public policy organisations.

Publications List

Xiaona Wang is a DPhil student in Education, at St. Antony’s College, the University of Oxford. Xiaona’s doctoral research is fully funded by the University of Oxford (Clarendon Fund Scholarship and St. Antony’s College The Warden’s Scholarship). She is also a member at the Center for Global Higher Education.

Before her DPhil, Xiaona obtained her M.A degree in Higher Education at Graduate School of Education at Peking University, and B.A at the Faulty of Education from Beijing Normal University in China with first-class honour. She also studied at the University of Manchester as an exchange student in the School of Social Science.

Previously, Xiaona worked at Global Education Cluster in UNICEF, Geneva, where she began her research on the international scientific collaboration between China and Switzerland, and this experience later became the starting point of her master thesis. In her master’s thesis, Xiaona used a longitudinal research method in following a group of Chinese scientists who studied and worked in Switzerland. Through semi-structured interviews, she explored how collaborative relationships between individual scientists began and developed.

Xiaona has strong research interests in the science studies, internationalization and globalization of higher education. Her doctoral research is going to continue to explore the scientific knowledge networks between China and Switzerland under the influence of geopolitical factors.

Wanlin Cai is a DPhil student in higher education and a member of CGHE research group at the Department of Education.

Wanlin’s research interest lies in international higher education, higher education policies and economy, with a specific focus on World-Class Universities.

She is also a member of South China Global Talent Institute, Center for China and Globalisation, where she focuses on the research of talent policy and development in the Great Bay Area in China.

Prior to her beginning as a DPhil student, Wanlin read for the M.Sc in Higher Education at the University of Oxford and the M.Sc in Management and Enterprise Growth at the University of Glasgow.

Naosuke is a DPhil student whose research interests are Global Englishes and mutual intelligibility in English communication.

Naosuke finished an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition at the University of Oxford with distinction in 2019. His DPhil research focuses on the intelligibility of non-native English speakers. Specifically, he would like to seek what kind of English pronunciation features are critical for successful English communication between non-native English speakers.

Adam, from Ethiopia, is interested in looking at the role of education in peacebuilding and conflicts.

Akira is a DPhil Student in Anthropology affiliated with the School of Anthropology & Museum Ethnography, and associated with both the Department of Education and Nissan Institute of Japanese Studies. He is supervised by David Mills and Roger Goodman.

Akira’s doctoral research rests with the concepts of ‘international’ and ‘global education,’ and is grounded in the recent emergence and growth of International Baccalaureate (IB) education in Japan. Focused on IB educator training across several higher education institutions (HEIs), Akira aims – solely through digital anthropological approaches – to contextualize the everyday negotiations of ‘international’ and ‘global’ knowledge, both by those receiving and administering its training. Considering social, political, economic and cognitive aspects, one key objective of this research hopes to inform educational practitioners and policy-makers of some of the conceptual and social challenges that emerge with dissonant notions of cultivating ‘international’ and ‘global people.’

Akira has been an Associate Researcher at the Graduate School of Teacher Education, Tokyo Gakugei University since autumn 2020, a post he continues to hold until the end of his doctoral degree. He also currently works as an Anthropological Analyst for Contemplative Spaces, a consultancy focused on designing and delivering a range of leadership development initiatives for individuals, groups, and organizational bodies. His future career plans include further anthropological research and establishing consultancy services dedicated to various inclusion-based development initiatives.

Amelia is passionate about access to and the effects of environmental education globally, particularly in the Galápagos Islands of Ecuador.

Because she experienced a wealth of informal and non-formal environmental education from her parents and from explorations growing up in Southern Oregon, she is interested in researching how environmental education manifests in global communities. She fell in love with the Galápagos on a structured university-led trip during her undergraduate studies and realized that there was a dearth of research on social aspects of the communities living on the islands.  Because of this, she pursued research in the Galápagos in 2014 on the prevalence of and access to both formal and informal (provided by numerous NGOs and government agencies) environmental education for students on the islands, and on the level of student environmental literacy in 28 schools.

Her Dphil research focus, under the supervision of Dr. Ann Childs and Dr. Steve Puttick, is on access to and effects of Experiential Environmental Education for students living in the Galápagos Islands, and on the production of research on the social sphere in Galápagos.

Prior to starting her Dphil at Oxford, she worked in alliances and partnerships at tech companies in the San Francisco Bay Area. Most recently, she was the Director of Global Partnerships at Conversica, a conversational AI platform, and cultivated, trained, and drove pipeline with select international resellers in APAC, EMEA, and LATAM, and with regional resellers in the United States. She also assisted with the design and construction of the Conversica partner program.

In her free time, she is a free-lance food photographer, food stylist, food blogger, recipe developer, and gluten free baker for her online blog and social handle, Sisters Sans Gluten (www.sisterssansgluten), which she created with her sister in 2018. She also continues to sing informally and takes voice lessons remotely with instructor Corey Head of San Francisco.

She holds a BA in both Anthropology and Music (vocal performance), and an MA in Latin American Studies from Stanford University. Highlights from Stanford include: playing and touring as a performing member of Stanford Taiko (Japanese ensemble drumming) for four years; singing with the Stanford Chamber Chorale led by Professor Steve Sano; studying voice with Wendy Hillhouse; participating in music department operas; performing in self-organized recitals showcasing western art songs, western musical theater, and Latin American art songs; studying abroad in Santiago, Chile; and learning Quechua during her masters program with Marisol Necochea.

Abdul Karim has completed a Bachelor of Science in Bioengineering and Computational Medicine (Imperial College London), a Bachelor of Medicine and Bachelor of Surgery (Queen Mary University of London), and Master of Science in the Philosophy of Science and Economics (The London School of Economics).

He has delivered lectures on the Philosophy of Human Nature and the History of Metaethics at the University of Cambridge and for Health Education East Midlands. This, in addition to the current positions he holds as a Hospital Doctor and Health Policy and Management Advisor at the University Hospitals of Leicester NHS Trust.

Abdul Karim’s current areas of interest include the biological definition of psychological states relevant to the learning environment, and the influence of language on the variable interpretation of a particular social context. For the latter of which he has published primary research.

Another is the appraisal and deployment of physiological measurement devices in learning environments as a means of quantitatively evaluating psychological states. Such research areas hold promise in enhancing the questionnaire-based evidences of contemporary theories in education, such as those regarding motivation, self-determination and engagement. This will to contribute to the evidence-based public policy optimisation in education and social care.

 

Publications

Ismail, A.K. 2017. A Cross Sectional Study to Explore the Effect of the Linguistic Origin and Evolution of a Language on Patient Interpretation of Haematological Cancers. Advances in Biological Research. 11 (4): 225-232.

Ismail, A.K. 2017. The Origin of the Arabic Medical Term for Cancer. Advances in Biological Research. 11 (4): 198-201.

Ismail, A.K. 2018. The Impact of da Vinci’s Anatomical Drawings and Calculations on Foundation of Orthopaedics. Advances in Biological Research. 12 (1): 26-30.

As a mathematics teacher who believes that anyone can understand mathematics, Ashley is keenly interested in developing interventions and resources for learners who struggle with the subject. More specifically, she is focusing on the transitionary moment in the classroom when discussions have ceased, and practice begins and how this transition can become more fluid for learners.

By drawing on research from education, psychology and cognitive neuroscience, Ashley hopes to gain insights into how the brain and mind process information and how this knowledge can inform teacher practice and, ultimately, help learners understand mathematics.

After having taught for over ten years, Ashley completed her MSc, with Distinction, at the Department of Education, and her dissertation was “Highly Commended” by the British Educational Research Association (BERA). She is committed to making mathematics more accessible for all learners and strives for research that is not only impactful but also directly applicable to the classroom.

I am a Research Project Coordinator and Co-PI at the Department of Education for a project on Education, Purpose and Human Flourishing in Times of Uncertainty (EPHF), and the Templeton World Charity Foundation Fellow in Comparative Education at St Antony’s College, Oxford.

I have a multi-disciplinary background and experience. Academically I am an Art Historian specialising in late 18th and early 19th-century French aesthetics, and prior to my return to academia I had a career in the international finance, entrepreneurial business and high net worth family business sectors. I have published and taught at the University of Oxford on late eighteenth-and early nineteenth century art, history and aesthetics. Drawing on my experience as Lay Chaplain at Somerville College, Oxford I have also published on religious education. In addition to my position in the Education Department I am the Principal Advisor for Strategic Relationships and Partnerships at the Templeton World Charity Foundation Inc where I work closely with other foundations, INGOs and public policy organisations.

Publications List

Xiaona Wang is a DPhil student in Education, at St. Antony’s College, the University of Oxford. Xiaona’s doctoral research is fully funded by the University of Oxford (Clarendon Fund Scholarship and St. Antony’s College The Warden’s Scholarship). She is also a member at the Center for Global Higher Education.

Before her DPhil, Xiaona obtained her M.A degree in Higher Education at Graduate School of Education at Peking University, and B.A at the Faulty of Education from Beijing Normal University in China with first-class honour. She also studied at the University of Manchester as an exchange student in the School of Social Science.

Previously, Xiaona worked at Global Education Cluster in UNICEF, Geneva, where she began her research on the international scientific collaboration between China and Switzerland, and this experience later became the starting point of her master thesis. In her master’s thesis, Xiaona used a longitudinal research method in following a group of Chinese scientists who studied and worked in Switzerland. Through semi-structured interviews, she explored how collaborative relationships between individual scientists began and developed.

Xiaona has strong research interests in the science studies, internationalization and globalization of higher education. Her doctoral research is going to continue to explore the scientific knowledge networks between China and Switzerland under the influence of geopolitical factors.

Wanlin Cai is a DPhil student in higher education and a member of CGHE research group at the Department of Education.

Wanlin’s research interest lies in international higher education, higher education policies and economy, with a specific focus on World-Class Universities.

She is also a member of South China Global Talent Institute, Center for China and Globalisation, where she focuses on the research of talent policy and development in the Great Bay Area in China.

Prior to her beginning as a DPhil student, Wanlin read for the M.Sc in Higher Education at the University of Oxford and the M.Sc in Management and Enterprise Growth at the University of Glasgow.

Naosuke is a DPhil student whose research interests are Global Englishes and mutual intelligibility in English communication.

Naosuke finished an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition at the University of Oxford with distinction in 2019. His DPhil research focuses on the intelligibility of non-native English speakers. Specifically, he would like to seek what kind of English pronunciation features are critical for successful English communication between non-native English speakers.

Adam, from Ethiopia, is interested in looking at the role of education in peacebuilding and conflicts.

Akira is a DPhil Student in Anthropology affiliated with the School of Anthropology & Museum Ethnography, and associated with both the Department of Education and Nissan Institute of Japanese Studies. He is supervised by David Mills and Roger Goodman.

Akira’s doctoral research rests with the concepts of ‘international’ and ‘global education,’ and is grounded in the recent emergence and growth of International Baccalaureate (IB) education in Japan. Focused on IB educator training across several higher education institutions (HEIs), Akira aims – solely through digital anthropological approaches – to contextualize the everyday negotiations of ‘international’ and ‘global’ knowledge, both by those receiving and administering its training. Considering social, political, economic and cognitive aspects, one key objective of this research hopes to inform educational practitioners and policy-makers of some of the conceptual and social challenges that emerge with dissonant notions of cultivating ‘international’ and ‘global people.’

Akira has been an Associate Researcher at the Graduate School of Teacher Education, Tokyo Gakugei University since autumn 2020, a post he continues to hold until the end of his doctoral degree. He also currently works as an Anthropological Analyst for Contemplative Spaces, a consultancy focused on designing and delivering a range of leadership development initiatives for individuals, groups, and organizational bodies. His future career plans include further anthropological research and establishing consultancy services dedicated to various inclusion-based development initiatives.

Amelia is passionate about access to and the effects of environmental education globally, particularly in the Galápagos Islands of Ecuador.

Because she experienced a wealth of informal and non-formal environmental education from her parents and from explorations growing up in Southern Oregon, she is interested in researching how environmental education manifests in global communities. She fell in love with the Galápagos on a structured university-led trip during her undergraduate studies and realized that there was a dearth of research on social aspects of the communities living on the islands.  Because of this, she pursued research in the Galápagos in 2014 on the prevalence of and access to both formal and informal (provided by numerous NGOs and government agencies) environmental education for students on the islands, and on the level of student environmental literacy in 28 schools.

Her Dphil research focus, under the supervision of Dr. Ann Childs and Dr. Steve Puttick, is on access to and effects of Experiential Environmental Education for students living in the Galápagos Islands, and on the production of research on the social sphere in Galápagos.

Prior to starting her Dphil at Oxford, she worked in alliances and partnerships at tech companies in the San Francisco Bay Area. Most recently, she was the Director of Global Partnerships at Conversica, a conversational AI platform, and cultivated, trained, and drove pipeline with select international resellers in APAC, EMEA, and LATAM, and with regional resellers in the United States. She also assisted with the design and construction of the Conversica partner program.

In her free time, she is a free-lance food photographer, food stylist, food blogger, recipe developer, and gluten free baker for her online blog and social handle, Sisters Sans Gluten (www.sisterssansgluten), which she created with her sister in 2018. She also continues to sing informally and takes voice lessons remotely with instructor Corey Head of San Francisco.

She holds a BA in both Anthropology and Music (vocal performance), and an MA in Latin American Studies from Stanford University. Highlights from Stanford include: playing and touring as a performing member of Stanford Taiko (Japanese ensemble drumming) for four years; singing with the Stanford Chamber Chorale led by Professor Steve Sano; studying voice with Wendy Hillhouse; participating in music department operas; performing in self-organized recitals showcasing western art songs, western musical theater, and Latin American art songs; studying abroad in Santiago, Chile; and learning Quechua during her masters program with Marisol Necochea.

Abdul Karim has completed a Bachelor of Science in Bioengineering and Computational Medicine (Imperial College London), a Bachelor of Medicine and Bachelor of Surgery (Queen Mary University of London), and Master of Science in the Philosophy of Science and Economics (The London School of Economics).

He has delivered lectures on the Philosophy of Human Nature and the History of Metaethics at the University of Cambridge and for Health Education East Midlands. This, in addition to the current positions he holds as a Hospital Doctor and Health Policy and Management Advisor at the University Hospitals of Leicester NHS Trust.

Abdul Karim’s current areas of interest include the biological definition of psychological states relevant to the learning environment, and the influence of language on the variable interpretation of a particular social context. For the latter of which he has published primary research.

Another is the appraisal and deployment of physiological measurement devices in learning environments as a means of quantitatively evaluating psychological states. Such research areas hold promise in enhancing the questionnaire-based evidences of contemporary theories in education, such as those regarding motivation, self-determination and engagement. This will to contribute to the evidence-based public policy optimisation in education and social care.

 

Publications

Ismail, A.K. 2017. A Cross Sectional Study to Explore the Effect of the Linguistic Origin and Evolution of a Language on Patient Interpretation of Haematological Cancers. Advances in Biological Research. 11 (4): 225-232.

Ismail, A.K. 2017. The Origin of the Arabic Medical Term for Cancer. Advances in Biological Research. 11 (4): 198-201.

Ismail, A.K. 2018. The Impact of da Vinci’s Anatomical Drawings and Calculations on Foundation of Orthopaedics. Advances in Biological Research. 12 (1): 26-30.

As a mathematics teacher who believes that anyone can understand mathematics, Ashley is keenly interested in developing interventions and resources for learners who struggle with the subject. More specifically, she is focusing on the transitionary moment in the classroom when discussions have ceased, and practice begins and how this transition can become more fluid for learners.

By drawing on research from education, psychology and cognitive neuroscience, Ashley hopes to gain insights into how the brain and mind process information and how this knowledge can inform teacher practice and, ultimately, help learners understand mathematics.

After having taught for over ten years, Ashley completed her MSc, with Distinction, at the Department of Education, and her dissertation was “Highly Commended” by the British Educational Research Association (BERA). She is committed to making mathematics more accessible for all learners and strives for research that is not only impactful but also directly applicable to the classroom.

I am a Research Project Coordinator and Co-PI at the Department of Education for a project on Education, Purpose and Human Flourishing in Times of Uncertainty (EPHF), and the Templeton World Charity Foundation Fellow in Comparative Education at St Antony’s College, Oxford.

I have a multi-disciplinary background and experience. Academically I am an Art Historian specialising in late 18th and early 19th-century French aesthetics, and prior to my return to academia I had a career in the international finance, entrepreneurial business and high net worth family business sectors. I have published and taught at the University of Oxford on late eighteenth-and early nineteenth century art, history and aesthetics. Drawing on my experience as Lay Chaplain at Somerville College, Oxford I have also published on religious education. In addition to my position in the Education Department I am the Principal Advisor for Strategic Relationships and Partnerships at the Templeton World Charity Foundation Inc where I work closely with other foundations, INGOs and public policy organisations.

Publications List

Xiaona Wang is a DPhil student in Education, at St. Antony’s College, the University of Oxford. Xiaona’s doctoral research is fully funded by the University of Oxford (Clarendon Fund Scholarship and St. Antony’s College The Warden’s Scholarship). She is also a member at the Center for Global Higher Education.

Before her DPhil, Xiaona obtained her M.A degree in Higher Education at Graduate School of Education at Peking University, and B.A at the Faulty of Education from Beijing Normal University in China with first-class honour. She also studied at the University of Manchester as an exchange student in the School of Social Science.

Previously, Xiaona worked at Global Education Cluster in UNICEF, Geneva, where she began her research on the international scientific collaboration between China and Switzerland, and this experience later became the starting point of her master thesis. In her master’s thesis, Xiaona used a longitudinal research method in following a group of Chinese scientists who studied and worked in Switzerland. Through semi-structured interviews, she explored how collaborative relationships between individual scientists began and developed.

Xiaona has strong research interests in the science studies, internationalization and globalization of higher education. Her doctoral research is going to continue to explore the scientific knowledge networks between China and Switzerland under the influence of geopolitical factors.

Wanlin Cai is a DPhil student in higher education and a member of CGHE research group at the Department of Education.

Wanlin’s research interest lies in international higher education, higher education policies and economy, with a specific focus on World-Class Universities.

She is also a member of South China Global Talent Institute, Center for China and Globalisation, where she focuses on the research of talent policy and development in the Great Bay Area in China.

Prior to her beginning as a DPhil student, Wanlin read for the M.Sc in Higher Education at the University of Oxford and the M.Sc in Management and Enterprise Growth at the University of Glasgow.

Naosuke is a DPhil student whose research interests are Global Englishes and mutual intelligibility in English communication.

Naosuke finished an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition at the University of Oxford with distinction in 2019. His DPhil research focuses on the intelligibility of non-native English speakers. Specifically, he would like to seek what kind of English pronunciation features are critical for successful English communication between non-native English speakers.

Adam, from Ethiopia, is interested in looking at the role of education in peacebuilding and conflicts.

Akira is a DPhil Student in Anthropology affiliated with the School of Anthropology & Museum Ethnography, and associated with both the Department of Education and Nissan Institute of Japanese Studies. He is supervised by David Mills and Roger Goodman.

Akira’s doctoral research rests with the concepts of ‘international’ and ‘global education,’ and is grounded in the recent emergence and growth of International Baccalaureate (IB) education in Japan. Focused on IB educator training across several higher education institutions (HEIs), Akira aims – solely through digital anthropological approaches – to contextualize the everyday negotiations of ‘international’ and ‘global’ knowledge, both by those receiving and administering its training. Considering social, political, economic and cognitive aspects, one key objective of this research hopes to inform educational practitioners and policy-makers of some of the conceptual and social challenges that emerge with dissonant notions of cultivating ‘international’ and ‘global people.’

Akira has been an Associate Researcher at the Graduate School of Teacher Education, Tokyo Gakugei University since autumn 2020, a post he continues to hold until the end of his doctoral degree. He also currently works as an Anthropological Analyst for Contemplative Spaces, a consultancy focused on designing and delivering a range of leadership development initiatives for individuals, groups, and organizational bodies. His future career plans include further anthropological research and establishing consultancy services dedicated to various inclusion-based development initiatives.

Amelia is passionate about access to and the effects of environmental education globally, particularly in the Galápagos Islands of Ecuador.

Because she experienced a wealth of informal and non-formal environmental education from her parents and from explorations growing up in Southern Oregon, she is interested in researching how environmental education manifests in global communities. She fell in love with the Galápagos on a structured university-led trip during her undergraduate studies and realized that there was a dearth of research on social aspects of the communities living on the islands.  Because of this, she pursued research in the Galápagos in 2014 on the prevalence of and access to both formal and informal (provided by numerous NGOs and government agencies) environmental education for students on the islands, and on the level of student environmental literacy in 28 schools.

Her Dphil research focus, under the supervision of Dr. Ann Childs and Dr. Steve Puttick, is on access to and effects of Experiential Environmental Education for students living in the Galápagos Islands, and on the production of research on the social sphere in Galápagos.

Prior to starting her Dphil at Oxford, she worked in alliances and partnerships at tech companies in the San Francisco Bay Area. Most recently, she was the Director of Global Partnerships at Conversica, a conversational AI platform, and cultivated, trained, and drove pipeline with select international resellers in APAC, EMEA, and LATAM, and with regional resellers in the United States. She also assisted with the design and construction of the Conversica partner program.

In her free time, she is a free-lance food photographer, food stylist, food blogger, recipe developer, and gluten free baker for her online blog and social handle, Sisters Sans Gluten (www.sisterssansgluten), which she created with her sister in 2018. She also continues to sing informally and takes voice lessons remotely with instructor Corey Head of San Francisco.

She holds a BA in both Anthropology and Music (vocal performance), and an MA in Latin American Studies from Stanford University. Highlights from Stanford include: playing and touring as a performing member of Stanford Taiko (Japanese ensemble drumming) for four years; singing with the Stanford Chamber Chorale led by Professor Steve Sano; studying voice with Wendy Hillhouse; participating in music department operas; performing in self-organized recitals showcasing western art songs, western musical theater, and Latin American art songs; studying abroad in Santiago, Chile; and learning Quechua during her masters program with Marisol Necochea.

Abdul Karim has completed a Bachelor of Science in Bioengineering and Computational Medicine (Imperial College London), a Bachelor of Medicine and Bachelor of Surgery (Queen Mary University of London), and Master of Science in the Philosophy of Science and Economics (The London School of Economics).

He has delivered lectures on the Philosophy of Human Nature and the History of Metaethics at the University of Cambridge and for Health Education East Midlands. This, in addition to the current positions he holds as a Hospital Doctor and Health Policy and Management Advisor at the University Hospitals of Leicester NHS Trust.

Abdul Karim’s current areas of interest include the biological definition of psychological states relevant to the learning environment, and the influence of language on the variable interpretation of a particular social context. For the latter of which he has published primary research.

Another is the appraisal and deployment of physiological measurement devices in learning environments as a means of quantitatively evaluating psychological states. Such research areas hold promise in enhancing the questionnaire-based evidences of contemporary theories in education, such as those regarding motivation, self-determination and engagement. This will to contribute to the evidence-based public policy optimisation in education and social care.

 

Publications

Ismail, A.K. 2017. A Cross Sectional Study to Explore the Effect of the Linguistic Origin and Evolution of a Language on Patient Interpretation of Haematological Cancers. Advances in Biological Research. 11 (4): 225-232.

Ismail, A.K. 2017. The Origin of the Arabic Medical Term for Cancer. Advances in Biological Research. 11 (4): 198-201.

Ismail, A.K. 2018. The Impact of da Vinci’s Anatomical Drawings and Calculations on Foundation of Orthopaedics. Advances in Biological Research. 12 (1): 26-30.

As a mathematics teacher who believes that anyone can understand mathematics, Ashley is keenly interested in developing interventions and resources for learners who struggle with the subject. More specifically, she is focusing on the transitionary moment in the classroom when discussions have ceased, and practice begins and how this transition can become more fluid for learners.

By drawing on research from education, psychology and cognitive neuroscience, Ashley hopes to gain insights into how the brain and mind process information and how this knowledge can inform teacher practice and, ultimately, help learners understand mathematics.

After having taught for over ten years, Ashley completed her MSc, with Distinction, at the Department of Education, and her dissertation was “Highly Commended” by the British Educational Research Association (BERA). She is committed to making mathematics more accessible for all learners and strives for research that is not only impactful but also directly applicable to the classroom.

I am a Research Project Coordinator and Co-PI at the Department of Education for a project on Education, Purpose and Human Flourishing in Times of Uncertainty (EPHF), and the Templeton World Charity Foundation Fellow in Comparative Education at St Antony’s College, Oxford.

I have a multi-disciplinary background and experience. Academically I am an Art Historian specialising in late 18th and early 19th-century French aesthetics, and prior to my return to academia I had a career in the international finance, entrepreneurial business and high net worth family business sectors. I have published and taught at the University of Oxford on late eighteenth-and early nineteenth century art, history and aesthetics. Drawing on my experience as Lay Chaplain at Somerville College, Oxford I have also published on religious education. In addition to my position in the Education Department I am the Principal Advisor for Strategic Relationships and Partnerships at the Templeton World Charity Foundation Inc where I work closely with other foundations, INGOs and public policy organisations.

Publications List

Xiaona Wang is a DPhil student in Education, at St. Antony’s College, the University of Oxford. Xiaona’s doctoral research is fully funded by the University of Oxford (Clarendon Fund Scholarship and St. Antony’s College The Warden’s Scholarship). She is also a member at the Center for Global Higher Education.

Before her DPhil, Xiaona obtained her M.A degree in Higher Education at Graduate School of Education at Peking University, and B.A at the Faulty of Education from Beijing Normal University in China with first-class honour. She also studied at the University of Manchester as an exchange student in the School of Social Science.

Previously, Xiaona worked at Global Education Cluster in UNICEF, Geneva, where she began her research on the international scientific collaboration between China and Switzerland, and this experience later became the starting point of her master thesis. In her master’s thesis, Xiaona used a longitudinal research method in following a group of Chinese scientists who studied and worked in Switzerland. Through semi-structured interviews, she explored how collaborative relationships between individual scientists began and developed.

Xiaona has strong research interests in the science studies, internationalization and globalization of higher education. Her doctoral research is going to continue to explore the scientific knowledge networks between China and Switzerland under the influence of geopolitical factors.

Wanlin Cai is a DPhil student in higher education and a member of CGHE research group at the Department of Education.

Wanlin’s research interest lies in international higher education, higher education policies and economy, with a specific focus on World-Class Universities.

She is also a member of South China Global Talent Institute, Center for China and Globalisation, where she focuses on the research of talent policy and development in the Great Bay Area in China.

Prior to her beginning as a DPhil student, Wanlin read for the M.Sc in Higher Education at the University of Oxford and the M.Sc in Management and Enterprise Growth at the University of Glasgow.

Naosuke is a DPhil student whose research interests are Global Englishes and mutual intelligibility in English communication.

Naosuke finished an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition at the University of Oxford with distinction in 2019. His DPhil research focuses on the intelligibility of non-native English speakers. Specifically, he would like to seek what kind of English pronunciation features are critical for successful English communication between non-native English speakers.

Adam, from Ethiopia, is interested in looking at the role of education in peacebuilding and conflicts.

Akira is a DPhil Student in Anthropology affiliated with the School of Anthropology & Museum Ethnography, and associated with both the Department of Education and Nissan Institute of Japanese Studies. He is supervised by David Mills and Roger Goodman.

Akira’s doctoral research rests with the concepts of ‘international’ and ‘global education,’ and is grounded in the recent emergence and growth of International Baccalaureate (IB) education in Japan. Focused on IB educator training across several higher education institutions (HEIs), Akira aims – solely through digital anthropological approaches – to contextualize the everyday negotiations of ‘international’ and ‘global’ knowledge, both by those receiving and administering its training. Considering social, political, economic and cognitive aspects, one key objective of this research hopes to inform educational practitioners and policy-makers of some of the conceptual and social challenges that emerge with dissonant notions of cultivating ‘international’ and ‘global people.’

