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Department of Education

Viewing archives for St Edmund Hall

Schooled in the discipline of Public Administration at the University of Dhaka and with an experience of over five years of lecturing graduate and post-graduate students at two reputed public universities in Bangladesh, I am interested in research works related to education, gender, public policy, social studies and have multiple publications.

Apart from my current lecturing position, I worked as a news editor and contributor for the Dhaka Insider, an online news portal, in 2015. I also served as the Head of the Department (Department of Public Administration) and Assistant Proctor at the Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujibur Rahman Science and Technology University (BSMRSTU) and as an elected member of the Teachers’ Association there. During my post-graduation (MA. Public Policy) at the University of Nottingham, a qualitative research focus helped me characterize patterns of gender gap in primary education access.

 

Selected Publications
  • Dutta,  P.  (2020).  Democratic  Decentralization  and  Participatory Development:  Focus  on  Bangladesh.  Journal  of    Contemporary  Governance  and  Public Policy, 1(2), 82-91. Permalink/DOI: https://doi.org/10.46507/jcgpp.v1i2
  • Dutta, P., 2021. • Towards Sound Integrity Management in Bangladesh: Challenges and Issues in Public Administration and Law Enforcement. In: S. N. Khanom, ed. Governance, In the 21st Century in the Sounth Asia: Challenges and Ways Forward. Dhaka: Hakkani Publishers, pp. 541-560.

Zhuohan (Johanne) has a BA in English from Dalian Maritime University, China, and has won China National Scholarship. She then graduated with a Distinction in MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from University of Oxford. Before her DPhil, Zhuohan worked for the organizing committee for the Harvard Summit for Young Leaders in China, an initiative that brought liberal arts education from Harvard to China’s top-performing high school students. She also helped evaluate the UNICEF China Child-Friendly School Programme as an RA, focusing on the socio-emotional learning among the Dong ethnic minority groups in Guangxi, China. She also teaches IELTS, TOEFL, and English phonics.

Her MSc research centres on linguistic relativity, specifically the effect of French grammatical gender system on both French speakers’ and learners’ perception of objects. Her DPhil research focuses on English pronunciation teaching and learning among young Chinese kids, particularly emphasising the influence of their mother tongue, Mandarin.

Supervisors

Robert Woore and Faidra Faitaki

Shuo-Fang earned a Bachelor’s degree from National Chengchi University (Taiwan) and a Master’s degree from Boston University. He has teaching experience in various EFL contexts including international high school, educational institute, and graduate language program.

Shuo-Fang’s areas of interest lie in applied linguistics, particularly phonetics/phonology and speech perception. As an Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholar, Shuo-Fang is currently undertaking his doctoral research, supervised by Dr Elizabeth Wonnacott and Dr Robert Woore. His doctoral project is mostly experimental and explores second language learners’ difficulty in processing English connected speech.

Shuo-Fang is affiliated with two research groups: Applied Linguistics and Wonnacott-Nation Lab (developmental cognitive psychology).

Publications

Liang, S., & Yu, H. (2021). Chinese students’ willingness to communicate in EFL classrooms: A case study of students at a Sino-foreign university. Professional and Academic English, 28(2), 15–33.

Siyu Ma is a DPhil student in child development and learning at the Department of Education. Her doctoral research focuses on second-born children under the Chinese two-child policy, especially how siblings play a role in the socio-emotional, language, and early literacy development of these children.

Prior to starting her Dphil, Siyu completed an MSc in Education (Research Design and Methodology) at the University of Oxford, under the supervision of Professor Sonali Nag. Her MSc dissertation explored the roles of social background and home literacy environment in the language and literacy development of a Wales subsample from the Millennium Cohort Study and was awarded a High Distinction. She also holds a BSc degree with first-class honours in Psychology from the University of Bath.

Siyu is also a research associate working on TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education.

At TalkTogether, Siyu is responsible for designing online surveys and analysing quantitative data from child assessments and parent reports.

Publications

Ma, S. (2021). Family background and home literacy environment as predictors of the early literacy development of children in Wales – findings from the Millennium Cohort Study (Master’s thesis, University of Oxford).

 

Amanda is the recipient of the Hazel Project Scholarship, based at the Rees Centre. Her doctoral research explores the conceptualisation of foster homes as therapeutic environments for complex/developmental trauma. Through participant-generated photography and collaborative qualitative methods with young people currently in foster care placements, her research explores if young people’s concepts and perceptions of therapeutic environments coincide with or challenge existing theoretical models and popular practitioner perspectives.

Amanda holds a BA from the University of Leeds (UK) and an MPhil from the University of Oxford (UK).

Lawrence is a teacher of mathematics who is particularly interested in classroom pedagogy, and how research and education policies interact with the teaching that students experience on a daily basis.

He finds that looking outwards in education is valuable with there being much more that unites our classrooms than isolates them. He has been extremely fortunate to study education through an international lens in the US, and to work on the Global Teaching InSights initiative of the Organisation for Economic Development (OECD) where he led on its videos of teaching.

Publications

Global Teaching InSights: A video study of teaching, OECD, 2020

Antonin is currently Doctoral Teaching Fellow on the MSc in Comparative and International Education, teaching Foundations of Educational Research. Antonin is also a Research Assistant for the Centre for Global Higher Education on the ‘Research on Research: the research function and mission of higher education’ project.

Alongside his teaching and research roles, Antonin is completing a Doctoral study on the European Universities Initiative, the European Commission’s flagship higher education programme that seeks to set up European Universities through transnational university alliances.

Arzhia Habibi is a DPhil in Education Candidate and uses Mandarin to conduct her research in the Chinese higher education context.

Arzhia’s research focuses on ‘expressions’ of global or world citizenship education in a Chinese higher education institution In the study, she explores the perspectives and practices of educators and students at a China-based university, which experiments with discourses related to citizenship. She further investigates how individual, local, national and global dynamics and the surrounding discourses influence worldviews and practices in a university setting.

As empirical studies on global or world citizenship education in the Chinese context are scarce, Arzhia hopes to contribute to a nascent knowledge base which may extend and add depth to the critical global discourses of global and world citizenship education, beyond Eurocentric framings.

Prior to her studies at Oxford, Arzhia received a first class Bachelor’s degree in Contemporary Chinese Studies at The University of Nottingham, and a Master’s in International Communication in Taiwan at National Chengchi University. As a child, she also attended kindergarten in Fuzhou, Fujian province of China.

Olga is a co-convenor of the Philosophy of Education Reading Group at the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. Olga’s main research interest is in the topics of epistemic injustice across all levels of education and across national borders with a focus on higher education and the process of knowledge production in academic institutes and universities. Her core interest lies between the areas of social epistemology, research on research (RoR) and comparative and international education (CIE). She has been a recipient of multiple research awards in the United States and the United Kingdom and is an elected co-convenor of the Comparative and International Education Special Interest Group at the British Educational Research Association (BERA).

Her new research at Oxford will explore the epistemically just and unjust practices as experienced by scholars from Kazakhstan during the internationalisation process in the social sciences and the humanities. Prior joining Oxford, Olga taught at University College London Institute of Education in London on the topics of migrant, refugee and minority education and European education traditions from a comparative lens.

Publications
  • Mun, O. (2020). ‘Epistemic Injustices in Internationalising Humanities and Social Sciences: A Case Study of Higher Education and Science Institutes in Kazakhstan.’ Centre for International Higher Education, Boston College. https://www.bc.edu/content/dam/bc1/schools/lsoe/sites/cihe/publication/Perspectives/Perspectives%20No%2018.pdf
  • Mun, O. and Gafu, G. (in press) ‘University Research Capacity in Kazakhstan’. Higher School of Economics, Russia.
  • Kandiko Howson, C., Mun, O. and Walker, R. (2020). ‘Academic Activism in STEM fields: Discipline in Theory and Practice.’ Philosophy and Theory of Higher Education Society.
  • Aizuddin M., Habibi A., Mun, O. (in press, 2020). ‘Post-Colonialism in Comparative and International Education.’ In Jules, T., Shields, R., Thomas, M. (Ed.), Bloomsbury Handbook of Theory in Comparative and International Education.
  • Palandjian, G., Silova, I., Mun, O., Zholdashaliyeva, R. (2018). ‘Gender and Nation in Postsocialist Educational Transformations.’ In Silova, I., & Chankseliani, M. (Eds.), Comparing Post-Socialist Transformations: Education in Eastern Europe and Former Soviet Union. Oxford: Symposium Books.
  • Mun, O., & Zholdashaliyeva, R. (2017). ‘Alippe, Bukvar’ and Gender: A comparative analysis of early literacy textbooks in Kazakhstan and Kyrgyzstan.’ In E. Brown & R. Craven & G. McLean (Ed.), International Advances in Education: Global Initiatives for Equity and Social Justice Series. Information Age Publishing
  • Patel, K. and Mun, O. (2017). ‘Marketing ‘development’ in the neoliberal university.’ DPU Working Papers https://www.ucl.ac.uk/bartlett/development/case-studies/2017/sep/marketing-development-neoliberal-university
  • Fimyar, O., Saniyazova, A. & Mun, O. (2017) ‘Methodology of Collaborative Research: Or, Searching for a Synergy in the Study of Student Transition in Kazakhstan.’ In SAGE Research Methods Cases. London, United Kingdom: SAGE Publications.
  • Mun, O. (2015). ‘(Re)imagining national identity through early literacy textbooks in Kazakhstan’, Forum of Young Central Asian Experts, 2nd edition. http://caa-network.org/archives/5620
  • Silova, I., Mead Yaqub, M., Mun, O., Palandjian, G. (2014). ‘Pedagogies of Space: (re)imagining nation and childhood in post-Soviet states.’ Global Studies of Childhood, 4(3), 195-209.
  • Silova, I., Brezhenyuk, V., Kudasova, M., Mun, O., Artemev, N. (2014). ‘Youth Protests against Privatisation of Education in post-Soviet states.’ European Education, 46(3), 56-65.

Schooled in the discipline of Public Administration at the University of Dhaka and with an experience of over five years of lecturing graduate and post-graduate students at two reputed public universities in Bangladesh, I am interested in research works related to education, gender, public policy, social studies and have multiple publications.

Apart from my current lecturing position, I worked as a news editor and contributor for the Dhaka Insider, an online news portal, in 2015. I also served as the Head of the Department (Department of Public Administration) and Assistant Proctor at the Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujibur Rahman Science and Technology University (BSMRSTU) and as an elected member of the Teachers’ Association there. During my post-graduation (MA. Public Policy) at the University of Nottingham, a qualitative research focus helped me characterize patterns of gender gap in primary education access.

 

Selected Publications
  • Dutta,  P.  (2020).  Democratic  Decentralization  and  Participatory Development:  Focus  on  Bangladesh.  Journal  of    Contemporary  Governance  and  Public Policy, 1(2), 82-91. Permalink/DOI: https://doi.org/10.46507/jcgpp.v1i2
  • Dutta, P., 2021. • Towards Sound Integrity Management in Bangladesh: Challenges and Issues in Public Administration and Law Enforcement. In: S. N. Khanom, ed. Governance, In the 21st Century in the Sounth Asia: Challenges and Ways Forward. Dhaka: Hakkani Publishers, pp. 541-560.

Zhuohan (Johanne) has a BA in English from Dalian Maritime University, China, and has won China National Scholarship. She then graduated with a Distinction in MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from University of Oxford. Before her DPhil, Zhuohan worked for the organizing committee for the Harvard Summit for Young Leaders in China, an initiative that brought liberal arts education from Harvard to China’s top-performing high school students. She also helped evaluate the UNICEF China Child-Friendly School Programme as an RA, focusing on the socio-emotional learning among the Dong ethnic minority groups in Guangxi, China. She also teaches IELTS, TOEFL, and English phonics.

Her MSc research centres on linguistic relativity, specifically the effect of French grammatical gender system on both French speakers’ and learners’ perception of objects. Her DPhil research focuses on English pronunciation teaching and learning among young Chinese kids, particularly emphasising the influence of their mother tongue, Mandarin.

Supervisors

Robert Woore and Faidra Faitaki

Shuo-Fang earned a Bachelor’s degree from National Chengchi University (Taiwan) and a Master’s degree from Boston University. He has teaching experience in various EFL contexts including international high school, educational institute, and graduate language program.

Shuo-Fang’s areas of interest lie in applied linguistics, particularly phonetics/phonology and speech perception. As an Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholar, Shuo-Fang is currently undertaking his doctoral research, supervised by Dr Elizabeth Wonnacott and Dr Robert Woore. His doctoral project is mostly experimental and explores second language learners’ difficulty in processing English connected speech.

Shuo-Fang is affiliated with two research groups: Applied Linguistics and Wonnacott-Nation Lab (developmental cognitive psychology).

Publications

Liang, S., & Yu, H. (2021). Chinese students’ willingness to communicate in EFL classrooms: A case study of students at a Sino-foreign university. Professional and Academic English, 28(2), 15–33.

Siyu Ma is a DPhil student in child development and learning at the Department of Education. Her doctoral research focuses on second-born children under the Chinese two-child policy, especially how siblings play a role in the socio-emotional, language, and early literacy development of these children.

Prior to starting her Dphil, Siyu completed an MSc in Education (Research Design and Methodology) at the University of Oxford, under the supervision of Professor Sonali Nag. Her MSc dissertation explored the roles of social background and home literacy environment in the language and literacy development of a Wales subsample from the Millennium Cohort Study and was awarded a High Distinction. She also holds a BSc degree with first-class honours in Psychology from the University of Bath.

Siyu is also a research associate working on TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education.

At TalkTogether, Siyu is responsible for designing online surveys and analysing quantitative data from child assessments and parent reports.

Publications

Ma, S. (2021). Family background and home literacy environment as predictors of the early literacy development of children in Wales – findings from the Millennium Cohort Study (Master’s thesis, University of Oxford).

 

Amanda is the recipient of the Hazel Project Scholarship, based at the Rees Centre. Her doctoral research explores the conceptualisation of foster homes as therapeutic environments for complex/developmental trauma. Through participant-generated photography and collaborative qualitative methods with young people currently in foster care placements, her research explores if young people’s concepts and perceptions of therapeutic environments coincide with or challenge existing theoretical models and popular practitioner perspectives.

Amanda holds a BA from the University of Leeds (UK) and an MPhil from the University of Oxford (UK).

Lawrence is a teacher of mathematics who is particularly interested in classroom pedagogy, and how research and education policies interact with the teaching that students experience on a daily basis.

He finds that looking outwards in education is valuable with there being much more that unites our classrooms than isolates them. He has been extremely fortunate to study education through an international lens in the US, and to work on the Global Teaching InSights initiative of the Organisation for Economic Development (OECD) where he led on its videos of teaching.

Publications

Global Teaching InSights: A video study of teaching, OECD, 2020

Antonin is currently Doctoral Teaching Fellow on the MSc in Comparative and International Education, teaching Foundations of Educational Research. Antonin is also a Research Assistant for the Centre for Global Higher Education on the ‘Research on Research: the research function and mission of higher education’ project.

Alongside his teaching and research roles, Antonin is completing a Doctoral study on the European Universities Initiative, the European Commission’s flagship higher education programme that seeks to set up European Universities through transnational university alliances.

Arzhia Habibi is a DPhil in Education Candidate and uses Mandarin to conduct her research in the Chinese higher education context.

Arzhia’s research focuses on ‘expressions’ of global or world citizenship education in a Chinese higher education institution In the study, she explores the perspectives and practices of educators and students at a China-based university, which experiments with discourses related to citizenship. She further investigates how individual, local, national and global dynamics and the surrounding discourses influence worldviews and practices in a university setting.

As empirical studies on global or world citizenship education in the Chinese context are scarce, Arzhia hopes to contribute to a nascent knowledge base which may extend and add depth to the critical global discourses of global and world citizenship education, beyond Eurocentric framings.

Prior to her studies at Oxford, Arzhia received a first class Bachelor’s degree in Contemporary Chinese Studies at The University of Nottingham, and a Master’s in International Communication in Taiwan at National Chengchi University. As a child, she also attended kindergarten in Fuzhou, Fujian province of China.

Olga is a co-convenor of the Philosophy of Education Reading Group at the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. Olga’s main research interest is in the topics of epistemic injustice across all levels of education and across national borders with a focus on higher education and the process of knowledge production in academic institutes and universities. Her core interest lies between the areas of social epistemology, research on research (RoR) and comparative and international education (CIE). She has been a recipient of multiple research awards in the United States and the United Kingdom and is an elected co-convenor of the Comparative and International Education Special Interest Group at the British Educational Research Association (BERA).

Her new research at Oxford will explore the epistemically just and unjust practices as experienced by scholars from Kazakhstan during the internationalisation process in the social sciences and the humanities. Prior joining Oxford, Olga taught at University College London Institute of Education in London on the topics of migrant, refugee and minority education and European education traditions from a comparative lens.

Publications
  • Mun, O. (2020). ‘Epistemic Injustices in Internationalising Humanities and Social Sciences: A Case Study of Higher Education and Science Institutes in Kazakhstan.’ Centre for International Higher Education, Boston College. https://www.bc.edu/content/dam/bc1/schools/lsoe/sites/cihe/publication/Perspectives/Perspectives%20No%2018.pdf
  • Mun, O. and Gafu, G. (in press) ‘University Research Capacity in Kazakhstan’. Higher School of Economics, Russia.
  • Kandiko Howson, C., Mun, O. and Walker, R. (2020). ‘Academic Activism in STEM fields: Discipline in Theory and Practice.’ Philosophy and Theory of Higher Education Society.
  • Aizuddin M., Habibi A., Mun, O. (in press, 2020). ‘Post-Colonialism in Comparative and International Education.’ In Jules, T., Shields, R., Thomas, M. (Ed.), Bloomsbury Handbook of Theory in Comparative and International Education.
  • Palandjian, G., Silova, I., Mun, O., Zholdashaliyeva, R. (2018). ‘Gender and Nation in Postsocialist Educational Transformations.’ In Silova, I., & Chankseliani, M. (Eds.), Comparing Post-Socialist Transformations: Education in Eastern Europe and Former Soviet Union. Oxford: Symposium Books.
  • Mun, O., & Zholdashaliyeva, R. (2017). ‘Alippe, Bukvar’ and Gender: A comparative analysis of early literacy textbooks in Kazakhstan and Kyrgyzstan.’ In E. Brown & R. Craven & G. McLean (Ed.), International Advances in Education: Global Initiatives for Equity and Social Justice Series. Information Age Publishing
  • Patel, K. and Mun, O. (2017). ‘Marketing ‘development’ in the neoliberal university.’ DPU Working Papers https://www.ucl.ac.uk/bartlett/development/case-studies/2017/sep/marketing-development-neoliberal-university
  • Fimyar, O., Saniyazova, A. & Mun, O. (2017) ‘Methodology of Collaborative Research: Or, Searching for a Synergy in the Study of Student Transition in Kazakhstan.’ In SAGE Research Methods Cases. London, United Kingdom: SAGE Publications.
  • Mun, O. (2015). ‘(Re)imagining national identity through early literacy textbooks in Kazakhstan’, Forum of Young Central Asian Experts, 2nd edition. http://caa-network.org/archives/5620
  • Silova, I., Mead Yaqub, M., Mun, O., Palandjian, G. (2014). ‘Pedagogies of Space: (re)imagining nation and childhood in post-Soviet states.’ Global Studies of Childhood, 4(3), 195-209.
  • Silova, I., Brezhenyuk, V., Kudasova, M., Mun, O., Artemev, N. (2014). ‘Youth Protests against Privatisation of Education in post-Soviet states.’ European Education, 46(3), 56-65.

Schooled in the discipline of Public Administration at the University of Dhaka and with an experience of over five years of lecturing graduate and post-graduate students at two reputed public universities in Bangladesh, I am interested in research works related to education, gender, public policy, social studies and have multiple publications.

Apart from my current lecturing position, I worked as a news editor and contributor for the Dhaka Insider, an online news portal, in 2015. I also served as the Head of the Department (Department of Public Administration) and Assistant Proctor at the Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujibur Rahman Science and Technology University (BSMRSTU) and as an elected member of the Teachers’ Association there. During my post-graduation (MA. Public Policy) at the University of Nottingham, a qualitative research focus helped me characterize patterns of gender gap in primary education access.

 

Selected Publications
  • Dutta,  P.  (2020).  Democratic  Decentralization  and  Participatory Development:  Focus  on  Bangladesh.  Journal  of    Contemporary  Governance  and  Public Policy, 1(2), 82-91. Permalink/DOI: https://doi.org/10.46507/jcgpp.v1i2
  • Dutta, P., 2021. • Towards Sound Integrity Management in Bangladesh: Challenges and Issues in Public Administration and Law Enforcement. In: S. N. Khanom, ed. Governance, In the 21st Century in the Sounth Asia: Challenges and Ways Forward. Dhaka: Hakkani Publishers, pp. 541-560.

Zhuohan (Johanne) has a BA in English from Dalian Maritime University, China, and has won China National Scholarship. She then graduated with a Distinction in MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from University of Oxford. Before her DPhil, Zhuohan worked for the organizing committee for the Harvard Summit for Young Leaders in China, an initiative that brought liberal arts education from Harvard to China’s top-performing high school students. She also helped evaluate the UNICEF China Child-Friendly School Programme as an RA, focusing on the socio-emotional learning among the Dong ethnic minority groups in Guangxi, China. She also teaches IELTS, TOEFL, and English phonics.

Her MSc research centres on linguistic relativity, specifically the effect of French grammatical gender system on both French speakers’ and learners’ perception of objects. Her DPhil research focuses on English pronunciation teaching and learning among young Chinese kids, particularly emphasising the influence of their mother tongue, Mandarin.

Supervisors

Robert Woore and Faidra Faitaki

Shuo-Fang earned a Bachelor’s degree from National Chengchi University (Taiwan) and a Master’s degree from Boston University. He has teaching experience in various EFL contexts including international high school, educational institute, and graduate language program.

Shuo-Fang’s areas of interest lie in applied linguistics, particularly phonetics/phonology and speech perception. As an Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholar, Shuo-Fang is currently undertaking his doctoral research, supervised by Dr Elizabeth Wonnacott and Dr Robert Woore. His doctoral project is mostly experimental and explores second language learners’ difficulty in processing English connected speech.

Shuo-Fang is affiliated with two research groups: Applied Linguistics and Wonnacott-Nation Lab (developmental cognitive psychology).

Publications

Liang, S., & Yu, H. (2021). Chinese students’ willingness to communicate in EFL classrooms: A case study of students at a Sino-foreign university. Professional and Academic English, 28(2), 15–33.

Siyu Ma is a DPhil student in child development and learning at the Department of Education. Her doctoral research focuses on second-born children under the Chinese two-child policy, especially how siblings play a role in the socio-emotional, language, and early literacy development of these children.

Prior to starting her Dphil, Siyu completed an MSc in Education (Research Design and Methodology) at the University of Oxford, under the supervision of Professor Sonali Nag. Her MSc dissertation explored the roles of social background and home literacy environment in the language and literacy development of a Wales subsample from the Millennium Cohort Study and was awarded a High Distinction. She also holds a BSc degree with first-class honours in Psychology from the University of Bath.

Siyu is also a research associate working on TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education.

At TalkTogether, Siyu is responsible for designing online surveys and analysing quantitative data from child assessments and parent reports.

Publications

Ma, S. (2021). Family background and home literacy environment as predictors of the early literacy development of children in Wales – findings from the Millennium Cohort Study (Master’s thesis, University of Oxford).

 

Amanda is the recipient of the Hazel Project Scholarship, based at the Rees Centre. Her doctoral research explores the conceptualisation of foster homes as therapeutic environments for complex/developmental trauma. Through participant-generated photography and collaborative qualitative methods with young people currently in foster care placements, her research explores if young people’s concepts and perceptions of therapeutic environments coincide with or challenge existing theoretical models and popular practitioner perspectives.

Amanda holds a BA from the University of Leeds (UK) and an MPhil from the University of Oxford (UK).

Lawrence is a teacher of mathematics who is particularly interested in classroom pedagogy, and how research and education policies interact with the teaching that students experience on a daily basis.

He finds that looking outwards in education is valuable with there being much more that unites our classrooms than isolates them. He has been extremely fortunate to study education through an international lens in the US, and to work on the Global Teaching InSights initiative of the Organisation for Economic Development (OECD) where he led on its videos of teaching.

Publications

Global Teaching InSights: A video study of teaching, OECD, 2020

Antonin is currently Doctoral Teaching Fellow on the MSc in Comparative and International Education, teaching Foundations of Educational Research. Antonin is also a Research Assistant for the Centre for Global Higher Education on the ‘Research on Research: the research function and mission of higher education’ project.

Alongside his teaching and research roles, Antonin is completing a Doctoral study on the European Universities Initiative, the European Commission’s flagship higher education programme that seeks to set up European Universities through transnational university alliances.

Arzhia Habibi is a DPhil in Education Candidate and uses Mandarin to conduct her research in the Chinese higher education context.

Arzhia’s research focuses on ‘expressions’ of global or world citizenship education in a Chinese higher education institution In the study, she explores the perspectives and practices of educators and students at a China-based university, which experiments with discourses related to citizenship. She further investigates how individual, local, national and global dynamics and the surrounding discourses influence worldviews and practices in a university setting.

As empirical studies on global or world citizenship education in the Chinese context are scarce, Arzhia hopes to contribute to a nascent knowledge base which may extend and add depth to the critical global discourses of global and world citizenship education, beyond Eurocentric framings.

Prior to her studies at Oxford, Arzhia received a first class Bachelor’s degree in Contemporary Chinese Studies at The University of Nottingham, and a Master’s in International Communication in Taiwan at National Chengchi University. As a child, she also attended kindergarten in Fuzhou, Fujian province of China.

Olga is a co-convenor of the Philosophy of Education Reading Group at the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. Olga’s main research interest is in the topics of epistemic injustice across all levels of education and across national borders with a focus on higher education and the process of knowledge production in academic institutes and universities. Her core interest lies between the areas of social epistemology, research on research (RoR) and comparative and international education (CIE). She has been a recipient of multiple research awards in the United States and the United Kingdom and is an elected co-convenor of the Comparative and International Education Special Interest Group at the British Educational Research Association (BERA).

Her new research at Oxford will explore the epistemically just and unjust practices as experienced by scholars from Kazakhstan during the internationalisation process in the social sciences and the humanities. Prior joining Oxford, Olga taught at University College London Institute of Education in London on the topics of migrant, refugee and minority education and European education traditions from a comparative lens.

Publications
  • Mun, O. (2020). ‘Epistemic Injustices in Internationalising Humanities and Social Sciences: A Case Study of Higher Education and Science Institutes in Kazakhstan.’ Centre for International Higher Education, Boston College. https://www.bc.edu/content/dam/bc1/schools/lsoe/sites/cihe/publication/Perspectives/Perspectives%20No%2018.pdf
  • Mun, O. and Gafu, G. (in press) ‘University Research Capacity in Kazakhstan’. Higher School of Economics, Russia.
  • Kandiko Howson, C., Mun, O. and Walker, R. (2020). ‘Academic Activism in STEM fields: Discipline in Theory and Practice.’ Philosophy and Theory of Higher Education Society.
  • Aizuddin M., Habibi A., Mun, O. (in press, 2020). ‘Post-Colonialism in Comparative and International Education.’ In Jules, T., Shields, R., Thomas, M. (Ed.), Bloomsbury Handbook of Theory in Comparative and International Education.
  • Palandjian, G., Silova, I., Mun, O., Zholdashaliyeva, R. (2018). ‘Gender and Nation in Postsocialist Educational Transformations.’ In Silova, I., & Chankseliani, M. (Eds.), Comparing Post-Socialist Transformations: Education in Eastern Europe and Former Soviet Union. Oxford: Symposium Books.
  • Mun, O., & Zholdashaliyeva, R. (2017). ‘Alippe, Bukvar’ and Gender: A comparative analysis of early literacy textbooks in Kazakhstan and Kyrgyzstan.’ In E. Brown & R. Craven & G. McLean (Ed.), International Advances in Education: Global Initiatives for Equity and Social Justice Series. Information Age Publishing
  • Patel, K. and Mun, O. (2017). ‘Marketing ‘development’ in the neoliberal university.’ DPU Working Papers https://www.ucl.ac.uk/bartlett/development/case-studies/2017/sep/marketing-development-neoliberal-university
  • Fimyar, O., Saniyazova, A. & Mun, O. (2017) ‘Methodology of Collaborative Research: Or, Searching for a Synergy in the Study of Student Transition in Kazakhstan.’ In SAGE Research Methods Cases. London, United Kingdom: SAGE Publications.
  • Mun, O. (2015). ‘(Re)imagining national identity through early literacy textbooks in Kazakhstan’, Forum of Young Central Asian Experts, 2nd edition. http://caa-network.org/archives/5620
  • Silova, I., Mead Yaqub, M., Mun, O., Palandjian, G. (2014). ‘Pedagogies of Space: (re)imagining nation and childhood in post-Soviet states.’ Global Studies of Childhood, 4(3), 195-209.
  • Silova, I., Brezhenyuk, V., Kudasova, M., Mun, O., Artemev, N. (2014). ‘Youth Protests against Privatisation of Education in post-Soviet states.’ European Education, 46(3), 56-65.

Schooled in the discipline of Public Administration at the University of Dhaka and with an experience of over five years of lecturing graduate and post-graduate students at two reputed public universities in Bangladesh, I am interested in research works related to education, gender, public policy, social studies and have multiple publications.

Apart from my current lecturing position, I worked as a news editor and contributor for the Dhaka Insider, an online news portal, in 2015. I also served as the Head of the Department (Department of Public Administration) and Assistant Proctor at the Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujibur Rahman Science and Technology University (BSMRSTU) and as an elected member of the Teachers’ Association there. During my post-graduation (MA. Public Policy) at the University of Nottingham, a qualitative research focus helped me characterize patterns of gender gap in primary education access.

 

Selected Publications
  • Dutta,  P.  (2020).  Democratic  Decentralization  and  Participatory Development:  Focus  on  Bangladesh.  Journal  of    Contemporary  Governance  and  Public Policy, 1(2), 82-91. Permalink/DOI: https://doi.org/10.46507/jcgpp.v1i2
  • Dutta, P., 2021. • Towards Sound Integrity Management in Bangladesh: Challenges and Issues in Public Administration and Law Enforcement. In: S. N. Khanom, ed. Governance, In the 21st Century in the Sounth Asia: Challenges and Ways Forward. Dhaka: Hakkani Publishers, pp. 541-560.

Zhuohan (Johanne) has a BA in English from Dalian Maritime University, China, and has won China National Scholarship. She then graduated with a Distinction in MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from University of Oxford. Before her DPhil, Zhuohan worked for the organizing committee for the Harvard Summit for Young Leaders in China, an initiative that brought liberal arts education from Harvard to China’s top-performing high school students. She also helped evaluate the UNICEF China Child-Friendly School Programme as an RA, focusing on the socio-emotional learning among the Dong ethnic minority groups in Guangxi, China. She also teaches IELTS, TOEFL, and English phonics.

Her MSc research centres on linguistic relativity, specifically the effect of French grammatical gender system on both French speakers’ and learners’ perception of objects. Her DPhil research focuses on English pronunciation teaching and learning among young Chinese kids, particularly emphasising the influence of their mother tongue, Mandarin.

Supervisors

Robert Woore and Faidra Faitaki

Shuo-Fang earned a Bachelor’s degree from National Chengchi University (Taiwan) and a Master’s degree from Boston University. He has teaching experience in various EFL contexts including international high school, educational institute, and graduate language program.

Shuo-Fang’s areas of interest lie in applied linguistics, particularly phonetics/phonology and speech perception. As an Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholar, Shuo-Fang is currently undertaking his doctoral research, supervised by Dr Elizabeth Wonnacott and Dr Robert Woore. His doctoral project is mostly experimental and explores second language learners’ difficulty in processing English connected speech.

Shuo-Fang is affiliated with two research groups: Applied Linguistics and Wonnacott-Nation Lab (developmental cognitive psychology).

Publications

Liang, S., & Yu, H. (2021). Chinese students’ willingness to communicate in EFL classrooms: A case study of students at a Sino-foreign university. Professional and Academic English, 28(2), 15–33.

Siyu Ma is a DPhil student in child development and learning at the Department of Education. Her doctoral research focuses on second-born children under the Chinese two-child policy, especially how siblings play a role in the socio-emotional, language, and early literacy development of these children.

Prior to starting her Dphil, Siyu completed an MSc in Education (Research Design and Methodology) at the University of Oxford, under the supervision of Professor Sonali Nag. Her MSc dissertation explored the roles of social background and home literacy environment in the language and literacy development of a Wales subsample from the Millennium Cohort Study and was awarded a High Distinction. She also holds a BSc degree with first-class honours in Psychology from the University of Bath.

Siyu is also a research associate working on TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education.

At TalkTogether, Siyu is responsible for designing online surveys and analysing quantitative data from child assessments and parent reports.

Publications

Ma, S. (2021). Family background and home literacy environment as predictors of the early literacy development of children in Wales – findings from the Millennium Cohort Study (Master’s thesis, University of Oxford).

 

Amanda is the recipient of the Hazel Project Scholarship, based at the Rees Centre. Her doctoral research explores the conceptualisation of foster homes as therapeutic environments for complex/developmental trauma. Through participant-generated photography and collaborative qualitative methods with young people currently in foster care placements, her research explores if young people’s concepts and perceptions of therapeutic environments coincide with or challenge existing theoretical models and popular practitioner perspectives.

Amanda holds a BA from the University of Leeds (UK) and an MPhil from the University of Oxford (UK).

Lawrence is a teacher of mathematics who is particularly interested in classroom pedagogy, and how research and education policies interact with the teaching that students experience on a daily basis.

He finds that looking outwards in education is valuable with there being much more that unites our classrooms than isolates them. He has been extremely fortunate to study education through an international lens in the US, and to work on the Global Teaching InSights initiative of the Organisation for Economic Development (OECD) where he led on its videos of teaching.

Publications

Global Teaching InSights: A video study of teaching, OECD, 2020

Antonin is currently Doctoral Teaching Fellow on the MSc in Comparative and International Education, teaching Foundations of Educational Research. Antonin is also a Research Assistant for the Centre for Global Higher Education on the ‘Research on Research: the research function and mission of higher education’ project.

Alongside his teaching and research roles, Antonin is completing a Doctoral study on the European Universities Initiative, the European Commission’s flagship higher education programme that seeks to set up European Universities through transnational university alliances.

Arzhia Habibi is a DPhil in Education Candidate and uses Mandarin to conduct her research in the Chinese higher education context.

Arzhia’s research focuses on ‘expressions’ of global or world citizenship education in a Chinese higher education institution In the study, she explores the perspectives and practices of educators and students at a China-based university, which experiments with discourses related to citizenship. She further investigates how individual, local, national and global dynamics and the surrounding discourses influence worldviews and practices in a university setting.

As empirical studies on global or world citizenship education in the Chinese context are scarce, Arzhia hopes to contribute to a nascent knowledge base which may extend and add depth to the critical global discourses of global and world citizenship education, beyond Eurocentric framings.

Prior to her studies at Oxford, Arzhia received a first class Bachelor’s degree in Contemporary Chinese Studies at The University of Nottingham, and a Master’s in International Communication in Taiwan at National Chengchi University. As a child, she also attended kindergarten in Fuzhou, Fujian province of China.

Olga is a co-convenor of the Philosophy of Education Reading Group at the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. Olga’s main research interest is in the topics of epistemic injustice across all levels of education and across national borders with a focus on higher education and the process of knowledge production in academic institutes and universities. Her core interest lies between the areas of social epistemology, research on research (RoR) and comparative and international education (CIE). She has been a recipient of multiple research awards in the United States and the United Kingdom and is an elected co-convenor of the Comparative and International Education Special Interest Group at the British Educational Research Association (BERA).

Her new research at Oxford will explore the epistemically just and unjust practices as experienced by scholars from Kazakhstan during the internationalisation process in the social sciences and the humanities. Prior joining Oxford, Olga taught at University College London Institute of Education in London on the topics of migrant, refugee and minority education and European education traditions from a comparative lens.

Publications
  • Mun, O. (2020). ‘Epistemic Injustices in Internationalising Humanities and Social Sciences: A Case Study of Higher Education and Science Institutes in Kazakhstan.’ Centre for International Higher Education, Boston College. https://www.bc.edu/content/dam/bc1/schools/lsoe/sites/cihe/publication/Perspectives/Perspectives%20No%2018.pdf
  • Mun, O. and Gafu, G. (in press) ‘University Research Capacity in Kazakhstan’. Higher School of Economics, Russia.
  • Kandiko Howson, C., Mun, O. and Walker, R. (2020). ‘Academic Activism in STEM fields: Discipline in Theory and Practice.’ Philosophy and Theory of Higher Education Society.
  • Aizuddin M., Habibi A., Mun, O. (in press, 2020). ‘Post-Colonialism in Comparative and International Education.’ In Jules, T., Shields, R., Thomas, M. (Ed.), Bloomsbury Handbook of Theory in Comparative and International Education.
  • Palandjian, G., Silova, I., Mun, O., Zholdashaliyeva, R. (2018). ‘Gender and Nation in Postsocialist Educational Transformations.’ In Silova, I., & Chankseliani, M. (Eds.), Comparing Post-Socialist Transformations: Education in Eastern Europe and Former Soviet Union. Oxford: Symposium Books.
  • Mun, O., & Zholdashaliyeva, R. (2017). ‘Alippe, Bukvar’ and Gender: A comparative analysis of early literacy textbooks in Kazakhstan and Kyrgyzstan.’ In E. Brown & R. Craven & G. McLean (Ed.), International Advances in Education: Global Initiatives for Equity and Social Justice Series. Information Age Publishing
  • Patel, K. and Mun, O. (2017). ‘Marketing ‘development’ in the neoliberal university.’ DPU Working Papers https://www.ucl.ac.uk/bartlett/development/case-studies/2017/sep/marketing-development-neoliberal-university
  • Fimyar, O., Saniyazova, A. & Mun, O. (2017) ‘Methodology of Collaborative Research: Or, Searching for a Synergy in the Study of Student Transition in Kazakhstan.’ In SAGE Research Methods Cases. London, United Kingdom: SAGE Publications.
  • Mun, O. (2015). ‘(Re)imagining national identity through early literacy textbooks in Kazakhstan’, Forum of Young Central Asian Experts, 2nd edition. http://caa-network.org/archives/5620
  • Silova, I., Mead Yaqub, M., Mun, O., Palandjian, G. (2014). ‘Pedagogies of Space: (re)imagining nation and childhood in post-Soviet states.’ Global Studies of Childhood, 4(3), 195-209.
  • Silova, I., Brezhenyuk, V., Kudasova, M., Mun, O., Artemev, N. (2014). ‘Youth Protests against Privatisation of Education in post-Soviet states.’ European Education, 46(3), 56-65.

Schooled in the discipline of Public Administration at the University of Dhaka and with an experience of over five years of lecturing graduate and post-graduate students at two reputed public universities in Bangladesh, I am interested in research works related to education, gender, public policy, social studies and have multiple publications.

Apart from my current lecturing position, I worked as a news editor and contributor for the Dhaka Insider, an online news portal, in 2015. I also served as the Head of the Department (Department of Public Administration) and Assistant Proctor at the Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujibur Rahman Science and Technology University (BSMRSTU) and as an elected member of the Teachers’ Association there. During my post-graduation (MA. Public Policy) at the University of Nottingham, a qualitative research focus helped me characterize patterns of gender gap in primary education access.

 

Selected Publications
  • Dutta,  P.  (2020).  Democratic  Decentralization  and  Participatory Development:  Focus  on  Bangladesh.  Journal  of    Contemporary  Governance  and  Public Policy, 1(2), 82-91. Permalink/DOI: https://doi.org/10.46507/jcgpp.v1i2
  • Dutta, P., 2021. • Towards Sound Integrity Management in Bangladesh: Challenges and Issues in Public Administration and Law Enforcement. In: S. N. Khanom, ed. Governance, In the 21st Century in the Sounth Asia: Challenges and Ways Forward. Dhaka: Hakkani Publishers, pp. 541-560.

Zhuohan (Johanne) has a BA in English from Dalian Maritime University, China, and has won China National Scholarship. She then graduated with a Distinction in MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from University of Oxford. Before her DPhil, Zhuohan worked for the organizing committee for the Harvard Summit for Young Leaders in China, an initiative that brought liberal arts education from Harvard to China’s top-performing high school students. She also helped evaluate the UNICEF China Child-Friendly School Programme as an RA, focusing on the socio-emotional learning among the Dong ethnic minority groups in Guangxi, China. She also teaches IELTS, TOEFL, and English phonics.

Her MSc research centres on linguistic relativity, specifically the effect of French grammatical gender system on both French speakers’ and learners’ perception of objects. Her DPhil research focuses on English pronunciation teaching and learning among young Chinese kids, particularly emphasising the influence of their mother tongue, Mandarin.

Supervisors

Robert Woore and Faidra Faitaki

Shuo-Fang earned a Bachelor’s degree from National Chengchi University (Taiwan) and a Master’s degree from Boston University. He has teaching experience in various EFL contexts including international high school, educational institute, and graduate language program.

Shuo-Fang’s areas of interest lie in applied linguistics, particularly phonetics/phonology and speech perception. As an Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholar, Shuo-Fang is currently undertaking his doctoral research, supervised by Dr Elizabeth Wonnacott and Dr Robert Woore. His doctoral project is mostly experimental and explores second language learners’ difficulty in processing English connected speech.

Shuo-Fang is affiliated with two research groups: Applied Linguistics and Wonnacott-Nation Lab (developmental cognitive psychology).

Publications

Liang, S., & Yu, H. (2021). Chinese students’ willingness to communicate in EFL classrooms: A case study of students at a Sino-foreign university. Professional and Academic English, 28(2), 15–33.

Siyu Ma is a DPhil student in child development and learning at the Department of Education. Her doctoral research focuses on second-born children under the Chinese two-child policy, especially how siblings play a role in the socio-emotional, language, and early literacy development of these children.

Prior to starting her Dphil, Siyu completed an MSc in Education (Research Design and Methodology) at the University of Oxford, under the supervision of Professor Sonali Nag. Her MSc dissertation explored the roles of social background and home literacy environment in the language and literacy development of a Wales subsample from the Millennium Cohort Study and was awarded a High Distinction. She also holds a BSc degree with first-class honours in Psychology from the University of Bath.

Siyu is also a research associate working on TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education.

At TalkTogether, Siyu is responsible for designing online surveys and analysing quantitative data from child assessments and parent reports.

Publications

Ma, S. (2021). Family background and home literacy environment as predictors of the early literacy development of children in Wales – findings from the Millennium Cohort Study (Master’s thesis, University of Oxford).

 

Amanda is the recipient of the Hazel Project Scholarship, based at the Rees Centre. Her doctoral research explores the conceptualisation of foster homes as therapeutic environments for complex/developmental trauma. Through participant-generated photography and collaborative qualitative methods with young people currently in foster care placements, her research explores if young people’s concepts and perceptions of therapeutic environments coincide with or challenge existing theoretical models and popular practitioner perspectives.

Amanda holds a BA from the University of Leeds (UK) and an MPhil from the University of Oxford (UK).

Lawrence is a teacher of mathematics who is particularly interested in classroom pedagogy, and how research and education policies interact with the teaching that students experience on a daily basis.

He finds that looking outwards in education is valuable with there being much more that unites our classrooms than isolates them. He has been extremely fortunate to study education through an international lens in the US, and to work on the Global Teaching InSights initiative of the Organisation for Economic Development (OECD) where he led on its videos of teaching.

Publications

Global Teaching InSights: A video study of teaching, OECD, 2020

Antonin is currently Doctoral Teaching Fellow on the MSc in Comparative and International Education, teaching Foundations of Educational Research. Antonin is also a Research Assistant for the Centre for Global Higher Education on the ‘Research on Research: the research function and mission of higher education’ project.

Alongside his teaching and research roles, Antonin is completing a Doctoral study on the European Universities Initiative, the European Commission’s flagship higher education programme that seeks to set up European Universities through transnational university alliances.

Arzhia Habibi is a DPhil in Education Candidate and uses Mandarin to conduct her research in the Chinese higher education context.

Arzhia’s research focuses on ‘expressions’ of global or world citizenship education in a Chinese higher education institution In the study, she explores the perspectives and practices of educators and students at a China-based university, which experiments with discourses related to citizenship. She further investigates how individual, local, national and global dynamics and the surrounding discourses influence worldviews and practices in a university setting.

As empirical studies on global or world citizenship education in the Chinese context are scarce, Arzhia hopes to contribute to a nascent knowledge base which may extend and add depth to the critical global discourses of global and world citizenship education, beyond Eurocentric framings.

Prior to her studies at Oxford, Arzhia received a first class Bachelor’s degree in Contemporary Chinese Studies at The University of Nottingham, and a Master’s in International Communication in Taiwan at National Chengchi University. As a child, she also attended kindergarten in Fuzhou, Fujian province of China.

Olga is a co-convenor of the Philosophy of Education Reading Group at the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. Olga’s main research interest is in the topics of epistemic injustice across all levels of education and across national borders with a focus on higher education and the process of knowledge production in academic institutes and universities. Her core interest lies between the areas of social epistemology, research on research (RoR) and comparative and international education (CIE). She has been a recipient of multiple research awards in the United States and the United Kingdom and is an elected co-convenor of the Comparative and International Education Special Interest Group at the British Educational Research Association (BERA).

Her new research at Oxford will explore the epistemically just and unjust practices as experienced by scholars from Kazakhstan during the internationalisation process in the social sciences and the humanities. Prior joining Oxford, Olga taught at University College London Institute of Education in London on the topics of migrant, refugee and minority education and European education traditions from a comparative lens.

Publications
  • Mun, O. (2020). ‘Epistemic Injustices in Internationalising Humanities and Social Sciences: A Case Study of Higher Education and Science Institutes in Kazakhstan.’ Centre for International Higher Education, Boston College. https://www.bc.edu/content/dam/bc1/schools/lsoe/sites/cihe/publication/Perspectives/Perspectives%20No%2018.pdf
  • Mun, O. and Gafu, G. (in press) ‘University Research Capacity in Kazakhstan’. Higher School of Economics, Russia.
  • Kandiko Howson, C., Mun, O. and Walker, R. (2020). ‘Academic Activism in STEM fields: Discipline in Theory and Practice.’ Philosophy and Theory of Higher Education Society.
  • Aizuddin M., Habibi A., Mun, O. (in press, 2020). ‘Post-Colonialism in Comparative and International Education.’ In Jules, T., Shields, R., Thomas, M. (Ed.), Bloomsbury Handbook of Theory in Comparative and International Education.
  • Palandjian, G., Silova, I., Mun, O., Zholdashaliyeva, R. (2018). ‘Gender and Nation in Postsocialist Educational Transformations.’ In Silova, I., & Chankseliani, M. (Eds.), Comparing Post-Socialist Transformations: Education in Eastern Europe and Former Soviet Union. Oxford: Symposium Books.
  • Mun, O., & Zholdashaliyeva, R. (2017). ‘Alippe, Bukvar’ and Gender: A comparative analysis of early literacy textbooks in Kazakhstan and Kyrgyzstan.’ In E. Brown & R. Craven & G. McLean (Ed.), International Advances in Education: Global Initiatives for Equity and Social Justice Series. Information Age Publishing
  • Patel, K. and Mun, O. (2017). ‘Marketing ‘development’ in the neoliberal university.’ DPU Working Papers https://www.ucl.ac.uk/bartlett/development/case-studies/2017/sep/marketing-development-neoliberal-university
  • Fimyar, O., Saniyazova, A. & Mun, O. (2017) ‘Methodology of Collaborative Research: Or, Searching for a Synergy in the Study of Student Transition in Kazakhstan.’ In SAGE Research Methods Cases. London, United Kingdom: SAGE Publications.
  • Mun, O. (2015). ‘(Re)imagining national identity through early literacy textbooks in Kazakhstan’, Forum of Young Central Asian Experts, 2nd edition. http://caa-network.org/archives/5620
  • Silova, I., Mead Yaqub, M., Mun, O., Palandjian, G. (2014). ‘Pedagogies of Space: (re)imagining nation and childhood in post-Soviet states.’ Global Studies of Childhood, 4(3), 195-209.
  • Silova, I., Brezhenyuk, V., Kudasova, M., Mun, O., Artemev, N. (2014). ‘Youth Protests against Privatisation of Education in post-Soviet states.’ European Education, 46(3), 56-65.

Schooled in the discipline of Public Administration at the University of Dhaka and with an experience of over five years of lecturing graduate and post-graduate students at two reputed public universities in Bangladesh, I am interested in research works related to education, gender, public policy, social studies and have multiple publications.

Apart from my current lecturing position, I worked as a news editor and contributor for the Dhaka Insider, an online news portal, in 2015. I also served as the Head of the Department (Department of Public Administration) and Assistant Proctor at the Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujibur Rahman Science and Technology University (BSMRSTU) and as an elected member of the Teachers’ Association there. During my post-graduation (MA. Public Policy) at the University of Nottingham, a qualitative research focus helped me characterize patterns of gender gap in primary education access.

 

Selected Publications
  • Dutta,  P.  (2020).  Democratic  Decentralization  and  Participatory Development:  Focus  on  Bangladesh.  Journal  of    Contemporary  Governance  and  Public Policy, 1(2), 82-91. Permalink/DOI: https://doi.org/10.46507/jcgpp.v1i2
  • Dutta, P., 2021. • Towards Sound Integrity Management in Bangladesh: Challenges and Issues in Public Administration and Law Enforcement. In: S. N. Khanom, ed. Governance, In the 21st Century in the Sounth Asia: Challenges and Ways Forward. Dhaka: Hakkani Publishers, pp. 541-560.

Zhuohan (Johanne) has a BA in English from Dalian Maritime University, China, and has won China National Scholarship. She then graduated with a Distinction in MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from University of Oxford. Before her DPhil, Zhuohan worked for the organizing committee for the Harvard Summit for Young Leaders in China, an initiative that brought liberal arts education from Harvard to China’s top-performing high school students. She also helped evaluate the UNICEF China Child-Friendly School Programme as an RA, focusing on the socio-emotional learning among the Dong ethnic minority groups in Guangxi, China. She also teaches IELTS, TOEFL, and English phonics.

Her MSc research centres on linguistic relativity, specifically the effect of French grammatical gender system on both French speakers’ and learners’ perception of objects. Her DPhil research focuses on English pronunciation teaching and learning among young Chinese kids, particularly emphasising the influence of their mother tongue, Mandarin.

Supervisors

Robert Woore and Faidra Faitaki

Shuo-Fang earned a Bachelor’s degree from National Chengchi University (Taiwan) and a Master’s degree from Boston University. He has teaching experience in various EFL contexts including international high school, educational institute, and graduate language program.

Shuo-Fang’s areas of interest lie in applied linguistics, particularly phonetics/phonology and speech perception. As an Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholar, Shuo-Fang is currently undertaking his doctoral research, supervised by Dr Elizabeth Wonnacott and Dr Robert Woore. His doctoral project is mostly experimental and explores second language learners’ difficulty in processing English connected speech.

Shuo-Fang is affiliated with two research groups: Applied Linguistics and Wonnacott-Nation Lab (developmental cognitive psychology).

Publications

Liang, S., & Yu, H. (2021). Chinese students’ willingness to communicate in EFL classrooms: A case study of students at a Sino-foreign university. Professional and Academic English, 28(2), 15–33.

Siyu Ma is a DPhil student in child development and learning at the Department of Education. Her doctoral research focuses on second-born children under the Chinese two-child policy, especially how siblings play a role in the socio-emotional, language, and early literacy development of these children.

Prior to starting her Dphil, Siyu completed an MSc in Education (Research Design and Methodology) at the University of Oxford, under the supervision of Professor Sonali Nag. Her MSc dissertation explored the roles of social background and home literacy environment in the language and literacy development of a Wales subsample from the Millennium Cohort Study and was awarded a High Distinction. She also holds a BSc degree with first-class honours in Psychology from the University of Bath.

Siyu is also a research associate working on TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education.

At TalkTogether, Siyu is responsible for designing online surveys and analysing quantitative data from child assessments and parent reports.

Publications

Ma, S. (2021). Family background and home literacy environment as predictors of the early literacy development of children in Wales – findings from the Millennium Cohort Study (Master’s thesis, University of Oxford).

 

Amanda is the recipient of the Hazel Project Scholarship, based at the Rees Centre. Her doctoral research explores the conceptualisation of foster homes as therapeutic environments for complex/developmental trauma. Through participant-generated photography and collaborative qualitative methods with young people currently in foster care placements, her research explores if young people’s concepts and perceptions of therapeutic environments coincide with or challenge existing theoretical models and popular practitioner perspectives.

Amanda holds a BA from the University of Leeds (UK) and an MPhil from the University of Oxford (UK).

Lawrence is a teacher of mathematics who is particularly interested in classroom pedagogy, and how research and education policies interact with the teaching that students experience on a daily basis.

He finds that looking outwards in education is valuable with there being much more that unites our classrooms than isolates them. He has been extremely fortunate to study education through an international lens in the US, and to work on the Global Teaching InSights initiative of the Organisation for Economic Development (OECD) where he led on its videos of teaching.

Publications

Global Teaching InSights: A video study of teaching, OECD, 2020

Antonin is currently Doctoral Teaching Fellow on the MSc in Comparative and International Education, teaching Foundations of Educational Research. Antonin is also a Research Assistant for the Centre for Global Higher Education on the ‘Research on Research: the research function and mission of higher education’ project.

Alongside his teaching and research roles, Antonin is completing a Doctoral study on the European Universities Initiative, the European Commission’s flagship higher education programme that seeks to set up European Universities through transnational university alliances.

Arzhia Habibi is a DPhil in Education Candidate and uses Mandarin to conduct her research in the Chinese higher education context.

Arzhia’s research focuses on ‘expressions’ of global or world citizenship education in a Chinese higher education institution In the study, she explores the perspectives and practices of educators and students at a China-based university, which experiments with discourses related to citizenship. She further investigates how individual, local, national and global dynamics and the surrounding discourses influence worldviews and practices in a university setting.

As empirical studies on global or world citizenship education in the Chinese context are scarce, Arzhia hopes to contribute to a nascent knowledge base which may extend and add depth to the critical global discourses of global and world citizenship education, beyond Eurocentric framings.

Prior to her studies at Oxford, Arzhia received a first class Bachelor’s degree in Contemporary Chinese Studies at The University of Nottingham, and a Master’s in International Communication in Taiwan at National Chengchi University. As a child, she also attended kindergarten in Fuzhou, Fujian province of China.

Olga is a co-convenor of the Philosophy of Education Reading Group at the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. Olga’s main research interest is in the topics of epistemic injustice across all levels of education and across national borders with a focus on higher education and the process of knowledge production in academic institutes and universities. Her core interest lies between the areas of social epistemology, research on research (RoR) and comparative and international education (CIE). She has been a recipient of multiple research awards in the United States and the United Kingdom and is an elected co-convenor of the Comparative and International Education Special Interest Group at the British Educational Research Association (BERA).

Her new research at Oxford will explore the epistemically just and unjust practices as experienced by scholars from Kazakhstan during the internationalisation process in the social sciences and the humanities. Prior joining Oxford, Olga taught at University College London Institute of Education in London on the topics of migrant, refugee and minority education and European education traditions from a comparative lens.

Publications
  • Mun, O. (2020). ‘Epistemic Injustices in Internationalising Humanities and Social Sciences: A Case Study of Higher Education and Science Institutes in Kazakhstan.’ Centre for International Higher Education, Boston College. https://www.bc.edu/content/dam/bc1/schools/lsoe/sites/cihe/publication/Perspectives/Perspectives%20No%2018.pdf
  • Mun, O. and Gafu, G. (in press) ‘University Research Capacity in Kazakhstan’. Higher School of Economics, Russia.
  • Kandiko Howson, C., Mun, O. and Walker, R. (2020). ‘Academic Activism in STEM fields: Discipline in Theory and Practice.’ Philosophy and Theory of Higher Education Society.
  • Aizuddin M., Habibi A., Mun, O. (in press, 2020). ‘Post-Colonialism in Comparative and International Education.’ In Jules, T., Shields, R., Thomas, M. (Ed.), Bloomsbury Handbook of Theory in Comparative and International Education.
  • Palandjian, G., Silova, I., Mun, O., Zholdashaliyeva, R. (2018). ‘Gender and Nation in Postsocialist Educational Transformations.’ In Silova, I., & Chankseliani, M. (Eds.), Comparing Post-Socialist Transformations: Education in Eastern Europe and Former Soviet Union. Oxford: Symposium Books.
  • Mun, O., & Zholdashaliyeva, R. (2017). ‘Alippe, Bukvar’ and Gender: A comparative analysis of early literacy textbooks in Kazakhstan and Kyrgyzstan.’ In E. Brown & R. Craven & G. McLean (Ed.), International Advances in Education: Global Initiatives for Equity and Social Justice Series. Information Age Publishing
  • Patel, K. and Mun, O. (2017). ‘Marketing ‘development’ in the neoliberal university.’ DPU Working Papers https://www.ucl.ac.uk/bartlett/development/case-studies/2017/sep/marketing-development-neoliberal-university
  • Fimyar, O., Saniyazova, A. & Mun, O. (2017) ‘Methodology of Collaborative Research: Or, Searching for a Synergy in the Study of Student Transition in Kazakhstan.’ In SAGE Research Methods Cases. London, United Kingdom: SAGE Publications.
  • Mun, O. (2015). ‘(Re)imagining national identity through early literacy textbooks in Kazakhstan’, Forum of Young Central Asian Experts, 2nd edition. http://caa-network.org/archives/5620
  • Silova, I., Mead Yaqub, M., Mun, O., Palandjian, G. (2014). ‘Pedagogies of Space: (re)imagining nation and childhood in post-Soviet states.’ Global Studies of Childhood, 4(3), 195-209.
  • Silova, I., Brezhenyuk, V., Kudasova, M., Mun, O., Artemev, N. (2014). ‘Youth Protests against Privatisation of Education in post-Soviet states.’ European Education, 46(3), 56-65.

Schooled in the discipline of Public Administration at the University of Dhaka and with an experience of over five years of lecturing graduate and post-graduate students at two reputed public universities in Bangladesh, I am interested in research works related to education, gender, public policy, social studies and have multiple publications.

Apart from my current lecturing position, I worked as a news editor and contributor for the Dhaka Insider, an online news portal, in 2015. I also served as the Head of the Department (Department of Public Administration) and Assistant Proctor at the Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujibur Rahman Science and Technology University (BSMRSTU) and as an elected member of the Teachers’ Association there. During my post-graduation (MA. Public Policy) at the University of Nottingham, a qualitative research focus helped me characterize patterns of gender gap in primary education access.

 

Selected Publications
  • Dutta,  P.  (2020).  Democratic  Decentralization  and  Participatory Development:  Focus  on  Bangladesh.  Journal  of    Contemporary  Governance  and  Public Policy, 1(2), 82-91. Permalink/DOI: https://doi.org/10.46507/jcgpp.v1i2
  • Dutta, P., 2021. • Towards Sound Integrity Management in Bangladesh: Challenges and Issues in Public Administration and Law Enforcement. In: S. N. Khanom, ed. Governance, In the 21st Century in the Sounth Asia: Challenges and Ways Forward. Dhaka: Hakkani Publishers, pp. 541-560.

Zhuohan (Johanne) has a BA in English from Dalian Maritime University, China, and has won China National Scholarship. She then graduated with a Distinction in MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from University of Oxford. Before her DPhil, Zhuohan worked for the organizing committee for the Harvard Summit for Young Leaders in China, an initiative that brought liberal arts education from Harvard to China’s top-performing high school students. She also helped evaluate the UNICEF China Child-Friendly School Programme as an RA, focusing on the socio-emotional learning among the Dong ethnic minority groups in Guangxi, China. She also teaches IELTS, TOEFL, and English phonics.

Her MSc research centres on linguistic relativity, specifically the effect of French grammatical gender system on both French speakers’ and learners’ perception of objects. Her DPhil research focuses on English pronunciation teaching and learning among young Chinese kids, particularly emphasising the influence of their mother tongue, Mandarin.

Supervisors

Robert Woore and Faidra Faitaki

Shuo-Fang earned a Bachelor’s degree from National Chengchi University (Taiwan) and a Master’s degree from Boston University. He has teaching experience in various EFL contexts including international high school, educational institute, and graduate language program.

Shuo-Fang’s areas of interest lie in applied linguistics, particularly phonetics/phonology and speech perception. As an Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholar, Shuo-Fang is currently undertaking his doctoral research, supervised by Dr Elizabeth Wonnacott and Dr Robert Woore. His doctoral project is mostly experimental and explores second language learners’ difficulty in processing English connected speech.

Shuo-Fang is affiliated with two research groups: Applied Linguistics and Wonnacott-Nation Lab (developmental cognitive psychology).

Publications

Liang, S., & Yu, H. (2021). Chinese students’ willingness to communicate in EFL classrooms: A case study of students at a Sino-foreign university. Professional and Academic English, 28(2), 15–33.

Siyu Ma is a DPhil student in child development and learning at the Department of Education. Her doctoral research focuses on second-born children under the Chinese two-child policy, especially how siblings play a role in the socio-emotional, language, and early literacy development of these children.

Prior to starting her Dphil, Siyu completed an MSc in Education (Research Design and Methodology) at the University of Oxford, under the supervision of Professor Sonali Nag. Her MSc dissertation explored the roles of social background and home literacy environment in the language and literacy development of a Wales subsample from the Millennium Cohort Study and was awarded a High Distinction. She also holds a BSc degree with first-class honours in Psychology from the University of Bath.

Siyu is also a research associate working on TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education.

At TalkTogether, Siyu is responsible for designing online surveys and analysing quantitative data from child assessments and parent reports.

Publications

Ma, S. (2021). Family background and home literacy environment as predictors of the early literacy development of children in Wales – findings from the Millennium Cohort Study (Master’s thesis, University of Oxford).

 

Amanda is the recipient of the Hazel Project Scholarship, based at the Rees Centre. Her doctoral research explores the conceptualisation of foster homes as therapeutic environments for complex/developmental trauma. Through participant-generated photography and collaborative qualitative methods with young people currently in foster care placements, her research explores if young people’s concepts and perceptions of therapeutic environments coincide with or challenge existing theoretical models and popular practitioner perspectives.

Amanda holds a BA from the University of Leeds (UK) and an MPhil from the University of Oxford (UK).

Lawrence is a teacher of mathematics who is particularly interested in classroom pedagogy, and how research and education policies interact with the teaching that students experience on a daily basis.

He finds that looking outwards in education is valuable with there being much more that unites our classrooms than isolates them. He has been extremely fortunate to study education through an international lens in the US, and to work on the Global Teaching InSights initiative of the Organisation for Economic Development (OECD) where he led on its videos of teaching.

Publications

Global Teaching InSights: A video study of teaching, OECD, 2020

Antonin is currently Doctoral Teaching Fellow on the MSc in Comparative and International Education, teaching Foundations of Educational Research. Antonin is also a Research Assistant for the Centre for Global Higher Education on the ‘Research on Research: the research function and mission of higher education’ project.

Alongside his teaching and research roles, Antonin is completing a Doctoral study on the European Universities Initiative, the European Commission’s flagship higher education programme that seeks to set up European Universities through transnational university alliances.

Arzhia Habibi is a DPhil in Education Candidate and uses Mandarin to conduct her research in the Chinese higher education context.

Arzhia’s research focuses on ‘expressions’ of global or world citizenship education in a Chinese higher education institution In the study, she explores the perspectives and practices of educators and students at a China-based university, which experiments with discourses related to citizenship. She further investigates how individual, local, national and global dynamics and the surrounding discourses influence worldviews and practices in a university setting.

As empirical studies on global or world citizenship education in the Chinese context are scarce, Arzhia hopes to contribute to a nascent knowledge base which may extend and add depth to the critical global discourses of global and world citizenship education, beyond Eurocentric framings.

Prior to her studies at Oxford, Arzhia received a first class Bachelor’s degree in Contemporary Chinese Studies at The University of Nottingham, and a Master’s in International Communication in Taiwan at National Chengchi University. As a child, she also attended kindergarten in Fuzhou, Fujian province of China.

Olga is a co-convenor of the Philosophy of Education Reading Group at the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. Olga’s main research interest is in the topics of epistemic injustice across all levels of education and across national borders with a focus on higher education and the process of knowledge production in academic institutes and universities. Her core interest lies between the areas of social epistemology, research on research (RoR) and comparative and international education (CIE). She has been a recipient of multiple research awards in the United States and the United Kingdom and is an elected co-convenor of the Comparative and International Education Special Interest Group at the British Educational Research Association (BERA).

Her new research at Oxford will explore the epistemically just and unjust practices as experienced by scholars from Kazakhstan during the internationalisation process in the social sciences and the humanities. Prior joining Oxford, Olga taught at University College London Institute of Education in London on the topics of migrant, refugee and minority education and European education traditions from a comparative lens.

Publications
  • Mun, O. (2020). ‘Epistemic Injustices in Internationalising Humanities and Social Sciences: A Case Study of Higher Education and Science Institutes in Kazakhstan.’ Centre for International Higher Education, Boston College. https://www.bc.edu/content/dam/bc1/schools/lsoe/sites/cihe/publication/Perspectives/Perspectives%20No%2018.pdf
  • Mun, O. and Gafu, G. (in press) ‘University Research Capacity in Kazakhstan’. Higher School of Economics, Russia.
  • Kandiko Howson, C., Mun, O. and Walker, R. (2020). ‘Academic Activism in STEM fields: Discipline in Theory and Practice.’ Philosophy and Theory of Higher Education Society.
  • Aizuddin M., Habibi A., Mun, O. (in press, 2020). ‘Post-Colonialism in Comparative and International Education.’ In Jules, T., Shields, R., Thomas, M. (Ed.), Bloomsbury Handbook of Theory in Comparative and International Education.
  • Palandjian, G., Silova, I., Mun, O., Zholdashaliyeva, R. (2018). ‘Gender and Nation in Postsocialist Educational Transformations.’ In Silova, I., & Chankseliani, M. (Eds.), Comparing Post-Socialist Transformations: Education in Eastern Europe and Former Soviet Union. Oxford: Symposium Books.
  • Mun, O., & Zholdashaliyeva, R. (2017). ‘Alippe, Bukvar’ and Gender: A comparative analysis of early literacy textbooks in Kazakhstan and Kyrgyzstan.’ In E. Brown & R. Craven & G. McLean (Ed.), International Advances in Education: Global Initiatives for Equity and Social Justice Series. Information Age Publishing
  • Patel, K. and Mun, O. (2017). ‘Marketing ‘development’ in the neoliberal university.’ DPU Working Papers https://www.ucl.ac.uk/bartlett/development/case-studies/2017/sep/marketing-development-neoliberal-university
  • Fimyar, O., Saniyazova, A. & Mun, O. (2017) ‘Methodology of Collaborative Research: Or, Searching for a Synergy in the Study of Student Transition in Kazakhstan.’ In SAGE Research Methods Cases. London, United Kingdom: SAGE Publications.
  • Mun, O. (2015). ‘(Re)imagining national identity through early literacy textbooks in Kazakhstan’, Forum of Young Central Asian Experts, 2nd edition. http://caa-network.org/archives/5620
  • Silova, I., Mead Yaqub, M., Mun, O., Palandjian, G. (2014). ‘Pedagogies of Space: (re)imagining nation and childhood in post-Soviet states.’ Global Studies of Childhood, 4(3), 195-209.
  • Silova, I., Brezhenyuk, V., Kudasova, M., Mun, O., Artemev, N. (2014). ‘Youth Protests against Privatisation of Education in post-Soviet states.’ European Education, 46(3), 56-65.

Schooled in the discipline of Public Administration at the University of Dhaka and with an experience of over five years of lecturing graduate and post-graduate students at two reputed public universities in Bangladesh, I am interested in research works related to education, gender, public policy, social studies and have multiple publications.

Apart from my current lecturing position, I worked as a news editor and contributor for the Dhaka Insider, an online news portal, in 2015. I also served as the Head of the Department (Department of Public Administration) and Assistant Proctor at the Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujibur Rahman Science and Technology University (BSMRSTU) and as an elected member of the Teachers’ Association there. During my post-graduation (MA. Public Policy) at the University of Nottingham, a qualitative research focus helped me characterize patterns of gender gap in primary education access.

 

Selected Publications
  • Dutta,  P.  (2020).  Democratic  Decentralization  and  Participatory Development:  Focus  on  Bangladesh.  Journal  of    Contemporary  Governance  and  Public Policy, 1(2), 82-91. Permalink/DOI: https://doi.org/10.46507/jcgpp.v1i2
  • Dutta, P., 2021. • Towards Sound Integrity Management in Bangladesh: Challenges and Issues in Public Administration and Law Enforcement. In: S. N. Khanom, ed. Governance, In the 21st Century in the Sounth Asia: Challenges and Ways Forward. Dhaka: Hakkani Publishers, pp. 541-560.

Zhuohan (Johanne) has a BA in English from Dalian Maritime University, China, and has won China National Scholarship. She then graduated with a Distinction in MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from University of Oxford. Before her DPhil, Zhuohan worked for the organizing committee for the Harvard Summit for Young Leaders in China, an initiative that brought liberal arts education from Harvard to China’s top-performing high school students. She also helped evaluate the UNICEF China Child-Friendly School Programme as an RA, focusing on the socio-emotional learning among the Dong ethnic minority groups in Guangxi, China. She also teaches IELTS, TOEFL, and English phonics.

Her MSc research centres on linguistic relativity, specifically the effect of French grammatical gender system on both French speakers’ and learners’ perception of objects. Her DPhil research focuses on English pronunciation teaching and learning among young Chinese kids, particularly emphasising the influence of their mother tongue, Mandarin.

Supervisors

Robert Woore and Faidra Faitaki

Shuo-Fang earned a Bachelor’s degree from National Chengchi University (Taiwan) and a Master’s degree from Boston University. He has teaching experience in various EFL contexts including international high school, educational institute, and graduate language program.

Shuo-Fang’s areas of interest lie in applied linguistics, particularly phonetics/phonology and speech perception. As an Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholar, Shuo-Fang is currently undertaking his doctoral research, supervised by Dr Elizabeth Wonnacott and Dr Robert Woore. His doctoral project is mostly experimental and explores second language learners’ difficulty in processing English connected speech.

Shuo-Fang is affiliated with two research groups: Applied Linguistics and Wonnacott-Nation Lab (developmental cognitive psychology).

Publications

Liang, S., & Yu, H. (2021). Chinese students’ willingness to communicate in EFL classrooms: A case study of students at a Sino-foreign university. Professional and Academic English, 28(2), 15–33.

Siyu Ma is a DPhil student in child development and learning at the Department of Education. Her doctoral research focuses on second-born children under the Chinese two-child policy, especially how siblings play a role in the socio-emotional, language, and early literacy development of these children.

Prior to starting her Dphil, Siyu completed an MSc in Education (Research Design and Methodology) at the University of Oxford, under the supervision of Professor Sonali Nag. Her MSc dissertation explored the roles of social background and home literacy environment in the language and literacy development of a Wales subsample from the Millennium Cohort Study and was awarded a High Distinction. She also holds a BSc degree with first-class honours in Psychology from the University of Bath.

Siyu is also a research associate working on TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education.

At TalkTogether, Siyu is responsible for designing online surveys and analysing quantitative data from child assessments and parent reports.

Publications

Ma, S. (2021). Family background and home literacy environment as predictors of the early literacy development of children in Wales – findings from the Millennium Cohort Study (Master’s thesis, University of Oxford).

 

Amanda is the recipient of the Hazel Project Scholarship, based at the Rees Centre. Her doctoral research explores the conceptualisation of foster homes as therapeutic environments for complex/developmental trauma. Through participant-generated photography and collaborative qualitative methods with young people currently in foster care placements, her research explores if young people’s concepts and perceptions of therapeutic environments coincide with or challenge existing theoretical models and popular practitioner perspectives.

Amanda holds a BA from the University of Leeds (UK) and an MPhil from the University of Oxford (UK).

Lawrence is a teacher of mathematics who is particularly interested in classroom pedagogy, and how research and education policies interact with the teaching that students experience on a daily basis.

He finds that looking outwards in education is valuable with there being much more that unites our classrooms than isolates them. He has been extremely fortunate to study education through an international lens in the US, and to work on the Global Teaching InSights initiative of the Organisation for Economic Development (OECD) where he led on its videos of teaching.

Publications

Global Teaching InSights: A video study of teaching, OECD, 2020

Antonin is currently Doctoral Teaching Fellow on the MSc in Comparative and International Education, teaching Foundations of Educational Research. Antonin is also a Research Assistant for the Centre for Global Higher Education on the ‘Research on Research: the research function and mission of higher education’ project.

Alongside his teaching and research roles, Antonin is completing a Doctoral study on the European Universities Initiative, the European Commission’s flagship higher education programme that seeks to set up European Universities through transnational university alliances.

Arzhia Habibi is a DPhil in Education Candidate and uses Mandarin to conduct her research in the Chinese higher education context.

Arzhia’s research focuses on ‘expressions’ of global or world citizenship education in a Chinese higher education institution In the study, she explores the perspectives and practices of educators and students at a China-based university, which experiments with discourses related to citizenship. She further investigates how individual, local, national and global dynamics and the surrounding discourses influence worldviews and practices in a university setting.

As empirical studies on global or world citizenship education in the Chinese context are scarce, Arzhia hopes to contribute to a nascent knowledge base which may extend and add depth to the critical global discourses of global and world citizenship education, beyond Eurocentric framings.

Prior to her studies at Oxford, Arzhia received a first class Bachelor’s degree in Contemporary Chinese Studies at The University of Nottingham, and a Master’s in International Communication in Taiwan at National Chengchi University. As a child, she also attended kindergarten in Fuzhou, Fujian province of China.

Olga is a co-convenor of the Philosophy of Education Reading Group at the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. Olga’s main research interest is in the topics of epistemic injustice across all levels of education and across national borders with a focus on higher education and the process of knowledge production in academic institutes and universities. Her core interest lies between the areas of social epistemology, research on research (RoR) and comparative and international education (CIE). She has been a recipient of multiple research awards in the United States and the United Kingdom and is an elected co-convenor of the Comparative and International Education Special Interest Group at the British Educational Research Association (BERA).

Her new research at Oxford will explore the epistemically just and unjust practices as experienced by scholars from Kazakhstan during the internationalisation process in the social sciences and the humanities. Prior joining Oxford, Olga taught at University College London Institute of Education in London on the topics of migrant, refugee and minority education and European education traditions from a comparative lens.

Publications
  • Mun, O. (2020). ‘Epistemic Injustices in Internationalising Humanities and Social Sciences: A Case Study of Higher Education and Science Institutes in Kazakhstan.’ Centre for International Higher Education, Boston College. https://www.bc.edu/content/dam/bc1/schools/lsoe/sites/cihe/publication/Perspectives/Perspectives%20No%2018.pdf
  • Mun, O. and Gafu, G. (in press) ‘University Research Capacity in Kazakhstan’. Higher School of Economics, Russia.
  • Kandiko Howson, C., Mun, O. and Walker, R. (2020). ‘Academic Activism in STEM fields: Discipline in Theory and Practice.’ Philosophy and Theory of Higher Education Society.
  • Aizuddin M., Habibi A., Mun, O. (in press, 2020). ‘Post-Colonialism in Comparative and International Education.’ In Jules, T., Shields, R., Thomas, M. (Ed.), Bloomsbury Handbook of Theory in Comparative and International Education.
  • Palandjian, G., Silova, I., Mun, O., Zholdashaliyeva, R. (2018). ‘Gender and Nation in Postsocialist Educational Transformations.’ In Silova, I., & Chankseliani, M. (Eds.), Comparing Post-Socialist Transformations: Education in Eastern Europe and Former Soviet Union. Oxford: Symposium Books.
  • Mun, O., & Zholdashaliyeva, R. (2017). ‘Alippe, Bukvar’ and Gender: A comparative analysis of early literacy textbooks in Kazakhstan and Kyrgyzstan.’ In E. Brown & R. Craven & G. McLean (Ed.), International Advances in Education: Global Initiatives for Equity and Social Justice Series. Information Age Publishing
  • Patel, K. and Mun, O. (2017). ‘Marketing ‘development’ in the neoliberal university.’ DPU Working Papers https://www.ucl.ac.uk/bartlett/development/case-studies/2017/sep/marketing-development-neoliberal-university
  • Fimyar, O., Saniyazova, A. & Mun, O. (2017) ‘Methodology of Collaborative Research: Or, Searching for a Synergy in the Study of Student Transition in Kazakhstan.’ In SAGE Research Methods Cases. London, United Kingdom: SAGE Publications.
  • Mun, O. (2015). ‘(Re)imagining national identity through early literacy textbooks in Kazakhstan’, Forum of Young Central Asian Experts, 2nd edition. http://caa-network.org/archives/5620
  • Silova, I., Mead Yaqub, M., Mun, O., Palandjian, G. (2014). ‘Pedagogies of Space: (re)imagining nation and childhood in post-Soviet states.’ Global Studies of Childhood, 4(3), 195-209.
  • Silova, I., Brezhenyuk, V., Kudasova, M., Mun, O., Artemev, N. (2014). ‘Youth Protests against Privatisation of Education in post-Soviet states.’ European Education, 46(3), 56-65.

Schooled in the discipline of Public Administration at the University of Dhaka and with an experience of over five years of lecturing graduate and post-graduate students at two reputed public universities in Bangladesh, I am interested in research works related to education, gender, public policy, social studies and have multiple publications.

Apart from my current lecturing position, I worked as a news editor and contributor for the Dhaka Insider, an online news portal, in 2015. I also served as the Head of the Department (Department of Public Administration) and Assistant Proctor at the Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujibur Rahman Science and Technology University (BSMRSTU) and as an elected member of the Teachers’ Association there. During my post-graduation (MA. Public Policy) at the University of Nottingham, a qualitative research focus helped me characterize patterns of gender gap in primary education access.

 

Selected Publications
  • Dutta,  P.  (2020).  Democratic  Decentralization  and  Participatory Development:  Focus  on  Bangladesh.  Journal  of    Contemporary  Governance  and  Public Policy, 1(2), 82-91. Permalink/DOI: https://doi.org/10.46507/jcgpp.v1i2
  • Dutta, P., 2021. • Towards Sound Integrity Management in Bangladesh: Challenges and Issues in Public Administration and Law Enforcement. In: S. N. Khanom, ed. Governance, In the 21st Century in the Sounth Asia: Challenges and Ways Forward. Dhaka: Hakkani Publishers, pp. 541-560.

Zhuohan (Johanne) has a BA in English from Dalian Maritime University, China, and has won China National Scholarship. She then graduated with a Distinction in MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from University of Oxford. Before her DPhil, Zhuohan worked for the organizing committee for the Harvard Summit for Young Leaders in China, an initiative that brought liberal arts education from Harvard to China’s top-performing high school students. She also helped evaluate the UNICEF China Child-Friendly School Programme as an RA, focusing on the socio-emotional learning among the Dong ethnic minority groups in Guangxi, China. She also teaches IELTS, TOEFL, and English phonics.

Her MSc research centres on linguistic relativity, specifically the effect of French grammatical gender system on both French speakers’ and learners’ perception of objects. Her DPhil research focuses on English pronunciation teaching and learning among young Chinese kids, particularly emphasising the influence of their mother tongue, Mandarin.

Supervisors

Robert Woore and Faidra Faitaki

Shuo-Fang earned a Bachelor’s degree from National Chengchi University (Taiwan) and a Master’s degree from Boston University. He has teaching experience in various EFL contexts including international high school, educational institute, and graduate language program.

Shuo-Fang’s areas of interest lie in applied linguistics, particularly phonetics/phonology and speech perception. As an Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholar, Shuo-Fang is currently undertaking his doctoral research, supervised by Dr Elizabeth Wonnacott and Dr Robert Woore. His doctoral project is mostly experimental and explores second language learners’ difficulty in processing English connected speech.

Shuo-Fang is affiliated with two research groups: Applied Linguistics and Wonnacott-Nation Lab (developmental cognitive psychology).

Publications

Liang, S., & Yu, H. (2021). Chinese students’ willingness to communicate in EFL classrooms: A case study of students at a Sino-foreign university. Professional and Academic English, 28(2), 15–33.

Siyu Ma is a DPhil student in child development and learning at the Department of Education. Her doctoral research focuses on second-born children under the Chinese two-child policy, especially how siblings play a role in the socio-emotional, language, and early literacy development of these children.

Prior to starting her Dphil, Siyu completed an MSc in Education (Research Design and Methodology) at the University of Oxford, under the supervision of Professor Sonali Nag. Her MSc dissertation explored the roles of social background and home literacy environment in the language and literacy development of a Wales subsample from the Millennium Cohort Study and was awarded a High Distinction. She also holds a BSc degree with first-class honours in Psychology from the University of Bath.

Siyu is also a research associate working on TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education.

At TalkTogether, Siyu is responsible for designing online surveys and analysing quantitative data from child assessments and parent reports.

Publications

Ma, S. (2021). Family background and home literacy environment as predictors of the early literacy development of children in Wales – findings from the Millennium Cohort Study (Master’s thesis, University of Oxford).

 

Amanda is the recipient of the Hazel Project Scholarship, based at the Rees Centre. Her doctoral research explores the conceptualisation of foster homes as therapeutic environments for complex/developmental trauma. Through participant-generated photography and collaborative qualitative methods with young people currently in foster care placements, her research explores if young people’s concepts and perceptions of therapeutic environments coincide with or challenge existing theoretical models and popular practitioner perspectives.

Amanda holds a BA from the University of Leeds (UK) and an MPhil from the University of Oxford (UK).

Lawrence is a teacher of mathematics who is particularly interested in classroom pedagogy, and how research and education policies interact with the teaching that students experience on a daily basis.

He finds that looking outwards in education is valuable with there being much more that unites our classrooms than isolates them. He has been extremely fortunate to study education through an international lens in the US, and to work on the Global Teaching InSights initiative of the Organisation for Economic Development (OECD) where he led on its videos of teaching.

Publications

Global Teaching InSights: A video study of teaching, OECD, 2020

Antonin is currently Doctoral Teaching Fellow on the MSc in Comparative and International Education, teaching Foundations of Educational Research. Antonin is also a Research Assistant for the Centre for Global Higher Education on the ‘Research on Research: the research function and mission of higher education’ project.

Alongside his teaching and research roles, Antonin is completing a Doctoral study on the European Universities Initiative, the European Commission’s flagship higher education programme that seeks to set up European Universities through transnational university alliances.

Arzhia Habibi is a DPhil in Education Candidate and uses Mandarin to conduct her research in the Chinese higher education context.

Arzhia’s research focuses on ‘expressions’ of global or world citizenship education in a Chinese higher education institution In the study, she explores the perspectives and practices of educators and students at a China-based university, which experiments with discourses related to citizenship. She further investigates how individual, local, national and global dynamics and the surrounding discourses influence worldviews and practices in a university setting.

As empirical studies on global or world citizenship education in the Chinese context are scarce, Arzhia hopes to contribute to a nascent knowledge base which may extend and add depth to the critical global discourses of global and world citizenship education, beyond Eurocentric framings.

Prior to her studies at Oxford, Arzhia received a first class Bachelor’s degree in Contemporary Chinese Studies at The University of Nottingham, and a Master’s in International Communication in Taiwan at National Chengchi University. As a child, she also attended kindergarten in Fuzhou, Fujian province of China.

Olga is a co-convenor of the Philosophy of Education Reading Group at the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. Olga’s main research interest is in the topics of epistemic injustice across all levels of education and across national borders with a focus on higher education and the process of knowledge production in academic institutes and universities. Her core interest lies between the areas of social epistemology, research on research (RoR) and comparative and international education (CIE). She has been a recipient of multiple research awards in the United States and the United Kingdom and is an elected co-convenor of the Comparative and International Education Special Interest Group at the British Educational Research Association (BERA).

Her new research at Oxford will explore the epistemically just and unjust practices as experienced by scholars from Kazakhstan during the internationalisation process in the social sciences and the humanities. Prior joining Oxford, Olga taught at University College London Institute of Education in London on the topics of migrant, refugee and minority education and European education traditions from a comparative lens.

Publications
  • Mun, O. (2020). ‘Epistemic Injustices in Internationalising Humanities and Social Sciences: A Case Study of Higher Education and Science Institutes in Kazakhstan.’ Centre for International Higher Education, Boston College. https://www.bc.edu/content/dam/bc1/schools/lsoe/sites/cihe/publication/Perspectives/Perspectives%20No%2018.pdf
  • Mun, O. and Gafu, G. (in press) ‘University Research Capacity in Kazakhstan’. Higher School of Economics, Russia.
  • Kandiko Howson, C., Mun, O. and Walker, R. (2020). ‘Academic Activism in STEM fields: Discipline in Theory and Practice.’ Philosophy and Theory of Higher Education Society.
  • Aizuddin M., Habibi A., Mun, O. (in press, 2020). ‘Post-Colonialism in Comparative and International Education.’ In Jules, T., Shields, R., Thomas, M. (Ed.), Bloomsbury Handbook of Theory in Comparative and International Education.
  • Palandjian, G., Silova, I., Mun, O., Zholdashaliyeva, R. (2018). ‘Gender and Nation in Postsocialist Educational Transformations.’ In Silova, I., & Chankseliani, M. (Eds.), Comparing Post-Socialist Transformations: Education in Eastern Europe and Former Soviet Union. Oxford: Symposium Books.
  • Mun, O., & Zholdashaliyeva, R. (2017). ‘Alippe, Bukvar’ and Gender: A comparative analysis of early literacy textbooks in Kazakhstan and Kyrgyzstan.’ In E. Brown & R. Craven & G. McLean (Ed.), International Advances in Education: Global Initiatives for Equity and Social Justice Series. Information Age Publishing
  • Patel, K. and Mun, O. (2017). ‘Marketing ‘development’ in the neoliberal university.’ DPU Working Papers https://www.ucl.ac.uk/bartlett/development/case-studies/2017/sep/marketing-development-neoliberal-university
  • Fimyar, O., Saniyazova, A. & Mun, O. (2017) ‘Methodology of Collaborative Research: Or, Searching for a Synergy in the Study of Student Transition in Kazakhstan.’ In SAGE Research Methods Cases. London, United Kingdom: SAGE Publications.
  • Mun, O. (2015). ‘(Re)imagining national identity through early literacy textbooks in Kazakhstan’, Forum of Young Central Asian Experts, 2nd edition. http://caa-network.org/archives/5620
  • Silova, I., Mead Yaqub, M., Mun, O., Palandjian, G. (2014). ‘Pedagogies of Space: (re)imagining nation and childhood in post-Soviet states.’ Global Studies of Childhood, 4(3), 195-209.
  • Silova, I., Brezhenyuk, V., Kudasova, M., Mun, O., Artemev, N. (2014). ‘Youth Protests against Privatisation of Education in post-Soviet states.’ European Education, 46(3), 56-65.

Schooled in the discipline of Public Administration at the University of Dhaka and with an experience of over five years of lecturing graduate and post-graduate students at two reputed public universities in Bangladesh, I am interested in research works related to education, gender, public policy, social studies and have multiple publications.

Apart from my current lecturing position, I worked as a news editor and contributor for the Dhaka Insider, an online news portal, in 2015. I also served as the Head of the Department (Department of Public Administration) and Assistant Proctor at the Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujibur Rahman Science and Technology University (BSMRSTU) and as an elected member of the Teachers’ Association there. During my post-graduation (MA. Public Policy) at the University of Nottingham, a qualitative research focus helped me characterize patterns of gender gap in primary education access.

 

Selected Publications
  • Dutta,  P.  (2020).  Democratic  Decentralization  and  Participatory Development:  Focus  on  Bangladesh.  Journal  of    Contemporary  Governance  and  Public Policy, 1(2), 82-91. Permalink/DOI: https://doi.org/10.46507/jcgpp.v1i2
  • Dutta, P., 2021. • Towards Sound Integrity Management in Bangladesh: Challenges and Issues in Public Administration and Law Enforcement. In: S. N. Khanom, ed. Governance, In the 21st Century in the Sounth Asia: Challenges and Ways Forward. Dhaka: Hakkani Publishers, pp. 541-560.

Zhuohan (Johanne) has a BA in English from Dalian Maritime University, China, and has won China National Scholarship. She then graduated with a Distinction in MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from University of Oxford. Before her DPhil, Zhuohan worked for the organizing committee for the Harvard Summit for Young Leaders in China, an initiative that brought liberal arts education from Harvard to China’s top-performing high school students. She also helped evaluate the UNICEF China Child-Friendly School Programme as an RA, focusing on the socio-emotional learning among the Dong ethnic minority groups in Guangxi, China. She also teaches IELTS, TOEFL, and English phonics.

Her MSc research centres on linguistic relativity, specifically the effect of French grammatical gender system on both French speakers’ and learners’ perception of objects. Her DPhil research focuses on English pronunciation teaching and learning among young Chinese kids, particularly emphasising the influence of their mother tongue, Mandarin.

Supervisors

Robert Woore and Faidra Faitaki

Shuo-Fang earned a Bachelor’s degree from National Chengchi University (Taiwan) and a Master’s degree from Boston University. He has teaching experience in various EFL contexts including international high school, educational institute, and graduate language program.

Shuo-Fang’s areas of interest lie in applied linguistics, particularly phonetics/phonology and speech perception. As an Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholar, Shuo-Fang is currently undertaking his doctoral research, supervised by Dr Elizabeth Wonnacott and Dr Robert Woore. His doctoral project is mostly experimental and explores second language learners’ difficulty in processing English connected speech.

Shuo-Fang is affiliated with two research groups: Applied Linguistics and Wonnacott-Nation Lab (developmental cognitive psychology).

Publications

Liang, S., & Yu, H. (2021). Chinese students’ willingness to communicate in EFL classrooms: A case study of students at a Sino-foreign university. Professional and Academic English, 28(2), 15–33.

Siyu Ma is a DPhil student in child development and learning at the Department of Education. Her doctoral research focuses on second-born children under the Chinese two-child policy, especially how siblings play a role in the socio-emotional, language, and early literacy development of these children.

Prior to starting her Dphil, Siyu completed an MSc in Education (Research Design and Methodology) at the University of Oxford, under the supervision of Professor Sonali Nag. Her MSc dissertation explored the roles of social background and home literacy environment in the language and literacy development of a Wales subsample from the Millennium Cohort Study and was awarded a High Distinction. She also holds a BSc degree with first-class honours in Psychology from the University of Bath.

Siyu is also a research associate working on TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education.

At TalkTogether, Siyu is responsible for designing online surveys and analysing quantitative data from child assessments and parent reports.

Publications

Ma, S. (2021). Family background and home literacy environment as predictors of the early literacy development of children in Wales – findings from the Millennium Cohort Study (Master’s thesis, University of Oxford).

 

Amanda is the recipient of the Hazel Project Scholarship, based at the Rees Centre. Her doctoral research explores the conceptualisation of foster homes as therapeutic environments for complex/developmental trauma. Through participant-generated photography and collaborative qualitative methods with young people currently in foster care placements, her research explores if young people’s concepts and perceptions of therapeutic environments coincide with or challenge existing theoretical models and popular practitioner perspectives.

Amanda holds a BA from the University of Leeds (UK) and an MPhil from the University of Oxford (UK).

Lawrence is a teacher of mathematics who is particularly interested in classroom pedagogy, and how research and education policies interact with the teaching that students experience on a daily basis.

He finds that looking outwards in education is valuable with there being much more that unites our classrooms than isolates them. He has been extremely fortunate to study education through an international lens in the US, and to work on the Global Teaching InSights initiative of the Organisation for Economic Development (OECD) where he led on its videos of teaching.

Publications

Global Teaching InSights: A video study of teaching, OECD, 2020

Antonin is currently Doctoral Teaching Fellow on the MSc in Comparative and International Education, teaching Foundations of Educational Research. Antonin is also a Research Assistant for the Centre for Global Higher Education on the ‘Research on Research: the research function and mission of higher education’ project.

Alongside his teaching and research roles, Antonin is completing a Doctoral study on the European Universities Initiative, the European Commission’s flagship higher education programme that seeks to set up European Universities through transnational university alliances.

Arzhia Habibi is a DPhil in Education Candidate and uses Mandarin to conduct her research in the Chinese higher education context.

Arzhia’s research focuses on ‘expressions’ of global or world citizenship education in a Chinese higher education institution In the study, she explores the perspectives and practices of educators and students at a China-based university, which experiments with discourses related to citizenship. She further investigates how individual, local, national and global dynamics and the surrounding discourses influence worldviews and practices in a university setting.

As empirical studies on global or world citizenship education in the Chinese context are scarce, Arzhia hopes to contribute to a nascent knowledge base which may extend and add depth to the critical global discourses of global and world citizenship education, beyond Eurocentric framings.

Prior to her studies at Oxford, Arzhia received a first class Bachelor’s degree in Contemporary Chinese Studies at The University of Nottingham, and a Master’s in International Communication in Taiwan at National Chengchi University. As a child, she also attended kindergarten in Fuzhou, Fujian province of China.

Olga is a co-convenor of the Philosophy of Education Reading Group at the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. Olga’s main research interest is in the topics of epistemic injustice across all levels of education and across national borders with a focus on higher education and the process of knowledge production in academic institutes and universities. Her core interest lies between the areas of social epistemology, research on research (RoR) and comparative and international education (CIE). She has been a recipient of multiple research awards in the United States and the United Kingdom and is an elected co-convenor of the Comparative and International Education Special Interest Group at the British Educational Research Association (BERA).

Her new research at Oxford will explore the epistemically just and unjust practices as experienced by scholars from Kazakhstan during the internationalisation process in the social sciences and the humanities. Prior joining Oxford, Olga taught at University College London Institute of Education in London on the topics of migrant, refugee and minority education and European education traditions from a comparative lens.

Publications
  • Mun, O. (2020). ‘Epistemic Injustices in Internationalising Humanities and Social Sciences: A Case Study of Higher Education and Science Institutes in Kazakhstan.’ Centre for International Higher Education, Boston College. https://www.bc.edu/content/dam/bc1/schools/lsoe/sites/cihe/publication/Perspectives/Perspectives%20No%2018.pdf
  • Mun, O. and Gafu, G. (in press) ‘University Research Capacity in Kazakhstan’. Higher School of Economics, Russia.
  • Kandiko Howson, C., Mun, O. and Walker, R. (2020). ‘Academic Activism in STEM fields: Discipline in Theory and Practice.’ Philosophy and Theory of Higher Education Society.
  • Aizuddin M., Habibi A., Mun, O. (in press, 2020). ‘Post-Colonialism in Comparative and International Education.’ In Jules, T., Shields, R., Thomas, M. (Ed.), Bloomsbury Handbook of Theory in Comparative and International Education.
  • Palandjian, G., Silova, I., Mun, O., Zholdashaliyeva, R. (2018). ‘Gender and Nation in Postsocialist Educational Transformations.’ In Silova, I., & Chankseliani, M. (Eds.), Comparing Post-Socialist Transformations: Education in Eastern Europe and Former Soviet Union. Oxford: Symposium Books.
  • Mun, O., & Zholdashaliyeva, R. (2017). ‘Alippe, Bukvar’ and Gender: A comparative analysis of early literacy textbooks in Kazakhstan and Kyrgyzstan.’ In E. Brown & R. Craven & G. McLean (Ed.), International Advances in Education: Global Initiatives for Equity and Social Justice Series. Information Age Publishing
  • Patel, K. and Mun, O. (2017). ‘Marketing ‘development’ in the neoliberal university.’ DPU Working Papers https://www.ucl.ac.uk/bartlett/development/case-studies/2017/sep/marketing-development-neoliberal-university
  • Fimyar, O., Saniyazova, A. & Mun, O. (2017) ‘Methodology of Collaborative Research: Or, Searching for a Synergy in the Study of Student Transition in Kazakhstan.’ In SAGE Research Methods Cases. London, United Kingdom: SAGE Publications.
  • Mun, O. (2015). ‘(Re)imagining national identity through early literacy textbooks in Kazakhstan’, Forum of Young Central Asian Experts, 2nd edition. http://caa-network.org/archives/5620
  • Silova, I., Mead Yaqub, M., Mun, O., Palandjian, G. (2014). ‘Pedagogies of Space: (re)imagining nation and childhood in post-Soviet states.’ Global Studies of Childhood, 4(3), 195-209.
  • Silova, I., Brezhenyuk, V., Kudasova, M., Mun, O., Artemev, N. (2014). ‘Youth Protests against Privatisation of Education in post-Soviet states.’ European Education, 46(3), 56-65.

Schooled in the discipline of Public Administration at the University of Dhaka and with an experience of over five years of lecturing graduate and post-graduate students at two reputed public universities in Bangladesh, I am interested in research works related to education, gender, public policy, social studies and have multiple publications.

Apart from my current lecturing position, I worked as a news editor and contributor for the Dhaka Insider, an online news portal, in 2015. I also served as the Head of the Department (Department of Public Administration) and Assistant Proctor at the Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujibur Rahman Science and Technology University (BSMRSTU) and as an elected member of the Teachers’ Association there. During my post-graduation (MA. Public Policy) at the University of Nottingham, a qualitative research focus helped me characterize patterns of gender gap in primary education access.