Akira has been an Associate Researcher at the Graduate School of Teacher Education, Tokyo Gakugei University since autumn 2020, a post he continues to hold until the end of his doctoral degree. He also currently works as an Anthropological Analyst for Contemplative Spaces, a consultancy focused on designing and delivering a range of leadership development initiatives for individuals, groups, and organizational bodies. His future career plans include further anthropological research and establishing consultancy services dedicated to various inclusion-based development initiatives.

Amelia is passionate about access to and the effects of environmental education globally, particularly in the Galápagos Islands of Ecuador.

Because she experienced a wealth of informal and non-formal environmental education from her parents and from explorations growing up in Southern Oregon, she is interested in researching how environmental education manifests in global communities. She fell in love with the Galápagos on a structured university-led trip during her undergraduate studies and realized that there was a dearth of research on social aspects of the communities living on the islands.  Because of this, she pursued research in the Galápagos in 2014 on the prevalence of and access to both formal and informal (provided by numerous NGOs and government agencies) environmental education for students on the islands, and on the level of student environmental literacy in 28 schools.

Her Dphil research focus, under the supervision of Dr. Ann Childs and Dr. Steve Puttick, is on access to and effects of Experiential Environmental Education for students living in the Galápagos Islands, and on the production of research on the social sphere in Galápagos.

Prior to starting her Dphil at Oxford, she worked in alliances and partnerships at tech companies in the San Francisco Bay Area. Most recently, she was the Director of Global Partnerships at Conversica, a conversational AI platform, and cultivated, trained, and drove pipeline with select international resellers in APAC, EMEA, and LATAM, and with regional resellers in the United States. She also assisted with the design and construction of the Conversica partner program.

In her free time, she is a free-lance food photographer, food stylist, food blogger, recipe developer, and gluten free baker for her online blog and social handle, Sisters Sans Gluten (www.sisterssansgluten), which she created with her sister in 2018. She also continues to sing informally and takes voice lessons remotely with instructor Corey Head of San Francisco.

She holds a BA in both Anthropology and Music (vocal performance), and an MA in Latin American Studies from Stanford University. Highlights from Stanford include: playing and touring as a performing member of Stanford Taiko (Japanese ensemble drumming) for four years; singing with the Stanford Chamber Chorale led by Professor Steve Sano; studying voice with Wendy Hillhouse; participating in music department operas; performing in self-organized recitals showcasing western art songs, western musical theater, and Latin American art songs; studying abroad in Santiago, Chile; and learning Quechua during her masters program with Marisol Necochea.

Abdul Karim has completed a Bachelor of Science in Bioengineering and Computational Medicine (Imperial College London), a Bachelor of Medicine and Bachelor of Surgery (Queen Mary University of London), and Master of Science in the Philosophy of Science and Economics (The London School of Economics).

He has delivered lectures on the Philosophy of Human Nature and the History of Metaethics at the University of Cambridge and for Health Education East Midlands. This, in addition to the current positions he holds as a Hospital Doctor and Health Policy and Management Advisor at the University Hospitals of Leicester NHS Trust.

Abdul Karim’s current areas of interest include the biological definition of psychological states relevant to the learning environment, and the influence of language on the variable interpretation of a particular social context. For the latter of which he has published primary research.

Another is the appraisal and deployment of physiological measurement devices in learning environments as a means of quantitatively evaluating psychological states. Such research areas hold promise in enhancing the questionnaire-based evidences of contemporary theories in education, such as those regarding motivation, self-determination and engagement. This will to contribute to the evidence-based public policy optimisation in education and social care.

 

Publications

Ismail, A.K. 2017. A Cross Sectional Study to Explore the Effect of the Linguistic Origin and Evolution of a Language on Patient Interpretation of Haematological Cancers. Advances in Biological Research. 11 (4): 225-232.

Ismail, A.K. 2017. The Origin of the Arabic Medical Term for Cancer. Advances in Biological Research. 11 (4): 198-201.

Ismail, A.K. 2018. The Impact of da Vinci’s Anatomical Drawings and Calculations on Foundation of Orthopaedics. Advances in Biological Research. 12 (1): 26-30.

As a mathematics teacher who believes that anyone can understand mathematics, Ashley is keenly interested in developing interventions and resources for learners who struggle with the subject. More specifically, she is focusing on the transitionary moment in the classroom when discussions have ceased, and practice begins and how this transition can become more fluid for learners.

By drawing on research from education, psychology and cognitive neuroscience, Ashley hopes to gain insights into how the brain and mind process information and how this knowledge can inform teacher practice and, ultimately, help learners understand mathematics.

After having taught for over ten years, Ashley completed her MSc, with Distinction, at the Department of Education, and her dissertation was “Highly Commended” by the British Educational Research Association (BERA). She is committed to making mathematics more accessible for all learners and strives for research that is not only impactful but also directly applicable to the classroom.

I am a Research Project Coordinator and Co-PI at the Department of Education for a project on Education, Purpose and Human Flourishing in Times of Uncertainty (EPHF), and the Templeton World Charity Foundation Fellow in Comparative Education at St Antony’s College, Oxford.

I have a multi-disciplinary background and experience. Academically I am an Art Historian specialising in late 18th and early 19th-century French aesthetics, and prior to my return to academia I had a career in the international finance, entrepreneurial business and high net worth family business sectors. I have published and taught at the University of Oxford on late eighteenth-and early nineteenth century art, history and aesthetics. Drawing on my experience as Lay Chaplain at Somerville College, Oxford I have also published on religious education. In addition to my position in the Education Department I am the Principal Advisor for Strategic Relationships and Partnerships at the Templeton World Charity Foundation Inc where I work closely with other foundations, INGOs and public policy organisations.

Publications List

Xiaona Wang is a DPhil student in Education, at St. Antony’s College, the University of Oxford. Xiaona’s doctoral research is fully funded by the University of Oxford (Clarendon Fund Scholarship and St. Antony’s College The Warden’s Scholarship). She is also a member at the Center for Global Higher Education.

Before her DPhil, Xiaona obtained her M.A degree in Higher Education at Graduate School of Education at Peking University, and B.A at the Faulty of Education from Beijing Normal University in China with first-class honour. She also studied at the University of Manchester as an exchange student in the School of Social Science.

Previously, Xiaona worked at Global Education Cluster in UNICEF, Geneva, where she began her research on the international scientific collaboration between China and Switzerland, and this experience later became the starting point of her master thesis. In her master’s thesis, Xiaona used a longitudinal research method in following a group of Chinese scientists who studied and worked in Switzerland. Through semi-structured interviews, she explored how collaborative relationships between individual scientists began and developed.

Xiaona has strong research interests in the science studies, internationalization and globalization of higher education. Her doctoral research is going to continue to explore the scientific knowledge networks between China and Switzerland under the influence of geopolitical factors.

Wanlin Cai is a DPhil student in higher education and a member of CGHE research group at the Department of Education.

Wanlin’s research interest lies in international higher education, higher education policies and economy, with a specific focus on World-Class Universities.

She is also a member of South China Global Talent Institute, Center for China and Globalisation, where she focuses on the research of talent policy and development in the Great Bay Area in China.

Prior to her beginning as a DPhil student, Wanlin read for the M.Sc in Higher Education at the University of Oxford and the M.Sc in Management and Enterprise Growth at the University of Glasgow.

Naosuke is a DPhil student whose research interests are Global Englishes and mutual intelligibility in English communication.

Naosuke finished an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition at the University of Oxford with distinction in 2019. His DPhil research focuses on the intelligibility of non-native English speakers. Specifically, he would like to seek what kind of English pronunciation features are critical for successful English communication between non-native English speakers.

Adam, from Ethiopia, is interested in looking at the role of education in peacebuilding and conflicts.

Akira is a DPhil Student in Anthropology affiliated with the School of Anthropology & Museum Ethnography, and associated with both the Department of Education and Nissan Institute of Japanese Studies. He is supervised by David Mills and Roger Goodman.

Akira’s doctoral research rests with the concepts of ‘international’ and ‘global education,’ and is grounded in the recent emergence and growth of International Baccalaureate (IB) education in Japan. Focused on IB educator training across several higher education institutions (HEIs), Akira aims – solely through digital anthropological approaches – to contextualize the everyday negotiations of ‘international’ and ‘global’ knowledge, both by those receiving and administering its training. Considering social, political, economic and cognitive aspects, one key objective of this research hopes to inform educational practitioners and policy-makers of some of the conceptual and social challenges that emerge with dissonant notions of cultivating ‘international’ and ‘global people.’

Akira has been an Associate Researcher at the Graduate School of Teacher Education, Tokyo Gakugei University since autumn 2020, a post he continues to hold until the end of his doctoral degree. He also currently works as an Anthropological Analyst for Contemplative Spaces, a consultancy focused on designing and delivering a range of leadership development initiatives for individuals, groups, and organizational bodies. His future career plans include further anthropological research and establishing consultancy services dedicated to various inclusion-based development initiatives.

Amelia is passionate about access to and the effects of environmental education globally, particularly in the Galápagos Islands of Ecuador.

Because she experienced a wealth of informal and non-formal environmental education from her parents and from explorations growing up in Southern Oregon, she is interested in researching how environmental education manifests in global communities. She fell in love with the Galápagos on a structured university-led trip during her undergraduate studies and realized that there was a dearth of research on social aspects of the communities living on the islands.  Because of this, she pursued research in the Galápagos in 2014 on the prevalence of and access to both formal and informal (provided by numerous NGOs and government agencies) environmental education for students on the islands, and on the level of student environmental literacy in 28 schools.

Her Dphil research focus, under the supervision of Dr. Ann Childs and Dr. Steve Puttick, is on access to and effects of Experiential Environmental Education for students living in the Galápagos Islands, and on the production of research on the social sphere in Galápagos.

Prior to starting her Dphil at Oxford, she worked in alliances and partnerships at tech companies in the San Francisco Bay Area. Most recently, she was the Director of Global Partnerships at Conversica, a conversational AI platform, and cultivated, trained, and drove pipeline with select international resellers in APAC, EMEA, and LATAM, and with regional resellers in the United States. She also assisted with the design and construction of the Conversica partner program.

In her free time, she is a free-lance food photographer, food stylist, food blogger, recipe developer, and gluten free baker for her online blog and social handle, Sisters Sans Gluten (www.sisterssansgluten), which she created with her sister in 2018. She also continues to sing informally and takes voice lessons remotely with instructor Corey Head of San Francisco.

She holds a BA in both Anthropology and Music (vocal performance), and an MA in Latin American Studies from Stanford University. Highlights from Stanford include: playing and touring as a performing member of Stanford Taiko (Japanese ensemble drumming) for four years; singing with the Stanford Chamber Chorale led by Professor Steve Sano; studying voice with Wendy Hillhouse; participating in music department operas; performing in self-organized recitals showcasing western art songs, western musical theater, and Latin American art songs; studying abroad in Santiago, Chile; and learning Quechua during her masters program with Marisol Necochea.

Abdul Karim has completed a Bachelor of Science in Bioengineering and Computational Medicine (Imperial College London), a Bachelor of Medicine and Bachelor of Surgery (Queen Mary University of London), and Master of Science in the Philosophy of Science and Economics (The London School of Economics).

He has delivered lectures on the Philosophy of Human Nature and the History of Metaethics at the University of Cambridge and for Health Education East Midlands. This, in addition to the current positions he holds as a Hospital Doctor and Health Policy and Management Advisor at the University Hospitals of Leicester NHS Trust.

Abdul Karim’s current areas of interest include the biological definition of psychological states relevant to the learning environment, and the influence of language on the variable interpretation of a particular social context. For the latter of which he has published primary research.

Another is the appraisal and deployment of physiological measurement devices in learning environments as a means of quantitatively evaluating psychological states. Such research areas hold promise in enhancing the questionnaire-based evidences of contemporary theories in education, such as those regarding motivation, self-determination and engagement. This will to contribute to the evidence-based public policy optimisation in education and social care.

 

Publications

Ismail, A.K. 2017. A Cross Sectional Study to Explore the Effect of the Linguistic Origin and Evolution of a Language on Patient Interpretation of Haematological Cancers. Advances in Biological Research. 11 (4): 225-232.

Ismail, A.K. 2017. The Origin of the Arabic Medical Term for Cancer. Advances in Biological Research. 11 (4): 198-201.

Ismail, A.K. 2018. The Impact of da Vinci’s Anatomical Drawings and Calculations on Foundation of Orthopaedics. Advances in Biological Research. 12 (1): 26-30.

As a mathematics teacher who believes that anyone can understand mathematics, Ashley is keenly interested in developing interventions and resources for learners who struggle with the subject. More specifically, she is focusing on the transitionary moment in the classroom when discussions have ceased, and practice begins and how this transition can become more fluid for learners.

By drawing on research from education, psychology and cognitive neuroscience, Ashley hopes to gain insights into how the brain and mind process information and how this knowledge can inform teacher practice and, ultimately, help learners understand mathematics.

After having taught for over ten years, Ashley completed her MSc, with Distinction, at the Department of Education, and her dissertation was “Highly Commended” by the British Educational Research Association (BERA). She is committed to making mathematics more accessible for all learners and strives for research that is not only impactful but also directly applicable to the classroom.

I am a Research Project Coordinator and Co-PI at the Department of Education for a project on Education, Purpose and Human Flourishing in Times of Uncertainty (EPHF), and the Templeton World Charity Foundation Fellow in Comparative Education at St Antony’s College, Oxford.

I have a multi-disciplinary background and experience. Academically I am an Art Historian specialising in late 18th and early 19th-century French aesthetics, and prior to my return to academia I had a career in the international finance, entrepreneurial business and high net worth family business sectors. I have published and taught at the University of Oxford on late eighteenth-and early nineteenth century art, history and aesthetics. Drawing on my experience as Lay Chaplain at Somerville College, Oxford I have also published on religious education. In addition to my position in the Education Department I am the Principal Advisor for Strategic Relationships and Partnerships at the Templeton World Charity Foundation Inc where I work closely with other foundations, INGOs and public policy organisations.

Publications List

Xiaona Wang is a DPhil student in Education, at St. Antony’s College, the University of Oxford. Xiaona’s doctoral research is fully funded by the University of Oxford (Clarendon Fund Scholarship and St. Antony’s College The Warden’s Scholarship). She is also a member at the Center for Global Higher Education.

Before her DPhil, Xiaona obtained her M.A degree in Higher Education at Graduate School of Education at Peking University, and B.A at the Faulty of Education from Beijing Normal University in China with first-class honour. She also studied at the University of Manchester as an exchange student in the School of Social Science.

Previously, Xiaona worked at Global Education Cluster in UNICEF, Geneva, where she began her research on the international scientific collaboration between China and Switzerland, and this experience later became the starting point of her master thesis. In her master’s thesis, Xiaona used a longitudinal research method in following a group of Chinese scientists who studied and worked in Switzerland. Through semi-structured interviews, she explored how collaborative relationships between individual scientists began and developed.

Xiaona has strong research interests in the science studies, internationalization and globalization of higher education. Her doctoral research is going to continue to explore the scientific knowledge networks between China and Switzerland under the influence of geopolitical factors.

Wanlin Cai is a DPhil student in higher education and a member of CGHE research group at the Department of Education.

Wanlin’s research interest lies in international higher education, higher education policies and economy, with a specific focus on World-Class Universities.

She is also a member of South China Global Talent Institute, Center for China and Globalisation, where she focuses on the research of talent policy and development in the Great Bay Area in China.

Prior to her beginning as a DPhil student, Wanlin read for the M.Sc in Higher Education at the University of Oxford and the M.Sc in Management and Enterprise Growth at the University of Glasgow.

Naosuke is a DPhil student whose research interests are Global Englishes and mutual intelligibility in English communication.

Naosuke finished an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition at the University of Oxford with distinction in 2019. His DPhil research focuses on the intelligibility of non-native English speakers. Specifically, he would like to seek what kind of English pronunciation features are critical for successful English communication between non-native English speakers.

Adam, from Ethiopia, is interested in looking at the role of education in peacebuilding and conflicts.

Akira is a DPhil Student in Anthropology affiliated with the School of Anthropology & Museum Ethnography, and associated with both the Department of Education and Nissan Institute of Japanese Studies. He is supervised by David Mills and Roger Goodman.

Akira’s doctoral research rests with the concepts of ‘international’ and ‘global education,’ and is grounded in the recent emergence and growth of International Baccalaureate (IB) education in Japan. Focused on IB educator training across several higher education institutions (HEIs), Akira aims – solely through digital anthropological approaches – to contextualize the everyday negotiations of ‘international’ and ‘global’ knowledge, both by those receiving and administering its training. Considering social, political, economic and cognitive aspects, one key objective of this research hopes to inform educational practitioners and policy-makers of some of the conceptual and social challenges that emerge with dissonant notions of cultivating ‘international’ and ‘global people.’

Akira has been an Associate Researcher at the Graduate School of Teacher Education, Tokyo Gakugei University since autumn 2020, a post he continues to hold until the end of his doctoral degree. He also currently works as an Anthropological Analyst for Contemplative Spaces, a consultancy focused on designing and delivering a range of leadership development initiatives for individuals, groups, and organizational bodies. His future career plans include further anthropological research and establishing consultancy services dedicated to various inclusion-based development initiatives.

Amelia is passionate about access to and the effects of environmental education globally, particularly in the Galápagos Islands of Ecuador.

Because she experienced a wealth of informal and non-formal environmental education from her parents and from explorations growing up in Southern Oregon, she is interested in researching how environmental education manifests in global communities. She fell in love with the Galápagos on a structured university-led trip during her undergraduate studies and realized that there was a dearth of research on social aspects of the communities living on the islands.  Because of this, she pursued research in the Galápagos in 2014 on the prevalence of and access to both formal and informal (provided by numerous NGOs and government agencies) environmental education for students on the islands, and on the level of student environmental literacy in 28 schools.

Her Dphil research focus, under the supervision of Dr. Ann Childs and Dr. Steve Puttick, is on access to and effects of Experiential Environmental Education for students living in the Galápagos Islands, and on the production of research on the social sphere in Galápagos.

Prior to starting her Dphil at Oxford, she worked in alliances and partnerships at tech companies in the San Francisco Bay Area. Most recently, she was the Director of Global Partnerships at Conversica, a conversational AI platform, and cultivated, trained, and drove pipeline with select international resellers in APAC, EMEA, and LATAM, and with regional resellers in the United States. She also assisted with the design and construction of the Conversica partner program.

In her free time, she is a free-lance food photographer, food stylist, food blogger, recipe developer, and gluten free baker for her online blog and social handle, Sisters Sans Gluten (www.sisterssansgluten), which she created with her sister in 2018. She also continues to sing informally and takes voice lessons remotely with instructor Corey Head of San Francisco.

She holds a BA in both Anthropology and Music (vocal performance), and an MA in Latin American Studies from Stanford University. Highlights from Stanford include: playing and touring as a performing member of Stanford Taiko (Japanese ensemble drumming) for four years; singing with the Stanford Chamber Chorale led by Professor Steve Sano; studying voice with Wendy Hillhouse; participating in music department operas; performing in self-organized recitals showcasing western art songs, western musical theater, and Latin American art songs; studying abroad in Santiago, Chile; and learning Quechua during her masters program with Marisol Necochea.

Abdul Karim has completed a Bachelor of Science in Bioengineering and Computational Medicine (Imperial College London), a Bachelor of Medicine and Bachelor of Surgery (Queen Mary University of London), and Master of Science in the Philosophy of Science and Economics (The London School of Economics).

He has delivered lectures on the Philosophy of Human Nature and the History of Metaethics at the University of Cambridge and for Health Education East Midlands. This, in addition to the current positions he holds as a Hospital Doctor and Health Policy and Management Advisor at the University Hospitals of Leicester NHS Trust.

Abdul Karim’s current areas of interest include the biological definition of psychological states relevant to the learning environment, and the influence of language on the variable interpretation of a particular social context. For the latter of which he has published primary research.

Another is the appraisal and deployment of physiological measurement devices in learning environments as a means of quantitatively evaluating psychological states. Such research areas hold promise in enhancing the questionnaire-based evidences of contemporary theories in education, such as those regarding motivation, self-determination and engagement. This will to contribute to the evidence-based public policy optimisation in education and social care.

 

Publications

Ismail, A.K. 2017. A Cross Sectional Study to Explore the Effect of the Linguistic Origin and Evolution of a Language on Patient Interpretation of Haematological Cancers. Advances in Biological Research. 11 (4): 225-232.

Ismail, A.K. 2017. The Origin of the Arabic Medical Term for Cancer. Advances in Biological Research. 11 (4): 198-201.

Ismail, A.K. 2018. The Impact of da Vinci’s Anatomical Drawings and Calculations on Foundation of Orthopaedics. Advances in Biological Research. 12 (1): 26-30.

As a mathematics teacher who believes that anyone can understand mathematics, Ashley is keenly interested in developing interventions and resources for learners who struggle with the subject. More specifically, she is focusing on the transitionary moment in the classroom when discussions have ceased, and practice begins and how this transition can become more fluid for learners.

By drawing on research from education, psychology and cognitive neuroscience, Ashley hopes to gain insights into how the brain and mind process information and how this knowledge can inform teacher practice and, ultimately, help learners understand mathematics.

After having taught for over ten years, Ashley completed her MSc, with Distinction, at the Department of Education, and her dissertation was “Highly Commended” by the British Educational Research Association (BERA). She is committed to making mathematics more accessible for all learners and strives for research that is not only impactful but also directly applicable to the classroom.

I am a Research Project Coordinator and Co-PI at the Department of Education for a project on Education, Purpose and Human Flourishing in Times of Uncertainty (EPHF), and the Templeton World Charity Foundation Fellow in Comparative Education at St Antony’s College, Oxford.

I have a multi-disciplinary background and experience. Academically I am an Art Historian specialising in late 18th and early 19th-century French aesthetics, and prior to my return to academia I had a career in the international finance, entrepreneurial business and high net worth family business sectors. I have published and taught at the University of Oxford on late eighteenth-and early nineteenth century art, history and aesthetics. Drawing on my experience as Lay Chaplain at Somerville College, Oxford I have also published on religious education. In addition to my position in the Education Department I am the Principal Advisor for Strategic Relationships and Partnerships at the Templeton World Charity Foundation Inc where I work closely with other foundations, INGOs and public policy organisations.

Publications List

Xiaona Wang is a DPhil student in Education, at St. Antony’s College, the University of Oxford. Xiaona’s doctoral research is fully funded by the University of Oxford (Clarendon Fund Scholarship and St. Antony’s College The Warden’s Scholarship). She is also a member at the Center for Global Higher Education.

Before her DPhil, Xiaona obtained her M.A degree in Higher Education at Graduate School of Education at Peking University, and B.A at the Faulty of Education from Beijing Normal University in China with first-class honour. She also studied at the University of Manchester as an exchange student in the School of Social Science.

Previously, Xiaona worked at Global Education Cluster in UNICEF, Geneva, where she began her research on the international scientific collaboration between China and Switzerland, and this experience later became the starting point of her master thesis. In her master’s thesis, Xiaona used a longitudinal research method in following a group of Chinese scientists who studied and worked in Switzerland. Through semi-structured interviews, she explored how collaborative relationships between individual scientists began and developed.

Xiaona has strong research interests in the science studies, internationalization and globalization of higher education. Her doctoral research is going to continue to explore the scientific knowledge networks between China and Switzerland under the influence of geopolitical factors.

Wanlin Cai is a DPhil student in higher education and a member of CGHE research group at the Department of Education.

Wanlin’s research interest lies in international higher education, higher education policies and economy, with a specific focus on World-Class Universities.

She is also a member of South China Global Talent Institute, Center for China and Globalisation, where she focuses on the research of talent policy and development in the Great Bay Area in China.

Prior to her beginning as a DPhil student, Wanlin read for the M.Sc in Higher Education at the University of Oxford and the M.Sc in Management and Enterprise Growth at the University of Glasgow.

Naosuke is a DPhil student whose research interests are Global Englishes and mutual intelligibility in English communication.

Naosuke finished an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition at the University of Oxford with distinction in 2019. His DPhil research focuses on the intelligibility of non-native English speakers. Specifically, he would like to seek what kind of English pronunciation features are critical for successful English communication between non-native English speakers.

Adam, from Ethiopia, is interested in looking at the role of education in peacebuilding and conflicts.

Akira is a DPhil Student in Anthropology affiliated with the School of Anthropology & Museum Ethnography, and associated with both the Department of Education and Nissan Institute of Japanese Studies. He is supervised by David Mills and Roger Goodman.

Akira’s doctoral research rests with the concepts of ‘international’ and ‘global education,’ and is grounded in the recent emergence and growth of International Baccalaureate (IB) education in Japan. Focused on IB educator training across several higher education institutions (HEIs), Akira aims – solely through digital anthropological approaches – to contextualize the everyday negotiations of ‘international’ and ‘global’ knowledge, both by those receiving and administering its training. Considering social, political, economic and cognitive aspects, one key objective of this research hopes to inform educational practitioners and policy-makers of some of the conceptual and social challenges that emerge with dissonant notions of cultivating ‘international’ and ‘global people.’

Akira has been an Associate Researcher at the Graduate School of Teacher Education, Tokyo Gakugei University since autumn 2020, a post he continues to hold until the end of his doctoral degree. He also currently works as an Anthropological Analyst for Contemplative Spaces, a consultancy focused on designing and delivering a range of leadership development initiatives for individuals, groups, and organizational bodies. His future career plans include further anthropological research and establishing consultancy services dedicated to various inclusion-based development initiatives.

Amelia is passionate about access to and the effects of environmental education globally, particularly in the Galápagos Islands of Ecuador.

Because she experienced a wealth of informal and non-formal environmental education from her parents and from explorations growing up in Southern Oregon, she is interested in researching how environmental education manifests in global communities. She fell in love with the Galápagos on a structured university-led trip during her undergraduate studies and realized that there was a dearth of research on social aspects of the communities living on the islands.  Because of this, she pursued research in the Galápagos in 2014 on the prevalence of and access to both formal and informal (provided by numerous NGOs and government agencies) environmental education for students on the islands, and on the level of student environmental literacy in 28 schools.

Her Dphil research focus, under the supervision of Dr. Ann Childs and Dr. Steve Puttick, is on access to and effects of Experiential Environmental Education for students living in the Galápagos Islands, and on the production of research on the social sphere in Galápagos.

Prior to starting her Dphil at Oxford, she worked in alliances and partnerships at tech companies in the San Francisco Bay Area. Most recently, she was the Director of Global Partnerships at Conversica, a conversational AI platform, and cultivated, trained, and drove pipeline with select international resellers in APAC, EMEA, and LATAM, and with regional resellers in the United States. She also assisted with the design and construction of the Conversica partner program.

In her free time, she is a free-lance food photographer, food stylist, food blogger, recipe developer, and gluten free baker for her online blog and social handle, Sisters Sans Gluten (www.sisterssansgluten), which she created with her sister in 2018. She also continues to sing informally and takes voice lessons remotely with instructor Corey Head of San Francisco.

She holds a BA in both Anthropology and Music (vocal performance), and an MA in Latin American Studies from Stanford University. Highlights from Stanford include: playing and touring as a performing member of Stanford Taiko (Japanese ensemble drumming) for four years; singing with the Stanford Chamber Chorale led by Professor Steve Sano; studying voice with Wendy Hillhouse; participating in music department operas; performing in self-organized recitals showcasing western art songs, western musical theater, and Latin American art songs; studying abroad in Santiago, Chile; and learning Quechua during her masters program with Marisol Necochea.

Abdul Karim has completed a Bachelor of Science in Bioengineering and Computational Medicine (Imperial College London), a Bachelor of Medicine and Bachelor of Surgery (Queen Mary University of London), and Master of Science in the Philosophy of Science and Economics (The London School of Economics).

He has delivered lectures on the Philosophy of Human Nature and the History of Metaethics at the University of Cambridge and for Health Education East Midlands. This, in addition to the current positions he holds as a Hospital Doctor and Health Policy and Management Advisor at the University Hospitals of Leicester NHS Trust.

Abdul Karim’s current areas of interest include the biological definition of psychological states relevant to the learning environment, and the influence of language on the variable interpretation of a particular social context. For the latter of which he has published primary research.

Another is the appraisal and deployment of physiological measurement devices in learning environments as a means of quantitatively evaluating psychological states. Such research areas hold promise in enhancing the questionnaire-based evidences of contemporary theories in education, such as those regarding motivation, self-determination and engagement. This will to contribute to the evidence-based public policy optimisation in education and social care.

 

Publications

Ismail, A.K. 2017. A Cross Sectional Study to Explore the Effect of the Linguistic Origin and Evolution of a Language on Patient Interpretation of Haematological Cancers. Advances in Biological Research. 11 (4): 225-232.

Ismail, A.K. 2017. The Origin of the Arabic Medical Term for Cancer. Advances in Biological Research. 11 (4): 198-201.

Ismail, A.K. 2018. The Impact of da Vinci’s Anatomical Drawings and Calculations on Foundation of Orthopaedics. Advances in Biological Research. 12 (1): 26-30.

As a mathematics teacher who believes that anyone can understand mathematics, Ashley is keenly interested in developing interventions and resources for learners who struggle with the subject. More specifically, she is focusing on the transitionary moment in the classroom when discussions have ceased, and practice begins and how this transition can become more fluid for learners.

By drawing on research from education, psychology and cognitive neuroscience, Ashley hopes to gain insights into how the brain and mind process information and how this knowledge can inform teacher practice and, ultimately, help learners understand mathematics.

After having taught for over ten years, Ashley completed her MSc, with Distinction, at the Department of Education, and her dissertation was “Highly Commended” by the British Educational Research Association (BERA). She is committed to making mathematics more accessible for all learners and strives for research that is not only impactful but also directly applicable to the classroom.

I am a Research Project Coordinator and Co-PI at the Department of Education for a project on Education, Purpose and Human Flourishing in Times of Uncertainty (EPHF), and the Templeton World Charity Foundation Fellow in Comparative Education at St Antony’s College, Oxford.

I have a multi-disciplinary background and experience. Academically I am an Art Historian specialising in late 18th and early 19th-century French aesthetics, and prior to my return to academia I had a career in the international finance, entrepreneurial business and high net worth family business sectors. I have published and taught at the University of Oxford on late eighteenth-and early nineteenth century art, history and aesthetics. Drawing on my experience as Lay Chaplain at Somerville College, Oxford I have also published on religious education. In addition to my position in the Education Department I am the Principal Advisor for Strategic Relationships and Partnerships at the Templeton World Charity Foundation Inc where I work closely with other foundations, INGOs and public policy organisations.

Publications List

Xiaona Wang is a DPhil student in Education, at St. Antony’s College, the University of Oxford. Xiaona’s doctoral research is fully funded by the University of Oxford (Clarendon Fund Scholarship and St. Antony’s College The Warden’s Scholarship). She is also a member at the Center for Global Higher Education.

Before her DPhil, Xiaona obtained her M.A degree in Higher Education at Graduate School of Education at Peking University, and B.A at the Faulty of Education from Beijing Normal University in China with first-class honour. She also studied at the University of Manchester as an exchange student in the School of Social Science.

Previously, Xiaona worked at Global Education Cluster in UNICEF, Geneva, where she began her research on the international scientific collaboration between China and Switzerland, and this experience later became the starting point of her master thesis. In her master’s thesis, Xiaona used a longitudinal research method in following a group of Chinese scientists who studied and worked in Switzerland. Through semi-structured interviews, she explored how collaborative relationships between individual scientists began and developed.

Xiaona has strong research interests in the science studies, internationalization and globalization of higher education. Her doctoral research is going to continue to explore the scientific knowledge networks between China and Switzerland under the influence of geopolitical factors.

Wanlin Cai is a DPhil student in higher education and a member of CGHE research group at the Department of Education.

Wanlin’s research interest lies in international higher education, higher education policies and economy, with a specific focus on World-Class Universities.

She is also a member of South China Global Talent Institute, Center for China and Globalisation, where she focuses on the research of talent policy and development in the Great Bay Area in China.

Prior to her beginning as a DPhil student, Wanlin read for the M.Sc in Higher Education at the University of Oxford and the M.Sc in Management and Enterprise Growth at the University of Glasgow.

Naosuke is a DPhil student whose research interests are Global Englishes and mutual intelligibility in English communication.

Naosuke finished an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition at the University of Oxford with distinction in 2019. His DPhil research focuses on the intelligibility of non-native English speakers. Specifically, he would like to seek what kind of English pronunciation features are critical for successful English communication between non-native English speakers.

Adam, from Ethiopia, is interested in looking at the role of education in peacebuilding and conflicts.

Akira is a DPhil Student in Anthropology affiliated with the School of Anthropology & Museum Ethnography, and associated with both the Department of Education and Nissan Institute of Japanese Studies. He is supervised by David Mills and Roger Goodman.

Akira’s doctoral research rests with the concepts of ‘international’ and ‘global education,’ and is grounded in the recent emergence and growth of International Baccalaureate (IB) education in Japan. Focused on IB educator training across several higher education institutions (HEIs), Akira aims – solely through digital anthropological approaches – to contextualize the everyday negotiations of ‘international’ and ‘global’ knowledge, both by those receiving and administering its training. Considering social, political, economic and cognitive aspects, one key objective of this research hopes to inform educational practitioners and policy-makers of some of the conceptual and social challenges that emerge with dissonant notions of cultivating ‘international’ and ‘global people.’

Akira has been an Associate Researcher at the Graduate School of Teacher Education, Tokyo Gakugei University since autumn 2020, a post he continues to hold until the end of his doctoral degree. He also currently works as an Anthropological Analyst for Contemplative Spaces, a consultancy focused on designing and delivering a range of leadership development initiatives for individuals, groups, and organizational bodies. His future career plans include further anthropological research and establishing consultancy services dedicated to various inclusion-based development initiatives.

Amelia is passionate about access to and the effects of environmental education globally, particularly in the Galápagos Islands of Ecuador.

Because she experienced a wealth of informal and non-formal environmental education from her parents and from explorations growing up in Southern Oregon, she is interested in researching how environmental education manifests in global communities. She fell in love with the Galápagos on a structured university-led trip during her undergraduate studies and realized that there was a dearth of research on social aspects of the communities living on the islands.  Because of this, she pursued research in the Galápagos in 2014 on the prevalence of and access to both formal and informal (provided by numerous NGOs and government agencies) environmental education for students on the islands, and on the level of student environmental literacy in 28 schools.

Her Dphil research focus, under the supervision of Dr. Ann Childs and Dr. Steve Puttick, is on access to and effects of Experiential Environmental Education for students living in the Galápagos Islands, and on the production of research on the social sphere in Galápagos.

Prior to starting her Dphil at Oxford, she worked in alliances and partnerships at tech companies in the San Francisco Bay Area. Most recently, she was the Director of Global Partnerships at Conversica, a conversational AI platform, and cultivated, trained, and drove pipeline with select international resellers in APAC, EMEA, and LATAM, and with regional resellers in the United States. She also assisted with the design and construction of the Conversica partner program.

In her free time, she is a free-lance food photographer, food stylist, food blogger, recipe developer, and gluten free baker for her online blog and social handle, Sisters Sans Gluten (www.sisterssansgluten), which she created with her sister in 2018. She also continues to sing informally and takes voice lessons remotely with instructor Corey Head of San Francisco.

She holds a BA in both Anthropology and Music (vocal performance), and an MA in Latin American Studies from Stanford University. Highlights from Stanford include: playing and touring as a performing member of Stanford Taiko (Japanese ensemble drumming) for four years; singing with the Stanford Chamber Chorale led by Professor Steve Sano; studying voice with Wendy Hillhouse; participating in music department operas; performing in self-organized recitals showcasing western art songs, western musical theater, and Latin American art songs; studying abroad in Santiago, Chile; and learning Quechua during her masters program with Marisol Necochea.

Abdul Karim has completed a Bachelor of Science in Bioengineering and Computational Medicine (Imperial College London), a Bachelor of Medicine and Bachelor of Surgery (Queen Mary University of London), and Master of Science in the Philosophy of Science and Economics (The London School of Economics).

He has delivered lectures on the Philosophy of Human Nature and the History of Metaethics at the University of Cambridge and for Health Education East Midlands. This, in addition to the current positions he holds as a Hospital Doctor and Health Policy and Management Advisor at the University Hospitals of Leicester NHS Trust.

Abdul Karim’s current areas of interest include the biological definition of psychological states relevant to the learning environment, and the influence of language on the variable interpretation of a particular social context. For the latter of which he has published primary research.

Another is the appraisal and deployment of physiological measurement devices in learning environments as a means of quantitatively evaluating psychological states. Such research areas hold promise in enhancing the questionnaire-based evidences of contemporary theories in education, such as those regarding motivation, self-determination and engagement. This will to contribute to the evidence-based public policy optimisation in education and social care.

 

Publications

Ismail, A.K. 2017. A Cross Sectional Study to Explore the Effect of the Linguistic Origin and Evolution of a Language on Patient Interpretation of Haematological Cancers. Advances in Biological Research. 11 (4): 225-232.

Ismail, A.K. 2017. The Origin of the Arabic Medical Term for Cancer. Advances in Biological Research. 11 (4): 198-201.

Ismail, A.K. 2018. The Impact of da Vinci’s Anatomical Drawings and Calculations on Foundation of Orthopaedics. Advances in Biological Research. 12 (1): 26-30.

As a mathematics teacher who believes that anyone can understand mathematics, Ashley is keenly interested in developing interventions and resources for learners who struggle with the subject. More specifically, she is focusing on the transitionary moment in the classroom when discussions have ceased, and practice begins and how this transition can become more fluid for learners.

By drawing on research from education, psychology and cognitive neuroscience, Ashley hopes to gain insights into how the brain and mind process information and how this knowledge can inform teacher practice and, ultimately, help learners understand mathematics.

After having taught for over ten years, Ashley completed her MSc, with Distinction, at the Department of Education, and her dissertation was “Highly Commended” by the British Educational Research Association (BERA). She is committed to making mathematics more accessible for all learners and strives for research that is not only impactful but also directly applicable to the classroom.

I am a Research Project Coordinator and Co-PI at the Department of Education for a project on Education, Purpose and Human Flourishing in Times of Uncertainty (EPHF), and the Templeton World Charity Foundation Fellow in Comparative Education at St Antony’s College, Oxford.

I have a multi-disciplinary background and experience. Academically I am an Art Historian specialising in late 18th and early 19th-century French aesthetics, and prior to my return to academia I had a career in the international finance, entrepreneurial business and high net worth family business sectors. I have published and taught at the University of Oxford on late eighteenth-and early nineteenth century art, history and aesthetics. Drawing on my experience as Lay Chaplain at Somerville College, Oxford I have also published on religious education. In addition to my position in the Education Department I am the Principal Advisor for Strategic Relationships and Partnerships at the Templeton World Charity Foundation Inc where I work closely with other foundations, INGOs and public policy organisations.

Publications List

Xiaona Wang is a DPhil student in Education, at St. Antony’s College, the University of Oxford. Xiaona’s doctoral research is fully funded by the University of Oxford (Clarendon Fund Scholarship and St. Antony’s College The Warden’s Scholarship). She is also a member at the Center for Global Higher Education.

Before her DPhil, Xiaona obtained her M.A degree in Higher Education at Graduate School of Education at Peking University, and B.A at the Faulty of Education from Beijing Normal University in China with first-class honour. She also studied at the University of Manchester as an exchange student in the School of Social Science.

Previously, Xiaona worked at Global Education Cluster in UNICEF, Geneva, where she began her research on the international scientific collaboration between China and Switzerland, and this experience later became the starting point of her master thesis. In her master’s thesis, Xiaona used a longitudinal research method in following a group of Chinese scientists who studied and worked in Switzerland. Through semi-structured interviews, she explored how collaborative relationships between individual scientists began and developed.

Xiaona has strong research interests in the science studies, internationalization and globalization of higher education. Her doctoral research is going to continue to explore the scientific knowledge networks between China and Switzerland under the influence of geopolitical factors.

Wanlin Cai is a DPhil student in higher education and a member of CGHE research group at the Department of Education.

Wanlin’s research interest lies in international higher education, higher education policies and economy, with a specific focus on World-Class Universities.

She is also a member of South China Global Talent Institute, Center for China and Globalisation, where she focuses on the research of talent policy and development in the Great Bay Area in China.

Prior to her beginning as a DPhil student, Wanlin read for the M.Sc in Higher Education at the University of Oxford and the M.Sc in Management and Enterprise Growth at the University of Glasgow.

Naosuke is a DPhil student whose research interests are Global Englishes and mutual intelligibility in English communication.

Naosuke finished an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition at the University of Oxford with distinction in 2019. His DPhil research focuses on the intelligibility of non-native English speakers. Specifically, he would like to seek what kind of English pronunciation features are critical for successful English communication between non-native English speakers.

Adam, from Ethiopia, is interested in looking at the role of education in peacebuilding and conflicts.

Akira is a DPhil Student in Anthropology affiliated with the School of Anthropology & Museum Ethnography, and associated with both the Department of Education and Nissan Institute of Japanese Studies. He is supervised by David Mills and Roger Goodman.

Akira’s doctoral research rests with the concepts of ‘international’ and ‘global education,’ and is grounded in the recent emergence and growth of International Baccalaureate (IB) education in Japan. Focused on IB educator training across several higher education institutions (HEIs), Akira aims – solely through digital anthropological approaches – to contextualize the everyday negotiations of ‘international’ and ‘global’ knowledge, both by those receiving and administering its training. Considering social, political, economic and cognitive aspects, one key objective of this research hopes to inform educational practitioners and policy-makers of some of the conceptual and social challenges that emerge with dissonant notions of cultivating ‘international’ and ‘global people.’

Akira has been an Associate Researcher at the Graduate School of Teacher Education, Tokyo Gakugei University since autumn 2020, a post he continues to hold until the end of his doctoral degree. He also currently works as an Anthropological Analyst for Contemplative Spaces, a consultancy focused on designing and delivering a range of leadership development initiatives for individuals, groups, and organizational bodies. His future career plans include further anthropological research and establishing consultancy services dedicated to various inclusion-based development initiatives.

Amelia is passionate about access to and the effects of environmental education globally, particularly in the Galápagos Islands of Ecuador.

Because she experienced a wealth of informal and non-formal environmental education from her parents and from explorations growing up in Southern Oregon, she is interested in researching how environmental education manifests in global communities. She fell in love with the Galápagos on a structured university-led trip during her undergraduate studies and realized that there was a dearth of research on social aspects of the communities living on the islands.  Because of this, she pursued research in the Galápagos in 2014 on the prevalence of and access to both formal and informal (provided by numerous NGOs and government agencies) environmental education for students on the islands, and on the level of student environmental literacy in 28 schools.

Her Dphil research focus, under the supervision of Dr. Ann Childs and Dr. Steve Puttick, is on access to and effects of Experiential Environmental Education for students living in the Galápagos Islands, and on the production of research on the social sphere in Galápagos.

Prior to starting her Dphil at Oxford, she worked in alliances and partnerships at tech companies in the San Francisco Bay Area. Most recently, she was the Director of Global Partnerships at Conversica, a conversational AI platform, and cultivated, trained, and drove pipeline with select international resellers in APAC, EMEA, and LATAM, and with regional resellers in the United States. She also assisted with the design and construction of the Conversica partner program.

In her free time, she is a free-lance food photographer, food stylist, food blogger, recipe developer, and gluten free baker for her online blog and social handle, Sisters Sans Gluten (www.sisterssansgluten), which she created with her sister in 2018. She also continues to sing informally and takes voice lessons remotely with instructor Corey Head of San Francisco.

She holds a BA in both Anthropology and Music (vocal performance), and an MA in Latin American Studies from Stanford University. Highlights from Stanford include: playing and touring as a performing member of Stanford Taiko (Japanese ensemble drumming) for four years; singing with the Stanford Chamber Chorale led by Professor Steve Sano; studying voice with Wendy Hillhouse; participating in music department operas; performing in self-organized recitals showcasing western art songs, western musical theater, and Latin American art songs; studying abroad in Santiago, Chile; and learning Quechua during her masters program with Marisol Necochea.

Abdul Karim has completed a Bachelor of Science in Bioengineering and Computational Medicine (Imperial College London), a Bachelor of Medicine and Bachelor of Surgery (Queen Mary University of London), and Master of Science in the Philosophy of Science and Economics (The London School of Economics).

He has delivered lectures on the Philosophy of Human Nature and the History of Metaethics at the University of Cambridge and for Health Education East Midlands. This, in addition to the current positions he holds as a Hospital Doctor and Health Policy and Management Advisor at the University Hospitals of Leicester NHS Trust.

Abdul Karim’s current areas of interest include the biological definition of psychological states relevant to the learning environment, and the influence of language on the variable interpretation of a particular social context. For the latter of which he has published primary research.

Another is the appraisal and deployment of physiological measurement devices in learning environments as a means of quantitatively evaluating psychological states. Such research areas hold promise in enhancing the questionnaire-based evidences of contemporary theories in education, such as those regarding motivation, self-determination and engagement. This will to contribute to the evidence-based public policy optimisation in education and social care.

 

Publications

Ismail, A.K. 2017. A Cross Sectional Study to Explore the Effect of the Linguistic Origin and Evolution of a Language on Patient Interpretation of Haematological Cancers. Advances in Biological Research. 11 (4): 225-232.

Ismail, A.K. 2017. The Origin of the Arabic Medical Term for Cancer. Advances in Biological Research. 11 (4): 198-201.

Ismail, A.K. 2018. The Impact of da Vinci’s Anatomical Drawings and Calculations on Foundation of Orthopaedics. Advances in Biological Research. 12 (1): 26-30.

As a mathematics teacher who believes that anyone can understand mathematics, Ashley is keenly interested in developing interventions and resources for learners who struggle with the subject. More specifically, she is focusing on the transitionary moment in the classroom when discussions have ceased, and practice begins and how this transition can become more fluid for learners.

By drawing on research from education, psychology and cognitive neuroscience, Ashley hopes to gain insights into how the brain and mind process information and how this knowledge can inform teacher practice and, ultimately, help learners understand mathematics.

After having taught for over ten years, Ashley completed her MSc, with Distinction, at the Department of Education, and her dissertation was “Highly Commended” by the British Educational Research Association (BERA). She is committed to making mathematics more accessible for all learners and strives for research that is not only impactful but also directly applicable to the classroom.

I am a Research Project Coordinator and Co-PI at the Department of Education for a project on Education, Purpose and Human Flourishing in Times of Uncertainty (EPHF), and the Templeton World Charity Foundation Fellow in Comparative Education at St Antony’s College, Oxford.

I have a multi-disciplinary background and experience. Academically I am an Art Historian specialising in late 18th and early 19th-century French aesthetics, and prior to my return to academia I had a career in the international finance, entrepreneurial business and high net worth family business sectors. I have published and taught at the University of Oxford on late eighteenth-and early nineteenth century art, history and aesthetics. Drawing on my experience as Lay Chaplain at Somerville College, Oxford I have also published on religious education. In addition to my position in the Education Department I am the Principal Advisor for Strategic Relationships and Partnerships at the Templeton World Charity Foundation Inc where I work closely with other foundations, INGOs and public policy organisations.

Publications List

Xiaona Wang is a DPhil student in Education, at St. Antony’s College, the University of Oxford. Xiaona’s doctoral research is fully funded by the University of Oxford (Clarendon Fund Scholarship and St. Antony’s College The Warden’s Scholarship). She is also a member at the Center for Global Higher Education.

Before her DPhil, Xiaona obtained her M.A degree in Higher Education at Graduate School of Education at Peking University, and B.A at the Faulty of Education from Beijing Normal University in China with first-class honour. She also studied at the University of Manchester as an exchange student in the School of Social Science.

Previously, Xiaona worked at Global Education Cluster in UNICEF, Geneva, where she began her research on the international scientific collaboration between China and Switzerland, and this experience later became the starting point of her master thesis. In her master’s thesis, Xiaona used a longitudinal research method in following a group of Chinese scientists who studied and worked in Switzerland. Through semi-structured interviews, she explored how collaborative relationships between individual scientists began and developed.

Xiaona has strong research interests in the science studies, internationalization and globalization of higher education. Her doctoral research is going to continue to explore the scientific knowledge networks between China and Switzerland under the influence of geopolitical factors.

Wanlin Cai is a DPhil student in higher education and a member of CGHE research group at the Department of Education.

Wanlin’s research interest lies in international higher education, higher education policies and economy, with a specific focus on World-Class Universities.

She is also a member of South China Global Talent Institute, Center for China and Globalisation, where she focuses on the research of talent policy and development in the Great Bay Area in China.

Prior to her beginning as a DPhil student, Wanlin read for the M.Sc in Higher Education at the University of Oxford and the M.Sc in Management and Enterprise Growth at the University of Glasgow.

Naosuke is a DPhil student whose research interests are Global Englishes and mutual intelligibility in English communication.

Naosuke finished an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition at the University of Oxford with distinction in 2019. His DPhil research focuses on the intelligibility of non-native English speakers. Specifically, he would like to seek what kind of English pronunciation features are critical for successful English communication between non-native English speakers.

Adam, from Ethiopia, is interested in looking at the role of education in peacebuilding and conflicts.

Akira is a DPhil Student in Anthropology affiliated with the School of Anthropology & Museum Ethnography, and associated with both the Department of Education and Nissan Institute of Japanese Studies. He is supervised by David Mills and Roger Goodman.

Akira’s doctoral research rests with the concepts of ‘international’ and ‘global education,’ and is grounded in the recent emergence and growth of International Baccalaureate (IB) education in Japan. Focused on IB educator training across several higher education institutions (HEIs), Akira aims – solely through digital anthropological approaches – to contextualize the everyday negotiations of ‘international’ and ‘global’ knowledge, both by those receiving and administering its training. Considering social, political, economic and cognitive aspects, one key objective of this research hopes to inform educational practitioners and policy-makers of some of the conceptual and social challenges that emerge with dissonant notions of cultivating ‘international’ and ‘global people.’

Akira has been an Associate Researcher at the Graduate School of Teacher Education, Tokyo Gakugei University since autumn 2020, a post he continues to hold until the end of his doctoral degree. He also currently works as an Anthropological Analyst for Contemplative Spaces, a consultancy focused on designing and delivering a range of leadership development initiatives for individuals, groups, and organizational bodies. His future career plans include further anthropological research and establishing consultancy services dedicated to various inclusion-based development initiatives.

Amelia is passionate about access to and the effects of environmental education globally, particularly in the Galápagos Islands of Ecuador.

Because she experienced a wealth of informal and non-formal environmental education from her parents and from explorations growing up in Southern Oregon, she is interested in researching how environmental education manifests in global communities. She fell in love with the Galápagos on a structured university-led trip during her undergraduate studies and realized that there was a dearth of research on social aspects of the communities living on the islands.  Because of this, she pursued research in the Galápagos in 2014 on the prevalence of and access to both formal and informal (provided by numerous NGOs and government agencies) environmental education for students on the islands, and on the level of student environmental literacy in 28 schools.

Her Dphil research focus, under the supervision of Dr. Ann Childs and Dr. Steve Puttick, is on access to and effects of Experiential Environmental Education for students living in the Galápagos Islands, and on the production of research on the social sphere in Galápagos.

Prior to starting her Dphil at Oxford, she worked in alliances and partnerships at tech companies in the San Francisco Bay Area. Most recently, she was the Director of Global Partnerships at Conversica, a conversational AI platform, and cultivated, trained, and drove pipeline with select international resellers in APAC, EMEA, and LATAM, and with regional resellers in the United States. She also assisted with the design and construction of the Conversica partner program.

In her free time, she is a free-lance food photographer, food stylist, food blogger, recipe developer, and gluten free baker for her online blog and social handle, Sisters Sans Gluten (www.sisterssansgluten), which she created with her sister in 2018. She also continues to sing informally and takes voice lessons remotely with instructor Corey Head of San Francisco.

She holds a BA in both Anthropology and Music (vocal performance), and an MA in Latin American Studies from Stanford University. Highlights from Stanford include: playing and touring as a performing member of Stanford Taiko (Japanese ensemble drumming) for four years; singing with the Stanford Chamber Chorale led by Professor Steve Sano; studying voice with Wendy Hillhouse; participating in music department operas; performing in self-organized recitals showcasing western art songs, western musical theater, and Latin American art songs; studying abroad in Santiago, Chile; and learning Quechua during her masters program with Marisol Necochea.

Abdul Karim has completed a Bachelor of Science in Bioengineering and Computational Medicine (Imperial College London), a Bachelor of Medicine and Bachelor of Surgery (Queen Mary University of London), and Master of Science in the Philosophy of Science and Economics (The London School of Economics).

He has delivered lectures on the Philosophy of Human Nature and the History of Metaethics at the University of Cambridge and for Health Education East Midlands. This, in addition to the current positions he holds as a Hospital Doctor and Health Policy and Management Advisor at the University Hospitals of Leicester NHS Trust.

Abdul Karim’s current areas of interest include the biological definition of psychological states relevant to the learning environment, and the influence of language on the variable interpretation of a particular social context. For the latter of which he has published primary research.

Another is the appraisal and deployment of physiological measurement devices in learning environments as a means of quantitatively evaluating psychological states. Such research areas hold promise in enhancing the questionnaire-based evidences of contemporary theories in education, such as those regarding motivation, self-determination and engagement. This will to contribute to the evidence-based public policy optimisation in education and social care.

 

Publications

Ismail, A.K. 2017. A Cross Sectional Study to Explore the Effect of the Linguistic Origin and Evolution of a Language on Patient Interpretation of Haematological Cancers. Advances in Biological Research. 11 (4): 225-232.

Ismail, A.K. 2017. The Origin of the Arabic Medical Term for Cancer. Advances in Biological Research. 11 (4): 198-201.

Ismail, A.K. 2018. The Impact of da Vinci’s Anatomical Drawings and Calculations on Foundation of Orthopaedics. Advances in Biological Research. 12 (1): 26-30.

As a mathematics teacher who believes that anyone can understand mathematics, Ashley is keenly interested in developing interventions and resources for learners who struggle with the subject. More specifically, she is focusing on the transitionary moment in the classroom when discussions have ceased, and practice begins and how this transition can become more fluid for learners.

By drawing on research from education, psychology and cognitive neuroscience, Ashley hopes to gain insights into how the brain and mind process information and how this knowledge can inform teacher practice and, ultimately, help learners understand mathematics.

After having taught for over ten years, Ashley completed her MSc, with Distinction, at the Department of Education, and her dissertation was “Highly Commended” by the British Educational Research Association (BERA). She is committed to making mathematics more accessible for all learners and strives for research that is not only impactful but also directly applicable to the classroom.

I am a Research Project Coordinator and Co-PI at the Department of Education for a project on Education, Purpose and Human Flourishing in Times of Uncertainty (EPHF), and the Templeton World Charity Foundation Fellow in Comparative Education at St Antony’s College, Oxford.

I have a multi-disciplinary background and experience. Academically I am an Art Historian specialising in late 18th and early 19th-century French aesthetics, and prior to my return to academia I had a career in the international finance, entrepreneurial business and high net worth family business sectors. I have published and taught at the University of Oxford on late eighteenth-and early nineteenth century art, history and aesthetics. Drawing on my experience as Lay Chaplain at Somerville College, Oxford I have also published on religious education. In addition to my position in the Education Department I am the Principal Advisor for Strategic Relationships and Partnerships at the Templeton World Charity Foundation Inc where I work closely with other foundations, INGOs and public policy organisations.

Publications List

Xiaona Wang is a DPhil student in Education, at St. Antony’s College, the University of Oxford. Xiaona’s doctoral research is fully funded by the University of Oxford (Clarendon Fund Scholarship and St. Antony’s College The Warden’s Scholarship). She is also a member at the Center for Global Higher Education.

Before her DPhil, Xiaona obtained her M.A degree in Higher Education at Graduate School of Education at Peking University, and B.A at the Faulty of Education from Beijing Normal University in China with first-class honour. She also studied at the University of Manchester as an exchange student in the School of Social Science.