 

Selected Publications
  • Dutta,  P.  (2020).  Democratic  Decentralization  and  Participatory Development:  Focus  on  Bangladesh.  Journal  of    Contemporary  Governance  and  Public Policy, 1(2), 82-91. Permalink/DOI: https://doi.org/10.46507/jcgpp.v1i2
  • Dutta, P., 2021. • Towards Sound Integrity Management in Bangladesh: Challenges and Issues in Public Administration and Law Enforcement. In: S. N. Khanom, ed. Governance, In the 21st Century in the Sounth Asia: Challenges and Ways Forward. Dhaka: Hakkani Publishers, pp. 541-560.

Zhuohan (Johanne) has a BA in English from Dalian Maritime University, China, and has won China National Scholarship. She then graduated with a Distinction in MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from University of Oxford. Before her DPhil, Zhuohan worked for the organizing committee for the Harvard Summit for Young Leaders in China, an initiative that brought liberal arts education from Harvard to China’s top-performing high school students. She also helped evaluate the UNICEF China Child-Friendly School Programme as an RA, focusing on the socio-emotional learning among the Dong ethnic minority groups in Guangxi, China. She also teaches IELTS, TOEFL, and English phonics.

Her MSc research centres on linguistic relativity, specifically the effect of French grammatical gender system on both French speakers’ and learners’ perception of objects. Her DPhil research focuses on English pronunciation teaching and learning among young Chinese kids, particularly emphasising the influence of their mother tongue, Mandarin.

Supervisors

Robert Woore and Faidra Faitaki

Shuo-Fang earned a Bachelor’s degree from National Chengchi University (Taiwan) and a Master’s degree from Boston University. He has teaching experience in various EFL contexts including international high school, educational institute, and graduate language program.

Shuo-Fang’s areas of interest lie in applied linguistics, particularly phonetics/phonology and speech perception. As an Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholar, Shuo-Fang is currently undertaking his doctoral research, supervised by Dr Elizabeth Wonnacott and Dr Robert Woore. His doctoral project is mostly experimental and explores second language learners’ difficulty in processing English connected speech.

Shuo-Fang is affiliated with two research groups: Applied Linguistics and Wonnacott-Nation Lab (developmental cognitive psychology).

Publications

Liang, S., & Yu, H. (2021). Chinese students’ willingness to communicate in EFL classrooms: A case study of students at a Sino-foreign university. Professional and Academic English, 28(2), 15–33.

Siyu Ma is a DPhil student in child development and learning at the Department of Education. Her doctoral research focuses on second-born children under the Chinese two-child policy, especially how siblings play a role in the socio-emotional, language, and early literacy development of these children.

Prior to starting her Dphil, Siyu completed an MSc in Education (Research Design and Methodology) at the University of Oxford, under the supervision of Professor Sonali Nag. Her MSc dissertation explored the roles of social background and home literacy environment in the language and literacy development of a Wales subsample from the Millennium Cohort Study and was awarded a High Distinction. She also holds a BSc degree with first-class honours in Psychology from the University of Bath.

Siyu is also a research associate working on TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education.

At TalkTogether, Siyu is responsible for designing online surveys and analysing quantitative data from child assessments and parent reports.

Publications

Ma, S. (2021). Family background and home literacy environment as predictors of the early literacy development of children in Wales – findings from the Millennium Cohort Study (Master’s thesis, University of Oxford).

 

Amanda is the recipient of the Hazel Project Scholarship, based at the Rees Centre. Her doctoral research explores the conceptualisation of foster homes as therapeutic environments for complex/developmental trauma. Through participant-generated photography and collaborative qualitative methods with young people currently in foster care placements, her research explores if young people’s concepts and perceptions of therapeutic environments coincide with or challenge existing theoretical models and popular practitioner perspectives.

Amanda holds a BA from the University of Leeds (UK) and an MPhil from the University of Oxford (UK).

Lawrence is a teacher of mathematics who is particularly interested in classroom pedagogy, and how research and education policies interact with the teaching that students experience on a daily basis.

He finds that looking outwards in education is valuable with there being much more that unites our classrooms than isolates them. He has been extremely fortunate to study education through an international lens in the US, and to work on the Global Teaching InSights initiative of the Organisation for Economic Development (OECD) where he led on its videos of teaching.

Publications

Global Teaching InSights: A video study of teaching, OECD, 2020

Antonin is currently Doctoral Teaching Fellow on the MSc in Comparative and International Education, teaching Foundations of Educational Research. Antonin is also a Research Assistant for the Centre for Global Higher Education on the ‘Research on Research: the research function and mission of higher education’ project.

Alongside his teaching and research roles, Antonin is completing a Doctoral study on the European Universities Initiative, the European Commission’s flagship higher education programme that seeks to set up European Universities through transnational university alliances.

Arzhia Habibi is a DPhil in Education Candidate and uses Mandarin to conduct her research in the Chinese higher education context.

Arzhia’s research focuses on ‘expressions’ of global or world citizenship education in a Chinese higher education institution In the study, she explores the perspectives and practices of educators and students at a China-based university, which experiments with discourses related to citizenship. She further investigates how individual, local, national and global dynamics and the surrounding discourses influence worldviews and practices in a university setting.

As empirical studies on global or world citizenship education in the Chinese context are scarce, Arzhia hopes to contribute to a nascent knowledge base which may extend and add depth to the critical global discourses of global and world citizenship education, beyond Eurocentric framings.

Prior to her studies at Oxford, Arzhia received a first class Bachelor’s degree in Contemporary Chinese Studies at The University of Nottingham, and a Master’s in International Communication in Taiwan at National Chengchi University. As a child, she also attended kindergarten in Fuzhou, Fujian province of China.

Olga is a co-convenor of the Philosophy of Education Reading Group at the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. Olga’s main research interest is in the topics of epistemic injustice across all levels of education and across national borders with a focus on higher education and the process of knowledge production in academic institutes and universities. Her core interest lies between the areas of social epistemology, research on research (RoR) and comparative and international education (CIE). She has been a recipient of multiple research awards in the United States and the United Kingdom and is an elected co-convenor of the Comparative and International Education Special Interest Group at the British Educational Research Association (BERA).

Her new research at Oxford will explore the epistemically just and unjust practices as experienced by scholars from Kazakhstan during the internationalisation process in the social sciences and the humanities. Prior joining Oxford, Olga taught at University College London Institute of Education in London on the topics of migrant, refugee and minority education and European education traditions from a comparative lens.

Publications
  • Mun, O. (2020). ‘Epistemic Injustices in Internationalising Humanities and Social Sciences: A Case Study of Higher Education and Science Institutes in Kazakhstan.’ Centre for International Higher Education, Boston College. https://www.bc.edu/content/dam/bc1/schools/lsoe/sites/cihe/publication/Perspectives/Perspectives%20No%2018.pdf
  • Mun, O. and Gafu, G. (in press) ‘University Research Capacity in Kazakhstan’. Higher School of Economics, Russia.
  • Kandiko Howson, C., Mun, O. and Walker, R. (2020). ‘Academic Activism in STEM fields: Discipline in Theory and Practice.’ Philosophy and Theory of Higher Education Society.
  • Aizuddin M., Habibi A., Mun, O. (in press, 2020). ‘Post-Colonialism in Comparative and International Education.’ In Jules, T., Shields, R., Thomas, M. (Ed.), Bloomsbury Handbook of Theory in Comparative and International Education.
  • Palandjian, G., Silova, I., Mun, O., Zholdashaliyeva, R. (2018). ‘Gender and Nation in Postsocialist Educational Transformations.’ In Silova, I., & Chankseliani, M. (Eds.), Comparing Post-Socialist Transformations: Education in Eastern Europe and Former Soviet Union. Oxford: Symposium Books.
  • Mun, O., & Zholdashaliyeva, R. (2017). ‘Alippe, Bukvar’ and Gender: A comparative analysis of early literacy textbooks in Kazakhstan and Kyrgyzstan.’ In E. Brown & R. Craven & G. McLean (Ed.), International Advances in Education: Global Initiatives for Equity and Social Justice Series. Information Age Publishing
  • Patel, K. and Mun, O. (2017). ‘Marketing ‘development’ in the neoliberal university.’ DPU Working Papers https://www.ucl.ac.uk/bartlett/development/case-studies/2017/sep/marketing-development-neoliberal-university
  • Fimyar, O., Saniyazova, A. & Mun, O. (2017) ‘Methodology of Collaborative Research: Or, Searching for a Synergy in the Study of Student Transition in Kazakhstan.’ In SAGE Research Methods Cases. London, United Kingdom: SAGE Publications.
  • Mun, O. (2015). ‘(Re)imagining national identity through early literacy textbooks in Kazakhstan’, Forum of Young Central Asian Experts, 2nd edition. http://caa-network.org/archives/5620
  • Silova, I., Mead Yaqub, M., Mun, O., Palandjian, G. (2014). ‘Pedagogies of Space: (re)imagining nation and childhood in post-Soviet states.’ Global Studies of Childhood, 4(3), 195-209.
  • Silova, I., Brezhenyuk, V., Kudasova, M., Mun, O., Artemev, N. (2014). ‘Youth Protests against Privatisation of Education in post-Soviet states.’ European Education, 46(3), 56-65.

Schooled in the discipline of Public Administration at the University of Dhaka and with an experience of over five years of lecturing graduate and post-graduate students at two reputed public universities in Bangladesh, I am interested in research works related to education, gender, public policy, social studies and have multiple publications.

Apart from my current lecturing position, I worked as a news editor and contributor for the Dhaka Insider, an online news portal, in 2015. I also served as the Head of the Department (Department of Public Administration) and Assistant Proctor at the Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujibur Rahman Science and Technology University (BSMRSTU) and as an elected member of the Teachers’ Association there. During my post-graduation (MA. Public Policy) at the University of Nottingham, a qualitative research focus helped me characterize patterns of gender gap in primary education access.

 

Selected Publications
  • Dutta,  P.  (2020).  Democratic  Decentralization  and  Participatory Development:  Focus  on  Bangladesh.  Journal  of    Contemporary  Governance  and  Public Policy, 1(2), 82-91. Permalink/DOI: https://doi.org/10.46507/jcgpp.v1i2
  • Dutta, P., 2021. • Towards Sound Integrity Management in Bangladesh: Challenges and Issues in Public Administration and Law Enforcement. In: S. N. Khanom, ed. Governance, In the 21st Century in the Sounth Asia: Challenges and Ways Forward. Dhaka: Hakkani Publishers, pp. 541-560.

Zhuohan (Johanne) has a BA in English from Dalian Maritime University, China, and has won China National Scholarship. She then graduated with a Distinction in MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from University of Oxford. Before her DPhil, Zhuohan worked for the organizing committee for the Harvard Summit for Young Leaders in China, an initiative that brought liberal arts education from Harvard to China’s top-performing high school students. She also helped evaluate the UNICEF China Child-Friendly School Programme as an RA, focusing on the socio-emotional learning among the Dong ethnic minority groups in Guangxi, China. She also teaches IELTS, TOEFL, and English phonics.

Her MSc research centres on linguistic relativity, specifically the effect of French grammatical gender system on both French speakers’ and learners’ perception of objects. Her DPhil research focuses on English pronunciation teaching and learning among young Chinese kids, particularly emphasising the influence of their mother tongue, Mandarin.

Supervisors

Robert Woore and Faidra Faitaki

Shuo-Fang earned a Bachelor’s degree from National Chengchi University (Taiwan) and a Master’s degree from Boston University. He has teaching experience in various EFL contexts including international high school, educational institute, and graduate language program.

Shuo-Fang’s areas of interest lie in applied linguistics, particularly phonetics/phonology and speech perception. As an Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholar, Shuo-Fang is currently undertaking his doctoral research, supervised by Dr Elizabeth Wonnacott and Dr Robert Woore. His doctoral project is mostly experimental and explores second language learners’ difficulty in processing English connected speech.

Shuo-Fang is affiliated with two research groups: Applied Linguistics and Wonnacott-Nation Lab (developmental cognitive psychology).

Publications

Liang, S., & Yu, H. (2021). Chinese students’ willingness to communicate in EFL classrooms: A case study of students at a Sino-foreign university. Professional and Academic English, 28(2), 15–33.

Siyu Ma is a DPhil student in child development and learning at the Department of Education. Her doctoral research focuses on second-born children under the Chinese two-child policy, especially how siblings play a role in the socio-emotional, language, and early literacy development of these children.

Prior to starting her Dphil, Siyu completed an MSc in Education (Research Design and Methodology) at the University of Oxford, under the supervision of Professor Sonali Nag. Her MSc dissertation explored the roles of social background and home literacy environment in the language and literacy development of a Wales subsample from the Millennium Cohort Study and was awarded a High Distinction. She also holds a BSc degree with first-class honours in Psychology from the University of Bath.

Siyu is also a research associate working on TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education.

At TalkTogether, Siyu is responsible for designing online surveys and analysing quantitative data from child assessments and parent reports.

Publications

Ma, S. (2021). Family background and home literacy environment as predictors of the early literacy development of children in Wales – findings from the Millennium Cohort Study (Master’s thesis, University of Oxford).

 

Amanda is the recipient of the Hazel Project Scholarship, based at the Rees Centre. Her doctoral research explores the conceptualisation of foster homes as therapeutic environments for complex/developmental trauma. Through participant-generated photography and collaborative qualitative methods with young people currently in foster care placements, her research explores if young people’s concepts and perceptions of therapeutic environments coincide with or challenge existing theoretical models and popular practitioner perspectives.

Amanda holds a BA from the University of Leeds (UK) and an MPhil from the University of Oxford (UK).

Lawrence is a teacher of mathematics who is particularly interested in classroom pedagogy, and how research and education policies interact with the teaching that students experience on a daily basis.

He finds that looking outwards in education is valuable with there being much more that unites our classrooms than isolates them. He has been extremely fortunate to study education through an international lens in the US, and to work on the Global Teaching InSights initiative of the Organisation for Economic Development (OECD) where he led on its videos of teaching.

Publications

Global Teaching InSights: A video study of teaching, OECD, 2020

Antonin is currently Doctoral Teaching Fellow on the MSc in Comparative and International Education, teaching Foundations of Educational Research. Antonin is also a Research Assistant for the Centre for Global Higher Education on the ‘Research on Research: the research function and mission of higher education’ project.

Alongside his teaching and research roles, Antonin is completing a Doctoral study on the European Universities Initiative, the European Commission’s flagship higher education programme that seeks to set up European Universities through transnational university alliances.

Arzhia Habibi is a DPhil in Education Candidate and uses Mandarin to conduct her research in the Chinese higher education context.

Arzhia’s research focuses on ‘expressions’ of global or world citizenship education in a Chinese higher education institution In the study, she explores the perspectives and practices of educators and students at a China-based university, which experiments with discourses related to citizenship. She further investigates how individual, local, national and global dynamics and the surrounding discourses influence worldviews and practices in a university setting.

As empirical studies on global or world citizenship education in the Chinese context are scarce, Arzhia hopes to contribute to a nascent knowledge base which may extend and add depth to the critical global discourses of global and world citizenship education, beyond Eurocentric framings.

Prior to her studies at Oxford, Arzhia received a first class Bachelor’s degree in Contemporary Chinese Studies at The University of Nottingham, and a Master’s in International Communication in Taiwan at National Chengchi University. As a child, she also attended kindergarten in Fuzhou, Fujian province of China.

Olga is a co-convenor of the Philosophy of Education Reading Group at the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. Olga’s main research interest is in the topics of epistemic injustice across all levels of education and across national borders with a focus on higher education and the process of knowledge production in academic institutes and universities. Her core interest lies between the areas of social epistemology, research on research (RoR) and comparative and international education (CIE). She has been a recipient of multiple research awards in the United States and the United Kingdom and is an elected co-convenor of the Comparative and International Education Special Interest Group at the British Educational Research Association (BERA).

Her new research at Oxford will explore the epistemically just and unjust practices as experienced by scholars from Kazakhstan during the internationalisation process in the social sciences and the humanities. Prior joining Oxford, Olga taught at University College London Institute of Education in London on the topics of migrant, refugee and minority education and European education traditions from a comparative lens.

Publications
  • Mun, O. (2020). ‘Epistemic Injustices in Internationalising Humanities and Social Sciences: A Case Study of Higher Education and Science Institutes in Kazakhstan.’ Centre for International Higher Education, Boston College. https://www.bc.edu/content/dam/bc1/schools/lsoe/sites/cihe/publication/Perspectives/Perspectives%20No%2018.pdf
  • Mun, O. and Gafu, G. (in press) ‘University Research Capacity in Kazakhstan’. Higher School of Economics, Russia.
  • Kandiko Howson, C., Mun, O. and Walker, R. (2020). ‘Academic Activism in STEM fields: Discipline in Theory and Practice.’ Philosophy and Theory of Higher Education Society.
  • Aizuddin M., Habibi A., Mun, O. (in press, 2020). ‘Post-Colonialism in Comparative and International Education.’ In Jules, T., Shields, R., Thomas, M. (Ed.), Bloomsbury Handbook of Theory in Comparative and International Education.
  • Palandjian, G., Silova, I., Mun, O., Zholdashaliyeva, R. (2018). ‘Gender and Nation in Postsocialist Educational Transformations.’ In Silova, I., & Chankseliani, M. (Eds.), Comparing Post-Socialist Transformations: Education in Eastern Europe and Former Soviet Union. Oxford: Symposium Books.
  • Mun, O., & Zholdashaliyeva, R. (2017). ‘Alippe, Bukvar’ and Gender: A comparative analysis of early literacy textbooks in Kazakhstan and Kyrgyzstan.’ In E. Brown & R. Craven & G. McLean (Ed.), International Advances in Education: Global Initiatives for Equity and Social Justice Series. Information Age Publishing
  • Patel, K. and Mun, O. (2017). ‘Marketing ‘development’ in the neoliberal university.’ DPU Working Papers https://www.ucl.ac.uk/bartlett/development/case-studies/2017/sep/marketing-development-neoliberal-university
  • Fimyar, O., Saniyazova, A. & Mun, O. (2017) ‘Methodology of Collaborative Research: Or, Searching for a Synergy in the Study of Student Transition in Kazakhstan.’ In SAGE Research Methods Cases. London, United Kingdom: SAGE Publications.
  • Mun, O. (2015). ‘(Re)imagining national identity through early literacy textbooks in Kazakhstan’, Forum of Young Central Asian Experts, 2nd edition. http://caa-network.org/archives/5620
  • Silova, I., Mead Yaqub, M., Mun, O., Palandjian, G. (2014). ‘Pedagogies of Space: (re)imagining nation and childhood in post-Soviet states.’ Global Studies of Childhood, 4(3), 195-209.
  • Silova, I., Brezhenyuk, V., Kudasova, M., Mun, O., Artemev, N. (2014). ‘Youth Protests against Privatisation of Education in post-Soviet states.’ European Education, 46(3), 56-65.

Schooled in the discipline of Public Administration at the University of Dhaka and with an experience of over five years of lecturing graduate and post-graduate students at two reputed public universities in Bangladesh, I am interested in research works related to education, gender, public policy, social studies and have multiple publications.

Apart from my current lecturing position, I worked as a news editor and contributor for the Dhaka Insider, an online news portal, in 2015. I also served as the Head of the Department (Department of Public Administration) and Assistant Proctor at the Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujibur Rahman Science and Technology University (BSMRSTU) and as an elected member of the Teachers’ Association there. During my post-graduation (MA. Public Policy) at the University of Nottingham, a qualitative research focus helped me characterize patterns of gender gap in primary education access.

 

Selected Publications
  • Dutta,  P.  (2020).  Democratic  Decentralization  and  Participatory Development:  Focus  on  Bangladesh.  Journal  of    Contemporary  Governance  and  Public Policy, 1(2), 82-91. Permalink/DOI: https://doi.org/10.46507/jcgpp.v1i2
  • Dutta, P., 2021. • Towards Sound Integrity Management in Bangladesh: Challenges and Issues in Public Administration and Law Enforcement. In: S. N. Khanom, ed. Governance, In the 21st Century in the Sounth Asia: Challenges and Ways Forward. Dhaka: Hakkani Publishers, pp. 541-560.

Zhuohan (Johanne) has a BA in English from Dalian Maritime University, China, and has won China National Scholarship. She then graduated with a Distinction in MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from University of Oxford. Before her DPhil, Zhuohan worked for the organizing committee for the Harvard Summit for Young Leaders in China, an initiative that brought liberal arts education from Harvard to China’s top-performing high school students. She also helped evaluate the UNICEF China Child-Friendly School Programme as an RA, focusing on the socio-emotional learning among the Dong ethnic minority groups in Guangxi, China. She also teaches IELTS, TOEFL, and English phonics.

Her MSc research centres on linguistic relativity, specifically the effect of French grammatical gender system on both French speakers’ and learners’ perception of objects. Her DPhil research focuses on English pronunciation teaching and learning among young Chinese kids, particularly emphasising the influence of their mother tongue, Mandarin.

Supervisors

Robert Woore and Faidra Faitaki

Shuo-Fang earned a Bachelor’s degree from National Chengchi University (Taiwan) and a Master’s degree from Boston University. He has teaching experience in various EFL contexts including international high school, educational institute, and graduate language program.

Shuo-Fang’s areas of interest lie in applied linguistics, particularly phonetics/phonology and speech perception. As an Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholar, Shuo-Fang is currently undertaking his doctoral research, supervised by Dr Elizabeth Wonnacott and Dr Robert Woore. His doctoral project is mostly experimental and explores second language learners’ difficulty in processing English connected speech.

Shuo-Fang is affiliated with two research groups: Applied Linguistics and Wonnacott-Nation Lab (developmental cognitive psychology).

Publications

Liang, S., & Yu, H. (2021). Chinese students’ willingness to communicate in EFL classrooms: A case study of students at a Sino-foreign university. Professional and Academic English, 28(2), 15–33.

Siyu Ma is a DPhil student in child development and learning at the Department of Education. Her doctoral research focuses on second-born children under the Chinese two-child policy, especially how siblings play a role in the socio-emotional, language, and early literacy development of these children.

Prior to starting her Dphil, Siyu completed an MSc in Education (Research Design and Methodology) at the University of Oxford, under the supervision of Professor Sonali Nag. Her MSc dissertation explored the roles of social background and home literacy environment in the language and literacy development of a Wales subsample from the Millennium Cohort Study and was awarded a High Distinction. She also holds a BSc degree with first-class honours in Psychology from the University of Bath.

Siyu is also a research associate working on TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education.

At TalkTogether, Siyu is responsible for designing online surveys and analysing quantitative data from child assessments and parent reports.

Publications

Ma, S. (2021). Family background and home literacy environment as predictors of the early literacy development of children in Wales – findings from the Millennium Cohort Study (Master’s thesis, University of Oxford).

 

Amanda is the recipient of the Hazel Project Scholarship, based at the Rees Centre. Her doctoral research explores the conceptualisation of foster homes as therapeutic environments for complex/developmental trauma. Through participant-generated photography and collaborative qualitative methods with young people currently in foster care placements, her research explores if young people’s concepts and perceptions of therapeutic environments coincide with or challenge existing theoretical models and popular practitioner perspectives.

Amanda holds a BA from the University of Leeds (UK) and an MPhil from the University of Oxford (UK).

Lawrence is a teacher of mathematics who is particularly interested in classroom pedagogy, and how research and education policies interact with the teaching that students experience on a daily basis.

He finds that looking outwards in education is valuable with there being much more that unites our classrooms than isolates them. He has been extremely fortunate to study education through an international lens in the US, and to work on the Global Teaching InSights initiative of the Organisation for Economic Development (OECD) where he led on its videos of teaching.

Publications

Global Teaching InSights: A video study of teaching, OECD, 2020

Antonin is currently Doctoral Teaching Fellow on the MSc in Comparative and International Education, teaching Foundations of Educational Research. Antonin is also a Research Assistant for the Centre for Global Higher Education on the ‘Research on Research: the research function and mission of higher education’ project.

Alongside his teaching and research roles, Antonin is completing a Doctoral study on the European Universities Initiative, the European Commission’s flagship higher education programme that seeks to set up European Universities through transnational university alliances.

Arzhia Habibi is a DPhil in Education Candidate and uses Mandarin to conduct her research in the Chinese higher education context.

Arzhia’s research focuses on ‘expressions’ of global or world citizenship education in a Chinese higher education institution In the study, she explores the perspectives and practices of educators and students at a China-based university, which experiments with discourses related to citizenship. She further investigates how individual, local, national and global dynamics and the surrounding discourses influence worldviews and practices in a university setting.

As empirical studies on global or world citizenship education in the Chinese context are scarce, Arzhia hopes to contribute to a nascent knowledge base which may extend and add depth to the critical global discourses of global and world citizenship education, beyond Eurocentric framings.

Prior to her studies at Oxford, Arzhia received a first class Bachelor’s degree in Contemporary Chinese Studies at The University of Nottingham, and a Master’s in International Communication in Taiwan at National Chengchi University. As a child, she also attended kindergarten in Fuzhou, Fujian province of China.

Olga is a co-convenor of the Philosophy of Education Reading Group at the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. Olga’s main research interest is in the topics of epistemic injustice across all levels of education and across national borders with a focus on higher education and the process of knowledge production in academic institutes and universities. Her core interest lies between the areas of social epistemology, research on research (RoR) and comparative and international education (CIE). She has been a recipient of multiple research awards in the United States and the United Kingdom and is an elected co-convenor of the Comparative and International Education Special Interest Group at the British Educational Research Association (BERA).

Her new research at Oxford will explore the epistemically just and unjust practices as experienced by scholars from Kazakhstan during the internationalisation process in the social sciences and the humanities. Prior joining Oxford, Olga taught at University College London Institute of Education in London on the topics of migrant, refugee and minority education and European education traditions from a comparative lens.

Publications
  • Mun, O. (2020). ‘Epistemic Injustices in Internationalising Humanities and Social Sciences: A Case Study of Higher Education and Science Institutes in Kazakhstan.’ Centre for International Higher Education, Boston College. https://www.bc.edu/content/dam/bc1/schools/lsoe/sites/cihe/publication/Perspectives/Perspectives%20No%2018.pdf
  • Mun, O. and Gafu, G. (in press) ‘University Research Capacity in Kazakhstan’. Higher School of Economics, Russia.
  • Kandiko Howson, C., Mun, O. and Walker, R. (2020). ‘Academic Activism in STEM fields: Discipline in Theory and Practice.’ Philosophy and Theory of Higher Education Society.
  • Aizuddin M., Habibi A., Mun, O. (in press, 2020). ‘Post-Colonialism in Comparative and International Education.’ In Jules, T., Shields, R., Thomas, M. (Ed.), Bloomsbury Handbook of Theory in Comparative and International Education.
  • Palandjian, G., Silova, I., Mun, O., Zholdashaliyeva, R. (2018). ‘Gender and Nation in Postsocialist Educational Transformations.’ In Silova, I., & Chankseliani, M. (Eds.), Comparing Post-Socialist Transformations: Education in Eastern Europe and Former Soviet Union. Oxford: Symposium Books.
  • Mun, O., & Zholdashaliyeva, R. (2017). ‘Alippe, Bukvar’ and Gender: A comparative analysis of early literacy textbooks in Kazakhstan and Kyrgyzstan.’ In E. Brown & R. Craven & G. McLean (Ed.), International Advances in Education: Global Initiatives for Equity and Social Justice Series. Information Age Publishing
  • Patel, K. and Mun, O. (2017). ‘Marketing ‘development’ in the neoliberal university.’ DPU Working Papers https://www.ucl.ac.uk/bartlett/development/case-studies/2017/sep/marketing-development-neoliberal-university
  • Fimyar, O., Saniyazova, A. & Mun, O. (2017) ‘Methodology of Collaborative Research: Or, Searching for a Synergy in the Study of Student Transition in Kazakhstan.’ In SAGE Research Methods Cases. London, United Kingdom: SAGE Publications.
  • Mun, O. (2015). ‘(Re)imagining national identity through early literacy textbooks in Kazakhstan’, Forum of Young Central Asian Experts, 2nd edition. http://caa-network.org/archives/5620
  • Silova, I., Mead Yaqub, M., Mun, O., Palandjian, G. (2014). ‘Pedagogies of Space: (re)imagining nation and childhood in post-Soviet states.’ Global Studies of Childhood, 4(3), 195-209.
  • Silova, I., Brezhenyuk, V., Kudasova, M., Mun, O., Artemev, N. (2014). ‘Youth Protests against Privatisation of Education in post-Soviet states.’ European Education, 46(3), 56-65.

Schooled in the discipline of Public Administration at the University of Dhaka and with an experience of over five years of lecturing graduate and post-graduate students at two reputed public universities in Bangladesh, I am interested in research works related to education, gender, public policy, social studies and have multiple publications.

Apart from my current lecturing position, I worked as a news editor and contributor for the Dhaka Insider, an online news portal, in 2015. I also served as the Head of the Department (Department of Public Administration) and Assistant Proctor at the Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujibur Rahman Science and Technology University (BSMRSTU) and as an elected member of the Teachers’ Association there. During my post-graduation (MA. Public Policy) at the University of Nottingham, a qualitative research focus helped me characterize patterns of gender gap in primary education access.

 

Selected Publications
  • Dutta,  P.  (2020).  Democratic  Decentralization  and  Participatory Development:  Focus  on  Bangladesh.  Journal  of    Contemporary  Governance  and  Public Policy, 1(2), 82-91. Permalink/DOI: https://doi.org/10.46507/jcgpp.v1i2
  • Dutta, P., 2021. • Towards Sound Integrity Management in Bangladesh: Challenges and Issues in Public Administration and Law Enforcement. In: S. N. Khanom, ed. Governance, In the 21st Century in the Sounth Asia: Challenges and Ways Forward. Dhaka: Hakkani Publishers, pp. 541-560.

Zhuohan (Johanne) has a BA in English from Dalian Maritime University, China, and has won China National Scholarship. She then graduated with a Distinction in MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from University of Oxford. Before her DPhil, Zhuohan worked for the organizing committee for the Harvard Summit for Young Leaders in China, an initiative that brought liberal arts education from Harvard to China’s top-performing high school students. She also helped evaluate the UNICEF China Child-Friendly School Programme as an RA, focusing on the socio-emotional learning among the Dong ethnic minority groups in Guangxi, China. She also teaches IELTS, TOEFL, and English phonics.

Her MSc research centres on linguistic relativity, specifically the effect of French grammatical gender system on both French speakers’ and learners’ perception of objects. Her DPhil research focuses on English pronunciation teaching and learning among young Chinese kids, particularly emphasising the influence of their mother tongue, Mandarin.

Supervisors

Robert Woore and Faidra Faitaki

Shuo-Fang earned a Bachelor’s degree from National Chengchi University (Taiwan) and a Master’s degree from Boston University. He has teaching experience in various EFL contexts including international high school, educational institute, and graduate language program.

Shuo-Fang’s areas of interest lie in applied linguistics, particularly phonetics/phonology and speech perception. As an Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholar, Shuo-Fang is currently undertaking his doctoral research, supervised by Dr Elizabeth Wonnacott and Dr Robert Woore. His doctoral project is mostly experimental and explores second language learners’ difficulty in processing English connected speech.

Shuo-Fang is affiliated with two research groups: Applied Linguistics and Wonnacott-Nation Lab (developmental cognitive psychology).

Publications

Liang, S., & Yu, H. (2021). Chinese students’ willingness to communicate in EFL classrooms: A case study of students at a Sino-foreign university. Professional and Academic English, 28(2), 15–33.

Siyu Ma is a DPhil student in child development and learning at the Department of Education. Her doctoral research focuses on second-born children under the Chinese two-child policy, especially how siblings play a role in the socio-emotional, language, and early literacy development of these children.

Prior to starting her Dphil, Siyu completed an MSc in Education (Research Design and Methodology) at the University of Oxford, under the supervision of Professor Sonali Nag. Her MSc dissertation explored the roles of social background and home literacy environment in the language and literacy development of a Wales subsample from the Millennium Cohort Study and was awarded a High Distinction. She also holds a BSc degree with first-class honours in Psychology from the University of Bath.

Siyu is also a research associate working on TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education.

At TalkTogether, Siyu is responsible for designing online surveys and analysing quantitative data from child assessments and parent reports.

Publications

Ma, S. (2021). Family background and home literacy environment as predictors of the early literacy development of children in Wales – findings from the Millennium Cohort Study (Master’s thesis, University of Oxford).

 

Amanda is the recipient of the Hazel Project Scholarship, based at the Rees Centre. Her doctoral research explores the conceptualisation of foster homes as therapeutic environments for complex/developmental trauma. Through participant-generated photography and collaborative qualitative methods with young people currently in foster care placements, her research explores if young people’s concepts and perceptions of therapeutic environments coincide with or challenge existing theoretical models and popular practitioner perspectives.

Amanda holds a BA from the University of Leeds (UK) and an MPhil from the University of Oxford (UK).

Lawrence is a teacher of mathematics who is particularly interested in classroom pedagogy, and how research and education policies interact with the teaching that students experience on a daily basis.

He finds that looking outwards in education is valuable with there being much more that unites our classrooms than isolates them. He has been extremely fortunate to study education through an international lens in the US, and to work on the Global Teaching InSights initiative of the Organisation for Economic Development (OECD) where he led on its videos of teaching.

Publications

Global Teaching InSights: A video study of teaching, OECD, 2020

Antonin is currently Doctoral Teaching Fellow on the MSc in Comparative and International Education, teaching Foundations of Educational Research. Antonin is also a Research Assistant for the Centre for Global Higher Education on the ‘Research on Research: the research function and mission of higher education’ project.

Alongside his teaching and research roles, Antonin is completing a Doctoral study on the European Universities Initiative, the European Commission’s flagship higher education programme that seeks to set up European Universities through transnational university alliances.

Arzhia Habibi is a DPhil in Education Candidate and uses Mandarin to conduct her research in the Chinese higher education context.

Arzhia’s research focuses on ‘expressions’ of global or world citizenship education in a Chinese higher education institution In the study, she explores the perspectives and practices of educators and students at a China-based university, which experiments with discourses related to citizenship. She further investigates how individual, local, national and global dynamics and the surrounding discourses influence worldviews and practices in a university setting.

As empirical studies on global or world citizenship education in the Chinese context are scarce, Arzhia hopes to contribute to a nascent knowledge base which may extend and add depth to the critical global discourses of global and world citizenship education, beyond Eurocentric framings.

Prior to her studies at Oxford, Arzhia received a first class Bachelor’s degree in Contemporary Chinese Studies at The University of Nottingham, and a Master’s in International Communication in Taiwan at National Chengchi University. As a child, she also attended kindergarten in Fuzhou, Fujian province of China.

Olga is a co-convenor of the Philosophy of Education Reading Group at the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. Olga’s main research interest is in the topics of epistemic injustice across all levels of education and across national borders with a focus on higher education and the process of knowledge production in academic institutes and universities. Her core interest lies between the areas of social epistemology, research on research (RoR) and comparative and international education (CIE). She has been a recipient of multiple research awards in the United States and the United Kingdom and is an elected co-convenor of the Comparative and International Education Special Interest Group at the British Educational Research Association (BERA).

Her new research at Oxford will explore the epistemically just and unjust practices as experienced by scholars from Kazakhstan during the internationalisation process in the social sciences and the humanities. Prior joining Oxford, Olga taught at University College London Institute of Education in London on the topics of migrant, refugee and minority education and European education traditions from a comparative lens.

Publications
  • Mun, O. (2020). ‘Epistemic Injustices in Internationalising Humanities and Social Sciences: A Case Study of Higher Education and Science Institutes in Kazakhstan.’ Centre for International Higher Education, Boston College. https://www.bc.edu/content/dam/bc1/schools/lsoe/sites/cihe/publication/Perspectives/Perspectives%20No%2018.pdf
  • Mun, O. and Gafu, G. (in press) ‘University Research Capacity in Kazakhstan’. Higher School of Economics, Russia.
  • Kandiko Howson, C., Mun, O. and Walker, R. (2020). ‘Academic Activism in STEM fields: Discipline in Theory and Practice.’ Philosophy and Theory of Higher Education Society.
  • Aizuddin M., Habibi A., Mun, O. (in press, 2020). ‘Post-Colonialism in Comparative and International Education.’ In Jules, T., Shields, R., Thomas, M. (Ed.), Bloomsbury Handbook of Theory in Comparative and International Education.
  • Palandjian, G., Silova, I., Mun, O., Zholdashaliyeva, R. (2018). ‘Gender and Nation in Postsocialist Educational Transformations.’ In Silova, I., & Chankseliani, M. (Eds.), Comparing Post-Socialist Transformations: Education in Eastern Europe and Former Soviet Union. Oxford: Symposium Books.
  • Mun, O., & Zholdashaliyeva, R. (2017). ‘Alippe, Bukvar’ and Gender: A comparative analysis of early literacy textbooks in Kazakhstan and Kyrgyzstan.’ In E. Brown & R. Craven & G. McLean (Ed.), International Advances in Education: Global Initiatives for Equity and Social Justice Series. Information Age Publishing
  • Patel, K. and Mun, O. (2017). ‘Marketing ‘development’ in the neoliberal university.’ DPU Working Papers https://www.ucl.ac.uk/bartlett/development/case-studies/2017/sep/marketing-development-neoliberal-university
  • Fimyar, O., Saniyazova, A. & Mun, O. (2017) ‘Methodology of Collaborative Research: Or, Searching for a Synergy in the Study of Student Transition in Kazakhstan.’ In SAGE Research Methods Cases. London, United Kingdom: SAGE Publications.
  • Mun, O. (2015). ‘(Re)imagining national identity through early literacy textbooks in Kazakhstan’, Forum of Young Central Asian Experts, 2nd edition. http://caa-network.org/archives/5620
  • Silova, I., Mead Yaqub, M., Mun, O., Palandjian, G. (2014). ‘Pedagogies of Space: (re)imagining nation and childhood in post-Soviet states.’ Global Studies of Childhood, 4(3), 195-209.
  • Silova, I., Brezhenyuk, V., Kudasova, M., Mun, O., Artemev, N. (2014). ‘Youth Protests against Privatisation of Education in post-Soviet states.’ European Education, 46(3), 56-65.

Schooled in the discipline of Public Administration at the University of Dhaka and with an experience of over five years of lecturing graduate and post-graduate students at two reputed public universities in Bangladesh, I am interested in research works related to education, gender, public policy, social studies and have multiple publications.

Apart from my current lecturing position, I worked as a news editor and contributor for the Dhaka Insider, an online news portal, in 2015. I also served as the Head of the Department (Department of Public Administration) and Assistant Proctor at the Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujibur Rahman Science and Technology University (BSMRSTU) and as an elected member of the Teachers’ Association there. During my post-graduation (MA. Public Policy) at the University of Nottingham, a qualitative research focus helped me characterize patterns of gender gap in primary education access.

 

Selected Publications
  • Dutta,  P.  (2020).  Democratic  Decentralization  and  Participatory Development:  Focus  on  Bangladesh.  Journal  of    Contemporary  Governance  and  Public Policy, 1(2), 82-91. Permalink/DOI: https://doi.org/10.46507/jcgpp.v1i2
  • Dutta, P., 2021. • Towards Sound Integrity Management in Bangladesh: Challenges and Issues in Public Administration and Law Enforcement. In: S. N. Khanom, ed. Governance, In the 21st Century in the Sounth Asia: Challenges and Ways Forward. Dhaka: Hakkani Publishers, pp. 541-560.

Zhuohan (Johanne) has a BA in English from Dalian Maritime University, China, and has won China National Scholarship. She then graduated with a Distinction in MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from University of Oxford. Before her DPhil, Zhuohan worked for the organizing committee for the Harvard Summit for Young Leaders in China, an initiative that brought liberal arts education from Harvard to China’s top-performing high school students. She also helped evaluate the UNICEF China Child-Friendly School Programme as an RA, focusing on the socio-emotional learning among the Dong ethnic minority groups in Guangxi, China. She also teaches IELTS, TOEFL, and English phonics.

Her MSc research centres on linguistic relativity, specifically the effect of French grammatical gender system on both French speakers’ and learners’ perception of objects. Her DPhil research focuses on English pronunciation teaching and learning among young Chinese kids, particularly emphasising the influence of their mother tongue, Mandarin.

Supervisors

Robert Woore and Faidra Faitaki

Shuo-Fang earned a Bachelor’s degree from National Chengchi University (Taiwan) and a Master’s degree from Boston University. He has teaching experience in various EFL contexts including international high school, educational institute, and graduate language program.

Shuo-Fang’s areas of interest lie in applied linguistics, particularly phonetics/phonology and speech perception. As an Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholar, Shuo-Fang is currently undertaking his doctoral research, supervised by Dr Elizabeth Wonnacott and Dr Robert Woore. His doctoral project is mostly experimental and explores second language learners’ difficulty in processing English connected speech.

Shuo-Fang is affiliated with two research groups: Applied Linguistics and Wonnacott-Nation Lab (developmental cognitive psychology).

Publications

Liang, S., & Yu, H. (2021). Chinese students’ willingness to communicate in EFL classrooms: A case study of students at a Sino-foreign university. Professional and Academic English, 28(2), 15–33.

Siyu Ma is a DPhil student in child development and learning at the Department of Education. Her doctoral research focuses on second-born children under the Chinese two-child policy, especially how siblings play a role in the socio-emotional, language, and early literacy development of these children.

Prior to starting her Dphil, Siyu completed an MSc in Education (Research Design and Methodology) at the University of Oxford, under the supervision of Professor Sonali Nag. Her MSc dissertation explored the roles of social background and home literacy environment in the language and literacy development of a Wales subsample from the Millennium Cohort Study and was awarded a High Distinction. She also holds a BSc degree with first-class honours in Psychology from the University of Bath.

Siyu is also a research associate working on TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education.

At TalkTogether, Siyu is responsible for designing online surveys and analysing quantitative data from child assessments and parent reports.

Publications

Ma, S. (2021). Family background and home literacy environment as predictors of the early literacy development of children in Wales – findings from the Millennium Cohort Study (Master’s thesis, University of Oxford).

 

Amanda is the recipient of the Hazel Project Scholarship, based at the Rees Centre. Her doctoral research explores the conceptualisation of foster homes as therapeutic environments for complex/developmental trauma. Through participant-generated photography and collaborative qualitative methods with young people currently in foster care placements, her research explores if young people’s concepts and perceptions of therapeutic environments coincide with or challenge existing theoretical models and popular practitioner perspectives.

Amanda holds a BA from the University of Leeds (UK) and an MPhil from the University of Oxford (UK).

Lawrence is a teacher of mathematics who is particularly interested in classroom pedagogy, and how research and education policies interact with the teaching that students experience on a daily basis.

He finds that looking outwards in education is valuable with there being much more that unites our classrooms than isolates them. He has been extremely fortunate to study education through an international lens in the US, and to work on the Global Teaching InSights initiative of the Organisation for Economic Development (OECD) where he led on its videos of teaching.

Publications

Global Teaching InSights: A video study of teaching, OECD, 2020

Antonin is currently Doctoral Teaching Fellow on the MSc in Comparative and International Education, teaching Foundations of Educational Research. Antonin is also a Research Assistant for the Centre for Global Higher Education on the ‘Research on Research: the research function and mission of higher education’ project.

Alongside his teaching and research roles, Antonin is completing a Doctoral study on the European Universities Initiative, the European Commission’s flagship higher education programme that seeks to set up European Universities through transnational university alliances.

Arzhia Habibi is a DPhil in Education Candidate and uses Mandarin to conduct her research in the Chinese higher education context.

Arzhia’s research focuses on ‘expressions’ of global or world citizenship education in a Chinese higher education institution In the study, she explores the perspectives and practices of educators and students at a China-based university, which experiments with discourses related to citizenship. She further investigates how individual, local, national and global dynamics and the surrounding discourses influence worldviews and practices in a university setting.

As empirical studies on global or world citizenship education in the Chinese context are scarce, Arzhia hopes to contribute to a nascent knowledge base which may extend and add depth to the critical global discourses of global and world citizenship education, beyond Eurocentric framings.

Prior to her studies at Oxford, Arzhia received a first class Bachelor’s degree in Contemporary Chinese Studies at The University of Nottingham, and a Master’s in International Communication in Taiwan at National Chengchi University. As a child, she also attended kindergarten in Fuzhou, Fujian province of China.

Olga is a co-convenor of the Philosophy of Education Reading Group at the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. Olga’s main research interest is in the topics of epistemic injustice across all levels of education and across national borders with a focus on higher education and the process of knowledge production in academic institutes and universities. Her core interest lies between the areas of social epistemology, research on research (RoR) and comparative and international education (CIE). She has been a recipient of multiple research awards in the United States and the United Kingdom and is an elected co-convenor of the Comparative and International Education Special Interest Group at the British Educational Research Association (BERA).

Her new research at Oxford will explore the epistemically just and unjust practices as experienced by scholars from Kazakhstan during the internationalisation process in the social sciences and the humanities. Prior joining Oxford, Olga taught at University College London Institute of Education in London on the topics of migrant, refugee and minority education and European education traditions from a comparative lens.

Publications
  • Mun, O. (2020). ‘Epistemic Injustices in Internationalising Humanities and Social Sciences: A Case Study of Higher Education and Science Institutes in Kazakhstan.’ Centre for International Higher Education, Boston College. https://www.bc.edu/content/dam/bc1/schools/lsoe/sites/cihe/publication/Perspectives/Perspectives%20No%2018.pdf
  • Mun, O. and Gafu, G. (in press) ‘University Research Capacity in Kazakhstan’. Higher School of Economics, Russia.
  • Kandiko Howson, C., Mun, O. and Walker, R. (2020). ‘Academic Activism in STEM fields: Discipline in Theory and Practice.’ Philosophy and Theory of Higher Education Society.
  • Aizuddin M., Habibi A., Mun, O. (in press, 2020). ‘Post-Colonialism in Comparative and International Education.’ In Jules, T., Shields, R., Thomas, M. (Ed.), Bloomsbury Handbook of Theory in Comparative and International Education.
  • Palandjian, G., Silova, I., Mun, O., Zholdashaliyeva, R. (2018). ‘Gender and Nation in Postsocialist Educational Transformations.’ In Silova, I., & Chankseliani, M. (Eds.), Comparing Post-Socialist Transformations: Education in Eastern Europe and Former Soviet Union. Oxford: Symposium Books.
  • Mun, O., & Zholdashaliyeva, R. (2017). ‘Alippe, Bukvar’ and Gender: A comparative analysis of early literacy textbooks in Kazakhstan and Kyrgyzstan.’ In E. Brown & R. Craven & G. McLean (Ed.), International Advances in Education: Global Initiatives for Equity and Social Justice Series. Information Age Publishing
  • Patel, K. and Mun, O. (2017). ‘Marketing ‘development’ in the neoliberal university.’ DPU Working Papers https://www.ucl.ac.uk/bartlett/development/case-studies/2017/sep/marketing-development-neoliberal-university
  • Fimyar, O., Saniyazova, A. & Mun, O. (2017) ‘Methodology of Collaborative Research: Or, Searching for a Synergy in the Study of Student Transition in Kazakhstan.’ In SAGE Research Methods Cases. London, United Kingdom: SAGE Publications.
  • Mun, O. (2015). ‘(Re)imagining national identity through early literacy textbooks in Kazakhstan’, Forum of Young Central Asian Experts, 2nd edition. http://caa-network.org/archives/5620
  • Silova, I., Mead Yaqub, M., Mun, O., Palandjian, G. (2014). ‘Pedagogies of Space: (re)imagining nation and childhood in post-Soviet states.’ Global Studies of Childhood, 4(3), 195-209.
  • Silova, I., Brezhenyuk, V., Kudasova, M., Mun, O., Artemev, N. (2014). ‘Youth Protests against Privatisation of Education in post-Soviet states.’ European Education, 46(3), 56-65.

Schooled in the discipline of Public Administration at the University of Dhaka and with an experience of over five years of lecturing graduate and post-graduate students at two reputed public universities in Bangladesh, I am interested in research works related to education, gender, public policy, social studies and have multiple publications.

Apart from my current lecturing position, I worked as a news editor and contributor for the Dhaka Insider, an online news portal, in 2015. I also served as the Head of the Department (Department of Public Administration) and Assistant Proctor at the Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujibur Rahman Science and Technology University (BSMRSTU) and as an elected member of the Teachers’ Association there. During my post-graduation (MA. Public Policy) at the University of Nottingham, a qualitative research focus helped me characterize patterns of gender gap in primary education access.

 

Selected Publications
  • Dutta,  P.  (2020).  Democratic  Decentralization  and  Participatory Development:  Focus  on  Bangladesh.  Journal  of    Contemporary  Governance  and  Public Policy, 1(2), 82-91. Permalink/DOI: https://doi.org/10.46507/jcgpp.v1i2
  • Dutta, P., 2021. • Towards Sound Integrity Management in Bangladesh: Challenges and Issues in Public Administration and Law Enforcement. In: S. N. Khanom, ed. Governance, In the 21st Century in the Sounth Asia: Challenges and Ways Forward. Dhaka: Hakkani Publishers, pp. 541-560.

Zhuohan (Johanne) has a BA in English from Dalian Maritime University, China, and has won China National Scholarship. She then graduated with a Distinction in MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from University of Oxford. Before her DPhil, Zhuohan worked for the organizing committee for the Harvard Summit for Young Leaders in China, an initiative that brought liberal arts education from Harvard to China’s top-performing high school students. She also helped evaluate the UNICEF China Child-Friendly School Programme as an RA, focusing on the socio-emotional learning among the Dong ethnic minority groups in Guangxi, China. She also teaches IELTS, TOEFL, and English phonics.

Her MSc research centres on linguistic relativity, specifically the effect of French grammatical gender system on both French speakers’ and learners’ perception of objects. Her DPhil research focuses on English pronunciation teaching and learning among young Chinese kids, particularly emphasising the influence of their mother tongue, Mandarin.

Supervisors

Robert Woore and Faidra Faitaki

Shuo-Fang earned a Bachelor’s degree from National Chengchi University (Taiwan) and a Master’s degree from Boston University. He has teaching experience in various EFL contexts including international high school, educational institute, and graduate language program.

Shuo-Fang’s areas of interest lie in applied linguistics, particularly phonetics/phonology and speech perception. As an Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholar, Shuo-Fang is currently undertaking his doctoral research, supervised by Dr Elizabeth Wonnacott and Dr Robert Woore. His doctoral project is mostly experimental and explores second language learners’ difficulty in processing English connected speech.

Shuo-Fang is affiliated with two research groups: Applied Linguistics and Wonnacott-Nation Lab (developmental cognitive psychology).

Publications

Liang, S., & Yu, H. (2021). Chinese students’ willingness to communicate in EFL classrooms: A case study of students at a Sino-foreign university. Professional and Academic English, 28(2), 15–33.

Siyu Ma is a DPhil student in child development and learning at the Department of Education. Her doctoral research focuses on second-born children under the Chinese two-child policy, especially how siblings play a role in the socio-emotional, language, and early literacy development of these children.

Prior to starting her Dphil, Siyu completed an MSc in Education (Research Design and Methodology) at the University of Oxford, under the supervision of Professor Sonali Nag. Her MSc dissertation explored the roles of social background and home literacy environment in the language and literacy development of a Wales subsample from the Millennium Cohort Study and was awarded a High Distinction. She also holds a BSc degree with first-class honours in Psychology from the University of Bath.

Siyu is also a research associate working on TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education.

At TalkTogether, Siyu is responsible for designing online surveys and analysing quantitative data from child assessments and parent reports.

Publications

Ma, S. (2021). Family background and home literacy environment as predictors of the early literacy development of children in Wales – findings from the Millennium Cohort Study (Master’s thesis, University of Oxford).

 

Amanda is the recipient of the Hazel Project Scholarship, based at the Rees Centre. Her doctoral research explores the conceptualisation of foster homes as therapeutic environments for complex/developmental trauma. Through participant-generated photography and collaborative qualitative methods with young people currently in foster care placements, her research explores if young people’s concepts and perceptions of therapeutic environments coincide with or challenge existing theoretical models and popular practitioner perspectives.

Amanda holds a BA from the University of Leeds (UK) and an MPhil from the University of Oxford (UK).

Lawrence is a teacher of mathematics who is particularly interested in classroom pedagogy, and how research and education policies interact with the teaching that students experience on a daily basis.

He finds that looking outwards in education is valuable with there being much more that unites our classrooms than isolates them. He has been extremely fortunate to study education through an international lens in the US, and to work on the Global Teaching InSights initiative of the Organisation for Economic Development (OECD) where he led on its videos of teaching.

Publications

Global Teaching InSights: A video study of teaching, OECD, 2020

Antonin is currently Doctoral Teaching Fellow on the MSc in Comparative and International Education, teaching Foundations of Educational Research. Antonin is also a Research Assistant for the Centre for Global Higher Education on the ‘Research on Research: the research function and mission of higher education’ project.

Alongside his teaching and research roles, Antonin is completing a Doctoral study on the European Universities Initiative, the European Commission’s flagship higher education programme that seeks to set up European Universities through transnational university alliances.

Arzhia Habibi is a DPhil in Education Candidate and uses Mandarin to conduct her research in the Chinese higher education context.

Arzhia’s research focuses on ‘expressions’ of global or world citizenship education in a Chinese higher education institution In the study, she explores the perspectives and practices of educators and students at a China-based university, which experiments with discourses related to citizenship. She further investigates how individual, local, national and global dynamics and the surrounding discourses influence worldviews and practices in a university setting.

As empirical studies on global or world citizenship education in the Chinese context are scarce, Arzhia hopes to contribute to a nascent knowledge base which may extend and add depth to the critical global discourses of global and world citizenship education, beyond Eurocentric framings.

Prior to her studies at Oxford, Arzhia received a first class Bachelor’s degree in Contemporary Chinese Studies at The University of Nottingham, and a Master’s in International Communication in Taiwan at National Chengchi University. As a child, she also attended kindergarten in Fuzhou, Fujian province of China.

Olga is a co-convenor of the Philosophy of Education Reading Group at the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. Olga’s main research interest is in the topics of epistemic injustice across all levels of education and across national borders with a focus on higher education and the process of knowledge production in academic institutes and universities. Her core interest lies between the areas of social epistemology, research on research (RoR) and comparative and international education (CIE). She has been a recipient of multiple research awards in the United States and the United Kingdom and is an elected co-convenor of the Comparative and International Education Special Interest Group at the British Educational Research Association (BERA).

Her new research at Oxford will explore the epistemically just and unjust practices as experienced by scholars from Kazakhstan during the internationalisation process in the social sciences and the humanities. Prior joining Oxford, Olga taught at University College London Institute of Education in London on the topics of migrant, refugee and minority education and European education traditions from a comparative lens.

Publications
  • Mun, O. (2020). ‘Epistemic Injustices in Internationalising Humanities and Social Sciences: A Case Study of Higher Education and Science Institutes in Kazakhstan.’ Centre for International Higher Education, Boston College. https://www.bc.edu/content/dam/bc1/schools/lsoe/sites/cihe/publication/Perspectives/Perspectives%20No%2018.pdf
  • Mun, O. and Gafu, G. (in press) ‘University Research Capacity in Kazakhstan’. Higher School of Economics, Russia.
  • Kandiko Howson, C., Mun, O. and Walker, R. (2020). ‘Academic Activism in STEM fields: Discipline in Theory and Practice.’ Philosophy and Theory of Higher Education Society.
  • Aizuddin M., Habibi A., Mun, O. (in press, 2020). ‘Post-Colonialism in Comparative and International Education.’ In Jules, T., Shields, R., Thomas, M. (Ed.), Bloomsbury Handbook of Theory in Comparative and International Education.
  • Palandjian, G., Silova, I., Mun, O., Zholdashaliyeva, R. (2018). ‘Gender and Nation in Postsocialist Educational Transformations.’ In Silova, I., & Chankseliani, M. (Eds.), Comparing Post-Socialist Transformations: Education in Eastern Europe and Former Soviet Union. Oxford: Symposium Books.
  • Mun, O., & Zholdashaliyeva, R. (2017). ‘Alippe, Bukvar’ and Gender: A comparative analysis of early literacy textbooks in Kazakhstan and Kyrgyzstan.’ In E. Brown & R. Craven & G. McLean (Ed.), International Advances in Education: Global Initiatives for Equity and Social Justice Series. Information Age Publishing
  • Patel, K. and Mun, O. (2017). ‘Marketing ‘development’ in the neoliberal university.’ DPU Working Papers https://www.ucl.ac.uk/bartlett/development/case-studies/2017/sep/marketing-development-neoliberal-university
  • Fimyar, O., Saniyazova, A. & Mun, O. (2017) ‘Methodology of Collaborative Research: Or, Searching for a Synergy in the Study of Student Transition in Kazakhstan.’ In SAGE Research Methods Cases. London, United Kingdom: SAGE Publications.
  • Mun, O. (2015). ‘(Re)imagining national identity through early literacy textbooks in Kazakhstan’, Forum of Young Central Asian Experts, 2nd edition. http://caa-network.org/archives/5620
  • Silova, I., Mead Yaqub, M., Mun, O., Palandjian, G. (2014). ‘Pedagogies of Space: (re)imagining nation and childhood in post-Soviet states.’ Global Studies of Childhood, 4(3), 195-209.
  • Silova, I., Brezhenyuk, V., Kudasova, M., Mun, O., Artemev, N. (2014). ‘Youth Protests against Privatisation of Education in post-Soviet states.’ European Education, 46(3), 56-65.

Schooled in the discipline of Public Administration at the University of Dhaka and with an experience of over five years of lecturing graduate and post-graduate students at two reputed public universities in Bangladesh, I am interested in research works related to education, gender, public policy, social studies and have multiple publications.

Apart from my current lecturing position, I worked as a news editor and contributor for the Dhaka Insider, an online news portal, in 2015. I also served as the Head of the Department (Department of Public Administration) and Assistant Proctor at the Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujibur Rahman Science and Technology University (BSMRSTU) and as an elected member of the Teachers’ Association there. During my post-graduation (MA. Public Policy) at the University of Nottingham, a qualitative research focus helped me characterize patterns of gender gap in primary education access.

 

Selected Publications
  • Dutta,  P.  (2020).  Democratic  Decentralization  and  Participatory Development:  Focus  on  Bangladesh.  Journal  of    Contemporary  Governance  and  Public Policy, 1(2), 82-91. Permalink/DOI: https://doi.org/10.46507/jcgpp.v1i2
  • Dutta, P., 2021. • Towards Sound Integrity Management in Bangladesh: Challenges and Issues in Public Administration and Law Enforcement. In: S. N. Khanom, ed. Governance, In the 21st Century in the Sounth Asia: Challenges and Ways Forward. Dhaka: Hakkani Publishers, pp. 541-560.

Zhuohan (Johanne) has a BA in English from Dalian Maritime University, China, and has won China National Scholarship. She then graduated with a Distinction in MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from University of Oxford. Before her DPhil, Zhuohan worked for the organizing committee for the Harvard Summit for Young Leaders in China, an initiative that brought liberal arts education from Harvard to China’s top-performing high school students. She also helped evaluate the UNICEF China Child-Friendly School Programme as an RA, focusing on the socio-emotional learning among the Dong ethnic minority groups in Guangxi, China. She also teaches IELTS, TOEFL, and English phonics.

Her MSc research centres on linguistic relativity, specifically the effect of French grammatical gender system on both French speakers’ and learners’ perception of objects. Her DPhil research focuses on English pronunciation teaching and learning among young Chinese kids, particularly emphasising the influence of their mother tongue, Mandarin.

Supervisors

Robert Woore and Faidra Faitaki

Shuo-Fang earned a Bachelor’s degree from National Chengchi University (Taiwan) and a Master’s degree from Boston University. He has teaching experience in various EFL contexts including international high school, educational institute, and graduate language program.

Shuo-Fang’s areas of interest lie in applied linguistics, particularly phonetics/phonology and speech perception. As an Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholar, Shuo-Fang is currently undertaking his doctoral research, supervised by Dr Elizabeth Wonnacott and Dr Robert Woore. His doctoral project is mostly experimental and explores second language learners’ difficulty in processing English connected speech.

Shuo-Fang is affiliated with two research groups: Applied Linguistics and Wonnacott-Nation Lab (developmental cognitive psychology).

Publications

Liang, S., & Yu, H. (2021). Chinese students’ willingness to communicate in EFL classrooms: A case study of students at a Sino-foreign university. Professional and Academic English, 28(2), 15–33.

Siyu Ma is a DPhil student in child development and learning at the Department of Education. Her doctoral research focuses on second-born children under the Chinese two-child policy, especially how siblings play a role in the socio-emotional, language, and early literacy development of these children.

Prior to starting her Dphil, Siyu completed an MSc in Education (Research Design and Methodology) at the University of Oxford, under the supervision of Professor Sonali Nag. Her MSc dissertation explored the roles of social background and home literacy environment in the language and literacy development of a Wales subsample from the Millennium Cohort Study and was awarded a High Distinction. She also holds a BSc degree with first-class honours in Psychology from the University of Bath.

Siyu is also a research associate working on TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education.

At TalkTogether, Siyu is responsible for designing online surveys and analysing quantitative data from child assessments and parent reports.

Publications

Ma, S. (2021). Family background and home literacy environment as predictors of the early literacy development of children in Wales – findings from the Millennium Cohort Study (Master’s thesis, University of Oxford).

 

Amanda is the recipient of the Hazel Project Scholarship, based at the Rees Centre. Her doctoral research explores the conceptualisation of foster homes as therapeutic environments for complex/developmental trauma. Through participant-generated photography and collaborative qualitative methods with young people currently in foster care placements, her research explores if young people’s concepts and perceptions of therapeutic environments coincide with or challenge existing theoretical models and popular practitioner perspectives.

Amanda holds a BA from the University of Leeds (UK) and an MPhil from the University of Oxford (UK).

Lawrence is a teacher of mathematics who is particularly interested in classroom pedagogy, and how research and education policies interact with the teaching that students experience on a daily basis.

He finds that looking outwards in education is valuable with there being much more that unites our classrooms than isolates them. He has been extremely fortunate to study education through an international lens in the US, and to work on the Global Teaching InSights initiative of the Organisation for Economic Development (OECD) where he led on its videos of teaching.

Publications

Global Teaching InSights: A video study of teaching, OECD, 2020

Antonin is currently Doctoral Teaching Fellow on the MSc in Comparative and International Education, teaching Foundations of Educational Research. Antonin is also a Research Assistant for the Centre for Global Higher Education on the ‘Research on Research: the research function and mission of higher education’ project.

Alongside his teaching and research roles, Antonin is completing a Doctoral study on the European Universities Initiative, the European Commission’s flagship higher education programme that seeks to set up European Universities through transnational university alliances.

Arzhia Habibi is a DPhil in Education Candidate and uses Mandarin to conduct her research in the Chinese higher education context.

Arzhia’s research focuses on ‘expressions’ of global or world citizenship education in a Chinese higher education institution In the study, she explores the perspectives and practices of educators and students at a China-based university, which experiments with discourses related to citizenship. She further investigates how individual, local, national and global dynamics and the surrounding discourses influence worldviews and practices in a university setting.

As empirical studies on global or world citizenship education in the Chinese context are scarce, Arzhia hopes to contribute to a nascent knowledge base which may extend and add depth to the critical global discourses of global and world citizenship education, beyond Eurocentric framings.

Prior to her studies at Oxford, Arzhia received a first class Bachelor’s degree in Contemporary Chinese Studies at The University of Nottingham, and a Master’s in International Communication in Taiwan at National Chengchi University. As a child, she also attended kindergarten in Fuzhou, Fujian province of China.

Olga is a co-convenor of the Philosophy of Education Reading Group at the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. Olga’s main research interest is in the topics of epistemic injustice across all levels of education and across national borders with a focus on higher education and the process of knowledge production in academic institutes and universities. Her core interest lies between the areas of social epistemology, research on research (RoR) and comparative and international education (CIE). She has been a recipient of multiple research awards in the United States and the United Kingdom and is an elected co-convenor of the Comparative and International Education Special Interest Group at the British Educational Research Association (BERA).

Her new research at Oxford will explore the epistemically just and unjust practices as experienced by scholars from Kazakhstan during the internationalisation process in the social sciences and the humanities. Prior joining Oxford, Olga taught at University College London Institute of Education in London on the topics of migrant, refugee and minority education and European education traditions from a comparative lens.

Publications
  • Mun, O. (2020). ‘Epistemic Injustices in Internationalising Humanities and Social Sciences: A Case Study of Higher Education and Science Institutes in Kazakhstan.’ Centre for International Higher Education, Boston College. https://www.bc.edu/content/dam/bc1/schools/lsoe/sites/cihe/publication/Perspectives/Perspectives%20No%2018.pdf
  • Mun, O. and Gafu, G. (in press) ‘University Research Capacity in Kazakhstan’. Higher School of Economics, Russia.
  • Kandiko Howson, C., Mun, O. and Walker, R. (2020). ‘Academic Activism in STEM fields: Discipline in Theory and Practice.’ Philosophy and Theory of Higher Education Society.
  • Aizuddin M., Habibi A., Mun, O. (in press, 2020). ‘Post-Colonialism in Comparative and International Education.’ In Jules, T., Shields, R., Thomas, M. (Ed.), Bloomsbury Handbook of Theory in Comparative and International Education.
  • Palandjian, G., Silova, I., Mun, O., Zholdashaliyeva, R. (2018). ‘Gender and Nation in Postsocialist Educational Transformations.’ In Silova, I., & Chankseliani, M. (Eds.), Comparing Post-Socialist Transformations: Education in Eastern Europe and Former Soviet Union. Oxford: Symposium Books.
  • Mun, O., & Zholdashaliyeva, R. (2017). ‘Alippe, Bukvar’ and Gender: A comparative analysis of early literacy textbooks in Kazakhstan and Kyrgyzstan.’ In E. Brown & R. Craven & G. McLean (Ed.), International Advances in Education: Global Initiatives for Equity and Social Justice Series. Information Age Publishing
  • Patel, K. and Mun, O. (2017). ‘Marketing ‘development’ in the neoliberal university.’ DPU Working Papers https://www.ucl.ac.uk/bartlett/development/case-studies/2017/sep/marketing-development-neoliberal-university
  • Fimyar, O., Saniyazova, A. & Mun, O. (2017) ‘Methodology of Collaborative Research: Or, Searching for a Synergy in the Study of Student Transition in Kazakhstan.’ In SAGE Research Methods Cases. London, United Kingdom: SAGE Publications.
  • Mun, O. (2015). ‘(Re)imagining national identity through early literacy textbooks in Kazakhstan’, Forum of Young Central Asian Experts, 2nd edition. http://caa-network.org/archives/5620
  • Silova, I., Mead Yaqub, M., Mun, O., Palandjian, G. (2014). ‘Pedagogies of Space: (re)imagining nation and childhood in post-Soviet states.’ Global Studies of Childhood, 4(3), 195-209.
  • Silova, I., Brezhenyuk, V., Kudasova, M., Mun, O., Artemev, N. (2014). ‘Youth Protests against Privatisation of Education in post-Soviet states.’ European Education, 46(3), 56-65.

Schooled in the discipline of Public Administration at the University of Dhaka and with an experience of over five years of lecturing graduate and post-graduate students at two reputed public universities in Bangladesh, I am interested in research works related to education, gender, public policy, social studies and have multiple publications.

Apart from my current lecturing position, I worked as a news editor and contributor for the Dhaka Insider, an online news portal, in 2015. I also served as the Head of the Department (Department of Public Administration) and Assistant Proctor at the Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujibur Rahman Science and Technology University (BSMRSTU) and as an elected member of the Teachers’ Association there. During my post-graduation (MA. Public Policy) at the University of Nottingham, a qualitative research focus helped me characterize patterns of gender gap in primary education access.

 

Selected Publications
  • Dutta,  P.  (2020).  Democratic  Decentralization  and  Participatory Development:  Focus  on  Bangladesh.  Journal  of    Contemporary  Governance  and  Public Policy, 1(2), 82-91. Permalink/DOI: https://doi.org/10.46507/jcgpp.v1i2
  • Dutta, P., 2021. • Towards Sound Integrity Management in Bangladesh: Challenges and Issues in Public Administration and Law Enforcement. In: S. N. Khanom, ed. Governance, In the 21st Century in the Sounth Asia: Challenges and Ways Forward. Dhaka: Hakkani Publishers, pp. 541-560.

Zhuohan (Johanne) has a BA in English from Dalian Maritime University, China, and has won China National Scholarship. She then graduated with a Distinction in MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from University of Oxford. Before her DPhil, Zhuohan worked for the organizing committee for the Harvard Summit for Young Leaders in China, an initiative that brought liberal arts education from Harvard to China’s top-performing high school students. She also helped evaluate the UNICEF China Child-Friendly School Programme as an RA, focusing on the socio-emotional learning among the Dong ethnic minority groups in Guangxi, China. She also teaches IELTS, TOEFL, and English phonics.

Her MSc research centres on linguistic relativity, specifically the effect of French grammatical gender system on both French speakers’ and learners’ perception of objects. Her DPhil research focuses on English pronunciation teaching and learning among young Chinese kids, particularly emphasising the influence of their mother tongue, Mandarin.

Supervisors

Robert Woore and Faidra Faitaki

Shuo-Fang earned a Bachelor’s degree from National Chengchi University (Taiwan) and a Master’s degree from Boston University. He has teaching experience in various EFL contexts including international high school, educational institute, and graduate language program.

Shuo-Fang’s areas of interest lie in applied linguistics, particularly phonetics/phonology and speech perception. As an Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholar, Shuo-Fang is currently undertaking his doctoral research, supervised by Dr Elizabeth Wonnacott and Dr Robert Woore. His doctoral project is mostly experimental and explores second language learners’ difficulty in processing English connected speech.

Shuo-Fang is affiliated with two research groups: Applied Linguistics and Wonnacott-Nation Lab (developmental cognitive psychology).

Publications

Liang, S., & Yu, H. (2021). Chinese students’ willingness to communicate in EFL classrooms: A case study of students at a Sino-foreign university. Professional and Academic English, 28(2), 15–33.

Siyu Ma is a DPhil student in child development and learning at the Department of Education. Her doctoral research focuses on second-born children under the Chinese two-child policy, especially how siblings play a role in the socio-emotional, language, and early literacy development of these children.

Prior to starting her Dphil, Siyu completed an MSc in Education (Research Design and Methodology) at the University of Oxford, under the supervision of Professor Sonali Nag. Her MSc dissertation explored the roles of social background and home literacy environment in the language and literacy development of a Wales subsample from the Millennium Cohort Study and was awarded a High Distinction. She also holds a BSc degree with first-class honours in Psychology from the University of Bath.

Siyu is also a research associate working on TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education.

At TalkTogether, Siyu is responsible for designing online surveys and analysing quantitative data from child assessments and parent reports.

Publications

Ma, S. (2021). Family background and home literacy environment as predictors of the early literacy development of children in Wales – findings from the Millennium Cohort Study (Master’s thesis, University of Oxford).

 

Amanda is the recipient of the Hazel Project Scholarship, based at the Rees Centre. Her doctoral research explores the conceptualisation of foster homes as therapeutic environments for complex/developmental trauma. Through participant-generated photography and collaborative qualitative methods with young people currently in foster care placements, her research explores if young people’s concepts and perceptions of therapeutic environments coincide with or challenge existing theoretical models and popular practitioner perspectives.

Amanda holds a BA from the University of Leeds (UK) and an MPhil from the University of Oxford (UK).

Lawrence is a teacher of mathematics who is particularly interested in classroom pedagogy, and how research and education policies interact with the teaching that students experience on a daily basis.

He finds that looking outwards in education is valuable with there being much more that unites our classrooms than isolates them. He has been extremely fortunate to study education through an international lens in the US, and to work on the Global Teaching InSights initiative of the Organisation for Economic Development (OECD) where he led on its videos of teaching.

Publications

Global Teaching InSights: A video study of teaching, OECD, 2020

Antonin is currently Doctoral Teaching Fellow on the MSc in Comparative and International Education, teaching Foundations of Educational Research. Antonin is also a Research Assistant for the Centre for Global Higher Education on the ‘Research on Research: the research function and mission of higher education’ project.

Alongside his teaching and research roles, Antonin is completing a Doctoral study on the European Universities Initiative, the European Commission’s flagship higher education programme that seeks to set up European Universities through transnational university alliances.

Arzhia Habibi is a DPhil in Education Candidate and uses Mandarin to conduct her research in the Chinese higher education context.

Arzhia’s research focuses on ‘expressions’ of global or world citizenship education in a Chinese higher education institution In the study, she explores the perspectives and practices of educators and students at a China-based university, which experiments with discourses related to citizenship. She further investigates how individual, local, national and global dynamics and the surrounding discourses influence worldviews and practices in a university setting.

As empirical studies on global or world citizenship education in the Chinese context are scarce, Arzhia hopes to contribute to a nascent knowledge base which may extend and add depth to the critical global discourses of global and world citizenship education, beyond Eurocentric framings.

Prior to her studies at Oxford, Arzhia received a first class Bachelor’s degree in Contemporary Chinese Studies at The University of Nottingham, and a Master’s in International Communication in Taiwan at National Chengchi University. As a child, she also attended kindergarten in Fuzhou, Fujian province of China.

Olga is a co-convenor of the Philosophy of Education Reading Group at the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. Olga’s main research interest is in the topics of epistemic injustice across all levels of education and across national borders with a focus on higher education and the process of knowledge production in academic institutes and universities. Her core interest lies between the areas of social epistemology, research on research (RoR) and comparative and international education (CIE). She has been a recipient of multiple research awards in the United States and the United Kingdom and is an elected co-convenor of the Comparative and International Education Special Interest Group at the British Educational Research Association (BERA).

Her new research at Oxford will explore the epistemically just and unjust practices as experienced by scholars from Kazakhstan during the internationalisation process in the social sciences and the humanities. Prior joining Oxford, Olga taught at University College London Institute of Education in London on the topics of migrant, refugee and minority education and European education traditions from a comparative lens.

Publications
  • Mun, O. (2020). ‘Epistemic Injustices in Internationalising Humanities and Social Sciences: A Case Study of Higher Education and Science Institutes in Kazakhstan.’ Centre for International Higher Education, Boston College. https://www.bc.edu/content/dam/bc1/schools/lsoe/sites/cihe/publication/Perspectives/Perspectives%20No%2018.pdf
  • Mun, O. and Gafu, G. (in press) ‘University Research Capacity in Kazakhstan’. Higher School of Economics, Russia.
  • Kandiko Howson, C., Mun, O. and Walker, R. (2020). ‘Academic Activism in STEM fields: Discipline in Theory and Practice.’ Philosophy and Theory of Higher Education Society.
  • Aizuddin M., Habibi A., Mun, O. (in press, 2020). ‘Post-Colonialism in Comparative and International Education.’ In Jules, T., Shields, R., Thomas, M. (Ed.), Bloomsbury Handbook of Theory in Comparative and International Education.
  • Palandjian, G., Silova, I., Mun, O., Zholdashaliyeva, R. (2018). ‘Gender and Nation in Postsocialist Educational Transformations.’ In Silova, I., & Chankseliani, M. (Eds.), Comparing Post-Socialist Transformations: Education in Eastern Europe and Former Soviet Union. Oxford: Symposium Books.
  • Mun, O., & Zholdashaliyeva, R. (2017). ‘Alippe, Bukvar’ and Gender: A comparative analysis of early literacy textbooks in Kazakhstan and Kyrgyzstan.’ In E. Brown & R. Craven & G. McLean (Ed.), International Advances in Education: Global Initiatives for Equity and Social Justice Series. Information Age Publishing
  • Patel, K. and Mun, O. (2017). ‘Marketing ‘development’ in the neoliberal university.’ DPU Working Papers https://www.ucl.ac.uk/bartlett/development/case-studies/2017/sep/marketing-development-neoliberal-university
  • Fimyar, O., Saniyazova, A. & Mun, O. (2017) ‘Methodology of Collaborative Research: Or, Searching for a Synergy in the Study of Student Transition in Kazakhstan.’ In SAGE Research Methods Cases. London, United Kingdom: SAGE Publications.
  • Mun, O. (2015). ‘(Re)imagining national identity through early literacy textbooks in Kazakhstan’, Forum of Young Central Asian Experts, 2nd edition. http://caa-network.org/archives/5620
  • Silova, I., Mead Yaqub, M., Mun, O., Palandjian, G. (2014). ‘Pedagogies of Space: (re)imagining nation and childhood in post-Soviet states.’ Global Studies of Childhood, 4(3), 195-209.
  • Silova, I., Brezhenyuk, V., Kudasova, M., Mun, O., Artemev, N. (2014). ‘Youth Protests against Privatisation of Education in post-Soviet states.’ European Education, 46(3), 56-65.

Schooled in the discipline of Public Administration at the University of Dhaka and with an experience of over five years of lecturing graduate and post-graduate students at two reputed public universities in Bangladesh, I am interested in research works related to education, gender, public policy, social studies and have multiple publications.

Apart from my current lecturing position, I worked as a news editor and contributor for the Dhaka Insider, an online news portal, in 2015. I also served as the Head of the Department (Department of Public Administration) and Assistant Proctor at the Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujibur Rahman Science and Technology University (BSMRSTU) and as an elected member of the Teachers’ Association there. During my post-graduation (MA. Public Policy) at the University of Nottingham, a qualitative research focus helped me characterize patterns of gender gap in primary education access.

 

Selected Publications
  • Dutta,  P.  (2020).  Democratic  Decentralization  and  Participatory Development:  Focus  on  Bangladesh.  Journal  of    Contemporary  Governance  and  Public Policy, 1(2), 82-91. Permalink/DOI: https://doi.org/10.46507/jcgpp.v1i2
  • Dutta, P., 2021. • Towards Sound Integrity Management in Bangladesh: Challenges and Issues in Public Administration and Law Enforcement. In: S. N. Khanom, ed. Governance, In the 21st Century in the Sounth Asia: Challenges and Ways Forward. Dhaka: Hakkani Publishers, pp. 541-560.

Zhuohan (Johanne) has a BA in English from Dalian Maritime University, China, and has won China National Scholarship. She then graduated with a Distinction in MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from University of Oxford. Before her DPhil, Zhuohan worked for the organizing committee for the Harvard Summit for Young Leaders in China, an initiative that brought liberal arts education from Harvard to China’s top-performing high school students. She also helped evaluate the UNICEF China Child-Friendly School Programme as an RA, focusing on the socio-emotional learning among the Dong ethnic minority groups in Guangxi, China. She also teaches IELTS, TOEFL, and English phonics.

Her MSc research centres on linguistic relativity, specifically the effect of French grammatical gender system on both French speakers’ and learners’ perception of objects. Her DPhil research focuses on English pronunciation teaching and learning among young Chinese kids, particularly emphasising the influence of their mother tongue, Mandarin.

Supervisors

Robert Woore and Faidra Faitaki

Shuo-Fang earned a Bachelor’s degree from National Chengchi University (Taiwan) and a Master’s degree from Boston University. He has teaching experience in various EFL contexts including international high school, educational institute, and graduate language program.

Shuo-Fang’s areas of interest lie in applied linguistics, particularly phonetics/phonology and speech perception. As an Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholar, Shuo-Fang is currently undertaking his doctoral research, supervised by Dr Elizabeth Wonnacott and Dr Robert Woore. His doctoral project is mostly experimental and explores second language learners’ difficulty in processing English connected speech.

Shuo-Fang is affiliated with two research groups: Applied Linguistics and Wonnacott-Nation Lab (developmental cognitive psychology).

Publications

Liang, S., & Yu, H. (2021). Chinese students’ willingness to communicate in EFL classrooms: A case study of students at a Sino-foreign university. Professional and Academic English, 28(2), 15–33.

Siyu Ma is a DPhil student in child development and learning at the Department of Education. Her doctoral research focuses on second-born children under the Chinese two-child policy, especially how siblings play a role in the socio-emotional, language, and early literacy development of these children.

Prior to starting her Dphil, Siyu completed an MSc in Education (Research Design and Methodology) at the University of Oxford, under the supervision of Professor Sonali Nag. Her MSc dissertation explored the roles of social background and home literacy environment in the language and literacy development of a Wales subsample from the Millennium Cohort Study and was awarded a High Distinction. She also holds a BSc degree with first-class honours in Psychology from the University of Bath.

Siyu is also a research associate working on TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education.

At TalkTogether, Siyu is responsible for designing online surveys and analysing quantitative data from child assessments and parent reports.

Publications

Ma, S. (2021). Family background and home literacy environment as predictors of the early literacy development of children in Wales – findings from the Millennium Cohort Study (Master’s thesis, University of Oxford).

 

Amanda is the recipient of the Hazel Project Scholarship, based at the Rees Centre. Her doctoral research explores the conceptualisation of foster homes as therapeutic environments for complex/developmental trauma. Through participant-generated photography and collaborative qualitative methods with young people currently in foster care placements, her research explores if young people’s concepts and perceptions of therapeutic environments coincide with or challenge existing theoretical models and popular practitioner perspectives.

Amanda holds a BA from the University of Leeds (UK) and an MPhil from the University of Oxford (UK).

Lawrence is a teacher of mathematics who is particularly interested in classroom pedagogy, and how research and education policies interact with the teaching that students experience on a daily basis.

He finds that looking outwards in education is valuable with there being much more that unites our classrooms than isolates them. He has been extremely fortunate to study education through an international lens in the US, and to work on the Global Teaching InSights initiative of the Organisation for Economic Development (OECD) where he led on its videos of teaching.

Publications

Global Teaching InSights: A video study of teaching, OECD, 2020

Antonin is currently Doctoral Teaching Fellow on the MSc in Comparative and International Education, teaching Foundations of Educational Research. Antonin is also a Research Assistant for the Centre for Global Higher Education on the ‘Research on Research: the research function and mission of higher education’ project.

Alongside his teaching and research roles, Antonin is completing a Doctoral study on the European Universities Initiative, the European Commission’s flagship higher education programme that seeks to set up European Universities through transnational university alliances.

Arzhia Habibi is a DPhil in Education Candidate and uses Mandarin to conduct her research in the Chinese higher education context.

Arzhia’s research focuses on ‘expressions’ of global or world citizenship education in a Chinese higher education institution In the study, she explores the perspectives and practices of educators and students at a China-based university, which experiments with discourses related to citizenship. She further investigates how individual, local, national and global dynamics and the surrounding discourses influence worldviews and practices in a university setting.

As empirical studies on global or world citizenship education in the Chinese context are scarce, Arzhia hopes to contribute to a nascent knowledge base which may extend and add depth to the critical global discourses of global and world citizenship education, beyond Eurocentric framings.

Prior to her studies at Oxford, Arzhia received a first class Bachelor’s degree in Contemporary Chinese Studies at The University of Nottingham, and a Master’s in International Communication in Taiwan at National Chengchi University. As a child, she also attended kindergarten in Fuzhou, Fujian province of China.

Olga is a co-convenor of the Philosophy of Education Reading Group at the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. Olga’s main research interest is in the topics of epistemic injustice across all levels of education and across national borders with a focus on higher education and the process of knowledge production in academic institutes and universities. Her core interest lies between the areas of social epistemology, research on research (RoR) and comparative and international education (CIE). She has been a recipient of multiple research awards in the United States and the United Kingdom and is an elected co-convenor of the Comparative and International Education Special Interest Group at the British Educational Research Association (BERA).

Her new research at Oxford will explore the epistemically just and unjust practices as experienced by scholars from Kazakhstan during the internationalisation process in the social sciences and the humanities. Prior joining Oxford, Olga taught at University College London Institute of Education in London on the topics of migrant, refugee and minority education and European education traditions from a comparative lens.

Publications
  • Mun, O. (2020). ‘Epistemic Injustices in Internationalising Humanities and Social Sciences: A Case Study of Higher Education and Science Institutes in Kazakhstan.’ Centre for International Higher Education, Boston College. https://www.bc.edu/content/dam/bc1/schools/lsoe/sites/cihe/publication/Perspectives/Perspectives%20No%2018.pdf
  • Mun, O. and Gafu, G. (in press) ‘University Research Capacity in Kazakhstan’. Higher School of Economics, Russia.
  • Kandiko Howson, C., Mun, O. and Walker, R. (2020). ‘Academic Activism in STEM fields: Discipline in Theory and Practice.’ Philosophy and Theory of Higher Education Society.
  • Aizuddin M., Habibi A., Mun, O. (in press, 2020). ‘Post-Colonialism in Comparative and International Education.’ In Jules, T., Shields, R., Thomas, M. (Ed.), Bloomsbury Handbook of Theory in Comparative and International Education.
  • Palandjian, G., Silova, I., Mun, O., Zholdashaliyeva, R. (2018). ‘Gender and Nation in Postsocialist Educational Transformations.’ In Silova, I., & Chankseliani, M. (Eds.), Comparing Post-Socialist Transformations: Education in Eastern Europe and Former Soviet Union. Oxford: Symposium Books.
  • Mun, O., & Zholdashaliyeva, R. (2017). ‘Alippe, Bukvar’ and Gender: A comparative analysis of early literacy textbooks in Kazakhstan and Kyrgyzstan.’ In E. Brown & R. Craven & G. McLean (Ed.), International Advances in Education: Global Initiatives for Equity and Social Justice Series. Information Age Publishing
  • Patel, K. and Mun, O. (2017). ‘Marketing ‘development’ in the neoliberal university.’ DPU Working Papers https://www.ucl.ac.uk/bartlett/development/case-studies/2017/sep/marketing-development-neoliberal-university
  • Fimyar, O., Saniyazova, A. & Mun, O. (2017) ‘Methodology of Collaborative Research: Or, Searching for a Synergy in the Study of Student Transition in Kazakhstan.’ In SAGE Research Methods Cases. London, United Kingdom: SAGE Publications.
  • Mun, O. (2015). ‘(Re)imagining national identity through early literacy textbooks in Kazakhstan’, Forum of Young Central Asian Experts, 2nd edition. http://caa-network.org/archives/5620
  • Silova, I., Mead Yaqub, M., Mun, O., Palandjian, G. (2014). ‘Pedagogies of Space: (re)imagining nation and childhood in post-Soviet states.’ Global Studies of Childhood, 4(3), 195-209.
  • Silova, I., Brezhenyuk, V., Kudasova, M., Mun, O., Artemev, N. (2014). ‘Youth Protests against Privatisation of Education in post-Soviet states.’ European Education, 46(3), 56-65.

Schooled in the discipline of Public Administration at the University of Dhaka and with an experience of over five years of lecturing graduate and post-graduate students at two reputed public universities in Bangladesh, I am interested in research works related to education, gender, public policy, social studies and have multiple publications.

Apart from my current lecturing position, I worked as a news editor and contributor for the Dhaka Insider, an online news portal, in 2015. I also served as the Head of the Department (Department of Public Administration) and Assistant Proctor at the Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujibur Rahman Science and Technology University (BSMRSTU) and as an elected member of the Teachers’ Association there. During my post-graduation (MA. Public Policy) at the University of Nottingham, a qualitative research focus helped me characterize patterns of gender gap in primary education access.

 

Selected Publications
  • Dutta,  P.  (2020).  Democratic  Decentralization  and  Participatory Development:  Focus  on  Bangladesh.  Journal  of    Contemporary  Governance  and  Public Policy, 1(2), 82-91. Permalink/DOI: https://doi.org/10.46507/jcgpp.v1i2
  • Dutta, P., 2021. • Towards Sound Integrity Management in Bangladesh: Challenges and Issues in Public Administration and Law Enforcement. In: S. N. Khanom, ed. Governance, In the 21st Century in the Sounth Asia: Challenges and Ways Forward. Dhaka: Hakkani Publishers, pp. 541-560.

Zhuohan (Johanne) has a BA in English from Dalian Maritime University, China, and has won China National Scholarship. She then graduated with a Distinction in MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from University of Oxford. Before her DPhil, Zhuohan worked for the organizing committee for the Harvard Summit for Young Leaders in China, an initiative that brought liberal arts education from Harvard to China’s top-performing high school students. She also helped evaluate the UNICEF China Child-Friendly School Programme as an RA, focusing on the socio-emotional learning among the Dong ethnic minority groups in Guangxi, China. She also teaches IELTS, TOEFL, and English phonics.

Her MSc research centres on linguistic relativity, specifically the effect of French grammatical gender system on both French speakers’ and learners’ perception of objects. Her DPhil research focuses on English pronunciation teaching and learning among young Chinese kids, particularly emphasising the influence of their mother tongue, Mandarin.

Supervisors

Robert Woore and Faidra Faitaki

Shuo-Fang earned a Bachelor’s degree from National Chengchi University (Taiwan) and a Master’s degree from Boston University. He has teaching experience in various EFL contexts including international high school, educational institute, and graduate language program.

Shuo-Fang’s areas of interest lie in applied linguistics, particularly phonetics/phonology and speech perception. As an Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholar, Shuo-Fang is currently undertaking his doctoral research, supervised by Dr Elizabeth Wonnacott and Dr Robert Woore. His doctoral project is mostly experimental and explores second language learners’ difficulty in processing English connected speech.

Shuo-Fang is affiliated with two research groups: Applied Linguistics and Wonnacott-Nation Lab (developmental cognitive psychology).

Publications

Liang, S., & Yu, H. (2021). Chinese students’ willingness to communicate in EFL classrooms: A case study of students at a Sino-foreign university. Professional and Academic English, 28(2), 15–33.

Siyu Ma is a DPhil student in child development and learning at the Department of Education. Her doctoral research focuses on second-born children under the Chinese two-child policy, especially how siblings play a role in the socio-emotional, language, and early literacy development of these children.

Prior to starting her Dphil, Siyu completed an MSc in Education (Research Design and Methodology) at the University of Oxford, under the supervision of Professor Sonali Nag. Her MSc dissertation explored the roles of social background and home literacy environment in the language and literacy development of a Wales subsample from the Millennium Cohort Study and was awarded a High Distinction. She also holds a BSc degree with first-class honours in Psychology from the University of Bath.

Siyu is also a research associate working on TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education.

At TalkTogether, Siyu is responsible for designing online surveys and analysing quantitative data from child assessments and parent reports.

Publications

Ma, S. (2021). Family background and home literacy environment as predictors of the early literacy development of children in Wales – findings from the Millennium Cohort Study (Master’s thesis, University of Oxford).

 

Amanda is the recipient of the Hazel Project Scholarship, based at the Rees Centre. Her doctoral research explores the conceptualisation of foster homes as therapeutic environments for complex/developmental trauma. Through participant-generated photography and collaborative qualitative methods with young people currently in foster care placements, her research explores if young people’s concepts and perceptions of therapeutic environments coincide with or challenge existing theoretical models and popular practitioner perspectives.

Amanda holds a BA from the University of Leeds (UK) and an MPhil from the University of Oxford (UK).

Lawrence is a teacher of mathematics who is particularly interested in classroom pedagogy, and how research and education policies interact with the teaching that students experience on a daily basis.

He finds that looking outwards in education is valuable with there being much more that unites our classrooms than isolates them. He has been extremely fortunate to study education through an international lens in the US, and to work on the Global Teaching InSights initiative of the Organisation for Economic Development (OECD) where he led on its videos of teaching.

Publications

Global Teaching InSights: A video study of teaching, OECD, 2020

Antonin is currently Doctoral Teaching Fellow on the MSc in Comparative and International Education, teaching Foundations of Educational Research. Antonin is also a Research Assistant for the Centre for Global Higher Education on the ‘Research on Research: the research function and mission of higher education’ project.

Alongside his teaching and research roles, Antonin is completing a Doctoral study on the European Universities Initiative, the European Commission’s flagship higher education programme that seeks to set up European Universities through transnational university alliances.

Arzhia Habibi is a DPhil in Education Candidate and uses Mandarin to conduct her research in the Chinese higher education context.

Arzhia’s research focuses on ‘expressions’ of global or world citizenship education in a Chinese higher education institution In the study, she explores the perspectives and practices of educators and students at a China-based university, which experiments with discourses related to citizenship. She further investigates how individual, local, national and global dynamics and the surrounding discourses influence worldviews and practices in a university setting.

As empirical studies on global or world citizenship education in the Chinese context are scarce, Arzhia hopes to contribute to a nascent knowledge base which may extend and add depth to the critical global discourses of global and world citizenship education, beyond Eurocentric framings.

Prior to her studies at Oxford, Arzhia received a first class Bachelor’s degree in Contemporary Chinese Studies at The University of Nottingham, and a Master’s in International Communication in Taiwan at National Chengchi University. As a child, she also attended kindergarten in Fuzhou, Fujian province of China.

Olga is a co-convenor of the Philosophy of Education Reading Group at the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. Olga’s main research interest is in the topics of epistemic injustice across all levels of education and across national borders with a focus on higher education and the process of knowledge production in academic institutes and universities. Her core interest lies between the areas of social epistemology, research on research (RoR) and comparative and international education (CIE). She has been a recipient of multiple research awards in the United States and the United Kingdom and is an elected co-convenor of the Comparative and International Education Special Interest Group at the British Educational Research Association (BERA).

Her new research at Oxford will explore the epistemically just and unjust practices as experienced by scholars from Kazakhstan during the internationalisation process in the social sciences and the humanities. Prior joining Oxford, Olga taught at University College London Institute of Education in London on the topics of migrant, refugee and minority education and European education traditions from a comparative lens.

Publications
  • Mun, O. (2020). ‘Epistemic Injustices in Internationalising Humanities and Social Sciences: A Case Study of Higher Education and Science Institutes in Kazakhstan.’ Centre for International Higher Education, Boston College. https://www.bc.edu/content/dam/bc1/schools/lsoe/sites/cihe/publication/Perspectives/Perspectives%20No%2018.pdf
  • Mun, O. and Gafu, G. (in press) ‘University Research Capacity in Kazakhstan’. Higher School of Economics, Russia.
  • Kandiko Howson, C., Mun, O. and Walker, R. (2020). ‘Academic Activism in STEM fields: Discipline in Theory and Practice.’ Philosophy and Theory of Higher Education Society.
  • Aizuddin M., Habibi A., Mun, O. (in press, 2020). ‘Post-Colonialism in Comparative and International Education.’ In Jules, T., Shields, R., Thomas, M. (Ed.), Bloomsbury Handbook of Theory in Comparative and International Education.
  • Palandjian, G., Silova, I., Mun, O., Zholdashaliyeva, R. (2018). ‘Gender and Nation in Postsocialist Educational Transformations.’ In Silova, I., & Chankseliani, M. (Eds.), Comparing Post-Socialist Transformations: Education in Eastern Europe and Former Soviet Union. Oxford: Symposium Books.
  • Mun, O., & Zholdashaliyeva, R. (2017). ‘Alippe, Bukvar’ and Gender: A comparative analysis of early literacy textbooks in Kazakhstan and Kyrgyzstan.’ In E. Brown & R. Craven & G. McLean (Ed.), International Advances in Education: Global Initiatives for Equity and Social Justice Series. Information Age Publishing
  • Patel, K. and Mun, O. (2017). ‘Marketing ‘development’ in the neoliberal university.’ DPU Working Papers https://www.ucl.ac.uk/bartlett/development/case-studies/2017/sep/marketing-development-neoliberal-university
  • Fimyar, O., Saniyazova, A. & Mun, O. (2017) ‘Methodology of Collaborative Research: Or, Searching for a Synergy in the Study of Student Transition in Kazakhstan.’ In SAGE Research Methods Cases. London, United Kingdom: SAGE Publications.
  • Mun, O. (2015). ‘(Re)imagining national identity through early literacy textbooks in Kazakhstan’, Forum of Young Central Asian Experts, 2nd edition. http://caa-network.org/archives/5620
  • Silova, I., Mead Yaqub, M., Mun, O., Palandjian, G. (2014). ‘Pedagogies of Space: (re)imagining nation and childhood in post-Soviet states.’ Global Studies of Childhood, 4(3), 195-209.
  • Silova, I., Brezhenyuk, V., Kudasova, M., Mun, O., Artemev, N. (2014). ‘Youth Protests against Privatisation of Education in post-Soviet states.’ European Education, 46(3), 56-65.

Schooled in the discipline of Public Administration at the University of Dhaka and with an experience of over five years of lecturing graduate and post-graduate students at two reputed public universities in Bangladesh, I am interested in research works related to education, gender, public policy, social studies and have multiple publications.

Apart from my current lecturing position, I worked as a news editor and contributor for the Dhaka Insider, an online news portal, in 2015. I also served as the Head of the Department (Department of Public Administration) and Assistant Proctor at the Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujibur Rahman Science and Technology University (BSMRSTU) and as an elected member of the Teachers’ Association there. During my post-graduation (MA. Public Policy) at the University of Nottingham, a qualitative research focus helped me characterize patterns of gender gap in primary education access.

 

Selected Publications
  • Dutta,  P.  (2020).  Democratic  Decentralization  and  Participatory Development:  Focus  on  Bangladesh.  Journal  of    Contemporary  Governance  and  Public Policy, 1(2), 82-91. Permalink/DOI: https://doi.org/10.46507/jcgpp.v1i2
  • Dutta, P., 2021. • Towards Sound Integrity Management in Bangladesh: Challenges and Issues in Public Administration and Law Enforcement. In: S. N. Khanom, ed. Governance, In the 21st Century in the Sounth Asia: Challenges and Ways Forward. Dhaka: Hakkani Publishers, pp. 541-560.

Zhuohan (Johanne) has a BA in English from Dalian Maritime University, China, and has won China National Scholarship. She then graduated with a Distinction in MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from University of Oxford. Before her DPhil, Zhuohan worked for the organizing committee for the Harvard Summit for Young Leaders in China, an initiative that brought liberal arts education from Harvard to China’s top-performing high school students. She also helped evaluate the UNICEF China Child-Friendly School Programme as an RA, focusing on the socio-emotional learning among the Dong ethnic minority groups in Guangxi, China. She also teaches IELTS, TOEFL, and English phonics.