Previously, Xiaona worked at Global Education Cluster in UNICEF, Geneva, where she began her research on the international scientific collaboration between China and Switzerland, and this experience later became the starting point of her master thesis. In her master’s thesis, Xiaona used a longitudinal research method in following a group of Chinese scientists who studied and worked in Switzerland. Through semi-structured interviews, she explored how collaborative relationships between individual scientists began and developed.

Xiaona has strong research interests in the science studies, internationalization and globalization of higher education. Her doctoral research is going to continue to explore the scientific knowledge networks between China and Switzerland under the influence of geopolitical factors.

Wanlin Cai is a DPhil student in higher education and a member of CGHE research group at the Department of Education.

Wanlin’s research interest lies in international higher education, higher education policies and economy, with a specific focus on World-Class Universities.

She is also a member of South China Global Talent Institute, Center for China and Globalisation, where she focuses on the research of talent policy and development in the Great Bay Area in China.

Prior to her beginning as a DPhil student, Wanlin read for the M.Sc in Higher Education at the University of Oxford and the M.Sc in Management and Enterprise Growth at the University of Glasgow.

Naosuke is a DPhil student whose research interests are Global Englishes and mutual intelligibility in English communication.

Naosuke finished an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition at the University of Oxford with distinction in 2019. His DPhil research focuses on the intelligibility of non-native English speakers. Specifically, he would like to seek what kind of English pronunciation features are critical for successful English communication between non-native English speakers.

Adam, from Ethiopia, is interested in looking at the role of education in peacebuilding and conflicts.

Akira is a DPhil Student in Anthropology affiliated with the School of Anthropology & Museum Ethnography, and associated with both the Department of Education and Nissan Institute of Japanese Studies. He is supervised by David Mills and Roger Goodman.

Akira’s doctoral research rests with the concepts of ‘international’ and ‘global education,’ and is grounded in the recent emergence and growth of International Baccalaureate (IB) education in Japan. Focused on IB educator training across several higher education institutions (HEIs), Akira aims – solely through digital anthropological approaches – to contextualize the everyday negotiations of ‘international’ and ‘global’ knowledge, both by those receiving and administering its training. Considering social, political, economic and cognitive aspects, one key objective of this research hopes to inform educational practitioners and policy-makers of some of the conceptual and social challenges that emerge with dissonant notions of cultivating ‘international’ and ‘global people.’

Akira has been an Associate Researcher at the Graduate School of Teacher Education, Tokyo Gakugei University since autumn 2020, a post he continues to hold until the end of his doctoral degree. He also currently works as an Anthropological Analyst for Contemplative Spaces, a consultancy focused on designing and delivering a range of leadership development initiatives for individuals, groups, and organizational bodies. His future career plans include further anthropological research and establishing consultancy services dedicated to various inclusion-based development initiatives.

Amelia is passionate about access to and the effects of environmental education globally, particularly in the Galápagos Islands of Ecuador.

Because she experienced a wealth of informal and non-formal environmental education from her parents and from explorations growing up in Southern Oregon, she is interested in researching how environmental education manifests in global communities. She fell in love with the Galápagos on a structured university-led trip during her undergraduate studies and realized that there was a dearth of research on social aspects of the communities living on the islands.  Because of this, she pursued research in the Galápagos in 2014 on the prevalence of and access to both formal and informal (provided by numerous NGOs and government agencies) environmental education for students on the islands, and on the level of student environmental literacy in 28 schools.

Her Dphil research focus, under the supervision of Dr. Ann Childs and Dr. Steve Puttick, is on access to and effects of Experiential Environmental Education for students living in the Galápagos Islands, and on the production of research on the social sphere in Galápagos.

Prior to starting her Dphil at Oxford, she worked in alliances and partnerships at tech companies in the San Francisco Bay Area. Most recently, she was the Director of Global Partnerships at Conversica, a conversational AI platform, and cultivated, trained, and drove pipeline with select international resellers in APAC, EMEA, and LATAM, and with regional resellers in the United States. She also assisted with the design and construction of the Conversica partner program.

In her free time, she is a free-lance food photographer, food stylist, food blogger, recipe developer, and gluten free baker for her online blog and social handle, Sisters Sans Gluten (www.sisterssansgluten), which she created with her sister in 2018. She also continues to sing informally and takes voice lessons remotely with instructor Corey Head of San Francisco.

She holds a BA in both Anthropology and Music (vocal performance), and an MA in Latin American Studies from Stanford University. Highlights from Stanford include: playing and touring as a performing member of Stanford Taiko (Japanese ensemble drumming) for four years; singing with the Stanford Chamber Chorale led by Professor Steve Sano; studying voice with Wendy Hillhouse; participating in music department operas; performing in self-organized recitals showcasing western art songs, western musical theater, and Latin American art songs; studying abroad in Santiago, Chile; and learning Quechua during her masters program with Marisol Necochea.

Abdul Karim has completed a Bachelor of Science in Bioengineering and Computational Medicine (Imperial College London), a Bachelor of Medicine and Bachelor of Surgery (Queen Mary University of London), and Master of Science in the Philosophy of Science and Economics (The London School of Economics).

He has delivered lectures on the Philosophy of Human Nature and the History of Metaethics at the University of Cambridge and for Health Education East Midlands. This, in addition to the current positions he holds as a Hospital Doctor and Health Policy and Management Advisor at the University Hospitals of Leicester NHS Trust.

Abdul Karim’s current areas of interest include the biological definition of psychological states relevant to the learning environment, and the influence of language on the variable interpretation of a particular social context. For the latter of which he has published primary research.

Another is the appraisal and deployment of physiological measurement devices in learning environments as a means of quantitatively evaluating psychological states. Such research areas hold promise in enhancing the questionnaire-based evidences of contemporary theories in education, such as those regarding motivation, self-determination and engagement. This will to contribute to the evidence-based public policy optimisation in education and social care.

 

Publications

Ismail, A.K. 2017. A Cross Sectional Study to Explore the Effect of the Linguistic Origin and Evolution of a Language on Patient Interpretation of Haematological Cancers. Advances in Biological Research. 11 (4): 225-232.

Ismail, A.K. 2017. The Origin of the Arabic Medical Term for Cancer. Advances in Biological Research. 11 (4): 198-201.

Ismail, A.K. 2018. The Impact of da Vinci’s Anatomical Drawings and Calculations on Foundation of Orthopaedics. Advances in Biological Research. 12 (1): 26-30.

As a mathematics teacher who believes that anyone can understand mathematics, Ashley is keenly interested in developing interventions and resources for learners who struggle with the subject. More specifically, she is focusing on the transitionary moment in the classroom when discussions have ceased, and practice begins and how this transition can become more fluid for learners.

By drawing on research from education, psychology and cognitive neuroscience, Ashley hopes to gain insights into how the brain and mind process information and how this knowledge can inform teacher practice and, ultimately, help learners understand mathematics.

After having taught for over ten years, Ashley completed her MSc, with Distinction, at the Department of Education, and her dissertation was “Highly Commended” by the British Educational Research Association (BERA). She is committed to making mathematics more accessible for all learners and strives for research that is not only impactful but also directly applicable to the classroom.

I am a Research Project Coordinator and Co-PI at the Department of Education for a project on Education, Purpose and Human Flourishing in Times of Uncertainty (EPHF), and the Templeton World Charity Foundation Fellow in Comparative Education at St Antony’s College, Oxford.

I have a multi-disciplinary background and experience. Academically I am an Art Historian specialising in late 18th and early 19th-century French aesthetics, and prior to my return to academia I had a career in the international finance, entrepreneurial business and high net worth family business sectors. I have published and taught at the University of Oxford on late eighteenth-and early nineteenth century art, history and aesthetics. Drawing on my experience as Lay Chaplain at Somerville College, Oxford I have also published on religious education. In addition to my position in the Education Department I am the Principal Advisor for Strategic Relationships and Partnerships at the Templeton World Charity Foundation Inc where I work closely with other foundations, INGOs and public policy organisations.

Publications List

Xiaona Wang is a DPhil student in Education, at St. Antony’s College, the University of Oxford. Xiaona’s doctoral research is fully funded by the University of Oxford (Clarendon Fund Scholarship and St. Antony’s College The Warden’s Scholarship). She is also a member at the Center for Global Higher Education.

Before her DPhil, Xiaona obtained her M.A degree in Higher Education at Graduate School of Education at Peking University, and B.A at the Faulty of Education from Beijing Normal University in China with first-class honour. She also studied at the University of Manchester as an exchange student in the School of Social Science.

Previously, Xiaona worked at Global Education Cluster in UNICEF, Geneva, where she began her research on the international scientific collaboration between China and Switzerland, and this experience later became the starting point of her master thesis. In her master’s thesis, Xiaona used a longitudinal research method in following a group of Chinese scientists who studied and worked in Switzerland. Through semi-structured interviews, she explored how collaborative relationships between individual scientists began and developed.

Xiaona has strong research interests in the science studies, internationalization and globalization of higher education. Her doctoral research is going to continue to explore the scientific knowledge networks between China and Switzerland under the influence of geopolitical factors.

Wanlin Cai is a DPhil student in higher education and a member of CGHE research group at the Department of Education.

Wanlin’s research interest lies in international higher education, higher education policies and economy, with a specific focus on World-Class Universities.

She is also a member of South China Global Talent Institute, Center for China and Globalisation, where she focuses on the research of talent policy and development in the Great Bay Area in China.

Prior to her beginning as a DPhil student, Wanlin read for the M.Sc in Higher Education at the University of Oxford and the M.Sc in Management and Enterprise Growth at the University of Glasgow.

Naosuke is a DPhil student whose research interests are Global Englishes and mutual intelligibility in English communication.

Naosuke finished an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition at the University of Oxford with distinction in 2019. His DPhil research focuses on the intelligibility of non-native English speakers. Specifically, he would like to seek what kind of English pronunciation features are critical for successful English communication between non-native English speakers.

Adam, from Ethiopia, is interested in looking at the role of education in peacebuilding and conflicts.

Akira is a DPhil Student in Anthropology affiliated with the School of Anthropology & Museum Ethnography, and associated with both the Department of Education and Nissan Institute of Japanese Studies. He is supervised by David Mills and Roger Goodman.

Akira’s doctoral research rests with the concepts of ‘international’ and ‘global education,’ and is grounded in the recent emergence and growth of International Baccalaureate (IB) education in Japan. Focused on IB educator training across several higher education institutions (HEIs), Akira aims – solely through digital anthropological approaches – to contextualize the everyday negotiations of ‘international’ and ‘global’ knowledge, both by those receiving and administering its training. Considering social, political, economic and cognitive aspects, one key objective of this research hopes to inform educational practitioners and policy-makers of some of the conceptual and social challenges that emerge with dissonant notions of cultivating ‘international’ and ‘global people.’

Akira has been an Associate Researcher at the Graduate School of Teacher Education, Tokyo Gakugei University since autumn 2020, a post he continues to hold until the end of his doctoral degree. He also currently works as an Anthropological Analyst for Contemplative Spaces, a consultancy focused on designing and delivering a range of leadership development initiatives for individuals, groups, and organizational bodies. His future career plans include further anthropological research and establishing consultancy services dedicated to various inclusion-based development initiatives.

Amelia is passionate about access to and the effects of environmental education globally, particularly in the Galápagos Islands of Ecuador.

Because she experienced a wealth of informal and non-formal environmental education from her parents and from explorations growing up in Southern Oregon, she is interested in researching how environmental education manifests in global communities. She fell in love with the Galápagos on a structured university-led trip during her undergraduate studies and realized that there was a dearth of research on social aspects of the communities living on the islands.  Because of this, she pursued research in the Galápagos in 2014 on the prevalence of and access to both formal and informal (provided by numerous NGOs and government agencies) environmental education for students on the islands, and on the level of student environmental literacy in 28 schools.

Her Dphil research focus, under the supervision of Dr. Ann Childs and Dr. Steve Puttick, is on access to and effects of Experiential Environmental Education for students living in the Galápagos Islands, and on the production of research on the social sphere in Galápagos.

Prior to starting her Dphil at Oxford, she worked in alliances and partnerships at tech companies in the San Francisco Bay Area. Most recently, she was the Director of Global Partnerships at Conversica, a conversational AI platform, and cultivated, trained, and drove pipeline with select international resellers in APAC, EMEA, and LATAM, and with regional resellers in the United States. She also assisted with the design and construction of the Conversica partner program.

In her free time, she is a free-lance food photographer, food stylist, food blogger, recipe developer, and gluten free baker for her online blog and social handle, Sisters Sans Gluten (www.sisterssansgluten), which she created with her sister in 2018. She also continues to sing informally and takes voice lessons remotely with instructor Corey Head of San Francisco.

She holds a BA in both Anthropology and Music (vocal performance), and an MA in Latin American Studies from Stanford University. Highlights from Stanford include: playing and touring as a performing member of Stanford Taiko (Japanese ensemble drumming) for four years; singing with the Stanford Chamber Chorale led by Professor Steve Sano; studying voice with Wendy Hillhouse; participating in music department operas; performing in self-organized recitals showcasing western art songs, western musical theater, and Latin American art songs; studying abroad in Santiago, Chile; and learning Quechua during her masters program with Marisol Necochea.

Abdul Karim has completed a Bachelor of Science in Bioengineering and Computational Medicine (Imperial College London), a Bachelor of Medicine and Bachelor of Surgery (Queen Mary University of London), and Master of Science in the Philosophy of Science and Economics (The London School of Economics).

He has delivered lectures on the Philosophy of Human Nature and the History of Metaethics at the University of Cambridge and for Health Education East Midlands. This, in addition to the current positions he holds as a Hospital Doctor and Health Policy and Management Advisor at the University Hospitals of Leicester NHS Trust.

Abdul Karim’s current areas of interest include the biological definition of psychological states relevant to the learning environment, and the influence of language on the variable interpretation of a particular social context. For the latter of which he has published primary research.

Another is the appraisal and deployment of physiological measurement devices in learning environments as a means of quantitatively evaluating psychological states. Such research areas hold promise in enhancing the questionnaire-based evidences of contemporary theories in education, such as those regarding motivation, self-determination and engagement. This will to contribute to the evidence-based public policy optimisation in education and social care.

 

Publications

Ismail, A.K. 2017. A Cross Sectional Study to Explore the Effect of the Linguistic Origin and Evolution of a Language on Patient Interpretation of Haematological Cancers. Advances in Biological Research. 11 (4): 225-232.

Ismail, A.K. 2017. The Origin of the Arabic Medical Term for Cancer. Advances in Biological Research. 11 (4): 198-201.

Ismail, A.K. 2018. The Impact of da Vinci’s Anatomical Drawings and Calculations on Foundation of Orthopaedics. Advances in Biological Research. 12 (1): 26-30.

As a mathematics teacher who believes that anyone can understand mathematics, Ashley is keenly interested in developing interventions and resources for learners who struggle with the subject. More specifically, she is focusing on the transitionary moment in the classroom when discussions have ceased, and practice begins and how this transition can become more fluid for learners.

By drawing on research from education, psychology and cognitive neuroscience, Ashley hopes to gain insights into how the brain and mind process information and how this knowledge can inform teacher practice and, ultimately, help learners understand mathematics.

After having taught for over ten years, Ashley completed her MSc, with Distinction, at the Department of Education, and her dissertation was “Highly Commended” by the British Educational Research Association (BERA). She is committed to making mathematics more accessible for all learners and strives for research that is not only impactful but also directly applicable to the classroom.

I am a Research Project Coordinator and Co-PI at the Department of Education for a project on Education, Purpose and Human Flourishing in Times of Uncertainty (EPHF), and the Templeton World Charity Foundation Fellow in Comparative Education at St Antony’s College, Oxford.

I have a multi-disciplinary background and experience. Academically I am an Art Historian specialising in late 18th and early 19th-century French aesthetics, and prior to my return to academia I had a career in the international finance, entrepreneurial business and high net worth family business sectors. I have published and taught at the University of Oxford on late eighteenth-and early nineteenth century art, history and aesthetics. Drawing on my experience as Lay Chaplain at Somerville College, Oxford I have also published on religious education. In addition to my position in the Education Department I am the Principal Advisor for Strategic Relationships and Partnerships at the Templeton World Charity Foundation Inc where I work closely with other foundations, INGOs and public policy organisations.

Publications List

Xiaona Wang is a DPhil student in Education, at St. Antony’s College, the University of Oxford. Xiaona’s doctoral research is fully funded by the University of Oxford (Clarendon Fund Scholarship and St. Antony’s College The Warden’s Scholarship). She is also a member at the Center for Global Higher Education.

Before her DPhil, Xiaona obtained her M.A degree in Higher Education at Graduate School of Education at Peking University, and B.A at the Faulty of Education from Beijing Normal University in China with first-class honour. She also studied at the University of Manchester as an exchange student in the School of Social Science.

Previously, Xiaona worked at Global Education Cluster in UNICEF, Geneva, where she began her research on the international scientific collaboration between China and Switzerland, and this experience later became the starting point of her master thesis. In her master’s thesis, Xiaona used a longitudinal research method in following a group of Chinese scientists who studied and worked in Switzerland. Through semi-structured interviews, she explored how collaborative relationships between individual scientists began and developed.

Xiaona has strong research interests in the science studies, internationalization and globalization of higher education. Her doctoral research is going to continue to explore the scientific knowledge networks between China and Switzerland under the influence of geopolitical factors.

Wanlin Cai is a DPhil student in higher education and a member of CGHE research group at the Department of Education.

Wanlin’s research interest lies in international higher education, higher education policies and economy, with a specific focus on World-Class Universities.

She is also a member of South China Global Talent Institute, Center for China and Globalisation, where she focuses on the research of talent policy and development in the Great Bay Area in China.

Prior to her beginning as a DPhil student, Wanlin read for the M.Sc in Higher Education at the University of Oxford and the M.Sc in Management and Enterprise Growth at the University of Glasgow.

Naosuke is a DPhil student whose research interests are Global Englishes and mutual intelligibility in English communication.

Naosuke finished an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition at the University of Oxford with distinction in 2019. His DPhil research focuses on the intelligibility of non-native English speakers. Specifically, he would like to seek what kind of English pronunciation features are critical for successful English communication between non-native English speakers.

Adam, from Ethiopia, is interested in looking at the role of education in peacebuilding and conflicts.

Akira is a DPhil Student in Anthropology affiliated with the School of Anthropology & Museum Ethnography, and associated with both the Department of Education and Nissan Institute of Japanese Studies. He is supervised by David Mills and Roger Goodman.

Akira’s doctoral research rests with the concepts of ‘international’ and ‘global education,’ and is grounded in the recent emergence and growth of International Baccalaureate (IB) education in Japan. Focused on IB educator training across several higher education institutions (HEIs), Akira aims – solely through digital anthropological approaches – to contextualize the everyday negotiations of ‘international’ and ‘global’ knowledge, both by those receiving and administering its training. Considering social, political, economic and cognitive aspects, one key objective of this research hopes to inform educational practitioners and policy-makers of some of the conceptual and social challenges that emerge with dissonant notions of cultivating ‘international’ and ‘global people.’

Akira has been an Associate Researcher at the Graduate School of Teacher Education, Tokyo Gakugei University since autumn 2020, a post he continues to hold until the end of his doctoral degree. He also currently works as an Anthropological Analyst for Contemplative Spaces, a consultancy focused on designing and delivering a range of leadership development initiatives for individuals, groups, and organizational bodies. His future career plans include further anthropological research and establishing consultancy services dedicated to various inclusion-based development initiatives.

Amelia is passionate about access to and the effects of environmental education globally, particularly in the Galápagos Islands of Ecuador.

Because she experienced a wealth of informal and non-formal environmental education from her parents and from explorations growing up in Southern Oregon, she is interested in researching how environmental education manifests in global communities. She fell in love with the Galápagos on a structured university-led trip during her undergraduate studies and realized that there was a dearth of research on social aspects of the communities living on the islands.  Because of this, she pursued research in the Galápagos in 2014 on the prevalence of and access to both formal and informal (provided by numerous NGOs and government agencies) environmental education for students on the islands, and on the level of student environmental literacy in 28 schools.

Her Dphil research focus, under the supervision of Dr. Ann Childs and Dr. Steve Puttick, is on access to and effects of Experiential Environmental Education for students living in the Galápagos Islands, and on the production of research on the social sphere in Galápagos.

Prior to starting her Dphil at Oxford, she worked in alliances and partnerships at tech companies in the San Francisco Bay Area. Most recently, she was the Director of Global Partnerships at Conversica, a conversational AI platform, and cultivated, trained, and drove pipeline with select international resellers in APAC, EMEA, and LATAM, and with regional resellers in the United States. She also assisted with the design and construction of the Conversica partner program.

In her free time, she is a free-lance food photographer, food stylist, food blogger, recipe developer, and gluten free baker for her online blog and social handle, Sisters Sans Gluten (www.sisterssansgluten), which she created with her sister in 2018. She also continues to sing informally and takes voice lessons remotely with instructor Corey Head of San Francisco.

She holds a BA in both Anthropology and Music (vocal performance), and an MA in Latin American Studies from Stanford University. Highlights from Stanford include: playing and touring as a performing member of Stanford Taiko (Japanese ensemble drumming) for four years; singing with the Stanford Chamber Chorale led by Professor Steve Sano; studying voice with Wendy Hillhouse; participating in music department operas; performing in self-organized recitals showcasing western art songs, western musical theater, and Latin American art songs; studying abroad in Santiago, Chile; and learning Quechua during her masters program with Marisol Necochea.

Abdul Karim has completed a Bachelor of Science in Bioengineering and Computational Medicine (Imperial College London), a Bachelor of Medicine and Bachelor of Surgery (Queen Mary University of London), and Master of Science in the Philosophy of Science and Economics (The London School of Economics).

He has delivered lectures on the Philosophy of Human Nature and the History of Metaethics at the University of Cambridge and for Health Education East Midlands. This, in addition to the current positions he holds as a Hospital Doctor and Health Policy and Management Advisor at the University Hospitals of Leicester NHS Trust.

Abdul Karim’s current areas of interest include the biological definition of psychological states relevant to the learning environment, and the influence of language on the variable interpretation of a particular social context. For the latter of which he has published primary research.

Another is the appraisal and deployment of physiological measurement devices in learning environments as a means of quantitatively evaluating psychological states. Such research areas hold promise in enhancing the questionnaire-based evidences of contemporary theories in education, such as those regarding motivation, self-determination and engagement. This will to contribute to the evidence-based public policy optimisation in education and social care.

 

Publications

Ismail, A.K. 2017. A Cross Sectional Study to Explore the Effect of the Linguistic Origin and Evolution of a Language on Patient Interpretation of Haematological Cancers. Advances in Biological Research. 11 (4): 225-232.

Ismail, A.K. 2017. The Origin of the Arabic Medical Term for Cancer. Advances in Biological Research. 11 (4): 198-201.

Ismail, A.K. 2018. The Impact of da Vinci’s Anatomical Drawings and Calculations on Foundation of Orthopaedics. Advances in Biological Research. 12 (1): 26-30.

As a mathematics teacher who believes that anyone can understand mathematics, Ashley is keenly interested in developing interventions and resources for learners who struggle with the subject. More specifically, she is focusing on the transitionary moment in the classroom when discussions have ceased, and practice begins and how this transition can become more fluid for learners.

By drawing on research from education, psychology and cognitive neuroscience, Ashley hopes to gain insights into how the brain and mind process information and how this knowledge can inform teacher practice and, ultimately, help learners understand mathematics.

After having taught for over ten years, Ashley completed her MSc, with Distinction, at the Department of Education, and her dissertation was “Highly Commended” by the British Educational Research Association (BERA). She is committed to making mathematics more accessible for all learners and strives for research that is not only impactful but also directly applicable to the classroom.

I am a Research Project Coordinator and Co-PI at the Department of Education for a project on Education, Purpose and Human Flourishing in Times of Uncertainty (EPHF), and the Templeton World Charity Foundation Fellow in Comparative Education at St Antony’s College, Oxford.

I have a multi-disciplinary background and experience. Academically I am an Art Historian specialising in late 18th and early 19th-century French aesthetics, and prior to my return to academia I had a career in the international finance, entrepreneurial business and high net worth family business sectors. I have published and taught at the University of Oxford on late eighteenth-and early nineteenth century art, history and aesthetics. Drawing on my experience as Lay Chaplain at Somerville College, Oxford I have also published on religious education. In addition to my position in the Education Department I am the Principal Advisor for Strategic Relationships and Partnerships at the Templeton World Charity Foundation Inc where I work closely with other foundations, INGOs and public policy organisations.

Publications List

Xiaona Wang is a DPhil student in Education, at St. Antony’s College, the University of Oxford. Xiaona’s doctoral research is fully funded by the University of Oxford (Clarendon Fund Scholarship and St. Antony’s College The Warden’s Scholarship). She is also a member at the Center for Global Higher Education.

Before her DPhil, Xiaona obtained her M.A degree in Higher Education at Graduate School of Education at Peking University, and B.A at the Faulty of Education from Beijing Normal University in China with first-class honour. She also studied at the University of Manchester as an exchange student in the School of Social Science.

Previously, Xiaona worked at Global Education Cluster in UNICEF, Geneva, where she began her research on the international scientific collaboration between China and Switzerland, and this experience later became the starting point of her master thesis. In her master’s thesis, Xiaona used a longitudinal research method in following a group of Chinese scientists who studied and worked in Switzerland. Through semi-structured interviews, she explored how collaborative relationships between individual scientists began and developed.

Xiaona has strong research interests in the science studies, internationalization and globalization of higher education. Her doctoral research is going to continue to explore the scientific knowledge networks between China and Switzerland under the influence of geopolitical factors.

Wanlin Cai is a DPhil student in higher education and a member of CGHE research group at the Department of Education.

Wanlin’s research interest lies in international higher education, higher education policies and economy, with a specific focus on World-Class Universities.

She is also a member of South China Global Talent Institute, Center for China and Globalisation, where she focuses on the research of talent policy and development in the Great Bay Area in China.

Prior to her beginning as a DPhil student, Wanlin read for the M.Sc in Higher Education at the University of Oxford and the M.Sc in Management and Enterprise Growth at the University of Glasgow.

Naosuke is a DPhil student whose research interests are Global Englishes and mutual intelligibility in English communication.

Naosuke finished an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition at the University of Oxford with distinction in 2019. His DPhil research focuses on the intelligibility of non-native English speakers. Specifically, he would like to seek what kind of English pronunciation features are critical for successful English communication between non-native English speakers.

Adam, from Ethiopia, is interested in looking at the role of education in peacebuilding and conflicts.

Akira is a DPhil Student in Anthropology affiliated with the School of Anthropology & Museum Ethnography, and associated with both the Department of Education and Nissan Institute of Japanese Studies. He is supervised by David Mills and Roger Goodman.

Akira’s doctoral research rests with the concepts of ‘international’ and ‘global education,’ and is grounded in the recent emergence and growth of International Baccalaureate (IB) education in Japan. Focused on IB educator training across several higher education institutions (HEIs), Akira aims – solely through digital anthropological approaches – to contextualize the everyday negotiations of ‘international’ and ‘global’ knowledge, both by those receiving and administering its training. Considering social, political, economic and cognitive aspects, one key objective of this research hopes to inform educational practitioners and policy-makers of some of the conceptual and social challenges that emerge with dissonant notions of cultivating ‘international’ and ‘global people.’

Akira has been an Associate Researcher at the Graduate School of Teacher Education, Tokyo Gakugei University since autumn 2020, a post he continues to hold until the end of his doctoral degree. He also currently works as an Anthropological Analyst for Contemplative Spaces, a consultancy focused on designing and delivering a range of leadership development initiatives for individuals, groups, and organizational bodies. His future career plans include further anthropological research and establishing consultancy services dedicated to various inclusion-based development initiatives.

Amelia is passionate about access to and the effects of environmental education globally, particularly in the Galápagos Islands of Ecuador.

Because she experienced a wealth of informal and non-formal environmental education from her parents and from explorations growing up in Southern Oregon, she is interested in researching how environmental education manifests in global communities. She fell in love with the Galápagos on a structured university-led trip during her undergraduate studies and realized that there was a dearth of research on social aspects of the communities living on the islands.  Because of this, she pursued research in the Galápagos in 2014 on the prevalence of and access to both formal and informal (provided by numerous NGOs and government agencies) environmental education for students on the islands, and on the level of student environmental literacy in 28 schools.