Her MSc research centres on linguistic relativity, specifically the effect of French grammatical gender system on both French speakers’ and learners’ perception of objects. Her DPhil research focuses on English pronunciation teaching and learning among young Chinese kids, particularly emphasising the influence of their mother tongue, Mandarin.

Supervisors

Robert Woore and Faidra Faitaki

Shuo-Fang earned a Bachelor’s degree from National Chengchi University (Taiwan) and a Master’s degree from Boston University. He has teaching experience in various EFL contexts including international high school, educational institute, and graduate language program.

Shuo-Fang’s areas of interest lie in applied linguistics, particularly phonetics/phonology and speech perception. As an Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholar, Shuo-Fang is currently undertaking his doctoral research, supervised by Dr Elizabeth Wonnacott and Dr Robert Woore. His doctoral project is mostly experimental and explores second language learners’ difficulty in processing English connected speech.

Shuo-Fang is affiliated with two research groups: Applied Linguistics and Wonnacott-Nation Lab (developmental cognitive psychology).

Publications

Liang, S., & Yu, H. (2021). Chinese students’ willingness to communicate in EFL classrooms: A case study of students at a Sino-foreign university. Professional and Academic English, 28(2), 15–33.

Siyu Ma is a DPhil student in child development and learning at the Department of Education. Her doctoral research focuses on second-born children under the Chinese two-child policy, especially how siblings play a role in the socio-emotional, language, and early literacy development of these children.

Prior to starting her Dphil, Siyu completed an MSc in Education (Research Design and Methodology) at the University of Oxford, under the supervision of Professor Sonali Nag. Her MSc dissertation explored the roles of social background and home literacy environment in the language and literacy development of a Wales subsample from the Millennium Cohort Study and was awarded a High Distinction. She also holds a BSc degree with first-class honours in Psychology from the University of Bath.

Siyu is also a research associate working on TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education.

At TalkTogether, Siyu is responsible for designing online surveys and analysing quantitative data from child assessments and parent reports.

Publications

Ma, S. (2021). Family background and home literacy environment as predictors of the early literacy development of children in Wales – findings from the Millennium Cohort Study (Master’s thesis, University of Oxford).

 

Amanda is the recipient of the Hazel Project Scholarship, based at the Rees Centre. Her doctoral research explores the conceptualisation of foster homes as therapeutic environments for complex/developmental trauma. Through participant-generated photography and collaborative qualitative methods with young people currently in foster care placements, her research explores if young people’s concepts and perceptions of therapeutic environments coincide with or challenge existing theoretical models and popular practitioner perspectives.

Amanda holds a BA from the University of Leeds (UK) and an MPhil from the University of Oxford (UK).

Lawrence is a teacher of mathematics who is particularly interested in classroom pedagogy, and how research and education policies interact with the teaching that students experience on a daily basis.

He finds that looking outwards in education is valuable with there being much more that unites our classrooms than isolates them. He has been extremely fortunate to study education through an international lens in the US, and to work on the Global Teaching InSights initiative of the Organisation for Economic Development (OECD) where he led on its videos of teaching.

Publications

Global Teaching InSights: A video study of teaching, OECD, 2020

Antonin is currently Doctoral Teaching Fellow on the MSc in Comparative and International Education, teaching Foundations of Educational Research. Antonin is also a Research Assistant for the Centre for Global Higher Education on the ‘Research on Research: the research function and mission of higher education’ project.

Alongside his teaching and research roles, Antonin is completing a Doctoral study on the European Universities Initiative, the European Commission’s flagship higher education programme that seeks to set up European Universities through transnational university alliances.

Arzhia Habibi is a DPhil in Education Candidate and uses Mandarin to conduct her research in the Chinese higher education context.

Arzhia’s research focuses on ‘expressions’ of global or world citizenship education in a Chinese higher education institution In the study, she explores the perspectives and practices of educators and students at a China-based university, which experiments with discourses related to citizenship. She further investigates how individual, local, national and global dynamics and the surrounding discourses influence worldviews and practices in a university setting.

As empirical studies on global or world citizenship education in the Chinese context are scarce, Arzhia hopes to contribute to a nascent knowledge base which may extend and add depth to the critical global discourses of global and world citizenship education, beyond Eurocentric framings.

Prior to her studies at Oxford, Arzhia received a first class Bachelor’s degree in Contemporary Chinese Studies at The University of Nottingham, and a Master’s in International Communication in Taiwan at National Chengchi University. As a child, she also attended kindergarten in Fuzhou, Fujian province of China.

Olga is a co-convenor of the Philosophy of Education Reading Group at the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. Olga’s main research interest is in the topics of epistemic injustice across all levels of education and across national borders with a focus on higher education and the process of knowledge production in academic institutes and universities. Her core interest lies between the areas of social epistemology, research on research (RoR) and comparative and international education (CIE). She has been a recipient of multiple research awards in the United States and the United Kingdom and is an elected co-convenor of the Comparative and International Education Special Interest Group at the British Educational Research Association (BERA).

Her new research at Oxford will explore the epistemically just and unjust practices as experienced by scholars from Kazakhstan during the internationalisation process in the social sciences and the humanities. Prior joining Oxford, Olga taught at University College London Institute of Education in London on the topics of migrant, refugee and minority education and European education traditions from a comparative lens.

Publications
  • Mun, O. (2020). ‘Epistemic Injustices in Internationalising Humanities and Social Sciences: A Case Study of Higher Education and Science Institutes in Kazakhstan.’ Centre for International Higher Education, Boston College. https://www.bc.edu/content/dam/bc1/schools/lsoe/sites/cihe/publication/Perspectives/Perspectives%20No%2018.pdf
  • Mun, O. and Gafu, G. (in press) ‘University Research Capacity in Kazakhstan’. Higher School of Economics, Russia.
  • Kandiko Howson, C., Mun, O. and Walker, R. (2020). ‘Academic Activism in STEM fields: Discipline in Theory and Practice.’ Philosophy and Theory of Higher Education Society.
  • Aizuddin M., Habibi A., Mun, O. (in press, 2020). ‘Post-Colonialism in Comparative and International Education.’ In Jules, T., Shields, R., Thomas, M. (Ed.), Bloomsbury Handbook of Theory in Comparative and International Education.
  • Palandjian, G., Silova, I., Mun, O., Zholdashaliyeva, R. (2018). ‘Gender and Nation in Postsocialist Educational Transformations.’ In Silova, I., & Chankseliani, M. (Eds.), Comparing Post-Socialist Transformations: Education in Eastern Europe and Former Soviet Union. Oxford: Symposium Books.
  • Mun, O., & Zholdashaliyeva, R. (2017). ‘Alippe, Bukvar’ and Gender: A comparative analysis of early literacy textbooks in Kazakhstan and Kyrgyzstan.’ In E. Brown & R. Craven & G. McLean (Ed.), International Advances in Education: Global Initiatives for Equity and Social Justice Series. Information Age Publishing
  • Patel, K. and Mun, O. (2017). ‘Marketing ‘development’ in the neoliberal university.’ DPU Working Papers https://www.ucl.ac.uk/bartlett/development/case-studies/2017/sep/marketing-development-neoliberal-university
  • Fimyar, O., Saniyazova, A. & Mun, O. (2017) ‘Methodology of Collaborative Research: Or, Searching for a Synergy in the Study of Student Transition in Kazakhstan.’ In SAGE Research Methods Cases. London, United Kingdom: SAGE Publications.
  • Mun, O. (2015). ‘(Re)imagining national identity through early literacy textbooks in Kazakhstan’, Forum of Young Central Asian Experts, 2nd edition. http://caa-network.org/archives/5620
  • Silova, I., Mead Yaqub, M., Mun, O., Palandjian, G. (2014). ‘Pedagogies of Space: (re)imagining nation and childhood in post-Soviet states.’ Global Studies of Childhood, 4(3), 195-209.
  • Silova, I., Brezhenyuk, V., Kudasova, M., Mun, O., Artemev, N. (2014). ‘Youth Protests against Privatisation of Education in post-Soviet states.’ European Education, 46(3), 56-65.

Schooled in the discipline of Public Administration at the University of Dhaka and with an experience of over five years of lecturing graduate and post-graduate students at two reputed public universities in Bangladesh, I am interested in research works related to education, gender, public policy, social studies and have multiple publications.

Apart from my current lecturing position, I worked as a news editor and contributor for the Dhaka Insider, an online news portal, in 2015. I also served as the Head of the Department (Department of Public Administration) and Assistant Proctor at the Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujibur Rahman Science and Technology University (BSMRSTU) and as an elected member of the Teachers’ Association there. During my post-graduation (MA. Public Policy) at the University of Nottingham, a qualitative research focus helped me characterize patterns of gender gap in primary education access.

 

Selected Publications
  • Dutta,  P.  (2020).  Democratic  Decentralization  and  Participatory Development:  Focus  on  Bangladesh.  Journal  of    Contemporary  Governance  and  Public Policy, 1(2), 82-91. Permalink/DOI: https://doi.org/10.46507/jcgpp.v1i2
  • Dutta, P., 2021. • Towards Sound Integrity Management in Bangladesh: Challenges and Issues in Public Administration and Law Enforcement. In: S. N. Khanom, ed. Governance, In the 21st Century in the Sounth Asia: Challenges and Ways Forward. Dhaka: Hakkani Publishers, pp. 541-560.

Zhuohan (Johanne) has a BA in English from Dalian Maritime University, China, and has won China National Scholarship. She then graduated with a Distinction in MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from University of Oxford. Before her DPhil, Zhuohan worked for the organizing committee for the Harvard Summit for Young Leaders in China, an initiative that brought liberal arts education from Harvard to China’s top-performing high school students. She also helped evaluate the UNICEF China Child-Friendly School Programme as an RA, focusing on the socio-emotional learning among the Dong ethnic minority groups in Guangxi, China. She also teaches IELTS, TOEFL, and English phonics.

Her MSc research centres on linguistic relativity, specifically the effect of French grammatical gender system on both French speakers’ and learners’ perception of objects. Her DPhil research focuses on English pronunciation teaching and learning among young Chinese kids, particularly emphasising the influence of their mother tongue, Mandarin.

Supervisors

Robert Woore and Faidra Faitaki

Shuo-Fang earned a Bachelor’s degree from National Chengchi University (Taiwan) and a Master’s degree from Boston University. He has teaching experience in various EFL contexts including international high school, educational institute, and graduate language program.

Shuo-Fang’s areas of interest lie in applied linguistics, particularly phonetics/phonology and speech perception. As an Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholar, Shuo-Fang is currently undertaking his doctoral research, supervised by Dr Elizabeth Wonnacott and Dr Robert Woore. His doctoral project is mostly experimental and explores second language learners’ difficulty in processing English connected speech.

Shuo-Fang is affiliated with two research groups: Applied Linguistics and Wonnacott-Nation Lab (developmental cognitive psychology).

Publications

Liang, S., & Yu, H. (2021). Chinese students’ willingness to communicate in EFL classrooms: A case study of students at a Sino-foreign university. Professional and Academic English, 28(2), 15–33.

Siyu Ma is a DPhil student in child development and learning at the Department of Education. Her doctoral research focuses on second-born children under the Chinese two-child policy, especially how siblings play a role in the socio-emotional, language, and early literacy development of these children.

Prior to starting her Dphil, Siyu completed an MSc in Education (Research Design and Methodology) at the University of Oxford, under the supervision of Professor Sonali Nag. Her MSc dissertation explored the roles of social background and home literacy environment in the language and literacy development of a Wales subsample from the Millennium Cohort Study and was awarded a High Distinction. She also holds a BSc degree with first-class honours in Psychology from the University of Bath.

Siyu is also a research associate working on TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education.

At TalkTogether, Siyu is responsible for designing online surveys and analysing quantitative data from child assessments and parent reports.

Publications

Ma, S. (2021). Family background and home literacy environment as predictors of the early literacy development of children in Wales – findings from the Millennium Cohort Study (Master’s thesis, University of Oxford).

 

Amanda is the recipient of the Hazel Project Scholarship, based at the Rees Centre. Her doctoral research explores the conceptualisation of foster homes as therapeutic environments for complex/developmental trauma. Through participant-generated photography and collaborative qualitative methods with young people currently in foster care placements, her research explores if young people’s concepts and perceptions of therapeutic environments coincide with or challenge existing theoretical models and popular practitioner perspectives.

Amanda holds a BA from the University of Leeds (UK) and an MPhil from the University of Oxford (UK).

Lawrence is a teacher of mathematics who is particularly interested in classroom pedagogy, and how research and education policies interact with the teaching that students experience on a daily basis.

He finds that looking outwards in education is valuable with there being much more that unites our classrooms than isolates them. He has been extremely fortunate to study education through an international lens in the US, and to work on the Global Teaching InSights initiative of the Organisation for Economic Development (OECD) where he led on its videos of teaching.

Publications

Global Teaching InSights: A video study of teaching, OECD, 2020

Antonin is currently Doctoral Teaching Fellow on the MSc in Comparative and International Education, teaching Foundations of Educational Research. Antonin is also a Research Assistant for the Centre for Global Higher Education on the ‘Research on Research: the research function and mission of higher education’ project.

Alongside his teaching and research roles, Antonin is completing a Doctoral study on the European Universities Initiative, the European Commission’s flagship higher education programme that seeks to set up European Universities through transnational university alliances.

Arzhia Habibi is a DPhil in Education Candidate and uses Mandarin to conduct her research in the Chinese higher education context.

Arzhia’s research focuses on ‘expressions’ of global or world citizenship education in a Chinese higher education institution In the study, she explores the perspectives and practices of educators and students at a China-based university, which experiments with discourses related to citizenship. She further investigates how individual, local, national and global dynamics and the surrounding discourses influence worldviews and practices in a university setting.

As empirical studies on global or world citizenship education in the Chinese context are scarce, Arzhia hopes to contribute to a nascent knowledge base which may extend and add depth to the critical global discourses of global and world citizenship education, beyond Eurocentric framings.

Prior to her studies at Oxford, Arzhia received a first class Bachelor’s degree in Contemporary Chinese Studies at The University of Nottingham, and a Master’s in International Communication in Taiwan at National Chengchi University. As a child, she also attended kindergarten in Fuzhou, Fujian province of China.

Olga is a co-convenor of the Philosophy of Education Reading Group at the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. Olga’s main research interest is in the topics of epistemic injustice across all levels of education and across national borders with a focus on higher education and the process of knowledge production in academic institutes and universities. Her core interest lies between the areas of social epistemology, research on research (RoR) and comparative and international education (CIE). She has been a recipient of multiple research awards in the United States and the United Kingdom and is an elected co-convenor of the Comparative and International Education Special Interest Group at the British Educational Research Association (BERA).

Her new research at Oxford will explore the epistemically just and unjust practices as experienced by scholars from Kazakhstan during the internationalisation process in the social sciences and the humanities. Prior joining Oxford, Olga taught at University College London Institute of Education in London on the topics of migrant, refugee and minority education and European education traditions from a comparative lens.

Publications
  • Mun, O. (2020). ‘Epistemic Injustices in Internationalising Humanities and Social Sciences: A Case Study of Higher Education and Science Institutes in Kazakhstan.’ Centre for International Higher Education, Boston College. https://www.bc.edu/content/dam/bc1/schools/lsoe/sites/cihe/publication/Perspectives/Perspectives%20No%2018.pdf
  • Mun, O. and Gafu, G. (in press) ‘University Research Capacity in Kazakhstan’. Higher School of Economics, Russia.
  • Kandiko Howson, C., Mun, O. and Walker, R. (2020). ‘Academic Activism in STEM fields: Discipline in Theory and Practice.’ Philosophy and Theory of Higher Education Society.
  • Aizuddin M., Habibi A., Mun, O. (in press, 2020). ‘Post-Colonialism in Comparative and International Education.’ In Jules, T., Shields, R., Thomas, M. (Ed.), Bloomsbury Handbook of Theory in Comparative and International Education.
  • Palandjian, G., Silova, I., Mun, O., Zholdashaliyeva, R. (2018). ‘Gender and Nation in Postsocialist Educational Transformations.’ In Silova, I., & Chankseliani, M. (Eds.), Comparing Post-Socialist Transformations: Education in Eastern Europe and Former Soviet Union. Oxford: Symposium Books.
  • Mun, O., & Zholdashaliyeva, R. (2017). ‘Alippe, Bukvar’ and Gender: A comparative analysis of early literacy textbooks in Kazakhstan and Kyrgyzstan.’ In E. Brown & R. Craven & G. McLean (Ed.), International Advances in Education: Global Initiatives for Equity and Social Justice Series. Information Age Publishing
  • Patel, K. and Mun, O. (2017). ‘Marketing ‘development’ in the neoliberal university.’ DPU Working Papers https://www.ucl.ac.uk/bartlett/development/case-studies/2017/sep/marketing-development-neoliberal-university
  • Fimyar, O., Saniyazova, A. & Mun, O. (2017) ‘Methodology of Collaborative Research: Or, Searching for a Synergy in the Study of Student Transition in Kazakhstan.’ In SAGE Research Methods Cases. London, United Kingdom: SAGE Publications.
  • Mun, O. (2015). ‘(Re)imagining national identity through early literacy textbooks in Kazakhstan’, Forum of Young Central Asian Experts, 2nd edition. http://caa-network.org/archives/5620
  • Silova, I., Mead Yaqub, M., Mun, O., Palandjian, G. (2014). ‘Pedagogies of Space: (re)imagining nation and childhood in post-Soviet states.’ Global Studies of Childhood, 4(3), 195-209.
  • Silova, I., Brezhenyuk, V., Kudasova, M., Mun, O., Artemev, N. (2014). ‘Youth Protests against Privatisation of Education in post-Soviet states.’ European Education, 46(3), 56-65.

Schooled in the discipline of Public Administration at the University of Dhaka and with an experience of over five years of lecturing graduate and post-graduate students at two reputed public universities in Bangladesh, I am interested in research works related to education, gender, public policy, social studies and have multiple publications.

Apart from my current lecturing position, I worked as a news editor and contributor for the Dhaka Insider, an online news portal, in 2015. I also served as the Head of the Department (Department of Public Administration) and Assistant Proctor at the Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujibur Rahman Science and Technology University (BSMRSTU) and as an elected member of the Teachers’ Association there. During my post-graduation (MA. Public Policy) at the University of Nottingham, a qualitative research focus helped me characterize patterns of gender gap in primary education access.

 

Selected Publications
  • Dutta,  P.  (2020).  Democratic  Decentralization  and  Participatory Development:  Focus  on  Bangladesh.  Journal  of    Contemporary  Governance  and  Public Policy, 1(2), 82-91. Permalink/DOI: https://doi.org/10.46507/jcgpp.v1i2
  • Dutta, P., 2021. • Towards Sound Integrity Management in Bangladesh: Challenges and Issues in Public Administration and Law Enforcement. In: S. N. Khanom, ed. Governance, In the 21st Century in the Sounth Asia: Challenges and Ways Forward. Dhaka: Hakkani Publishers, pp. 541-560.

Zhuohan (Johanne) has a BA in English from Dalian Maritime University, China, and has won China National Scholarship. She then graduated with a Distinction in MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from University of Oxford. Before her DPhil, Zhuohan worked for the organizing committee for the Harvard Summit for Young Leaders in China, an initiative that brought liberal arts education from Harvard to China’s top-performing high school students. She also helped evaluate the UNICEF China Child-Friendly School Programme as an RA, focusing on the socio-emotional learning among the Dong ethnic minority groups in Guangxi, China. She also teaches IELTS, TOEFL, and English phonics.

Her MSc research centres on linguistic relativity, specifically the effect of French grammatical gender system on both French speakers’ and learners’ perception of objects. Her DPhil research focuses on English pronunciation teaching and learning among young Chinese kids, particularly emphasising the influence of their mother tongue, Mandarin.

Supervisors

Robert Woore and Faidra Faitaki

Shuo-Fang earned a Bachelor’s degree from National Chengchi University (Taiwan) and a Master’s degree from Boston University. He has teaching experience in various EFL contexts including international high school, educational institute, and graduate language program.

Shuo-Fang’s areas of interest lie in applied linguistics, particularly phonetics/phonology and speech perception. As an Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholar, Shuo-Fang is currently undertaking his doctoral research, supervised by Dr Elizabeth Wonnacott and Dr Robert Woore. His doctoral project is mostly experimental and explores second language learners’ difficulty in processing English connected speech.

Shuo-Fang is affiliated with two research groups: Applied Linguistics and Wonnacott-Nation Lab (developmental cognitive psychology).

Publications

Liang, S., & Yu, H. (2021). Chinese students’ willingness to communicate in EFL classrooms: A case study of students at a Sino-foreign university. Professional and Academic English, 28(2), 15–33.

Siyu Ma is a DPhil student in child development and learning at the Department of Education. Her doctoral research focuses on second-born children under the Chinese two-child policy, especially how siblings play a role in the socio-emotional, language, and early literacy development of these children.

Prior to starting her Dphil, Siyu completed an MSc in Education (Research Design and Methodology) at the University of Oxford, under the supervision of Professor Sonali Nag. Her MSc dissertation explored the roles of social background and home literacy environment in the language and literacy development of a Wales subsample from the Millennium Cohort Study and was awarded a High Distinction. She also holds a BSc degree with first-class honours in Psychology from the University of Bath.

Siyu is also a research associate working on TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education.

At TalkTogether, Siyu is responsible for designing online surveys and analysing quantitative data from child assessments and parent reports.

Publications

Ma, S. (2021). Family background and home literacy environment as predictors of the early literacy development of children in Wales – findings from the Millennium Cohort Study (Master’s thesis, University of Oxford).

 

Amanda is the recipient of the Hazel Project Scholarship, based at the Rees Centre. Her doctoral research explores the conceptualisation of foster homes as therapeutic environments for complex/developmental trauma. Through participant-generated photography and collaborative qualitative methods with young people currently in foster care placements, her research explores if young people’s concepts and perceptions of therapeutic environments coincide with or challenge existing theoretical models and popular practitioner perspectives.

Amanda holds a BA from the University of Leeds (UK) and an MPhil from the University of Oxford (UK).

Lawrence is a teacher of mathematics who is particularly interested in classroom pedagogy, and how research and education policies interact with the teaching that students experience on a daily basis.

He finds that looking outwards in education is valuable with there being much more that unites our classrooms than isolates them. He has been extremely fortunate to study education through an international lens in the US, and to work on the Global Teaching InSights initiative of the Organisation for Economic Development (OECD) where he led on its videos of teaching.

Publications

Global Teaching InSights: A video study of teaching, OECD, 2020

Antonin is currently Doctoral Teaching Fellow on the MSc in Comparative and International Education, teaching Foundations of Educational Research. Antonin is also a Research Assistant for the Centre for Global Higher Education on the ‘Research on Research: the research function and mission of higher education’ project.

Alongside his teaching and research roles, Antonin is completing a Doctoral study on the European Universities Initiative, the European Commission’s flagship higher education programme that seeks to set up European Universities through transnational university alliances.

Arzhia Habibi is a DPhil in Education Candidate and uses Mandarin to conduct her research in the Chinese higher education context.

Arzhia’s research focuses on ‘expressions’ of global or world citizenship education in a Chinese higher education institution In the study, she explores the perspectives and practices of educators and students at a China-based university, which experiments with discourses related to citizenship. She further investigates how individual, local, national and global dynamics and the surrounding discourses influence worldviews and practices in a university setting.

As empirical studies on global or world citizenship education in the Chinese context are scarce, Arzhia hopes to contribute to a nascent knowledge base which may extend and add depth to the critical global discourses of global and world citizenship education, beyond Eurocentric framings.

Prior to her studies at Oxford, Arzhia received a first class Bachelor’s degree in Contemporary Chinese Studies at The University of Nottingham, and a Master’s in International Communication in Taiwan at National Chengchi University. As a child, she also attended kindergarten in Fuzhou, Fujian province of China.

Olga is a co-convenor of the Philosophy of Education Reading Group at the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. Olga’s main research interest is in the topics of epistemic injustice across all levels of education and across national borders with a focus on higher education and the process of knowledge production in academic institutes and universities. Her core interest lies between the areas of social epistemology, research on research (RoR) and comparative and international education (CIE). She has been a recipient of multiple research awards in the United States and the United Kingdom and is an elected co-convenor of the Comparative and International Education Special Interest Group at the British Educational Research Association (BERA).

Her new research at Oxford will explore the epistemically just and unjust practices as experienced by scholars from Kazakhstan during the internationalisation process in the social sciences and the humanities. Prior joining Oxford, Olga taught at University College London Institute of Education in London on the topics of migrant, refugee and minority education and European education traditions from a comparative lens.

Publications
  • Mun, O. (2020). ‘Epistemic Injustices in Internationalising Humanities and Social Sciences: A Case Study of Higher Education and Science Institutes in Kazakhstan.’ Centre for International Higher Education, Boston College. https://www.bc.edu/content/dam/bc1/schools/lsoe/sites/cihe/publication/Perspectives/Perspectives%20No%2018.pdf
  • Mun, O. and Gafu, G. (in press) ‘University Research Capacity in Kazakhstan’. Higher School of Economics, Russia.
  • Kandiko Howson, C., Mun, O. and Walker, R. (2020). ‘Academic Activism in STEM fields: Discipline in Theory and Practice.’ Philosophy and Theory of Higher Education Society.
  • Aizuddin M., Habibi A., Mun, O. (in press, 2020). ‘Post-Colonialism in Comparative and International Education.’ In Jules, T., Shields, R., Thomas, M. (Ed.), Bloomsbury Handbook of Theory in Comparative and International Education.
  • Palandjian, G., Silova, I., Mun, O., Zholdashaliyeva, R. (2018). ‘Gender and Nation in Postsocialist Educational Transformations.’ In Silova, I., & Chankseliani, M. (Eds.), Comparing Post-Socialist Transformations: Education in Eastern Europe and Former Soviet Union. Oxford: Symposium Books.
  • Mun, O., & Zholdashaliyeva, R. (2017). ‘Alippe, Bukvar’ and Gender: A comparative analysis of early literacy textbooks in Kazakhstan and Kyrgyzstan.’ In E. Brown & R. Craven & G. McLean (Ed.), International Advances in Education: Global Initiatives for Equity and Social Justice Series. Information Age Publishing
  • Patel, K. and Mun, O. (2017). ‘Marketing ‘development’ in the neoliberal university.’ DPU Working Papers https://www.ucl.ac.uk/bartlett/development/case-studies/2017/sep/marketing-development-neoliberal-university
  • Fimyar, O., Saniyazova, A. & Mun, O. (2017) ‘Methodology of Collaborative Research: Or, Searching for a Synergy in the Study of Student Transition in Kazakhstan.’ In SAGE Research Methods Cases. London, United Kingdom: SAGE Publications.
  • Mun, O. (2015). ‘(Re)imagining national identity through early literacy textbooks in Kazakhstan’, Forum of Young Central Asian Experts, 2nd edition. http://caa-network.org/archives/5620
  • Silova, I., Mead Yaqub, M., Mun, O., Palandjian, G. (2014). ‘Pedagogies of Space: (re)imagining nation and childhood in post-Soviet states.’ Global Studies of Childhood, 4(3), 195-209.
  • Silova, I., Brezhenyuk, V., Kudasova, M., Mun, O., Artemev, N. (2014). ‘Youth Protests against Privatisation of Education in post-Soviet states.’ European Education, 46(3), 56-65.

Schooled in the discipline of Public Administration at the University of Dhaka and with an experience of over five years of lecturing graduate and post-graduate students at two reputed public universities in Bangladesh, I am interested in research works related to education, gender, public policy, social studies and have multiple publications.

Apart from my current lecturing position, I worked as a news editor and contributor for the Dhaka Insider, an online news portal, in 2015. I also served as the Head of the Department (Department of Public Administration) and Assistant Proctor at the Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujibur Rahman Science and Technology University (BSMRSTU) and as an elected member of the Teachers’ Association there. During my post-graduation (MA. Public Policy) at the University of Nottingham, a qualitative research focus helped me characterize patterns of gender gap in primary education access.

 

Selected Publications
  • Dutta,  P.  (2020).  Democratic  Decentralization  and  Participatory Development:  Focus  on  Bangladesh.  Journal  of    Contemporary  Governance  and  Public Policy, 1(2), 82-91. Permalink/DOI: https://doi.org/10.46507/jcgpp.v1i2
  • Dutta, P., 2021. • Towards Sound Integrity Management in Bangladesh: Challenges and Issues in Public Administration and Law Enforcement. In: S. N. Khanom, ed. Governance, In the 21st Century in the Sounth Asia: Challenges and Ways Forward. Dhaka: Hakkani Publishers, pp. 541-560.

Zhuohan (Johanne) has a BA in English from Dalian Maritime University, China, and has won China National Scholarship. She then graduated with a Distinction in MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from University of Oxford. Before her DPhil, Zhuohan worked for the organizing committee for the Harvard Summit for Young Leaders in China, an initiative that brought liberal arts education from Harvard to China’s top-performing high school students. She also helped evaluate the UNICEF China Child-Friendly School Programme as an RA, focusing on the socio-emotional learning among the Dong ethnic minority groups in Guangxi, China. She also teaches IELTS, TOEFL, and English phonics.

Her MSc research centres on linguistic relativity, specifically the effect of French grammatical gender system on both French speakers’ and learners’ perception of objects. Her DPhil research focuses on English pronunciation teaching and learning among young Chinese kids, particularly emphasising the influence of their mother tongue, Mandarin.

Supervisors

Robert Woore and Faidra Faitaki

Shuo-Fang earned a Bachelor’s degree from National Chengchi University (Taiwan) and a Master’s degree from Boston University. He has teaching experience in various EFL contexts including international high school, educational institute, and graduate language program.

Shuo-Fang’s areas of interest lie in applied linguistics, particularly phonetics/phonology and speech perception. As an Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholar, Shuo-Fang is currently undertaking his doctoral research, supervised by Dr Elizabeth Wonnacott and Dr Robert Woore. His doctoral project is mostly experimental and explores second language learners’ difficulty in processing English connected speech.

Shuo-Fang is affiliated with two research groups: Applied Linguistics and Wonnacott-Nation Lab (developmental cognitive psychology).

Publications

Liang, S., & Yu, H. (2021). Chinese students’ willingness to communicate in EFL classrooms: A case study of students at a Sino-foreign university. Professional and Academic English, 28(2), 15–33.

Siyu Ma is a DPhil student in child development and learning at the Department of Education. Her doctoral research focuses on second-born children under the Chinese two-child policy, especially how siblings play a role in the socio-emotional, language, and early literacy development of these children.

Prior to starting her Dphil, Siyu completed an MSc in Education (Research Design and Methodology) at the University of Oxford, under the supervision of Professor Sonali Nag. Her MSc dissertation explored the roles of social background and home literacy environment in the language and literacy development of a Wales subsample from the Millennium Cohort Study and was awarded a High Distinction. She also holds a BSc degree with first-class honours in Psychology from the University of Bath.

Siyu is also a research associate working on TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education.

At TalkTogether, Siyu is responsible for designing online surveys and analysing quantitative data from child assessments and parent reports.

Publications

Ma, S. (2021). Family background and home literacy environment as predictors of the early literacy development of children in Wales – findings from the Millennium Cohort Study (Master’s thesis, University of Oxford).

 

Amanda is the recipient of the Hazel Project Scholarship, based at the Rees Centre. Her doctoral research explores the conceptualisation of foster homes as therapeutic environments for complex/developmental trauma. Through participant-generated photography and collaborative qualitative methods with young people currently in foster care placements, her research explores if young people’s concepts and perceptions of therapeutic environments coincide with or challenge existing theoretical models and popular practitioner perspectives.

Amanda holds a BA from the University of Leeds (UK) and an MPhil from the University of Oxford (UK).

Lawrence is a teacher of mathematics who is particularly interested in classroom pedagogy, and how research and education policies interact with the teaching that students experience on a daily basis.

He finds that looking outwards in education is valuable with there being much more that unites our classrooms than isolates them. He has been extremely fortunate to study education through an international lens in the US, and to work on the Global Teaching InSights initiative of the Organisation for Economic Development (OECD) where he led on its videos of teaching.

Publications

Global Teaching InSights: A video study of teaching, OECD, 2020

Antonin is currently Doctoral Teaching Fellow on the MSc in Comparative and International Education, teaching Foundations of Educational Research. Antonin is also a Research Assistant for the Centre for Global Higher Education on the ‘Research on Research: the research function and mission of higher education’ project.

Alongside his teaching and research roles, Antonin is completing a Doctoral study on the European Universities Initiative, the European Commission’s flagship higher education programme that seeks to set up European Universities through transnational university alliances.

Arzhia Habibi is a DPhil in Education Candidate and uses Mandarin to conduct her research in the Chinese higher education context.

Arzhia’s research focuses on ‘expressions’ of global or world citizenship education in a Chinese higher education institution In the study, she explores the perspectives and practices of educators and students at a China-based university, which experiments with discourses related to citizenship. She further investigates how individual, local, national and global dynamics and the surrounding discourses influence worldviews and practices in a university setting.

As empirical studies on global or world citizenship education in the Chinese context are scarce, Arzhia hopes to contribute to a nascent knowledge base which may extend and add depth to the critical global discourses of global and world citizenship education, beyond Eurocentric framings.

Prior to her studies at Oxford, Arzhia received a first class Bachelor’s degree in Contemporary Chinese Studies at The University of Nottingham, and a Master’s in International Communication in Taiwan at National Chengchi University. As a child, she also attended kindergarten in Fuzhou, Fujian province of China.

Olga is a co-convenor of the Philosophy of Education Reading Group at the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. Olga’s main research interest is in the topics of epistemic injustice across all levels of education and across national borders with a focus on higher education and the process of knowledge production in academic institutes and universities. Her core interest lies between the areas of social epistemology, research on research (RoR) and comparative and international education (CIE). She has been a recipient of multiple research awards in the United States and the United Kingdom and is an elected co-convenor of the Comparative and International Education Special Interest Group at the British Educational Research Association (BERA).

Her new research at Oxford will explore the epistemically just and unjust practices as experienced by scholars from Kazakhstan during the internationalisation process in the social sciences and the humanities. Prior joining Oxford, Olga taught at University College London Institute of Education in London on the topics of migrant, refugee and minority education and European education traditions from a comparative lens.

Publications
  • Mun, O. (2020). ‘Epistemic Injustices in Internationalising Humanities and Social Sciences: A Case Study of Higher Education and Science Institutes in Kazakhstan.’ Centre for International Higher Education, Boston College. https://www.bc.edu/content/dam/bc1/schools/lsoe/sites/cihe/publication/Perspectives/Perspectives%20No%2018.pdf
  • Mun, O. and Gafu, G. (in press) ‘University Research Capacity in Kazakhstan’. Higher School of Economics, Russia.
  • Kandiko Howson, C., Mun, O. and Walker, R. (2020). ‘Academic Activism in STEM fields: Discipline in Theory and Practice.’ Philosophy and Theory of Higher Education Society.
  • Aizuddin M., Habibi A., Mun, O. (in press, 2020). ‘Post-Colonialism in Comparative and International Education.’ In Jules, T., Shields, R., Thomas, M. (Ed.), Bloomsbury Handbook of Theory in Comparative and International Education.
  • Palandjian, G., Silova, I., Mun, O., Zholdashaliyeva, R. (2018). ‘Gender and Nation in Postsocialist Educational Transformations.’ In Silova, I., & Chankseliani, M. (Eds.), Comparing Post-Socialist Transformations: Education in Eastern Europe and Former Soviet Union. Oxford: Symposium Books.
  • Mun, O., & Zholdashaliyeva, R. (2017). ‘Alippe, Bukvar’ and Gender: A comparative analysis of early literacy textbooks in Kazakhstan and Kyrgyzstan.’ In E. Brown & R. Craven & G. McLean (Ed.), International Advances in Education: Global Initiatives for Equity and Social Justice Series. Information Age Publishing
  • Patel, K. and Mun, O. (2017). ‘Marketing ‘development’ in the neoliberal university.’ DPU Working Papers https://www.ucl.ac.uk/bartlett/development/case-studies/2017/sep/marketing-development-neoliberal-university
  • Fimyar, O., Saniyazova, A. & Mun, O. (2017) ‘Methodology of Collaborative Research: Or, Searching for a Synergy in the Study of Student Transition in Kazakhstan.’ In SAGE Research Methods Cases. London, United Kingdom: SAGE Publications.
  • Mun, O. (2015). ‘(Re)imagining national identity through early literacy textbooks in Kazakhstan’, Forum of Young Central Asian Experts, 2nd edition. http://caa-network.org/archives/5620
  • Silova, I., Mead Yaqub, M., Mun, O., Palandjian, G. (2014). ‘Pedagogies of Space: (re)imagining nation and childhood in post-Soviet states.’ Global Studies of Childhood, 4(3), 195-209.
  • Silova, I., Brezhenyuk, V., Kudasova, M., Mun, O., Artemev, N. (2014). ‘Youth Protests against Privatisation of Education in post-Soviet states.’ European Education, 46(3), 56-65.

Schooled in the discipline of Public Administration at the University of Dhaka and with an experience of over five years of lecturing graduate and post-graduate students at two reputed public universities in Bangladesh, I am interested in research works related to education, gender, public policy, social studies and have multiple publications.

Apart from my current lecturing position, I worked as a news editor and contributor for the Dhaka Insider, an online news portal, in 2015. I also served as the Head of the Department (Department of Public Administration) and Assistant Proctor at the Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujibur Rahman Science and Technology University (BSMRSTU) and as an elected member of the Teachers’ Association there. During my post-graduation (MA. Public Policy) at the University of Nottingham, a qualitative research focus helped me characterize patterns of gender gap in primary education access.

 

Selected Publications
  • Dutta,  P.  (2020).  Democratic  Decentralization  and  Participatory Development:  Focus  on  Bangladesh.  Journal  of    Contemporary  Governance  and  Public Policy, 1(2), 82-91. Permalink/DOI: https://doi.org/10.46507/jcgpp.v1i2
  • Dutta, P., 2021. • Towards Sound Integrity Management in Bangladesh: Challenges and Issues in Public Administration and Law Enforcement. In: S. N. Khanom, ed. Governance, In the 21st Century in the Sounth Asia: Challenges and Ways Forward. Dhaka: Hakkani Publishers, pp. 541-560.

Zhuohan (Johanne) has a BA in English from Dalian Maritime University, China, and has won China National Scholarship. She then graduated with a Distinction in MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from University of Oxford. Before her DPhil, Zhuohan worked for the organizing committee for the Harvard Summit for Young Leaders in China, an initiative that brought liberal arts education from Harvard to China’s top-performing high school students. She also helped evaluate the UNICEF China Child-Friendly School Programme as an RA, focusing on the socio-emotional learning among the Dong ethnic minority groups in Guangxi, China. She also teaches IELTS, TOEFL, and English phonics.

Her MSc research centres on linguistic relativity, specifically the effect of French grammatical gender system on both French speakers’ and learners’ perception of objects. Her DPhil research focuses on English pronunciation teaching and learning among young Chinese kids, particularly emphasising the influence of their mother tongue, Mandarin.

Supervisors

Robert Woore and Faidra Faitaki

Shuo-Fang earned a Bachelor’s degree from National Chengchi University (Taiwan) and a Master’s degree from Boston University. He has teaching experience in various EFL contexts including international high school, educational institute, and graduate language program.

Shuo-Fang’s areas of interest lie in applied linguistics, particularly phonetics/phonology and speech perception. As an Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholar, Shuo-Fang is currently undertaking his doctoral research, supervised by Dr Elizabeth Wonnacott and Dr Robert Woore. His doctoral project is mostly experimental and explores second language learners’ difficulty in processing English connected speech.

Shuo-Fang is affiliated with two research groups: Applied Linguistics and Wonnacott-Nation Lab (developmental cognitive psychology).

Publications

Liang, S., & Yu, H. (2021). Chinese students’ willingness to communicate in EFL classrooms: A case study of students at a Sino-foreign university. Professional and Academic English, 28(2), 15–33.

Siyu Ma is a DPhil student in child development and learning at the Department of Education. Her doctoral research focuses on second-born children under the Chinese two-child policy, especially how siblings play a role in the socio-emotional, language, and early literacy development of these children.

Prior to starting her Dphil, Siyu completed an MSc in Education (Research Design and Methodology) at the University of Oxford, under the supervision of Professor Sonali Nag. Her MSc dissertation explored the roles of social background and home literacy environment in the language and literacy development of a Wales subsample from the Millennium Cohort Study and was awarded a High Distinction. She also holds a BSc degree with first-class honours in Psychology from the University of Bath.

Siyu is also a research associate working on TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education.

At TalkTogether, Siyu is responsible for designing online surveys and analysing quantitative data from child assessments and parent reports.

Publications

Ma, S. (2021). Family background and home literacy environment as predictors of the early literacy development of children in Wales – findings from the Millennium Cohort Study (Master’s thesis, University of Oxford).

 

Amanda is the recipient of the Hazel Project Scholarship, based at the Rees Centre. Her doctoral research explores the conceptualisation of foster homes as therapeutic environments for complex/developmental trauma. Through participant-generated photography and collaborative qualitative methods with young people currently in foster care placements, her research explores if young people’s concepts and perceptions of therapeutic environments coincide with or challenge existing theoretical models and popular practitioner perspectives.

Amanda holds a BA from the University of Leeds (UK) and an MPhil from the University of Oxford (UK).

Lawrence is a teacher of mathematics who is particularly interested in classroom pedagogy, and how research and education policies interact with the teaching that students experience on a daily basis.

He finds that looking outwards in education is valuable with there being much more that unites our classrooms than isolates them. He has been extremely fortunate to study education through an international lens in the US, and to work on the Global Teaching InSights initiative of the Organisation for Economic Development (OECD) where he led on its videos of teaching.

Publications

Global Teaching InSights: A video study of teaching, OECD, 2020

Antonin is currently Doctoral Teaching Fellow on the MSc in Comparative and International Education, teaching Foundations of Educational Research. Antonin is also a Research Assistant for the Centre for Global Higher Education on the ‘Research on Research: the research function and mission of higher education’ project.

Alongside his teaching and research roles, Antonin is completing a Doctoral study on the European Universities Initiative, the European Commission’s flagship higher education programme that seeks to set up European Universities through transnational university alliances.

Arzhia Habibi is a DPhil in Education Candidate and uses Mandarin to conduct her research in the Chinese higher education context.

Arzhia’s research focuses on ‘expressions’ of global or world citizenship education in a Chinese higher education institution In the study, she explores the perspectives and practices of educators and students at a China-based university, which experiments with discourses related to citizenship. She further investigates how individual, local, national and global dynamics and the surrounding discourses influence worldviews and practices in a university setting.

As empirical studies on global or world citizenship education in the Chinese context are scarce, Arzhia hopes to contribute to a nascent knowledge base which may extend and add depth to the critical global discourses of global and world citizenship education, beyond Eurocentric framings.

Prior to her studies at Oxford, Arzhia received a first class Bachelor’s degree in Contemporary Chinese Studies at The University of Nottingham, and a Master’s in International Communication in Taiwan at National Chengchi University. As a child, she also attended kindergarten in Fuzhou, Fujian province of China.

Olga is a co-convenor of the Philosophy of Education Reading Group at the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. Olga’s main research interest is in the topics of epistemic injustice across all levels of education and across national borders with a focus on higher education and the process of knowledge production in academic institutes and universities. Her core interest lies between the areas of social epistemology, research on research (RoR) and comparative and international education (CIE). She has been a recipient of multiple research awards in the United States and the United Kingdom and is an elected co-convenor of the Comparative and International Education Special Interest Group at the British Educational Research Association (BERA).

Her new research at Oxford will explore the epistemically just and unjust practices as experienced by scholars from Kazakhstan during the internationalisation process in the social sciences and the humanities. Prior joining Oxford, Olga taught at University College London Institute of Education in London on the topics of migrant, refugee and minority education and European education traditions from a comparative lens.

Publications
  • Mun, O. (2020). ‘Epistemic Injustices in Internationalising Humanities and Social Sciences: A Case Study of Higher Education and Science Institutes in Kazakhstan.’ Centre for International Higher Education, Boston College. https://www.bc.edu/content/dam/bc1/schools/lsoe/sites/cihe/publication/Perspectives/Perspectives%20No%2018.pdf
  • Mun, O. and Gafu, G. (in press) ‘University Research Capacity in Kazakhstan’. Higher School of Economics, Russia.
  • Kandiko Howson, C., Mun, O. and Walker, R. (2020). ‘Academic Activism in STEM fields: Discipline in Theory and Practice.’ Philosophy and Theory of Higher Education Society.
  • Aizuddin M., Habibi A., Mun, O. (in press, 2020). ‘Post-Colonialism in Comparative and International Education.’ In Jules, T., Shields, R., Thomas, M. (Ed.), Bloomsbury Handbook of Theory in Comparative and International Education.
  • Palandjian, G., Silova, I., Mun, O., Zholdashaliyeva, R. (2018). ‘Gender and Nation in Postsocialist Educational Transformations.’ In Silova, I., & Chankseliani, M. (Eds.), Comparing Post-Socialist Transformations: Education in Eastern Europe and Former Soviet Union. Oxford: Symposium Books.
  • Mun, O., & Zholdashaliyeva, R. (2017). ‘Alippe, Bukvar’ and Gender: A comparative analysis of early literacy textbooks in Kazakhstan and Kyrgyzstan.’ In E. Brown & R. Craven & G. McLean (Ed.), International Advances in Education: Global Initiatives for Equity and Social Justice Series. Information Age Publishing
  • Patel, K. and Mun, O. (2017). ‘Marketing ‘development’ in the neoliberal university.’ DPU Working Papers https://www.ucl.ac.uk/bartlett/development/case-studies/2017/sep/marketing-development-neoliberal-university
  • Fimyar, O., Saniyazova, A. & Mun, O. (2017) ‘Methodology of Collaborative Research: Or, Searching for a Synergy in the Study of Student Transition in Kazakhstan.’ In SAGE Research Methods Cases. London, United Kingdom: SAGE Publications.
  • Mun, O. (2015). ‘(Re)imagining national identity through early literacy textbooks in Kazakhstan’, Forum of Young Central Asian Experts, 2nd edition. http://caa-network.org/archives/5620
  • Silova, I., Mead Yaqub, M., Mun, O., Palandjian, G. (2014). ‘Pedagogies of Space: (re)imagining nation and childhood in post-Soviet states.’ Global Studies of Childhood, 4(3), 195-209.
  • Silova, I., Brezhenyuk, V., Kudasova, M., Mun, O., Artemev, N. (2014). ‘Youth Protests against Privatisation of Education in post-Soviet states.’ European Education, 46(3), 56-65.

Schooled in the discipline of Public Administration at the University of Dhaka and with an experience of over five years of lecturing graduate and post-graduate students at two reputed public universities in Bangladesh, I am interested in research works related to education, gender, public policy, social studies and have multiple publications.

Apart from my current lecturing position, I worked as a news editor and contributor for the Dhaka Insider, an online news portal, in 2015. I also served as the Head of the Department (Department of Public Administration) and Assistant Proctor at the Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujibur Rahman Science and Technology University (BSMRSTU) and as an elected member of the Teachers’ Association there. During my post-graduation (MA. Public Policy) at the University of Nottingham, a qualitative research focus helped me characterize patterns of gender gap in primary education access.

 

Selected Publications
  • Dutta,  P.  (2020).  Democratic  Decentralization  and  Participatory Development:  Focus  on  Bangladesh.  Journal  of    Contemporary  Governance  and  Public Policy, 1(2), 82-91. Permalink/DOI: https://doi.org/10.46507/jcgpp.v1i2
  • Dutta, P., 2021. • Towards Sound Integrity Management in Bangladesh: Challenges and Issues in Public Administration and Law Enforcement. In: S. N. Khanom, ed. Governance, In the 21st Century in the Sounth Asia: Challenges and Ways Forward. Dhaka: Hakkani Publishers, pp. 541-560.

Zhuohan (Johanne) has a BA in English from Dalian Maritime University, China, and has won China National Scholarship. She then graduated with a Distinction in MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from University of Oxford. Before her DPhil, Zhuohan worked for the organizing committee for the Harvard Summit for Young Leaders in China, an initiative that brought liberal arts education from Harvard to China’s top-performing high school students. She also helped evaluate the UNICEF China Child-Friendly School Programme as an RA, focusing on the socio-emotional learning among the Dong ethnic minority groups in Guangxi, China. She also teaches IELTS, TOEFL, and English phonics.

Her MSc research centres on linguistic relativity, specifically the effect of French grammatical gender system on both French speakers’ and learners’ perception of objects. Her DPhil research focuses on English pronunciation teaching and learning among young Chinese kids, particularly emphasising the influence of their mother tongue, Mandarin.

Supervisors

Robert Woore and Faidra Faitaki

Shuo-Fang earned a Bachelor’s degree from National Chengchi University (Taiwan) and a Master’s degree from Boston University. He has teaching experience in various EFL contexts including international high school, educational institute, and graduate language program.

Shuo-Fang’s areas of interest lie in applied linguistics, particularly phonetics/phonology and speech perception. As an Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholar, Shuo-Fang is currently undertaking his doctoral research, supervised by Dr Elizabeth Wonnacott and Dr Robert Woore. His doctoral project is mostly experimental and explores second language learners’ difficulty in processing English connected speech.

Shuo-Fang is affiliated with two research groups: Applied Linguistics and Wonnacott-Nation Lab (developmental cognitive psychology).

Publications

Liang, S., & Yu, H. (2021). Chinese students’ willingness to communicate in EFL classrooms: A case study of students at a Sino-foreign university. Professional and Academic English, 28(2), 15–33.

Siyu Ma is a DPhil student in child development and learning at the Department of Education. Her doctoral research focuses on second-born children under the Chinese two-child policy, especially how siblings play a role in the socio-emotional, language, and early literacy development of these children.

Prior to starting her Dphil, Siyu completed an MSc in Education (Research Design and Methodology) at the University of Oxford, under the supervision of Professor Sonali Nag. Her MSc dissertation explored the roles of social background and home literacy environment in the language and literacy development of a Wales subsample from the Millennium Cohort Study and was awarded a High Distinction. She also holds a BSc degree with first-class honours in Psychology from the University of Bath.

Siyu is also a research associate working on TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education.

At TalkTogether, Siyu is responsible for designing online surveys and analysing quantitative data from child assessments and parent reports.

Publications

Ma, S. (2021). Family background and home literacy environment as predictors of the early literacy development of children in Wales – findings from the Millennium Cohort Study (Master’s thesis, University of Oxford).

 

Amanda is the recipient of the Hazel Project Scholarship, based at the Rees Centre. Her doctoral research explores the conceptualisation of foster homes as therapeutic environments for complex/developmental trauma. Through participant-generated photography and collaborative qualitative methods with young people currently in foster care placements, her research explores if young people’s concepts and perceptions of therapeutic environments coincide with or challenge existing theoretical models and popular practitioner perspectives.

Amanda holds a BA from the University of Leeds (UK) and an MPhil from the University of Oxford (UK).

Lawrence is a teacher of mathematics who is particularly interested in classroom pedagogy, and how research and education policies interact with the teaching that students experience on a daily basis.

He finds that looking outwards in education is valuable with there being much more that unites our classrooms than isolates them. He has been extremely fortunate to study education through an international lens in the US, and to work on the Global Teaching InSights initiative of the Organisation for Economic Development (OECD) where he led on its videos of teaching.

Publications

Global Teaching InSights: A video study of teaching, OECD, 2020

Antonin is currently Doctoral Teaching Fellow on the MSc in Comparative and International Education, teaching Foundations of Educational Research. Antonin is also a Research Assistant for the Centre for Global Higher Education on the ‘Research on Research: the research function and mission of higher education’ project.

Alongside his teaching and research roles, Antonin is completing a Doctoral study on the European Universities Initiative, the European Commission’s flagship higher education programme that seeks to set up European Universities through transnational university alliances.

Arzhia Habibi is a DPhil in Education Candidate and uses Mandarin to conduct her research in the Chinese higher education context.

Arzhia’s research focuses on ‘expressions’ of global or world citizenship education in a Chinese higher education institution In the study, she explores the perspectives and practices of educators and students at a China-based university, which experiments with discourses related to citizenship. She further investigates how individual, local, national and global dynamics and the surrounding discourses influence worldviews and practices in a university setting.

As empirical studies on global or world citizenship education in the Chinese context are scarce, Arzhia hopes to contribute to a nascent knowledge base which may extend and add depth to the critical global discourses of global and world citizenship education, beyond Eurocentric framings.

Prior to her studies at Oxford, Arzhia received a first class Bachelor’s degree in Contemporary Chinese Studies at The University of Nottingham, and a Master’s in International Communication in Taiwan at National Chengchi University. As a child, she also attended kindergarten in Fuzhou, Fujian province of China.

Olga is a co-convenor of the Philosophy of Education Reading Group at the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. Olga’s main research interest is in the topics of epistemic injustice across all levels of education and across national borders with a focus on higher education and the process of knowledge production in academic institutes and universities. Her core interest lies between the areas of social epistemology, research on research (RoR) and comparative and international education (CIE). She has been a recipient of multiple research awards in the United States and the United Kingdom and is an elected co-convenor of the Comparative and International Education Special Interest Group at the British Educational Research Association (BERA).

Her new research at Oxford will explore the epistemically just and unjust practices as experienced by scholars from Kazakhstan during the internationalisation process in the social sciences and the humanities. Prior joining Oxford, Olga taught at University College London Institute of Education in London on the topics of migrant, refugee and minority education and European education traditions from a comparative lens.

Publications
  • Mun, O. (2020). ‘Epistemic Injustices in Internationalising Humanities and Social Sciences: A Case Study of Higher Education and Science Institutes in Kazakhstan.’ Centre for International Higher Education, Boston College. https://www.bc.edu/content/dam/bc1/schools/lsoe/sites/cihe/publication/Perspectives/Perspectives%20No%2018.pdf
  • Mun, O. and Gafu, G. (in press) ‘University Research Capacity in Kazakhstan’. Higher School of Economics, Russia.
  • Kandiko Howson, C., Mun, O. and Walker, R. (2020). ‘Academic Activism in STEM fields: Discipline in Theory and Practice.’ Philosophy and Theory of Higher Education Society.
  • Aizuddin M., Habibi A., Mun, O. (in press, 2020). ‘Post-Colonialism in Comparative and International Education.’ In Jules, T., Shields, R., Thomas, M. (Ed.), Bloomsbury Handbook of Theory in Comparative and International Education.
  • Palandjian, G., Silova, I., Mun, O., Zholdashaliyeva, R. (2018). ‘Gender and Nation in Postsocialist Educational Transformations.’ In Silova, I., & Chankseliani, M. (Eds.), Comparing Post-Socialist Transformations: Education in Eastern Europe and Former Soviet Union. Oxford: Symposium Books.
  • Mun, O., & Zholdashaliyeva, R. (2017). ‘Alippe, Bukvar’ and Gender: A comparative analysis of early literacy textbooks in Kazakhstan and Kyrgyzstan.’ In E. Brown & R. Craven & G. McLean (Ed.), International Advances in Education: Global Initiatives for Equity and Social Justice Series. Information Age Publishing
  • Patel, K. and Mun, O. (2017). ‘Marketing ‘development’ in the neoliberal university.’ DPU Working Papers https://www.ucl.ac.uk/bartlett/development/case-studies/2017/sep/marketing-development-neoliberal-university
  • Fimyar, O., Saniyazova, A. & Mun, O. (2017) ‘Methodology of Collaborative Research: Or, Searching for a Synergy in the Study of Student Transition in Kazakhstan.’ In SAGE Research Methods Cases. London, United Kingdom: SAGE Publications.
  • Mun, O. (2015). ‘(Re)imagining national identity through early literacy textbooks in Kazakhstan’, Forum of Young Central Asian Experts, 2nd edition. http://caa-network.org/archives/5620
  • Silova, I., Mead Yaqub, M., Mun, O., Palandjian, G. (2014). ‘Pedagogies of Space: (re)imagining nation and childhood in post-Soviet states.’ Global Studies of Childhood, 4(3), 195-209.
  • Silova, I., Brezhenyuk, V., Kudasova, M., Mun, O., Artemev, N. (2014). ‘Youth Protests against Privatisation of Education in post-Soviet states.’ European Education, 46(3), 56-65.

Schooled in the discipline of Public Administration at the University of Dhaka and with an experience of over five years of lecturing graduate and post-graduate students at two reputed public universities in Bangladesh, I am interested in research works related to education, gender, public policy, social studies and have multiple publications.

Apart from my current lecturing position, I worked as a news editor and contributor for the Dhaka Insider, an online news portal, in 2015. I also served as the Head of the Department (Department of Public Administration) and Assistant Proctor at the Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujibur Rahman Science and Technology University (BSMRSTU) and as an elected member of the Teachers’ Association there. During my post-graduation (MA. Public Policy) at the University of Nottingham, a qualitative research focus helped me characterize patterns of gender gap in primary education access.

 

Selected Publications
  • Dutta,  P.  (2020).  Democratic  Decentralization  and  Participatory Development:  Focus  on  Bangladesh.  Journal  of    Contemporary  Governance  and  Public Policy, 1(2), 82-91. Permalink/DOI: https://doi.org/10.46507/jcgpp.v1i2
  • Dutta, P., 2021. • Towards Sound Integrity Management in Bangladesh: Challenges and Issues in Public Administration and Law Enforcement. In: S. N. Khanom, ed. Governance, In the 21st Century in the Sounth Asia: Challenges and Ways Forward. Dhaka: Hakkani Publishers, pp. 541-560.

Zhuohan (Johanne) has a BA in English from Dalian Maritime University, China, and has won China National Scholarship. She then graduated with a Distinction in MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from University of Oxford. Before her DPhil, Zhuohan worked for the organizing committee for the Harvard Summit for Young Leaders in China, an initiative that brought liberal arts education from Harvard to China’s top-performing high school students. She also helped evaluate the UNICEF China Child-Friendly School Programme as an RA, focusing on the socio-emotional learning among the Dong ethnic minority groups in Guangxi, China. She also teaches IELTS, TOEFL, and English phonics.

Her MSc research centres on linguistic relativity, specifically the effect of French grammatical gender system on both French speakers’ and learners’ perception of objects. Her DPhil research focuses on English pronunciation teaching and learning among young Chinese kids, particularly emphasising the influence of their mother tongue, Mandarin.

Supervisors

Robert Woore and Faidra Faitaki

Shuo-Fang earned a Bachelor’s degree from National Chengchi University (Taiwan) and a Master’s degree from Boston University. He has teaching experience in various EFL contexts including international high school, educational institute, and graduate language program.

Shuo-Fang’s areas of interest lie in applied linguistics, particularly phonetics/phonology and speech perception. As an Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholar, Shuo-Fang is currently undertaking his doctoral research, supervised by Dr Elizabeth Wonnacott and Dr Robert Woore. His doctoral project is mostly experimental and explores second language learners’ difficulty in processing English connected speech.

Shuo-Fang is affiliated with two research groups: Applied Linguistics and Wonnacott-Nation Lab (developmental cognitive psychology).

Publications

Liang, S., & Yu, H. (2021). Chinese students’ willingness to communicate in EFL classrooms: A case study of students at a Sino-foreign university. Professional and Academic English, 28(2), 15–33.

Siyu Ma is a DPhil student in child development and learning at the Department of Education. Her doctoral research focuses on second-born children under the Chinese two-child policy, especially how siblings play a role in the socio-emotional, language, and early literacy development of these children.

Prior to starting her Dphil, Siyu completed an MSc in Education (Research Design and Methodology) at the University of Oxford, under the supervision of Professor Sonali Nag. Her MSc dissertation explored the roles of social background and home literacy environment in the language and literacy development of a Wales subsample from the Millennium Cohort Study and was awarded a High Distinction. She also holds a BSc degree with first-class honours in Psychology from the University of Bath.

Siyu is also a research associate working on TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education.

At TalkTogether, Siyu is responsible for designing online surveys and analysing quantitative data from child assessments and parent reports.

Publications

Ma, S. (2021). Family background and home literacy environment as predictors of the early literacy development of children in Wales – findings from the Millennium Cohort Study (Master’s thesis, University of Oxford).

 

Amanda is the recipient of the Hazel Project Scholarship, based at the Rees Centre. Her doctoral research explores the conceptualisation of foster homes as therapeutic environments for complex/developmental trauma. Through participant-generated photography and collaborative qualitative methods with young people currently in foster care placements, her research explores if young people’s concepts and perceptions of therapeutic environments coincide with or challenge existing theoretical models and popular practitioner perspectives.

Amanda holds a BA from the University of Leeds (UK) and an MPhil from the University of Oxford (UK).

Lawrence is a teacher of mathematics who is particularly interested in classroom pedagogy, and how research and education policies interact with the teaching that students experience on a daily basis.

He finds that looking outwards in education is valuable with there being much more that unites our classrooms than isolates them. He has been extremely fortunate to study education through an international lens in the US, and to work on the Global Teaching InSights initiative of the Organisation for Economic Development (OECD) where he led on its videos of teaching.

Publications

Global Teaching InSights: A video study of teaching, OECD, 2020

Antonin is currently Doctoral Teaching Fellow on the MSc in Comparative and International Education, teaching Foundations of Educational Research. Antonin is also a Research Assistant for the Centre for Global Higher Education on the ‘Research on Research: the research function and mission of higher education’ project.

Alongside his teaching and research roles, Antonin is completing a Doctoral study on the European Universities Initiative, the European Commission’s flagship higher education programme that seeks to set up European Universities through transnational university alliances.

Arzhia Habibi is a DPhil in Education Candidate and uses Mandarin to conduct her research in the Chinese higher education context.

Arzhia’s research focuses on ‘expressions’ of global or world citizenship education in a Chinese higher education institution In the study, she explores the perspectives and practices of educators and students at a China-based university, which experiments with discourses related to citizenship. She further investigates how individual, local, national and global dynamics and the surrounding discourses influence worldviews and practices in a university setting.

As empirical studies on global or world citizenship education in the Chinese context are scarce, Arzhia hopes to contribute to a nascent knowledge base which may extend and add depth to the critical global discourses of global and world citizenship education, beyond Eurocentric framings.

Prior to her studies at Oxford, Arzhia received a first class Bachelor’s degree in Contemporary Chinese Studies at The University of Nottingham, and a Master’s in International Communication in Taiwan at National Chengchi University. As a child, she also attended kindergarten in Fuzhou, Fujian province of China.

Olga is a co-convenor of the Philosophy of Education Reading Group at the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. Olga’s main research interest is in the topics of epistemic injustice across all levels of education and across national borders with a focus on higher education and the process of knowledge production in academic institutes and universities. Her core interest lies between the areas of social epistemology, research on research (RoR) and comparative and international education (CIE). She has been a recipient of multiple research awards in the United States and the United Kingdom and is an elected co-convenor of the Comparative and International Education Special Interest Group at the British Educational Research Association (BERA).

Her new research at Oxford will explore the epistemically just and unjust practices as experienced by scholars from Kazakhstan during the internationalisation process in the social sciences and the humanities. Prior joining Oxford, Olga taught at University College London Institute of Education in London on the topics of migrant, refugee and minority education and European education traditions from a comparative lens.

Publications
  • Mun, O. (2020). ‘Epistemic Injustices in Internationalising Humanities and Social Sciences: A Case Study of Higher Education and Science Institutes in Kazakhstan.’ Centre for International Higher Education, Boston College. https://www.bc.edu/content/dam/bc1/schools/lsoe/sites/cihe/publication/Perspectives/Perspectives%20No%2018.pdf
  • Mun, O. and Gafu, G. (in press) ‘University Research Capacity in Kazakhstan’. Higher School of Economics, Russia.
  • Kandiko Howson, C., Mun, O. and Walker, R. (2020). ‘Academic Activism in STEM fields: Discipline in Theory and Practice.’ Philosophy and Theory of Higher Education Society.
  • Aizuddin M., Habibi A., Mun, O. (in press, 2020). ‘Post-Colonialism in Comparative and International Education.’ In Jules, T., Shields, R., Thomas, M. (Ed.), Bloomsbury Handbook of Theory in Comparative and International Education.
  • Palandjian, G., Silova, I., Mun, O., Zholdashaliyeva, R. (2018). ‘Gender and Nation in Postsocialist Educational Transformations.’ In Silova, I., & Chankseliani, M. (Eds.), Comparing Post-Socialist Transformations: Education in Eastern Europe and Former Soviet Union. Oxford: Symposium Books.
  • Mun, O., & Zholdashaliyeva, R. (2017). ‘Alippe, Bukvar’ and Gender: A comparative analysis of early literacy textbooks in Kazakhstan and Kyrgyzstan.’ In E. Brown & R. Craven & G. McLean (Ed.), International Advances in Education: Global Initiatives for Equity and Social Justice Series. Information Age Publishing
  • Patel, K. and Mun, O. (2017). ‘Marketing ‘development’ in the neoliberal university.’ DPU Working Papers https://www.ucl.ac.uk/bartlett/development/case-studies/2017/sep/marketing-development-neoliberal-university
  • Fimyar, O., Saniyazova, A. & Mun, O. (2017) ‘Methodology of Collaborative Research: Or, Searching for a Synergy in the Study of Student Transition in Kazakhstan.’ In SAGE Research Methods Cases. London, United Kingdom: SAGE Publications.
  • Mun, O. (2015). ‘(Re)imagining national identity through early literacy textbooks in Kazakhstan’, Forum of Young Central Asian Experts, 2nd edition. http://caa-network.org/archives/5620
  • Silova, I., Mead Yaqub, M., Mun, O., Palandjian, G. (2014). ‘Pedagogies of Space: (re)imagining nation and childhood in post-Soviet states.’ Global Studies of Childhood, 4(3), 195-209.
  • Silova, I., Brezhenyuk, V., Kudasova, M., Mun, O., Artemev, N. (2014). ‘Youth Protests against Privatisation of Education in post-Soviet states.’ European Education, 46(3), 56-65.

Schooled in the discipline of Public Administration at the University of Dhaka and with an experience of over five years of lecturing graduate and post-graduate students at two reputed public universities in Bangladesh, I am interested in research works related to education, gender, public policy, social studies and have multiple publications.

Apart from my current lecturing position, I worked as a news editor and contributor for the Dhaka Insider, an online news portal, in 2015. I also served as the Head of the Department (Department of Public Administration) and Assistant Proctor at the Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujibur Rahman Science and Technology University (BSMRSTU) and as an elected member of the Teachers’ Association there. During my post-graduation (MA. Public Policy) at the University of Nottingham, a qualitative research focus helped me characterize patterns of gender gap in primary education access.

 

Selected Publications
  • Dutta,  P.  (2020).  Democratic  Decentralization  and  Participatory Development:  Focus  on  Bangladesh.  Journal  of    Contemporary  Governance  and  Public Policy, 1(2), 82-91. Permalink/DOI: https://doi.org/10.46507/jcgpp.v1i2
  • Dutta, P., 2021. • Towards Sound Integrity Management in Bangladesh: Challenges and Issues in Public Administration and Law Enforcement. In: S. N. Khanom, ed. Governance, In the 21st Century in the Sounth Asia: Challenges and Ways Forward. Dhaka: Hakkani Publishers, pp. 541-560.

Zhuohan (Johanne) has a BA in English from Dalian Maritime University, China, and has won China National Scholarship. She then graduated with a Distinction in MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from University of Oxford. Before her DPhil, Zhuohan worked for the organizing committee for the Harvard Summit for Young Leaders in China, an initiative that brought liberal arts education from Harvard to China’s top-performing high school students. She also helped evaluate the UNICEF China Child-Friendly School Programme as an RA, focusing on the socio-emotional learning among the Dong ethnic minority groups in Guangxi, China. She also teaches IELTS, TOEFL, and English phonics.

Her MSc research centres on linguistic relativity, specifically the effect of French grammatical gender system on both French speakers’ and learners’ perception of objects. Her DPhil research focuses on English pronunciation teaching and learning among young Chinese kids, particularly emphasising the influence of their mother tongue, Mandarin.

Supervisors

Robert Woore and Faidra Faitaki

Shuo-Fang earned a Bachelor’s degree from National Chengchi University (Taiwan) and a Master’s degree from Boston University. He has teaching experience in various EFL contexts including international high school, educational institute, and graduate language program.

Shuo-Fang’s areas of interest lie in applied linguistics, particularly phonetics/phonology and speech perception. As an Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholar, Shuo-Fang is currently undertaking his doctoral research, supervised by Dr Elizabeth Wonnacott and Dr Robert Woore. His doctoral project is mostly experimental and explores second language learners’ difficulty in processing English connected speech.

Shuo-Fang is affiliated with two research groups: Applied Linguistics and Wonnacott-Nation Lab (developmental cognitive psychology).

Publications

Liang, S., & Yu, H. (2021). Chinese students’ willingness to communicate in EFL classrooms: A case study of students at a Sino-foreign university. Professional and Academic English, 28(2), 15–33.

Siyu Ma is a DPhil student in child development and learning at the Department of Education. Her doctoral research focuses on second-born children under the Chinese two-child policy, especially how siblings play a role in the socio-emotional, language, and early literacy development of these children.

Prior to starting her Dphil, Siyu completed an MSc in Education (Research Design and Methodology) at the University of Oxford, under the supervision of Professor Sonali Nag. Her MSc dissertation explored the roles of social background and home literacy environment in the language and literacy development of a Wales subsample from the Millennium Cohort Study and was awarded a High Distinction. She also holds a BSc degree with first-class honours in Psychology from the University of Bath.

Siyu is also a research associate working on TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education.

At TalkTogether, Siyu is responsible for designing online surveys and analysing quantitative data from child assessments and parent reports.

Publications

Ma, S. (2021). Family background and home literacy environment as predictors of the early literacy development of children in Wales – findings from the Millennium Cohort Study (Master’s thesis, University of Oxford).

 

Amanda is the recipient of the Hazel Project Scholarship, based at the Rees Centre. Her doctoral research explores the conceptualisation of foster homes as therapeutic environments for complex/developmental trauma. Through participant-generated photography and collaborative qualitative methods with young people currently in foster care placements, her research explores if young people’s concepts and perceptions of therapeutic environments coincide with or challenge existing theoretical models and popular practitioner perspectives.

Amanda holds a BA from the University of Leeds (UK) and an MPhil from the University of Oxford (UK).

Lawrence is a teacher of mathematics who is particularly interested in classroom pedagogy, and how research and education policies interact with the teaching that students experience on a daily basis.

He finds that looking outwards in education is valuable with there being much more that unites our classrooms than isolates them. He has been extremely fortunate to study education through an international lens in the US, and to work on the Global Teaching InSights initiative of the Organisation for Economic Development (OECD) where he led on its videos of teaching.

Publications

Global Teaching InSights: A video study of teaching, OECD, 2020

Antonin is currently Doctoral Teaching Fellow on the MSc in Comparative and International Education, teaching Foundations of Educational Research. Antonin is also a Research Assistant for the Centre for Global Higher Education on the ‘Research on Research: the research function and mission of higher education’ project.

Alongside his teaching and research roles, Antonin is completing a Doctoral study on the European Universities Initiative, the European Commission’s flagship higher education programme that seeks to set up European Universities through transnational university alliances.

Arzhia Habibi is a DPhil in Education Candidate and uses Mandarin to conduct her research in the Chinese higher education context.

Arzhia’s research focuses on ‘expressions’ of global or world citizenship education in a Chinese higher education institution In the study, she explores the perspectives and practices of educators and students at a China-based university, which experiments with discourses related to citizenship. She further investigates how individual, local, national and global dynamics and the surrounding discourses influence worldviews and practices in a university setting.

As empirical studies on global or world citizenship education in the Chinese context are scarce, Arzhia hopes to contribute to a nascent knowledge base which may extend and add depth to the critical global discourses of global and world citizenship education, beyond Eurocentric framings.

Prior to her studies at Oxford, Arzhia received a first class Bachelor’s degree in Contemporary Chinese Studies at The University of Nottingham, and a Master’s in International Communication in Taiwan at National Chengchi University. As a child, she also attended kindergarten in Fuzhou, Fujian province of China.

Olga is a co-convenor of the Philosophy of Education Reading Group at the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. Olga’s main research interest is in the topics of epistemic injustice across all levels of education and across national borders with a focus on higher education and the process of knowledge production in academic institutes and universities. Her core interest lies between the areas of social epistemology, research on research (RoR) and comparative and international education (CIE). She has been a recipient of multiple research awards in the United States and the United Kingdom and is an elected co-convenor of the Comparative and International Education Special Interest Group at the British Educational Research Association (BERA).

Her new research at Oxford will explore the epistemically just and unjust practices as experienced by scholars from Kazakhstan during the internationalisation process in the social sciences and the humanities. Prior joining Oxford, Olga taught at University College London Institute of Education in London on the topics of migrant, refugee and minority education and European education traditions from a comparative lens.

Publications
  • Mun, O. (2020). ‘Epistemic Injustices in Internationalising Humanities and Social Sciences: A Case Study of Higher Education and Science Institutes in Kazakhstan.’ Centre for International Higher Education, Boston College. https://www.bc.edu/content/dam/bc1/schools/lsoe/sites/cihe/publication/Perspectives/Perspectives%20No%2018.pdf
  • Mun, O. and Gafu, G. (in press) ‘University Research Capacity in Kazakhstan’. Higher School of Economics, Russia.
  • Kandiko Howson, C., Mun, O. and Walker, R. (2020). ‘Academic Activism in STEM fields: Discipline in Theory and Practice.’ Philosophy and Theory of Higher Education Society.
  • Aizuddin M., Habibi A., Mun, O. (in press, 2020). ‘Post-Colonialism in Comparative and International Education.’ In Jules, T., Shields, R., Thomas, M. (Ed.), Bloomsbury Handbook of Theory in Comparative and International Education.
  • Palandjian, G., Silova, I., Mun, O., Zholdashaliyeva, R. (2018). ‘Gender and Nation in Postsocialist Educational Transformations.’ In Silova, I., & Chankseliani, M. (Eds.), Comparing Post-Socialist Transformations: Education in Eastern Europe and Former Soviet Union. Oxford: Symposium Books.
  • Mun, O., & Zholdashaliyeva, R. (2017). ‘Alippe, Bukvar’ and Gender: A comparative analysis of early literacy textbooks in Kazakhstan and Kyrgyzstan.’ In E. Brown & R. Craven & G. McLean (Ed.), International Advances in Education: Global Initiatives for Equity and Social Justice Series. Information Age Publishing
  • Patel, K. and Mun, O. (2017). ‘Marketing ‘development’ in the neoliberal university.’ DPU Working Papers https://www.ucl.ac.uk/bartlett/development/case-studies/2017/sep/marketing-development-neoliberal-university
  • Fimyar, O., Saniyazova, A. & Mun, O. (2017) ‘Methodology of Collaborative Research: Or, Searching for a Synergy in the Study of Student Transition in Kazakhstan.’ In SAGE Research Methods Cases. London, United Kingdom: SAGE Publications.
  • Mun, O. (2015). ‘(Re)imagining national identity through early literacy textbooks in Kazakhstan’, Forum of Young Central Asian Experts, 2nd edition. http://caa-network.org/archives/5620
  • Silova, I., Mead Yaqub, M., Mun, O., Palandjian, G. (2014). ‘Pedagogies of Space: (re)imagining nation and childhood in post-Soviet states.’ Global Studies of Childhood, 4(3), 195-209.
  • Silova, I., Brezhenyuk, V., Kudasova, M., Mun, O., Artemev, N. (2014). ‘Youth Protests against Privatisation of Education in post-Soviet states.’ European Education, 46(3), 56-65.

Schooled in the discipline of Public Administration at the University of Dhaka and with an experience of over five years of lecturing graduate and post-graduate students at two reputed public universities in Bangladesh, I am interested in research works related to education, gender, public policy, social studies and have multiple publications.

Apart from my current lecturing position, I worked as a news editor and contributor for the Dhaka Insider, an online news portal, in 2015. I also served as the Head of the Department (Department of Public Administration) and Assistant Proctor at the Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujibur Rahman Science and Technology University (BSMRSTU) and as an elected member of the Teachers’ Association there. During my post-graduation (MA. Public Policy) at the University of Nottingham, a qualitative research focus helped me characterize patterns of gender gap in primary education access.

 

Selected Publications
  • Dutta,  P.  (2020).  Democratic  Decentralization  and  Participatory Development:  Focus  on  Bangladesh.  Journal  of    Contemporary  Governance  and  Public Policy, 1(2), 82-91. Permalink/DOI: https://doi.org/10.46507/jcgpp.v1i2
  • Dutta, P., 2021. • Towards Sound Integrity Management in Bangladesh: Challenges and Issues in Public Administration and Law Enforcement. In: S. N. Khanom, ed. Governance, In the 21st Century in the Sounth Asia: Challenges and Ways Forward. Dhaka: Hakkani Publishers, pp. 541-560.

Zhuohan (Johanne) has a BA in English from Dalian Maritime University, China, and has won China National Scholarship. She then graduated with a Distinction in MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from University of Oxford. Before her DPhil, Zhuohan worked for the organizing committee for the Harvard Summit for Young Leaders in China, an initiative that brought liberal arts education from Harvard to China’s top-performing high school students. She also helped evaluate the UNICEF China Child-Friendly School Programme as an RA, focusing on the socio-emotional learning among the Dong ethnic minority groups in Guangxi, China. She also teaches IELTS, TOEFL, and English phonics.

Her MSc research centres on linguistic relativity, specifically the effect of French grammatical gender system on both French speakers’ and learners’ perception of objects. Her DPhil research focuses on English pronunciation teaching and learning among young Chinese kids, particularly emphasising the influence of their mother tongue, Mandarin.

Supervisors

Robert Woore and Faidra Faitaki

Shuo-Fang earned a Bachelor’s degree from National Chengchi University (Taiwan) and a Master’s degree from Boston University. He has teaching experience in various EFL contexts including international high school, educational institute, and graduate language program.

Shuo-Fang’s areas of interest lie in applied linguistics, particularly phonetics/phonology and speech perception. As an Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholar, Shuo-Fang is currently undertaking his doctoral research, supervised by Dr Elizabeth Wonnacott and Dr Robert Woore. His doctoral project is mostly experimental and explores second language learners’ difficulty in processing English connected speech.

Shuo-Fang is affiliated with two research groups: Applied Linguistics and Wonnacott-Nation Lab (developmental cognitive psychology).

Publications

Liang, S., & Yu, H. (2021). Chinese students’ willingness to communicate in EFL classrooms: A case study of students at a Sino-foreign university. Professional and Academic English, 28(2), 15–33.

Siyu Ma is a DPhil student in child development and learning at the Department of Education. Her doctoral research focuses on second-born children under the Chinese two-child policy, especially how siblings play a role in the socio-emotional, language, and early literacy development of these children.

Prior to starting her Dphil, Siyu completed an MSc in Education (Research Design and Methodology) at the University of Oxford, under the supervision of Professor Sonali Nag. Her MSc dissertation explored the roles of social background and home literacy environment in the language and literacy development of a Wales subsample from the Millennium Cohort Study and was awarded a High Distinction. She also holds a BSc degree with first-class honours in Psychology from the University of Bath.

Siyu is also a research associate working on TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education.

At TalkTogether, Siyu is responsible for designing online surveys and analysing quantitative data from child assessments and parent reports.

Publications

Ma, S. (2021). Family background and home literacy environment as predictors of the early literacy development of children in Wales – findings from the Millennium Cohort Study (Master’s thesis, University of Oxford).

 

Amanda is the recipient of the Hazel Project Scholarship, based at the Rees Centre. Her doctoral research explores the conceptualisation of foster homes as therapeutic environments for complex/developmental trauma. Through participant-generated photography and collaborative qualitative methods with young people currently in foster care placements, her research explores if young people’s concepts and perceptions of therapeutic environments coincide with or challenge existing theoretical models and popular practitioner perspectives.

Amanda holds a BA from the University of Leeds (UK) and an MPhil from the University of Oxford (UK).

Lawrence is a teacher of mathematics who is particularly interested in classroom pedagogy, and how research and education policies interact with the teaching that students experience on a daily basis.

He finds that looking outwards in education is valuable with there being much more that unites our classrooms than isolates them. He has been extremely fortunate to study education through an international lens in the US, and to work on the Global Teaching InSights initiative of the Organisation for Economic Development (OECD) where he led on its videos of teaching.

Publications

Global Teaching InSights: A video study of teaching, OECD, 2020

Antonin is currently Doctoral Teaching Fellow on the MSc in Comparative and International Education, teaching Foundations of Educational Research. Antonin is also a Research Assistant for the Centre for Global Higher Education on the ‘Research on Research: the research function and mission of higher education’ project.

Alongside his teaching and research roles, Antonin is completing a Doctoral study on the European Universities Initiative, the European Commission’s flagship higher education programme that seeks to set up European Universities through transnational university alliances.

Arzhia Habibi is a DPhil in Education Candidate and uses Mandarin to conduct her research in the Chinese higher education context.

Arzhia’s research focuses on ‘expressions’ of global or world citizenship education in a Chinese higher education institution In the study, she explores the perspectives and practices of educators and students at a China-based university, which experiments with discourses related to citizenship. She further investigates how individual, local, national and global dynamics and the surrounding discourses influence worldviews and practices in a university setting.

As empirical studies on global or world citizenship education in the Chinese context are scarce, Arzhia hopes to contribute to a nascent knowledge base which may extend and add depth to the critical global discourses of global and world citizenship education, beyond Eurocentric framings.

Prior to her studies at Oxford, Arzhia received a first class Bachelor’s degree in Contemporary Chinese Studies at The University of Nottingham, and a Master’s in International Communication in Taiwan at National Chengchi University. As a child, she also attended kindergarten in Fuzhou, Fujian province of China.

Olga is a co-convenor of the Philosophy of Education Reading Group at the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. Olga’s main research interest is in the topics of epistemic injustice across all levels of education and across national borders with a focus on higher education and the process of knowledge production in academic institutes and universities. Her core interest lies between the areas of social epistemology, research on research (RoR) and comparative and international education (CIE). She has been a recipient of multiple research awards in the United States and the United Kingdom and is an elected co-convenor of the Comparative and International Education Special Interest Group at the British Educational Research Association (BERA).

Her new research at Oxford will explore the epistemically just and unjust practices as experienced by scholars from Kazakhstan during the internationalisation process in the social sciences and the humanities. Prior joining Oxford, Olga taught at University College London Institute of Education in London on the topics of migrant, refugee and minority education and European education traditions from a comparative lens.

Publications
  • Mun, O. (2020). ‘Epistemic Injustices in Internationalising Humanities and Social Sciences: A Case Study of Higher Education and Science Institutes in Kazakhstan.’ Centre for International Higher Education, Boston College. https://www.bc.edu/content/dam/bc1/schools/lsoe/sites/cihe/publication/Perspectives/Perspectives%20No%2018.pdf
  • Mun, O. and Gafu, G. (in press) ‘University Research Capacity in Kazakhstan’. Higher School of Economics, Russia.
  • Kandiko Howson, C., Mun, O. and Walker, R. (2020). ‘Academic Activism in STEM fields: Discipline in Theory and Practice.’ Philosophy and Theory of Higher Education Society.
  • Aizuddin M., Habibi A., Mun, O. (in press, 2020). ‘Post-Colonialism in Comparative and International Education.’ In Jules, T., Shields, R., Thomas, M. (Ed.), Bloomsbury Handbook of Theory in Comparative and International Education.
  • Palandjian, G., Silova, I., Mun, O., Zholdashaliyeva, R. (2018). ‘Gender and Nation in Postsocialist Educational Transformations.’ In Silova, I., & Chankseliani, M. (Eds.), Comparing Post-Socialist Transformations: Education in Eastern Europe and Former Soviet Union. Oxford: Symposium Books.
  • Mun, O., & Zholdashaliyeva, R. (2017). ‘Alippe, Bukvar’ and Gender: A comparative analysis of early literacy textbooks in Kazakhstan and Kyrgyzstan.’ In E. Brown & R. Craven & G. McLean (Ed.), International Advances in Education: Global Initiatives for Equity and Social Justice Series. Information Age Publishing
  • Patel, K. and Mun, O. (2017). ‘Marketing ‘development’ in the neoliberal university.’ DPU Working Papers https://www.ucl.ac.uk/bartlett/development/case-studies/2017/sep/marketing-development-neoliberal-university
  • Fimyar, O., Saniyazova, A. & Mun, O. (2017) ‘Methodology of Collaborative Research: Or, Searching for a Synergy in the Study of Student Transition in Kazakhstan.’ In SAGE Research Methods Cases. London, United Kingdom: SAGE Publications.
  • Mun, O. (2015). ‘(Re)imagining national identity through early literacy textbooks in Kazakhstan’, Forum of Young Central Asian Experts, 2nd edition. http://caa-network.org/archives/5620
  • Silova, I., Mead Yaqub, M., Mun, O., Palandjian, G. (2014). ‘Pedagogies of Space: (re)imagining nation and childhood in post-Soviet states.’ Global Studies of Childhood, 4(3), 195-209.
  • Silova, I., Brezhenyuk, V., Kudasova, M., Mun, O., Artemev, N. (2014). ‘Youth Protests against Privatisation of Education in post-Soviet states.’ European Education, 46(3), 56-65.

Schooled in the discipline of Public Administration at the University of Dhaka and with an experience of over five years of lecturing graduate and post-graduate students at two reputed public universities in Bangladesh, I am interested in research works related to education, gender, public policy, social studies and have multiple publications.

Apart from my current lecturing position, I worked as a news editor and contributor for the Dhaka Insider, an online news portal, in 2015. I also served as the Head of the Department (Department of Public Administration) and Assistant Proctor at the Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujibur Rahman Science and Technology University (BSMRSTU) and as an elected member of the Teachers’ Association there. During my post-graduation (MA. Public Policy) at the University of Nottingham, a qualitative research focus helped me characterize patterns of gender gap in primary education access.

 

Selected Publications
  • Dutta,  P.  (2020).  Democratic  Decentralization  and  Participatory Development:  Focus  on  Bangladesh.  Journal  of    Contemporary  Governance  and  Public Policy, 1(2), 82-91. Permalink/DOI: https://doi.org/10.46507/jcgpp.v1i2
  • Dutta, P., 2021. • Towards Sound Integrity Management in Bangladesh: Challenges and Issues in Public Administration and Law Enforcement. In: S. N. Khanom, ed. Governance, In the 21st Century in the Sounth Asia: Challenges and Ways Forward. Dhaka: Hakkani Publishers, pp. 541-560.

Zhuohan (Johanne) has a BA in English from Dalian Maritime University, China, and has won China National Scholarship. She then graduated with a Distinction in MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from University of Oxford. Before her DPhil, Zhuohan worked for the organizing committee for the Harvard Summit for Young Leaders in China, an initiative that brought liberal arts education from Harvard to China’s top-performing high school students. She also helped evaluate the UNICEF China Child-Friendly School Programme as an RA, focusing on the socio-emotional learning among the Dong ethnic minority groups in Guangxi, China. She also teaches IELTS, TOEFL, and English phonics.

Her MSc research centres on linguistic relativity, specifically the effect of French grammatical gender system on both French speakers’ and learners’ perception of objects. Her DPhil research focuses on English pronunciation teaching and learning among young Chinese kids, particularly emphasising the influence of their mother tongue, Mandarin.

Supervisors

Robert Woore and Faidra Faitaki

Shuo-Fang earned a Bachelor’s degree from National Chengchi University (Taiwan) and a Master’s degree from Boston University. He has teaching experience in various EFL contexts including international high school, educational institute, and graduate language program.

Shuo-Fang’s areas of interest lie in applied linguistics, particularly phonetics/phonology and speech perception. As an Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholar, Shuo-Fang is currently undertaking his doctoral research, supervised by Dr Elizabeth Wonnacott and Dr Robert Woore. His doctoral project is mostly experimental and explores second language learners’ difficulty in processing English connected speech.

Shuo-Fang is affiliated with two research groups: Applied Linguistics and Wonnacott-Nation Lab (developmental cognitive psychology).

Publications

Liang, S., & Yu, H. (2021). Chinese students’ willingness to communicate in EFL classrooms: A case study of students at a Sino-foreign university. Professional and Academic English, 28(2), 15–33.

Siyu Ma is a DPhil student in child development and learning at the Department of Education. Her doctoral research focuses on second-born children under the Chinese two-child policy, especially how siblings play a role in the socio-emotional, language, and early literacy development of these children.

Prior to starting her Dphil, Siyu completed an MSc in Education (Research Design and Methodology) at the University of Oxford, under the supervision of Professor Sonali Nag. Her MSc dissertation explored the roles of social background and home literacy environment in the language and literacy development of a Wales subsample from the Millennium Cohort Study and was awarded a High Distinction. She also holds a BSc degree with first-class honours in Psychology from the University of Bath.

Siyu is also a research associate working on TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education.

At TalkTogether, Siyu is responsible for designing online surveys and analysing quantitative data from child assessments and parent reports.

Publications

Ma, S. (2021). Family background and home literacy environment as predictors of the early literacy development of children in Wales – findings from the Millennium Cohort Study (Master’s thesis, University of Oxford).

 

Amanda is the recipient of the Hazel Project Scholarship, based at the Rees Centre. Her doctoral research explores the conceptualisation of foster homes as therapeutic environments for complex/developmental trauma. Through participant-generated photography and collaborative qualitative methods with young people currently in foster care placements, her research explores if young people’s concepts and perceptions of therapeutic environments coincide with or challenge existing theoretical models and popular practitioner perspectives.

Amanda holds a BA from the University of Leeds (UK) and an MPhil from the University of Oxford (UK).

Lawrence is a teacher of mathematics who is particularly interested in classroom pedagogy, and how research and education policies interact with the teaching that students experience on a daily basis.

He finds that looking outwards in education is valuable with there being much more that unites our classrooms than isolates them. He has been extremely fortunate to study education through an international lens in the US, and to work on the Global Teaching InSights initiative of the Organisation for Economic Development (OECD) where he led on its videos of teaching.

Publications

Global Teaching InSights: A video study of teaching, OECD, 2020

Antonin is currently Doctoral Teaching Fellow on the MSc in Comparative and International Education, teaching Foundations of Educational Research. Antonin is also a Research Assistant for the Centre for Global Higher Education on the ‘Research on Research: the research function and mission of higher education’ project.

Alongside his teaching and research roles, Antonin is completing a Doctoral study on the European Universities Initiative, the European Commission’s flagship higher education programme that seeks to set up European Universities through transnational university alliances.

Arzhia Habibi is a DPhil in Education Candidate and uses Mandarin to conduct her research in the Chinese higher education context.

Arzhia’s research focuses on ‘expressions’ of global or world citizenship education in a Chinese higher education institution In the study, she explores the perspectives and practices of educators and students at a China-based university, which experiments with discourses related to citizenship. She further investigates how individual, local, national and global dynamics and the surrounding discourses influence worldviews and practices in a university setting.

As empirical studies on global or world citizenship education in the Chinese context are scarce, Arzhia hopes to contribute to a nascent knowledge base which may extend and add depth to the critical global discourses of global and world citizenship education, beyond Eurocentric framings.

Prior to her studies at Oxford, Arzhia received a first class Bachelor’s degree in Contemporary Chinese Studies at The University of Nottingham, and a Master’s in International Communication in Taiwan at National Chengchi University. As a child, she also attended kindergarten in Fuzhou, Fujian province of China.

Olga is a co-convenor of the Philosophy of Education Reading Group at the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. Olga’s main research interest is in the topics of epistemic injustice across all levels of education and across national borders with a focus on higher education and the process of knowledge production in academic institutes and universities. Her core interest lies between the areas of social epistemology, research on research (RoR) and comparative and international education (CIE). She has been a recipient of multiple research awards in the United States and the United Kingdom and is an elected co-convenor of the Comparative and International Education Special Interest Group at the British Educational Research Association (BERA).

Her new research at Oxford will explore the epistemically just and unjust practices as experienced by scholars from Kazakhstan during the internationalisation process in the social sciences and the humanities. Prior joining Oxford, Olga taught at University College London Institute of Education in London on the topics of migrant, refugee and minority education and European education traditions from a comparative lens.

Publications
  • Mun, O. (2020). ‘Epistemic Injustices in Internationalising Humanities and Social Sciences: A Case Study of Higher Education and Science Institutes in Kazakhstan.’ Centre for International Higher Education, Boston College. https://www.bc.edu/content/dam/bc1/schools/lsoe/sites/cihe/publication/Perspectives/Perspectives%20No%2018.pdf
  • Mun, O. and Gafu, G. (in press) ‘University Research Capacity in Kazakhstan’. Higher School of Economics, Russia.
  • Kandiko Howson, C., Mun, O. and Walker, R. (2020). ‘Academic Activism in STEM fields: Discipline in Theory and Practice.’ Philosophy and Theory of Higher Education Society.
  • Aizuddin M., Habibi A., Mun, O. (in press, 2020). ‘Post-Colonialism in Comparative and International Education.’ In Jules, T., Shields, R., Thomas, M. (Ed.), Bloomsbury Handbook of Theory in Comparative and International Education.
  • Palandjian, G., Silova, I., Mun, O., Zholdashaliyeva, R. (2018). ‘Gender and Nation in Postsocialist Educational Transformations.’ In Silova, I., & Chankseliani, M. (Eds.), Comparing Post-Socialist Transformations: Education in Eastern Europe and Former Soviet Union. Oxford: Symposium Books.
  • Mun, O., & Zholdashaliyeva, R. (2017). ‘Alippe, Bukvar’ and Gender: A comparative analysis of early literacy textbooks in Kazakhstan and Kyrgyzstan.’ In E. Brown & R. Craven & G. McLean (Ed.), International Advances in Education: Global Initiatives for Equity and Social Justice Series. Information Age Publishing
  • Patel, K. and Mun, O. (2017). ‘Marketing ‘development’ in the neoliberal university.’ DPU Working Papers https://www.ucl.ac.uk/bartlett/development/case-studies/2017/sep/marketing-development-neoliberal-university
  • Fimyar, O., Saniyazova, A. & Mun, O. (2017) ‘Methodology of Collaborative Research: Or, Searching for a Synergy in the Study of Student Transition in Kazakhstan.’ In SAGE Research Methods Cases. London, United Kingdom: SAGE Publications.
  • Mun, O. (2015). ‘(Re)imagining national identity through early literacy textbooks in Kazakhstan’, Forum of Young Central Asian Experts, 2nd edition. http://caa-network.org/archives/5620
  • Silova, I., Mead Yaqub, M., Mun, O., Palandjian, G. (2014). ‘Pedagogies of Space: (re)imagining nation and childhood in post-Soviet states.’ Global Studies of Childhood, 4(3), 195-209.
  • Silova, I., Brezhenyuk, V., Kudasova, M., Mun, O., Artemev, N. (2014). ‘Youth Protests against Privatisation of Education in post-Soviet states.’ European Education, 46(3), 56-65.

Schooled in the discipline of Public Administration at the University of Dhaka and with an experience of over five years of lecturing graduate and post-graduate students at two reputed public universities in Bangladesh, I am interested in research works related to education, gender, public policy, social studies and have multiple publications.

Apart from my current lecturing position, I worked as a news editor and contributor for the Dhaka Insider, an online news portal, in 2015. I also served as the Head of the Department (Department of Public Administration) and Assistant Proctor at the Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujibur Rahman Science and Technology University (BSMRSTU) and as an elected member of the Teachers’ Association there. During my post-graduation (MA. Public Policy) at the University of Nottingham, a qualitative research focus helped me characterize patterns of gender gap in primary education access.

 

Selected Publications
  • Dutta,  P.  (2020).  Democratic  Decentralization  and  Participatory Development:  Focus  on  Bangladesh.  Journal  of    Contemporary  Governance  and  Public Policy, 1(2), 82-91. Permalink/DOI: https://doi.org/10.46507/jcgpp.v1i2
  • Dutta, P., 2021. • Towards Sound Integrity Management in Bangladesh: Challenges and Issues in Public Administration and Law Enforcement. In: S. N. Khanom, ed. Governance, In the 21st Century in the Sounth Asia: Challenges and Ways Forward. Dhaka: Hakkani Publishers, pp. 541-560.

Zhuohan (Johanne) has a BA in English from Dalian Maritime University, China, and has won China National Scholarship. She then graduated with a Distinction in MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from University of Oxford. Before her DPhil, Zhuohan worked for the organizing committee for the Harvard Summit for Young Leaders in China, an initiative that brought liberal arts education from Harvard to China’s top-performing high school students. She also helped evaluate the UNICEF China Child-Friendly School Programme as an RA, focusing on the socio-emotional learning among the Dong ethnic minority groups in Guangxi, China. She also teaches IELTS, TOEFL, and English phonics.

Her MSc research centres on linguistic relativity, specifically the effect of French grammatical gender system on both French speakers’ and learners’ perception of objects. Her DPhil research focuses on English pronunciation teaching and learning among young Chinese kids, particularly emphasising the influence of their mother tongue, Mandarin.

Supervisors

Robert Woore and Faidra Faitaki

Shuo-Fang earned a Bachelor’s degree from National Chengchi University (Taiwan) and a Master’s degree from Boston University. He has teaching experience in various EFL contexts including international high school, educational institute, and graduate language program.

Shuo-Fang’s areas of interest lie in applied linguistics, particularly phonetics/phonology and speech perception. As an Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholar, Shuo-Fang is currently undertaking his doctoral research, supervised by Dr Elizabeth Wonnacott and Dr Robert Woore. His doctoral project is mostly experimental and explores second language learners’ difficulty in processing English connected speech.

Shuo-Fang is affiliated with two research groups: Applied Linguistics and Wonnacott-Nation Lab (developmental cognitive psychology).

Publications

Liang, S., & Yu, H. (2021). Chinese students’ willingness to communicate in EFL classrooms: A case study of students at a Sino-foreign university. Professional and Academic English, 28(2), 15–33.

Siyu Ma is a DPhil student in child development and learning at the Department of Education. Her doctoral research focuses on second-born children under the Chinese two-child policy, especially how siblings play a role in the socio-emotional, language, and early literacy development of these children.

Prior to starting her Dphil, Siyu completed an MSc in Education (Research Design and Methodology) at the University of Oxford, under the supervision of Professor Sonali Nag. Her MSc dissertation explored the roles of social background and home literacy environment in the language and literacy development of a Wales subsample from the Millennium Cohort Study and was awarded a High Distinction. She also holds a BSc degree with first-class honours in Psychology from the University of Bath.

Siyu is also a research associate working on TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education.

At TalkTogether, Siyu is responsible for designing online surveys and analysing quantitative data from child assessments and parent reports.

Publications

Ma, S. (2021). Family background and home literacy environment as predictors of the early literacy development of children in Wales – findings from the Millennium Cohort Study (Master’s thesis, University of Oxford).

 

Amanda is the recipient of the Hazel Project Scholarship, based at the Rees Centre. Her doctoral research explores the conceptualisation of foster homes as therapeutic environments for complex/developmental trauma. Through participant-generated photography and collaborative qualitative methods with young people currently in foster care placements, her research explores if young people’s concepts and perceptions of therapeutic environments coincide with or challenge existing theoretical models and popular practitioner perspectives.

Amanda holds a BA from the University of Leeds (UK) and an MPhil from the University of Oxford (UK).

Lawrence is a teacher of mathematics who is particularly interested in classroom pedagogy, and how research and education policies interact with the teaching that students experience on a daily basis.

He finds that looking outwards in education is valuable with there being much more that unites our classrooms than isolates them. He has been extremely fortunate to study education through an international lens in the US, and to work on the Global Teaching InSights initiative of the Organisation for Economic Development (OECD) where he led on its videos of teaching.

Publications

Global Teaching InSights: A video study of teaching, OECD, 2020

Antonin is currently Doctoral Teaching Fellow on the MSc in Comparative and International Education, teaching Foundations of Educational Research. Antonin is also a Research Assistant for the Centre for Global Higher Education on the ‘Research on Research: the research function and mission of higher education’ project.

Alongside his teaching and research roles, Antonin is completing a Doctoral study on the European Universities Initiative, the European Commission’s flagship higher education programme that seeks to set up European Universities through transnational university alliances.

Arzhia Habibi is a DPhil in Education Candidate and uses Mandarin to conduct her research in the Chinese higher education context.

Arzhia’s research focuses on ‘expressions’ of global or world citizenship education in a Chinese higher education institution In the study, she explores the perspectives and practices of educators and students at a China-based university, which experiments with discourses related to citizenship. She further investigates how individual, local, national and global dynamics and the surrounding discourses influence worldviews and practices in a university setting.

As empirical studies on global or world citizenship education in the Chinese context are scarce, Arzhia hopes to contribute to a nascent knowledge base which may extend and add depth to the critical global discourses of global and world citizenship education, beyond Eurocentric framings.

Prior to her studies at Oxford, Arzhia received a first class Bachelor’s degree in Contemporary Chinese Studies at The University of Nottingham, and a Master’s in International Communication in Taiwan at National Chengchi University. As a child, she also attended kindergarten in Fuzhou, Fujian province of China.

Olga is a co-convenor of the Philosophy of Education Reading Group at the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. Olga’s main research interest is in the topics of epistemic injustice across all levels of education and across national borders with a focus on higher education and the process of knowledge production in academic institutes and universities. Her core interest lies between the areas of social epistemology, research on research (RoR) and comparative and international education (CIE). She has been a recipient of multiple research awards in the United States and the United Kingdom and is an elected co-convenor of the Comparative and International Education Special Interest Group at the British Educational Research Association (BERA).

Her new research at Oxford will explore the epistemically just and unjust practices as experienced by scholars from Kazakhstan during the internationalisation process in the social sciences and the humanities. Prior joining Oxford, Olga taught at University College London Institute of Education in London on the topics of migrant, refugee and minority education and European education traditions from a comparative lens.

Publications
  • Mun, O. (2020). ‘Epistemic Injustices in Internationalising Humanities and Social Sciences: A Case Study of Higher Education and Science Institutes in Kazakhstan.’ Centre for International Higher Education, Boston College. https://www.bc.edu/content/dam/bc1/schools/lsoe/sites/cihe/publication/Perspectives/Perspectives%20No%2018.pdf
  • Mun, O. and Gafu, G. (in press) ‘University Research Capacity in Kazakhstan’. Higher School of Economics, Russia.
  • Kandiko Howson, C., Mun, O. and Walker, R. (2020). ‘Academic Activism in STEM fields: Discipline in Theory and Practice.’ Philosophy and Theory of Higher Education Society.
  • Aizuddin M., Habibi A., Mun, O. (in press, 2020). ‘Post-Colonialism in Comparative and International Education.’ In Jules, T., Shields, R., Thomas, M. (Ed.), Bloomsbury Handbook of Theory in Comparative and International Education.
  • Palandjian, G., Silova, I., Mun, O., Zholdashaliyeva, R. (2018). ‘Gender and Nation in Postsocialist Educational Transformations.’ In Silova, I., & Chankseliani, M. (Eds.), Comparing Post-Socialist Transformations: Education in Eastern Europe and Former Soviet Union. Oxford: Symposium Books.
  • Mun, O., & Zholdashaliyeva, R. (2017). ‘Alippe, Bukvar’ and Gender: A comparative analysis of early literacy textbooks in Kazakhstan and Kyrgyzstan.’ In E. Brown & R. Craven & G. McLean (Ed.), International Advances in Education: Global Initiatives for Equity and Social Justice Series. Information Age Publishing
  • Patel, K. and Mun, O. (2017). ‘Marketing ‘development’ in the neoliberal university.’ DPU Working Papers https://www.ucl.ac.uk/bartlett/development/case-studies/2017/sep/marketing-development-neoliberal-university
  • Fimyar, O., Saniyazova, A. & Mun, O. (2017) ‘Methodology of Collaborative Research: Or, Searching for a Synergy in the Study of Student Transition in Kazakhstan.’ In SAGE Research Methods Cases. London, United Kingdom: SAGE Publications.
  • Mun, O. (2015). ‘(Re)imagining national identity through early literacy textbooks in Kazakhstan’, Forum of Young Central Asian Experts, 2nd edition. http://caa-network.org/archives/5620
  • Silova, I., Mead Yaqub, M., Mun, O., Palandjian, G. (2014). ‘Pedagogies of Space: (re)imagining nation and childhood in post-Soviet states.’ Global Studies of Childhood, 4(3), 195-209.
  • Silova, I., Brezhenyuk, V., Kudasova, M., Mun, O., Artemev, N. (2014). ‘Youth Protests against Privatisation of Education in post-Soviet states.’ European Education, 46(3), 56-65.

Schooled in the discipline of Public Administration at the University of Dhaka and with an experience of over five years of lecturing graduate and post-graduate students at two reputed public universities in Bangladesh, I am interested in research works related to education, gender, public policy, social studies and have multiple publications.

Apart from my current lecturing position, I worked as a news editor and contributor for the Dhaka Insider, an online news portal, in 2015. I also served as the Head of the Department (Department of Public Administration) and Assistant Proctor at the Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujibur Rahman Science and Technology University (BSMRSTU) and as an elected member of the Teachers’ Association there. During my post-graduation (MA. Public Policy) at the University of Nottingham, a qualitative research focus helped me characterize patterns of gender gap in primary education access.

 

Selected Publications
  • Dutta,  P.  (2020).  Democratic  Decentralization  and  Participatory Development:  Focus  on  Bangladesh.  Journal  of    Contemporary  Governance  and  Public Policy, 1(2), 82-91. Permalink/DOI: https://doi.org/10.46507/jcgpp.v1i2
  • Dutta, P., 2021. • Towards Sound Integrity Management in Bangladesh: Challenges and Issues in Public Administration and Law Enforcement. In: S. N. Khanom, ed. Governance, In the 21st Century in the Sounth Asia: Challenges and Ways Forward. Dhaka: Hakkani Publishers, pp. 541-560.

Zhuohan (Johanne) has a BA in English from Dalian Maritime University, China, and has won China National Scholarship. She then graduated with a Distinction in MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from University of Oxford. Before her DPhil, Zhuohan worked for the organizing committee for the Harvard Summit for Young Leaders in China, an initiative that brought liberal arts education from Harvard to China’s top-performing high school students. She also helped evaluate the UNICEF China Child-Friendly School Programme as an RA, focusing on the socio-emotional learning among the Dong ethnic minority groups in Guangxi, China. She also teaches IELTS, TOEFL, and English phonics.

Her MSc research centres on linguistic relativity, specifically the effect of French grammatical gender system on both French speakers’ and learners’ perception of objects. Her DPhil research focuses on English pronunciation teaching and learning among young Chinese kids, particularly emphasising the influence of their mother tongue, Mandarin.

Supervisors

Robert Woore and Faidra Faitaki

Shuo-Fang earned a Bachelor’s degree from National Chengchi University (Taiwan) and a Master’s degree from Boston University. He has teaching experience in various EFL contexts including international high school, educational institute, and graduate language program.

Shuo-Fang’s areas of interest lie in applied linguistics, particularly phonetics/phonology and speech perception. As an Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholar, Shuo-Fang is currently undertaking his doctoral research, supervised by Dr Elizabeth Wonnacott and Dr Robert Woore. His doctoral project is mostly experimental and explores second language learners’ difficulty in processing English connected speech.

Shuo-Fang is affiliated with two research groups: Applied Linguistics and Wonnacott-Nation Lab (developmental cognitive psychology).

Publications

Liang, S., & Yu, H. (2021). Chinese students’ willingness to communicate in EFL classrooms: A case study of students at a Sino-foreign university. Professional and Academic English, 28(2), 15–33.

Siyu Ma is a DPhil student in child development and learning at the Department of Education. Her doctoral research focuses on second-born children under the Chinese two-child policy, especially how siblings play a role in the socio-emotional, language, and early literacy development of these children.

Prior to starting her Dphil, Siyu completed an MSc in Education (Research Design and Methodology) at the University of Oxford, under the supervision of Professor Sonali Nag. Her MSc dissertation explored the roles of social background and home literacy environment in the language and literacy development of a Wales subsample from the Millennium Cohort Study and was awarded a High Distinction. She also holds a BSc degree with first-class honours in Psychology from the University of Bath.

Siyu is also a research associate working on TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education.

At TalkTogether, Siyu is responsible for designing online surveys and analysing quantitative data from child assessments and parent reports.

Publications

Ma, S. (2021). Family background and home literacy environment as predictors of the early literacy development of children in Wales – findings from the Millennium Cohort Study (Master’s thesis, University of Oxford).

 

Amanda is the recipient of the Hazel Project Scholarship, based at the Rees Centre. Her doctoral research explores the conceptualisation of foster homes as therapeutic environments for complex/developmental trauma. Through participant-generated photography and collaborative qualitative methods with young people currently in foster care placements, her research explores if young people’s concepts and perceptions of therapeutic environments coincide with or challenge existing theoretical models and popular practitioner perspectives.

Amanda holds a BA from the University of Leeds (UK) and an MPhil from the University of Oxford (UK).

Lawrence is a teacher of mathematics who is particularly interested in classroom pedagogy, and how research and education policies interact with the teaching that students experience on a daily basis.

He finds that looking outwards in education is valuable with there being much more that unites our classrooms than isolates them. He has been extremely fortunate to study education through an international lens in the US, and to work on the Global Teaching InSights initiative of the Organisation for Economic Development (OECD) where he led on its videos of teaching.

Publications

Global Teaching InSights: A video study of teaching, OECD, 2020

Antonin is currently Doctoral Teaching Fellow on the MSc in Comparative and International Education, teaching Foundations of Educational Research. Antonin is also a Research Assistant for the Centre for Global Higher Education on the ‘Research on Research: the research function and mission of higher education’ project.

Alongside his teaching and research roles, Antonin is completing a Doctoral study on the European Universities Initiative, the European Commission’s flagship higher education programme that seeks to set up European Universities through transnational university alliances.

Arzhia Habibi is a DPhil in Education Candidate and uses Mandarin to conduct her research in the Chinese higher education context.

Arzhia’s research focuses on ‘expressions’ of global or world citizenship education in a Chinese higher education institution In the study, she explores the perspectives and practices of educators and students at a China-based university, which experiments with discourses related to citizenship. She further investigates how individual, local, national and global dynamics and the surrounding discourses influence worldviews and practices in a university setting.

As empirical studies on global or world citizenship education in the Chinese context are scarce, Arzhia hopes to contribute to a nascent knowledge base which may extend and add depth to the critical global discourses of global and world citizenship education, beyond Eurocentric framings.

Prior to her studies at Oxford, Arzhia received a first class Bachelor’s degree in Contemporary Chinese Studies at The University of Nottingham, and a Master’s in International Communication in Taiwan at National Chengchi University. As a child, she also attended kindergarten in Fuzhou, Fujian province of China.

Olga is a co-convenor of the Philosophy of Education Reading Group at the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. Olga’s main research interest is in the topics of epistemic injustice across all levels of education and across national borders with a focus on higher education and the process of knowledge production in academic institutes and universities. Her core interest lies between the areas of social epistemology, research on research (RoR) and comparative and international education (CIE). She has been a recipient of multiple research awards in the United States and the United Kingdom and is an elected co-convenor of the Comparative and International Education Special Interest Group at the British Educational Research Association (BERA).

Her new research at Oxford will explore the epistemically just and unjust practices as experienced by scholars from Kazakhstan during the internationalisation process in the social sciences and the humanities. Prior joining Oxford, Olga taught at University College London Institute of Education in London on the topics of migrant, refugee and minority education and European education traditions from a comparative lens.

Publications
  • Mun, O. (2020). ‘Epistemic Injustices in Internationalising Humanities and Social Sciences: A Case Study of Higher Education and Science Institutes in Kazakhstan.’ Centre for International Higher Education, Boston College. https://www.bc.edu/content/dam/bc1/schools/lsoe/sites/cihe/publication/Perspectives/Perspectives%20No%2018.pdf
  • Mun, O. and Gafu, G. (in press) ‘University Research Capacity in Kazakhstan’. Higher School of Economics, Russia.
  • Kandiko Howson, C., Mun, O. and Walker, R. (2020). ‘Academic Activism in STEM fields: Discipline in Theory and Practice.’ Philosophy and Theory of Higher Education Society.
  • Aizuddin M., Habibi A., Mun, O. (in press, 2020). ‘Post-Colonialism in Comparative and International Education.’ In Jules, T., Shields, R., Thomas, M. (Ed.), Bloomsbury Handbook of Theory in Comparative and International Education.
  • Palandjian, G., Silova, I., Mun, O., Zholdashaliyeva, R. (2018). ‘Gender and Nation in Postsocialist Educational Transformations.’ In Silova, I., & Chankseliani, M. (Eds.), Comparing Post-Socialist Transformations: Education in Eastern Europe and Former Soviet Union. Oxford: Symposium Books.
  • Mun, O., & Zholdashaliyeva, R. (2017). ‘Alippe, Bukvar’ and Gender: A comparative analysis of early literacy textbooks in Kazakhstan and Kyrgyzstan.’ In E. Brown & R. Craven & G. McLean (Ed.), International Advances in Education: Global Initiatives for Equity and Social Justice Series. Information Age Publishing
  • Patel, K. and Mun, O. (2017). ‘Marketing ‘development’ in the neoliberal university.’ DPU Working Papers https://www.ucl.ac.uk/bartlett/development/case-studies/2017/sep/marketing-development-neoliberal-university
  • Fimyar, O., Saniyazova, A. & Mun, O. (2017) ‘Methodology of Collaborative Research: Or, Searching for a Synergy in the Study of Student Transition in Kazakhstan.’ In SAGE Research Methods Cases. London, United Kingdom: SAGE Publications.
  • Mun, O. (2015). ‘(Re)imagining national identity through early literacy textbooks in Kazakhstan’, Forum of Young Central Asian Experts, 2nd edition. http://caa-network.org/archives/5620
  • Silova, I., Mead Yaqub, M., Mun, O., Palandjian, G. (2014). ‘Pedagogies of Space: (re)imagining nation and childhood in post-Soviet states.’ Global Studies of Childhood, 4(3), 195-209.
  • Silova, I., Brezhenyuk, V., Kudasova, M., Mun, O., Artemev, N. (2014). ‘Youth Protests against Privatisation of Education in post-Soviet states.’ European Education, 46(3), 56-65.

Schooled in the discipline of Public Administration at the University of Dhaka and with an experience of over five years of lecturing graduate and post-graduate students at two reputed public universities in Bangladesh, I am interested in research works related to education, gender, public policy, social studies and have multiple publications.

Apart from my current lecturing position, I worked as a news editor and contributor for the Dhaka Insider, an online news portal, in 2015. I also served as the Head of the Department (Department of Public Administration) and Assistant Proctor at the Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujibur Rahman Science and Technology University (BSMRSTU) and as an elected member of the Teachers’ Association there. During my post-graduation (MA. Public Policy) at the University of Nottingham, a qualitative research focus helped me characterize patterns of gender gap in primary education access.

 

Selected Publications
  • Dutta,  P.  (2020).  Democratic  Decentralization  and  Participatory Development:  Focus  on  Bangladesh.  Journal  of    Contemporary  Governance  and  Public Policy, 1(2), 82-91. Permalink/DOI: https://doi.org/10.46507/jcgpp.v1i2
  • Dutta, P., 2021. • Towards Sound Integrity Management in Bangladesh: Challenges and Issues in Public Administration and Law Enforcement. In: S. N. Khanom, ed. Governance, In the 21st Century in the Sounth Asia: Challenges and Ways Forward. Dhaka: Hakkani Publishers, pp. 541-560.

Zhuohan (Johanne) has a BA in English from Dalian Maritime University, China, and has won China National Scholarship. She then graduated with a Distinction in MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from University of Oxford. Before her DPhil, Zhuohan worked for the organizing committee for the Harvard Summit for Young Leaders in China, an initiative that brought liberal arts education from Harvard to China’s top-performing high school students. She also helped evaluate the UNICEF China Child-Friendly School Programme as an RA, focusing on the socio-emotional learning among the Dong ethnic minority groups in Guangxi, China. She also teaches IELTS, TOEFL, and English phonics.

Her MSc research centres on linguistic relativity, specifically the effect of French grammatical gender system on both French speakers’ and learners’ perception of objects. Her DPhil research focuses on English pronunciation teaching and learning among young Chinese kids, particularly emphasising the influence of their mother tongue, Mandarin.

Supervisors

Robert Woore and Faidra Faitaki

Shuo-Fang earned a Bachelor’s degree from National Chengchi University (Taiwan) and a Master’s degree from Boston University. He has teaching experience in various EFL contexts including international high school, educational institute, and graduate language program.

Shuo-Fang’s areas of interest lie in applied linguistics, particularly phonetics/phonology and speech perception. As an Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholar, Shuo-Fang is currently undertaking his doctoral research, supervised by Dr Elizabeth Wonnacott and Dr Robert Woore. His doctoral project is mostly experimental and explores second language learners’ difficulty in processing English connected speech.

Shuo-Fang is affiliated with two research groups: Applied Linguistics and Wonnacott-Nation Lab (developmental cognitive psychology).

Publications

Liang, S., & Yu, H. (2021). Chinese students’ willingness to communicate in EFL classrooms: A case study of students at a Sino-foreign university. Professional and Academic English, 28(2), 15–33.

Siyu Ma is a DPhil student in child development and learning at the Department of Education. Her doctoral research focuses on second-born children under the Chinese two-child policy, especially how siblings play a role in the socio-emotional, language, and early literacy development of these children.

Prior to starting her Dphil, Siyu completed an MSc in Education (Research Design and Methodology) at the University of Oxford, under the supervision of Professor Sonali Nag. Her MSc dissertation explored the roles of social background and home literacy environment in the language and literacy development of a Wales subsample from the Millennium Cohort Study and was awarded a High Distinction. She also holds a BSc degree with first-class honours in Psychology from the University of Bath.

Siyu is also a research associate working on TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education.

At TalkTogether, Siyu is responsible for designing online surveys and analysing quantitative data from child assessments and parent reports.

Publications

Ma, S. (2021). Family background and home literacy environment as predictors of the early literacy development of children in Wales – findings from the Millennium Cohort Study (Master’s thesis, University of Oxford).

 

Amanda is the recipient of the Hazel Project Scholarship, based at the Rees Centre. Her doctoral research explores the conceptualisation of foster homes as therapeutic environments for complex/developmental trauma. Through participant-generated photography and collaborative qualitative methods with young people currently in foster care placements, her research explores if young people’s concepts and perceptions of therapeutic environments coincide with or challenge existing theoretical models and popular practitioner perspectives.

Amanda holds a BA from the University of Leeds (UK) and an MPhil from the University of Oxford (UK).

Lawrence is a teacher of mathematics who is particularly interested in classroom pedagogy, and how research and education policies interact with the teaching that students experience on a daily basis.

He finds that looking outwards in education is valuable with there being much more that unites our classrooms than isolates them. He has been extremely fortunate to study education through an international lens in the US, and to work on the Global Teaching InSights initiative of the Organisation for Economic Development (OECD) where he led on its videos of teaching.

Publications

Global Teaching InSights: A video study of teaching, OECD, 2020

Antonin is currently Doctoral Teaching Fellow on the MSc in Comparative and International Education, teaching Foundations of Educational Research. Antonin is also a Research Assistant for the Centre for Global Higher Education on the ‘Research on Research: the research function and mission of higher education’ project.

Alongside his teaching and research roles, Antonin is completing a Doctoral study on the European Universities Initiative, the European Commission’s flagship higher education programme that seeks to set up European Universities through transnational university alliances.

Arzhia Habibi is a DPhil in Education Candidate and uses Mandarin to conduct her research in the Chinese higher education context.

Arzhia’s research focuses on ‘expressions’ of global or world citizenship education in a Chinese higher education institution In the study, she explores the perspectives and practices of educators and students at a China-based university, which experiments with discourses related to citizenship. She further investigates how individual, local, national and global dynamics and the surrounding discourses influence worldviews and practices in a university setting.

As empirical studies on global or world citizenship education in the Chinese context are scarce, Arzhia hopes to contribute to a nascent knowledge base which may extend and add depth to the critical global discourses of global and world citizenship education, beyond Eurocentric framings.

Prior to her studies at Oxford, Arzhia received a first class Bachelor’s degree in Contemporary Chinese Studies at The University of Nottingham, and a Master’s in International Communication in Taiwan at National Chengchi University. As a child, she also attended kindergarten in Fuzhou, Fujian province of China.

Olga is a co-convenor of the Philosophy of Education Reading Group at the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. Olga’s main research interest is in the topics of epistemic injustice across all levels of education and across national borders with a focus on higher education and the process of knowledge production in academic institutes and universities. Her core interest lies between the areas of social epistemology, research on research (RoR) and comparative and international education (CIE). She has been a recipient of multiple research awards in the United States and the United Kingdom and is an elected co-convenor of the Comparative and International Education Special Interest Group at the British Educational Research Association (BERA).

Her new research at Oxford will explore the epistemically just and unjust practices as experienced by scholars from Kazakhstan during the internationalisation process in the social sciences and the humanities. Prior joining Oxford, Olga taught at University College London Institute of Education in London on the topics of migrant, refugee and minority education and European education traditions from a comparative lens.

Publications
  • Mun, O. (2020). ‘Epistemic Injustices in Internationalising Humanities and Social Sciences: A Case Study of Higher Education and Science Institutes in Kazakhstan.’ Centre for International Higher Education, Boston College. https://www.bc.edu/content/dam/bc1/schools/lsoe/sites/cihe/publication/Perspectives/Perspectives%20No%2018.pdf
  • Mun, O. and Gafu, G. (in press) ‘University Research Capacity in Kazakhstan’. Higher School of Economics, Russia.
  • Kandiko Howson, C., Mun, O. and Walker, R. (2020). ‘Academic Activism in STEM fields: Discipline in Theory and Practice.’ Philosophy and Theory of Higher Education Society.
  • Aizuddin M., Habibi A., Mun, O. (in press, 2020). ‘Post-Colonialism in Comparative and International Education.’ In Jules, T., Shields, R., Thomas, M. (Ed.), Bloomsbury Handbook of Theory in Comparative and International Education.
  • Palandjian, G., Silova, I., Mun, O., Zholdashaliyeva, R. (2018). ‘Gender and Nation in Postsocialist Educational Transformations.’ In Silova, I., & Chankseliani, M. (Eds.), Comparing Post-Socialist Transformations: Education in Eastern Europe and Former Soviet Union. Oxford: Symposium Books.
  • Mun, O., & Zholdashaliyeva, R. (2017). ‘Alippe, Bukvar’ and Gender: A comparative analysis of early literacy textbooks in Kazakhstan and Kyrgyzstan.’ In E. Brown & R. Craven & G. McLean (Ed.), International Advances in Education: Global Initiatives for Equity and Social Justice Series. Information Age Publishing
  • Patel, K. and Mun, O. (2017). ‘Marketing ‘development’ in the neoliberal university.’ DPU Working Papers https://www.ucl.ac.uk/bartlett/development/case-studies/2017/sep/marketing-development-neoliberal-university
  • Fimyar, O., Saniyazova, A. & Mun, O. (2017) ‘Methodology of Collaborative Research: Or, Searching for a Synergy in the Study of Student Transition in Kazakhstan.’ In SAGE Research Methods Cases. London, United Kingdom: SAGE Publications.
  • Mun, O. (2015). ‘(Re)imagining national identity through early literacy textbooks in Kazakhstan’, Forum of Young Central Asian Experts, 2nd edition. http://caa-network.org/archives/5620
  • Silova, I., Mead Yaqub, M., Mun, O., Palandjian, G. (2014). ‘Pedagogies of Space: (re)imagining nation and childhood in post-Soviet states.’ Global Studies of Childhood, 4(3), 195-209.
  • Silova, I., Brezhenyuk, V., Kudasova, M., Mun, O., Artemev, N. (2014). ‘Youth Protests against Privatisation of Education in post-Soviet states.’ European Education, 46(3), 56-65.

Schooled in the discipline of Public Administration at the University of Dhaka and with an experience of over five years of lecturing graduate and post-graduate students at two reputed public universities in Bangladesh, I am interested in research works related to education, gender, public policy, social studies and have multiple publications.

Apart from my current lecturing position, I worked as a news editor and contributor for the Dhaka Insider, an online news portal, in 2015. I also served as the Head of the Department (Department of Public Administration) and Assistant Proctor at the Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujibur Rahman Science and Technology University (BSMRSTU) and as an elected member of the Teachers’ Association there. During my post-graduation (MA. Public Policy) at the University of Nottingham, a qualitative research focus helped me characterize patterns of gender gap in primary education access.

 

Selected Publications
  • Dutta,  P.  (2020).  Democratic  Decentralization  and  Participatory Development:  Focus  on  Bangladesh.  Journal  of    Contemporary  Governance  and  Public Policy, 1(2), 82-91. Permalink/DOI: https://doi.org/10.46507/jcgpp.v1i2
  • Dutta, P., 2021. • Towards Sound Integrity Management in Bangladesh: Challenges and Issues in Public Administration and Law Enforcement. In: S. N. Khanom, ed. Governance, In the 21st Century in the Sounth Asia: Challenges and Ways Forward. Dhaka: Hakkani Publishers, pp. 541-560.

Zhuohan (Johanne) has a BA in English from Dalian Maritime University, China, and has won China National Scholarship. She then graduated with a Distinction in MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from University of Oxford. Before her DPhil, Zhuohan worked for the organizing committee for the Harvard Summit for Young Leaders in China, an initiative that brought liberal arts education from Harvard to China’s top-performing high school students. She also helped evaluate the UNICEF China Child-Friendly School Programme as an RA, focusing on the socio-emotional learning among the Dong ethnic minority groups in Guangxi, China. She also teaches IELTS, TOEFL, and English phonics.

Her MSc research centres on linguistic relativity, specifically the effect of French grammatical gender system on both French speakers’ and learners’ perception of objects. Her DPhil research focuses on English pronunciation teaching and learning among young Chinese kids, particularly emphasising the influence of their mother tongue, Mandarin.

Supervisors

Robert Woore and Faidra Faitaki

Shuo-Fang earned a Bachelor’s degree from National Chengchi University (Taiwan) and a Master’s degree from Boston University. He has teaching experience in various EFL contexts including international high school, educational institute, and graduate language program.

Shuo-Fang’s areas of interest lie in applied linguistics, particularly phonetics/phonology and speech perception. As an Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholar, Shuo-Fang is currently undertaking his doctoral research, supervised by Dr Elizabeth Wonnacott and Dr Robert Woore. His doctoral project is mostly experimental and explores second language learners’ difficulty in processing English connected speech.

Shuo-Fang is affiliated with two research groups: Applied Linguistics and Wonnacott-Nation Lab (developmental cognitive psychology).

Publications

Liang, S., & Yu, H. (2021). Chinese students’ willingness to communicate in EFL classrooms: A case study of students at a Sino-foreign university. Professional and Academic English, 28(2), 15–33.

Siyu Ma is a DPhil student in child development and learning at the Department of Education. Her doctoral research focuses on second-born children under the Chinese two-child policy, especially how siblings play a role in the socio-emotional, language, and early literacy development of these children.

Prior to starting her Dphil, Siyu completed an MSc in Education (Research Design and Methodology) at the University of Oxford, under the supervision of Professor Sonali Nag. Her MSc dissertation explored the roles of social background and home literacy environment in the language and literacy development of a Wales subsample from the Millennium Cohort Study and was awarded a High Distinction. She also holds a BSc degree with first-class honours in Psychology from the University of Bath.

Siyu is also a research associate working on TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education.

At TalkTogether, Siyu is responsible for designing online surveys and analysing quantitative data from child assessments and parent reports.

Publications

Ma, S. (2021). Family background and home literacy environment as predictors of the early literacy development of children in Wales – findings from the Millennium Cohort Study (Master’s thesis, University of Oxford).

 

Amanda is the recipient of the Hazel Project Scholarship, based at the Rees Centre. Her doctoral research explores the conceptualisation of foster homes as therapeutic environments for complex/developmental trauma. Through participant-generated photography and collaborative qualitative methods with young people currently in foster care placements, her research explores if young people’s concepts and perceptions of therapeutic environments coincide with or challenge existing theoretical models and popular practitioner perspectives.

Amanda holds a BA from the University of Leeds (UK) and an MPhil from the University of Oxford (UK).

Lawrence is a teacher of mathematics who is particularly interested in classroom pedagogy, and how research and education policies interact with the teaching that students experience on a daily basis.

He finds that looking outwards in education is valuable with there being much more that unites our classrooms than isolates them. He has been extremely fortunate to study education through an international lens in the US, and to work on the Global Teaching InSights initiative of the Organisation for Economic Development (OECD) where he led on its videos of teaching.

Publications

Global Teaching InSights: A video study of teaching, OECD, 2020

Antonin is currently Doctoral Teaching Fellow on the MSc in Comparative and International Education, teaching Foundations of Educational Research. Antonin is also a Research Assistant for the Centre for Global Higher Education on the ‘Research on Research: the research function and mission of higher education’ project.

Alongside his teaching and research roles, Antonin is completing a Doctoral study on the European Universities Initiative, the European Commission’s flagship higher education programme that seeks to set up European Universities through transnational university alliances.

Arzhia Habibi is a DPhil in Education Candidate and uses Mandarin to conduct her research in the Chinese higher education context.

Arzhia’s research focuses on ‘expressions’ of global or world citizenship education in a Chinese higher education institution In the study, she explores the perspectives and practices of educators and students at a China-based university, which experiments with discourses related to citizenship. She further investigates how individual, local, national and global dynamics and the surrounding discourses influence worldviews and practices in a university setting.

As empirical studies on global or world citizenship education in the Chinese context are scarce, Arzhia hopes to contribute to a nascent knowledge base which may extend and add depth to the critical global discourses of global and world citizenship education, beyond Eurocentric framings.

Prior to her studies at Oxford, Arzhia received a first class Bachelor’s degree in Contemporary Chinese Studies at The University of Nottingham, and a Master’s in International Communication in Taiwan at National Chengchi University. As a child, she also attended kindergarten in Fuzhou, Fujian province of China.

Olga is a co-convenor of the Philosophy of Education Reading Group at the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. Olga’s main research interest is in the topics of epistemic injustice across all levels of education and across national borders with a focus on higher education and the process of knowledge production in academic institutes and universities. Her core interest lies between the areas of social epistemology, research on research (RoR) and comparative and international education (CIE). She has been a recipient of multiple research awards in the United States and the United Kingdom and is an elected co-convenor of the Comparative and International Education Special Interest Group at the British Educational Research Association (BERA).

Her new research at Oxford will explore the epistemically just and unjust practices as experienced by scholars from Kazakhstan during the internationalisation process in the social sciences and the humanities. Prior joining Oxford, Olga taught at University College London Institute of Education in London on the topics of migrant, refugee and minority education and European education traditions from a comparative lens.

Publications
  • Mun, O. (2020). ‘Epistemic Injustices in Internationalising Humanities and Social Sciences: A Case Study of Higher Education and Science Institutes in Kazakhstan.’ Centre for International Higher Education, Boston College. https://www.bc.edu/content/dam/bc1/schools/lsoe/sites/cihe/publication/Perspectives/Perspectives%20No%2018.pdf
  • Mun, O. and Gafu, G. (in press) ‘University Research Capacity in Kazakhstan’. Higher School of Economics, Russia.
  • Kandiko Howson, C., Mun, O. and Walker, R. (2020). ‘Academic Activism in STEM fields: Discipline in Theory and Practice.’ Philosophy and Theory of Higher Education Society.
  • Aizuddin M., Habibi A., Mun, O. (in press, 2020). ‘Post-Colonialism in Comparative and International Education.’ In Jules, T., Shields, R., Thomas, M. (Ed.), Bloomsbury Handbook of Theory in Comparative and International Education.
  • Palandjian, G., Silova, I., Mun, O., Zholdashaliyeva, R. (2018). ‘Gender and Nation in Postsocialist Educational Transformations.’ In Silova, I., & Chankseliani, M. (Eds.), Comparing Post-Socialist Transformations: Education in Eastern Europe and Former Soviet Union. Oxford: Symposium Books.
  • Mun, O., & Zholdashaliyeva, R. (2017). ‘Alippe, Bukvar’ and Gender: A comparative analysis of early literacy textbooks in Kazakhstan and Kyrgyzstan.’ In E. Brown & R. Craven & G. McLean (Ed.), International Advances in Education: Global Initiatives for Equity and Social Justice Series. Information Age Publishing
  • Patel, K. and Mun, O. (2017). ‘Marketing ‘development’ in the neoliberal university.’ DPU Working Papers https://www.ucl.ac.uk/bartlett/development/case-studies/2017/sep/marketing-development-neoliberal-university
  • Fimyar, O., Saniyazova, A. & Mun, O. (2017) ‘Methodology of Collaborative Research: Or, Searching for a Synergy in the Study of Student Transition in Kazakhstan.’ In SAGE Research Methods Cases. London, United Kingdom: SAGE Publications.
  • Mun, O. (2015). ‘(Re)imagining national identity through early literacy textbooks in Kazakhstan’, Forum of Young Central Asian Experts, 2nd edition. http://caa-network.org/archives/5620
  • Silova, I., Mead Yaqub, M., Mun, O., Palandjian, G. (2014). ‘Pedagogies of Space: (re)imagining nation and childhood in post-Soviet states.’ Global Studies of Childhood, 4(3), 195-209.
  • Silova, I., Brezhenyuk, V., Kudasova, M., Mun, O., Artemev, N. (2014). ‘Youth Protests against Privatisation of Education in post-Soviet states.’ European Education, 46(3), 56-65.

Schooled in the discipline of Public Administration at the University of Dhaka and with an experience of over five years of lecturing graduate and post-graduate students at two reputed public universities in Bangladesh, I am interested in research works related to education, gender, public policy, social studies and have multiple publications.

Apart from my current lecturing position, I worked as a news editor and contributor for the Dhaka Insider, an online news portal, in 2015. I also served as the Head of the Department (Department of Public Administration) and Assistant Proctor at the Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujibur Rahman Science and Technology University (BSMRSTU) and as an elected member of the Teachers’ Association there. During my post-graduation (MA. Public Policy) at the University of Nottingham, a qualitative research focus helped me characterize patterns of gender gap in primary education access.

 

Selected Publications
  • Dutta,  P.  (2020).  Democratic  Decentralization  and  Participatory Development:  Focus  on  Bangladesh.  Journal  of    Contemporary  Governance  and  Public Policy, 1(2), 82-91. Permalink/DOI: https://doi.org/10.46507/jcgpp.v1i2
  • Dutta, P., 2021. • Towards Sound Integrity Management in Bangladesh: Challenges and Issues in Public Administration and Law Enforcement. In: S. N. Khanom, ed. Governance, In the 21st Century in the Sounth Asia: Challenges and Ways Forward. Dhaka: Hakkani Publishers, pp. 541-560.

Zhuohan (Johanne) has a BA in English from Dalian Maritime University, China, and has won China National Scholarship. She then graduated with a Distinction in MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from University of Oxford. Before her DPhil, Zhuohan worked for the organizing committee for the Harvard Summit for Young Leaders in China, an initiative that brought liberal arts education from Harvard to China’s top-performing high school students. She also helped evaluate the UNICEF China Child-Friendly School Programme as an RA, focusing on the socio-emotional learning among the Dong ethnic minority groups in Guangxi, China. She also teaches IELTS, TOEFL, and English phonics.

Her MSc research centres on linguistic relativity, specifically the effect of French grammatical gender system on both French speakers’ and learners’ perception of objects. Her DPhil research focuses on English pronunciation teaching and learning among young Chinese kids, particularly emphasising the influence of their mother tongue, Mandarin.

Supervisors

Robert Woore and Faidra Faitaki

Shuo-Fang earned a Bachelor’s degree from National Chengchi University (Taiwan) and a Master’s degree from Boston University. He has teaching experience in various EFL contexts including international high school, educational institute, and graduate language program.

Shuo-Fang’s areas of interest lie in applied linguistics, particularly phonetics/phonology and speech perception. As an Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholar, Shuo-Fang is currently undertaking his doctoral research, supervised by Dr Elizabeth Wonnacott and Dr Robert Woore. His doctoral project is mostly experimental and explores second language learners’ difficulty in processing English connected speech.

Shuo-Fang is affiliated with two research groups: Applied Linguistics and Wonnacott-Nation Lab (developmental cognitive psychology).

Publications

Liang, S., & Yu, H. (2021). Chinese students’ willingness to communicate in EFL classrooms: A case study of students at a Sino-foreign university. Professional and Academic English, 28(2), 15–33.

Siyu Ma is a DPhil student in child development and learning at the Department of Education. Her doctoral research focuses on second-born children under the Chinese two-child policy, especially how siblings play a role in the socio-emotional, language, and early literacy development of these children.

Prior to starting her Dphil, Siyu completed an MSc in Education (Research Design and Methodology) at the University of Oxford, under the supervision of Professor Sonali Nag. Her MSc dissertation explored the roles of social background and home literacy environment in the language and literacy development of a Wales subsample from the Millennium Cohort Study and was awarded a High Distinction. She also holds a BSc degree with first-class honours in Psychology from the University of Bath.

Siyu is also a research associate working on TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education.

At TalkTogether, Siyu is responsible for designing online surveys and analysing quantitative data from child assessments and parent reports.

Publications

Ma, S. (2021). Family background and home literacy environment as predictors of the early literacy development of children in Wales – findings from the Millennium Cohort Study (Master’s thesis, University of Oxford).

 

Amanda is the recipient of the Hazel Project Scholarship, based at the Rees Centre. Her doctoral research explores the conceptualisation of foster homes as therapeutic environments for complex/developmental trauma. Through participant-generated photography and collaborative qualitative methods with young people currently in foster care placements, her research explores if young people’s concepts and perceptions of therapeutic environments coincide with or challenge existing theoretical models and popular practitioner perspectives.

Amanda holds a BA from the University of Leeds (UK) and an MPhil from the University of Oxford (UK).

Lawrence is a teacher of mathematics who is particularly interested in classroom pedagogy, and how research and education policies interact with the teaching that students experience on a daily basis.

He finds that looking outwards in education is valuable with there being much more that unites our classrooms than isolates them. He has been extremely fortunate to study education through an international lens in the US, and to work on the Global Teaching InSights initiative of the Organisation for Economic Development (OECD) where he led on its videos of teaching.

Publications

Global Teaching InSights: A video study of teaching, OECD, 2020

Antonin is currently Doctoral Teaching Fellow on the MSc in Comparative and International Education, teaching Foundations of Educational Research. Antonin is also a Research Assistant for the Centre for Global Higher Education on the ‘Research on Research: the research function and mission of higher education’ project.

Alongside his teaching and research roles, Antonin is completing a Doctoral study on the European Universities Initiative, the European Commission’s flagship higher education programme that seeks to set up European Universities through transnational university alliances.

Arzhia Habibi is a DPhil in Education Candidate and uses Mandarin to conduct her research in the Chinese higher education context.

Arzhia’s research focuses on ‘expressions’ of global or world citizenship education in a Chinese higher education institution In the study, she explores the perspectives and practices of educators and students at a China-based university, which experiments with discourses related to citizenship. She further investigates how individual, local, national and global dynamics and the surrounding discourses influence worldviews and practices in a university setting.

As empirical studies on global or world citizenship education in the Chinese context are scarce, Arzhia hopes to contribute to a nascent knowledge base which may extend and add depth to the critical global discourses of global and world citizenship education, beyond Eurocentric framings.

Prior to her studies at Oxford, Arzhia received a first class Bachelor’s degree in Contemporary Chinese Studies at The University of Nottingham, and a Master’s in International Communication in Taiwan at National Chengchi University. As a child, she also attended kindergarten in Fuzhou, Fujian province of China.

Olga is a co-convenor of the Philosophy of Education Reading Group at the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. Olga’s main research interest is in the topics of epistemic injustice across all levels of education and across national borders with a focus on higher education and the process of knowledge production in academic institutes and universities. Her core interest lies between the areas of social epistemology, research on research (RoR) and comparative and international education (CIE). She has been a recipient of multiple research awards in the United States and the United Kingdom and is an elected co-convenor of the Comparative and International Education Special Interest Group at the British Educational Research Association (BERA).

Her new research at Oxford will explore the epistemically just and unjust practices as experienced by scholars from Kazakhstan during the internationalisation process in the social sciences and the humanities. Prior joining Oxford, Olga taught at University College London Institute of Education in London on the topics of migrant, refugee and minority education and European education traditions from a comparative lens.

Publications
  • Mun, O. (2020). ‘Epistemic Injustices in Internationalising Humanities and Social Sciences: A Case Study of Higher Education and Science Institutes in Kazakhstan.’ Centre for International Higher Education, Boston College. https://www.bc.edu/content/dam/bc1/schools/lsoe/sites/cihe/publication/Perspectives/Perspectives%20No%2018.pdf
  • Mun, O. and Gafu, G. (in press) ‘University Research Capacity in Kazakhstan’. Higher School of Economics, Russia.
  • Kandiko Howson, C., Mun, O. and Walker, R. (2020). ‘Academic Activism in STEM fields: Discipline in Theory and Practice.’ Philosophy and Theory of Higher Education Society.
  • Aizuddin M., Habibi A., Mun, O. (in press, 2020). ‘Post-Colonialism in Comparative and International Education.’ In Jules, T., Shields, R., Thomas, M. (Ed.), Bloomsbury Handbook of Theory in Comparative and International Education.
  • Palandjian, G., Silova, I., Mun, O., Zholdashaliyeva, R. (2018). ‘Gender and Nation in Postsocialist Educational Transformations.’ In Silova, I., & Chankseliani, M. (Eds.), Comparing Post-Socialist Transformations: Education in Eastern Europe and Former Soviet Union. Oxford: Symposium Books.
  • Mun, O., & Zholdashaliyeva, R. (2017). ‘Alippe, Bukvar’ and Gender: A comparative analysis of early literacy textbooks in Kazakhstan and Kyrgyzstan.’ In E. Brown & R. Craven & G. McLean (Ed.), International Advances in Education: Global Initiatives for Equity and Social Justice Series. Information Age Publishing
  • Patel, K. and Mun, O. (2017). ‘Marketing ‘development’ in the neoliberal university.’ DPU Working Papers https://www.ucl.ac.uk/bartlett/development/case-studies/2017/sep/marketing-development-neoliberal-university
  • Fimyar, O., Saniyazova, A. & Mun, O. (2017) ‘Methodology of Collaborative Research: Or, Searching for a Synergy in the Study of Student Transition in Kazakhstan.’ In SAGE Research Methods Cases. London, United Kingdom: SAGE Publications.
  • Mun, O. (2015). ‘(Re)imagining national identity through early literacy textbooks in Kazakhstan’, Forum of Young Central Asian Experts, 2nd edition. http://caa-network.org/archives/5620
  • Silova, I., Mead Yaqub, M., Mun, O., Palandjian, G. (2014). ‘Pedagogies of Space: (re)imagining nation and childhood in post-Soviet states.’ Global Studies of Childhood, 4(3), 195-209.
  • Silova, I., Brezhenyuk, V., Kudasova, M., Mun, O., Artemev, N. (2014). ‘Youth Protests against Privatisation of Education in post-Soviet states.’ European Education, 46(3), 56-65.

Schooled in the discipline of Public Administration at the University of Dhaka and with an experience of over five years of lecturing graduate and post-graduate students at two reputed public universities in Bangladesh, I am interested in research works related to education, gender, public policy, social studies and have multiple publications.

Apart from my current lecturing position, I worked as a news editor and contributor for the Dhaka Insider, an online news portal, in 2015. I also served as the Head of the Department (Department of Public Administration) and Assistant Proctor at the Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujibur Rahman Science and Technology University (BSMRSTU) and as an elected member of the Teachers’ Association there. During my post-graduation (MA. Public Policy) at the University of Nottingham, a qualitative research focus helped me characterize patterns of gender gap in primary education access.

 

Selected Publications
  • Dutta,  P.  (2020).  Democratic  Decentralization  and  Participatory Development:  Focus  on  Bangladesh.  Journal  of    Contemporary  Governance  and  Public Policy, 1(2), 82-91. Permalink/DOI: https://doi.org/10.46507/jcgpp.v1i2
  • Dutta, P., 2021. • Towards Sound Integrity Management in Bangladesh: Challenges and Issues in Public Administration and Law Enforcement. In: S. N. Khanom, ed. Governance, In the 21st Century in the Sounth Asia: Challenges and Ways Forward. Dhaka: Hakkani Publishers, pp. 541-560.

Zhuohan (Johanne) has a BA in English from Dalian Maritime University, China, and has won China National Scholarship. She then graduated with a Distinction in MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from University of Oxford. Before her DPhil, Zhuohan worked for the organizing committee for the Harvard Summit for Young Leaders in China, an initiative that brought liberal arts education from Harvard to China’s top-performing high school students. She also helped evaluate the UNICEF China Child-Friendly School Programme as an RA, focusing on the socio-emotional learning among the Dong ethnic minority groups in Guangxi, China. She also teaches IELTS, TOEFL, and English phonics.

Her MSc research centres on linguistic relativity, specifically the effect of French grammatical gender system on both French speakers’ and learners’ perception of objects. Her DPhil research focuses on English pronunciation teaching and learning among young Chinese kids, particularly emphasising the influence of their mother tongue, Mandarin.

Supervisors

Robert Woore and Faidra Faitaki

Shuo-Fang earned a Bachelor’s degree from National Chengchi University (Taiwan) and a Master’s degree from Boston University. He has teaching experience in various EFL contexts including international high school, educational institute, and graduate language program.

Shuo-Fang’s areas of interest lie in applied linguistics, particularly phonetics/phonology and speech perception. As an Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholar, Shuo-Fang is currently undertaking his doctoral research, supervised by Dr Elizabeth Wonnacott and Dr Robert Woore. His doctoral project is mostly experimental and explores second language learners’ difficulty in processing English connected speech.

Shuo-Fang is affiliated with two research groups: Applied Linguistics and Wonnacott-Nation Lab (developmental cognitive psychology).

Publications

Liang, S., & Yu, H. (2021). Chinese students’ willingness to communicate in EFL classrooms: A case study of students at a Sino-foreign university. Professional and Academic English, 28(2), 15–33.

Siyu Ma is a DPhil student in child development and learning at the Department of Education. Her doctoral research focuses on second-born children under the Chinese two-child policy, especially how siblings play a role in the socio-emotional, language, and early literacy development of these children.

Prior to starting her Dphil, Siyu completed an MSc in Education (Research Design and Methodology) at the University of Oxford, under the supervision of Professor Sonali Nag. Her MSc dissertation explored the roles of social background and home literacy environment in the language and literacy development of a Wales subsample from the Millennium Cohort Study and was awarded a High Distinction. She also holds a BSc degree with first-class honours in Psychology from the University of Bath.

Siyu is also a research associate working on TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education.

At TalkTogether, Siyu is responsible for designing online surveys and analysing quantitative data from child assessments and parent reports.

Publications

Ma, S. (2021). Family background and home literacy environment as predictors of the early literacy development of children in Wales – findings from the Millennium Cohort Study (Master’s thesis, University of Oxford).

 

Amanda is the recipient of the Hazel Project Scholarship, based at the Rees Centre. Her doctoral research explores the conceptualisation of foster homes as therapeutic environments for complex/developmental trauma. Through participant-generated photography and collaborative qualitative methods with young people currently in foster care placements, her research explores if young people’s concepts and perceptions of therapeutic environments coincide with or challenge existing theoretical models and popular practitioner perspectives.

Amanda holds a BA from the University of Leeds (UK) and an MPhil from the University of Oxford (UK).

Lawrence is a teacher of mathematics who is particularly interested in classroom pedagogy, and how research and education policies interact with the teaching that students experience on a daily basis.

He finds that looking outwards in education is valuable with there being much more that unites our classrooms than isolates them. He has been extremely fortunate to study education through an international lens in the US, and to work on the Global Teaching InSights initiative of the Organisation for Economic Development (OECD) where he led on its videos of teaching.

Publications

Global Teaching InSights: A video study of teaching, OECD, 2020

Antonin is currently Doctoral Teaching Fellow on the MSc in Comparative and International Education, teaching Foundations of Educational Research. Antonin is also a Research Assistant for the Centre for Global Higher Education on the ‘Research on Research: the research function and mission of higher education’ project.

Alongside his teaching and research roles, Antonin is completing a Doctoral study on the European Universities Initiative, the European Commission’s flagship higher education programme that seeks to set up European Universities through transnational university alliances.

Arzhia Habibi is a DPhil in Education Candidate and uses Mandarin to conduct her research in the Chinese higher education context.

Arzhia’s research focuses on ‘expressions’ of global or world citizenship education in a Chinese higher education institution In the study, she explores the perspectives and practices of educators and students at a China-based university, which experiments with discourses related to citizenship. She further investigates how individual, local, national and global dynamics and the surrounding discourses influence worldviews and practices in a university setting.

As empirical studies on global or world citizenship education in the Chinese context are scarce, Arzhia hopes to contribute to a nascent knowledge base which may extend and add depth to the critical global discourses of global and world citizenship education, beyond Eurocentric framings.

Prior to her studies at Oxford, Arzhia received a first class Bachelor’s degree in Contemporary Chinese Studies at The University of Nottingham, and a Master’s in International Communication in Taiwan at National Chengchi University. As a child, she also attended kindergarten in Fuzhou, Fujian province of China.

Olga is a co-convenor of the Philosophy of Education Reading Group at the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. Olga’s main research interest is in the topics of epistemic injustice across all levels of education and across national borders with a focus on higher education and the process of knowledge production in academic institutes and universities. Her core interest lies between the areas of social epistemology, research on research (RoR) and comparative and international education (CIE). She has been a recipient of multiple research awards in the United States and the United Kingdom and is an elected co-convenor of the Comparative and International Education Special Interest Group at the British Educational Research Association (BERA).

Her new research at Oxford will explore the epistemically just and unjust practices as experienced by scholars from Kazakhstan during the internationalisation process in the social sciences and the humanities. Prior joining Oxford, Olga taught at University College London Institute of Education in London on the topics of migrant, refugee and minority education and European education traditions from a comparative lens.

Publications
  • Mun, O. (2020). ‘Epistemic Injustices in Internationalising Humanities and Social Sciences: A Case Study of Higher Education and Science Institutes in Kazakhstan.’ Centre for International Higher Education, Boston College. https://www.bc.edu/content/dam/bc1/schools/lsoe/sites/cihe/publication/Perspectives/Perspectives%20No%2018.pdf
  • Mun, O. and Gafu, G. (in press) ‘University Research Capacity in Kazakhstan’. Higher School of Economics, Russia.
  • Kandiko Howson, C., Mun, O. and Walker, R. (2020). ‘Academic Activism in STEM fields: Discipline in Theory and Practice.’ Philosophy and Theory of Higher Education Society.
  • Aizuddin M., Habibi A., Mun, O. (in press, 2020). ‘Post-Colonialism in Comparative and International Education.’ In Jules, T., Shields, R., Thomas, M. (Ed.), Bloomsbury Handbook of Theory in Comparative and International Education.
  • Palandjian, G., Silova, I., Mun, O., Zholdashaliyeva, R. (2018). ‘Gender and Nation in Postsocialist Educational Transformations.’ In Silova, I., & Chankseliani, M. (Eds.), Comparing Post-Socialist Transformations: Education in Eastern Europe and Former Soviet Union. Oxford: Symposium Books.
  • Mun, O., & Zholdashaliyeva, R. (2017). ‘Alippe, Bukvar’ and Gender: A comparative analysis of early literacy textbooks in Kazakhstan and Kyrgyzstan.’ In E. Brown & R. Craven & G. McLean (Ed.), International Advances in Education: Global Initiatives for Equity and Social Justice Series. Information Age Publishing
  • Patel, K. and Mun, O. (2017). ‘Marketing ‘development’ in the neoliberal university.’ DPU Working Papers https://www.ucl.ac.uk/bartlett/development/case-studies/2017/sep/marketing-development-neoliberal-university
  • Fimyar, O., Saniyazova, A. & Mun, O. (2017) ‘Methodology of Collaborative Research: Or, Searching for a Synergy in the Study of Student Transition in Kazakhstan.’ In SAGE Research Methods Cases. London, United Kingdom: SAGE Publications.
  • Mun, O. (2015). ‘(Re)imagining national identity through early literacy textbooks in Kazakhstan’, Forum of Young Central Asian Experts, 2nd edition. http://caa-network.org/archives/5620
  • Silova, I., Mead Yaqub, M., Mun, O., Palandjian, G. (2014). ‘Pedagogies of Space: (re)imagining nation and childhood in post-Soviet states.’ Global Studies of Childhood, 4(3), 195-209.
  • Silova, I., Brezhenyuk, V., Kudasova, M., Mun, O., Artemev, N. (2014). ‘Youth Protests against Privatisation of Education in post-Soviet states.’ European Education, 46(3), 56-65.

Schooled in the discipline of Public Administration at the University of Dhaka and with an experience of over five years of lecturing graduate and post-graduate students at two reputed public universities in Bangladesh, I am interested in research works related to education, gender, public policy, social studies and have multiple publications.

Apart from my current lecturing position, I worked as a news editor and contributor for the Dhaka Insider, an online news portal, in 2015. I also served as the Head of the Department (Department of Public Administration) and Assistant Proctor at the Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujibur Rahman Science and Technology University (BSMRSTU) and as an elected member of the Teachers’ Association there. During my post-graduation (MA. Public Policy) at the University of Nottingham, a qualitative research focus helped me characterize patterns of gender gap in primary education access.

 

Selected Publications
  • Dutta,  P.  (2020).  Democratic  Decentralization  and  Participatory Development:  Focus  on  Bangladesh.  Journal  of    Contemporary  Governance  and  Public Policy, 1(2), 82-91. Permalink/DOI: https://doi.org/10.46507/jcgpp.v1i2
  • Dutta, P., 2021. • Towards Sound Integrity Management in Bangladesh: Challenges and Issues in Public Administration and Law Enforcement. In: S. N. Khanom, ed. Governance, In the 21st Century in the Sounth Asia: Challenges and Ways Forward. Dhaka: Hakkani Publishers, pp. 541-560.

Zhuohan (Johanne) has a BA in English from Dalian Maritime University, China, and has won China National Scholarship. She then graduated with a Distinction in MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from University of Oxford. Before her DPhil, Zhuohan worked for the organizing committee for the Harvard Summit for Young Leaders in China, an initiative that brought liberal arts education from Harvard to China’s top-performing high school students. She also helped evaluate the UNICEF China Child-Friendly School Programme as an RA, focusing on the socio-emotional learning among the Dong ethnic minority groups in Guangxi, China. She also teaches IELTS, TOEFL, and English phonics.

Her MSc research centres on linguistic relativity, specifically the effect of French grammatical gender system on both French speakers’ and learners’ perception of objects. Her DPhil research focuses on English pronunciation teaching and learning among young Chinese kids, particularly emphasising the influence of their mother tongue, Mandarin.

Supervisors

Robert Woore and Faidra Faitaki

Shuo-Fang earned a Bachelor’s degree from National Chengchi University (Taiwan) and a Master’s degree from Boston University. He has teaching experience in various EFL contexts including international high school, educational institute, and graduate language program.

Shuo-Fang’s areas of interest lie in applied linguistics, particularly phonetics/phonology and speech perception. As an Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholar, Shuo-Fang is currently undertaking his doctoral research, supervised by Dr Elizabeth Wonnacott and Dr Robert Woore. His doctoral project is mostly experimental and explores second language learners’ difficulty in processing English connected speech.

Shuo-Fang is affiliated with two research groups: Applied Linguistics and Wonnacott-Nation Lab (developmental cognitive psychology).

Publications

Liang, S., & Yu, H. (2021). Chinese students’ willingness to communicate in EFL classrooms: A case study of students at a Sino-foreign university. Professional and Academic English, 28(2), 15–33.

Siyu Ma is a DPhil student in child development and learning at the Department of Education. Her doctoral research focuses on second-born children under the Chinese two-child policy, especially how siblings play a role in the socio-emotional, language, and early literacy development of these children.

Prior to starting her Dphil, Siyu completed an MSc in Education (Research Design and Methodology) at the University of Oxford, under the supervision of Professor Sonali Nag. Her MSc dissertation explored the roles of social background and home literacy environment in the language and literacy development of a Wales subsample from the Millennium Cohort Study and was awarded a High Distinction. She also holds a BSc degree with first-class honours in Psychology from the University of Bath.

Siyu is also a research associate working on TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education.

At TalkTogether, Siyu is responsible for designing online surveys and analysing quantitative data from child assessments and parent reports.

Publications

Ma, S. (2021). Family background and home literacy environment as predictors of the early literacy development of children in Wales – findings from the Millennium Cohort Study (Master’s thesis, University of Oxford).

 

Amanda is the recipient of the Hazel Project Scholarship, based at the Rees Centre. Her doctoral research explores the conceptualisation of foster homes as therapeutic environments for complex/developmental trauma. Through participant-generated photography and collaborative qualitative methods with young people currently in foster care placements, her research explores if young people’s concepts and perceptions of therapeutic environments coincide with or challenge existing theoretical models and popular practitioner perspectives.

Amanda holds a BA from the University of Leeds (UK) and an MPhil from the University of Oxford (UK).

Lawrence is a teacher of mathematics who is particularly interested in classroom pedagogy, and how research and education policies interact with the teaching that students experience on a daily basis.

He finds that looking outwards in education is valuable with there being much more that unites our classrooms than isolates them. He has been extremely fortunate to study education through an international lens in the US, and to work on the Global Teaching InSights initiative of the Organisation for Economic Development (OECD) where he led on its videos of teaching.

Publications

Global Teaching InSights: A video study of teaching, OECD, 2020

Antonin is currently Doctoral Teaching Fellow on the MSc in Comparative and International Education, teaching Foundations of Educational Research. Antonin is also a Research Assistant for the Centre for Global Higher Education on the ‘Research on Research: the research function and mission of higher education’ project.

Alongside his teaching and research roles, Antonin is completing a Doctoral study on the European Universities Initiative, the European Commission’s flagship higher education programme that seeks to set up European Universities through transnational university alliances.

Arzhia Habibi is a DPhil in Education Candidate and uses Mandarin to conduct her research in the Chinese higher education context.

Arzhia’s research focuses on ‘expressions’ of global or world citizenship education in a Chinese higher education institution In the study, she explores the perspectives and practices of educators and students at a China-based university, which experiments with discourses related to citizenship. She further investigates how individual, local, national and global dynamics and the surrounding discourses influence worldviews and practices in a university setting.

As empirical studies on global or world citizenship education in the Chinese context are scarce, Arzhia hopes to contribute to a nascent knowledge base which may extend and add depth to the critical global discourses of global and world citizenship education, beyond Eurocentric framings.

Prior to her studies at Oxford, Arzhia received a first class Bachelor’s degree in Contemporary Chinese Studies at The University of Nottingham, and a Master’s in International Communication in Taiwan at National Chengchi University. As a child, she also attended kindergarten in Fuzhou, Fujian province of China.

Olga is a co-convenor of the Philosophy of Education Reading Group at the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. Olga’s main research interest is in the topics of epistemic injustice across all levels of education and across national borders with a focus on higher education and the process of knowledge production in academic institutes and universities. Her core interest lies between the areas of social epistemology, research on research (RoR) and comparative and international education (CIE). She has been a recipient of multiple research awards in the United States and the United Kingdom and is an elected co-convenor of the Comparative and International Education Special Interest Group at the British Educational Research Association (BERA).

Her new research at Oxford will explore the epistemically just and unjust practices as experienced by scholars from Kazakhstan during the internationalisation process in the social sciences and the humanities. Prior joining Oxford, Olga taught at University College London Institute of Education in London on the topics of migrant, refugee and minority education and European education traditions from a comparative lens.

Publications
  • Mun, O. (2020). ‘Epistemic Injustices in Internationalising Humanities and Social Sciences: A Case Study of Higher Education and Science Institutes in Kazakhstan.’ Centre for International Higher Education, Boston College. https://www.bc.edu/content/dam/bc1/schools/lsoe/sites/cihe/publication/Perspectives/Perspectives%20No%2018.pdf
  • Mun, O. and Gafu, G. (in press) ‘University Research Capacity in Kazakhstan’. Higher School of Economics, Russia.
  • Kandiko Howson, C., Mun, O. and Walker, R. (2020). ‘Academic Activism in STEM fields: Discipline in Theory and Practice.’ Philosophy and Theory of Higher Education Society.
  • Aizuddin M., Habibi A., Mun, O. (in press, 2020). ‘Post-Colonialism in Comparative and International Education.’ In Jules, T., Shields, R., Thomas, M. (Ed.), Bloomsbury Handbook of Theory in Comparative and International Education.
  • Palandjian, G., Silova, I., Mun, O., Zholdashaliyeva, R. (2018). ‘Gender and Nation in Postsocialist Educational Transformations.’ In Silova, I., & Chankseliani, M. (Eds.), Comparing Post-Socialist Transformations: Education in Eastern Europe and Former Soviet Union. Oxford: Symposium Books.
  • Mun, O., & Zholdashaliyeva, R. (2017). ‘Alippe, Bukvar’ and Gender: A comparative analysis of early literacy textbooks in Kazakhstan and Kyrgyzstan.’ In E. Brown & R. Craven & G. McLean (Ed.), International Advances in Education: Global Initiatives for Equity and Social Justice Series. Information Age Publishing
  • Patel, K. and Mun, O. (2017). ‘Marketing ‘development’ in the neoliberal university.’ DPU Working Papers https://www.ucl.ac.uk/bartlett/development/case-studies/2017/sep/marketing-development-neoliberal-university
  • Fimyar, O., Saniyazova, A. & Mun, O. (2017) ‘Methodology of Collaborative Research: Or, Searching for a Synergy in the Study of Student Transition in Kazakhstan.’ In SAGE Research Methods Cases. London, United Kingdom: SAGE Publications.
  • Mun, O. (2015). ‘(Re)imagining national identity through early literacy textbooks in Kazakhstan’, Forum of Young Central Asian Experts, 2nd edition. http://caa-network.org/archives/5620
  • Silova, I., Mead Yaqub, M., Mun, O., Palandjian, G. (2014). ‘Pedagogies of Space: (re)imagining nation and childhood in post-Soviet states.’ Global Studies of Childhood, 4(3), 195-209.
  • Silova, I., Brezhenyuk, V., Kudasova, M., Mun, O., Artemev, N. (2014). ‘Youth Protests against Privatisation of Education in post-Soviet states.’ European Education, 46(3), 56-65.

Schooled in the discipline of Public Administration at the University of Dhaka and with an experience of over five years of lecturing graduate and post-graduate students at two reputed public universities in Bangladesh, I am interested in research works related to education, gender, public policy, social studies and have multiple publications.

Apart from my current lecturing position, I worked as a news editor and contributor for the Dhaka Insider, an online news portal, in 2015. I also served as the Head of the Department (Department of Public Administration) and Assistant Proctor at the Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujibur Rahman Science and Technology University (BSMRSTU) and as an elected member of the Teachers’ Association there. During my post-graduation (MA. Public Policy) at the University of Nottingham, a qualitative research focus helped me characterize patterns of gender gap in primary education access.

 

Selected Publications
  • Dutta,  P.  (2020).  Democratic  Decentralization  and  Participatory Development:  Focus  on  Bangladesh.  Journal  of    Contemporary  Governance  and  Public Policy, 1(2), 82-91. Permalink/DOI: https://doi.org/10.46507/jcgpp.v1i2
  • Dutta, P., 2021. • Towards Sound Integrity Management in Bangladesh: Challenges and Issues in Public Administration and Law Enforcement. In: S. N. Khanom, ed. Governance, In the 21st Century in the Sounth Asia: Challenges and Ways Forward. Dhaka: Hakkani Publishers, pp. 541-560.

Zhuohan (Johanne) has a BA in English from Dalian Maritime University, China, and has won China National Scholarship. She then graduated with a Distinction in MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from University of Oxford. Before her DPhil, Zhuohan worked for the organizing committee for the Harvard Summit for Young Leaders in China, an initiative that brought liberal arts education from Harvard to China’s top-performing high school students. She also helped evaluate the UNICEF China Child-Friendly School Programme as an RA, focusing on the socio-emotional learning among the Dong ethnic minority groups in Guangxi, China. She also teaches IELTS, TOEFL, and English phonics.

Her MSc research centres on linguistic relativity, specifically the effect of French grammatical gender system on both French speakers’ and learners’ perception of objects. Her DPhil research focuses on English pronunciation teaching and learning among young Chinese kids, particularly emphasising the influence of their mother tongue, Mandarin.

Supervisors

Robert Woore and Faidra Faitaki

Shuo-Fang earned a Bachelor’s degree from National Chengchi University (Taiwan) and a Master’s degree from Boston University. He has teaching experience in various EFL contexts including international high school, educational institute, and graduate language program.

Shuo-Fang’s areas of interest lie in applied linguistics, particularly phonetics/phonology and speech perception. As an Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholar, Shuo-Fang is currently undertaking his doctoral research, supervised by Dr Elizabeth Wonnacott and Dr Robert Woore. His doctoral project is mostly experimental and explores second language learners’ difficulty in processing English connected speech.

Shuo-Fang is affiliated with two research groups: Applied Linguistics and Wonnacott-Nation Lab (developmental cognitive psychology).

Publications

Liang, S., & Yu, H. (2021). Chinese students’ willingness to communicate in EFL classrooms: A case study of students at a Sino-foreign university. Professional and Academic English, 28(2), 15–33.

Siyu Ma is a DPhil student in child development and learning at the Department of Education. Her doctoral research focuses on second-born children under the Chinese two-child policy, especially how siblings play a role in the socio-emotional, language, and early literacy development of these children.

Prior to starting her Dphil, Siyu completed an MSc in Education (Research Design and Methodology) at the University of Oxford, under the supervision of Professor Sonali Nag. Her MSc dissertation explored the roles of social background and home literacy environment in the language and literacy development of a Wales subsample from the Millennium Cohort Study and was awarded a High Distinction. She also holds a BSc degree with first-class honours in Psychology from the University of Bath.

Siyu is also a research associate working on TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education.

At TalkTogether, Siyu is responsible for designing online surveys and analysing quantitative data from child assessments and parent reports.

Publications

Ma, S. (2021). Family background and home literacy environment as predictors of the early literacy development of children in Wales – findings from the Millennium Cohort Study (Master’s thesis, University of Oxford).

 

Amanda is the recipient of the Hazel Project Scholarship, based at the Rees Centre. Her doctoral research explores the conceptualisation of foster homes as therapeutic environments for complex/developmental trauma. Through participant-generated photography and collaborative qualitative methods with young people currently in foster care placements, her research explores if young people’s concepts and perceptions of therapeutic environments coincide with or challenge existing theoretical models and popular practitioner perspectives.

Amanda holds a BA from the University of Leeds (UK) and an MPhil from the University of Oxford (UK).

Lawrence is a teacher of mathematics who is particularly interested in classroom pedagogy, and how research and education policies interact with the teaching that students experience on a daily basis.

He finds that looking outwards in education is valuable with there being much more that unites our classrooms than isolates them. He has been extremely fortunate to study education through an international lens in the US, and to work on the Global Teaching InSights initiative of the Organisation for Economic Development (OECD) where he led on its videos of teaching.

Publications

Global Teaching InSights: A video study of teaching, OECD, 2020

Antonin is currently Doctoral Teaching Fellow on the MSc in Comparative and International Education, teaching Foundations of Educational Research. Antonin is also a Research Assistant for the Centre for Global Higher Education on the ‘Research on Research: the research function and mission of higher education’ project.

Alongside his teaching and research roles, Antonin is completing a Doctoral study on the European Universities Initiative, the European Commission’s flagship higher education programme that seeks to set up European Universities through transnational university alliances.

Arzhia Habibi is a DPhil in Education Candidate and uses Mandarin to conduct her research in the Chinese higher education context.

Arzhia’s research focuses on ‘expressions’ of global or world citizenship education in a Chinese higher education institution In the study, she explores the perspectives and practices of educators and students at a China-based university, which experiments with discourses related to citizenship. She further investigates how individual, local, national and global dynamics and the surrounding discourses influence worldviews and practices in a university setting.

As empirical studies on global or world citizenship education in the Chinese context are scarce, Arzhia hopes to contribute to a nascent knowledge base which may extend and add depth to the critical global discourses of global and world citizenship education, beyond Eurocentric framings.

Prior to her studies at Oxford, Arzhia received a first class Bachelor’s degree in Contemporary Chinese Studies at The University of Nottingham, and a Master’s in International Communication in Taiwan at National Chengchi University. As a child, she also attended kindergarten in Fuzhou, Fujian province of China.

Olga is a co-convenor of the Philosophy of Education Reading Group at the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. Olga’s main research interest is in the topics of epistemic injustice across all levels of education and across national borders with a focus on higher education and the process of knowledge production in academic institutes and universities. Her core interest lies between the areas of social epistemology, research on research (RoR) and comparative and international education (CIE). She has been a recipient of multiple research awards in the United States and the United Kingdom and is an elected co-convenor of the Comparative and International Education Special Interest Group at the British Educational Research Association (BERA).

Her new research at Oxford will explore the epistemically just and unjust practices as experienced by scholars from Kazakhstan during the internationalisation process in the social sciences and the humanities. Prior joining Oxford, Olga taught at University College London Institute of Education in London on the topics of migrant, refugee and minority education and European education traditions from a comparative lens.

Publications
  • Mun, O. (2020). ‘Epistemic Injustices in Internationalising Humanities and Social Sciences: A Case Study of Higher Education and Science Institutes in Kazakhstan.’ Centre for International Higher Education, Boston College. https://www.bc.edu/content/dam/bc1/schools/lsoe/sites/cihe/publication/Perspectives/Perspectives%20No%2018.pdf
  • Mun, O. and Gafu, G. (in press) ‘University Research Capacity in Kazakhstan’. Higher School of Economics, Russia.
  • Kandiko Howson, C., Mun, O. and Walker, R. (2020). ‘Academic Activism in STEM fields: Discipline in Theory and Practice.’ Philosophy and Theory of Higher Education Society.
  • Aizuddin M., Habibi A., Mun, O. (in press, 2020). ‘Post-Colonialism in Comparative and International Education.’ In Jules, T., Shields, R., Thomas, M. (Ed.), Bloomsbury Handbook of Theory in Comparative and International Education.
  • Palandjian, G., Silova, I., Mun, O., Zholdashaliyeva, R. (2018). ‘Gender and Nation in Postsocialist Educational Transformations.’ In Silova, I., & Chankseliani, M. (Eds.), Comparing Post-Socialist Transformations: Education in Eastern Europe and Former Soviet Union. Oxford: Symposium Books.
  • Mun, O., & Zholdashaliyeva, R. (2017). ‘Alippe, Bukvar’ and Gender: A comparative analysis of early literacy textbooks in Kazakhstan and Kyrgyzstan.’ In E. Brown & R. Craven & G. McLean (Ed.), International Advances in Education: Global Initiatives for Equity and Social Justice Series. Information Age Publishing
  • Patel, K. and Mun, O. (2017). ‘Marketing ‘development’ in the neoliberal university.’ DPU Working Papers https://www.ucl.ac.uk/bartlett/development/case-studies/2017/sep/marketing-development-neoliberal-university
  • Fimyar, O., Saniyazova, A. & Mun, O. (2017) ‘Methodology of Collaborative Research: Or, Searching for a Synergy in the Study of Student Transition in Kazakhstan.’ In SAGE Research Methods Cases. London, United Kingdom: SAGE Publications.
  • Mun, O. (2015). ‘(Re)imagining national identity through early literacy textbooks in Kazakhstan’, Forum of Young Central Asian Experts, 2nd edition. http://caa-network.org/archives/5620
  • Silova, I., Mead Yaqub, M., Mun, O., Palandjian, G. (2014). ‘Pedagogies of Space: (re)imagining nation and childhood in post-Soviet states.’ Global Studies of Childhood, 4(3), 195-209.
  • Silova, I., Brezhenyuk, V., Kudasova, M., Mun, O., Artemev, N. (2014). ‘Youth Protests against Privatisation of Education in post-Soviet states.’ European Education, 46(3), 56-65.

Schooled in the discipline of Public Administration at the University of Dhaka and with an experience of over five years of lecturing graduate and post-graduate students at two reputed public universities in Bangladesh, I am interested in research works related to education, gender, public policy, social studies and have multiple publications.

Apart from my current lecturing position, I worked as a news editor and contributor for the Dhaka Insider, an online news portal, in 2015. I also served as the Head of the Department (Department of Public Administration) and Assistant Proctor at the Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujibur Rahman Science and Technology University (BSMRSTU) and as an elected member of the Teachers’ Association there. During my post-graduation (MA. Public Policy) at the University of Nottingham, a qualitative research focus helped me characterize patterns of gender gap in primary education access.

 

Selected Publications
  • Dutta,  P.  (2020).  Democratic  Decentralization  and  Participatory Development:  Focus  on  Bangladesh.  Journal  of    Contemporary  Governance  and  Public Policy, 1(2), 82-91. Permalink/DOI: https://doi.org/10.46507/jcgpp.v1i2
  • Dutta, P., 2021. • Towards Sound Integrity Management in Bangladesh: Challenges and Issues in Public Administration and Law Enforcement. In: S. N. Khanom, ed. Governance, In the 21st Century in the Sounth Asia: Challenges and Ways Forward. Dhaka: Hakkani Publishers, pp. 541-560.

Zhuohan (Johanne) has a BA in English from Dalian Maritime University, China, and has won China National Scholarship. She then graduated with a Distinction in MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from University of Oxford. Before her DPhil, Zhuohan worked for the organizing committee for the Harvard Summit for Young Leaders in China, an initiative that brought liberal arts education from Harvard to China’s top-performing high school students. She also helped evaluate the UNICEF China Child-Friendly School Programme as an RA, focusing on the socio-emotional learning among the Dong ethnic minority groups in Guangxi, China. She also teaches IELTS, TOEFL, and English phonics.

Her MSc research centres on linguistic relativity, specifically the effect of French grammatical gender system on both French speakers’ and learners’ perception of objects. Her DPhil research focuses on English pronunciation teaching and learning among young Chinese kids, particularly emphasising the influence of their mother tongue, Mandarin.

Supervisors

Robert Woore and Faidra Faitaki

Shuo-Fang earned a Bachelor’s degree from National Chengchi University (Taiwan) and a Master’s degree from Boston University. He has teaching experience in various EFL contexts including international high school, educational institute, and graduate language program.

Shuo-Fang’s areas of interest lie in applied linguistics, particularly phonetics/phonology and speech perception. As an Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholar, Shuo-Fang is currently undertaking his doctoral research, supervised by Dr Elizabeth Wonnacott and Dr Robert Woore. His doctoral project is mostly experimental and explores second language learners’ difficulty in processing English connected speech.

Shuo-Fang is affiliated with two research groups: Applied Linguistics and Wonnacott-Nation Lab (developmental cognitive psychology).

Publications

Liang, S., & Yu, H. (2021). Chinese students’ willingness to communicate in EFL classrooms: A case study of students at a Sino-foreign university. Professional and Academic English, 28(2), 15–33.

Siyu Ma is a DPhil student in child development and learning at the Department of Education. Her doctoral research focuses on second-born children under the Chinese two-child policy, especially how siblings play a role in the socio-emotional, language, and early literacy development of these children.

Prior to starting her Dphil, Siyu completed an MSc in Education (Research Design and Methodology) at the University of Oxford, under the supervision of Professor Sonali Nag. Her MSc dissertation explored the roles of social background and home literacy environment in the language and literacy development of a Wales subsample from the Millennium Cohort Study and was awarded a High Distinction. She also holds a BSc degree with first-class honours in Psychology from the University of Bath.

Siyu is also a research associate working on TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education.

At TalkTogether, Siyu is responsible for designing online surveys and analysing quantitative data from child assessments and parent reports.

Publications

Ma, S. (2021). Family background and home literacy environment as predictors of the early literacy development of children in Wales – findings from the Millennium Cohort Study (Master’s thesis, University of Oxford).

 

Amanda is the recipient of the Hazel Project Scholarship, based at the Rees Centre. Her doctoral research explores the conceptualisation of foster homes as therapeutic environments for complex/developmental trauma. Through participant-generated photography and collaborative qualitative methods with young people currently in foster care placements, her research explores if young people’s concepts and perceptions of therapeutic environments coincide with or challenge existing theoretical models and popular practitioner perspectives.

Amanda holds a BA from the University of Leeds (UK) and an MPhil from the University of Oxford (UK).

Lawrence is a teacher of mathematics who is particularly interested in classroom pedagogy, and how research and education policies interact with the teaching that students experience on a daily basis.

He finds that looking outwards in education is valuable with there being much more that unites our classrooms than isolates them. He has been extremely fortunate to study education through an international lens in the US, and to work on the Global Teaching InSights initiative of the Organisation for Economic Development (OECD) where he led on its videos of teaching.

Publications

Global Teaching InSights: A video study of teaching, OECD, 2020

Antonin is currently Doctoral Teaching Fellow on the MSc in Comparative and International Education, teaching Foundations of Educational Research. Antonin is also a Research Assistant for the Centre for Global Higher Education on the ‘Research on Research: the research function and mission of higher education’ project.

Alongside his teaching and research roles, Antonin is completing a Doctoral study on the European Universities Initiative, the European Commission’s flagship higher education programme that seeks to set up European Universities through transnational university alliances.

Arzhia Habibi is a DPhil in Education Candidate and uses Mandarin to conduct her research in the Chinese higher education context.

Arzhia’s research focuses on ‘expressions’ of global or world citizenship education in a Chinese higher education institution In the study, she explores the perspectives and practices of educators and students at a China-based university, which experiments with discourses related to citizenship. She further investigates how individual, local, national and global dynamics and the surrounding discourses influence worldviews and practices in a university setting.

As empirical studies on global or world citizenship education in the Chinese context are scarce, Arzhia hopes to contribute to a nascent knowledge base which may extend and add depth to the critical global discourses of global and world citizenship education, beyond Eurocentric framings.

Prior to her studies at Oxford, Arzhia received a first class Bachelor’s degree in Contemporary Chinese Studies at The University of Nottingham, and a Master’s in International Communication in Taiwan at National Chengchi University. As a child, she also attended kindergarten in Fuzhou, Fujian province of China.

Olga is a co-convenor of the Philosophy of Education Reading Group at the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. Olga’s main research interest is in the topics of epistemic injustice across all levels of education and across national borders with a focus on higher education and the process of knowledge production in academic institutes and universities. Her core interest lies between the areas of social epistemology, research on research (RoR) and comparative and international education (CIE). She has been a recipient of multiple research awards in the United States and the United Kingdom and is an elected co-convenor of the Comparative and International Education Special Interest Group at the British Educational Research Association (BERA).

Her new research at Oxford will explore the epistemically just and unjust practices as experienced by scholars from Kazakhstan during the internationalisation process in the social sciences and the humanities. Prior joining Oxford, Olga taught at University College London Institute of Education in London on the topics of migrant, refugee and minority education and European education traditions from a comparative lens.

Publications
  • Mun, O. (2020). ‘Epistemic Injustices in Internationalising Humanities and Social Sciences: A Case Study of Higher Education and Science Institutes in Kazakhstan.’ Centre for International Higher Education, Boston College. https://www.bc.edu/content/dam/bc1/schools/lsoe/sites/cihe/publication/Perspectives/Perspectives%20No%2018.pdf
  • Mun, O. and Gafu, G. (in press) ‘University Research Capacity in Kazakhstan’. Higher School of Economics, Russia.
  • Kandiko Howson, C., Mun, O. and Walker, R. (2020). ‘Academic Activism in STEM fields: Discipline in Theory and Practice.’ Philosophy and Theory of Higher Education Society.
  • Aizuddin M., Habibi A., Mun, O. (in press, 2020). ‘Post-Colonialism in Comparative and International Education.’ In Jules, T., Shields, R., Thomas, M. (Ed.), Bloomsbury Handbook of Theory in Comparative and International Education.
  • Palandjian, G., Silova, I., Mun, O., Zholdashaliyeva, R. (2018). ‘Gender and Nation in Postsocialist Educational Transformations.’ In Silova, I., & Chankseliani, M. (Eds.), Comparing Post-Socialist Transformations: Education in Eastern Europe and Former Soviet Union. Oxford: Symposium Books.
  • Mun, O., & Zholdashaliyeva, R. (2017). ‘Alippe, Bukvar’ and Gender: A comparative analysis of early literacy textbooks in Kazakhstan and Kyrgyzstan.’ In E. Brown & R. Craven & G. McLean (Ed.), International Advances in Education: Global Initiatives for Equity and Social Justice Series. Information Age Publishing
  • Patel, K. and Mun, O. (2017). ‘Marketing ‘development’ in the neoliberal university.’ DPU Working Papers https://www.ucl.ac.uk/bartlett/development/case-studies/2017/sep/marketing-development-neoliberal-university
  • Fimyar, O., Saniyazova, A. & Mun, O. (2017) ‘Methodology of Collaborative Research: Or, Searching for a Synergy in the Study of Student Transition in Kazakhstan.’ In SAGE Research Methods Cases. London, United Kingdom: SAGE Publications.
  • Mun, O. (2015). ‘(Re)imagining national identity through early literacy textbooks in Kazakhstan’, Forum of Young Central Asian Experts, 2nd edition. http://caa-network.org/archives/5620
  • Silova, I., Mead Yaqub, M., Mun, O., Palandjian, G. (2014). ‘Pedagogies of Space: (re)imagining nation and childhood in post-Soviet states.’ Global Studies of Childhood, 4(3), 195-209.
  • Silova, I., Brezhenyuk, V., Kudasova, M., Mun, O., Artemev, N. (2014). ‘Youth Protests against Privatisation of Education in post-Soviet states.’ European Education, 46(3), 56-65.

Schooled in the discipline of Public Administration at the University of Dhaka and with an experience of over five years of lecturing graduate and post-graduate students at two reputed public universities in Bangladesh, I am interested in research works related to education, gender, public policy, social studies and have multiple publications.

Apart from my current lecturing position, I worked as a news editor and contributor for the Dhaka Insider, an online news portal, in 2015. I also served as the Head of the Department (Department of Public Administration) and Assistant Proctor at the Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujibur Rahman Science and Technology University (BSMRSTU) and as an elected member of the Teachers’ Association there. During my post-graduation (MA. Public Policy) at the University of Nottingham, a qualitative research focus helped me characterize patterns of gender gap in primary education access.

 

Selected Publications
  • Dutta,  P.  (2020).  Democratic  Decentralization  and  Participatory Development:  Focus  on  Bangladesh.  Journal  of    Contemporary  Governance  and  Public Policy, 1(2), 82-91. Permalink/DOI: https://doi.org/10.46507/jcgpp.v1i2
  • Dutta, P., 2021. • Towards Sound Integrity Management in Bangladesh: Challenges and Issues in Public Administration and Law Enforcement. In: S. N. Khanom, ed. Governance, In the 21st Century in the Sounth Asia: Challenges and Ways Forward. Dhaka: Hakkani Publishers, pp. 541-560.

Zhuohan (Johanne) has a BA in English from Dalian Maritime University, China, and has won China National Scholarship. She then graduated with a Distinction in MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from University of Oxford. Before her DPhil, Zhuohan worked for the organizing committee for the Harvard Summit for Young Leaders in China, an initiative that brought liberal arts education from Harvard to China’s top-performing high school students. She also helped evaluate the UNICEF China Child-Friendly School Programme as an RA, focusing on the socio-emotional learning among the Dong ethnic minority groups in Guangxi, China. She also teaches IELTS, TOEFL, and English phonics.

Her MSc research centres on linguistic relativity, specifically the effect of French grammatical gender system on both French speakers’ and learners’ perception of objects. Her DPhil research focuses on English pronunciation teaching and learning among young Chinese kids, particularly emphasising the influence of their mother tongue, Mandarin.

Supervisors

Robert Woore and Faidra Faitaki

Shuo-Fang earned a Bachelor’s degree from National Chengchi University (Taiwan) and a Master’s degree from Boston University. He has teaching experience in various EFL contexts including international high school, educational institute, and graduate language program.

Shuo-Fang’s areas of interest lie in applied linguistics, particularly phonetics/phonology and speech perception. As an Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholar, Shuo-Fang is currently undertaking his doctoral research, supervised by Dr Elizabeth Wonnacott and Dr Robert Woore. His doctoral project is mostly experimental and explores second language learners’ difficulty in processing English connected speech.

Shuo-Fang is affiliated with two research groups: Applied Linguistics and Wonnacott-Nation Lab (developmental cognitive psychology).

Publications

Liang, S., & Yu, H. (2021). Chinese students’ willingness to communicate in EFL classrooms: A case study of students at a Sino-foreign university. Professional and Academic English, 28(2), 15–33.

Siyu Ma is a DPhil student in child development and learning at the Department of Education. Her doctoral research focuses on second-born children under the Chinese two-child policy, especially how siblings play a role in the socio-emotional, language, and early literacy development of these children.

Prior to starting her Dphil, Siyu completed an MSc in Education (Research Design and Methodology) at the University of Oxford, under the supervision of Professor Sonali Nag. Her MSc dissertation explored the roles of social background and home literacy environment in the language and literacy development of a Wales subsample from the Millennium Cohort Study and was awarded a High Distinction. She also holds a BSc degree with first-class honours in Psychology from the University of Bath.

Siyu is also a research associate working on TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education.

At TalkTogether, Siyu is responsible for designing online surveys and analysing quantitative data from child assessments and parent reports.

Publications

Ma, S. (2021). Family background and home literacy environment as predictors of the early literacy development of children in Wales – findings from the Millennium Cohort Study (Master’s thesis, University of Oxford).

 

Amanda is the recipient of the Hazel Project Scholarship, based at the Rees Centre. Her doctoral research explores the conceptualisation of foster homes as therapeutic environments for complex/developmental trauma. Through participant-generated photography and collaborative qualitative methods with young people currently in foster care placements, her research explores if young people’s concepts and perceptions of therapeutic environments coincide with or challenge existing theoretical models and popular practitioner perspectives.

Amanda holds a BA from the University of Leeds (UK) and an MPhil from the University of Oxford (UK).

Lawrence is a teacher of mathematics who is particularly interested in classroom pedagogy, and how research and education policies interact with the teaching that students experience on a daily basis.

He finds that looking outwards in education is valuable with there being much more that unites our classrooms than isolates them. He has been extremely fortunate to study education through an international lens in the US, and to work on the Global Teaching InSights initiative of the Organisation for Economic Development (OECD) where he led on its videos of teaching.

Publications

Global Teaching InSights: A video study of teaching, OECD, 2020

Antonin is currently Doctoral Teaching Fellow on the MSc in Comparative and International Education, teaching Foundations of Educational Research. Antonin is also a Research Assistant for the Centre for Global Higher Education on the ‘Research on Research: the research function and mission of higher education’ project.

Alongside his teaching and research roles, Antonin is completing a Doctoral study on the European Universities Initiative, the European Commission’s flagship higher education programme that seeks to set up European Universities through transnational university alliances.

Arzhia Habibi is a DPhil in Education Candidate and uses Mandarin to conduct her research in the Chinese higher education context.

Arzhia’s research focuses on ‘expressions’ of global or world citizenship education in a Chinese higher education institution In the study, she explores the perspectives and practices of educators and students at a China-based university, which experiments with discourses related to citizenship. She further investigates how individual, local, national and global dynamics and the surrounding discourses influence worldviews and practices in a university setting.

As empirical studies on global or world citizenship education in the Chinese context are scarce, Arzhia hopes to contribute to a nascent knowledge base which may extend and add depth to the critical global discourses of global and world citizenship education, beyond Eurocentric framings.

Prior to her studies at Oxford, Arzhia received a first class Bachelor’s degree in Contemporary Chinese Studies at The University of Nottingham, and a Master’s in International Communication in Taiwan at National Chengchi University. As a child, she also attended kindergarten in Fuzhou, Fujian province of China.

Olga is a co-convenor of the Philosophy of Education Reading Group at the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. Olga’s main research interest is in the topics of epistemic injustice across all levels of education and across national borders with a focus on higher education and the process of knowledge production in academic institutes and universities. Her core interest lies between the areas of social epistemology, research on research (RoR) and comparative and international education (CIE). She has been a recipient of multiple research awards in the United States and the United Kingdom and is an elected co-convenor of the Comparative and International Education Special Interest Group at the British Educational Research Association (BERA).

Her new research at Oxford will explore the epistemically just and unjust practices as experienced by scholars from Kazakhstan during the internationalisation process in the social sciences and the humanities. Prior joining Oxford, Olga taught at University College London Institute of Education in London on the topics of migrant, refugee and minority education and European education traditions from a comparative lens.

Publications
  • Mun, O. (2020). ‘Epistemic Injustices in Internationalising Humanities and Social Sciences: A Case Study of Higher Education and Science Institutes in Kazakhstan.’ Centre for International Higher Education, Boston College. https://www.bc.edu/content/dam/bc1/schools/lsoe/sites/cihe/publication/Perspectives/Perspectives%20No%2018.pdf
  • Mun, O. and Gafu, G. (in press) ‘University Research Capacity in Kazakhstan’. Higher School of Economics, Russia.
  • Kandiko Howson, C., Mun, O. and Walker, R. (2020). ‘Academic Activism in STEM fields: Discipline in Theory and Practice.’ Philosophy and Theory of Higher Education Society.
  • Aizuddin M., Habibi A., Mun, O. (in press, 2020). ‘Post-Colonialism in Comparative and International Education.’ In Jules, T., Shields, R., Thomas, M. (Ed.), Bloomsbury Handbook of Theory in Comparative and International Education.
  • Palandjian, G., Silova, I., Mun, O., Zholdashaliyeva, R. (2018). ‘Gender and Nation in Postsocialist Educational Transformations.’ In Silova, I., & Chankseliani, M. (Eds.), Comparing Post-Socialist Transformations: Education in Eastern Europe and Former Soviet Union. Oxford: Symposium Books.
  • Mun, O., & Zholdashaliyeva, R. (2017). ‘Alippe, Bukvar’ and Gender: A comparative analysis of early literacy textbooks in Kazakhstan and Kyrgyzstan.’ In E. Brown & R. Craven & G. McLean (Ed.), International Advances in Education: Global Initiatives for Equity and Social Justice Series. Information Age Publishing
  • Patel, K. and Mun, O. (2017). ‘Marketing ‘development’ in the neoliberal university.’ DPU Working Papers https://www.ucl.ac.uk/bartlett/development/case-studies/2017/sep/marketing-development-neoliberal-university
  • Fimyar, O., Saniyazova, A. & Mun, O. (2017) ‘Methodology of Collaborative Research: Or, Searching for a Synergy in the Study of Student Transition in Kazakhstan.’ In SAGE Research Methods Cases. London, United Kingdom: SAGE Publications.
  • Mun, O. (2015). ‘(Re)imagining national identity through early literacy textbooks in Kazakhstan’, Forum of Young Central Asian Experts, 2nd edition. http://caa-network.org/archives/5620
  • Silova, I., Mead Yaqub, M., Mun, O., Palandjian, G. (2014). ‘Pedagogies of Space: (re)imagining nation and childhood in post-Soviet states.’ Global Studies of Childhood, 4(3), 195-209.
  • Silova, I., Brezhenyuk, V., Kudasova, M., Mun, O., Artemev, N. (2014). ‘Youth Protests against Privatisation of Education in post-Soviet states.’ European Education, 46(3), 56-65.

Schooled in the discipline of Public Administration at the University of Dhaka and with an experience of over five years of lecturing graduate and post-graduate students at two reputed public universities in Bangladesh, I am interested in research works related to education, gender, public policy, social studies and have multiple publications.

Apart from my current lecturing position, I worked as a news editor and contributor for the Dhaka Insider, an online news portal, in 2015. I also served as the Head of the Department (Department of Public Administration) and Assistant Proctor at the Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujibur Rahman Science and Technology University (BSMRSTU) and as an elected member of the Teachers’ Association there. During my post-graduation (MA. Public Policy) at the University of Nottingham, a qualitative research focus helped me characterize patterns of gender gap in primary education access.

 

Selected Publications
  • Dutta,  P.  (2020).  Democratic  Decentralization  and  Participatory Development:  Focus  on  Bangladesh.  Journal  of    Contemporary  Governance  and  Public Policy, 1(2), 82-91. Permalink/DOI: https://doi.org/10.46507/jcgpp.v1i2
  • Dutta, P., 2021. • Towards Sound Integrity Management in Bangladesh: Challenges and Issues in Public Administration and Law Enforcement. In: S. N. Khanom, ed. Governance, In the 21st Century in the Sounth Asia: Challenges and Ways Forward. Dhaka: Hakkani Publishers, pp. 541-560.

Zhuohan (Johanne) has a BA in English from Dalian Maritime University, China, and has won China National Scholarship. She then graduated with a Distinction in MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from University of Oxford. Before her DPhil, Zhuohan worked for the organizing committee for the Harvard Summit for Young Leaders in China, an initiative that brought liberal arts education from Harvard to China’s top-performing high school students. She also helped evaluate the UNICEF China Child-Friendly School Programme as an RA, focusing on the socio-emotional learning among the Dong ethnic minority groups in Guangxi, China. She also teaches IELTS, TOEFL, and English phonics.

Her MSc research centres on linguistic relativity, specifically the effect of French grammatical gender system on both French speakers’ and learners’ perception of objects. Her DPhil research focuses on English pronunciation teaching and learning among young Chinese kids, particularly emphasising the influence of their mother tongue, Mandarin.

Supervisors

Robert Woore and Faidra Faitaki

Shuo-Fang earned a Bachelor’s degree from National Chengchi University (Taiwan) and a Master’s degree from Boston University. He has teaching experience in various EFL contexts including international high school, educational institute, and graduate language program.

Shuo-Fang’s areas of interest lie in applied linguistics, particularly phonetics/phonology and speech perception. As an Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholar, Shuo-Fang is currently undertaking his doctoral research, supervised by Dr Elizabeth Wonnacott and Dr Robert Woore. His doctoral project is mostly experimental and explores second language learners’ difficulty in processing English connected speech.

Shuo-Fang is affiliated with two research groups: Applied Linguistics and Wonnacott-Nation Lab (developmental cognitive psychology).

Publications

Liang, S., & Yu, H. (2021). Chinese students’ willingness to communicate in EFL classrooms: A case study of students at a Sino-foreign university. Professional and Academic English, 28(2), 15–33.

Siyu Ma is a DPhil student in child development and learning at the Department of Education. Her doctoral research focuses on second-born children under the Chinese two-child policy, especially how siblings play a role in the socio-emotional, language, and early literacy development of these children.

Prior to starting her Dphil, Siyu completed an MSc in Education (Research Design and Methodology) at the University of Oxford, under the supervision of Professor Sonali Nag. Her MSc dissertation explored the roles of social background and home literacy environment in the language and literacy development of a Wales subsample from the Millennium Cohort Study and was awarded a High Distinction. She also holds a BSc degree with first-class honours in Psychology from the University of Bath.