Her Dphil research focus, under the supervision of Dr. Ann Childs and Dr. Steve Puttick, is on access to and effects of Experiential Environmental Education for students living in the Galápagos Islands, and on the production of research on the social sphere in Galápagos.

Prior to starting her Dphil at Oxford, she worked in alliances and partnerships at tech companies in the San Francisco Bay Area. Most recently, she was the Director of Global Partnerships at Conversica, a conversational AI platform, and cultivated, trained, and drove pipeline with select international resellers in APAC, EMEA, and LATAM, and with regional resellers in the United States. She also assisted with the design and construction of the Conversica partner program.

In her free time, she is a free-lance food photographer, food stylist, food blogger, recipe developer, and gluten free baker for her online blog and social handle, Sisters Sans Gluten (www.sisterssansgluten), which she created with her sister in 2018. She also continues to sing informally and takes voice lessons remotely with instructor Corey Head of San Francisco.

She holds a BA in both Anthropology and Music (vocal performance), and an MA in Latin American Studies from Stanford University. Highlights from Stanford include: playing and touring as a performing member of Stanford Taiko (Japanese ensemble drumming) for four years; singing with the Stanford Chamber Chorale led by Professor Steve Sano; studying voice with Wendy Hillhouse; participating in music department operas; performing in self-organized recitals showcasing western art songs, western musical theater, and Latin American art songs; studying abroad in Santiago, Chile; and learning Quechua during her masters program with Marisol Necochea.

Abdul Karim has completed a Bachelor of Science in Bioengineering and Computational Medicine (Imperial College London), a Bachelor of Medicine and Bachelor of Surgery (Queen Mary University of London), and Master of Science in the Philosophy of Science and Economics (The London School of Economics).

He has delivered lectures on the Philosophy of Human Nature and the History of Metaethics at the University of Cambridge and for Health Education East Midlands. This, in addition to the current positions he holds as a Hospital Doctor and Health Policy and Management Advisor at the University Hospitals of Leicester NHS Trust.

Abdul Karim’s current areas of interest include the biological definition of psychological states relevant to the learning environment, and the influence of language on the variable interpretation of a particular social context. For the latter of which he has published primary research.

Another is the appraisal and deployment of physiological measurement devices in learning environments as a means of quantitatively evaluating psychological states. Such research areas hold promise in enhancing the questionnaire-based evidences of contemporary theories in education, such as those regarding motivation, self-determination and engagement. This will to contribute to the evidence-based public policy optimisation in education and social care.

 

Publications

Ismail, A.K. 2017. A Cross Sectional Study to Explore the Effect of the Linguistic Origin and Evolution of a Language on Patient Interpretation of Haematological Cancers. Advances in Biological Research. 11 (4): 225-232.

Ismail, A.K. 2017. The Origin of the Arabic Medical Term for Cancer. Advances in Biological Research. 11 (4): 198-201.

Ismail, A.K. 2018. The Impact of da Vinci’s Anatomical Drawings and Calculations on Foundation of Orthopaedics. Advances in Biological Research. 12 (1): 26-30.

As a mathematics teacher who believes that anyone can understand mathematics, Ashley is keenly interested in developing interventions and resources for learners who struggle with the subject. More specifically, she is focusing on the transitionary moment in the classroom when discussions have ceased, and practice begins and how this transition can become more fluid for learners.

By drawing on research from education, psychology and cognitive neuroscience, Ashley hopes to gain insights into how the brain and mind process information and how this knowledge can inform teacher practice and, ultimately, help learners understand mathematics.

After having taught for over ten years, Ashley completed her MSc, with Distinction, at the Department of Education, and her dissertation was “Highly Commended” by the British Educational Research Association (BERA). She is committed to making mathematics more accessible for all learners and strives for research that is not only impactful but also directly applicable to the classroom.

I am a Research Project Coordinator and Co-PI at the Department of Education for a project on Education, Purpose and Human Flourishing in Times of Uncertainty (EPHF), and the Templeton World Charity Foundation Fellow in Comparative Education at St Antony’s College, Oxford.

I have a multi-disciplinary background and experience. Academically I am an Art Historian specialising in late 18th and early 19th-century French aesthetics, and prior to my return to academia I had a career in the international finance, entrepreneurial business and high net worth family business sectors. I have published and taught at the University of Oxford on late eighteenth-and early nineteenth century art, history and aesthetics. Drawing on my experience as Lay Chaplain at Somerville College, Oxford I have also published on religious education. In addition to my position in the Education Department I am the Principal Advisor for Strategic Relationships and Partnerships at the Templeton World Charity Foundation Inc where I work closely with other foundations, INGOs and public policy organisations.

Publications List

Xiaona Wang is a DPhil student in Education, at St. Antony’s College, the University of Oxford. Xiaona’s doctoral research is fully funded by the University of Oxford (Clarendon Fund Scholarship and St. Antony’s College The Warden’s Scholarship). She is also a member at the Center for Global Higher Education.

Before her DPhil, Xiaona obtained her M.A degree in Higher Education at Graduate School of Education at Peking University, and B.A at the Faulty of Education from Beijing Normal University in China with first-class honour. She also studied at the University of Manchester as an exchange student in the School of Social Science.

Previously, Xiaona worked at Global Education Cluster in UNICEF, Geneva, where she began her research on the international scientific collaboration between China and Switzerland, and this experience later became the starting point of her master thesis. In her master’s thesis, Xiaona used a longitudinal research method in following a group of Chinese scientists who studied and worked in Switzerland. Through semi-structured interviews, she explored how collaborative relationships between individual scientists began and developed.

Xiaona has strong research interests in the science studies, internationalization and globalization of higher education. Her doctoral research is going to continue to explore the scientific knowledge networks between China and Switzerland under the influence of geopolitical factors.

Wanlin Cai is a DPhil student in higher education and a member of CGHE research group at the Department of Education.

Wanlin’s research interest lies in international higher education, higher education policies and economy, with a specific focus on World-Class Universities.

She is also a member of South China Global Talent Institute, Center for China and Globalisation, where she focuses on the research of talent policy and development in the Great Bay Area in China.

Prior to her beginning as a DPhil student, Wanlin read for the M.Sc in Higher Education at the University of Oxford and the M.Sc in Management and Enterprise Growth at the University of Glasgow.

Naosuke is a DPhil student whose research interests are Global Englishes and mutual intelligibility in English communication.

Naosuke finished an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition at the University of Oxford with distinction in 2019. His DPhil research focuses on the intelligibility of non-native English speakers. Specifically, he would like to seek what kind of English pronunciation features are critical for successful English communication between non-native English speakers.

Adam, from Ethiopia, is interested in looking at the role of education in peacebuilding and conflicts.

Akira is a DPhil Student in Anthropology affiliated with the School of Anthropology & Museum Ethnography, and associated with both the Department of Education and Nissan Institute of Japanese Studies. He is supervised by David Mills and Roger Goodman.

Akira’s doctoral research rests with the concepts of ‘international’ and ‘global education,’ and is grounded in the recent emergence and growth of International Baccalaureate (IB) education in Japan. Focused on IB educator training across several higher education institutions (HEIs), Akira aims – solely through digital anthropological approaches – to contextualize the everyday negotiations of ‘international’ and ‘global’ knowledge, both by those receiving and administering its training. Considering social, political, economic and cognitive aspects, one key objective of this research hopes to inform educational practitioners and policy-makers of some of the conceptual and social challenges that emerge with dissonant notions of cultivating ‘international’ and ‘global people.’

Akira has been an Associate Researcher at the Graduate School of Teacher Education, Tokyo Gakugei University since autumn 2020, a post he continues to hold until the end of his doctoral degree. He also currently works as an Anthropological Analyst for Contemplative Spaces, a consultancy focused on designing and delivering a range of leadership development initiatives for individuals, groups, and organizational bodies. His future career plans include further anthropological research and establishing consultancy services dedicated to various inclusion-based development initiatives.

Amelia is passionate about access to and the effects of environmental education globally, particularly in the Galápagos Islands of Ecuador.

Because she experienced a wealth of informal and non-formal environmental education from her parents and from explorations growing up in Southern Oregon, she is interested in researching how environmental education manifests in global communities. She fell in love with the Galápagos on a structured university-led trip during her undergraduate studies and realized that there was a dearth of research on social aspects of the communities living on the islands.  Because of this, she pursued research in the Galápagos in 2014 on the prevalence of and access to both formal and informal (provided by numerous NGOs and government agencies) environmental education for students on the islands, and on the level of student environmental literacy in 28 schools.

Her Dphil research focus, under the supervision of Dr. Ann Childs and Dr. Steve Puttick, is on access to and effects of Experiential Environmental Education for students living in the Galápagos Islands, and on the production of research on the social sphere in Galápagos.

Prior to starting her Dphil at Oxford, she worked in alliances and partnerships at tech companies in the San Francisco Bay Area. Most recently, she was the Director of Global Partnerships at Conversica, a conversational AI platform, and cultivated, trained, and drove pipeline with select international resellers in APAC, EMEA, and LATAM, and with regional resellers in the United States. She also assisted with the design and construction of the Conversica partner program.

In her free time, she is a free-lance food photographer, food stylist, food blogger, recipe developer, and gluten free baker for her online blog and social handle, Sisters Sans Gluten (www.sisterssansgluten), which she created with her sister in 2018. She also continues to sing informally and takes voice lessons remotely with instructor Corey Head of San Francisco.

She holds a BA in both Anthropology and Music (vocal performance), and an MA in Latin American Studies from Stanford University. Highlights from Stanford include: playing and touring as a performing member of Stanford Taiko (Japanese ensemble drumming) for four years; singing with the Stanford Chamber Chorale led by Professor Steve Sano; studying voice with Wendy Hillhouse; participating in music department operas; performing in self-organized recitals showcasing western art songs, western musical theater, and Latin American art songs; studying abroad in Santiago, Chile; and learning Quechua during her masters program with Marisol Necochea.

Abdul Karim has completed a Bachelor of Science in Bioengineering and Computational Medicine (Imperial College London), a Bachelor of Medicine and Bachelor of Surgery (Queen Mary University of London), and Master of Science in the Philosophy of Science and Economics (The London School of Economics).

He has delivered lectures on the Philosophy of Human Nature and the History of Metaethics at the University of Cambridge and for Health Education East Midlands. This, in addition to the current positions he holds as a Hospital Doctor and Health Policy and Management Advisor at the University Hospitals of Leicester NHS Trust.

Abdul Karim’s current areas of interest include the biological definition of psychological states relevant to the learning environment, and the influence of language on the variable interpretation of a particular social context. For the latter of which he has published primary research.

Another is the appraisal and deployment of physiological measurement devices in learning environments as a means of quantitatively evaluating psychological states. Such research areas hold promise in enhancing the questionnaire-based evidences of contemporary theories in education, such as those regarding motivation, self-determination and engagement. This will to contribute to the evidence-based public policy optimisation in education and social care.

 

Publications

Ismail, A.K. 2017. A Cross Sectional Study to Explore the Effect of the Linguistic Origin and Evolution of a Language on Patient Interpretation of Haematological Cancers. Advances in Biological Research. 11 (4): 225-232.

Ismail, A.K. 2017. The Origin of the Arabic Medical Term for Cancer. Advances in Biological Research. 11 (4): 198-201.

Ismail, A.K. 2018. The Impact of da Vinci’s Anatomical Drawings and Calculations on Foundation of Orthopaedics. Advances in Biological Research. 12 (1): 26-30.

As a mathematics teacher who believes that anyone can understand mathematics, Ashley is keenly interested in developing interventions and resources for learners who struggle with the subject. More specifically, she is focusing on the transitionary moment in the classroom when discussions have ceased, and practice begins and how this transition can become more fluid for learners.

By drawing on research from education, psychology and cognitive neuroscience, Ashley hopes to gain insights into how the brain and mind process information and how this knowledge can inform teacher practice and, ultimately, help learners understand mathematics.

After having taught for over ten years, Ashley completed her MSc, with Distinction, at the Department of Education, and her dissertation was “Highly Commended” by the British Educational Research Association (BERA). She is committed to making mathematics more accessible for all learners and strives for research that is not only impactful but also directly applicable to the classroom.

I am a Research Project Coordinator and Co-PI at the Department of Education for a project on Education, Purpose and Human Flourishing in Times of Uncertainty (EPHF), and the Templeton World Charity Foundation Fellow in Comparative Education at St Antony’s College, Oxford.

I have a multi-disciplinary background and experience. Academically I am an Art Historian specialising in late 18th and early 19th-century French aesthetics, and prior to my return to academia I had a career in the international finance, entrepreneurial business and high net worth family business sectors. I have published and taught at the University of Oxford on late eighteenth-and early nineteenth century art, history and aesthetics. Drawing on my experience as Lay Chaplain at Somerville College, Oxford I have also published on religious education. In addition to my position in the Education Department I am the Principal Advisor for Strategic Relationships and Partnerships at the Templeton World Charity Foundation Inc where I work closely with other foundations, INGOs and public policy organisations.

Publications List

Xiaona Wang is a DPhil student in Education, at St. Antony’s College, the University of Oxford. Xiaona’s doctoral research is fully funded by the University of Oxford (Clarendon Fund Scholarship and St. Antony’s College The Warden’s Scholarship). She is also a member at the Center for Global Higher Education.

Before her DPhil, Xiaona obtained her M.A degree in Higher Education at Graduate School of Education at Peking University, and B.A at the Faulty of Education from Beijing Normal University in China with first-class honour. She also studied at the University of Manchester as an exchange student in the School of Social Science.

Previously, Xiaona worked at Global Education Cluster in UNICEF, Geneva, where she began her research on the international scientific collaboration between China and Switzerland, and this experience later became the starting point of her master thesis. In her master’s thesis, Xiaona used a longitudinal research method in following a group of Chinese scientists who studied and worked in Switzerland. Through semi-structured interviews, she explored how collaborative relationships between individual scientists began and developed.

Xiaona has strong research interests in the science studies, internationalization and globalization of higher education. Her doctoral research is going to continue to explore the scientific knowledge networks between China and Switzerland under the influence of geopolitical factors.

Wanlin Cai is a DPhil student in higher education and a member of CGHE research group at the Department of Education.

Wanlin’s research interest lies in international higher education, higher education policies and economy, with a specific focus on World-Class Universities.

She is also a member of South China Global Talent Institute, Center for China and Globalisation, where she focuses on the research of talent policy and development in the Great Bay Area in China.

Prior to her beginning as a DPhil student, Wanlin read for the M.Sc in Higher Education at the University of Oxford and the M.Sc in Management and Enterprise Growth at the University of Glasgow.

Naosuke is a DPhil student whose research interests are Global Englishes and mutual intelligibility in English communication.

Naosuke finished an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition at the University of Oxford with distinction in 2019. His DPhil research focuses on the intelligibility of non-native English speakers. Specifically, he would like to seek what kind of English pronunciation features are critical for successful English communication between non-native English speakers.

Adam, from Ethiopia, is interested in looking at the role of education in peacebuilding and conflicts.

Akira is a DPhil Student in Anthropology affiliated with the School of Anthropology & Museum Ethnography, and associated with both the Department of Education and Nissan Institute of Japanese Studies. He is supervised by David Mills and Roger Goodman.

Akira’s doctoral research rests with the concepts of ‘international’ and ‘global education,’ and is grounded in the recent emergence and growth of International Baccalaureate (IB) education in Japan. Focused on IB educator training across several higher education institutions (HEIs), Akira aims – solely through digital anthropological approaches – to contextualize the everyday negotiations of ‘international’ and ‘global’ knowledge, both by those receiving and administering its training. Considering social, political, economic and cognitive aspects, one key objective of this research hopes to inform educational practitioners and policy-makers of some of the conceptual and social challenges that emerge with dissonant notions of cultivating ‘international’ and ‘global people.’

Akira has been an Associate Researcher at the Graduate School of Teacher Education, Tokyo Gakugei University since autumn 2020, a post he continues to hold until the end of his doctoral degree. He also currently works as an Anthropological Analyst for Contemplative Spaces, a consultancy focused on designing and delivering a range of leadership development initiatives for individuals, groups, and organizational bodies. His future career plans include further anthropological research and establishing consultancy services dedicated to various inclusion-based development initiatives.

Amelia is passionate about access to and the effects of environmental education globally, particularly in the Galápagos Islands of Ecuador.

Because she experienced a wealth of informal and non-formal environmental education from her parents and from explorations growing up in Southern Oregon, she is interested in researching how environmental education manifests in global communities. She fell in love with the Galápagos on a structured university-led trip during her undergraduate studies and realized that there was a dearth of research on social aspects of the communities living on the islands.  Because of this, she pursued research in the Galápagos in 2014 on the prevalence of and access to both formal and informal (provided by numerous NGOs and government agencies) environmental education for students on the islands, and on the level of student environmental literacy in 28 schools.

Her Dphil research focus, under the supervision of Dr. Ann Childs and Dr. Steve Puttick, is on access to and effects of Experiential Environmental Education for students living in the Galápagos Islands, and on the production of research on the social sphere in Galápagos.

Prior to starting her Dphil at Oxford, she worked in alliances and partnerships at tech companies in the San Francisco Bay Area. Most recently, she was the Director of Global Partnerships at Conversica, a conversational AI platform, and cultivated, trained, and drove pipeline with select international resellers in APAC, EMEA, and LATAM, and with regional resellers in the United States. She also assisted with the design and construction of the Conversica partner program.

In her free time, she is a free-lance food photographer, food stylist, food blogger, recipe developer, and gluten free baker for her online blog and social handle, Sisters Sans Gluten (www.sisterssansgluten), which she created with her sister in 2018. She also continues to sing informally and takes voice lessons remotely with instructor Corey Head of San Francisco.

She holds a BA in both Anthropology and Music (vocal performance), and an MA in Latin American Studies from Stanford University. Highlights from Stanford include: playing and touring as a performing member of Stanford Taiko (Japanese ensemble drumming) for four years; singing with the Stanford Chamber Chorale led by Professor Steve Sano; studying voice with Wendy Hillhouse; participating in music department operas; performing in self-organized recitals showcasing western art songs, western musical theater, and Latin American art songs; studying abroad in Santiago, Chile; and learning Quechua during her masters program with Marisol Necochea.

Abdul Karim has completed a Bachelor of Science in Bioengineering and Computational Medicine (Imperial College London), a Bachelor of Medicine and Bachelor of Surgery (Queen Mary University of London), and Master of Science in the Philosophy of Science and Economics (The London School of Economics).

He has delivered lectures on the Philosophy of Human Nature and the History of Metaethics at the University of Cambridge and for Health Education East Midlands. This, in addition to the current positions he holds as a Hospital Doctor and Health Policy and Management Advisor at the University Hospitals of Leicester NHS Trust.

Abdul Karim’s current areas of interest include the biological definition of psychological states relevant to the learning environment, and the influence of language on the variable interpretation of a particular social context. For the latter of which he has published primary research.

Another is the appraisal and deployment of physiological measurement devices in learning environments as a means of quantitatively evaluating psychological states. Such research areas hold promise in enhancing the questionnaire-based evidences of contemporary theories in education, such as those regarding motivation, self-determination and engagement. This will to contribute to the evidence-based public policy optimisation in education and social care.

 

Publications

Ismail, A.K. 2017. A Cross Sectional Study to Explore the Effect of the Linguistic Origin and Evolution of a Language on Patient Interpretation of Haematological Cancers. Advances in Biological Research. 11 (4): 225-232.

Ismail, A.K. 2017. The Origin of the Arabic Medical Term for Cancer. Advances in Biological Research. 11 (4): 198-201.

Ismail, A.K. 2018. The Impact of da Vinci’s Anatomical Drawings and Calculations on Foundation of Orthopaedics. Advances in Biological Research. 12 (1): 26-30.

As a mathematics teacher who believes that anyone can understand mathematics, Ashley is keenly interested in developing interventions and resources for learners who struggle with the subject. More specifically, she is focusing on the transitionary moment in the classroom when discussions have ceased, and practice begins and how this transition can become more fluid for learners.

By drawing on research from education, psychology and cognitive neuroscience, Ashley hopes to gain insights into how the brain and mind process information and how this knowledge can inform teacher practice and, ultimately, help learners understand mathematics.

After having taught for over ten years, Ashley completed her MSc, with Distinction, at the Department of Education, and her dissertation was “Highly Commended” by the British Educational Research Association (BERA). She is committed to making mathematics more accessible for all learners and strives for research that is not only impactful but also directly applicable to the classroom.

I am a Research Project Coordinator and Co-PI at the Department of Education for a project on Education, Purpose and Human Flourishing in Times of Uncertainty (EPHF), and the Templeton World Charity Foundation Fellow in Comparative Education at St Antony’s College, Oxford.

I have a multi-disciplinary background and experience. Academically I am an Art Historian specialising in late 18th and early 19th-century French aesthetics, and prior to my return to academia I had a career in the international finance, entrepreneurial business and high net worth family business sectors. I have published and taught at the University of Oxford on late eighteenth-and early nineteenth century art, history and aesthetics. Drawing on my experience as Lay Chaplain at Somerville College, Oxford I have also published on religious education. In addition to my position in the Education Department I am the Principal Advisor for Strategic Relationships and Partnerships at the Templeton World Charity Foundation Inc where I work closely with other foundations, INGOs and public policy organisations.

Publications List

Xiaona Wang is a DPhil student in Education, at St. Antony’s College, the University of Oxford. Xiaona’s doctoral research is fully funded by the University of Oxford (Clarendon Fund Scholarship and St. Antony’s College The Warden’s Scholarship). She is also a member at the Center for Global Higher Education.

Before her DPhil, Xiaona obtained her M.A degree in Higher Education at Graduate School of Education at Peking University, and B.A at the Faulty of Education from Beijing Normal University in China with first-class honour. She also studied at the University of Manchester as an exchange student in the School of Social Science.

Previously, Xiaona worked at Global Education Cluster in UNICEF, Geneva, where she began her research on the international scientific collaboration between China and Switzerland, and this experience later became the starting point of her master thesis. In her master’s thesis, Xiaona used a longitudinal research method in following a group of Chinese scientists who studied and worked in Switzerland. Through semi-structured interviews, she explored how collaborative relationships between individual scientists began and developed.

Xiaona has strong research interests in the science studies, internationalization and globalization of higher education. Her doctoral research is going to continue to explore the scientific knowledge networks between China and Switzerland under the influence of geopolitical factors.

Wanlin Cai is a DPhil student in higher education and a member of CGHE research group at the Department of Education.

Wanlin’s research interest lies in international higher education, higher education policies and economy, with a specific focus on World-Class Universities.

She is also a member of South China Global Talent Institute, Center for China and Globalisation, where she focuses on the research of talent policy and development in the Great Bay Area in China.

Prior to her beginning as a DPhil student, Wanlin read for the M.Sc in Higher Education at the University of Oxford and the M.Sc in Management and Enterprise Growth at the University of Glasgow.

Naosuke is a DPhil student whose research interests are Global Englishes and mutual intelligibility in English communication.

Naosuke finished an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition at the University of Oxford with distinction in 2019. His DPhil research focuses on the intelligibility of non-native English speakers. Specifically, he would like to seek what kind of English pronunciation features are critical for successful English communication between non-native English speakers.

Adam, from Ethiopia, is interested in looking at the role of education in peacebuilding and conflicts.

Akira is a DPhil Student in Anthropology affiliated with the School of Anthropology & Museum Ethnography, and associated with both the Department of Education and Nissan Institute of Japanese Studies. He is supervised by David Mills and Roger Goodman.

Akira’s doctoral research rests with the concepts of ‘international’ and ‘global education,’ and is grounded in the recent emergence and growth of International Baccalaureate (IB) education in Japan. Focused on IB educator training across several higher education institutions (HEIs), Akira aims – solely through digital anthropological approaches – to contextualize the everyday negotiations of ‘international’ and ‘global’ knowledge, both by those receiving and administering its training. Considering social, political, economic and cognitive aspects, one key objective of this research hopes to inform educational practitioners and policy-makers of some of the conceptual and social challenges that emerge with dissonant notions of cultivating ‘international’ and ‘global people.’

Akira has been an Associate Researcher at the Graduate School of Teacher Education, Tokyo Gakugei University since autumn 2020, a post he continues to hold until the end of his doctoral degree. He also currently works as an Anthropological Analyst for Contemplative Spaces, a consultancy focused on designing and delivering a range of leadership development initiatives for individuals, groups, and organizational bodies. His future career plans include further anthropological research and establishing consultancy services dedicated to various inclusion-based development initiatives.

Amelia is passionate about access to and the effects of environmental education globally, particularly in the Galápagos Islands of Ecuador.

Because she experienced a wealth of informal and non-formal environmental education from her parents and from explorations growing up in Southern Oregon, she is interested in researching how environmental education manifests in global communities. She fell in love with the Galápagos on a structured university-led trip during her undergraduate studies and realized that there was a dearth of research on social aspects of the communities living on the islands.  Because of this, she pursued research in the Galápagos in 2014 on the prevalence of and access to both formal and informal (provided by numerous NGOs and government agencies) environmental education for students on the islands, and on the level of student environmental literacy in 28 schools.

Her Dphil research focus, under the supervision of Dr. Ann Childs and Dr. Steve Puttick, is on access to and effects of Experiential Environmental Education for students living in the Galápagos Islands, and on the production of research on the social sphere in Galápagos.

Prior to starting her Dphil at Oxford, she worked in alliances and partnerships at tech companies in the San Francisco Bay Area. Most recently, she was the Director of Global Partnerships at Conversica, a conversational AI platform, and cultivated, trained, and drove pipeline with select international resellers in APAC, EMEA, and LATAM, and with regional resellers in the United States. She also assisted with the design and construction of the Conversica partner program.

In her free time, she is a free-lance food photographer, food stylist, food blogger, recipe developer, and gluten free baker for her online blog and social handle, Sisters Sans Gluten (www.sisterssansgluten), which she created with her sister in 2018. She also continues to sing informally and takes voice lessons remotely with instructor Corey Head of San Francisco.

She holds a BA in both Anthropology and Music (vocal performance), and an MA in Latin American Studies from Stanford University. Highlights from Stanford include: playing and touring as a performing member of Stanford Taiko (Japanese ensemble drumming) for four years; singing with the Stanford Chamber Chorale led by Professor Steve Sano; studying voice with Wendy Hillhouse; participating in music department operas; performing in self-organized recitals showcasing western art songs, western musical theater, and Latin American art songs; studying abroad in Santiago, Chile; and learning Quechua during her masters program with Marisol Necochea.

Abdul Karim has completed a Bachelor of Science in Bioengineering and Computational Medicine (Imperial College London), a Bachelor of Medicine and Bachelor of Surgery (Queen Mary University of London), and Master of Science in the Philosophy of Science and Economics (The London School of Economics).

He has delivered lectures on the Philosophy of Human Nature and the History of Metaethics at the University of Cambridge and for Health Education East Midlands. This, in addition to the current positions he holds as a Hospital Doctor and Health Policy and Management Advisor at the University Hospitals of Leicester NHS Trust.

Abdul Karim’s current areas of interest include the biological definition of psychological states relevant to the learning environment, and the influence of language on the variable interpretation of a particular social context. For the latter of which he has published primary research.

Another is the appraisal and deployment of physiological measurement devices in learning environments as a means of quantitatively evaluating psychological states. Such research areas hold promise in enhancing the questionnaire-based evidences of contemporary theories in education, such as those regarding motivation, self-determination and engagement. This will to contribute to the evidence-based public policy optimisation in education and social care.

 

Publications

Ismail, A.K. 2017. A Cross Sectional Study to Explore the Effect of the Linguistic Origin and Evolution of a Language on Patient Interpretation of Haematological Cancers. Advances in Biological Research. 11 (4): 225-232.

Ismail, A.K. 2017. The Origin of the Arabic Medical Term for Cancer. Advances in Biological Research. 11 (4): 198-201.