Siyu is also a research associate working on TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education.

At TalkTogether, Siyu is responsible for designing online surveys and analysing quantitative data from child assessments and parent reports.

Publications

Ma, S. (2021). Family background and home literacy environment as predictors of the early literacy development of children in Wales – findings from the Millennium Cohort Study (Master’s thesis, University of Oxford).

 

Amanda is the recipient of the Hazel Project Scholarship, based at the Rees Centre. Her doctoral research explores the conceptualisation of foster homes as therapeutic environments for complex/developmental trauma. Through participant-generated photography and collaborative qualitative methods with young people currently in foster care placements, her research explores if young people’s concepts and perceptions of therapeutic environments coincide with or challenge existing theoretical models and popular practitioner perspectives.

Amanda holds a BA from the University of Leeds (UK) and an MPhil from the University of Oxford (UK).

Lawrence is a teacher of mathematics who is particularly interested in classroom pedagogy, and how research and education policies interact with the teaching that students experience on a daily basis.

He finds that looking outwards in education is valuable with there being much more that unites our classrooms than isolates them. He has been extremely fortunate to study education through an international lens in the US, and to work on the Global Teaching InSights initiative of the Organisation for Economic Development (OECD) where he led on its videos of teaching.

Publications

Global Teaching InSights: A video study of teaching, OECD, 2020

Antonin is currently Doctoral Teaching Fellow on the MSc in Comparative and International Education, teaching Foundations of Educational Research. Antonin is also a Research Assistant for the Centre for Global Higher Education on the ‘Research on Research: the research function and mission of higher education’ project.

Alongside his teaching and research roles, Antonin is completing a Doctoral study on the European Universities Initiative, the European Commission’s flagship higher education programme that seeks to set up European Universities through transnational university alliances.

Arzhia Habibi is a DPhil in Education Candidate and uses Mandarin to conduct her research in the Chinese higher education context.

Arzhia’s research focuses on ‘expressions’ of global or world citizenship education in a Chinese higher education institution In the study, she explores the perspectives and practices of educators and students at a China-based university, which experiments with discourses related to citizenship. She further investigates how individual, local, national and global dynamics and the surrounding discourses influence worldviews and practices in a university setting.

As empirical studies on global or world citizenship education in the Chinese context are scarce, Arzhia hopes to contribute to a nascent knowledge base which may extend and add depth to the critical global discourses of global and world citizenship education, beyond Eurocentric framings.

Prior to her studies at Oxford, Arzhia received a first class Bachelor’s degree in Contemporary Chinese Studies at The University of Nottingham, and a Master’s in International Communication in Taiwan at National Chengchi University. As a child, she also attended kindergarten in Fuzhou, Fujian province of China.

Olga is a co-convenor of the Philosophy of Education Reading Group at the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. Olga’s main research interest is in the topics of epistemic injustice across all levels of education and across national borders with a focus on higher education and the process of knowledge production in academic institutes and universities. Her core interest lies between the areas of social epistemology, research on research (RoR) and comparative and international education (CIE). She has been a recipient of multiple research awards in the United States and the United Kingdom and is an elected co-convenor of the Comparative and International Education Special Interest Group at the British Educational Research Association (BERA).

Her new research at Oxford will explore the epistemically just and unjust practices as experienced by scholars from Kazakhstan during the internationalisation process in the social sciences and the humanities. Prior joining Oxford, Olga taught at University College London Institute of Education in London on the topics of migrant, refugee and minority education and European education traditions from a comparative lens.

Publications
  • Mun, O. (2020). ‘Epistemic Injustices in Internationalising Humanities and Social Sciences: A Case Study of Higher Education and Science Institutes in Kazakhstan.’ Centre for International Higher Education, Boston College. https://www.bc.edu/content/dam/bc1/schools/lsoe/sites/cihe/publication/Perspectives/Perspectives%20No%2018.pdf
  • Mun, O. and Gafu, G. (in press) ‘University Research Capacity in Kazakhstan’. Higher School of Economics, Russia.
  • Kandiko Howson, C., Mun, O. and Walker, R. (2020). ‘Academic Activism in STEM fields: Discipline in Theory and Practice.’ Philosophy and Theory of Higher Education Society.
  • Aizuddin M., Habibi A., Mun, O. (in press, 2020). ‘Post-Colonialism in Comparative and International Education.’ In Jules, T., Shields, R., Thomas, M. (Ed.), Bloomsbury Handbook of Theory in Comparative and International Education.
  • Palandjian, G., Silova, I., Mun, O., Zholdashaliyeva, R. (2018). ‘Gender and Nation in Postsocialist Educational Transformations.’ In Silova, I., & Chankseliani, M. (Eds.), Comparing Post-Socialist Transformations: Education in Eastern Europe and Former Soviet Union. Oxford: Symposium Books.
  • Mun, O., & Zholdashaliyeva, R. (2017). ‘Alippe, Bukvar’ and Gender: A comparative analysis of early literacy textbooks in Kazakhstan and Kyrgyzstan.’ In E. Brown & R. Craven & G. McLean (Ed.), International Advances in Education: Global Initiatives for Equity and Social Justice Series. Information Age Publishing
  • Patel, K. and Mun, O. (2017). ‘Marketing ‘development’ in the neoliberal university.’ DPU Working Papers https://www.ucl.ac.uk/bartlett/development/case-studies/2017/sep/marketing-development-neoliberal-university
  • Fimyar, O., Saniyazova, A. & Mun, O. (2017) ‘Methodology of Collaborative Research: Or, Searching for a Synergy in the Study of Student Transition in Kazakhstan.’ In SAGE Research Methods Cases. London, United Kingdom: SAGE Publications.
  • Mun, O. (2015). ‘(Re)imagining national identity through early literacy textbooks in Kazakhstan’, Forum of Young Central Asian Experts, 2nd edition. http://caa-network.org/archives/5620
  • Silova, I., Mead Yaqub, M., Mun, O., Palandjian, G. (2014). ‘Pedagogies of Space: (re)imagining nation and childhood in post-Soviet states.’ Global Studies of Childhood, 4(3), 195-209.
  • Silova, I., Brezhenyuk, V., Kudasova, M., Mun, O., Artemev, N. (2014). ‘Youth Protests against Privatisation of Education in post-Soviet states.’ European Education, 46(3), 56-65.

Schooled in the discipline of Public Administration at the University of Dhaka and with an experience of over five years of lecturing graduate and post-graduate students at two reputed public universities in Bangladesh, I am interested in research works related to education, gender, public policy, social studies and have multiple publications.

Apart from my current lecturing position, I worked as a news editor and contributor for the Dhaka Insider, an online news portal, in 2015. I also served as the Head of the Department (Department of Public Administration) and Assistant Proctor at the Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujibur Rahman Science and Technology University (BSMRSTU) and as an elected member of the Teachers’ Association there. During my post-graduation (MA. Public Policy) at the University of Nottingham, a qualitative research focus helped me characterize patterns of gender gap in primary education access.

 

Selected Publications
  • Dutta,  P.  (2020).  Democratic  Decentralization  and  Participatory Development:  Focus  on  Bangladesh.  Journal  of    Contemporary  Governance  and  Public Policy, 1(2), 82-91. Permalink/DOI: https://doi.org/10.46507/jcgpp.v1i2
  • Dutta, P., 2021. • Towards Sound Integrity Management in Bangladesh: Challenges and Issues in Public Administration and Law Enforcement. In: S. N. Khanom, ed. Governance, In the 21st Century in the Sounth Asia: Challenges and Ways Forward. Dhaka: Hakkani Publishers, pp. 541-560.

Zhuohan (Johanne) has a BA in English from Dalian Maritime University, China, and has won China National Scholarship. She then graduated with a Distinction in MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from University of Oxford. Before her DPhil, Zhuohan worked for the organizing committee for the Harvard Summit for Young Leaders in China, an initiative that brought liberal arts education from Harvard to China’s top-performing high school students. She also helped evaluate the UNICEF China Child-Friendly School Programme as an RA, focusing on the socio-emotional learning among the Dong ethnic minority groups in Guangxi, China. She also teaches IELTS, TOEFL, and English phonics.

Her MSc research centres on linguistic relativity, specifically the effect of French grammatical gender system on both French speakers’ and learners’ perception of objects. Her DPhil research focuses on English pronunciation teaching and learning among young Chinese kids, particularly emphasising the influence of their mother tongue, Mandarin.

Supervisors

Robert Woore and Faidra Faitaki

Shuo-Fang earned a Bachelor’s degree from National Chengchi University (Taiwan) and a Master’s degree from Boston University. He has teaching experience in various EFL contexts including international high school, educational institute, and graduate language program.

Shuo-Fang’s areas of interest lie in applied linguistics, particularly phonetics/phonology and speech perception. As an Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholar, Shuo-Fang is currently undertaking his doctoral research, supervised by Dr Elizabeth Wonnacott and Dr Robert Woore. His doctoral project is mostly experimental and explores second language learners’ difficulty in processing English connected speech.

Shuo-Fang is affiliated with two research groups: Applied Linguistics and Wonnacott-Nation Lab (developmental cognitive psychology).

Publications

Liang, S., & Yu, H. (2021). Chinese students’ willingness to communicate in EFL classrooms: A case study of students at a Sino-foreign university. Professional and Academic English, 28(2), 15–33.

Siyu Ma is a DPhil student in child development and learning at the Department of Education. Her doctoral research focuses on second-born children under the Chinese two-child policy, especially how siblings play a role in the socio-emotional, language, and early literacy development of these children.

Prior to starting her Dphil, Siyu completed an MSc in Education (Research Design and Methodology) at the University of Oxford, under the supervision of Professor Sonali Nag. Her MSc dissertation explored the roles of social background and home literacy environment in the language and literacy development of a Wales subsample from the Millennium Cohort Study and was awarded a High Distinction. She also holds a BSc degree with first-class honours in Psychology from the University of Bath.

Siyu is also a research associate working on TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education.

At TalkTogether, Siyu is responsible for designing online surveys and analysing quantitative data from child assessments and parent reports.

Publications

Ma, S. (2021). Family background and home literacy environment as predictors of the early literacy development of children in Wales – findings from the Millennium Cohort Study (Master’s thesis, University of Oxford).

 

Amanda is the recipient of the Hazel Project Scholarship, based at the Rees Centre. Her doctoral research explores the conceptualisation of foster homes as therapeutic environments for complex/developmental trauma. Through participant-generated photography and collaborative qualitative methods with young people currently in foster care placements, her research explores if young people’s concepts and perceptions of therapeutic environments coincide with or challenge existing theoretical models and popular practitioner perspectives.

Amanda holds a BA from the University of Leeds (UK) and an MPhil from the University of Oxford (UK).

Lawrence is a teacher of mathematics who is particularly interested in classroom pedagogy, and how research and education policies interact with the teaching that students experience on a daily basis.

He finds that looking outwards in education is valuable with there being much more that unites our classrooms than isolates them. He has been extremely fortunate to study education through an international lens in the US, and to work on the Global Teaching InSights initiative of the Organisation for Economic Development (OECD) where he led on its videos of teaching.

Publications

Global Teaching InSights: A video study of teaching, OECD, 2020

Antonin is currently Doctoral Teaching Fellow on the MSc in Comparative and International Education, teaching Foundations of Educational Research. Antonin is also a Research Assistant for the Centre for Global Higher Education on the ‘Research on Research: the research function and mission of higher education’ project.

Alongside his teaching and research roles, Antonin is completing a Doctoral study on the European Universities Initiative, the European Commission’s flagship higher education programme that seeks to set up European Universities through transnational university alliances.

Arzhia Habibi is a DPhil in Education Candidate and uses Mandarin to conduct her research in the Chinese higher education context.

Arzhia’s research focuses on ‘expressions’ of global or world citizenship education in a Chinese higher education institution In the study, she explores the perspectives and practices of educators and students at a China-based university, which experiments with discourses related to citizenship. She further investigates how individual, local, national and global dynamics and the surrounding discourses influence worldviews and practices in a university setting.

As empirical studies on global or world citizenship education in the Chinese context are scarce, Arzhia hopes to contribute to a nascent knowledge base which may extend and add depth to the critical global discourses of global and world citizenship education, beyond Eurocentric framings.

Prior to her studies at Oxford, Arzhia received a first class Bachelor’s degree in Contemporary Chinese Studies at The University of Nottingham, and a Master’s in International Communication in Taiwan at National Chengchi University. As a child, she also attended kindergarten in Fuzhou, Fujian province of China.

Olga is a co-convenor of the Philosophy of Education Reading Group at the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. Olga’s main research interest is in the topics of epistemic injustice across all levels of education and across national borders with a focus on higher education and the process of knowledge production in academic institutes and universities. Her core interest lies between the areas of social epistemology, research on research (RoR) and comparative and international education (CIE). She has been a recipient of multiple research awards in the United States and the United Kingdom and is an elected co-convenor of the Comparative and International Education Special Interest Group at the British Educational Research Association (BERA).

Her new research at Oxford will explore the epistemically just and unjust practices as experienced by scholars from Kazakhstan during the internationalisation process in the social sciences and the humanities. Prior joining Oxford, Olga taught at University College London Institute of Education in London on the topics of migrant, refugee and minority education and European education traditions from a comparative lens.

Publications
  • Mun, O. (2020). ‘Epistemic Injustices in Internationalising Humanities and Social Sciences: A Case Study of Higher Education and Science Institutes in Kazakhstan.’ Centre for International Higher Education, Boston College. https://www.bc.edu/content/dam/bc1/schools/lsoe/sites/cihe/publication/Perspectives/Perspectives%20No%2018.pdf
  • Mun, O. and Gafu, G. (in press) ‘University Research Capacity in Kazakhstan’. Higher School of Economics, Russia.
  • Kandiko Howson, C., Mun, O. and Walker, R. (2020). ‘Academic Activism in STEM fields: Discipline in Theory and Practice.’ Philosophy and Theory of Higher Education Society.
  • Aizuddin M., Habibi A., Mun, O. (in press, 2020). ‘Post-Colonialism in Comparative and International Education.’ In Jules, T., Shields, R., Thomas, M. (Ed.), Bloomsbury Handbook of Theory in Comparative and International Education.
  • Palandjian, G., Silova, I., Mun, O., Zholdashaliyeva, R. (2018). ‘Gender and Nation in Postsocialist Educational Transformations.’ In Silova, I., & Chankseliani, M. (Eds.), Comparing Post-Socialist Transformations: Education in Eastern Europe and Former Soviet Union. Oxford: Symposium Books.
  • Mun, O., & Zholdashaliyeva, R. (2017). ‘Alippe, Bukvar’ and Gender: A comparative analysis of early literacy textbooks in Kazakhstan and Kyrgyzstan.’ In E. Brown & R. Craven & G. McLean (Ed.), International Advances in Education: Global Initiatives for Equity and Social Justice Series. Information Age Publishing
  • Patel, K. and Mun, O. (2017). ‘Marketing ‘development’ in the neoliberal university.’ DPU Working Papers https://www.ucl.ac.uk/bartlett/development/case-studies/2017/sep/marketing-development-neoliberal-university
  • Fimyar, O., Saniyazova, A. & Mun, O. (2017) ‘Methodology of Collaborative Research: Or, Searching for a Synergy in the Study of Student Transition in Kazakhstan.’ In SAGE Research Methods Cases. London, United Kingdom: SAGE Publications.
  • Mun, O. (2015). ‘(Re)imagining national identity through early literacy textbooks in Kazakhstan’, Forum of Young Central Asian Experts, 2nd edition. http://caa-network.org/archives/5620
  • Silova, I., Mead Yaqub, M., Mun, O., Palandjian, G. (2014). ‘Pedagogies of Space: (re)imagining nation and childhood in post-Soviet states.’ Global Studies of Childhood, 4(3), 195-209.
  • Silova, I., Brezhenyuk, V., Kudasova, M., Mun, O., Artemev, N. (2014). ‘Youth Protests against Privatisation of Education in post-Soviet states.’ European Education, 46(3), 56-65.

Schooled in the discipline of Public Administration at the University of Dhaka and with an experience of over five years of lecturing graduate and post-graduate students at two reputed public universities in Bangladesh, I am interested in research works related to education, gender, public policy, social studies and have multiple publications.

Apart from my current lecturing position, I worked as a news editor and contributor for the Dhaka Insider, an online news portal, in 2015. I also served as the Head of the Department (Department of Public Administration) and Assistant Proctor at the Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujibur Rahman Science and Technology University (BSMRSTU) and as an elected member of the Teachers’ Association there. During my post-graduation (MA. Public Policy) at the University of Nottingham, a qualitative research focus helped me characterize patterns of gender gap in primary education access.

 

Selected Publications
  • Dutta,  P.  (2020).  Democratic  Decentralization  and  Participatory Development:  Focus  on  Bangladesh.  Journal  of    Contemporary  Governance  and  Public Policy, 1(2), 82-91. Permalink/DOI: https://doi.org/10.46507/jcgpp.v1i2
  • Dutta, P., 2021. • Towards Sound Integrity Management in Bangladesh: Challenges and Issues in Public Administration and Law Enforcement. In: S. N. Khanom, ed. Governance, In the 21st Century in the Sounth Asia: Challenges and Ways Forward. Dhaka: Hakkani Publishers, pp. 541-560.

Zhuohan (Johanne) has a BA in English from Dalian Maritime University, China, and has won China National Scholarship. She then graduated with a Distinction in MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from University of Oxford. Before her DPhil, Zhuohan worked for the organizing committee for the Harvard Summit for Young Leaders in China, an initiative that brought liberal arts education from Harvard to China’s top-performing high school students. She also helped evaluate the UNICEF China Child-Friendly School Programme as an RA, focusing on the socio-emotional learning among the Dong ethnic minority groups in Guangxi, China. She also teaches IELTS, TOEFL, and English phonics.

Her MSc research centres on linguistic relativity, specifically the effect of French grammatical gender system on both French speakers’ and learners’ perception of objects. Her DPhil research focuses on English pronunciation teaching and learning among young Chinese kids, particularly emphasising the influence of their mother tongue, Mandarin.

Supervisors

Robert Woore and Faidra Faitaki

Shuo-Fang earned a Bachelor’s degree from National Chengchi University (Taiwan) and a Master’s degree from Boston University. He has teaching experience in various EFL contexts including international high school, educational institute, and graduate language program.

Shuo-Fang’s areas of interest lie in applied linguistics, particularly phonetics/phonology and speech perception. As an Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholar, Shuo-Fang is currently undertaking his doctoral research, supervised by Dr Elizabeth Wonnacott and Dr Robert Woore. His doctoral project is mostly experimental and explores second language learners’ difficulty in processing English connected speech.

Shuo-Fang is affiliated with two research groups: Applied Linguistics and Wonnacott-Nation Lab (developmental cognitive psychology).

Publications

Liang, S., & Yu, H. (2021). Chinese students’ willingness to communicate in EFL classrooms: A case study of students at a Sino-foreign university. Professional and Academic English, 28(2), 15–33.

Siyu Ma is a DPhil student in child development and learning at the Department of Education. Her doctoral research focuses on second-born children under the Chinese two-child policy, especially how siblings play a role in the socio-emotional, language, and early literacy development of these children.

Prior to starting her Dphil, Siyu completed an MSc in Education (Research Design and Methodology) at the University of Oxford, under the supervision of Professor Sonali Nag. Her MSc dissertation explored the roles of social background and home literacy environment in the language and literacy development of a Wales subsample from the Millennium Cohort Study and was awarded a High Distinction. She also holds a BSc degree with first-class honours in Psychology from the University of Bath.

Siyu is also a research associate working on TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education.

At TalkTogether, Siyu is responsible for designing online surveys and analysing quantitative data from child assessments and parent reports.

Publications

Ma, S. (2021). Family background and home literacy environment as predictors of the early literacy development of children in Wales – findings from the Millennium Cohort Study (Master’s thesis, University of Oxford).

 

Amanda is the recipient of the Hazel Project Scholarship, based at the Rees Centre. Her doctoral research explores the conceptualisation of foster homes as therapeutic environments for complex/developmental trauma. Through participant-generated photography and collaborative qualitative methods with young people currently in foster care placements, her research explores if young people’s concepts and perceptions of therapeutic environments coincide with or challenge existing theoretical models and popular practitioner perspectives.

Amanda holds a BA from the University of Leeds (UK) and an MPhil from the University of Oxford (UK).

Lawrence is a teacher of mathematics who is particularly interested in classroom pedagogy, and how research and education policies interact with the teaching that students experience on a daily basis.

He finds that looking outwards in education is valuable with there being much more that unites our classrooms than isolates them. He has been extremely fortunate to study education through an international lens in the US, and to work on the Global Teaching InSights initiative of the Organisation for Economic Development (OECD) where he led on its videos of teaching.

Publications

Global Teaching InSights: A video study of teaching, OECD, 2020

Antonin is currently Doctoral Teaching Fellow on the MSc in Comparative and International Education, teaching Foundations of Educational Research. Antonin is also a Research Assistant for the Centre for Global Higher Education on the ‘Research on Research: the research function and mission of higher education’ project.

Alongside his teaching and research roles, Antonin is completing a Doctoral study on the European Universities Initiative, the European Commission’s flagship higher education programme that seeks to set up European Universities through transnational university alliances.

Arzhia Habibi is a DPhil in Education Candidate and uses Mandarin to conduct her research in the Chinese higher education context.

Arzhia’s research focuses on ‘expressions’ of global or world citizenship education in a Chinese higher education institution In the study, she explores the perspectives and practices of educators and students at a China-based university, which experiments with discourses related to citizenship. She further investigates how individual, local, national and global dynamics and the surrounding discourses influence worldviews and practices in a university setting.

As empirical studies on global or world citizenship education in the Chinese context are scarce, Arzhia hopes to contribute to a nascent knowledge base which may extend and add depth to the critical global discourses of global and world citizenship education, beyond Eurocentric framings.

Prior to her studies at Oxford, Arzhia received a first class Bachelor’s degree in Contemporary Chinese Studies at The University of Nottingham, and a Master’s in International Communication in Taiwan at National Chengchi University. As a child, she also attended kindergarten in Fuzhou, Fujian province of China.

Olga is a co-convenor of the Philosophy of Education Reading Group at the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. Olga’s main research interest is in the topics of epistemic injustice across all levels of education and across national borders with a focus on higher education and the process of knowledge production in academic institutes and universities. Her core interest lies between the areas of social epistemology, research on research (RoR) and comparative and international education (CIE). She has been a recipient of multiple research awards in the United States and the United Kingdom and is an elected co-convenor of the Comparative and International Education Special Interest Group at the British Educational Research Association (BERA).

Her new research at Oxford will explore the epistemically just and unjust practices as experienced by scholars from Kazakhstan during the internationalisation process in the social sciences and the humanities. Prior joining Oxford, Olga taught at University College London Institute of Education in London on the topics of migrant, refugee and minority education and European education traditions from a comparative lens.

Publications
  • Mun, O. (2020). ‘Epistemic Injustices in Internationalising Humanities and Social Sciences: A Case Study of Higher Education and Science Institutes in Kazakhstan.’ Centre for International Higher Education, Boston College. https://www.bc.edu/content/dam/bc1/schools/lsoe/sites/cihe/publication/Perspectives/Perspectives%20No%2018.pdf
  • Mun, O. and Gafu, G. (in press) ‘University Research Capacity in Kazakhstan’. Higher School of Economics, Russia.
  • Kandiko Howson, C., Mun, O. and Walker, R. (2020). ‘Academic Activism in STEM fields: Discipline in Theory and Practice.’ Philosophy and Theory of Higher Education Society.
  • Aizuddin M., Habibi A., Mun, O. (in press, 2020). ‘Post-Colonialism in Comparative and International Education.’ In Jules, T., Shields, R., Thomas, M. (Ed.), Bloomsbury Handbook of Theory in Comparative and International Education.
  • Palandjian, G., Silova, I., Mun, O., Zholdashaliyeva, R. (2018). ‘Gender and Nation in Postsocialist Educational Transformations.’ In Silova, I., & Chankseliani, M. (Eds.), Comparing Post-Socialist Transformations: Education in Eastern Europe and Former Soviet Union. Oxford: Symposium Books.
  • Mun, O., & Zholdashaliyeva, R. (2017). ‘Alippe, Bukvar’ and Gender: A comparative analysis of early literacy textbooks in Kazakhstan and Kyrgyzstan.’ In E. Brown & R. Craven & G. McLean (Ed.), International Advances in Education: Global Initiatives for Equity and Social Justice Series. Information Age Publishing
  • Patel, K. and Mun, O. (2017). ‘Marketing ‘development’ in the neoliberal university.’ DPU Working Papers https://www.ucl.ac.uk/bartlett/development/case-studies/2017/sep/marketing-development-neoliberal-university
  • Fimyar, O., Saniyazova, A. & Mun, O. (2017) ‘Methodology of Collaborative Research: Or, Searching for a Synergy in the Study of Student Transition in Kazakhstan.’ In SAGE Research Methods Cases. London, United Kingdom: SAGE Publications.
  • Mun, O. (2015). ‘(Re)imagining national identity through early literacy textbooks in Kazakhstan’, Forum of Young Central Asian Experts, 2nd edition. http://caa-network.org/archives/5620
  • Silova, I., Mead Yaqub, M., Mun, O., Palandjian, G. (2014). ‘Pedagogies of Space: (re)imagining nation and childhood in post-Soviet states.’ Global Studies of Childhood, 4(3), 195-209.
  • Silova, I., Brezhenyuk, V., Kudasova, M., Mun, O., Artemev, N. (2014). ‘Youth Protests against Privatisation of Education in post-Soviet states.’ European Education, 46(3), 56-65.

Schooled in the discipline of Public Administration at the University of Dhaka and with an experience of over five years of lecturing graduate and post-graduate students at two reputed public universities in Bangladesh, I am interested in research works related to education, gender, public policy, social studies and have multiple publications.

Apart from my current lecturing position, I worked as a news editor and contributor for the Dhaka Insider, an online news portal, in 2015. I also served as the Head of the Department (Department of Public Administration) and Assistant Proctor at the Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujibur Rahman Science and Technology University (BSMRSTU) and as an elected member of the Teachers’ Association there. During my post-graduation (MA. Public Policy) at the University of Nottingham, a qualitative research focus helped me characterize patterns of gender gap in primary education access.

 

Selected Publications
  • Dutta,  P.  (2020).  Democratic  Decentralization  and  Participatory Development:  Focus  on  Bangladesh.  Journal  of    Contemporary  Governance  and  Public Policy, 1(2), 82-91. Permalink/DOI: https://doi.org/10.46507/jcgpp.v1i2
  • Dutta, P., 2021. • Towards Sound Integrity Management in Bangladesh: Challenges and Issues in Public Administration and Law Enforcement. In: S. N. Khanom, ed. Governance, In the 21st Century in the Sounth Asia: Challenges and Ways Forward. Dhaka: Hakkani Publishers, pp. 541-560.

Zhuohan (Johanne) has a BA in English from Dalian Maritime University, China, and has won China National Scholarship. She then graduated with a Distinction in MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from University of Oxford. Before her DPhil, Zhuohan worked for the organizing committee for the Harvard Summit for Young Leaders in China, an initiative that brought liberal arts education from Harvard to China’s top-performing high school students. She also helped evaluate the UNICEF China Child-Friendly School Programme as an RA, focusing on the socio-emotional learning among the Dong ethnic minority groups in Guangxi, China. She also teaches IELTS, TOEFL, and English phonics.

Her MSc research centres on linguistic relativity, specifically the effect of French grammatical gender system on both French speakers’ and learners’ perception of objects. Her DPhil research focuses on English pronunciation teaching and learning among young Chinese kids, particularly emphasising the influence of their mother tongue, Mandarin.

Supervisors

Robert Woore and Faidra Faitaki

Shuo-Fang earned a Bachelor’s degree from National Chengchi University (Taiwan) and a Master’s degree from Boston University. He has teaching experience in various EFL contexts including international high school, educational institute, and graduate language program.

Shuo-Fang’s areas of interest lie in applied linguistics, particularly phonetics/phonology and speech perception. As an Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholar, Shuo-Fang is currently undertaking his doctoral research, supervised by Dr Elizabeth Wonnacott and Dr Robert Woore. His doctoral project is mostly experimental and explores second language learners’ difficulty in processing English connected speech.

Shuo-Fang is affiliated with two research groups: Applied Linguistics and Wonnacott-Nation Lab (developmental cognitive psychology).

Publications

Liang, S., & Yu, H. (2021). Chinese students’ willingness to communicate in EFL classrooms: A case study of students at a Sino-foreign university. Professional and Academic English, 28(2), 15–33.

Siyu Ma is a DPhil student in child development and learning at the Department of Education. Her doctoral research focuses on second-born children under the Chinese two-child policy, especially how siblings play a role in the socio-emotional, language, and early literacy development of these children.

Prior to starting her Dphil, Siyu completed an MSc in Education (Research Design and Methodology) at the University of Oxford, under the supervision of Professor Sonali Nag. Her MSc dissertation explored the roles of social background and home literacy environment in the language and literacy development of a Wales subsample from the Millennium Cohort Study and was awarded a High Distinction. She also holds a BSc degree with first-class honours in Psychology from the University of Bath.

Siyu is also a research associate working on TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education.

At TalkTogether, Siyu is responsible for designing online surveys and analysing quantitative data from child assessments and parent reports.

Publications

Ma, S. (2021). Family background and home literacy environment as predictors of the early literacy development of children in Wales – findings from the Millennium Cohort Study (Master’s thesis, University of Oxford).

 

Amanda is the recipient of the Hazel Project Scholarship, based at the Rees Centre. Her doctoral research explores the conceptualisation of foster homes as therapeutic environments for complex/developmental trauma. Through participant-generated photography and collaborative qualitative methods with young people currently in foster care placements, her research explores if young people’s concepts and perceptions of therapeutic environments coincide with or challenge existing theoretical models and popular practitioner perspectives.

Amanda holds a BA from the University of Leeds (UK) and an MPhil from the University of Oxford (UK).

Lawrence is a teacher of mathematics who is particularly interested in classroom pedagogy, and how research and education policies interact with the teaching that students experience on a daily basis.

He finds that looking outwards in education is valuable with there being much more that unites our classrooms than isolates them. He has been extremely fortunate to study education through an international lens in the US, and to work on the Global Teaching InSights initiative of the Organisation for Economic Development (OECD) where he led on its videos of teaching.

Publications

Global Teaching InSights: A video study of teaching, OECD, 2020

Antonin is currently Doctoral Teaching Fellow on the MSc in Comparative and International Education, teaching Foundations of Educational Research. Antonin is also a Research Assistant for the Centre for Global Higher Education on the ‘Research on Research: the research function and mission of higher education’ project.

Alongside his teaching and research roles, Antonin is completing a Doctoral study on the European Universities Initiative, the European Commission’s flagship higher education programme that seeks to set up European Universities through transnational university alliances.

Arzhia Habibi is a DPhil in Education Candidate and uses Mandarin to conduct her research in the Chinese higher education context.

Arzhia’s research focuses on ‘expressions’ of global or world citizenship education in a Chinese higher education institution In the study, she explores the perspectives and practices of educators and students at a China-based university, which experiments with discourses related to citizenship. She further investigates how individual, local, national and global dynamics and the surrounding discourses influence worldviews and practices in a university setting.

As empirical studies on global or world citizenship education in the Chinese context are scarce, Arzhia hopes to contribute to a nascent knowledge base which may extend and add depth to the critical global discourses of global and world citizenship education, beyond Eurocentric framings.

Prior to her studies at Oxford, Arzhia received a first class Bachelor’s degree in Contemporary Chinese Studies at The University of Nottingham, and a Master’s in International Communication in Taiwan at National Chengchi University. As a child, she also attended kindergarten in Fuzhou, Fujian province of China.

Olga is a co-convenor of the Philosophy of Education Reading Group at the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. Olga’s main research interest is in the topics of epistemic injustice across all levels of education and across national borders with a focus on higher education and the process of knowledge production in academic institutes and universities. Her core interest lies between the areas of social epistemology, research on research (RoR) and comparative and international education (CIE). She has been a recipient of multiple research awards in the United States and the United Kingdom and is an elected co-convenor of the Comparative and International Education Special Interest Group at the British Educational Research Association (BERA).

Her new research at Oxford will explore the epistemically just and unjust practices as experienced by scholars from Kazakhstan during the internationalisation process in the social sciences and the humanities. Prior joining Oxford, Olga taught at University College London Institute of Education in London on the topics of migrant, refugee and minority education and European education traditions from a comparative lens.

Publications
  • Mun, O. (2020). ‘Epistemic Injustices in Internationalising Humanities and Social Sciences: A Case Study of Higher Education and Science Institutes in Kazakhstan.’ Centre for International Higher Education, Boston College. https://www.bc.edu/content/dam/bc1/schools/lsoe/sites/cihe/publication/Perspectives/Perspectives%20No%2018.pdf
  • Mun, O. and Gafu, G. (in press) ‘University Research Capacity in Kazakhstan’. Higher School of Economics, Russia.
  • Kandiko Howson, C., Mun, O. and Walker, R. (2020). ‘Academic Activism in STEM fields: Discipline in Theory and Practice.’ Philosophy and Theory of Higher Education Society.
  • Aizuddin M., Habibi A., Mun, O. (in press, 2020). ‘Post-Colonialism in Comparative and International Education.’ In Jules, T., Shields, R., Thomas, M. (Ed.), Bloomsbury Handbook of Theory in Comparative and International Education.
  • Palandjian, G., Silova, I., Mun, O., Zholdashaliyeva, R. (2018). ‘Gender and Nation in Postsocialist Educational Transformations.’ In Silova, I., & Chankseliani, M. (Eds.), Comparing Post-Socialist Transformations: Education in Eastern Europe and Former Soviet Union. Oxford: Symposium Books.
  • Mun, O., & Zholdashaliyeva, R. (2017). ‘Alippe, Bukvar’ and Gender: A comparative analysis of early literacy textbooks in Kazakhstan and Kyrgyzstan.’ In E. Brown & R. Craven & G. McLean (Ed.), International Advances in Education: Global Initiatives for Equity and Social Justice Series. Information Age Publishing
  • Patel, K. and Mun, O. (2017). ‘Marketing ‘development’ in the neoliberal university.’ DPU Working Papers https://www.ucl.ac.uk/bartlett/development/case-studies/2017/sep/marketing-development-neoliberal-university
  • Fimyar, O., Saniyazova, A. & Mun, O. (2017) ‘Methodology of Collaborative Research: Or, Searching for a Synergy in the Study of Student Transition in Kazakhstan.’ In SAGE Research Methods Cases. London, United Kingdom: SAGE Publications.
  • Mun, O. (2015). ‘(Re)imagining national identity through early literacy textbooks in Kazakhstan’, Forum of Young Central Asian Experts, 2nd edition. http://caa-network.org/archives/5620
  • Silova, I., Mead Yaqub, M., Mun, O., Palandjian, G. (2014). ‘Pedagogies of Space: (re)imagining nation and childhood in post-Soviet states.’ Global Studies of Childhood, 4(3), 195-209.
  • Silova, I., Brezhenyuk, V., Kudasova, M., Mun, O., Artemev, N. (2014). ‘Youth Protests against Privatisation of Education in post-Soviet states.’ European Education, 46(3), 56-65.

Schooled in the discipline of Public Administration at the University of Dhaka and with an experience of over five years of lecturing graduate and post-graduate students at two reputed public universities in Bangladesh, I am interested in research works related to education, gender, public policy, social studies and have multiple publications.

Apart from my current lecturing position, I worked as a news editor and contributor for the Dhaka Insider, an online news portal, in 2015. I also served as the Head of the Department (Department of Public Administration) and Assistant Proctor at the Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujibur Rahman Science and Technology University (BSMRSTU) and as an elected member of the Teachers’ Association there. During my post-graduation (MA. Public Policy) at the University of Nottingham, a qualitative research focus helped me characterize patterns of gender gap in primary education access.

 

Selected Publications
  • Dutta,  P.  (2020).  Democratic  Decentralization  and  Participatory Development:  Focus  on  Bangladesh.  Journal  of    Contemporary  Governance  and  Public Policy, 1(2), 82-91. Permalink/DOI: https://doi.org/10.46507/jcgpp.v1i2
  • Dutta, P., 2021. • Towards Sound Integrity Management in Bangladesh: Challenges and Issues in Public Administration and Law Enforcement. In: S. N. Khanom, ed. Governance, In the 21st Century in the Sounth Asia: Challenges and Ways Forward. Dhaka: Hakkani Publishers, pp. 541-560.

Zhuohan (Johanne) has a BA in English from Dalian Maritime University, China, and has won China National Scholarship. She then graduated with a Distinction in MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from University of Oxford. Before her DPhil, Zhuohan worked for the organizing committee for the Harvard Summit for Young Leaders in China, an initiative that brought liberal arts education from Harvard to China’s top-performing high school students. She also helped evaluate the UNICEF China Child-Friendly School Programme as an RA, focusing on the socio-emotional learning among the Dong ethnic minority groups in Guangxi, China. She also teaches IELTS, TOEFL, and English phonics.

Her MSc research centres on linguistic relativity, specifically the effect of French grammatical gender system on both French speakers’ and learners’ perception of objects. Her DPhil research focuses on English pronunciation teaching and learning among young Chinese kids, particularly emphasising the influence of their mother tongue, Mandarin.

Supervisors

Robert Woore and Faidra Faitaki

Shuo-Fang earned a Bachelor’s degree from National Chengchi University (Taiwan) and a Master’s degree from Boston University. He has teaching experience in various EFL contexts including international high school, educational institute, and graduate language program.

Shuo-Fang’s areas of interest lie in applied linguistics, particularly phonetics/phonology and speech perception. As an Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholar, Shuo-Fang is currently undertaking his doctoral research, supervised by Dr Elizabeth Wonnacott and Dr Robert Woore. His doctoral project is mostly experimental and explores second language learners’ difficulty in processing English connected speech.

Shuo-Fang is affiliated with two research groups: Applied Linguistics and Wonnacott-Nation Lab (developmental cognitive psychology).

Publications

Liang, S., & Yu, H. (2021). Chinese students’ willingness to communicate in EFL classrooms: A case study of students at a Sino-foreign university. Professional and Academic English, 28(2), 15–33.

Siyu Ma is a DPhil student in child development and learning at the Department of Education. Her doctoral research focuses on second-born children under the Chinese two-child policy, especially how siblings play a role in the socio-emotional, language, and early literacy development of these children.

Prior to starting her Dphil, Siyu completed an MSc in Education (Research Design and Methodology) at the University of Oxford, under the supervision of Professor Sonali Nag. Her MSc dissertation explored the roles of social background and home literacy environment in the language and literacy development of a Wales subsample from the Millennium Cohort Study and was awarded a High Distinction. She also holds a BSc degree with first-class honours in Psychology from the University of Bath.

Siyu is also a research associate working on TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education.

At TalkTogether, Siyu is responsible for designing online surveys and analysing quantitative data from child assessments and parent reports.

Publications

Ma, S. (2021). Family background and home literacy environment as predictors of the early literacy development of children in Wales – findings from the Millennium Cohort Study (Master’s thesis, University of Oxford).

 

Amanda is the recipient of the Hazel Project Scholarship, based at the Rees Centre. Her doctoral research explores the conceptualisation of foster homes as therapeutic environments for complex/developmental trauma. Through participant-generated photography and collaborative qualitative methods with young people currently in foster care placements, her research explores if young people’s concepts and perceptions of therapeutic environments coincide with or challenge existing theoretical models and popular practitioner perspectives.

Amanda holds a BA from the University of Leeds (UK) and an MPhil from the University of Oxford (UK).

Lawrence is a teacher of mathematics who is particularly interested in classroom pedagogy, and how research and education policies interact with the teaching that students experience on a daily basis.

He finds that looking outwards in education is valuable with there being much more that unites our classrooms than isolates them. He has been extremely fortunate to study education through an international lens in the US, and to work on the Global Teaching InSights initiative of the Organisation for Economic Development (OECD) where he led on its videos of teaching.

Publications

Global Teaching InSights: A video study of teaching, OECD, 2020

Antonin is currently Doctoral Teaching Fellow on the MSc in Comparative and International Education, teaching Foundations of Educational Research. Antonin is also a Research Assistant for the Centre for Global Higher Education on the ‘Research on Research: the research function and mission of higher education’ project.

Alongside his teaching and research roles, Antonin is completing a Doctoral study on the European Universities Initiative, the European Commission’s flagship higher education programme that seeks to set up European Universities through transnational university alliances.

Arzhia Habibi is a DPhil in Education Candidate and uses Mandarin to conduct her research in the Chinese higher education context.

Arzhia’s research focuses on ‘expressions’ of global or world citizenship education in a Chinese higher education institution In the study, she explores the perspectives and practices of educators and students at a China-based university, which experiments with discourses related to citizenship. She further investigates how individual, local, national and global dynamics and the surrounding discourses influence worldviews and practices in a university setting.

As empirical studies on global or world citizenship education in the Chinese context are scarce, Arzhia hopes to contribute to a nascent knowledge base which may extend and add depth to the critical global discourses of global and world citizenship education, beyond Eurocentric framings.

Prior to her studies at Oxford, Arzhia received a first class Bachelor’s degree in Contemporary Chinese Studies at The University of Nottingham, and a Master’s in International Communication in Taiwan at National Chengchi University. As a child, she also attended kindergarten in Fuzhou, Fujian province of China.

Olga is a co-convenor of the Philosophy of Education Reading Group at the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. Olga’s main research interest is in the topics of epistemic injustice across all levels of education and across national borders with a focus on higher education and the process of knowledge production in academic institutes and universities. Her core interest lies between the areas of social epistemology, research on research (RoR) and comparative and international education (CIE). She has been a recipient of multiple research awards in the United States and the United Kingdom and is an elected co-convenor of the Comparative and International Education Special Interest Group at the British Educational Research Association (BERA).

Her new research at Oxford will explore the epistemically just and unjust practices as experienced by scholars from Kazakhstan during the internationalisation process in the social sciences and the humanities. Prior joining Oxford, Olga taught at University College London Institute of Education in London on the topics of migrant, refugee and minority education and European education traditions from a comparative lens.

Publications
  • Mun, O. (2020). ‘Epistemic Injustices in Internationalising Humanities and Social Sciences: A Case Study of Higher Education and Science Institutes in Kazakhstan.’ Centre for International Higher Education, Boston College. https://www.bc.edu/content/dam/bc1/schools/lsoe/sites/cihe/publication/Perspectives/Perspectives%20No%2018.pdf
  • Mun, O. and Gafu, G. (in press) ‘University Research Capacity in Kazakhstan’. Higher School of Economics, Russia.
  • Kandiko Howson, C., Mun, O. and Walker, R. (2020). ‘Academic Activism in STEM fields: Discipline in Theory and Practice.’ Philosophy and Theory of Higher Education Society.
  • Aizuddin M., Habibi A., Mun, O. (in press, 2020). ‘Post-Colonialism in Comparative and International Education.’ In Jules, T., Shields, R., Thomas, M. (Ed.), Bloomsbury Handbook of Theory in Comparative and International Education.
  • Palandjian, G., Silova, I., Mun, O., Zholdashaliyeva, R. (2018). ‘Gender and Nation in Postsocialist Educational Transformations.’ In Silova, I., & Chankseliani, M. (Eds.), Comparing Post-Socialist Transformations: Education in Eastern Europe and Former Soviet Union. Oxford: Symposium Books.
  • Mun, O., & Zholdashaliyeva, R. (2017). ‘Alippe, Bukvar’ and Gender: A comparative analysis of early literacy textbooks in Kazakhstan and Kyrgyzstan.’ In E. Brown & R. Craven & G. McLean (Ed.), International Advances in Education: Global Initiatives for Equity and Social Justice Series. Information Age Publishing
  • Patel, K. and Mun, O. (2017). ‘Marketing ‘development’ in the neoliberal university.’ DPU Working Papers https://www.ucl.ac.uk/bartlett/development/case-studies/2017/sep/marketing-development-neoliberal-university
  • Fimyar, O., Saniyazova, A. & Mun, O. (2017) ‘Methodology of Collaborative Research: Or, Searching for a Synergy in the Study of Student Transition in Kazakhstan.’ In SAGE Research Methods Cases. London, United Kingdom: SAGE Publications.
  • Mun, O. (2015). ‘(Re)imagining national identity through early literacy textbooks in Kazakhstan’, Forum of Young Central Asian Experts, 2nd edition. http://caa-network.org/archives/5620
  • Silova, I., Mead Yaqub, M., Mun, O., Palandjian, G. (2014). ‘Pedagogies of Space: (re)imagining nation and childhood in post-Soviet states.’ Global Studies of Childhood, 4(3), 195-209.
  • Silova, I., Brezhenyuk, V., Kudasova, M., Mun, O., Artemev, N. (2014). ‘Youth Protests against Privatisation of Education in post-Soviet states.’ European Education, 46(3), 56-65.

Schooled in the discipline of Public Administration at the University of Dhaka and with an experience of over five years of lecturing graduate and post-graduate students at two reputed public universities in Bangladesh, I am interested in research works related to education, gender, public policy, social studies and have multiple publications.

Apart from my current lecturing position, I worked as a news editor and contributor for the Dhaka Insider, an online news portal, in 2015. I also served as the Head of the Department (Department of Public Administration) and Assistant Proctor at the Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujibur Rahman Science and Technology University (BSMRSTU) and as an elected member of the Teachers’ Association there. During my post-graduation (MA. Public Policy) at the University of Nottingham, a qualitative research focus helped me characterize patterns of gender gap in primary education access.

 

Selected Publications
  • Dutta,  P.  (2020).  Democratic  Decentralization  and  Participatory Development:  Focus  on  Bangladesh.  Journal  of    Contemporary  Governance  and  Public Policy, 1(2), 82-91. Permalink/DOI: https://doi.org/10.46507/jcgpp.v1i2
  • Dutta, P., 2021. • Towards Sound Integrity Management in Bangladesh: Challenges and Issues in Public Administration and Law Enforcement. In: S. N. Khanom, ed. Governance, In the 21st Century in the Sounth Asia: Challenges and Ways Forward. Dhaka: Hakkani Publishers, pp. 541-560.

Zhuohan (Johanne) has a BA in English from Dalian Maritime University, China, and has won China National Scholarship. She then graduated with a Distinction in MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from University of Oxford. Before her DPhil, Zhuohan worked for the organizing committee for the Harvard Summit for Young Leaders in China, an initiative that brought liberal arts education from Harvard to China’s top-performing high school students. She also helped evaluate the UNICEF China Child-Friendly School Programme as an RA, focusing on the socio-emotional learning among the Dong ethnic minority groups in Guangxi, China. She also teaches IELTS, TOEFL, and English phonics.

Her MSc research centres on linguistic relativity, specifically the effect of French grammatical gender system on both French speakers’ and learners’ perception of objects. Her DPhil research focuses on English pronunciation teaching and learning among young Chinese kids, particularly emphasising the influence of their mother tongue, Mandarin.

Supervisors

Robert Woore and Faidra Faitaki

Shuo-Fang earned a Bachelor’s degree from National Chengchi University (Taiwan) and a Master’s degree from Boston University. He has teaching experience in various EFL contexts including international high school, educational institute, and graduate language program.

Shuo-Fang’s areas of interest lie in applied linguistics, particularly phonetics/phonology and speech perception. As an Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholar, Shuo-Fang is currently undertaking his doctoral research, supervised by Dr Elizabeth Wonnacott and Dr Robert Woore. His doctoral project is mostly experimental and explores second language learners’ difficulty in processing English connected speech.

Shuo-Fang is affiliated with two research groups: Applied Linguistics and Wonnacott-Nation Lab (developmental cognitive psychology).

Publications

Liang, S., & Yu, H. (2021). Chinese students’ willingness to communicate in EFL classrooms: A case study of students at a Sino-foreign university. Professional and Academic English, 28(2), 15–33.

Siyu Ma is a DPhil student in child development and learning at the Department of Education. Her doctoral research focuses on second-born children under the Chinese two-child policy, especially how siblings play a role in the socio-emotional, language, and early literacy development of these children.

Prior to starting her Dphil, Siyu completed an MSc in Education (Research Design and Methodology) at the University of Oxford, under the supervision of Professor Sonali Nag. Her MSc dissertation explored the roles of social background and home literacy environment in the language and literacy development of a Wales subsample from the Millennium Cohort Study and was awarded a High Distinction. She also holds a BSc degree with first-class honours in Psychology from the University of Bath.

Siyu is also a research associate working on TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education.

At TalkTogether, Siyu is responsible for designing online surveys and analysing quantitative data from child assessments and parent reports.

Publications

Ma, S. (2021). Family background and home literacy environment as predictors of the early literacy development of children in Wales – findings from the Millennium Cohort Study (Master’s thesis, University of Oxford).

 

Amanda is the recipient of the Hazel Project Scholarship, based at the Rees Centre. Her doctoral research explores the conceptualisation of foster homes as therapeutic environments for complex/developmental trauma. Through participant-generated photography and collaborative qualitative methods with young people currently in foster care placements, her research explores if young people’s concepts and perceptions of therapeutic environments coincide with or challenge existing theoretical models and popular practitioner perspectives.

Amanda holds a BA from the University of Leeds (UK) and an MPhil from the University of Oxford (UK).

Lawrence is a teacher of mathematics who is particularly interested in classroom pedagogy, and how research and education policies interact with the teaching that students experience on a daily basis.

He finds that looking outwards in education is valuable with there being much more that unites our classrooms than isolates them. He has been extremely fortunate to study education through an international lens in the US, and to work on the Global Teaching InSights initiative of the Organisation for Economic Development (OECD) where he led on its videos of teaching.

Publications

Global Teaching InSights: A video study of teaching, OECD, 2020

Antonin is currently Doctoral Teaching Fellow on the MSc in Comparative and International Education, teaching Foundations of Educational Research. Antonin is also a Research Assistant for the Centre for Global Higher Education on the ‘Research on Research: the research function and mission of higher education’ project.

Alongside his teaching and research roles, Antonin is completing a Doctoral study on the European Universities Initiative, the European Commission’s flagship higher education programme that seeks to set up European Universities through transnational university alliances.

Arzhia Habibi is a DPhil in Education Candidate and uses Mandarin to conduct her research in the Chinese higher education context.

Arzhia’s research focuses on ‘expressions’ of global or world citizenship education in a Chinese higher education institution In the study, she explores the perspectives and practices of educators and students at a China-based university, which experiments with discourses related to citizenship. She further investigates how individual, local, national and global dynamics and the surrounding discourses influence worldviews and practices in a university setting.

As empirical studies on global or world citizenship education in the Chinese context are scarce, Arzhia hopes to contribute to a nascent knowledge base which may extend and add depth to the critical global discourses of global and world citizenship education, beyond Eurocentric framings.

Prior to her studies at Oxford, Arzhia received a first class Bachelor’s degree in Contemporary Chinese Studies at The University of Nottingham, and a Master’s in International Communication in Taiwan at National Chengchi University. As a child, she also attended kindergarten in Fuzhou, Fujian province of China.

Olga is a co-convenor of the Philosophy of Education Reading Group at the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. Olga’s main research interest is in the topics of epistemic injustice across all levels of education and across national borders with a focus on higher education and the process of knowledge production in academic institutes and universities. Her core interest lies between the areas of social epistemology, research on research (RoR) and comparative and international education (CIE). She has been a recipient of multiple research awards in the United States and the United Kingdom and is an elected co-convenor of the Comparative and International Education Special Interest Group at the British Educational Research Association (BERA).

Her new research at Oxford will explore the epistemically just and unjust practices as experienced by scholars from Kazakhstan during the internationalisation process in the social sciences and the humanities. Prior joining Oxford, Olga taught at University College London Institute of Education in London on the topics of migrant, refugee and minority education and European education traditions from a comparative lens.

Publications
  • Mun, O. (2020). ‘Epistemic Injustices in Internationalising Humanities and Social Sciences: A Case Study of Higher Education and Science Institutes in Kazakhstan.’ Centre for International Higher Education, Boston College. https://www.bc.edu/content/dam/bc1/schools/lsoe/sites/cihe/publication/Perspectives/Perspectives%20No%2018.pdf
  • Mun, O. and Gafu, G. (in press) ‘University Research Capacity in Kazakhstan’. Higher School of Economics, Russia.
  • Kandiko Howson, C., Mun, O. and Walker, R. (2020). ‘Academic Activism in STEM fields: Discipline in Theory and Practice.’ Philosophy and Theory of Higher Education Society.
  • Aizuddin M., Habibi A., Mun, O. (in press, 2020). ‘Post-Colonialism in Comparative and International Education.’ In Jules, T., Shields, R., Thomas, M. (Ed.), Bloomsbury Handbook of Theory in Comparative and International Education.
  • Palandjian, G., Silova, I., Mun, O., Zholdashaliyeva, R. (2018). ‘Gender and Nation in Postsocialist Educational Transformations.’ In Silova, I., & Chankseliani, M. (Eds.), Comparing Post-Socialist Transformations: Education in Eastern Europe and Former Soviet Union. Oxford: Symposium Books.
  • Mun, O., & Zholdashaliyeva, R. (2017). ‘Alippe, Bukvar’ and Gender: A comparative analysis of early literacy textbooks in Kazakhstan and Kyrgyzstan.’ In E. Brown & R. Craven & G. McLean (Ed.), International Advances in Education: Global Initiatives for Equity and Social Justice Series. Information Age Publishing
  • Patel, K. and Mun, O. (2017). ‘Marketing ‘development’ in the neoliberal university.’ DPU Working Papers https://www.ucl.ac.uk/bartlett/development/case-studies/2017/sep/marketing-development-neoliberal-university
  • Fimyar, O., Saniyazova, A. & Mun, O. (2017) ‘Methodology of Collaborative Research: Or, Searching for a Synergy in the Study of Student Transition in Kazakhstan.’ In SAGE Research Methods Cases. London, United Kingdom: SAGE Publications.
  • Mun, O. (2015). ‘(Re)imagining national identity through early literacy textbooks in Kazakhstan’, Forum of Young Central Asian Experts, 2nd edition. http://caa-network.org/archives/5620
  • Silova, I., Mead Yaqub, M., Mun, O., Palandjian, G. (2014). ‘Pedagogies of Space: (re)imagining nation and childhood in post-Soviet states.’ Global Studies of Childhood, 4(3), 195-209.
  • Silova, I., Brezhenyuk, V., Kudasova, M., Mun, O., Artemev, N. (2014). ‘Youth Protests against Privatisation of Education in post-Soviet states.’ European Education, 46(3), 56-65.

Schooled in the discipline of Public Administration at the University of Dhaka and with an experience of over five years of lecturing graduate and post-graduate students at two reputed public universities in Bangladesh, I am interested in research works related to education, gender, public policy, social studies and have multiple publications.

Apart from my current lecturing position, I worked as a news editor and contributor for the Dhaka Insider, an online news portal, in 2015. I also served as the Head of the Department (Department of Public Administration) and Assistant Proctor at the Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujibur Rahman Science and Technology University (BSMRSTU) and as an elected member of the Teachers’ Association there. During my post-graduation (MA. Public Policy) at the University of Nottingham, a qualitative research focus helped me characterize patterns of gender gap in primary education access.

 

Selected Publications
  • Dutta,  P.  (2020).  Democratic  Decentralization  and  Participatory Development:  Focus  on  Bangladesh.  Journal  of    Contemporary  Governance  and  Public Policy, 1(2), 82-91. Permalink/DOI: https://doi.org/10.46507/jcgpp.v1i2
  • Dutta, P., 2021. • Towards Sound Integrity Management in Bangladesh: Challenges and Issues in Public Administration and Law Enforcement. In: S. N. Khanom, ed. Governance, In the 21st Century in the Sounth Asia: Challenges and Ways Forward. Dhaka: Hakkani Publishers, pp. 541-560.

Zhuohan (Johanne) has a BA in English from Dalian Maritime University, China, and has won China National Scholarship. She then graduated with a Distinction in MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from University of Oxford. Before her DPhil, Zhuohan worked for the organizing committee for the Harvard Summit for Young Leaders in China, an initiative that brought liberal arts education from Harvard to China’s top-performing high school students. She also helped evaluate the UNICEF China Child-Friendly School Programme as an RA, focusing on the socio-emotional learning among the Dong ethnic minority groups in Guangxi, China. She also teaches IELTS, TOEFL, and English phonics.

Her MSc research centres on linguistic relativity, specifically the effect of French grammatical gender system on both French speakers’ and learners’ perception of objects. Her DPhil research focuses on English pronunciation teaching and learning among young Chinese kids, particularly emphasising the influence of their mother tongue, Mandarin.

Supervisors

Robert Woore and Faidra Faitaki

Shuo-Fang earned a Bachelor’s degree from National Chengchi University (Taiwan) and a Master’s degree from Boston University. He has teaching experience in various EFL contexts including international high school, educational institute, and graduate language program.

Shuo-Fang’s areas of interest lie in applied linguistics, particularly phonetics/phonology and speech perception. As an Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholar, Shuo-Fang is currently undertaking his doctoral research, supervised by Dr Elizabeth Wonnacott and Dr Robert Woore. His doctoral project is mostly experimental and explores second language learners’ difficulty in processing English connected speech.

Shuo-Fang is affiliated with two research groups: Applied Linguistics and Wonnacott-Nation Lab (developmental cognitive psychology).

Publications

Liang, S., & Yu, H. (2021). Chinese students’ willingness to communicate in EFL classrooms: A case study of students at a Sino-foreign university. Professional and Academic English, 28(2), 15–33.

Siyu Ma is a DPhil student in child development and learning at the Department of Education. Her doctoral research focuses on second-born children under the Chinese two-child policy, especially how siblings play a role in the socio-emotional, language, and early literacy development of these children.

Prior to starting her Dphil, Siyu completed an MSc in Education (Research Design and Methodology) at the University of Oxford, under the supervision of Professor Sonali Nag. Her MSc dissertation explored the roles of social background and home literacy environment in the language and literacy development of a Wales subsample from the Millennium Cohort Study and was awarded a High Distinction. She also holds a BSc degree with first-class honours in Psychology from the University of Bath.

Siyu is also a research associate working on TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education.

At TalkTogether, Siyu is responsible for designing online surveys and analysing quantitative data from child assessments and parent reports.

Publications

Ma, S. (2021). Family background and home literacy environment as predictors of the early literacy development of children in Wales – findings from the Millennium Cohort Study (Master’s thesis, University of Oxford).

 

Amanda is the recipient of the Hazel Project Scholarship, based at the Rees Centre. Her doctoral research explores the conceptualisation of foster homes as therapeutic environments for complex/developmental trauma. Through participant-generated photography and collaborative qualitative methods with young people currently in foster care placements, her research explores if young people’s concepts and perceptions of therapeutic environments coincide with or challenge existing theoretical models and popular practitioner perspectives.

Amanda holds a BA from the University of Leeds (UK) and an MPhil from the University of Oxford (UK).

Lawrence is a teacher of mathematics who is particularly interested in classroom pedagogy, and how research and education policies interact with the teaching that students experience on a daily basis.

He finds that looking outwards in education is valuable with there being much more that unites our classrooms than isolates them. He has been extremely fortunate to study education through an international lens in the US, and to work on the Global Teaching InSights initiative of the Organisation for Economic Development (OECD) where he led on its videos of teaching.

Publications

Global Teaching InSights: A video study of teaching, OECD, 2020

Antonin is currently Doctoral Teaching Fellow on the MSc in Comparative and International Education, teaching Foundations of Educational Research. Antonin is also a Research Assistant for the Centre for Global Higher Education on the ‘Research on Research: the research function and mission of higher education’ project.

Alongside his teaching and research roles, Antonin is completing a Doctoral study on the European Universities Initiative, the European Commission’s flagship higher education programme that seeks to set up European Universities through transnational university alliances.

Arzhia Habibi is a DPhil in Education Candidate and uses Mandarin to conduct her research in the Chinese higher education context.

Arzhia’s research focuses on ‘expressions’ of global or world citizenship education in a Chinese higher education institution In the study, she explores the perspectives and practices of educators and students at a China-based university, which experiments with discourses related to citizenship. She further investigates how individual, local, national and global dynamics and the surrounding discourses influence worldviews and practices in a university setting.

As empirical studies on global or world citizenship education in the Chinese context are scarce, Arzhia hopes to contribute to a nascent knowledge base which may extend and add depth to the critical global discourses of global and world citizenship education, beyond Eurocentric framings.

Prior to her studies at Oxford, Arzhia received a first class Bachelor’s degree in Contemporary Chinese Studies at The University of Nottingham, and a Master’s in International Communication in Taiwan at National Chengchi University. As a child, she also attended kindergarten in Fuzhou, Fujian province of China.

Olga is a co-convenor of the Philosophy of Education Reading Group at the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. Olga’s main research interest is in the topics of epistemic injustice across all levels of education and across national borders with a focus on higher education and the process of knowledge production in academic institutes and universities. Her core interest lies between the areas of social epistemology, research on research (RoR) and comparative and international education (CIE). She has been a recipient of multiple research awards in the United States and the United Kingdom and is an elected co-convenor of the Comparative and International Education Special Interest Group at the British Educational Research Association (BERA).

Her new research at Oxford will explore the epistemically just and unjust practices as experienced by scholars from Kazakhstan during the internationalisation process in the social sciences and the humanities. Prior joining Oxford, Olga taught at University College London Institute of Education in London on the topics of migrant, refugee and minority education and European education traditions from a comparative lens.

Publications
  • Mun, O. (2020). ‘Epistemic Injustices in Internationalising Humanities and Social Sciences: A Case Study of Higher Education and Science Institutes in Kazakhstan.’ Centre for International Higher Education, Boston College. https://www.bc.edu/content/dam/bc1/schools/lsoe/sites/cihe/publication/Perspectives/Perspectives%20No%2018.pdf
  • Mun, O. and Gafu, G. (in press) ‘University Research Capacity in Kazakhstan’. Higher School of Economics, Russia.
  • Kandiko Howson, C., Mun, O. and Walker, R. (2020). ‘Academic Activism in STEM fields: Discipline in Theory and Practice.’ Philosophy and Theory of Higher Education Society.
  • Aizuddin M., Habibi A., Mun, O. (in press, 2020). ‘Post-Colonialism in Comparative and International Education.’ In Jules, T., Shields, R., Thomas, M. (Ed.), Bloomsbury Handbook of Theory in Comparative and International Education.
  • Palandjian, G., Silova, I., Mun, O., Zholdashaliyeva, R. (2018). ‘Gender and Nation in Postsocialist Educational Transformations.’ In Silova, I., & Chankseliani, M. (Eds.), Comparing Post-Socialist Transformations: Education in Eastern Europe and Former Soviet Union. Oxford: Symposium Books.
  • Mun, O., & Zholdashaliyeva, R. (2017). ‘Alippe, Bukvar’ and Gender: A comparative analysis of early literacy textbooks in Kazakhstan and Kyrgyzstan.’ In E. Brown & R. Craven & G. McLean (Ed.), International Advances in Education: Global Initiatives for Equity and Social Justice Series. Information Age Publishing
  • Patel, K. and Mun, O. (2017). ‘Marketing ‘development’ in the neoliberal university.’ DPU Working Papers https://www.ucl.ac.uk/bartlett/development/case-studies/2017/sep/marketing-development-neoliberal-university
  • Fimyar, O., Saniyazova, A. & Mun, O. (2017) ‘Methodology of Collaborative Research: Or, Searching for a Synergy in the Study of Student Transition in Kazakhstan.’ In SAGE Research Methods Cases. London, United Kingdom: SAGE Publications.
  • Mun, O. (2015). ‘(Re)imagining national identity through early literacy textbooks in Kazakhstan’, Forum of Young Central Asian Experts, 2nd edition. http://caa-network.org/archives/5620
  • Silova, I., Mead Yaqub, M., Mun, O., Palandjian, G. (2014). ‘Pedagogies of Space: (re)imagining nation and childhood in post-Soviet states.’ Global Studies of Childhood, 4(3), 195-209.
  • Silova, I., Brezhenyuk, V., Kudasova, M., Mun, O., Artemev, N. (2014). ‘Youth Protests against Privatisation of Education in post-Soviet states.’ European Education, 46(3), 56-65.

Schooled in the discipline of Public Administration at the University of Dhaka and with an experience of over five years of lecturing graduate and post-graduate students at two reputed public universities in Bangladesh, I am interested in research works related to education, gender, public policy, social studies and have multiple publications.

Apart from my current lecturing position, I worked as a news editor and contributor for the Dhaka Insider, an online news portal, in 2015. I also served as the Head of the Department (Department of Public Administration) and Assistant Proctor at the Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujibur Rahman Science and Technology University (BSMRSTU) and as an elected member of the Teachers’ Association there. During my post-graduation (MA. Public Policy) at the University of Nottingham, a qualitative research focus helped me characterize patterns of gender gap in primary education access.

 

Selected Publications
  • Dutta,  P.  (2020).  Democratic  Decentralization  and  Participatory Development:  Focus  on  Bangladesh.  Journal  of    Contemporary  Governance  and  Public Policy, 1(2), 82-91. Permalink/DOI: https://doi.org/10.46507/jcgpp.v1i2
  • Dutta, P., 2021. • Towards Sound Integrity Management in Bangladesh: Challenges and Issues in Public Administration and Law Enforcement. In: S. N. Khanom, ed. Governance, In the 21st Century in the Sounth Asia: Challenges and Ways Forward. Dhaka: Hakkani Publishers, pp. 541-560.

Zhuohan (Johanne) has a BA in English from Dalian Maritime University, China, and has won China National Scholarship. She then graduated with a Distinction in MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from University of Oxford. Before her DPhil, Zhuohan worked for the organizing committee for the Harvard Summit for Young Leaders in China, an initiative that brought liberal arts education from Harvard to China’s top-performing high school students. She also helped evaluate the UNICEF China Child-Friendly School Programme as an RA, focusing on the socio-emotional learning among the Dong ethnic minority groups in Guangxi, China. She also teaches IELTS, TOEFL, and English phonics.

Her MSc research centres on linguistic relativity, specifically the effect of French grammatical gender system on both French speakers’ and learners’ perception of objects. Her DPhil research focuses on English pronunciation teaching and learning among young Chinese kids, particularly emphasising the influence of their mother tongue, Mandarin.

Supervisors

Robert Woore and Faidra Faitaki

Shuo-Fang earned a Bachelor’s degree from National Chengchi University (Taiwan) and a Master’s degree from Boston University. He has teaching experience in various EFL contexts including international high school, educational institute, and graduate language program.

Shuo-Fang’s areas of interest lie in applied linguistics, particularly phonetics/phonology and speech perception. As an Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholar, Shuo-Fang is currently undertaking his doctoral research, supervised by Dr Elizabeth Wonnacott and Dr Robert Woore. His doctoral project is mostly experimental and explores second language learners’ difficulty in processing English connected speech.

Shuo-Fang is affiliated with two research groups: Applied Linguistics and Wonnacott-Nation Lab (developmental cognitive psychology).

Publications

Liang, S., & Yu, H. (2021). Chinese students’ willingness to communicate in EFL classrooms: A case study of students at a Sino-foreign university. Professional and Academic English, 28(2), 15–33.

Siyu Ma is a DPhil student in child development and learning at the Department of Education. Her doctoral research focuses on second-born children under the Chinese two-child policy, especially how siblings play a role in the socio-emotional, language, and early literacy development of these children.

Prior to starting her Dphil, Siyu completed an MSc in Education (Research Design and Methodology) at the University of Oxford, under the supervision of Professor Sonali Nag. Her MSc dissertation explored the roles of social background and home literacy environment in the language and literacy development of a Wales subsample from the Millennium Cohort Study and was awarded a High Distinction. She also holds a BSc degree with first-class honours in Psychology from the University of Bath.

Siyu is also a research associate working on TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education.

At TalkTogether, Siyu is responsible for designing online surveys and analysing quantitative data from child assessments and parent reports.

Publications

Ma, S. (2021). Family background and home literacy environment as predictors of the early literacy development of children in Wales – findings from the Millennium Cohort Study (Master’s thesis, University of Oxford).

 

Amanda is the recipient of the Hazel Project Scholarship, based at the Rees Centre. Her doctoral research explores the conceptualisation of foster homes as therapeutic environments for complex/developmental trauma. Through participant-generated photography and collaborative qualitative methods with young people currently in foster care placements, her research explores if young people’s concepts and perceptions of therapeutic environments coincide with or challenge existing theoretical models and popular practitioner perspectives.

Amanda holds a BA from the University of Leeds (UK) and an MPhil from the University of Oxford (UK).

Lawrence is a teacher of mathematics who is particularly interested in classroom pedagogy, and how research and education policies interact with the teaching that students experience on a daily basis.

He finds that looking outwards in education is valuable with there being much more that unites our classrooms than isolates them. He has been extremely fortunate to study education through an international lens in the US, and to work on the Global Teaching InSights initiative of the Organisation for Economic Development (OECD) where he led on its videos of teaching.

Publications

Global Teaching InSights: A video study of teaching, OECD, 2020

Antonin is currently Doctoral Teaching Fellow on the MSc in Comparative and International Education, teaching Foundations of Educational Research. Antonin is also a Research Assistant for the Centre for Global Higher Education on the ‘Research on Research: the research function and mission of higher education’ project.

Alongside his teaching and research roles, Antonin is completing a Doctoral study on the European Universities Initiative, the European Commission’s flagship higher education programme that seeks to set up European Universities through transnational university alliances.

Arzhia Habibi is a DPhil in Education Candidate and uses Mandarin to conduct her research in the Chinese higher education context.

Arzhia’s research focuses on ‘expressions’ of global or world citizenship education in a Chinese higher education institution In the study, she explores the perspectives and practices of educators and students at a China-based university, which experiments with discourses related to citizenship. She further investigates how individual, local, national and global dynamics and the surrounding discourses influence worldviews and practices in a university setting.

As empirical studies on global or world citizenship education in the Chinese context are scarce, Arzhia hopes to contribute to a nascent knowledge base which may extend and add depth to the critical global discourses of global and world citizenship education, beyond Eurocentric framings.

Prior to her studies at Oxford, Arzhia received a first class Bachelor’s degree in Contemporary Chinese Studies at The University of Nottingham, and a Master’s in International Communication in Taiwan at National Chengchi University. As a child, she also attended kindergarten in Fuzhou, Fujian province of China.

Olga is a co-convenor of the Philosophy of Education Reading Group at the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. Olga’s main research interest is in the topics of epistemic injustice across all levels of education and across national borders with a focus on higher education and the process of knowledge production in academic institutes and universities. Her core interest lies between the areas of social epistemology, research on research (RoR) and comparative and international education (CIE). She has been a recipient of multiple research awards in the United States and the United Kingdom and is an elected co-convenor of the Comparative and International Education Special Interest Group at the British Educational Research Association (BERA).

Her new research at Oxford will explore the epistemically just and unjust practices as experienced by scholars from Kazakhstan during the internationalisation process in the social sciences and the humanities. Prior joining Oxford, Olga taught at University College London Institute of Education in London on the topics of migrant, refugee and minority education and European education traditions from a comparative lens.

Publications
  • Mun, O. (2020). ‘Epistemic Injustices in Internationalising Humanities and Social Sciences: A Case Study of Higher Education and Science Institutes in Kazakhstan.’ Centre for International Higher Education, Boston College. https://www.bc.edu/content/dam/bc1/schools/lsoe/sites/cihe/publication/Perspectives/Perspectives%20No%2018.pdf
  • Mun, O. and Gafu, G. (in press) ‘University Research Capacity in Kazakhstan’. Higher School of Economics, Russia.
  • Kandiko Howson, C., Mun, O. and Walker, R. (2020). ‘Academic Activism in STEM fields: Discipline in Theory and Practice.’ Philosophy and Theory of Higher Education Society.
  • Aizuddin M., Habibi A., Mun, O. (in press, 2020). ‘Post-Colonialism in Comparative and International Education.’ In Jules, T., Shields, R., Thomas, M. (Ed.), Bloomsbury Handbook of Theory in Comparative and International Education.
  • Palandjian, G., Silova, I., Mun, O., Zholdashaliyeva, R. (2018). ‘Gender and Nation in Postsocialist Educational Transformations.’ In Silova, I., & Chankseliani, M. (Eds.), Comparing Post-Socialist Transformations: Education in Eastern Europe and Former Soviet Union. Oxford: Symposium Books.
  • Mun, O., & Zholdashaliyeva, R. (2017). ‘Alippe, Bukvar’ and Gender: A comparative analysis of early literacy textbooks in Kazakhstan and Kyrgyzstan.’ In E. Brown & R. Craven & G. McLean (Ed.), International Advances in Education: Global Initiatives for Equity and Social Justice Series. Information Age Publishing
  • Patel, K. and Mun, O. (2017). ‘Marketing ‘development’ in the neoliberal university.’ DPU Working Papers https://www.ucl.ac.uk/bartlett/development/case-studies/2017/sep/marketing-development-neoliberal-university
  • Fimyar, O., Saniyazova, A. & Mun, O. (2017) ‘Methodology of Collaborative Research: Or, Searching for a Synergy in the Study of Student Transition in Kazakhstan.’ In SAGE Research Methods Cases. London, United Kingdom: SAGE Publications.
  • Mun, O. (2015). ‘(Re)imagining national identity through early literacy textbooks in Kazakhstan’, Forum of Young Central Asian Experts, 2nd edition. http://caa-network.org/archives/5620
  • Silova, I., Mead Yaqub, M., Mun, O., Palandjian, G. (2014). ‘Pedagogies of Space: (re)imagining nation and childhood in post-Soviet states.’ Global Studies of Childhood, 4(3), 195-209.
  • Silova, I., Brezhenyuk, V., Kudasova, M., Mun, O., Artemev, N. (2014). ‘Youth Protests against Privatisation of Education in post-Soviet states.’ European Education, 46(3), 56-65.

Schooled in the discipline of Public Administration at the University of Dhaka and with an experience of over five years of lecturing graduate and post-graduate students at two reputed public universities in Bangladesh, I am interested in research works related to education, gender, public policy, social studies and have multiple publications.

Apart from my current lecturing position, I worked as a news editor and contributor for the Dhaka Insider, an online news portal, in 2015. I also served as the Head of the Department (Department of Public Administration) and Assistant Proctor at the Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujibur Rahman Science and Technology University (BSMRSTU) and as an elected member of the Teachers’ Association there. During my post-graduation (MA. Public Policy) at the University of Nottingham, a qualitative research focus helped me characterize patterns of gender gap in primary education access.

 

Selected Publications
  • Dutta,  P.  (2020).  Democratic  Decentralization  and  Participatory Development:  Focus  on  Bangladesh.  Journal  of    Contemporary  Governance  and  Public Policy, 1(2), 82-91. Permalink/DOI: https://doi.org/10.46507/jcgpp.v1i2
  • Dutta, P., 2021. • Towards Sound Integrity Management in Bangladesh: Challenges and Issues in Public Administration and Law Enforcement. In: S. N. Khanom, ed. Governance, In the 21st Century in the Sounth Asia: Challenges and Ways Forward. Dhaka: Hakkani Publishers, pp. 541-560.

Zhuohan (Johanne) has a BA in English from Dalian Maritime University, China, and has won China National Scholarship. She then graduated with a Distinction in MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from University of Oxford. Before her DPhil, Zhuohan worked for the organizing committee for the Harvard Summit for Young Leaders in China, an initiative that brought liberal arts education from Harvard to China’s top-performing high school students. She also helped evaluate the UNICEF China Child-Friendly School Programme as an RA, focusing on the socio-emotional learning among the Dong ethnic minority groups in Guangxi, China. She also teaches IELTS, TOEFL, and English phonics.

Her MSc research centres on linguistic relativity, specifically the effect of French grammatical gender system on both French speakers’ and learners’ perception of objects. Her DPhil research focuses on English pronunciation teaching and learning among young Chinese kids, particularly emphasising the influence of their mother tongue, Mandarin.

Supervisors

Robert Woore and Faidra Faitaki

Shuo-Fang earned a Bachelor’s degree from National Chengchi University (Taiwan) and a Master’s degree from Boston University. He has teaching experience in various EFL contexts including international high school, educational institute, and graduate language program.

Shuo-Fang’s areas of interest lie in applied linguistics, particularly phonetics/phonology and speech perception. As an Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholar, Shuo-Fang is currently undertaking his doctoral research, supervised by Dr Elizabeth Wonnacott and Dr Robert Woore. His doctoral project is mostly experimental and explores second language learners’ difficulty in processing English connected speech.

Shuo-Fang is affiliated with two research groups: Applied Linguistics and Wonnacott-Nation Lab (developmental cognitive psychology).

Publications

Liang, S., & Yu, H. (2021). Chinese students’ willingness to communicate in EFL classrooms: A case study of students at a Sino-foreign university. Professional and Academic English, 28(2), 15–33.

Siyu Ma is a DPhil student in child development and learning at the Department of Education. Her doctoral research focuses on second-born children under the Chinese two-child policy, especially how siblings play a role in the socio-emotional, language, and early literacy development of these children.

Prior to starting her Dphil, Siyu completed an MSc in Education (Research Design and Methodology) at the University of Oxford, under the supervision of Professor Sonali Nag. Her MSc dissertation explored the roles of social background and home literacy environment in the language and literacy development of a Wales subsample from the Millennium Cohort Study and was awarded a High Distinction. She also holds a BSc degree with first-class honours in Psychology from the University of Bath.

Siyu is also a research associate working on TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education.

At TalkTogether, Siyu is responsible for designing online surveys and analysing quantitative data from child assessments and parent reports.

Publications

Ma, S. (2021). Family background and home literacy environment as predictors of the early literacy development of children in Wales – findings from the Millennium Cohort Study (Master’s thesis, University of Oxford).

 

Amanda is the recipient of the Hazel Project Scholarship, based at the Rees Centre. Her doctoral research explores the conceptualisation of foster homes as therapeutic environments for complex/developmental trauma. Through participant-generated photography and collaborative qualitative methods with young people currently in foster care placements, her research explores if young people’s concepts and perceptions of therapeutic environments coincide with or challenge existing theoretical models and popular practitioner perspectives.

Amanda holds a BA from the University of Leeds (UK) and an MPhil from the University of Oxford (UK).

Lawrence is a teacher of mathematics who is particularly interested in classroom pedagogy, and how research and education policies interact with the teaching that students experience on a daily basis.

He finds that looking outwards in education is valuable with there being much more that unites our classrooms than isolates them. He has been extremely fortunate to study education through an international lens in the US, and to work on the Global Teaching InSights initiative of the Organisation for Economic Development (OECD) where he led on its videos of teaching.

Publications

Global Teaching InSights: A video study of teaching, OECD, 2020

Antonin is currently Doctoral Teaching Fellow on the MSc in Comparative and International Education, teaching Foundations of Educational Research. Antonin is also a Research Assistant for the Centre for Global Higher Education on the ‘Research on Research: the research function and mission of higher education’ project.

Alongside his teaching and research roles, Antonin is completing a Doctoral study on the European Universities Initiative, the European Commission’s flagship higher education programme that seeks to set up European Universities through transnational university alliances.

Arzhia Habibi is a DPhil in Education Candidate and uses Mandarin to conduct her research in the Chinese higher education context.

Arzhia’s research focuses on ‘expressions’ of global or world citizenship education in a Chinese higher education institution In the study, she explores the perspectives and practices of educators and students at a China-based university, which experiments with discourses related to citizenship. She further investigates how individual, local, national and global dynamics and the surrounding discourses influence worldviews and practices in a university setting.

As empirical studies on global or world citizenship education in the Chinese context are scarce, Arzhia hopes to contribute to a nascent knowledge base which may extend and add depth to the critical global discourses of global and world citizenship education, beyond Eurocentric framings.

Prior to her studies at Oxford, Arzhia received a first class Bachelor’s degree in Contemporary Chinese Studies at The University of Nottingham, and a Master’s in International Communication in Taiwan at National Chengchi University. As a child, she also attended kindergarten in Fuzhou, Fujian province of China.

Olga is a co-convenor of the Philosophy of Education Reading Group at the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. Olga’s main research interest is in the topics of epistemic injustice across all levels of education and across national borders with a focus on higher education and the process of knowledge production in academic institutes and universities. Her core interest lies between the areas of social epistemology, research on research (RoR) and comparative and international education (CIE). She has been a recipient of multiple research awards in the United States and the United Kingdom and is an elected co-convenor of the Comparative and International Education Special Interest Group at the British Educational Research Association (BERA).

Her new research at Oxford will explore the epistemically just and unjust practices as experienced by scholars from Kazakhstan during the internationalisation process in the social sciences and the humanities. Prior joining Oxford, Olga taught at University College London Institute of Education in London on the topics of migrant, refugee and minority education and European education traditions from a comparative lens.

Publications
  • Mun, O. (2020). ‘Epistemic Injustices in Internationalising Humanities and Social Sciences: A Case Study of Higher Education and Science Institutes in Kazakhstan.’ Centre for International Higher Education, Boston College. https://www.bc.edu/content/dam/bc1/schools/lsoe/sites/cihe/publication/Perspectives/Perspectives%20No%2018.pdf
  • Mun, O. and Gafu, G. (in press) ‘University Research Capacity in Kazakhstan’. Higher School of Economics, Russia.
  • Kandiko Howson, C., Mun, O. and Walker, R. (2020). ‘Academic Activism in STEM fields: Discipline in Theory and Practice.’ Philosophy and Theory of Higher Education Society.
  • Aizuddin M., Habibi A., Mun, O. (in press, 2020). ‘Post-Colonialism in Comparative and International Education.’ In Jules, T., Shields, R., Thomas, M. (Ed.), Bloomsbury Handbook of Theory in Comparative and International Education.
  • Palandjian, G., Silova, I., Mun, O., Zholdashaliyeva, R. (2018). ‘Gender and Nation in Postsocialist Educational Transformations.’ In Silova, I., & Chankseliani, M. (Eds.), Comparing Post-Socialist Transformations: Education in Eastern Europe and Former Soviet Union. Oxford: Symposium Books.
  • Mun, O., & Zholdashaliyeva, R. (2017). ‘Alippe, Bukvar’ and Gender: A comparative analysis of early literacy textbooks in Kazakhstan and Kyrgyzstan.’ In E. Brown & R. Craven & G. McLean (Ed.), International Advances in Education: Global Initiatives for Equity and Social Justice Series. Information Age Publishing
  • Patel, K. and Mun, O. (2017). ‘Marketing ‘development’ in the neoliberal university.’ DPU Working Papers https://www.ucl.ac.uk/bartlett/development/case-studies/2017/sep/marketing-development-neoliberal-university
  • Fimyar, O., Saniyazova, A. & Mun, O. (2017) ‘Methodology of Collaborative Research: Or, Searching for a Synergy in the Study of Student Transition in Kazakhstan.’ In SAGE Research Methods Cases. London, United Kingdom: SAGE Publications.
  • Mun, O. (2015). ‘(Re)imagining national identity through early literacy textbooks in Kazakhstan’, Forum of Young Central Asian Experts, 2nd edition. http://caa-network.org/archives/5620
  • Silova, I., Mead Yaqub, M., Mun, O., Palandjian, G. (2014). ‘Pedagogies of Space: (re)imagining nation and childhood in post-Soviet states.’ Global Studies of Childhood, 4(3), 195-209.
  • Silova, I., Brezhenyuk, V., Kudasova, M., Mun, O., Artemev, N. (2014). ‘Youth Protests against Privatisation of Education in post-Soviet states.’ European Education, 46(3), 56-65.

Schooled in the discipline of Public Administration at the University of Dhaka and with an experience of over five years of lecturing graduate and post-graduate students at two reputed public universities in Bangladesh, I am interested in research works related to education, gender, public policy, social studies and have multiple publications.

Apart from my current lecturing position, I worked as a news editor and contributor for the Dhaka Insider, an online news portal, in 2015. I also served as the Head of the Department (Department of Public Administration) and Assistant Proctor at the Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujibur Rahman Science and Technology University (BSMRSTU) and as an elected member of the Teachers’ Association there. During my post-graduation (MA. Public Policy) at the University of Nottingham, a qualitative research focus helped me characterize patterns of gender gap in primary education access.

 

Selected Publications
  • Dutta,  P.  (2020).  Democratic  Decentralization  and  Participatory Development:  Focus  on  Bangladesh.  Journal  of    Contemporary  Governance  and  Public Policy, 1(2), 82-91. Permalink/DOI: https://doi.org/10.46507/jcgpp.v1i2
  • Dutta, P., 2021. • Towards Sound Integrity Management in Bangladesh: Challenges and Issues in Public Administration and Law Enforcement. In: S. N. Khanom, ed. Governance, In the 21st Century in the Sounth Asia: Challenges and Ways Forward. Dhaka: Hakkani Publishers, pp. 541-560.

Zhuohan (Johanne) has a BA in English from Dalian Maritime University, China, and has won China National Scholarship. She then graduated with a Distinction in MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from University of Oxford. Before her DPhil, Zhuohan worked for the organizing committee for the Harvard Summit for Young Leaders in China, an initiative that brought liberal arts education from Harvard to China’s top-performing high school students. She also helped evaluate the UNICEF China Child-Friendly School Programme as an RA, focusing on the socio-emotional learning among the Dong ethnic minority groups in Guangxi, China. She also teaches IELTS, TOEFL, and English phonics.

Her MSc research centres on linguistic relativity, specifically the effect of French grammatical gender system on both French speakers’ and learners’ perception of objects. Her DPhil research focuses on English pronunciation teaching and learning among young Chinese kids, particularly emphasising the influence of their mother tongue, Mandarin.

Supervisors

Robert Woore and Faidra Faitaki

Shuo-Fang earned a Bachelor’s degree from National Chengchi University (Taiwan) and a Master’s degree from Boston University. He has teaching experience in various EFL contexts including international high school, educational institute, and graduate language program.

Shuo-Fang’s areas of interest lie in applied linguistics, particularly phonetics/phonology and speech perception. As an Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholar, Shuo-Fang is currently undertaking his doctoral research, supervised by Dr Elizabeth Wonnacott and Dr Robert Woore. His doctoral project is mostly experimental and explores second language learners’ difficulty in processing English connected speech.

Shuo-Fang is affiliated with two research groups: Applied Linguistics and Wonnacott-Nation Lab (developmental cognitive psychology).

Publications

Liang, S., & Yu, H. (2021). Chinese students’ willingness to communicate in EFL classrooms: A case study of students at a Sino-foreign university. Professional and Academic English, 28(2), 15–33.

Siyu Ma is a DPhil student in child development and learning at the Department of Education. Her doctoral research focuses on second-born children under the Chinese two-child policy, especially how siblings play a role in the socio-emotional, language, and early literacy development of these children.

Prior to starting her Dphil, Siyu completed an MSc in Education (Research Design and Methodology) at the University of Oxford, under the supervision of Professor Sonali Nag. Her MSc dissertation explored the roles of social background and home literacy environment in the language and literacy development of a Wales subsample from the Millennium Cohort Study and was awarded a High Distinction. She also holds a BSc degree with first-class honours in Psychology from the University of Bath.

Siyu is also a research associate working on TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education.

At TalkTogether, Siyu is responsible for designing online surveys and analysing quantitative data from child assessments and parent reports.

Publications

Ma, S. (2021). Family background and home literacy environment as predictors of the early literacy development of children in Wales – findings from the Millennium Cohort Study (Master’s thesis, University of Oxford).

 

Amanda is the recipient of the Hazel Project Scholarship, based at the Rees Centre. Her doctoral research explores the conceptualisation of foster homes as therapeutic environments for complex/developmental trauma. Through participant-generated photography and collaborative qualitative methods with young people currently in foster care placements, her research explores if young people’s concepts and perceptions of therapeutic environments coincide with or challenge existing theoretical models and popular practitioner perspectives.

Amanda holds a BA from the University of Leeds (UK) and an MPhil from the University of Oxford (UK).

Lawrence is a teacher of mathematics who is particularly interested in classroom pedagogy, and how research and education policies interact with the teaching that students experience on a daily basis.

He finds that looking outwards in education is valuable with there being much more that unites our classrooms than isolates them. He has been extremely fortunate to study education through an international lens in the US, and to work on the Global Teaching InSights initiative of the Organisation for Economic Development (OECD) where he led on its videos of teaching.

Publications

Global Teaching InSights: A video study of teaching, OECD, 2020

Antonin is currently Doctoral Teaching Fellow on the MSc in Comparative and International Education, teaching Foundations of Educational Research. Antonin is also a Research Assistant for the Centre for Global Higher Education on the ‘Research on Research: the research function and mission of higher education’ project.

Alongside his teaching and research roles, Antonin is completing a Doctoral study on the European Universities Initiative, the European Commission’s flagship higher education programme that seeks to set up European Universities through transnational university alliances.

Arzhia Habibi is a DPhil in Education Candidate and uses Mandarin to conduct her research in the Chinese higher education context.

Arzhia’s research focuses on ‘expressions’ of global or world citizenship education in a Chinese higher education institution In the study, she explores the perspectives and practices of educators and students at a China-based university, which experiments with discourses related to citizenship. She further investigates how individual, local, national and global dynamics and the surrounding discourses influence worldviews and practices in a university setting.

As empirical studies on global or world citizenship education in the Chinese context are scarce, Arzhia hopes to contribute to a nascent knowledge base which may extend and add depth to the critical global discourses of global and world citizenship education, beyond Eurocentric framings.

Prior to her studies at Oxford, Arzhia received a first class Bachelor’s degree in Contemporary Chinese Studies at The University of Nottingham, and a Master’s in International Communication in Taiwan at National Chengchi University. As a child, she also attended kindergarten in Fuzhou, Fujian province of China.

Olga is a co-convenor of the Philosophy of Education Reading Group at the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. Olga’s main research interest is in the topics of epistemic injustice across all levels of education and across national borders with a focus on higher education and the process of knowledge production in academic institutes and universities. Her core interest lies between the areas of social epistemology, research on research (RoR) and comparative and international education (CIE). She has been a recipient of multiple research awards in the United States and the United Kingdom and is an elected co-convenor of the Comparative and International Education Special Interest Group at the British Educational Research Association (BERA).

Her new research at Oxford will explore the epistemically just and unjust practices as experienced by scholars from Kazakhstan during the internationalisation process in the social sciences and the humanities. Prior joining Oxford, Olga taught at University College London Institute of Education in London on the topics of migrant, refugee and minority education and European education traditions from a comparative lens.

Publications
  • Mun, O. (2020). ‘Epistemic Injustices in Internationalising Humanities and Social Sciences: A Case Study of Higher Education and Science Institutes in Kazakhstan.’ Centre for International Higher Education, Boston College. https://www.bc.edu/content/dam/bc1/schools/lsoe/sites/cihe/publication/Perspectives/Perspectives%20No%2018.pdf
  • Mun, O. and Gafu, G. (in press) ‘University Research Capacity in Kazakhstan’. Higher School of Economics, Russia.
  • Kandiko Howson, C., Mun, O. and Walker, R. (2020). ‘Academic Activism in STEM fields: Discipline in Theory and Practice.’ Philosophy and Theory of Higher Education Society.
  • Aizuddin M., Habibi A., Mun, O. (in press, 2020). ‘Post-Colonialism in Comparative and International Education.’ In Jules, T., Shields, R., Thomas, M. (Ed.), Bloomsbury Handbook of Theory in Comparative and International Education.
  • Palandjian, G., Silova, I., Mun, O., Zholdashaliyeva, R. (2018). ‘Gender and Nation in Postsocialist Educational Transformations.’ In Silova, I., & Chankseliani, M. (Eds.), Comparing Post-Socialist Transformations: Education in Eastern Europe and Former Soviet Union. Oxford: Symposium Books.
  • Mun, O., & Zholdashaliyeva, R. (2017). ‘Alippe, Bukvar’ and Gender: A comparative analysis of early literacy textbooks in Kazakhstan and Kyrgyzstan.’ In E. Brown & R. Craven & G. McLean (Ed.), International Advances in Education: Global Initiatives for Equity and Social Justice Series. Information Age Publishing
  • Patel, K. and Mun, O. (2017). ‘Marketing ‘development’ in the neoliberal university.’ DPU Working Papers https://www.ucl.ac.uk/bartlett/development/case-studies/2017/sep/marketing-development-neoliberal-university
  • Fimyar, O., Saniyazova, A. & Mun, O. (2017) ‘Methodology of Collaborative Research: Or, Searching for a Synergy in the Study of Student Transition in Kazakhstan.’ In SAGE Research Methods Cases. London, United Kingdom: SAGE Publications.
  • Mun, O. (2015). ‘(Re)imagining national identity through early literacy textbooks in Kazakhstan’, Forum of Young Central Asian Experts, 2nd edition. http://caa-network.org/archives/5620
  • Silova, I., Mead Yaqub, M., Mun, O., Palandjian, G. (2014). ‘Pedagogies of Space: (re)imagining nation and childhood in post-Soviet states.’ Global Studies of Childhood, 4(3), 195-209.
  • Silova, I., Brezhenyuk, V., Kudasova, M., Mun, O., Artemev, N. (2014). ‘Youth Protests against Privatisation of Education in post-Soviet states.’ European Education, 46(3), 56-65.

Schooled in the discipline of Public Administration at the University of Dhaka and with an experience of over five years of lecturing graduate and post-graduate students at two reputed public universities in Bangladesh, I am interested in research works related to education, gender, public policy, social studies and have multiple publications.

Apart from my current lecturing position, I worked as a news editor and contributor for the Dhaka Insider, an online news portal, in 2015. I also served as the Head of the Department (Department of Public Administration) and Assistant Proctor at the Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujibur Rahman Science and Technology University (BSMRSTU) and as an elected member of the Teachers’ Association there. During my post-graduation (MA. Public Policy) at the University of Nottingham, a qualitative research focus helped me characterize patterns of gender gap in primary education access.

 

Selected Publications
  • Dutta,  P.  (2020).  Democratic  Decentralization  and  Participatory Development:  Focus  on  Bangladesh.  Journal  of    Contemporary  Governance  and  Public Policy, 1(2), 82-91. Permalink/DOI: https://doi.org/10.46507/jcgpp.v1i2
  • Dutta, P., 2021. • Towards Sound Integrity Management in Bangladesh: Challenges and Issues in Public Administration and Law Enforcement. In: S. N. Khanom, ed. Governance, In the 21st Century in the Sounth Asia: Challenges and Ways Forward. Dhaka: Hakkani Publishers, pp. 541-560.

Zhuohan (Johanne) has a BA in English from Dalian Maritime University, China, and has won China National Scholarship. She then graduated with a Distinction in MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from University of Oxford. Before her DPhil, Zhuohan worked for the organizing committee for the Harvard Summit for Young Leaders in China, an initiative that brought liberal arts education from Harvard to China’s top-performing high school students. She also helped evaluate the UNICEF China Child-Friendly School Programme as an RA, focusing on the socio-emotional learning among the Dong ethnic minority groups in Guangxi, China. She also teaches IELTS, TOEFL, and English phonics.

Her MSc research centres on linguistic relativity, specifically the effect of French grammatical gender system on both French speakers’ and learners’ perception of objects. Her DPhil research focuses on English pronunciation teaching and learning among young Chinese kids, particularly emphasising the influence of their mother tongue, Mandarin.

Supervisors

Robert Woore and Faidra Faitaki

Shuo-Fang earned a Bachelor’s degree from National Chengchi University (Taiwan) and a Master’s degree from Boston University. He has teaching experience in various EFL contexts including international high school, educational institute, and graduate language program.

Shuo-Fang’s areas of interest lie in applied linguistics, particularly phonetics/phonology and speech perception. As an Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholar, Shuo-Fang is currently undertaking his doctoral research, supervised by Dr Elizabeth Wonnacott and Dr Robert Woore. His doctoral project is mostly experimental and explores second language learners’ difficulty in processing English connected speech.

Shuo-Fang is affiliated with two research groups: Applied Linguistics and Wonnacott-Nation Lab (developmental cognitive psychology).

Publications

Liang, S., & Yu, H. (2021). Chinese students’ willingness to communicate in EFL classrooms: A case study of students at a Sino-foreign university. Professional and Academic English, 28(2), 15–33.

Siyu Ma is a DPhil student in child development and learning at the Department of Education. Her doctoral research focuses on second-born children under the Chinese two-child policy, especially how siblings play a role in the socio-emotional, language, and early literacy development of these children.

Prior to starting her Dphil, Siyu completed an MSc in Education (Research Design and Methodology) at the University of Oxford, under the supervision of Professor Sonali Nag. Her MSc dissertation explored the roles of social background and home literacy environment in the language and literacy development of a Wales subsample from the Millennium Cohort Study and was awarded a High Distinction. She also holds a BSc degree with first-class honours in Psychology from the University of Bath.

Siyu is also a research associate working on TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education.

At TalkTogether, Siyu is responsible for designing online surveys and analysing quantitative data from child assessments and parent reports.

Publications

Ma, S. (2021). Family background and home literacy environment as predictors of the early literacy development of children in Wales – findings from the Millennium Cohort Study (Master’s thesis, University of Oxford).

 

Amanda is the recipient of the Hazel Project Scholarship, based at the Rees Centre. Her doctoral research explores the conceptualisation of foster homes as therapeutic environments for complex/developmental trauma. Through participant-generated photography and collaborative qualitative methods with young people currently in foster care placements, her research explores if young people’s concepts and perceptions of therapeutic environments coincide with or challenge existing theoretical models and popular practitioner perspectives.

Amanda holds a BA from the University of Leeds (UK) and an MPhil from the University of Oxford (UK).