Ismail, A.K. 2018. The Impact of da Vinci’s Anatomical Drawings and Calculations on Foundation of Orthopaedics. Advances in Biological Research. 12 (1): 26-30.

As a mathematics teacher who believes that anyone can understand mathematics, Ashley is keenly interested in developing interventions and resources for learners who struggle with the subject. More specifically, she is focusing on the transitionary moment in the classroom when discussions have ceased, and practice begins and how this transition can become more fluid for learners.

By drawing on research from education, psychology and cognitive neuroscience, Ashley hopes to gain insights into how the brain and mind process information and how this knowledge can inform teacher practice and, ultimately, help learners understand mathematics.

After having taught for over ten years, Ashley completed her MSc, with Distinction, at the Department of Education, and her dissertation was “Highly Commended” by the British Educational Research Association (BERA). She is committed to making mathematics more accessible for all learners and strives for research that is not only impactful but also directly applicable to the classroom.

I am a Research Project Coordinator and Co-PI at the Department of Education for a project on Education, Purpose and Human Flourishing in Times of Uncertainty (EPHF), and the Templeton World Charity Foundation Fellow in Comparative Education at St Antony’s College, Oxford.

I have a multi-disciplinary background and experience. Academically I am an Art Historian specialising in late 18th and early 19th-century French aesthetics, and prior to my return to academia I had a career in the international finance, entrepreneurial business and high net worth family business sectors. I have published and taught at the University of Oxford on late eighteenth-and early nineteenth century art, history and aesthetics. Drawing on my experience as Lay Chaplain at Somerville College, Oxford I have also published on religious education. In addition to my position in the Education Department I am the Principal Advisor for Strategic Relationships and Partnerships at the Templeton World Charity Foundation Inc where I work closely with other foundations, INGOs and public policy organisations.

Publications List

Xiaona Wang is a DPhil student in Education, at St. Antony’s College, the University of Oxford. Xiaona’s doctoral research is fully funded by the University of Oxford (Clarendon Fund Scholarship and St. Antony’s College The Warden’s Scholarship). She is also a member at the Center for Global Higher Education.

Before her DPhil, Xiaona obtained her M.A degree in Higher Education at Graduate School of Education at Peking University, and B.A at the Faulty of Education from Beijing Normal University in China with first-class honour. She also studied at the University of Manchester as an exchange student in the School of Social Science.

Previously, Xiaona worked at Global Education Cluster in UNICEF, Geneva, where she began her research on the international scientific collaboration between China and Switzerland, and this experience later became the starting point of her master thesis. In her master’s thesis, Xiaona used a longitudinal research method in following a group of Chinese scientists who studied and worked in Switzerland. Through semi-structured interviews, she explored how collaborative relationships between individual scientists began and developed.

Xiaona has strong research interests in the science studies, internationalization and globalization of higher education. Her doctoral research is going to continue to explore the scientific knowledge networks between China and Switzerland under the influence of geopolitical factors.

Wanlin Cai is a DPhil student in higher education and a member of CGHE research group at the Department of Education.

Wanlin’s research interest lies in international higher education, higher education policies and economy, with a specific focus on World-Class Universities.

She is also a member of South China Global Talent Institute, Center for China and Globalisation, where she focuses on the research of talent policy and development in the Great Bay Area in China.

Prior to her beginning as a DPhil student, Wanlin read for the M.Sc in Higher Education at the University of Oxford and the M.Sc in Management and Enterprise Growth at the University of Glasgow.

Naosuke is a DPhil student whose research interests are Global Englishes and mutual intelligibility in English communication.

Naosuke finished an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition at the University of Oxford with distinction in 2019. His DPhil research focuses on the intelligibility of non-native English speakers. Specifically, he would like to seek what kind of English pronunciation features are critical for successful English communication between non-native English speakers.

Adam, from Ethiopia, is interested in looking at the role of education in peacebuilding and conflicts.

Akira is a DPhil Student in Anthropology affiliated with the School of Anthropology & Museum Ethnography, and associated with both the Department of Education and Nissan Institute of Japanese Studies. He is supervised by David Mills and Roger Goodman.

Akira’s doctoral research rests with the concepts of ‘international’ and ‘global education,’ and is grounded in the recent emergence and growth of International Baccalaureate (IB) education in Japan. Focused on IB educator training across several higher education institutions (HEIs), Akira aims – solely through digital anthropological approaches – to contextualize the everyday negotiations of ‘international’ and ‘global’ knowledge, both by those receiving and administering its training. Considering social, political, economic and cognitive aspects, one key objective of this research hopes to inform educational practitioners and policy-makers of some of the conceptual and social challenges that emerge with dissonant notions of cultivating ‘international’ and ‘global people.’

Akira has been an Associate Researcher at the Graduate School of Teacher Education, Tokyo Gakugei University since autumn 2020, a post he continues to hold until the end of his doctoral degree. He also currently works as an Anthropological Analyst for Contemplative Spaces, a consultancy focused on designing and delivering a range of leadership development initiatives for individuals, groups, and organizational bodies. His future career plans include further anthropological research and establishing consultancy services dedicated to various inclusion-based development initiatives.

Amelia is passionate about access to and the effects of environmental education globally, particularly in the Galápagos Islands of Ecuador.

Because she experienced a wealth of informal and non-formal environmental education from her parents and from explorations growing up in Southern Oregon, she is interested in researching how environmental education manifests in global communities. She fell in love with the Galápagos on a structured university-led trip during her undergraduate studies and realized that there was a dearth of research on social aspects of the communities living on the islands.  Because of this, she pursued research in the Galápagos in 2014 on the prevalence of and access to both formal and informal (provided by numerous NGOs and government agencies) environmental education for students on the islands, and on the level of student environmental literacy in 28 schools.

Her Dphil research focus, under the supervision of Dr. Ann Childs and Dr. Steve Puttick, is on access to and effects of Experiential Environmental Education for students living in the Galápagos Islands, and on the production of research on the social sphere in Galápagos.

Prior to starting her Dphil at Oxford, she worked in alliances and partnerships at tech companies in the San Francisco Bay Area. Most recently, she was the Director of Global Partnerships at Conversica, a conversational AI platform, and cultivated, trained, and drove pipeline with select international resellers in APAC, EMEA, and LATAM, and with regional resellers in the United States. She also assisted with the design and construction of the Conversica partner program.

In her free time, she is a free-lance food photographer, food stylist, food blogger, recipe developer, and gluten free baker for her online blog and social handle, Sisters Sans Gluten (www.sisterssansgluten), which she created with her sister in 2018. She also continues to sing informally and takes voice lessons remotely with instructor Corey Head of San Francisco.

She holds a BA in both Anthropology and Music (vocal performance), and an MA in Latin American Studies from Stanford University. Highlights from Stanford include: playing and touring as a performing member of Stanford Taiko (Japanese ensemble drumming) for four years; singing with the Stanford Chamber Chorale led by Professor Steve Sano; studying voice with Wendy Hillhouse; participating in music department operas; performing in self-organized recitals showcasing western art songs, western musical theater, and Latin American art songs; studying abroad in Santiago, Chile; and learning Quechua during her masters program with Marisol Necochea.

Abdul Karim has completed a Bachelor of Science in Bioengineering and Computational Medicine (Imperial College London), a Bachelor of Medicine and Bachelor of Surgery (Queen Mary University of London), and Master of Science in the Philosophy of Science and Economics (The London School of Economics).

He has delivered lectures on the Philosophy of Human Nature and the History of Metaethics at the University of Cambridge and for Health Education East Midlands. This, in addition to the current positions he holds as a Hospital Doctor and Health Policy and Management Advisor at the University Hospitals of Leicester NHS Trust.

Abdul Karim’s current areas of interest include the biological definition of psychological states relevant to the learning environment, and the influence of language on the variable interpretation of a particular social context. For the latter of which he has published primary research.

Another is the appraisal and deployment of physiological measurement devices in learning environments as a means of quantitatively evaluating psychological states. Such research areas hold promise in enhancing the questionnaire-based evidences of contemporary theories in education, such as those regarding motivation, self-determination and engagement. This will to contribute to the evidence-based public policy optimisation in education and social care.

 

Publications

Ismail, A.K. 2017. A Cross Sectional Study to Explore the Effect of the Linguistic Origin and Evolution of a Language on Patient Interpretation of Haematological Cancers. Advances in Biological Research. 11 (4): 225-232.

Ismail, A.K. 2017. The Origin of the Arabic Medical Term for Cancer. Advances in Biological Research. 11 (4): 198-201.

Ismail, A.K. 2018. The Impact of da Vinci’s Anatomical Drawings and Calculations on Foundation of Orthopaedics. Advances in Biological Research. 12 (1): 26-30.

As a mathematics teacher who believes that anyone can understand mathematics, Ashley is keenly interested in developing interventions and resources for learners who struggle with the subject. More specifically, she is focusing on the transitionary moment in the classroom when discussions have ceased, and practice begins and how this transition can become more fluid for learners.

By drawing on research from education, psychology and cognitive neuroscience, Ashley hopes to gain insights into how the brain and mind process information and how this knowledge can inform teacher practice and, ultimately, help learners understand mathematics.

After having taught for over ten years, Ashley completed her MSc, with Distinction, at the Department of Education, and her dissertation was “Highly Commended” by the British Educational Research Association (BERA). She is committed to making mathematics more accessible for all learners and strives for research that is not only impactful but also directly applicable to the classroom.

I am a Research Project Coordinator and Co-PI at the Department of Education for a project on Education, Purpose and Human Flourishing in Times of Uncertainty (EPHF), and the Templeton World Charity Foundation Fellow in Comparative Education at St Antony’s College, Oxford.

I have a multi-disciplinary background and experience. Academically I am an Art Historian specialising in late 18th and early 19th-century French aesthetics, and prior to my return to academia I had a career in the international finance, entrepreneurial business and high net worth family business sectors. I have published and taught at the University of Oxford on late eighteenth-and early nineteenth century art, history and aesthetics. Drawing on my experience as Lay Chaplain at Somerville College, Oxford I have also published on religious education. In addition to my position in the Education Department I am the Principal Advisor for Strategic Relationships and Partnerships at the Templeton World Charity Foundation Inc where I work closely with other foundations, INGOs and public policy organisations.

Publications List

Xiaona Wang is a DPhil student in Education, at St. Antony’s College, the University of Oxford. Xiaona’s doctoral research is fully funded by the University of Oxford (Clarendon Fund Scholarship and St. Antony’s College The Warden’s Scholarship). She is also a member at the Center for Global Higher Education.

Before her DPhil, Xiaona obtained her M.A degree in Higher Education at Graduate School of Education at Peking University, and B.A at the Faulty of Education from Beijing Normal University in China with first-class honour. She also studied at the University of Manchester as an exchange student in the School of Social Science.

Previously, Xiaona worked at Global Education Cluster in UNICEF, Geneva, where she began her research on the international scientific collaboration between China and Switzerland, and this experience later became the starting point of her master thesis. In her master’s thesis, Xiaona used a longitudinal research method in following a group of Chinese scientists who studied and worked in Switzerland. Through semi-structured interviews, she explored how collaborative relationships between individual scientists began and developed.

Xiaona has strong research interests in the science studies, internationalization and globalization of higher education. Her doctoral research is going to continue to explore the scientific knowledge networks between China and Switzerland under the influence of geopolitical factors.

Wanlin Cai is a DPhil student in higher education and a member of CGHE research group at the Department of Education.

Wanlin’s research interest lies in international higher education, higher education policies and economy, with a specific focus on World-Class Universities.

She is also a member of South China Global Talent Institute, Center for China and Globalisation, where she focuses on the research of talent policy and development in the Great Bay Area in China.

Prior to her beginning as a DPhil student, Wanlin read for the M.Sc in Higher Education at the University of Oxford and the M.Sc in Management and Enterprise Growth at the University of Glasgow.

Naosuke is a DPhil student whose research interests are Global Englishes and mutual intelligibility in English communication.

Naosuke finished an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition at the University of Oxford with distinction in 2019. His DPhil research focuses on the intelligibility of non-native English speakers. Specifically, he would like to seek what kind of English pronunciation features are critical for successful English communication between non-native English speakers.

Adam, from Ethiopia, is interested in looking at the role of education in peacebuilding and conflicts.

Akira is a DPhil Student in Anthropology affiliated with the School of Anthropology & Museum Ethnography, and associated with both the Department of Education and Nissan Institute of Japanese Studies. He is supervised by David Mills and Roger Goodman.

Akira’s doctoral research rests with the concepts of ‘international’ and ‘global education,’ and is grounded in the recent emergence and growth of International Baccalaureate (IB) education in Japan. Focused on IB educator training across several higher education institutions (HEIs), Akira aims – solely through digital anthropological approaches – to contextualize the everyday negotiations of ‘international’ and ‘global’ knowledge, both by those receiving and administering its training. Considering social, political, economic and cognitive aspects, one key objective of this research hopes to inform educational practitioners and policy-makers of some of the conceptual and social challenges that emerge with dissonant notions of cultivating ‘international’ and ‘global people.’

Akira has been an Associate Researcher at the Graduate School of Teacher Education, Tokyo Gakugei University since autumn 2020, a post he continues to hold until the end of his doctoral degree. He also currently works as an Anthropological Analyst for Contemplative Spaces, a consultancy focused on designing and delivering a range of leadership development initiatives for individuals, groups, and organizational bodies. His future career plans include further anthropological research and establishing consultancy services dedicated to various inclusion-based development initiatives.

Amelia is passionate about access to and the effects of environmental education globally, particularly in the Galápagos Islands of Ecuador.

Because she experienced a wealth of informal and non-formal environmental education from her parents and from explorations growing up in Southern Oregon, she is interested in researching how environmental education manifests in global communities. She fell in love with the Galápagos on a structured university-led trip during her undergraduate studies and realized that there was a dearth of research on social aspects of the communities living on the islands.  Because of this, she pursued research in the Galápagos in 2014 on the prevalence of and access to both formal and informal (provided by numerous NGOs and government agencies) environmental education for students on the islands, and on the level of student environmental literacy in 28 schools.

Her Dphil research focus, under the supervision of Dr. Ann Childs and Dr. Steve Puttick, is on access to and effects of Experiential Environmental Education for students living in the Galápagos Islands, and on the production of research on the social sphere in Galápagos.

Prior to starting her Dphil at Oxford, she worked in alliances and partnerships at tech companies in the San Francisco Bay Area. Most recently, she was the Director of Global Partnerships at Conversica, a conversational AI platform, and cultivated, trained, and drove pipeline with select international resellers in APAC, EMEA, and LATAM, and with regional resellers in the United States. She also assisted with the design and construction of the Conversica partner program.

In her free time, she is a free-lance food photographer, food stylist, food blogger, recipe developer, and gluten free baker for her online blog and social handle, Sisters Sans Gluten (www.sisterssansgluten), which she created with her sister in 2018. She also continues to sing informally and takes voice lessons remotely with instructor Corey Head of San Francisco.

She holds a BA in both Anthropology and Music (vocal performance), and an MA in Latin American Studies from Stanford University. Highlights from Stanford include: playing and touring as a performing member of Stanford Taiko (Japanese ensemble drumming) for four years; singing with the Stanford Chamber Chorale led by Professor Steve Sano; studying voice with Wendy Hillhouse; participating in music department operas; performing in self-organized recitals showcasing western art songs, western musical theater, and Latin American art songs; studying abroad in Santiago, Chile; and learning Quechua during her masters program with Marisol Necochea.

Abdul Karim has completed a Bachelor of Science in Bioengineering and Computational Medicine (Imperial College London), a Bachelor of Medicine and Bachelor of Surgery (Queen Mary University of London), and Master of Science in the Philosophy of Science and Economics (The London School of Economics).

He has delivered lectures on the Philosophy of Human Nature and the History of Metaethics at the University of Cambridge and for Health Education East Midlands. This, in addition to the current positions he holds as a Hospital Doctor and Health Policy and Management Advisor at the University Hospitals of Leicester NHS Trust.

Abdul Karim’s current areas of interest include the biological definition of psychological states relevant to the learning environment, and the influence of language on the variable interpretation of a particular social context. For the latter of which he has published primary research.

Another is the appraisal and deployment of physiological measurement devices in learning environments as a means of quantitatively evaluating psychological states. Such research areas hold promise in enhancing the questionnaire-based evidences of contemporary theories in education, such as those regarding motivation, self-determination and engagement. This will to contribute to the evidence-based public policy optimisation in education and social care.

 

Publications

Ismail, A.K. 2017. A Cross Sectional Study to Explore the Effect of the Linguistic Origin and Evolution of a Language on Patient Interpretation of Haematological Cancers. Advances in Biological Research. 11 (4): 225-232.

Ismail, A.K. 2017. The Origin of the Arabic Medical Term for Cancer. Advances in Biological Research. 11 (4): 198-201.

Ismail, A.K. 2018. The Impact of da Vinci’s Anatomical Drawings and Calculations on Foundation of Orthopaedics. Advances in Biological Research. 12 (1): 26-30.

As a mathematics teacher who believes that anyone can understand mathematics, Ashley is keenly interested in developing interventions and resources for learners who struggle with the subject. More specifically, she is focusing on the transitionary moment in the classroom when discussions have ceased, and practice begins and how this transition can become more fluid for learners.

By drawing on research from education, psychology and cognitive neuroscience, Ashley hopes to gain insights into how the brain and mind process information and how this knowledge can inform teacher practice and, ultimately, help learners understand mathematics.

After having taught for over ten years, Ashley completed her MSc, with Distinction, at the Department of Education, and her dissertation was “Highly Commended” by the British Educational Research Association (BERA). She is committed to making mathematics more accessible for all learners and strives for research that is not only impactful but also directly applicable to the classroom.

I am a Research Project Coordinator and Co-PI at the Department of Education for a project on Education, Purpose and Human Flourishing in Times of Uncertainty (EPHF), and the Templeton World Charity Foundation Fellow in Comparative Education at St Antony’s College, Oxford.

I have a multi-disciplinary background and experience. Academically I am an Art Historian specialising in late 18th and early 19th-century French aesthetics, and prior to my return to academia I had a career in the international finance, entrepreneurial business and high net worth family business sectors. I have published and taught at the University of Oxford on late eighteenth-and early nineteenth century art, history and aesthetics. Drawing on my experience as Lay Chaplain at Somerville College, Oxford I have also published on religious education. In addition to my position in the Education Department I am the Principal Advisor for Strategic Relationships and Partnerships at the Templeton World Charity Foundation Inc where I work closely with other foundations, INGOs and public policy organisations.

Publications List

Xiaona Wang is a DPhil student in Education, at St. Antony’s College, the University of Oxford. Xiaona’s doctoral research is fully funded by the University of Oxford (Clarendon Fund Scholarship and St. Antony’s College The Warden’s Scholarship). She is also a member at the Center for Global Higher Education.

Before her DPhil, Xiaona obtained her M.A degree in Higher Education at Graduate School of Education at Peking University, and B.A at the Faulty of Education from Beijing Normal University in China with first-class honour. She also studied at the University of Manchester as an exchange student in the School of Social Science.

Previously, Xiaona worked at Global Education Cluster in UNICEF, Geneva, where she began her research on the international scientific collaboration between China and Switzerland, and this experience later became the starting point of her master thesis. In her master’s thesis, Xiaona used a longitudinal research method in following a group of Chinese scientists who studied and worked in Switzerland. Through semi-structured interviews, she explored how collaborative relationships between individual scientists began and developed.

Xiaona has strong research interests in the science studies, internationalization and globalization of higher education. Her doctoral research is going to continue to explore the scientific knowledge networks between China and Switzerland under the influence of geopolitical factors.

Wanlin Cai is a DPhil student in higher education and a member of CGHE research group at the Department of Education.

Wanlin’s research interest lies in international higher education, higher education policies and economy, with a specific focus on World-Class Universities.

She is also a member of South China Global Talent Institute, Center for China and Globalisation, where she focuses on the research of talent policy and development in the Great Bay Area in China.

Prior to her beginning as a DPhil student, Wanlin read for the M.Sc in Higher Education at the University of Oxford and the M.Sc in Management and Enterprise Growth at the University of Glasgow.

Naosuke is a DPhil student whose research interests are Global Englishes and mutual intelligibility in English communication.

Naosuke finished an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition at the University of Oxford with distinction in 2019. His DPhil research focuses on the intelligibility of non-native English speakers. Specifically, he would like to seek what kind of English pronunciation features are critical for successful English communication between non-native English speakers.

Adam, from Ethiopia, is interested in looking at the role of education in peacebuilding and conflicts.

Akira is a DPhil Student in Anthropology affiliated with the School of Anthropology & Museum Ethnography, and associated with both the Department of Education and Nissan Institute of Japanese Studies. He is supervised by David Mills and Roger Goodman.

Akira’s doctoral research rests with the concepts of ‘international’ and ‘global education,’ and is grounded in the recent emergence and growth of International Baccalaureate (IB) education in Japan. Focused on IB educator training across several higher education institutions (HEIs), Akira aims – solely through digital anthropological approaches – to contextualize the everyday negotiations of ‘international’ and ‘global’ knowledge, both by those receiving and administering its training. Considering social, political, economic and cognitive aspects, one key objective of this research hopes to inform educational practitioners and policy-makers of some of the conceptual and social challenges that emerge with dissonant notions of cultivating ‘international’ and ‘global people.’

Akira has been an Associate Researcher at the Graduate School of Teacher Education, Tokyo Gakugei University since autumn 2020, a post he continues to hold until the end of his doctoral degree. He also currently works as an Anthropological Analyst for Contemplative Spaces, a consultancy focused on designing and delivering a range of leadership development initiatives for individuals, groups, and organizational bodies. His future career plans include further anthropological research and establishing consultancy services dedicated to various inclusion-based development initiatives.

Amelia is passionate about access to and the effects of environmental education globally, particularly in the Galápagos Islands of Ecuador.

Because she experienced a wealth of informal and non-formal environmental education from her parents and from explorations growing up in Southern Oregon, she is interested in researching how environmental education manifests in global communities. She fell in love with the Galápagos on a structured university-led trip during her undergraduate studies and realized that there was a dearth of research on social aspects of the communities living on the islands.  Because of this, she pursued research in the Galápagos in 2014 on the prevalence of and access to both formal and informal (provided by numerous NGOs and government agencies) environmental education for students on the islands, and on the level of student environmental literacy in 28 schools.

Her Dphil research focus, under the supervision of Dr. Ann Childs and Dr. Steve Puttick, is on access to and effects of Experiential Environmental Education for students living in the Galápagos Islands, and on the production of research on the social sphere in Galápagos.

Prior to starting her Dphil at Oxford, she worked in alliances and partnerships at tech companies in the San Francisco Bay Area. Most recently, she was the Director of Global Partnerships at Conversica, a conversational AI platform, and cultivated, trained, and drove pipeline with select international resellers in APAC, EMEA, and LATAM, and with regional resellers in the United States. She also assisted with the design and construction of the Conversica partner program.

In her free time, she is a free-lance food photographer, food stylist, food blogger, recipe developer, and gluten free baker for her online blog and social handle, Sisters Sans Gluten (www.sisterssansgluten), which she created with her sister in 2018. She also continues to sing informally and takes voice lessons remotely with instructor Corey Head of San Francisco.

She holds a BA in both Anthropology and Music (vocal performance), and an MA in Latin American Studies from Stanford University. Highlights from Stanford include: playing and touring as a performing member of Stanford Taiko (Japanese ensemble drumming) for four years; singing with the Stanford Chamber Chorale led by Professor Steve Sano; studying voice with Wendy Hillhouse; participating in music department operas; performing in self-organized recitals showcasing western art songs, western musical theater, and Latin American art songs; studying abroad in Santiago, Chile; and learning Quechua during her masters program with Marisol Necochea.

Abdul Karim has completed a Bachelor of Science in Bioengineering and Computational Medicine (Imperial College London), a Bachelor of Medicine and Bachelor of Surgery (Queen Mary University of London), and Master of Science in the Philosophy of Science and Economics (The London School of Economics).

He has delivered lectures on the Philosophy of Human Nature and the History of Metaethics at the University of Cambridge and for Health Education East Midlands. This, in addition to the current positions he holds as a Hospital Doctor and Health Policy and Management Advisor at the University Hospitals of Leicester NHS Trust.

Abdul Karim’s current areas of interest include the biological definition of psychological states relevant to the learning environment, and the influence of language on the variable interpretation of a particular social context. For the latter of which he has published primary research.

Another is the appraisal and deployment of physiological measurement devices in learning environments as a means of quantitatively evaluating psychological states. Such research areas hold promise in enhancing the questionnaire-based evidences of contemporary theories in education, such as those regarding motivation, self-determination and engagement. This will to contribute to the evidence-based public policy optimisation in education and social care.

 

Publications

Ismail, A.K. 2017. A Cross Sectional Study to Explore the Effect of the Linguistic Origin and Evolution of a Language on Patient Interpretation of Haematological Cancers. Advances in Biological Research. 11 (4): 225-232.

Ismail, A.K. 2017. The Origin of the Arabic Medical Term for Cancer. Advances in Biological Research. 11 (4): 198-201.

Ismail, A.K. 2018. The Impact of da Vinci’s Anatomical Drawings and Calculations on Foundation of Orthopaedics. Advances in Biological Research. 12 (1): 26-30.

As a mathematics teacher who believes that anyone can understand mathematics, Ashley is keenly interested in developing interventions and resources for learners who struggle with the subject. More specifically, she is focusing on the transitionary moment in the classroom when discussions have ceased, and practice begins and how this transition can become more fluid for learners.

By drawing on research from education, psychology and cognitive neuroscience, Ashley hopes to gain insights into how the brain and mind process information and how this knowledge can inform teacher practice and, ultimately, help learners understand mathematics.

After having taught for over ten years, Ashley completed her MSc, with Distinction, at the Department of Education, and her dissertation was “Highly Commended” by the British Educational Research Association (BERA). She is committed to making mathematics more accessible for all learners and strives for research that is not only impactful but also directly applicable to the classroom.

I am a Research Project Coordinator and Co-PI at the Department of Education for a project on Education, Purpose and Human Flourishing in Times of Uncertainty (EPHF), and the Templeton World Charity Foundation Fellow in Comparative Education at St Antony’s College, Oxford.

I have a multi-disciplinary background and experience. Academically I am an Art Historian specialising in late 18th and early 19th-century French aesthetics, and prior to my return to academia I had a career in the international finance, entrepreneurial business and high net worth family business sectors. I have published and taught at the University of Oxford on late eighteenth-and early nineteenth century art, history and aesthetics. Drawing on my experience as Lay Chaplain at Somerville College, Oxford I have also published on religious education. In addition to my position in the Education Department I am the Principal Advisor for Strategic Relationships and Partnerships at the Templeton World Charity Foundation Inc where I work closely with other foundations, INGOs and public policy organisations.

Publications List

Xiaona Wang is a DPhil student in Education, at St. Antony’s College, the University of Oxford. Xiaona’s doctoral research is fully funded by the University of Oxford (Clarendon Fund Scholarship and St. Antony’s College The Warden’s Scholarship). She is also a member at the Center for Global Higher Education.

Before her DPhil, Xiaona obtained her M.A degree in Higher Education at Graduate School of Education at Peking University, and B.A at the Faulty of Education from Beijing Normal University in China with first-class honour. She also studied at the University of Manchester as an exchange student in the School of Social Science.

Previously, Xiaona worked at Global Education Cluster in UNICEF, Geneva, where she began her research on the international scientific collaboration between China and Switzerland, and this experience later became the starting point of her master thesis. In her master’s thesis, Xiaona used a longitudinal research method in following a group of Chinese scientists who studied and worked in Switzerland. Through semi-structured interviews, she explored how collaborative relationships between individual scientists began and developed.

Xiaona has strong research interests in the science studies, internationalization and globalization of higher education. Her doctoral research is going to continue to explore the scientific knowledge networks between China and Switzerland under the influence of geopolitical factors.

Wanlin Cai is a DPhil student in higher education and a member of CGHE research group at the Department of Education.

Wanlin’s research interest lies in international higher education, higher education policies and economy, with a specific focus on World-Class Universities.