Lawrence is a teacher of mathematics who is particularly interested in classroom pedagogy, and how research and education policies interact with the teaching that students experience on a daily basis.

He finds that looking outwards in education is valuable with there being much more that unites our classrooms than isolates them. He has been extremely fortunate to study education through an international lens in the US, and to work on the Global Teaching InSights initiative of the Organisation for Economic Development (OECD) where he led on its videos of teaching.

Publications

Global Teaching InSights: A video study of teaching, OECD, 2020

Antonin is currently Doctoral Teaching Fellow on the MSc in Comparative and International Education, teaching Foundations of Educational Research. Antonin is also a Research Assistant for the Centre for Global Higher Education on the ‘Research on Research: the research function and mission of higher education’ project.

Alongside his teaching and research roles, Antonin is completing a Doctoral study on the European Universities Initiative, the European Commission’s flagship higher education programme that seeks to set up European Universities through transnational university alliances.

Arzhia Habibi is a DPhil in Education Candidate and uses Mandarin to conduct her research in the Chinese higher education context.

Arzhia’s research focuses on ‘expressions’ of global or world citizenship education in a Chinese higher education institution In the study, she explores the perspectives and practices of educators and students at a China-based university, which experiments with discourses related to citizenship. She further investigates how individual, local, national and global dynamics and the surrounding discourses influence worldviews and practices in a university setting.

As empirical studies on global or world citizenship education in the Chinese context are scarce, Arzhia hopes to contribute to a nascent knowledge base which may extend and add depth to the critical global discourses of global and world citizenship education, beyond Eurocentric framings.

Prior to her studies at Oxford, Arzhia received a first class Bachelor’s degree in Contemporary Chinese Studies at The University of Nottingham, and a Master’s in International Communication in Taiwan at National Chengchi University. As a child, she also attended kindergarten in Fuzhou, Fujian province of China.

Olga is a co-convenor of the Philosophy of Education Reading Group at the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. Olga’s main research interest is in the topics of epistemic injustice across all levels of education and across national borders with a focus on higher education and the process of knowledge production in academic institutes and universities. Her core interest lies between the areas of social epistemology, research on research (RoR) and comparative and international education (CIE). She has been a recipient of multiple research awards in the United States and the United Kingdom and is an elected co-convenor of the Comparative and International Education Special Interest Group at the British Educational Research Association (BERA).

Her new research at Oxford will explore the epistemically just and unjust practices as experienced by scholars from Kazakhstan during the internationalisation process in the social sciences and the humanities. Prior joining Oxford, Olga taught at University College London Institute of Education in London on the topics of migrant, refugee and minority education and European education traditions from a comparative lens.

Publications
  • Mun, O. (2020). ‘Epistemic Injustices in Internationalising Humanities and Social Sciences: A Case Study of Higher Education and Science Institutes in Kazakhstan.’ Centre for International Higher Education, Boston College. https://www.bc.edu/content/dam/bc1/schools/lsoe/sites/cihe/publication/Perspectives/Perspectives%20No%2018.pdf
  • Mun, O. and Gafu, G. (in press) ‘University Research Capacity in Kazakhstan’. Higher School of Economics, Russia.
  • Kandiko Howson, C., Mun, O. and Walker, R. (2020). ‘Academic Activism in STEM fields: Discipline in Theory and Practice.’ Philosophy and Theory of Higher Education Society.
  • Aizuddin M., Habibi A., Mun, O. (in press, 2020). ‘Post-Colonialism in Comparative and International Education.’ In Jules, T., Shields, R., Thomas, M. (Ed.), Bloomsbury Handbook of Theory in Comparative and International Education.
  • Palandjian, G., Silova, I., Mun, O., Zholdashaliyeva, R. (2018). ‘Gender and Nation in Postsocialist Educational Transformations.’ In Silova, I., & Chankseliani, M. (Eds.), Comparing Post-Socialist Transformations: Education in Eastern Europe and Former Soviet Union. Oxford: Symposium Books.
  • Mun, O., & Zholdashaliyeva, R. (2017). ‘Alippe, Bukvar’ and Gender: A comparative analysis of early literacy textbooks in Kazakhstan and Kyrgyzstan.’ In E. Brown & R. Craven & G. McLean (Ed.), International Advances in Education: Global Initiatives for Equity and Social Justice Series. Information Age Publishing
  • Patel, K. and Mun, O. (2017). ‘Marketing ‘development’ in the neoliberal university.’ DPU Working Papers https://www.ucl.ac.uk/bartlett/development/case-studies/2017/sep/marketing-development-neoliberal-university
  • Fimyar, O., Saniyazova, A. & Mun, O. (2017) ‘Methodology of Collaborative Research: Or, Searching for a Synergy in the Study of Student Transition in Kazakhstan.’ In SAGE Research Methods Cases. London, United Kingdom: SAGE Publications.
  • Mun, O. (2015). ‘(Re)imagining national identity through early literacy textbooks in Kazakhstan’, Forum of Young Central Asian Experts, 2nd edition. http://caa-network.org/archives/5620
  • Silova, I., Mead Yaqub, M., Mun, O., Palandjian, G. (2014). ‘Pedagogies of Space: (re)imagining nation and childhood in post-Soviet states.’ Global Studies of Childhood, 4(3), 195-209.
  • Silova, I., Brezhenyuk, V., Kudasova, M., Mun, O., Artemev, N. (2014). ‘Youth Protests against Privatisation of Education in post-Soviet states.’ European Education, 46(3), 56-65.

Schooled in the discipline of Public Administration at the University of Dhaka and with an experience of over five years of lecturing graduate and post-graduate students at two reputed public universities in Bangladesh, I am interested in research works related to education, gender, public policy, social studies and have multiple publications.

Apart from my current lecturing position, I worked as a news editor and contributor for the Dhaka Insider, an online news portal, in 2015. I also served as the Head of the Department (Department of Public Administration) and Assistant Proctor at the Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujibur Rahman Science and Technology University (BSMRSTU) and as an elected member of the Teachers’ Association there. During my post-graduation (MA. Public Policy) at the University of Nottingham, a qualitative research focus helped me characterize patterns of gender gap in primary education access.

 

Selected Publications
  • Dutta,  P.  (2020).  Democratic  Decentralization  and  Participatory Development:  Focus  on  Bangladesh.  Journal  of    Contemporary  Governance  and  Public Policy, 1(2), 82-91. Permalink/DOI: https://doi.org/10.46507/jcgpp.v1i2
  • Dutta, P., 2021. • Towards Sound Integrity Management in Bangladesh: Challenges and Issues in Public Administration and Law Enforcement. In: S. N. Khanom, ed. Governance, In the 21st Century in the Sounth Asia: Challenges and Ways Forward. Dhaka: Hakkani Publishers, pp. 541-560.

Zhuohan (Johanne) has a BA in English from Dalian Maritime University, China, and has won China National Scholarship. She then graduated with a Distinction in MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from University of Oxford. Before her DPhil, Zhuohan worked for the organizing committee for the Harvard Summit for Young Leaders in China, an initiative that brought liberal arts education from Harvard to China’s top-performing high school students. She also helped evaluate the UNICEF China Child-Friendly School Programme as an RA, focusing on the socio-emotional learning among the Dong ethnic minority groups in Guangxi, China. She also teaches IELTS, TOEFL, and English phonics.

Her MSc research centres on linguistic relativity, specifically the effect of French grammatical gender system on both French speakers’ and learners’ perception of objects. Her DPhil research focuses on English pronunciation teaching and learning among young Chinese kids, particularly emphasising the influence of their mother tongue, Mandarin.

Supervisors

Robert Woore and Faidra Faitaki

Shuo-Fang earned a Bachelor’s degree from National Chengchi University (Taiwan) and a Master’s degree from Boston University. He has teaching experience in various EFL contexts including international high school, educational institute, and graduate language program.

Shuo-Fang’s areas of interest lie in applied linguistics, particularly phonetics/phonology and speech perception. As an Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholar, Shuo-Fang is currently undertaking his doctoral research, supervised by Dr Elizabeth Wonnacott and Dr Robert Woore. His doctoral project is mostly experimental and explores second language learners’ difficulty in processing English connected speech.

Shuo-Fang is affiliated with two research groups: Applied Linguistics and Wonnacott-Nation Lab (developmental cognitive psychology).

Publications

Liang, S., & Yu, H. (2021). Chinese students’ willingness to communicate in EFL classrooms: A case study of students at a Sino-foreign university. Professional and Academic English, 28(2), 15–33.

Siyu Ma is a DPhil student in child development and learning at the Department of Education. Her doctoral research focuses on second-born children under the Chinese two-child policy, especially how siblings play a role in the socio-emotional, language, and early literacy development of these children.

Prior to starting her Dphil, Siyu completed an MSc in Education (Research Design and Methodology) at the University of Oxford, under the supervision of Professor Sonali Nag. Her MSc dissertation explored the roles of social background and home literacy environment in the language and literacy development of a Wales subsample from the Millennium Cohort Study and was awarded a High Distinction. She also holds a BSc degree with first-class honours in Psychology from the University of Bath.

Siyu is also a research associate working on TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education.

At TalkTogether, Siyu is responsible for designing online surveys and analysing quantitative data from child assessments and parent reports.

Publications

Ma, S. (2021). Family background and home literacy environment as predictors of the early literacy development of children in Wales – findings from the Millennium Cohort Study (Master’s thesis, University of Oxford).

 

Amanda is the recipient of the Hazel Project Scholarship, based at the Rees Centre. Her doctoral research explores the conceptualisation of foster homes as therapeutic environments for complex/developmental trauma. Through participant-generated photography and collaborative qualitative methods with young people currently in foster care placements, her research explores if young people’s concepts and perceptions of therapeutic environments coincide with or challenge existing theoretical models and popular practitioner perspectives.

Amanda holds a BA from the University of Leeds (UK) and an MPhil from the University of Oxford (UK).

Lawrence is a teacher of mathematics who is particularly interested in classroom pedagogy, and how research and education policies interact with the teaching that students experience on a daily basis.

He finds that looking outwards in education is valuable with there being much more that unites our classrooms than isolates them. He has been extremely fortunate to study education through an international lens in the US, and to work on the Global Teaching InSights initiative of the Organisation for Economic Development (OECD) where he led on its videos of teaching.

Publications

Global Teaching InSights: A video study of teaching, OECD, 2020

Antonin is currently Doctoral Teaching Fellow on the MSc in Comparative and International Education, teaching Foundations of Educational Research. Antonin is also a Research Assistant for the Centre for Global Higher Education on the ‘Research on Research: the research function and mission of higher education’ project.

Alongside his teaching and research roles, Antonin is completing a Doctoral study on the European Universities Initiative, the European Commission’s flagship higher education programme that seeks to set up European Universities through transnational university alliances.

Arzhia Habibi is a DPhil in Education Candidate and uses Mandarin to conduct her research in the Chinese higher education context.

Arzhia’s research focuses on ‘expressions’ of global or world citizenship education in a Chinese higher education institution In the study, she explores the perspectives and practices of educators and students at a China-based university, which experiments with discourses related to citizenship. She further investigates how individual, local, national and global dynamics and the surrounding discourses influence worldviews and practices in a university setting.

As empirical studies on global or world citizenship education in the Chinese context are scarce, Arzhia hopes to contribute to a nascent knowledge base which may extend and add depth to the critical global discourses of global and world citizenship education, beyond Eurocentric framings.

Prior to her studies at Oxford, Arzhia received a first class Bachelor’s degree in Contemporary Chinese Studies at The University of Nottingham, and a Master’s in International Communication in Taiwan at National Chengchi University. As a child, she also attended kindergarten in Fuzhou, Fujian province of China.

Olga is a co-convenor of the Philosophy of Education Reading Group at the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. Olga’s main research interest is in the topics of epistemic injustice across all levels of education and across national borders with a focus on higher education and the process of knowledge production in academic institutes and universities. Her core interest lies between the areas of social epistemology, research on research (RoR) and comparative and international education (CIE). She has been a recipient of multiple research awards in the United States and the United Kingdom and is an elected co-convenor of the Comparative and International Education Special Interest Group at the British Educational Research Association (BERA).

Her new research at Oxford will explore the epistemically just and unjust practices as experienced by scholars from Kazakhstan during the internationalisation process in the social sciences and the humanities. Prior joining Oxford, Olga taught at University College London Institute of Education in London on the topics of migrant, refugee and minority education and European education traditions from a comparative lens.

Publications
  • Mun, O. (2020). ‘Epistemic Injustices in Internationalising Humanities and Social Sciences: A Case Study of Higher Education and Science Institutes in Kazakhstan.’ Centre for International Higher Education, Boston College. https://www.bc.edu/content/dam/bc1/schools/lsoe/sites/cihe/publication/Perspectives/Perspectives%20No%2018.pdf
  • Mun, O. and Gafu, G. (in press) ‘University Research Capacity in Kazakhstan’. Higher School of Economics, Russia.
  • Kandiko Howson, C., Mun, O. and Walker, R. (2020). ‘Academic Activism in STEM fields: Discipline in Theory and Practice.’ Philosophy and Theory of Higher Education Society.
  • Aizuddin M., Habibi A., Mun, O. (in press, 2020). ‘Post-Colonialism in Comparative and International Education.’ In Jules, T., Shields, R., Thomas, M. (Ed.), Bloomsbury Handbook of Theory in Comparative and International Education.
  • Palandjian, G., Silova, I., Mun, O., Zholdashaliyeva, R. (2018). ‘Gender and Nation in Postsocialist Educational Transformations.’ In Silova, I., & Chankseliani, M. (Eds.), Comparing Post-Socialist Transformations: Education in Eastern Europe and Former Soviet Union. Oxford: Symposium Books.
  • Mun, O., & Zholdashaliyeva, R. (2017). ‘Alippe, Bukvar’ and Gender: A comparative analysis of early literacy textbooks in Kazakhstan and Kyrgyzstan.’ In E. Brown & R. Craven & G. McLean (Ed.), International Advances in Education: Global Initiatives for Equity and Social Justice Series. Information Age Publishing
  • Patel, K. and Mun, O. (2017). ‘Marketing ‘development’ in the neoliberal university.’ DPU Working Papers https://www.ucl.ac.uk/bartlett/development/case-studies/2017/sep/marketing-development-neoliberal-university
  • Fimyar, O., Saniyazova, A. & Mun, O. (2017) ‘Methodology of Collaborative Research: Or, Searching for a Synergy in the Study of Student Transition in Kazakhstan.’ In SAGE Research Methods Cases. London, United Kingdom: SAGE Publications.
  • Mun, O. (2015). ‘(Re)imagining national identity through early literacy textbooks in Kazakhstan’, Forum of Young Central Asian Experts, 2nd edition. http://caa-network.org/archives/5620
  • Silova, I., Mead Yaqub, M., Mun, O., Palandjian, G. (2014). ‘Pedagogies of Space: (re)imagining nation and childhood in post-Soviet states.’ Global Studies of Childhood, 4(3), 195-209.
  • Silova, I., Brezhenyuk, V., Kudasova, M., Mun, O., Artemev, N. (2014). ‘Youth Protests against Privatisation of Education in post-Soviet states.’ European Education, 46(3), 56-65.

Schooled in the discipline of Public Administration at the University of Dhaka and with an experience of over five years of lecturing graduate and post-graduate students at two reputed public universities in Bangladesh, I am interested in research works related to education, gender, public policy, social studies and have multiple publications.

Apart from my current lecturing position, I worked as a news editor and contributor for the Dhaka Insider, an online news portal, in 2015. I also served as the Head of the Department (Department of Public Administration) and Assistant Proctor at the Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujibur Rahman Science and Technology University (BSMRSTU) and as an elected member of the Teachers’ Association there. During my post-graduation (MA. Public Policy) at the University of Nottingham, a qualitative research focus helped me characterize patterns of gender gap in primary education access.

 

Selected Publications
  • Dutta,  P.  (2020).  Democratic  Decentralization  and  Participatory Development:  Focus  on  Bangladesh.  Journal  of    Contemporary  Governance  and  Public Policy, 1(2), 82-91. Permalink/DOI: https://doi.org/10.46507/jcgpp.v1i2
  • Dutta, P., 2021. • Towards Sound Integrity Management in Bangladesh: Challenges and Issues in Public Administration and Law Enforcement. In: S. N. Khanom, ed. Governance, In the 21st Century in the Sounth Asia: Challenges and Ways Forward. Dhaka: Hakkani Publishers, pp. 541-560.

Zhuohan (Johanne) has a BA in English from Dalian Maritime University, China, and has won China National Scholarship. She then graduated with a Distinction in MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from University of Oxford. Before her DPhil, Zhuohan worked for the organizing committee for the Harvard Summit for Young Leaders in China, an initiative that brought liberal arts education from Harvard to China’s top-performing high school students. She also helped evaluate the UNICEF China Child-Friendly School Programme as an RA, focusing on the socio-emotional learning among the Dong ethnic minority groups in Guangxi, China. She also teaches IELTS, TOEFL, and English phonics.

Her MSc research centres on linguistic relativity, specifically the effect of French grammatical gender system on both French speakers’ and learners’ perception of objects. Her DPhil research focuses on English pronunciation teaching and learning among young Chinese kids, particularly emphasising the influence of their mother tongue, Mandarin.

Supervisors

Robert Woore and Faidra Faitaki

Shuo-Fang earned a Bachelor’s degree from National Chengchi University (Taiwan) and a Master’s degree from Boston University. He has teaching experience in various EFL contexts including international high school, educational institute, and graduate language program.

Shuo-Fang’s areas of interest lie in applied linguistics, particularly phonetics/phonology and speech perception. As an Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholar, Shuo-Fang is currently undertaking his doctoral research, supervised by Dr Elizabeth Wonnacott and Dr Robert Woore. His doctoral project is mostly experimental and explores second language learners’ difficulty in processing English connected speech.

Shuo-Fang is affiliated with two research groups: Applied Linguistics and Wonnacott-Nation Lab (developmental cognitive psychology).

Publications

Liang, S., & Yu, H. (2021). Chinese students’ willingness to communicate in EFL classrooms: A case study of students at a Sino-foreign university. Professional and Academic English, 28(2), 15–33.

Siyu Ma is a DPhil student in child development and learning at the Department of Education. Her doctoral research focuses on second-born children under the Chinese two-child policy, especially how siblings play a role in the socio-emotional, language, and early literacy development of these children.

Prior to starting her Dphil, Siyu completed an MSc in Education (Research Design and Methodology) at the University of Oxford, under the supervision of Professor Sonali Nag. Her MSc dissertation explored the roles of social background and home literacy environment in the language and literacy development of a Wales subsample from the Millennium Cohort Study and was awarded a High Distinction. She also holds a BSc degree with first-class honours in Psychology from the University of Bath.

Siyu is also a research associate working on TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education.

At TalkTogether, Siyu is responsible for designing online surveys and analysing quantitative data from child assessments and parent reports.

Publications

Ma, S. (2021). Family background and home literacy environment as predictors of the early literacy development of children in Wales – findings from the Millennium Cohort Study (Master’s thesis, University of Oxford).

 

Amanda is the recipient of the Hazel Project Scholarship, based at the Rees Centre. Her doctoral research explores the conceptualisation of foster homes as therapeutic environments for complex/developmental trauma. Through participant-generated photography and collaborative qualitative methods with young people currently in foster care placements, her research explores if young people’s concepts and perceptions of therapeutic environments coincide with or challenge existing theoretical models and popular practitioner perspectives.

Amanda holds a BA from the University of Leeds (UK) and an MPhil from the University of Oxford (UK).

Lawrence is a teacher of mathematics who is particularly interested in classroom pedagogy, and how research and education policies interact with the teaching that students experience on a daily basis.

He finds that looking outwards in education is valuable with there being much more that unites our classrooms than isolates them. He has been extremely fortunate to study education through an international lens in the US, and to work on the Global Teaching InSights initiative of the Organisation for Economic Development (OECD) where he led on its videos of teaching.

Publications

Global Teaching InSights: A video study of teaching, OECD, 2020

Antonin is currently Doctoral Teaching Fellow on the MSc in Comparative and International Education, teaching Foundations of Educational Research. Antonin is also a Research Assistant for the Centre for Global Higher Education on the ‘Research on Research: the research function and mission of higher education’ project.

Alongside his teaching and research roles, Antonin is completing a Doctoral study on the European Universities Initiative, the European Commission’s flagship higher education programme that seeks to set up European Universities through transnational university alliances.

Arzhia Habibi is a DPhil in Education Candidate and uses Mandarin to conduct her research in the Chinese higher education context.

Arzhia’s research focuses on ‘expressions’ of global or world citizenship education in a Chinese higher education institution In the study, she explores the perspectives and practices of educators and students at a China-based university, which experiments with discourses related to citizenship. She further investigates how individual, local, national and global dynamics and the surrounding discourses influence worldviews and practices in a university setting.

As empirical studies on global or world citizenship education in the Chinese context are scarce, Arzhia hopes to contribute to a nascent knowledge base which may extend and add depth to the critical global discourses of global and world citizenship education, beyond Eurocentric framings.

Prior to her studies at Oxford, Arzhia received a first class Bachelor’s degree in Contemporary Chinese Studies at The University of Nottingham, and a Master’s in International Communication in Taiwan at National Chengchi University. As a child, she also attended kindergarten in Fuzhou, Fujian province of China.

Olga is a co-convenor of the Philosophy of Education Reading Group at the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. Olga’s main research interest is in the topics of epistemic injustice across all levels of education and across national borders with a focus on higher education and the process of knowledge production in academic institutes and universities. Her core interest lies between the areas of social epistemology, research on research (RoR) and comparative and international education (CIE). She has been a recipient of multiple research awards in the United States and the United Kingdom and is an elected co-convenor of the Comparative and International Education Special Interest Group at the British Educational Research Association (BERA).

Her new research at Oxford will explore the epistemically just and unjust practices as experienced by scholars from Kazakhstan during the internationalisation process in the social sciences and the humanities. Prior joining Oxford, Olga taught at University College London Institute of Education in London on the topics of migrant, refugee and minority education and European education traditions from a comparative lens.

Publications
  • Mun, O. (2020). ‘Epistemic Injustices in Internationalising Humanities and Social Sciences: A Case Study of Higher Education and Science Institutes in Kazakhstan.’ Centre for International Higher Education, Boston College. https://www.bc.edu/content/dam/bc1/schools/lsoe/sites/cihe/publication/Perspectives/Perspectives%20No%2018.pdf
  • Mun, O. and Gafu, G. (in press) ‘University Research Capacity in Kazakhstan’. Higher School of Economics, Russia.
  • Kandiko Howson, C., Mun, O. and Walker, R. (2020). ‘Academic Activism in STEM fields: Discipline in Theory and Practice.’ Philosophy and Theory of Higher Education Society.
  • Aizuddin M., Habibi A., Mun, O. (in press, 2020). ‘Post-Colonialism in Comparative and International Education.’ In Jules, T., Shields, R., Thomas, M. (Ed.), Bloomsbury Handbook of Theory in Comparative and International Education.
  • Palandjian, G., Silova, I., Mun, O., Zholdashaliyeva, R. (2018). ‘Gender and Nation in Postsocialist Educational Transformations.’ In Silova, I., & Chankseliani, M. (Eds.), Comparing Post-Socialist Transformations: Education in Eastern Europe and Former Soviet Union. Oxford: Symposium Books.
  • Mun, O., & Zholdashaliyeva, R. (2017). ‘Alippe, Bukvar’ and Gender: A comparative analysis of early literacy textbooks in Kazakhstan and Kyrgyzstan.’ In E. Brown & R. Craven & G. McLean (Ed.), International Advances in Education: Global Initiatives for Equity and Social Justice Series. Information Age Publishing
  • Patel, K. and Mun, O. (2017). ‘Marketing ‘development’ in the neoliberal university.’ DPU Working Papers https://www.ucl.ac.uk/bartlett/development/case-studies/2017/sep/marketing-development-neoliberal-university
  • Fimyar, O., Saniyazova, A. & Mun, O. (2017) ‘Methodology of Collaborative Research: Or, Searching for a Synergy in the Study of Student Transition in Kazakhstan.’ In SAGE Research Methods Cases. London, United Kingdom: SAGE Publications.
  • Mun, O. (2015). ‘(Re)imagining national identity through early literacy textbooks in Kazakhstan’, Forum of Young Central Asian Experts, 2nd edition. http://caa-network.org/archives/5620
  • Silova, I., Mead Yaqub, M., Mun, O., Palandjian, G. (2014). ‘Pedagogies of Space: (re)imagining nation and childhood in post-Soviet states.’ Global Studies of Childhood, 4(3), 195-209.
  • Silova, I., Brezhenyuk, V., Kudasova, M., Mun, O., Artemev, N. (2014). ‘Youth Protests against Privatisation of Education in post-Soviet states.’ European Education, 46(3), 56-65.

Schooled in the discipline of Public Administration at the University of Dhaka and with an experience of over five years of lecturing graduate and post-graduate students at two reputed public universities in Bangladesh, I am interested in research works related to education, gender, public policy, social studies and have multiple publications.

Apart from my current lecturing position, I worked as a news editor and contributor for the Dhaka Insider, an online news portal, in 2015. I also served as the Head of the Department (Department of Public Administration) and Assistant Proctor at the Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujibur Rahman Science and Technology University (BSMRSTU) and as an elected member of the Teachers’ Association there. During my post-graduation (MA. Public Policy) at the University of Nottingham, a qualitative research focus helped me characterize patterns of gender gap in primary education access.

 

Selected Publications
  • Dutta,  P.  (2020).  Democratic  Decentralization  and  Participatory Development:  Focus  on  Bangladesh.  Journal  of    Contemporary  Governance  and  Public Policy, 1(2), 82-91. Permalink/DOI: https://doi.org/10.46507/jcgpp.v1i2
  • Dutta, P., 2021. • Towards Sound Integrity Management in Bangladesh: Challenges and Issues in Public Administration and Law Enforcement. In: S. N. Khanom, ed. Governance, In the 21st Century in the Sounth Asia: Challenges and Ways Forward. Dhaka: Hakkani Publishers, pp. 541-560.

Zhuohan (Johanne) has a BA in English from Dalian Maritime University, China, and has won China National Scholarship. She then graduated with a Distinction in MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from University of Oxford. Before her DPhil, Zhuohan worked for the organizing committee for the Harvard Summit for Young Leaders in China, an initiative that brought liberal arts education from Harvard to China’s top-performing high school students. She also helped evaluate the UNICEF China Child-Friendly School Programme as an RA, focusing on the socio-emotional learning among the Dong ethnic minority groups in Guangxi, China. She also teaches IELTS, TOEFL, and English phonics.

Her MSc research centres on linguistic relativity, specifically the effect of French grammatical gender system on both French speakers’ and learners’ perception of objects. Her DPhil research focuses on English pronunciation teaching and learning among young Chinese kids, particularly emphasising the influence of their mother tongue, Mandarin.

Supervisors

Robert Woore and Faidra Faitaki

Shuo-Fang earned a Bachelor’s degree from National Chengchi University (Taiwan) and a Master’s degree from Boston University. He has teaching experience in various EFL contexts including international high school, educational institute, and graduate language program.

Shuo-Fang’s areas of interest lie in applied linguistics, particularly phonetics/phonology and speech perception. As an Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholar, Shuo-Fang is currently undertaking his doctoral research, supervised by Dr Elizabeth Wonnacott and Dr Robert Woore. His doctoral project is mostly experimental and explores second language learners’ difficulty in processing English connected speech.

Shuo-Fang is affiliated with two research groups: Applied Linguistics and Wonnacott-Nation Lab (developmental cognitive psychology).

Publications

Liang, S., & Yu, H. (2021). Chinese students’ willingness to communicate in EFL classrooms: A case study of students at a Sino-foreign university. Professional and Academic English, 28(2), 15–33.

Siyu Ma is a DPhil student in child development and learning at the Department of Education. Her doctoral research focuses on second-born children under the Chinese two-child policy, especially how siblings play a role in the socio-emotional, language, and early literacy development of these children.

Prior to starting her Dphil, Siyu completed an MSc in Education (Research Design and Methodology) at the University of Oxford, under the supervision of Professor Sonali Nag. Her MSc dissertation explored the roles of social background and home literacy environment in the language and literacy development of a Wales subsample from the Millennium Cohort Study and was awarded a High Distinction. She also holds a BSc degree with first-class honours in Psychology from the University of Bath.

Siyu is also a research associate working on TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education.

At TalkTogether, Siyu is responsible for designing online surveys and analysing quantitative data from child assessments and parent reports.

Publications

Ma, S. (2021). Family background and home literacy environment as predictors of the early literacy development of children in Wales – findings from the Millennium Cohort Study (Master’s thesis, University of Oxford).

 

Amanda is the recipient of the Hazel Project Scholarship, based at the Rees Centre. Her doctoral research explores the conceptualisation of foster homes as therapeutic environments for complex/developmental trauma. Through participant-generated photography and collaborative qualitative methods with young people currently in foster care placements, her research explores if young people’s concepts and perceptions of therapeutic environments coincide with or challenge existing theoretical models and popular practitioner perspectives.

Amanda holds a BA from the University of Leeds (UK) and an MPhil from the University of Oxford (UK).

Lawrence is a teacher of mathematics who is particularly interested in classroom pedagogy, and how research and education policies interact with the teaching that students experience on a daily basis.

He finds that looking outwards in education is valuable with there being much more that unites our classrooms than isolates them. He has been extremely fortunate to study education through an international lens in the US, and to work on the Global Teaching InSights initiative of the Organisation for Economic Development (OECD) where he led on its videos of teaching.

Publications

Global Teaching InSights: A video study of teaching, OECD, 2020

Antonin is currently Doctoral Teaching Fellow on the MSc in Comparative and International Education, teaching Foundations of Educational Research. Antonin is also a Research Assistant for the Centre for Global Higher Education on the ‘Research on Research: the research function and mission of higher education’ project.

Alongside his teaching and research roles, Antonin is completing a Doctoral study on the European Universities Initiative, the European Commission’s flagship higher education programme that seeks to set up European Universities through transnational university alliances.

Arzhia Habibi is a DPhil in Education Candidate and uses Mandarin to conduct her research in the Chinese higher education context.

Arzhia’s research focuses on ‘expressions’ of global or world citizenship education in a Chinese higher education institution In the study, she explores the perspectives and practices of educators and students at a China-based university, which experiments with discourses related to citizenship. She further investigates how individual, local, national and global dynamics and the surrounding discourses influence worldviews and practices in a university setting.

As empirical studies on global or world citizenship education in the Chinese context are scarce, Arzhia hopes to contribute to a nascent knowledge base which may extend and add depth to the critical global discourses of global and world citizenship education, beyond Eurocentric framings.

Prior to her studies at Oxford, Arzhia received a first class Bachelor’s degree in Contemporary Chinese Studies at The University of Nottingham, and a Master’s in International Communication in Taiwan at National Chengchi University. As a child, she also attended kindergarten in Fuzhou, Fujian province of China.

Olga is a co-convenor of the Philosophy of Education Reading Group at the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. Olga’s main research interest is in the topics of epistemic injustice across all levels of education and across national borders with a focus on higher education and the process of knowledge production in academic institutes and universities. Her core interest lies between the areas of social epistemology, research on research (RoR) and comparative and international education (CIE). She has been a recipient of multiple research awards in the United States and the United Kingdom and is an elected co-convenor of the Comparative and International Education Special Interest Group at the British Educational Research Association (BERA).

Her new research at Oxford will explore the epistemically just and unjust practices as experienced by scholars from Kazakhstan during the internationalisation process in the social sciences and the humanities. Prior joining Oxford, Olga taught at University College London Institute of Education in London on the topics of migrant, refugee and minority education and European education traditions from a comparative lens.

Publications
  • Mun, O. (2020). ‘Epistemic Injustices in Internationalising Humanities and Social Sciences: A Case Study of Higher Education and Science Institutes in Kazakhstan.’ Centre for International Higher Education, Boston College. https://www.bc.edu/content/dam/bc1/schools/lsoe/sites/cihe/publication/Perspectives/Perspectives%20No%2018.pdf
  • Mun, O. and Gafu, G. (in press) ‘University Research Capacity in Kazakhstan’. Higher School of Economics, Russia.
  • Kandiko Howson, C., Mun, O. and Walker, R. (2020). ‘Academic Activism in STEM fields: Discipline in Theory and Practice.’ Philosophy and Theory of Higher Education Society.
  • Aizuddin M., Habibi A., Mun, O. (in press, 2020). ‘Post-Colonialism in Comparative and International Education.’ In Jules, T., Shields, R., Thomas, M. (Ed.), Bloomsbury Handbook of Theory in Comparative and International Education.
  • Palandjian, G., Silova, I., Mun, O., Zholdashaliyeva, R. (2018). ‘Gender and Nation in Postsocialist Educational Transformations.’ In Silova, I., & Chankseliani, M. (Eds.), Comparing Post-Socialist Transformations: Education in Eastern Europe and Former Soviet Union. Oxford: Symposium Books.
  • Mun, O., & Zholdashaliyeva, R. (2017). ‘Alippe, Bukvar’ and Gender: A comparative analysis of early literacy textbooks in Kazakhstan and Kyrgyzstan.’ In E. Brown & R. Craven & G. McLean (Ed.), International Advances in Education: Global Initiatives for Equity and Social Justice Series. Information Age Publishing
  • Patel, K. and Mun, O. (2017). ‘Marketing ‘development’ in the neoliberal university.’ DPU Working Papers https://www.ucl.ac.uk/bartlett/development/case-studies/2017/sep/marketing-development-neoliberal-university
  • Fimyar, O., Saniyazova, A. & Mun, O. (2017) ‘Methodology of Collaborative Research: Or, Searching for a Synergy in the Study of Student Transition in Kazakhstan.’ In SAGE Research Methods Cases. London, United Kingdom: SAGE Publications.
  • Mun, O. (2015). ‘(Re)imagining national identity through early literacy textbooks in Kazakhstan’, Forum of Young Central Asian Experts, 2nd edition. http://caa-network.org/archives/5620
  • Silova, I., Mead Yaqub, M., Mun, O., Palandjian, G. (2014). ‘Pedagogies of Space: (re)imagining nation and childhood in post-Soviet states.’ Global Studies of Childhood, 4(3), 195-209.
  • Silova, I., Brezhenyuk, V., Kudasova, M., Mun, O., Artemev, N. (2014). ‘Youth Protests against Privatisation of Education in post-Soviet states.’ European Education, 46(3), 56-65.

Schooled in the discipline of Public Administration at the University of Dhaka and with an experience of over five years of lecturing graduate and post-graduate students at two reputed public universities in Bangladesh, I am interested in research works related to education, gender, public policy, social studies and have multiple publications.

Apart from my current lecturing position, I worked as a news editor and contributor for the Dhaka Insider, an online news portal, in 2015. I also served as the Head of the Department (Department of Public Administration) and Assistant Proctor at the Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujibur Rahman Science and Technology University (BSMRSTU) and as an elected member of the Teachers’ Association there. During my post-graduation (MA. Public Policy) at the University of Nottingham, a qualitative research focus helped me characterize patterns of gender gap in primary education access.

 

Selected Publications
  • Dutta,  P.  (2020).  Democratic  Decentralization  and  Participatory Development:  Focus  on  Bangladesh.  Journal  of    Contemporary  Governance  and  Public Policy, 1(2), 82-91. Permalink/DOI: https://doi.org/10.46507/jcgpp.v1i2
  • Dutta, P., 2021. • Towards Sound Integrity Management in Bangladesh: Challenges and Issues in Public Administration and Law Enforcement. In: S. N. Khanom, ed. Governance, In the 21st Century in the Sounth Asia: Challenges and Ways Forward. Dhaka: Hakkani Publishers, pp. 541-560.

Zhuohan (Johanne) has a BA in English from Dalian Maritime University, China, and has won China National Scholarship. She then graduated with a Distinction in MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from University of Oxford. Before her DPhil, Zhuohan worked for the organizing committee for the Harvard Summit for Young Leaders in China, an initiative that brought liberal arts education from Harvard to China’s top-performing high school students. She also helped evaluate the UNICEF China Child-Friendly School Programme as an RA, focusing on the socio-emotional learning among the Dong ethnic minority groups in Guangxi, China. She also teaches IELTS, TOEFL, and English phonics.

Her MSc research centres on linguistic relativity, specifically the effect of French grammatical gender system on both French speakers’ and learners’ perception of objects. Her DPhil research focuses on English pronunciation teaching and learning among young Chinese kids, particularly emphasising the influence of their mother tongue, Mandarin.

Supervisors

Robert Woore and Faidra Faitaki

Shuo-Fang earned a Bachelor’s degree from National Chengchi University (Taiwan) and a Master’s degree from Boston University. He has teaching experience in various EFL contexts including international high school, educational institute, and graduate language program.

Shuo-Fang’s areas of interest lie in applied linguistics, particularly phonetics/phonology and speech perception. As an Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholar, Shuo-Fang is currently undertaking his doctoral research, supervised by Dr Elizabeth Wonnacott and Dr Robert Woore. His doctoral project is mostly experimental and explores second language learners’ difficulty in processing English connected speech.

Shuo-Fang is affiliated with two research groups: Applied Linguistics and Wonnacott-Nation Lab (developmental cognitive psychology).

Publications

Liang, S., & Yu, H. (2021). Chinese students’ willingness to communicate in EFL classrooms: A case study of students at a Sino-foreign university. Professional and Academic English, 28(2), 15–33.

Siyu Ma is a DPhil student in child development and learning at the Department of Education. Her doctoral research focuses on second-born children under the Chinese two-child policy, especially how siblings play a role in the socio-emotional, language, and early literacy development of these children.

Prior to starting her Dphil, Siyu completed an MSc in Education (Research Design and Methodology) at the University of Oxford, under the supervision of Professor Sonali Nag. Her MSc dissertation explored the roles of social background and home literacy environment in the language and literacy development of a Wales subsample from the Millennium Cohort Study and was awarded a High Distinction. She also holds a BSc degree with first-class honours in Psychology from the University of Bath.

Siyu is also a research associate working on TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education.

At TalkTogether, Siyu is responsible for designing online surveys and analysing quantitative data from child assessments and parent reports.

Publications

Ma, S. (2021). Family background and home literacy environment as predictors of the early literacy development of children in Wales – findings from the Millennium Cohort Study (Master’s thesis, University of Oxford).

 

Amanda is the recipient of the Hazel Project Scholarship, based at the Rees Centre. Her doctoral research explores the conceptualisation of foster homes as therapeutic environments for complex/developmental trauma. Through participant-generated photography and collaborative qualitative methods with young people currently in foster care placements, her research explores if young people’s concepts and perceptions of therapeutic environments coincide with or challenge existing theoretical models and popular practitioner perspectives.

Amanda holds a BA from the University of Leeds (UK) and an MPhil from the University of Oxford (UK).

Lawrence is a teacher of mathematics who is particularly interested in classroom pedagogy, and how research and education policies interact with the teaching that students experience on a daily basis.

He finds that looking outwards in education is valuable with there being much more that unites our classrooms than isolates them. He has been extremely fortunate to study education through an international lens in the US, and to work on the Global Teaching InSights initiative of the Organisation for Economic Development (OECD) where he led on its videos of teaching.

Publications

Global Teaching InSights: A video study of teaching, OECD, 2020

Antonin is currently Doctoral Teaching Fellow on the MSc in Comparative and International Education, teaching Foundations of Educational Research. Antonin is also a Research Assistant for the Centre for Global Higher Education on the ‘Research on Research: the research function and mission of higher education’ project.

Alongside his teaching and research roles, Antonin is completing a Doctoral study on the European Universities Initiative, the European Commission’s flagship higher education programme that seeks to set up European Universities through transnational university alliances.

Arzhia Habibi is a DPhil in Education Candidate and uses Mandarin to conduct her research in the Chinese higher education context.

Arzhia’s research focuses on ‘expressions’ of global or world citizenship education in a Chinese higher education institution In the study, she explores the perspectives and practices of educators and students at a China-based university, which experiments with discourses related to citizenship. She further investigates how individual, local, national and global dynamics and the surrounding discourses influence worldviews and practices in a university setting.

As empirical studies on global or world citizenship education in the Chinese context are scarce, Arzhia hopes to contribute to a nascent knowledge base which may extend and add depth to the critical global discourses of global and world citizenship education, beyond Eurocentric framings.

Prior to her studies at Oxford, Arzhia received a first class Bachelor’s degree in Contemporary Chinese Studies at The University of Nottingham, and a Master’s in International Communication in Taiwan at National Chengchi University. As a child, she also attended kindergarten in Fuzhou, Fujian province of China.

Olga is a co-convenor of the Philosophy of Education Reading Group at the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. Olga’s main research interest is in the topics of epistemic injustice across all levels of education and across national borders with a focus on higher education and the process of knowledge production in academic institutes and universities. Her core interest lies between the areas of social epistemology, research on research (RoR) and comparative and international education (CIE). She has been a recipient of multiple research awards in the United States and the United Kingdom and is an elected co-convenor of the Comparative and International Education Special Interest Group at the British Educational Research Association (BERA).

Her new research at Oxford will explore the epistemically just and unjust practices as experienced by scholars from Kazakhstan during the internationalisation process in the social sciences and the humanities. Prior joining Oxford, Olga taught at University College London Institute of Education in London on the topics of migrant, refugee and minority education and European education traditions from a comparative lens.

Publications
  • Mun, O. (2020). ‘Epistemic Injustices in Internationalising Humanities and Social Sciences: A Case Study of Higher Education and Science Institutes in Kazakhstan.’ Centre for International Higher Education, Boston College. https://www.bc.edu/content/dam/bc1/schools/lsoe/sites/cihe/publication/Perspectives/Perspectives%20No%2018.pdf
  • Mun, O. and Gafu, G. (in press) ‘University Research Capacity in Kazakhstan’. Higher School of Economics, Russia.
  • Kandiko Howson, C., Mun, O. and Walker, R. (2020). ‘Academic Activism in STEM fields: Discipline in Theory and Practice.’ Philosophy and Theory of Higher Education Society.
  • Aizuddin M., Habibi A., Mun, O. (in press, 2020). ‘Post-Colonialism in Comparative and International Education.’ In Jules, T., Shields, R., Thomas, M. (Ed.), Bloomsbury Handbook of Theory in Comparative and International Education.
  • Palandjian, G., Silova, I., Mun, O., Zholdashaliyeva, R. (2018). ‘Gender and Nation in Postsocialist Educational Transformations.’ In Silova, I., & Chankseliani, M. (Eds.), Comparing Post-Socialist Transformations: Education in Eastern Europe and Former Soviet Union. Oxford: Symposium Books.
  • Mun, O., & Zholdashaliyeva, R. (2017). ‘Alippe, Bukvar’ and Gender: A comparative analysis of early literacy textbooks in Kazakhstan and Kyrgyzstan.’ In E. Brown & R. Craven & G. McLean (Ed.), International Advances in Education: Global Initiatives for Equity and Social Justice Series. Information Age Publishing
  • Patel, K. and Mun, O. (2017). ‘Marketing ‘development’ in the neoliberal university.’ DPU Working Papers https://www.ucl.ac.uk/bartlett/development/case-studies/2017/sep/marketing-development-neoliberal-university
  • Fimyar, O., Saniyazova, A. & Mun, O. (2017) ‘Methodology of Collaborative Research: Or, Searching for a Synergy in the Study of Student Transition in Kazakhstan.’ In SAGE Research Methods Cases. London, United Kingdom: SAGE Publications.
  • Mun, O. (2015). ‘(Re)imagining national identity through early literacy textbooks in Kazakhstan’, Forum of Young Central Asian Experts, 2nd edition. http://caa-network.org/archives/5620
  • Silova, I., Mead Yaqub, M., Mun, O., Palandjian, G. (2014). ‘Pedagogies of Space: (re)imagining nation and childhood in post-Soviet states.’ Global Studies of Childhood, 4(3), 195-209.
  • Silova, I., Brezhenyuk, V., Kudasova, M., Mun, O., Artemev, N. (2014). ‘Youth Protests against Privatisation of Education in post-Soviet states.’ European Education, 46(3), 56-65.

Schooled in the discipline of Public Administration at the University of Dhaka and with an experience of over five years of lecturing graduate and post-graduate students at two reputed public universities in Bangladesh, I am interested in research works related to education, gender, public policy, social studies and have multiple publications.

Apart from my current lecturing position, I worked as a news editor and contributor for the Dhaka Insider, an online news portal, in 2015. I also served as the Head of the Department (Department of Public Administration) and Assistant Proctor at the Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujibur Rahman Science and Technology University (BSMRSTU) and as an elected member of the Teachers’ Association there. During my post-graduation (MA. Public Policy) at the University of Nottingham, a qualitative research focus helped me characterize patterns of gender gap in primary education access.

 

Selected Publications
  • Dutta,  P.  (2020).  Democratic  Decentralization  and  Participatory Development:  Focus  on  Bangladesh.  Journal  of    Contemporary  Governance  and  Public Policy, 1(2), 82-91. Permalink/DOI: https://doi.org/10.46507/jcgpp.v1i2
  • Dutta, P., 2021. • Towards Sound Integrity Management in Bangladesh: Challenges and Issues in Public Administration and Law Enforcement. In: S. N. Khanom, ed. Governance, In the 21st Century in the Sounth Asia: Challenges and Ways Forward. Dhaka: Hakkani Publishers, pp. 541-560.

Zhuohan (Johanne) has a BA in English from Dalian Maritime University, China, and has won China National Scholarship. She then graduated with a Distinction in MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from University of Oxford. Before her DPhil, Zhuohan worked for the organizing committee for the Harvard Summit for Young Leaders in China, an initiative that brought liberal arts education from Harvard to China’s top-performing high school students. She also helped evaluate the UNICEF China Child-Friendly School Programme as an RA, focusing on the socio-emotional learning among the Dong ethnic minority groups in Guangxi, China. She also teaches IELTS, TOEFL, and English phonics.

Her MSc research centres on linguistic relativity, specifically the effect of French grammatical gender system on both French speakers’ and learners’ perception of objects. Her DPhil research focuses on English pronunciation teaching and learning among young Chinese kids, particularly emphasising the influence of their mother tongue, Mandarin.

Supervisors

Robert Woore and Faidra Faitaki

Shuo-Fang earned a Bachelor’s degree from National Chengchi University (Taiwan) and a Master’s degree from Boston University. He has teaching experience in various EFL contexts including international high school, educational institute, and graduate language program.

Shuo-Fang’s areas of interest lie in applied linguistics, particularly phonetics/phonology and speech perception. As an Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholar, Shuo-Fang is currently undertaking his doctoral research, supervised by Dr Elizabeth Wonnacott and Dr Robert Woore. His doctoral project is mostly experimental and explores second language learners’ difficulty in processing English connected speech.

Shuo-Fang is affiliated with two research groups: Applied Linguistics and Wonnacott-Nation Lab (developmental cognitive psychology).

Publications

Liang, S., & Yu, H. (2021). Chinese students’ willingness to communicate in EFL classrooms: A case study of students at a Sino-foreign university. Professional and Academic English, 28(2), 15–33.

Siyu Ma is a DPhil student in child development and learning at the Department of Education. Her doctoral research focuses on second-born children under the Chinese two-child policy, especially how siblings play a role in the socio-emotional, language, and early literacy development of these children.

Prior to starting her Dphil, Siyu completed an MSc in Education (Research Design and Methodology) at the University of Oxford, under the supervision of Professor Sonali Nag. Her MSc dissertation explored the roles of social background and home literacy environment in the language and literacy development of a Wales subsample from the Millennium Cohort Study and was awarded a High Distinction. She also holds a BSc degree with first-class honours in Psychology from the University of Bath.

Siyu is also a research associate working on TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education.

At TalkTogether, Siyu is responsible for designing online surveys and analysing quantitative data from child assessments and parent reports.

Publications

Ma, S. (2021). Family background and home literacy environment as predictors of the early literacy development of children in Wales – findings from the Millennium Cohort Study (Master’s thesis, University of Oxford).

 

Amanda is the recipient of the Hazel Project Scholarship, based at the Rees Centre. Her doctoral research explores the conceptualisation of foster homes as therapeutic environments for complex/developmental trauma. Through participant-generated photography and collaborative qualitative methods with young people currently in foster care placements, her research explores if young people’s concepts and perceptions of therapeutic environments coincide with or challenge existing theoretical models and popular practitioner perspectives.

Amanda holds a BA from the University of Leeds (UK) and an MPhil from the University of Oxford (UK).

Lawrence is a teacher of mathematics who is particularly interested in classroom pedagogy, and how research and education policies interact with the teaching that students experience on a daily basis.

He finds that looking outwards in education is valuable with there being much more that unites our classrooms than isolates them. He has been extremely fortunate to study education through an international lens in the US, and to work on the Global Teaching InSights initiative of the Organisation for Economic Development (OECD) where he led on its videos of teaching.

Publications

Global Teaching InSights: A video study of teaching, OECD, 2020

Antonin is currently Doctoral Teaching Fellow on the MSc in Comparative and International Education, teaching Foundations of Educational Research. Antonin is also a Research Assistant for the Centre for Global Higher Education on the ‘Research on Research: the research function and mission of higher education’ project.

Alongside his teaching and research roles, Antonin is completing a Doctoral study on the European Universities Initiative, the European Commission’s flagship higher education programme that seeks to set up European Universities through transnational university alliances.

Arzhia Habibi is a DPhil in Education Candidate and uses Mandarin to conduct her research in the Chinese higher education context.

Arzhia’s research focuses on ‘expressions’ of global or world citizenship education in a Chinese higher education institution In the study, she explores the perspectives and practices of educators and students at a China-based university, which experiments with discourses related to citizenship. She further investigates how individual, local, national and global dynamics and the surrounding discourses influence worldviews and practices in a university setting.

As empirical studies on global or world citizenship education in the Chinese context are scarce, Arzhia hopes to contribute to a nascent knowledge base which may extend and add depth to the critical global discourses of global and world citizenship education, beyond Eurocentric framings.

Prior to her studies at Oxford, Arzhia received a first class Bachelor’s degree in Contemporary Chinese Studies at The University of Nottingham, and a Master’s in International Communication in Taiwan at National Chengchi University. As a child, she also attended kindergarten in Fuzhou, Fujian province of China.

Olga is a co-convenor of the Philosophy of Education Reading Group at the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. Olga’s main research interest is in the topics of epistemic injustice across all levels of education and across national borders with a focus on higher education and the process of knowledge production in academic institutes and universities. Her core interest lies between the areas of social epistemology, research on research (RoR) and comparative and international education (CIE). She has been a recipient of multiple research awards in the United States and the United Kingdom and is an elected co-convenor of the Comparative and International Education Special Interest Group at the British Educational Research Association (BERA).

Her new research at Oxford will explore the epistemically just and unjust practices as experienced by scholars from Kazakhstan during the internationalisation process in the social sciences and the humanities. Prior joining Oxford, Olga taught at University College London Institute of Education in London on the topics of migrant, refugee and minority education and European education traditions from a comparative lens.

Publications
  • Mun, O. (2020). ‘Epistemic Injustices in Internationalising Humanities and Social Sciences: A Case Study of Higher Education and Science Institutes in Kazakhstan.’ Centre for International Higher Education, Boston College. https://www.bc.edu/content/dam/bc1/schools/lsoe/sites/cihe/publication/Perspectives/Perspectives%20No%2018.pdf
  • Mun, O. and Gafu, G. (in press) ‘University Research Capacity in Kazakhstan’. Higher School of Economics, Russia.
  • Kandiko Howson, C., Mun, O. and Walker, R. (2020). ‘Academic Activism in STEM fields: Discipline in Theory and Practice.’ Philosophy and Theory of Higher Education Society.
  • Aizuddin M., Habibi A., Mun, O. (in press, 2020). ‘Post-Colonialism in Comparative and International Education.’ In Jules, T., Shields, R., Thomas, M. (Ed.), Bloomsbury Handbook of Theory in Comparative and International Education.
  • Palandjian, G., Silova, I., Mun, O., Zholdashaliyeva, R. (2018). ‘Gender and Nation in Postsocialist Educational Transformations.’ In Silova, I., & Chankseliani, M. (Eds.), Comparing Post-Socialist Transformations: Education in Eastern Europe and Former Soviet Union. Oxford: Symposium Books.
  • Mun, O., & Zholdashaliyeva, R. (2017). ‘Alippe, Bukvar’ and Gender: A comparative analysis of early literacy textbooks in Kazakhstan and Kyrgyzstan.’ In E. Brown & R. Craven & G. McLean (Ed.), International Advances in Education: Global Initiatives for Equity and Social Justice Series. Information Age Publishing
  • Patel, K. and Mun, O. (2017). ‘Marketing ‘development’ in the neoliberal university.’ DPU Working Papers https://www.ucl.ac.uk/bartlett/development/case-studies/2017/sep/marketing-development-neoliberal-university
  • Fimyar, O., Saniyazova, A. & Mun, O. (2017) ‘Methodology of Collaborative Research: Or, Searching for a Synergy in the Study of Student Transition in Kazakhstan.’ In SAGE Research Methods Cases. London, United Kingdom: SAGE Publications.
  • Mun, O. (2015). ‘(Re)imagining national identity through early literacy textbooks in Kazakhstan’, Forum of Young Central Asian Experts, 2nd edition. http://caa-network.org/archives/5620
  • Silova, I., Mead Yaqub, M., Mun, O., Palandjian, G. (2014). ‘Pedagogies of Space: (re)imagining nation and childhood in post-Soviet states.’ Global Studies of Childhood, 4(3), 195-209.
  • Silova, I., Brezhenyuk, V., Kudasova, M., Mun, O., Artemev, N. (2014). ‘Youth Protests against Privatisation of Education in post-Soviet states.’ European Education, 46(3), 56-65.

Schooled in the discipline of Public Administration at the University of Dhaka and with an experience of over five years of lecturing graduate and post-graduate students at two reputed public universities in Bangladesh, I am interested in research works related to education, gender, public policy, social studies and have multiple publications.

Apart from my current lecturing position, I worked as a news editor and contributor for the Dhaka Insider, an online news portal, in 2015. I also served as the Head of the Department (Department of Public Administration) and Assistant Proctor at the Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujibur Rahman Science and Technology University (BSMRSTU) and as an elected member of the Teachers’ Association there. During my post-graduation (MA. Public Policy) at the University of Nottingham, a qualitative research focus helped me characterize patterns of gender gap in primary education access.

 

Selected Publications
  • Dutta,  P.  (2020).  Democratic  Decentralization  and  Participatory Development:  Focus  on  Bangladesh.  Journal  of    Contemporary  Governance  and  Public Policy, 1(2), 82-91. Permalink/DOI: https://doi.org/10.46507/jcgpp.v1i2
  • Dutta, P., 2021. • Towards Sound Integrity Management in Bangladesh: Challenges and Issues in Public Administration and Law Enforcement. In: S. N. Khanom, ed. Governance, In the 21st Century in the Sounth Asia: Challenges and Ways Forward. Dhaka: Hakkani Publishers, pp. 541-560.

Zhuohan (Johanne) has a BA in English from Dalian Maritime University, China, and has won China National Scholarship. She then graduated with a Distinction in MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from University of Oxford. Before her DPhil, Zhuohan worked for the organizing committee for the Harvard Summit for Young Leaders in China, an initiative that brought liberal arts education from Harvard to China’s top-performing high school students. She also helped evaluate the UNICEF China Child-Friendly School Programme as an RA, focusing on the socio-emotional learning among the Dong ethnic minority groups in Guangxi, China. She also teaches IELTS, TOEFL, and English phonics.

Her MSc research centres on linguistic relativity, specifically the effect of French grammatical gender system on both French speakers’ and learners’ perception of objects. Her DPhil research focuses on English pronunciation teaching and learning among young Chinese kids, particularly emphasising the influence of their mother tongue, Mandarin.

Supervisors

Robert Woore and Faidra Faitaki

Shuo-Fang earned a Bachelor’s degree from National Chengchi University (Taiwan) and a Master’s degree from Boston University. He has teaching experience in various EFL contexts including international high school, educational institute, and graduate language program.

Shuo-Fang’s areas of interest lie in applied linguistics, particularly phonetics/phonology and speech perception. As an Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholar, Shuo-Fang is currently undertaking his doctoral research, supervised by Dr Elizabeth Wonnacott and Dr Robert Woore. His doctoral project is mostly experimental and explores second language learners’ difficulty in processing English connected speech.

Shuo-Fang is affiliated with two research groups: Applied Linguistics and Wonnacott-Nation Lab (developmental cognitive psychology).

Publications

Liang, S., & Yu, H. (2021). Chinese students’ willingness to communicate in EFL classrooms: A case study of students at a Sino-foreign university. Professional and Academic English, 28(2), 15–33.

Siyu Ma is a DPhil student in child development and learning at the Department of Education. Her doctoral research focuses on second-born children under the Chinese two-child policy, especially how siblings play a role in the socio-emotional, language, and early literacy development of these children.

Prior to starting her Dphil, Siyu completed an MSc in Education (Research Design and Methodology) at the University of Oxford, under the supervision of Professor Sonali Nag. Her MSc dissertation explored the roles of social background and home literacy environment in the language and literacy development of a Wales subsample from the Millennium Cohort Study and was awarded a High Distinction. She also holds a BSc degree with first-class honours in Psychology from the University of Bath.

Siyu is also a research associate working on TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education.

At TalkTogether, Siyu is responsible for designing online surveys and analysing quantitative data from child assessments and parent reports.

Publications

Ma, S. (2021). Family background and home literacy environment as predictors of the early literacy development of children in Wales – findings from the Millennium Cohort Study (Master’s thesis, University of Oxford).

 

Amanda is the recipient of the Hazel Project Scholarship, based at the Rees Centre. Her doctoral research explores the conceptualisation of foster homes as therapeutic environments for complex/developmental trauma. Through participant-generated photography and collaborative qualitative methods with young people currently in foster care placements, her research explores if young people’s concepts and perceptions of therapeutic environments coincide with or challenge existing theoretical models and popular practitioner perspectives.

Amanda holds a BA from the University of Leeds (UK) and an MPhil from the University of Oxford (UK).

Lawrence is a teacher of mathematics who is particularly interested in classroom pedagogy, and how research and education policies interact with the teaching that students experience on a daily basis.

He finds that looking outwards in education is valuable with there being much more that unites our classrooms than isolates them. He has been extremely fortunate to study education through an international lens in the US, and to work on the Global Teaching InSights initiative of the Organisation for Economic Development (OECD) where he led on its videos of teaching.

Publications

Global Teaching InSights: A video study of teaching, OECD, 2020

Antonin is currently Doctoral Teaching Fellow on the MSc in Comparative and International Education, teaching Foundations of Educational Research. Antonin is also a Research Assistant for the Centre for Global Higher Education on the ‘Research on Research: the research function and mission of higher education’ project.

Alongside his teaching and research roles, Antonin is completing a Doctoral study on the European Universities Initiative, the European Commission’s flagship higher education programme that seeks to set up European Universities through transnational university alliances.

Arzhia Habibi is a DPhil in Education Candidate and uses Mandarin to conduct her research in the Chinese higher education context.

Arzhia’s research focuses on ‘expressions’ of global or world citizenship education in a Chinese higher education institution In the study, she explores the perspectives and practices of educators and students at a China-based university, which experiments with discourses related to citizenship. She further investigates how individual, local, national and global dynamics and the surrounding discourses influence worldviews and practices in a university setting.

As empirical studies on global or world citizenship education in the Chinese context are scarce, Arzhia hopes to contribute to a nascent knowledge base which may extend and add depth to the critical global discourses of global and world citizenship education, beyond Eurocentric framings.

Prior to her studies at Oxford, Arzhia received a first class Bachelor’s degree in Contemporary Chinese Studies at The University of Nottingham, and a Master’s in International Communication in Taiwan at National Chengchi University. As a child, she also attended kindergarten in Fuzhou, Fujian province of China.

Olga is a co-convenor of the Philosophy of Education Reading Group at the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. Olga’s main research interest is in the topics of epistemic injustice across all levels of education and across national borders with a focus on higher education and the process of knowledge production in academic institutes and universities. Her core interest lies between the areas of social epistemology, research on research (RoR) and comparative and international education (CIE). She has been a recipient of multiple research awards in the United States and the United Kingdom and is an elected co-convenor of the Comparative and International Education Special Interest Group at the British Educational Research Association (BERA).

Her new research at Oxford will explore the epistemically just and unjust practices as experienced by scholars from Kazakhstan during the internationalisation process in the social sciences and the humanities. Prior joining Oxford, Olga taught at University College London Institute of Education in London on the topics of migrant, refugee and minority education and European education traditions from a comparative lens.

Publications
  • Mun, O. (2020). ‘Epistemic Injustices in Internationalising Humanities and Social Sciences: A Case Study of Higher Education and Science Institutes in Kazakhstan.’ Centre for International Higher Education, Boston College. https://www.bc.edu/content/dam/bc1/schools/lsoe/sites/cihe/publication/Perspectives/Perspectives%20No%2018.pdf
  • Mun, O. and Gafu, G. (in press) ‘University Research Capacity in Kazakhstan’. Higher School of Economics, Russia.
  • Kandiko Howson, C., Mun, O. and Walker, R. (2020). ‘Academic Activism in STEM fields: Discipline in Theory and Practice.’ Philosophy and Theory of Higher Education Society.
  • Aizuddin M., Habibi A., Mun, O. (in press, 2020). ‘Post-Colonialism in Comparative and International Education.’ In Jules, T., Shields, R., Thomas, M. (Ed.), Bloomsbury Handbook of Theory in Comparative and International Education.
  • Palandjian, G., Silova, I., Mun, O., Zholdashaliyeva, R. (2018). ‘Gender and Nation in Postsocialist Educational Transformations.’ In Silova, I., & Chankseliani, M. (Eds.), Comparing Post-Socialist Transformations: Education in Eastern Europe and Former Soviet Union. Oxford: Symposium Books.
  • Mun, O., & Zholdashaliyeva, R. (2017). ‘Alippe, Bukvar’ and Gender: A comparative analysis of early literacy textbooks in Kazakhstan and Kyrgyzstan.’ In E. Brown & R. Craven & G. McLean (Ed.), International Advances in Education: Global Initiatives for Equity and Social Justice Series. Information Age Publishing
  • Patel, K. and Mun, O. (2017). ‘Marketing ‘development’ in the neoliberal university.’ DPU Working Papers https://www.ucl.ac.uk/bartlett/development/case-studies/2017/sep/marketing-development-neoliberal-university
  • Fimyar, O., Saniyazova, A. & Mun, O. (2017) ‘Methodology of Collaborative Research: Or, Searching for a Synergy in the Study of Student Transition in Kazakhstan.’ In SAGE Research Methods Cases. London, United Kingdom: SAGE Publications.
  • Mun, O. (2015). ‘(Re)imagining national identity through early literacy textbooks in Kazakhstan’, Forum of Young Central Asian Experts, 2nd edition. http://caa-network.org/archives/5620
  • Silova, I., Mead Yaqub, M., Mun, O., Palandjian, G. (2014). ‘Pedagogies of Space: (re)imagining nation and childhood in post-Soviet states.’ Global Studies of Childhood, 4(3), 195-209.
  • Silova, I., Brezhenyuk, V., Kudasova, M., Mun, O., Artemev, N. (2014). ‘Youth Protests against Privatisation of Education in post-Soviet states.’ European Education, 46(3), 56-65.

Schooled in the discipline of Public Administration at the University of Dhaka and with an experience of over five years of lecturing graduate and post-graduate students at two reputed public universities in Bangladesh, I am interested in research works related to education, gender, public policy, social studies and have multiple publications.

Apart from my current lecturing position, I worked as a news editor and contributor for the Dhaka Insider, an online news portal, in 2015. I also served as the Head of the Department (Department of Public Administration) and Assistant Proctor at the Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujibur Rahman Science and Technology University (BSMRSTU) and as an elected member of the Teachers’ Association there. During my post-graduation (MA. Public Policy) at the University of Nottingham, a qualitative research focus helped me characterize patterns of gender gap in primary education access.

 

Selected Publications
  • Dutta,  P.  (2020).  Democratic  Decentralization  and  Participatory Development:  Focus  on  Bangladesh.  Journal  of    Contemporary  Governance  and  Public Policy, 1(2), 82-91. Permalink/DOI: https://doi.org/10.46507/jcgpp.v1i2
  • Dutta, P., 2021. • Towards Sound Integrity Management in Bangladesh: Challenges and Issues in Public Administration and Law Enforcement. In: S. N. Khanom, ed. Governance, In the 21st Century in the Sounth Asia: Challenges and Ways Forward. Dhaka: Hakkani Publishers, pp. 541-560.

Zhuohan (Johanne) has a BA in English from Dalian Maritime University, China, and has won China National Scholarship. She then graduated with a Distinction in MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from University of Oxford. Before her DPhil, Zhuohan worked for the organizing committee for the Harvard Summit for Young Leaders in China, an initiative that brought liberal arts education from Harvard to China’s top-performing high school students. She also helped evaluate the UNICEF China Child-Friendly School Programme as an RA, focusing on the socio-emotional learning among the Dong ethnic minority groups in Guangxi, China. She also teaches IELTS, TOEFL, and English phonics.

Her MSc research centres on linguistic relativity, specifically the effect of French grammatical gender system on both French speakers’ and learners’ perception of objects. Her DPhil research focuses on English pronunciation teaching and learning among young Chinese kids, particularly emphasising the influence of their mother tongue, Mandarin.

Supervisors

Robert Woore and Faidra Faitaki

Shuo-Fang earned a Bachelor’s degree from National Chengchi University (Taiwan) and a Master’s degree from Boston University. He has teaching experience in various EFL contexts including international high school, educational institute, and graduate language program.

Shuo-Fang’s areas of interest lie in applied linguistics, particularly phonetics/phonology and speech perception. As an Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholar, Shuo-Fang is currently undertaking his doctoral research, supervised by Dr Elizabeth Wonnacott and Dr Robert Woore. His doctoral project is mostly experimental and explores second language learners’ difficulty in processing English connected speech.

Shuo-Fang is affiliated with two research groups: Applied Linguistics and Wonnacott-Nation Lab (developmental cognitive psychology).

Publications

Liang, S., & Yu, H. (2021). Chinese students’ willingness to communicate in EFL classrooms: A case study of students at a Sino-foreign university. Professional and Academic English, 28(2), 15–33.

Siyu Ma is a DPhil student in child development and learning at the Department of Education. Her doctoral research focuses on second-born children under the Chinese two-child policy, especially how siblings play a role in the socio-emotional, language, and early literacy development of these children.

Prior to starting her Dphil, Siyu completed an MSc in Education (Research Design and Methodology) at the University of Oxford, under the supervision of Professor Sonali Nag. Her MSc dissertation explored the roles of social background and home literacy environment in the language and literacy development of a Wales subsample from the Millennium Cohort Study and was awarded a High Distinction. She also holds a BSc degree with first-class honours in Psychology from the University of Bath.

Siyu is also a research associate working on TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education.

At TalkTogether, Siyu is responsible for designing online surveys and analysing quantitative data from child assessments and parent reports.

Publications

Ma, S. (2021). Family background and home literacy environment as predictors of the early literacy development of children in Wales – findings from the Millennium Cohort Study (Master’s thesis, University of Oxford).

 

Amanda is the recipient of the Hazel Project Scholarship, based at the Rees Centre. Her doctoral research explores the conceptualisation of foster homes as therapeutic environments for complex/developmental trauma. Through participant-generated photography and collaborative qualitative methods with young people currently in foster care placements, her research explores if young people’s concepts and perceptions of therapeutic environments coincide with or challenge existing theoretical models and popular practitioner perspectives.

Amanda holds a BA from the University of Leeds (UK) and an MPhil from the University of Oxford (UK).

Lawrence is a teacher of mathematics who is particularly interested in classroom pedagogy, and how research and education policies interact with the teaching that students experience on a daily basis.

He finds that looking outwards in education is valuable with there being much more that unites our classrooms than isolates them. He has been extremely fortunate to study education through an international lens in the US, and to work on the Global Teaching InSights initiative of the Organisation for Economic Development (OECD) where he led on its videos of teaching.

Publications

Global Teaching InSights: A video study of teaching, OECD, 2020

Antonin is currently Doctoral Teaching Fellow on the MSc in Comparative and International Education, teaching Foundations of Educational Research. Antonin is also a Research Assistant for the Centre for Global Higher Education on the ‘Research on Research: the research function and mission of higher education’ project.

Alongside his teaching and research roles, Antonin is completing a Doctoral study on the European Universities Initiative, the European Commission’s flagship higher education programme that seeks to set up European Universities through transnational university alliances.

Arzhia Habibi is a DPhil in Education Candidate and uses Mandarin to conduct her research in the Chinese higher education context.

Arzhia’s research focuses on ‘expressions’ of global or world citizenship education in a Chinese higher education institution In the study, she explores the perspectives and practices of educators and students at a China-based university, which experiments with discourses related to citizenship. She further investigates how individual, local, national and global dynamics and the surrounding discourses influence worldviews and practices in a university setting.

As empirical studies on global or world citizenship education in the Chinese context are scarce, Arzhia hopes to contribute to a nascent knowledge base which may extend and add depth to the critical global discourses of global and world citizenship education, beyond Eurocentric framings.

Prior to her studies at Oxford, Arzhia received a first class Bachelor’s degree in Contemporary Chinese Studies at The University of Nottingham, and a Master’s in International Communication in Taiwan at National Chengchi University. As a child, she also attended kindergarten in Fuzhou, Fujian province of China.

Olga is a co-convenor of the Philosophy of Education Reading Group at the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. Olga’s main research interest is in the topics of epistemic injustice across all levels of education and across national borders with a focus on higher education and the process of knowledge production in academic institutes and universities. Her core interest lies between the areas of social epistemology, research on research (RoR) and comparative and international education (CIE). She has been a recipient of multiple research awards in the United States and the United Kingdom and is an elected co-convenor of the Comparative and International Education Special Interest Group at the British Educational Research Association (BERA).

Her new research at Oxford will explore the epistemically just and unjust practices as experienced by scholars from Kazakhstan during the internationalisation process in the social sciences and the humanities. Prior joining Oxford, Olga taught at University College London Institute of Education in London on the topics of migrant, refugee and minority education and European education traditions from a comparative lens.

Publications
  • Mun, O. (2020). ‘Epistemic Injustices in Internationalising Humanities and Social Sciences: A Case Study of Higher Education and Science Institutes in Kazakhstan.’ Centre for International Higher Education, Boston College. https://www.bc.edu/content/dam/bc1/schools/lsoe/sites/cihe/publication/Perspectives/Perspectives%20No%2018.pdf
  • Mun, O. and Gafu, G. (in press) ‘University Research Capacity in Kazakhstan’. Higher School of Economics, Russia.
  • Kandiko Howson, C., Mun, O. and Walker, R. (2020). ‘Academic Activism in STEM fields: Discipline in Theory and Practice.’ Philosophy and Theory of Higher Education Society.
  • Aizuddin M., Habibi A., Mun, O. (in press, 2020). ‘Post-Colonialism in Comparative and International Education.’ In Jules, T., Shields, R., Thomas, M. (Ed.), Bloomsbury Handbook of Theory in Comparative and International Education.
  • Palandjian, G., Silova, I., Mun, O., Zholdashaliyeva, R. (2018). ‘Gender and Nation in Postsocialist Educational Transformations.’ In Silova, I., & Chankseliani, M. (Eds.), Comparing Post-Socialist Transformations: Education in Eastern Europe and Former Soviet Union. Oxford: Symposium Books.
  • Mun, O., & Zholdashaliyeva, R. (2017). ‘Alippe, Bukvar’ and Gender: A comparative analysis of early literacy textbooks in Kazakhstan and Kyrgyzstan.’ In E. Brown & R. Craven & G. McLean (Ed.), International Advances in Education: Global Initiatives for Equity and Social Justice Series. Information Age Publishing
  • Patel, K. and Mun, O. (2017). ‘Marketing ‘development’ in the neoliberal university.’ DPU Working Papers https://www.ucl.ac.uk/bartlett/development/case-studies/2017/sep/marketing-development-neoliberal-university
  • Fimyar, O., Saniyazova, A. & Mun, O. (2017) ‘Methodology of Collaborative Research: Or, Searching for a Synergy in the Study of Student Transition in Kazakhstan.’ In SAGE Research Methods Cases. London, United Kingdom: SAGE Publications.
  • Mun, O. (2015). ‘(Re)imagining national identity through early literacy textbooks in Kazakhstan’, Forum of Young Central Asian Experts, 2nd edition. http://caa-network.org/archives/5620
  • Silova, I., Mead Yaqub, M., Mun, O., Palandjian, G. (2014). ‘Pedagogies of Space: (re)imagining nation and childhood in post-Soviet states.’ Global Studies of Childhood, 4(3), 195-209.
  • Silova, I., Brezhenyuk, V., Kudasova, M., Mun, O., Artemev, N. (2014). ‘Youth Protests against Privatisation of Education in post-Soviet states.’ European Education, 46(3), 56-65.

Schooled in the discipline of Public Administration at the University of Dhaka and with an experience of over five years of lecturing graduate and post-graduate students at two reputed public universities in Bangladesh, I am interested in research works related to education, gender, public policy, social studies and have multiple publications.

Apart from my current lecturing position, I worked as a news editor and contributor for the Dhaka Insider, an online news portal, in 2015. I also served as the Head of the Department (Department of Public Administration) and Assistant Proctor at the Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujibur Rahman Science and Technology University (BSMRSTU) and as an elected member of the Teachers’ Association there. During my post-graduation (MA. Public Policy) at the University of Nottingham, a qualitative research focus helped me characterize patterns of gender gap in primary education access.

 

Selected Publications
  • Dutta,  P.  (2020).  Democratic  Decentralization  and  Participatory Development:  Focus  on  Bangladesh.  Journal  of    Contemporary  Governance  and  Public Policy, 1(2), 82-91. Permalink/DOI: https://doi.org/10.46507/jcgpp.v1i2
  • Dutta, P., 2021. • Towards Sound Integrity Management in Bangladesh: Challenges and Issues in Public Administration and Law Enforcement. In: S. N. Khanom, ed. Governance, In the 21st Century in the Sounth Asia: Challenges and Ways Forward. Dhaka: Hakkani Publishers, pp. 541-560.

Zhuohan (Johanne) has a BA in English from Dalian Maritime University, China, and has won China National Scholarship. She then graduated with a Distinction in MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from University of Oxford. Before her DPhil, Zhuohan worked for the organizing committee for the Harvard Summit for Young Leaders in China, an initiative that brought liberal arts education from Harvard to China’s top-performing high school students. She also helped evaluate the UNICEF China Child-Friendly School Programme as an RA, focusing on the socio-emotional learning among the Dong ethnic minority groups in Guangxi, China. She also teaches IELTS, TOEFL, and English phonics.

Her MSc research centres on linguistic relativity, specifically the effect of French grammatical gender system on both French speakers’ and learners’ perception of objects. Her DPhil research focuses on English pronunciation teaching and learning among young Chinese kids, particularly emphasising the influence of their mother tongue, Mandarin.

Supervisors

Robert Woore and Faidra Faitaki

Shuo-Fang earned a Bachelor’s degree from National Chengchi University (Taiwan) and a Master’s degree from Boston University. He has teaching experience in various EFL contexts including international high school, educational institute, and graduate language program.

Shuo-Fang’s areas of interest lie in applied linguistics, particularly phonetics/phonology and speech perception. As an Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholar, Shuo-Fang is currently undertaking his doctoral research, supervised by Dr Elizabeth Wonnacott and Dr Robert Woore. His doctoral project is mostly experimental and explores second language learners’ difficulty in processing English connected speech.

Shuo-Fang is affiliated with two research groups: Applied Linguistics and Wonnacott-Nation Lab (developmental cognitive psychology).

Publications

Liang, S., & Yu, H. (2021). Chinese students’ willingness to communicate in EFL classrooms: A case study of students at a Sino-foreign university. Professional and Academic English, 28(2), 15–33.

Siyu Ma is a DPhil student in child development and learning at the Department of Education. Her doctoral research focuses on second-born children under the Chinese two-child policy, especially how siblings play a role in the socio-emotional, language, and early literacy development of these children.

Prior to starting her Dphil, Siyu completed an MSc in Education (Research Design and Methodology) at the University of Oxford, under the supervision of Professor Sonali Nag. Her MSc dissertation explored the roles of social background and home literacy environment in the language and literacy development of a Wales subsample from the Millennium Cohort Study and was awarded a High Distinction. She also holds a BSc degree with first-class honours in Psychology from the University of Bath.

Siyu is also a research associate working on TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education.

At TalkTogether, Siyu is responsible for designing online surveys and analysing quantitative data from child assessments and parent reports.

Publications

Ma, S. (2021). Family background and home literacy environment as predictors of the early literacy development of children in Wales – findings from the Millennium Cohort Study (Master’s thesis, University of Oxford).

 

Amanda is the recipient of the Hazel Project Scholarship, based at the Rees Centre. Her doctoral research explores the conceptualisation of foster homes as therapeutic environments for complex/developmental trauma. Through participant-generated photography and collaborative qualitative methods with young people currently in foster care placements, her research explores if young people’s concepts and perceptions of therapeutic environments coincide with or challenge existing theoretical models and popular practitioner perspectives.

Amanda holds a BA from the University of Leeds (UK) and an MPhil from the University of Oxford (UK).

Lawrence is a teacher of mathematics who is particularly interested in classroom pedagogy, and how research and education policies interact with the teaching that students experience on a daily basis.

He finds that looking outwards in education is valuable with there being much more that unites our classrooms than isolates them. He has been extremely fortunate to study education through an international lens in the US, and to work on the Global Teaching InSights initiative of the Organisation for Economic Development (OECD) where he led on its videos of teaching.

Publications

Global Teaching InSights: A video study of teaching, OECD, 2020

Antonin is currently Doctoral Teaching Fellow on the MSc in Comparative and International Education, teaching Foundations of Educational Research. Antonin is also a Research Assistant for the Centre for Global Higher Education on the ‘Research on Research: the research function and mission of higher education’ project.

Alongside his teaching and research roles, Antonin is completing a Doctoral study on the European Universities Initiative, the European Commission’s flagship higher education programme that seeks to set up European Universities through transnational university alliances.

Arzhia Habibi is a DPhil in Education Candidate and uses Mandarin to conduct her research in the Chinese higher education context.

Arzhia’s research focuses on ‘expressions’ of global or world citizenship education in a Chinese higher education institution In the study, she explores the perspectives and practices of educators and students at a China-based university, which experiments with discourses related to citizenship. She further investigates how individual, local, national and global dynamics and the surrounding discourses influence worldviews and practices in a university setting.

As empirical studies on global or world citizenship education in the Chinese context are scarce, Arzhia hopes to contribute to a nascent knowledge base which may extend and add depth to the critical global discourses of global and world citizenship education, beyond Eurocentric framings.

Prior to her studies at Oxford, Arzhia received a first class Bachelor’s degree in Contemporary Chinese Studies at The University of Nottingham, and a Master’s in International Communication in Taiwan at National Chengchi University. As a child, she also attended kindergarten in Fuzhou, Fujian province of China.

Olga is a co-convenor of the Philosophy of Education Reading Group at the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. Olga’s main research interest is in the topics of epistemic injustice across all levels of education and across national borders with a focus on higher education and the process of knowledge production in academic institutes and universities. Her core interest lies between the areas of social epistemology, research on research (RoR) and comparative and international education (CIE). She has been a recipient of multiple research awards in the United States and the United Kingdom and is an elected co-convenor of the Comparative and International Education Special Interest Group at the British Educational Research Association (BERA).

Her new research at Oxford will explore the epistemically just and unjust practices as experienced by scholars from Kazakhstan during the internationalisation process in the social sciences and the humanities. Prior joining Oxford, Olga taught at University College London Institute of Education in London on the topics of migrant, refugee and minority education and European education traditions from a comparative lens.

Publications
  • Mun, O. (2020). ‘Epistemic Injustices in Internationalising Humanities and Social Sciences: A Case Study of Higher Education and Science Institutes in Kazakhstan.’ Centre for International Higher Education, Boston College. https://www.bc.edu/content/dam/bc1/schools/lsoe/sites/cihe/publication/Perspectives/Perspectives%20No%2018.pdf
  • Mun, O. and Gafu, G. (in press) ‘University Research Capacity in Kazakhstan’. Higher School of Economics, Russia.
  • Kandiko Howson, C., Mun, O. and Walker, R. (2020). ‘Academic Activism in STEM fields: Discipline in Theory and Practice.’ Philosophy and Theory of Higher Education Society.
  • Aizuddin M., Habibi A., Mun, O. (in press, 2020). ‘Post-Colonialism in Comparative and International Education.’ In Jules, T., Shields, R., Thomas, M. (Ed.), Bloomsbury Handbook of Theory in Comparative and International Education.
  • Palandjian, G., Silova, I., Mun, O., Zholdashaliyeva, R. (2018). ‘Gender and Nation in Postsocialist Educational Transformations.’ In Silova, I., & Chankseliani, M. (Eds.), Comparing Post-Socialist Transformations: Education in Eastern Europe and Former Soviet Union. Oxford: Symposium Books.
  • Mun, O., & Zholdashaliyeva, R. (2017). ‘Alippe, Bukvar’ and Gender: A comparative analysis of early literacy textbooks in Kazakhstan and Kyrgyzstan.’ In E. Brown & R. Craven & G. McLean (Ed.), International Advances in Education: Global Initiatives for Equity and Social Justice Series. Information Age Publishing
  • Patel, K. and Mun, O. (2017). ‘Marketing ‘development’ in the neoliberal university.’ DPU Working Papers https://www.ucl.ac.uk/bartlett/development/case-studies/2017/sep/marketing-development-neoliberal-university
  • Fimyar, O., Saniyazova, A. & Mun, O. (2017) ‘Methodology of Collaborative Research: Or, Searching for a Synergy in the Study of Student Transition in Kazakhstan.’ In SAGE Research Methods Cases. London, United Kingdom: SAGE Publications.
  • Mun, O. (2015). ‘(Re)imagining national identity through early literacy textbooks in Kazakhstan’, Forum of Young Central Asian Experts, 2nd edition. http://caa-network.org/archives/5620
  • Silova, I., Mead Yaqub, M., Mun, O., Palandjian, G. (2014). ‘Pedagogies of Space: (re)imagining nation and childhood in post-Soviet states.’ Global Studies of Childhood, 4(3), 195-209.
  • Silova, I., Brezhenyuk, V., Kudasova, M., Mun, O., Artemev, N. (2014). ‘Youth Protests against Privatisation of Education in post-Soviet states.’ European Education, 46(3), 56-65.

Schooled in the discipline of Public Administration at the University of Dhaka and with an experience of over five years of lecturing graduate and post-graduate students at two reputed public universities in Bangladesh, I am interested in research works related to education, gender, public policy, social studies and have multiple publications.

Apart from my current lecturing position, I worked as a news editor and contributor for the Dhaka Insider, an online news portal, in 2015. I also served as the Head of the Department (Department of Public Administration) and Assistant Proctor at the Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujibur Rahman Science and Technology University (BSMRSTU) and as an elected member of the Teachers’ Association there. During my post-graduation (MA. Public Policy) at the University of Nottingham, a qualitative research focus helped me characterize patterns of gender gap in primary education access.

 

Selected Publications
  • Dutta,  P.  (2020).  Democratic  Decentralization  and  Participatory Development:  Focus  on  Bangladesh.  Journal  of    Contemporary  Governance  and  Public Policy, 1(2), 82-91. Permalink/DOI: https://doi.org/10.46507/jcgpp.v1i2
  • Dutta, P., 2021. • Towards Sound Integrity Management in Bangladesh: Challenges and Issues in Public Administration and Law Enforcement. In: S. N. Khanom, ed. Governance, In the 21st Century in the Sounth Asia: Challenges and Ways Forward. Dhaka: Hakkani Publishers, pp. 541-560.

Zhuohan (Johanne) has a BA in English from Dalian Maritime University, China, and has won China National Scholarship. She then graduated with a Distinction in MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from University of Oxford. Before her DPhil, Zhuohan worked for the organizing committee for the Harvard Summit for Young Leaders in China, an initiative that brought liberal arts education from Harvard to China’s top-performing high school students. She also helped evaluate the UNICEF China Child-Friendly School Programme as an RA, focusing on the socio-emotional learning among the Dong ethnic minority groups in Guangxi, China. She also teaches IELTS, TOEFL, and English phonics.

Her MSc research centres on linguistic relativity, specifically the effect of French grammatical gender system on both French speakers’ and learners’ perception of objects. Her DPhil research focuses on English pronunciation teaching and learning among young Chinese kids, particularly emphasising the influence of their mother tongue, Mandarin.

Supervisors

Robert Woore and Faidra Faitaki

Shuo-Fang earned a Bachelor’s degree from National Chengchi University (Taiwan) and a Master’s degree from Boston University. He has teaching experience in various EFL contexts including international high school, educational institute, and graduate language program.

Shuo-Fang’s areas of interest lie in applied linguistics, particularly phonetics/phonology and speech perception. As an Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholar, Shuo-Fang is currently undertaking his doctoral research, supervised by Dr Elizabeth Wonnacott and Dr Robert Woore. His doctoral project is mostly experimental and explores second language learners’ difficulty in processing English connected speech.

Shuo-Fang is affiliated with two research groups: Applied Linguistics and Wonnacott-Nation Lab (developmental cognitive psychology).

Publications

Liang, S., & Yu, H. (2021). Chinese students’ willingness to communicate in EFL classrooms: A case study of students at a Sino-foreign university. Professional and Academic English, 28(2), 15–33.

Siyu Ma is a DPhil student in child development and learning at the Department of Education. Her doctoral research focuses on second-born children under the Chinese two-child policy, especially how siblings play a role in the socio-emotional, language, and early literacy development of these children.

Prior to starting her Dphil, Siyu completed an MSc in Education (Research Design and Methodology) at the University of Oxford, under the supervision of Professor Sonali Nag. Her MSc dissertation explored the roles of social background and home literacy environment in the language and literacy development of a Wales subsample from the Millennium Cohort Study and was awarded a High Distinction. She also holds a BSc degree with first-class honours in Psychology from the University of Bath.

Siyu is also a research associate working on TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education.

At TalkTogether, Siyu is responsible for designing online surveys and analysing quantitative data from child assessments and parent reports.

Publications

Ma, S. (2021). Family background and home literacy environment as predictors of the early literacy development of children in Wales – findings from the Millennium Cohort Study (Master’s thesis, University of Oxford).

 

Amanda is the recipient of the Hazel Project Scholarship, based at the Rees Centre. Her doctoral research explores the conceptualisation of foster homes as therapeutic environments for complex/developmental trauma. Through participant-generated photography and collaborative qualitative methods with young people currently in foster care placements, her research explores if young people’s concepts and perceptions of therapeutic environments coincide with or challenge existing theoretical models and popular practitioner perspectives.

Amanda holds a BA from the University of Leeds (UK) and an MPhil from the University of Oxford (UK).

Lawrence is a teacher of mathematics who is particularly interested in classroom pedagogy, and how research and education policies interact with the teaching that students experience on a daily basis.

He finds that looking outwards in education is valuable with there being much more that unites our classrooms than isolates them. He has been extremely fortunate to study education through an international lens in the US, and to work on the Global Teaching InSights initiative of the Organisation for Economic Development (OECD) where he led on its videos of teaching.

Publications

Global Teaching InSights: A video study of teaching, OECD, 2020

Antonin is currently Doctoral Teaching Fellow on the MSc in Comparative and International Education, teaching Foundations of Educational Research. Antonin is also a Research Assistant for the Centre for Global Higher Education on the ‘Research on Research: the research function and mission of higher education’ project.

Alongside his teaching and research roles, Antonin is completing a Doctoral study on the European Universities Initiative, the European Commission’s flagship higher education programme that seeks to set up European Universities through transnational university alliances.

Arzhia Habibi is a DPhil in Education Candidate and uses Mandarin to conduct her research in the Chinese higher education context.

Arzhia’s research focuses on ‘expressions’ of global or world citizenship education in a Chinese higher education institution In the study, she explores the perspectives and practices of educators and students at a China-based university, which experiments with discourses related to citizenship. She further investigates how individual, local, national and global dynamics and the surrounding discourses influence worldviews and practices in a university setting.

As empirical studies on global or world citizenship education in the Chinese context are scarce, Arzhia hopes to contribute to a nascent knowledge base which may extend and add depth to the critical global discourses of global and world citizenship education, beyond Eurocentric framings.

Prior to her studies at Oxford, Arzhia received a first class Bachelor’s degree in Contemporary Chinese Studies at The University of Nottingham, and a Master’s in International Communication in Taiwan at National Chengchi University. As a child, she also attended kindergarten in Fuzhou, Fujian province of China.

Olga is a co-convenor of the Philosophy of Education Reading Group at the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. Olga’s main research interest is in the topics of epistemic injustice across all levels of education and across national borders with a focus on higher education and the process of knowledge production in academic institutes and universities. Her core interest lies between the areas of social epistemology, research on research (RoR) and comparative and international education (CIE). She has been a recipient of multiple research awards in the United States and the United Kingdom and is an elected co-convenor of the Comparative and International Education Special Interest Group at the British Educational Research Association (BERA).

Her new research at Oxford will explore the epistemically just and unjust practices as experienced by scholars from Kazakhstan during the internationalisation process in the social sciences and the humanities. Prior joining Oxford, Olga taught at University College London Institute of Education in London on the topics of migrant, refugee and minority education and European education traditions from a comparative lens.

Publications
  • Mun, O. (2020). ‘Epistemic Injustices in Internationalising Humanities and Social Sciences: A Case Study of Higher Education and Science Institutes in Kazakhstan.’ Centre for International Higher Education, Boston College. https://www.bc.edu/content/dam/bc1/schools/lsoe/sites/cihe/publication/Perspectives/Perspectives%20No%2018.pdf
  • Mun, O. and Gafu, G. (in press) ‘University Research Capacity in Kazakhstan’. Higher School of Economics, Russia.
  • Kandiko Howson, C., Mun, O. and Walker, R. (2020). ‘Academic Activism in STEM fields: Discipline in Theory and Practice.’ Philosophy and Theory of Higher Education Society.
  • Aizuddin M., Habibi A., Mun, O. (in press, 2020). ‘Post-Colonialism in Comparative and International Education.’ In Jules, T., Shields, R., Thomas, M. (Ed.), Bloomsbury Handbook of Theory in Comparative and International Education.
  • Palandjian, G., Silova, I., Mun, O., Zholdashaliyeva, R. (2018). ‘Gender and Nation in Postsocialist Educational Transformations.’ In Silova, I., & Chankseliani, M. (Eds.), Comparing Post-Socialist Transformations: Education in Eastern Europe and Former Soviet Union. Oxford: Symposium Books.
  • Mun, O., & Zholdashaliyeva, R. (2017). ‘Alippe, Bukvar’ and Gender: A comparative analysis of early literacy textbooks in Kazakhstan and Kyrgyzstan.’ In E. Brown & R. Craven & G. McLean (Ed.), International Advances in Education: Global Initiatives for Equity and Social Justice Series. Information Age Publishing
  • Patel, K. and Mun, O. (2017). ‘Marketing ‘development’ in the neoliberal university.’ DPU Working Papers https://www.ucl.ac.uk/bartlett/development/case-studies/2017/sep/marketing-development-neoliberal-university
  • Fimyar, O., Saniyazova, A. & Mun, O. (2017) ‘Methodology of Collaborative Research: Or, Searching for a Synergy in the Study of Student Transition in Kazakhstan.’ In SAGE Research Methods Cases. London, United Kingdom: SAGE Publications.
  • Mun, O. (2015). ‘(Re)imagining national identity through early literacy textbooks in Kazakhstan’, Forum of Young Central Asian Experts, 2nd edition. http://caa-network.org/archives/5620
  • Silova, I., Mead Yaqub, M., Mun, O., Palandjian, G. (2014). ‘Pedagogies of Space: (re)imagining nation and childhood in post-Soviet states.’ Global Studies of Childhood, 4(3), 195-209.
  • Silova, I., Brezhenyuk, V., Kudasova, M., Mun, O., Artemev, N. (2014). ‘Youth Protests against Privatisation of Education in post-Soviet states.’ European Education, 46(3), 56-65.

Schooled in the discipline of Public Administration at the University of Dhaka and with an experience of over five years of lecturing graduate and post-graduate students at two reputed public universities in Bangladesh, I am interested in research works related to education, gender, public policy, social studies and have multiple publications.

Apart from my current lecturing position, I worked as a news editor and contributor for the Dhaka Insider, an online news portal, in 2015. I also served as the Head of the Department (Department of Public Administration) and Assistant Proctor at the Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujibur Rahman Science and Technology University (BSMRSTU) and as an elected member of the Teachers’ Association there. During my post-graduation (MA. Public Policy) at the University of Nottingham, a qualitative research focus helped me characterize patterns of gender gap in primary education access.

 

Selected Publications
  • Dutta,  P.  (2020).  Democratic  Decentralization  and  Participatory Development:  Focus  on  Bangladesh.  Journal  of    Contemporary  Governance  and  Public Policy, 1(2), 82-91. Permalink/DOI: https://doi.org/10.46507/jcgpp.v1i2
  • Dutta, P., 2021. • Towards Sound Integrity Management in Bangladesh: Challenges and Issues in Public Administration and Law Enforcement. In: S. N. Khanom, ed. Governance, In the 21st Century in the Sounth Asia: Challenges and Ways Forward. Dhaka: Hakkani Publishers, pp. 541-560.

Zhuohan (Johanne) has a BA in English from Dalian Maritime University, China, and has won China National Scholarship. She then graduated with a Distinction in MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from University of Oxford. Before her DPhil, Zhuohan worked for the organizing committee for the Harvard Summit for Young Leaders in China, an initiative that brought liberal arts education from Harvard to China’s top-performing high school students. She also helped evaluate the UNICEF China Child-Friendly School Programme as an RA, focusing on the socio-emotional learning among the Dong ethnic minority groups in Guangxi, China. She also teaches IELTS, TOEFL, and English phonics.

Her MSc research centres on linguistic relativity, specifically the effect of French grammatical gender system on both French speakers’ and learners’ perception of objects. Her DPhil research focuses on English pronunciation teaching and learning among young Chinese kids, particularly emphasising the influence of their mother tongue, Mandarin.

Supervisors

Robert Woore and Faidra Faitaki

Shuo-Fang earned a Bachelor’s degree from National Chengchi University (Taiwan) and a Master’s degree from Boston University. He has teaching experience in various EFL contexts including international high school, educational institute, and graduate language program.

Shuo-Fang’s areas of interest lie in applied linguistics, particularly phonetics/phonology and speech perception. As an Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholar, Shuo-Fang is currently undertaking his doctoral research, supervised by Dr Elizabeth Wonnacott and Dr Robert Woore. His doctoral project is mostly experimental and explores second language learners’ difficulty in processing English connected speech.

Shuo-Fang is affiliated with two research groups: Applied Linguistics and Wonnacott-Nation Lab (developmental cognitive psychology).

Publications

Liang, S., & Yu, H. (2021). Chinese students’ willingness to communicate in EFL classrooms: A case study of students at a Sino-foreign university. Professional and Academic English, 28(2), 15–33.

Siyu Ma is a DPhil student in child development and learning at the Department of Education. Her doctoral research focuses on second-born children under the Chinese two-child policy, especially how siblings play a role in the socio-emotional, language, and early literacy development of these children.

Prior to starting her Dphil, Siyu completed an MSc in Education (Research Design and Methodology) at the University of Oxford, under the supervision of Professor Sonali Nag. Her MSc dissertation explored the roles of social background and home literacy environment in the language and literacy development of a Wales subsample from the Millennium Cohort Study and was awarded a High Distinction. She also holds a BSc degree with first-class honours in Psychology from the University of Bath.

Siyu is also a research associate working on TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education.

At TalkTogether, Siyu is responsible for designing online surveys and analysing quantitative data from child assessments and parent reports.

Publications

Ma, S. (2021). Family background and home literacy environment as predictors of the early literacy development of children in Wales – findings from the Millennium Cohort Study (Master’s thesis, University of Oxford).

 

Amanda is the recipient of the Hazel Project Scholarship, based at the Rees Centre. Her doctoral research explores the conceptualisation of foster homes as therapeutic environments for complex/developmental trauma. Through participant-generated photography and collaborative qualitative methods with young people currently in foster care placements, her research explores if young people’s concepts and perceptions of therapeutic environments coincide with or challenge existing theoretical models and popular practitioner perspectives.

Amanda holds a BA from the University of Leeds (UK) and an MPhil from the University of Oxford (UK).

Lawrence is a teacher of mathematics who is particularly interested in classroom pedagogy, and how research and education policies interact with the teaching that students experience on a daily basis.

He finds that looking outwards in education is valuable with there being much more that unites our classrooms than isolates them. He has been extremely fortunate to study education through an international lens in the US, and to work on the Global Teaching InSights initiative of the Organisation for Economic Development (OECD) where he led on its videos of teaching.

Publications

Global Teaching InSights: A video study of teaching, OECD, 2020

Antonin is currently Doctoral Teaching Fellow on the MSc in Comparative and International Education, teaching Foundations of Educational Research. Antonin is also a Research Assistant for the Centre for Global Higher Education on the ‘Research on Research: the research function and mission of higher education’ project.

Alongside his teaching and research roles, Antonin is completing a Doctoral study on the European Universities Initiative, the European Commission’s flagship higher education programme that seeks to set up European Universities through transnational university alliances.

Arzhia Habibi is a DPhil in Education Candidate and uses Mandarin to conduct her research in the Chinese higher education context.

Arzhia’s research focuses on ‘expressions’ of global or world citizenship education in a Chinese higher education institution In the study, she explores the perspectives and practices of educators and students at a China-based university, which experiments with discourses related to citizenship. She further investigates how individual, local, national and global dynamics and the surrounding discourses influence worldviews and practices in a university setting.

As empirical studies on global or world citizenship education in the Chinese context are scarce, Arzhia hopes to contribute to a nascent knowledge base which may extend and add depth to the critical global discourses of global and world citizenship education, beyond Eurocentric framings.

Prior to her studies at Oxford, Arzhia received a first class Bachelor’s degree in Contemporary Chinese Studies at The University of Nottingham, and a Master’s in International Communication in Taiwan at National Chengchi University. As a child, she also attended kindergarten in Fuzhou, Fujian province of China.

Olga is a co-convenor of the Philosophy of Education Reading Group at the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. Olga’s main research interest is in the topics of epistemic injustice across all levels of education and across national borders with a focus on higher education and the process of knowledge production in academic institutes and universities. Her core interest lies between the areas of social epistemology, research on research (RoR) and comparative and international education (CIE). She has been a recipient of multiple research awards in the United States and the United Kingdom and is an elected co-convenor of the Comparative and International Education Special Interest Group at the British Educational Research Association (BERA).

Her new research at Oxford will explore the epistemically just and unjust practices as experienced by scholars from Kazakhstan during the internationalisation process in the social sciences and the humanities. Prior joining Oxford, Olga taught at University College London Institute of Education in London on the topics of migrant, refugee and minority education and European education traditions from a comparative lens.

Publications
  • Mun, O. (2020). ‘Epistemic Injustices in Internationalising Humanities and Social Sciences: A Case Study of Higher Education and Science Institutes in Kazakhstan.’ Centre for International Higher Education, Boston College. https://www.bc.edu/content/dam/bc1/schools/lsoe/sites/cihe/publication/Perspectives/Perspectives%20No%2018.pdf
  • Mun, O. and Gafu, G. (in press) ‘University Research Capacity in Kazakhstan’. Higher School of Economics, Russia.
  • Kandiko Howson, C., Mun, O. and Walker, R. (2020). ‘Academic Activism in STEM fields: Discipline in Theory and Practice.’ Philosophy and Theory of Higher Education Society.
  • Aizuddin M., Habibi A., Mun, O. (in press, 2020). ‘Post-Colonialism in Comparative and International Education.’ In Jules, T., Shields, R., Thomas, M. (Ed.), Bloomsbury Handbook of Theory in Comparative and International Education.
  • Palandjian, G., Silova, I., Mun, O., Zholdashaliyeva, R. (2018). ‘Gender and Nation in Postsocialist Educational Transformations.’ In Silova, I., & Chankseliani, M. (Eds.), Comparing Post-Socialist Transformations: Education in Eastern Europe and Former Soviet Union. Oxford: Symposium Books.
  • Mun, O., & Zholdashaliyeva, R. (2017). ‘Alippe, Bukvar’ and Gender: A comparative analysis of early literacy textbooks in Kazakhstan and Kyrgyzstan.’ In E. Brown & R. Craven & G. McLean (Ed.), International Advances in Education: Global Initiatives for Equity and Social Justice Series. Information Age Publishing
  • Patel, K. and Mun, O. (2017). ‘Marketing ‘development’ in the neoliberal university.’ DPU Working Papers https://www.ucl.ac.uk/bartlett/development/case-studies/2017/sep/marketing-development-neoliberal-university
  • Fimyar, O., Saniyazova, A. & Mun, O. (2017) ‘Methodology of Collaborative Research: Or, Searching for a Synergy in the Study of Student Transition in Kazakhstan.’ In SAGE Research Methods Cases. London, United Kingdom: SAGE Publications.
  • Mun, O. (2015). ‘(Re)imagining national identity through early literacy textbooks in Kazakhstan’, Forum of Young Central Asian Experts, 2nd edition. http://caa-network.org/archives/5620
  • Silova, I., Mead Yaqub, M., Mun, O., Palandjian, G. (2014). ‘Pedagogies of Space: (re)imagining nation and childhood in post-Soviet states.’ Global Studies of Childhood, 4(3), 195-209.
  • Silova, I., Brezhenyuk, V., Kudasova, M., Mun, O., Artemev, N. (2014). ‘Youth Protests against Privatisation of Education in post-Soviet states.’ European Education, 46(3), 56-65.

Schooled in the discipline of Public Administration at the University of Dhaka and with an experience of over five years of lecturing graduate and post-graduate students at two reputed public universities in Bangladesh, I am interested in research works related to education, gender, public policy, social studies and have multiple publications.

Apart from my current lecturing position, I worked as a news editor and contributor for the Dhaka Insider, an online news portal, in 2015. I also served as the Head of the Department (Department of Public Administration) and Assistant Proctor at the Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujibur Rahman Science and Technology University (BSMRSTU) and as an elected member of the Teachers’ Association there. During my post-graduation (MA. Public Policy) at the University of Nottingham, a qualitative research focus helped me characterize patterns of gender gap in primary education access.

 

Selected Publications
  • Dutta,  P.  (2020).  Democratic  Decentralization  and  Participatory Development:  Focus  on  Bangladesh.  Journal  of    Contemporary  Governance  and  Public Policy, 1(2), 82-91. Permalink/DOI: https://doi.org/10.46507/jcgpp.v1i2
  • Dutta, P., 2021. • Towards Sound Integrity Management in Bangladesh: Challenges and Issues in Public Administration and Law Enforcement. In: S. N. Khanom, ed. Governance, In the 21st Century in the Sounth Asia: Challenges and Ways Forward. Dhaka: Hakkani Publishers, pp. 541-560.

Zhuohan (Johanne) has a BA in English from Dalian Maritime University, China, and has won China National Scholarship. She then graduated with a Distinction in MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from University of Oxford. Before her DPhil, Zhuohan worked for the organizing committee for the Harvard Summit for Young Leaders in China, an initiative that brought liberal arts education from Harvard to China’s top-performing high school students. She also helped evaluate the UNICEF China Child-Friendly School Programme as an RA, focusing on the socio-emotional learning among the Dong ethnic minority groups in Guangxi, China. She also teaches IELTS, TOEFL, and English phonics.

Her MSc research centres on linguistic relativity, specifically the effect of French grammatical gender system on both French speakers’ and learners’ perception of objects. Her DPhil research focuses on English pronunciation teaching and learning among young Chinese kids, particularly emphasising the influence of their mother tongue, Mandarin.

Supervisors

Robert Woore and Faidra Faitaki

Shuo-Fang earned a Bachelor’s degree from National Chengchi University (Taiwan) and a Master’s degree from Boston University. He has teaching experience in various EFL contexts including international high school, educational institute, and graduate language program.

Shuo-Fang’s areas of interest lie in applied linguistics, particularly phonetics/phonology and speech perception. As an Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholar, Shuo-Fang is currently undertaking his doctoral research, supervised by Dr Elizabeth Wonnacott and Dr Robert Woore. His doctoral project is mostly experimental and explores second language learners’ difficulty in processing English connected speech.

Shuo-Fang is affiliated with two research groups: Applied Linguistics and Wonnacott-Nation Lab (developmental cognitive psychology).

Publications

Liang, S., & Yu, H. (2021). Chinese students’ willingness to communicate in EFL classrooms: A case study of students at a Sino-foreign university. Professional and Academic English, 28(2), 15–33.

Siyu Ma is a DPhil student in child development and learning at the Department of Education. Her doctoral research focuses on second-born children under the Chinese two-child policy, especially how siblings play a role in the socio-emotional, language, and early literacy development of these children.

Prior to starting her Dphil, Siyu completed an MSc in Education (Research Design and Methodology) at the University of Oxford, under the supervision of Professor Sonali Nag. Her MSc dissertation explored the roles of social background and home literacy environment in the language and literacy development of a Wales subsample from the Millennium Cohort Study and was awarded a High Distinction. She also holds a BSc degree with first-class honours in Psychology from the University of Bath.

Siyu is also a research associate working on TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education.

At TalkTogether, Siyu is responsible for designing online surveys and analysing quantitative data from child assessments and parent reports.

Publications

Ma, S. (2021). Family background and home literacy environment as predictors of the early literacy development of children in Wales – findings from the Millennium Cohort Study (Master’s thesis, University of Oxford).

 

Amanda is the recipient of the Hazel Project Scholarship, based at the Rees Centre. Her doctoral research explores the conceptualisation of foster homes as therapeutic environments for complex/developmental trauma. Through participant-generated photography and collaborative qualitative methods with young people currently in foster care placements, her research explores if young people’s concepts and perceptions of therapeutic environments coincide with or challenge existing theoretical models and popular practitioner perspectives.

Amanda holds a BA from the University of Leeds (UK) and an MPhil from the University of Oxford (UK).

Lawrence is a teacher of mathematics who is particularly interested in classroom pedagogy, and how research and education policies interact with the teaching that students experience on a daily basis.

He finds that looking outwards in education is valuable with there being much more that unites our classrooms than isolates them. He has been extremely fortunate to study education through an international lens in the US, and to work on the Global Teaching InSights initiative of the Organisation for Economic Development (OECD) where he led on its videos of teaching.

Publications

Global Teaching InSights: A video study of teaching, OECD, 2020

Antonin is currently Doctoral Teaching Fellow on the MSc in Comparative and International Education, teaching Foundations of Educational Research. Antonin is also a Research Assistant for the Centre for Global Higher Education on the ‘Research on Research: the research function and mission of higher education’ project.

Alongside his teaching and research roles, Antonin is completing a Doctoral study on the European Universities Initiative, the European Commission’s flagship higher education programme that seeks to set up European Universities through transnational university alliances.

Arzhia Habibi is a DPhil in Education Candidate and uses Mandarin to conduct her research in the Chinese higher education context.

Arzhia’s research focuses on ‘expressions’ of global or world citizenship education in a Chinese higher education institution In the study, she explores the perspectives and practices of educators and students at a China-based university, which experiments with discourses related to citizenship. She further investigates how individual, local, national and global dynamics and the surrounding discourses influence worldviews and practices in a university setting.

As empirical studies on global or world citizenship education in the Chinese context are scarce, Arzhia hopes to contribute to a nascent knowledge base which may extend and add depth to the critical global discourses of global and world citizenship education, beyond Eurocentric framings.

Prior to her studies at Oxford, Arzhia received a first class Bachelor’s degree in Contemporary Chinese Studies at The University of Nottingham, and a Master’s in International Communication in Taiwan at National Chengchi University. As a child, she also attended kindergarten in Fuzhou, Fujian province of China.

Olga is a co-convenor of the Philosophy of Education Reading Group at the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. Olga’s main research interest is in the topics of epistemic injustice across all levels of education and across national borders with a focus on higher education and the process of knowledge production in academic institutes and universities. Her core interest lies between the areas of social epistemology, research on research (RoR) and comparative and international education (CIE). She has been a recipient of multiple research awards in the United States and the United Kingdom and is an elected co-convenor of the Comparative and International Education Special Interest Group at the British Educational Research Association (BERA).

Her new research at Oxford will explore the epistemically just and unjust practices as experienced by scholars from Kazakhstan during the internationalisation process in the social sciences and the humanities. Prior joining Oxford, Olga taught at University College London Institute of Education in London on the topics of migrant, refugee and minority education and European education traditions from a comparative lens.

Publications
  • Mun, O. (2020). ‘Epistemic Injustices in Internationalising Humanities and Social Sciences: A Case Study of Higher Education and Science Institutes in Kazakhstan.’ Centre for International Higher Education, Boston College. https://www.bc.edu/content/dam/bc1/schools/lsoe/sites/cihe/publication/Perspectives/Perspectives%20No%2018.pdf
  • Mun, O. and Gafu, G. (in press) ‘University Research Capacity in Kazakhstan’. Higher School of Economics, Russia.
  • Kandiko Howson, C., Mun, O. and Walker, R. (2020). ‘Academic Activism in STEM fields: Discipline in Theory and Practice.’ Philosophy and Theory of Higher Education Society.
  • Aizuddin M., Habibi A., Mun, O. (in press, 2020). ‘Post-Colonialism in Comparative and International Education.’ In Jules, T., Shields, R., Thomas, M. (Ed.), Bloomsbury Handbook of Theory in Comparative and International Education.
  • Palandjian, G., Silova, I., Mun, O., Zholdashaliyeva, R. (2018). ‘Gender and Nation in Postsocialist Educational Transformations.’ In Silova, I., & Chankseliani, M. (Eds.), Comparing Post-Socialist Transformations: Education in Eastern Europe and Former Soviet Union. Oxford: Symposium Books.
  • Mun, O., & Zholdashaliyeva, R. (2017). ‘Alippe, Bukvar’ and Gender: A comparative analysis of early literacy textbooks in Kazakhstan and Kyrgyzstan.’ In E. Brown & R. Craven & G. McLean (Ed.), International Advances in Education: Global Initiatives for Equity and Social Justice Series. Information Age Publishing
  • Patel, K. and Mun, O. (2017). ‘Marketing ‘development’ in the neoliberal university.’ DPU Working Papers https://www.ucl.ac.uk/bartlett/development/case-studies/2017/sep/marketing-development-neoliberal-university
  • Fimyar, O., Saniyazova, A. & Mun, O. (2017) ‘Methodology of Collaborative Research: Or, Searching for a Synergy in the Study of Student Transition in Kazakhstan.’ In SAGE Research Methods Cases. London, United Kingdom: SAGE Publications.
  • Mun, O. (2015). ‘(Re)imagining national identity through early literacy textbooks in Kazakhstan’, Forum of Young Central Asian Experts, 2nd edition. http://caa-network.org/archives/5620
  • Silova, I., Mead Yaqub, M., Mun, O., Palandjian, G. (2014). ‘Pedagogies of Space: (re)imagining nation and childhood in post-Soviet states.’ Global Studies of Childhood, 4(3), 195-209.
  • Silova, I., Brezhenyuk, V., Kudasova, M., Mun, O., Artemev, N. (2014). ‘Youth Protests against Privatisation of Education in post-Soviet states.’ European Education, 46(3), 56-65.

Schooled in the discipline of Public Administration at the University of Dhaka and with an experience of over five years of lecturing graduate and post-graduate students at two reputed public universities in Bangladesh, I am interested in research works related to education, gender, public policy, social studies and have multiple publications.

Apart from my current lecturing position, I worked as a news editor and contributor for the Dhaka Insider, an online news portal, in 2015. I also served as the Head of the Department (Department of Public Administration) and Assistant Proctor at the Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujibur Rahman Science and Technology University (BSMRSTU) and as an elected member of the Teachers’ Association there. During my post-graduation (MA. Public Policy) at the University of Nottingham, a qualitative research focus helped me characterize patterns of gender gap in primary education access.

 

Selected Publications
  • Dutta,  P.  (2020).  Democratic  Decentralization  and  Participatory Development:  Focus  on  Bangladesh.  Journal  of    Contemporary  Governance  and  Public Policy, 1(2), 82-91. Permalink/DOI: https://doi.org/10.46507/jcgpp.v1i2
  • Dutta, P., 2021. • Towards Sound Integrity Management in Bangladesh: Challenges and Issues in Public Administration and Law Enforcement. In: S. N. Khanom, ed. Governance, In the 21st Century in the Sounth Asia: Challenges and Ways Forward. Dhaka: Hakkani Publishers, pp. 541-560.

Zhuohan (Johanne) has a BA in English from Dalian Maritime University, China, and has won China National Scholarship. She then graduated with a Distinction in MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from University of Oxford. Before her DPhil, Zhuohan worked for the organizing committee for the Harvard Summit for Young Leaders in China, an initiative that brought liberal arts education from Harvard to China’s top-performing high school students. She also helped evaluate the UNICEF China Child-Friendly School Programme as an RA, focusing on the socio-emotional learning among the Dong ethnic minority groups in Guangxi, China. She also teaches IELTS, TOEFL, and English phonics.

Her MSc research centres on linguistic relativity, specifically the effect of French grammatical gender system on both French speakers’ and learners’ perception of objects. Her DPhil research focuses on English pronunciation teaching and learning among young Chinese kids, particularly emphasising the influence of their mother tongue, Mandarin.

Supervisors

Robert Woore and Faidra Faitaki

Shuo-Fang earned a Bachelor’s degree from National Chengchi University (Taiwan) and a Master’s degree from Boston University. He has teaching experience in various EFL contexts including international high school, educational institute, and graduate language program.

Shuo-Fang’s areas of interest lie in applied linguistics, particularly phonetics/phonology and speech perception. As an Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholar, Shuo-Fang is currently undertaking his doctoral research, supervised by Dr Elizabeth Wonnacott and Dr Robert Woore. His doctoral project is mostly experimental and explores second language learners’ difficulty in processing English connected speech.

Shuo-Fang is affiliated with two research groups: Applied Linguistics and Wonnacott-Nation Lab (developmental cognitive psychology).

Publications

Liang, S., & Yu, H. (2021). Chinese students’ willingness to communicate in EFL classrooms: A case study of students at a Sino-foreign university. Professional and Academic English, 28(2), 15–33.

Siyu Ma is a DPhil student in child development and learning at the Department of Education. Her doctoral research focuses on second-born children under the Chinese two-child policy, especially how siblings play a role in the socio-emotional, language, and early literacy development of these children.

Prior to starting her Dphil, Siyu completed an MSc in Education (Research Design and Methodology) at the University of Oxford, under the supervision of Professor Sonali Nag. Her MSc dissertation explored the roles of social background and home literacy environment in the language and literacy development of a Wales subsample from the Millennium Cohort Study and was awarded a High Distinction. She also holds a BSc degree with first-class honours in Psychology from the University of Bath.

Siyu is also a research associate working on TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education.

At TalkTogether, Siyu is responsible for designing online surveys and analysing quantitative data from child assessments and parent reports.

Publications

Ma, S. (2021). Family background and home literacy environment as predictors of the early literacy development of children in Wales – findings from the Millennium Cohort Study (Master’s thesis, University of Oxford).

 

Amanda is the recipient of the Hazel Project Scholarship, based at the Rees Centre. Her doctoral research explores the conceptualisation of foster homes as therapeutic environments for complex/developmental trauma. Through participant-generated photography and collaborative qualitative methods with young people currently in foster care placements, her research explores if young people’s concepts and perceptions of therapeutic environments coincide with or challenge existing theoretical models and popular practitioner perspectives.

Amanda holds a BA from the University of Leeds (UK) and an MPhil from the University of Oxford (UK).

Lawrence is a teacher of mathematics who is particularly interested in classroom pedagogy, and how research and education policies interact with the teaching that students experience on a daily basis.

He finds that looking outwards in education is valuable with there being much more that unites our classrooms than isolates them. He has been extremely fortunate to study education through an international lens in the US, and to work on the Global Teaching InSights initiative of the Organisation for Economic Development (OECD) where he led on its videos of teaching.

Publications

Global Teaching InSights: A video study of teaching, OECD, 2020

Antonin is currently Doctoral Teaching Fellow on the MSc in Comparative and International Education, teaching Foundations of Educational Research. Antonin is also a Research Assistant for the Centre for Global Higher Education on the ‘Research on Research: the research function and mission of higher education’ project.

Alongside his teaching and research roles, Antonin is completing a Doctoral study on the European Universities Initiative, the European Commission’s flagship higher education programme that seeks to set up European Universities through transnational university alliances.

Arzhia Habibi is a DPhil in Education Candidate and uses Mandarin to conduct her research in the Chinese higher education context.

Arzhia’s research focuses on ‘expressions’ of global or world citizenship education in a Chinese higher education institution In the study, she explores the perspectives and practices of educators and students at a China-based university, which experiments with discourses related to citizenship. She further investigates how individual, local, national and global dynamics and the surrounding discourses influence worldviews and practices in a university setting.

As empirical studies on global or world citizenship education in the Chinese context are scarce, Arzhia hopes to contribute to a nascent knowledge base which may extend and add depth to the critical global discourses of global and world citizenship education, beyond Eurocentric framings.

Prior to her studies at Oxford, Arzhia received a first class Bachelor’s degree in Contemporary Chinese Studies at The University of Nottingham, and a Master’s in International Communication in Taiwan at National Chengchi University. As a child, she also attended kindergarten in Fuzhou, Fujian province of China.

Olga is a co-convenor of the Philosophy of Education Reading Group at the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. Olga’s main research interest is in the topics of epistemic injustice across all levels of education and across national borders with a focus on higher education and the process of knowledge production in academic institutes and universities. Her core interest lies between the areas of social epistemology, research on research (RoR) and comparative and international education (CIE). She has been a recipient of multiple research awards in the United States and the United Kingdom and is an elected co-convenor of the Comparative and International Education Special Interest Group at the British Educational Research Association (BERA).

Her new research at Oxford will explore the epistemically just and unjust practices as experienced by scholars from Kazakhstan during the internationalisation process in the social sciences and the humanities. Prior joining Oxford, Olga taught at University College London Institute of Education in London on the topics of migrant, refugee and minority education and European education traditions from a comparative lens.

Publications
  • Mun, O. (2020). ‘Epistemic Injustices in Internationalising Humanities and Social Sciences: A Case Study of Higher Education and Science Institutes in Kazakhstan.’ Centre for International Higher Education, Boston College. https://www.bc.edu/content/dam/bc1/schools/lsoe/sites/cihe/publication/Perspectives/Perspectives%20No%2018.pdf
  • Mun, O. and Gafu, G. (in press) ‘University Research Capacity in Kazakhstan’. Higher School of Economics, Russia.
  • Kandiko Howson, C., Mun, O. and Walker, R. (2020). ‘Academic Activism in STEM fields: Discipline in Theory and Practice.’ Philosophy and Theory of Higher Education Society.
  • Aizuddin M., Habibi A., Mun, O. (in press, 2020). ‘Post-Colonialism in Comparative and International Education.’ In Jules, T., Shields, R., Thomas, M. (Ed.), Bloomsbury Handbook of Theory in Comparative and International Education.
  • Palandjian, G., Silova, I., Mun, O., Zholdashaliyeva, R. (2018). ‘Gender and Nation in Postsocialist Educational Transformations.’ In Silova, I., & Chankseliani, M. (Eds.), Comparing Post-Socialist Transformations: Education in Eastern Europe and Former Soviet Union. Oxford: Symposium Books.
  • Mun, O., & Zholdashaliyeva, R. (2017). ‘Alippe, Bukvar’ and Gender: A comparative analysis of early literacy textbooks in Kazakhstan and Kyrgyzstan.’ In E. Brown & R. Craven & G. McLean (Ed.), International Advances in Education: Global Initiatives for Equity and Social Justice Series. Information Age Publishing
  • Patel, K. and Mun, O. (2017). ‘Marketing ‘development’ in the neoliberal university.’ DPU Working Papers https://www.ucl.ac.uk/bartlett/development/case-studies/2017/sep/marketing-development-neoliberal-university
  • Fimyar, O., Saniyazova, A. & Mun, O. (2017) ‘Methodology of Collaborative Research: Or, Searching for a Synergy in the Study of Student Transition in Kazakhstan.’ In SAGE Research Methods Cases. London, United Kingdom: SAGE Publications.
  • Mun, O. (2015). ‘(Re)imagining national identity through early literacy textbooks in Kazakhstan’, Forum of Young Central Asian Experts, 2nd edition. http://caa-network.org/archives/5620
  • Silova, I., Mead Yaqub, M., Mun, O., Palandjian, G. (2014). ‘Pedagogies of Space: (re)imagining nation and childhood in post-Soviet states.’ Global Studies of Childhood, 4(3), 195-209.
  • Silova, I., Brezhenyuk, V., Kudasova, M., Mun, O., Artemev, N. (2014). ‘Youth Protests against Privatisation of Education in post-Soviet states.’ European Education, 46(3), 56-65.

Schooled in the discipline of Public Administration at the University of Dhaka and with an experience of over five years of lecturing graduate and post-graduate students at two reputed public universities in Bangladesh, I am interested in research works related to education, gender, public policy, social studies and have multiple publications.

Apart from my current lecturing position, I worked as a news editor and contributor for the Dhaka Insider, an online news portal, in 2015. I also served as the Head of the Department (Department of Public Administration) and Assistant Proctor at the Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujibur Rahman Science and Technology University (BSMRSTU) and as an elected member of the Teachers’ Association there. During my post-graduation (MA. Public Policy) at the University of Nottingham, a qualitative research focus helped me characterize patterns of gender gap in primary education access.

 

Selected Publications
  • Dutta,  P.  (2020).  Democratic  Decentralization  and  Participatory Development:  Focus  on  Bangladesh.  Journal  of    Contemporary  Governance  and  Public Policy, 1(2), 82-91. Permalink/DOI: https://doi.org/10.46507/jcgpp.v1i2
  • Dutta, P., 2021. • Towards Sound Integrity Management in Bangladesh: Challenges and Issues in Public Administration and Law Enforcement. In: S. N. Khanom, ed. Governance, In the 21st Century in the Sounth Asia: Challenges and Ways Forward. Dhaka: Hakkani Publishers, pp. 541-560.

Zhuohan (Johanne) has a BA in English from Dalian Maritime University, China, and has won China National Scholarship. She then graduated with a Distinction in MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from University of Oxford. Before her DPhil, Zhuohan worked for the organizing committee for the Harvard Summit for Young Leaders in China, an initiative that brought liberal arts education from Harvard to China’s top-performing high school students. She also helped evaluate the UNICEF China Child-Friendly School Programme as an RA, focusing on the socio-emotional learning among the Dong ethnic minority groups in Guangxi, China. She also teaches IELTS, TOEFL, and English phonics.

Her MSc research centres on linguistic relativity, specifically the effect of French grammatical gender system on both French speakers’ and learners’ perception of objects. Her DPhil research focuses on English pronunciation teaching and learning among young Chinese kids, particularly emphasising the influence of their mother tongue, Mandarin.

Supervisors

Robert Woore and Faidra Faitaki

Shuo-Fang earned a Bachelor’s degree from National Chengchi University (Taiwan) and a Master’s degree from Boston University. He has teaching experience in various EFL contexts including international high school, educational institute, and graduate language program.

Shuo-Fang’s areas of interest lie in applied linguistics, particularly phonetics/phonology and speech perception. As an Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholar, Shuo-Fang is currently undertaking his doctoral research, supervised by Dr Elizabeth Wonnacott and Dr Robert Woore. His doctoral project is mostly experimental and explores second language learners’ difficulty in processing English connected speech.

Shuo-Fang is affiliated with two research groups: Applied Linguistics and Wonnacott-Nation Lab (developmental cognitive psychology).

Publications

Liang, S., & Yu, H. (2021). Chinese students’ willingness to communicate in EFL classrooms: A case study of students at a Sino-foreign university. Professional and Academic English, 28(2), 15–33.

Siyu Ma is a DPhil student in child development and learning at the Department of Education. Her doctoral research focuses on second-born children under the Chinese two-child policy, especially how siblings play a role in the socio-emotional, language, and early literacy development of these children.

Prior to starting her Dphil, Siyu completed an MSc in Education (Research Design and Methodology) at the University of Oxford, under the supervision of Professor Sonali Nag. Her MSc dissertation explored the roles of social background and home literacy environment in the language and literacy development of a Wales subsample from the Millennium Cohort Study and was awarded a High Distinction. She also holds a BSc degree with first-class honours in Psychology from the University of Bath.

Siyu is also a research associate working on TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education.

At TalkTogether, Siyu is responsible for designing online surveys and analysing quantitative data from child assessments and parent reports.

Publications

Ma, S. (2021). Family background and home literacy environment as predictors of the early literacy development of children in Wales – findings from the Millennium Cohort Study (Master’s thesis, University of Oxford).

 

Amanda is the recipient of the Hazel Project Scholarship, based at the Rees Centre. Her doctoral research explores the conceptualisation of foster homes as therapeutic environments for complex/developmental trauma. Through participant-generated photography and collaborative qualitative methods with young people currently in foster care placements, her research explores if young people’s concepts and perceptions of therapeutic environments coincide with or challenge existing theoretical models and popular practitioner perspectives.

Amanda holds a BA from the University of Leeds (UK) and an MPhil from the University of Oxford (UK).

Lawrence is a teacher of mathematics who is particularly interested in classroom pedagogy, and how research and education policies interact with the teaching that students experience on a daily basis.

He finds that looking outwards in education is valuable with there being much more that unites our classrooms than isolates them. He has been extremely fortunate to study education through an international lens in the US, and to work on the Global Teaching InSights initiative of the Organisation for Economic Development (OECD) where he led on its videos of teaching.

Publications

Global Teaching InSights: A video study of teaching, OECD, 2020

Antonin is currently Doctoral Teaching Fellow on the MSc in Comparative and International Education, teaching Foundations of Educational Research. Antonin is also a Research Assistant for the Centre for Global Higher Education on the ‘Research on Research: the research function and mission of higher education’ project.

Alongside his teaching and research roles, Antonin is completing a Doctoral study on the European Universities Initiative, the European Commission’s flagship higher education programme that seeks to set up European Universities through transnational university alliances.

Arzhia Habibi is a DPhil in Education Candidate and uses Mandarin to conduct her research in the Chinese higher education context.

Arzhia’s research focuses on ‘expressions’ of global or world citizenship education in a Chinese higher education institution In the study, she explores the perspectives and practices of educators and students at a China-based university, which experiments with discourses related to citizenship. She further investigates how individual, local, national and global dynamics and the surrounding discourses influence worldviews and practices in a university setting.

As empirical studies on global or world citizenship education in the Chinese context are scarce, Arzhia hopes to contribute to a nascent knowledge base which may extend and add depth to the critical global discourses of global and world citizenship education, beyond Eurocentric framings.

Prior to her studies at Oxford, Arzhia received a first class Bachelor’s degree in Contemporary Chinese Studies at The University of Nottingham, and a Master’s in International Communication in Taiwan at National Chengchi University. As a child, she also attended kindergarten in Fuzhou, Fujian province of China.

Olga is a co-convenor of the Philosophy of Education Reading Group at the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. Olga’s main research interest is in the topics of epistemic injustice across all levels of education and across national borders with a focus on higher education and the process of knowledge production in academic institutes and universities. Her core interest lies between the areas of social epistemology, research on research (RoR) and comparative and international education (CIE). She has been a recipient of multiple research awards in the United States and the United Kingdom and is an elected co-convenor of the Comparative and International Education Special Interest Group at the British Educational Research Association (BERA).

Her new research at Oxford will explore the epistemically just and unjust practices as experienced by scholars from Kazakhstan during the internationalisation process in the social sciences and the humanities. Prior joining Oxford, Olga taught at University College London Institute of Education in London on the topics of migrant, refugee and minority education and European education traditions from a comparative lens.

Publications
  • Mun, O. (2020). ‘Epistemic Injustices in Internationalising Humanities and Social Sciences: A Case Study of Higher Education and Science Institutes in Kazakhstan.’ Centre for International Higher Education, Boston College. https://www.bc.edu/content/dam/bc1/schools/lsoe/sites/cihe/publication/Perspectives/Perspectives%20No%2018.pdf
  • Mun, O. and Gafu, G. (in press) ‘University Research Capacity in Kazakhstan’. Higher School of Economics, Russia.
  • Kandiko Howson, C., Mun, O. and Walker, R. (2020). ‘Academic Activism in STEM fields: Discipline in Theory and Practice.’ Philosophy and Theory of Higher Education Society.
  • Aizuddin M., Habibi A., Mun, O. (in press, 2020). ‘Post-Colonialism in Comparative and International Education.’ In Jules, T., Shields, R., Thomas, M. (Ed.), Bloomsbury Handbook of Theory in Comparative and International Education.
  • Palandjian, G., Silova, I., Mun, O., Zholdashaliyeva, R. (2018). ‘Gender and Nation in Postsocialist Educational Transformations.’ In Silova, I., & Chankseliani, M. (Eds.), Comparing Post-Socialist Transformations: Education in Eastern Europe and Former Soviet Union. Oxford: Symposium Books.
  • Mun, O., & Zholdashaliyeva, R. (2017). ‘Alippe, Bukvar’ and Gender: A comparative analysis of early literacy textbooks in Kazakhstan and Kyrgyzstan.’ In E. Brown & R. Craven & G. McLean (Ed.), International Advances in Education: Global Initiatives for Equity and Social Justice Series. Information Age Publishing
  • Patel, K. and Mun, O. (2017). ‘Marketing ‘development’ in the neoliberal university.’ DPU Working Papers https://www.ucl.ac.uk/bartlett/development/case-studies/2017/sep/marketing-development-neoliberal-university
  • Fimyar, O., Saniyazova, A. & Mun, O. (2017) ‘Methodology of Collaborative Research: Or, Searching for a Synergy in the Study of Student Transition in Kazakhstan.’ In SAGE Research Methods Cases. London, United Kingdom: SAGE Publications.
  • Mun, O. (2015). ‘(Re)imagining national identity through early literacy textbooks in Kazakhstan’, Forum of Young Central Asian Experts, 2nd edition. http://caa-network.org/archives/5620
  • Silova, I., Mead Yaqub, M., Mun, O., Palandjian, G. (2014). ‘Pedagogies of Space: (re)imagining nation and childhood in post-Soviet states.’ Global Studies of Childhood, 4(3), 195-209.
  • Silova, I., Brezhenyuk, V., Kudasova, M., Mun, O., Artemev, N. (2014). ‘Youth Protests against Privatisation of Education in post-Soviet states.’ European Education, 46(3), 56-65.

Schooled in the discipline of Public Administration at the University of Dhaka and with an experience of over five years of lecturing graduate and post-graduate students at two reputed public universities in Bangladesh, I am interested in research works related to education, gender, public policy, social studies and have multiple publications.

Apart from my current lecturing position, I worked as a news editor and contributor for the Dhaka Insider, an online news portal, in 2015. I also served as the Head of the Department (Department of Public Administration) and Assistant Proctor at the Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujibur Rahman Science and Technology University (BSMRSTU) and as an elected member of the Teachers’ Association there. During my post-graduation (MA. Public Policy) at the University of Nottingham, a qualitative research focus helped me characterize patterns of gender gap in primary education access.

 

Selected Publications
  • Dutta,  P.  (2020).  Democratic  Decentralization  and  Participatory Development:  Focus  on  Bangladesh.  Journal  of    Contemporary  Governance  and  Public Policy, 1(2), 82-91. Permalink/DOI: https://doi.org/10.46507/jcgpp.v1i2
  • Dutta, P., 2021. • Towards Sound Integrity Management in Bangladesh: Challenges and Issues in Public Administration and Law Enforcement. In: S. N. Khanom, ed. Governance, In the 21st Century in the Sounth Asia: Challenges and Ways Forward. Dhaka: Hakkani Publishers, pp. 541-560.

Zhuohan (Johanne) has a BA in English from Dalian Maritime University, China, and has won China National Scholarship. She then graduated with a Distinction in MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from University of Oxford. Before her DPhil, Zhuohan worked for the organizing committee for the Harvard Summit for Young Leaders in China, an initiative that brought liberal arts education from Harvard to China’s top-performing high school students. She also helped evaluate the UNICEF China Child-Friendly School Programme as an RA, focusing on the socio-emotional learning among the Dong ethnic minority groups in Guangxi, China. She also teaches IELTS, TOEFL, and English phonics.

Her MSc research centres on linguistic relativity, specifically the effect of French grammatical gender system on both French speakers’ and learners’ perception of objects. Her DPhil research focuses on English pronunciation teaching and learning among young Chinese kids, particularly emphasising the influence of their mother tongue, Mandarin.

Supervisors

Robert Woore and Faidra Faitaki

Shuo-Fang earned a Bachelor’s degree from National Chengchi University (Taiwan) and a Master’s degree from Boston University. He has teaching experience in various EFL contexts including international high school, educational institute, and graduate language program.

Shuo-Fang’s areas of interest lie in applied linguistics, particularly phonetics/phonology and speech perception. As an Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholar, Shuo-Fang is currently undertaking his doctoral research, supervised by Dr Elizabeth Wonnacott and Dr Robert Woore. His doctoral project is mostly experimental and explores second language learners’ difficulty in processing English connected speech.

Shuo-Fang is affiliated with two research groups: Applied Linguistics and Wonnacott-Nation Lab (developmental cognitive psychology).

Publications

Liang, S., & Yu, H. (2021). Chinese students’ willingness to communicate in EFL classrooms: A case study of students at a Sino-foreign university. Professional and Academic English, 28(2), 15–33.

Siyu Ma is a DPhil student in child development and learning at the Department of Education. Her doctoral research focuses on second-born children under the Chinese two-child policy, especially how siblings play a role in the socio-emotional, language, and early literacy development of these children.

Prior to starting her Dphil, Siyu completed an MSc in Education (Research Design and Methodology) at the University of Oxford, under the supervision of Professor Sonali Nag. Her MSc dissertation explored the roles of social background and home literacy environment in the language and literacy development of a Wales subsample from the Millennium Cohort Study and was awarded a High Distinction. She also holds a BSc degree with first-class honours in Psychology from the University of Bath.

Siyu is also a research associate working on TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education.

At TalkTogether, Siyu is responsible for designing online surveys and analysing quantitative data from child assessments and parent reports.

Publications

Ma, S. (2021). Family background and home literacy environment as predictors of the early literacy development of children in Wales – findings from the Millennium Cohort Study (Master’s thesis, University of Oxford).

 

Amanda is the recipient of the Hazel Project Scholarship, based at the Rees Centre. Her doctoral research explores the conceptualisation of foster homes as therapeutic environments for complex/developmental trauma. Through participant-generated photography and collaborative qualitative methods with young people currently in foster care placements, her research explores if young people’s concepts and perceptions of therapeutic environments coincide with or challenge existing theoretical models and popular practitioner perspectives.

Amanda holds a BA from the University of Leeds (UK) and an MPhil from the University of Oxford (UK).

Lawrence is a teacher of mathematics who is particularly interested in classroom pedagogy, and how research and education policies interact with the teaching that students experience on a daily basis.

He finds that looking outwards in education is valuable with there being much more that unites our classrooms than isolates them. He has been extremely fortunate to study education through an international lens in the US, and to work on the Global Teaching InSights initiative of the Organisation for Economic Development (OECD) where he led on its videos of teaching.

Publications

Global Teaching InSights: A video study of teaching, OECD, 2020

Antonin is currently Doctoral Teaching Fellow on the MSc in Comparative and International Education, teaching Foundations of Educational Research. Antonin is also a Research Assistant for the Centre for Global Higher Education on the ‘Research on Research: the research function and mission of higher education’ project.

Alongside his teaching and research roles, Antonin is completing a Doctoral study on the European Universities Initiative, the European Commission’s flagship higher education programme that seeks to set up European Universities through transnational university alliances.

Arzhia Habibi is a DPhil in Education Candidate and uses Mandarin to conduct her research in the Chinese higher education context.

Arzhia’s research focuses on ‘expressions’ of global or world citizenship education in a Chinese higher education institution In the study, she explores the perspectives and practices of educators and students at a China-based university, which experiments with discourses related to citizenship. She further investigates how individual, local, national and global dynamics and the surrounding discourses influence worldviews and practices in a university setting.

As empirical studies on global or world citizenship education in the Chinese context are scarce, Arzhia hopes to contribute to a nascent knowledge base which may extend and add depth to the critical global discourses of global and world citizenship education, beyond Eurocentric framings.

Prior to her studies at Oxford, Arzhia received a first class Bachelor’s degree in Contemporary Chinese Studies at The University of Nottingham, and a Master’s in International Communication in Taiwan at National Chengchi University. As a child, she also attended kindergarten in Fuzhou, Fujian province of China.

Olga is a co-convenor of the Philosophy of Education Reading Group at the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. Olga’s main research interest is in the topics of epistemic injustice across all levels of education and across national borders with a focus on higher education and the process of knowledge production in academic institutes and universities. Her core interest lies between the areas of social epistemology, research on research (RoR) and comparative and international education (CIE). She has been a recipient of multiple research awards in the United States and the United Kingdom and is an elected co-convenor of the Comparative and International Education Special Interest Group at the British Educational Research Association (BERA).

Her new research at Oxford will explore the epistemically just and unjust practices as experienced by scholars from Kazakhstan during the internationalisation process in the social sciences and the humanities. Prior joining Oxford, Olga taught at University College London Institute of Education in London on the topics of migrant, refugee and minority education and European education traditions from a comparative lens.

Publications
  • Mun, O. (2020). ‘Epistemic Injustices in Internationalising Humanities and Social Sciences: A Case Study of Higher Education and Science Institutes in Kazakhstan.’ Centre for International Higher Education, Boston College. https://www.bc.edu/content/dam/bc1/schools/lsoe/sites/cihe/publication/Perspectives/Perspectives%20No%2018.pdf
  • Mun, O. and Gafu, G. (in press) ‘University Research Capacity in Kazakhstan’. Higher School of Economics, Russia.
  • Kandiko Howson, C., Mun, O. and Walker, R. (2020). ‘Academic Activism in STEM fields: Discipline in Theory and Practice.’ Philosophy and Theory of Higher Education Society.
  • Aizuddin M., Habibi A., Mun, O. (in press, 2020). ‘Post-Colonialism in Comparative and International Education.’ In Jules, T., Shields, R., Thomas, M. (Ed.), Bloomsbury Handbook of Theory in Comparative and International Education.
  • Palandjian, G., Silova, I., Mun, O., Zholdashaliyeva, R. (2018). ‘Gender and Nation in Postsocialist Educational Transformations.’ In Silova, I., & Chankseliani, M. (Eds.), Comparing Post-Socialist Transformations: Education in Eastern Europe and Former Soviet Union. Oxford: Symposium Books.
  • Mun, O., & Zholdashaliyeva, R. (2017). ‘Alippe, Bukvar’ and Gender: A comparative analysis of early literacy textbooks in Kazakhstan and Kyrgyzstan.’ In E. Brown & R. Craven & G. McLean (Ed.), International Advances in Education: Global Initiatives for Equity and Social Justice Series. Information Age Publishing
  • Patel, K. and Mun, O. (2017). ‘Marketing ‘development’ in the neoliberal university.’ DPU Working Papers https://www.ucl.ac.uk/bartlett/development/case-studies/2017/sep/marketing-development-neoliberal-university
  • Fimyar, O., Saniyazova, A. & Mun, O. (2017) ‘Methodology of Collaborative Research: Or, Searching for a Synergy in the Study of Student Transition in Kazakhstan.’ In SAGE Research Methods Cases. London, United Kingdom: SAGE Publications.
  • Mun, O. (2015). ‘(Re)imagining national identity through early literacy textbooks in Kazakhstan’, Forum of Young Central Asian Experts, 2nd edition. http://caa-network.org/archives/5620
  • Silova, I., Mead Yaqub, M., Mun, O., Palandjian, G. (2014). ‘Pedagogies of Space: (re)imagining nation and childhood in post-Soviet states.’ Global Studies of Childhood, 4(3), 195-209.
  • Silova, I., Brezhenyuk, V., Kudasova, M., Mun, O., Artemev, N. (2014). ‘Youth Protests against Privatisation of Education in post-Soviet states.’ European Education, 46(3), 56-65.

Schooled in the discipline of Public Administration at the University of Dhaka and with an experience of over five years of lecturing graduate and post-graduate students at two reputed public universities in Bangladesh, I am interested in research works related to education, gender, public policy, social studies and have multiple publications.

Apart from my current lecturing position, I worked as a news editor and contributor for the Dhaka Insider, an online news portal, in 2015. I also served as the Head of the Department (Department of Public Administration) and Assistant Proctor at the Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujibur Rahman Science and Technology University (BSMRSTU) and as an elected member of the Teachers’ Association there. During my post-graduation (MA. Public Policy) at the University of Nottingham, a qualitative research focus helped me characterize patterns of gender gap in primary education access.

 

Selected Publications
  • Dutta,  P.  (2020).  Democratic  Decentralization  and  Participatory Development:  Focus  on  Bangladesh.  Journal  of    Contemporary  Governance  and  Public Policy, 1(2), 82-91. Permalink/DOI: https://doi.org/10.46507/jcgpp.v1i2
  • Dutta, P., 2021. • Towards Sound Integrity Management in Bangladesh: Challenges and Issues in Public Administration and Law Enforcement. In: S. N. Khanom, ed. Governance, In the 21st Century in the Sounth Asia: Challenges and Ways Forward. Dhaka: Hakkani Publishers, pp. 541-560.

Zhuohan (Johanne) has a BA in English from Dalian Maritime University, China, and has won China National Scholarship. She then graduated with a Distinction in MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from University of Oxford. Before her DPhil, Zhuohan worked for the organizing committee for the Harvard Summit for Young Leaders in China, an initiative that brought liberal arts education from Harvard to China’s top-performing high school students. She also helped evaluate the UNICEF China Child-Friendly School Programme as an RA, focusing on the socio-emotional learning among the Dong ethnic minority groups in Guangxi, China. She also teaches IELTS, TOEFL, and English phonics.

Her MSc research centres on linguistic relativity, specifically the effect of French grammatical gender system on both French speakers’ and learners’ perception of objects. Her DPhil research focuses on English pronunciation teaching and learning among young Chinese kids, particularly emphasising the influence of their mother tongue, Mandarin.

Supervisors

Robert Woore and Faidra Faitaki

Shuo-Fang earned a Bachelor’s degree from National Chengchi University (Taiwan) and a Master’s degree from Boston University. He has teaching experience in various EFL contexts including international high school, educational institute, and graduate language program.

Shuo-Fang’s areas of interest lie in applied linguistics, particularly phonetics/phonology and speech perception. As an Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholar, Shuo-Fang is currently undertaking his doctoral research, supervised by Dr Elizabeth Wonnacott and Dr Robert Woore. His doctoral project is mostly experimental and explores second language learners’ difficulty in processing English connected speech.

Shuo-Fang is affiliated with two research groups: Applied Linguistics and Wonnacott-Nation Lab (developmental cognitive psychology).

Publications

Liang, S., & Yu, H. (2021). Chinese students’ willingness to communicate in EFL classrooms: A case study of students at a Sino-foreign university. Professional and Academic English, 28(2), 15–33.

Siyu Ma is a DPhil student in child development and learning at the Department of Education. Her doctoral research focuses on second-born children under the Chinese two-child policy, especially how siblings play a role in the socio-emotional, language, and early literacy development of these children.

Prior to starting her Dphil, Siyu completed an MSc in Education (Research Design and Methodology) at the University of Oxford, under the supervision of Professor Sonali Nag. Her MSc dissertation explored the roles of social background and home literacy environment in the language and literacy development of a Wales subsample from the Millennium Cohort Study and was awarded a High Distinction. She also holds a BSc degree with first-class honours in Psychology from the University of Bath.

Siyu is also a research associate working on TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education.

At TalkTogether, Siyu is responsible for designing online surveys and analysing quantitative data from child assessments and parent reports.

Publications

Ma, S. (2021). Family background and home literacy environment as predictors of the early literacy development of children in Wales – findings from the Millennium Cohort Study (Master’s thesis, University of Oxford).

 

Amanda is the recipient of the Hazel Project Scholarship, based at the Rees Centre. Her doctoral research explores the conceptualisation of foster homes as therapeutic environments for complex/developmental trauma. Through participant-generated photography and collaborative qualitative methods with young people currently in foster care placements, her research explores if young people’s concepts and perceptions of therapeutic environments coincide with or challenge existing theoretical models and popular practitioner perspectives.

Amanda holds a BA from the University of Leeds (UK) and an MPhil from the University of Oxford (UK).

Lawrence is a teacher of mathematics who is particularly interested in classroom pedagogy, and how research and education policies interact with the teaching that students experience on a daily basis.

He finds that looking outwards in education is valuable with there being much more that unites our classrooms than isolates them. He has been extremely fortunate to study education through an international lens in the US, and to work on the Global Teaching InSights initiative of the Organisation for Economic Development (OECD) where he led on its videos of teaching.

Publications

Global Teaching InSights: A video study of teaching, OECD, 2020

Antonin is currently Doctoral Teaching Fellow on the MSc in Comparative and International Education, teaching Foundations of Educational Research. Antonin is also a Research Assistant for the Centre for Global Higher Education on the ‘Research on Research: the research function and mission of higher education’ project.

Alongside his teaching and research roles, Antonin is completing a Doctoral study on the European Universities Initiative, the European Commission’s flagship higher education programme that seeks to set up European Universities through transnational university alliances.

Arzhia Habibi is a DPhil in Education Candidate and uses Mandarin to conduct her research in the Chinese higher education context.

Arzhia’s research focuses on ‘expressions’ of global or world citizenship education in a Chinese higher education institution In the study, she explores the perspectives and practices of educators and students at a China-based university, which experiments with discourses related to citizenship. She further investigates how individual, local, national and global dynamics and the surrounding discourses influence worldviews and practices in a university setting.

As empirical studies on global or world citizenship education in the Chinese context are scarce, Arzhia hopes to contribute to a nascent knowledge base which may extend and add depth to the critical global discourses of global and world citizenship education, beyond Eurocentric framings.

Prior to her studies at Oxford, Arzhia received a first class Bachelor’s degree in Contemporary Chinese Studies at The University of Nottingham, and a Master’s in International Communication in Taiwan at National Chengchi University. As a child, she also attended kindergarten in Fuzhou, Fujian province of China.

Olga is a co-convenor of the Philosophy of Education Reading Group at the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. Olga’s main research interest is in the topics of epistemic injustice across all levels of education and across national borders with a focus on higher education and the process of knowledge production in academic institutes and universities. Her core interest lies between the areas of social epistemology, research on research (RoR) and comparative and international education (CIE). She has been a recipient of multiple research awards in the United States and the United Kingdom and is an elected co-convenor of the Comparative and International Education Special Interest Group at the British Educational Research Association (BERA).

Her new research at Oxford will explore the epistemically just and unjust practices as experienced by scholars from Kazakhstan during the internationalisation process in the social sciences and the humanities. Prior joining Oxford, Olga taught at University College London Institute of Education in London on the topics of migrant, refugee and minority education and European education traditions from a comparative lens.

Publications
  • Mun, O. (2020). ‘Epistemic Injustices in Internationalising Humanities and Social Sciences: A Case Study of Higher Education and Science Institutes in Kazakhstan.’ Centre for International Higher Education, Boston College. https://www.bc.edu/content/dam/bc1/schools/lsoe/sites/cihe/publication/Perspectives/Perspectives%20No%2018.pdf
  • Mun, O. and Gafu, G. (in press) ‘University Research Capacity in Kazakhstan’. Higher School of Economics, Russia.
  • Kandiko Howson, C., Mun, O. and Walker, R. (2020). ‘Academic Activism in STEM fields: Discipline in Theory and Practice.’ Philosophy and Theory of Higher Education Society.
  • Aizuddin M., Habibi A., Mun, O. (in press, 2020). ‘Post-Colonialism in Comparative and International Education.’ In Jules, T., Shields, R., Thomas, M. (Ed.), Bloomsbury Handbook of Theory in Comparative and International Education.
  • Palandjian, G., Silova, I., Mun, O., Zholdashaliyeva, R. (2018). ‘Gender and Nation in Postsocialist Educational Transformations.’ In Silova, I., & Chankseliani, M. (Eds.), Comparing Post-Socialist Transformations: Education in Eastern Europe and Former Soviet Union. Oxford: Symposium Books.
  • Mun, O., & Zholdashaliyeva, R. (2017). ‘Alippe, Bukvar’ and Gender: A comparative analysis of early literacy textbooks in Kazakhstan and Kyrgyzstan.’ In E. Brown & R. Craven & G. McLean (Ed.), International Advances in Education: Global Initiatives for Equity and Social Justice Series. Information Age Publishing
  • Patel, K. and Mun, O. (2017). ‘Marketing ‘development’ in the neoliberal university.’ DPU Working Papers https://www.ucl.ac.uk/bartlett/development/case-studies/2017/sep/marketing-development-neoliberal-university
  • Fimyar, O., Saniyazova, A. & Mun, O. (2017) ‘Methodology of Collaborative Research: Or, Searching for a Synergy in the Study of Student Transition in Kazakhstan.’ In SAGE Research Methods Cases. London, United Kingdom: SAGE Publications.
  • Mun, O. (2015). ‘(Re)imagining national identity through early literacy textbooks in Kazakhstan’, Forum of Young Central Asian Experts, 2nd edition. http://caa-network.org/archives/5620
  • Silova, I., Mead Yaqub, M., Mun, O., Palandjian, G. (2014). ‘Pedagogies of Space: (re)imagining nation and childhood in post-Soviet states.’ Global Studies of Childhood, 4(3), 195-209.
  • Silova, I., Brezhenyuk, V., Kudasova, M., Mun, O., Artemev, N. (2014). ‘Youth Protests against Privatisation of Education in post-Soviet states.’ European Education, 46(3), 56-65.

Schooled in the discipline of Public Administration at the University of Dhaka and with an experience of over five years of lecturing graduate and post-graduate students at two reputed public universities in Bangladesh, I am interested in research works related to education, gender, public policy, social studies and have multiple publications.

Apart from my current lecturing position, I worked as a news editor and contributor for the Dhaka Insider, an online news portal, in 2015. I also served as the Head of the Department (Department of Public Administration) and Assistant Proctor at the Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujibur Rahman Science and Technology University (BSMRSTU) and as an elected member of the Teachers’ Association there. During my post-graduation (MA. Public Policy) at the University of Nottingham, a qualitative research focus helped me characterize patterns of gender gap in primary education access.

 

Selected Publications
  • Dutta,  P.  (2020).  Democratic  Decentralization  and  Participatory Development:  Focus  on  Bangladesh.  Journal  of    Contemporary  Governance  and  Public Policy, 1(2), 82-91. Permalink/DOI: https://doi.org/10.46507/jcgpp.v1i2
  • Dutta, P., 2021. • Towards Sound Integrity Management in Bangladesh: Challenges and Issues in Public Administration and Law Enforcement. In: S. N. Khanom, ed. Governance, In the 21st Century in the Sounth Asia: Challenges and Ways Forward. Dhaka: Hakkani Publishers, pp. 541-560.

Zhuohan (Johanne) has a BA in English from Dalian Maritime University, China, and has won China National Scholarship. She then graduated with a Distinction in MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from University of Oxford. Before her DPhil, Zhuohan worked for the organizing committee for the Harvard Summit for Young Leaders in China, an initiative that brought liberal arts education from Harvard to China’s top-performing high school students. She also helped evaluate the UNICEF China Child-Friendly School Programme as an RA, focusing on the socio-emotional learning among the Dong ethnic minority groups in Guangxi, China. She also teaches IELTS, TOEFL, and English phonics.

Her MSc research centres on linguistic relativity, specifically the effect of French grammatical gender system on both French speakers’ and learners’ perception of objects. Her DPhil research focuses on English pronunciation teaching and learning among young Chinese kids, particularly emphasising the influence of their mother tongue, Mandarin.

Supervisors

Robert Woore and Faidra Faitaki

Shuo-Fang earned a Bachelor’s degree from National Chengchi University (Taiwan) and a Master’s degree from Boston University. He has teaching experience in various EFL contexts including international high school, educational institute, and graduate language program.

Shuo-Fang’s areas of interest lie in applied linguistics, particularly phonetics/phonology and speech perception. As an Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholar, Shuo-Fang is currently undertaking his doctoral research, supervised by Dr Elizabeth Wonnacott and Dr Robert Woore. His doctoral project is mostly experimental and explores second language learners’ difficulty in processing English connected speech.

Shuo-Fang is affiliated with two research groups: Applied Linguistics and Wonnacott-Nation Lab (developmental cognitive psychology).

Publications

Liang, S., & Yu, H. (2021). Chinese students’ willingness to communicate in EFL classrooms: A case study of students at a Sino-foreign university. Professional and Academic English, 28(2), 15–33.

Siyu Ma is a DPhil student in child development and learning at the Department of Education. Her doctoral research focuses on second-born children under the Chinese two-child policy, especially how siblings play a role in the socio-emotional, language, and early literacy development of these children.

Prior to starting her Dphil, Siyu completed an MSc in Education (Research Design and Methodology) at the University of Oxford, under the supervision of Professor Sonali Nag. Her MSc dissertation explored the roles of social background and home literacy environment in the language and literacy development of a Wales subsample from the Millennium Cohort Study and was awarded a High Distinction. She also holds a BSc degree with first-class honours in Psychology from the University of Bath.

Siyu is also a research associate working on TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education.

At TalkTogether, Siyu is responsible for designing online surveys and analysing quantitative data from child assessments and parent reports.

Publications

Ma, S. (2021). Family background and home literacy environment as predictors of the early literacy development of children in Wales – findings from the Millennium Cohort Study (Master’s thesis, University of Oxford).

 

Amanda is the recipient of the Hazel Project Scholarship, based at the Rees Centre. Her doctoral research explores the conceptualisation of foster homes as therapeutic environments for complex/developmental trauma. Through participant-generated photography and collaborative qualitative methods with young people currently in foster care placements, her research explores if young people’s concepts and perceptions of therapeutic environments coincide with or challenge existing theoretical models and popular practitioner perspectives.

Amanda holds a BA from the University of Leeds (UK) and an MPhil from the University of Oxford (UK).

Lawrence is a teacher of mathematics who is particularly interested in classroom pedagogy, and how research and education policies interact with the teaching that students experience on a daily basis.

He finds that looking outwards in education is valuable with there being much more that unites our classrooms than isolates them. He has been extremely fortunate to study education through an international lens in the US, and to work on the Global Teaching InSights initiative of the Organisation for Economic Development (OECD) where he led on its videos of teaching.

Publications

Global Teaching InSights: A video study of teaching, OECD, 2020

Antonin is currently Doctoral Teaching Fellow on the MSc in Comparative and International Education, teaching Foundations of Educational Research. Antonin is also a Research Assistant for the Centre for Global Higher Education on the ‘Research on Research: the research function and mission of higher education’ project.

Alongside his teaching and research roles, Antonin is completing a Doctoral study on the European Universities Initiative, the European Commission’s flagship higher education programme that seeks to set up European Universities through transnational university alliances.

Arzhia Habibi is a DPhil in Education Candidate and uses Mandarin to conduct her research in the Chinese higher education context.

Arzhia’s research focuses on ‘expressions’ of global or world citizenship education in a Chinese higher education institution In the study, she explores the perspectives and practices of educators and students at a China-based university, which experiments with discourses related to citizenship. She further investigates how individual, local, national and global dynamics and the surrounding discourses influence worldviews and practices in a university setting.

As empirical studies on global or world citizenship education in the Chinese context are scarce, Arzhia hopes to contribute to a nascent knowledge base which may extend and add depth to the critical global discourses of global and world citizenship education, beyond Eurocentric framings.

Prior to her studies at Oxford, Arzhia received a first class Bachelor’s degree in Contemporary Chinese Studies at The University of Nottingham, and a Master’s in International Communication in Taiwan at National Chengchi University. As a child, she also attended kindergarten in Fuzhou, Fujian province of China.

Olga is a co-convenor of the Philosophy of Education Reading Group at the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. Olga’s main research interest is in the topics of epistemic injustice across all levels of education and across national borders with a focus on higher education and the process of knowledge production in academic institutes and universities. Her core interest lies between the areas of social epistemology, research on research (RoR) and comparative and international education (CIE). She has been a recipient of multiple research awards in the United States and the United Kingdom and is an elected co-convenor of the Comparative and International Education Special Interest Group at the British Educational Research Association (BERA).

Her new research at Oxford will explore the epistemically just and unjust practices as experienced by scholars from Kazakhstan during the internationalisation process in the social sciences and the humanities. Prior joining Oxford, Olga taught at University College London Institute of Education in London on the topics of migrant, refugee and minority education and European education traditions from a comparative lens.

Publications
  • Mun, O. (2020). ‘Epistemic Injustices in Internationalising Humanities and Social Sciences: A Case Study of Higher Education and Science Institutes in Kazakhstan.’ Centre for International Higher Education, Boston College. https://www.bc.edu/content/dam/bc1/schools/lsoe/sites/cihe/publication/Perspectives/Perspectives%20No%2018.pdf
  • Mun, O. and Gafu, G. (in press) ‘University Research Capacity in Kazakhstan’. Higher School of Economics, Russia.
  • Kandiko Howson, C., Mun, O. and Walker, R. (2020). ‘Academic Activism in STEM fields: Discipline in Theory and Practice.’ Philosophy and Theory of Higher Education Society.
  • Aizuddin M., Habibi A., Mun, O. (in press, 2020). ‘Post-Colonialism in Comparative and International Education.’ In Jules, T., Shields, R., Thomas, M. (Ed.), Bloomsbury Handbook of Theory in Comparative and International Education.
  • Palandjian, G., Silova, I., Mun, O., Zholdashaliyeva, R. (2018). ‘Gender and Nation in Postsocialist Educational Transformations.’ In Silova, I., & Chankseliani, M. (Eds.), Comparing Post-Socialist Transformations: Education in Eastern Europe and Former Soviet Union. Oxford: Symposium Books.
  • Mun, O., & Zholdashaliyeva, R. (2017). ‘Alippe, Bukvar’ and Gender: A comparative analysis of early literacy textbooks in Kazakhstan and Kyrgyzstan.’ In E. Brown & R. Craven & G. McLean (Ed.), International Advances in Education: Global Initiatives for Equity and Social Justice Series. Information Age Publishing
  • Patel, K. and Mun, O. (2017). ‘Marketing ‘development’ in the neoliberal university.’ DPU Working Papers https://www.ucl.ac.uk/bartlett/development/case-studies/2017/sep/marketing-development-neoliberal-university
  • Fimyar, O., Saniyazova, A. & Mun, O. (2017) ‘Methodology of Collaborative Research: Or, Searching for a Synergy in the Study of Student Transition in Kazakhstan.’ In SAGE Research Methods Cases. London, United Kingdom: SAGE Publications.
  • Mun, O. (2015). ‘(Re)imagining national identity through early literacy textbooks in Kazakhstan’, Forum of Young Central Asian Experts, 2nd edition. http://caa-network.org/archives/5620
  • Silova, I., Mead Yaqub, M., Mun, O., Palandjian, G. (2014). ‘Pedagogies of Space: (re)imagining nation and childhood in post-Soviet states.’ Global Studies of Childhood, 4(3), 195-209.
  • Silova, I., Brezhenyuk, V., Kudasova, M., Mun, O., Artemev, N. (2014). ‘Youth Protests against Privatisation of Education in post-Soviet states.’ European Education, 46(3), 56-65.

Schooled in the discipline of Public Administration at the University of Dhaka and with an experience of over five years of lecturing graduate and post-graduate students at two reputed public universities in Bangladesh, I am interested in research works related to education, gender, public policy, social studies and have multiple publications.

Apart from my current lecturing position, I worked as a news editor and contributor for the Dhaka Insider, an online news portal, in 2015. I also served as the Head of the Department (Department of Public Administration) and Assistant Proctor at the Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujibur Rahman Science and Technology University (BSMRSTU) and as an elected member of the Teachers’ Association there. During my post-graduation (MA. Public Policy) at the University of Nottingham, a qualitative research focus helped me characterize patterns of gender gap in primary education access.

 

Selected Publications
  • Dutta,  P.  (2020).  Democratic  Decentralization  and  Participatory Development:  Focus  on  Bangladesh.  Journal  of    Contemporary  Governance  and  Public Policy, 1(2), 82-91. Permalink/DOI: https://doi.org/10.46507/jcgpp.v1i2
  • Dutta, P., 2021. • Towards Sound Integrity Management in Bangladesh: Challenges and Issues in Public Administration and Law Enforcement. In: S. N. Khanom, ed. Governance, In the 21st Century in the Sounth Asia: Challenges and Ways Forward. Dhaka: Hakkani Publishers, pp. 541-560.

Zhuohan (Johanne) has a BA in English from Dalian Maritime University, China, and has won China National Scholarship. She then graduated with a Distinction in MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from University of Oxford. Before her DPhil, Zhuohan worked for the organizing committee for the Harvard Summit for Young Leaders in China, an initiative that brought liberal arts education from Harvard to China’s top-performing high school students. She also helped evaluate the UNICEF China Child-Friendly School Programme as an RA, focusing on the socio-emotional learning among the Dong ethnic minority groups in Guangxi, China. She also teaches IELTS, TOEFL, and English phonics.

Her MSc research centres on linguistic relativity, specifically the effect of French grammatical gender system on both French speakers’ and learners’ perception of objects. Her DPhil research focuses on English pronunciation teaching and learning among young Chinese kids, particularly emphasising the influence of their mother tongue, Mandarin.

Supervisors

Robert Woore and Faidra Faitaki

Shuo-Fang earned a Bachelor’s degree from National Chengchi University (Taiwan) and a Master’s degree from Boston University. He has teaching experience in various EFL contexts including international high school, educational institute, and graduate language program.

Shuo-Fang’s areas of interest lie in applied linguistics, particularly phonetics/phonology and speech perception. As an Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholar, Shuo-Fang is currently undertaking his doctoral research, supervised by Dr Elizabeth Wonnacott and Dr Robert Woore. His doctoral project is mostly experimental and explores second language learners’ difficulty in processing English connected speech.

Shuo-Fang is affiliated with two research groups: Applied Linguistics and Wonnacott-Nation Lab (developmental cognitive psychology).

Publications

Liang, S., & Yu, H. (2021). Chinese students’ willingness to communicate in EFL classrooms: A case study of students at a Sino-foreign university. Professional and Academic English, 28(2), 15–33.

Siyu Ma is a DPhil student in child development and learning at the Department of Education. Her doctoral research focuses on second-born children under the Chinese two-child policy, especially how siblings play a role in the socio-emotional, language, and early literacy development of these children.

Prior to starting her Dphil, Siyu completed an MSc in Education (Research Design and Methodology) at the University of Oxford, under the supervision of Professor Sonali Nag. Her MSc dissertation explored the roles of social background and home literacy environment in the language and literacy development of a Wales subsample from the Millennium Cohort Study and was awarded a High Distinction. She also holds a BSc degree with first-class honours in Psychology from the University of Bath.

Siyu is also a research associate working on TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education.

At TalkTogether, Siyu is responsible for designing online surveys and analysing quantitative data from child assessments and parent reports.

Publications

Ma, S. (2021). Family background and home literacy environment as predictors of the early literacy development of children in Wales – findings from the Millennium Cohort Study (Master’s thesis, University of Oxford).

 

Amanda is the recipient of the Hazel Project Scholarship, based at the Rees Centre. Her doctoral research explores the conceptualisation of foster homes as therapeutic environments for complex/developmental trauma. Through participant-generated photography and collaborative qualitative methods with young people currently in foster care placements, her research explores if young people’s concepts and perceptions of therapeutic environments coincide with or challenge existing theoretical models and popular practitioner perspectives.

Amanda holds a BA from the University of Leeds (UK) and an MPhil from the University of Oxford (UK).

Lawrence is a teacher of mathematics who is particularly interested in classroom pedagogy, and how research and education policies interact with the teaching that students experience on a daily basis.

He finds that looking outwards in education is valuable with there being much more that unites our classrooms than isolates them. He has been extremely fortunate to study education through an international lens in the US, and to work on the Global Teaching InSights initiative of the Organisation for Economic Development (OECD) where he led on its videos of teaching.

Publications

Global Teaching InSights: A video study of teaching, OECD, 2020

Antonin is currently Doctoral Teaching Fellow on the MSc in Comparative and International Education, teaching Foundations of Educational Research. Antonin is also a Research Assistant for the Centre for Global Higher Education on the ‘Research on Research: the research function and mission of higher education’ project.

Alongside his teaching and research roles, Antonin is completing a Doctoral study on the European Universities Initiative, the European Commission’s flagship higher education programme that seeks to set up European Universities through transnational university alliances.

Arzhia Habibi is a DPhil in Education Candidate and uses Mandarin to conduct her research in the Chinese higher education context.

Arzhia’s research focuses on ‘expressions’ of global or world citizenship education in a Chinese higher education institution In the study, she explores the perspectives and practices of educators and students at a China-based university, which experiments with discourses related to citizenship. She further investigates how individual, local, national and global dynamics and the surrounding discourses influence worldviews and practices in a university setting.

As empirical studies on global or world citizenship education in the Chinese context are scarce, Arzhia hopes to contribute to a nascent knowledge base which may extend and add depth to the critical global discourses of global and world citizenship education, beyond Eurocentric framings.

Prior to her studies at Oxford, Arzhia received a first class Bachelor’s degree in Contemporary Chinese Studies at The University of Nottingham, and a Master’s in International Communication in Taiwan at National Chengchi University. As a child, she also attended kindergarten in Fuzhou, Fujian province of China.

Olga is a co-convenor of the Philosophy of Education Reading Group at the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. Olga’s main research interest is in the topics of epistemic injustice across all levels of education and across national borders with a focus on higher education and the process of knowledge production in academic institutes and universities. Her core interest lies between the areas of social epistemology, research on research (RoR) and comparative and international education (CIE). She has been a recipient of multiple research awards in the United States and the United Kingdom and is an elected co-convenor of the Comparative and International Education Special Interest Group at the British Educational Research Association (BERA).

Her new research at Oxford will explore the epistemically just and unjust practices as experienced by scholars from Kazakhstan during the internationalisation process in the social sciences and the humanities. Prior joining Oxford, Olga taught at University College London Institute of Education in London on the topics of migrant, refugee and minority education and European education traditions from a comparative lens.

Publications
  • Mun, O. (2020). ‘Epistemic Injustices in Internationalising Humanities and Social Sciences: A Case Study of Higher Education and Science Institutes in Kazakhstan.’ Centre for International Higher Education, Boston College. https://www.bc.edu/content/dam/bc1/schools/lsoe/sites/cihe/publication/Perspectives/Perspectives%20No%2018.pdf
  • Mun, O. and Gafu, G. (in press) ‘University Research Capacity in Kazakhstan’. Higher School of Economics, Russia.
  • Kandiko Howson, C., Mun, O. and Walker, R. (2020). ‘Academic Activism in STEM fields: Discipline in Theory and Practice.’ Philosophy and Theory of Higher Education Society.
  • Aizuddin M., Habibi A., Mun, O. (in press, 2020). ‘Post-Colonialism in Comparative and International Education.’ In Jules, T., Shields, R., Thomas, M. (Ed.), Bloomsbury Handbook of Theory in Comparative and International Education.
  • Palandjian, G., Silova, I., Mun, O., Zholdashaliyeva, R. (2018). ‘Gender and Nation in Postsocialist Educational Transformations.’ In Silova, I., & Chankseliani, M. (Eds.), Comparing Post-Socialist Transformations: Education in Eastern Europe and Former Soviet Union. Oxford: Symposium Books.
  • Mun, O., & Zholdashaliyeva, R. (2017). ‘Alippe, Bukvar’ and Gender: A comparative analysis of early literacy textbooks in Kazakhstan and Kyrgyzstan.’ In E. Brown & R. Craven & G. McLean (Ed.), International Advances in Education: Global Initiatives for Equity and Social Justice Series. Information Age Publishing
  • Patel, K. and Mun, O. (2017). ‘Marketing ‘development’ in the neoliberal university.’ DPU Working Papers https://www.ucl.ac.uk/bartlett/development/case-studies/2017/sep/marketing-development-neoliberal-university
  • Fimyar, O., Saniyazova, A. & Mun, O. (2017) ‘Methodology of Collaborative Research: Or, Searching for a Synergy in the Study of Student Transition in Kazakhstan.’ In SAGE Research Methods Cases. London, United Kingdom: SAGE Publications.
  • Mun, O. (2015). ‘(Re)imagining national identity through early literacy textbooks in Kazakhstan’, Forum of Young Central Asian Experts, 2nd edition. http://caa-network.org/archives/5620
  • Silova, I., Mead Yaqub, M., Mun, O., Palandjian, G. (2014). ‘Pedagogies of Space: (re)imagining nation and childhood in post-Soviet states.’ Global Studies of Childhood, 4(3), 195-209.
  • Silova, I., Brezhenyuk, V., Kudasova, M., Mun, O., Artemev, N. (2014). ‘Youth Protests against Privatisation of Education in post-Soviet states.’ European Education, 46(3), 56-65.

Schooled in the discipline of Public Administration at the University of Dhaka and with an experience of over five years of lecturing graduate and post-graduate students at two reputed public universities in Bangladesh, I am interested in research works related to education, gender, public policy, social studies and have multiple publications.

Apart from my current lecturing position, I worked as a news editor and contributor for the Dhaka Insider, an online news portal, in 2015. I also served as the Head of the Department (Department of Public Administration) and Assistant Proctor at the Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujibur Rahman Science and Technology University (BSMRSTU) and as an elected member of the Teachers’ Association there. During my post-graduation (MA. Public Policy) at the University of Nottingham, a qualitative research focus helped me characterize patterns of gender gap in primary education access.

 

Selected Publications
  • Dutta,  P.  (2020).  Democratic  Decentralization  and  Participatory Development:  Focus  on  Bangladesh.  Journal  of    Contemporary  Governance  and  Public Policy, 1(2), 82-91. Permalink/DOI: https://doi.org/10.46507/jcgpp.v1i2
  • Dutta, P., 2021. • Towards Sound Integrity Management in Bangladesh: Challenges and Issues in Public Administration and Law Enforcement. In: S. N. Khanom, ed. Governance, In the 21st Century in the Sounth Asia: Challenges and Ways Forward. Dhaka: Hakkani Publishers, pp. 541-560.

Zhuohan (Johanne) has a BA in English from Dalian Maritime University, China, and has won China National Scholarship. She then graduated with a Distinction in MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from University of Oxford. Before her DPhil, Zhuohan worked for the organizing committee for the Harvard Summit for Young Leaders in China, an initiative that brought liberal arts education from Harvard to China’s top-performing high school students. She also helped evaluate the UNICEF China Child-Friendly School Programme as an RA, focusing on the socio-emotional learning among the Dong ethnic minority groups in Guangxi, China. She also teaches IELTS, TOEFL, and English phonics.

Her MSc research centres on linguistic relativity, specifically the effect of French grammatical gender system on both French speakers’ and learners’ perception of objects. Her DPhil research focuses on English pronunciation teaching and learning among young Chinese kids, particularly emphasising the influence of their mother tongue, Mandarin.

Supervisors

Robert Woore and Faidra Faitaki

Shuo-Fang earned a Bachelor’s degree from National Chengchi University (Taiwan) and a Master’s degree from Boston University. He has teaching experience in various EFL contexts including international high school, educational institute, and graduate language program.

Shuo-Fang’s areas of interest lie in applied linguistics, particularly phonetics/phonology and speech perception. As an Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholar, Shuo-Fang is currently undertaking his doctoral research, supervised by Dr Elizabeth Wonnacott and Dr Robert Woore. His doctoral project is mostly experimental and explores second language learners’ difficulty in processing English connected speech.

Shuo-Fang is affiliated with two research groups: Applied Linguistics and Wonnacott-Nation Lab (developmental cognitive psychology).

Publications

Liang, S., & Yu, H. (2021). Chinese students’ willingness to communicate in EFL classrooms: A case study of students at a Sino-foreign university. Professional and Academic English, 28(2), 15–33.

Siyu Ma is a DPhil student in child development and learning at the Department of Education. Her doctoral research focuses on second-born children under the Chinese two-child policy, especially how siblings play a role in the socio-emotional, language, and early literacy development of these children.

Prior to starting her Dphil, Siyu completed an MSc in Education (Research Design and Methodology) at the University of Oxford, under the supervision of Professor Sonali Nag. Her MSc dissertation explored the roles of social background and home literacy environment in the language and literacy development of a Wales subsample from the Millennium Cohort Study and was awarded a High Distinction. She also holds a BSc degree with first-class honours in Psychology from the University of Bath.

Siyu is also a research associate working on TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education.

At TalkTogether, Siyu is responsible for designing online surveys and analysing quantitative data from child assessments and parent reports.

Publications

Ma, S. (2021). Family background and home literacy environment as predictors of the early literacy development of children in Wales – findings from the Millennium Cohort Study (Master’s thesis, University of Oxford).

 

Amanda is the recipient of the Hazel Project Scholarship, based at the Rees Centre. Her doctoral research explores the conceptualisation of foster homes as therapeutic environments for complex/developmental trauma. Through participant-generated photography and collaborative qualitative methods with young people currently in foster care placements, her research explores if young people’s concepts and perceptions of therapeutic environments coincide with or challenge existing theoretical models and popular practitioner perspectives.

Amanda holds a BA from the University of Leeds (UK) and an MPhil from the University of Oxford (UK).

Lawrence is a teacher of mathematics who is particularly interested in classroom pedagogy, and how research and education policies interact with the teaching that students experience on a daily basis.

He finds that looking outwards in education is valuable with there being much more that unites our classrooms than isolates them. He has been extremely fortunate to study education through an international lens in the US, and to work on the Global Teaching InSights initiative of the Organisation for Economic Development (OECD) where he led on its videos of teaching.

Publications

Global Teaching InSights: A video study of teaching, OECD, 2020

Antonin is currently Doctoral Teaching Fellow on the MSc in Comparative and International Education, teaching Foundations of Educational Research. Antonin is also a Research Assistant for the Centre for Global Higher Education on the ‘Research on Research: the research function and mission of higher education’ project.

Alongside his teaching and research roles, Antonin is completing a Doctoral study on the European Universities Initiative, the European Commission’s flagship higher education programme that seeks to set up European Universities through transnational university alliances.

Arzhia Habibi is a DPhil in Education Candidate and uses Mandarin to conduct her research in the Chinese higher education context.

Arzhia’s research focuses on ‘expressions’ of global or world citizenship education in a Chinese higher education institution In the study, she explores the perspectives and practices of educators and students at a China-based university, which experiments with discourses related to citizenship. She further investigates how individual, local, national and global dynamics and the surrounding discourses influence worldviews and practices in a university setting.

As empirical studies on global or world citizenship education in the Chinese context are scarce, Arzhia hopes to contribute to a nascent knowledge base which may extend and add depth to the critical global discourses of global and world citizenship education, beyond Eurocentric framings.

Prior to her studies at Oxford, Arzhia received a first class Bachelor’s degree in Contemporary Chinese Studies at The University of Nottingham, and a Master’s in International Communication in Taiwan at National Chengchi University. As a child, she also attended kindergarten in Fuzhou, Fujian province of China.

Olga is a co-convenor of the Philosophy of Education Reading Group at the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. Olga’s main research interest is in the topics of epistemic injustice across all levels of education and across national borders with a focus on higher education and the process of knowledge production in academic institutes and universities. Her core interest lies between the areas of social epistemology, research on research (RoR) and comparative and international education (CIE). She has been a recipient of multiple research awards in the United States and the United Kingdom and is an elected co-convenor of the Comparative and International Education Special Interest Group at the British Educational Research Association (BERA).

Her new research at Oxford will explore the epistemically just and unjust practices as experienced by scholars from Kazakhstan during the internationalisation process in the social sciences and the humanities. Prior joining Oxford, Olga taught at University College London Institute of Education in London on the topics of migrant, refugee and minority education and European education traditions from a comparative lens.

Publications
  • Mun, O. (2020). ‘Epistemic Injustices in Internationalising Humanities and Social Sciences: A Case Study of Higher Education and Science Institutes in Kazakhstan.’ Centre for International Higher Education, Boston College. https://www.bc.edu/content/dam/bc1/schools/lsoe/sites/cihe/publication/Perspectives/Perspectives%20No%2018.pdf
  • Mun, O. and Gafu, G. (in press) ‘University Research Capacity in Kazakhstan’. Higher School of Economics, Russia.
  • Kandiko Howson, C., Mun, O. and Walker, R. (2020). ‘Academic Activism in STEM fields: Discipline in Theory and Practice.’ Philosophy and Theory of Higher Education Society.
  • Aizuddin M., Habibi A., Mun, O. (in press, 2020). ‘Post-Colonialism in Comparative and International Education.’ In Jules, T., Shields, R., Thomas, M. (Ed.), Bloomsbury Handbook of Theory in Comparative and International Education.
  • Palandjian, G., Silova, I., Mun, O., Zholdashaliyeva, R. (2018). ‘Gender and Nation in Postsocialist Educational Transformations.’ In Silova, I., & Chankseliani, M. (Eds.), Comparing Post-Socialist Transformations: Education in Eastern Europe and Former Soviet Union. Oxford: Symposium Books.
  • Mun, O., & Zholdashaliyeva, R. (2017). ‘Alippe, Bukvar’ and Gender: A comparative analysis of early literacy textbooks in Kazakhstan and Kyrgyzstan.’ In E. Brown & R. Craven & G. McLean (Ed.), International Advances in Education: Global Initiatives for Equity and Social Justice Series. Information Age Publishing
  • Patel, K. and Mun, O. (2017). ‘Marketing ‘development’ in the neoliberal university.’ DPU Working Papers https://www.ucl.ac.uk/bartlett/development/case-studies/2017/sep/marketing-development-neoliberal-university
  • Fimyar, O., Saniyazova, A. & Mun, O. (2017) ‘Methodology of Collaborative Research: Or, Searching for a Synergy in the Study of Student Transition in Kazakhstan.’ In SAGE Research Methods Cases. London, United Kingdom: SAGE Publications.
  • Mun, O. (2015). ‘(Re)imagining national identity through early literacy textbooks in Kazakhstan’, Forum of Young Central Asian Experts, 2nd edition. http://caa-network.org/archives/5620
  • Silova, I., Mead Yaqub, M., Mun, O., Palandjian, G. (2014). ‘Pedagogies of Space: (re)imagining nation and childhood in post-Soviet states.’ Global Studies of Childhood, 4(3), 195-209.
  • Silova, I., Brezhenyuk, V., Kudasova, M., Mun, O., Artemev, N. (2014). ‘Youth Protests against Privatisation of Education in post-Soviet states.’ European Education, 46(3), 56-65.

Schooled in the discipline of Public Administration at the University of Dhaka and with an experience of over five years of lecturing graduate and post-graduate students at two reputed public universities in Bangladesh, I am interested in research works related to education, gender, public policy, social studies and have multiple publications.

Apart from my current lecturing position, I worked as a news editor and contributor for the Dhaka Insider, an online news portal, in 2015. I also served as the Head of the Department (Department of Public Administration) and Assistant Proctor at the Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujibur Rahman Science and Technology University (BSMRSTU) and as an elected member of the Teachers’ Association there. During my post-graduation (MA. Public Policy) at the University of Nottingham, a qualitative research focus helped me characterize patterns of gender gap in primary education access.

 

Selected Publications
  • Dutta,  P.  (2020).  Democratic  Decentralization  and  Participatory Development:  Focus  on  Bangladesh.  Journal  of    Contemporary  Governance  and  Public Policy, 1(2), 82-91. Permalink/DOI: https://doi.org/10.46507/jcgpp.v1i2
  • Dutta, P., 2021. • Towards Sound Integrity Management in Bangladesh: Challenges and Issues in Public Administration and Law Enforcement. In: S. N. Khanom, ed. Governance, In the 21st Century in the Sounth Asia: Challenges and Ways Forward. Dhaka: Hakkani Publishers, pp. 541-560.

Zhuohan (Johanne) has a BA in English from Dalian Maritime University, China, and has won China National Scholarship. She then graduated with a Distinction in MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from University of Oxford. Before her DPhil, Zhuohan worked for the organizing committee for the Harvard Summit for Young Leaders in China, an initiative that brought liberal arts education from Harvard to China’s top-performing high school students. She also helped evaluate the UNICEF China Child-Friendly School Programme as an RA, focusing on the socio-emotional learning among the Dong ethnic minority groups in Guangxi, China. She also teaches IELTS, TOEFL, and English phonics.

Her MSc research centres on linguistic relativity, specifically the effect of French grammatical gender system on both French speakers’ and learners’ perception of objects. Her DPhil research focuses on English pronunciation teaching and learning among young Chinese kids, particularly emphasising the influence of their mother tongue, Mandarin.

Supervisors

Robert Woore and Faidra Faitaki

Shuo-Fang earned a Bachelor’s degree from National Chengchi University (Taiwan) and a Master’s degree from Boston University. He has teaching experience in various EFL contexts including international high school, educational institute, and graduate language program.

Shuo-Fang’s areas of interest lie in applied linguistics, particularly phonetics/phonology and speech perception. As an Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholar, Shuo-Fang is currently undertaking his doctoral research, supervised by Dr Elizabeth Wonnacott and Dr Robert Woore. His doctoral project is mostly experimental and explores second language learners’ difficulty in processing English connected speech.

Shuo-Fang is affiliated with two research groups: Applied Linguistics and Wonnacott-Nation Lab (developmental cognitive psychology).

Publications

Liang, S., & Yu, H. (2021). Chinese students’ willingness to communicate in EFL classrooms: A case study of students at a Sino-foreign university. Professional and Academic English, 28(2), 15–33.

Siyu Ma is a DPhil student in child development and learning at the Department of Education. Her doctoral research focuses on second-born children under the Chinese two-child policy, especially how siblings play a role in the socio-emotional, language, and early literacy development of these children.

Prior to starting her Dphil, Siyu completed an MSc in Education (Research Design and Methodology) at the University of Oxford, under the supervision of Professor Sonali Nag. Her MSc dissertation explored the roles of social background and home literacy environment in the language and literacy development of a Wales subsample from the Millennium Cohort Study and was awarded a High Distinction. She also holds a BSc degree with first-class honours in Psychology from the University of Bath.

Siyu is also a research associate working on TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education.

At TalkTogether, Siyu is responsible for designing online surveys and analysing quantitative data from child assessments and parent reports.

Publications

Ma, S. (2021). Family background and home literacy environment as predictors of the early literacy development of children in Wales – findings from the Millennium Cohort Study (Master’s thesis, University of Oxford).

 

Amanda is the recipient of the Hazel Project Scholarship, based at the Rees Centre. Her doctoral research explores the conceptualisation of foster homes as therapeutic environments for complex/developmental trauma. Through participant-generated photography and collaborative qualitative methods with young people currently in foster care placements, her research explores if young people’s concepts and perceptions of therapeutic environments coincide with or challenge existing theoretical models and popular practitioner perspectives.

Amanda holds a BA from the University of Leeds (UK) and an MPhil from the University of Oxford (UK).

Lawrence is a teacher of mathematics who is particularly interested in classroom pedagogy, and how research and education policies interact with the teaching that students experience on a daily basis.

He finds that looking outwards in education is valuable with there being much more that unites our classrooms than isolates them. He has been extremely fortunate to study education through an international lens in the US, and to work on the Global Teaching InSights initiative of the Organisation for Economic Development (OECD) where he led on its videos of teaching.

Publications

Global Teaching InSights: A video study of teaching, OECD, 2020

Antonin is currently Doctoral Teaching Fellow on the MSc in Comparative and International Education, teaching Foundations of Educational Research. Antonin is also a Research Assistant for the Centre for Global Higher Education on the ‘Research on Research: the research function and mission of higher education’ project.

Alongside his teaching and research roles, Antonin is completing a Doctoral study on the European Universities Initiative, the European Commission’s flagship higher education programme that seeks to set up European Universities through transnational university alliances.

Arzhia Habibi is a DPhil in Education Candidate and uses Mandarin to conduct her research in the Chinese higher education context.

Arzhia’s research focuses on ‘expressions’ of global or world citizenship education in a Chinese higher education institution In the study, she explores the perspectives and practices of educators and students at a China-based university, which experiments with discourses related to citizenship. She further investigates how individual, local, national and global dynamics and the surrounding discourses influence worldviews and practices in a university setting.

As empirical studies on global or world citizenship education in the Chinese context are scarce, Arzhia hopes to contribute to a nascent knowledge base which may extend and add depth to the critical global discourses of global and world citizenship education, beyond Eurocentric framings.

Prior to her studies at Oxford, Arzhia received a first class Bachelor’s degree in Contemporary Chinese Studies at The University of Nottingham, and a Master’s in International Communication in Taiwan at National Chengchi University. As a child, she also attended kindergarten in Fuzhou, Fujian province of China.

Olga is a co-convenor of the Philosophy of Education Reading Group at the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. Olga’s main research interest is in the topics of epistemic injustice across all levels of education and across national borders with a focus on higher education and the process of knowledge production in academic institutes and universities. Her core interest lies between the areas of social epistemology, research on research (RoR) and comparative and international education (CIE). She has been a recipient of multiple research awards in the United States and the United Kingdom and is an elected co-convenor of the Comparative and International Education Special Interest Group at the British Educational Research Association (BERA).

Her new research at Oxford will explore the epistemically just and unjust practices as experienced by scholars from Kazakhstan during the internationalisation process in the social sciences and the humanities. Prior joining Oxford, Olga taught at University College London Institute of Education in London on the topics of migrant, refugee and minority education and European education traditions from a comparative lens.

Publications
  • Mun, O. (2020). ‘Epistemic Injustices in Internationalising Humanities and Social Sciences: A Case Study of Higher Education and Science Institutes in Kazakhstan.’ Centre for International Higher Education, Boston College. https://www.bc.edu/content/dam/bc1/schools/lsoe/sites/cihe/publication/Perspectives/Perspectives%20No%2018.pdf
  • Mun, O. and Gafu, G. (in press) ‘University Research Capacity in Kazakhstan’. Higher School of Economics, Russia.
  • Kandiko Howson, C., Mun, O. and Walker, R. (2020). ‘Academic Activism in STEM fields: Discipline in Theory and Practice.’ Philosophy and Theory of Higher Education Society.
  • Aizuddin M., Habibi A., Mun, O. (in press, 2020). ‘Post-Colonialism in Comparative and International Education.’ In Jules, T., Shields, R., Thomas, M. (Ed.), Bloomsbury Handbook of Theory in Comparative and International Education.
  • Palandjian, G., Silova, I., Mun, O., Zholdashaliyeva, R. (2018). ‘Gender and Nation in Postsocialist Educational Transformations.’ In Silova, I., & Chankseliani, M. (Eds.), Comparing Post-Socialist Transformations: Education in Eastern Europe and Former Soviet Union. Oxford: Symposium Books.
  • Mun, O., & Zholdashaliyeva, R. (2017). ‘Alippe, Bukvar’ and Gender: A comparative analysis of early literacy textbooks in Kazakhstan and Kyrgyzstan.’ In E. Brown & R. Craven & G. McLean (Ed.), International Advances in Education: Global Initiatives for Equity and Social Justice Series. Information Age Publishing
  • Patel, K. and Mun, O. (2017). ‘Marketing ‘development’ in the neoliberal university.’ DPU Working Papers https://www.ucl.ac.uk/bartlett/development/case-studies/2017/sep/marketing-development-neoliberal-university
  • Fimyar, O., Saniyazova, A. & Mun, O. (2017) ‘Methodology of Collaborative Research: Or, Searching for a Synergy in the Study of Student Transition in Kazakhstan.’ In SAGE Research Methods Cases. London, United Kingdom: SAGE Publications.
  • Mun, O. (2015). ‘(Re)imagining national identity through early literacy textbooks in Kazakhstan’, Forum of Young Central Asian Experts, 2nd edition. http://caa-network.org/archives/5620
  • Silova, I., Mead Yaqub, M., Mun, O., Palandjian, G. (2014). ‘Pedagogies of Space: (re)imagining nation and childhood in post-Soviet states.’ Global Studies of Childhood, 4(3), 195-209.
  • Silova, I., Brezhenyuk, V., Kudasova, M., Mun, O., Artemev, N. (2014). ‘Youth Protests against Privatisation of Education in post-Soviet states.’ European Education, 46(3), 56-65.

Schooled in the discipline of Public Administration at the University of Dhaka and with an experience of over five years of lecturing graduate and post-graduate students at two reputed public universities in Bangladesh, I am interested in research works related to education, gender, public policy, social studies and have multiple publications.

Apart from my current lecturing position, I worked as a news editor and contributor for the Dhaka Insider, an online news portal, in 2015. I also served as the Head of the Department (Department of Public Administration) and Assistant Proctor at the Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujibur Rahman Science and Technology University (BSMRSTU) and as an elected member of the Teachers’ Association there. During my post-graduation (MA. Public Policy) at the University of Nottingham, a qualitative research focus helped me characterize patterns of gender gap in primary education access.

 

Selected Publications
  • Dutta,  P.  (2020).  Democratic  Decentralization  and  Participatory Development:  Focus  on  Bangladesh.  Journal  of    Contemporary  Governance  and  Public Policy, 1(2), 82-91. Permalink/DOI: https://doi.org/10.46507/jcgpp.v1i2
  • Dutta, P., 2021. • Towards Sound Integrity Management in Bangladesh: Challenges and Issues in Public Administration and Law Enforcement. In: S. N. Khanom, ed. Governance, In the 21st Century in the Sounth Asia: Challenges and Ways Forward. Dhaka: Hakkani Publishers, pp. 541-560.

Zhuohan (Johanne) has a BA in English from Dalian Maritime University, China, and has won China National Scholarship. She then graduated with a Distinction in MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from University of Oxford. Before her DPhil, Zhuohan worked for the organizing committee for the Harvard Summit for Young Leaders in China, an initiative that brought liberal arts education from Harvard to China’s top-performing high school students. She also helped evaluate the UNICEF China Child-Friendly School Programme as an RA, focusing on the socio-emotional learning among the Dong ethnic minority groups in Guangxi, China. She also teaches IELTS, TOEFL, and English phonics.

Her MSc research centres on linguistic relativity, specifically the effect of French grammatical gender system on both French speakers’ and learners’ perception of objects. Her DPhil research focuses on English pronunciation teaching and learning among young Chinese kids, particularly emphasising the influence of their mother tongue, Mandarin.

Supervisors

Robert Woore and Faidra Faitaki

Shuo-Fang earned a Bachelor’s degree from National Chengchi University (Taiwan) and a Master’s degree from Boston University. He has teaching experience in various EFL contexts including international high school, educational institute, and graduate language program.

Shuo-Fang’s areas of interest lie in applied linguistics, particularly phonetics/phonology and speech perception. As an Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholar, Shuo-Fang is currently undertaking his doctoral research, supervised by Dr Elizabeth Wonnacott and Dr Robert Woore. His doctoral project is mostly experimental and explores second language learners’ difficulty in processing English connected speech.

Shuo-Fang is affiliated with two research groups: Applied Linguistics and Wonnacott-Nation Lab (developmental cognitive psychology).

Publications

Liang, S., & Yu, H. (2021). Chinese students’ willingness to communicate in EFL classrooms: A case study of students at a Sino-foreign university. Professional and Academic English, 28(2), 15–33.

Siyu Ma is a DPhil student in child development and learning at the Department of Education. Her doctoral research focuses on second-born children under the Chinese two-child policy, especially how siblings play a role in the socio-emotional, language, and early literacy development of these children.

Prior to starting her Dphil, Siyu completed an MSc in Education (Research Design and Methodology) at the University of Oxford, under the supervision of Professor Sonali Nag. Her MSc dissertation explored the roles of social background and home literacy environment in the language and literacy development of a Wales subsample from the Millennium Cohort Study and was awarded a High Distinction. She also holds a BSc degree with first-class honours in Psychology from the University of Bath.

Siyu is also a research associate working on TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education.

At TalkTogether, Siyu is responsible for designing online surveys and analysing quantitative data from child assessments and parent reports.

Publications

Ma, S. (2021). Family background and home literacy environment as predictors of the early literacy development of children in Wales – findings from the Millennium Cohort Study (Master’s thesis, University of Oxford).

 

Amanda is the recipient of the Hazel Project Scholarship, based at the Rees Centre. Her doctoral research explores the conceptualisation of foster homes as therapeutic environments for complex/developmental trauma. Through participant-generated photography and collaborative qualitative methods with young people currently in foster care placements, her research explores if young people’s concepts and perceptions of therapeutic environments coincide with or challenge existing theoretical models and popular practitioner perspectives.

Amanda holds a BA from the University of Leeds (UK) and an MPhil from the University of Oxford (UK).

Lawrence is a teacher of mathematics who is particularly interested in classroom pedagogy, and how research and education policies interact with the teaching that students experience on a daily basis.

He finds that looking outwards in education is valuable with there being much more that unites our classrooms than isolates them. He has been extremely fortunate to study education through an international lens in the US, and to work on the Global Teaching InSights initiative of the Organisation for Economic Development (OECD) where he led on its videos of teaching.

Publications

Global Teaching InSights: A video study of teaching, OECD, 2020

Antonin is currently Doctoral Teaching Fellow on the MSc in Comparative and International Education, teaching Foundations of Educational Research. Antonin is also a Research Assistant for the Centre for Global Higher Education on the ‘Research on Research: the research function and mission of higher education’ project.

Alongside his teaching and research roles, Antonin is completing a Doctoral study on the European Universities Initiative, the European Commission’s flagship higher education programme that seeks to set up European Universities through transnational university alliances.

Arzhia Habibi is a DPhil in Education Candidate and uses Mandarin to conduct her research in the Chinese higher education context.

Arzhia’s research focuses on ‘expressions’ of global or world citizenship education in a Chinese higher education institution In the study, she explores the perspectives and practices of educators and students at a China-based university, which experiments with discourses related to citizenship. She further investigates how individual, local, national and global dynamics and the surrounding discourses influence worldviews and practices in a university setting.

As empirical studies on global or world citizenship education in the Chinese context are scarce, Arzhia hopes to contribute to a nascent knowledge base which may extend and add depth to the critical global discourses of global and world citizenship education, beyond Eurocentric framings.

Prior to her studies at Oxford, Arzhia received a first class Bachelor’s degree in Contemporary Chinese Studies at The University of Nottingham, and a Master’s in International Communication in Taiwan at National Chengchi University. As a child, she also attended kindergarten in Fuzhou, Fujian province of China.