She is also a member of South China Global Talent Institute, Center for China and Globalisation, where she focuses on the research of talent policy and development in the Great Bay Area in China.

Prior to her beginning as a DPhil student, Wanlin read for the M.Sc in Higher Education at the University of Oxford and the M.Sc in Management and Enterprise Growth at the University of Glasgow.

Naosuke is a DPhil student whose research interests are Global Englishes and mutual intelligibility in English communication.

Naosuke finished an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition at the University of Oxford with distinction in 2019. His DPhil research focuses on the intelligibility of non-native English speakers. Specifically, he would like to seek what kind of English pronunciation features are critical for successful English communication between non-native English speakers.

Adam, from Ethiopia, is interested in looking at the role of education in peacebuilding and conflicts.

Akira is a DPhil Student in Anthropology affiliated with the School of Anthropology & Museum Ethnography, and associated with both the Department of Education and Nissan Institute of Japanese Studies. He is supervised by David Mills and Roger Goodman.

Akira’s doctoral research rests with the concepts of ‘international’ and ‘global education,’ and is grounded in the recent emergence and growth of International Baccalaureate (IB) education in Japan. Focused on IB educator training across several higher education institutions (HEIs), Akira aims – solely through digital anthropological approaches – to contextualize the everyday negotiations of ‘international’ and ‘global’ knowledge, both by those receiving and administering its training. Considering social, political, economic and cognitive aspects, one key objective of this research hopes to inform educational practitioners and policy-makers of some of the conceptual and social challenges that emerge with dissonant notions of cultivating ‘international’ and ‘global people.’

Akira has been an Associate Researcher at the Graduate School of Teacher Education, Tokyo Gakugei University since autumn 2020, a post he continues to hold until the end of his doctoral degree. He also currently works as an Anthropological Analyst for Contemplative Spaces, a consultancy focused on designing and delivering a range of leadership development initiatives for individuals, groups, and organizational bodies. His future career plans include further anthropological research and establishing consultancy services dedicated to various inclusion-based development initiatives.

Amelia is passionate about access to and the effects of environmental education globally, particularly in the Galápagos Islands of Ecuador.

Because she experienced a wealth of informal and non-formal environmental education from her parents and from explorations growing up in Southern Oregon, she is interested in researching how environmental education manifests in global communities. She fell in love with the Galápagos on a structured university-led trip during her undergraduate studies and realized that there was a dearth of research on social aspects of the communities living on the islands.  Because of this, she pursued research in the Galápagos in 2014 on the prevalence of and access to both formal and informal (provided by numerous NGOs and government agencies) environmental education for students on the islands, and on the level of student environmental literacy in 28 schools.

Her Dphil research focus, under the supervision of Dr. Ann Childs and Dr. Steve Puttick, is on access to and effects of Experiential Environmental Education for students living in the Galápagos Islands, and on the production of research on the social sphere in Galápagos.

Prior to starting her Dphil at Oxford, she worked in alliances and partnerships at tech companies in the San Francisco Bay Area. Most recently, she was the Director of Global Partnerships at Conversica, a conversational AI platform, and cultivated, trained, and drove pipeline with select international resellers in APAC, EMEA, and LATAM, and with regional resellers in the United States. She also assisted with the design and construction of the Conversica partner program.

In her free time, she is a free-lance food photographer, food stylist, food blogger, recipe developer, and gluten free baker for her online blog and social handle, Sisters Sans Gluten (www.sisterssansgluten), which she created with her sister in 2018. She also continues to sing informally and takes voice lessons remotely with instructor Corey Head of San Francisco.

She holds a BA in both Anthropology and Music (vocal performance), and an MA in Latin American Studies from Stanford University. Highlights from Stanford include: playing and touring as a performing member of Stanford Taiko (Japanese ensemble drumming) for four years; singing with the Stanford Chamber Chorale led by Professor Steve Sano; studying voice with Wendy Hillhouse; participating in music department operas; performing in self-organized recitals showcasing western art songs, western musical theater, and Latin American art songs; studying abroad in Santiago, Chile; and learning Quechua during her masters program with Marisol Necochea.

Abdul Karim has completed a Bachelor of Science in Bioengineering and Computational Medicine (Imperial College London), a Bachelor of Medicine and Bachelor of Surgery (Queen Mary University of London), and Master of Science in the Philosophy of Science and Economics (The London School of Economics).

He has delivered lectures on the Philosophy of Human Nature and the History of Metaethics at the University of Cambridge and for Health Education East Midlands. This, in addition to the current positions he holds as a Hospital Doctor and Health Policy and Management Advisor at the University Hospitals of Leicester NHS Trust.

Abdul Karim’s current areas of interest include the biological definition of psychological states relevant to the learning environment, and the influence of language on the variable interpretation of a particular social context. For the latter of which he has published primary research.

Another is the appraisal and deployment of physiological measurement devices in learning environments as a means of quantitatively evaluating psychological states. Such research areas hold promise in enhancing the questionnaire-based evidences of contemporary theories in education, such as those regarding motivation, self-determination and engagement. This will to contribute to the evidence-based public policy optimisation in education and social care.

 

Publications

Ismail, A.K. 2017. A Cross Sectional Study to Explore the Effect of the Linguistic Origin and Evolution of a Language on Patient Interpretation of Haematological Cancers. Advances in Biological Research. 11 (4): 225-232.

Ismail, A.K. 2017. The Origin of the Arabic Medical Term for Cancer. Advances in Biological Research. 11 (4): 198-201.

Ismail, A.K. 2018. The Impact of da Vinci’s Anatomical Drawings and Calculations on Foundation of Orthopaedics. Advances in Biological Research. 12 (1): 26-30.

As a mathematics teacher who believes that anyone can understand mathematics, Ashley is keenly interested in developing interventions and resources for learners who struggle with the subject. More specifically, she is focusing on the transitionary moment in the classroom when discussions have ceased, and practice begins and how this transition can become more fluid for learners.

By drawing on research from education, psychology and cognitive neuroscience, Ashley hopes to gain insights into how the brain and mind process information and how this knowledge can inform teacher practice and, ultimately, help learners understand mathematics.

After having taught for over ten years, Ashley completed her MSc, with Distinction, at the Department of Education, and her dissertation was “Highly Commended” by the British Educational Research Association (BERA). She is committed to making mathematics more accessible for all learners and strives for research that is not only impactful but also directly applicable to the classroom.

I am a Research Project Coordinator and Co-PI at the Department of Education for a project on Education, Purpose and Human Flourishing in Times of Uncertainty (EPHF), and the Templeton World Charity Foundation Fellow in Comparative Education at St Antony’s College, Oxford.

I have a multi-disciplinary background and experience. Academically I am an Art Historian specialising in late 18th and early 19th-century French aesthetics, and prior to my return to academia I had a career in the international finance, entrepreneurial business and high net worth family business sectors. I have published and taught at the University of Oxford on late eighteenth-and early nineteenth century art, history and aesthetics. Drawing on my experience as Lay Chaplain at Somerville College, Oxford I have also published on religious education. In addition to my position in the Education Department I am the Principal Advisor for Strategic Relationships and Partnerships at the Templeton World Charity Foundation Inc where I work closely with other foundations, INGOs and public policy organisations.

Publications List

Xiaona Wang is a DPhil student in Education, at St. Antony’s College, the University of Oxford. Xiaona’s doctoral research is fully funded by the University of Oxford (Clarendon Fund Scholarship and St. Antony’s College The Warden’s Scholarship). She is also a member at the Center for Global Higher Education.

Before her DPhil, Xiaona obtained her M.A degree in Higher Education at Graduate School of Education at Peking University, and B.A at the Faulty of Education from Beijing Normal University in China with first-class honour. She also studied at the University of Manchester as an exchange student in the School of Social Science.

Previously, Xiaona worked at Global Education Cluster in UNICEF, Geneva, where she began her research on the international scientific collaboration between China and Switzerland, and this experience later became the starting point of her master thesis. In her master’s thesis, Xiaona used a longitudinal research method in following a group of Chinese scientists who studied and worked in Switzerland. Through semi-structured interviews, she explored how collaborative relationships between individual scientists began and developed.

Xiaona has strong research interests in the science studies, internationalization and globalization of higher education. Her doctoral research is going to continue to explore the scientific knowledge networks between China and Switzerland under the influence of geopolitical factors.

Wanlin Cai is a DPhil student in higher education and a member of CGHE research group at the Department of Education.

Wanlin’s research interest lies in international higher education, higher education policies and economy, with a specific focus on World-Class Universities.

She is also a member of South China Global Talent Institute, Center for China and Globalisation, where she focuses on the research of talent policy and development in the Great Bay Area in China.

Prior to her beginning as a DPhil student, Wanlin read for the M.Sc in Higher Education at the University of Oxford and the M.Sc in Management and Enterprise Growth at the University of Glasgow.

Naosuke is a DPhil student whose research interests are Global Englishes and mutual intelligibility in English communication.

Naosuke finished an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition at the University of Oxford with distinction in 2019. His DPhil research focuses on the intelligibility of non-native English speakers. Specifically, he would like to seek what kind of English pronunciation features are critical for successful English communication between non-native English speakers.

Adam, from Ethiopia, is interested in looking at the role of education in peacebuilding and conflicts.

Akira is a DPhil Student in Anthropology affiliated with the School of Anthropology & Museum Ethnography, and associated with both the Department of Education and Nissan Institute of Japanese Studies. He is supervised by David Mills and Roger Goodman.

Akira’s doctoral research rests with the concepts of ‘international’ and ‘global education,’ and is grounded in the recent emergence and growth of International Baccalaureate (IB) education in Japan. Focused on IB educator training across several higher education institutions (HEIs), Akira aims – solely through digital anthropological approaches – to contextualize the everyday negotiations of ‘international’ and ‘global’ knowledge, both by those receiving and administering its training. Considering social, political, economic and cognitive aspects, one key objective of this research hopes to inform educational practitioners and policy-makers of some of the conceptual and social challenges that emerge with dissonant notions of cultivating ‘international’ and ‘global people.’

Akira has been an Associate Researcher at the Graduate School of Teacher Education, Tokyo Gakugei University since autumn 2020, a post he continues to hold until the end of his doctoral degree. He also currently works as an Anthropological Analyst for Contemplative Spaces, a consultancy focused on designing and delivering a range of leadership development initiatives for individuals, groups, and organizational bodies. His future career plans include further anthropological research and establishing consultancy services dedicated to various inclusion-based development initiatives.

Amelia is passionate about access to and the effects of environmental education globally, particularly in the Galápagos Islands of Ecuador.

Because she experienced a wealth of informal and non-formal environmental education from her parents and from explorations growing up in Southern Oregon, she is interested in researching how environmental education manifests in global communities. She fell in love with the Galápagos on a structured university-led trip during her undergraduate studies and realized that there was a dearth of research on social aspects of the communities living on the islands.  Because of this, she pursued research in the Galápagos in 2014 on the prevalence of and access to both formal and informal (provided by numerous NGOs and government agencies) environmental education for students on the islands, and on the level of student environmental literacy in 28 schools.

Her Dphil research focus, under the supervision of Dr. Ann Childs and Dr. Steve Puttick, is on access to and effects of Experiential Environmental Education for students living in the Galápagos Islands, and on the production of research on the social sphere in Galápagos.

Prior to starting her Dphil at Oxford, she worked in alliances and partnerships at tech companies in the San Francisco Bay Area. Most recently, she was the Director of Global Partnerships at Conversica, a conversational AI platform, and cultivated, trained, and drove pipeline with select international resellers in APAC, EMEA, and LATAM, and with regional resellers in the United States. She also assisted with the design and construction of the Conversica partner program.

In her free time, she is a free-lance food photographer, food stylist, food blogger, recipe developer, and gluten free baker for her online blog and social handle, Sisters Sans Gluten (www.sisterssansgluten), which she created with her sister in 2018. She also continues to sing informally and takes voice lessons remotely with instructor Corey Head of San Francisco.

She holds a BA in both Anthropology and Music (vocal performance), and an MA in Latin American Studies from Stanford University. Highlights from Stanford include: playing and touring as a performing member of Stanford Taiko (Japanese ensemble drumming) for four years; singing with the Stanford Chamber Chorale led by Professor Steve Sano; studying voice with Wendy Hillhouse; participating in music department operas; performing in self-organized recitals showcasing western art songs, western musical theater, and Latin American art songs; studying abroad in Santiago, Chile; and learning Quechua during her masters program with Marisol Necochea.

Abdul Karim has completed a Bachelor of Science in Bioengineering and Computational Medicine (Imperial College London), a Bachelor of Medicine and Bachelor of Surgery (Queen Mary University of London), and Master of Science in the Philosophy of Science and Economics (The London School of Economics).

He has delivered lectures on the Philosophy of Human Nature and the History of Metaethics at the University of Cambridge and for Health Education East Midlands. This, in addition to the current positions he holds as a Hospital Doctor and Health Policy and Management Advisor at the University Hospitals of Leicester NHS Trust.

Abdul Karim’s current areas of interest include the biological definition of psychological states relevant to the learning environment, and the influence of language on the variable interpretation of a particular social context. For the latter of which he has published primary research.

Another is the appraisal and deployment of physiological measurement devices in learning environments as a means of quantitatively evaluating psychological states. Such research areas hold promise in enhancing the questionnaire-based evidences of contemporary theories in education, such as those regarding motivation, self-determination and engagement. This will to contribute to the evidence-based public policy optimisation in education and social care.

 

Publications

Ismail, A.K. 2017. A Cross Sectional Study to Explore the Effect of the Linguistic Origin and Evolution of a Language on Patient Interpretation of Haematological Cancers. Advances in Biological Research. 11 (4): 225-232.

Ismail, A.K. 2017. The Origin of the Arabic Medical Term for Cancer. Advances in Biological Research. 11 (4): 198-201.

Ismail, A.K. 2018. The Impact of da Vinci’s Anatomical Drawings and Calculations on Foundation of Orthopaedics. Advances in Biological Research. 12 (1): 26-30.

As a mathematics teacher who believes that anyone can understand mathematics, Ashley is keenly interested in developing interventions and resources for learners who struggle with the subject. More specifically, she is focusing on the transitionary moment in the classroom when discussions have ceased, and practice begins and how this transition can become more fluid for learners.

By drawing on research from education, psychology and cognitive neuroscience, Ashley hopes to gain insights into how the brain and mind process information and how this knowledge can inform teacher practice and, ultimately, help learners understand mathematics.

After having taught for over ten years, Ashley completed her MSc, with Distinction, at the Department of Education, and her dissertation was “Highly Commended” by the British Educational Research Association (BERA). She is committed to making mathematics more accessible for all learners and strives for research that is not only impactful but also directly applicable to the classroom.

I am a Research Project Coordinator and Co-PI at the Department of Education for a project on Education, Purpose and Human Flourishing in Times of Uncertainty (EPHF), and the Templeton World Charity Foundation Fellow in Comparative Education at St Antony’s College, Oxford.

I have a multi-disciplinary background and experience. Academically I am an Art Historian specialising in late 18th and early 19th-century French aesthetics, and prior to my return to academia I had a career in the international finance, entrepreneurial business and high net worth family business sectors. I have published and taught at the University of Oxford on late eighteenth-and early nineteenth century art, history and aesthetics. Drawing on my experience as Lay Chaplain at Somerville College, Oxford I have also published on religious education. In addition to my position in the Education Department I am the Principal Advisor for Strategic Relationships and Partnerships at the Templeton World Charity Foundation Inc where I work closely with other foundations, INGOs and public policy organisations.

Publications List

Xiaona Wang is a DPhil student in Education, at St. Antony’s College, the University of Oxford. Xiaona’s doctoral research is fully funded by the University of Oxford (Clarendon Fund Scholarship and St. Antony’s College The Warden’s Scholarship). She is also a member at the Center for Global Higher Education.

Before her DPhil, Xiaona obtained her M.A degree in Higher Education at Graduate School of Education at Peking University, and B.A at the Faulty of Education from Beijing Normal University in China with first-class honour. She also studied at the University of Manchester as an exchange student in the School of Social Science.

Previously, Xiaona worked at Global Education Cluster in UNICEF, Geneva, where she began her research on the international scientific collaboration between China and Switzerland, and this experience later became the starting point of her master thesis. In her master’s thesis, Xiaona used a longitudinal research method in following a group of Chinese scientists who studied and worked in Switzerland. Through semi-structured interviews, she explored how collaborative relationships between individual scientists began and developed.

Xiaona has strong research interests in the science studies, internationalization and globalization of higher education. Her doctoral research is going to continue to explore the scientific knowledge networks between China and Switzerland under the influence of geopolitical factors.

Wanlin Cai is a DPhil student in higher education and a member of CGHE research group at the Department of Education.

Wanlin’s research interest lies in international higher education, higher education policies and economy, with a specific focus on World-Class Universities.

She is also a member of South China Global Talent Institute, Center for China and Globalisation, where she focuses on the research of talent policy and development in the Great Bay Area in China.

Prior to her beginning as a DPhil student, Wanlin read for the M.Sc in Higher Education at the University of Oxford and the M.Sc in Management and Enterprise Growth at the University of Glasgow.

Naosuke is a DPhil student whose research interests are Global Englishes and mutual intelligibility in English communication.

Naosuke finished an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition at the University of Oxford with distinction in 2019. His DPhil research focuses on the intelligibility of non-native English speakers. Specifically, he would like to seek what kind of English pronunciation features are critical for successful English communication between non-native English speakers.

Adam, from Ethiopia, is interested in looking at the role of education in peacebuilding and conflicts.

Akira is a DPhil Student in Anthropology affiliated with the School of Anthropology & Museum Ethnography, and associated with both the Department of Education and Nissan Institute of Japanese Studies. He is supervised by David Mills and Roger Goodman.

Akira’s doctoral research rests with the concepts of ‘international’ and ‘global education,’ and is grounded in the recent emergence and growth of International Baccalaureate (IB) education in Japan. Focused on IB educator training across several higher education institutions (HEIs), Akira aims – solely through digital anthropological approaches – to contextualize the everyday negotiations of ‘international’ and ‘global’ knowledge, both by those receiving and administering its training. Considering social, political, economic and cognitive aspects, one key objective of this research hopes to inform educational practitioners and policy-makers of some of the conceptual and social challenges that emerge with dissonant notions of cultivating ‘international’ and ‘global people.’

Akira has been an Associate Researcher at the Graduate School of Teacher Education, Tokyo Gakugei University since autumn 2020, a post he continues to hold until the end of his doctoral degree. He also currently works as an Anthropological Analyst for Contemplative Spaces, a consultancy focused on designing and delivering a range of leadership development initiatives for individuals, groups, and organizational bodies. His future career plans include further anthropological research and establishing consultancy services dedicated to various inclusion-based development initiatives.

Amelia is passionate about access to and the effects of environmental education globally, particularly in the Galápagos Islands of Ecuador.

Because she experienced a wealth of informal and non-formal environmental education from her parents and from explorations growing up in Southern Oregon, she is interested in researching how environmental education manifests in global communities. She fell in love with the Galápagos on a structured university-led trip during her undergraduate studies and realized that there was a dearth of research on social aspects of the communities living on the islands.  Because of this, she pursued research in the Galápagos in 2014 on the prevalence of and access to both formal and informal (provided by numerous NGOs and government agencies) environmental education for students on the islands, and on the level of student environmental literacy in 28 schools.

Her Dphil research focus, under the supervision of Dr. Ann Childs and Dr. Steve Puttick, is on access to and effects of Experiential Environmental Education for students living in the Galápagos Islands, and on the production of research on the social sphere in Galápagos.

Prior to starting her Dphil at Oxford, she worked in alliances and partnerships at tech companies in the San Francisco Bay Area. Most recently, she was the Director of Global Partnerships at Conversica, a conversational AI platform, and cultivated, trained, and drove pipeline with select international resellers in APAC, EMEA, and LATAM, and with regional resellers in the United States. She also assisted with the design and construction of the Conversica partner program.

In her free time, she is a free-lance food photographer, food stylist, food blogger, recipe developer, and gluten free baker for her online blog and social handle, Sisters Sans Gluten (www.sisterssansgluten), which she created with her sister in 2018. She also continues to sing informally and takes voice lessons remotely with instructor Corey Head of San Francisco.

She holds a BA in both Anthropology and Music (vocal performance), and an MA in Latin American Studies from Stanford University. Highlights from Stanford include: playing and touring as a performing member of Stanford Taiko (Japanese ensemble drumming) for four years; singing with the Stanford Chamber Chorale led by Professor Steve Sano; studying voice with Wendy Hillhouse; participating in music department operas; performing in self-organized recitals showcasing western art songs, western musical theater, and Latin American art songs; studying abroad in Santiago, Chile; and learning Quechua during her masters program with Marisol Necochea.

Abdul Karim has completed a Bachelor of Science in Bioengineering and Computational Medicine (Imperial College London), a Bachelor of Medicine and Bachelor of Surgery (Queen Mary University of London), and Master of Science in the Philosophy of Science and Economics (The London School of Economics).

He has delivered lectures on the Philosophy of Human Nature and the History of Metaethics at the University of Cambridge and for Health Education East Midlands. This, in addition to the current positions he holds as a Hospital Doctor and Health Policy and Management Advisor at the University Hospitals of Leicester NHS Trust.

Abdul Karim’s current areas of interest include the biological definition of psychological states relevant to the learning environment, and the influence of language on the variable interpretation of a particular social context. For the latter of which he has published primary research.

Another is the appraisal and deployment of physiological measurement devices in learning environments as a means of quantitatively evaluating psychological states. Such research areas hold promise in enhancing the questionnaire-based evidences of contemporary theories in education, such as those regarding motivation, self-determination and engagement. This will to contribute to the evidence-based public policy optimisation in education and social care.

 

Publications

Ismail, A.K. 2017. A Cross Sectional Study to Explore the Effect of the Linguistic Origin and Evolution of a Language on Patient Interpretation of Haematological Cancers. Advances in Biological Research. 11 (4): 225-232.

Ismail, A.K. 2017. The Origin of the Arabic Medical Term for Cancer. Advances in Biological Research. 11 (4): 198-201.

Ismail, A.K. 2018. The Impact of da Vinci’s Anatomical Drawings and Calculations on Foundation of Orthopaedics. Advances in Biological Research. 12 (1): 26-30.

As a mathematics teacher who believes that anyone can understand mathematics, Ashley is keenly interested in developing interventions and resources for learners who struggle with the subject. More specifically, she is focusing on the transitionary moment in the classroom when discussions have ceased, and practice begins and how this transition can become more fluid for learners.

By drawing on research from education, psychology and cognitive neuroscience, Ashley hopes to gain insights into how the brain and mind process information and how this knowledge can inform teacher practice and, ultimately, help learners understand mathematics.

After having taught for over ten years, Ashley completed her MSc, with Distinction, at the Department of Education, and her dissertation was “Highly Commended” by the British Educational Research Association (BERA). She is committed to making mathematics more accessible for all learners and strives for research that is not only impactful but also directly applicable to the classroom.

I am a Research Project Coordinator and Co-PI at the Department of Education for a project on Education, Purpose and Human Flourishing in Times of Uncertainty (EPHF), and the Templeton World Charity Foundation Fellow in Comparative Education at St Antony’s College, Oxford.

I have a multi-disciplinary background and experience. Academically I am an Art Historian specialising in late 18th and early 19th-century French aesthetics, and prior to my return to academia I had a career in the international finance, entrepreneurial business and high net worth family business sectors. I have published and taught at the University of Oxford on late eighteenth-and early nineteenth century art, history and aesthetics. Drawing on my experience as Lay Chaplain at Somerville College, Oxford I have also published on religious education. In addition to my position in the Education Department I am the Principal Advisor for Strategic Relationships and Partnerships at the Templeton World Charity Foundation Inc where I work closely with other foundations, INGOs and public policy organisations.

Publications List

Xiaona Wang is a DPhil student in Education, at St. Antony’s College, the University of Oxford. Xiaona’s doctoral research is fully funded by the University of Oxford (Clarendon Fund Scholarship and St. Antony’s College The Warden’s Scholarship). She is also a member at the Center for Global Higher Education.

Before her DPhil, Xiaona obtained her M.A degree in Higher Education at Graduate School of Education at Peking University, and B.A at the Faulty of Education from Beijing Normal University in China with first-class honour. She also studied at the University of Manchester as an exchange student in the School of Social Science.

Previously, Xiaona worked at Global Education Cluster in UNICEF, Geneva, where she began her research on the international scientific collaboration between China and Switzerland, and this experience later became the starting point of her master thesis. In her master’s thesis, Xiaona used a longitudinal research method in following a group of Chinese scientists who studied and worked in Switzerland. Through semi-structured interviews, she explored how collaborative relationships between individual scientists began and developed.

Xiaona has strong research interests in the science studies, internationalization and globalization of higher education. Her doctoral research is going to continue to explore the scientific knowledge networks between China and Switzerland under the influence of geopolitical factors.

Wanlin Cai is a DPhil student in higher education and a member of CGHE research group at the Department of Education.

Wanlin’s research interest lies in international higher education, higher education policies and economy, with a specific focus on World-Class Universities.

She is also a member of South China Global Talent Institute, Center for China and Globalisation, where she focuses on the research of talent policy and development in the Great Bay Area in China.

Prior to her beginning as a DPhil student, Wanlin read for the M.Sc in Higher Education at the University of Oxford and the M.Sc in Management and Enterprise Growth at the University of Glasgow.

Naosuke is a DPhil student whose research interests are Global Englishes and mutual intelligibility in English communication.

Naosuke finished an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition at the University of Oxford with distinction in 2019. His DPhil research focuses on the intelligibility of non-native English speakers. Specifically, he would like to seek what kind of English pronunciation features are critical for successful English communication between non-native English speakers.

Adam, from Ethiopia, is interested in looking at the role of education in peacebuilding and conflicts.

Akira is a DPhil Student in Anthropology affiliated with the School of Anthropology & Museum Ethnography, and associated with both the Department of Education and Nissan Institute of Japanese Studies. He is supervised by David Mills and Roger Goodman.

Akira’s doctoral research rests with the concepts of ‘international’ and ‘global education,’ and is grounded in the recent emergence and growth of International Baccalaureate (IB) education in Japan. Focused on IB educator training across several higher education institutions (HEIs), Akira aims – solely through digital anthropological approaches – to contextualize the everyday negotiations of ‘international’ and ‘global’ knowledge, both by those receiving and administering its training. Considering social, political, economic and cognitive aspects, one key objective of this research hopes to inform educational practitioners and policy-makers of some of the conceptual and social challenges that emerge with dissonant notions of cultivating ‘international’ and ‘global people.’

Akira has been an Associate Researcher at the Graduate School of Teacher Education, Tokyo Gakugei University since autumn 2020, a post he continues to hold until the end of his doctoral degree. He also currently works as an Anthropological Analyst for Contemplative Spaces, a consultancy focused on designing and delivering a range of leadership development initiatives for individuals, groups, and organizational bodies. His future career plans include further anthropological research and establishing consultancy services dedicated to various inclusion-based development initiatives.

Amelia is passionate about access to and the effects of environmental education globally, particularly in the Galápagos Islands of Ecuador.

Because she experienced a wealth of informal and non-formal environmental education from her parents and from explorations growing up in Southern Oregon, she is interested in researching how environmental education manifests in global communities. She fell in love with the Galápagos on a structured university-led trip during her undergraduate studies and realized that there was a dearth of research on social aspects of the communities living on the islands.  Because of this, she pursued research in the Galápagos in 2014 on the prevalence of and access to both formal and informal (provided by numerous NGOs and government agencies) environmental education for students on the islands, and on the level of student environmental literacy in 28 schools.

Her Dphil research focus, under the supervision of Dr. Ann Childs and Dr. Steve Puttick, is on access to and effects of Experiential Environmental Education for students living in the Galápagos Islands, and on the production of research on the social sphere in Galápagos.

Prior to starting her Dphil at Oxford, she worked in alliances and partnerships at tech companies in the San Francisco Bay Area. Most recently, she was the Director of Global Partnerships at Conversica, a conversational AI platform, and cultivated, trained, and drove pipeline with select international resellers in APAC, EMEA, and LATAM, and with regional resellers in the United States. She also assisted with the design and construction of the Conversica partner program.