Olga is a co-convenor of the Philosophy of Education Reading Group at the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. Olga’s main research interest is in the topics of epistemic injustice across all levels of education and across national borders with a focus on higher education and the process of knowledge production in academic institutes and universities. Her core interest lies between the areas of social epistemology, research on research (RoR) and comparative and international education (CIE). She has been a recipient of multiple research awards in the United States and the United Kingdom and is an elected co-convenor of the Comparative and International Education Special Interest Group at the British Educational Research Association (BERA).

Her new research at Oxford will explore the epistemically just and unjust practices as experienced by scholars from Kazakhstan during the internationalisation process in the social sciences and the humanities. Prior joining Oxford, Olga taught at University College London Institute of Education in London on the topics of migrant, refugee and minority education and European education traditions from a comparative lens.

Publications
  • Mun, O. (2020). ‘Epistemic Injustices in Internationalising Humanities and Social Sciences: A Case Study of Higher Education and Science Institutes in Kazakhstan.’ Centre for International Higher Education, Boston College. https://www.bc.edu/content/dam/bc1/schools/lsoe/sites/cihe/publication/Perspectives/Perspectives%20No%2018.pdf
  • Mun, O. and Gafu, G. (in press) ‘University Research Capacity in Kazakhstan’. Higher School of Economics, Russia.
  • Kandiko Howson, C., Mun, O. and Walker, R. (2020). ‘Academic Activism in STEM fields: Discipline in Theory and Practice.’ Philosophy and Theory of Higher Education Society.
  • Aizuddin M., Habibi A., Mun, O. (in press, 2020). ‘Post-Colonialism in Comparative and International Education.’ In Jules, T., Shields, R., Thomas, M. (Ed.), Bloomsbury Handbook of Theory in Comparative and International Education.
  • Palandjian, G., Silova, I., Mun, O., Zholdashaliyeva, R. (2018). ‘Gender and Nation in Postsocialist Educational Transformations.’ In Silova, I., & Chankseliani, M. (Eds.), Comparing Post-Socialist Transformations: Education in Eastern Europe and Former Soviet Union. Oxford: Symposium Books.
  • Mun, O., & Zholdashaliyeva, R. (2017). ‘Alippe, Bukvar’ and Gender: A comparative analysis of early literacy textbooks in Kazakhstan and Kyrgyzstan.’ In E. Brown & R. Craven & G. McLean (Ed.), International Advances in Education: Global Initiatives for Equity and Social Justice Series. Information Age Publishing
  • Patel, K. and Mun, O. (2017). ‘Marketing ‘development’ in the neoliberal university.’ DPU Working Papers https://www.ucl.ac.uk/bartlett/development/case-studies/2017/sep/marketing-development-neoliberal-university
  • Fimyar, O., Saniyazova, A. & Mun, O. (2017) ‘Methodology of Collaborative Research: Or, Searching for a Synergy in the Study of Student Transition in Kazakhstan.’ In SAGE Research Methods Cases. London, United Kingdom: SAGE Publications.
  • Mun, O. (2015). ‘(Re)imagining national identity through early literacy textbooks in Kazakhstan’, Forum of Young Central Asian Experts, 2nd edition. http://caa-network.org/archives/5620
  • Silova, I., Mead Yaqub, M., Mun, O., Palandjian, G. (2014). ‘Pedagogies of Space: (re)imagining nation and childhood in post-Soviet states.’ Global Studies of Childhood, 4(3), 195-209.
  • Silova, I., Brezhenyuk, V., Kudasova, M., Mun, O., Artemev, N. (2014). ‘Youth Protests against Privatisation of Education in post-Soviet states.’ European Education, 46(3), 56-65.

Schooled in the discipline of Public Administration at the University of Dhaka and with an experience of over five years of lecturing graduate and post-graduate students at two reputed public universities in Bangladesh, I am interested in research works related to education, gender, public policy, social studies and have multiple publications.

Apart from my current lecturing position, I worked as a news editor and contributor for the Dhaka Insider, an online news portal, in 2015. I also served as the Head of the Department (Department of Public Administration) and Assistant Proctor at the Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujibur Rahman Science and Technology University (BSMRSTU) and as an elected member of the Teachers’ Association there. During my post-graduation (MA. Public Policy) at the University of Nottingham, a qualitative research focus helped me characterize patterns of gender gap in primary education access.

 

Selected Publications
  • Dutta,  P.  (2020).  Democratic  Decentralization  and  Participatory Development:  Focus  on  Bangladesh.  Journal  of    Contemporary  Governance  and  Public Policy, 1(2), 82-91. Permalink/DOI: https://doi.org/10.46507/jcgpp.v1i2
  • Dutta, P., 2021. • Towards Sound Integrity Management in Bangladesh: Challenges and Issues in Public Administration and Law Enforcement. In: S. N. Khanom, ed. Governance, In the 21st Century in the Sounth Asia: Challenges and Ways Forward. Dhaka: Hakkani Publishers, pp. 541-560.

Zhuohan (Johanne) has a BA in English from Dalian Maritime University, China, and has won China National Scholarship. She then graduated with a Distinction in MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from University of Oxford. Before her DPhil, Zhuohan worked for the organizing committee for the Harvard Summit for Young Leaders in China, an initiative that brought liberal arts education from Harvard to China’s top-performing high school students. She also helped evaluate the UNICEF China Child-Friendly School Programme as an RA, focusing on the socio-emotional learning among the Dong ethnic minority groups in Guangxi, China. She also teaches IELTS, TOEFL, and English phonics.

Her MSc research centres on linguistic relativity, specifically the effect of French grammatical gender system on both French speakers’ and learners’ perception of objects. Her DPhil research focuses on English pronunciation teaching and learning among young Chinese kids, particularly emphasising the influence of their mother tongue, Mandarin.

Supervisors

Robert Woore and Faidra Faitaki

Shuo-Fang earned a Bachelor’s degree from National Chengchi University (Taiwan) and a Master’s degree from Boston University. He has teaching experience in various EFL contexts including international high school, educational institute, and graduate language program.

Shuo-Fang’s areas of interest lie in applied linguistics, particularly phonetics/phonology and speech perception. As an Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholar, Shuo-Fang is currently undertaking his doctoral research, supervised by Dr Elizabeth Wonnacott and Dr Robert Woore. His doctoral project is mostly experimental and explores second language learners’ difficulty in processing English connected speech.

Shuo-Fang is affiliated with two research groups: Applied Linguistics and Wonnacott-Nation Lab (developmental cognitive psychology).

Publications

Liang, S., & Yu, H. (2021). Chinese students’ willingness to communicate in EFL classrooms: A case study of students at a Sino-foreign university. Professional and Academic English, 28(2), 15–33.

Siyu Ma is a DPhil student in child development and learning at the Department of Education. Her doctoral research focuses on second-born children under the Chinese two-child policy, especially how siblings play a role in the socio-emotional, language, and early literacy development of these children.

Prior to starting her Dphil, Siyu completed an MSc in Education (Research Design and Methodology) at the University of Oxford, under the supervision of Professor Sonali Nag. Her MSc dissertation explored the roles of social background and home literacy environment in the language and literacy development of a Wales subsample from the Millennium Cohort Study and was awarded a High Distinction. She also holds a BSc degree with first-class honours in Psychology from the University of Bath.

Siyu is also a research associate working on TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education.

At TalkTogether, Siyu is responsible for designing online surveys and analysing quantitative data from child assessments and parent reports.

Publications

Ma, S. (2021). Family background and home literacy environment as predictors of the early literacy development of children in Wales – findings from the Millennium Cohort Study (Master’s thesis, University of Oxford).

 

Amanda is the recipient of the Hazel Project Scholarship, based at the Rees Centre. Her doctoral research explores the conceptualisation of foster homes as therapeutic environments for complex/developmental trauma. Through participant-generated photography and collaborative qualitative methods with young people currently in foster care placements, her research explores if young people’s concepts and perceptions of therapeutic environments coincide with or challenge existing theoretical models and popular practitioner perspectives.

Amanda holds a BA from the University of Leeds (UK) and an MPhil from the University of Oxford (UK).

Lawrence is a teacher of mathematics who is particularly interested in classroom pedagogy, and how research and education policies interact with the teaching that students experience on a daily basis.

He finds that looking outwards in education is valuable with there being much more that unites our classrooms than isolates them. He has been extremely fortunate to study education through an international lens in the US, and to work on the Global Teaching InSights initiative of the Organisation for Economic Development (OECD) where he led on its videos of teaching.

Publications

Global Teaching InSights: A video study of teaching, OECD, 2020

Antonin is currently Doctoral Teaching Fellow on the MSc in Comparative and International Education, teaching Foundations of Educational Research. Antonin is also a Research Assistant for the Centre for Global Higher Education on the ‘Research on Research: the research function and mission of higher education’ project.

Alongside his teaching and research roles, Antonin is completing a Doctoral study on the European Universities Initiative, the European Commission’s flagship higher education programme that seeks to set up European Universities through transnational university alliances.

Arzhia Habibi is a DPhil in Education Candidate and uses Mandarin to conduct her research in the Chinese higher education context.

Arzhia’s research focuses on ‘expressions’ of global or world citizenship education in a Chinese higher education institution In the study, she explores the perspectives and practices of educators and students at a China-based university, which experiments with discourses related to citizenship. She further investigates how individual, local, national and global dynamics and the surrounding discourses influence worldviews and practices in a university setting.

As empirical studies on global or world citizenship education in the Chinese context are scarce, Arzhia hopes to contribute to a nascent knowledge base which may extend and add depth to the critical global discourses of global and world citizenship education, beyond Eurocentric framings.

Prior to her studies at Oxford, Arzhia received a first class Bachelor’s degree in Contemporary Chinese Studies at The University of Nottingham, and a Master’s in International Communication in Taiwan at National Chengchi University. As a child, she also attended kindergarten in Fuzhou, Fujian province of China.

Olga is a co-convenor of the Philosophy of Education Reading Group at the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. Olga’s main research interest is in the topics of epistemic injustice across all levels of education and across national borders with a focus on higher education and the process of knowledge production in academic institutes and universities. Her core interest lies between the areas of social epistemology, research on research (RoR) and comparative and international education (CIE). She has been a recipient of multiple research awards in the United States and the United Kingdom and is an elected co-convenor of the Comparative and International Education Special Interest Group at the British Educational Research Association (BERA).

Her new research at Oxford will explore the epistemically just and unjust practices as experienced by scholars from Kazakhstan during the internationalisation process in the social sciences and the humanities. Prior joining Oxford, Olga taught at University College London Institute of Education in London on the topics of migrant, refugee and minority education and European education traditions from a comparative lens.

Publications
  • Mun, O. (2020). ‘Epistemic Injustices in Internationalising Humanities and Social Sciences: A Case Study of Higher Education and Science Institutes in Kazakhstan.’ Centre for International Higher Education, Boston College. https://www.bc.edu/content/dam/bc1/schools/lsoe/sites/cihe/publication/Perspectives/Perspectives%20No%2018.pdf
  • Mun, O. and Gafu, G. (in press) ‘University Research Capacity in Kazakhstan’. Higher School of Economics, Russia.
  • Kandiko Howson, C., Mun, O. and Walker, R. (2020). ‘Academic Activism in STEM fields: Discipline in Theory and Practice.’ Philosophy and Theory of Higher Education Society.
  • Aizuddin M., Habibi A., Mun, O. (in press, 2020). ‘Post-Colonialism in Comparative and International Education.’ In Jules, T., Shields, R., Thomas, M. (Ed.), Bloomsbury Handbook of Theory in Comparative and International Education.
  • Palandjian, G., Silova, I., Mun, O., Zholdashaliyeva, R. (2018). ‘Gender and Nation in Postsocialist Educational Transformations.’ In Silova, I., & Chankseliani, M. (Eds.), Comparing Post-Socialist Transformations: Education in Eastern Europe and Former Soviet Union. Oxford: Symposium Books.
  • Mun, O., & Zholdashaliyeva, R. (2017). ‘Alippe, Bukvar’ and Gender: A comparative analysis of early literacy textbooks in Kazakhstan and Kyrgyzstan.’ In E. Brown & R. Craven & G. McLean (Ed.), International Advances in Education: Global Initiatives for Equity and Social Justice Series. Information Age Publishing
  • Patel, K. and Mun, O. (2017). ‘Marketing ‘development’ in the neoliberal university.’ DPU Working Papers https://www.ucl.ac.uk/bartlett/development/case-studies/2017/sep/marketing-development-neoliberal-university
  • Fimyar, O., Saniyazova, A. & Mun, O. (2017) ‘Methodology of Collaborative Research: Or, Searching for a Synergy in the Study of Student Transition in Kazakhstan.’ In SAGE Research Methods Cases. London, United Kingdom: SAGE Publications.
  • Mun, O. (2015). ‘(Re)imagining national identity through early literacy textbooks in Kazakhstan’, Forum of Young Central Asian Experts, 2nd edition. http://caa-network.org/archives/5620
  • Silova, I., Mead Yaqub, M., Mun, O., Palandjian, G. (2014). ‘Pedagogies of Space: (re)imagining nation and childhood in post-Soviet states.’ Global Studies of Childhood, 4(3), 195-209.
  • Silova, I., Brezhenyuk, V., Kudasova, M., Mun, O., Artemev, N. (2014). ‘Youth Protests against Privatisation of Education in post-Soviet states.’ European Education, 46(3), 56-65.

Schooled in the discipline of Public Administration at the University of Dhaka and with an experience of over five years of lecturing graduate and post-graduate students at two reputed public universities in Bangladesh, I am interested in research works related to education, gender, public policy, social studies and have multiple publications.

Apart from my current lecturing position, I worked as a news editor and contributor for the Dhaka Insider, an online news portal, in 2015. I also served as the Head of the Department (Department of Public Administration) and Assistant Proctor at the Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujibur Rahman Science and Technology University (BSMRSTU) and as an elected member of the Teachers’ Association there. During my post-graduation (MA. Public Policy) at the University of Nottingham, a qualitative research focus helped me characterize patterns of gender gap in primary education access.

 

Selected Publications
  • Dutta,  P.  (2020).  Democratic  Decentralization  and  Participatory Development:  Focus  on  Bangladesh.  Journal  of    Contemporary  Governance  and  Public Policy, 1(2), 82-91. Permalink/DOI: https://doi.org/10.46507/jcgpp.v1i2
  • Dutta, P., 2021. • Towards Sound Integrity Management in Bangladesh: Challenges and Issues in Public Administration and Law Enforcement. In: S. N. Khanom, ed. Governance, In the 21st Century in the Sounth Asia: Challenges and Ways Forward. Dhaka: Hakkani Publishers, pp. 541-560.

Zhuohan (Johanne) has a BA in English from Dalian Maritime University, China, and has won China National Scholarship. She then graduated with a Distinction in MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from University of Oxford. Before her DPhil, Zhuohan worked for the organizing committee for the Harvard Summit for Young Leaders in China, an initiative that brought liberal arts education from Harvard to China’s top-performing high school students. She also helped evaluate the UNICEF China Child-Friendly School Programme as an RA, focusing on the socio-emotional learning among the Dong ethnic minority groups in Guangxi, China. She also teaches IELTS, TOEFL, and English phonics.

Her MSc research centres on linguistic relativity, specifically the effect of French grammatical gender system on both French speakers’ and learners’ perception of objects. Her DPhil research focuses on English pronunciation teaching and learning among young Chinese kids, particularly emphasising the influence of their mother tongue, Mandarin.

Supervisors

Robert Woore and Faidra Faitaki

Shuo-Fang earned a Bachelor’s degree from National Chengchi University (Taiwan) and a Master’s degree from Boston University. He has teaching experience in various EFL contexts including international high school, educational institute, and graduate language program.

Shuo-Fang’s areas of interest lie in applied linguistics, particularly phonetics/phonology and speech perception. As an Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholar, Shuo-Fang is currently undertaking his doctoral research, supervised by Dr Elizabeth Wonnacott and Dr Robert Woore. His doctoral project is mostly experimental and explores second language learners’ difficulty in processing English connected speech.

Shuo-Fang is affiliated with two research groups: Applied Linguistics and Wonnacott-Nation Lab (developmental cognitive psychology).

Publications

Liang, S., & Yu, H. (2021). Chinese students’ willingness to communicate in EFL classrooms: A case study of students at a Sino-foreign university. Professional and Academic English, 28(2), 15–33.

Siyu Ma is a DPhil student in child development and learning at the Department of Education. Her doctoral research focuses on second-born children under the Chinese two-child policy, especially how siblings play a role in the socio-emotional, language, and early literacy development of these children.

Prior to starting her Dphil, Siyu completed an MSc in Education (Research Design and Methodology) at the University of Oxford, under the supervision of Professor Sonali Nag. Her MSc dissertation explored the roles of social background and home literacy environment in the language and literacy development of a Wales subsample from the Millennium Cohort Study and was awarded a High Distinction. She also holds a BSc degree with first-class honours in Psychology from the University of Bath.

Siyu is also a research associate working on TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education.

At TalkTogether, Siyu is responsible for designing online surveys and analysing quantitative data from child assessments and parent reports.

Publications

Ma, S. (2021). Family background and home literacy environment as predictors of the early literacy development of children in Wales – findings from the Millennium Cohort Study (Master’s thesis, University of Oxford).

 

Amanda is the recipient of the Hazel Project Scholarship, based at the Rees Centre. Her doctoral research explores the conceptualisation of foster homes as therapeutic environments for complex/developmental trauma. Through participant-generated photography and collaborative qualitative methods with young people currently in foster care placements, her research explores if young people’s concepts and perceptions of therapeutic environments coincide with or challenge existing theoretical models and popular practitioner perspectives.

Amanda holds a BA from the University of Leeds (UK) and an MPhil from the University of Oxford (UK).

Lawrence is a teacher of mathematics who is particularly interested in classroom pedagogy, and how research and education policies interact with the teaching that students experience on a daily basis.

He finds that looking outwards in education is valuable with there being much more that unites our classrooms than isolates them. He has been extremely fortunate to study education through an international lens in the US, and to work on the Global Teaching InSights initiative of the Organisation for Economic Development (OECD) where he led on its videos of teaching.

Publications

Global Teaching InSights: A video study of teaching, OECD, 2020

Antonin is currently Doctoral Teaching Fellow on the MSc in Comparative and International Education, teaching Foundations of Educational Research. Antonin is also a Research Assistant for the Centre for Global Higher Education on the ‘Research on Research: the research function and mission of higher education’ project.

Alongside his teaching and research roles, Antonin is completing a Doctoral study on the European Universities Initiative, the European Commission’s flagship higher education programme that seeks to set up European Universities through transnational university alliances.

Arzhia Habibi is a DPhil in Education Candidate and uses Mandarin to conduct her research in the Chinese higher education context.

Arzhia’s research focuses on ‘expressions’ of global or world citizenship education in a Chinese higher education institution In the study, she explores the perspectives and practices of educators and students at a China-based university, which experiments with discourses related to citizenship. She further investigates how individual, local, national and global dynamics and the surrounding discourses influence worldviews and practices in a university setting.

As empirical studies on global or world citizenship education in the Chinese context are scarce, Arzhia hopes to contribute to a nascent knowledge base which may extend and add depth to the critical global discourses of global and world citizenship education, beyond Eurocentric framings.

Prior to her studies at Oxford, Arzhia received a first class Bachelor’s degree in Contemporary Chinese Studies at The University of Nottingham, and a Master’s in International Communication in Taiwan at National Chengchi University. As a child, she also attended kindergarten in Fuzhou, Fujian province of China.

Olga is a co-convenor of the Philosophy of Education Reading Group at the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. Olga’s main research interest is in the topics of epistemic injustice across all levels of education and across national borders with a focus on higher education and the process of knowledge production in academic institutes and universities. Her core interest lies between the areas of social epistemology, research on research (RoR) and comparative and international education (CIE). She has been a recipient of multiple research awards in the United States and the United Kingdom and is an elected co-convenor of the Comparative and International Education Special Interest Group at the British Educational Research Association (BERA).

Her new research at Oxford will explore the epistemically just and unjust practices as experienced by scholars from Kazakhstan during the internationalisation process in the social sciences and the humanities. Prior joining Oxford, Olga taught at University College London Institute of Education in London on the topics of migrant, refugee and minority education and European education traditions from a comparative lens.

Publications
  • Mun, O. (2020). ‘Epistemic Injustices in Internationalising Humanities and Social Sciences: A Case Study of Higher Education and Science Institutes in Kazakhstan.’ Centre for International Higher Education, Boston College. https://www.bc.edu/content/dam/bc1/schools/lsoe/sites/cihe/publication/Perspectives/Perspectives%20No%2018.pdf
  • Mun, O. and Gafu, G. (in press) ‘University Research Capacity in Kazakhstan’. Higher School of Economics, Russia.
  • Kandiko Howson, C., Mun, O. and Walker, R. (2020). ‘Academic Activism in STEM fields: Discipline in Theory and Practice.’ Philosophy and Theory of Higher Education Society.
  • Aizuddin M., Habibi A., Mun, O. (in press, 2020). ‘Post-Colonialism in Comparative and International Education.’ In Jules, T., Shields, R., Thomas, M. (Ed.), Bloomsbury Handbook of Theory in Comparative and International Education.
  • Palandjian, G., Silova, I., Mun, O., Zholdashaliyeva, R. (2018). ‘Gender and Nation in Postsocialist Educational Transformations.’ In Silova, I., & Chankseliani, M. (Eds.), Comparing Post-Socialist Transformations: Education in Eastern Europe and Former Soviet Union. Oxford: Symposium Books.
  • Mun, O., & Zholdashaliyeva, R. (2017). ‘Alippe, Bukvar’ and Gender: A comparative analysis of early literacy textbooks in Kazakhstan and Kyrgyzstan.’ In E. Brown & R. Craven & G. McLean (Ed.), International Advances in Education: Global Initiatives for Equity and Social Justice Series. Information Age Publishing
  • Patel, K. and Mun, O. (2017). ‘Marketing ‘development’ in the neoliberal university.’ DPU Working Papers https://www.ucl.ac.uk/bartlett/development/case-studies/2017/sep/marketing-development-neoliberal-university
  • Fimyar, O., Saniyazova, A. & Mun, O. (2017) ‘Methodology of Collaborative Research: Or, Searching for a Synergy in the Study of Student Transition in Kazakhstan.’ In SAGE Research Methods Cases. London, United Kingdom: SAGE Publications.
  • Mun, O. (2015). ‘(Re)imagining national identity through early literacy textbooks in Kazakhstan’, Forum of Young Central Asian Experts, 2nd edition. http://caa-network.org/archives/5620
  • Silova, I., Mead Yaqub, M., Mun, O., Palandjian, G. (2014). ‘Pedagogies of Space: (re)imagining nation and childhood in post-Soviet states.’ Global Studies of Childhood, 4(3), 195-209.
  • Silova, I., Brezhenyuk, V., Kudasova, M., Mun, O., Artemev, N. (2014). ‘Youth Protests against Privatisation of Education in post-Soviet states.’ European Education, 46(3), 56-65.

Schooled in the discipline of Public Administration at the University of Dhaka and with an experience of over five years of lecturing graduate and post-graduate students at two reputed public universities in Bangladesh, I am interested in research works related to education, gender, public policy, social studies and have multiple publications.

Apart from my current lecturing position, I worked as a news editor and contributor for the Dhaka Insider, an online news portal, in 2015. I also served as the Head of the Department (Department of Public Administration) and Assistant Proctor at the Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujibur Rahman Science and Technology University (BSMRSTU) and as an elected member of the Teachers’ Association there. During my post-graduation (MA. Public Policy) at the University of Nottingham, a qualitative research focus helped me characterize patterns of gender gap in primary education access.

 

Selected Publications
  • Dutta,  P.  (2020).  Democratic  Decentralization  and  Participatory Development:  Focus  on  Bangladesh.  Journal  of    Contemporary  Governance  and  Public Policy, 1(2), 82-91. Permalink/DOI: https://doi.org/10.46507/jcgpp.v1i2
  • Dutta, P., 2021. • Towards Sound Integrity Management in Bangladesh: Challenges and Issues in Public Administration and Law Enforcement. In: S. N. Khanom, ed. Governance, In the 21st Century in the Sounth Asia: Challenges and Ways Forward. Dhaka: Hakkani Publishers, pp. 541-560.

Zhuohan (Johanne) has a BA in English from Dalian Maritime University, China, and has won China National Scholarship. She then graduated with a Distinction in MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from University of Oxford. Before her DPhil, Zhuohan worked for the organizing committee for the Harvard Summit for Young Leaders in China, an initiative that brought liberal arts education from Harvard to China’s top-performing high school students. She also helped evaluate the UNICEF China Child-Friendly School Programme as an RA, focusing on the socio-emotional learning among the Dong ethnic minority groups in Guangxi, China. She also teaches IELTS, TOEFL, and English phonics.

Her MSc research centres on linguistic relativity, specifically the effect of French grammatical gender system on both French speakers’ and learners’ perception of objects. Her DPhil research focuses on English pronunciation teaching and learning among young Chinese kids, particularly emphasising the influence of their mother tongue, Mandarin.

Supervisors

Robert Woore and Faidra Faitaki

Shuo-Fang earned a Bachelor’s degree from National Chengchi University (Taiwan) and a Master’s degree from Boston University. He has teaching experience in various EFL contexts including international high school, educational institute, and graduate language program.

Shuo-Fang’s areas of interest lie in applied linguistics, particularly phonetics/phonology and speech perception. As an Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholar, Shuo-Fang is currently undertaking his doctoral research, supervised by Dr Elizabeth Wonnacott and Dr Robert Woore. His doctoral project is mostly experimental and explores second language learners’ difficulty in processing English connected speech.

Shuo-Fang is affiliated with two research groups: Applied Linguistics and Wonnacott-Nation Lab (developmental cognitive psychology).

Publications

Liang, S., & Yu, H. (2021). Chinese students’ willingness to communicate in EFL classrooms: A case study of students at a Sino-foreign university. Professional and Academic English, 28(2), 15–33.

Siyu Ma is a DPhil student in child development and learning at the Department of Education. Her doctoral research focuses on second-born children under the Chinese two-child policy, especially how siblings play a role in the socio-emotional, language, and early literacy development of these children.

Prior to starting her Dphil, Siyu completed an MSc in Education (Research Design and Methodology) at the University of Oxford, under the supervision of Professor Sonali Nag. Her MSc dissertation explored the roles of social background and home literacy environment in the language and literacy development of a Wales subsample from the Millennium Cohort Study and was awarded a High Distinction. She also holds a BSc degree with first-class honours in Psychology from the University of Bath.

Siyu is also a research associate working on TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education.

At TalkTogether, Siyu is responsible for designing online surveys and analysing quantitative data from child assessments and parent reports.

Publications

Ma, S. (2021). Family background and home literacy environment as predictors of the early literacy development of children in Wales – findings from the Millennium Cohort Study (Master’s thesis, University of Oxford).

 

Amanda is the recipient of the Hazel Project Scholarship, based at the Rees Centre. Her doctoral research explores the conceptualisation of foster homes as therapeutic environments for complex/developmental trauma. Through participant-generated photography and collaborative qualitative methods with young people currently in foster care placements, her research explores if young people’s concepts and perceptions of therapeutic environments coincide with or challenge existing theoretical models and popular practitioner perspectives.

Amanda holds a BA from the University of Leeds (UK) and an MPhil from the University of Oxford (UK).

Lawrence is a teacher of mathematics who is particularly interested in classroom pedagogy, and how research and education policies interact with the teaching that students experience on a daily basis.

He finds that looking outwards in education is valuable with there being much more that unites our classrooms than isolates them. He has been extremely fortunate to study education through an international lens in the US, and to work on the Global Teaching InSights initiative of the Organisation for Economic Development (OECD) where he led on its videos of teaching.

Publications

Global Teaching InSights: A video study of teaching, OECD, 2020

Antonin is currently Doctoral Teaching Fellow on the MSc in Comparative and International Education, teaching Foundations of Educational Research. Antonin is also a Research Assistant for the Centre for Global Higher Education on the ‘Research on Research: the research function and mission of higher education’ project.

Alongside his teaching and research roles, Antonin is completing a Doctoral study on the European Universities Initiative, the European Commission’s flagship higher education programme that seeks to set up European Universities through transnational university alliances.

Arzhia Habibi is a DPhil in Education Candidate and uses Mandarin to conduct her research in the Chinese higher education context.

Arzhia’s research focuses on ‘expressions’ of global or world citizenship education in a Chinese higher education institution In the study, she explores the perspectives and practices of educators and students at a China-based university, which experiments with discourses related to citizenship. She further investigates how individual, local, national and global dynamics and the surrounding discourses influence worldviews and practices in a university setting.

As empirical studies on global or world citizenship education in the Chinese context are scarce, Arzhia hopes to contribute to a nascent knowledge base which may extend and add depth to the critical global discourses of global and world citizenship education, beyond Eurocentric framings.

Prior to her studies at Oxford, Arzhia received a first class Bachelor’s degree in Contemporary Chinese Studies at The University of Nottingham, and a Master’s in International Communication in Taiwan at National Chengchi University. As a child, she also attended kindergarten in Fuzhou, Fujian province of China.

Olga is a co-convenor of the Philosophy of Education Reading Group at the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. Olga’s main research interest is in the topics of epistemic injustice across all levels of education and across national borders with a focus on higher education and the process of knowledge production in academic institutes and universities. Her core interest lies between the areas of social epistemology, research on research (RoR) and comparative and international education (CIE). She has been a recipient of multiple research awards in the United States and the United Kingdom and is an elected co-convenor of the Comparative and International Education Special Interest Group at the British Educational Research Association (BERA).

Her new research at Oxford will explore the epistemically just and unjust practices as experienced by scholars from Kazakhstan during the internationalisation process in the social sciences and the humanities. Prior joining Oxford, Olga taught at University College London Institute of Education in London on the topics of migrant, refugee and minority education and European education traditions from a comparative lens.

Publications
  • Mun, O. (2020). ‘Epistemic Injustices in Internationalising Humanities and Social Sciences: A Case Study of Higher Education and Science Institutes in Kazakhstan.’ Centre for International Higher Education, Boston College. https://www.bc.edu/content/dam/bc1/schools/lsoe/sites/cihe/publication/Perspectives/Perspectives%20No%2018.pdf
  • Mun, O. and Gafu, G. (in press) ‘University Research Capacity in Kazakhstan’. Higher School of Economics, Russia.
  • Kandiko Howson, C., Mun, O. and Walker, R. (2020). ‘Academic Activism in STEM fields: Discipline in Theory and Practice.’ Philosophy and Theory of Higher Education Society.
  • Aizuddin M., Habibi A., Mun, O. (in press, 2020). ‘Post-Colonialism in Comparative and International Education.’ In Jules, T., Shields, R., Thomas, M. (Ed.), Bloomsbury Handbook of Theory in Comparative and International Education.
  • Palandjian, G., Silova, I., Mun, O., Zholdashaliyeva, R. (2018). ‘Gender and Nation in Postsocialist Educational Transformations.’ In Silova, I., & Chankseliani, M. (Eds.), Comparing Post-Socialist Transformations: Education in Eastern Europe and Former Soviet Union. Oxford: Symposium Books.
  • Mun, O., & Zholdashaliyeva, R. (2017). ‘Alippe, Bukvar’ and Gender: A comparative analysis of early literacy textbooks in Kazakhstan and Kyrgyzstan.’ In E. Brown & R. Craven & G. McLean (Ed.), International Advances in Education: Global Initiatives for Equity and Social Justice Series. Information Age Publishing
  • Patel, K. and Mun, O. (2017). ‘Marketing ‘development’ in the neoliberal university.’ DPU Working Papers https://www.ucl.ac.uk/bartlett/development/case-studies/2017/sep/marketing-development-neoliberal-university
  • Fimyar, O., Saniyazova, A. & Mun, O. (2017) ‘Methodology of Collaborative Research: Or, Searching for a Synergy in the Study of Student Transition in Kazakhstan.’ In SAGE Research Methods Cases. London, United Kingdom: SAGE Publications.
  • Mun, O. (2015). ‘(Re)imagining national identity through early literacy textbooks in Kazakhstan’, Forum of Young Central Asian Experts, 2nd edition. http://caa-network.org/archives/5620
  • Silova, I., Mead Yaqub, M., Mun, O., Palandjian, G. (2014). ‘Pedagogies of Space: (re)imagining nation and childhood in post-Soviet states.’ Global Studies of Childhood, 4(3), 195-209.
  • Silova, I., Brezhenyuk, V., Kudasova, M., Mun, O., Artemev, N. (2014). ‘Youth Protests against Privatisation of Education in post-Soviet states.’ European Education, 46(3), 56-65.

Schooled in the discipline of Public Administration at the University of Dhaka and with an experience of over five years of lecturing graduate and post-graduate students at two reputed public universities in Bangladesh, I am interested in research works related to education, gender, public policy, social studies and have multiple publications.

Apart from my current lecturing position, I worked as a news editor and contributor for the Dhaka Insider, an online news portal, in 2015. I also served as the Head of the Department (Department of Public Administration) and Assistant Proctor at the Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujibur Rahman Science and Technology University (BSMRSTU) and as an elected member of the Teachers’ Association there. During my post-graduation (MA. Public Policy) at the University of Nottingham, a qualitative research focus helped me characterize patterns of gender gap in primary education access.

 

Selected Publications
  • Dutta,  P.  (2020).  Democratic  Decentralization  and  Participatory Development:  Focus  on  Bangladesh.  Journal  of    Contemporary  Governance  and  Public Policy, 1(2), 82-91. Permalink/DOI: https://doi.org/10.46507/jcgpp.v1i2
  • Dutta, P., 2021. • Towards Sound Integrity Management in Bangladesh: Challenges and Issues in Public Administration and Law Enforcement. In: S. N. Khanom, ed. Governance, In the 21st Century in the Sounth Asia: Challenges and Ways Forward. Dhaka: Hakkani Publishers, pp. 541-560.

Zhuohan (Johanne) has a BA in English from Dalian Maritime University, China, and has won China National Scholarship. She then graduated with a Distinction in MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from University of Oxford. Before her DPhil, Zhuohan worked for the organizing committee for the Harvard Summit for Young Leaders in China, an initiative that brought liberal arts education from Harvard to China’s top-performing high school students. She also helped evaluate the UNICEF China Child-Friendly School Programme as an RA, focusing on the socio-emotional learning among the Dong ethnic minority groups in Guangxi, China. She also teaches IELTS, TOEFL, and English phonics.

Her MSc research centres on linguistic relativity, specifically the effect of French grammatical gender system on both French speakers’ and learners’ perception of objects. Her DPhil research focuses on English pronunciation teaching and learning among young Chinese kids, particularly emphasising the influence of their mother tongue, Mandarin.

Supervisors

Robert Woore and Faidra Faitaki

Shuo-Fang earned a Bachelor’s degree from National Chengchi University (Taiwan) and a Master’s degree from Boston University. He has teaching experience in various EFL contexts including international high school, educational institute, and graduate language program.

Shuo-Fang’s areas of interest lie in applied linguistics, particularly phonetics/phonology and speech perception. As an Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholar, Shuo-Fang is currently undertaking his doctoral research, supervised by Dr Elizabeth Wonnacott and Dr Robert Woore. His doctoral project is mostly experimental and explores second language learners’ difficulty in processing English connected speech.

Shuo-Fang is affiliated with two research groups: Applied Linguistics and Wonnacott-Nation Lab (developmental cognitive psychology).

Publications

Liang, S., & Yu, H. (2021). Chinese students’ willingness to communicate in EFL classrooms: A case study of students at a Sino-foreign university. Professional and Academic English, 28(2), 15–33.

Siyu Ma is a DPhil student in child development and learning at the Department of Education. Her doctoral research focuses on second-born children under the Chinese two-child policy, especially how siblings play a role in the socio-emotional, language, and early literacy development of these children.

Prior to starting her Dphil, Siyu completed an MSc in Education (Research Design and Methodology) at the University of Oxford, under the supervision of Professor Sonali Nag. Her MSc dissertation explored the roles of social background and home literacy environment in the language and literacy development of a Wales subsample from the Millennium Cohort Study and was awarded a High Distinction. She also holds a BSc degree with first-class honours in Psychology from the University of Bath.

Siyu is also a research associate working on TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education.

At TalkTogether, Siyu is responsible for designing online surveys and analysing quantitative data from child assessments and parent reports.

Publications

Ma, S. (2021). Family background and home literacy environment as predictors of the early literacy development of children in Wales – findings from the Millennium Cohort Study (Master’s thesis, University of Oxford).

 

Amanda is the recipient of the Hazel Project Scholarship, based at the Rees Centre. Her doctoral research explores the conceptualisation of foster homes as therapeutic environments for complex/developmental trauma. Through participant-generated photography and collaborative qualitative methods with young people currently in foster care placements, her research explores if young people’s concepts and perceptions of therapeutic environments coincide with or challenge existing theoretical models and popular practitioner perspectives.

Amanda holds a BA from the University of Leeds (UK) and an MPhil from the University of Oxford (UK).

Lawrence is a teacher of mathematics who is particularly interested in classroom pedagogy, and how research and education policies interact with the teaching that students experience on a daily basis.

He finds that looking outwards in education is valuable with there being much more that unites our classrooms than isolates them. He has been extremely fortunate to study education through an international lens in the US, and to work on the Global Teaching InSights initiative of the Organisation for Economic Development (OECD) where he led on its videos of teaching.

Publications

Global Teaching InSights: A video study of teaching, OECD, 2020

Antonin is currently Doctoral Teaching Fellow on the MSc in Comparative and International Education, teaching Foundations of Educational Research. Antonin is also a Research Assistant for the Centre for Global Higher Education on the ‘Research on Research: the research function and mission of higher education’ project.

Alongside his teaching and research roles, Antonin is completing a Doctoral study on the European Universities Initiative, the European Commission’s flagship higher education programme that seeks to set up European Universities through transnational university alliances.

Arzhia Habibi is a DPhil in Education Candidate and uses Mandarin to conduct her research in the Chinese higher education context.

Arzhia’s research focuses on ‘expressions’ of global or world citizenship education in a Chinese higher education institution In the study, she explores the perspectives and practices of educators and students at a China-based university, which experiments with discourses related to citizenship. She further investigates how individual, local, national and global dynamics and the surrounding discourses influence worldviews and practices in a university setting.

As empirical studies on global or world citizenship education in the Chinese context are scarce, Arzhia hopes to contribute to a nascent knowledge base which may extend and add depth to the critical global discourses of global and world citizenship education, beyond Eurocentric framings.

Prior to her studies at Oxford, Arzhia received a first class Bachelor’s degree in Contemporary Chinese Studies at The University of Nottingham, and a Master’s in International Communication in Taiwan at National Chengchi University. As a child, she also attended kindergarten in Fuzhou, Fujian province of China.

Olga is a co-convenor of the Philosophy of Education Reading Group at the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. Olga’s main research interest is in the topics of epistemic injustice across all levels of education and across national borders with a focus on higher education and the process of knowledge production in academic institutes and universities. Her core interest lies between the areas of social epistemology, research on research (RoR) and comparative and international education (CIE). She has been a recipient of multiple research awards in the United States and the United Kingdom and is an elected co-convenor of the Comparative and International Education Special Interest Group at the British Educational Research Association (BERA).

Her new research at Oxford will explore the epistemically just and unjust practices as experienced by scholars from Kazakhstan during the internationalisation process in the social sciences and the humanities. Prior joining Oxford, Olga taught at University College London Institute of Education in London on the topics of migrant, refugee and minority education and European education traditions from a comparative lens.

Publications
  • Mun, O. (2020). ‘Epistemic Injustices in Internationalising Humanities and Social Sciences: A Case Study of Higher Education and Science Institutes in Kazakhstan.’ Centre for International Higher Education, Boston College. https://www.bc.edu/content/dam/bc1/schools/lsoe/sites/cihe/publication/Perspectives/Perspectives%20No%2018.pdf
  • Mun, O. and Gafu, G. (in press) ‘University Research Capacity in Kazakhstan’. Higher School of Economics, Russia.
  • Kandiko Howson, C., Mun, O. and Walker, R. (2020). ‘Academic Activism in STEM fields: Discipline in Theory and Practice.’ Philosophy and Theory of Higher Education Society.
  • Aizuddin M., Habibi A., Mun, O. (in press, 2020). ‘Post-Colonialism in Comparative and International Education.’ In Jules, T., Shields, R., Thomas, M. (Ed.), Bloomsbury Handbook of Theory in Comparative and International Education.
  • Palandjian, G., Silova, I., Mun, O., Zholdashaliyeva, R. (2018). ‘Gender and Nation in Postsocialist Educational Transformations.’ In Silova, I., & Chankseliani, M. (Eds.), Comparing Post-Socialist Transformations: Education in Eastern Europe and Former Soviet Union. Oxford: Symposium Books.
  • Mun, O., & Zholdashaliyeva, R. (2017). ‘Alippe, Bukvar’ and Gender: A comparative analysis of early literacy textbooks in Kazakhstan and Kyrgyzstan.’ In E. Brown & R. Craven & G. McLean (Ed.), International Advances in Education: Global Initiatives for Equity and Social Justice Series. Information Age Publishing
  • Patel, K. and Mun, O. (2017). ‘Marketing ‘development’ in the neoliberal university.’ DPU Working Papers https://www.ucl.ac.uk/bartlett/development/case-studies/2017/sep/marketing-development-neoliberal-university
  • Fimyar, O., Saniyazova, A. & Mun, O. (2017) ‘Methodology of Collaborative Research: Or, Searching for a Synergy in the Study of Student Transition in Kazakhstan.’ In SAGE Research Methods Cases. London, United Kingdom: SAGE Publications.
  • Mun, O. (2015). ‘(Re)imagining national identity through early literacy textbooks in Kazakhstan’, Forum of Young Central Asian Experts, 2nd edition. http://caa-network.org/archives/5620
  • Silova, I., Mead Yaqub, M., Mun, O., Palandjian, G. (2014). ‘Pedagogies of Space: (re)imagining nation and childhood in post-Soviet states.’ Global Studies of Childhood, 4(3), 195-209.
  • Silova, I., Brezhenyuk, V., Kudasova, M., Mun, O., Artemev, N. (2014). ‘Youth Protests against Privatisation of Education in post-Soviet states.’ European Education, 46(3), 56-65.

Schooled in the discipline of Public Administration at the University of Dhaka and with an experience of over five years of lecturing graduate and post-graduate students at two reputed public universities in Bangladesh, I am interested in research works related to education, gender, public policy, social studies and have multiple publications.

Apart from my current lecturing position, I worked as a news editor and contributor for the Dhaka Insider, an online news portal, in 2015. I also served as the Head of the Department (Department of Public Administration) and Assistant Proctor at the Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujibur Rahman Science and Technology University (BSMRSTU) and as an elected member of the Teachers’ Association there. During my post-graduation (MA. Public Policy) at the University of Nottingham, a qualitative research focus helped me characterize patterns of gender gap in primary education access.

 

Selected Publications
  • Dutta,  P.  (2020).  Democratic  Decentralization  and  Participatory Development:  Focus  on  Bangladesh.  Journal  of    Contemporary  Governance  and  Public Policy, 1(2), 82-91. Permalink/DOI: https://doi.org/10.46507/jcgpp.v1i2
  • Dutta, P., 2021. • Towards Sound Integrity Management in Bangladesh: Challenges and Issues in Public Administration and Law Enforcement. In: S. N. Khanom, ed. Governance, In the 21st Century in the Sounth Asia: Challenges and Ways Forward. Dhaka: Hakkani Publishers, pp. 541-560.

Zhuohan (Johanne) has a BA in English from Dalian Maritime University, China, and has won China National Scholarship. She then graduated with a Distinction in MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from University of Oxford. Before her DPhil, Zhuohan worked for the organizing committee for the Harvard Summit for Young Leaders in China, an initiative that brought liberal arts education from Harvard to China’s top-performing high school students. She also helped evaluate the UNICEF China Child-Friendly School Programme as an RA, focusing on the socio-emotional learning among the Dong ethnic minority groups in Guangxi, China. She also teaches IELTS, TOEFL, and English phonics.

Her MSc research centres on linguistic relativity, specifically the effect of French grammatical gender system on both French speakers’ and learners’ perception of objects. Her DPhil research focuses on English pronunciation teaching and learning among young Chinese kids, particularly emphasising the influence of their mother tongue, Mandarin.

Supervisors

Robert Woore and Faidra Faitaki

Shuo-Fang earned a Bachelor’s degree from National Chengchi University (Taiwan) and a Master’s degree from Boston University. He has teaching experience in various EFL contexts including international high school, educational institute, and graduate language program.

Shuo-Fang’s areas of interest lie in applied linguistics, particularly phonetics/phonology and speech perception. As an Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholar, Shuo-Fang is currently undertaking his doctoral research, supervised by Dr Elizabeth Wonnacott and Dr Robert Woore. His doctoral project is mostly experimental and explores second language learners’ difficulty in processing English connected speech.

Shuo-Fang is affiliated with two research groups: Applied Linguistics and Wonnacott-Nation Lab (developmental cognitive psychology).

Publications

Liang, S., & Yu, H. (2021). Chinese students’ willingness to communicate in EFL classrooms: A case study of students at a Sino-foreign university. Professional and Academic English, 28(2), 15–33.

Siyu Ma is a DPhil student in child development and learning at the Department of Education. Her doctoral research focuses on second-born children under the Chinese two-child policy, especially how siblings play a role in the socio-emotional, language, and early literacy development of these children.

Prior to starting her Dphil, Siyu completed an MSc in Education (Research Design and Methodology) at the University of Oxford, under the supervision of Professor Sonali Nag. Her MSc dissertation explored the roles of social background and home literacy environment in the language and literacy development of a Wales subsample from the Millennium Cohort Study and was awarded a High Distinction. She also holds a BSc degree with first-class honours in Psychology from the University of Bath.

Siyu is also a research associate working on TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education.

At TalkTogether, Siyu is responsible for designing online surveys and analysing quantitative data from child assessments and parent reports.

Publications

Ma, S. (2021). Family background and home literacy environment as predictors of the early literacy development of children in Wales – findings from the Millennium Cohort Study (Master’s thesis, University of Oxford).

 

Amanda is the recipient of the Hazel Project Scholarship, based at the Rees Centre. Her doctoral research explores the conceptualisation of foster homes as therapeutic environments for complex/developmental trauma. Through participant-generated photography and collaborative qualitative methods with young people currently in foster care placements, her research explores if young people’s concepts and perceptions of therapeutic environments coincide with or challenge existing theoretical models and popular practitioner perspectives.

Amanda holds a BA from the University of Leeds (UK) and an MPhil from the University of Oxford (UK).

Lawrence is a teacher of mathematics who is particularly interested in classroom pedagogy, and how research and education policies interact with the teaching that students experience on a daily basis.

He finds that looking outwards in education is valuable with there being much more that unites our classrooms than isolates them. He has been extremely fortunate to study education through an international lens in the US, and to work on the Global Teaching InSights initiative of the Organisation for Economic Development (OECD) where he led on its videos of teaching.

Publications

Global Teaching InSights: A video study of teaching, OECD, 2020

Antonin is currently Doctoral Teaching Fellow on the MSc in Comparative and International Education, teaching Foundations of Educational Research. Antonin is also a Research Assistant for the Centre for Global Higher Education on the ‘Research on Research: the research function and mission of higher education’ project.

Alongside his teaching and research roles, Antonin is completing a Doctoral study on the European Universities Initiative, the European Commission’s flagship higher education programme that seeks to set up European Universities through transnational university alliances.

Arzhia Habibi is a DPhil in Education Candidate and uses Mandarin to conduct her research in the Chinese higher education context.

Arzhia’s research focuses on ‘expressions’ of global or world citizenship education in a Chinese higher education institution In the study, she explores the perspectives and practices of educators and students at a China-based university, which experiments with discourses related to citizenship. She further investigates how individual, local, national and global dynamics and the surrounding discourses influence worldviews and practices in a university setting.

As empirical studies on global or world citizenship education in the Chinese context are scarce, Arzhia hopes to contribute to a nascent knowledge base which may extend and add depth to the critical global discourses of global and world citizenship education, beyond Eurocentric framings.

Prior to her studies at Oxford, Arzhia received a first class Bachelor’s degree in Contemporary Chinese Studies at The University of Nottingham, and a Master’s in International Communication in Taiwan at National Chengchi University. As a child, she also attended kindergarten in Fuzhou, Fujian province of China.

Olga is a co-convenor of the Philosophy of Education Reading Group at the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. Olga’s main research interest is in the topics of epistemic injustice across all levels of education and across national borders with a focus on higher education and the process of knowledge production in academic institutes and universities. Her core interest lies between the areas of social epistemology, research on research (RoR) and comparative and international education (CIE). She has been a recipient of multiple research awards in the United States and the United Kingdom and is an elected co-convenor of the Comparative and International Education Special Interest Group at the British Educational Research Association (BERA).

Her new research at Oxford will explore the epistemically just and unjust practices as experienced by scholars from Kazakhstan during the internationalisation process in the social sciences and the humanities. Prior joining Oxford, Olga taught at University College London Institute of Education in London on the topics of migrant, refugee and minority education and European education traditions from a comparative lens.

Publications
  • Mun, O. (2020). ‘Epistemic Injustices in Internationalising Humanities and Social Sciences: A Case Study of Higher Education and Science Institutes in Kazakhstan.’ Centre for International Higher Education, Boston College. https://www.bc.edu/content/dam/bc1/schools/lsoe/sites/cihe/publication/Perspectives/Perspectives%20No%2018.pdf
  • Mun, O. and Gafu, G. (in press) ‘University Research Capacity in Kazakhstan’. Higher School of Economics, Russia.
  • Kandiko Howson, C., Mun, O. and Walker, R. (2020). ‘Academic Activism in STEM fields: Discipline in Theory and Practice.’ Philosophy and Theory of Higher Education Society.
  • Aizuddin M., Habibi A., Mun, O. (in press, 2020). ‘Post-Colonialism in Comparative and International Education.’ In Jules, T., Shields, R., Thomas, M. (Ed.), Bloomsbury Handbook of Theory in Comparative and International Education.
  • Palandjian, G., Silova, I., Mun, O., Zholdashaliyeva, R. (2018). ‘Gender and Nation in Postsocialist Educational Transformations.’ In Silova, I., & Chankseliani, M. (Eds.), Comparing Post-Socialist Transformations: Education in Eastern Europe and Former Soviet Union. Oxford: Symposium Books.
  • Mun, O., & Zholdashaliyeva, R. (2017). ‘Alippe, Bukvar’ and Gender: A comparative analysis of early literacy textbooks in Kazakhstan and Kyrgyzstan.’ In E. Brown & R. Craven & G. McLean (Ed.), International Advances in Education: Global Initiatives for Equity and Social Justice Series. Information Age Publishing
  • Patel, K. and Mun, O. (2017). ‘Marketing ‘development’ in the neoliberal university.’ DPU Working Papers https://www.ucl.ac.uk/bartlett/development/case-studies/2017/sep/marketing-development-neoliberal-university
  • Fimyar, O., Saniyazova, A. & Mun, O. (2017) ‘Methodology of Collaborative Research: Or, Searching for a Synergy in the Study of Student Transition in Kazakhstan.’ In SAGE Research Methods Cases. London, United Kingdom: SAGE Publications.
  • Mun, O. (2015). ‘(Re)imagining national identity through early literacy textbooks in Kazakhstan’, Forum of Young Central Asian Experts, 2nd edition. http://caa-network.org/archives/5620
  • Silova, I., Mead Yaqub, M., Mun, O., Palandjian, G. (2014). ‘Pedagogies of Space: (re)imagining nation and childhood in post-Soviet states.’ Global Studies of Childhood, 4(3), 195-209.
  • Silova, I., Brezhenyuk, V., Kudasova, M., Mun, O., Artemev, N. (2014). ‘Youth Protests against Privatisation of Education in post-Soviet states.’ European Education, 46(3), 56-65.

Schooled in the discipline of Public Administration at the University of Dhaka and with an experience of over five years of lecturing graduate and post-graduate students at two reputed public universities in Bangladesh, I am interested in research works related to education, gender, public policy, social studies and have multiple publications.

Apart from my current lecturing position, I worked as a news editor and contributor for the Dhaka Insider, an online news portal, in 2015. I also served as the Head of the Department (Department of Public Administration) and Assistant Proctor at the Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujibur Rahman Science and Technology University (BSMRSTU) and as an elected member of the Teachers’ Association there. During my post-graduation (MA. Public Policy) at the University of Nottingham, a qualitative research focus helped me characterize patterns of gender gap in primary education access.

 

Selected Publications
  • Dutta,  P.  (2020).  Democratic  Decentralization  and  Participatory Development:  Focus  on  Bangladesh.  Journal  of    Contemporary  Governance  and  Public Policy, 1(2), 82-91. Permalink/DOI: https://doi.org/10.46507/jcgpp.v1i2
  • Dutta, P., 2021. • Towards Sound Integrity Management in Bangladesh: Challenges and Issues in Public Administration and Law Enforcement. In: S. N. Khanom, ed. Governance, In the 21st Century in the Sounth Asia: Challenges and Ways Forward. Dhaka: Hakkani Publishers, pp. 541-560.

Zhuohan (Johanne) has a BA in English from Dalian Maritime University, China, and has won China National Scholarship. She then graduated with a Distinction in MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from University of Oxford. Before her DPhil, Zhuohan worked for the organizing committee for the Harvard Summit for Young Leaders in China, an initiative that brought liberal arts education from Harvard to China’s top-performing high school students. She also helped evaluate the UNICEF China Child-Friendly School Programme as an RA, focusing on the socio-emotional learning among the Dong ethnic minority groups in Guangxi, China. She also teaches IELTS, TOEFL, and English phonics.

Her MSc research centres on linguistic relativity, specifically the effect of French grammatical gender system on both French speakers’ and learners’ perception of objects. Her DPhil research focuses on English pronunciation teaching and learning among young Chinese kids, particularly emphasising the influence of their mother tongue, Mandarin.

Supervisors

Robert Woore and Faidra Faitaki

Shuo-Fang earned a Bachelor’s degree from National Chengchi University (Taiwan) and a Master’s degree from Boston University. He has teaching experience in various EFL contexts including international high school, educational institute, and graduate language program.

Shuo-Fang’s areas of interest lie in applied linguistics, particularly phonetics/phonology and speech perception. As an Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholar, Shuo-Fang is currently undertaking his doctoral research, supervised by Dr Elizabeth Wonnacott and Dr Robert Woore. His doctoral project is mostly experimental and explores second language learners’ difficulty in processing English connected speech.

Shuo-Fang is affiliated with two research groups: Applied Linguistics and Wonnacott-Nation Lab (developmental cognitive psychology).

Publications

Liang, S., & Yu, H. (2021). Chinese students’ willingness to communicate in EFL classrooms: A case study of students at a Sino-foreign university. Professional and Academic English, 28(2), 15–33.

Siyu Ma is a DPhil student in child development and learning at the Department of Education. Her doctoral research focuses on second-born children under the Chinese two-child policy, especially how siblings play a role in the socio-emotional, language, and early literacy development of these children.

Prior to starting her Dphil, Siyu completed an MSc in Education (Research Design and Methodology) at the University of Oxford, under the supervision of Professor Sonali Nag. Her MSc dissertation explored the roles of social background and home literacy environment in the language and literacy development of a Wales subsample from the Millennium Cohort Study and was awarded a High Distinction. She also holds a BSc degree with first-class honours in Psychology from the University of Bath.

Siyu is also a research associate working on TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education.

At TalkTogether, Siyu is responsible for designing online surveys and analysing quantitative data from child assessments and parent reports.

Publications

Ma, S. (2021). Family background and home literacy environment as predictors of the early literacy development of children in Wales – findings from the Millennium Cohort Study (Master’s thesis, University of Oxford).

 

Amanda is the recipient of the Hazel Project Scholarship, based at the Rees Centre. Her doctoral research explores the conceptualisation of foster homes as therapeutic environments for complex/developmental trauma. Through participant-generated photography and collaborative qualitative methods with young people currently in foster care placements, her research explores if young people’s concepts and perceptions of therapeutic environments coincide with or challenge existing theoretical models and popular practitioner perspectives.

Amanda holds a BA from the University of Leeds (UK) and an MPhil from the University of Oxford (UK).

Lawrence is a teacher of mathematics who is particularly interested in classroom pedagogy, and how research and education policies interact with the teaching that students experience on a daily basis.

He finds that looking outwards in education is valuable with there being much more that unites our classrooms than isolates them. He has been extremely fortunate to study education through an international lens in the US, and to work on the Global Teaching InSights initiative of the Organisation for Economic Development (OECD) where he led on its videos of teaching.

Publications

Global Teaching InSights: A video study of teaching, OECD, 2020

Antonin is currently Doctoral Teaching Fellow on the MSc in Comparative and International Education, teaching Foundations of Educational Research. Antonin is also a Research Assistant for the Centre for Global Higher Education on the ‘Research on Research: the research function and mission of higher education’ project.

Alongside his teaching and research roles, Antonin is completing a Doctoral study on the European Universities Initiative, the European Commission’s flagship higher education programme that seeks to set up European Universities through transnational university alliances.

Arzhia Habibi is a DPhil in Education Candidate and uses Mandarin to conduct her research in the Chinese higher education context.

Arzhia’s research focuses on ‘expressions’ of global or world citizenship education in a Chinese higher education institution In the study, she explores the perspectives and practices of educators and students at a China-based university, which experiments with discourses related to citizenship. She further investigates how individual, local, national and global dynamics and the surrounding discourses influence worldviews and practices in a university setting.

As empirical studies on global or world citizenship education in the Chinese context are scarce, Arzhia hopes to contribute to a nascent knowledge base which may extend and add depth to the critical global discourses of global and world citizenship education, beyond Eurocentric framings.

Prior to her studies at Oxford, Arzhia received a first class Bachelor’s degree in Contemporary Chinese Studies at The University of Nottingham, and a Master’s in International Communication in Taiwan at National Chengchi University. As a child, she also attended kindergarten in Fuzhou, Fujian province of China.

Olga is a co-convenor of the Philosophy of Education Reading Group at the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. Olga’s main research interest is in the topics of epistemic injustice across all levels of education and across national borders with a focus on higher education and the process of knowledge production in academic institutes and universities. Her core interest lies between the areas of social epistemology, research on research (RoR) and comparative and international education (CIE). She has been a recipient of multiple research awards in the United States and the United Kingdom and is an elected co-convenor of the Comparative and International Education Special Interest Group at the British Educational Research Association (BERA).

Her new research at Oxford will explore the epistemically just and unjust practices as experienced by scholars from Kazakhstan during the internationalisation process in the social sciences and the humanities. Prior joining Oxford, Olga taught at University College London Institute of Education in London on the topics of migrant, refugee and minority education and European education traditions from a comparative lens.

Publications
  • Mun, O. (2020). ‘Epistemic Injustices in Internationalising Humanities and Social Sciences: A Case Study of Higher Education and Science Institutes in Kazakhstan.’ Centre for International Higher Education, Boston College. https://www.bc.edu/content/dam/bc1/schools/lsoe/sites/cihe/publication/Perspectives/Perspectives%20No%2018.pdf
  • Mun, O. and Gafu, G. (in press) ‘University Research Capacity in Kazakhstan’. Higher School of Economics, Russia.
  • Kandiko Howson, C., Mun, O. and Walker, R. (2020). ‘Academic Activism in STEM fields: Discipline in Theory and Practice.’ Philosophy and Theory of Higher Education Society.
  • Aizuddin M., Habibi A., Mun, O. (in press, 2020). ‘Post-Colonialism in Comparative and International Education.’ In Jules, T., Shields, R., Thomas, M. (Ed.), Bloomsbury Handbook of Theory in Comparative and International Education.
  • Palandjian, G., Silova, I., Mun, O., Zholdashaliyeva, R. (2018). ‘Gender and Nation in Postsocialist Educational Transformations.’ In Silova, I., & Chankseliani, M. (Eds.), Comparing Post-Socialist Transformations: Education in Eastern Europe and Former Soviet Union. Oxford: Symposium Books.
  • Mun, O., & Zholdashaliyeva, R. (2017). ‘Alippe, Bukvar’ and Gender: A comparative analysis of early literacy textbooks in Kazakhstan and Kyrgyzstan.’ In E. Brown & R. Craven & G. McLean (Ed.), International Advances in Education: Global Initiatives for Equity and Social Justice Series. Information Age Publishing
  • Patel, K. and Mun, O. (2017). ‘Marketing ‘development’ in the neoliberal university.’ DPU Working Papers https://www.ucl.ac.uk/bartlett/development/case-studies/2017/sep/marketing-development-neoliberal-university
  • Fimyar, O., Saniyazova, A. & Mun, O. (2017) ‘Methodology of Collaborative Research: Or, Searching for a Synergy in the Study of Student Transition in Kazakhstan.’ In SAGE Research Methods Cases. London, United Kingdom: SAGE Publications.
  • Mun, O. (2015). ‘(Re)imagining national identity through early literacy textbooks in Kazakhstan’, Forum of Young Central Asian Experts, 2nd edition. http://caa-network.org/archives/5620
  • Silova, I., Mead Yaqub, M., Mun, O., Palandjian, G. (2014). ‘Pedagogies of Space: (re)imagining nation and childhood in post-Soviet states.’ Global Studies of Childhood, 4(3), 195-209.
  • Silova, I., Brezhenyuk, V., Kudasova, M., Mun, O., Artemev, N. (2014). ‘Youth Protests against Privatisation of Education in post-Soviet states.’ European Education, 46(3), 56-65.

Schooled in the discipline of Public Administration at the University of Dhaka and with an experience of over five years of lecturing graduate and post-graduate students at two reputed public universities in Bangladesh, I am interested in research works related to education, gender, public policy, social studies and have multiple publications.

Apart from my current lecturing position, I worked as a news editor and contributor for the Dhaka Insider, an online news portal, in 2015. I also served as the Head of the Department (Department of Public Administration) and Assistant Proctor at the Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujibur Rahman Science and Technology University (BSMRSTU) and as an elected member of the Teachers’ Association there. During my post-graduation (MA. Public Policy) at the University of Nottingham, a qualitative research focus helped me characterize patterns of gender gap in primary education access.

 

Selected Publications
  • Dutta,  P.  (2020).  Democratic  Decentralization  and  Participatory Development:  Focus  on  Bangladesh.  Journal  of    Contemporary  Governance  and  Public Policy, 1(2), 82-91. Permalink/DOI: https://doi.org/10.46507/jcgpp.v1i2
  • Dutta, P., 2021. • Towards Sound Integrity Management in Bangladesh: Challenges and Issues in Public Administration and Law Enforcement. In: S. N. Khanom, ed. Governance, In the 21st Century in the Sounth Asia: Challenges and Ways Forward. Dhaka: Hakkani Publishers, pp. 541-560.

Zhuohan (Johanne) has a BA in English from Dalian Maritime University, China, and has won China National Scholarship. She then graduated with a Distinction in MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from University of Oxford. Before her DPhil, Zhuohan worked for the organizing committee for the Harvard Summit for Young Leaders in China, an initiative that brought liberal arts education from Harvard to China’s top-performing high school students. She also helped evaluate the UNICEF China Child-Friendly School Programme as an RA, focusing on the socio-emotional learning among the Dong ethnic minority groups in Guangxi, China. She also teaches IELTS, TOEFL, and English phonics.

Her MSc research centres on linguistic relativity, specifically the effect of French grammatical gender system on both French speakers’ and learners’ perception of objects. Her DPhil research focuses on English pronunciation teaching and learning among young Chinese kids, particularly emphasising the influence of their mother tongue, Mandarin.

Supervisors

Robert Woore and Faidra Faitaki

Shuo-Fang earned a Bachelor’s degree from National Chengchi University (Taiwan) and a Master’s degree from Boston University. He has teaching experience in various EFL contexts including international high school, educational institute, and graduate language program.

Shuo-Fang’s areas of interest lie in applied linguistics, particularly phonetics/phonology and speech perception. As an Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholar, Shuo-Fang is currently undertaking his doctoral research, supervised by Dr Elizabeth Wonnacott and Dr Robert Woore. His doctoral project is mostly experimental and explores second language learners’ difficulty in processing English connected speech.

Shuo-Fang is affiliated with two research groups: Applied Linguistics and Wonnacott-Nation Lab (developmental cognitive psychology).

Publications

Liang, S., & Yu, H. (2021). Chinese students’ willingness to communicate in EFL classrooms: A case study of students at a Sino-foreign university. Professional and Academic English, 28(2), 15–33.

Siyu Ma is a DPhil student in child development and learning at the Department of Education. Her doctoral research focuses on second-born children under the Chinese two-child policy, especially how siblings play a role in the socio-emotional, language, and early literacy development of these children.

Prior to starting her Dphil, Siyu completed an MSc in Education (Research Design and Methodology) at the University of Oxford, under the supervision of Professor Sonali Nag. Her MSc dissertation explored the roles of social background and home literacy environment in the language and literacy development of a Wales subsample from the Millennium Cohort Study and was awarded a High Distinction. She also holds a BSc degree with first-class honours in Psychology from the University of Bath.

Siyu is also a research associate working on TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education.

At TalkTogether, Siyu is responsible for designing online surveys and analysing quantitative data from child assessments and parent reports.

Publications

Ma, S. (2021). Family background and home literacy environment as predictors of the early literacy development of children in Wales – findings from the Millennium Cohort Study (Master’s thesis, University of Oxford).

 

Amanda is the recipient of the Hazel Project Scholarship, based at the Rees Centre. Her doctoral research explores the conceptualisation of foster homes as therapeutic environments for complex/developmental trauma. Through participant-generated photography and collaborative qualitative methods with young people currently in foster care placements, her research explores if young people’s concepts and perceptions of therapeutic environments coincide with or challenge existing theoretical models and popular practitioner perspectives.

Amanda holds a BA from the University of Leeds (UK) and an MPhil from the University of Oxford (UK).

Lawrence is a teacher of mathematics who is particularly interested in classroom pedagogy, and how research and education policies interact with the teaching that students experience on a daily basis.

He finds that looking outwards in education is valuable with there being much more that unites our classrooms than isolates them. He has been extremely fortunate to study education through an international lens in the US, and to work on the Global Teaching InSights initiative of the Organisation for Economic Development (OECD) where he led on its videos of teaching.

Publications

Global Teaching InSights: A video study of teaching, OECD, 2020

Antonin is currently Doctoral Teaching Fellow on the MSc in Comparative and International Education, teaching Foundations of Educational Research. Antonin is also a Research Assistant for the Centre for Global Higher Education on the ‘Research on Research: the research function and mission of higher education’ project.

Alongside his teaching and research roles, Antonin is completing a Doctoral study on the European Universities Initiative, the European Commission’s flagship higher education programme that seeks to set up European Universities through transnational university alliances.

Arzhia Habibi is a DPhil in Education Candidate and uses Mandarin to conduct her research in the Chinese higher education context.

Arzhia’s research focuses on ‘expressions’ of global or world citizenship education in a Chinese higher education institution In the study, she explores the perspectives and practices of educators and students at a China-based university, which experiments with discourses related to citizenship. She further investigates how individual, local, national and global dynamics and the surrounding discourses influence worldviews and practices in a university setting.

As empirical studies on global or world citizenship education in the Chinese context are scarce, Arzhia hopes to contribute to a nascent knowledge base which may extend and add depth to the critical global discourses of global and world citizenship education, beyond Eurocentric framings.

Prior to her studies at Oxford, Arzhia received a first class Bachelor’s degree in Contemporary Chinese Studies at The University of Nottingham, and a Master’s in International Communication in Taiwan at National Chengchi University. As a child, she also attended kindergarten in Fuzhou, Fujian province of China.

Olga is a co-convenor of the Philosophy of Education Reading Group at the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. Olga’s main research interest is in the topics of epistemic injustice across all levels of education and across national borders with a focus on higher education and the process of knowledge production in academic institutes and universities. Her core interest lies between the areas of social epistemology, research on research (RoR) and comparative and international education (CIE). She has been a recipient of multiple research awards in the United States and the United Kingdom and is an elected co-convenor of the Comparative and International Education Special Interest Group at the British Educational Research Association (BERA).

Her new research at Oxford will explore the epistemically just and unjust practices as experienced by scholars from Kazakhstan during the internationalisation process in the social sciences and the humanities. Prior joining Oxford, Olga taught at University College London Institute of Education in London on the topics of migrant, refugee and minority education and European education traditions from a comparative lens.

Publications
  • Mun, O. (2020). ‘Epistemic Injustices in Internationalising Humanities and Social Sciences: A Case Study of Higher Education and Science Institutes in Kazakhstan.’ Centre for International Higher Education, Boston College. https://www.bc.edu/content/dam/bc1/schools/lsoe/sites/cihe/publication/Perspectives/Perspectives%20No%2018.pdf
  • Mun, O. and Gafu, G. (in press) ‘University Research Capacity in Kazakhstan’. Higher School of Economics, Russia.
  • Kandiko Howson, C., Mun, O. and Walker, R. (2020). ‘Academic Activism in STEM fields: Discipline in Theory and Practice.’ Philosophy and Theory of Higher Education Society.
  • Aizuddin M., Habibi A., Mun, O. (in press, 2020). ‘Post-Colonialism in Comparative and International Education.’ In Jules, T., Shields, R., Thomas, M. (Ed.), Bloomsbury Handbook of Theory in Comparative and International Education.
  • Palandjian, G., Silova, I., Mun, O., Zholdashaliyeva, R. (2018). ‘Gender and Nation in Postsocialist Educational Transformations.’ In Silova, I., & Chankseliani, M. (Eds.), Comparing Post-Socialist Transformations: Education in Eastern Europe and Former Soviet Union. Oxford: Symposium Books.
  • Mun, O., & Zholdashaliyeva, R. (2017). ‘Alippe, Bukvar’ and Gender: A comparative analysis of early literacy textbooks in Kazakhstan and Kyrgyzstan.’ In E. Brown & R. Craven & G. McLean (Ed.), International Advances in Education: Global Initiatives for Equity and Social Justice Series. Information Age Publishing
  • Patel, K. and Mun, O. (2017). ‘Marketing ‘development’ in the neoliberal university.’ DPU Working Papers https://www.ucl.ac.uk/bartlett/development/case-studies/2017/sep/marketing-development-neoliberal-university
  • Fimyar, O., Saniyazova, A. & Mun, O. (2017) ‘Methodology of Collaborative Research: Or, Searching for a Synergy in the Study of Student Transition in Kazakhstan.’ In SAGE Research Methods Cases. London, United Kingdom: SAGE Publications.
  • Mun, O. (2015). ‘(Re)imagining national identity through early literacy textbooks in Kazakhstan’, Forum of Young Central Asian Experts, 2nd edition. http://caa-network.org/archives/5620
  • Silova, I., Mead Yaqub, M., Mun, O., Palandjian, G. (2014). ‘Pedagogies of Space: (re)imagining nation and childhood in post-Soviet states.’ Global Studies of Childhood, 4(3), 195-209.
  • Silova, I., Brezhenyuk, V., Kudasova, M., Mun, O., Artemev, N. (2014). ‘Youth Protests against Privatisation of Education in post-Soviet states.’ European Education, 46(3), 56-65.

Schooled in the discipline of Public Administration at the University of Dhaka and with an experience of over five years of lecturing graduate and post-graduate students at two reputed public universities in Bangladesh, I am interested in research works related to education, gender, public policy, social studies and have multiple publications.

Apart from my current lecturing position, I worked as a news editor and contributor for the Dhaka Insider, an online news portal, in 2015. I also served as the Head of the Department (Department of Public Administration) and Assistant Proctor at the Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujibur Rahman Science and Technology University (BSMRSTU) and as an elected member of the Teachers’ Association there. During my post-graduation (MA. Public Policy) at the University of Nottingham, a qualitative research focus helped me characterize patterns of gender gap in primary education access.

 

Selected Publications
  • Dutta,  P.  (2020).  Democratic  Decentralization  and  Participatory Development:  Focus  on  Bangladesh.  Journal  of    Contemporary  Governance  and  Public Policy, 1(2), 82-91. Permalink/DOI: https://doi.org/10.46507/jcgpp.v1i2
  • Dutta, P., 2021. • Towards Sound Integrity Management in Bangladesh: Challenges and Issues in Public Administration and Law Enforcement. In: S. N. Khanom, ed. Governance, In the 21st Century in the Sounth Asia: Challenges and Ways Forward. Dhaka: Hakkani Publishers, pp. 541-560.

Zhuohan (Johanne) has a BA in English from Dalian Maritime University, China, and has won China National Scholarship. She then graduated with a Distinction in MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from University of Oxford. Before her DPhil, Zhuohan worked for the organizing committee for the Harvard Summit for Young Leaders in China, an initiative that brought liberal arts education from Harvard to China’s top-performing high school students. She also helped evaluate the UNICEF China Child-Friendly School Programme as an RA, focusing on the socio-emotional learning among the Dong ethnic minority groups in Guangxi, China. She also teaches IELTS, TOEFL, and English phonics.

Her MSc research centres on linguistic relativity, specifically the effect of French grammatical gender system on both French speakers’ and learners’ perception of objects. Her DPhil research focuses on English pronunciation teaching and learning among young Chinese kids, particularly emphasising the influence of their mother tongue, Mandarin.

Supervisors

Robert Woore and Faidra Faitaki

Shuo-Fang earned a Bachelor’s degree from National Chengchi University (Taiwan) and a Master’s degree from Boston University. He has teaching experience in various EFL contexts including international high school, educational institute, and graduate language program.

Shuo-Fang’s areas of interest lie in applied linguistics, particularly phonetics/phonology and speech perception. As an Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholar, Shuo-Fang is currently undertaking his doctoral research, supervised by Dr Elizabeth Wonnacott and Dr Robert Woore. His doctoral project is mostly experimental and explores second language learners’ difficulty in processing English connected speech.

Shuo-Fang is affiliated with two research groups: Applied Linguistics and Wonnacott-Nation Lab (developmental cognitive psychology).

Publications

Liang, S., & Yu, H. (2021). Chinese students’ willingness to communicate in EFL classrooms: A case study of students at a Sino-foreign university. Professional and Academic English, 28(2), 15–33.

Siyu Ma is a DPhil student in child development and learning at the Department of Education. Her doctoral research focuses on second-born children under the Chinese two-child policy, especially how siblings play a role in the socio-emotional, language, and early literacy development of these children.

Prior to starting her Dphil, Siyu completed an MSc in Education (Research Design and Methodology) at the University of Oxford, under the supervision of Professor Sonali Nag. Her MSc dissertation explored the roles of social background and home literacy environment in the language and literacy development of a Wales subsample from the Millennium Cohort Study and was awarded a High Distinction. She also holds a BSc degree with first-class honours in Psychology from the University of Bath.

Siyu is also a research associate working on TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education.

At TalkTogether, Siyu is responsible for designing online surveys and analysing quantitative data from child assessments and parent reports.

Publications

Ma, S. (2021). Family background and home literacy environment as predictors of the early literacy development of children in Wales – findings from the Millennium Cohort Study (Master’s thesis, University of Oxford).

 

Amanda is the recipient of the Hazel Project Scholarship, based at the Rees Centre. Her doctoral research explores the conceptualisation of foster homes as therapeutic environments for complex/developmental trauma. Through participant-generated photography and collaborative qualitative methods with young people currently in foster care placements, her research explores if young people’s concepts and perceptions of therapeutic environments coincide with or challenge existing theoretical models and popular practitioner perspectives.

Amanda holds a BA from the University of Leeds (UK) and an MPhil from the University of Oxford (UK).

Lawrence is a teacher of mathematics who is particularly interested in classroom pedagogy, and how research and education policies interact with the teaching that students experience on a daily basis.

He finds that looking outwards in education is valuable with there being much more that unites our classrooms than isolates them. He has been extremely fortunate to study education through an international lens in the US, and to work on the Global Teaching InSights initiative of the Organisation for Economic Development (OECD) where he led on its videos of teaching.

Publications

Global Teaching InSights: A video study of teaching, OECD, 2020

Antonin is currently Doctoral Teaching Fellow on the MSc in Comparative and International Education, teaching Foundations of Educational Research. Antonin is also a Research Assistant for the Centre for Global Higher Education on the ‘Research on Research: the research function and mission of higher education’ project.

Alongside his teaching and research roles, Antonin is completing a Doctoral study on the European Universities Initiative, the European Commission’s flagship higher education programme that seeks to set up European Universities through transnational university alliances.

Arzhia Habibi is a DPhil in Education Candidate and uses Mandarin to conduct her research in the Chinese higher education context.

Arzhia’s research focuses on ‘expressions’ of global or world citizenship education in a Chinese higher education institution In the study, she explores the perspectives and practices of educators and students at a China-based university, which experiments with discourses related to citizenship. She further investigates how individual, local, national and global dynamics and the surrounding discourses influence worldviews and practices in a university setting.

As empirical studies on global or world citizenship education in the Chinese context are scarce, Arzhia hopes to contribute to a nascent knowledge base which may extend and add depth to the critical global discourses of global and world citizenship education, beyond Eurocentric framings.

Prior to her studies at Oxford, Arzhia received a first class Bachelor’s degree in Contemporary Chinese Studies at The University of Nottingham, and a Master’s in International Communication in Taiwan at National Chengchi University. As a child, she also attended kindergarten in Fuzhou, Fujian province of China.

Olga is a co-convenor of the Philosophy of Education Reading Group at the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. Olga’s main research interest is in the topics of epistemic injustice across all levels of education and across national borders with a focus on higher education and the process of knowledge production in academic institutes and universities. Her core interest lies between the areas of social epistemology, research on research (RoR) and comparative and international education (CIE). She has been a recipient of multiple research awards in the United States and the United Kingdom and is an elected co-convenor of the Comparative and International Education Special Interest Group at the British Educational Research Association (BERA).

Her new research at Oxford will explore the epistemically just and unjust practices as experienced by scholars from Kazakhstan during the internationalisation process in the social sciences and the humanities. Prior joining Oxford, Olga taught at University College London Institute of Education in London on the topics of migrant, refugee and minority education and European education traditions from a comparative lens.

Publications
  • Mun, O. (2020). ‘Epistemic Injustices in Internationalising Humanities and Social Sciences: A Case Study of Higher Education and Science Institutes in Kazakhstan.’ Centre for International Higher Education, Boston College. https://www.bc.edu/content/dam/bc1/schools/lsoe/sites/cihe/publication/Perspectives/Perspectives%20No%2018.pdf
  • Mun, O. and Gafu, G. (in press) ‘University Research Capacity in Kazakhstan’. Higher School of Economics, Russia.
  • Kandiko Howson, C., Mun, O. and Walker, R. (2020). ‘Academic Activism in STEM fields: Discipline in Theory and Practice.’ Philosophy and Theory of Higher Education Society.
  • Aizuddin M., Habibi A., Mun, O. (in press, 2020). ‘Post-Colonialism in Comparative and International Education.’ In Jules, T., Shields, R., Thomas, M. (Ed.), Bloomsbury Handbook of Theory in Comparative and International Education.
  • Palandjian, G., Silova, I., Mun, O., Zholdashaliyeva, R. (2018). ‘Gender and Nation in Postsocialist Educational Transformations.’ In Silova, I., & Chankseliani, M. (Eds.), Comparing Post-Socialist Transformations: Education in Eastern Europe and Former Soviet Union. Oxford: Symposium Books.
  • Mun, O., & Zholdashaliyeva, R. (2017). ‘Alippe, Bukvar’ and Gender: A comparative analysis of early literacy textbooks in Kazakhstan and Kyrgyzstan.’ In E. Brown & R. Craven & G. McLean (Ed.), International Advances in Education: Global Initiatives for Equity and Social Justice Series. Information Age Publishing
  • Patel, K. and Mun, O. (2017). ‘Marketing ‘development’ in the neoliberal university.’ DPU Working Papers https://www.ucl.ac.uk/bartlett/development/case-studies/2017/sep/marketing-development-neoliberal-university
  • Fimyar, O., Saniyazova, A. & Mun, O. (2017) ‘Methodology of Collaborative Research: Or, Searching for a Synergy in the Study of Student Transition in Kazakhstan.’ In SAGE Research Methods Cases. London, United Kingdom: SAGE Publications.
  • Mun, O. (2015). ‘(Re)imagining national identity through early literacy textbooks in Kazakhstan’, Forum of Young Central Asian Experts, 2nd edition. http://caa-network.org/archives/5620
  • Silova, I., Mead Yaqub, M., Mun, O., Palandjian, G. (2014). ‘Pedagogies of Space: (re)imagining nation and childhood in post-Soviet states.’ Global Studies of Childhood, 4(3), 195-209.
  • Silova, I., Brezhenyuk, V., Kudasova, M., Mun, O., Artemev, N. (2014). ‘Youth Protests against Privatisation of Education in post-Soviet states.’ European Education, 46(3), 56-65.

Schooled in the discipline of Public Administration at the University of Dhaka and with an experience of over five years of lecturing graduate and post-graduate students at two reputed public universities in Bangladesh, I am interested in research works related to education, gender, public policy, social studies and have multiple publications.

Apart from my current lecturing position, I worked as a news editor and contributor for the Dhaka Insider, an online news portal, in 2015. I also served as the Head of the Department (Department of Public Administration) and Assistant Proctor at the Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujibur Rahman Science and Technology University (BSMRSTU) and as an elected member of the Teachers’ Association there. During my post-graduation (MA. Public Policy) at the University of Nottingham, a qualitative research focus helped me characterize patterns of gender gap in primary education access.

 

Selected Publications
  • Dutta,  P.  (2020).  Democratic  Decentralization  and  Participatory Development:  Focus  on  Bangladesh.  Journal  of    Contemporary  Governance  and  Public Policy, 1(2), 82-91. Permalink/DOI: https://doi.org/10.46507/jcgpp.v1i2
  • Dutta, P., 2021. • Towards Sound Integrity Management in Bangladesh: Challenges and Issues in Public Administration and Law Enforcement. In: S. N. Khanom, ed. Governance, In the 21st Century in the Sounth Asia: Challenges and Ways Forward. Dhaka: Hakkani Publishers, pp. 541-560.

Zhuohan (Johanne) has a BA in English from Dalian Maritime University, China, and has won China National Scholarship. She then graduated with a Distinction in MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from University of Oxford. Before her DPhil, Zhuohan worked for the organizing committee for the Harvard Summit for Young Leaders in China, an initiative that brought liberal arts education from Harvard to China’s top-performing high school students. She also helped evaluate the UNICEF China Child-Friendly School Programme as an RA, focusing on the socio-emotional learning among the Dong ethnic minority groups in Guangxi, China. She also teaches IELTS, TOEFL, and English phonics.

Her MSc research centres on linguistic relativity, specifically the effect of French grammatical gender system on both French speakers’ and learners’ perception of objects. Her DPhil research focuses on English pronunciation teaching and learning among young Chinese kids, particularly emphasising the influence of their mother tongue, Mandarin.

Supervisors

Robert Woore and Faidra Faitaki

Shuo-Fang earned a Bachelor’s degree from National Chengchi University (Taiwan) and a Master’s degree from Boston University. He has teaching experience in various EFL contexts including international high school, educational institute, and graduate language program.

Shuo-Fang’s areas of interest lie in applied linguistics, particularly phonetics/phonology and speech perception. As an Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholar, Shuo-Fang is currently undertaking his doctoral research, supervised by Dr Elizabeth Wonnacott and Dr Robert Woore. His doctoral project is mostly experimental and explores second language learners’ difficulty in processing English connected speech.

Shuo-Fang is affiliated with two research groups: Applied Linguistics and Wonnacott-Nation Lab (developmental cognitive psychology).

Publications

Liang, S., & Yu, H. (2021). Chinese students’ willingness to communicate in EFL classrooms: A case study of students at a Sino-foreign university. Professional and Academic English, 28(2), 15–33.

Siyu Ma is a DPhil student in child development and learning at the Department of Education. Her doctoral research focuses on second-born children under the Chinese two-child policy, especially how siblings play a role in the socio-emotional, language, and early literacy development of these children.

Prior to starting her Dphil, Siyu completed an MSc in Education (Research Design and Methodology) at the University of Oxford, under the supervision of Professor Sonali Nag. Her MSc dissertation explored the roles of social background and home literacy environment in the language and literacy development of a Wales subsample from the Millennium Cohort Study and was awarded a High Distinction. She also holds a BSc degree with first-class honours in Psychology from the University of Bath.

Siyu is also a research associate working on TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education.

At TalkTogether, Siyu is responsible for designing online surveys and analysing quantitative data from child assessments and parent reports.

Publications

Ma, S. (2021). Family background and home literacy environment as predictors of the early literacy development of children in Wales – findings from the Millennium Cohort Study (Master’s thesis, University of Oxford).

 

Amanda is the recipient of the Hazel Project Scholarship, based at the Rees Centre. Her doctoral research explores the conceptualisation of foster homes as therapeutic environments for complex/developmental trauma. Through participant-generated photography and collaborative qualitative methods with young people currently in foster care placements, her research explores if young people’s concepts and perceptions of therapeutic environments coincide with or challenge existing theoretical models and popular practitioner perspectives.

Amanda holds a BA from the University of Leeds (UK) and an MPhil from the University of Oxford (UK).

Lawrence is a teacher of mathematics who is particularly interested in classroom pedagogy, and how research and education policies interact with the teaching that students experience on a daily basis.

He finds that looking outwards in education is valuable with there being much more that unites our classrooms than isolates them. He has been extremely fortunate to study education through an international lens in the US, and to work on the Global Teaching InSights initiative of the Organisation for Economic Development (OECD) where he led on its videos of teaching.

Publications

Global Teaching InSights: A video study of teaching, OECD, 2020

Antonin is currently Doctoral Teaching Fellow on the MSc in Comparative and International Education, teaching Foundations of Educational Research. Antonin is also a Research Assistant for the Centre for Global Higher Education on the ‘Research on Research: the research function and mission of higher education’ project.

Alongside his teaching and research roles, Antonin is completing a Doctoral study on the European Universities Initiative, the European Commission’s flagship higher education programme that seeks to set up European Universities through transnational university alliances.

Arzhia Habibi is a DPhil in Education Candidate and uses Mandarin to conduct her research in the Chinese higher education context.

Arzhia’s research focuses on ‘expressions’ of global or world citizenship education in a Chinese higher education institution In the study, she explores the perspectives and practices of educators and students at a China-based university, which experiments with discourses related to citizenship. She further investigates how individual, local, national and global dynamics and the surrounding discourses influence worldviews and practices in a university setting.

As empirical studies on global or world citizenship education in the Chinese context are scarce, Arzhia hopes to contribute to a nascent knowledge base which may extend and add depth to the critical global discourses of global and world citizenship education, beyond Eurocentric framings.

Prior to her studies at Oxford, Arzhia received a first class Bachelor’s degree in Contemporary Chinese Studies at The University of Nottingham, and a Master’s in International Communication in Taiwan at National Chengchi University. As a child, she also attended kindergarten in Fuzhou, Fujian province of China.

Olga is a co-convenor of the Philosophy of Education Reading Group at the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. Olga’s main research interest is in the topics of epistemic injustice across all levels of education and across national borders with a focus on higher education and the process of knowledge production in academic institutes and universities. Her core interest lies between the areas of social epistemology, research on research (RoR) and comparative and international education (CIE). She has been a recipient of multiple research awards in the United States and the United Kingdom and is an elected co-convenor of the Comparative and International Education Special Interest Group at the British Educational Research Association (BERA).

Her new research at Oxford will explore the epistemically just and unjust practices as experienced by scholars from Kazakhstan during the internationalisation process in the social sciences and the humanities. Prior joining Oxford, Olga taught at University College London Institute of Education in London on the topics of migrant, refugee and minority education and European education traditions from a comparative lens.

Publications
  • Mun, O. (2020). ‘Epistemic Injustices in Internationalising Humanities and Social Sciences: A Case Study of Higher Education and Science Institutes in Kazakhstan.’ Centre for International Higher Education, Boston College. https://www.bc.edu/content/dam/bc1/schools/lsoe/sites/cihe/publication/Perspectives/Perspectives%20No%2018.pdf
  • Mun, O. and Gafu, G. (in press) ‘University Research Capacity in Kazakhstan’. Higher School of Economics, Russia.
  • Kandiko Howson, C., Mun, O. and Walker, R. (2020). ‘Academic Activism in STEM fields: Discipline in Theory and Practice.’ Philosophy and Theory of Higher Education Society.
  • Aizuddin M., Habibi A., Mun, O. (in press, 2020). ‘Post-Colonialism in Comparative and International Education.’ In Jules, T., Shields, R., Thomas, M. (Ed.), Bloomsbury Handbook of Theory in Comparative and International Education.
  • Palandjian, G., Silova, I., Mun, O., Zholdashaliyeva, R. (2018). ‘Gender and Nation in Postsocialist Educational Transformations.’ In Silova, I., & Chankseliani, M. (Eds.), Comparing Post-Socialist Transformations: Education in Eastern Europe and Former Soviet Union. Oxford: Symposium Books.
  • Mun, O., & Zholdashaliyeva, R. (2017). ‘Alippe, Bukvar’ and Gender: A comparative analysis of early literacy textbooks in Kazakhstan and Kyrgyzstan.’ In E. Brown & R. Craven & G. McLean (Ed.), International Advances in Education: Global Initiatives for Equity and Social Justice Series. Information Age Publishing
  • Patel, K. and Mun, O. (2017). ‘Marketing ‘development’ in the neoliberal university.’ DPU Working Papers https://www.ucl.ac.uk/bartlett/development/case-studies/2017/sep/marketing-development-neoliberal-university
  • Fimyar, O., Saniyazova, A. & Mun, O. (2017) ‘Methodology of Collaborative Research: Or, Searching for a Synergy in the Study of Student Transition in Kazakhstan.’ In SAGE Research Methods Cases. London, United Kingdom: SAGE Publications.
  • Mun, O. (2015). ‘(Re)imagining national identity through early literacy textbooks in Kazakhstan’, Forum of Young Central Asian Experts, 2nd edition. http://caa-network.org/archives/5620
  • Silova, I., Mead Yaqub, M., Mun, O., Palandjian, G. (2014). ‘Pedagogies of Space: (re)imagining nation and childhood in post-Soviet states.’ Global Studies of Childhood, 4(3), 195-209.
  • Silova, I., Brezhenyuk, V., Kudasova, M., Mun, O., Artemev, N. (2014). ‘Youth Protests against Privatisation of Education in post-Soviet states.’ European Education, 46(3), 56-65.

Schooled in the discipline of Public Administration at the University of Dhaka and with an experience of over five years of lecturing graduate and post-graduate students at two reputed public universities in Bangladesh, I am interested in research works related to education, gender, public policy, social studies and have multiple publications.

Apart from my current lecturing position, I worked as a news editor and contributor for the Dhaka Insider, an online news portal, in 2015. I also served as the Head of the Department (Department of Public Administration) and Assistant Proctor at the Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujibur Rahman Science and Technology University (BSMRSTU) and as an elected member of the Teachers’ Association there. During my post-graduation (MA. Public Policy) at the University of Nottingham, a qualitative research focus helped me characterize patterns of gender gap in primary education access.

 

Selected Publications
  • Dutta,  P.  (2020).  Democratic  Decentralization  and  Participatory Development:  Focus  on  Bangladesh.  Journal  of    Contemporary  Governance  and  Public Policy, 1(2), 82-91. Permalink/DOI: https://doi.org/10.46507/jcgpp.v1i2
  • Dutta, P., 2021. • Towards Sound Integrity Management in Bangladesh: Challenges and Issues in Public Administration and Law Enforcement. In: S. N. Khanom, ed. Governance, In the 21st Century in the Sounth Asia: Challenges and Ways Forward. Dhaka: Hakkani Publishers, pp. 541-560.

Zhuohan (Johanne) has a BA in English from Dalian Maritime University, China, and has won China National Scholarship. She then graduated with a Distinction in MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from University of Oxford. Before her DPhil, Zhuohan worked for the organizing committee for the Harvard Summit for Young Leaders in China, an initiative that brought liberal arts education from Harvard to China’s top-performing high school students. She also helped evaluate the UNICEF China Child-Friendly School Programme as an RA, focusing on the socio-emotional learning among the Dong ethnic minority groups in Guangxi, China. She also teaches IELTS, TOEFL, and English phonics.

Her MSc research centres on linguistic relativity, specifically the effect of French grammatical gender system on both French speakers’ and learners’ perception of objects. Her DPhil research focuses on English pronunciation teaching and learning among young Chinese kids, particularly emphasising the influence of their mother tongue, Mandarin.

Supervisors

Robert Woore and Faidra Faitaki

Shuo-Fang earned a Bachelor’s degree from National Chengchi University (Taiwan) and a Master’s degree from Boston University. He has teaching experience in various EFL contexts including international high school, educational institute, and graduate language program.

Shuo-Fang’s areas of interest lie in applied linguistics, particularly phonetics/phonology and speech perception. As an Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholar, Shuo-Fang is currently undertaking his doctoral research, supervised by Dr Elizabeth Wonnacott and Dr Robert Woore. His doctoral project is mostly experimental and explores second language learners’ difficulty in processing English connected speech.

Shuo-Fang is affiliated with two research groups: Applied Linguistics and Wonnacott-Nation Lab (developmental cognitive psychology).

Publications

Liang, S., & Yu, H. (2021). Chinese students’ willingness to communicate in EFL classrooms: A case study of students at a Sino-foreign university. Professional and Academic English, 28(2), 15–33.

Siyu Ma is a DPhil student in child development and learning at the Department of Education. Her doctoral research focuses on second-born children under the Chinese two-child policy, especially how siblings play a role in the socio-emotional, language, and early literacy development of these children.

Prior to starting her Dphil, Siyu completed an MSc in Education (Research Design and Methodology) at the University of Oxford, under the supervision of Professor Sonali Nag. Her MSc dissertation explored the roles of social background and home literacy environment in the language and literacy development of a Wales subsample from the Millennium Cohort Study and was awarded a High Distinction. She also holds a BSc degree with first-class honours in Psychology from the University of Bath.

Siyu is also a research associate working on TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education.

At TalkTogether, Siyu is responsible for designing online surveys and analysing quantitative data from child assessments and parent reports.

Publications

Ma, S. (2021). Family background and home literacy environment as predictors of the early literacy development of children in Wales – findings from the Millennium Cohort Study (Master’s thesis, University of Oxford).

 

Amanda is the recipient of the Hazel Project Scholarship, based at the Rees Centre. Her doctoral research explores the conceptualisation of foster homes as therapeutic environments for complex/developmental trauma. Through participant-generated photography and collaborative qualitative methods with young people currently in foster care placements, her research explores if young people’s concepts and perceptions of therapeutic environments coincide with or challenge existing theoretical models and popular practitioner perspectives.

Amanda holds a BA from the University of Leeds (UK) and an MPhil from the University of Oxford (UK).

Lawrence is a teacher of mathematics who is particularly interested in classroom pedagogy, and how research and education policies interact with the teaching that students experience on a daily basis.

He finds that looking outwards in education is valuable with there being much more that unites our classrooms than isolates them. He has been extremely fortunate to study education through an international lens in the US, and to work on the Global Teaching InSights initiative of the Organisation for Economic Development (OECD) where he led on its videos of teaching.

Publications

Global Teaching InSights: A video study of teaching, OECD, 2020

Antonin is currently Doctoral Teaching Fellow on the MSc in Comparative and International Education, teaching Foundations of Educational Research. Antonin is also a Research Assistant for the Centre for Global Higher Education on the ‘Research on Research: the research function and mission of higher education’ project.

Alongside his teaching and research roles, Antonin is completing a Doctoral study on the European Universities Initiative, the European Commission’s flagship higher education programme that seeks to set up European Universities through transnational university alliances.

Arzhia Habibi is a DPhil in Education Candidate and uses Mandarin to conduct her research in the Chinese higher education context.

Arzhia’s research focuses on ‘expressions’ of global or world citizenship education in a Chinese higher education institution In the study, she explores the perspectives and practices of educators and students at a China-based university, which experiments with discourses related to citizenship. She further investigates how individual, local, national and global dynamics and the surrounding discourses influence worldviews and practices in a university setting.

As empirical studies on global or world citizenship education in the Chinese context are scarce, Arzhia hopes to contribute to a nascent knowledge base which may extend and add depth to the critical global discourses of global and world citizenship education, beyond Eurocentric framings.

Prior to her studies at Oxford, Arzhia received a first class Bachelor’s degree in Contemporary Chinese Studies at The University of Nottingham, and a Master’s in International Communication in Taiwan at National Chengchi University. As a child, she also attended kindergarten in Fuzhou, Fujian province of China.

Olga is a co-convenor of the Philosophy of Education Reading Group at the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. Olga’s main research interest is in the topics of epistemic injustice across all levels of education and across national borders with a focus on higher education and the process of knowledge production in academic institutes and universities. Her core interest lies between the areas of social epistemology, research on research (RoR) and comparative and international education (CIE). She has been a recipient of multiple research awards in the United States and the United Kingdom and is an elected co-convenor of the Comparative and International Education Special Interest Group at the British Educational Research Association (BERA).

Her new research at Oxford will explore the epistemically just and unjust practices as experienced by scholars from Kazakhstan during the internationalisation process in the social sciences and the humanities. Prior joining Oxford, Olga taught at University College London Institute of Education in London on the topics of migrant, refugee and minority education and European education traditions from a comparative lens.

Publications
  • Mun, O. (2020). ‘Epistemic Injustices in Internationalising Humanities and Social Sciences: A Case Study of Higher Education and Science Institutes in Kazakhstan.’ Centre for International Higher Education, Boston College.