In her free time, she is a free-lance food photographer, food stylist, food blogger, recipe developer, and gluten free baker for her online blog and social handle, Sisters Sans Gluten (www.sisterssansgluten), which she created with her sister in 2018. She also continues to sing informally and takes voice lessons remotely with instructor Corey Head of San Francisco.

She holds a BA in both Anthropology and Music (vocal performance), and an MA in Latin American Studies from Stanford University. Highlights from Stanford include: playing and touring as a performing member of Stanford Taiko (Japanese ensemble drumming) for four years; singing with the Stanford Chamber Chorale led by Professor Steve Sano; studying voice with Wendy Hillhouse; participating in music department operas; performing in self-organized recitals showcasing western art songs, western musical theater, and Latin American art songs; studying abroad in Santiago, Chile; and learning Quechua during her masters program with Marisol Necochea.

Abdul Karim has completed a Bachelor of Science in Bioengineering and Computational Medicine (Imperial College London), a Bachelor of Medicine and Bachelor of Surgery (Queen Mary University of London), and Master of Science in the Philosophy of Science and Economics (The London School of Economics).

He has delivered lectures on the Philosophy of Human Nature and the History of Metaethics at the University of Cambridge and for Health Education East Midlands. This, in addition to the current positions he holds as a Hospital Doctor and Health Policy and Management Advisor at the University Hospitals of Leicester NHS Trust.

Abdul Karim’s current areas of interest include the biological definition of psychological states relevant to the learning environment, and the influence of language on the variable interpretation of a particular social context. For the latter of which he has published primary research.

Another is the appraisal and deployment of physiological measurement devices in learning environments as a means of quantitatively evaluating psychological states. Such research areas hold promise in enhancing the questionnaire-based evidences of contemporary theories in education, such as those regarding motivation, self-determination and engagement. This will to contribute to the evidence-based public policy optimisation in education and social care.

 

Publications

Ismail, A.K. 2017. A Cross Sectional Study to Explore the Effect of the Linguistic Origin and Evolution of a Language on Patient Interpretation of Haematological Cancers. Advances in Biological Research. 11 (4): 225-232.

Ismail, A.K. 2017. The Origin of the Arabic Medical Term for Cancer. Advances in Biological Research. 11 (4): 198-201.

Ismail, A.K. 2018. The Impact of da Vinci’s Anatomical Drawings and Calculations on Foundation of Orthopaedics. Advances in Biological Research. 12 (1): 26-30.

As a mathematics teacher who believes that anyone can understand mathematics, Ashley is keenly interested in developing interventions and resources for learners who struggle with the subject. More specifically, she is focusing on the transitionary moment in the classroom when discussions have ceased, and practice begins and how this transition can become more fluid for learners.

By drawing on research from education, psychology and cognitive neuroscience, Ashley hopes to gain insights into how the brain and mind process information and how this knowledge can inform teacher practice and, ultimately, help learners understand mathematics.

After having taught for over ten years, Ashley completed her MSc, with Distinction, at the Department of Education, and her dissertation was “Highly Commended” by the British Educational Research Association (BERA). She is committed to making mathematics more accessible for all learners and strives for research that is not only impactful but also directly applicable to the classroom.

I am a Research Project Coordinator and Co-PI at the Department of Education for a project on Education, Purpose and Human Flourishing in Times of Uncertainty (EPHF), and the Templeton World Charity Foundation Fellow in Comparative Education at St Antony’s College, Oxford.

I have a multi-disciplinary background and experience. Academically I am an Art Historian specialising in late 18th and early 19th-century French aesthetics, and prior to my return to academia I had a career in the international finance, entrepreneurial business and high net worth family business sectors. I have published and taught at the University of Oxford on late eighteenth-and early nineteenth century art, history and aesthetics. Drawing on my experience as Lay Chaplain at Somerville College, Oxford I have also published on religious education. In addition to my position in the Education Department I am the Principal Advisor for Strategic Relationships and Partnerships at the Templeton World Charity Foundation Inc where I work closely with other foundations, INGOs and public policy organisations.

Publications List

Xiaona Wang is a DPhil student in Education, at St. Antony’s College, the University of Oxford. Xiaona’s doctoral research is fully funded by the University of Oxford (Clarendon Fund Scholarship and St. Antony’s College The Warden’s Scholarship). She is also a member at the Center for Global Higher Education.

Before her DPhil, Xiaona obtained her M.A degree in Higher Education at Graduate School of Education at Peking University, and B.A at the Faulty of Education from Beijing Normal University in China with first-class honour. She also studied at the University of Manchester as an exchange student in the School of Social Science.

Previously, Xiaona worked at Global Education Cluster in UNICEF, Geneva, where she began her research on the international scientific collaboration between China and Switzerland, and this experience later became the starting point of her master thesis. In her master’s thesis, Xiaona used a longitudinal research method in following a group of Chinese scientists who studied and worked in Switzerland. Through semi-structured interviews, she explored how collaborative relationships between individual scientists began and developed.

Xiaona has strong research interests in the science studies, internationalization and globalization of higher education. Her doctoral research is going to continue to explore the scientific knowledge networks between China and Switzerland under the influence of geopolitical factors.

Wanlin Cai is a DPhil student in higher education and a member of CGHE research group at the Department of Education.

Wanlin’s research interest lies in international higher education, higher education policies and economy, with a specific focus on World-Class Universities.

She is also a member of South China Global Talent Institute, Center for China and Globalisation, where she focuses on the research of talent policy and development in the Great Bay Area in China.

Prior to her beginning as a DPhil student, Wanlin read for the M.Sc in Higher Education at the University of Oxford and the M.Sc in Management and Enterprise Growth at the University of Glasgow.

Naosuke is a DPhil student whose research interests are Global Englishes and mutual intelligibility in English communication.

Naosuke finished an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition at the University of Oxford with distinction in 2019. His DPhil research focuses on the intelligibility of non-native English speakers. Specifically, he would like to seek what kind of English pronunciation features are critical for successful English communication between non-native English speakers.

Adam, from Ethiopia, is interested in looking at the role of education in peacebuilding and conflicts.

Akira is a DPhil Student in Anthropology affiliated with the School of Anthropology & Museum Ethnography, and associated with both the Department of Education and Nissan Institute of Japanese Studies. He is supervised by David Mills and Roger Goodman.

Akira’s doctoral research rests with the concepts of ‘international’ and ‘global education,’ and is grounded in the recent emergence and growth of International Baccalaureate (IB) education in Japan. Focused on IB educator training across several higher education institutions (HEIs), Akira aims – solely through digital anthropological approaches – to contextualize the everyday negotiations of ‘international’ and ‘global’ knowledge, both by those receiving and administering its training. Considering social, political, economic and cognitive aspects, one key objective of this research hopes to inform educational practitioners and policy-makers of some of the conceptual and social challenges that emerge with dissonant notions of cultivating ‘international’ and ‘global people.’

Akira has been an Associate Researcher at the Graduate School of Teacher Education, Tokyo Gakugei University since autumn 2020, a post he continues to hold until the end of his doctoral degree. He also currently works as an Anthropological Analyst for Contemplative Spaces, a consultancy focused on designing and delivering a range of leadership development initiatives for individuals, groups, and organizational bodies. His future career plans include further anthropological research and establishing consultancy services dedicated to various inclusion-based development initiatives.

Amelia is passionate about access to and the effects of environmental education globally, particularly in the Galápagos Islands of Ecuador.

Because she experienced a wealth of informal and non-formal environmental education from her parents and from explorations growing up in Southern Oregon, she is interested in researching how environmental education manifests in global communities. She fell in love with the Galápagos on a structured university-led trip during her undergraduate studies and realized that there was a dearth of research on social aspects of the communities living on the islands.  Because of this, she pursued research in the Galápagos in 2014 on the prevalence of and access to both formal and informal (provided by numerous NGOs and government agencies) environmental education for students on the islands, and on the level of student environmental literacy in 28 schools.

Her Dphil research focus, under the supervision of Dr. Ann Childs and Dr. Steve Puttick, is on access to and effects of Experiential Environmental Education for students living in the Galápagos Islands, and on the production of research on the social sphere in Galápagos.

Prior to starting her Dphil at Oxford, she worked in alliances and partnerships at tech companies in the San Francisco Bay Area. Most recently, she was the Director of Global Partnerships at Conversica, a conversational AI platform, and cultivated, trained, and drove pipeline with select international resellers in APAC, EMEA, and LATAM, and with regional resellers in the United States. She also assisted with the design and construction of the Conversica partner program.

In her free time, she is a free-lance food photographer, food stylist, food blogger, recipe developer, and gluten free baker for her online blog and social handle, Sisters Sans Gluten (www.sisterssansgluten), which she created with her sister in 2018. She also continues to sing informally and takes voice lessons remotely with instructor Corey Head of San Francisco.

She holds a BA in both Anthropology and Music (vocal performance), and an MA in Latin American Studies from Stanford University. Highlights from Stanford include: playing and touring as a performing member of Stanford Taiko (Japanese ensemble drumming) for four years; singing with the Stanford Chamber Chorale led by Professor Steve Sano; studying voice with Wendy Hillhouse; participating in music department operas; performing in self-organized recitals showcasing western art songs, western musical theater, and Latin American art songs; studying abroad in Santiago, Chile; and learning Quechua during her masters program with Marisol Necochea.

Abdul Karim has completed a Bachelor of Science in Bioengineering and Computational Medicine (Imperial College London), a Bachelor of Medicine and Bachelor of Surgery (Queen Mary University of London), and Master of Science in the Philosophy of Science and Economics (The London School of Economics).

He has delivered lectures on the Philosophy of Human Nature and the History of Metaethics at the University of Cambridge and for Health Education East Midlands. This, in addition to the current positions he holds as a Hospital Doctor and Health Policy and Management Advisor at the University Hospitals of Leicester NHS Trust.

Abdul Karim’s current areas of interest include the biological definition of psychological states relevant to the learning environment, and the influence of language on the variable interpretation of a particular social context. For the latter of which he has published primary research.

Another is the appraisal and deployment of physiological measurement devices in learning environments as a means of quantitatively evaluating psychological states. Such research areas hold promise in enhancing the questionnaire-based evidences of contemporary theories in education, such as those regarding motivation, self-determination and engagement. This will to contribute to the evidence-based public policy optimisation in education and social care.

 

Publications

Ismail, A.K. 2017. A Cross Sectional Study to Explore the Effect of the Linguistic Origin and Evolution of a Language on Patient Interpretation of Haematological Cancers. Advances in Biological Research. 11 (4): 225-232.

Ismail, A.K. 2017. The Origin of the Arabic Medical Term for Cancer. Advances in Biological Research. 11 (4): 198-201.

Ismail, A.K. 2018. The Impact of da Vinci’s Anatomical Drawings and Calculations on Foundation of Orthopaedics. Advances in Biological Research. 12 (1): 26-30.

As a mathematics teacher who believes that anyone can understand mathematics, Ashley is keenly interested in developing interventions and resources for learners who struggle with the subject. More specifically, she is focusing on the transitionary moment in the classroom when discussions have ceased, and practice begins and how this transition can become more fluid for learners.

By drawing on research from education, psychology and cognitive neuroscience, Ashley hopes to gain insights into how the brain and mind process information and how this knowledge can inform teacher practice and, ultimately, help learners understand mathematics.

After having taught for over ten years, Ashley completed her MSc, with Distinction, at the Department of Education, and her dissertation was “Highly Commended” by the British Educational Research Association (BERA). She is committed to making mathematics more accessible for all learners and strives for research that is not only impactful but also directly applicable to the classroom.

I am a Research Project Coordinator and Co-PI at the Department of Education for a project on Education, Purpose and Human Flourishing in Times of Uncertainty (EPHF), and the Templeton World Charity Foundation Fellow in Comparative Education at St Antony’s College, Oxford.

I have a multi-disciplinary background and experience. Academically I am an Art Historian specialising in late 18th and early 19th-century French aesthetics, and prior to my return to academia I had a career in the international finance, entrepreneurial business and high net worth family business sectors. I have published and taught at the University of Oxford on late eighteenth-and early nineteenth century art, history and aesthetics. Drawing on my experience as Lay Chaplain at Somerville College, Oxford I have also published on religious education. In addition to my position in the Education Department I am the Principal Advisor for Strategic Relationships and Partnerships at the Templeton World Charity Foundation Inc where I work closely with other foundations, INGOs and public policy organisations.

Publications List

Xiaona Wang is a DPhil student in Education, at St. Antony’s College, the University of Oxford. Xiaona’s doctoral research is fully funded by the University of Oxford (Clarendon Fund Scholarship and St. Antony’s College The Warden’s Scholarship). She is also a member at the Center for Global Higher Education.

Before her DPhil, Xiaona obtained her M.A degree in Higher Education at Graduate School of Education at Peking University, and B.A at the Faulty of Education from Beijing Normal University in China with first-class honour. She also studied at the University of Manchester as an exchange student in the School of Social Science.

Previously, Xiaona worked at Global Education Cluster in UNICEF, Geneva, where she began her research on the international scientific collaboration between China and Switzerland, and this experience later became the starting point of her master thesis. In her master’s thesis, Xiaona used a longitudinal research method in following a group of Chinese scientists who studied and worked in Switzerland. Through semi-structured interviews, she explored how collaborative relationships between individual scientists began and developed.

Xiaona has strong research interests in the science studies, internationalization and globalization of higher education. Her doctoral research is going to continue to explore the scientific knowledge networks between China and Switzerland under the influence of geopolitical factors.

Wanlin Cai is a DPhil student in higher education and a member of CGHE research group at the Department of Education.

Wanlin’s research interest lies in international higher education, higher education policies and economy, with a specific focus on World-Class Universities.

She is also a member of South China Global Talent Institute, Center for China and Globalisation, where she focuses on the research of talent policy and development in the Great Bay Area in China.

Prior to her beginning as a DPhil student, Wanlin read for the M.Sc in Higher Education at the University of Oxford and the M.Sc in Management and Enterprise Growth at the University of Glasgow.

Naosuke is a DPhil student whose research interests are Global Englishes and mutual intelligibility in English communication.

Naosuke finished an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition at the University of Oxford with distinction in 2019. His DPhil research focuses on the intelligibility of non-native English speakers. Specifically, he would like to seek what kind of English pronunciation features are critical for successful English communication between non-native English speakers.

Adam, from Ethiopia, is interested in looking at the role of education in peacebuilding and conflicts.

Akira is a DPhil Student in Anthropology affiliated with the School of Anthropology & Museum Ethnography, and associated with both the Department of Education and Nissan Institute of Japanese Studies. He is supervised by David Mills and Roger Goodman.

Akira’s doctoral research rests with the concepts of ‘international’ and ‘global education,’ and is grounded in the recent emergence and growth of International Baccalaureate (IB) education in Japan. Focused on IB educator training across several higher education institutions (HEIs), Akira aims – solely through digital anthropological approaches – to contextualize the everyday negotiations of ‘international’ and ‘global’ knowledge, both by those receiving and administering its training. Considering social, political, economic and cognitive aspects, one key objective of this research hopes to inform educational practitioners and policy-makers of some of the conceptual and social challenges that emerge with dissonant notions of cultivating ‘international’ and ‘global people.’

Akira has been an Associate Researcher at the Graduate School of Teacher Education, Tokyo Gakugei University since autumn 2020, a post he continues to hold until the end of his doctoral degree. He also currently works as an Anthropological Analyst for Contemplative Spaces, a consultancy focused on designing and delivering a range of leadership development initiatives for individuals, groups, and organizational bodies. His future career plans include further anthropological research and establishing consultancy services dedicated to various inclusion-based development initiatives.

Amelia is passionate about access to and the effects of environmental education globally, particularly in the Galápagos Islands of Ecuador.

Because she experienced a wealth of informal and non-formal environmental education from her parents and from explorations growing up in Southern Oregon, she is interested in researching how environmental education manifests in global communities. She fell in love with the Galápagos on a structured university-led trip during her undergraduate studies and realized that there was a dearth of research on social aspects of the communities living on the islands.  Because of this, she pursued research in the Galápagos in 2014 on the prevalence of and access to both formal and informal (provided by numerous NGOs and government agencies) environmental education for students on the islands, and on the level of student environmental literacy in 28 schools.

Her Dphil research focus, under the supervision of Dr. Ann Childs and Dr. Steve Puttick, is on access to and effects of Experiential Environmental Education for students living in the Galápagos Islands, and on the production of research on the social sphere in Galápagos.

Prior to starting her Dphil at Oxford, she worked in alliances and partnerships at tech companies in the San Francisco Bay Area. Most recently, she was the Director of Global Partnerships at Conversica, a conversational AI platform, and cultivated, trained, and drove pipeline with select international resellers in APAC, EMEA, and LATAM, and with regional resellers in the United States. She also assisted with the design and construction of the Conversica partner program.

In her free time, she is a free-lance food photographer, food stylist, food blogger, recipe developer, and gluten free baker for her online blog and social handle, Sisters Sans Gluten (www.sisterssansgluten), which she created with her sister in 2018. She also continues to sing informally and takes voice lessons remotely with instructor Corey Head of San Francisco.

She holds a BA in both Anthropology and Music (vocal performance), and an MA in Latin American Studies from Stanford University. Highlights from Stanford include: playing and touring as a performing member of Stanford Taiko (Japanese ensemble drumming) for four years; singing with the Stanford Chamber Chorale led by Professor Steve Sano; studying voice with Wendy Hillhouse; participating in music department operas; performing in self-organized recitals showcasing western art songs, western musical theater, and Latin American art songs; studying abroad in Santiago, Chile; and learning Quechua during her masters program with Marisol Necochea.

Abdul Karim has completed a Bachelor of Science in Bioengineering and Computational Medicine (Imperial College London), a Bachelor of Medicine and Bachelor of Surgery (Queen Mary University of London), and Master of Science in the Philosophy of Science and Economics (The London School of Economics).

He has delivered lectures on the Philosophy of Human Nature and the History of Metaethics at the University of Cambridge and for Health Education East Midlands. This, in addition to the current positions he holds as a Hospital Doctor and Health Policy and Management Advisor at the University Hospitals of Leicester NHS Trust.

Abdul Karim’s current areas of interest include the biological definition of psychological states relevant to the learning environment, and the influence of language on the variable interpretation of a particular social context. For the latter of which he has published primary research.

Another is the appraisal and deployment of physiological measurement devices in learning environments as a means of quantitatively evaluating psychological states. Such research areas hold promise in enhancing the questionnaire-based evidences of contemporary theories in education, such as those regarding motivation, self-determination and engagement. This will to contribute to the evidence-based public policy optimisation in education and social care.

 

Publications

Ismail, A.K. 2017. A Cross Sectional Study to Explore the Effect of the Linguistic Origin and Evolution of a Language on Patient Interpretation of Haematological Cancers. Advances in Biological Research. 11 (4): 225-232.

Ismail, A.K. 2017. The Origin of the Arabic Medical Term for Cancer. Advances in Biological Research. 11 (4): 198-201.

Ismail, A.K. 2018. The Impact of da Vinci’s Anatomical Drawings and Calculations on Foundation of Orthopaedics. Advances in Biological Research. 12 (1): 26-30.

As a mathematics teacher who believes that anyone can understand mathematics, Ashley is keenly interested in developing interventions and resources for learners who struggle with the subject. More specifically, she is focusing on the transitionary moment in the classroom when discussions have ceased, and practice begins and how this transition can become more fluid for learners.

By drawing on research from education, psychology and cognitive neuroscience, Ashley hopes to gain insights into how the brain and mind process information and how this knowledge can inform teacher practice and, ultimately, help learners understand mathematics.

After having taught for over ten years, Ashley completed her MSc, with Distinction, at the Department of Education, and her dissertation was “Highly Commended” by the British Educational Research Association (BERA). She is committed to making mathematics more accessible for all learners and strives for research that is not only impactful but also directly applicable to the classroom.

I am a Research Project Coordinator and Co-PI at the Department of Education for a project on Education, Purpose and Human Flourishing in Times of Uncertainty (EPHF), and the Templeton World Charity Foundation Fellow in Comparative Education at St Antony’s College, Oxford.

I have a multi-disciplinary background and experience. Academically I am an Art Historian specialising in late 18th and early 19th-century French aesthetics, and prior to my return to academia I had a career in the international finance, entrepreneurial business and high net worth family business sectors. I have published and taught at the University of Oxford on late eighteenth-and early nineteenth century art, history and aesthetics. Drawing on my experience as Lay Chaplain at Somerville College, Oxford I have also published on religious education. In addition to my position in the Education Department I am the Principal Advisor for Strategic Relationships and Partnerships at the Templeton World Charity Foundation Inc where I work closely with other foundations, INGOs and public policy organisations.

Publications List

Xiaona Wang is a DPhil student in Education, at St. Antony’s College, the University of Oxford. Xiaona’s doctoral research is fully funded by the University of Oxford (Clarendon Fund Scholarship and St. Antony’s College The Warden’s Scholarship). She is also a member at the Center for Global Higher Education.

Before her DPhil, Xiaona obtained her M.A degree in Higher Education at Graduate School of Education at Peking University, and B.A at the Faulty of Education from Beijing Normal University in China with first-class honour. She also studied at the University of Manchester as an exchange student in the School of Social Science.

Previously, Xiaona worked at Global Education Cluster in UNICEF, Geneva, where she began her research on the international scientific collaboration between China and Switzerland, and this experience later became the starting point of her master thesis. In her master’s thesis, Xiaona used a longitudinal research method in following a group of Chinese scientists who studied and worked in Switzerland. Through semi-structured interviews, she explored how collaborative relationships between individual scientists began and developed.

Xiaona has strong research interests in the science studies, internationalization and globalization of higher education. Her doctoral research is going to continue to explore the scientific knowledge networks between China and Switzerland under the influence of geopolitical factors.

Wanlin Cai is a DPhil student in higher education and a member of CGHE research group at the Department of Education.

Wanlin’s research interest lies in international higher education, higher education policies and economy, with a specific focus on World-Class Universities.

She is also a member of South China Global Talent Institute, Center for China and Globalisation, where she focuses on the research of talent policy and development in the Great Bay Area in China.

Prior to her beginning as a DPhil student, Wanlin read for the M.Sc in Higher Education at the University of Oxford and the M.Sc in Management and Enterprise Growth at the University of Glasgow.

Naosuke is a DPhil student whose research interests are Global Englishes and mutual intelligibility in English communication.

Naosuke finished an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition at the University of Oxford with distinction in 2019. His DPhil research focuses on the intelligibility of non-native English speakers. Specifically, he would like to seek what kind of English pronunciation features are critical for successful English communication between non-native English speakers.

Adam, from Ethiopia, is interested in looking at the role of education in peacebuilding and conflicts.

Akira is a DPhil Student in Anthropology affiliated with the School of Anthropology & Museum Ethnography, and associated with both the Department of Education and Nissan Institute of Japanese Studies. He is supervised by David Mills and Roger Goodman.

Akira’s doctoral research rests with the concepts of ‘international’ and ‘global education,’ and is grounded in the recent emergence and growth of International Baccalaureate (IB) education in Japan. Focused on IB educator training across several higher education institutions (HEIs), Akira aims – solely through digital anthropological approaches – to contextualize the everyday negotiations of ‘international’ and ‘global’ knowledge, both by those receiving and administering its training. Considering social, political, economic and cognitive aspects, one key objective of this research hopes to inform educational practitioners and policy-makers of some of the conceptual and social challenges that emerge with dissonant notions of cultivating ‘international’ and ‘global people.’

Akira has been an Associate Researcher at the Graduate School of Teacher Education, Tokyo Gakugei University since autumn 2020, a post he continues to hold until the end of his doctoral degree. He also currently works as an Anthropological Analyst for Contemplative Spaces, a consultancy focused on designing and delivering a range of leadership development initiatives for individuals, groups, and organizational bodies. His future career plans include further anthropological research and establishing consultancy services dedicated to various inclusion-based development initiatives.

Amelia is passionate about access to and the effects of environmental education globally, particularly in the Galápagos Islands of Ecuador.

Because she experienced a wealth of informal and non-formal environmental education from her parents and from explorations growing up in Southern Oregon, she is interested in researching how environmental education manifests in global communities. She fell in love with the Galápagos on a structured university-led trip during her undergraduate studies and realized that there was a dearth of research on social aspects of the communities living on the islands.  Because of this, she pursued research in the Galápagos in 2014 on the prevalence of and access to both formal and informal (provided by numerous NGOs and government agencies) environmental education for students on the islands, and on the level of student environmental literacy in 28 schools.

Her Dphil research focus, under the supervision of Dr. Ann Childs and Dr. Steve Puttick, is on access to and effects of Experiential Environmental Education for students living in the Galápagos Islands, and on the production of research on the social sphere in Galápagos.

Prior to starting her Dphil at Oxford, she worked in alliances and partnerships at tech companies in the San Francisco Bay Area. Most recently, she was the Director of Global Partnerships at Conversica, a conversational AI platform, and cultivated, trained, and drove pipeline with select international resellers in APAC, EMEA, and LATAM, and with regional resellers in the United States. She also assisted with the design and construction of the Conversica partner program.

In her free time, she is a free-lance food photographer, food stylist, food blogger, recipe developer, and gluten free baker for her online blog and social handle, Sisters Sans Gluten (www.sisterssansgluten), which she created with her sister in 2018. She also continues to sing informally and takes voice lessons remotely with instructor Corey Head of San Francisco.

She holds a BA in both Anthropology and Music (vocal performance), and an MA in Latin American Studies from Stanford University. Highlights from Stanford include: playing and touring as a performing member of Stanford Taiko (Japanese ensemble drumming) for four years; singing with the Stanford Chamber Chorale led by Professor Steve Sano; studying voice with Wendy Hillhouse; participating in music department operas; performing in self-organized recitals showcasing western art songs, western musical theater, and Latin American art songs; studying abroad in Santiago, Chile; and learning Quechua during her masters program with Marisol Necochea.

Abdul Karim has completed a Bachelor of Science in Bioengineering and Computational Medicine (Imperial College London), a Bachelor of Medicine and Bachelor of Surgery (Queen Mary University of London), and Master of Science in the Philosophy of Science and Economics (The London School of Economics).

He has delivered lectures on the Philosophy of Human Nature and the History of Metaethics at the University of Cambridge and for Health Education East Midlands. This, in addition to the current positions he holds as a Hospital Doctor and Health Policy and Management Advisor at the University Hospitals of Leicester NHS Trust.

Abdul Karim’s current areas of interest include the biological definition of psychological states relevant to the learning environment, and the influence of language on the variable interpretation of a particular social context. For the latter of which he has published primary research.

Another is the appraisal and deployment of physiological measurement devices in learning environments as a means of quantitatively evaluating psychological states. Such research areas hold promise in enhancing the questionnaire-based evidences of contemporary theories in education, such as those regarding motivation, self-determination and engagement. This will to contribute to the evidence-based public policy optimisation in education and social care.

 

Publications

Ismail, A.K. 2017. A Cross Sectional Study to Explore the Effect of the Linguistic Origin and Evolution of a Language on Patient Interpretation of Haematological Cancers. Advances in Biological Research. 11 (4): 225-232.

Ismail, A.K. 2017. The Origin of the Arabic Medical Term for Cancer. Advances in Biological Research. 11 (4): 198-201.

Ismail, A.K. 2018. The Impact of da Vinci’s Anatomical Drawings and Calculations on Foundation of Orthopaedics. Advances in Biological Research. 12 (1): 26-30.

As a mathematics teacher who believes that anyone can understand mathematics, Ashley is keenly interested in developing interventions and resources for learners who struggle with the subject. More specifically, she is focusing on the transitionary moment in the classroom when discussions have ceased, and practice begins and how this transition can become more fluid for learners.

By drawing on research from education, psychology and cognitive neuroscience, Ashley hopes to gain insights into how the brain and mind process information and how this knowledge can inform teacher practice and, ultimately, help learners understand mathematics.

After having taught for over ten years,